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Updated on Friday, April 18 at 09:45 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Snow Bunting,©Jan Wilczur

18 Apr RE: Today in east bham []
18 Apr Today in east bham ["Duncan, Scot" ]
18 Apr Fw: [rubythroat AT aol.com ]
14 Apr Backyard Birding! [Jack and Karen Moore ]
17 Apr No rest for the weary birder - fallout again?!! ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
17 Apr No rest for the weary birder - fallout again?!! ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
17 Apr Barn Owl in Pogo []
17 Apr Chewacla and Town Creek City Park, Apr 17, 2014 ["James Holmes" ]
17 Apr Couple of Grosbeaks [Charles Grisham ]
17 Apr Do not open []
17 Apr Comments on the fallout of Tuesday Apri 15 ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
17 Apr Comments on the fallout of Tuesday Apri 15 ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
17 Apr Blue-winged Warbler at the BBG this morning ["Gregory J. Harber" ]
17 Apr Re: Pelican Island []
16 Apr May 3-Working Field Trip to Limestone Park and Lunch at Vizzini Winery []
16 Apr Re: Pelican Island ["Gregory J. Harber" ]
16 Apr FOS Green Heron, Chimney Swift [Harold Peterson ]
16 Apr Pelican Island ["James Holmes" ]
16 Apr Daupin Island and Blakeley Island on Tuesday (April 15) ["James Holmes" ]
16 Apr Nashville Warbler at Indian Creek Greenway [Charles Grisham ]
16 Apr Blue Winged Warbler at Wheeler NWR ["Thomas V. Ress" ]
16 Apr Cerulean and Golden-winged Warbler at Monte Sano [Amber Hart ]
15 Apr Dauphin Island []
15 Apr Dauphin Island []
15 Apr Dauphin Island Tuesday [Fred Carney ]
15 Apr sorry about duplication.. must have leaned on that send key... [J C Allen ]
15 Apr Re: perception as applies to birdwatching [J C Allen ]
15 Apr Re: perception as applies to birdwatching [J C Allen ]
15 Apr Cerulean Warbler still on Monte Sano [Charles Grisham ]
15 Apr Possible Blackpoll Warbler at Monte Sano [Amber Hart ]
15 Apr ft. morgan-wear a coat []
15 Apr Plegadis at Blakeley [jfholmes ]
15 Apr Cerulean Photos [Charles Grisham ]
14 Apr Re: 3 Ceruleans at Ruffner, and summary of Potentially good birding today - Monday []
14 Apr Southern Baldwin County April 14 ["James Holmes" ]
15 Apr 3 Ceruleans at Ruffner, and summary of Potentially good birding today - Monday ["Duncan, Scot" ]
14 Apr Re: Fallout possibilities update ["Jim Stevenson" ]
14 Apr Fallout possibilities update ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
14 Apr Fallout possibilities update ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
14 Apr Re: Potentially good birding today - Monday [Amber Hart ]
14 Apr Re: Potentially good birding today - Monday []
14 Apr Re: Potentially good birding today - Monday []
14 Apr More Ceruleans and others [cgrishamlaw ]
14 Apr perception as applies to birdwatching [J C Allen ]
14 Apr RE: Potentially good birding today - Monday ["James Holmes" ]
14 Apr Potentially good birding today - Monday ["Duncan, Scot" ]
14 Apr Cerulean, Blackburnian in Huntsville [Charles Grisham ]
14 Apr FOS Yellow-throated Vireo [Harold Peterson ]
14 Apr Re: Indigo Bunting [stacey gordon ]
13 Apr Fallout conditions developing along the northern Gulf Coast ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
13 Apr Fallout conditions developing along the northern Gulf Coast ["Lucy & Bob Duncan" ]
13 Apr Ruffner []
13 Apr Am . Bittern, Rockhouse bottoms [J C Allen ]
13 Apr Opelika Sewage Ponds, Apr 13, 2014 ["James Holmes" ]
13 Apr Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast ["Duncan, Scot" ]
12 Apr FOS Nashville Warbler [Harold Peterson ]
12 Apr Tri-colored Heron []
12 Apr Tuskegee NF, Apr 12, 2014 ["James Holmes" ]
12 Apr Re: [Conservation] Challenges of recreating extinct species ["Duncan, Scot" ]
12 Apr Indigo Bunting []
12 Apr Re: Indigo Bunting [stacey gordon ]
12 Apr Indigo Bunting [stacey gordon ]
12 Apr Late Mr Jeff Wilson and bait fishing Green Heron ["michel.reglade" ]
12 Apr [Conservation] Challenges of recreating extinct species ["Gregory J. Harber" ]
11 Apr Blakeley Mud Lakes [Craig Litteken ]
11 Apr Three ceruleans in a week []
11 Apr TVA Nature Trails ["Simbeck, Damien J" ]
10 Apr Re: Bewick's Wren []
10 Apr Bewick's Wren []
10 Apr Last post. hummer at Wheeler [J C Allen ]
10 Apr Ruby-throated Hummer-Wheeler NWR,Decatur AL [J C Allen ]
9 Apr Madison County Wildlife Rehabilitators is Seeking Summer Volunteers ["Kenneth Ward" ]
9 Apr Broad winged haws []
09 Apr Northern Harrier still here []
9 Apr Indigo Buntings, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Enterprise [Rick ]
8 Apr Re: Fort Morgan [Mac Walter ]

Subject: RE: Today in east bham
From: lgardellabirds AT charter.net
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 22:22:39 -0400 (EDT)
No sign any birds crossed the Gulf to see us, but there are still good 
numbers of birds around.  Today, Andrea and I had 16 species of warbler 
including Cerulean, Bay-breasted, Chestnut-sided, Blackpoll and more 
than 100 birds overall on the Island.  We missed a Cape May and a 
Blackburnian.

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL

On Fri, Apr 18, 2014 at 3:09 PM, Duncan, Scot wrote:

    I had the day off and went birding this morning early.  Blackpoll, 
Blu-winged and Worm-eatings were the best picks. Lots of palms, indigos, 
and WEVireos. Since diversity was low I ran a big hour just for kicks. 
54 species is my unofficial total.  60 is still just out of reach, but 
migration has yet to peak.  It rained on me the whole time but birds 
were active in the drizzle. Hope folks on the coast at the AOS meeting 
are having good luck.

Scot Duncan

Sent from my iPhone
  
Subject: Today in east bham
From: "Duncan, Scot" <sduncan AT bsc.edu>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:09:41 +0000
I had the day off and went birding this morning early. Blackpoll, Blu-winged 
and Worm-eatings were the best picks. Lots of palms, indigos, and WEVireos. 
Since diversity was low I ran a big hour just for kicks. 54 species is my 
unofficial total. 60 is still just out of reach, but migration has yet to peak. 
It rained on me the whole time but birds were active in the drizzle. Hope folks 
on the coast at the AOS meeting are having good luck. 


Scot Duncan 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Fw:
From: rubythroat AT aol.com <RubyThroat@aol.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2014 01:10:14 +0100
Hi!       

News:  http://espacine.es/skv/page.php

 

rubythroat AT aol.com
Subject: Backyard Birding!
From: Jack and Karen Moore <kjmoore AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 20:25:01 -0700 (PDT)
Visitors to my feeders this morning included 2 male indigo buntings, a male 
rose breasted grosbeak and two female ruby throated hummingbirds.  This 
afternoon brought a flock of male and female buntings.  What a great day!  


Karen Moore
3917 Carisbrooke Lane
Hoover, AL 35226
205-822-7200
Subject: No rest for the weary birder - fallout again?!!
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 18:51:49 -0500
Hi all,

 

               When Lucy and I returned home last night from Dauphin Is.,
the forecast issued yesterday morning was for a stable High to settle over
the east coast and birding to be quite dull for a few days. To my surprise,
the forecast changed to a rainy, possible fallout situation for Fri and
maybe Sat. with a low developing in the Gulf. What?? Not another fallout?
But -----

 

               With 90% chance of rain in Pensacola tonight (Thurs.) and 80%
tomorrow, one would think ingredients for another fallout are in the making.
Maybe not. This is not the typical pattern of a low tracking across the
continent with an attendant squall line ahead of it. This is a low in the
Gulf, a different scenario entirely. Cloudy and rain in the central Gulf
right now should keep birds in place in Yucatan. Although the rain does not
extend to Yucatan, the tops of thunderstorms are quite visible from well
over 60 miles away and I should think birds can see even farther at the
altitudes at which they fly. Therefore birds should not be taking off
tonight and if they do, brisk NE winds should vector them well west of the
AL - NW FL coasts. Therefore a fallout tomorrow is not likely. 

 

               Stiff NE winds continue through tomorrow afternoon backing to
brisk N through Sat. (When winds go counterclockwise, we say that they
"back".) The rain should clear the Gulf by tomorrow night but I don't know
what the winds in the S. Gulf will be tomorrow night, (theoretically
westerly, but that depends on the strength of the low) so launch conditions
in Yucatan are iffy. Therefore whether there will be fallout conditions Sat.
is still a moot question.

 

               At any rate, after our frenetic birding pace yesterday, we
could stand a break. We should be so lucky???   J

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze in the w. Panhandle
Subject: No rest for the weary birder - fallout again?!!
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 18:51:49 -0500
Hi all,

 

               When Lucy and I returned home last night from Dauphin Is.,
the forecast issued yesterday morning was for a stable High to settle over
the east coast and birding to be quite dull for a few days. To my surprise,
the forecast changed to a rainy, possible fallout situation for Fri and
maybe Sat. with a low developing in the Gulf. What?? Not another fallout?
But -----

 

               With 90% chance of rain in Pensacola tonight (Thurs.) and 80%
tomorrow, one would think ingredients for another fallout are in the making.
Maybe not. This is not the typical pattern of a low tracking across the
continent with an attendant squall line ahead of it. This is a low in the
Gulf, a different scenario entirely. Cloudy and rain in the central Gulf
right now should keep birds in place in Yucatan. Although the rain does not
extend to Yucatan, the tops of thunderstorms are quite visible from well
over 60 miles away and I should think birds can see even farther at the
altitudes at which they fly. Therefore birds should not be taking off
tonight and if they do, brisk NE winds should vector them well west of the
AL - NW FL coasts. Therefore a fallout tomorrow is not likely. 

 

               Stiff NE winds continue through tomorrow afternoon backing to
brisk N through Sat. (When winds go counterclockwise, we say that they
"back".) The rain should clear the Gulf by tomorrow night but I don't know
what the winds in the S. Gulf will be tomorrow night, (theoretically
westerly, but that depends on the strength of the low) so launch conditions
in Yucatan are iffy. Therefore whether there will be fallout conditions Sat.
is still a moot question.

 

               At any rate, after our frenetic birding pace yesterday, we
could stand a break. We should be so lucky???   J

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze in the w. Panhandle
Subject: Barn Owl in Pogo
From: TNbarredowl AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 17:04:36 -0400 (EDT)
I was working in western Colbert County this morning and walked under the CR 90 
bridge over Cedar Creek, immediately east of "downtown" Pogo (this is a large 
metropolis region about 5 miles north of Red Bay). I was standing under the 
bridge watching many Cliff Swallows go in and out of their nest when all of a 
sudden a Barn Owl flew from one of the bridge abutments and then into the 
nearby woodland. I had not noticed the owl sitting on the abutment, so I don't 
know if he was out in the open or hidden in a crevice. I did not see any 
nesting materials in the area from which it flew. It's always enjoyable to see 
these owls, especially in the day time when they are not just a ghostly image 
flying through some light source (headlight, moonlight, etc.). 

 
Damien Simbeck
Killen, AL
Subject: Chewacla and Town Creek City Park, Apr 17, 2014
From: "James Holmes" <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 13:03:34 -0700
I birded Chewacla State Park and Town Creek Park in Auburn this morning. Lots 
of wind and cold. Good numbers of Yellow-rumped Warblers but otherwise limited 
migrants. 


eBird lists below.....

Jim Holmes



Chewacla State Park, Lee, US-AL
Apr 17, 2014 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
20 species

Red-bellied Woodpecker  4
Downy Woodpecker  2
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  5
American Crow  3
Carolina Chickadee  8
Tufted Titmouse  7
Brown-headed Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Brown Thrasher  1
Hooded Warbler  1     singing
Palm Warbler  3
Yellow-rumped Warbler  28
Eastern Towhee  1
Northern Cardinal  5
Blue Grosbeak  1     male
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
American Goldfinch  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17931946 





Town Creek City Park, Lee, US-AL
Apr 17, 2014 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
24 species

Mourning Dove  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
White-eyed Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  3
Carolina Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  6
Brown-headed Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Wood Thrush  1
Brown Thrasher  2
Northern Mockingbird  2
European Starling  4
Cedar Waxwing  8
Orange-crowned Warbler  3
Hooded Warbler  1     singing
Palm Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  14     * coronata (Myrtle)
Eastern Towhee  2
Northern Cardinal  6

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17931896 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



------------------------------------

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Subject: Couple of Grosbeaks
From: Charles Grisham <cgrishamlaw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 12:16:12 -0700 (PDT)
Hello birders (:

I wanted to report that the Cerulean was still at the Land Trust parking lot 
this morning.  I heard it a couple of times.  



Yesterday at the same location there were several Hooded Warblers present, a 
Blue-winged Warbler as well.  I usually see one Blue-winged each time I go 
there, but this bird does not like to stick around.  Also have recently seen a 
Worm-eating Warbler at Land Trust on 2 occasions, and saw another one today in 
Decatur near Point Mallard.  The Worm-eatings are not very conspicuous at this 
time, as the ones I have seen are typically foraging (slowly) about half way up 
large trees, and they are not singing yet. 



Also saw a Black and White Warbler in Decatur today.  Lots of Indigo Buntings 
and Palms, Prairies, etc.  



Today for the first time this year, I saw hummers, 2 of them.  They were 
eating off some ground flowers below the lookout point at the Land Trust 
parking lot.  I was surprised to see them there, it was about 6:40 am and it 
was cold and windy.  When I left around 7:10, my car's temperature gauge said 
it as 43 degrees. 



Anyway, I wanted to share some photos of a Blue Grosbeak I photographed today 
at the Indian Creek Greenway, as well as a Rose-breasted Grosbeak that me and 
Jim Green photographed at the Land Trust parking lot.  I know the grosbeaks 
are no rarity, but they never cease to amaze me with there beauty lol.  I 
purposely over-exposed the Blue Grosbeak photos when I took them in an effort 
to show more color on them, hence the purple fringing lol. 


I hope everybody has a great day today (:   Below are the grosbeaks.  I put 
them in a gallery that I am going to start adding new migrant photos too, that 
way I won't keep on posting galleries on here lol. 


