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Updated on Tuesday, January 24 at 08:37 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Sri Lanka Magpie,©BirdQuest

24 Jan Clacking goose [Teresa Mathews ]
24 Jan ASCA Field Trip Saturday [Karen Holliday ]
23 Jan My bird list at work today [Teresa Mathews ]
22 Jan Re: Miller and Lafayette Counties, 1/21/2017 [Elizabeth Shores ]
22 Jan Miller and Lafayette Counties, 1/21/2017 [swamp_fox ]
22 Jan Sandhill Cranes [Bob Harden ]
22 Jan Toltec Mound [Randy ]
22 Jan Sandhill Cranes [Randy ]
21 Jan Common Merganser [Dottie Boyles ]
21 Jan What Flock Did I See This Morning? [Ann Honeycutt ]
20 Jan Inauguration day at Charlie B Craig fish hatchery, Centerton AR [Jacque Brown ]
21 Jan Red-throated loon [Randy ]
20 Jan Rusty Blackbirds Murray Park Little Rock [CK Franklin ]
20 Jan Re: Bird list [Nancy Felker ]
20 Jan Fwd: Inauguration day at Charlie B Craig fish hatchery, Centerton AR [Jacque Brown ]
20 Jan irrigators [Bill Shepherd ]
19 Jan Re: Bird list [Dan Scheiman ]
19 Jan Bird list [Nancy Felker ]
19 Jan Re: Our Tenkiller [Nancy Young ]
19 Jan Our Tenkiller [Joseph Neal ]
18 Jan Re: Support a state dinosaur [James Morgan ]
18 Jan Support a state dinosaur [Jeffrey Short ]
18 Jan Creeperology, an addendum [Herschel Raney ]
18 Jan Oops! [Dorothy Cooney ]
18 Jan Friday lunch [Dorothy Cooney ]
18 Jan eBird Basics Workshop, Feb 11, Little Rock Audubon Center [Dan Scheiman ]
18 Jan Re: banded tagged dead red-tailed hawk banding info. ["bill ." ]
17 Jan Fwd: Southern Lafayette County birds 12-28-16 and 1-11-17 [Charles Lyon ]
17 Jan Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 17 [David Arbour ]
18 Jan MAYSVILLE – NO EXPLANATION NEEDED [Joseph Neal ]
17 Jan Re: banded tagged dead red-tailed hawk banding info. [Judy & Don ]
17 Jan Banded and tagged red-tailed hawk [Jerry Butler ]
17 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Michael Linz ]
17 Jan Lonoke & Pulaski Counties on a gray day with a chance of rain [CK Franklin ]
16 Jan Sandhill Cranes [Charles H Mills ]
16 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Don Simons ]
16 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Jerry Butler ]
15 Jan Fwd: AAST Belize birding tour [Karen ]
15 Jan Re: AAST Belize birding tour [Audrey Weymiller ]
15 Jan Adult Tundra Swan [Terry Butler ]
15 Jan Lower Frazier Pike Road Jan 14- Pulaski County [CK Franklin ]
14 Jan Creeperology [Herschel Raney ]
14 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Jerry Butler ]
14 Jan LONG-TAILED DUCK AT BEAVER LAKE [Joseph Neal ]
14 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Jerry Davis ]
14 Jan Re: SUMMER TANAGER MALE IN FAYETTEVILLE ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
13 Jan Re: sandhill cranes [Ed Laster ]
13 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Barry Haas ]
13 Jan SUMMER TANAGER MALE IN FAYETTEVILLE [Joseph Neal ]
13 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Gmail ]
13 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Gmail ]
13 Jan Re: Whooping Cranes [Abby Gibson ]
13 Jan ASCA Upcoming Field Trips [Karen Holliday ]
13 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [ ]
13 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [ ]
13 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Judy & Don ]
13 Jan Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead ["Todd, Shelley" ]
13 Jan Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead [Jerry Butler ]
13 Jan Whooping Cranes [Dan Scheiman ]
13 Jan GREATER SCAUPS AT MOBERLY STORM WATER RETENTION POND [Joseph Neal ]
12 Jan Opportunity to Display Your Bird Photography [Dan Scheiman ]
12 Jan Together for Birds Petition [Steve Holmer ]
11 Jan Birder TV [Joseph Neal ]
11 Jan Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 10 [David Arbour ]
10 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... [Judy & Don ]
10 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... [ ]
10 Jan Please ignore this email... ["shalom AT cyberback.com" ]
10 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... [Gail Miller ]
10 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... [Sandy Berger ]
10 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
10 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... [Judy & Don ]
10 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... [Gail Miller ]
9 Jan Re: Not for the weak stomach... ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
9 Jan Not for the weak stomach... [Butch Tetzlaff ]
9 Jan alot of ducks [Teresa & Leif ]
9 Jan BIG DUCK INFLUX AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE [Joseph Neal ]

Subject: Clacking goose
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 19:27:39 -0600
 Was in the Diamondhead front pond there by the road going into Catherine
State Park this morning at 7:30am. I have seen it there twice now this week
and later in the day it goes into Lake Catherine State Park with the other
geese.  Today was quiet.    There was about 7 Turkey Vultures and 2 hawks
circling high in the sky.    Just several crows.  Even the little guys that
normally I see there was quiet too.  Teresa, Hot Springs, AR

-- 
Believe in yourself, God does. Things will work out the way HE wants to
them to be.
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Saturday
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 14:11:10 +0000
Just a reminder that ASCA's January field trip is this Saturday.  Details are 
below.  Come join us!  You don't have to be an ASCA member to participate.  
The weather for Saturday is predicted to be sunny, with a high of 48 and 
windy.  With the wind, that means it will be cold, especially at the lake, so 
dress warm and in layers.  The sun will help warm us up as the day goes 
forward.  For more information about ASCA, go to our website at 
www.ascabird.org.  If you have questions about the field trip, feel free to 
contact me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorMaumelle/Little 
Rock 

 January 28, 2017Lake Dardanelle-DelawarePark and Holla Bend National Wildlife 
Refuge (NWR)Meet at 8:00 a.m. at the Mayflower commuter lot off I-40West at 
Exit 135.  We’ll carpool to DelawarePark, located on the southwest side of 
Lake Dardanelle.  We should arrive at the Delaware Park boatramp around 9:15 
a.m. for anyone who wants to meet us there.  We’ll scan the lake for gulls, 
pelicans, loons,mergansers, ducks, grebes, and eagles.  Arare gull or duck is 
a possibility.  Thelake can be very cold and windy.  Dressin layers, 
including gloves and hats.   Next, we’ll caravan to the Holla Bend NWR 
headquarters’parking lot.  There is a $4.00 entrancefee per vehicle.  A 
duck stamp or a NationalParks pass will get a vehicle in for free.  Our target 
birds will be raptors, including nestingBald Eagles, also swans, ducks, geese, 
and sparrows.  At Holla Bend, there will be some walking intall grass, so 
boots are recommended.  Bring snacks, lunch, and plenty of water.  We’ll 
return to Little Rock late afternoon.  Directions from the town of Dardanelle 
to DelawarePark:  At the junction of Hwy. 7 and Hwy.22, go west on Hwy 22 
approximately 10 miles. Turn right onto Hwy. 393, which is the first road on 
your right after youcross the long causeway at the west end of the lake.  Hwy. 
393 dead ends at Delaware Park.  GPS coordinates:  35.295749, -93.271458.  
For more information about the Holla Bend NWR,go to 
http://www.fws.gov/hollabend/.  The headquarters is located at 10448 HollaBend 
Road, Dardanelle, AR 72834.  GPScoordinates: 35.163222, -93.093477.  
Subject: My bird list at work today
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 22:20:33 -0600
 I'm working now part time at Lake Catherine State Park so when I get to
take my break I sit  wherever my last cleaning job was and watch the birds
in the area.  Here's my list today.  Probably I am the only one out there
watching for birds.
1 Loon unknown kind
90 ringbilled gulls
2 hairy woodpecker
45 Canada geese
1 Crackling goose
4 pine warblers
2 tit mouse
14 chickadees
3 brown nut hatch
1 bald eagle
2 turkey Vultures
2 Flickers
1Bufflehead

They do Eagle Tours they said. And I saw the one bald eagle they said they
got two of them.   They are building a nest in a tree not far from some of
the cabins on the lake. One of my co-workers said she was watching them
carrying sticks over the lake.  None of them seem to be bird watchers.  The
place is loaded with birds some of which I never heard sing before and I
not one to identify them by song.   Its a pretty nice state park to camp ,
They have rv sites, tent sites, and they rent cabins, Yurts, and self Made
tents.  Pretty cool.  Anyhow its off the beaten path if anyone is
interested to go there.   Teresa, Hot Springs, AR

-- 
Believe in yourself, God does. Things will work out the way HE wants to
them to be.
Subject: Re: Miller and Lafayette Counties, 1/21/2017
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 19:00:19 -0600
Buddy and his wife had a great time. Thank you, Charles!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2017, at 6:45 PM, swamp_fox  wrote:
> 
> I spent much of yesterday morning escorted a high school friend and his wife 
around Miller and Lafayette Counties. The primary objective was Sandhill Cranes 
and the 58 we tallied didn’t disappoint. A lone Ross’s Goose was tagging 
along with one group of Sandhills. We also encountered a most cooperative adult 
Cooper’s Hawk and 2 Merlins-one in each county. 

> 
> An image of the Merlin found in Lafayette County may be viewed at: 
http://www.pbase.com/image/164867287 

> 
> Charles Mills
Subject: Miller and Lafayette Counties, 1/21/2017
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 18:45:54 -0600
I spent much of yesterday morning escorted a high school friend and his wife 
around Miller and Lafayette Counties. The primary objective was Sandhill Cranes 
and the 58 we tallied didn’t disappoint. A lone Ross’s Goose was tagging 
along with one group of Sandhills. We also encountered a most cooperative adult 
Cooper’s Hawk and 2 Merlins-one in each county. 


An image of the Merlin found in Lafayette County may be viewed at: 
http://www.pbase.com/image/164867287  


Charles Mills
Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 11:43:51 -0600
Follow up Randy Robinson. At least twelve Sandhill Cranes just past second 
levee on Frazier Pike out past hay bales 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Toltec Mound
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 11:26:45 -0600
Thousands of snow hundreds of white-fronted and pintails lots Ross's geese 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 10:45:28 -0600
Cranes second leave on Frazier west side of road past hay bales 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Common Merganser
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 20:40:08 +0000
Seen from Vista Point on Lake Maumelle. Observed by Doris Boyles, Ed Laster and 
myself. 


Dottie
Little Rock



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Subject: What Flock Did I See This Morning?
From: Ann Honeycutt <annhoneycutt53 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 18:03:10 -0600
I'm new to birding and curiosity compels me to write for identification.

 

This morning before dawn I was stuck at the light at the traffic light at
Rodney Parham and Highway 10 near Two Rivers Park on the Arkansas River when
a huge flock of smaller birds flew low above my car.

 

I watched in amazement for over a minute as a half-mile, serpentine line of
birds undulated northwest in the direction of the Maumelle River.  It was an
impressive how well coordinated the line was with no stragglers and all
flapping at the same speed.

 

What might those birds have been this time of year?  Blackbirds? 

 

Thanks for your help,

 

Ann

 

Ann Honeycutt

Little Rock, AR

 

 
Subject: Inauguration day at Charlie B Craig fish hatchery, Centerton AR
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:05:54 -0600
I had a bad cold last weekend and stayed in so today seemed the perfect day to 
get back in the birding saddle since the TV will remain OFF today! 


At the fish hatchery nearly everything was in the two westernmost lower ponds. 
I made two trips, 8:30 ish AM and back around 1:30 PM. 



AM

4 Redhead Ducks, 1 male 3 female
2 Lesser Scaup, 1 male 1 female
32 Bufflehead
12 Mallards

2 Great Blue Herons
1 Kingfisher
1 Kestrel
1 Red-tailed Hawk
8 Pipits
16 Meadowlarks
14 Starlings

assorted Sparrows that dove to fast to really ID

PM

add

16 Gadwall 
1 Pintail  male

In between AM and PM I went to Lake Atalanta in Rogers. 

I only checked out the lake today 

1 fairly tame Canada Goose
about a dozen fairly tame Mallards 

2 Common Goldeneye   males
8 Ring-necked Ducks    7 males and 1 female
1 Bald Eagle  sub-adult

Bluebirds
Cardinals
Titmice

I probably got the best Ring-necked Duck photos to date for me.  
I was also able to get photos of the Redhead pair and Lesser Scaup pair at the 
fish hatchery but they were further off. 



Jacque Brown

Centerton, AR
bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: Red-throated loon
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Jan 2017 10:31:28 -0600
Lake Maumelle Vista Point spotted by Danny Thownson and observed by Rhonda and 
me . 9:30 this morning lots of boats on lake today make birds move a lot . 


Randy

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds Murray Park Little Rock
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 21:43:31 +0000
Here's any easy bird for your year's list. Watching a flock of 37 Rusty 
Blackbirds under the trees just before the entrance to the dog park at Murray 
Park. 

Cindy
Little Rock
Pulaski County
Subject: Re: Bird list
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:43:36 -0700
Thank you everyone, I just submitted my first sighting. 
Nancy

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 20, 2017, at 2:00 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> For those of you not yet participating in ebird - it's GREAT!  
> 
> Joanie
> 
> 
> From: Dan Scheiman 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 12:43 PM
> Subject: Re: Bird list
> 
> Nancy,
> 
> Set up an eBird account at http://ebird.org and then install the eBird mobile 
app. 
http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/1848031-ebird-mobile-apps-overview?b_id=1928. 

> 
> eBird is the best program for list keeping, plus you contribute to the 
largest citizen science program on the planet. Birders and ornithologists make 
use of eBird's data. The more people who use eBird, the more useful the data 
become. 

> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
> 
> 
> From: "Nancy Felker" 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 12:25:30 PM
> Subject: Bird list
> 
> I would love some suggestions of the easiest way of keeping track of the 
birds I see this year. I do have an iPhone and wondered if there is an app that 
people use. I do not find my Audubon app easy to use for this purpose. Thank 
you. 

> Nancy (Fayetteville)
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Fwd: Inauguration day at Charlie B Craig fish hatchery, Centerton AR
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:26:38 -0600

I meant to mention if you go to the hatchery beware driving around that big 
pond that has been dug out for so many months, I about got stuck today, it took 
me 10 minutes to get out of the mud on one corner of the pond. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Jacque Brown 
> Date: 1/20/17 3:05 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Inauguration day at Charlie B Craig fish hatchery, Centerton AR
> 
> I had a bad cold last weekend and stayed in so today seemed the perfect day 
to get back in the birding saddle since the TV will remain OFF today! 

> 
> At the fish hatchery nearly everything was in the two westernmost lower 
ponds. I made two trips, 8:30 ish AM and back around 1:30 PM. 

> 
> 
> AM
> 
> 4 Redhead Ducks, 1 male 3 female
> 2 Lesser Scaup, 1 male 1 female
> 32 Bufflehead
> 12 Mallards
> 
> 2 Great Blue Herons
> 1 Kingfisher
> 1 Kestrel
> 1 Red-tailed Hawk
> 8 Pipits
> 16 Meadowlarks
> 14 Starlings
> 
> assorted Sparrows that dove to fast to really ID
> 
> PM
> 
> add
> 
> 16 Gadwall 
> 1 Pintail  male
> 
> In between AM and PM I went to Lake Atalanta in Rogers. 
> 
> I only checked out the lake today 
> 
> 1 fairly tame Canada Goose
> about a dozen fairly tame Mallards 
> 
> 2 Common Goldeneye   males
> 8 Ring-necked Ducks    7 males and 1 female
> 1 Bald Eagle  sub-adult
> 
> Bluebirds
> Cardinals
> Titmice
> 
> I probably got the best Ring-necked Duck photos to date for me.  
> I was also able to get photos of the Redhead pair and Lesser Scaup pair at 
the fish hatchery but they were further off. 

> 
> 
> Jacque Brown
> 
> Centerton, AR
> bluebird2 AT cox.net 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: irrigators
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:56:27 +0000
For everyone's information, the name of that "wheeled irrigation system" is 
center-pivot irrigator. 



