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Updated on Wednesday, July 30 at 01:52 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hooded Merganser,©Julie Zickefoose

30 Jul Tricolored Heron in Pine Bluff [Delos McCauley ]
30 Jul The scion of Pinnacle Prairie ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
30 Jul eBird -- Beaver Lake--Oak Ridge Park -- Jul 30, 2014 [Art Weigand ]
30 Jul Nao Ueda [Dan Scheiman ]
29 Jul Re: Rubythroat migration [Sara Caulk ]
29 Jul Rubythroat migration [CK Franklin ]
29 Jul Re: California Gull--BIG YES! [David Ray ]
29 Jul Sage Grouse video ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Jul Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter! [Samantha Scheiman ]
28 Jul Request for Bird Walk Leaders [Dan Scheiman ]
27 Jul Starting from the prairie mounds at Agri Park ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 Jul California Gull - YES [Danny Townsend ]
27 Jul Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter! ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
27 Jul Last call for migration count data ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
26 Jul Re: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends) [Jeffrey Short ]
26 Jul Re: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends) [Janine Perlman ]
26 Jul Almost comical [Bill Thurman ]
26 Jul California Gull--Yes [Terry Butler ]
26 Jul Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends) [Barry Haas ]
26 Jul Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter! [Norman Lavers ]
26 Jul HOTTEST birding of the year: Frog and Valley Saturday August 9 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
25 Jul California Gull No [Jim Dixon ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns [Joan Reynolds ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns [Jeffrey Short ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
25 Jul California Gull [Michael ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns [Hilary David Chapman ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns [Jeffrey Short ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns [Janine Perlman ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns [Bill Thurman ]
25 Jul Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns [Judy & Don ]
25 Jul These aren't inconsequential concerns ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
24 Jul Amazing [Bill ]
24 Jul Fayetteville's easiest Painted Bunting ever ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
14 Jul Re: Wood Stork [Kenny Nichols ]
23 Jul Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter! [Samantha Scheiman ]
23 Jul A Chance to Reciprocate. [Jack and Pam ]
23 Jul Re: SW Arkansas Birds [ ]
23 Jul Adult Bald Eagle near Goshen [James Morgan ]
23 Jul SWAINSON'S HAWKS (2) NEAR CHEROKEE CITY THIS MORNING ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
23 Jul FIGHTING GREAT EGRETS [JFR ]
23 Jul SW Arkansas Birds [Michael Linz ]
22 Jul MOS fall meeting: Sept. 21 with photographer & ID expert Kevin Karlson [Jason Hoeksema ]
22 Jul Re: Database Update [Ann Gordon ]
22 Jul Re: Database Update [Allan Mueller ]
22 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 22 [David Arbour ]
22 Jul Database Update [Lyndal York ]
22 Jul Ruddy Ducks Part II [Doc George ]
22 Jul RUDDY DUCKS IN BREEDING PLUMAGE [JFR ]
22 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Gail Miller ]
22 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Terry Butler ]
22 Jul Re: Forest Man [Sally Jo Gibson ]
22 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Bill Shepherd ]
21 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Michael Linz ]
21 Jul Re: Forest Man [Dorothy Cooney ]
21 Jul Dyer Lake [Sandy Berger ]
21 Jul Long-billed wren [Jerry Butler ]
21 Jul Ruddy Duck in breeding plumage [JFR ]
21 Jul NEOTROPIC AND DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS AT EAGLE WATCH, GENTRY ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Jul ArkDem 7/21/14: Birds find island as waypoint to Brazil [Barry Haas ]
21 Jul AAS News of Members ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
19 Jul Good Bird [Terry Butler ]
18 Jul Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton [Joyce Hartmann ]
18 Jul crested caracara [Danny Townsend ]
18 Jul Crested Caracara - probably not [Kelly Chitwood ]
18 Jul Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton [Dawner ]
18 Jul Crested Caracara in El Dorado [Danny Townsend ]
18 Jul some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
18 Jul Basic info about GBH killed on Centerton powerline -- birders can help ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul MESSAGES FROM A SADLY DISHEVELED FORM ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul Birds Eat Insects! Volunteer or Attend the Insect Festival of Arkansas ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
17 Jul ticket price ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
17 Jul Mulhollan Waterfowl Blind at Lake Fayetteville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul nothing to do with birds - for people near Fayetteville ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
16 Jul Magic Mix for birds [Sally Jo Gibson ]
16 Jul Forest Man [Herschel Raney ]

Subject: Tricolored Heron in Pine Bluff
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:26:53 -0500
John Redman and I observed an immature Tricolored Heron just beyond the mud
flat on Wilbur West Road (South Ohio Street) this morning.  It was a long
distance out but we were able to walk across the dry mud flat to get decent
shots.  The coming rains will prevent that.  The heron was among a Great
Blue Heron, a Great Egret, a Snowy Egret and a Little Blue Heron.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: The scion of Pinnacle Prairie
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:24:06 +0000
A BLUE GROSBEAK IS SINGING ON THE FIELD EDGE AND AUBREY SHEPHERD, scion of 
Pinnacle Prairie and adjacent World Peace Wetland Prairie, is out in the middle 
smoking a cig and photographing fetching yellow Seedbox (Ludwigia) flowers. Im 
on my bicycle, on Pinnacle Prairie Trail, with binoculars exploring south 
Fayetteville, below campus. 


Aubrey seems oblivious to ticks and chiggers, and blackberries, too, for hes 
wearing jean shorts and his legs have old scars and fresh blood streaks. Thats 
our Aubrey, conservationist, good government advocate, outdoors writer for the 
digital age. 


I started out at 8 this morning near intersection of highway 71 B (South 
School) and MLK Blvd for some more bicycle birding. In less than two leisurely 
hours  I mean geezer leisurely -- Ive gone through several tunnels and 
crossed 3 or 4 fine bridges over Town Branch Creek and various tribs, each with 
a protected buffer of riparian vegetation, always an invitation to stop and 
look, plus meeting Aubrey, pure lagniappe on a bike trip. 


While Aubrey wades out in grass and brambles, Im spotting with my bins: 
slender mountain mint, blazing stars, ashy sunflowers, blue vervain (Verbena), 
rattlesnake master, and back-and-forth flights of American Goldfinches midst 
their nesting season. 


After a visit, Im off to nearby Walker Park Trail. While crossing the creek I 
hear familiar sharp waterthrush call notes. No problem. My dizzy pace of 
pedaling drops from 3 to 0 MPH; I lean on the rail and wait. Soon enough, here 
comes a fine Louisiana walking shady shale bedrock, with another upstream and 
unseen singing in partial song. A talkative flock of Fish Crows (4+) perches in 
a snag. Barn Swallows (7) patrol soccer fields. A White-eyed Vireo sings in 
shady bushes. 


The shale below the bridge reminds me you sometimes find pseudo fossils in the 
Fayetteville Shale Formation. Sure enough while watching the waterthrush I spot 
a nice example of turtle rocks, a sedimentary formation resembling a big turtle 
shell and maybe 300 million years old. Of more recent vintage, Red-eyed Vireo, 
Summer Tanager, and a Green Heron, fine squawk as it flies over. 


Theres art, too. Walker Park Trail passes a fabulous historical mural that 
includes my old friend, Eleanor Lincoln Johnson whose civic motto was, One 
persons problem is everyones problem. 


The network here includes Tsa La Gi Trail, Cherokee in their own language. It 
roughly parallels the Trail of Tears route taken by Cherokees and other Native 
Americans forced from their homes in the 1830s. when Fayetteville was 500. It 
passes over a creek and under a railroad trestle, past a nice block of mature 
hardwoods, and on through what was once an industrial zone of trucking, 
milling, and storage, now fronted by strip malls and redeveloped as apartment 
complexes. 


Tsa La Gi Trail is the mix of history, nature, and memory. Going forward, this 
is a Woo Pig Sooey Zone. You never know for sure whats ahead. Last bird: 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. 
Subject: eBird -- Beaver Lake--Oak Ridge Park -- Jul 30, 2014
From: Art Weigand <aweigand13 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 12:02:50 -0500
It was an excellent morning for birding between showers. I got great looks at a 
number of warblers. 


aweigand
Jul 30, 2014
Beaver Lake--Oak Ridge Park
Traveling
12 miles
282 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Very cool 69 degree morning with intermittent rain. Birds were very 
active between rains. 

10 Canada Goose
16 Wild Turkey
1 Great Blue Heron
1 Red-shouldered Hawk
1 Broad-winged Hawk
5 Mourning Dove
1 Greater Roadrunner
4 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
3 Red-headed Woodpecker
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
5 Downy Woodpecker
3 Pileated Woodpecker
2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
4 Eastern Phoebe
2 Eastern Kingbird
4 White-eyed Vireo
7 Red-eyed Vireo
3 Blue Jay
9 American Crow
1 Fish Crow
3 Barn Swallow
6 Carolina Chickadee
9 Tufted Titmouse
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
7 Carolina Wren
7 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5 Eastern Bluebird
1 Blue-winged Warbler
6 Northern Parula
1 Yellow-throated Warbler
3 Black-and-white Warbler
2 Ovenbird
1 Louisiana Waterthrush
2 Kentucky Warbler
1 Hooded Warbler
3 Chipping Sparrow
2 Summer Tanager
8 Northern Cardinal
2 Blue Grosbeak
13 Indigo Bunting
2 House Finch
6 American Goldfinch




Art Weigand
Wichita KS/Beaver Lake AR
Subject: Nao Ueda
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 03:08:26 +0000
Today the birding community lost our dear friend Nao Ueda. Some of you will 
know her from ASCA field trips and AAS meetings. She worked alongside me at 
Audubon Arkansas for a time. She was an outspoken environmental advocate and a 
green guru who showed us all how to live a sustainable lifestyle. Nao was well 
known in the Little Rock community for her work with the Arkansas 
Sustainability Network, for her urban homestead in downtown Little Rock, and 
for her blog, Green AR by the Day. She was in the midst of getting a degree in 
environmental law at the Bowen School of Law. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Rubythroat migration
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:32:52 -0500




Subject: Rubythroat migration
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 11:20:18 -0500
All,

Over the past few days, I hung out the majority of my feeders in 3 concentrated 
clusters around the yard. At the present time I am recording between 5-8 RTHU 
per day. Over the next 14 day period I expect that number to rise into the 
teens on a daily basis with the count approaching 20 birds per day by the 
middle of August. 


Otherwise nothing remarkable in the yard other than the smaller birds drinking 
from the ant moats even though there is fresh water available elsewhere in the 
yard. Also, the downy woodpeckers seem to enjoy enjoy the nectar nearly as much 
as the hummingbirds. 

Cindy
waiting patiently for the hummingbird onslaught here in the Heights
Little Rock


 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: California Gull--BIG YES!
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 09:29:35 -0500
I'm traveling to Atkins this afternoon and was wondering if anyone else was 
going to be California gull watching  AT  Dardenale that might give a heads up on 
any sighting today? 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2014, at 1:23 PM, Mitchell Pruitt 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> The California Gull was present from 11:45-12:50 (when we left) this morning. 
It was seen directly north of Delaware Point, perched on a piling next to a 
dock with a red roof. It then flew south, past us and sat on the water near the 
osprey nest and some logs (where I think Michael Linz's photos were taken). As 
it flew past banking over the water, Ryan Risher and I, were able to get great 
looks at the thick, dark sub-terminal band on the tail and other plumage 
characteristics. I think we both also got identifiable photos. I'll post those 
later. 

> 
> A state bird and a lifer!
> 
> There were also numerous Forster's and Black Terns, as well as 4 RB Gulls and 
a Herring Gull...huh? Gulls must be moving in early this season. 

> 
> ~Mitchell
> 
> Sent from my iPhone.
Subject: Sage Grouse video
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:27:19 +0000
Jerry Davis sent me this link to a video report on the Sage Grouse issues out 
West, particularly in Wyoming.I find these things interesting, not only because 
of Sage Grouse, but because of the numerous elements of controversy: local v 
national, energy development v conservation, wind energy v grouse conservation, 
etc. and how this all must interact with the specific biology of a specific 
species. It reminds me a great deal of the complex interactions that involved 
my years working on Red-cockaded Woodpecker issues. I am reminded in all of 
this that good willed-people occupy a variety of positions and best outcomes 
result from everyone listening before deciding: 



http://features.aol.com/video/soon-be-endangered-bird-has-big-consequences?icid=maing-grid7%7Chtmlws-main-bb%7Cdl30%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D506500 

Subject: Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter!
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:29:52 -0500
George,

You did read that right, so long as drawings fall with the scope of
the Arkansas
Audubon Society !  Feel free to send
your artwork, whether rough field sketches or masterpieces, to
samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com.  Just email me if you have further questions
about this opportunity.