Migratory Birds in north Alabama, 2014 - charles grisham (natureshots)

enjoy your day!

 
   Migratory Birds in north Alabama, 2014 - charles gri...
GENESIS 1-20-30 And God said, “...let birds fly above the earth across the 
expanse of the heavens.” So God created...every living creature that... 

View on natureshots.smugm... Preview by Yahoo  
 




 
Charles H. Grisham Jr.
Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 5585
Huntsville, AL  35814
Subject: Do not open
From: RubyThroat AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 15:05:38 -0400 (EDT)
Albirders
Please do not open any emails from _rubythroat AT aol.com_ 
(mailto:rubythroat AT aol.com) that have the slightest fishy subject line. I will 
not send 

anything with odd subject lines.   Nor will send any kind of URL that will 
indicate that you should click on  it.
 
Thanks guys.
Bob Sargent, home from Fort Morgan.
Subject: Comments on the fallout of Tuesday Apri 15
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 13:28:31 -0500
Hi all,

 

The front and attendant squall lines ahead of it produced fallouts from
Dauphin Island to  the Big Bend area of Florida, with good numbers of
migrants reported from Dauphin Is., St. George Is. and St. Marks. 

Ft. Pickens, unfortunately, was left out. It was covered by birders.

 

Monday night, while the front was in LA and rain was in SE MS/SW AL (but not
in Gulf), radar in the FL Keys was showing bird echoes in the FL Straits.
Angel and Mariel Abreu (Badbirdz reloaded 
) thought a movement was also underway in the E. Gulf. [Be sure to check out
their website.] Winds at the time were generally SE. Some of the movement
would have vectored N or NW toward our coast (AL/NW FL). The Sargents'
banding operation (Hummer Bird Study Group) at Ft. Morgan AL encountered
migrants coming in Tuesday morning, by which time the front had come through
with attendant rain in the Gulf and NW winds almost gale force. My thought
is that the morning arrivals were part of the E. Gulf movement which made
good time overnight but hit stiff headwinds in the N. Gulf and put down on
the immediate coast. 

 

The adverse, high winds would hit long distance migrants very hard like Barn
Swallows, whose flights may have started much farther south than the West
Indies. This was what was witnessed at Dauphin Is. on Tues a.m. The
Callaways at Ft. Pickens also witnessed E. Kingbirds and swallows coming out
of the Gulf early in the morning, also likely a movement from the West
Indies.

 

In these parts we tend to think that all birds arriving at our migrant traps
come from Yucatan. But many actually winter in the West Indies and move N or
NW in migration up the FL peninsula or eastern Gulf. Some examples of
wintering West Indian birds are:

Indigo Bunting (Common winter resident); Painted Bunting (Fairly Common
winter resident); Parula Warbler (Common winter resident); Prairie Warbler
(Common winter resident - one of 6 N. Am. Migrants that winter almost
exclusively in the West Indies); Barn Swallow (Common migrant);
Yellow-throated Vireo (Common winter resident); Eastern Kingbird (Uncommon
migrant, winters as far south as South America). Source - A Guide to the
Birds of the West Indies, Rafaelle et al.

 

The accumulation of Indigo Buntings at feeders and traps prior to the
fallout of April 15 might be birds that moved on favorable SE winds toward
our area. 

 

With windshift to the W & NW occurring in mid-Gulf in early morning, a
movement out of Yucatan (trans-Gulf) would have caught birds in a bad
situation, especially since rain was occurring as far south as 100 mi off
the coast. These birds would have been vectored more to the east of the
LA/E. TX coasts and would have provided fallouts from AL to St. Marks.
Notable at Dauphin Is. yesterday (leftovers) were numerous thrushes
(especially Wood) that are only rare migrants in Cuba.

 

Yesterday Lucy and I ran a "Birdathon" for the F. M. Weston Audubon Chapter
and found plenty of "leftovers," totaling 110 spcs for Dauphin Island alone,
including 17 warbler species (and another 15 species elsewhere). Our thanks
to the battalion of birders who offered us help in finding birds and in
donations to the birdathon. We are currently working on an update of the
"Bird Migration, Weather and Fallout" booklet (out of print) which explains
the mechanics of migration, and which should help birders understand the
prediction of when birds will occur along the northern Gulf Coast.

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze, FL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Comments on the fallout of Tuesday Apri 15
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 13:28:31 -0500
Hi all,

 

The front and attendant squall lines ahead of it produced fallouts from
Dauphin Island to  the Big Bend area of Florida, with good numbers of
migrants reported from Dauphin Is., St. George Is. and St. Marks. 

Ft. Pickens, unfortunately, was left out. It was covered by birders.

 

Monday night, while the front was in LA and rain was in SE MS/SW AL (but not
in Gulf), radar in the FL Keys was showing bird echoes in the FL Straits.
Angel and Mariel Abreu (Badbirdz reloaded 
) thought a movement was also underway in the E. Gulf. [Be sure to check out
their website.] Winds at the time were generally SE. Some of the movement
would have vectored N or NW toward our coast (AL/NW FL). The Sargents'
banding operation (Hummer Bird Study Group) at Ft. Morgan AL encountered
migrants coming in Tuesday morning, by which time the front had come through
with attendant rain in the Gulf and NW winds almost gale force. My thought
is that the morning arrivals were part of the E. Gulf movement which made
good time overnight but hit stiff headwinds in the N. Gulf and put down on
the immediate coast. 

 

The adverse, high winds would hit long distance migrants very hard like Barn
Swallows, whose flights may have started much farther south than the West
Indies. This was what was witnessed at Dauphin Is. on Tues a.m. The
Callaways at Ft. Pickens also witnessed E. Kingbirds and swallows coming out
of the Gulf early in the morning, also likely a movement from the West
Indies.

 

In these parts we tend to think that all birds arriving at our migrant traps
come from Yucatan. But many actually winter in the West Indies and move N or
NW in migration up the FL peninsula or eastern Gulf. Some examples of
wintering West Indian birds are:

Indigo Bunting (Common winter resident); Painted Bunting (Fairly Common
winter resident); Parula Warbler (Common winter resident); Prairie Warbler
(Common winter resident - one of 6 N. Am. Migrants that winter almost
exclusively in the West Indies); Barn Swallow (Common migrant);
Yellow-throated Vireo (Common winter resident); Eastern Kingbird (Uncommon
migrant, winters as far south as South America). Source - A Guide to the
Birds of the West Indies, Rafaelle et al.

 

The accumulation of Indigo Buntings at feeders and traps prior to the
fallout of April 15 might be birds that moved on favorable SE winds toward
our area. 

 

With windshift to the W & NW occurring in mid-Gulf in early morning, a
movement out of Yucatan (trans-Gulf) would have caught birds in a bad
situation, especially since rain was occurring as far south as 100 mi off
the coast. These birds would have been vectored more to the east of the
LA/E. TX coasts and would have provided fallouts from AL to St. Marks.
Notable at Dauphin Is. yesterday (leftovers) were numerous thrushes
(especially Wood) that are only rare migrants in Cuba.

 

Yesterday Lucy and I ran a "Birdathon" for the F. M. Weston Audubon Chapter
and found plenty of "leftovers," totaling 110 spcs for Dauphin Island alone,
including 17 warbler species (and another 15 species elsewhere). Our thanks
to the battalion of birders who offered us help in finding birds and in
donations to the birdathon. We are currently working on an update of the
"Bird Migration, Weather and Fallout" booklet (out of print) which explains
the mechanics of migration, and which should help birders understand the
prediction of when birds will occur along the northern Gulf Coast.

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze, FL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Blue-winged Warbler at the BBG this morning
From: "Gregory J. Harber" <gharber AT mindspring.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:40:09 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
Good morning all-

This morning at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens I saw a male Blue-winged 
Warbler in the Bog Garden area. He was in a Sweet Shrub and the color 
combination of the bird's plumage against the blood red blossoms was just 
stunning. As it happens, this was the first time I have recorded this species 
during one of my migration surveys, bringing my gardens total to 111 species. I 
had been stuck at 110 species for a while now. Palm Warblers were the bird of 
the day - lots of them in evidence - and an Indigo Bunting in the Rose Garden 
was a first in a long time. 


Take care all,  Greg

Gregory J. Harber
Birmingham, AL
gharber AT mindspring.com
"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
Tom Robbins


------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Pelican Island
From: Swmavocet AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 09:27:41 -0400 (EDT)
...or Pelican Peninsula. ...or "find the pier and go south." : ) 


Steve McConnell
Hartselle, AL


-----Original Message-----
From: Gregory J. Harber 
To: albirds 
Sent: Wed, Apr 16, 2014 8:36 pm
Subject: Re: [ALBIRDS] Pelican Island


 
  
    
                  
Hi Jim et. al.,

Thanks for the details of your sightings on Pelican Island and its location. 
Some folks may know this as Sand Island, too. 


Hope to see some of you at the AOS meeting this weekend.  Take care all.  Greg

-----Original Message-----

From: James Holmes 

Sent: Apr 16, 2014 7:51 PM

To: albirds AT yahoogroups.com

Subject: [ALBIRDS] Pelican Island

I had a couple of questions about Pelican Island and where it is located. 
Pelican Island is now connected to Dauphin Island (I think this happened about 
5 years ago but when I lived in Alabama in the late 80s/early 90s, it was only 
a dream to bird this area). Pelican Island is probably now the best location to 
access beach birds (gulls, terns, beach shorebirds) on the Alabama coast. It 
certainly appears reliable for Reddish Egret, Snowy/Piping Plovers, 
Least/Sandwich Terns. I have provided google map coordinates below. Plug these 
into the search bar on google maps https://maps.google.com/ You have to use 
google maps with these coordinates (another internet program might not give the 
correct location). To find pelican island, plug in “Pelican Island, 
Alabama” into the google maps search bar. Alternatively, you can plug in the 
coordinates: 30.244665,-88.124835 into the search bar.Make sure that google 
maps is on Satellite mode (it won’t make sense if it is map mode). To access, 
pelican island, park in the parking lot (google map coordinates: 
30.249438,-88.127249) that leads to the public pier. The parking area is 
opposite Dauphin Island Real Estate office (on Bienville). From the parking 
lot, walk south over the dunes and to the pier. Walk to the end of the pier and 
take the stairs down to the beach. Once at the beach, walk south. The best area 
for birds (shorebirds, Reddish Egrets, terns, etc) is along the edges where the 
water flows in (creates a small lagoon/estuary). google map coordinates for 
this area: 30.239122,-88.123055Gulls and terns will also roost at the southern 
tip of Pelican Island, google map coordinates: 30.228166,-88.110824 Feel free 
to ask any additional questions. Thanks 

jim Holmes

Gregory J. Harber
Birmingham, AL
gharber AT mindspring.com
"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
Tom Robbins

    
             

  
Subject: May 3-Working Field Trip to Limestone Park and Lunch at Vizzini Winery
From: <Memontei AT aol.com>
Date: 16 Apr 2014 18:45:58 -0700
Hello all,
  
 I wanted to let you know about an opportunity on May 3 to enjoy some birds at 
Limestone Park, do some good for conservation and have lunch at a neat winery. 
See the details below. 

  
 Enjoy and Conserve the Creation,
 Ken Wills 
 For this reason I say to you, do not be worried about your life,---Look at the 
birds of the air, that they do not sow, nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet 
your heavenly Father feeds them. 

 Mathew 6:25-26
  
 Working Field Trip to Limestone Park and Optional Lunch At Vizzini Farms 
Winery 

Saturday, May 3, 2104
 Join Birmingham Audubon in performing conservation work at Limestone Park and 
be rewarded with birding and fellowship. We will begin our day with an hour of 
birding at 8 a.m. We hope to start the day by spotting migrating shorebirds, 
songbirds as well as resident grassland and wetland birds. Sighting an anhinga 
is even a distinct possibility. 

 Then beginning at 9 a.m., volunteers will perform various conservation tasks 
at Limestone Park which may include the following: removal of exotic and 
invasive plants, control of fire ants; and installation of additional bird 
houses. 

 Around 11 a.m., we will call it a workday and proceed to an optional lunch at 
Vizzini Farms Winery. After lunch if anyone is interested, we can visit the 
Ebenezer Swamp boardwalk. 

 For more information about this event contact Ken Wills, coordinator, at 
205-515-9412 or Ken's email. 

 Directions to Limestone Park: From Interstate-65 in Shelby County, take exit 
number 238 to US 31 South. Follow US 31 south for 4.2 miles, turning right onto 
a gravel road with a yellow pipe gate. The address is 2400 Highway 31 South, 
Alabaster, AL 35080. The gate is just past Saginaw Pipe and the entrance sign 
of a mobile home area. The park entrance is marked by a small white sign 
stating Limestone Park Bird Observatory. 

GPS: 33.1857985 -86.7635383
Subject: Re: Pelican Island
From: "Gregory J. Harber" <gharber AT mindspring.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:36:16 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
Hi Jim et. al.,

Thanks for the details of your sightings on Pelican Island and its location. 
Some folks may know this as Sand Island, too. 


Hope to see some of you at the AOS meeting this weekend.  Take care all.  Greg

-----Original Message-----

From: James Holmes 

Sent: Apr 16, 2014 7:51 PM

To: albirds AT yahoogroups.com

Subject: [ALBIRDS] Pelican Island
















 

 



  


    
      
      
 I had a couple of questions about Pelican Island and where it is located. 
Pelican Island is now connected to Dauphin Island (I think this happened about 
5 years ago but when I lived in Alabama in the late 80s/early 90s, it was only 
a dream to bird this area). Pelican Island is probably now the best location to 
access beach birds (gulls, terns, beach shorebirds) on the Alabama coast. It 
certainly appears reliable for Reddish Egret, Snowy/Piping Plovers, 
Least/Sandwich Terns. I have provided google map coordinates below. Plug these 
into the search bar on google maps https://maps.google.com/ You have to use 
google maps with these coordinates (another internet program might not give the 
correct location). To find pelican island, plug in “Pelican Island, 
Alabama” into the google maps search bar. Alternatively, you can plug in the 
coordinates: 30.244665,-88.124835 into the search bar.Make sure that google 
maps is on Satellite mode (it won’t make sense if it is map mode). To access, 
pelican island, park in the parking lot (google map coordinates: 
30.249438,-88.127249) that leads to the public pier. The parking area is 
opposite Dauphin Island Real Estate office (on Bienville). From the parking 
lot, walk south over the dunes and to the pier. Walk to the end of the pier and 
take the stairs down to the beach. Once at the beach, walk south. The best area 
for birds (shorebirds, Reddish Egrets, terns, etc) is along the edges where the 
water flows in (creates a small lagoon/estuary). google map coordinates for 
this area: 30.239122,-88.123055Gulls and terns will also roost at the southern 
tip of Pelican Island, google map coordinates: 30.228166,-88.110824 Feel free 
to ask any additional questions. Thanks 

jim Holmes

    
     

    
    

Gregory J. Harber
Birmingham, AL
gharber AT mindspring.com
"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
Tom Robbins


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Subject: FOS Green Heron, Chimney Swift
From: Harold Peterson <pinkfloyd137 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 18:27:19 -0700 (PDT)
The heron was flying over AL 53 on the west side of Ardmore. The swifts were 
flying over California Park just north of California and Governor's in 
Huntsville. Both sightings came in the late afternoon today. 