Bill


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 
Subject: Re: Bird list
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2017 18:43:37 +0000
Nancy, 

Set up an eBird account at http://ebird.org and then install the eBird mobile 
app. 
http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/1848031-ebird-mobile-apps-overview?b_id=1928 
. 


eBird is the best program for list keeping, plus you contribute to the largest 
citizen science program on the planet. Birders and ornithologists make use of 
eBird's data. The more people who use eBird, the more useful the data become. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 


----- Original Message -----

From: "Nancy Felker"  
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 12:25:30 PM 
Subject: Bird list 

I would love some suggestions of the easiest way of keeping track of the birds 
I see this year. I do have an iPhone and wondered if there is an app that 
people use. I do not find my Audubon app easy to use for this purpose. Thank 
you. 

Nancy (Fayetteville) 

Sent from my iPhone 
Subject: Bird list
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2017 11:25:30 -0700
I would love some suggestions of the easiest way of keeping track of the birds 
I see this year. I do have an iPhone and wondered if there is an app that 
people use. I do not find my Audubon app easy to use for this purpose. Thank 
you. 

Nancy (Fayetteville)

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Our Tenkiller
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2017 14:24:47 +0000
The water in the Illinois River is MUCH cleaner now than it was ten years ago. 
 Court-ordered mitigation of the poultry litter application has helped with 
this, but the most improvements in water quality were made by the town/city 
wastewater systems which were in poor shape but are now working properly. 
 Some tributaries and sections of the river have been delisted from the 303d 
water quality impaired list both in Arkansas and Oklahoma.  Good progress has 
been made on the issue, and the work continues.   


 On Thursday, January 19, 2017 3:43 AM, Joseph Neal  wrote: 

 

 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Our Tenkiller
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 19 Jan 2017 09:42:55 +0000
Yesterday, at Tenkiller Ferry Lake in northeastern Oklahoma, about 1.5 hours 
from my home in Fayetteville: Common Loon (121), Red-throated Loon (3), 
American White Pelican (97). 

Tenkiller is one of the best places in a wide region to see wintering loons. It 
is, BY FAR, the closest dependable place to see numerous Common Loons, and 
decent chances to see other loon species. This is of interest to many observers 
in northwest and west-central Arkansas, even if it crosses state lines. 

Tenkiller is an impoundment of the Illinois River, which rises in northwest 
Arkansas. We discharge part of Fayetteville's treated wastewater into an 
Illinois R tributary. Those of you who have birded Woolsey Wet Prairie 
Sanctuary were right next door to this wastewater plant and its Illinois R 
discharge. 

Our former prairies in northwest Arkansas have become cattle operations whose 
waste production drains to the Illinois. Our "poultry prairies" generate vast 
quantities of litter, much of it spread on our fields as fertilizer and this 
too drains to the Illinois. Waste pouring from our smokestacks settles into the 
Illinois. 

This is why I feel a big sigh when people talk about "state's rights." What 
could this possibly mean when it comes to dealing with water pollution (or air 
pollution, etc)? A rejectionist tide whose purpose is to stymie or overthrow 
sound science directly impacts all of us and the birds that interest and 
concern us. 

So yes, we in Arkansas have something DIRECTLY in common with birds swimming in 
a lake in Oklahoma. The remote winter bird of our fantasies - that far off 
Red-throated Loon -- swims in reality we make in Arkansas. 

Subject: Re: Support a state dinosaur
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 21:01:08 -0600
Local teenager here in the Fayetteville area decided at least year ago 
to do this. Selected a dinosaur only found in Arkansas (so far). 
Bi-partisan support is what I heard on the local NPR station.

I haven't taken the time, since I've heard both radio reports, but am 
sure if you googled/search for some subset of

Mason Cyprus Oury, KUAF radio, dinosaur

one would find the two podcasts and hear him interviewed.

Cheers

Jim

Fayetteville

On 1/18/2017 7:59 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> Reading an article in Arkansas Online tonight and our Legislature is 
> considering naming a state dinosaur ( 
> 
http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/jan/18/arkansas-legislators-advance-bill-designating-stat/ 

> ).
>
> It is described as “ostrich-like” which definitely relates to our 
> interests.
>
> It was identified by Dr. James Quinn 
> (http://arkansaslife.com/them-dry-bones/).
>
> Our support may actually lead to a positive accomplishment by this 
> session.
>
> Jeff Short
>
Subject: Support a state dinosaur
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 19:59:00 -0600
Reading an article in Arkansas Online tonight and our Legislature is
considering naming a state dinosaur (
http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/jan/18/arkansas-legislators-advance-
bill-designating-stat/ ).  

 

It is described as "ostrich-like" which definitely relates to our interests.

 

It was identified by Dr. James Quinn
(http://arkansaslife.com/them-dry-bones/).   

 

Our support may actually lead to a positive accomplishment by this session.

 

Jeff Short
Subject: Creeperology, an addendum
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 17:16:46 -0600
As with many suet cakes attached to trees or near trees in my woods in 
the past, the raccoons find them. And the first night, the deft-fingered 
masked-dog just opened the cage and got the cake out, eating a large 
portion and leaving the rest on the ground.

The next night, I wired the cage shut with a length of wire. And the 
masked-dog poked with his nose and fingers through the cage and turned 
the cake into a scattered pile of very yellow detritus in the leaves 
below. I took quite a bit of this and spread it like butter on the bark 
of the hickory tree. On the side facing my window. I will now use half a 
cake during the days and remove it completely inside the safety of my 
door at night. I smear a portion on the tree any day I will get to sit 
and watch.

The Creeper has returned many times. And at first, it preferred to take 
small amounts of the suet from the bark of the tree. It seems satisfied 
with this, as though it found this unnaturally rich food of its own 
accord and taking it is right with the universe. Today the Creeper 
returned multiple times to the base of the tree. Once it sidled/wagged 
to the bottom and took small pieces from the leaves where the raccoon 
had spread it. And then at least twice it inched and wove up to the cage 
and took directly from the cake. It did not stay for long but did stop 
long enough for me to run for the camera. It spends quite a bit of time 
retracting and extending its long tongue in flashes, cocking its head back.

They still spiral the other tree trunks but seem to be getting better 
and better at coming directly to the cake tree.

I will not be able to watch again until Friday afternoon. But will smear 
some cake daily on the tree.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Oops!
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:38:14 -0600
my email "Friday lunch" was meant for a small group.  I somehow sent it to
everyone.  Please disregard if not part of the group.  Sorry if I confused
you.

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Friday lunch
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 10:21:33 -0600
We'll meet at J&L again on Friday.  The group liked it so we'll give it a
go again.  See ya there!

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: eBird Basics Workshop, Feb 11, Little Rock Audubon Center
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:21:50 +0000
On Saturday February 11 I will be teaching an eBird Basics workshop at the 
Little Rock Audubon Center from 9-12. http://ar.audubon.org/events/ebird-basics 
This workshop will teach you what eBird ( http://ebird.org ) is and how to use 
it, including starting an account, entering a checklist, and using the many 
tools available for finding birds and birding hotspots. We'll start with a 
short bird walk to create a checklist and learn about counting birds. Then I'll 
walk you through the steps of using the program. There is an app for entering 
checklists only, so you will need a device for accessing the internet (you'll 
have wifi access) like a laptop or tablet to use all the features available at 
http://ebird.org . Audubon will have a few extra laptops if needed. 


Cost is $15/person (cash or check made out to "Audubon Arkansas") 
Space is limited. 
RSVP with Uta Meyer at umeyer AT audubon.org or 501-244-2229 
Ages 16 and up. 

Dan Scheiman 
Bird Conservation Director, Audubon Arkansas 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: banded tagged dead red-tailed hawk banding info.
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 08:30:47 +0000
Thank you Mitchell for grounding this back into science. It so happens that 
Turkey Vultures are my favorite avian species. Yes the amazing v-shaped flight 
pattern, the steadiness aloft, the oh-so-very-useful "ugliness" of the head, 
but most of all that they, unlike most of us, are able to exist without doing 
harm. Just cleaning up. Doing their job. In my little part of the world they 
disappear before Halloween and only reappear sometime in March. I faithfully 
record the last and first ones seen, but at the same time this is not 
sufficient. I long to be where they are year-round. In the end nothing else 
will do. I have never seen a band on one, but would be privileged to report 
any. 


peace

-bill

enid garfield ok


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2017 3:37 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] banded tagged dead red-tailed hawk banding info.

Methods in science are getting better all the time. Patagial tags were 
introduced as a supplement to banding birds (an equivalent to color banding a 
bird so you could identify it as an individual), as well as to replace the use 
of bands on vultures, where a band can cause lesions and infection on the legs. 


Here's a short paper with a great description of how patagial tags are attached 
and some minimal potential effects on the bird (the example species here is the 
Common Raven): 


https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/jfo/v054n03/p0326-p0328.pdf

Here's an example specifically for our Cathartid vultures, complete with a 
couple of diagrams. It's an interesting process! 


https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/jfo/v051n04/p0309-p0314.pdf
JOURNAL OF FIELD ORNITHOLOGY - University of New 
Mexico 

sora.unm.edu
JOURNAL OF FIELD ORNITHOLOGY Formerly BIRD-BANDING A Journal of Ormtholog*cal 
Investigatmn VOL. 51, No. 4 AUTUMN 1980 PAGES 309--428 



These tags are pretty much like using a band and, like anything else, should 
cause no issues to the bird if executed properly. 


I, too, am glad I don't have a tag attached to my arm, but as the birds get 
used to it, it becomes just like another feather, albeit a colorful one. 
Interestingly, Turkey Vultures tagged by researchers in Minnesota, have passed 
through northeastern Oklahoma during migration (and probably Arkansas too). I'm 
just as guilty as the next birder for not giving vultures a second look, but it 
might do give them a good look in spring and fall! 


Mitchell Pruitt


On Jan 17, 2017, at 2:03 PM, Jim and Karen Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
wrote: 


 Travis Guerrant (currently Assistant State Director, USDA APHIS Wildlife 
Services,. Springfield, Illinois), banded the red-tailed hawk (recently found 
dead near Hot Springs Arkansas) in October 2011 at the Chicago O'Hare 
International Airport. The juvenile hawk was moved and released 100 miles from 
the airport as a part of a study to reduce raptor/aircraft collisions. Given 
that the hawk was over 5 years old when it died, it is highly unlikely that the 
patagial tags on the hawk's wings had a negative impact on the hawk's survival. 
Mr. Guerrant said that they banded over 600 red-tailed hawks and had no issues 
caused by the patagial tags. A publication on their research should appear in 
an upcoming issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management. 


Karen Rowe
Subject: Fwd: Southern Lafayette County birds 12-28-16 and 1-11-17
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 22:43:36 -0600

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Charles Lyon 
> Subject: Fwd: Southern Lafayette County birds 12-28-16 and 1-11-17
> Date: January 17, 2017 at 10:42:33 PM CST
> To: Charles Lyon 
> 
> 
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: Charles Lyon 
>> Subject: Southern Lafayette County birds 12-28-16 and 1-11-17
>> Date: January 17, 2017 at 10:39:29 PM CST
>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>> 
>> AR-birders,
>> Below are links to four ebird lists I made of birds seen in southern 
Lafayette County near the Louisiana border on 

>> 12-28-16 and 1-11-17. I just wanted to give you all an idea of what is still 
down here in a part of the state far removed 

>> from most of you all. I still plan on birding in the SW part of Arkansas 
this year, but will be spending a bit more time in 

>> Louisiana as well as Oklahoma this year. I also plan on doing some “hit and 
run” birding when a rarity or new state 

>> bird shows up. I’m still looking for American Tree Sparrow and ( I can’t 
believe) Spotted Towhee, as well as a number 

>> of others for Arkansas state birds. Best to you all.
>> Charlie Lyon 
>> Shreveport, LA
>> 
>> 12-28-16 lists
>> 
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33757636
>> 
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33757257
>> 
>> 1-11-17 lists
>> 
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33678947
>> 
>> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33678565
> 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 17
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 22:29:06 -0600
It was mostly overcast, cool, and windy on the bird survey today.  79
species were found.   Passerines were difficult to find because of the wind.
Here is my list for today:

 

 

Greater White-fronted Goose -1

Canada Goose - 2

Wood Duck - 4

Gadwall - 665

"Brewer's" Duck - 1

American Wigeon - 1

Mallard - 200

Northern Shoveler - 235

Northern Pintail - 5

Green-winged Teal - 654

Canvasback - 41

Ring-necked Duck - 1315

Bufflehead - 1

Hooded Merganser - 27

Ruddy Duck - 6

Pied-billed Grebe - 5

American White Pelican - 19

Double-crested Cormorant - 7

Great-blue Heron - 8

Great Egret - 3

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 43

Bald Eagle - 1

Northern Harrier - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Red-tailed Hawk - 7

Merlin - 1 (very black individual)

Virginia Rail - 2

American Coot - 635

Killdeer - 21

Greater Yellowlegs - 2

Rock Pigeon - 2

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Mourning Dove - 1

Barred Owl - 3

Belted Kingfisher - 4

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 5

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 4

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 8

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 10

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Blue Jay - 10

American Crow - 139

Fish Crow - 4

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 7

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 5

Eastern Bluebird - 10

Hermit Thrush - 1

American Robin - 5

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 2

American Pipit - 1

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4

Pine Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 4

Fox Sparrow - 1

Song Sparrow - 12

Swamp Sparrow - 3

White-throated Sparrow - 6

White-crowned Sparrow - 7

Northern Cardinal - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 730

Eastern Meadowlark - 10

Rusty Blackbird - 21

Common Grackle - 33

Purple Finch - 1

American Goldfinch - 2

 

Other finds:

 

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 
Subject: MAYSVILLE – NO EXPLANATION NEEDED
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2017 00:21:40 +0000
Another winter day, another fine outing to the former Beaty Prairie around 
Maysville in western Benton County. First, some of the winter regulars: singing 
Horned Larks (1). A meadowlark flock (~65) working through a harvested soybean 
field and Western Meadowlarks chupping (2). Brewer’s Blackbirds (4) with cows. 
A huge flock of blackbirds and starlings, including a subset of Rusty 
Blackbirds (at least 45). 


Partially flooded fields hosted Mallards, Green-winged Teals, Wilson’s Snipe, 
and a few Ring-billed Gulls. One largish White-crowned Sparrow flock (~40) 
included Harris’s Sparrows (5). We picked up a few American Pipits in one 
field, then a flock (~50) in another. A burned area near the highway included 
Savannah Sparrows (~12). Bald Eagles all day (~20), scattered, mostly adults. A 
refreshing pause-in-the-action, gas and snacks, at Maysville Handistop. 


The finale occurred east of Maysville. David Oakley noticed an almost solid 
black hawk on a fencepost. This proved a dark morph of the Western Red-tailed 
Hawk, subspecies calurus, red tail with multiple thin dark bands (juv). We were 
looking at David’s photo when a guy drove up in a pickup. 


I tensed up and assumed Now we have to ‘splain ourselves, but he said he’d also 
seen that bird. Then mentioned he lived nearby and that there was a largish 
black hawk right behind his house. Would we like to see it? 


So off we went, and while the guy’s cats (2) walked around on top of my car, we 
watched what proved a Harlan’s Hawk – very dark morph with a distinctive white 
streaking on upper chest. When it flew, it displayed a remarkable white tail 
(on top). Quite a nice prize. 


The guy said we were welcome on his place any time. Don’t worry about the dogs 
or the cats. And then we picked up a 3rd black hawk before we left his place– 
this one a Bald Eagle, a juv in its first year. It didn’t pay much attention to 
us. In fact, David got out of the car and all but walked under it. 

Subject: Re: banded tagged dead red-tailed hawk banding info.
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 15:49:55 -0600
Thanks for both of your explanations, Mitchell, and for the links. I understand 
the reason to use these on vultures. This one point still bothers me though - 
as a convenience for humans, leg bands are not so large as to be readable at a 
distance, so why should patagial tags be this big on hawks? 


Judith

On Jan 17, 2017, at 3:37 PM, Mitchell Pruitt 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


> Methods in science are getting better all the time. Patagial tags were 
introduced as a supplement to banding birds (an equivalent to color banding a 
bird so you could identify it as an individual), as well as to replace the use 
of bands on vultures, where a band can cause lesions and infection on the legs. 