Thanks,

Samantha Scheiman
*Arkansas Birds* editor
Little Rock, Ark.


On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 12:57 AM, George R. Hoelzeman 
wrote:

>  so, if I'm reading this right I could send in some drawings?
>
> I could actually do that.
>
> George (n. Conway Co.  Drawing, that I CAN do! ;))
>
>
> On 7/26/2014 10:15 AM, Norman Lavers wrote:
>
>  Would you like me to do something on insect natural history, something
> with brief text illustrated by photographs? For an example (to show you to
> see if you think it would be suitable), I am thinking right now of doing
> something on insects mimicking more dangerous insects, so that predators
> will leave them alone. I'm thinking expressly of all the insects that mimic
> bumblebees, and the ingenious methods they use, and the complexity of
> motives.
>
>  If that would work for you, I expect I could manage something on insect
> natural history on a regular basis.
>
>  Norm Lavers
>
>  PS If I send you something I would do it in my low-tech way, an email
> with pictures attached, and a note of where the pictures go. But Cheryl
> says that, with her help, I could probably make it into a "document."
> Would that make it easier for you?
>
>
>    On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:28 PM, Samantha Scheiman
>   wrote:
>
>
>   Arkansas birders,
>
>  As Dottie Boyles expressed, the next *Arkansas Birds* newsletter of the
> Arkansas Audubon Society will be published and in your mailbox before you
> know it!  While you are compiling birding news for Dottie (email your
> updates to dboyles AT arkansasedc.com by August 1), consider also sharing an
> additional piece for the newsletter that highlights birds, conservation
> issues, Arkansas wildlife/plants/natural communities, or something
> similar.
>
> Virtually any format will do ... photos paired with captions, accounts
> from your most recent birding trips near and far, artwork, haikus,
> editorials, news stories, birding gear reviews, app reviews, local
> coverage of conservation issues, intriguing backyard bird sightings, etc.
> To get a small taste of what I'm looking for as newsletter editor, check
> out the most recent *Arkansas Birds*:
> http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf
> 
 

>
>
> For work to appear in the September issue, I need your inspired pieces by
> August 15 (emailed to samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com), but know that I will
> happily accept pieces anytime.
>
>  Lastly, if you don't receive *Arkansas Birds* in your mailbox, become a
> member of the Arkansas Audubon Society here
> 
 

> to receive this quarterly publication and support our diverse work, which 
includes 

> the Halberg Ecology Camp for 11- and 12-year-olds, Adult Natural History
> Workshops, educational conventions, Arkansas's bird records committee, and
> so much more.  Please join us as we strive to be a potent force in the
> conservation of Arkansas's natural resources.
>
>  Many thanks,
>
> Samantha Scheiman
>  Little Rock, Ark.
>  *Arkansas Birds* editor
>
>   --
> “To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
> waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
>
>
>
>
> --
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County
>
>


-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: Request for Bird Walk Leaders
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:23:12 +0000
I would greatly appreciate volunteers to lead two Little Rock bird walks that I 
am unable to lead due to prior commitments. 


The annual Hillcrest Harvest is Saturday October 4 http://harvestfest.us . A 
bird walk in Allsopp Park is scheduled to meet at 7:15. There are lots of fun 
things to do after the bird walk, including a hearty pancake breakfast, the 
farmers' market, and lots of vendors and musicians. I'm sad to miss it but I'll 
be in WI. 


The Grapevine (TX) Garden Club will be touring central Arkansas at the end of 
April/beginning of May, 2015. They love birds as well as native plants, and 
have asked for a walk for 15-20 people at the Little Rock Audubon Center on 
Saturday May 2 at 8 AM. I'll be at the AAS meeting that weekend. The 
LRAC/Gillam Park is great for spring migrants. If you know native plants too, 
that's a plus. 


Please contact me off-list to be connected with event coordinators. Thanks. 

Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Starting from the prairie mounds at Agri Park
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 23:57:39 +0000
Bike trails north of the main UA-Fayetteville campus pass through and alongside 
former Tallgrass Prairie lands of the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station. 
This morning I parked at Agri Park on Garland Avenue (Highway 112), a small 
shady triangle with a notable canopy of mature oaks growing from impressive 
natural features called prairie mounds. Bird-wise, a logical place to explore a 
century and a half since the first rough frame structures were built on the 
hill dominated now by Old Main and a strange creature called a Razorback. 


From the prairie mounds at Agri Park, I rode roughly west for 1.5 miles, 
through a nifty bike tunnel under 112, then through the farm. Its open country 
in the middle of Arkansass fastest growth area courtesy of research projects 
involving cows and pastures, chicken houses, experiments with native grasses, a 
watershed research project, horses, and maybe goats? Midst all that, there are 
Northern Bobwhites and Mourning Doves and an American Kestrel on a powerline. 


Its former prairie and not strip malls because of more than a century ag 
research. Riding along, I wonder if somewhere in the genes of the Dickcissels, 
Bobwhites, and Eastern Kingbirds are there memories of Passenger Pigeons? Of 
Greater Prairie-Chickens? But there are lots of others riding the trail and I 
need to stick to business or get run over. 


Then I returned to the park and rode east, on the Meadow Valley Trail along the 
southern edge of the farm, then north on Scull Creek Trail along the farms 
east side. Maybe another 1.5 miles and back. There are crop fields here with 
Eastern Meadowlarks. I walk them in winter on the Fayetteville CBC looking for 
Western Meadowlarks, Horned Larks, and Lapland Longspurs. Today there are 
Red-winged Blackbirds, Fish Crows, an Eastern Phoebe feeding a Brown-headed 
Cowbird, and overhead, a Green Heron. 


I may have ridden 6 miles, leisurely (a sign that said SLOW is no problem for 
me), and I did all that in about 2 hours. Heres a list. Keep in mind its late 
July in a heat wave and drought: 



Canada Goose - 31

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Great Blue Heron - 1

Green Heron - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

American Kestrel - 4

Killdeer

Rock Pigeon ~50

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Mourning Dove - 12

Chimney Swift - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 6

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 7

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 10

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Wren - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 2

American Robin  50+

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 6

Brown Thrasher - 2

European Starling - hundreds

Northern Cardinal - 4

Indigo Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird

Eastern Meadowlark - 7

Common Grackle - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

House Finch - 7

American Goldfinch

House Sparrow
Subject: California Gull - YES
From: Danny Townsend <perfectplaces AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 15:14:13 -0500
We pulled up at Dardanelle Lock & Dam at 9:37a.m., the gull flew over at 
9:44a.m. heading down river. 

Subject: Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter!
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 00:57:31 -0500
so, if I'm reading this right I could send in some drawings?

I could actually do that.

George (n. Conway Co.  Drawing, that I CAN do! ;))

On 7/26/2014 10:15 AM, Norman Lavers wrote:
> Would you like me to do something on insect natural history, something 
> with brief text illustrated by photographs? For an example (to show 
> you to see if you think it would be suitable), I am thinking right now 
> of doing something on insects mimicking more dangerous insects, so 
> that predators will leave them alone. I'm thinking expressly of all 
> the insects that mimic bumblebees, and the ingenious methods they use, 
> and the complexity of motives.
>
> If that would work for you, I expect I could manage something on 
> insect natural history on a regular basis.
>
> Norm Lavers
>
> PS If I send you something I would do it in my low-tech way, an email 
> with pictures attached, and a note of where the pictures go. But 
> Cheryl says that, with her help, I could probably make it into a 
> "document."  Would that make it easier for you?
>
>
> On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:28 PM, Samantha Scheiman 
>  wrote:
>
>
> Arkansas birders,
>
> As Dottie Boyles expressed, the next /Arkansas Birds/ newsletter of 
> the Arkansas Audubon Society will be published and in your mailbox 
> before you know it!  While you are compiling birding news for Dottie 
> (email your updates to dboyles AT arkansasedc.com 
> by August 1), consider also sharing an 
> additional piece for the newsletter that highlights birds, 
> conservation issues, Arkansas wildlife/plants/natural communities, or 
> something similar.
>
> Virtually any format will do ... photos paired with captions, accounts 
> from your most recent birding trips near and far, artwork, haikus, 
> editorials, news stories, birding gear reviews, app reviews, local 
> coverage of conservation issues, intriguing backyard bird sightings, 
> etc.  To get a small taste of what I'm looking for as newsletter 
> editor, check out the most recent /Arkansas Birds/: 
> http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf 
> 
 

>
>
> For work to appear in the September issue, I need your inspired pieces 
> by August 15 (emailed to samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com 
> ), but know that I will happily 
> accept pieces//anytime.
>
> Lastly, if you don't receive /Arkansas Birds/ in your mailbox, become 
> a member of the Arkansas Audubon Society here 
> 
 

> to receive this quarterly publication and support our diverse work, 
> which includes the Halberg Ecology Camp for 11- and 12-year-olds, 
> Adult Natural History Workshops, educational conventions, Arkansas's 
> bird records committee, and so much more.  Please join us as we strive 
> to be a potent force in the conservation of Arkansas's natural resources.
>
> Many thanks,
>
> Samantha Scheiman
> Little Rock, Ark.
> /Arkansas Birds/ editor
>
> -- 
> “To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless 
> waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
>
>
>

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Last call for migration count data
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 03:24:47 +0000
Greetings all,
I've wading through the data entry for the migration count article. I've 
received > 85 checklists from compilers and eBird, but there is still room for 
YOURS, if you haven't already sent it in. 


Because the numbers get normalized by party hours any count is worth sending. A 
count with 10 parties and 150 sp can be compared to a count by 1 party of 30 
sp. So please don't think yours isn't good enough! 


I'm planning for up to 4 count days per county.

Guidelines for data submission:
1 - Did you have > 30 species?
2 - Did you keep track of the hours?
3 - Was it in a county other than these? (Already have 4 lists from these 
counties): Arkansas, Benton, Craighead, Crittenden, Desha, Faulkner, Franklin, 
Garland, Greene, Jefferson, Logan, Marion, Pope, Pulaski, Saline, Scott, Sharp, 
Washington and White. 


If you have one, please email it to me by 8/1: leanderson "at" fs.fed.us or 
mail it to PO Box 195 Hector, AR. 72843 


Thanks to all of you that got out and enjoyed spring migration! Cheers, Leif  AT  
Hector 







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Subject: Re: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends)
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 22:07:21 -0500
I am no fan of commercialized sports since it distracts us from other,
important things. (Sorry Kim and Doug!) But, maybe that is the idea...

My understanding of "bird-proof" glass is that it only works when the
outside light is stronger than the inside lighting:  during the daytime when
only local birds are involved in bird collisions.  There are other
ideas--like angling the glass to reduce reflectivity to birds (like at some
parts of Crystal Bridges Museum) instead of replacing all the panes with
more expensive glass.

Since most of the usage of the new Vikings complex will be during the
Fall-and-Winter, then won't migrating warblers, etc. be spared since the
largest expanse of windowed area be facing west i.e., not of interest to
north-south migrants?  I would like to hear more about the mitigating
measures planned to reduce nighttime bird collisions.  And, if there is data
from the surrounding area about building-bird collisions, it would add some
information that we could use in the fight (which may be
OBE--"overcome-by-events" at this time.

Re: Cargill-jump on them with all four feet and buy local (though the local
producers may get their little hogs from Mt. Judea).

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry Haas
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 2:43 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please
forward to your birder friends)

Dear ARBIRDers,

On Wednesday Jack Stewart, Arkansas's representative on the National Audubon
Society Board of Directors, posted several links- one urging Cargill remove
the factory hog farm near the Buffalo River and the other regarding a new
football stadium to be built in Minnesota that may end up being a major
killer of migrating birds.  The connection other than negative environmental
consequences?  Cargill, for whom the hogs are produced near the Buffalo
River (they get the hogs, we get the waste), is headquartered in Minnesota.

I've already sent my comments re the new Minnesota football stadium, and
intend to do so re the factory hog farm.

Here's a commentary in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune I just came across
urging that the new stadium incorporate bird-safe glass:

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/268670942.html

And here's an artist's rendering so you can see the extent of the glass
exterior:

http://www.vikings.com/stadium/new-stadium/by-the-numbers.html

Of the estimated $975 million stadium construction cost (that's not a typo!)
$348 million is from "the state" (read taxpayers) and another $150 million
from "the city" (also the taxpayers, Minneapolis-St. Paul).  The bird-safe
glass would add $1.1 million to the cost, or 1/10 of 1% to the cost.
Wouldn't you say taxpayers have a right and responsibility given their 51%
share of the cost to demand as bird safe a stadium as possible?