-Harold Peterson
Huntsville, AL
Subject: Pelican Island
From: "James Holmes" <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 17:51:17 -0700
I had a couple of questions about Pelican Island and where it is located.

 

Pelican Island is now connected to Dauphin Island (I think this happened
about 5 years ago but when I lived in Alabama in the late 80s/early 90s, it
was only a dream to bird this area).   Pelican Island is probably now the
best location to access beach birds (gulls, terns, beach shorebirds) on the
Alabama coast.  It certainly appears reliable for Reddish Egret,
Snowy/Piping Plovers, Least/Sandwich Terns.   

 

I have provided google map coordinates below.  Plug these into the search
bar on google maps   https://maps.google.com/
You have to use google maps with these coordinates (another internet program
might not give the correct location).

 

To find pelican island, plug in "Pelican Island, Alabama" into the google
maps search bar.  Alternatively, you can plug in the coordinates:
30.244665,-88.124835 into the search bar.

Make sure that google maps is on Satellite mode (it won't make sense if it
is map mode).  

 

To access, pelican island, park in the parking lot (google map coordinates:
30.249438,-88.127249) that leads to the public pier.  The parking area is
opposite Dauphin Island Real Estate office (on Bienville).  From the parking
lot, walk south over the dunes and to the pier.  Walk to the end of the pier
and take the stairs down to the beach.  Once at the beach, walk south.  The
best area for birds (shorebirds, Reddish Egrets, terns, etc) is along the
edges where the water flows in (creates a small lagoon/estuary).  google map
coordinates for this area:  30.239122,-88.123055

Gulls and terns will also roost at the southern tip of Pelican Island,
google map coordinates: 30.228166,-88.110824

 

 

Feel free to ask any additional questions.

 

Thanks


jim Holmes
Subject: Daupin Island and Blakeley Island on Tuesday (April 15)
From: "James Holmes" <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 15:13:15 -0700
My wife and I birded Dauphin Island and Blakeley Island on Tuesday.

 

We started early with Blakeley Island and the rain/wind were brutal.  The
highlights were the Plegadis Ibis.  There were at least 8 birds.
Unfortunately, only three allowed identifiable views (2 Glossy and 1
White-faced).  The White-faced facial skin is reddish and should be easily
viewable, even at some distance.  We also had 51 Black-bellied Whistling
Ducks.   A large group of shorebirds (mostly dowitchers) were only seen in
flight as they flew off and over the dikes.  Otherwise, shorebirding was
disappointing.  eBird list is:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17918684 

 

Then, we birded Dauphin Island until dark.  Strong northerly winds and cool
temperatures.  Lots of standing water.  We primarily birded the shell
mounds, goat trees, and Audubon sanctuary.    We took ~1.5 hour break from
the woods and walked along Pelican Island.   Good numbers of Summer and
Scarlet Tanagers as well as Indigo Buntings.   We ended up with 20 species
of Warblers but had to work hard for many of them.  I missed Blackburnian,
Bay-breasted, Chestnut-sided and Yellow that were seen on Tuesday so at
least 24 species were on Dauphin Island on Tuesday.  Hooded  was the most
common warbler.    We had 8 Piping Plovers and 1 Snowy Plover on Pelican
Island, but no Wilson's Plovers.   

 

eBird list for Pelican Island and Dauphin Island below..

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17918885 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17920462 

 

Thanks,

 

Jim Holmes

 
Subject: Nashville Warbler at Indian Creek Greenway
From: Charles Grisham <cgrishamlaw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 09:37:04 -0700 (PDT)
Hey birders!

I wanted to report a Nashville Warbler at the Indian Creek Greenway in 
Huntsville, Alabama.  It didn't give me many photo opportunities but I was 
able to get some shots that I would like to share.  I hope ya'll enjoy (:   
There are a couple of random photos of a Prarie and White-eyed that were at the 
Greenway as well. 


Nashville Warbler at Indian Creek Greenway, Huntsville Alabama - charles 
grisham (natureshots) 


 
   Nashville Warbler at Indian Creek Greenway, Huntsville...
GENESIS 1-20-30 And God said, “...let birds fly above the earth across the 
expanse of the heavens.” So God created...every living creature that... 

View on natureshots.smugm... Preview by Yahoo  
 
 
Charles H. Grisham Jr.
Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 5585
Huntsville, AL  35814
Subject: Blue Winged Warbler at Wheeler NWR
From: "Thomas V. Ress" <resscat AT aol.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 11:55:36 -0400 (EDT)


Good day for birding at Wheeler NWR, highlight was the Blue Winged Warbler.
 
 
Limestone Bay: Blue Winged Warbler, Palm Warbler ,White-eyed Vireo, Parula, 
Yellow-rumped warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Green Winged Teal, Shoveler, and 
Solitary, Spotted and Semipalmated Sandpiper. 


Blackwell Swamp: Hooded, Yellow-rumped, Parula,  Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

Penney Bottoms was full of Indigo Buntings in the wheat field inside the first 
gate. 


Tom Ress
Athens, AL


Subject: Cerulean and Golden-winged Warbler at Monte Sano
From: Amber Hart <whitehartrabbitry AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 06:33:46 -0700 (PDT)
Past Land Trust parking lot in front of pavilion, I got brief views of both 
warblers. Both males singing. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
Subject: Dauphin Island
From: <siegwald AT shc.edu>
Date: 15 Apr 2014 21:47:54 -0700

 There was good birding on Dauphin Island this afternoon -- warblers, vireos, 
tanagers, orioles, grosbeaks, and indigos. Best birds for me were Cerulean 
Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, and Baltimore Oriole. 


 

 If you will be on the island later this week or this weekend for AOS, I just 
want to let you know that the island is very wet after yesterday's storms -- 
the Shell Mounds and the banding area at the Sanctuary have standing water and 
muddy areas. These areas may dry out some by the weekend if there is no more 
rain before then, but it could still be somewhat messy -- so waterproof boots 
might be a good idea. 

 

 Joan Siegwald
 Mobile, Alabama

Subject: Dauphin Island
From: <siegwald AT shc.edu>
Date: 15 Apr 2014 21:38:09 -0700
There was good birding on Dauphin Island this afternoon -- warblers, vireos, 
tanagers, orioles, grosbeaks, and indigos. Best birds for me were Cerulean 
Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, and Baltimore Oriole. 


 

 If you will be on the island later this week or this weekend for AOS, I just 
want to let you know that the island is very wet after yesterday's storms -- 
the Shell Mounds and the banding area at the Sanctuary have standing water and 
muddy areas. These areas may dry out some by the weekend if there is no more 
rain before then, but it could still be somewhat messy -- so waterproof boots 
might be a good idea. 

 

 Joan
Subject: Dauphin Island Tuesday
From: Fred Carney <carney.fred AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 21:31:13 -0700 (PDT)
I arrived at 11 am and left at 5 pm. Many, many people turned out today. There 
was adecent representation of small birds but not in especially large numbers. 
By the time I left no afternoon influx of birds had arrived except for a few 
hundred tired Barn swallows (starting~2pm). It seemed thatwarbler numbers 
were at a peak around 12-1 then fewer were seen after that. I spotted more 
warblers around the Goat Trees area than the Shell Mounds. There was a water 
moccasin in the lot across from and to the beach side from the Goat Trees. 
There were quite a few Orchard orioles at both those locations , two Northern 
Orioles, many Blue grosbeaks and Indigo Buntingsand Rose-br. grosbeak. Great 
close-up look at a male Painted bunting at Shell Mounds. Equal numbers of 
Red-eye, white-eye and Yellow throated vireos. 

Warbler list -- Yellow, B&W, Prothonotary, Tennessee (most common), Chestnut 
sided, Prairie, Hooded, Yellow-rump, Kentucky, N. Parula, Black-Thr Green, 
Blackburnian. I missed Cerulean, Blue-winged, worm eating and Northern 
Waterthrush that others saw. 

Fred Carney
Subject: sorry about duplication.. must have leaned on that send key...
From: J C Allen <ssallen1 AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 14:05:37 -0700 (PDT)
Jane Allen
NW Huntsville, AL
Subject: Re: perception as applies to birdwatching
From: J C Allen <ssallen1 AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 13:49:48 -0700 (PDT)
There have been quite a number of views on the A. bittern.  I think, apart 
from my perception issue, it's good to see a whole bittern.. I just wish the 
pics had been better.. .An after thought.. Think how easy it is NOT to see a 
usually secretive bird. And this one was "out of the water"..I tend to think 
that we just don't see most of  the birds around us.. So, what data we have 
may be accurate in the broad term, but much lacking in the total population. 
The trend nationally is for bird watching to be on the increase.  That's good 
as long as we keep in mind the habitat necessary and also don't scare the 
birds. I personally think that Wheeler NWR keeps that spirit of refuge as goal 
number one.  It's not a playground.  It's a wonderland..  


Jane Allen 
NW Huntsville, AL


________________________________
 From: J C Allen 
To: "albirds AT yahoogroups.com"  
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 10:41 AM
Subject: [ALBIRDS] perception as applies to birdwatching
 


  
   I hope this is seen as relevant to the mission of this forum... 
I have a bit of a struggle matching sounds, sights, etc with memory re: bird 
identification.  A recent experience highlighted these issues.. 

Sue Moske and I were at Rockhouse Road area of Wheeler NWR.. and were scanning 
for whatever was in the rapidly disappearing wetland area . As background, 
there had been sightings recently of  bitterns, both kinds and it has been a 
long time since I had seen either.   

My experience of seeing bitterns were in reeds.. that were mostly green.  So 
my ID memory  of the birds were that they had green on them.. I probably 
should study books more.. Anyhow, before this outing, Sue had cleared that up 
for me.   

So she saw what looked like dark vegetation, elongated vertically. It showed no 
movement.(that was a scope view, not shown in my pics)   There was heat 
distortion making it harder.  

So we continued to watch and this dark "something" moved.  
Now to the relevant part:  We agreed it was a A. bittern.. I decided to get 
closer and try for pics.. as I did, I kept losing it visually  the closer I 
got..It became less and less distinct as it's beige-browner color was perceived 
and its position varied.   Behind me, Sue had moved along closer and found 
that true looking through her scope. 

I finally was satisfied with image thinking I might spook it ( and it might 
disappear because it blended in so well with the surroundings).  

I'm thinking , any of you who might have studied visual perception and/or how 
the brain stores that information, would see the applicability to bird watching 
, especially at some distance.. It would be interesting to know more about that 
phenomenon.. On the face of it I would say the contrast effect was at work from 
a distance.. the contrast with the striping and the darker strips stood out 
more to the human eye.. Think evolutionary benefit of that out on the 
savannah.. As the brain got a better gestalt of the object, and more 
information, it became more accurate.. But ironically, that also enhanced the 
camouflage quality to protect the bird.. 

   .  You can see some of that variation at: 

http://ladyswan.smugmug.com/April-13-2014-birding/


The close up pics were at the end of the pictures, time wise.. The distant pics 
had no editing.. The closer ones were trimmed and sharpened with some lighting 
enhancement . 


And  I was reminded recently that the camera/lens also has it's effect too.. 
Reality is darned hard to pin down..  


Jane Allen 
NW Huntsville, AL
Subject: Re: perception as applies to birdwatching
From: J C Allen <ssallen1 AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 13:49:48 -0700 (PDT)
There have been quite a number of views on the A. bittern.  I think, apart 
from my perception issue, it's good to see a whole bittern.. I just wish the 
pics had been better.. .An after thought.. Think how easy it is NOT to see a 
usually secretive bird. And this one was "out of the water"..I tend to think 
that we just don't see most of  the birds around us.. So, what data we have 
may be accurate in the broad term, but much lacking in the total population. 
The trend nationally is for bird watching to be on the increase.  That's good 
as long as we keep in mind the habitat necessary and also don't scare the 
birds. I personally think that Wheeler NWR keeps that spirit of refuge as goal 
number one.  It's not a playground.  It's a wonderland..  


Jane Allen 
NW Huntsville, AL


________________________________
 From: J C Allen 
To: "albirds AT yahoogroups.com"  
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 10:41 AM
Subject: [ALBIRDS] perception as applies to birdwatching
 


  
   I hope this is seen as relevant to the mission of this forum... 
I have a bit of a struggle matching sounds, sights, etc with memory re: bird 
identification.  A recent experience highlighted these issues.. 

Sue Moske and I were at Rockhouse Road area of Wheeler NWR.. and were scanning 
for whatever was in the rapidly disappearing wetland area . As background, 
there had been sightings recently of  bitterns, both kinds and it has been a 
long time since I had seen either.   

My experience of seeing bitterns were in reeds.. that were mostly green.  So 
my ID memory  of the birds were that they had green on them.. I probably 
should study books more.. Anyhow, before this outing, Sue had cleared that up 
for me.   

So she saw what looked like dark vegetation, elongated vertically. It showed no 
movement.(that was a scope view, not shown in my pics)   There was heat 
distortion making it harder.  

So we continued to watch and this dark "something" moved.  
Now to the relevant part:  We agreed it was a A. bittern.. I decided to get 
closer and try for pics.. as I did, I kept losing it visually  the closer I 
got..It became less and less distinct as it's beige-browner color was perceived 
and its position varied.   Behind me, Sue had moved along closer and found 
that true looking through her scope. 

I finally was satisfied with image thinking I might spook it ( and it might 
disappear because it blended in so well with the surroundings).  

I'm thinking , any of you who might have studied visual perception and/or how 
the brain stores that information, would see the applicability to bird watching 
, especially at some distance.. It would be interesting to know more about that 
phenomenon.. On the face of it I would say the contrast effect was at work from 
a distance.. the contrast with the striping and the darker strips stood out 
more to the human eye.. Think evolutionary benefit of that out on the 
savannah.. As the brain got a better gestalt of the object, and more 
information, it became more accurate.. But ironically, that also enhanced the 
camouflage quality to protect the bird.. 

