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Updated on Monday, June 23 at 02:48 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Great Blue Turaco,©BirdQuest

22 Jun Red-eyed Vireos (Vireo olivaceus) near Juneau []
22 Jun Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) near Juneau []
22 Jun Common House-Martin (Delichon urbicum) at St. Paul []
22 Jun Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) at Ketchikan []
22 Jun Siberian Rubythroat (Luscinia calliope) at St. Paul []
22 Jun Common Rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus) at St. Paul []
22 Jun Tiaga Bean-Goose (Anser fabalis) at St. Paul []
22 Jun Common Rosefinches (Carpodacus erythrinus) at Shemya []
22 Jun Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) at Shemya []
22 Jun Smew (Mergellus albellus) at Shemya []
17 Jun Veery (Catharus fuscescens) near Juneau []
17 Jun Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) in Fairbanks []
17 Jun Wilson's Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor) near Wasilla []
17 Jun Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) near Juneau []
16 Jun Fort-tailed Swift (Apus pacificus) at St. Paul []
16 Jun Gray Wagtail (Motacilla cinera) at St. Paul []
16 Jun Ruff (Calidris pugnax) at St. Paul []
16 Jun Tennessee Warbler (Orethlypis perigrina) on McCarthy Road []
16 Jun Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus) at St. Paul []
16 Jun Ruddy Ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) at Kenny Lake []
16 Jun Common Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita) at Gambell []
16 Jun Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) at Hyder []
16 Jun White-rumped Sandpipers (Calidris fuscicollis) at Barrow []
16 Jun Skylark (Alauda arvensis) at St. Paul []
16 Jun Temminck's Stint (Calidris temminckiii) at Gambell []
16 Jun American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) at hyder []
16 Jun Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni) near Delta Junction []
16 Jun Northern Rough-winged Swallows (Stelgidopteryx serripennis) at Hyder []
09 Jun White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis) near Gustavus []
08 Jun Common Pochard (Aythya ferina) near Nome []
08 Jun Five Ruff (Reeve) (Calidris pugnax) at Gambell []
08 Jun Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia) at Gambell []
08 Jun Common Ringed Plovers (Charadrius hiaticula) at Gambell []
08 Jun Common Cuckoo (Culculus canorus) at Gambell []
08 Jun Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus) at Gambell []
08 Jun Oriental Cuckoo (Cuculus optatus) at St. Paul []
08 Jun Long-toed Stint (Calidris subminuta) at St .Paul []
08 Jun Ruff (Calidris pugnax) at St. Paul Island []
08 Jun Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) at Gambell []
08 Jun Common Cuckoo (Culculus canorus) at St. Paul []
08 Jun Common Sandpipers (Actitus hypolecus) at St. Paul []
05 May Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina) at Juneau []
05 May Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) near Juneau []
05 May Tufted Ducks (Aythya fuligula) at Unalaska []
20 Apr Western Screech-Owls (Megascopus kennicotti) at Seward []
13 Apr Whooper Swan (Cygnus cygnus) near King Salmon []
10 Apr Little Gull (Hydrocoloeus minutus) near Ketchikan []
27 Mar White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Homer []
27 Mar Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) near Homer []
12 Jan Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) near Ketchikan []
12 Jan White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Juneau []
12 Jan American Coot (Fulica americana) at Sitka []
12 Jan Anna's Hummingbirds (Calypte anna) at Sitka []
12 Jan White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) at Sitka []
12 Jan Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) at Sitka []
31 Dec White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Douglas []
16 Dec White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Seward []
16 Dec Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) near Seward []
16 Dec Rustic Bunting (Emberiza rustica) in Homer []
09 Dec Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) at Adak []
08 Dec White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) In Bethel []
04 Dec Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola) at Gustavus []
01 Dec Dusky Thrush (Turdus naumanni) in Anchorage []
21 Nov Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) at Juneau []
27 Sep Siberian Accentor (Prunella montanella) at Gambell []
24 Sep Lanceolated Warbler (Locustella lanceolata) at Gambell []
24 Sep Stonechat (Saxicola torquatus) at Anchorage []
24 Sep Red-flanked Bluetail (Tarsiger cyanurus) at Gambell []
24 Sep Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus) at St. Paul []
22 Sep "Siberian" Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita tristis) at Gambell []
22 Sep Common Rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus) at St. Paul []
22 Sep Pechora Pipit (Anthus gustavi) at Gambell []
21 Sep Gray-streaked Flycatcher (Muscicapa griseistica) at St. Paul []
21 Sep Pacific swift (Apus pacificus) at St. Paul []
21 Sep Black-headed Grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus) at Sitka []
21 Sep Buller's Shearwaters (Puffinus bulleri) near Kodiak []

Subject: Red-eyed Vireos (Vireo olivaceus) near Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 23:23:16 -0800
Region: Southeast; Juneau; Mendenhall River Valley; Brotherhood Bridge

Date: 19-21+ June 2014

Species: Two, red-eyed Vireos (Vireo olivaceus)

Location: These birds were observed on the east side of the Mendenhall 
River along the Brotherhood Bridge Trail.

Contact: Thanks to Mark Schwan (aukebay AT gci.net), Gus van Vleit, 
Patty Rose, and Bev Agler for submitting information and to Alaska eBird.

History: It is unclear if one of these birds is the individual 
previously reported near the path leading over to Diamond Park. This is 
also the general area where a male Red eyed Vireo established a song 
territory for part of the summer in 2013.
Red-eyed Vireo is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare, local, probable breeder on the mainland river systems of southern 
southeast Alaska (Chickamin River, Stikine River). Casual at Juneau and 
Hyder. Accidental in southcaostal Alaska (Middleton Island, Anchorage) 
and Ketchikan. Best found at the Stikine River and Hyder." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around Brotherhood Bridge has plenty of 
parking and public use trails which make birding this area easy.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) near Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 23:10:52 -0800
Region: Southeast; Juneau; Mendenhall Forelands; Mendenhall Recreation Area

Date: 19 June 2014

Species: A single, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flavivenstris)

Location: This bird was observed and photographed at the junction of the 
Moose Lake and Norton Lake Trails in the Mendenhall Recreation Area.

Contact: Thanks to Patty Rose (p_rose_raven AT yahoo.com) for submitting 
information and images to Alaska eBird about her discovery.

History: The area around the Mendenhall Recreation Area south of the 
Mendenhall Glacier is an area with dense deciduous forest in an area 
otherwise dominated by dense coniferous forests. As such, it attracts 
species which favor the broad-leaf trees in this area.
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare summer visitant in east central Alaska (Tetlin National Wildlife 
Refuge, Northway, Taylor Highway, Tok, Chitna, Kenny Lake, Delta 
Junction, Fairbanks, Eureka, Cole Creek near Woodchopper off of the 
Yukon River) and at Skagway, Petersburg, Juneau, and Hyder. Has nested 
north of Eureka (Elliot Highway northwest of Fairbanks) on Rampart Road. 
Casual at Juneau. Captured regularly at the [former] ABO banding station 
near Fairbanks, but easiest to find at the breeding site on the Elliot 
Highway near Eureka." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The vicinity at the Mendenhall Recreation Area 
is public property and has parking and a network of trails for birders 
to enjoy.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Common House-Martin (Delichon urbicum) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 22:57:23 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 19 June 2014

Species: A single, adult, Common House-Martin (Delichon urbicum)

Location: This bird was observed and photographed in flight over 
Southwest Point at the extreme southwestern portion of St. Paul island.

Contact: Thanks to Cory Gregory (arcticory AT g mail.com) for submitting 
information and images to Alaska eBird.

History: This is believed to be the Eighth record of this species for 
the Pribilof Islands.
Common House-Martin is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual, with widely scattered reports from Nome, St. Paul Island, 
Gambell, Buldir Island, St. Matthew Island, and the Colville River 
mouth." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birding at St. Paul Island is done through the 
tour company St. Paul Island Tours. this company is established by the 
native corporation managing St. Paul Island ,TDX.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) at Ketchikan
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 22:49:41 -0800
Region: Southeast; Alexander Archeological; Revillagedo Island; Ketchikan

Date: 18 June 2014

Species: A, singing, male, Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)

Location: This bird was detected singing along the boardwalk of 
Ketchikan Creek near downtown Ketchikan.

Contact: Thanks to Brian White (bwhite AT smith.edu) for submitting 
information to Alaska eBird about his observation.

History: This is turning into a banner year for Red-eyed Vireo in Alaska 
away from the southeast mainland river systems, their normal haunts.
Red-eyed Vireo is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare, local, probably breeder on the mainland river system of southern 
southeast Alaska (Chickamin River, Stikine River). Casual at Juneau and 
Hyder. Accidental in southcoastal Alaska (Middleton Island), Anchorage) 
and Ketchikan. Best found at the Stikine River and in Hyder." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around Ketchikan Creek is often very 
busy during the summer with people from outside of Alaska. Birding this 
location is best done early in the morning.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Siberian Rubythroat (Luscinia calliope) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 22:39:24 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 18 June 2014

Species: A single, Siberian Rubythroat (Luscinia calliope)

Location: There was no specific location mentioned in the reports as to 
where this bird was discovered on St.Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information to AK Birding about this finding.

History: St. Paul Island represents a good Alaskan outpost to search for 
this charismatic Asiatic passerine.
Siberian Rubythroat is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring and casual fall migrant in the western Aleutian Islands. 
Casual in spring to the central Aleutian Islands, casual in spring, 
summer, and fall on the Pribilof Islands and at Gambell. Accidental at 
Nome and Barrow." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, 
July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: TDX, the native corporation, has developed a 
tour company on St. Paul Island which provides birders with lodging, 
meals, transportation and guides to lead birders to the best locations 
on the island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Common Rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 22:31:41 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 17-19+ June 2014

Species: A single, female, Common Rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus)

Location: This bird was discovered in the small excavated cut on the 
east side of Hutchinson Hill on the northeast portion of St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette 9sschuette01 AT hotmail.com for 
providing information about this sighting to Alaska eBird.

History: This is believed to be the Seventh record of this species for 
the Pribilof islands.
Common Rosefinch is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring migrant in southwest and western Alaska (Yukon-Kuskokwim 
River delta), St.Paul Island, Gambell and in the western Aleutian 
Islands. Casual fall at Gambell and accidental in the central Aleutian 
Islands." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Birding at St. Paul is conducted with St. Paul 
Island Tours. Organized tour groups bring their clients to St. Paul and 
Independent birders also get the benefit of the tours with 
transportation, meals, lodging and guide services.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Tiaga Bean-Goose (Anser fabalis) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 22:23:34 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island group; St. Paul Island

Date: 17 June 2014

Species: A single, Tiaga bean-Goose (Anser fabalis)

Location: There was no specific location given in the reports as to 
where this Asiatic goose was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about his observation to AK Birding.