What if you don't so much as lift a finger, and the migrating birds you
expect to see each fall die flying into the new stadium's glass walls?  No
or fewer birds for you- and me!  It will be too late once the stadium is
built.  How many bird's lives will be spared over the life of that stadium
for the $1.1 million investment?

Take a few seconds and voice your concerns.  Here's the link Jack provided
so you can do so:

http://tinyurl.com/nprxmfq

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas=
Subject: Re: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends)
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 16:37:50 -0500
Thanks for this, Barry.  I've written letters on behalf of both issues.  
It's very easy, and I found that the more I learned about each one, the 
more specific and heartfelt my letters became.

Presently there is a lot of resistance from Cargill and from the 
Vikings; they show little inclination to make the badly needed changes.  
Popular sentiment could change their minds.

Please write now; time is of the essence.  And of course please urge 
anyone you know in MN to do the same!

Janine


On 7/26/2014 2:42 PM, Barry Haas wrote:
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> On Wednesday Jack Stewart, Arkansas's representative on the National Audubon 
Society Board of Directors, posted several links- one urging Cargill remove the 
factory hog farm near the Buffalo River and the other regarding a new football 
stadium to be built in Minnesota that may end up being a major killer of 
migrating birds. The connection other than negative environmental consequences? 
Cargill, for whom the hogs are produced near the Buffalo River (they get the 
hogs, we get the waste), is headquartered in Minnesota. 

>
> I've already sent my comments re the new Minnesota football stadium, and 
intend to do so re the factory hog farm. 

>
> Here's a commentary in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune I just came across urging 
that the new stadium incorporate bird-safe glass: 

>
> http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/268670942.html
>
> And here's an artist's rendering so you can see the extent of the glass 
exterior: 

>
> http://www.vikings.com/stadium/new-stadium/by-the-numbers.html
>
> Of the estimated $975 million stadium construction cost (that's not a typo!) 
$348 million is from "the state" (read taxpayers) and another $150 million from 
"the city" (also the taxpayers, Minneapolis-St. Paul). The bird-safe glass 
would add $1.1 million to the cost, or 1/10 of 1% to the cost. Wouldn't you say 
taxpayers have a right and responsibility given their 51% share of the cost to 
demand as bird safe a stadium as possible? 

>
> What if you don't so much as lift a finger, and the migrating birds you 
expect to see each fall die flying into the new stadium's glass walls? No or 
fewer birds for you- and me! It will be too late once the stadium is built. How 
many bird's lives will be spared over the life of that stadium for the $1.1 
million investment? 

>
> Take a few seconds and voice your concerns. Here's the link Jack provided so 
you can do so: 

>
> http://tinyurl.com/nprxmfq
>
>  From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
Subject: Almost comical
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 15:29:14 -0600
This morning I saw and heard a curious and almost comical scene. While
driving down Center Valley Rd, very near to Baker Creek in Pope Co. (very
rural area) I saw an adult male Wild Turkey and his hen walking down the
creek bank apparently to get a drink of water. I stopped my car and watched
for around 20 - 25 seconds. The hen was leading the walk down and the male
was following 2 or 3 feet behind, "barking" the whole time. I had never
seen a scene like that before.


            Bill Thurman
Subject: California Gull--Yes
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 15:19:54 -0500
With Kenny Nichols as a guide, he located and stuck my eye to his scope to
show me a California Gull  this morning.

 

Thanks Kenny,

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR 
Subject: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends)
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 14:42:59 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

On Wednesday Jack Stewart, Arkansas's representative on the National Audubon 
Society Board of Directors, posted several links- one urging Cargill remove the 
factory hog farm near the Buffalo River and the other regarding a new football 
stadium to be built in Minnesota that may end up being a major killer of 
migrating birds. The connection other than negative environmental consequences? 
Cargill, for whom the hogs are produced near the Buffalo River (they get the 
hogs, we get the waste), is headquartered in Minnesota. 


I've already sent my comments re the new Minnesota football stadium, and intend 
to do so re the factory hog farm. 


Here's a commentary in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune I just came across urging 
that the new stadium incorporate bird-safe glass: 


http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/268670942.html

And here's an artist's rendering so you can see the extent of the glass 
exterior: 


http://www.vikings.com/stadium/new-stadium/by-the-numbers.html

Of the estimated $975 million stadium construction cost (that's not a typo!) 
$348 million is from "the state" (read taxpayers) and another $150 million from 
"the city" (also the taxpayers, Minneapolis-St. Paul). The bird-safe glass 
would add $1.1 million to the cost, or 1/10 of 1% to the cost. Wouldn't you say 
taxpayers have a right and responsibility given their 51% share of the cost to 
demand as bird safe a stadium as possible? 


What if you don't so much as lift a finger, and the migrating birds you expect 
to see each fall die flying into the new stadium's glass walls? No or fewer 
birds for you- and me! It will be too late once the stadium is built. How many 
bird's lives will be spared over the life of that stadium for the $1.1 million 
investment? 


Take a few seconds and voice your concerns. Here's the link Jack provided so 
you can do so: 


http://tinyurl.com/nprxmfq

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter!
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 08:15:09 -0700
Would you like me to do something on insect natural history, something with 
brief text illustrated by photographs? For an example (to show you to see if 
you think it would be suitable), I am thinking right now of doing something on 
insects mimicking more dangerous insects, so that predators will leave them 
alone. I'm thinking expressly of all the insects that mimic bumblebees, and the 
ingenious methods they use, and the complexity of motives. 


If that would work for you, I expect I could manage something on insect natural 
history on a regular basis.  


Norm Lavers

PS If I send you something I would do it in my low-tech way, an email with 
pictures attached, and a note of where the pictures go. But Cheryl says that, 
with her help, I could probably make it into a "document."  Would that make it 
easier for you? 




On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:28 PM, Samantha Scheiman 
 wrote: 

 


Arkansas birders,

As Dottie Boyles expressed, the next Arkansas Birds newsletter of the Arkansas 
Audubon Society will be published and in your mailbox before you know it!  
While you are compiling birding news for Dottie (email your updates to 
dboyles AT arkansasedc.comby August 1), consider also sharing an additional piece 
for the newsletter that highlights birds, conservation issues, Arkansas 
wildlife/plants/natural communities, or something similar.  


Virtually any format will do ... photos paired with captions, accounts from 
your most recent birding trips near and far, artwork, haikus, editorials, news 
stories, birding gear reviews, app reviews, local coverage of conservation 
issues, intriguing backyard bird sightings, etc.  To get a small taste of what 
I'm looking for as newsletter editor, check out the most recent Arkansas Birds: 
http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf  


For work to appear in the September issue, I need your inspired pieces by 
August 15 (emailed to samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com), but know that I will 
happily accept piecesanytime. 



Lastly, if you don't receive Arkansas Birds in your mailbox, become a member of 
the Arkansas Audubon Society here to receive this quarterly publication and 
support our diverse work, which includes the Halberg Ecology Camp for 11- and 
12-year-olds, Adult Natural History 

Workshops, educational conventions, Arkansas's bird records committee, and so 
much more.  Please join us as we strive to be a potent force in the 
conservation of Arkansas's natural resources. 



Many thanks,

Samantha Scheiman

Little Rock, Ark.

Arkansas Birds editor



-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless waste; 
to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold  
Subject: HOTTEST birding of the year: Frog and Valley Saturday August 9
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:51:41 +0000
Saturday August 9, 2014 . Western Arkansas River Valley, including Frog Bayou 
WMA and sod farms. More information about Frog and area at 
http://media.tripod.lycos.com/2020453/1274831.pdf 


Members and friends of Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society are invited to join a 
field trip to Frog Bayou WMA along the Arkansas River south of Dyer on 
Saturday, August 9. We are meeting at the Frog boat launch parking area by 
about 9:00 AM. We will visit parts of Frog, check out Black Land Road and the 
Dyer bay portion of the Arkansas River, and look for Black-bellied 
Whistling-Ducks at the Alma Wastewater Treatment ponds. We may take short walks 
to view a few of Frogs moist soil units close to parking areas. Otherwise, 
most birding will be stop and look around fairly near cars rather than a lot of 
hiking. This trip should work well for everyone, including those with mobility 
limitations. There are no bathrooms or other facilities. The nearest bathrooms, 
food, etc. are just off I-40 at exit 20 (to Dyer and Mulberry) and just off 
I-40 at Alma (McDonalds etc). Be prepared for sun and heat. Ticks and chiggers 
shouldnt be a problem. 


DIRECTIONS: To get to the 9 AM meeting place, driving I-40 from either east 
(Little Rock) or west (Fort Smith, Fayetteville), get off I-40 at exit 20 (Dyer 
and Mulberry). Turn south onto Georgia Ridge Drive, go the short distance (0.17 
miles) past the Phillips station and caf to highway 64 intersection. Turn 
right (west) onto 64 and travel about 1.35 miles: note the brown sign on the 
right marked FROG BAYOU WMA. Turn left (south) onto River Road. Pavement ends 
at 1.2 miles (intersection of River Road and Black Land Road) but continue on 
the graded road to mile 2.55. This is the end of the road. Dyer bay of the 
Arkansas River dead ahead! There is a gravel parking lot on the right and on 
the left, a boat launch just around the corner. Well meet on the gravel lot. 


It may be that we can also do some car pooling if there is interest and space 
in anyones car. If there has been a lot of rain, or rain is predicted for 
field trip day, we will modify the trip to avoid problem roads. You can call me 
on Friday evening if there are any questions 479 521-1858 . You can also reach 
me on this cell phone on field trip day: 479 935 5170. 


Subject: California Gull No
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:03:24 -0500
Just checked Delaware Rec Area. Lots of Canada geese and a few other regulars 
but no gull. :( 



Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:57:16 -0500
Seems humans have been causing most of the jetliner crashes lately.


On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 1:07 PM, Jeffrey Short 
wrote:

> To clarify, OvoControl does not make birds sterile.   The active
> ingredient, Nicarbazin. which is used in the broiler industry to prevent
> coccidiosis, prevents  the yolk membrane from forming, so the egg is not
> viable.  Measured amounts of Nicarbazin are administered through feed
> pellets depending on the body mass of the target species.  In the case of
> CGs, they would receive the feed during their breeding season, which in
> this neck of the woods is late January – March.
>
>
>
> OvoControl has not been readily accepted for CG control because the other
> means (chasing dogs, hunting, addling/oiling, trapping/relocation) create
> quicker successes.  (As a note, the actual data on how many geese were
> controlled by these other methods is not readily available.)  As a result,
> the CG goose registration has lapsed; but, the Rock Dove business is
> booming.  Contraception is a slower process and produces long-lasting
> (=cost-effective) results.
>
>
>
> Jeff Short
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Hilary David Chapman
> *Sent:* Friday, July 25, 2014 11:18 AM
>
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
>
>
>
> As one of Joe Neal’s friends I qualify as one who might be “offended” 
by 

> his remarks on at least two counts. That is not the case, however, since I
> fully concur with what he has to say – even if politically incorrect.
>
>
>
> Firstly my old property has a septic tank which I would gladly get rid of
> – if someone could persuade the city of Springdale to move into the 21st
> century and upgrade its sewage system to all its taxpayers.  We do empty it
> occasionally and so far it has overflown only once. I assume the filtrates
> in about 100 years will eventually leak down to nearby Lake Fayetteville.
> The resultant pollution will be minor however compared with the other
> wastes that find their way into the watershed, including I must say - large
> amounts of Canada Goose poop.
>
>
>
> Secondly I work for the Department of Poultry Science at the University of
> Arkansas which supports the efforts of the poultry industry. I am sure
> everyone is aware that without a poultry industry Arkansas would probably
> slip even further down the economic order in the USA. I can only say that I
> know the industry would like to solve some of the environmental problems
> that afflict us. We do indeed have an active program of research into water
> quality.
>
>
>
> Regarding Canada geese populations, I am not unduly concerned if efforts
> are made to regulate feral populations.  Why should one be so in a country
> that regularly massacres wildlife under the socially acceptable “hunting”
> philosophy? There have been extraordinary proposed solutions to regulate
> Canada Geese numbers such as feeding a substance that renders them
> sterile!  A product was on the market but I believe is now withdrawn since
> it not surprisingly received no public acceptance.
>
>
>
> I find it hard to believe that the few folks providing bread to ducks etc.
> seriously have any effect on Canada Geese numbers. The massive numbers that
> are recorded on christmas counts many of which roost at Lake Fayetteville
> are northern birds that take flight when approached by humans. The causes
> of these increases in numbers must be sought elsewhere.
>
>
>
> David Chapman
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [
> mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU ] *On
> Behalf Of *Judy & Don
> *Sent:* Friday, July 25, 2014 9:39 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
>
>
>
> I second the AMEN!!!
>
> J
>
>
>
> On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:57 AM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:
>
>
>
> There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning:
> “Goose’s gain causes human headaches” (July 25, 2014). It included 
ominous 