> 
> Here’s a short paper with a great description of how patagial tags are 
attached and some minimal potential effects on the bird (the example species 
here is the Common Raven): 

> 
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/jfo/v054n03/p0326-p0328.pdf
> 
> Here’s an example specifically for our Cathartid vultures, complete with a 
couple of diagrams. It’s an interesting process! 

> 
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/jfo/v051n04/p0309-p0314.pdf
> 
> These tags are pretty much like using a band and, like anything else, should 
cause no issues to the bird if executed properly. 

> 
> I, too, am glad I don’t have a tag attached to my arm, but as the birds get 
used to it, it becomes just like another feather, albeit a colorful one. 
Interestingly, Turkey Vultures tagged by researchers in Minnesota, have passed 
through northeastern Oklahoma during migration (and probably Arkansas too). I’m 
just as guilty as the next birder for not giving vultures a second look, but it 
might do give them a good look in spring and fall! 

> 
> Mitchell Pruitt
> 
> 
>> On Jan 17, 2017, at 2:03 PM, Jim and Karen Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

>> 
>> Travis Guerrant (currently Assistant State Director, USDA APHIS Wildlife 
Services,. Springfield, Illinois), banded the red-tailed hawk (recently found 
dead near Hot Springs Arkansas) in October 2011 at the Chicago O'Hare 
International Airport. The juvenile hawk was moved and released 100 miles from 
the airport as a part of a study to reduce raptor/aircraft collisions. Given 
that the hawk was over 5 years old when it died, it is highly unlikely that the 
patagial tags on the hawk's wings had a negative impact on the hawk's survival. 
Mr. Guerrant said that they banded over 600 red-tailed hawks and had no issues 
caused by the patagial tags. A publication on their research should appear in 
an upcoming issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management. 

>> 
>> Karen Rowe
> 
Subject: Banded and tagged red-tailed hawk
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 14:57:59 -0600
Karen Rowe just telephoned researchers in Illinois and reported this:

 Travis Guerrant (currently Assistant State Director, USDA APHIS Wildlife
Services,. Springfield, Illinois), banded the red-tailed hawk (recently
found dead near Hot Springs Arkansas) in October 2011 at the Chicago O'Hare
International Airport.  The juvenile hawk was moved and released 100 miles
from the airport as a part of a study to reduce raptor/aircraft
collisions.  Given that the hawk was over 5 years old when it died, it is
highly unlikely that the patagial tags on the  hawk's wings had a negative
impact on the hawk's survival.  Mr. Guerrant said that they banded over 600
red-tailed hawks and had no issues caused by the patagial tags.  A
publication on their research  should appear in an upcoming  issue of
the Journal of Wildlife Management.
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 00:01:42 -0500
Jerry,
Thanks for putting this out there for discussion...I have enjoyed reading
all the comments.
And personally I have came to two conclusions:
1. If we are the ones doing it and we do it in the name of knowledge, it is
acceptable (i.e. 50 years ago it was acceptable to kill birds in the name
of science where we could better understand them and now it is ok to put
un-natural appendage on them to gather information).
2. We do get better in our scientific methods of abusing the subjects of
our studies and hopefully we will continue to get less invasive as time
goes on.

My hope is that we also learn that just because it is for our purposes does
not always make it justifiable.

Michael(Glad nobody decided I should have 3 ft tags on my back)


On Mon, Jan 16, 2017 at 2:54 AM, Jerry Butler 
wrote:

> When I originally reported the finding of the red-tail and asked the
> question about the tags possibly contributing to the hawks demise, I was
> not presuming that they did, merely wondering.  And the fact is we have yet
> to collect some clues that will help us reach a  conclusion on that
> issue one way or the other.
>
> The information that we've been given by knowledgeable people in this
> discussion stream is interesting and helpful and I hope to synthesize  it
> in a popularly distributed written forum.
>
>  The recognition that patagial tags are approved USGS method of avian
> research, that they are used regularly in vulture studies, and that
> they have some cost/benefit advantages , however, should not keep us from
> re-examining or questioning them or any scientific research methodologies
> to find even less obtrusive research techniques.
>
> We are a scant two generations removed from a time when shooting and
> collecting birds was an approved system of studying them by Universities,
> Museums and even the Smithsonian.   Shotguns were regularly used in the
> study of all kinds of birds and it was cheaper than trapping them.  As
> shocking as that may seem, the scientific community still learned much
> about birds in that way that has advanced our understanding.  Now, we have
> better methodologies and those methods may be replaced in two
> generations with ones that are superior.  Obtrusive ways of observing any
> phenomenon impact both the object of that research and the validity of the
> conclusions we draw from those observations.
>
> On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 11:17 PM, Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-
> request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:
>
>> To add to what Butch said, patagial tags are a fairly common as a raptor
>> marking technique, although they are not commonly used on Red-taileds. The
>> tags are usually safe and probably didn’t cause the mortality of this 
bird. 

>>
>> Patagial tags are most commonly used on vultures and condors. The reason
>> being, these species cannot wear typical bands, as their excrement
>> accumulates and can cause infection around a band. Therefore, palatial tags
>> are the usually harmless answer. They must be large enough to be read at a
>> distance from soaring birds. They’re also attached in a harmless manner.
>> These tags are clipped onto a stretchy piece of skin that has virtually no
>> feathers shafts or blood vessels in the way of the piercing. Because the
>> clip is so small, there is still ample room for feather growth around the
>> tag.
>>
>> I’ve helped put patagial tags on Black Vultures and the birds feel a
>> pinch, but it would be the equivalent of getting a piercing on a piece of
>> skin with very few pain receptors or blood vessels.
>>
>> Hope this helps,
>>
>> Mitchell Pruitt
>>
>> > On Jan 13, 2017, at 12:00 PM, Gmail  wrote:
>> >
>> > The "large, flapping tags" are called patagial tags.  Yes, they are
>> used for identification purposes as the ID number can be seen from great
>> distances.  For hawks, it allows researchers (and others) to ID the bird
>> while it is soaring overhead.
>> >
>> > If I recall, there have been a few recent studies that suggest there
>> may be increased mortality associated with this type of tagging.  I think
>> one explanation had to do with increased energy expenditure in soaring
>> birds as the tags interrupted smooth air flow over the wings.
>> >
>> > Having said that, it is doubtful that the tags directly contributed to
>> the bird's demise.  As with most dead wild animal finds, we often cannot
>> determine the real cause of death unless a professional investigates it
>> forensically. Starvation, exposure, electrocution, physical contact with
>> power lines or vehicles, internal or external parasites, bacterial or viral
>> infection, eating contaminated food...any of these are possibilities and
>> very likely the real cause of death.  Unfortunately, most of these factors
>> do not show obvious external signs.
>> >
>> > Yes, telemetry is an another way to mark and track birds, but it is not
>> necessarily better as those methods have their own set of costs and
>> benefits both to birds and researchers (and the public funding the
>> research).  Just ask Mitchell.
>> >
>> > Regardless of the method of marking birds, the main thing to keep in
>> mind is that any mortality caused by handling and marking only occurs to a
>> very small fraction of birds that are marked, and researchers constantly
>> work to reduce it.  And that number is infinitesimally small compared with
>> window strikes and house cats.
>> >
>> > So we always have to keep perspective.
>> >
>> > Sorry to hear about the hawk.
>> >
>> > Butch Tetzlaff
>> > Bentonville, AR
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >> On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38, Todd, Shelley  wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's
>> meeting.
>> >>
>> >> https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.
>> 1073741829.100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67
>> >>
>> >> Shelley Todd
>> >> Natural Resource Program Manager
>> >> Hot Springs National Park
>> >> 101 Reserve Street
>> >> Hot Springs, AR  71901
>> >> (501) 620-6751 (office)
>> >> (501) 620-6778 (fax)
>> >> shelley_todd AT nps.gov
>> >>
>> >>> On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler <
>> jerrysharon.butler AT gmail.com> wrote:
>> >>> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of
>> Nature Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs,
>> AR  and found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died,
>> was not stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest
>> thing about it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples
>> were white round vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers
>> written on them.
>> >>>
>> >>> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the
>> bird was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those
>> large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes.
>> >>>
>> >>> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send
>> them at this time.
>> >>>
>> >>> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could
>> have easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry
>> would be a better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping
>> obtrusive tags and would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and
>> quest for prey.
>> >>>
>> >>> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
>> >>>
>> >>> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>
>>
>
>
Subject: Lonoke & Pulaski Counties on a gray day with a chance of rain
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 05:01:35 +0000
Karen Holliday, Doris & Dottie Boyles, and I headed out early-ish this morning 
for a grand tour of Lonoke & SE Pulaski counties today. The rain was light at 
7:30A and it soon gave way to a rising bluster out of the southeast over on the 
delta. Joe Hogan Hatchery in Lonoke is a walk-in place these days, and many of 
the ponds are currently drained. Despite the breezy conditions there was a good 
number of land & water birds visible on the water, on the ground, and in the 
air. We ventured on down Hwy 31 to the fabled Bob Long Road which was in greasy 
to gumbo conditions today due to the rain overnight. Fortunate for us we did 
not get stuck out among the minnow ponds. To the sound of shotguns in the 
distance we counted ducks until they determined we were dangerous and they fled 
which happened fast and often. Great Egrets have settled in around the ponds in 
sufficient numbers to trigger the Need More Info box in eBird. We were treated 
to a fashion show by two little dapper Golden-crowned Kinglets strutting their 
stuff back & forth through a tangle of vines near one of the ponds. 




By this time old lady bladders were in revolt and we headed off to England, the 
town, not the country to find satisfactory restroom facilities. We did have to 
stop along Hwy 31 South into Keo to behold a pond full of Northern Pintails 
estimated at 750 birds strong near the east side of the Keo Fish Farm. The 
Pintails seemed a little less concerned by our presence than their cousins over 
on Bob Long Road. A nice mix of other semi-relaxed ducks accompanied them. 


The England Subway sandwich shop provided a full service stop for bladders and 
stomachs. The place was clean, even the men's room, which we commandeered in 
the service of demanding nature. The sandwiches were fresh and tasty. Do stop 
by if you are in the neighborhood. 




The area around the England grain elevators was quiet today. All of the geese, 
blackbirds, and house sparrows were elsewhere during our visit. However the 
neighborhood Eurasian Collared-Doves had gathered on the power/telephone lines 
behind the facility, sufficient to make said lines sag not unlike the much 
lighter but more numerous Purple Martin gala out at the Little Rock port every 
August. BTW, if you haven't seen the martins out past the airport, you might 
want to go see them this coming summer. Development is continuing around the 
port & Wellspun is currently storing their pipe on what was a grassy field the 
martins used for feeding. It's not going to be much longer before all that open 
space is gone, & when that happens, the martin roost out there may well 
disappear. But back to today. 




We did the Hwy 161 loop east out of England and north to Hwy 232 back to Keo. 
The habitat includes fields, bayous, woodlots, swamps, seeps, fence rows, and 
swamps sufficient for a wide variety of birds. My quest to find a rogue Harris 
Sparrow palling around with the White-crowned Sparrows in central Arkansas was 
foiled yet again today but not for lack of trying. Highlights along that 
stretch of road were Brewer's Blackbirds, Eastern Meadowlarks, and a right 
smart amount of ducks, geese, and the usual blackbird clouds. But no Rusty 
Blackbirds. They seem to have withdrawn into the swamps well away from us 
prying humans. 




We visited the facilities at Toltec and those needing one got their State Park 
passports stamped on the appropriate pages. I took Karen out to always reliable 
Horned Lark ridge at the Scott Grass Farm except for when they are away on 
business like today. To be fair the larks reveal themselves only to those will 
to stare unblinking at dandelion heads and count henbit blossoms for a half 
hour at least. Perhaps then they will reveal themselves by flying past or not. 
Sometimes their little heads pop out of vegetation the average birder would 
swear was too scant to harbor a garter snake, let along these little 
scoundrels. We did not yield them their due, and they declined to present 
themselves. We showed them by heading toward Frazier Pike south of the port. 




Only five Sandhill Cranes were on display today in the far south of the field 
on past the double levee crossing. Of note--no Merlin, no Rusty Blackbirds, and 
no Vesper Sparrows. We had to settle for the consolation prize of 20 Wood Ducks 
steaming north away from the Fourche Bayou bridge. It was now about quarter to 
five and the clouds had congealed into a dark squall line off to the west over 
past Little Rock. We popped back across the river to the Caterpillar plant on 
Faulkner Lake Road. Apparently the new management has a no birds policy because 
there wasn't much on the ponds. We called it a day as the rain began to fall in 
earnest and headed back to Maumelle. Where I discovered I had left a window 
down this morning. The car was still there. Drenched inside, of course. 




eBird says we counted 75 species & 28.7K birds today. Not a bad day's work in 
Arkansas. 



Cindy

Pulaski County

Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Charles H Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 14:07:47 -0600
A drive through eastern Miller County yesterday morning turned up 62 Sandhill 
Cranes. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana Texas 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Don Simons <drsimons56 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 09:01:54 -0600
Back in the 1990s, I canoed down the Mississippi River from the Greenville 
highway 82 bridge to The port of Lake Providence, Louisiana. It was an exciting 
trip with lots of interesting bird observations. As I entered the port an 
immature bald eagle flew over and landed in a tree. It had wing tags. I later 
learned it was hatched in Indiana. 


Don

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 16, 2017, at 1:54 AM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 

> 
> When I originally reported the finding of the red-tail and asked the question 
about the tags possibly contributing to the hawks demise, I was not presuming 
that they did, merely wondering. And the fact is we have yet to collect some 
clues that will help us reach a conclusion on that issue one way or the other. 

> 
> The information that we've been given by knowledgeable people in this 
discussion stream is interesting and helpful and I hope to synthesize it in a 
popularly distributed written forum. 

> 
> The recognition that patagial tags are approved USGS method of avian 
research, that they are used regularly in vulture studies, and that they have 
some cost/benefit advantages , however, should not keep us from re-examining or 
questioning them or any scientific research methodologies to find even less 
obtrusive research techniques. 

> 
> We are a scant two generations removed from a time when shooting and 
collecting birds was an approved system of studying them by Universities, 
Museums and even the Smithsonian. Shotguns were regularly used in the study of 
all kinds of birds and it was cheaper than trapping them. As shocking as that 
may seem, the scientific community still learned much about birds in that way 
that has advanced our understanding. Now, we have better methodologies and 
those methods may be replaced in two generations with ones that are superior. 
Obtrusive ways of observing any phenomenon impact both the object of that 
research and the validity of the conclusions we draw from those observations. 

> 
>> On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 11:17 PM, Mitchell Pruitt 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote: 

>> To add to what Butch said, patagial tags are a fairly common as a raptor 
marking technique, although they are not commonly used on Red-taileds. The tags 
are usually safe and probably didn’t cause the mortality of this bird. 

>> 
>> Patagial tags are most commonly used on vultures and condors. The reason 
being, these species cannot wear typical bands, as their excrement accumulates 
and can cause infection around a band. Therefore, palatial tags are the usually 
harmless answer. They must be large enough to be read at a distance from 
soaring birds. They’re also attached in a harmless manner. These tags are 
clipped onto a stretchy piece of skin that has virtually no feathers shafts or 
blood vessels in the way of the piercing. Because the clip is so small, there 
is still ample room for feather growth around the tag. 

>> 
>> I’ve helped put patagial tags on Black Vultures and the birds feel a 
pinch, but it would be the equivalent of getting a piercing on a piece of skin 
with very few pain receptors or blood vessels. 

>> 
>> Hope this helps,
>> 
>> Mitchell Pruitt
>> 
>> > On Jan 13, 2017, at 12:00 PM, Gmail  wrote:
>> >
>> > The "large, flapping tags" are called patagial tags. Yes, they are used 
for identification purposes as the ID number can be seen from great distances. 
For hawks, it allows researchers (and others) to ID the bird while it is 
soaring overhead. 

>> >
>> > If I recall, there have been a few recent studies that suggest there may 
be increased mortality associated with this type of tagging. I think one 
explanation had to do with increased energy expenditure in soaring birds as the 
tags interrupted smooth air flow over the wings. 