History: St. Paul represents one of the easiest of the Alaska Outposts 
to get to in search of this species and its relative Tundra Bean-Goose.
Tiaga Bean Goose is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Until very recently, the "Bean" Goose was considered one species that 
was a rare spring migrant in the west and central Aleutians and on St. 
Paul Island, a casual visitant to St. Lawrence Island and the Seward 
Peninsula coast (Nome), and accidental in fall (only three records). In 
2007, the American Ornithologist Union (AOU) split Bean Goose into Tiaga 
and Tundra species: however, nearly all past reports of this species 
were only reliable identified as "bean" goose, rather than to one or the 
other two new species. More information is needed to clarify the status 
of each species in Alaska. A single specimen from St. Paul Island and a 
photograph of a family group at Shemya are the only verified records of 
the Tiaga Bean-Goose in Alaska." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. 
George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: St. Paul Island has developed infrastructure for 
birding this remote island. TDX, the native corporation, has established 
Lodging, Meals (at the local cannery) and Transportation in either vans 
or small buses and Guides who know the island and the birds very well.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Common Rosefinches (Carpodacus erythrinus) at Shemya
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 22:10:31 -0800
Region: Southwest; Aleutian Islands; Near Island Group; Shemya Island

Date: 15-17+ June 2014

Species: Up to Five (four females, one male) Common Rosefinch 
(Carpodacus erythrinus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
these birds were observed on Shemya Island.

Contact: thanks to Dennis Shirley (colimawarbler AT yahoo.com) for 
submitting information to Alaska eBird about his observations.

History: The far western Aleutian Islands is certainly one of the best 
locations in North America to search for this Eurasian finch.
Common Rosefinch is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring migrant in southwest and western Alaska (Yukon-Kuskokwim 
River delta, St. Paul Island, Gambell) and in the western Aleutian 
Islands. Casual in fall at Gambell and accidental in central Aleutian 
Islands." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Shemya Island is operated as an Air Station by 
the United Sates Air Force. It is a closed military installation and as 
such there is no birding by the public. Access to the island is 
restricted and an approved reason to be at Earekson Air Station my us t 
be obtained months in advance of any visit.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) at Shemya
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 21:59:49 -0800
Region: Southwest; Aleutian Islands; Near Island Group; Shemya Island

Date: 15+ June 2014

Species: A single, Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this bird was discovered on Shemya Island.

Contact: Thanks to Dennis Shirley (colimawarbler AT yahoo.com ) for 
submitting information to Alaska eBird about his discovery.

History: This has been a good year for Common Cuckoo in Alaska with at 
least 5 birds reported recently from St. Paul Island.
Common Cuckoo is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring migrant and early summer visitant in the western and 
central Aleutian Islands, the Shumigan Islands, at Gambell, and St. Paul 
Island. Accidental at Nome and Anchorage." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Shemya Island is entirely managed as Eareckson 
Air Station by the United States Air Force. Birding is ancillary to any 
activities which have been pre-approved by the military. Recreational 
birding is not sanctioned by the Air Force at Eareckson Air Station.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Smew (Mergellus albellus) at Shemya
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 21:49:56 -0800
Region: Southwest; Aleutian Islands; Near Island Group; Shemya

Date: 4-17+ June 2014

Species: A single, Smew (Mergellus albellus)

Location: There was no specific location giving in the report as to 
where this Asiatic merganser was discovered on Shemya Island.

Contact: Thanks to Dennis Shirley (colimawarbler AT yahoo.com) for 
forwarding information about his observation to Alaska eBird.

History: Shemya represents one of the best locations in Alaska to search 
for this charismatic merganser. If one can get there!
Smew is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. 
Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring and casual summer visitant and fall migrant in the western 
and central Aleutians. very rare spring and summer migrant at St. Paul 
Island; casual at Kodiak Island and Cordova. Best chance is at Adak and 
St. Paul Island in the spring." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. 
George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birding at Eareckson Air Station is in 
conjunction with other sanctioned activities via the Air Force. Birding 
on its own is not a sanctioned activity at the Air Station.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Veery (Catharus fuscescens) near Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2014 22:51:37 -0800
Region: Southeast; Juneau; Mendenhall Forelands

Date: 16-17 June 2014

Species: A single, singing, Veery (Catharus fuscescens)

Location: This bird was heard calling at the north end of Moose Lake in 
the Dredge Lakes area of the Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area. Take 
the Back Loop Bridge and walk up to the dike and head left (north) to 
the north end of Moose lake.

Contact: Thanks to Bev Agler, Mark Schwan, Gus van Vleit and Gwen Baluss 
(gwenbaluss AT yahoo.com) for submitting information to Eagle Chat about 
this discovery.

History: It is believed that this is the first documentation of this 
species in Alaska away from either Hyder or Misty Fiords National Monument.
Veery is listed as Accidental in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel 
D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Accidental at Hyder and Misty Fiords National Monument." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area along the trails in the Mendenhall 
Glacier Recreational Area are public property. Playing tapes of regional 
rare bird songs/calls is in violation of birding ethics established by 
the American Birding Association.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) in Fairbanks
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2014 22:40:08 -0800
Region: Interior; Eastcentral; Fairbanks

Date: 16 June 2014

Species: A single, male Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)

Location: This bird was discovered feeding along the breakdown lane on 
the south side of the Mitchell Expressway in south Fairbanks midway 
between the intersections of University Avenue and Peger Road.

Contact: Thanks to Ed Clark (akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net) for 
submitting information about his observation to Boreal Birder.

History: It has been quite a while since this species has been reported 
form the greater Fairbanks area.
Brown-headed Cowbird is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare migrant and probable breeder in southeast Alaska. Casual winter 
visitant in Juneau. Casual migrant and summer visitant at Fairbanks, 
Tok, Cordova, Copper Center, Katmai, Mineral Lakes, Kantishna, Kivalina 
and Barrow. Casual fall visitor (especially juveniles) to many locations 
throughout the state. One winter record for Dutch Harbor." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The Mitchell Expressway is a busy thoroughfare 
with lots of truck traffic and narrow shoulders. If looking for this 
bird it would be better to park at either University Avenue or Peger 
Road and walk the section of expressway. Be aware there are Rusty 
Blackbirds in this area as well.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Wilson's Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor) near Wasilla
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2014 22:29:00 -0800
Region: Southcentral; Wasilla

Date: 16 June 2014

Species: A pair of Wilson's Phalarope (Phalarope tricolor)

Location: These birds were discovered about 1 mile out along the Barge 
Trailhead at Goose Bay State Game Refuge at the end of the Knik-Goose 
Bay road.

Contact: Thanks to Dan Crowson (trapperdan AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information and images about his discovery to AK Birding.

History: These birds were discovered in a wetlands which earlier in the 
season had hundreds of Red-necked Phalaropes.
Wilson's Phalarope is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual migrant and summer visitant to Southeast Alaska (Gustavus, 
Juneau), southcoastal (Valdez, Anchorage, Kodiak), eastcentral (Taylor 
Highway, Kenny Lake, Fairbanks), and northern Alaska (Arctic National 
Wildlife Refuge, Barrow). Very rare breeder in interior Alaska (Yukon 
Flats National Wildlife Refuge)" From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. 
George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around Barge Trail head and the Goose 
Bay State Game refuge is public property.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) near Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2014 22:18:36 -0800
Region: Southeast; Juneau; Mendenhall River Valley

Date: 15 June 2014

Species: A single, singing, male, Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)

Location: This bird was heard on both side of the Mendenhall River near 
the footbridge which leads to Diamond Park Fieldhouse Aquatic Center.

Contact: Thanks to Gwen Baluss (gwenbaluss AT yahoo.com) for forwarding 
her information about this sighting to Eagle Chat.

History: This singing bird is very close to where a male red-eyed Vireo 
established a territory in the summer of 2013.
Red-eyed Vireo is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare, local, probable breeder on the mainland river systems of southern 
Southeast Alaska (Chickamin River, Stikine River). Casual at Juneau and 
Hyder. Accidental in southcoastal Alaska (Middleton Island, Anchorage) 
and Ketchikan. Best found at the Stikine River and at Hyder." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around the Mendenhall River where this 
bird is found is public land. There is adequate parking near by.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
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Subject: Fort-tailed Swift (Apus pacificus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 23:37:52 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 14 June 2014

Species: A single, Fork-tailed (Pacific) Swift (Apus pacificus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this Asiatic swift was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about his observation to AK Birding.

History: This birds brief appearance as a fly-by makes it the Eighth 
record of this species for the Pribilof Islands.The former name of this 
species was Fork-tailed Swift. Most authorities outside of North America 
call this species Pacific Swift.
Fork-tailed Swift is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring and fall visitant in the western and central Aleutians 
and Pribilof Islands; accidental in fall at Gambell and Middleton 
island." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: the local tour company sponsored by the native 
corporation TDX,. welcomes visitors to St.Paul island with 
accommodations near the airport, prepared meals at the cannery , buses 
and vans for transportation and guides who know St. Paul Island very well.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
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Subject: Gray Wagtail (Motacilla cinera) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 23:29:06 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul island

Date: 12-13 June 2014

Species: A single, Gray Wagtail (Motacilla cinerea)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this Asiatic wagtail was found on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this observation to AK Birding.

History: This is believed to be the six record of this species for the 
Pribilof Islands and the third in the last six years.
Gray Wagtail is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual migrant to the western and central; Aleutian Islands, mostly in 
spring, and accidental on St. Lawrence Island and the Pribilof Islands" 
 From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: At St. Paul there are typical rural 
accommodations and hearty food at the local cannery. The vehicles are 
able to reach most locations on St. Paul Island and the guides know 
where the best places to look are on the island for Asiatic and local birds.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Ruff (Calidris pugnax) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 23:20:15 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 13 June 2014

Species: Two, male Ruff (Calidris pugnax)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
these two charismatic shorebirds were discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about the discovery of these birds to AK Birding.