> lines like: “These aren’t inconsequential concerns.”
>
>
>
> I’ve sent off a response. Unfortunately, I’m pretty sure I’m going to
> offend my friends --  all of them who appreciate and generally defend
> birds and the environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are
> water quality experts, who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented
> communities, who work as engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal
> offense. I say the following for balance.
>
>
>
> The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically
> states those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed
> day old bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them
> injured and dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose
> overpopulation. The editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada
> Goose, returning from near extinction after a long and difficult effort
> recovery by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and conservation
> organizations.
>
>
>
> In this goose-bashing, we don’t even take into account our role. Growing
> populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the
> furious human population grow turning northwest Arkansas’s grasslands into
> malls, parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with
> picture-perfect ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000
> people? Water quality experts always rightly state fecal material is a
> problem in managing water quality.
>
>
>
> I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious –
> human population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in
> various northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter)
> Capitol of the Universe.
>
>
>
> What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of
> millions here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable
> spread in the millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our
> watersheds, all flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility
> in the watershed of the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of
> untreated hog waste on Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in
> northwest Arkansas lives in a home connected, not to a wastewater treatment
> plant, but to a septic tank which – whether it functions properly or not --
> eventually flows to the watershed?
>
>
>
> Reminds me of Willie Nelson’s, “Mama don’t let your babies…” 
Instead, 

> “Grandma, don’t let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese.” That’s 
the 

> problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard
> goose with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas.
>
>
>
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 13:07:00 -0500
To clarify, OvoControl does not make birds sterile.   The active ingredient,
Nicarbazin. which is used in the broiler industry to prevent coccidiosis,
prevents  the yolk membrane from forming, so the egg is not viable.
Measured amounts of Nicarbazin are administered through feed pellets
depending on the body mass of the target species.  In the case of CGs, they
would receive the feed during their breeding season, which in this neck of
the woods is late January - March.

 

OvoControl has not been readily accepted for CG control because the other
means (chasing dogs, hunting, addling/oiling, trapping/relocation) create
quicker successes.  (As a note, the actual data on how many geese were
controlled by these other methods is not readily available.)  As a result,
the CG goose registration has lapsed; but, the Rock Dove business is
booming.  Contraception is a slower process and produces long-lasting
(=cost-effective) results.  

 

Jeff Short

 

 

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Hilary David Chapman
Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 11:18 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns

 

As one of Joe Neal's friends I qualify as one who might be "offended" by his
remarks on at least two counts. That is not the case, however, since I fully
concur with what he has to say - even if politically incorrect.

 

Firstly my old property has a septic tank which I would gladly get rid of -
if someone could persuade the city of Springdale to move into the 21st
century and upgrade its sewage system to all its taxpayers.  We do empty it
occasionally and so far it has overflown only once. I assume the filtrates
in about 100 years will eventually leak down to nearby Lake Fayetteville.
The resultant pollution will be minor however compared with the other wastes
that find their way into the watershed, including I must say - large amounts
of Canada Goose poop.

 

Secondly I work for the Department of Poultry Science at the University of
Arkansas which supports the efforts of the poultry industry. I am sure
everyone is aware that without a poultry industry Arkansas would probably
slip even further down the economic order in the USA. I can only say that I
know the industry would like to solve some of the environmental problems
that afflict us. We do indeed have an active program of research into water
quality.

 

Regarding Canada geese populations, I am not unduly concerned if efforts are
made to regulate feral populations.  Why should one be so in a country that
regularly massacres wildlife under the socially acceptable "hunting"
philosophy? There have been extraordinary proposed solutions to regulate
Canada Geese numbers such as feeding a substance that renders them sterile!
A product was on the market but I believe is now withdrawn since it not
surprisingly received no public acceptance.

 

I find it hard to believe that the few folks providing bread to ducks etc.
seriously have any effect on Canada Geese numbers. The massive numbers that
are recorded on christmas counts many of which roost at Lake Fayetteville
are northern birds that take flight when approached by humans. The causes of
these increases in numbers must be sought elsewhere.

 

David Chapman

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 9:39 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns

 

I second the AMEN!!!

J

 

On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:57 AM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:

 

There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning:
"Goose's gain causes human headaches" (July 25, 2014). It included ominous
lines like: "These aren't inconsequential concerns."

 

I've sent off a response. Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure I'm going to offend
my friends --  all of them who appreciate and generally defend birds and the
environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are water quality
experts, who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented communities, who
work as engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal offense. I say the
following for balance.

 

The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically
states those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed
day old bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them
injured and dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose
overpopulation. The editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada
Goose, returning from near extinction after a long and difficult effort
recovery by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and conservation
organizations.

 

In this goose-bashing, we don't even take into account our role. Growing
populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the
furious human population grow turning northwest Arkansas's grasslands into
malls, parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with
picture-perfect ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000
people? Water quality experts always rightly state fecal material is a
problem in managing water quality.

  

I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious -
human population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in
various northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter) Capitol
of the Universe.

 

What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of millions
here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable spread in
the millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our watersheds,
all flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility in the
watershed of the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of untreated
hog waste on Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in northwest
Arkansas lives in a home connected, not to a wastewater treatment plant, but
to a septic tank which - whether it functions properly or not -- eventually
flows to the watershed?

 

Reminds me of Willie Nelson's, "Mama don't let your babies." Instead,
"Grandma, don't let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese." That's the
problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard goose
with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas.  

 
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:53:07 +0000
I guess I should claim partial responsibility for some of the goose issues we 
face today. From approx. 86-88, while with the AGFC, I was in charge of the 
care and feeding of 1 breeding pen and 1 reserve breeding pen of giant Canada 
geese. 1 pen was at Clarksville and 1 was at Holla Bend refuge. In my defense 
it wasn't my idea but I hired on after the fact. We protected and monitored 
nests both wild and in captivity, and released many birds around the State. 
Saying that program was successful is an understatement and many nuisance birds 
have resulted over time. Numbers increased to the point that some hunting 
seasons were established for those resident birds. 


That program has long been shut down and even the pens were dismantled sometime 
in the early 90's. Every time I see some of those birds flying over now, I have 
mixed feelings about whether that was a good idea or not. One thing is for 
certain though, those birds are here to stay... 


Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Mgr.
Malheur National Forest
PO Box 909, 431 Patterson Bridge Rd.
P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR  97845
541-575-3474

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Hilary David Chapman 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 9:18 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns

As one of Joe Neal's friends I qualify as one who might be "offended" by his 
remarks on at least two counts. That is not the case, however, since I fully 
concur with what he has to say - even if politically incorrect. 


Firstly my old property has a septic tank which I would gladly get rid of - if 
someone could persuade the city of Springdale to move into the 21st century and 
upgrade its sewage system to all its taxpayers. We do empty it occasionally and 
so far it has overflown only once. I assume the filtrates in about 100 years 
will eventually leak down to nearby Lake Fayetteville. The resultant pollution 
will be minor however compared with the other wastes that find their way into 
the watershed, including I must say - large amounts of Canada Goose poop. 


Secondly I work for the Department of Poultry Science at the University of 
Arkansas which supports the efforts of the poultry industry. I am sure everyone 
is aware that without a poultry industry Arkansas would probably slip even 
further down the economic order in the USA. I can only say that I know the 
industry would like to solve some of the environmental problems that afflict 
us. We do indeed have an active program of research into water quality. 


Regarding Canada geese populations, I am not unduly concerned if efforts are 
made to regulate feral populations. Why should one be so in a country that 
regularly massacres wildlife under the socially acceptable "hunting" 
philosophy? There have been extraordinary proposed solutions to regulate Canada 
Geese numbers such as feeding a substance that renders them sterile! A product 
was on the market but I believe is now withdrawn since it not surprisingly 
received no public acceptance. 


I find it hard to believe that the few folks providing bread to ducks etc. 
seriously have any effect on Canada Geese numbers. The massive numbers that are 
recorded on christmas counts many of which roost at Lake Fayetteville are 
northern birds that take flight when approached by humans. The causes of these 
increases in numbers must be sought elsewhere. 


David Chapman

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Judy & Don 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 9:39 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns

I second the AMEN!!!
J

On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:57 AM, "Joseph C. Neal" 
> wrote: 


There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning: "Goose's 
gain causes human headaches" (July 25, 2014). It included ominous lines like: 
"These aren't inconsequential concerns." 


I've sent off a response. Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure I'm going to offend my 
friends -- all of them who appreciate and generally defend birds and the 
environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are water quality experts, 
who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented communities, who work as 
engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal offense. I say the following 
for balance. 


The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically states 
those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed day old 
bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them injured and 
dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose overpopulation. The 
editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada Goose, returning from 
near extinction after a long and difficult effort recovery by Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission and conservation organizations. 


In this goose-bashing, we don't even take into account our role. Growing 
populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the furious 
human population grow turning northwest Arkansas's grasslands into malls, 
parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with picture-perfect 
ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000 people? Water quality 
experts always rightly state fecal material is a problem in managing water 
quality. 


I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious - human 
population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in various 
northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter) Capitol of the 
Universe. 


What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of millions 
here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable spread in the 
millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our watersheds, all 
flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility in the watershed of 
the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of untreated hog waste on 
Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in northwest Arkansas lives in a 
home connected, not to a wastewater treatment plant, but to a septic tank which 
- whether it functions properly or not -- eventually flows to the watershed? 


Reminds me of Willie Nelson's, "Mama don't let your babies..." Instead, 
"Grandma, don't let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese." That's the 
problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard goose 
with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas. 






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
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Subject: California Gull
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:34:13 -0500
I observed and photographed a California Gull at Delaware Recretional Area at 
Lake Dardanelle yesterday afternoon. 

The gull was first located by Kenny Nichols... 

Michael(Conway)
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: Hilary David Chapman <dchapman AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:18:01 +0000
As one of Joe Neal's friends I qualify as one who might be "offended" by his 
remarks on at least two counts. That is not the case, however, since I fully 
concur with what he has to say - even if politically incorrect. 


Firstly my old property has a septic tank which I would gladly get rid of - if 
someone could persuade the city of Springdale to move into the 21st century and 
upgrade its sewage system to all its taxpayers. We do empty it occasionally and 
so far it has overflown only once. I assume the filtrates in about 100 years 
will eventually leak down to nearby Lake Fayetteville. The resultant pollution 
will be minor however compared with the other wastes that find their way into 
the watershed, including I must say - large amounts of Canada Goose poop. 


Secondly I work for the Department of Poultry Science at the University of 
Arkansas which supports the efforts of the poultry industry. I am sure everyone 
is aware that without a poultry industry Arkansas would probably slip even 
further down the economic order in the USA. I can only say that I know the 
industry would like to solve some of the environmental problems that afflict 
us. We do indeed have an active program of research into water quality. 


Regarding Canada geese populations, I am not unduly concerned if efforts are 
made to regulate feral populations. Why should one be so in a country that 
regularly massacres wildlife under the socially acceptable "hunting" 
philosophy? There have been extraordinary proposed solutions to regulate Canada 
Geese numbers such as feeding a substance that renders them sterile! A product 
was on the market but I believe is now withdrawn since it not surprisingly 
received no public acceptance. 


I find it hard to believe that the few folks providing bread to ducks etc. 
seriously have any effect on Canada Geese numbers. The massive numbers that are 
recorded on christmas counts many of which roost at Lake Fayetteville are 
northern birds that take flight when approached by humans. The causes of these 
increases in numbers must be sought elsewhere. 


David Chapman
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Judy & Don 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 9:39 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns

I second the AMEN!!!
J

On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:57 AM, "Joseph C. Neal" 
> wrote: 



There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning: "Goose's 
gain causes human headaches" (July 25, 2014). It included ominous lines like: 
"These aren't inconsequential concerns." 


I've sent off a response. Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure I'm going to offend my 
friends -- all of them who appreciate and generally defend birds and the 
environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are water quality experts, 
who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented communities, who work as 
engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal offense. I say the following 
for balance. 


The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically states 
those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed day old 
bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them injured and 
dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose overpopulation. The 
editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada Goose, returning from 
near extinction after a long and difficult effort recovery by Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission and conservation organizations. 


In this goose-bashing, we don't even take into account our role. Growing 
populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the furious 
human population grow turning northwest Arkansas's grasslands into malls, 
parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with picture-perfect 
ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000 people? Water quality 
experts always rightly state fecal material is a problem in managing water 
quality. 


I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious - human 
population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in various 
northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter) Capitol of the 
Universe. 