>> >
>> > Having said that, it is doubtful that the tags directly contributed to the 
bird's demise. As with most dead wild animal finds, we often cannot determine 
the real cause of death unless a professional investigates it forensically. 
Starvation, exposure, electrocution, physical contact with power lines or 
vehicles, internal or external parasites, bacterial or viral infection, eating 
contaminated food...any of these are possibilities and very likely the real 
cause of death. Unfortunately, most of these factors do not show obvious 
external signs. 

>> >
>> > Yes, telemetry is an another way to mark and track birds, but it is not 
necessarily better as those methods have their own set of costs and benefits 
both to birds and researchers (and the public funding the research). Just ask 
Mitchell. 

>> >
>> > Regardless of the method of marking birds, the main thing to keep in mind 
is that any mortality caused by handling and marking only occurs to a very 
small fraction of birds that are marked, and researchers constantly work to 
reduce it. And that number is infinitesimally small compared with window 
strikes and house cats. 

>> >
>> > So we always have to keep perspective.
>> >
>> > Sorry to hear about the hawk.
>> >
>> > Butch Tetzlaff
>> > Bentonville, AR
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >> On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38, Todd, Shelley  wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's 
meeting. 

>> >>
>> >> 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.1073741829.100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67 

>> >>
>> >> Shelley Todd
>> >> Natural Resource Program Manager
>> >> Hot Springs National Park
>> >> 101 Reserve Street
>> >> Hot Springs, AR  71901
>> >> (501) 620-6751 (office)
>> >> (501) 620-6778 (fax)
>> >> shelley_todd AT nps.gov
>> >>
>> >>> On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler 
 wrote: 

>> >>> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of 
Nature Conservancy land away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR and 
found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not stiff, 
had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries. The oddest thing about it was 
that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round vinyl 
tags about 3 inches in diameter. With large numbers written on them. 

>> >>>
>> >>> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the 
bird was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those 
large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 

>> >>>
>> >>> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them 
at this time. 

>> >>>
>> >>> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could 
have easily contributed to the bird's demise. I would think telemetry would be 
a better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 

>> >>>
>> >>> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
>> >>>
>> >>> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>
> 
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2017 01:54:24 -0600
When I originally reported the finding of the red-tail and asked the
question about the tags possibly contributing to the hawks demise, I was
not presuming that they did, merely wondering.  And the fact is we have yet
to collect some clues that will help us reach a  conclusion on that
issue one way or the other.

The information that we've been given by knowledgeable people in this
discussion stream is interesting and helpful and I hope to synthesize  it
in a popularly distributed written forum.

 The recognition that patagial tags are approved USGS method of avian
research, that they are used regularly in vulture studies, and that
they have some cost/benefit advantages , however, should not keep us from
re-examining or questioning them or any scientific research methodologies
to find even less obtrusive research techniques.

We are a scant two generations removed from a time when shooting and
collecting birds was an approved system of studying them by Universities,
Museums and even the Smithsonian.   Shotguns were regularly used in the
study of all kinds of birds and it was cheaper than trapping them.  As
shocking as that may seem, the scientific community still learned much
about birds in that way that has advanced our understanding.  Now, we have
better methodologies and those methods may be replaced in two
generations with ones that are superior.  Obtrusive ways of observing any
phenomenon impact both the object of that research and the validity of the
conclusions we draw from those observations.

On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 11:17 PM, Mitchell Pruitt <
0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> To add to what Butch said, patagial tags are a fairly common as a raptor
> marking technique, although they are not commonly used on Red-taileds. The
> tags are usually safe and probably didn’t cause the mortality of this bird.
>
> Patagial tags are most commonly used on vultures and condors. The reason
> being, these species cannot wear typical bands, as their excrement
> accumulates and can cause infection around a band. Therefore, palatial tags
> are the usually harmless answer. They must be large enough to be read at a
> distance from soaring birds. They’re also attached in a harmless manner.
> These tags are clipped onto a stretchy piece of skin that has virtually no
> feathers shafts or blood vessels in the way of the piercing. Because the
> clip is so small, there is still ample room for feather growth around the
> tag.
>
> I’ve helped put patagial tags on Black Vultures and the birds feel a
> pinch, but it would be the equivalent of getting a piercing on a piece of
> skin with very few pain receptors or blood vessels.
>
> Hope this helps,
>
> Mitchell Pruitt
>
> > On Jan 13, 2017, at 12:00 PM, Gmail  wrote:
> >
> > The "large, flapping tags" are called patagial tags.  Yes, they are used
> for identification purposes as the ID number can be seen from great
> distances.  For hawks, it allows researchers (and others) to ID the bird
> while it is soaring overhead.
> >
> > If I recall, there have been a few recent studies that suggest there may
> be increased mortality associated with this type of tagging.  I think one
> explanation had to do with increased energy expenditure in soaring birds as
> the tags interrupted smooth air flow over the wings.
> >
> > Having said that, it is doubtful that the tags directly contributed to
> the bird's demise.  As with most dead wild animal finds, we often cannot
> determine the real cause of death unless a professional investigates it
> forensically. Starvation, exposure, electrocution, physical contact with
> power lines or vehicles, internal or external parasites, bacterial or viral
> infection, eating contaminated food...any of these are possibilities and
> very likely the real cause of death.  Unfortunately, most of these factors
> do not show obvious external signs.
> >
> > Yes, telemetry is an another way to mark and track birds, but it is not
> necessarily better as those methods have their own set of costs and
> benefits both to birds and researchers (and the public funding the
> research).  Just ask Mitchell.
> >
> > Regardless of the method of marking birds, the main thing to keep in
> mind is that any mortality caused by handling and marking only occurs to a
> very small fraction of birds that are marked, and researchers constantly
> work to reduce it.  And that number is infinitesimally small compared with
> window strikes and house cats.
> >
> > So we always have to keep perspective.
> >
> > Sorry to hear about the hawk.
> >
> > Butch Tetzlaff
> > Bentonville, AR
> >
> >
> >
> >> On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38, Todd, Shelley  wrote:
> >>
> >> Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's
> meeting.
> >>
> >> https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.1073741829.
> 100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67
> >>
> >> Shelley Todd
> >> Natural Resource Program Manager
> >> Hot Springs National Park
> >> 101 Reserve Street
> >> Hot Springs, AR  71901
> >> (501) 620-6751 (office)
> >> (501) 620-6778 (fax)
> >> shelley_todd AT nps.gov
> >>
> >>> On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler <
> jerrysharon.butler AT gmail.com> wrote:
> >>> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of
> Nature Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs,
> AR  and found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died,
> was not stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest
> thing about it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples
> were white round vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers
> written on them.
> >>>
> >>> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the
> bird was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those
> large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes.
> >>>
> >>> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them
> at this time.
> >>>
> >>> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could
> have easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry
> would be a better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping
> obtrusive tags and would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and
> quest for prey.
> >>>
> >>> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
> >>>
> >>> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
>
Subject: Fwd: AAST Belize birding tour
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 19:57:27 -0600
My Dad, Mother, and I were so lucky to sign on to Dr. Kannan's trip to Trinidad 
several years ago. It was fabulous! He leads great trips with life birds 
dripping off the trees! Great accommodations and wonderful use of the local 
guides. The trips are an absolute bargain! Plus, on my Trinidad trip, I 
reconnected with old friends and met new birding friends whom I'm still birding 
with internationally to this day. As past President of the Arkansas Audubon 
Society (AAS), I can't thank Dr. Kannan enough for his generosity over the 
years in channeling his profits from his trips into the AAS. AAS uses his 
donations to help fund our AAS Trust awards to university students who are 
doing research projects on all kinds of study projects related to the wonderful 
creatures with whom we share this earth with. Participating in one of Dr 
.Kannan's trips means a birding adventure of a lifetime, plus a chance to pay 
it forward to a future scientist who also loves our feathered and scaly friends 
who share this earth with us. Book now! 

Karen Holliday
AAS Past President
Maumelle/Little Rock

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Audrey Weymiller 
> Date: January 15, 2017 at 2:03:58 PM CST
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: AAST Belize birding tour
> Reply-To: Audrey Weymiller 
> 
> Everyone should be interested.   This will be a fantastic trip!
> 
> 
> Audrey
> 
> 
> PS: I have not been on a trip with Dr. Kannan but met him in Belize when we 
were both staying at Crystal Paradise. The Tut family that runs Crystal 
Paradise includes some of the best birders in the world and delivers Belizean 
hospitality that surpasses all expectations. 

> 
> 
> 
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

> Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2017 1:53 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Fw: AAST Belize birding tour
>  
> Half the seats are already committed for this Belize birding adventure! 
Please consider coming and show your support for the Arkansas Audubon Society 
Trust, which funds research, conservation, and education projects mainly on 
Arkansas birds. If you know someone who may be interested, please forward. 
--Kannan 

> 
> 
> On Friday, 13 January 2017 3:08 PM, Ragupathy Kannan 
 wrote: 

> 
> 
> The Arkansas Audubon Society Trust is making an effort to boost its Endowment 
Fund to $200,000 by its 50th anniversary. I hope to raise $1,000 for the trust 
by doing the following birding tour to Belize in March. The tour is open to 10 
birders only. If interested to go, please send me an email giving me your 
birding background. We did this in March 2015 and saw 226 species (eBird lists 
below). I expect that number to be surpassed this time because the itinerary 
has been tweaked to include more habitats. Participants should of course be 
physically fit to undertake the activities listed. 

> I have led birding tours and/or have taught tropical biology courses in 
Belize every year since 2009. 

> R. Kannan, Ph.D.,
> Professor of Biology
> University of Arkansas--Fort Smith
> 
> 
> BELIZE BIRDING TOUR
> Group
>  based on 10 participants   US $1,795.00 each excluding air,
> plus $200 to cover Dr. Kannan’s expenses and a donation to the Arkansas 
Audubon Society Trust 

> Includes:
> All local transportation, tours, guides, park fees, lodging and meals as 
stated 

> Saturday,
>  March 18, 2017. AIRPORT/CRYSTAL PARADISE 
> You
> will be met at the airport by your Belizean bird guide and transferred to 
your jungle lodge accommodations. There will be opportunities for birding along 
the way as we drive through a number of habitats such as mangrove swamps, pine 
savannahs and tropical 

> forests. We check into our accommodations at Crystal Paradise after a short 
orientation. O/N Crystal Paradise Resort (www.crystalparadise.com). Dinner 
included. 

> 
> Sunday,
>  March 19, 2017. MOUNTAIN PINE RIDGE
> After
> an early breakfast we depart for the Mountain Pine Ridge Reserve. Here we 
have the opportunity to see Yellow-faced 

> Grassquits, Rufous-capped Warblers, Acorn Woodpeckers, Yellow-backed Orioles 
and Golden-hooded Tanagers. Black headed Siskins can often be seen flying in 
flocks. There is a strong possibility of seeing the Orange-breasted Falcons and 
King Vultures by The 1,000 

> Ft. Falls (Hidden Valley). We have seen the Lovely Cotinga 8 out of 10 trips. 
Other birds include Ornate Hawk-Eagle, Black and White Hawk eagle and the 
Stygian Owl. (See the 2015 list at 

> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22618706).
> Breakfast, packed
>  lunches, and dinner included. Overnight at Crystal Paradise Resort.
> 
> Monday, March 20, 2017. El PILAR MAYAN RUINS AND MACAL RIVER CANOEING
> Morning:
> After
> breakfast we will visit El Pilar, a Maya site and flora/fauna reserve. It is 
excellent for birding, hiking, and provides an insight to Belize’s 
sub-tropical forests. We will make stops along the way to view such birds as 
Collared Manakins and Honeycreepers 

>  and an array of flycatchers.
> Afternoon:
> Canoeing on the Macal River. While canoeing we have the chance to see 
Neotropic Cormorants, Mangrove Swallows, various Kingfishers, Gray-necked 
Wood-rails and other wildlife that frequent the riverbanks. We will do an eBird 
census that enables us see about 

> 70 species. (See the 2015 census at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22573813). 

> We may flush Proboscis bats from the limestone bluffs by the river and watch 
iguanas sunning themselves on the rocks and trees. We can take the challenge of 
finding Tody Motmots and Sungrebes as we canoe! Waterproof binoculars come 
handy here. O/N Crystal 

>  Paradise Resort. B/L/D included.
> 
> Tuesday,
>  March 21, 2017.  SPANISH LOOKOUT & LAGUNA AGUACATE
> A
> 45-minute drive north of Crystal Paradise through rolling green hills brings 
you to 

> Spanish Lookout, a modern-day Mennonite settlement reminiscent of 
Pennsylvania farmlands. Several different habitats 

> in the area make it a favorable birding destination. The area consists of 
savannah, open farmland, and subtropical forest around the lake. In the open 
land and pastures it is easy to find Vermillion Flycatchers, Fork-tailed 
Flycatchers, Yellow-rumped Warblers, 

> White-Tailed Kites and Hawks, Laughing Falcons, Meadowlarks, Swallows, 
Herons, Jabiru storks, just to name a few. Aguacate Lagoon Reserve is located 
about 20 minutes beyond the community, and provides a birdwatcher’s paradise. 
In the forest around the lake 

> we will look for Jacamars, Trogons, Puff-birds, Crested Guans and Great 
Curassows. Other birds may include Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Rails and 
Crakes. O/N Crystal Paradise Resort. B/L/D included 

> 
> Wednesday,
>  March 22, 2017.  BLUE HOLE /CROOKED TREE
> We
> will depart in the early morning for a birding hike at one of the famous 
trails in Blue Hole National Park. Some of the coveted birds known to this area 
include White Hawks, Spotted-Wood Quails, Crested Guans, Lovely Cotingas, 
Keel-Billed Toucans, Red-Legged 

> Honey Creepers, Slaty-tailed Trogons, Northern Bentbill, Royal Flycatcher, 
Bright-rumped Attila, and Sulphur-rumped Flycatcher. If time permits, we can 
dip in the clear blue cenote (pond) in the middle of the jungle. 

>  See the 2015 list at 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22620414. We
> will make an optional stop at the world famous Belize Zoo (which hosts only 
native animals) and lunch at one of the local restaurants. Belize Zoo admission 
will be on your own (about $15). Those not opting for the Zoo stop will go for 
a guided 2-hr bird 

> walk in the nearby forests. In the evening or late afternoon, we will check 
into our hotel at Bird’s Eye View lodge at Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary. 
Dinner and Overnight Birds Eye View lodge (www.birdseyeviewbelize.com). B/L/D 
included. 

> 
> Thursday, March 23, 2017  CROOKED TREE BIRDING / CAYE
> CAULKER
> 
> We
>  will do an early morning birding by boat on the lagoon of Crooked
>  Tree Wildlife Sanctuary.
> Water birds will be the main target with special emphasis on finding the 
Jabiru, Sungrebe, Boat-billed and Agami herons. (See the 2015 list at 

> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22618126). Late breakfast at Birds Eye 
view, following which we will transfer to the Belize water taxi terminal in 
Belize City for the 45-min boat ride to Caye Caulker. Overnight at Tropical 
Paradise (www.tropicalparadisehotel.com) 

>  in Caye Caulker. B/L included; dinner on your own.
> 
> Tropical Paradise - Caye Caulker - Belize
> www.tropicalparadisehotel.com
> Discover the charm and peacefulness of Caye Caulker’s original beach resort 
on the Caribbean Sea, just one mile from the Belize Barrier Reef. 

> 
> 
> Friday, March 24, 2017.  CAYE CAULKER- CORAL GARDENS MARINE RESERVE
> 
> Pre-breakfast
> bird walk on the mangrove forest reserve at Caye Caulker. We will look for 
caye specialities like Black Catbird, Bananaquit, Rufous-necked Woodrail, 
Mangrove (Yellow) Warbler, 

> Yucatan Vireo, White-capped Pigeon, Cinnamon Hummingbird, and more. 
Magnificent Frigate birds and Brown Pelicans 

>  are commonly seen flying over the sea. (See the 2015 list at 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22619160). Snorkeling tour departs at 
10:30 to the Coral Gardens Reserve. We will have a chance to swim with 
(harmless) rays and nurse sharks and watch dozens of species of beautiful coral 
reef fishes. Breakfast 

> and lunch included. Dinner on your own. Overnight at Tropical Paradise in 
Caye Caulker. 