   .  You can see some of that variation at: 

http://ladyswan.smugmug.com/April-13-2014-birding/


The close up pics were at the end of the pictures, time wise.. The distant pics 
had no editing.. The closer ones were trimmed and sharpened with some lighting 
enhancement . 


And  I was reminded recently that the camera/lens also has it's effect too.. 
Reality is darned hard to pin down..  


Jane Allen 
NW Huntsville, AL
Subject: Cerulean Warbler still on Monte Sano
From: Charles Grisham <cgrishamlaw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 12:48:36 -0700 (PDT)
I went by Monte Sano mountain again this morning, saw the Cerulean Warbler, but 
it flew down the mountain and I couldn't find it again.  However, I came back 
around noon and (it was mostly sunny then) and located the bird.  I got lucky 
and got some more photos of the bird.  In many of the photos, there was very 
good light, and so the photos turned out better this time...thought I would 
share them with you all (:   I added them to the same gallery I posted 
yesterday, but put them in the front of the gallery since, in my opinion, they 
are prettier.  I hope ya'll enjoy them (: 


Cerulean Warbler on Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsville, Alabama - charles 
grisham (natureshots) 


 
   Cerulean Warbler on Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsvill...
GENESIS 1-20-30 And God said, “...let birds fly above the earth across the 
expanse of the heavens.” So God created...every living creature that... 

View on natureshots.smugm... Preview by Yahoo  
 

God Bless



Charles H. Grisham Jr.
Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 5585
Huntsville, AL  35814
Subject: Possible Blackpoll Warbler at Monte Sano
From: Amber Hart <whitehartrabbitry AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 11:59:18 -0700 (PDT)
Went to Monte Sano this morning to look for the Ceruleans. (Did see one!) While 
there, I saw seven other species of warbler including: Prairie, Tennessee, 
Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped, Yellowthroat, Hooded, and Parula. Also present 
were Indigo Buntings, a singing male Rose-breasted Grosbeak that flew in right 
before I left, and a male Scarlet Tanager. The most interesting bird to note 
was a possible Blackpoll Warbler. I am fairly certain that's what it was (about 
75% sure) but the glimpse I got was through lots of branches and I was unable 
to snap a photo. Might be worth checking back. 


Happy birding.

Amber Hart
http://underneaththecanopy.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/redheadphotog

https://www.facebook.com/amber.hart.9085
Subject: ft. morgan-wear a coat
From: RubyThroat AT aol.com
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 12:15:00 -0400 (EDT)
morning guys
we open late today as the rains quit.  
The woods have been overrun with birds.  tons of hummers.   very  cold here 
today with strong north winds that had prevented opening  all of our nets.  
wear a coat and hat if you make it down today.
 
I expect today's birds to be mostly gone by tomorrow, but still expect it  
will be good birding
 
pardon the short note; just thought you would like to know.  Bob  Duncan 
nailed this one.....again!
 
LATER GUYS
BOB MARTHA AND OUR GREAT CREW OF VOLUNTEERS
Subject: Plegadis at Blakeley
From: jfholmes <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 09:48:05 -0500
There were 8 Plegadis Ibis at Blakeley.  2 glory and 1 white-faced.  Could 
not ID the others.  Did not see a Spoonbill.  


In NW ponds, near gate 5 entrance.

Jim Holmes


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Charles Grisham  
Date:04/15/2014  7:22 AM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: albirds AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Cerulean Photos 

Hey birders!

I wanted to share some of the photos of a Cerulean Warbler I photographed on 
Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsville yesterday.  There were three of them in one 
location there.  Actually saw two of them chasing each other around.  All 
three of them were very vocal as usual.  I hope ya'll enjoy (:  


It was rainy and overcast so I overexposed the photos quite a bit to make it 
appear that it was sunny.  This does result in washed out photos sometimes, 
but identifiable as Ceruleans nonetheless, and much better than dark gloomy 
photos lol. 


Cerulean Warbler on Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsville, Alabama - charles 
grisham (natureshots) 


Cerulean Warbler on Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsvill...
GENESIS 1-20-30 And God said, “...let birds fly above the earth across the 
expanse of the heavens.” So God created...every living creature that... 

View on natureshots.smugm...
Preview by Yahoo
 
 
Charles H. Grisham Jr.
Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 5585
Huntsville, AL  35814

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Subject: Cerulean Photos
From: Charles Grisham <cgrishamlaw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 05:22:25 -0700 (PDT)
Hey birders!

I wanted to share some of the photos of a Cerulean Warbler I photographed on 
Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsville yesterday.  There were three of them in one 
location there.  Actually saw two of them chasing each other around.  All 
three of them were very vocal as usual.  I hope ya'll enjoy (:  



It was rainy and overcast so I overexposed the photos quite a bit to make it 
appear that it was sunny.  This does result in washed out photos sometimes, 
but identifiable as Ceruleans nonetheless, and much better than dark gloomy 
photos lol. 



Cerulean Warbler on Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsville, Alabama - charles 
grisham (natureshots) 


 
   Cerulean Warbler on Monte Sano Mountain in Huntsvill...
GENESIS 1-20-30 And God said, “...let birds fly above the earth across the 
expanse of the heavens.” So God created...every living creature that... 

View on natureshots.smugm... Preview by Yahoo  
 
 
Charles H. Grisham Jr.
Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 5585
Huntsville, AL  35814
Subject: Re: 3 Ceruleans at Ruffner, and summary of Potentially good birding today - Monday
From: SueMoske AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 23:06:03 -0400 (EDT)
Scot,

It is very enlightening to hear about other birder's experiences today. I don't 
know how many people you heard from, but I get the impression that the 
individuals with the enhanced birding were on mountains. I birded my yard on 
Green Mountain. Even if I had not read your post this morning, I would have 
been looking out my window, because I get more migrants after a heavy rain most 
of the time. I have had one or two other phenomenal days like today, in the 
seven years I have lived here. But I would say that I have had more individual 
birds at other times, and today was more species, which made it seem fantastic 
to me. Another point I would like to make is that I had all of the birds I saw 
today in my yard! Which is in the woods. But since it is a relatively small 
area, I was thinking fallout. None of the birds were left over from yesterday, 
as I had one migrant then. It rained, quit raining mid-morning, but then the 
wind was blowing hard. So nothing going on until the wind died down, when the 
birds started coming through. 

Hoping for another rain storm in a week or two when the northern nesters come 
through. Because I like watching warblers from my easy chair. 


 
Sue Moske
Huntsville

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duncan, Scot 
To: albirds 
Sent: Mon, Apr 14, 2014 9:20 pm
Subject: [ALBIRDS] 3 Ceruleans at Ruffner, and summary of Potentially good 
birding today - Monday 



 
  
    
                  


Hi folks,



First, I'd like to thank the many of you who went out birding today and 
reported back what you observed. I think it is relatively safe to say that 
predicting migrant birding in the northern portion of the state is still 
relatively new terrain, and the best way we'll learn how to do it better is by 
sharing our findings from throughout the region. 



What follows is my working hypothesis (subject to discussion and revision) 
based on observations of radar, birding reports from across the state, and 
local observations. My conclusion is that the weather did enhance the number of 
migrants observed, but only in some places and at some times. 



First off, the radar summary for the day on Wunderground.com (and what i 
observed on NWS at 530 am) shows that skies were mostly clear north of 
Birmingham until about 3 am. Radar "noise" that has been established to be 
mostly migrating birds (see links to articles, below), was moderate from 
Birmingham south. Not enough to suggest a huge movement, but enough to show 
that birds were on the move. From 3-5 am, the northwestern corner of the state 
filled with strong rain storms. During this time and for the remaining of the 
night, radar has little to say about bird migration because the radar seemed to 
switch from 'clear skies' mode that will display migrating birds, to one that 
is best for viewing storms. For those of you new to this, birds will not 
willingly fly through rain - they get heavy and cold. 



During the day, some observers saw very few birds, while others had a lot of 
activity. Some of this variation seemed to be due to geography. Birding west of 
Huntsville was less productive (Charles Grisham, Amber Hart) while birding 
around Huntsville (Sue Moske, Charles Grisham) was apparently great. This makes 
sense if the storm front guided birds towards the northeast. Birmingham was 
hit-or-miss. Charles Yeager had a handful of migrants at Turkey Creek Nature 
Preserve in Pinson, as did Ken Wills at Vulcan Park. I had good birding on the 
BSC campus around mid-morning – many more birds than during a typical spring 
day. Yet, the Hamiltons had very slow birding at Ruffner (in eastern 
Birmingham) while I had great birding at Ruffner an hour later (see details 
below). 



My overall sense is that there were more birds in the region than we'd have on 
a clear-weather day, but not by huge amounts. Many were probably leftovers from 
yesterday, but my subjective impression is that there were more (I had birded 
Ruffner Sat, Sun, and now today). The moderate numbers generally match the 
moderate amount of radar signal we had before the storms hit. We are still not 
at peak migration in our area, so this story might have been a lot different if 
we had these conditions in 2 weeks. 



Personally, Ruffner was very interesting today. I played hookie and left work 
early, getting there about 345. Despite hearing a Black-throated Green and 
Hooded singing, the parking lot was very quiet. Sometimes the ridgeline can be 
active while the lower elevations are empty, so I headed uphill. The slopes 
were very quite, but where the trail intersects the ridge, I caught up with a 
flock of male Scarlet Tanagers. At one point there were about a dozen in a 
large oak, and they were absolutely radiant against the leaden gray skies. And 
then I heard the first Cerulean Warbler. It was out of sight range, but I 
caught up with a 'swarm' of Yellow-rumps and Palms higher on the ridge, and was 
then able to locate a singing male Cerulean. By the time the afternoon was 
over, I had confirmed three Ceruleans at one time (2 different ones singing, 
and one nearby in sight). So for me personally, today was great. I had a total 
of 9 warblers and 3 vireos. ​ 




If anyone has different interpretations of today, or other insights about 
predicting good migrant birding in north Alabama, then please share. 



Below are some links to on-line articles about radar and bird migration. 
There's a lot more out there, and if you have favorite links, please share. 

http://www.eagleoptics.com/articles/birding/nexrad-ornithology
http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionOases/HowNEXRADseestheatmosphere.aspx
http://badbirdz2.wordpress.com/
http://www.laits.utexas.edu/kimmel_tornado/html/rad-sat.html

 
Scot Duncan



From: Amber Hart 
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 7:18 PM
To: SueMoske AT aol.com; Duncan, Scot; albirds AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday
 


I didn't notice today to be any better than some of the previous days I've had 
this month (I've had better). I went over to Blackwell Swamp at Wheeler after 
the rain broke and found a single spot that had warblers (11 total warbler 
species in the almost 2 hours I was there).... birds weren't in high numbers... 
really found it to be quite a normal spring day and not so "fallout-like"... I 
had a Hooded Warbler on my property at home around 3 (on Brindlee Mountain at 
the Morgan/Marshall County line), but not much else in the way of migrants that 
hasn't already been here. (White-eyed Vireos, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers mostly) 



Not a bad birding day, but not one I'm super excited about. Maybe I just didn't 
have the luck of looking in the right places today. 



Happy birding all.

 

Amber Hart
http://underneaththecanopy.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/redheadphotog

https://www.facebook.com/amber.hart.9085





On Monday, April 14, 2014 6:43 PM, "SueMoske AT aol.com"  wrote:


 

The Duncan Migration Prognosticator Cabal was correct, again. After the rain 
stopped, I had some errands and stopped at a place I know in Morgan County. Had 
some great birds. But the real fun started when I was finally able to sit down 
on my deck around 2:00. The birds didn't stop coming until around 6:00. There 
were warblers taking a bath in the stream, warblers high and low, 14 species in 
all. There were thrushes, grosbeaks, and tanagers as well. I've had days up 
here on Green Mountain when I've seen more species, but, then, I was watching 
only half a day today. So I'd say it was the best day ever. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville








-----Original Message-----
From: Duncan, Scot 
To: AL birds 
Sent: Mon, Apr 14, 2014 8:50 am
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday


 



I’ll never be able to predict birding conditions as well as my ol’ man (Bob 
Duncan), but here’s what I’m excited about right now…. 

 
For those of us here in northern Alabama, if the rain breaks this afternoon 
(that’s a big IF right now), there could potentially be very good birding in 
our area for 3 reasons. First, migrants were aloft this morning before dawn 
based on NWS radar imagery, but they were meeting the wall of rain coming in 
from the NW. Those birds - which had launched from the coastal plain last night 
- probably put down in our area in the predawn hours. The extent to which this 
happened depends on the timing of the front as it entered our region. Better 
odds of good birding in the NE quadrant of the state. 

 
The second reason is that any migrants in the area today will have a difficult 
time feeding in the rain, and they’ll be hungry and active, even if it is 
late afternoon when the rain breaks. 

 
Third, these heavy rains are knocking the food for migrants (mostly 
caterpillars) down to the ground, so a lot of our canopy feeding migrants 
should be lower in the forest, which makes it easier to spot them. 

 
If anyone can get out, please post what birding is like in your area today, 
either to ALbirds or to me, privately. 

 
Scot
 

R. Scot Duncan
Associate Professor, Biology
Birmingham-Southern College
900 Arkadelphia Rd.
Birmingham, AL
Ph: 205.226.4777
Fax: 205.226.3078

 

From:albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of 
Duncan, Scot 

Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 10:20 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast

 
  


Good morning,
 
I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised to 
hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants. But, since I am on a quest to hit 
60 birds in one hour, I tried again today. I was able to attain 59 species 
today, my highest total ever. Soooooo close. 

 
Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing on 
the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center. He came down low for some great 
looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the Museum of 
Flight. In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP Tennessee Warbler, FOSP Wood 
Thrush, and yesterday a FOSP Worm-eating Warbler. 

 
Storms are coming through tomorrow. If birds launch from the coast tonight, but 
are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front during 
the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region of the 
state. Unfortunately its a Monday. 

 
Scot Duncan
 






















    
             

  
Subject: Southern Baldwin County April 14
From: "James Holmes" <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:35:23 -0700
My wife and I stopped at the Magnolia Springs Landfill prior to making it to 
Ft. Morgan this afternoon. 


We spent about 1 hour sorting through gulls at the landfill with the highlight 
was a 2nd cycle LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. There was also one BONAPARTES GULL in 
the ponds at the landfill. None of the Herring Gulls were even suspicious 
looking. 


We spent 1.5 hours at Ft. Morgan with intermittent rain for the last 1 hour. 
Highlight was a BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO. Migrants were scarce with only eight 
species of warblers. eBird list for Ft Morgan is below.... 