What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of millions 
here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable spread in the 
millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our watersheds, all 
flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility in the watershed of 
the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of untreated hog waste on 
Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in northwest Arkansas lives in a 
home connected, not to a wastewater treatment plant, but to a septic tank which 
- whether it functions properly or not -- eventually flows to the watershed? 


Reminds me of Willie Nelson's, "Mama don't let your babies..." Instead, 
"Grandma, don't let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese." That's the 
problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard goose 
with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas. 

Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:02:19 -0500
What is the opposite of “Amen”?  

 

The exponential population growth of the resident Canada Goose must be halted. 
Everyone likes to go to the park to step around the “goose grease”, don’t 
they. Apparently, the CGs are easy culprits for the E. coliI contamination of 
some water bodies. The CGs are attracted to the short grass, easy walk-in to 
ponds, and generally safe surroundings of parks and subdivisions. 


 

The CGs are a significant threat to safe air travel when their population is 
allowed to increase unchecked around airfields. 24 lives were lost in an 
aircraft crash at an Alaskan AFB due to CGs 
http://articles.latimes.com/1995-09-23/news/mn-49141_1_air-force) (though they 
weren’t the giant subspecies). And we all remember the “Miracle on the 
Hudson” caused by CGs. In the UK in Jan of this year, geese caused the crash 
of a helicopter and death of the 4-person crew. 


 

The problem nowadays is mostly outside the airfield fence so it falls upon the 
community to control CGs and their populations. Dogs are employed, but they 
scare off the birds to another part of the landscape. So we are left with 
trapping and relocation, hunting, and addling (the eggs). (Disclaimer: I am a 
sales representative for OvoControl, a bird contraceptive feed which is more 
cost-effective and humane in long-term than the others.) 


 

I do want to plug some development of varieties of grass that taste bad to 
avian and mammalian grazers 
(http://www.agresearch.co.nz/our-science/plant-forage/endophytes/Pages/bird-deterrent-ryegrass.aspx). 


 

We need to celebrate the success of the comeback of the giant CG race, but 
limit the population through whatever means is appropriate. 


 

I am no supporter of human excess and our demands on the environment, 
either—except mine, of course. 


 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Edie Calaway 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 9:32 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns

 

AMEN!

Sent from my iPhone


On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:57 AM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:

There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning: 
“Goose’s gain causes human headaches” (July 25, 2014). It included 
ominous lines like: “These aren’t inconsequential concerns.” 


 

I’ve sent off a response. Unfortunately, I’m pretty sure I’m going to 
offend my friends -- all of them who appreciate and generally defend birds and 
the environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are water quality 
experts, who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented communities, who work 
as engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal offense. I say the 
following for balance. 


 

The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically states 
those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed day old 
bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them injured and 
dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose overpopulation. The 
editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada Goose, returning from 
near extinction after a long and difficult effort recovery by Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission and conservation organizations. 


 

In this goose-bashing, we don’t even take into account our role. Growing 
populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the furious 
human population grow turning northwest Arkansas’s grasslands into malls, 
parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with picture-perfect 
ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000 people? Water quality 
experts always rightly state fecal material is a problem in managing water 
quality. 


  

I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious – human 
population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in various 
northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter) Capitol of the 
Universe. 


 

What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of millions 
here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable spread in the 
millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our watersheds, all 
flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility in the watershed of 
the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of untreated hog waste on 
Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in northwest Arkansas lives in a 
home connected, not to a wastewater treatment plant, but to a septic tank which 
– whether it functions properly or not -- eventually flows to the watershed? 


 

Reminds me of Willie Nelson’s, “Mama don’t let your babies…” Instead, 
“Grandma, don’t let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese.” That’s 
the problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard 
goose with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas. 

Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:34:33 -0500
Joe, I hope your response is published, and that all of us will think 
about our personal responsibility in these issues.

You are so right that overall, the livestock industry is the biggest 
single cause of environmental degradation---deforestation, water 
pollution, water shortages, habitat loss, global warming.  One result is 
the precipitous decline in bird populations. It's not people /per se/; 
it's how and what we're eating.

Every time we choose to buy and eat meat or dairy, _we_ are directly 
responsible.  It's that simple.

Janine



On 7/25/2014 8:57 AM, Joseph C. Neal wrote:
>
> There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning: 
> Gooses gain causes human headaches (July 25, 2014). It included 
> ominous lines like: These arent inconsequential concerns.
>
>
> Ive sent off a response. Unfortunately, Im pretty sure Im going to 
> offend my friends --all of them who appreciate and generally defend 
> birds and the environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are 
> water quality experts, who have septic tanks, who live in 
> golf-oriented communities, who work as engineers for government, etc. 
> I mean no personal offense. I say the following for balance.
>
>
> The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically 
> states those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to 
> feed day old bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of 
> them injured and dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose 
> overpopulation. The editorial specifically targets the giant form of 
> Canada Goose, returning from near extinction after a long and 
> difficult effort recovery by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and 
> conservation organizations.
>
>
> In this goose-bashing, we dont even take into account our role. 
> Growing populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because 
> of the furious human population grow turning northwest Arkansass 
> grasslands into malls, parks, private estates, golf courses, and 
> subdivisions with picture-perfect ponds. Sure, there are more geese, 
> but what about 500,000 people? Water quality experts always rightly 
> state fecal material is a problem in managing water quality.
>
>
> I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious 
>  human population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment 
> systems in various northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry 
> (and litter) Capitol of the Universe.
>
>
> What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of 
> millions here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and 
> honorable spread in the millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of 
> acres of our watersheds, all flowing to our drinking water? What 
> hog-production facility in the watershed of the Buffalo River is 
> spreading millions of gallons of untreated hog waste on Ozark 
> farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in northwest Arkansas lives 
> in a home connected, not to a wastewater treatment plant, but to a 
> septic tank which  whether it functions properly or not -- eventually 
> flows to the watershed?
>
>
> Reminds me of Willie Nelsons, Mama dont let your babies Instead, 
> Grandma, dont let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese. Thats 
> the problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the 
> baryard goose with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of 
> Canadas.
>
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:06:20 -0600
Great post, Joe! Human over-population growth is the number One KILLER on
the planet. It is especially for the wildlife, water and resources as well
as the humans too. For another thing, there are tens of millions too many
cattle on earth too. All human made problems. Cattle?? Humans have made
them what they've become.

"Mamas don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys - don't let 'em pick
guitars and drive them ole trucks
Let 'em be doctors and lawyers and such    Mamas don't let your babies grow
up to be cowboys
They'll never stay home and they're always alone, even with someone they
love"

A song filled with a bitter irony if there ever was one.
                                              Bill Thurman


On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 8:39 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> I second the AMEN!!!
> J
>
> On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:57 AM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:
>
> There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning:
> “Goose’s gain causes human headaches” (July 25, 2014). It included 
ominous 

> lines like: “These aren’t inconsequential concerns.”
>
> I’ve sent off a response. Unfortunately, I’m pretty sure I’m going to
> offend my friends --  all of them who appreciate and generally defend
> birds and the environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are
> water quality experts, who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented
> communities, who work as engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal
> offense. I say the following for balance.
>
> The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically
> states those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed
> day old bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them
> injured and dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose
> overpopulation. The editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada
> Goose, returning from near extinction after a long and difficult effort
> recovery by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and conservation
> organizations.
>
> In this goose-bashing, we don’t even take into account our role. Growing
> populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the
> furious human population grow turning northwest Arkansas’s grasslands into
> malls, parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with
> picture-perfect ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000
> people? Water quality experts always rightly state fecal material is a
> problem in managing water quality.
>
> I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious –
> human population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in
> various northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter)
> Capitol of the Universe.
>
> What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of
> millions here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable
> spread in the millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our
> watersheds, all flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility
> in the watershed of the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of
> untreated hog waste on Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in
> northwest Arkansas lives in a home connected, not to a wastewater treatment
> plant, but to a septic tank which – whether it functions properly or not --
> eventually flows to the watershed?
>
> Reminds me of Willie Nelson’s, “Mama don’t let your babies…” 
Instead, 

> “Grandma, don’t let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese.” That’s 
the 

> problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard
> goose with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas.
>
>
>
Subject: Re: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:39:15 -0500
I second the AMEN!!!
J

On Jul 25, 2014, at 8:57 AM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:

> There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning: Gooses 
gain causes human headaches (July 25, 2014). It included ominous lines like: 
These arent inconsequential concerns. 

> 
> Ive sent off a response. Unfortunately, Im pretty sure Im going to offend 
my friends -- all of them who appreciate and generally defend birds and the 
environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are water quality experts, 
who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented communities, who work as 
engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal offense. I say the following 
for balance. 

> 
> The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically states 
those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed day old 
bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them injured and 
dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose overpopulation. The 
editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada Goose, returning from 
near extinction after a long and difficult effort recovery by Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission and conservation organizations. 

> 
> In this goose-bashing, we dont even take into account our role. Growing 
populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the furious 
human population grow turning northwest Arkansass grasslands into malls, 
parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with picture-perfect 
ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000 people? Water quality 
experts always rightly state fecal material is a problem in managing water 
quality. 

>   
> I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious  human 
population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in various 
northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter) Capitol of the 
Universe. 

> 
> What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of millions 
here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable spread in the 
millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our watersheds, all 
flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility in the watershed of 
the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of untreated hog waste on 
Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in northwest Arkansas lives in a 
home connected, not to a wastewater treatment plant, but to a septic tank which 
 whether it functions properly or not -- eventually flows to the watershed? 

> 
> Reminds me of Willie Nelsons, Mama dont let your babies Instead, 
Grandma, dont let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese. Thats the 
problem, you know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard goose 
with a broken wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas. 

Subject: These aren't inconsequential concerns
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 13:57:48 +0000
There was an editorial in the Northwest Arkansas Times this morning: Gooses 
gain causes human headaches (July 25, 2014). It included ominous lines like: 
These arent inconsequential concerns. 


Ive sent off a response. Unfortunately, Im pretty sure Im going to offend my 
friends -- all of them who appreciate and generally defend birds and the 
environment -- who work in the poultry industry, who are water quality experts, 
who have septic tanks, who live in golf-oriented communities, who work as 
engineers for government, etc. I mean no personal offense. I say the following 
for balance. 


The editorial is about the threat of the Canada Goose. It specifically states 
those who enjoy a few minutes going to a local lake or pond to feed day old 
bread to the waterfowl gaggle of geese and ducks, many of them injured and 
dumped off, are contributing to the problem of goose overpopulation. The 
editorial specifically targets the giant form of Canada Goose, returning from 
near extinction after a long and difficult effort recovery by Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission and conservation organizations. 


In this goose-bashing, we dont even take into account our role. Growing 
populations of geese and other waterfowl inconvenience because of the furious 
human population grow turning northwest Arkansass grasslands into malls, 
parks, private estates, golf courses, and subdivisions with picture-perfect 
ponds. Sure, there are more geese, but what about 500,000 people? Water quality 
experts always rightly state fecal material is a problem in managing water 
quality. 


I kept thinking the editorial would finish with geese and get obvious  human 
population growth, poorly functioning wastewater treatment systems in various 
northwest Arkansas communities, and the Poultry (and litter) Capitol of the 
Universe. 


What white, super-fast growing bird is produced in the hundreds of millions 
here every year? What fecal matter is deliberately and honorable spread in the 
millions of tons on hundreds of thousands of acres of our watersheds, all 
flowing to our drinking water? What hog-production facility in the watershed of 
the Buffalo River is spreading millions of gallons of untreated hog waste on 
Ozark farmland, and hence to ground water? Who in northwest Arkansas lives in a 
home connected, not to a wastewater treatment plant, but to a septic tank which 
 whether it functions properly or not -- eventually flows to the watershed? 


Reminds me of Willie Nelsons, Mama dont let your babies Instead, Grandma, 
dont let your grandkids grow up to feed the geese. Thats the problem, you 
know: grandma and grandkids feeding muscovys, the baryard goose with a broken 
wing, a few Mallards, and that flock of Canadas. 
Subject: Amazing
From: Bill <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:20:56 -0500
I didn't think it would matter much to anyone, but yesterday I drove to the top 
of a beautiful ridge a few miles away from Dover, AR where peach orchards and 
mixed field and forest are present. 

On a telephone wire perching just like a bluebird, I saw a Rose Breasted 
Grosbeak. I've only heard about them a lot being at people's feeders way out 
the country. Apparently it was just resting and enjoying itself. I hadn't seen 
one like that since the one I saw in Tennessee 50 something years ago - a 
fleeting childhood memory. 