History: St. Paul Island is a very good location to search for this 
Asiatic shorebird with records both in the spring and fall.
Ruff is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. 
Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring migrant at Gambell, very rare an the Aleutian and Pribilof 
Islands. Rare fall migrant in the west and central Aleutian Islands and 
on the Pribilof Islands, casual on St.Lawrence Island and the Chukchi 
Sea coast as far north as Kotzebue Sound. Casual fall visitant in 
northern Alaska (Barrow, Colville River mouth, Prudhoe Bay) and in 
southcoastal Alaska (Kodiak Island, Seward, Anchorage, Cordova). 
Accidental in spring migration in southcoastal (Homer, Seward) and 
Southeast Alaska (Annette Island, Juneau), casual in fall migration at 
Juneau. Casual breeder in northern Alaska (Point Lay) and possibly on 
the Seward Peninsula and St. Lawrence Island." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: TDX, the native corporation, has established a 
tour company for visiting birders who wish to visit the island. There 
are accommodations, meals in the local cannery, transportation and 
guides who lead birders around the island to the best habitat.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Tennessee Warbler (Orethlypis perigrina) on McCarthy Road
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 23:07:52 -0800
Region: Interior; Eastcentral; McCarthy Road

Date: 10 June 2014

Species: A single, singing Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis perigrina)

Location: This bird was heard and photographed on the backside of a 
small wetland on the north side of the road to McCarthy at mile 15.2.

Contact: Thanks to Luke DeCicco (akswallow AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about his discovery to AK Birding.

History: This species in the past eight years or so has become much 
easier to find in the southern east-central portion of Alaska.
Tennessee Warbler is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual migrant in southeast Alaska (Ketchikan, Hyder, Juneau, 
Gustavus). Casual late spring, summer and fall visitant in central 
Alaska (Fairbanks, Birch Lake, Delta Junction, Donnely Dome, Scottie 
Creek, and on the Taylor Highway). Casual in southcentral Alaska 
(Anchorage) and on the Alaska Peninsula (King Salmon). Accidental at 
Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: The area around this small wetland has a small 
pull out very close to the marshy wetlands. Pull completely off of the 
gravel road, even if you have to walk a short distance to the location 
of the singing bird.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 22:57:33 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 10 June 2014

Species: A single, Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this Eurasian Thrush was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this discovery to AK Birding.

History: Eyebrowed Thrush is the most common Asiatic Turdus thrush to be 
found in Alaska.
Eyebrowed Thrush is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring and casual fall migrant in the west and central Aleutian 
Islands, and casual in spring and fall at St. Paul, St. Mathew, and St. 
Lawrence Islands. Accidental spring migrant in Wales, Nunavak Island, 
and northern Alaska (Barrow). Best found in fall on Shemya or Adak 
island and at Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birding at St. Paul is done by competent guides 
who know the island very well. There is modest accommodations, and meals 
at the local cannery and transportation are also provided.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Ruddy Ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) at Kenny Lake
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 22:46:49 -0800
Region: Interior; East-central; Kenny Lake

Date: 9 June 2014

Species: A pair of Ruddy Ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis)

Location: These birds were discovered on Kenny Lake just off of the 
Edgerton Highway (Alaska route 10) south of the community of Kenny Lake.

Contact: Thanks to Luke DeCicco (akswallow AT hotmail.com) for sending 
in information about his discovery to AK Birding.

History: Historically the shallow, weedy lakes in the Northway area have 
been good producers of this species. With the continued documentation of 
Ruddy Ducks at Kenny Lake few (if any) birders are now checking the 
lakes around the Northway Airport for this species.
Ruddy Duck is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel 
D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Very rare migrant, summer and winter visitant, and breeder in southeast 
central Alaska (Fairbanks, Tok, Kenny Lake). Casual on the Kenai 
Peninsula (Homer), Anchorage, and in southeast Alaska (Juneau). Best 
found at Kenny Lake and along the Alaska Highway near Tetlin and 
Northway." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Kenny Lake is easily birded by a pull-out on the 
Edgerton Highway on the north side of the lake. This pull-out is often 
cleared of vegetation periodically by the Sate of Alaska yielding good 
views of the lake. A trail leads down to the lake from the pull-out to 
offer a better look of all of the lake.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Common Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 22:36:09 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 9 June 2014

Species: A single Common "Siberian" Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita 
tristis)

Location: This bird was discovered in the so called "Old Town" boatyard 
where the skin boats are stored near the older homes in Gambell.

Contact: Originally discovered by Colorado birders, thanks go out to Bob 
Dittrick who photographed the bird and to Paul Lehman (lehman.paul01 AT 
verizon.com) for getting the word out about this discovery to AK Birding.

History: This is believed to be the third (or possibly the fourth) 
Common "Siberian" Chiffchaff discovered at Gambell. The first was not 
documented well on 30 September 2011; another on 6 June 2013 and the the 
previous was on 22 September 2013
Common Chiffchaff is listed as Accidental in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
Common Chiffchaff is not in the Annotated List of the Birds of Alaska as 
all of the records of this species have been after the second edition 
was published. From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, 
July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Birding at Gambell is often conducted via guides 
who handle the logistics, meals, lodging, transportation, and guiding 
around the island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) at Hyder
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 22:20:07 -0800
Region: Southeast; Portland Canal; Hyder

Date: 8-13 June 2014

Species: A single, calling, Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus)

Location: This bird was heard calling on the back (west) side of Moose 
Pond about 2 miles north of the town of Hyder.

Contact: Thanks to James Levison (j.levison AT yahoo.com) for submitting 
information about his finding.

History: Hyder has a very good track record for producing this casual 
Alaskan Empid.
Least Flycatcher is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare in Alaska at scattered locations mostly in summer (Ketchikan, 
Hyder, Stikine River, Juneau, Haines, Skagway, Fairbanks, Delta 
Junction). Accidental at Anchorage and Nome. There are fall records off 
shore at Middleton Island and Gambell. Check for territorial birds at 
Kenny Lake or at Hyder." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George 
C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The birding is pleasant at Moose Pond (also 
called "Two-mile pond"). Make sure to pull completely off of the 
traveled portion of the road to let the Canadian mining trucks pass safely.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: White-rumped Sandpipers (Calidris fuscicollis) at Barrow
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 22:10:05 -0800
Region: North Slope; Coastal; Barrow

Date: 8-9 June 2014

Species: Three, White-rumped Sandpipers (Calidris fuscicollis)

Location: These birds were observed near the intersection of Anvak and 
freshwater lake Roads.

Contact: Thanks to David Makay (dmac AT solipaso.com) for submitting 
information about his observation.

History: The small, shallow edged ponds and lakes in Barrow represent 
the best "easy" to reach location in Alaska to search for this species.
White-rumped Sandpiper listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"rare migrant and breeder in northcoastal Alaska from Canada west to 
Prudhoe bay, Colville River delta, and Barrow, occasional to Wainwright. 
Very rare spring migrant in central Alaska (Denali Highway, Sheenjek 
River, Fairbanks, Anaktuvuk Pass. Casual migrant in southcoastal and 
southeast Alaska (Kenai Peninsula, Copper River delta, Gustavus, 
Juneau). Accidental on St. Paul Island. Best found in spring at Barrow 
or Oliktok Point." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The birding at Barrow is mostly from a vehicle 
next to the few roads that exist. The local Barrowites are used to 
seeing birders in their town and they might even be curious to ask what 
you are seeing.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
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Subject: Skylark (Alauda arvensis) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 21:57:33 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 7 June 2014

Species: A single, Sky Lark (Alauda arvensis)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as the 
where this Asiatic passerine was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information to AK Birding about this discovery.

History: St. Paul island with its marine tundra is a good location to 
search for this species, which favors open terrain.
Sky Lark is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. 
Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
" Rare spring and fall migrant and casual summer visitant and probable 
breeder in the western Aleutian Islands. Very rare spring and fall 
migrant and casual summer visitant to the Pribilof Islands (breed there 
in 1995); casual in spring and fall at Gambell and central Aleutian 
Islands." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: St. Paul Island is set up to accommodate 
visiting birders with tour buses, lodging, meals at the local cannery 
and guides who know the best birding locations on the island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Temminck's Stint (Calidris temminckiii) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 21:48:56 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 7 June 2014

Species: A single, Temminck's Stint (Calidris temminckii)

Location: The was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this bird was found at Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Paul Lehman (lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net) for 
forwarding information about this bird to AK Birding.

History: The small gravel ponds south of Troutman Lake have produced a 
diverse suite of Asian stints over the years, Temminick's among them.
Temminick's Stint is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Very rare spring and casual fall migrant in the western and central 
Aleutian Islands, Pribilof, St. Mathew, and St.Lawrence Islands. Casual 
visitant on the north coast (Barrow, Colville River delta)." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The birding at Gambell is very challenging 
getting over the wave washed pea stones. Most birders are either very 
strong walkers or they ride bicycles or rend ATV (4-wheelers) to get 
around the village and surroundings.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
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Subject: American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) at hyder
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 21:37:32 -0800
Region: Southeast, Portland Canal, Hyder

Date: 31 May - 13 June 2014

Species: Approximately Twenty Five, American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos)

Location: These birds were observed in and around the salt flats and at 
various locations in the town of Hyder.

Contact: Thanks to James Levison (j.levison AT yahoo.com) for submitting 
information about his observations.

History: Hyder is the only location (so far) where this species has been 
documented in Alaska.
American Crow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Fairly common summer breeder found only at Hyder." From A Birder's 
Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birding is easy around the salt flats (avoid the 
border area) and birding at the dump will certainly produce American 
Crows, but also could produce some Black or Grizzly Bears as well.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni) near Delta Junction
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 21:30:31 -0800
Region: Interior; East-central; Delta Junction Agricultural Project.

Date: 30 May, 14 June 2014

Species: A single, dark morph, Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni)

Location: This bird (or birds) were located along Sawmill Creek Road 
north of the intersection of Barley Way on 30 May and again observed 
less than 1/4 miles away to the east on Barley Way on 14 June.

Contact: Thanks to James Levison (j.levison AT yahoo.com) for forwarding 
information about his observation to Boreal Birder.