Fort Morgan, Baldwin, US-AL
Apr 14, 2014 4:05 PM - 5:40 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
43 species

Common Loon  2
Brown Pelican  6
Snowy Egret  1
Green Heron  7
Willet  1
Laughing Gull  15
Royal Tern  4
Mourning Dove  8
Black-billed Cuckoo  1
Chimney Swift  4
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Merlin  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
White-eyed Vireo  3
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  4
Purple Martin  4
Barn Swallow  4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Eastern Bluebird  2
Gray Catbird  5
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  4
European Starling  4
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Hooded Warbler  2     both males
Northern Parula  1     male
Palm Warbler  3     * palmarum (Western)
Pine Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  2
Prairie Warbler  2     male and female
Black-throated Green Warbler  4
Summer Tanager  3     2 males and 1 female
Scarlet Tanager  1     male
Northern Cardinal  5
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1     male
Blue Grosbeak  3     2 male and 1 female
Indigo Bunting  6     4 males and 2 females
Red-winged Blackbird  10
Common Grackle  6
Orchard Oriole  9
House Finch  1

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17897711 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



------------------------------------

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Subject: 3 Ceruleans at Ruffner, and summary of Potentially good birding today - Monday
From: "Duncan, Scot" <sduncan AT bsc.edu>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 02:20:27 +0000
Hi folks,


First, I'd like to thank the many of you who went out birding today and 
reported back what you observed. I think it is relatively safe to say that 
predicting migrant birding in the northern portion of the state is still 
relatively new terrain, and the best way we'll learn how to do it better is by 
sharing our findings from throughout the region. 



What follows is my working hypothesis (subject to discussion and revision) 
based on observations of radar, birding reports from across the state, and 
local observations. My conclusion is that the weather did enhance the number of 
migrants observed, but only in some places and at some times. 



First off, the radar summary for the day on Wunderground.com (and what i 
observed on NWS at 530 am) shows that skies were mostly clear north of 
Birmingham until about 3 am. Radar "noise" that has been established to be 
mostly migrating birds (see links to articles, below), was moderate from 
Birmingham south. Not enough to suggest a huge movement, but enough to show 
that birds were on the move. From 3-5 am, the northwestern corner of the state 
filled with strong rain storms. During this time and for the remaining of the 
night, radar has little to say about bird migration because the radar seemed to 
switch from 'clear skies' mode that will display migrating birds, to one that 
is best for viewing storms. For those of you new to this, birds will not 
willingly fly through rain - they get heavy and cold. 



During the day, some observers saw very few birds, while others had a lot of 
activity. Some of this variation seemed to be due to geography. Birding west of 
Huntsville was less productive (Charles Grisham, Amber Hart) while birding 
around Huntsville (Sue Moske, Charles Grisham) was apparently great. This makes 
sense if the storm front guided birds towards the northeast. Birmingham was 
hit-or-miss. Charles Yeager had a handful of migrants at Turkey Creek Nature 
Preserve in Pinson, as did Ken Wills at Vulcan Park. I had good birding on the 
BSC campus around mid-morning – many more birds than during a typical spring 
day. Yet, the Hamiltons had very slow birding at Ruffner (in eastern 
Birmingham) while I had great birding at Ruffner an hour later (see details 
below). 



My overall sense is that there were more birds in the region than we'd have on 
a clear-weather day, but not by huge amounts. Many were probably leftovers from 
yesterday, but my subjective impression is that there were more (I had birded 
Ruffner Sat, Sun, and now today). The moderate numbers generally match the 
moderate amount of radar signal we had before the storms hit. We are still not 
at peak migration in our area, so this story might have been a lot different if 
we had these conditions in 2 weeks. 



Personally, Ruffner was very interesting today. I played hookie and left work 
early, getting there about 345. Despite hearing a Black-throated Green and 
Hooded singing, the parking lot was very quiet. Sometimes the ridgeline can be 
active while the lower elevations are empty, so I headed uphill. The slopes 
were very quite, but where the trail intersects the ridge, I caught up with a 
flock of male Scarlet Tanagers. At one point there were about a dozen in a 
large oak, and they were absolutely radiant against the leaden gray skies. And 
then I heard the first Cerulean Warbler. It was out of sight range, but I 
caught up with a 'swarm' of Yellow-rumps and Palms higher on the ridge, and was 
then able to locate a singing male Cerulean. By the time the afternoon was 
over, I had confirmed three Ceruleans at one time (2 different ones singing, 
and one nearby in sight). So for me personally, today was great. I had a total 
of 9 warblers and 3 vireos. ​ 



If anyone has different interpretations of today, or other insights about 
predicting good migrant birding in north Alabama, then please share. 



Below are some links to on-line articles about radar and bird migration. 
There's a lot more out there, and if you have favorite links, please share. 


http://www.eagleoptics.com/articles/birding/nexrad-ornithology

http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionOases/HowNEXRADseestheatmosphere.aspx

http://badbirdz2.wordpress.com/

http://www.laits.utexas.edu/kimmel_tornado/html/rad-sat.html



Scot Duncan

________________________________
From: Amber Hart 
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 7:18 PM
To: SueMoske AT aol.com; Duncan, Scot; albirds AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday

I didn't notice today to be any better than some of the previous days I've had 
this month (I've had better). I went over to Blackwell Swamp at Wheeler after 
the rain broke and found a single spot that had warblers (11 total warbler 
species in the almost 2 hours I was there).... birds weren't in high numbers... 
really found it to be quite a normal spring day and not so "fallout-like"... I 
had a Hooded Warbler on my property at home around 3 (on Brindlee Mountain at 
the Morgan/Marshall County line), but not much else in the way of migrants that 
hasn't already been here. (White-eyed Vireos, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers mostly) 


Not a bad birding day, but not one I'm super excited about. Maybe I just didn't 
have the luck of looking in the right places today. 


Happy birding all.

Amber Hart
http://underneaththecanopy.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/redheadphotog
https://www.facebook.com/amber.hart.9085

On Monday, April 14, 2014 6:43 PM, "SueMoske AT aol.com"  wrote: 


The Duncan Migration Prognosticator Cabal was correct, again. After the rain 
stopped, I had some errands and stopped at a place I know in Morgan County. Had 
some great birds. But the real fun started when I was finally able to sit down 
on my deck around 2:00. The birds didn't stop coming until around 6:00. There 
were warblers taking a bath in the stream, warblers high and low, 14 species in 
all. There were thrushes, grosbeaks, and tanagers as well. I've had days up 
here on Green Mountain when I've seen more species, but, then, I was watching 
only half a day today. So I'd say it was the best day ever. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville



-----Original Message-----
From: Duncan, Scot 
To: AL birds 
Sent: Mon, Apr 14, 2014 8:50 am
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday


I’ll never be able to predict birding conditions as well as my ol’ man (Bob 
Duncan), but here’s what I’m excited about right now…. 


For those of us here in northern Alabama, if the rain breaks this afternoon 
(that’s a big IF right now), there could potentially be very good birding in 
our area for 3 reasons. First, migrants were aloft this morning before dawn 
based on NWS radar imagery, but they were meeting the wall of rain coming in 
from the NW. Those birds - which had launched from the coastal plain last night 
- probably put down in our area in the predawn hours. The extent to which this 
happened depends on the timing of the front as it entered our region. Better 
odds of good birding in the NE quadrant of the state. 


The second reason is that any migrants in the area today will have a difficult 
time feeding in the rain, and they’ll be hungry and active, even if it is 
late afternoon when the rain breaks. 


Third, these heavy rains are knocking the food for migrants (mostly 
caterpillars) down to the ground, so a lot of our canopy feeding migrants 
should be lower in the forest, which makes it easier to spot them. 


If anyone can get out, please post what birding is like in your area today, 
either to ALbirds or to me, privately. 


Scot

R. Scot Duncan
Associate Professor, Biology
Birmingham-Southern College
900 Arkadelphia Rd.
Birmingham, AL
Ph: 205.226.4777
Fax: 205.226.3078

From: albirds AT yahoogroups.com 
[mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Duncan, Scot 

Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 10:20 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast


Good morning,

I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised to 
hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants. But, since I am on a quest to hit 
60 birds in one hour, I tried again today. I was able to attain 59 species 
today, my highest total ever. Soooooo close. 


Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing on 
the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center. He came down low for some great 
looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the Museum of 
Flight. In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP Tennessee Warbler, FOSP Wood 
Thrush, and yesterday a FOSP Worm-eating Warbler. 


Storms are coming through tomorrow. If birds launch from the coast tonight, but 
are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front during 
the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region of the 
state. Unfortunately its a Monday. 


Scot Duncan




Subject: Re: Fallout possibilities update
From: "Jim Stevenson" <galornsoc AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:41:06 -0500
Very well-written, Bob.

And from my home on Galveston (which had a nice grounding today), this may be 
the strongest front I have ever seen for April. 


What a winter...

js

From: Lucy & Bob Duncan 
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 7:31 PM
To: AL-BIRDS ; 'FLORIDABIRDS' ; nflbirds AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: [nflbirds] Fallout possibilities update

  

Hi all,


 Today, rain did not materialize south of us or along this part of the coast 
during the time for migrants to approach from the south (late a.m., early 
p.m.). Winds remained SE and there was only a “trickle out” (very light 
“fallout”) here in Gulf Breeze in NW FL. 



 The very strong front has entered the NW Gulf and is making good progress with 
winds NNW around 30 mph. If it has entered the southern Gulf by the time 
migrants take off (launch time = about ½ hr after sunset), migrants would not 
have taken off and the rest of the week would be a bust (birds have been known 
to turn back to Yucatan when encountering bad weather). But winds in northern 
Yucatan are still SSE – SE about 15 mph as of about 6 p.m. and mid-Gulf still 
has SE wind, so birds should take off this evening if the front does not move 
too fast. At this point I don’t think it will move that far south that fast. 



 IF they take off, and my feeling is they will, when they encounter the front, 
SW then NW winds, the timing will determine where they will end up. Should they 
encounter it in mid-Gulf, the thrust of the movement will probably be toward 
the west coast of Florida (do I hear cheers coming from St. Pete?). But if they 
encounter it farther north, the AL – NW FL coast will be the landfall. At any 
rate, the arrival will be delayed by headwinds and extra miles traveled. 



 So tomorrow a.m. should not have birds coming in, but my guess is that late 
tomorrow (Tues) would be the time to start looking at the migrant traps. And 
Wed. a.m. would be my choice of birding days, as N winds nearing gale force 
tomorrow will make detection somewhat difficult at the traps. 



For what it’s worth,


Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze in the w. Panhandle 
Subject: Fallout possibilities update
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:31:18 -0500
Hi all,

 

               Today, rain did not materialize south of us or along this
part of the coast during the time for migrants to approach from the south
(late a.m., early p.m.). Winds remained SE and there was only a trickle
out (very light fallout) here in Gulf Breeze in NW FL.

 

               The very strong front has entered the NW Gulf and is making
good progress with winds NNW around 30 mph. If it has entered the southern
Gulf by the time migrants take off (launch time = about  hr after sunset),
migrants would not have taken off and the rest of the week would be a bust
(birds have been known to turn back to Yucatan when encountering bad
weather). But winds in northern Yucatan are still SSE  SE about 15 mph as
of about 6 p.m. and mid-Gulf still has SE wind, so birds should take off
this evening if the front does not move too fast. At this point I dont
think it will move that far south that fast.

 

               IF they take off, and my feeling is they will, when they
encounter the front,  SW then NW winds, the timing will determine where they
will end up. Should they encounter it in mid-Gulf, the thrust of the
movement will probably be toward the west coast of Florida (do I hear cheers
coming from St. Pete?). But if they encounter it farther north, the AL  NW
FL coast will be the landfall. At any rate, the arrival will be delayed by
headwinds and extra miles traveled.

 

               So tomorrow a.m. should not have birds coming in, but my
guess is that late tomorrow (Tues) would be the time to start looking at the
migrant traps. And Wed. a.m. would be my choice of birding days, as N winds
nearing gale force tomorrow will make detection somewhat difficult at the
traps.

 

For what its worth,

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze in the w. Panhandle 
Subject: Fallout possibilities update
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:31:18 -0500
Hi all,

 

               Today, rain did not materialize south of us or along this
part of the coast during the time for migrants to approach from the south
(late a.m., early p.m.). Winds remained SE and there was only a trickle
out (very light fallout) here in Gulf Breeze in NW FL.

 

               The very strong front has entered the NW Gulf and is making
good progress with winds NNW around 30 mph. If it has entered the southern
Gulf by the time migrants take off (launch time = about  hr after sunset),
migrants would not have taken off and the rest of the week would be a bust
(birds have been known to turn back to Yucatan when encountering bad
weather). But winds in northern Yucatan are still SSE  SE about 15 mph as
of about 6 p.m. and mid-Gulf still has SE wind, so birds should take off
this evening if the front does not move too fast. At this point I dont
think it will move that far south that fast.

 

               IF they take off, and my feeling is they will, when they
encounter the front,  SW then NW winds, the timing will determine where they
will end up. Should they encounter it in mid-Gulf, the thrust of the
movement will probably be toward the west coast of Florida (do I hear cheers
coming from St. Pete?). But if they encounter it farther north, the AL  NW
FL coast will be the landfall. At any rate, the arrival will be delayed by
headwinds and extra miles traveled.

 

               So tomorrow a.m. should not have birds coming in, but my
guess is that late tomorrow (Tues) would be the time to start looking at the
migrant traps. And Wed. a.m. would be my choice of birding days, as N winds
nearing gale force tomorrow will make detection somewhat difficult at the
traps.

 

For what its worth,

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze in the w. Panhandle 
Subject: Re: Potentially good birding today - Monday
From: Amber Hart <whitehartrabbitry AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:18:38 -0700 (PDT)
I didn't notice today to be any better than some of the previous days I've had 
this month (I've had better). I went over to Blackwell Swamp at Wheeler after 
the rain broke and found a single spot that had warblers (11 total warbler 
species in the almost 2 hours I was there).... birds weren't in high numbers... 
really found it to be quite a normal spring day and not so "fallout-like"... I 
had a Hooded Warbler on my property at home around 3 (on Brindlee Mountain at 
the Morgan/Marshall County line), but not much else in the way of migrants that 
hasn't already been here. (White-eyed Vireos, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers mostly) 


Not a bad birding day, but not one I'm super excited about. Maybe I just 
didn't have the luck of looking in the right places today. 


Happy birding all.
 