                                  Bill Thurman

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Fayetteville's easiest Painted Bunting ever
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:58:07 +0000
Surely theres nothing that so saddens the heart of a bird watching bike rider 
as passing from relatively quiet, forested Lake Fayetteville Trail, to sudden 
encounter with northwest Arkansass busiest-to-the-max highway 71B, just north 
of at Northwest Arkansas Mall. 


Nothing so gladdens as discovering the trail passes UNDER that howling urban 
rush to nowhere. We emerge free and clear on the west side, on a birdy forested 
slope above Clear Creek. But not just that. In a small opening, alongside but 
safely beyond reach of commuters, motorcycles, chicken trucks, 18-wheelers and 
only god could say with certainty what other Hell on Wheels  There! There up 
in a small tree! A male PAINTED BUNTING, all red, blue and two shades of green, 
singing like it was nothing more  and nothing less  than bucolic wilderness. 


Driving by at a slow speed, you could almost reach out and touch him. Windows 
down, you could hear him. On a bicycle, I did have all my windows down, and I 
do hear and see him, Fayetteville easiest Painted Bunting ever, and lots more 
(list below). 


I hauled my bike out to Veterans Park on the north side of Lake Fayetteville. 
From there, rode about 1.5 miles east, toward the Botanical Garden of the 
Ozarks and then back, then west, toward Johnson, for another 1.5 miles, to an 
astounding place where the trail cleverly hangs from a bare limestone face 
above Clear Creek. 


Beside the trail, flowering wild hydrangeas and tall bellflowers attended by 
energetic bees. And mountain mint, with elegantly frosted leaves, attended by a 
skipper whose name I dont know. 


If you add it all up, I probably rode a total of 6 miles, but with many stops 
and listenings, it took 3 hours. Im guessing I wont qualify for bike races so 
much in favor with our young blades. But will qualify in the birding derby. 
Heres a rough list, in case you are looking for a birding opportunity: 



Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk  fledgling constantly calling in that high shrill WEE WEE WEE

Mourning Dove - 2

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds - foraging at trumpet creeper vines

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2

Acadian Flycatcher - family group

Great Crested Flycatcher - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2 family groups, 1 with 5 birds

White-eyed Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 1

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin

Carolina Chickadee - family group

Tufted Titmouse - family group

White-breasted Nuthatch - 1

Carolina Wren - 4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Brown Thrasher - 1

Northern Parula - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - one of most common birds all morning

Indigo Bunting - 5

PAINTED BUNTING - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

House Finch - 2

American Goldfinch  heard them overhead all morning
Subject: Re: Wood Stork
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:56:25 -0700
holy cow, kingston?!?

can't be very many records of Wood Stork for NWA.

kenny  nichols
cabot, ar


On Monday, July 14, 2014 8:45 PM, "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

 

>
>
>Beth Waver just posted photos to Arkansas Birders Facebook group of a Wood 
Stork that she saw today. She says it was on HWY 21 just outside Kingston in a 
farm field pond. 

>Donna Haynes
>West Pulaski Co.
>
>Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
>
>
Subject: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter!
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:28:06 -0500
Arkansas birders,

As Dottie Boyles expressed, the next *Arkansas Birds* newsletter of the
Arkansas Audubon Society will be published and in your mailbox before you
know it!  While you are compiling birding news for Dottie (email your
updates to dboyles AT arkansasedc.com by August 1), consider also sharing an
additional piece for the newsletter that highlights birds, conservation
issues, Arkansas wildlife/plants/natural communities, or something
similar.

Virtually any format will do ... photos paired with captions, accounts from
your most recent birding trips near and far, artwork, haikus, editorials, news
stories, birding gear reviews, app reviews, local coverage of conservation
issues, intriguing backyard bird sightings, etc.  To get a small taste of
what I'm looking for as newsletter editor, check out the most recent *Arkansas
Birds*: http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf

For work to appear in the September issue, I need your inspired pieces by
August 15 (emailed to samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com), but know that I will
happily accept pieces anytime.

Lastly, if you don't receive *Arkansas Birds* in your mailbox, become a
member of the Arkansas Audubon Society here
 to receive this quarterly publication
and support our diverse work, which includes the Halberg Ecology Camp for
11- and 12-year-olds, Adult Natural History Workshops, educational
conventions, Arkansas's bird records committee, and so much more.  Please
join us as we strive to be a potent force in the conservation of Arkansas's
natural resources.

Many thanks,

Samantha Scheiman
Little Rock, Ark.
*Arkansas Birds* editor

-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: A Chance to Reciprocate.
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:08:17 -0700


Some of you on this list may remember the Audubon Action Alert a few months ago 
asking people to sign-on to a letter urging Cargill to  remove the hog CAFO 
from the Buffalo River watershed.  What you may not know is that the same 
Alert went out to Audubon members in Minnesota, where Cargill has its 
headquarters. 


Minnesotans responded and within 24 hours working together we generated 1300 
letters )plus another 500 in subsequent days. 


Arkansans now have a chance to return the favor.  The new Vikings stadium in 
Minneapolis is going to be a disaster for neotropical migrants if the design is 
not altered. What needs to be done is change the type of glass.  I’ve 
visited the site and have seen the drawings for the proposed stadium.  If one 
were to design a building with the express purpose of killing birds, the 
Vikings stadium might just be the winning design. 


You can help birds and support Minnesotans by adding your name to the action 
alert. 



https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=DD2452A6134BDE0737A7ECD23AA9A5CD.app304a?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1717&autologin=true&s_src=JUL14_ATD2 


Note: It is worth clicking just to see the cute picture of one of my favorite 
warblers. 


And by-the-way, if you still haven’t written to Cargill to save the Buffalo 
National River there is still time.  Doing both good deeds should only take a 
few minutes. 



http://www.audubonaction.org/site/MessageViewer?dlv_id=50603&pgwrap=n&em_id=40601.1 



If you wish to reply or have comments please send them to me rather than on 
this list serv. 


Thank you!

Jack Stewart (near the Buffalo)
Subject: Re: SW Arkansas Birds
From: Robert Wiedenmann <0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:14:19 -0400
 Sorry to be slow to post sightings from Sunday, July 20. Three of us spent 4 h 
at Bois D'Arc WMA, Hempstead County, AR. 



Black-bellied Whistling-duck - 4
Double-crested Cormorant - 6
Anhinga - 12
Least Bittern - 3
Great Blue Heron - 8
Great Egret - 40
Snowy Egret - 30
Little Blue Heron - 20
Cattle Egret - 200
Green Heron - 30
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 8
White Ibis - 4
Black Vulture - 25
Turkey Vulture – 60
Mississippi Kite - 1
Red-shouldered Hawk – 1 (Heard Only)
Red-tailed Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 30 adults (also numerous downy chicks)
Common Gallinule - 16 (also downy chicks)
Killdeer - 6
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Least Tern - 6
Mourning Dove - 8
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 4
Belted Kingfisher - 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 5
Red-headed Woodpecker – 1 (Heard Only)
Northern Flicker – 1 (Heard Only)
Eastern Wood-pewee – 1
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 10
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 1
Blue Jay - 6
American Crow – 16
Fish Crow - 4
Tree Swallow - 15
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3
Bank Swallow - 20
Cave Swallow - 4 (two adults, two immatures)
Barn Swallow - 5
Carolina Wren - 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
Northern Mockingbird - 5
Yellow-breasted Chat – 1 (Heard Only)
Summer Tanager - 7
Northern Cardinal - 6
Blue Grosbeak - 6
Indigo Bunting - 7
Painted Bunting - 1
Red-winged Blackbird - 150
Common Grackle - 2
Orchard Oriole – 1
House Sparrow - 4

Rob Wiedenmann
Fayetteville



 
Subject: Adult Bald Eagle near Goshen
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 19:41:17 -0500
Adult Bald Eagle about a mile and half west of the intersection of AR 
295 & AR 45 while traveling west on 45 on the way into Goshen.
3 PM or so. The bird was flying north and looked like it had just 
taken off a perch and was about 30 feet in the air over the highway.

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville 
Subject: SWAINSON'S HAWKS (2) NEAR CHEROKEE CITY THIS MORNING
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:17:33 +0000
Two Swainsons Hawks soared over me on highway 43, 1.5 miles south of the 
intersection of highways 43 and 12. I had a single bird soar over the same area 
July 16, carrying food. So perhaps there is a nest in this area. 


This is the former Round Prairie north of Siloam Springs, west of Gentry, and 
south of Cherokee City. The roadside Tallgrass Prairie is in full bloom along 
there, too: blazing stars (along 12), sawtooth sunflower (six feet tall, but 
not yet flowering), ashy sunflower, compass plant, winged sumac, wild bergamot 
(full of bumblebees and other pollinators), hairy wild petunia, etc. Lots of 
traffic in this area, so when you stop, get off the road and keep a good eye 
out for safety. 
Subject: FIGHTING GREAT EGRETS
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:41:36 -0500
Today at Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff, I observed and photographed two Great 
Egrets in a protracted fight. I knew that Great Egrets were aggressive and have 
observed a lot of squabbles, but have never observed the aggressor to 
completely submerge its opponent. The total submergence occured twice in the 
battle. The aggressor landed on the underdog with its axis perpendicular to 
him. Ultimately, the uppermost Egret stood on the submerged neck of its 
opponent with the losers legs now positioned on either side of the aggressor. 
At battles end, both flew off, apparently neither scathed. The photos were made 
in low light, but certainly document the fight. I will be glad to share a few 
pics or a more compete series if anyone has an interest. 

John Redman










 
Subject: SW Arkansas Birds
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:00:04 -0500
I spent the weekend in SW Arkansas mostly looking for dragonflies and
wildflowers.  I did not see anything rare like a Crested Caracara but did
see the following interesting birds.  So if you are a year lister some of
these may be of interest:

Bois D'Arc
White Ibis
Least Bittern
Black-bellied Whistling Duck
Black-crowned Night Heron

Sarasota
Inca Dove

Okay Levee
Painted Buntings
I heard a little farther down than I went there were good views of an
Osprey nest

Smith Lake (I think) in the Sulfur River Area
Black-crowned Night Heron

Pictures were taken of some but I have not posted yet....

Michael
Subject: MOS fall meeting: Sept. 21 with photographer & ID expert Kevin Karlson
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT OLEMISS.EDU>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:49:48 -0500
Arkansas birders,
The Mississippi Ornithological Society (MOS) will hold its *fall meeting*
in Greenwood, MS the weekend of September 19-21, 2014. We really hope
you'll consider a trip south to join us.  Our special guest will be
*photographer
and ID expert Kevin Karlson  *(*The
Shorebird Guide*

), 

who will give presentations on the amazing lives and varieties of
shorebirds migrating through the Delta, as well as his impressionistic
approach to bird identification. In addition, Kevin will lead an
interactive 1/2-day field workshop on Saturday to put shorebird
identification to practice and showcase Delta birding. Meeting events will
be scheduled for Friday evening through Saturday evening with field trips
Saturday and Sunday morning. During the weekend, we expect to find 14+
species of shorebirds (including American Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, and
their more cryptic cousins), along with thousands of waders (including Wood
Stork & Roseate Spoonbill), and migrant passerines. Delta birding can be
fantastic this time of year.

For *additional details* including speaker bio, lodging information, and
itinerary, please visit this page:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/fall_meeting_announcement.pdf

For online (or mail-in) meeting *registration*, please visit this webpage:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/FallMeeting.htm

Also: You can now *join MOS online*. MOS members will receive discounted
registration for this event, are eligible to register for a meet & greet
with Kevin Karlson on Sept. 19, and also will receive discounted
registration for future field trips led by Delta Wind Birds
 (who is co-sponsoring this fall MOS
meeting). To join MOS, please visit this webpage:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Membership%20info.htm

We hope to see you in Greenwood in September!

best wishes,
Jason Hoeksema & J.R. Rigby
Oxford, MS
Subject: Re: Database Update
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:28:49 -0500
Yes!  Thank you Lyndal.  What a valuable research tool.


Ann



On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 6:20 PM, Allan Mueller  wrote:

> Lyndal,
>
> Thanks for keeping up with this database.  It is very valuable.
>
> Allan Mueller
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 4:31 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:
>
>> Arbirders:
>>
>> Last spring's vetted bird records have been added to the on-line archival
>> database of rare and out of season birds. The database now contains 14,379
>> records. This searchable database can be accessed at:
>>
>> www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html
>> 
 

>>
>> Good searching,
>>
>> Lyndal York,
>> Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Allan Mueller
> 20 Moseley Lane
> Conway, AR 72032
> 501-327-8952 home
> 501-339-8071 cell
>
>
> "I ain't never did no wrong."
> Elvis Presley in "One Night"
>
>
Subject: Re: Database Update
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:20:51 -0500
Lyndal,

Thanks for keeping up with this database.  It is very valuable.