History: After a dearth of sightings from the Delta Agricultural 
project, the last three years have had documented observations of this 
species.
Swainson's Hawk is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"very rare and declining in summer in interior (Delta Junction, 
Northway, Tetlin) where it probably breeds, and along the Glen Highway 
(Glenallen, Eureka Summit) in migration. Casual in southcoastal (Homer, 
Cordova) and southeast Alaska (Juneau). Accidental at Barrow (October 
2006). Best found in flood plain Balsam Poplar forest from Eagle to the 
Canadian Border on the Yukon River." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by 
Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around the agricultural field 17 miles 
east of Delta Junction can easily be birded from the vehicle. Most of 
the land in the project is privately owned and no one should enter any 
fields without obtaining prior approval to do so.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Northern Rough-winged Swallows (Stelgidopteryx serripennis) at Hyder
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2014 21:17:56 -0800
Region: Southeast; Portland Canal; Hyder

Date: 30 May - 13 June 2014

Species: Up to Four, Northern Rough-winged Swallows (Stelgidopterx 
serripennis)

Location: These birds were observed both over the salt flats at the edge 
of the Portland Canal and also where the Salmon River come close to the 
road leading north out of town close to the start of the "Dike Trail".

Contact: Thanks to James Levison (j.levison AT yahoo.com) for submitting 
information about his observation.

History: The area near the salt/sedge flats in Hyder and the swallow 
flocks over the Salmon River during inclement weather, are a great 
places to look for this rare Alaskan swallow.
Northern Rough-winged Swallow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of 
Alaska Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, 
Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. 
It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring migrant, summer visitant, and breeder in southeast Alaska 
on the mainland and on islands near mouths of major rivers (Ketchikan, 
Petersburg, Wrangell, Stikine River, Hyder, Juneau, Gustavus, Haines). 
Casual spring migrant, summer visitant, and possible breeder in 
southcoastal Alaska (Copper River delta, Kamishak Bay). Accidental at 
Barrow. Best looked for at the mouth of the Salmon River at the Portland 
Canal at Hyder." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, 
July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: The area around the salt/sedge flats and along 
the dike trail along the salmon river are open to birding. Do not cross 
into Canada on the salt flats without checking in at Canadian Customs 
and aware of both Black and Grizzly bears along the Salmon River.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis) near Gustavus
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2014 00:01:07 -0800
Region: Southeast; Gustavus

Date: 5 June 2014

Species: A single, White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis)

Location: This bird was discovered along with 19 Baird's Sandpipers 
along the beach line past Airport Creek east of the town of Gustavus.

Contact: Thanks to Bruce Paige (spruceak AT yahoo.com) for submitting 
information to Eaglechat about his discovery.

History: this is only one of a few records of this species from the 
Gustavus area.
White-rumped Sandpiper is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare migrant and breeder in northern Alaska from Canada west to Prudhoe 
Bay, Colville River delta, and Barrow, occasionally to Wainwright. Very 
rare spring migrant in central Alaska (Denali Highway, Sheenjek River, 
Fairbanks, Anaktuvuk Pass) Casual migrant in southcoastal and southeast 
Alaska (Kenai Peninsula, Copper River Delta, Gustavus, Juneau). 
Accidental on St. Paul Island. Best found in spring at Barrow or Oliktok 
Point." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around Airport Creek is easily birded. 
Be aware their are bear and moose in this area.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Common Pochard (Aythya ferina) near Nome
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 23:48:16 -0800
Region: West; Seward Peninsula; Nome; Safety Lagoon

Date: 4 June 2014

Species: A single male, Common Pochard (Aythya ferina)

Location: This bird was discovered at mile 29.1 of the council road east 
of of Nome. It was in safety Lagoon on the north side of the road.

Contact: Thanks to Aaron Lang (birdingak AT gmail.com) for submitting 
ind formation about this observation to AK Birding.

History: Common Pochard has been discovered at this location n the past 
often, in the company of scaup and other diving ducks.
Common Pochard is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring migrant in the western and central Aleutians, very rare at 
St. Paul and casual at Gambell and Nome." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: There are no known restrictions from birding at 
this location at Safety Sound. The birds are a bit spooky at this 
location so it is preferred to have good back lighting and the use of a 
spotting scope as to not jump the birds or cause them to take flight.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
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Subject: Five Ruff (Reeve) (Calidris pugnax) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 23:39:45 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 4 June 2014

Species: Five Ruff (female-Reeves) (Calidris pugnax)

Location: These birds were discovered at the so called "Northwest Marsh" 
as it is in the northwest corner of Troutman Lake near Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Gavin Bieber (kingbird77 at hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this observation.

History: Until recently the female of this species was given her own 
name (Reeve) to distinguish her from the more flamboyant male bird 
called the Ruff.
Ruff is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. 
Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring migrant at Gambell, very rare on the Aleutian and Pribilof 
Islands. Rare fall migrant in the western and central Aleutian Islands 
and on the Pribilof Islands, casual on St. Lawrence Island and the 
Chukchi Sea coast as far north as Kotzebue Sound. Casual fall visitant 
in northern Alaska (Barrow, Colville River mouth, Prudhoe Bay) and in 
southcoastal Alaska (Homer, Seward, Anchorage, Cordova). Accidental in 
spring migration in southcoastal Alaska (Homer, Seward) and southeast 
Alaska (Annette Island, Juneau), casual in fall migration at Juneau. 
Casual breeder in northern Alaska (Point Lay) and possibly on the Seward 
peninsula and St. Lawrence Island." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by 
Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birding at Gambell is often conducted through 
one of the tour companies which make all of the arrangements for food, 
lodging, and guide services.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 23:25:27 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence island; Gambell

Date: 3 June 2014

Species: A single, Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia)

Location: This bird was moving around the various wet areas surrounding 
Gambell village.

Contact: Thanks to Gavin Bieber (kingbird77 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this discovery to AK Birding.

History: Common Greenshank is distributed evenly in very low numbers in 
both the spring and the fall at Gambell.
Common Greenshank is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring and casual fall migrant in the western and central Aleutian 
Islands. Casual spring and fall migrant on St. Paul Island and at 
Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Gambell really represents one of the most remote 
of all North American Birding locations. As such, the logistics and 
arrangements for birding there have to be worked out far in advance.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
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Subject: Common Ringed Plovers (Charadrius hiaticula) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 23:17:53 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 2 June 2014

Species: Two, Common Ringed Plovers (Charadrius hiaticula)

Location: There was no specific location given in the post as to where 
these Asiatic plovers were located, although most of the Common Ringed 
Plovers at Gambell are discovered on the stone plain south of Troutman Lake.

Contact: Thank to Gavin Bieber (kingbird77 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about his discovery to AK Birding.

History: Gambell represents the single best location in Alaska to find 
these shorebirds which look superficially like Semipalmated Plovers.
Common Ringed Plover is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare but regular spring migrant and casual breeder at Gambell, very 
rare in early fall. Accidental on St. Paul Island and at Wales. Casual 
migrant in the western and central Aleutian Islands. Best found at 
Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Birders often take advantage of the several tour 
companies which offer logistical services for lodging, meals and guides 
on Gambell. Schedules often need to be adjusted due to weather.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
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Subject: Common Cuckoo (Culculus canorus) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 23:08:39 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence island; Gambell

Date: 2 June 2014

Species: A single Common Cuckoo ( Culculus canorus)

Location: This bird was discovered in the so called "Near Boneyard" as 
it is the closest one to the village of Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Gavin Beiber (kingbird77 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this observation to AK Birding.

History: This species is particularly difficult to tell from the less 
common Oriental Cuckoo and thus should be studied carefully and 
photographed.
Common Cuckoo is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring migrant and early summer visitant in the western and 
central Aleutian Islands, the Shumigan Islands, at Gambell , and at St. 
Paul Island. Accidental at Nome and Anchorage." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: One needs to be well adaptable to changes when 
birding the Alaskan Outposts, and birding Gambell requires more 
sophistication than many other outposts locations when it come to 
patience and flexibility with ones schedule.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 22:58:34 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 2 June 2014

Species: A single, Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus)

Location: This bird was discovered south of Troutman Lake which is 
southeast of the village of Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Gavin Beiber (kingbird77 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information to AK Birding.

History: This shorebird is most often found in the far western Near 
Island group of the Aleutians. Any find outside of this area is noteworthy.
Terek Sandpiper is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Very rare migrant in the western Aleutians Islands, casual to 
accidental in the central and eastern Aleutian Islands, casual on the 
Bering Sea Islands (Nunivak, St. Paul, Gambell) and at Nome and in 
Anchorage," From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Birding Gambell in the Bering Sea Straights 
requires a savvy for remote travel and a patience with logistics and 
weather delays.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Oriental Cuckoo (Cuculus optatus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 22:48:50 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 2-5 June 2014

Species: A single, Oriental Cuckoo (Cuculus optatus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this bird was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this discovery to AK Birding.

History: This is believed to be the fourth Pribilof record of this 
species and the first from late spring.
Oriental Cuckoo is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual in spring in western Aleutian Islands and accidental in central 
Aleutian Islands (Rat Island), and casual between late June and late 
September at Adak, Gambell, and St. Paul. One record on the mainland at 
Cape Prince of Wales." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: St .Paul Island is served by the TDX 
corporation's St. Paul Island Tours which offers visiting birders 
lodging, meals, transportation and guide service for the island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Long-toed Stint (Calidris subminuta) at St .Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 22:13:38 -0800
Region: West, Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul; Island

Date: 2 June 2014

Species: A single, Long-toed Stint (Calidris subminuta)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this Asiatic peep was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this discovery to AK birding.

History: This species is almost always found in the far western Near 
Islands in Alaska. So discovering one on St. Paul island is a great find.
Long-toed Stint is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare but regular spring and very rare fall migrant in the western 
Aleutian Islands, casual in central Aleutian Islands. Very rare spring 
and casual fall migrant on the Bering Sea Islands (Pribilof and St. 
Lawrence Island)." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birders are welcomed to the Pribilof Islands 
with Guides, Meals, Lodging, Transportation available through the native 
tour company operated by TDX corporation.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Ruff (Calidris pugnax) at St. Paul Island
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 22:04:13 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 2 June 2014

Species: A single, Ruff (Calidris pugnax)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this charismatic shorebird was located on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this discovery to AK Birding.

History: This species is often observed more often in the fall than in 
the spring on St. Paul Island.
Ruff is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. 
Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring migrant at Gambell, very rare on the Aleutian and Pribilof 
Islands. Rare fall migrant in the western and central Aleutian islands 
and on the Pribilof Islands, casual on St. Lawrence Island and the 
Chukchi Sea coast as far north as Kotzebue Sound. Casual fall Visitant 
in northern Alaska (Barrow, Colville River mouth, Prudhoe Bay) and in 
southcoastal Alaska (Kodiak Island, Seward, Anchorage, Cordova). 
Accidental in spring migration in southcoastal (Homer, Seward) and 
southeast Alaska (Annette Island, Juneau), casual fall fall migration at 
Juneau. Casual breeder in northern Alaska (Point Lay) and possibly on 
the Seward Peninsula and St. Lawrence Island." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The native Aleut corporation has established 
amenities for the visiting birder providing Lodging, Transportation, 
Meals and Guides who take the birders around the island to the various 
habitat types found on this small 45 square mile island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 21:50:42 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence island; Gambell

Date: 2 June 2014

Species: A single, Common Tern (Sterna hirundo longipennis)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this Asiatic subspecies of the abundant, North American Common Tern, was 
discovered at Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Gavin Bieber (kingbird77 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this discovery to AK Birding.