> 
> 
> Saturday, March 25, 2017. Caye to BZE via water taxi
> 
> After
> breakfast, we will catch the boat to Belize City and then the short drive to 
BZE Int’l airport for our flight home. Breakfast included. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: AAST Belize birding tour
From: Audrey Weymiller <audreyjane56 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 20:03:58 +0000
Everyone should be interested.   This will be a fantastic trip!


Audrey


PS: I have not been on a trip with Dr. Kannan but met him in Belize when we 
were both staying at Crystal Paradise. The Tut family that runs Crystal 
Paradise includes some of the best birders in the world and delivers Belizean 
hospitality that surpasses all expectations. 



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2017 1:53 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Fw: AAST Belize birding tour

Half the seats are already committed for this Belize birding adventure! Please 
consider coming and show your support for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, 
which funds research, conservation, and education projects mainly on Arkansas 
birds. If you know someone who may be interested, please forward. --Kannan 



On Friday, 13 January 2017 3:08 PM, Ragupathy Kannan 
 wrote: 



The Arkansas Audubon Society Trust is making an effort to boost its Endowment 
Fund to $200,000 by its 50th anniversary. I hope to raise $1,000 for the trust 
by doing the following birding tour to Belize in March. The tour is open to 10 
birders only. If interested to go, please send me an email giving me your 
birding background. We did this in March 2015 and saw 226 species (eBird lists 
below). I expect that number to be surpassed this time because the itinerary 
has been tweaked to include more habitats. Participants should of course be 
physically fit to undertake the activities listed. 

I have led birding tours and/or have taught tropical biology courses in Belize 
every year since 2009. 

R. Kannan, Ph.D.,
Professor of Biology
University of Arkansas--Fort Smith


BELIZE BIRDING TOUR
Group based on 10 participants US $1,795.00 each excluding air, plus $200 to 
cover Dr. Kannan’s expenses and a donation to the Arkansas Audubon Society 
Trust 

Includes: All local transportation, tours, guides, park fees, lodging and meals 
as stated 

Saturday, March 18, 2017. AIRPORT/CRYSTAL PARADISE
You will be met at the airport by your Belizean bird guide and transferred to 
your jungle lodge accommodations. There will be opportunities for birding along 
the way as we drive through a number of habitats such as mangrove swamps, pine 
savannahs and tropical forests. We check into our accommodations at Crystal 
Paradise after a short orientation. O/N Crystal Paradise Resort 
(www.crystalparadise.com). Dinner included. 


Sunday, March 19, 2017. MOUNTAIN PINE RIDGE
After an early breakfast we depart for the Mountain Pine Ridge Reserve. Here we 
have the opportunity to see Yellow-faced Grassquits, Rufous-capped Warblers, 
Acorn Woodpeckers, Yellow-backed Orioles and Golden-hooded Tanagers. Black 
headed Siskins can often be seen flying in flocks. There is a strong 
possibility of seeing the Orange-breasted Falcons and King Vultures by The 
1,000 Ft. Falls (Hidden Valley). We have seen the Lovely Cotinga 8 out of 10 
trips. Other birds include Ornate Hawk-Eagle, Black and White Hawk eagle and 
the Stygian Owl. (See the 2015 list at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22618706). Breakfast, packed lunches, 
and dinner included. Overnight at Crystal Paradise Resort. 


Monday, March 20, 2017. El PILAR MAYAN RUINS AND MACAL RIVER CANOEING
Morning: After breakfast we will visit El Pilar, a Maya site and flora/fauna 
reserve. It is excellent for birding, hiking, and provides an insight to 
Belize’s sub-tropical forests. We will make stops along the way to view such 
birds as Collared Manakins and Honeycreepers and an array of flycatchers. 

Afternoon: Canoeing on the Macal River. While canoeing we have the chance to 
see Neotropic Cormorants, Mangrove Swallows, various Kingfishers, Gray-necked 
Wood-rails and other wildlife that frequent the riverbanks. We will do an eBird 
census that enables us see about 70 species. (See the 2015 census at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22573813). We may flush Proboscis bats 
from the limestone bluffs by the river and watch iguanas sunning themselves on 
the rocks and trees. We can take the challenge of finding Tody Motmots and 
Sungrebes as we canoe! Waterproof binoculars come handy here. O/N Crystal 
Paradise Resort. B/L/D included. 


Tuesday, March 21, 2017.  SPANISH LOOKOUT & LAGUNA AGUACATE
A 45-minute drive north of Crystal Paradise through rolling green hills brings 
you to Spanish Lookout, a modern-day Mennonite settlement reminiscent of 
Pennsylvania farmlands. Several different habitats in the area make it a 
favorable birding destination. The area consists of savannah, open farmland, 
and subtropical forest around the lake. In the open land and pastures it is 
easy to find Vermillion Flycatchers, Fork-tailed Flycatchers, Yellow-rumped 
Warblers, White-Tailed Kites and Hawks, Laughing Falcons, Meadowlarks, 
Swallows, Herons, Jabiru storks, just to name a few. Aguacate Lagoon Reserve is 
located about 20 minutes beyond the community, and provides a birdwatcher’s 
paradise. In the forest around the lake we will look for Jacamars, Trogons, 
Puff-birds, Crested Guans and Great Curassows. Other birds may include 
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Rails and Crakes. O/N Crystal Paradise Resort. 
B/L/D included 


Wednesday, March 22, 2017.  BLUE HOLE /CROOKED TREE
We will depart in the early morning for a birding hike at one of the famous 
trails in Blue Hole National Park. Some of the coveted birds known to this area 
include White Hawks, Spotted-Wood Quails, Crested Guans, Lovely Cotingas, 
Keel-Billed Toucans, Red-Legged Honey Creepers, Slaty-tailed Trogons, Northern 
Bentbill, Royal Flycatcher, Bright-rumped Attila, and Sulphur-rumped 
Flycatcher. If time permits, we can dip in the clear blue cenote (pond) in the 
middle of the jungle. See the 2015 list at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22620414. We will make an optional stop 
at the world famous Belize Zoo (which hosts only native animals) and lunch at 
one of the local restaurants. Belize Zoo admission will be on your own (about 
$15). Those not opting for the Zoo stop will go for a guided 2-hr bird walk in 
the nearby forests. In the evening or late afternoon, we will check into our 
hotel at Bird’s Eye View lodge at Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary. Dinner and 
Overnight Birds Eye View lodge (www.birdseyeviewbelize.com). B/L/D included. 


Thursday, March 23, 2017  CROOKED TREE BIRDING / CAYE CAULKER
We will do an early morning birding by boat on the lagoon of Crooked Tree 
Wildlife Sanctuary. Water birds will be the main target with special emphasis 
on finding the Jabiru, Sungrebe, Boat-billed and Agami herons. (See the 2015 
list at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22618126). Late breakfast at 
Birds Eye view, following which we will transfer to the Belize water taxi 
terminal in Belize City for the 45-min boat ride to Caye Caulker. Overnight at 
Tropical Paradise 
(www.tropicalparadisehotel.com) in Caye 
Caulker. B/L included; dinner on your own. 


[http://cdn1.buuteeq.com/upload/2004070/dsc_5321.jpg.1920x810_default.jpeg] 


Tropical Paradise - Caye Caulker - 
Belize 

www.tropicalparadisehotel.com
Discover the charm and peacefulness of Caye Caulker’s original beach resort on 
the Caribbean Sea, just one mile from the Belize Barrier Reef. 




Friday, March 24, 2017.  CAYE CAULKER- CORAL GARDENS MARINE RESERVE
Pre-breakfast bird walk on the mangrove forest reserve at Caye Caulker. We will 
look for caye specialities like Black Catbird, Bananaquit, Rufous-necked 
Woodrail, Mangrove (Yellow) Warbler, Yucatan Vireo, White-capped Pigeon, 
Cinnamon Hummingbird, and more. Magnificent Frigate birds and Brown Pelicans 
are commonly seen flying over the sea. (See the 2015 list at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22619160). Snorkeling tour departs at 
10:30 to the Coral Gardens Reserve. We will have a chance to swim with 
(harmless) rays and nurse sharks and watch dozens of species of beautiful coral 
reef fishes. Breakfast and lunch included. Dinner on your own. Overnight at 
Tropical Paradise in Caye Caulker. 


Saturday, March 25, 2017. Caye to BZE via water taxi
After breakfast, we will catch the boat to Belize City and then the short drive 
to BZE Int’l airport for our flight home. Breakfast included. 



Subject: Adult Tundra Swan
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 12:46:49 -0600
Adult Tundra Swan at "Water for Sale" pond this morning 1-15-2017

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR
Subject: Lower Frazier Pike Road Jan 14- Pulaski County
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 15 Jan 2017 03:39:59 +0000
In the deep fog with daylight fading, the flock of 14 Sandhill Cranes drifted 
like ghosts in front of the wagon wheel irrigator in the far back of the lower 
field along Frazier Pike. A mass of White-crowned Sparrows worked the weedy 
deep drainage ditch past the field. Once again my hunt for a Harris Sparrow in 
Pulaski County is thwarted by nature. Where Frazier Road crosses Fourche Bayou 
and dead ends into Asher Road, four pairs of Wood Ducks steamed down the 
channel. They probably would have been content on the water if I hadn't backed 
up for a better look. They fled for their lives. Two Hooded Mergansers were 
skulking in a temporary pool in a farm field west of the bayou headed toward 
Wrightsville. The male's white patch against the brown vegetation & darker dirt 
gave them away. They stayed put, safe at distance. 



No Peregrine at the port area although a flock of Canada Geese, one Snow Goose, 
a dozen or so Mallards, and maybe another species of duck were present in the 
sunken fields No merlin this afternoon on Thibault. A broken down big truck at 
the corner by the old dirt company and several people working on it no doubt 
discouraged its presence. No Inca Doves at Harper Rd and Frazier Pike. Most of 
their cousins, the Mourning Doves, were already off the ground when I headed 
down the road. It was a good afternoon to find a roost early and settle in for 
the damp & chilly night. 



Cindy
Pulaski County

Subject: Creeperology
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 18:32:56 -0600
My daughter gave me a suet cake cage that screws into the tree this past 
week. She has become friends with Duncraft and ACE. She has about five 
or six feeders now and the only yard in her neighborhood marked by the 
local House Finches and the marauding grackle flocks. She may, for now, 
be fond of grackles. She has multiple suet cakes as well. Her ID skills 
are rapidly improving. Soon she will have the winter birds down at 
least. She bought the cake cage for me because I mentioned that the 
Pileated Woodpeckers would not come to the regular suet but needed a 
cake attached to a tree.

This is all to say that now in my feeding “station” out front I have the 
cake protruding from one of my hickory trunks. There are two hickory 
trunks and a white oak trunk in a triangle around the feeders. She 
wanted to know what bird came to the cake first. Dutifully, after 
putting it up, I sat vigil to find out for her. Ah, the sacrifices.

This trunk is the one used by the Red-bellied Woodpeckers and the 
White-breasted Nuthatches to wedge their sunflower seeds into. They 
don’t, of course, have the finchy bill and dexterity to just manipulate 
a sunflower hull off the seed on the perch as the Purples do. Or the 
cardinals. Or the goldfinches. The nuthatches, of which I seem to have 
one pair of a male and a female (our eastern females having some bluing 
on the head, and, well, an attitude) use this tree almost exclusively as 
a wedge device. Having, I suppose, the perfect barky rumplings. Anyway 
the nuthatch male was the first bird to feed on the cake. He just 
stumbled into it on his way head down the tree and stabbed at it, 
returning several times. Suet cake cages or the suet blocks themselves 
are definitely not natural looking things to a bird. Say a yearling 
nuthatch. I presume they have to discover this stumpy protrusion is in 
fact food. This nuthatch had no trouble with the concept. The nuthatch 
often stops at the cake each time now. And also likes to swipe off its 
beak after a suet break, wiping it left and right on the edge of a bark 
ridge. Both the male and female take cake between seed runs now.

The Brown Creepers are those somewhat mysterious little animals that do 
come virtually every day to my dying hickory (just twenty feet west of 
the feeder array). I spotted one in my cake vigil working up the oak 
trunk before I saw it drop over to the bottom of the cake hickory. It 
was doing its normal zig zaggy upward searching before encountering the 
cake. It went over the top once, dropped back and came to it again from 
below. All web listings and Mister Sibley suggest these guys in winter 
eat “spiders, spider eggs, and insects gleaned from bark.” I have never 
seen one drink. I have never seen anything leggy in their beaks. This 
bird was in 8.5 power at twenty feet. I could see its eyelashes. After 
about the third pass it stopped at the cake and ate some of it. It 
appears to have a fairly long tongue. It is indeed the first time I have 
ever seen one take suet. And, wow, suet for a bird who has to work so 
hard for “spider eggs” surely must be food of the gods. Or I would 
think. But afterward it became more obsessed with the tree trunk that 
had produced this cakey protuberance. It dropped to the bottom and 
worked the five feet of trunk below the cake over and over. At one point 
there were two creepers doing this. But neither of them returned to the 
cake, the yellow rich motherload. One of them seemed to be gleaning some 
tiny suet flakes off the bark ridges, presumably the bits wiped off the 
beaks of the nuthatches. Pale and sticky stuff anyway. I was fascinated.

And then the one creeper did the most extraordinary thing. It cocked 
itself on the right side of the trunk just opposite the cake and it did 
not move. This was in broadside view from my watcher’s chair. I could 
see its dark eye and its eyelids flashing quickly open and shut. It 
vibrated its beak, it nodded its head rapidly. Sadly I could not hear if 
it was making a noise. I have never heard the full song of a creeper. We 
have all heard the piercing winter cry they make. It is how we find them 
most of the time. This one also seemed to be rapid probing the air with 
its tongue. After one minute of stillness I started timing just how long 
this creeper remained in one spot. Because, well, I could. And I kept my 
8.5 power eye on it. It seemed to alert once to actual consciousness 
when a nuthatch came down the tree on its side. And then back to eye 
motion and vibration and tongue flicking. I thought for a moment that, 
good lord, I have killed this thing with the richness of suet. Something 
in suet is about to destroy its inner creeperness and it will just fall 
off the perch onto its back in the leaves. I will never, ever be able to 
tell my daughter. I will have to hide its little brown body someplace 
where my wife will never know.

It stayed on the one spot for 9 full minutes. I have never seen one stop 
for five seconds before. And then it went up the tree like life was 
clicked back on. I have to assume they roost somewhere at night. And 
then they must be this still, cocked in some safe shadowy place. A Zen 
creeper status. Something like that. And the creepers have been back to 
the cake trunk over and over since then. Not once, ever have they fed on 
it again while I watched. Often they seem to make a point of hitching to 
the right and staying away from the suet. Perhaps it is like peyote to a 
creeper. Just too much for its hypermetabolism. For its spider egg 
palate and sensibility. I like the mystery though. And love the little 
bird even more for it.

I will keep you posted.

Herschel Raney

Conway, AR (In the Woods)
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 14:15:21 -0600
As it turns out the hawk was banded in 2011, six years ago, but I have not
learned if the patagial tags were attached at that time.  I am in email
contact with those who should know, and I'll post on the ListServ what I
discover.

Does anyone have a citation for studies that investigated such tagged birds
mortality rates against other methods or no tags?  And how long might a red
tail hawk be expected to live in the wild anyway?