Allan Mueller


On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 4:31 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:

> Arbirders:
>
> Last spring's vetted bird records have been added to the on-line archival
> database of rare and out of season birds. The database now contains 14,379
> records. This searchable database can be accessed at:
>
> www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html
> 
 

>
> Good searching,
>
> Lyndal York,
> Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
>
>
>


-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 22
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:15:00 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 63 species were found. 
Anyone wishing to see the Wood Storks can view them from the east levee of 
Lotus Lake looking east into unit 27B. There is a dead tree they like to roost 
in during the day there. There are often Neotropic Cormorants in the tree with 
them. They also like to feed and rest in the water below this tree too. For the 
best view of this tree, walk east on the south levee of unit 27B about 100 
yards from the SE corner of Lotus Lake. The best way to get to this area on 
foot would be to walk west from the middle parking area into Bittern Lake then 
cross the foot bridge near the NW corner of Bittern Lake. Also, the best place 
to find the Cave Swallows is at the first bridge on Mudline Road north of Push 
Creek. They like to roost with the Barn Swallows in a dead tree on the west 
side of the bridge. Here is my list for today: 


Black-bellied Whistling-Duck - 1
Wood Duck - 5
Pied-billed Grebe - 24
Neotropic Cormorant - 5
Anhinga - 16
Least Bittern - 2
Great Blue Heron - 26
Great Egret - 114
Snowy Egret - 67
Little Blue Heron - 29
Green Heron - 20
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 36
White Ibis - 187
Wood Stork - 26
Black Vulture - 11
Turkey Vulture - 11
Red-shouldered Hawk - 1
Red-tailed Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 2 adults (also brood of at least 3 black downy chicks.)
Common Gallinule - 5
American Coot - 1
Killdeer - 25
Spotted Sandpiper - 3
Solitary Sandpiper - 9
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 2
Least Sandpiper - 4
Pectoral Sandpiper - 3
Mourning Dove - 33
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2
Belted Kingfisher - 3
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Willow Flycatcher - 1 (with cowbird chick in tow; new breeding location.)
Eastern Phoebe - 6
Great Crested Flycatcher - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 7
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2
White-eyed Vireo - 2
Bell's Vireo - 2
American Crow - 7
Fish Crow - 5
Purple Martin - 8
Tree Swallow - 78
Cave Swallow - 5 juveniles
Barn Swallow - 50
Carolina Chickadee - 1
Tufted Titmouse - 1
Carolina Wren - 8
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
Eastern Bluebird - 2
Gray Catbird - 1
Northern Mockingbird - 1
Prothonotary Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 12
Yellow-breasted Chat - 3
Northern Cardinal - 13
Blue Grosbeak - 2
Indigo Bunting - 12
Painted Bunting - 4
Dickcissel - 26
Red-winged Blackbird - 41
Common Grackle - 6
Brown-headed Cowbird - 3


Odonates:

Fragile Forktail
Lilypad Forktail
Regal Darner
Prince Baskettail
Halloween Pennant
Eastern Pondhawk
Slaty Skimmer
Widow Skimmer
Common Whitetail
Eastern Amberwing
Blue Dasher
Wandering Glider
Spot-winged Glider
Black Saddlebags


Good birding!


David Arbour
De Queen, AR

Visit the Red Slough Photo Gallery:  www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma
Subject: Database Update
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:31:41 -0500
Arbirders:

Last spring's vetted bird records have been added to the on-line archival
database of rare and out of season birds. The database now contains 14,379
records. This searchable database can be accessed at:

www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html

Good searching,

Lyndal York,
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Ruddy Ducks Part II
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:16:15 -0700
Following up on John Redman's post about the Ruddy Ducks at Boyd Point Waste 
Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. For anyone interested here's a link to 
two of the photos I took this morning. 


http://www.pbase.com/docg/july_2014


Doc George  
Subject: RUDDY DUCKS IN BREEDING PLUMAGE
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:51:16 -0500
This morning Doc George and I observed and photographed a pair of Ruddy Ducks 
in full breeding plumage at the Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Facility in 
Pine Bluff. The sky was clear, the water glassy and the ducks came in close to 
the shore. Today, there were two pair. The second male may well have been 
present yesterday, but was never seen. The photos of the two vibrant males 
together with their reflections in the water are striking. (I will be glad to 
share photos, when downloaded.) If anyone has not see Ruddy Ducks in breeding 
plumage, this would be a great opportunity. They are easy to spot since no 
other ducks are present. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:44:59 -0500
Looking in my ‘oldest’ bird book, Copyright 1966: Golden Guide to Field 
Identification Birds of North America; it has Long-billed Marsh Wren in it. 
Also has Short-billed Marsh Wren. At least I think that was probably my first 
bird book. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Terry Butler 
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 10:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren

I have a bird book (Audubon’s Birds of America) my grandmother gave me for 
Christmas in 1950. It has several different names for birds back then. I looked 
for the Marsh Wren but it wasn’t listed. There was a listing for the Sedge 
Wren, then called the Short-billed Marsh Wren. To list a few of the other 
names, Duck Hawk-Peregrine Falcon, Fish Hawk-Osprey, Red-backed 
Sandpiper-Dunlin, Upland Plover-Upland Sandpiper, Robin Snipe-Red Knot, Wood 
Ibis- Wood Stork, etc…… 


 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR  

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd 

Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:11 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren

 

Oh, yes! Now I remember. That's its old name--the way I first learned it. But 
I've never seen "Long-billed" without the "Marsh" before. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 

 



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
From: mplinz AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

Jerry,

I found this reference…

The Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it 
from the Sedge Wren. 


 

Michael 

 

On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 


I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the birding 
site descriptions there. I have seen references to a "long-billed wren", but I 
can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson. What is that? a 
sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled one. I'd 
appreciate some help. 


 

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler

 
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:08:21 -0500
I have a bird book (Audubon's Birds of America) my grandmother gave me for
Christmas in 1950.  It has several different names for birds back then.  I
looked for the Marsh Wren but it wasn't listed.  There was a listing for the
Sedge Wren, then called the Short-billed Marsh Wren. To list a few of the
other names, Duck Hawk-Peregrine Falcon, Fish Hawk-Osprey, Red-backed
Sandpiper-Dunlin, Upland Plover-Upland Sandpiper, Robin Snipe-Red Knot, Wood
Ibis- Wood Stork, etc..

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR  

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:11 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren

 

Oh, yes!  Now I remember.  That's its old name--the way I first learned it.
But I've never seen "Long-billed" without the "Marsh" before.
 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 
 

  _____  

Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
From: mplinz AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

Jerry,

I found this reference.

The Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it
from the Sedge Wren.

 

Michael 

 

On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler 
wrote:

I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the
birding site descriptions there.  I have seen references to a "long-billed
wren", but I can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson.  What is
that? a sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled one.
I'd appreciate some help.

 

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler

 
Subject: Re: Forest Man
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:43:16 -0500
After viewing this again, I think I've found a place where I can plant three 
more trees this year. Maybe even five. I have a small yard that won't support 
any more trees. If all members on ARBird list serve would plant at least one 
tree somewhere, we might make a very small difference in habitat for birds. 

SJ Gibson
Harrison

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 21, 2014, at 11:02 PM, Dorothy Cooney 
<00000061bc52899a-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Thank you Herschel, wonderful video! I finally got to watch it and it's very 
inspiring. COme on Usee, we miss you. 

>  
> Dorothy Cooney
> Wickes, AR
> 
> 
> On Wednesday, July 16, 2014 12:38 PM, Herschel Raney 
 wrote: 

> 
> 
> I am amazed.
> 
> And a shirker, a lazy man. Comparatively. I think I have planted perhaps 
thirty trees in my life. 

> 
> This is a 16 minute film. So choose your right time to click on it.
> 
> 
> http://devour.com/video/forest-man/
> 
> 
> Herschel Raney
> Conway AR (where I still have a forest)
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:11:08 -0500
Oh, yes! Now I remember. That's its old name--the way I first learned it. But 
I've never seen "Long-billed" without the "Marsh" before. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
From: mplinz AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

Jerry,I found this referenceThe Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed 
Marsh Wren to distinguish it from the Sedge Wren. 



Michael 



On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 



I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the birding 
site descriptions there. I have seen references to a "long-billed wren", but I 
can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson. What is that? a 
sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled one. I'd 
appreciate some help. 




Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
Jerry,
I found this reference…
The Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it
from the Sedge Wren.

Michael


On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler 
wrote:

> I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the
> birding site descriptions there.  I have seen references to a "long-billed
> wren", but I can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson.  What is
> that? a sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled
> one.  I'd appreciate some help.
>
> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>
Subject: Re: Forest Man
From: Dorothy Cooney <00000061bc52899a-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:02:51 -0700
Thank you Herschel, wonderful video! I finally got to watch it and it's very 
inspiring. COme on Usee, we miss you. 



Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR



On Wednesday, July 16, 2014 12:38 PM, Herschel Raney 
 wrote: 

 

>
>
>I am amazed.
>
>
>And a shirker, a lazy man. Comparatively. I think I have planted perhaps 
thirty trees in my life. 

>
>
>This is a 16 minute film. So choose your right time to click on it. 
>
>
>
>
>http://devour.com/video/forest-man/
>
>
>
>
>Herschel Raney
>Conway AR (where I still have a forest)
>
>
Subject: Dyer Lake
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:12:17 -0500
So I found Dyer Lake today. Pretty cool place. Sure wish I had a kayak. From 
the boat ramp I saw Great Egret, Little Blue, Great Blue, and Snowy Egret. 
Couldn't see the whole lake from the ramp. No Wood Storks. But who knows what 
might be around the bend. 


Drove south toward the river on Gin Town. There were two wet areas with mud 
flats full of egrets, herons, and killdeer. Then I drove east to Vine Prairie 
rd and went south to the river to look downstream to Bird Island. The island 
was awash in white. Hundreds of egrets were standing on the beaches and trees. 
Lots were still flying to and fro. I guess young were still being fed. 


Nothing happening at Frog Bayou. But the Alma sewage lagoons had Black-bellied 
Whistling Ducks. And the ponds across from the lagoons were filled with cattle 
egrets. 


Swallows were sunning in the roads, and spread out to sunbathe in the tops of 
small trees. Brown Thrashers were dust bathing. Still lots of bird song. But 
many birds were just quietly moving about, looking for food, job done, waiting 
for the right time to head south. 


I saw zero Least Terns today.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Long-billed wren
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:15:30 -0500
I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the
birding site descriptions there.  I have seen references to a "long-billed
wren", but I can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson.  What is
that? a sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled
one.  I'd appreciate some help.

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: Ruddy Duck in breeding plumage
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:26:31 -0500
A male Ruddy Duck in full breeding plumage arrived today at Boyd Point Waste 
Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. He was accompanied by two females. The 
male came in close to the shore for great looks and clear photos. 
Subject: NEOTROPIC AND DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS AT EAGLE WATCH, GENTRY
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:16:15 +0000
Terry Stanfill and I saw NEOTROPIC (1) AND DOUBLE-CRESTED (3) CORMORANTS at 
Eagle Watch Nature Trail just west of Gentry this morning. The birds were 
easily seen from the viewing area at the end of the short walking trail, where 
it overlooks SWEPCO Lake. We had our first sighting of a Neotropic in July 
2011, with subsequent late summer sightings in 2012 and 2013. The lake is high 
now, which appears to limit where the cormorants perch to dry off, a good thing 
if you want to see them, since one of the best places is directly east of the 
viewing platform, with excellent light in the morning. I'll post some 
photographs on both the Eagle Watch Nature Trail facebook page and on Joe Neal 
facebook this evening. If you get the view we had today, you won't have to be a 
cormorant expert to see the difference in the two species. 
Subject: ArkDem 7/21/14: Birds find island as waypoint to Brazil
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:44:01 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

There is a good article titled "Birds find island as waypoint to Brazil" on the 
front page of today's Ark. Democrat ActiveStyle section. It's about bird island 
on Lake Ouachita that purple martins and other bird species use as a roosting 
site. 


Enjoy,
Barry Haas
Subject: AAS News of Members
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:19:20 +0000
Dear ARbirders:

I am pleased to fill the News of Members editor position for the AAS 
newsletter, Arkansas Birds. A position held by Loice Lacy for many years! 


It's about time for the next issue to be published so.........Please send your 
recent adventures, anecdotes, photos, birding news, and observations to me at 
dboyles AT arkansasedc.com, by August 1 for the 
upcoming edition of the Arkansas Birds newsletter! Thank you for supporting our 
newsletter through your personal contributions! 