Amber Hart
http://underneaththecanopy.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/redheadphotog

https://www.facebook.com/amber.hart.9085


On Monday, April 14, 2014 6:43 PM, "SueMoske AT aol.com"  wrote:
 
  
The Duncan Migration Prognosticator Cabal was correct, again.  After the rain 
stopped, I had some errands and stopped at a place I know in Morgan County.  
Had some great birds.  But the real fun started when I was finally able to sit 
down on my deck around 2:00.  The birds didn't stop coming until around 
6:00.  There were warblers taking a bath in the stream, warblers high and low, 
14 species in all.  There were thrushes, grosbeaks, and tanagers as well.  
I've had days up here on Green Mountain when I've seen more species, but, then, 
I was watching only half a day today.  So I'd say it was the best day ever. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville
 



-----Original Message-----
From: Duncan, Scot 
To: AL birds 
Sent: Mon, Apr 14, 2014 8:50 am
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday


  
I’ll never be able to predict birding conditions as well as my ol’ man (Bob 
Duncan), but here’s what I’m excited about right now…. 

 
For those of us here in northern Alabama, if the rain breaks this afternoon 
(that’s a big IF right now), there could potentially be very good birding in 
our area for 3 reasons.  First, migrants were aloft this morning before dawn 
based on NWS radar imagery, but they were meeting the wall of rain coming in 
from the NW.  Those birds - which had launched from the coastal plain last 
night -  probably put down in our area in the predawn hours.  The extent to 
which this happened depends on the timing of the front as it entered our 
region.  Better odds of good birding in the NE quadrant of the state.   

 
The second reason is that any migrants in the area today will have a difficult 
time feeding in the rain, and they’ll be hungry and active, even if it is 
late afternoon when the rain breaks.   

 
Third, these heavy rains are knocking the food for migrants (mostly 
caterpillars) down to the ground, so a lot of our canopy feeding migrants 
should be lower in the forest, which makes it easier to spot them.  

 
If anyone can get out, please post what birding is like in your area today, 
either to ALbirds or to me, privately. 

 
Scot
 
R. Scot Duncan
Associate Professor, Biology
Birmingham-Southern College
900 Arkadelphia Rd.
Birmingham, AL
Ph: 205.226.4777
Fax: 205.226.3078
 
From:albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Duncan, Scot 

Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 10:20 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast
 
  
Good morning,
 
I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised to 
hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants.   But, since I am on a quest to 
hit 60 birds in one hour, I tried again today.   I was able to attain 59 
species today, my highest total ever.   Soooooo close.    

 
Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing on 
the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center.  He came down low for some great 
looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the Museum of 
Flight.   In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP  Tennessee Warbler, FOSP 
Wood Thrush, and yesterday a FOSP Worm-eating Warbler.  

 
Storms are coming through tomorrow.  If birds launch from the coast tonight, 
but are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front 
during the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region of 
the state.  Unfortunately its a Monday.  

 
Scot Duncan
 
Subject: Re: Potentially good birding today - Monday
From: SueMoske AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:43:51 -0400 (EDT)
The Duncan Migration Prognosticator Cabal was correct, again. After the rain 
stopped, I had some errands and stopped at a place I know in Morgan County. Had 
some great birds. But the real fun started when I was finally able to sit down 
on my deck around 2:00. The birds didn't stop coming until around 6:00. There 
were warblers taking a bath in the stream, warblers high and low, 14 species in 
all. There were thrushes, grosbeaks, and tanagers as well. I've had days up 
here on Green Mountain when I've seen more species, but, then, I was watching 
only half a day today. So I'd say it was the best day ever. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Duncan, Scot 
To: AL birds 
Sent: Mon, Apr 14, 2014 8:50 am
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday


 
  
    
                  

I’ll never be able to predict birding conditions as well as my ol’ man (Bob 
Duncan), but here’s what I’m excited about right now…. 

 
For those of us here in northern Alabama, if the rain breaks this afternoon 
(that’s a big IF right now), there could potentially be very good birding in 
our area for 3 reasons. First, migrants were aloft this morning before dawn 
based on NWS radar imagery, but they were meeting the wall of rain coming in 
from the NW. Those birds - which had launched from the coastal plain last night 
- probably put down in our area in the predawn hours. The extent to which this 
happened depends on the timing of the front as it entered our region. Better 
odds of good birding in the NE quadrant of the state. 

 
The second reason is that any migrants in the area today will have a difficult 
time feeding in the rain, and they’ll be hungry and active, even if it is 
late afternoon when the rain breaks. 

 
Third, these heavy rains are knocking the food for migrants (mostly 
caterpillars) down to the ground, so a lot of our canopy feeding migrants 
should be lower in the forest, which makes it easier to spot them. 

 
If anyone can get out, please post what birding is like in your area today, 
either to ALbirds or to me, privately. 

 
Scot
 

R. Scot Duncan
Associate Professor, Biology
Birmingham-Southern College
900 Arkadelphia Rd.
Birmingham, AL
Ph: 205.226.4777
Fax: 205.226.3078

 

From: albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of 
Duncan, Scot 

Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 10:20 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast

 
  


Good morning,
 
I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised to 
hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants. But, since I am on a quest to hit 
60 birds in one hour, I tried again today. I was able to attain 59 species 
today, my highest total ever. Soooooo close. 

 
Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing on 
the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center. He came down low for some great 
looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the Museum of 
Flight. In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP Tennessee Warbler, FOSP Wood 
Thrush, and yesterday a FOSP Worm-eating Warbler. 

 
Storms are coming through tomorrow. If birds launch from the coast tonight, but 
are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front during 
the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region of the 
state. Unfortunately its a Monday. 

 
Scot Duncan
 





    
             

  
Subject: Re: Potentially good birding today - Monday
From: SueMoske AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 16:26:32 -0400 (EDT)
 It is a good day after the rain up here on Green Mountain, just south of Monte 
Sano. Eight species of warbler so far, plus other migrants. Walked my property 
some, but the best viewing is from my window watching warblers take baths in 
the stream running down the bluff. More later. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: James Holmes 
To: 'AL birds' 
Sent: Mon, Apr 14, 2014 3:05 pm
Subject: RE: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday


 
  
    
                  

I was out early this morning.
 
Seemed like a regular April day in Lee County (which is not a good area for 
spring migrants). 

 
Bald Eagle and Osprey were the highlights. Warblers included: Palm (lots), 
Prairie (multiple birds on territories), Orange-crowned, Pine, Parula, and 
plenty of Yellow-rumped. 

 
We are on our way to the coast now. Fingers crossed that the wind/rain/birds 
participate. 

 
Jim Holmes
 

From: albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Duncan, Scot 

Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 6:50 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday

 
  


I’ll never be able to predict birding conditions as well as my ol’ man (Bob 
Duncan), but here’s what I’m excited about right now…. 

 
For those of us here in northern Alabama, if the rain breaks this afternoon 
(that’s a big IF right now), there could potentially be very good birding in 
our area for 3 reasons. First, migrants were aloft this morning before dawn 
based on NWS radar imagery, but they were meeting the wall of rain coming in 
from the NW. Those birds - which had launched from the coastal plain last night 
- probably put down in our area in the predawn hours. The extent to which this 
happened depends on the timing of the front as it entered our region. Better 
odds of good birding in the NE quadrant of the state. 

 
The second reason is that any migrants in the area today will have a difficult 
time feeding in the rain, and they’ll be hungry and active, even if it is 
late afternoon when the rain breaks. 

 
Third, these heavy rains are knocking the food for migrants (mostly 
caterpillars) down to the ground, so a lot of our canopy feeding migrants 
should be lower in the forest, which makes it easier to spot them. 

 
If anyone can get out, please post what birding is like in your area today, 
either to ALbirds or to me, privately. 

 
Scot
 

R. Scot Duncan
Associate Professor, Biology
Birmingham-Southern College
900 Arkadelphia Rd.
Birmingham, AL
Ph: 205.226.4777
Fax: 205.226.3078

 

From: albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Duncan, Scot 

Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 10:20 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast

 
  


Good morning,< /span>
 
I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised to 
hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants. But, since I am on a quest to hit 
60 birds in one hour, I tried again today. I was able to attain 59 species 
today, my highest total ever. Soooooo close. 

 
Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing on 
the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center. He came down low for some great 
looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the Museum of 
Flight. In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP Tennessee Warbler, FOSP Wood 
Thrush, and yesterday a FOS P Worm-eating Warbler. 

 
Storms are coming through tomorrow. If birds launch from the coast tonight, but 
are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front during 
the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region of the 
state. Unfortunately its a Monday. 

 
Scot Duncan
 







    
             

  
Subject: More Ceruleans and others
From: cgrishamlaw <cgrishamlaw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:13:08 -0500
I followed the advice of professor Duncan and went to Monte Sano mountain in 
Huntsville this afternoon (early).  There were birds all over the place!! 
 Many warblers.  Saw 3 male Ceruleans, 1 blue-winged, heard a Prarie, saw 
dozens of Palm Warblers,  too many Yellow-rumped, a few Parulas, one Hooded 
Warbler and a Tennessee. Also saw some Yellow-throated, Red-eyed and White-eyed 
Vireos.  Several Indigo Buntings.  Unlike the Cerulean on Berry Mountain 
yesterday,  the Ceruleans on Monte Sano today were in smaller trees and thus 
much easier to photograph.   I will post photos later.  The Ceruleans today 
were at the Land Trust parking lot about half way up Monte Sano if anybody is 
interested.    

Happy birding!
Charles Grisham
www.natureshots.smugmug.com


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: perception as applies to birdwatching
From: J C Allen <ssallen1 AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 08:41:42 -0700 (PDT)
 I hope this is seen as relevant to the mission of this forum...
I have a bit of a struggle matching sounds, sights, etc with memory re: bird 
identification. A recent experience highlighted these issues.. 

Sue Moske and I were at Rockhouse Road area of Wheeler NWR.. and were scanning 
for whatever was in the rapidly disappearing wetland area . As background, 
there had been sightings recently of bitterns, both kinds and it has been a 
long time since I had seen either.  

My experience of seeing bitterns were in reeds.. that were mostly green. So my 
ID memory of the birds were that they had green on them.. I probably should 
study books more.. Anyhow, before this outing, Sue had cleared that up for me. 
 

So she saw what looked like dark vegetation, elongated vertically. It showed no 
movement.(that was a scope view, not shown in my pics)  There was heat 
distortion making it harder. 

So we continued to watch and this dark "something" moved. 
Now to the relevant part: We agreed it was a A. bittern.. I decided to get 
closer and try for pics.. as I did, I kept losing it visually the closer I 
got..It became less and less distinct as it's beige-browner color was perceived 
and its position varied.  Behind me, Sue had moved along closer and found that 
true looking through her scope. 

I finally was satisfied with image thinking I might spook it ( and it might 
disappear because it blended in so well with the surroundings). 

I'm thinking , any of you who might have studied visual perception and/or how 
the brain stores that information, would see the applicability to bird watching 
, especially at some distance.. It would be interesting to know more about that 
phenomenon.. On the face of it I would say the contrast effect was at work from 
a distance.. the contrast with the striping and the darker strips stood out 
more to the human eye.. Think evolutionary benefit of that out on the 
savannah.. As the brain got a better gestalt of the object, and more 
information, it became more accurate.. But ironically, that also enhanced the 
camouflage quality to protect the bird.. 

 . You can see some of that variation at:

http://ladyswan.smugmug.com/April-13-2014-birding/


The close up pics were at the end of the pictures, time wise.. The distant pics 
had no editing.. The closer ones were trimmed and sharpened with some lighting 
enhancement . 


And I was reminded recently that the camera/lens also has it's effect too.. 
Reality is darned hard to pin down.. 


Jane Allen
NW Huntsville, AL
Subject: RE: Potentially good birding today - Monday
From: "James Holmes" <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 07:31:23 -0700
I was out early this morning.

 

Seemed like a regular April day in Lee County (which is not a good area for
spring migrants).

 

Bald Eagle and Osprey were the highlights.  Warblers included: Palm (lots),
Prairie (multiple birds on territories), Orange-crowned, Pine, Parula, and
plenty of Yellow-rumped.

 

We are on our way to the coast now.  Fingers crossed that the
wind/rain/birds participate.

 

Jim Holmes

 

From: albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Duncan, Scot
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 6:50 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Potentially good birding today - Monday

 

  

I'll never be able to predict birding conditions as well as my ol' man (Bob
Duncan), but here's what I'm excited about right now..

 

For those of us here in northern Alabama, if the rain breaks this afternoon
(that's a big IF right now), there could potentially be very good birding in
our area for 3 reasons.  First, migrants were aloft this morning before dawn
based on NWS radar imagery, but they were meeting the wall of rain coming in
from the NW.  Those birds - which had launched from the coastal plain last
night -  probably put down in our area in the predawn hours.  The extent to
which this happened depends on the timing of the front as it entered our
region.  Better odds of good birding in the NE quadrant of the state.   

 

The second reason is that any migrants in the area today will have a
difficult time feeding in the rain, and they'll be hungry and active, even
if it is late afternoon when the rain breaks.   

 

Third, these heavy rains are knocking the food for migrants (mostly
caterpillars) down to the ground, so a lot of our canopy feeding migrants
should be lower in the forest, which makes it easier to spot them.  

 

If anyone can get out, please post what birding is like in your area today,
either to ALbirds or to me, privately.

 

Scot

 

R. Scot Duncan

Associate Professor, Biology

Birmingham-Southern College

900 Arkadelphia Rd.

Birmingham, AL

Ph: 205.226.4777

Fax: 205.226.3078

 

From: albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Duncan, Scot
Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 10:20 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast

 

  

Good morning,

 

I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised
to hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants.   But, since I am on a quest
to hit 60 birds in one hour, I tried again today.   I was able to attain 59
species today, my highest total ever.   Soooooo close.   

 

Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing
on the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center.  He came down low for some
great looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the
Museum of Flight.   In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP  Tennessee
Warbler, FOSP Wood Thrush, and yesterday a FOSP Worm-eating Warbler. 

 

Storms are coming through tomorrow.  If birds launch from the coast tonight,
but are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front
during the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region
of the state.  Unfortunately its a Monday. 

 

Scot Duncan

 


Subject: Potentially good birding today - Monday
From: "Duncan, Scot" <sduncan AT bsc.edu>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 13:50:21 +0000
I'll never be able to predict birding conditions as well as my ol' man (Bob 
Duncan), but here's what I'm excited about right now.... 


For those of us here in northern Alabama, if the rain breaks this afternoon 
(that's a big IF right now), there could potentially be very good birding in 
our area for 3 reasons. First, migrants were aloft this morning before dawn 
based on NWS radar imagery, but they were meeting the wall of rain coming in 
from the NW. Those birds - which had launched from the coastal plain last night 
- probably put down in our area in the predawn hours. The extent to which this 
happened depends on the timing of the front as it entered our region. Better 
odds of good birding in the NE quadrant of the state. 