History: This species is mostly found in the extreme westerly Near 
Island group of the Aleutian Islands. Finding one at Gambell is a good get.
Common Tern is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Alaska Records are all of Sterna hirundo longipennis, the northeast 
Asia race. Very rare spring migrant and summer visitant and casual fall 
migrant in the western and central Aleutian Islands and at St. Paul 
Island. Casual spring migrant in the northern Bering Sea (Gambell) and 
at Nome." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Birding Gambell requires a long lead time to 
arrange guide services or secured housing for the independent birder.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Common Cuckoo (Culculus canorus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 21:40:09 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 2 June 2014

Species: A single, Common Cuckoo (Culculus canorus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this Asiatic bird was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information about this find to AK Birding.

History: This Asiatic species is often detected on St .Paul Island in 
the spring and into early summer.
Common Cuckoo is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring migrant and early summer visitant in western and central 
Aleutian Islands, the Shumagin Islands, at Gambell, and St. Paul Island. 
Accidental at Nome and Anchorage." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by 
Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: St. Paul Island welcomes visitors with flights 
from Anchorage and a guide service which knows the natural history of 
the island very well. There is lodging, meals and transportation 
available on the island through the TDX tour service.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Common Sandpipers (Actitus hypolecus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2014 21:31:38 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 31- May -2+ June 2014

Species: Two, Common Sandpipers (Actitus hypolecus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
these birds were observed on St.Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information to AK Birding about this discovery.

History: St. Paul Island represents one of the most accessible locations 
to find this conger of North America's Spotted Sandpiper.
Common Sandpiper is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring and casual fall migrant in the western and central Aleutian 
Islands. Very rare spring migrant on the Pribilof Islands and at 
Gambell. Casual on the Seward Peninsula." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The native Aleut corporation TDX, has 
established a tour service on St. Paul Island which includes 
Transportation, Lodging, Meals at a local cannery and knowledgeable 
guides to the Natural History of St. Paul Island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina) at Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 05 May 2014 23:51:48 -0800
Region: Southeast; Juneau

Date: 4 May 2014

Species: Tennessee Warbler (Oreothlypis peregrina)

Location: This bird was reported at a private residence along Wolfram Way near 
Juneau. To access this road, take Mendenhall Loop to Montana Creek Road. Take 
the third right off of Montana Creek Road onto Ninnis Drive. Wolfram Way will 
be the first road on your left, which will loop back and connect with Ninnis 
Drive. 


Contact: Thanks to Amy Clark Courtney for providing information on this 
sighting. Please contact Nick Hajdukovich (alaskabirds AT ak.net) for 
additional information on this sighting. 


History: This bird was heard singing at this location for several hours in 
late-morning to early-afternoon of 4 May. Tennessee Warbler is listed as Rare 
in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert 
E. Gill Jr., Steve C. Heinl, Aaron J. Lang, Theodore G. Tobish Jr., and Jack J. 
Withrow. It is available online at: 
http://www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf "Casual 
migrant in SE Alaska (Ketchikan, Hyder, Juneau, Gustavus). Casual late spring, 
summer, and fall visitant in central Alaska (Fairbanks, Birch Lake, Delta 
Junction, Donnelly Dome, Scottie Creek, and on the Taylor Hwy). Casual in 
southcentral Alaska (Anchorage) and on the Alaska Pen (King Salmon). Accidental 
at Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association. 


Special Considerations: This bird was observed in a residential area so please 
be conscience and considerate of all private property. 


Nick Hajdukovich
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nick Hajdukovich                  Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell)                457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT ak.net            akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(Please direct email sightings to both addresses!)

 
_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
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Subject: Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) near Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 05 May 2014 22:21:03 -0800
Region: Southeast; Juneau; Lynn Canal; Eagle Beach

Date: 3-5+ May 2014

Species: A single, female, Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus)

Location: This bird was discovered with a Whimbrel near the section of 
Eagle Beach called Boy Scout Camp. The main area called Eagle Beach 
South Section is on the south side of the Herbert River about 26 miles 
north of downtown Juneau off of the Glacier Highway.

Contact: Thanks to Martina Kallenberger, Doug Sanvik, Gus van Vleit, 
Gwen Baluss and Steve Heinl (stevencheinl AT gamail) for forwarding 
information and images about this discovery.

History: There have been two previous undocumented reports of this 
species in Alaska: A single bird was observed at the mouth of the 
Stikine River in May 1992 and another single bird was observed at the 
mouth of the Situk River near Yakutat on 30 May 2008.
Long-billed Curlew is listed as Unsubstantiated in the Checklist of 
Alaska Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, 
Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. 
It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Accidental from a site record at the Stikine River mouth in May 1992." 
 From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The location where the Long-billed Curlew was 
see on its day of discovery and on 5 May is off of the Eagle River Trail 
and is a bit of a walk from the parking area. This bird is quite large 
and was associating with a single Whimbrel offering a side-by-side 
comparison of the two species. the bird was observed in the same 
location on both days.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Tufted Ducks (Aythya fuligula) at Unalaska
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 05 May 2014 22:01:35 -0800
Region: Southwest , Aleutian Islands; Fox Island Group; Unalaska

Date: 2+ May 2014

Species: A pair (male & female) Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)

Location: These birds were discovered on the small body of water know as 
"Nirvana Pond". This is the body of water north of East Broadway near 
the elementary school at the base of Nirvana Hill. They were 
subsequently found across the street on the much larger Unalaska Lake.

Contact: Thanks to Suzi Golodoff (sgolodoff AT gmail.com) for submitting 
information and images about her discovery.

History: The male Tufted Duck has been observed off and on around 
Unalaska Lake since late February 2014. The recent discovery of the 
female may stem from the obvious association with the charismatic 
alternate plumaged male.
Tufted Duck is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel 
D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare to locally uncommon spring and fall migrant and winter visitant in 
the western and central Aleutians. Casual winter visitant to the eastern 
Aleutians (Dutch Harbor) and spring migrant on the Pribilof Islands. 
Casual spring migrant and summer visitant further north in the Bering 
Sea on St. Mathew Island, at Gambell, and at Nome and in the interior at 
Fairbanks and Kenny Lake. Casual winter visitant to south coastal 
(Kodiak, Cordova) and southeast Alaska (Petersburg). Accidental in 
northern Alaska (Barrow)." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George 
C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: There is plenty of parking at the elementary 
school and further along East Broadway to walk along the northern shore 
of Unalaska Lake and ample room to get close to Nirvana Pond to look for 
these birds.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: Western Screech-Owls (Megascopus kennicotti) at Seward
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 21:57:01 -0800
Region: Southcoastal; Kenai Peninsula; Seward

Date: 16-18+ April 2014

Species: Four, Western Screech-Owls (Megascopus kennicottii)

Location: Two birds were heard calling at the Lost Lake subdivision near 
Seward and two different birds were heard calling 1.5 miles past the 
first bridge on the Exit Glacier Road a couple of miles north of 
downtown Seward.

Contact: Thanks to John Manisalco, Sadie Ulman and Carol Griswold (cgriz 
AT yahoo.com) for forwarding information about these discoveries to AK 
Birding.

History: The coastal rainforest around Seward represents one of the best 
locations to search for Western Screech-Owls along the road network in 
southcoastal Alaska.
Western Screech-Owl is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Uncommon resident int he woods of southeast Alaska from Ketchikan to 
Juneau north to Gustavus; rare in southcoastal Alaska (Seward, Copper 
Center, Sterling), and accidental further west (Homer)." From A Birder's 
Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The section of road along the Exit Glacier Road 
1.5 miles past the first bridge from town is much quieter location than 
the Long Lake subdivision and at night when listening for the Owls there 
will not be a parking problem or traffic issues along the Exit Glacier Road.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Whooper Swan (Cygnus cygnus) near King Salmon
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 21:50:16 -0800
Region: Southwest; Alaska Peninsula; King Salmon; Naknek River

Date: 6-10+ April 2014

Species: A single Whooper Swan (Cygnus cygnus)

Location: This bird was observed near the Rapids Camp Lodge, which is located 
5.8 miles south of King Salmon along the Naknek River. 


Contact: Thanks to Richard Russell, Rod Cyr, and Susan Savage (susan_savage AT 
fws.gov) for forwarding information about this discovery. 


History: This Whooper Swan was discovered considerably further east than the 
normal wintering rage for the species in Alaska, which centers around Adak 
Island. It was associated with a single "Bewick's" Tundra Swan as well as 
several other columbianus Tundra Swans. Whooper Swan is listed as Rare in the 
Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill 
Jr., Steve C. Heinl, Aaron J. Lang, Theodore G. Tobish Jr., and Jack J. 
Withrow. It is available online at: 
http://www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/Alaska_bird_checklist.pdf 
"Uncommon winter visitant in the C and W Aleutian Is. Casual in summer on Attu 
Is (successfully nested in 1996 and 1997), on the Pribilof and St. Lawrence Is, 
and in W Alaska (Wales, Nome) N to the Noatak River delta. Accidental in fall 
in southcoastal Alaska (Cordova) and in winter on the Alaska Pen (Golovin). 
Best found at Adak Is in winter." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George 
C. West, July 2008 (seco! 

 nd edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: This bird was observed near the Rapids Camp Lodge: 
www.rapidscamplodge.com; (907) 246-8354. 


Nick Hajdukovich
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nick Hajdukovich                 Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell)                   457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT ak.net            akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

 
_______________________________________________
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Subject: Little Gull (Hydrocoloeus minutus) near Ketchikan
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 20:04:16 -0800
Region: Southeast; Alexander Archipelago; Revillagigedo Island, Ketchikan

Date: 10 April 2014

Species: A single, first cycle, Little Gull (Hydrocoloeus minutus)

Location: This bird was discovered mixed in with a flock of Bonaparte's 
Gull at Rotary Park, 3.7 miles south of downtown Ketchikan off of the 
south Tongass Highway

Contact: Thanks to Steve Heinl (stevecheinl AT gmail.com) and Andrew 
Piston for submitting information and images about this discovery.