Jerry Butler

On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 12:00 PM, Gmail  wrote:

> The "large, flapping tags" are called patagial tags.  Yes, they are used
> for identification purposes as the ID number can be seen from great
> distances.  For hawks, it allows researchers (and others) to ID the bird
> while it is soaring overhead.
>
> If I recall, there have been a few recent studies that suggest there may
> be increased mortality associated with this type of tagging.  I think one
> explanation had to do with increased energy expenditure in soaring birds as
> the tags interrupted smooth air flow over the wings.
>
> Having said that, it is doubtful that the tags directly contributed to the
> bird's demise.  As with most dead wild animal finds, we often cannot
> determine the real cause of death unless a professional investigates it
> forensically. Starvation, exposure, electrocution, physical contact with
> power lines or vehicles, internal or external parasites, bacterial or viral
> infection, eating contaminated food...any of these are possibilities and
> very likely the real cause of death.  Unfortunately, most of these factors
> do not show obvious external signs.
>
> Yes, telemetry is an another way to mark and track birds, but it is not
> necessarily better as those methods have their own set of costs and
> benefits both to birds and researchers (and the public funding the
> research).  Just ask Mitchell.
>
> Regardless of the method of marking birds, the main thing to keep in mind
> is that any mortality caused by handling and marking only occurs to a very
> small fraction of birds that are marked, and researchers constantly work to
> reduce it.  And that number is infinitesimally small compared with window
> strikes and house cats.
>
> So we always have to keep perspective.
>
> Sorry to hear about the hawk.
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville, AR
>
>
>
> On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38, Todd, Shelley  wrote:
>
> Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's
> meeting.
>
> https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.
> 1073741829.100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67
>
> Shelley Todd
> Natural Resource Program Manager
> Hot Springs National Park
> 101 Reserve Street
> Hot Springs, AR  71901
> (501) 620-6751 (office)
> (501) 620-6778 (fax)
> shelley_todd AT nps.gov
>
> On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler <
> jerrysharon.butler AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of
>> Nature Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs,
>> AR  and found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died,
>> was not stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest
>> thing about it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples
>> were white round vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers
>> written on them.
>>
>> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird
>> was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those
>> large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes.
>>
>> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at
>> this time.
>>
>> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have
>> easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry would be
>> a better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags
>> and would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey.
>>
>> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
>>
>> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: LONG-TAILED DUCK AT BEAVER LAKE
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 22:37:06 +0000
A Long-tailed Duck was associated with Common Goldeneyes (43) off Lost Bridge 
North Park on Beaver Lake this morning. Adult male, winter plumage, with a nice 
long tail. With a spotting scope, Joan Reynolds studied the raft, including 
this duck, pretty well, even at roughly a half-mile. This is the same general 
area where we saw an adult Franklin's Gull January 7 & 8. This morning we saw 
only a few Bonaparte's and no Franklin's. I collected some digiscope images 
that are horrible, and that's charitable - 100% overcast, low clouds, 
occasional mist, etc. 

Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 15:05:53 -0500
It would seem like from the information that Karen reported that the white
tag with black numbers was for 2014.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs




 Jerry & ARBIRDers,
>
> I would think it would be useful information to know how long ago those
> wing tags were attached to the red-tailed hawk.  If for example it was
> several years ago, one could make a stronger case that the tags did not
> prevent the hawk "from making a living" (catching enough prey to survive).
>  If instead the tags were attached fairly recently, I would think a
> stronger case could be made that the tags could have contributed to the
> death of the hawk in hindering its ability to catch enough prey.
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
Subject: Re: SUMMER TANAGER MALE IN FAYETTEVILLE
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 14 Jan 2017 19:44:02 +0000
Joe, Mike, and I have a paper in press in the Journal of the Arkansas Academy 
of Science on last year's Summer Tanager "invasion"... let me know if you would 
like a copy... 


Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Joseph Neal 

Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 11:26 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: SUMMER TANAGER MALE IN FAYETTEVILLE

A Summer Tanager male in typical summer plumage was reported to me on January 
11 from a residence on the south slope of Mt Sequoyah in Fayetteville. I saw 
and photographed the bird this morning. Summer Tanagers are common in Arkansas 
as migrants and they nest during summer in forested areas throughout the state. 
Winter records are relatively few. Last winter (December 2015 to February 
2016), Kim Smith, Mike Mlodinow, and I collected at least 11 winter records in 
northwest Arkansas. All of these involved juvenile or female yellow plumage. 
This morning's tanager is my only sighting so far this winter. I'll post some 
photos to my facebook page. 

Subject: Re: sandhill cranes
From: Ed Laster <elaster523 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 13:32:23 -0600
And the Merlin was on Thibault Rd before noon. 
Ed Laster
Little Rock


> On Jan 13, 2017, at 1:28 PM, Glenn 
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Looking at at least 14 Sandhill Cranes on Frazier Pike. I'm looking from the 
second levee crossing. They are out there in the fog. 

> 
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot, AR
> 
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
 
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 11:10:17 -0600
Jerry & ARBIRDers,

I would think it would be useful information to know how long ago those wing 
tags were attached to the red-tailed hawk. If for example it was several years 
ago, one could make a stronger case that the tags did not prevent the hawk 
"from making a living" (catching enough prey to survive). If instead the tags 
were attached fairly recently, I would think a stronger case could be made that 
the tags could have contributed to the death of the hawk in hindering its 
ability to catch enough prey. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: SUMMER TANAGER MALE IN FAYETTEVILLE
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 17:26:01 +0000
A Summer Tanager male in typical summer plumage was reported to me on January 
11 from a residence on the south slope of Mt Sequoyah in Fayetteville. I saw 
and photographed the bird this morning. Summer Tanagers are common in Arkansas 
as migrants and they nest during summer in forested areas throughout the state. 
Winter records are relatively few. Last winter (December 2015 to February 
2016), Kim Smith, Mike Mlodinow, and I collected at least 11 winter records in 
northwest Arkansas. All of these involved juvenile or female yellow plumage. 
This morning's tanager is my only sighting so far this winter. I'll post some 
photos to my facebook page. 

Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 12:06:06 -0600
The "large, flapping tags" are called patagial tags. Yes, they are used for 
identification purposes as the ID number can be seen from great distances. For 
hawks, it allows researchers (and others) to ID the bird while it is soaring 
overhead. 


If I recall, there have been a few recent studies that suggest there may be 
increased mortality associated with this type of tagging. I think one 
explanation had to do with increased energy expenditure in soaring birds as the 
tags interrupted smooth air flow over the wings. 


Having said that, it is doubtful that the tags directly contributed to the 
bird's demise. As with most dead wild animal finds, we often cannot determine 
the real cause of death unless a professional investigates it forensically. 
Starvation, exposure, electrocution, physical contact with power lines or 
vehicles, internal or external parasites, bacterial or viral infection, eating 
contaminated food...any of these are possibilities and very likely the real 
cause of death. Unfortunately, most of these factors do show obvious external 
signs. 


Yes, telemetry is an another way to mark and track birds, but it is not 
necessarily better as those methods have their own set of costs and benefits 
both to birds and researchers (and the public funding the research). Just ask 
Mitchell! 


Regardless of the method of marking birds, the main thing to keep in mind is 
that mortality caused by handling and marking occurs to a very small fraction 
of birds that are marked, and that researchers are always working to reduce it 
even further. And that number is infinitesimally small compared with window 
strikes or house cats. 


So we always have to keep perspective.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR



> On Jan 13, 2017, at 11:36, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
> 
> How tragic. I am currently reading "H is for Hawk" by Helen McDonald and 
appreciate the author's understandings of the delicate practice of falconry, 
and the dangers of jesses. Even without that small glimpse into the 
human/raptor connection, seeing and realizing the hazards these huge white 
flapping tags must present is just heartbreaking. I hope someone contacts the 
bander to find out why they did such a thing, and to help educate and prevent 
using this method in the future. 

> 
> Judith
> Ninestone
> 
>> On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38 AM, "Todd, Shelley"  wrote:
>> 
>> Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting.
>> 
>> 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.1073741829.100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67 

>> 
>> Shelley Todd
>> Natural Resource Program Manager
>> Hot Springs National Park
>> 101 Reserve Street
>> Hot Springs, AR  71901
>> (501) 620-6751 (office)
>> (501) 620-6778 (fax)
>> shelley_todd AT nps.gov
>> 
>>> On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler 
 wrote: 

>>> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature 
Conservancy land away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR and found 
a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not stiff, had 
no "death" odor and no apparent injuries. The oddest thing about it was that on 
either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round vinyl tags 
about 3 inches in diameter. With large numbers written on them. 

>>>  
>>> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird 
was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those large 
vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 

>>> 
>>> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at 
this time. 

>>> 
>>> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have 
easily contributed to the bird's demise. I would think telemetry would be a 
better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 

>>> 
>>> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
>>> 
>>> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
> 
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 12:00:26 -0600
The "large, flapping tags" are called patagial tags. Yes, they are used for 
identification purposes as the ID number can be seen from great distances. For 
hawks, it allows researchers (and others) to ID the bird while it is soaring 
overhead. 


If I recall, there have been a few recent studies that suggest there may be 
increased mortality associated with this type of tagging. I think one 
explanation had to do with increased energy expenditure in soaring birds as the 
tags interrupted smooth air flow over the wings. 


Having said that, it is doubtful that the tags directly contributed to the 
bird's demise. As with most dead wild animal finds, we often cannot determine 
the real cause of death unless a professional investigates it forensically. 
Starvation, exposure, electrocution, physical contact with power lines or 
vehicles, internal or external parasites, bacterial or viral infection, eating 
contaminated food...any of these are possibilities and very likely the real 
cause of death. Unfortunately, most of these factors do not show obvious 
external signs. 


Yes, telemetry is an another way to mark and track birds, but it is not 
necessarily better as those methods have their own set of costs and benefits 
both to birds and researchers (and the public funding the research). Just ask 
Mitchell. 


Regardless of the method of marking birds, the main thing to keep in mind is 
that any mortality caused by handling and marking only occurs to a very small 
fraction of birds that are marked, and researchers constantly work to reduce 
it. And that number is infinitesimally small compared with window strikes and 
house cats. 


So we always have to keep perspective.

Sorry to hear about the hawk.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR



> On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38, Todd, Shelley  wrote:
> 
> Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting.
> 
> 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.1073741829.100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67 

> 
> Shelley Todd
> Natural Resource Program Manager
> Hot Springs National Park
> 101 Reserve Street
> Hot Springs, AR  71901
> (501) 620-6751 (office)
> (501) 620-6778 (fax)
> shelley_todd AT nps.gov
> 
>> On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler 
 wrote: 

>> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature 
Conservancy land away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR and found 
a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not stiff, had 
no "death" odor and no apparent injuries. The oddest thing about it was that on 
either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round vinyl tags 
about 3 inches in diameter. With large numbers written on them. 

>>  
>> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird 
was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those large 
vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 

>> 
>> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at 
this time. 

>> 
>> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have 
easily contributed to the bird's demise. I would think telemetry would be a 
better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 

>> 
>> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
>> 
>> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Whooping Cranes
From: Abby Gibson <balllgibson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 22:44:21 +0000
I live in south eastern Arkansas and after reading this email I drove home
from work and nearly drove in a ditch when I saw what turned out to be two
escaped white goats in an agricultural field!

On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 3:09 PM Carol Joan Patterson <
0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> It is thrilling!!!!!
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Dan Scheiman 
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Sent:* Friday, January 13, 2017 9:51 AM
> *Subject:* Whooping Cranes
>
> For the record, on January 10 there were (and might still be) two banded
> WHOOPING CRANES on private land in eastern Arkansas. They are from the
> eastern migratory population established by the Whooping Crane Eastern
> Partnership (http://www.bringbackthecranes.org) and are being tracked by
> WCEP and AGFC. I wouldn't tell you where they are exactly even if I knew.
> Its just exciting to know that this species is once again a part of our
> avifauna, if marginally.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
>
>
Subject: ASCA Upcoming Field Trips
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 20:35:52 +0000
Below are details about the ASCA field trips scheduled for January and 
February.  Anyone interested in our feathered friends is welcome to join us.  
You don't have to be a member.  To find out more about ASCA, its monthly 
meetings which include exceptional guest speakers, and other information, 
please go to our website at www.asacbird.org.  If you have questions about the 
field trips, feel free to contact me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip 
CoordinatorMaumelle/Little Rock 

 January 28, 2017Lake Dardanelle-DelawarePark and Holla Bend National Wildlife 
Refuge (NWR)Meet at 8:00 a.m. at the Mayflower commuter lot off I-40West at 
Exit 135.  We’ll carpool to DelawarePark, located on the southwest side of 
Lake Dardanelle.  We should arrive at the Delaware Park boatramp around 9:15 
a.m. for anyone who wants to meet us there.  We’ll scan the lake for gulls, 
pelicans, loons,mergansers, ducks, grebes, and eagles.  Arare gull or duck is 
a possibility.  Thelake can be very cold and windy.  Dressin layers, 
including gloves and hats.   Next, we’ll caravan to the Holla Bend NWR 
headquarters’parking lot.  There is a $4.00 entrancefee per vehicle.  A 
duck stamp or a NationalParks pass will get a vehicle in for free.  Our target 
birds will be raptors, including nestingBald Eagles, also swans, ducks, geese, 
and sparrows.  At Holla Bend, there will be some walking intall grass, so 
boots are recommended.  Bring snacks, lunch, and plenty of water.  We’ll 
return to Little Rock late afternoon.  Directions from the town of Dardanelle 
to DelawarePark:  At the junction of Hwy. 7 and Hwy.22, go west on Hwy 22 
approximately 10 miles. Turn right onto Hwy. 393, which is the first road on 
your right after youcross the long causeway at the west end of the lake.  Hwy. 
393 dead ends at Delaware Park.  GPS coordinates:  35.295749, -93.271458.  
For more information about the Holla Bend NWR,go to 
http://www.fws.gov/hollabend/.  The headquarters is located at 10448 HollaBend 
Road, Dardanelle, AR 72834.  GPScoordinates: 35.163222, 
-93.093477.  February 18, 2017Two Rivers Park, LittleRock AR Participate in 
the 2017 Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) byjoining ASCA’s February field 
trip.  Meetat 9:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Two Rivers Park Bridge (also 
known asthe “Little” Dam Bridge) at the start of the walking trail located 
at 4468River Mountain Road at the southeast end of the Two Rivers Park 
peninsula.  We’ll scope the river from the parking lot andbridge, then walk 
the paved trail as far as people wish to go.  You can turn around at any point 
and headback to your vehicle.  After returning toour cars, we’ll drive to 
the west entrance into Two Rivers Park and walk the bigfield and horse trail.  
Both areas have adiverse population of sparrows and provides a great 
opportunity to work onidentifying those “little brown birds”. Knee-high 
rubber boots are recommend for the big field because of thecopious sand 
burrs.  Bring water, snacks,and your scope if you have one.  Weshould finish 
around noon.  If any rareloons are being reported, birders can continue on to 
Lake Maumelle.  Loons, mergansers, ducks, and grebes areeasily found on the 
lake this time of year.  Ifyou can’t join the field trip, participate in the 
GBBC by counting the birds inyour own backyard and submitting your sightings to 
the GBBC website at www.birdcount.org. TakeExit 9 west off I-430 onto Cantrell 
Rd. At the first stop light, turn right (north) onto River MountainRoad.  Go 
to the bottom of the hill thenbear right to the main parking lot.  
GPScoordinates are 34.797458,-92.383017. 
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 19:36:31 +0000
I may have the banding information on this bird from my quick Google Search.
Please read the post by Ron Skleney 
http://www.ilbirds.com/index.php?topic=52292.0 as well as the information on 
the O'Hare Airport Red-tailed Hawk Banding Project here 
http://www.annemariesmith.net/RVI/PDFs/RTHAResearchOverview.pdf 

For those not inclined to click on links here's the information:
To supplement the research previously conducted with red-tailed hawks (RTHAs) 
at O’Hare International Airport (ORD), USDA-Wildlife Services (WS) is 
conducting a project in collaboration with WS’ National Wildlife Research 
Center (NWRC).  Specific data regarding temporal and spatial movement patterns 
of red-tailed hawks on airfields is lacking.  This project will provide 
information regarding the movement and activity patterns of red-tailed hawks in 
and around airport environments and allows for a quantification of the risk 
posed by red-tailed hawks to safe aircraft operations.  The objective of the 
study is to use patagial tags on red-tailed hawks to monitor return rates from 
relocation sites that are 50, 75, 100 and 125 miles west and south of ORD. 

  
Birds will be uniquely marked using standard U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
aluminum bands and patagial tags on the wings.  Patagial tags will be attached 
to up to 200 RTHAs per year through 2015 and relocated offsite to 50, 75, 100 
and 125 miles west of ORD in years 2010-2012 and south during years 
2013-2015.  Birds with patagial tags will be documented upon return to ORD via 
opportunistic sightings.  Time, date and GPS location information will be 
recorded when tagged birds are encountered.  For the birds tagged in 2010 and 
2013, the patagial tags will be green with white numbers while 2011 and 2014 
tags will be white with black numbers and 2012 and 2015 the tags will be orange 
with black numbers. 