The second reason is that any migrants in the area today will have a difficult 
time feeding in the rain, and they'll be hungry and active, even if it is late 
afternoon when the rain breaks. 


Third, these heavy rains are knocking the food for migrants (mostly 
caterpillars) down to the ground, so a lot of our canopy feeding migrants 
should be lower in the forest, which makes it easier to spot them. 


If anyone can get out, please post what birding is like in your area today, 
either to ALbirds or to me, privately. 


Scot

R. Scot Duncan
Associate Professor, Biology
Birmingham-Southern College
900 Arkadelphia Rd.
Birmingham, AL
Ph: 205.226.4777
Fax: 205.226.3078

From: albirds AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:albirds AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Duncan, Scot 

Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 10:20 AM
To: AL birds
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast



Good morning,



I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised to 
hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants. But, since I am on a quest to hit 
60 birds in one hour, I tried again today. I was able to attain 59 species 
today, my highest total ever. Soooooo close. 




Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing on 
the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center. He came down low for some great 
looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the Museum of 
Flight. In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP Tennessee Warbler, FOSP Wood 
Thrush, and yesterday a FOSP Worm-eating Warbler. 




Storms are coming through tomorrow. If birds launch from the coast tonight, but 
are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front during 
the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region of the 
state. Unfortunately its a Monday. 




Scot Duncan


Subject: Cerulean, Blackburnian in Huntsville
From: Charles Grisham <cgrishamlaw AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 06:21:39 -0700 (PDT)
Hello fellow birders (:

Wanted to report that yesterday I was able to get out for a couple of hours, 
all thanks to my wife for watching our 4 and 3 year old, and 4 month old lol.  
Anyway, went to Berry Mountain where my parents have land and walked a couple 
of mountain miles.  Not much going on at all in the woods compared to what I 
usually see there this time of year.  Aside from the usual non migrant birds, 
I heard one Summer Tanager, saw 2 Yellow-throated Vireos, heard and saw several 
Red-eyed Vireos, but what was really neat, which is a first for me on our land 
in this area, was a typical singing male (very vocal) Cerulean Warbler.  I 
watched it in the same general area for a couple of hours and was only able to 
get a few decent photos of it.  It rarely came anywhere below the canopy.  
They can be seen here: 


Cerulean and Blackburnian on Berry Mountain - charles grisham (natureshots)

 
   Cerulean and Blackburnian on Berry Mountain - charles gr...
GENESIS 1-20-30 And God said, “...let birds fly above the earth across the 
expanse of the heavens.” So God created...every living creature that... 

View on natureshots.smugm... Preview by Yahoo  


While trying to get photos of this neat bird, I came across a male 
Blackburnian, as you can see from the photos.  I have gotten much better 
photos of a Cerulean before at the Walls of Jericho in Jackson County, which is 
about 10 or so miles northeast of where I photographed the above Cerulean.  If 
you want to see them, they are here: 


Cerulean Warbler at the Walls of Jericho in North Alabama - charles grisham 
(natureshots) 


 
   Cerulean Warbler at the Walls of Jericho in North Alabam...
I photographed this bird species at the Walls of Jericho in north Alabama / 
south Tennessee. I spent at least 3 hours chasing Cerulean Warblers on ... 

View on natureshots.smugm... Preview by Yahoo  

I hope ya'll enjoy!
 
Charles H. Grisham Jr.
Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 5585
Huntsville, AL  35814
Subject: FOS Yellow-throated Vireo
From: Harold Peterson <pinkfloyd137 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 06:12:16 -0700 (PDT)
Also in the Huntsville Botanical Gardens (yesterday), though this time near the 
water feature near the entrance. There were no warblers present at the fish 
pond this time. 


-Harold Peterson
Huntsville, AL
Subject: Re: Indigo Bunting
From: stacey gordon <lithotripter31 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 05:21:30 -0700 (PDT)
Feeder is in the Crestwood neighborhood of Birmingham.
 
It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.
--Yogi Berra

http://southgeek.blogspot.com/



On Saturday, April 12, 2014 10:32 AM, "wareaglebirder AT yahoo.com" 
 wrote: 

 
  
This week I had FOS Indigo Buntings (2) feeding on my "ground feeder" with 
Chipping Sparrows.  My ground feeder is a 20'x20' closely mowed area in my 
back on which I spread about 5 pounds of white millet a day...lots of Sparrows 
and, unfortunately, 10 or so Brown-headed Cowbirds. 

This morning I had an adult American Goldfinch on one of my feeders.  I had 
them in late winter but this is my first male decked out in his "dating 
attire."  


Rod Douglas
Wetumpka


Subject: Fallout conditions developing along the northern Gulf Coast
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 21:52:42 -0500
Hi all,

 

               It's that guessing game time again! A front accompanied by
heavy rain is predicted to pass through the area Mon & Tue. Timing of the
rain and wind shift is the key to fallout prediction.

 

               Monday prospects:    Tonight (Sunday) launch conditions are
good for birds to move out of Yucatan and Central America. Winds at Merida
(NW Yucatan) are fresh and in mid-Gulf moderate ESE to SE. This should
vector birds toward the TX - SW LA coasts. So I do not see fallout
conditions here tomorrow even though rain is expected in the morning, though
heaviest rain will be tomorrow night. Winds here are predicted to be SE 13 -
18 knots tonight and tomorrow, so the movement should not be our way. Of
course, West Indian - Peninsula migrants may move through on the SE Winds,
but not Trans-Gulf.

 

               Tuesday prospects:  As far as I can tell, the front will not
be in the southern Gulf tomorrow night or Yucatan, but I am not certain
about that. IF launch conditions are good, then birds will encounter W & NW
winds as they move through the Gulf and may even encounter light rain as
they approach the coast in late morning or early afternoon. A delay in
arrival time could occur as they encounter headwinds. The  vector should be
our way. Therefore fallout conditions may prevail Tuesday afternoon or
later. IF birds encounter the wind shift to W early on, then the migrant
traps to our east (St. George, Ft. DeSoto) will benefit.

 

               Wednesday prospects:   Stiff N  winds Tues night should hold
birds at the traps and birding should be good Wed a.m.  

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze in the W. Panhandle

 

 
Subject: Fallout conditions developing along the northern Gulf Coast
From: "Lucy & Bob Duncan" <town_point AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 21:52:42 -0500
Hi all,

 

               It's that guessing game time again! A front accompanied by
heavy rain is predicted to pass through the area Mon & Tue. Timing of the
rain and wind shift is the key to fallout prediction.

 

               Monday prospects:    Tonight (Sunday) launch conditions are
good for birds to move out of Yucatan and Central America. Winds at Merida
(NW Yucatan) are fresh and in mid-Gulf moderate ESE to SE. This should
vector birds toward the TX - SW LA coasts. So I do not see fallout
conditions here tomorrow even though rain is expected in the morning, though
heaviest rain will be tomorrow night. Winds here are predicted to be SE 13 -
18 knots tonight and tomorrow, so the movement should not be our way. Of
course, West Indian - Peninsula migrants may move through on the SE Winds,
but not Trans-Gulf.

 

               Tuesday prospects:  As far as I can tell, the front will not
be in the southern Gulf tomorrow night or Yucatan, but I am not certain
about that. IF launch conditions are good, then birds will encounter W & NW
winds as they move through the Gulf and may even encounter light rain as
they approach the coast in late morning or early afternoon. A delay in
arrival time could occur as they encounter headwinds. The  vector should be
our way. Therefore fallout conditions may prevail Tuesday afternoon or
later. IF birds encounter the wind shift to W early on, then the migrant
traps to our east (St. George, Ft. DeSoto) will benefit.

 

               Wednesday prospects:   Stiff N  winds Tues night should hold
birds at the traps and birding should be good Wed a.m.  

 

Bob Duncan

Gulf Breeze in the W. Panhandle

 

 
Subject: Ruffner
From: <rickremy AT hotmail.com>
Date: 13 Apr 2014 12:30:31 -0700
Susan and I spent three hours at Ruffner this morning. We started at the 
parking lot at the Nature Centerr, hiked the ridge road, down the mountain to 
the Wetlands Trail, then back to the Nature Center. The wildflowers were 
terrific and we had some good birds. We had 14 species of warblers including 
Cape May, Blue Wing, Swainson's, Yellow, Kentucky(2), and Black and White. We 
also saw three Scarlet Tanagers and also had three Summer Tanagers. Great 
Crested Flycatcher, Louisiana Waterthrush, and Wood Thrush were also found. It 
was a great day outside! 


 Rick
 Irondale, Al
Subject: Am . Bittern, Rockhouse bottoms
From: J C Allen <ssallen1 AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 10:44:24 -0700 (PDT)
Seen from road T. N 34.55433,
W 86. 79500. Spotted by Sue Moske. Seen also by Jane Allen 12:30 pm today, 
4/13/14 


Jane Allen
NW Huntsville. AL
Subject: Opelika Sewage Ponds, Apr 13, 2014
From: "James Holmes" <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 09:39:36 -0700
Daniel (?) and I birded the Opelika Wood Duck Heritage Preserve and Siddique 
Nature Park this morning. Highlight was two singing Swainson's Warblers. I 
voice recorded one of these birds and uploaded it to xeno-canto. The recording 
link is below. 


 

eBird list below.

 

 

Opelika Sewage Ponds, Lee, US-AL

Apr 13, 2014 6:30 AM - 8:25 AM

Protocol: Traveling

1.5 mile(s)

36 species

 

Wood Duck  37     including 6 young

Blue-winged Teal  12

Red-tailed Hawk  1

Killdeer  1

Spotted Sandpiper  1

Mourning Dove  2

Red-bellied Woodpecker  2

Downy Woodpecker  1

Eastern Phoebe  1

White-eyed Vireo  1

Red-eyed Vireo  1     singing

Blue Jay  6

American Crow  2

Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2

Barn Swallow  1

Carolina Chickadee  3

Tufted Titmouse  1

Brown-headed Nuthatch  2

Carolina Wren  4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  5

Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1

Eastern Bluebird  2

Brown Thrasher  1

Cedar Waxwing  2

Swainson's Warbler 2 1 bird seen and the other heard only. 
http://www.xeno-canto.org/174331 


Palm Warbler  18     * palmarum (Western)

Pine Warbler  3

Yellow-rumped Warbler  40     * coronata (Myrtle)

Eastern Towhee  1

Summer Tanager  3

Northern Cardinal  7

Indigo Bunting  1     male

Red-winged Blackbird  8

Brown-headed Cowbird  2

House Finch  3

American Goldfinch  4

 

View this checklist online at 
 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17870742 


 

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (  
http://ebird.org) 


 

Jim Holmes
Subject: Birdingham Big Hour and Tomorrow's forecast
From: "Duncan, Scot" <sduncan AT bsc.edu>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 15:19:58 +0000
Good morning,


I ran a big hour yesterday here in east Birmingham and was quite surprised to 
hit 56 species, despite just a few migrants. But, since I am on a quest to hit 
60 birds in one hour, I tried again today. I was able to attain 59 species 
today, my highest total ever. Soooooo close. 



Best birds of the morning were 1) a Blue-wing Warbler male that was singing on 
the ridge at Ruffner Mountain Nature Center. He came down low for some great 
looks, and 2) a singing male Yellow Warbler along a creek near the Museum of 
Flight. In addition to these FOSPs, I had a FOSP Tennessee Warbler, FOSP Wood 
Thrush, and yesterday a FOSP Worm-eating Warbler. 



Storms are coming through tomorrow. If birds launch from the coast tonight, but 
are blocked from going farther north than central Alabama by the front during 
the night, then birding could be good tomorrow in the northern region of the 
state. Unfortunately its a Monday. 



Scot Duncan
Subject: FOS Nashville Warbler
From: Harold Peterson <pinkfloyd137 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 16:55:26 -0700 (PDT)
Heard in the Huntsville Botanical Gardens near the coy pond. That's turned 
into my warbler hot spot this spring. 


-Harold Peterson
Huntsville, AL
Subject: Tri-colored Heron
From: SueMoske AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 19:43:05 -0400 (EDT)
For those of you in the Huntsville area, I saw a Tri-colored Heron around 10 
this morning and again around 4 this afternoon. This is a rare bird for our 
area. I've only seen it once before in Limestone County. It is in Rockhouse 
Bottoms in Limestone County which is adjacent to Blackwell Swamp on the Madison 
County Line Road. The Bottoms road can be accessed either from Rockhouse Road 
or the Blackwell Swamp Road. Rockwell Bottoms is a good place for shorebirds 
this spring, also, although it is drying up from what it was a few weeks ago. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville
Subject: Tuskegee NF, Apr 12, 2014
From: "James Holmes" <jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 11:13:29 -0700
I birded Tuskegee National Forest this morning. Highlights were 2 Bachman's 
Sparrows, a singing Swainson's Warbler and some lingering winter birds 
(Blue-headed Vireo, Hermit Thrush). 

Later, I looked for shorebirds in Macon County without success (only finding 
some Blue-winged Teal). 


eBird list below....



Tuskegee NF, Macon, US-AL
Apr 12, 2014 7:00 AM - 9:56 AM
Protocol: Traveling
9.0 mile(s)
35 species

Black Vulture  1
Mourning Dove  2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  9
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  6
White-eyed Vireo  11
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  2     both singing
Blue Jay  6
American Crow  4     by voice
Fish Crow  3     by voice
Carolina Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  5
Brown-headed Nuthatch  8
Carolina Wren  10
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  8
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Hermit Thrush  1
Prothonotary Warbler  1
Swainson's Warbler  1     singing
Hooded Warbler  8     all singing
Northern Parula  4
Palm Warbler  19     * palmarum (Western)
Pine Warbler  24
Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
Prairie Warbler  21     males singing at all spots stopped, 4 females
Eastern Towhee  7
Bachman's Sparrow  2     one on NF road 916 and one on NF road 908
White-throated Sparrow  1
Summer Tanager  3
Northern Cardinal  13
Indigo Bunting  2     males
Brown-headed Cowbird  2

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17855304 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



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Subject: Re: [Conservation] Challenges of recreating extinct species
From: "Duncan, Scot" <sduncan AT bsc.edu>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 17:47:31 +0000
Greg et al.,

Thanks for this post. Another introduction to this topic is a TED talk by 
Stewart Brand from Feb 2013. See link below. And there is a good Nat. Geo. 
Article recently by Carl Zimmer. It can also be found online. This is a 
fascinating and highly controversial topic that we all will be forced to 
confront within the next decade or two. In my mind, the key issue is that the 
money spent on deextinction could prevent new extinctions. Wish we had enough 
conservation dollars to do both. 