History: There is no one location in Alaska where Little Gull is 
reliably found, although Ketchikan area is a good place to look for them.
Little Gull is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual, with scattered records from Kodiak Island, Cape Romanzof, 
Juneau, Anchorage, Petersburg, Hoonah, Wrangell, and Ketchikan." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Rotary Park is a public park with plenty of 
parking spaces. This is a good area to search for other rare Alaska 
gulls such as Ring-billed Gull.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Homer
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2014 21:43:12 -0800
Region: Southcoastal; Kenai Peninsula; Homer

Date: 25 March 2014

Species: Two, White-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis)

Location: These birds were discovered at the intersection of Portlock 
Drive and Taku. This location is approximately 5.5 miles north of the 
intersection of Pioneer and Lake Streets in downtown Homer.

Contact: Thanks to Dave Sonneborn and Aaron Lang (birdingak AT 
gmail.com) for submitting information to AK Birding about their discovery.

History: Of the "rare" sparrows in Alaska, White-throated Sparrow has to 
be one of the most common!
White-throated Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: 
www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare fall and winter visitant at any season to southeast and 
southcoastal Alaska. Accidental to Barrow." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The intersection of Portlock Drive and Taku 
Drive is in a residential neighborhood. Please do not block the traveled 
lane of traffic on these roads or block access to peoples driveways.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) near Homer
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2014 21:35:14 -0800
Region: Southcoastal; Kenai Peninsula; Homer

Date: 23-27+ March 2014

Species: A single, Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)

Location: This bird is patronizing a feeding station near the top of 
Cannonball Road which is approximately 7.5 miles north from downtown 
Homer on the East End Road. The bird is found at a feeding station 
across from a log house near the top of Cannonball Road.

Contact: Thanks to Dave Sonneborn and Aaron Bowman (apbowman AT 
gmail.com) for submitting information about this discovery to AK Birding.

History: Interestingly a single Mourning Dove was found in this general 
area in the fall of 2013.
Mourning Dove is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare fall migrant and very rare spring migrant and summer visitant in 
southeast Alaska. Rare fall visitant in southcoastal Alaska (Cordova, 
Homer, Kodiak, Anchorage) and casual fall visitant north of the Alaska 
Range (Fort Yukon). Prior to 1972, doves were rare spring and summer 
visitants in the interior (Fairbanks, Chena Hot Springs, Circle Hot 
Springs). Casual fall visitant in southwest Alaska (Kvichak River mouth, 
Dillingham). Accidental at Wales." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by 
Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: This bird is frequenting a private residence. 
Please respect property rights and park in such a way as to not block 
local traffic on this narrow road.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
AlaskaBirds-L mailing list
AlaskaBirds-L AT lists.alaska.edu
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Subject: Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) near Ketchikan
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2014 13:02:25 -0900
Region: Southwest; Alexander Archipelago; Rivillagigedo Island; 
Ketchikan; North Point

Date: 5 January 2014

Species: A single, Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta)

Location: This bird was discovered at the sports fields at North 
Point-Higgins School about 14 miles north of downtown Ketchikan.

Contact: Thanks to Steve Heinl (stevecheinl AT gmail) for submitting 
information and an image of this discovery.

History: The few acres of sports fields at North Point Higgins School 
has to be the single best location to find Western Meadowlark in Alaska.
Western Meadowlark is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual fall and winter visitant to southeast Alaska (Auke Bay, Juneau, 
Mitkof Island, Ketchikan) and eastern interior Alaska (Tok, Scottie 
Creek, Delta Junction). Accidental at Anaktuvuk Pass." From A Birder's 
Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: There is plenty of parking on the school 
grounds. The school is normally closed on weekends and this might be a 
better time to search for this meadowlark other than times of school 
recess, when the children are using the fields.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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https://lists.alaska.edu/mailman/listinfo/alaskabirds-l
Subject: White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2014 13:14:48 -0900
Region: Southeast; Douglas Island

Date: 24 December 2013  11+ January 2014

Species: Two White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis)

Location: These two birds are being seen at a private residence's bird feeder 
along the North Douglas Highway on Douglas Island. Douglas Island is located 
across Gastineau Channel from Juneau and accessible via the Juneau road system. 


Contact: Thanks to Julie Coghill for providing information on these sightings. 
Please contact Nick Hajdukovich (alaskabirds AT ak.net) for additional 
information. 


History: A single "tan-striped" individual was first observed on 24 December 
2013 and was joined by a second "tan-striped" individual on 11 January 2014. 
White-throated Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill Jr., Steve C. Heinl, Aaron 
J. Lang, Theodore G. Tobish Jr., and Jack J. Withrow. It is available online 
at: 
http://www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/Alaska_bird_checklist.pdf 
A printed version is available from the Alaska Bird observatory at: 
www.alaskabird.org. "Rare fall and winter visitant at any season to SE and SC 
Alaska. Accidental at Barrow." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association. 


Special Considerations: This bird is being seen at a private residence so 
please contact me for more details on observing these birds. 


Nick Hajdukovich
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nick Hajdukovich                        Ed Clark
978-2018  (cell)                        457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT ak.net                        akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

 
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Subject: American Coot (Fulica americana) at Sitka
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2014 12:34:15 -0900
Region: Southeast; Alexander Archipelago; Baranof island; Sitka

Date: 4+ January 2014

Species: Four, American Coot (Fulica americana)

Location: These birds were discovered at several locations in the 
greater Sitka area, specifically; two were at Swan Lake near downtown, 
and another two were along the saltwater edge along Katilian Street.

Contact: Thanks to Matt Goff (goff AT nawwal,org) for submitting 
information about these Christmas Bird Count observations.

History: American Coot have been discovered annually at Sitka in winter 
over the last 6 years or more.
American Coot is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare fall migrant and winter visitant in southeast Alaska. Rare migrant 
and summer visitant (and rare breeder) in central Alaska from Minto 
Lakes to Delta Junction and Tetlin lakes. Casual migrant in southcoastal 
Alaska (Cordova, Anchorage, Seward, Homer, Kodiak). Accidental in 
northern Alaska (Colville River delta). Southwest Alaska (Pribilof 
Islands), and the Aleutian Islands (Unimak Island). Best seen on Swan 
Lake in Sitka in fall." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around Swan Lake is accessible in 
winter if one parks at parking spaces near the lake. The area along 
Katilian Street has room to park vehicles with a good view of the waters 
edge.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

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Subject: Anna's Hummingbirds (Calypte anna) at Sitka
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2014 12:21:29 -0900
Region: Southeast; Alexander Archipelago; Baranof Island; Sitka

Date: 4+ January 2014

Species: Five, Anna's Hummingbirds (Calypte anna)

Location: These birds have been observed at various locations around 
Sitka. One is at Galakin Island which might be difficult to reach. They 
also have been found in the vicinity of DeGroff and Monastery, not far 
from Swan Lake, and in the neighborhood at Jamestown Bay, all at sugar 
water feeders.

Contact: Thanks to Matt Goff (goff AT nawwal.org) for submitting 
information about these Christmas Bird Count observations.

History: Over the past 12 years or so this species is now annual in 
small numbers around southeast Alaska sugar water feeding stations.
Anna's Hummingbird is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual visitant at any season in southeast Alaska. Casual in 
southcoastal Alaska (Girdwood, Cordova, Homer). The range is expanding 
north in recent decades." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George 
C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: These birds are tied to sugar water feeders in 
southeast and as such should be easy to locate once one arrives.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) at Sitka
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2014 12:10:03 -0900
Region: Southeast; Alexander Archipelago; Baranof Island; Sitka

Date: 4+ January 2014

Species: Two, White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis)

Location: One White-throated Sparrow is visiting several feeders in the 
Market Center neighborhood and the other has been observed at the Path 
of Hope at Moller Park.

Contact: Thanks to Matt Goff (goff AT nawwal,org) for forwarding 
information about these observations.

History: There is no doubt that this species has been detected more 
frequently in the last decade. This might be due to increased observers?
White-throated Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare fall and winter visitant at any season to southeast and 
southcoastal Alaska. Accidental at Borrow." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: These species is generally bound to feeders or 
seed sources during the winter month in Alaska. To find these birds look 
for active feeders in the Market Center neighborhood or walk along the 
weedy edges at Moller Park


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

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Subject: Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) at Sitka
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2014 12:01:24 -0900
Region: Southeast; Alexander Archipelago ; Baranof Island; Sitka

Date: 4-8+ 2014

Species: A single, Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)

Location: This bird was discovered in a Salmonberry thicket below the 
Russian Blockhouse across the street from the Pioneer Home.

Contact: Thanks to Matt Goff (goff AT nawwal.org) for providing 
information about this observation.

History: Southeast coastal sites are traditionally where this rare 
Alaskan sparrow has been detected in fall or winter.
Swamp Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual primarily in fall with sightings at Sitka, Ketchikan, 
Petersburg, Juneau, Middleton Island and Anchorage. Best found in late 
fall at Ketchikan" From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: This bird was detected during Sitka's Christmas 
Bird Count. It is not known if it is still in the area. Swamp Sparrows 
are know to be furtive in Alaska and are difficult to detect even though 
they are present at that location.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Douglas
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 31 Dec 2013 15:35:19 -0900
Region: Southeast; Douglas Island; West Juneau

Date: 24 December 2013

Location: A single, tan morph, White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia 
albicollis)

Contact: Thanks to Julie Coghill (photoalaska AT yahoo.com) (907) 
460-6147 for submitting information about her sighting to Eagle Chat.

History: There certainly have been more observations of this species 
over he last five years or so, particularly at coastal area feeders.
White-throated Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare fall and winter visitant at any season to southeast and 
southcoastal Alaska. Accidental at Barrow." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Unfortunately Ms. Coghill has not observed this 
bird beyond the 24th of December.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) near Seward
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Dec 2013 22:10:13 -0900
Region: Southcoastal; Kenai Peninsula; Seward

Date: 16 December 2013

Species: A single, White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)

Location: This bird was discovered along Lowell Point Beach. This beach 
is reached at the southern end of Pinnacle View Road. This road is 
accessed by driving south on Lowell Point Road and then east on Boarder 
Avenue and then south to the end of Pinnacle View Road.

Contact: Thanks to Carol Griswold (c_griz AT yahoo.com) for submitting 
information and images to AK Birding and her blog.