  
If any of these birds are spotted please feel free to contact Craig Pullins at 
craig.k.pullins AT aphis.usda.gov or Travis Guerrant at 
Travis.guerrant AT aphis.usda.gov. 

If possible, time, date and GPS location would be greatly appreciated, but any 
information and/or pictures you can provide would be helpful.  Any questions 
about the project please do not hesitate to reach out to the contacts above." 


Karen Rowe        




      From: Jerry Butler 
 To: "ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU" ; Karen And Jim 
Rowe ; Bob n Lou Hawkins ; 
John Schwagman  

 Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 10:10 AM
 Subject: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
   
Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature 
Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR  and 
found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not 
stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest thing about 
it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round 
vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers written on 
them. John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the 
bird was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those 
large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 

Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at 
this time. 

It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have 
easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry would be a 
better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 

Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler



   
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 18:12:37 +0000

Patagial tags are a USGS Bird Banding Lab approved method of marking banded 
birds for observation and reporting purposes.  The Bird Banding Lab only 
allows the use of scientifically proven safe methods of banding and marking 
migratory bird 
species.https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBl/homepage/aboutaux.cfm#patagial 

AGFC marked all of our bald eagles that were released in the state in the 1980s 
and 1990s with patagial tags and the eagles experienced no issues with the 
markers, although they were smaller than those on this red-tailed hawk. 

I suggest that the bird be submitted for necropsy by the Arkansas Livestock and 
Poultry Commission.  It could have died from a wide variety of causes 
including lead poisoning, aspergillosis, electrocution (often there is no 
external signs of this), secondary rodenticide poisoning or carbamate 
poisoning.  

USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services has been translocating red-tailed hawks from 
airports where they pose a hazard to aircraft and thus people.  They move the 
live-trapped hawks a very great distance away from the trap site.  They are 
trying to determine just how far they have to go to release the hawk before it 
will not return to the airport it was trapped at.   There is a possibility, 
this is one of the translocated red-tails since they need to mark the hawks 
with some type of visible auxiliary marker so they can determine by looking at 
the bird if a hawk observed on the airport is a new hawk or a trapped and 
release hawk that has returned. 

Karen Rowe  



      From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 11:36 AM
 Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
   
How tragic. I am currently reading "H is for Hawk" by Helen McDonald and 
appreciate the author's understandings of the delicate practice of falconry, 
and the dangers of jesses. Even without that small glimpse into the 
human/raptor connection, seeing and realizing the hazards these huge white 
flapping tags must present is just heartbreaking. I hope someone contacts the 
bander to find out why they did such a thing, and to help educate and prevent 
using this method in the future. 

JudithNinestone

On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38 AM, "Todd, Shelley"  wrote:

Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting.
https://www.facebook.com/ media/set/?set=a. 366641567032684.1073741829. 
100010605317819&type=1&l= 8fe8172f67 


Shelley ToddNatural Resource Program ManagerHot Springs National Park101 
Reserve StreetHot Springs, AR  71901(501) 620-6751 (office)(501) 620-6778 
(fax)shelley_todd AT nps.gov 

On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 


Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature 
Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR  and 
found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not 
stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest thing about 
it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round 
vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers written on 
them. John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the 
bird was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those 
large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 

Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at 
this time. 

It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have 
easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry would be a 
better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 

Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler







   
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 11:36:25 -0600
How tragic. I am currently reading "H is for Hawk" by Helen McDonald and 
appreciate the author's understandings of the delicate practice of falconry, 
and the dangers of jesses. Even without that small glimpse into the 
human/raptor connection, seeing and realizing the hazards these huge white 
flapping tags must present is just heartbreaking. I hope someone contacts the 
bander to find out why they did such a thing, and to help educate and prevent 
using this method in the future. 


Judith
Ninestone

On Jan 13, 2017, at 10:38 AM, "Todd, Shelley"  wrote:

> Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting.
> 
> 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.1073741829.100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67 

> 
> Shelley Todd
> Natural Resource Program Manager
> Hot Springs National Park
> 101 Reserve Street
> Hot Springs, AR  71901
> (501) 620-6751 (office)
> (501) 620-6778 (fax)
> shelley_todd AT nps.gov
> 
> On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 

> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature 
Conservancy land away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR and found 
a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not stiff, had 
no "death" odor and no apparent injuries. The oddest thing about it was that on 
either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round vinyl tags 
about 3 inches in diameter. With large numbers written on them. 

>  
> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird was 
banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those large vinyl 
tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 

> 
> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at 
this time. 

> 
> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have 
easily contributed to the bird's demise. I would think telemetry would be a 
better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 

> 
> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
> 
> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: "Todd, Shelley" <shelley_todd AT NPS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 10:38:14 -0600
Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.366641567032684.1073741829.
100010605317819&type=1&l=8fe8172f67

Shelley Todd
Natural Resource Program Manager
Hot Springs National Park
101 Reserve Street
Hot Springs, AR  71901
(501) 620-6751 (office)
(501) 620-6778 (fax)
shelley_todd AT nps.gov

On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler  wrote:

> Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of
> Nature Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs,
> AR  and found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died,
> was not stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest
> thing about it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples
> were white round vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers
> written on them.
>
> John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird
> was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those
> large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes.
>
> Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at
> this time.
>
> It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have
> easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry would be
> a better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags
> and would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey.
>
> Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
>
> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>
>
>
Subject: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 10:10:34 -0600
Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature
Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR  and
found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not
stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest thing
about it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were
white round vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers
written on them.

John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird
was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those
large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes.

Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at
this time.

It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have
easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry would be
a better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags
and would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey.

Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: Whooping Cranes
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 15:51:30 +0000
For the record, on January 10 there were (and might still be) two banded 
WHOOPING CRANES on private land in eastern Arkansas. They are from the eastern 
migratory population established by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership ( 
http://www.bringbackthecranes.org ) and are being tracked by WCEP and AGFC. I 
wouldn't tell you where they are exactly even if I knew. Its just exciting to 
know that this species is once again a part of our avifauna, if marginally. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: GREATER SCAUPS AT MOBERLY STORM WATER RETENTION POND
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2017 13:18:58 +0000
Moberly Pond in Bentonville is an extensive storm water retention structure 
near corner of I-49 and highway 102. It is large in size and fenced. Both may 
contribute to making it attractive to wintering coots, ducks, geese, etc. My 
tallies from yesterday afternoon included Canada Goose, Gadwall, Mallard, 
Ring-necked Duck (83), Greater Scaup (2), Lesser Scaup (1), Bufflehead (4), 
Pied-billed Grebe (1), American Coot (22). 

Storm water retentions like this are important in this former Tallgrass Prairie 
region. Water has nowhere to go with clay soils and a general level terrain. 
This pond retains run-off from a huge apartment complex and adjacent 
businesses. Retaining high amounts of rainfall reduces flash flooding and 
pressure on wastewater treatment facilities. 

I park safely at the curb and ignore the traffic. Views are relatively close as 
compared to the usual lake once you get used to peering through the metal 
fence. It is amazing how metaphorically far away an urban interstate sounds 
when engrossed in lives of wild ducks. 

I keep studying the two scaup species when both are present. My hope is that 
differences will become more apparent with more views. This is explanation to 
my Inner Environmentalist for driving to Moberly from Fayetteville - need more 
views to get better at understanding of these two closely related species among 
us in winter. 

Subject: Opportunity to Display Your Bird Photography
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 22:38:20 +0000

For the past year, Audubon Arkansas has been fortunate to partner with Flyway 
Brewing (North Little Rock) on Audubon Happy Hours and other events. The 
overall theme of Flyway Brewing, from their beer names to their interior and 
exterior décor, is inspired by the birds of the Mississippi Flyway. 




This year, Flyway is interested in displaying bird photography in their 
taproom. Their taproom has served as a gallery space for a few select 
paintings. Some of these paintings have sold. Now Flyway is looking to fill the 
gaps with photos of Arkansas birds by Arkansas photographers. 




If you have a photo that you’d like to have displayed at Flyway Brewing at no 
cost, please send the image to Uta Meyer at umeyer AT audubon.org . Flyway staff 
will select images out of those sent along and request framed prints (8x10 size 
minimum) and prices, if you’re choosing to not just display. Photos will be 
displayed until sold or at Flyway’s/photographer’s discretion. 





P.S. This coming Tuesday is Audubon's monthly Happy Hour, 5-7 PM. 
https://www.facebook.com/events/1336117389796634/ 






Dan Scheiman 


Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Together for Birds Petition
From: Steve Holmer <sholmer AT ABCBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 20:11:00 +0000
[ABC-Together-for-Birds-petition-banner.jpg]

Together for Birds Petition 
 


Bird conservation is a core American value, whether inspired by the powerful 
flight of a Bald Eagle or the charisma of a Golden-crowned Kinglet. This value 
is widely supported by citizens of all political persuasions. Now, we face a 
critical moment. The environment was not a major issue in the recent election, 
but decisions made by the incoming Administration and Congress could have 
far-reaching impacts for birds and their habitats. 


That's why we need everyone who cares about birds to join together and sign 
this 
petition 
to protect cornerstone legislation and other top conservation priorities. This 
may be the single best opportunity ever for our community to stand together for 
birds. Please show your support for bird conservation and ensure that the 
progress we have made in recent decades is preserved. 


We will present the petition and signatures to the new Administration and 
Congress on January 23, just after the Inauguration. Please 
sign 
to show your support for bird conservation today! 


Sign the Petition


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


Forward the Petition

Please use Facebook, Twitter (#togetherforbirds) and email to let family, 
friends and colleagues know about this effort to join together in support of 
birds. 

Organizations Can Endorse the Petition

To sign on your organization, please fill in the name in the box provided


https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


Organizations, Please Circulate the Petition

Please forward this link to your lists 
https://secure2.convio.net/abcb/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=290 


"TOGETHER FOR BIRDS" PETITION



Dear [Administration and Congress],



We, the undersigned organizations and individuals, represent a broad 
cross-section of the bird conservation community. We aim to build a dialogue 
with the new Administration and Congress to promote the conservation of birds 
and their habitats, which are of fundamental value to the American people. 


More than 60 million Americans care deeply about birds, and bird-related 
recreation contributes more than $36 billion to our economy. Birds also act as 
the "canary in the coal mine" for our environment and provide valuable benefits 
to society, from pollination to pest control. But birds are in trouble, with 
many declining in population or facing extinction. 


We endorse the following priorities to ensure that birds and their habitats 
continue to be effectively conserved for the benefit of all Americans. We ask 
that you please support: 


1. THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: Protect the Act that has helped recover our 
national bird, the Bald Eagle, and other species in trouble. 


2. THE MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY ACT: Safeguard the only law that exists to protect 
most American birds, and support the federal Duck Stamp, one of the nation's 
most successful conservation programs. 


3. FEDERAL FUNDING FOR BIRDS: Maintain and grow essential sources of federal 
support for migratory bird conservation. 


4. THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY: Ensure that the EPA can continue its 
vital work to protect people and birds from dangerous pesticides and other 
toxins. 


5. LAND MANAGEMENT FOR BIRDS AND PEOPLE: Ensure that public lands remain 
public, are properly managed for wildlife, and that recreational access is 
maintained. 


We also acknowledge that many other national and state initiatives are of 
critical importance to birds, and that citizens and private enterprise can play 
vital roles in these conservation efforts. 


Let's work together for birds!


[ABC-Together-for-Birds-petition-banner.jpg]






Steve Holmer
Vice President of Policy
American Bird Conservancy &
Director, Bird Conservation Alliance
202-888-7490
sholmer AT abcbirds.org

www.abcbirds.org, 
https://abcbirds.org/get-involved/bird-conservation-alliance/, ABC on 
Facebook, 
ABC Videos 


[letterhead]

Subject: Birder TV
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 19:14:25 +0000
My experience this morning at Mulhollan Waterfowl Blind on Lake Fayetteville: 
Bald Eagle to Winter Wren, and lots of stuff inbetween, like Common Goldeneyes. 
All of Monday's ice is gone the way of 68 degrees and south winds 20-30 MPH. So 
have most ducks that came in with suddenly winter. 


Canada Goose (over blind - heard honking), Gadwall (12), Mallard (1), Common 
Goldeneye (3), Pied-billed Grebe (6). The blind blocks most of the south wind, 
so it is comfy inside, an invite to linger, to stare out the ports at waves - a 
kind of birder TV. Bring on the snacks. 


 As clouds cleared, the blind's porch became sunny. I went out there in the 
middle of a moving flock of White-throated and Song Sparrows. Last Winter Wren 
for me at the blind was before Christmas. One chirped right up this morning, 
had a look, dodged under the blind. 


Then, out on a much wind-chopped lake, up flushed Gadwalls, adult Bald Eagle 
close behind. 

Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 10
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 01:35:24 -0600
It was partly cloudy, warm, and extremely windy on the bird survey
yesterday.  67 species were found.  The high winds made surveying difficult
especially for finding the smaller passerines.  I heard calling today a bird
that I am fairly sure was a Townsend's Solitaire.  I was unable to find the
bird though to confirm it.  I will be searching for it again today.  Here is
my list:

 

Wood duck - 3

Gadwall - 524

Mallard - 779

Northern Shoveler - 136

Northern Pintail - 29

Green-winged Teal - 627

Canvasback - 27

Ring-necked Duck - 880

Bufflehead - 1

Ruddy Duck - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 5

Double-crested Cormorant - 15

Great-blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 23

Turkey Vulture - 17

Bald Eagle - 2

Northern Harrier - 5

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 6

American Coot - 284

Killdeer - 8

Wilson's Snipe - 4

Rock Pigeon - 1

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1

Mourning Dove - 21

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 9

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 8

Blue Jay - 7

American Crow - 8

Fish Crow - 10

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 5

House Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Hermit Thrush - 2

American Robin - 17

Northern Mockingbird - 4

Brown Thrasher - 2

American Pipit - 2

Cedar Waxwing - 14

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 12

Pine Warbler - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 3

LeConte's Sparrow - 2

Fox Sparrow - 3

Song Sparrow - 11

Swamp Sparrow - 5

White-throated Sparrow - 14

White-crowned Sparrow - 10

Northern Cardinal - 22

Red-winged Blackbird - 200

Meadowlark sp. - 16

Rusty Blackbird - 20

Common Grackle - 16

American Goldfinch - 2

 

Other sightings:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared sliders

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:55:51 -0600
Good to know!
J

On Jan 10, 2017, at 8:01 PM, Karen And Jim Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


> Falconers that hawk squirrels put protecting leather "leggings" on their 
falconry birds, usually Harris Hawks or Red-tails to try to protect their 
raptors' legs from squirrel bites. 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Jan 10, 2017, at 2:13 PM, Gail Miller  wrote:
> 
>> Oh wow, I had no idea that squirrels would bite raptors’ legs, makes sense 
though. Thanks so much for sharing Judy!!! Mystery solved!! 

>>  
>> Gail in Conway
>>  
>> From: Judy & Don [mailto:9waterfall9 AT gmail.com] 
>> Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 8:32 AM
>> To: Gail Miller 
>> Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>> Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
>>  
>> I agree, Gail. Squirrels are fat and plentiful here too! But they can be leg 
biters. Several years ago one wounded a crow by biting its leg, and all crows 
since that time have been exceptionally cautious around squirrels at the ground 
feeder. J 

>>  
>> On Jan 10, 2017, at 8:28 AM, Gail Miller  wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> Wow, I’m shocked at this too, sorry for the beautiful kestrel. I have a 
Cooper’s Hawk here, seems to raise young every year. It usually gets a slow, 
fat, noisy Mourning Dove. I did witness a Red-shouldered Hawk here chase the 
heck out of a Pileated Woodpecker in the woods behind my house a few months 
back. Pretty awesome to watch it … especially, for me, since the chatty 
woodpecker got away. I’ve never understood why the hawks don’t want a big fate 
meaty squirrel here!!! The squirrels just sit on the feeder after all the birds 
scatter when there is a hawk near. There HAS to be more meat on a squirrel than 
a small song bird!! 