Scot Duncan

http://www.ted.com/talks/stewart_brand_the_dawn_of_de_extinction_are_you_ready


Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 12, 2014, at 7:47 AM, "Gregory J. Harber" 
> wrote: 




Good morning all,

Yesterday I listened to the podcast of Thursday's Diane Rehm show on NPR. It 
featured an excellent program on the challenges and ethics of the efforts to 
recreate extinct species: 
http://thedianerehmshow.org/shows/2014-04-10/new-efforts-bring-extinct-species-back-life 


Included in the topics discussed by the panel was the effort to bring back the 
Passenger Pigeon. If this sort of topic is of interest to you I highly 
recommend the book by Scott Weidensaul, "The Ghost with Trembling Wings: 
Science, Wishful Thinking and the Search for Lost Species." 


Take care all, Greg

Gregory J. Harber
Birmingham, AL
gharber AT mindspring.com
"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
Tom Robbins

Subject: Indigo Bunting
From: <wareaglebirder AT yahoo.com>
Date: 12 Apr 2014 08:32:19 -0700
This week I had FOS Indigo Buntings (2) feeding on my "ground feeder" with 
Chipping Sparrows. My ground feeder is a 20'x20' closely mowed area in my back 
on which I spread about 5 pounds of white millet a day...lots of Sparrows and, 
unfortunately, 10 or so Brown-headed Cowbirds. This morning I had an adult 
American Goldfinch on one of my feeders. I had them in late winter but this is 
my first male decked out in his "dating attire." 

 

 Rod Douglas
 Wetumpka
 

 


Subject: Re: Indigo Bunting
From: stacey gordon <lithotripter31 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 08:04:56 -0700 (PDT)
Uh, that's feeders/in the back yard... ooops
 
It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.
--Yogi Berra

http://southgeek.blogspot.com/



On Saturday, April 12, 2014 10:04 AM, stacey gordon  
wrote: 

 
  
It may not be anything unusual, but I am thrilled to report an indigo bunting 
on my feeder/sin the backyard this morning.  Gorgeous! 

 
It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.
--Yogi Berra

http://southgeek.blogspot.com/


Subject: Indigo Bunting
From: stacey gordon <lithotripter31 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 08:04:05 -0700 (PDT)
It may not be anything unusual, but I am thrilled to report an indigo bunting 
on my feeder/sin the backyard this morning. Gorgeous! 


It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.
--Yogi Berra

http://southgeek.blogspot.com/
Subject: Late Mr Jeff Wilson and bait fishing Green Heron
From: "michel.reglade" <michel.reglade AT voila.fr>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 16:50:19 +0200 (CEST)
Hi,

In a post of 2001, late Mr Jeff Wilson wrote "I have seen Green Herons bait 
fish". 

Do one of you know if his field observations have been recorded elsewhere?

If you have any information, thank you to answer to me in private (I receive no 
post from the list). 


Kind regards,

Michel Réglade (Toulouse-France).
___________________________________________________________
Mode, hifi, maison,… J'achète malin. Je compare les prix avec Voila.fr 
http://shopping.voila.fr/ 
Subject: [Conservation] Challenges of recreating extinct species
From: "Gregory J. Harber" <gharber AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 07:47:47 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
Good morning all,

Yesterday I listened to the podcast of Thursday's Diane Rehm show on NPR. It 
featured an excellent program on the challenges and ethics of the efforts to 
recreate extinct species: 
http://thedianerehmshow.org/shows/2014-04-10/new-efforts-bring-extinct-species-back-life 


Included in the topics discussed by the panel was the effort to bring back the 
Passenger Pigeon. If this sort of topic is of interest to you I highly 
recommend the book by Scott Weidensaul, "The Ghost with Trembling Wings: 
Science, Wishful Thinking and the Search for Lost Species." 


Take care all,  Greg

Gregory J. Harber
Birmingham, AL
gharber AT mindspring.com
"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
Tom Robbins


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Subject: Blakeley Mud Lakes
From: Craig Litteken <littekenc AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 23:56:47 -0500
If you're looking for a good, long hike in this nice weather, I highly 
recommend a visit to the Blakeley Mud Lakes. I visited the area for a few hours 
this afternoon and was not disappointed. There is a lot of excellent shorebird 
habitat throughout the pools south of the "B" entrance as well as the South 
Blakeley disposal area pools south of the "A" entrance. There were easily a 
couple thousand shorebirds with the greatest number being Dunlin, Dowitchers, 
and avocets. There were also a couple hundred ducks throughout the area. The 
best bird of the day was a very pink Roseate Spoonbill roosting in a small tree 
with several Great Egrets toward the east end of the deep pool south of the 
east/west dike from the "A" entrance. 


My list is shown below.

American white pelican
Great egret
Snowy egret
Little blue heron
White ibis - 126
Roseate spoonbill
Canada goose
Gadwall
Mallard
Mottled duck - 8
Blue-winged teal - 95
Northern shoveler - 120
Green-winged teal - 13
Lesser scaup
Bald eagle
Northern harrier
Broad-winged hawk
Clapper rail
American coot
Killdeer
Black-necked stilt - 120
America avocet - 250
Greater yellowlegs
Lesser yellowlegs
Western sandpiper
Least sandpiper
Dunlin
Stilt sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Laughing gull
Ring-billed gull
Gull-billed tern - 11
Caspian tern - 18
Forster's tern
Mourning dove
Fish crow
Tree swallow
Northern rough-winged swallow
Bank swallow
Cliff swallow
Barn swallow
Carolina chickadee
Marsh wren
Blue-gray gnatcatcher
Northern mockingbird
European starling
Yellow-rumped warbler
Common yellowthroat
Eastern towhee
Swamp sparrow
White-throated sparrow
Northern cardinal
Indigo bunting
Red-winged blackbird
Boat-tailed grackle

Craig Litteken
Daphne



Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Three ceruleans in a week
From: <Memontei AT aol.com>
Date: 11 Apr 2014 19:57:49 -0700
Hello all,
  
 You many not believe this but I have seen or heard 3 cerulean warblers around 
Birmingham this week. On Monday, I was at Ruffner Mountain and briefly heard a 
singing male cerulean. I will admit I would have liked more time with it for 
additional confirmation. However, before work this morning in my backyard next 
to Moss Rock Preserve on Shades Mountain, I had great views of a singing male 
cerulean for over 5 minutes. On an early lunch break later this morning I 
birded the Vulcan trail on Red Mountain and in a patch of woods at the end of 
the mile long path was another singing male cerulean warbler. I did not see 
this one, but it was repeatedly hammering tzeedl tzeedl ti ti tzeeee. I heard a 
parula for comparison earlier on the trail. Two ceruleans in the same morning 
on different ridge systems, and a third one earlier in the week. Is this 
species making a comeback or did I just use up all my luck for the year? 


 Enjoy and Conserve the Creation,
 Ken Wills 
  
 For this reason I say to you, do not be worried about your life,---Look at the 
birds of the air, that they do not sow, nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet 
your heavenly Father feeds them. 

 Mathew 6:25-26

 
 
Subject: TVA Nature Trails
From: "Simbeck, Damien J" <djsimbeck AT tva.gov>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 15:12:07 +0000
Jack Paul and I joined Virginia birder Roberta Kellum for a couple hours on the 
TVA Nature Trails this morning. Blue-gray Gnatcatchers were, but far, the bird 
of the day. We found nine species of warblers including a fairly early 
Nashville Warbler. We also had an early Swainson's Thrush. Warblers included 
Blue-winged, Prothonotary, Orange-crowned (2), Nashville, Hooded, Northern 
Parula, Yellow-rumped, Prairie, and Black-throated Green. Probably our most 
interesting bird was a Ruby-crowned Elaenia. Jack found a bird perched in a 
privet thicket and called our attention to a possible Phoebe. I got the bird in 
my view and thought, sitting like a flycatcher, but looks more like an Empid. I 
finally got a good look and, sure enough, it had an eye ring and wing bars 
(poorly visible the way the bird was sitting). We then tried to determine which 
Empid we had (recent head chart was referenced). The bird then looked down and 
we could clearly see a red patch on top of its head. I am not familiar with all 
(any) the Elaenias of the world, but if one has a red head patch, this was it. 
We immediately tried to get some photos because we had no idea what we were 
seeing. Then the bird changed position, from erect flycatcher posture to 
horizontal. We then saw it had yellow primaries and outer tail feathers, which 
it proceeded to start flitting regularly. Finally a confirmed ID...Ruby-crowned 
Kinglet. It's not fair when they sit like a flycatcher!! We ended our walk with 
a brief conversation with the local Barred Owl. 


Damien J. Simbeck
Watershed Representative
Tennessee Valley Authority
Natural Resource Management - West Operations
P.O. Box 1010, MPB 1H-M
Muscle Shoals, AL 35662-1010
Phone:  256-386-2543
Fax:  256-386-2954
Subject: Re: Bewick's Wren
From: SueMoske AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 14:41:42 -0400 (EDT)
The Bewick's Wren has not returned to the feeder as of 1:40, but if anyone 
wants to come search the woods surrounding my house, you are welcome to do so. 
I live on a bluff on Green Mountain at 14035 Valley Vista Drive. 256-881-2629. 


Sue Moske

 Huntsville

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: SueMoske 
To: albirds 
Sent: Thu, Apr 10, 2014 12:08 pm
Subject: [ALBIRDS] Bewick's Wren


 
  
    
                  
Hi, all,

I had a Bewick's Wren at my nut feeder mid-morning. I have been sitting at the 
window waiting to see if it returns. Two Carolina Wrens frequent this feeder 
every day, and unfortunately, they are bigger than the Bewick's. The Carolinas 
have made a couple of visits to the feeder since the Bewick's was here. If the 
Bewick's Wren does return, I will post it. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville, AL

    
             

  
Subject: Bewick's Wren
From: SueMoske AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 13:08:29 -0400 (EDT)
Hi, all,

I had a Bewick's Wren at my nut feeder mid-morning. I have been sitting at the 
window waiting to see if it returns. Two Carolina Wrens frequent this feeder 
every day, and unfortunately, they are bigger than the Bewick's. The Carolinas 
have made a couple of visits to the feeder since the Bewick's was here. If the 
Bewick's Wren does return, I will post it. 


Sue Moske
Huntsville, AL
Subject: Last post. hummer at Wheeler
From: J C Allen <ssallen1 AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 07:46:37 -0700 (PDT)
Last post was by
Jane Allen , Volunteer
Wheeler NWR
Decatur,AL
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummer-Wheeler NWR,Decatur AL
From: J C Allen <ssallen1 AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 07:42:45 -0700 (PDT)
Staff at Visitor Center, Wheeler NWR, reported ruby-throated hummingbird at 
feeder-April 9 , 2014. 
Subject: Madison County Wildlife Rehabilitators is Seeking Summer Volunteers
From: "Kenneth Ward" <bustmilo AT knology.net>
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 22:00:02 -0500
FYI:

Madison County Wildlife Rehabilitators is Seeking Summer Volunteers

Madison County Wildlife Rehabilitators is currently the only federally
permitted organization north of Birmingham able to rehabilitate songbirds.
As you can imagine, the demand for help with birds is high, and our
organization is small!  We are seeking bird experts and bird lovers of all
ages to help us this summer, and we have some unique and exciting
opportunities available!  

* We receive numerous calls on our hotline regarding "orphaned" nestlings
and fledglings, most of which simply need to be properly renested or
reunited with their families.  Would you like to help us help the birds in
North Alabama to be properly reunited with their wild parents so that these
birds can live the wild lives they were created to have?

* Do your kids need something fascinating and fun to do this summer? We can
teach them how to raise mealworms! Not only will it entertain and educate
kids of all ages, but you'll be helping to feed many hungry mouths! 

* Do you frequently go birdwatching and are aware of active songbird nests
and gosling families in your area?  We will be seeking surrogate placement
of some healthy baby birds this year, but will need to be able to match the
species and ages of these baby orphans.  If you are able to help us find
suitable surrogate families and are able to monitor the success of these
experiments for several days, you alone will be the key to exciting new
conservation opportunities that to our knowledge has never been done in
North Alabama.  

 

If you are interested in hearing more about these and other opportunities,
please call our hotline at 256-258-9453 (WILD)!  We look forward to hearing
from you!

 

Please feel free to check us out on: 

 
https://www.facebook.com/MadisonCountyWildlifeRehabilitators




-- 

Sincerely,

 

Stephanie Kern

 

Madison County Wildlife Rehabilitators

(256)258-WILD
Subject: Broad winged haws
From: jjoal AT att.net
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 13:52:49 -0500
Greetings: a pair of Broad Winged hawks just joined the neighborhood! They are 
fun to watch! Good to hear the GC flycatchers as well! Macon county has given 
the best views of warblers so far! But not the same as the coast! Good birding! 
Lorna West,Opelika 


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Northern Harrier still here
From: <justadude80 AT hotmail.com>
Date: 09 Apr 2014 07:14:12 -0700
About three months ago I questioned if Northern Harriers ever spend the summer 
in North Alabama. I said it because I know of a field where I see them all 
winter long and last year I saw one there after the trees had turned green, I 
think it was June. 


 So this year I am going to pay attention to when I see it again. My sweetheart 
Inez saw it yesterday near that same field, so as of mid-April it is still 
here. If anyone wants to look for it, it is on Cambridge Lane, just east of 
Athens. Cambridge lane runs north and south connecting Hwy 72 to Huntsville 
Browns-Ferry Road. The entire road is only about two miles long with big fields 
on both sides for most of the length of the road. She has been seeing it mostly 
about half way between Hwy 72 and Browns-Ferry road. 

 

 Rocky Baker - Limestone County
Subject: Indigo Buntings, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Enterprise
From: Rick <movarick AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 08:27:44 -0500
Five first of season Indigo Buntings stopped by our backyard yesterday,
snacking on sunflower seeds from our feeders. All five were here again at
daylight this morning, plus the addition of a beautiful male Rose-breasted
Grosbeak. Our Ruby-throated Hummingbird count is now up to at least 25, all
fussing over the feeders. Stepping out on the deck has become an exercise
in caution!

Rick Ingram
Enterprise, AL
Subject: Re: Fort Morgan
From: Mac Walter <macwalter AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 8 Apr 2014 22:06:15 -0500
A lovely morning for us as well. A wild cerulean and blue winged warbler were 
hi lights for me. Many others as well not 19 tho. 


Mac Walter
410-719-0607-h
410-913-1730-c
macwalter.com

> On Apr 8, 2014, at 7:12 PM, RubyThroat AT aol.com wrote:
> 
> today we banded about 650 birds.  Another fallout day.  If was wonderful.
> Clay-colored sparrow and Baltimore Oriole were best birds;  "All Were Great".
> Bob Sargent and hard working crew.
>