History: Southcoastal Alaska communities near to the salt water shore 
have had an increasing number of White-throated Sparrows in recent 
years, particularly in late fall/winter.
White-throated Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"rare fall and winter visitant at any season to Southeast and 
southcoastal Alaska. Accidental at Barrow." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The parking at the very end of Pinnacle View 
Road is limited. Park as to not block traffic along the road that leads 
to the path dropping down to the beach. Do not park in the actual path area.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) near Seward
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Dec 2013 21:54:01 -0900
Region: Southcoastal; Kenai Peninsula; Seward

Date: 15 December 2013

Species: A single, Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)

Location: This bird was frequenting the feeding station of a private 
residence just north of the town of Seward. To get there drive east on 
Nash Road. Go over the Alaska Railroad tracks and take a right on Salmon 
Creek Road. Drive over the Salmon Creek bridge and turn right and drive 
down a long driveway looking for a house with a blue roof and lots of 
feeders.

Contact: Thanks to Arva, Luke DeCicco, and Carol Griswold (c_griz AT 
yahoo.com) for submitting information and images to AK Birding.

History: This is believed to be the fourth record for southcoastal 
Alaska and the second for the Kenai Peninsula.
Swamp Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual primarily in fall with sightings at Sitka, Ketchikan, 
Petersburg, Juneau, Middleton Island, and Anchorage. Best found in late 
fall at Ketchikan." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Arva welcomes birders to her elaborate feeders. 
It would be a friendly gesture to bring some black-oil sunflowers for 
her feeding station. Some great birds have shown up at her feeders over 
the years.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Rustic Bunting (Emberiza rustica) in Homer
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 16 Dec 2013 21:42:24 -0900
Region: Southcoastal; Kenai Peninsula; Homer

Date: 11-16+ December 2013

Species: A single, Rustic Bunting (Emberiza rustica)

Location: This bird is frequenting a private feeding station at 4251 
Hohe Street near South Peninsula Hospital in Homer.

Contact: Thanks to Tami R. and Aaron Lang (birdingak AT gmail.com) for 
submitting information and images to AK Birding.

History: This is the second record of Rustic Bunting from Homer. The 
first was at George West's feeders from 21 March - 14 April 1985.
Rustic Bunting is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring and casual fall migrant in the western and central Aleutian 
Islands. Casual spring and fall migrant to the Bering Sea islands and in 
southcoastal Alaska (Kodiak, Homer ,Seward). Accidental in fall at 
Wales, in winter in the interior near Fairbanks, and in southeast Alaska 
at Petersburg and Juneau." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George 
C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The feeders at Tami's house are visible from the 
street and are hanging from a chokecherry tree.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) at Adak
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 09 Dec 2013 22:10:23 -0900
Region: Southwest; Aleutian Islands ; Andreanof Island Group; Adak island

Date: 9 December 2013

Species: A single, Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus)

Location: There was no mention in the report as to where this bird was 
discovered and photographed on Adak Island.

Contact: Thanks to John Pushock (g_g_allin AT hotmail.com) and David 
Sonneborn (davesonne AT aol.com) for submitting information about this 
sighting.

History: The observation of this bird was not documented by discernible 
photos. If this bird can be sufficiently documented it will represent a 
first record for Alaska (and North America). Eurasian Sparrowhawk breeds 
as close to Alaska as the Kamchatka Peninsula.
Eurasian Sparrowhawk is not listed in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson,Lucas H DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, 
Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"there is no mention of this species in A Birder's Guide to Alaska." 
 From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Alaska Airlines flies to Adak on Thursdays and 
Sundays. There is Lodging available there through the Aleutian Housing 
Authority (907) 592-4512 and you can probably rent a car on island (907) 
592-3865.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

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Subject: White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) In Bethel
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 08 Dec 2013 21:39:36 -0900
Region: Southwest; Yukon-Kuskokwin River Delta; Bethel

Date: 6 December 2013

Species: A single, adult, White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)

Location: This bird is frequenting a feeding station at a private 
residence in the town of Bethel.

Contact: Thanks to Kevin Morgan (kevinmorgan AT hotmail.com) for 
submitting information and images to AkBirding.

History: Last year the Morgan feeder hosted Alaska's second Dickcissel. 
White-throated Sparrow is being detected much more frequently over the 
past five years or so.
White-throated Sparrow is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. 
Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is 
available online at: www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare fall and winter visitant at any season to southeast and 
southcoastal Alaska. Accidental in Barrow." From A Birder's Guide to 
Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: It is unclear if the Morgan;s would welcome 
birders to see this bird. Contact Kevin via e-mail if you are interested 
in looking for this sparrow


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola) at Gustavus
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 00:46:28 -0900
Region: Southeast; Gustavus

Date: 3 December 2013

Species: Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola)

Location: This bird was observed in a ditch out in the Crane Flats near 
Gustavus. 


Contact: Thanks to Nat Drumheller for providing information on this sighting. 
Contact Nick Hajdukovich (alaskabirds AT ak.net) for more information. 


History: This bird was observed in freezing conditions and was struggling with 
ice and snow. If temperatures continue to stay cold in Gustavus, it is not 
known how much longer this bird might survive. This is the 4th record for this 
species in the Gustavus area. Virginia Rail is listed as Casual on the 
Checklist of Alaska Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill 
Jr., Steve C. Heinl, Aaron J. Lang, Theodore G. Tobish Jr., and Jack J. 
Withrow. It is available online at: 
http://www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/Alaska_bird_checklist.pdf 
"Casual in SE Alaska (Haines, Gustavus, Juneau, Klawock, Stikine River, 
Ketchikan). From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association. 


Special Considerations: There are no special considerations to birding in this 
area. 


Nick Hajdukovich
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nick Hajdukovich                        Ed Clark
978-2018  (cell)                        457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT ak.net            akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

 
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Subject: Dusky Thrush (Turdus naumanni) in Anchorage
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 01 Dec 2013 21:01:41 -0900
Region: Southcoastal, Upper Cook Inlet, Anchorage

Date: 24-30+ November 2013

Species: A single, adult, Dusky Thrush (Turdus naumanni eunomus)

Location: This bird is most reliably being observed with American Robin 
and Bohemian Waxwing flocks between 34th and 35 Avenues east of 
Wisconsin Street in the Turnagain area of east Anchorage.

Contact: Thanks to Bev Cason, Chris Maack and Ed Clark (Akbirder AT 
eagle.ptialaska.net) for submitting information to AK Birding.

History: This individual is believed to be the same bird discovered by 
Thede Tobish on 10 December 2011 in his backyard north of Northern 
Lights Boulevard not far from where the bird is presently being observed.
Dusky Thrush is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring and fall migrant on the western Aleutian Islands; 
accidental to St. Lawrence and St. Paul Island, as well as Barrow, 
Askinuk Mountains (north of Hooper Bay), Petersburg and Juneau." From A 
Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second 
edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The area around 34th and 35th Avenues are small 
roads which do not have much in the way of parking. The recent snowfall 
has made these roads even narrower. Please park at either Balto-Seppala 
Park and walk across Wisconsin Street to the east or find a space on 
Turnagain Street (between 34th and 35th) or near McRae Road. Respect 
private property.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

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Subject: Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) at Juneau
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2013 21:14:13 -0900
Region: Southeast; Juneau

Date: 10 - 19+ November 2013

Species: A single Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculates)

Location: This bird is being observed near private residences in the Lemon 
Creek neighborhood of Juneau. More specifically, the bird has been observed 
near the end of Lund Road where it has started to visit a pile of sunflower 
seeds. 


Contact: Thanks to Kurt Rieselbach, Gus Van Vliet, and Gwen Baluss for 
providing information on this sighting. Please contact Nick Hajdukovich 
(alaskabirds AT ak.net) for additional information. 


History: This bird was first seen on 10 November and later seen and 
photographed by many. The most recent known sighting of this bird was on 19 
November. Spotted Towhee is listed as Casual on the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Lucas H. DeCicco, Robert E. Gill Jr., Steve C. Heinl, 
Aaron J. Lang, Theodore G. Tobish Jr., and Jack J. Withrow. It is available 
online at: 
http://www.universityofalaskamuseumbirds.org/products/Alaska_bird_checklist.pdf 
"Casual with several records from Juneau, one from Anchorage, and one from 
Homer." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association. 


Special Considerations: Because this bird is being seen in a residential 
neighborhood, please be considerate of private property if you attempt to find 
this bird. 


Nick Hajdukovich
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nick Hajdukovich                 Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell)                457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT ak.net            akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

 
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Subject: Siberian Accentor (Prunella montanella) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Fri, 27 Sep 2013 19:02:45 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 26 September 2013

Species: A single, Siberian Accentor (Prunella montanella)

Location: This bird was discovered at the so called "Far Boneyard" north 
of the village of Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Paul Lehman (lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net) for 
submitting information and images to AK Birding and Surfbirds.com

History: This is the third Siberian Accentor discovered at Gambell this 
fall and the Ninetieth record observed there since 1999.
Siberian Accentor is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Very rare fall visitor at Gambell, casual fall visitant at Nunivak 
Island and St. Paul Island, and accidental at Barrow, Ester near 
Fairbanks, Juneau, Anchorage [Seward] and in the western Aleutian 
Islands. Best found at Gambell where there are now [19] fall records 
through [2013]." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, 
July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Gambell requires a bit more savvy for the 
traveling birder than some of the other Alaska outpost birding 
locations. Plan far in advance for a visit to this famous birding location.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Lanceolated Warbler (Locustella lanceolata) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 23:17:34 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 24 September 2013

Species: A single, Lanceolated Warbler (Locustella lanceolata)

Location: This bird was discovered in a small 30-foot patch of Wormwood 
northwest of the "Far Boneyard"near the base of Sivuqaq Mountain.

Contact: Thanks to Paul Lehman (lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net) for 
submitting information about his discovery.

History: This is the first record of Lanceolated Warbler for Gambell and 
the first true fall record for the species in Alaska.
Lanceolated Warbler is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Accidental (but a total of 25 birds) an Attu Island in June-July 1984 
and one or two others there in June 2000." [Buldir Island up to four 
singing males 8-10 June 2007; a pair carrying food, 11 August 2007 and 
an adult with fledgling 16 August 2007 (Western Birds volume 39: pp 
2-7)] From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 
(second edition). It is available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Getting to and birding Gambell requires the 
birder to be flexible and a savvy travel in remote regions.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Stonechat (Saxicola torquatus) at Anchorage
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 23:04:43 -0800
Region: Southcoastal; Upper Cook Inlet; Anchorage

Date: 24 September 2013

Species: A single, "Siberian" Stonechat (Saxicola torquatus)

Location: This bird was observed an photographed near tidewater at 
Carr-Gottstein Park in South Anchorage. The park is located near the 
intersection of Southport Drive and West Klatt Road.