Thanks and good birding,
Dottie Boyles

This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Good Bird
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 18:07:30 -0500
Saw a 1st year Laughing Gull at Treadway's today.  Also 100+ Least
Sandpipers, several Western Sandpipers a few still in breading plumage, six
Green Herons, dozen Ruddy Duck's, a couple of Lesser Scaups, half dozen
American Coots, 50+ Great Egrets, Little and Great Blue Herons, Pect's, one
Semipalmated Plover, Spotted Sandpiper's, hundreds of Tree and Rough Winged
Swallows, a few Barn Swallows and several Killdeer.  Saul's ponds was to
muddy to enter. Mr. Saul in the past has told me I could look for birds but
to avoid the ponds during wet weather, please.

 

Terry Butler
Subject: Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:41:19 -0500
That's great! Some good PR would probably provide a pat on the back for
cooperating as well as to raise awareness of the problem for other companies
who use wires. Thanks, Joe, for following up.you are a good example for all
of us! Joyce Hartmann, Van Buren County

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 10:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton

 

I've just gotten off the phone with a person at SWEPCO-AEP who accepted my
report on the heron powerline death, understood what I was saying, and said
he would immediately pursue getting the line marked near the hatchery. I am
quite pleased that he completely understood the problem. It is a good start
and I will report back on this when the solution is in place. I was also
able to get in a pitch for protection of the high wintering population of
raptors in the same area. 
Subject: crested caracara
From: Danny Townsend <perfectplaces AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 17:50:16 -0500
I just recieved and email with regards to bird. The picture was indeed taken in 
Texas. Sorry for all of the excitement. Would have been fun though. 
Subject: Crested Caracara - probably not
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:05:42 -0500
Dear fellow birders:


I attempted to follow-up on the sighting and learned (through friends of this 
person) that they are currently in San Antonio, and it is most likely 

that is where the image was taken. There were 5 of them! This makes more sense 
they were 

seen in TX. 


Sincerely,


Kelly Chitwood
(Who will look anyway, just in case.) 
Subject: Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton
From: Dawner <000000554a8a6ef2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:16:35 -0400
How wonderful!
?
Dawn
Izard County


-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Sent: Fri, Jul 18, 2014 10:08 am
Subject: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton

I've just gotten off the phone with a person at SWEPCO-AEP who accepted my 
report on the heron powerline death, understood what I was saying, and said he 
would immediately pursue getting the line marked near the hatchery. I am quite 
pleased that he completely understood the problem. It is a good start and I 
will report back on this when the solution is in place. I was also able to get 
in a pitch for protection of the high wintering population of raptors in the 
same area. 

Subject: Crested Caracara in El Dorado
From: Danny Townsend <perfectplaces AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:59:15 -0500
I just recieved information and a picture of a Crested Caracara in El Dorado 
that was seen in yesterday. I will post more information as it is given to me. 
I do not know the exact location as of yet. 

Subject: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:08:01 +0000
I've just gotten off the phone with a person at SWEPCO-AEP who accepted my 
report on the heron powerline death, understood what I was saying, and said he 
would immediately pursue getting the line marked near the hatchery. I am quite 
pleased that he completely understood the problem. It is a good start and I 
will report back on this when the solution is in place. I was also able to get 
in a pitch for protection of the high wintering population of raptors in the 
same area. 
Subject: Basic info about GBH killed on Centerton powerline -- birders can help
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:12:16 +0000
Here is the basic information about the killing of a Great Blue Heron on a 
SWEPCO high voltage powerline that is immediately adjacent the south boundary 
of Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton, in Benton County, Arkansas, in case 
you can encourage SWEPCO to act on this: 

-- The line runs along and immediately adjacent the entire south boundary of 
the hatchery. 

--These lines are part of the 345,000-volt transmission line associated with 
Shipe Road station built within the past few years. The line features tall 
metal poles with four wires. The bottom three wires are easily seen, but the 
top wire is smaller and less visible. 

--The hatchery itself (110 acres) and the surrounding landscape is all former 
prairie and is heavily used by all kinds of birds, including many raptors. We 
have seen all three falcons here (Peregrine, Prairie, and Kestrel, the latter 
nesting), Red-tailed Hawks, Swainsons Hawks, both vulture species, and in 
winter, regular visits to the hatchery by Bald Eagles. Obviously, they are all 
now at risk. And because these lines cover many miles, it is not clear just how 
much of a risk the top line presents. 

--I do not have any specific contact information for SWEPCO, other than what is 
available on SWEPCO.com. So starting there, the customer service number is 
1-888-216-3523. If you go to SWEPCO.com, there is a contact us email form. 

--If you contact SWEPCO, please ask them to install balls used as line 
identifiers on this particular expanse of line across the south end of the 
hatchery. Also, mention the requirement that this mortality be reported to the 
US Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent. 

I will be happy to provide to anyone my photograph of the Great Blue Heron dead 
on the powerline and a view of the powerline without the heron that shows the 
basic invisibility of the top wire (send me an email request). 

Im going to try and figure out how to get these images to SWEPCO today.
Subject: MESSAGES FROM A SADLY DISHEVELED FORM
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 19:43:02 +0000
Sometimes you see stuff that makes you sick, and sometimes it also makes you 
think. 


This morning I headed up to Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton to see if 
any more shorebirds had come south. Before I got there I saw a Solitary 
Sandpiper alongside a little farm pond, my first of the fall. 


Right before the hatchery, the road passes under the 345,000-volt transmission 
line associated with Southwestern Electrical Power Companys Shipe Road station 
near Centerton. Hawks and other birds perch on these wires and on the tall 
poles. I look down the lines where they cross a pasture immediately south of 
the Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton. You never know when a Swainsons 
Hawk might be there. 


Unfortunately, today on the otherwise largely invisible top wire I saw the 
dangled form of what I knew immediately was a Great Blue Heron. Ive seen this 
sadly disheveled form before, though not at Centerton. 


I have just posted two photographs on my facebook page. If interested, take a 
look and you dont have to be my friend to do so. There is a bird in one 
photograph, but not in the other. The fledgling heron probably never saw the 
top 1 of 4 wires, got a wing wrapped and trapped, hung and eventually died 
there. In the other photograph, taken nearby, 3 of 4 wires are easily seen, but 
the top killer is all but invisible. I assume that is what happened to this 
novice Great Blue: tried to fly above the obvious 3 wires and, until too late, 
never saw the killer. There an inescapable moral dimension to such a bold 
creature caught helplessly in the nameless jaws of modernity. 


So who is responsible for this? In my younger days I would have just pointed 
the finger at SWEPCO. Older now, I notice fingers pointing back at me, too. I 
have my lights on and the air-conditioner running in summer, using lots of 
juice. That said, shouldnt such hazards as all-but-invisible high wires be 
marked so as to improve the life chances of our fellow creatures? 


Great Blue Herons and other flying creatures are expressions of our universe, 
widely cherished by the same public that uses electricity. I am personally 
willing to add a few cents to my monthly bill to give herons a better chance. 
That is, willing to do unto others as you would have them do unto you. 


We entangle them at great cost to ourselves. When we respect them, we respect 
ourselves, too. 
Subject: Birds Eat Insects! Volunteer or Attend the Insect Festival of Arkansas
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:03:28 +0000
Dear Birders,

I love birds and I love insects. They go hand in hand. The Department of 
Entomology at the University of Arkansas will be having our 14th Insect 
Festival of Arkansas on October 2, 2014 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. It is a free 
event and we usually have 3,000+ school children and adults come to the event. 


We can always use volunteers. It is a lot of fun, and you would learn about 
insects too. 


Best of all would be if some birders would make a display of some kind about 
the interaction of birds and insects, or bring some live birds to show the 
children. I do not really know what is possible in this regard. 


We will have a fish and game aquarium there with native fish.

I have attached our poster. If you want to volunteer, please contact me by 
email. 


Otherwise, I hope you will attend. I guarantee you will be amazed. We have a 
great arthropod/insect zoo, lots of experts, a cotton patch, insect theatre, 
honey bees, and on and on. 


Best regards,
Dr. Donald C. Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology
Subject: ticket price
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:30:56 +0000
I notice that the poster for our Slow Food event tonight did not have the price 
of tickets... they are $35 each.. 




****************************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA
phone 479-575-6359  fax 479-575-4010
email kgsmith AT uark.edu
****************************************
Subject: Mulhollan Waterfowl Blind at Lake Fayetteville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 11:54:01 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society is the lead conservation organization 
working to build a modern, attractive waterfowl observation blind at Lake 
Fayetteville. This is one of our education responses to growing pressures on 
natural resources in northwest Arkansas. Please take a look at a painting of 
the blind by blind architect Michael Cockram, our introduction to Dr Mulhollan 
and his service to the natural history community, and additional material on 
the NWAAS web site. Go here: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/. 


Dr David Chapman has offered to send a copy of his excellent "The Birdlife of 
Lake Fayetteville" for donations of $100 or more. Details are on the web page. 
For those who donate $200 or more he will send a copy of his "The History of 
Lake Fayetteville" published in Flashback (vol 61, no. 3, Fall 2011). This 
fascinating history won the Walter J. Lemke Prize awarded by Washington County 
Historical Society. If cash donations are unrealistic, but you'd still like to 
help, we will need the help of many volunteer hands on several days this fall 
during construction. 
Subject: nothing to do with birds - for people near Fayetteville
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 00:57:36 +0000
well there is a chicken liver terrine... Slow Food is the opposite of fast 
food... eat locally... hope some of you can attend... you can buy tickets at 
the door or online... 




****************************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA
phone 479-575-6359  fax 479-575-4010
email kgsmith AT uark.edu
****************************************



Join us tomorrow for
Fund Your 
Farmers! 


Thursday, July 17, 5-7pm
at the Garden Room
215 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville

Purchase 
Tickets! 


or call 479-799-7985



Announcing an exciting tasting menu from five local chefs:

Tomato Peach Gazpacho
vegan, gluten free
Jerrmy Gawthrop Greenhouse Grille



Sweden Creek Farm Shiitake Pate
Across the Creek Chicken Liver Terrine
Cedar Creek Farm Head Cheese
Alan Dierks, Vetro 1925



An Ozark adaptation of Elote: grilled corn on the cob smothered with bacon 
aioli, beer vinegar, candied sage, and red chile flakes 


plus vegetarian version

Dorothy Hall, 28 Springs



Round Mountain Farm Lamb-Stuffed Pasta with White River Creamery lemon-chevre 
sauce and crisp basil chiffonade 


Blue Heaven Farm Blueberry Cheesecake bites on steel-cut oat tuille from War 
Eagle Mill 


Bill Lyle, Eleven Restaurant



French Macarons made with local fruit
Robyn Bowen, The Fayetteville Pastry Shop


Purchase 
Tickets! 


or call 479-799-7985



Can't attend? You can still
make a tax-deductible 
donation. 


Proceeds will support Ozark Slow Food's Micro-Grant 
Program. 












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Ozark Slow Food | 18235 Wildlife Rd | Fayetteville | AR | 72701



Subject: Magic Mix for birds
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 12:48:23 -0500
The recipe for Magic Mix is taken from a newspaper column by Ruth Thomas:

 

MAGIC MIX:

            Melt about two cupfuls of fat, preferably bacon grease (you may
use oleo, cooking oil, poultry fat, any shortening): blend in some peanut
butter, a cup more or less, then stir in about as much heavy syrup as you
had grease; and finally work in cornmeal until the mix is stiffer than
peanut butter.

            Too much cornmeal makes the mix dry as it tends to harden if the
birds do not eat it at once.  Too little leaves the mix sticky, and on warm
days the grease will ooze to the top.  However, the birds are not critical.
Once having acquired the taste, they will eat it in almost any variation.
Nutmeats, raisins, stale cake and cookies may be added.  It is not advisable
to stir in seeds.  Serve your seed mixtures separately.  All birds relish
Magic Mix, but its greatest value is the acceptance by those species that do
not, by their nature, eat small seeds or the larger grains found in hen
scratch.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NO SPOIL BIRD SEED BALL:

1 oz. peanut butter

1 oz. shortening

1 oz. flour

4 oz. cornmeal

1 oz. bird seed

Mix and shape

 

 

 

Sally Jo Gibson

512 Yorkshire Cove

Harrison, AR 72601

Home Phone: 870-741-5805

Cell: 870-688-9950

sjogibson AT live.com

 

Life is too short to be anything but happy. 

Falling down is a part of life, Getting back up is living.

 
Subject: Forest Man
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 12:38:15 -0500
I am amazed.

And a shirker, a lazy man. Comparatively. I think I have planted perhaps
thirty trees in my life.

This is a 16 minute film. So choose your right time to click on it.


http://devour.com/video/forest-man/


Herschel Raney
Conway AR (where I still have a forest)