Contact: Thanks to Aaron Bowman (ambowman AT gmail.com) for submitting 
information and images to AK Birding about his discovery.

History: It is believed that this is the first record of this species 
for the greater Anchorage area.
"Siberian" Stonechat is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual, with several spring and fall records from Gambell and one fall 
record from Middleton Island. Best chance to find this bird is in the 
first week of June at Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. 
George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Carr-Gottstein Park is public property and the 
park allows parking and access to the tidal zone of Turnagain Arm.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Red-flanked Bluetail (Tarsiger cyanurus) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 22:53:50 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence island; Gambell

Date: 23 September 2013

Species: A single, Red-flanked Bluetail (Tarsiger cyanurus)

Location: This bird was discovered in the productive "Far Boneyard" 
north of the village of Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Paul Lehman (lehman.paul1 AT verizon,net) and 
Clarence Irrigoo for submitting information and images of their discovery.

History: This is the second record of Red-flanked Bluetail for St. 
Lawrence Island, the first coming on 30 September 2006.
Red-flanked Bluetail is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual in spring and fall at Attu, Shemya, and St. Paul Island; 
accidental at Gambell. One sight record at Hooper Bay." From A Birder's 
Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is 
available from the American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birding at Gambell requires the birding traveler 
to have a flexible schedule as weather often dictates when planes can 
come and go from the island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 22:44:27 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 22 September 2013

Species: A single, Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
this bird was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Doug Gochfeld, Gavin Bieber, and Scott Schuette 
(sschuette01 AT hotmail.com) for submitting information about this 
sighting to AK Birding.

History: St. Paul represents a good location to search for this Asiatic 
thrush.
Eyebrowed Thrush is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare spring and casual fall migrant in the western and central Aleutian 
Islands, and casual in spring and fall at St. Paul, St. Mathew, and St. 
Lawrence Island. Accidental spring migrant in western (Wales, Nunavak 
Island) and northern Alaska (Barrow). Best found in fall on Shemya or 
Adak and at Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Birders are welcomed to St. Paul Island. The 
local native corporation TDX, has established modest accommodations, 
vans, meals at the local seafood processor and knowledgeable guides to 
lead birders around the island.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: "Siberian" Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collybita tristis) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 14:01:48 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 22 September 2013

Species: A single, "Siberian" Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus collbita tristis)

Location: This bird was observed and photographed in the so called "Far 
Boneyard" north of the village of Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Paul Lehman (lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net) for 
submitting information about this discovery.

History:  On 30 September 2011 Peter Scully observed a bird he thought 
might be an unusual Phylloscopus Warbler  at Gambell. The bird was 
refound and photographed on 2 October. It was last seen on 3 October. 
The photographs of this bird were not definitive enough to add 
Chiffchaff to the North American (Alaskan) Checklist. On 6 June 2012 
Kevin Zimmer flushed a dull Phylloscopus warbler in the Near Boneyard. 
Latter this same bird was refound by Paul Lehman. Multiple high quality 
digital images of the bird were taken and allowed detailed analysis that 
the bird was a Chiffchaff of the easternmost Asiatic race /tristis/. See 
North American Birds Volume 66: Number 3: pages 428-435.
"Siberian" Chiffchaff is listed as Accidental in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. "
[Chiffchaff is not covered in the Annotated Checklist in A Birder's 
Guide to Alaska as the species was added to the Alaska Checklist after 
the 2008 publication date!] From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. 
George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: Traveling to Gambell quickly from Nome could be 
problematic due to weather affecting air transportation, the only 
practical means of getting to Gambell on short notice.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich                       Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell)                                  457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)
_______________________________________________
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Subject: Common Rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 12:00:06 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 21 September 2013

Species: A single; Common Rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus)

Location: There was no specific location mentioned in the report as to 
where this bird was discovered on St. Paul Island.

Contact: Thanks to Doug Gochfeld and Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT 
hotmail.com) for submitting information about their observation.

History: This is the sixth record for the Pribilof Islands and the first 
record of this species for the fall time period.
Common Rosefinch is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring migrant in southwest and west Alaska (Yukon-Kuskokwim 
River delta, St. Paul Island, Gambell) and in the western Aleutian 
Islands. Casual in fall at Gambell and accidental in the central 
Aleutian Islands." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: St. Paul Island has infrastructure for visiting 
birders with modest hotel accommodations, vans, meals, and guide service 
established through the local native corporation TDX.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Pechora Pipit (Anthus gustavi) at Gambell
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 11:50:35 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea Straights; St. Lawrence Island; Gambell

Date: 20 September 2013

Species: A single, Pechora Pipit (Anthus gustavi)

Location: This bird was found in the so called "Circular Boneyard" north 
of the village of Gambell.

Contact: Thanks to Paul Lehman (lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net) for 
submitting information about his discovery to AK Birding.

History: This is believed to be the eighteenth fall record of this 
species for Gambell since the first was found in 2003.
Pechora Pipit is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring migrant to western Aleutian Islands, very rare at St. 
Paul Island, casual at Gambell, and accidental on the central 
Aleutians." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, July 
2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: Late fall birding at Gambell is punctuated by 
phenomenal discoveries with long periods in between of commonly observed 
species.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Gray-streaked Flycatcher (Muscicapa griseistica) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 22:10:10 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 19 September 2013

Species: A single, Gray-streaked Flycatcher (Muscicapa griseisticta)

Location: There was no specific location given in the report as to where 
on St. Paul Island this Asiatic Flycatcher was discovered.

Contact: Thanks to Doug Gochfeld and Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT 
hotmail.com) on submitting information about their find to AK Birding.

History: September is proving to be a very good month to search for this 
Muscapid with about 13 previous records.
Gray-streaked Flycatcher is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska 
Birds by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. 
Tobish, Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring and fall migrant in the western and central Aleutian 
islands and on the Pribilof islands." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by 
Dr. George C. West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the 
American Birding Association.

Special Considerations: St. Paul Island welcomes visitors with modest 
accommodations, Vans, meals and Guided nature study.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Pacific swift (Apus pacificus) at St. Paul
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 22:00:17 -0800
Region: West; Bering Sea; Pribilof Island Group; St. Paul Island

Date: 19 September 2013

Species: A single, Pacific Swift (Apus pacificus)

Location: There was no specific area on St. Paul Island mentioned in the 
report as to where this bird was discovered.

Contact: Thanks to Doug Gochfeld and Scott Schuette (sschuette01 AT 
hotmail.com) for submitting information about this finding to AK Birding.

History: Pacific Swift used to be known as Fork-tailed Swift until very 
recently. There are previous reports from St. Paul island.
Pacific Swift is listed as Casual in the Checklist of Alaska Birds by 
Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual spring and fall visitant in the western and central Aleutian 
islands and in the Pribilof Islands, Accidental in fall at Gambell and 
Middleton Island. " From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: The native corporation on St.Paul TDX has 
established all of the infrastructure which birders would want on the 
island. Fall birding with guides is a recent phenomenon at St. Paul.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

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Subject: Black-headed Grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus) at Sitka
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 21:50:30 -0800
Region: Southeast; Alexander Archipelago; Baranoff island; Sitka

Date: 19-21+ September 2013

Species: A single, Immature Back-headed grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus)

Location: This bird was discovered at a feeding station at a private 
residence in downtown Sitka.

Contact: Thanks to Cliff and Matt Goff (goff AT nawwal.org) for 
submitting information and images to Sitka Birds.

History: Black-headed Grosbeak is becoming much more regular in 
southeast Alaska, particularly at and around feeders.
Black-headed Grosbeak is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Casual in southeast Alaska (15+ records) and single records on Kodiak 
Island and at Gambell." From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. 
West, July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American 
Birding Association.

Special Considerations: It is not known at this time if the homeowner 
would welcome birders to observe this grosbeak.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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Subject: Buller's Shearwaters (Puffinus bulleri) near Kodiak
From: alaskabirds-l AT lists.alaska.edu
Date: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 21:30:57 -0800
Region: Southcoastal; Kodiak Archipelago; Kodiak Island; Portlock Bank

Date: 17-19 September 2013

Species: Ninety Three, Buller's Shearwaters (Puffinus bulleri)

Location: These birds were observed east of Kodiak Island, south of 
Portlock Bank, near the edge of the continental shelf.

Contact: Thanks to Rich Macintosh (ipetefink AT yahoo.com) for 
submitting information about these observations to Kodiak Birding.

History: The fall of 2013 will no doubt go down as a high point in the 
number of Buller's Shearwaters which have been detected in Alaska.
Buller's Shearwater is listed as Rare in the Checklist of Alaska Birds 
by Daniel D. Gibson, Robert E. Gill, Steve C. Heinl, Theodore G. Tobish, 
Aaron J. Lang, and Jack. J. Withrow. It is available online at: 
www.uaf.edu/museum/bird/products/checklist.pdf. 
"Rare and irregular well off shore in late summer and early fall in the 
Gulf of Alaska between Middleton Island and the Fairweather Grounds and 
west of Kodiak Island. Moderate numbers may be present in some years. 
One recorded off Sitka in September 1997. One recorded north of Tanaga 
Island in the central Aleutian Islands in 2006. Best chance may be west 
of Kayak Island from the Juneau-Whittier Ferry in late summer and early 
fall, or from the Homer-Dutch Harbor ferry when the ferry runs south of 
Kodiak Island. " From A Birder's Guide to Alaska by Dr. George C. West, 
July 2008 (second edition). It is available from the American Birding 
Association.

Special Considerations: these birds were observed over a three day 
period from a commercial fishing boat. This are of the Gulf of Alaska is 
not often visited by boats offering passage for birders. No pelagic 
trips are offered in the area and the Alaska marine Highway might be the 
only way to search for birds at a reasonable cost in the Gulf of Alaska.


Ed Clark
AlaskaBirds-L Moderator

Please direct messages about rare or unusual birds to:

Nicholas Hajdukovich Ed Clark
978-2018 (cell) 457-1526 (home)
alaskabirds AT gci.net akbirder AT eagle.ptialaska.net

(direct email sightings to both addresses!)

_______________________________________________
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