>>  
>>  
>>  
>> Gail Miller
>> Conway
>>  
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:01:05 -0600
Falconers that hawk squirrels put protecting leather "leggings" on their 
falconry birds, usually Harris Hawks or Red-tails to try to protect their 
raptors' legs from squirrel bites. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 10, 2017, at 2:13 PM, Gail Miller  wrote:
> 
> Oh wow, I had no idea that squirrels would bite raptors’ legs, makes sense 
though. Thanks so much for sharing Judy!!! Mystery solved!! 

>  
> Gail in Conway
>  
> From: Judy & Don [mailto:9waterfall9 AT gmail.com] 
> Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 8:32 AM
> To: Gail Miller 
> Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
>  
> I agree, Gail. Squirrels are fat and plentiful here too! But they can be leg 
biters. Several years ago one wounded a crow by biting its leg, and all crows 
since that time have been exceptionally cautious around squirrels at the ground 
feeder. J 

>  
> On Jan 10, 2017, at 8:28 AM, Gail Miller  wrote:
> 
> 
> Wow, I’m shocked at this too, sorry for the beautiful kestrel. I have a 
Cooper’s Hawk here, seems to raise young every year. It usually gets a slow, 
fat, noisy Mourning Dove. I did witness a Red-shouldered Hawk here chase the 
heck out of a Pileated Woodpecker in the woods behind my house a few months 
back. Pretty awesome to watch it … especially, for me, since the chatty 
woodpecker got away. I’ve never understood why the hawks don’t want a big 
fate meaty squirrel here!!! The squirrels just sit on the feeder after all the 
birds scatter when there is a hawk near. There HAS to be more meat on a 
squirrel than a small song bird!! 

>  
>  
>  
> Gail Miller
> Conway
>  
Subject: Please ignore this email...
From: "shalom AT cyberback.com" <shalom@CYBERBACK.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 17:31:38 -0600
Checking my email ability...

:)
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 14:13:27 -0600
Oh wow, I had no idea that squirrels would bite raptors' legs, makes sense
though.  Thanks so much for sharing Judy!!!  Mystery solved!!

 

Gail in Conway

 

From: Judy & Don [mailto:9waterfall9 AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 8:32 AM
To: Gail Miller 
Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...

 

I agree, Gail. Squirrels are fat and plentiful here too! But they can be leg
biters. Several years ago one wounded a crow by biting its leg, and all
crows since that time have been exceptionally cautious around squirrels at
the ground feeder. J

 

On Jan 10, 2017, at 8:28 AM, Gail Miller  > wrote:





Wow, I'm shocked at this too, sorry for the beautiful kestrel.  I have a
Cooper's Hawk here, seems to raise young every year.  It usually gets a
slow, fat, noisy Mourning Dove.  I did witness a Red-shouldered Hawk here
chase the heck out of a Pileated Woodpecker in the woods behind my house a
few months back.  Pretty awesome to watch it . especially, for me, since the
chatty woodpecker got away.  I've never understood why the hawks don't want
a big fate meaty squirrel here!!!  The squirrels just sit on the feeder
after all the birds scatter when there is a hawk near.  There HAS to be more
meat on a squirrel than a small song bird!!

 

 

 

Gail Miller

Conway

 
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 18:33:26 +0000
And Great Blue Herons eat Black Rails.

Thanks for the info, Kim Smith.

Sandy B.


On Tue, Jan 10, 2017 at 12:26 PM Kimberly G. Smith  wrote:

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> American Kestrel populations have been in decline since the early 1990s in
> eastern US and the increase in Cooper’s Hawks have been suggested as one
> reason, along with other reasons like West Nile virus.  There
>
> have been almost no studies of the winter diet of Cooper’s Hawks, but they
> were suspected as the main predator on radio-tagged kestrels in
> Pennsylvania.
>
>
> Farmer, G.C., K. McCarty, S. Robertson, B. Robertson, and K.L. Bildstein.
> 2006. Suspected predation by accipiters on radio-tracked American Kestrels
> (Falco sparverius) in eastern Pennsylvania. Journal of Raptor
>
> Research 40:294–297.
>
>
>
>
>
> Predation by Northern Goshawks have also been implicated in the decline of
> Common Kestrels in northern England.
>
>
> Petty, S. J., D. I. K. Anderson, M. Davison, B. Little, T. N. Sherratt, C.
> J. Thomas, and. X. Lambin. 2003. The decline of Common Kestrels Falco
> tinnunculus in a forested area of northern England: the role of
>
> predation by Northern Goshawks Accipiter gentilis. Ibis 145:472-483.
>
>
>
>
>
> So big raptors do eat small raptors…
>
>
>
>
>
> Also, big owls eat small owls… Great-horned and Barred are suspected as
> main predators of saw-whets…
>
>
>
>
>
> Cheers, Kim
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Kimberly G. Smith
>
>
> Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
>
>
> Department of Biological Sciences
>
>
> University of Arkansas
>
>
> Fayetteville, AR 72701
>
>
> Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
>
>
> Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU]
>
> *On Behalf Of *Butch Tetzlaff
>
>
> *Sent:* Monday, January 09, 2017 5:09 PM
>
>
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>
>
> *Subject:* Not for the weak stomach...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> While sitting in my living room this afternoon, I heard a weak thud
> against the house.  Given that the wind had been gusting at 30mph most of
> the afternoon, I figured my patio furniture had finally made it closer to
> the door, so I consciously
>
> ignored it.  About 20 minutes later, I got up and looked out the window.
> Much to my surprise a Cooper’s Hawk was standing on the ground in the
> middle of my back yard.  We had seen him off and on for about a month now,
> but it is always still a surprise when
>
> he shows up.  It is wonderful opportunity to see a great predator from the
> comfort of my kitchen and be fully obscured from his view.
>
>
>
>
>
> Then it hit me…he was dining.
>
>
>
>
>
> At this point, the prey was naught but an explosion of feathers strewn
> across the yard, so I just casually moved to another room for a better
> view.  I figured he had picked off one of the many MODO’s that tend to sit
> on the fence.  It’s
>
> happened before.
>
>
>
>
>
> But the feathers were all wrong especially the primaries.  They were
> orange.
>
>
>
>
>
> I let him dine some more as I surveyed the situation.  He continued to
> pick at the carcass leaving little left for identification.  I had already
> suspected what it was; I just couldn’t believe a Coop could nab one.  Given
> that we have an
>
> indoor dog, I knew I was going to have to clean up the mess as soon as the
> Coop was finished, so I was going to get my chance to know for sure.  When
> I decided he had had enough to eat, I went outside.
>
>
>
>
>
> He took one look at me, grabbed his dinner, and flew off down wind.  He
> didn’t struggle at all.
>
>
>
>
>
> There wasn’t much left of the bird that he had caught: upper and lower
> mandible, one left foot, and an array of feathers.  I am sorry to report it
> was a Kestrel.  I think they are one of the coolest birds on the planet.
> And I never expected
>
> that a Coop would go for one of those.  I am still amazed.
>
>
>
>
>
> I am saddened to know it was a Kestrel, but for one brief moment I was
> allowed the privilege of viewing the reality of nature.  I was in the
> world, and not just on it.
>
>
>
>
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
>
>
> Bentonville, AR
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 18:25:42 +0000
American Kestrel populations have been in decline since the early 1990s in 
eastern US and the increase in Cooper's Hawks have been suggested as one 
reason, along with other reasons like West Nile virus. There have been almost 
no studies of the winter diet of Cooper's Hawks, but they were suspected as the 
main predator on radio-tagged kestrels in Pennsylvania. 

Farmer, G.C., K. McCarty, S. Robertson, B. Robertson, and K.L. Bildstein. 2006. 
Suspected predation by accipiters on radio-tracked American Kestrels (Falco 
sparverius) in eastern Pennsylvania. Journal of Raptor Research 40:294-297. 


Predation by Northern Goshawks have also been implicated in the decline of 
Common Kestrels in northern England. 

Petty, S. J., D. I. K. Anderson, M. Davison, B. Little, T. N. Sherratt, C. J. 
Thomas, and. X. Lambin. 2003. The decline of Common Kestrels Falco tinnunculus 
in a forested area of northern England: the role of predation by Northern 
Goshawks Accipiter gentilis. Ibis 145:472-483. 


So big raptors do eat small raptors...

Also, big owls eat small owls... Great-horned and Barred are suspected as main 
predators of saw-whets... 


Cheers, Kim

Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Butch Tetzlaff 

Sent: Monday, January 09, 2017 5:09 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Not for the weak stomach...

While sitting in my living room this afternoon, I heard a weak thud against the 
house. Given that the wind had been gusting at 30mph most of the afternoon, I 
figured my patio furniture had finally made it closer to the door, so I 
consciously ignored it. About 20 minutes later, I got up and looked out the 
window. Much to my surprise a Cooper's Hawk was standing on the ground in the 
middle of my back yard. We had seen him off and on for about a month now, but 
it is always still a surprise when he shows up. It is wonderful opportunity to 
see a great predator from the comfort of my kitchen and be fully obscured from 
his view. 


Then it hit me...he was dining.

At this point, the prey was naught but an explosion of feathers strewn across 
the yard, so I just casually moved to another room for a better view. I figured 
he had picked off one of the many MODO's that tend to sit on the fence. It's 
happened before. 


But the feathers were all wrong especially the primaries.  They were orange.

I let him dine some more as I surveyed the situation. He continued to pick at 
the carcass leaving little left for identification. I had already suspected 
what it was; I just couldn't believe a Coop could nab one. Given that we have 
an indoor dog, I knew I was going to have to clean up the mess as soon as the 
Coop was finished, so I was going to get my chance to know for sure. When I 
decided he had had enough to eat, I went outside. 


He took one look at me, grabbed his dinner, and flew off down wind. He didn't 
struggle at all. 


There wasn't much left of the bird that he had caught: upper and lower 
mandible, one left foot, and an array of feathers. I am sorry to report it was 
a Kestrel. I think they are one of the coolest birds on the planet. And I never 
expected that a Coop would go for one of those. I am still amazed. 


I am saddened to know it was a Kestrel, but for one brief moment I was allowed 
the privilege of viewing the reality of nature. I was in the world, and not 
just on it. 


Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR


Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 08:32:14 -0600
I agree, Gail. Squirrels are fat and plentiful here too! But they can be leg 
biters. Several years ago one wounded a crow by biting its leg, and all crows 
since that time have been exceptionally cautious around squirrels at the ground 
feeder. J 


On Jan 10, 2017, at 8:28 AM, Gail Miller  wrote:

> Wow, I’m shocked at this too, sorry for the beautiful kestrel. I have a 
Cooper’s Hawk here, seems to raise young every year. It usually gets a slow, 
fat, noisy Mourning Dove. I did witness a Red-shouldered Hawk here chase the 
heck out of a Pileated Woodpecker in the woods behind my house a few months 
back. Pretty awesome to watch it … especially, for me, since the chatty 
woodpecker got away. I’ve never understood why the hawks don’t want a big fate 
meaty squirrel here!!! The squirrels just sit on the feeder after all the birds 
scatter when there is a hawk near. There HAS to be more meat on a squirrel than 
a small song bird!! 

>  
>  
>  
> Gail Miller
> Conway
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

> Sent: Monday, January 09, 2017 9:24 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
>  
> I didn't think raptors would go for another raptor.  Clearly, I was wrong.
> 
> Fascinating story!
> 
> George (n. Conway County, saw a Kestral with a rat on a power line near Lake 
Overcup yesterday) 

> 
>  
> On 1/9/2017 5:09 PM, Butch Tetzlaff wrote:
> While sitting in my living room this afternoon, I heard a weak thud against 
the house. Given that the wind had been gusting at 30mph most of the afternoon, 
I figured my patio furniture had finally made it closer to the door, so I 
consciously ignored it. About 20 minutes later, I got up and looked out the 
window. Much to my surprise a Cooper’s Hawk was standing on the ground in the 
middle of my back yard. We had seen him off and on for about a month now, but 
it is always still a surprise when he shows up. It is wonderful opportunity to 
see a great predator from the comfort of my kitchen and be fully obscured from 
his view. 

>  
> Then it hit me…he was dining.
>  
> At this point, the prey was naught but an explosion of feathers strewn across 
the yard, so I just casually moved to another room for a better view. I figured 
he had picked off one of the many MODO’s that tend to sit on the fence. It’s 
happened before. 

>  
> But the feathers were all wrong especially the primaries.  They were orange.
>  
> I let him dine some more as I surveyed the situation. He continued to pick at 
the carcass leaving little left for identification. I had already suspected 
what it was; I just couldn’t believe a Coop could nab one. Given that we have 
an indoor dog, I knew I was going to have to clean up the mess as soon as the 
Coop was finished, so I was going to get my chance to know for sure. When I 
decided he had had enough to eat, I went outside. 

>  
> He took one look at me, grabbed his dinner, and flew off down wind. He didn’t 
struggle at all. 

>  
> There wasn’t much left of the bird that he had caught: upper and lower 
mandible, one left foot, and an array of feathers. I am sorry to report it was 
a Kestrel. I think they are one of the coolest birds on the planet. And I never 
expected that a Coop would go for one of those. I am still amazed. 

>  
> I am saddened to know it was a Kestrel, but for one brief moment I was 
allowed the privilege of viewing the reality of nature. I was in the world, and 
not just on it. 

>  
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville, AR
>  
>  
>  
>  
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 08:28:01 -0600
Wow, I'm shocked at this too, sorry for the beautiful kestrel.  I have a
Cooper's Hawk here, seems to raise young every year.  It usually gets a
slow, fat, noisy Mourning Dove.  I did witness a Red-shouldered Hawk here
chase the heck out of a Pileated Woodpecker in the woods behind my house a
few months back.  Pretty awesome to watch it . especially, for me, since the
chatty woodpecker got away.  I've never understood why the hawks don't want
a big fate meaty squirrel here!!!  The squirrels just sit on the feeder
after all the birds scatter when there is a hawk near.  There HAS to be more
meat on a squirrel than a small song bird!!

 

 

 

Gail Miller

Conway

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Monday, January 09, 2017 9:24 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...

 

I didn't think raptors would go for another raptor.  Clearly, I was wrong.

Fascinating story!

George (n. Conway County, saw a Kestral with a rat on a power line near Lake
Overcup yesterday)

 

On 1/9/2017 5:09 PM, Butch Tetzlaff wrote:

While sitting in my living room this afternoon, I heard a weak thud against
the house.  Given that the wind had been gusting at 30mph most of the
afternoon, I figured my patio furniture had finally made it closer to the
door, so I consciously ignored it.  About 20 minutes later, I got up and
looked out the window.  Much to my surprise a Cooper's Hawk was standing on
the ground in the middle of my back yard.  We had seen him off and on for
about a month now, but it is always still a surprise when he shows up.  It
is wonderful opportunity to see a great predator from the comfort of my
kitchen and be fully obscured from his view.

 

Then it hit me.he was dining.

 

At this point, the prey was naught but an explosion of feathers strewn
across the yard, so I just casually moved to another room for a better view.
I figured he had picked off one of the many MODO's that tend to sit on the
fence.  It's happened before.

 

But the feathers were all wrong especially the primaries.  They were orange.

 

I let him dine some more as I surveyed the situation.  He continued to pick
at the carcass leaving little left for identification.  I had already
suspected what it was; I just couldn't believe a Coop could nab one.  Given
that we have an indoor dog, I knew I was going to have to clean up the mess
as soon as the Coop was finished, so I was going to get my chance to know
for sure.  When I decided he had had enough to eat, I went outside.

 

He took one look at me, grabbed his dinner, and flew off down wind.  He
didn't struggle at all.

 

There wasn't much left of the bird that he had caught: upper and lower
mandible, one left foot, and an array of feathers.  I am sorry to report it
was a Kestrel.  I think they are one of the coolest birds on the planet.
And I never expected that a Coop would go for one of those.  I am still
amazed.

 

I am saddened to know it was a Kestrel, but for one brief moment I was
allowed the privilege of viewing the reality of nature.  I was in the world,
and not just on it.

 

Butch Tetzlaff

Bentonville, AR

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Not for the weak stomach...
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 21:24:03 -0600
I didn't think raptors would go for another raptor.  Clearly, I was wrong.

Fascinating story!

George (n. Conway County, saw a Kestral with a rat on a power line near 
Lake Overcup yesterday)


On 1/9/2017 5:09 PM, Butch Tetzlaff wrote:
>
> While sitting in my living room this afternoon, I heard a weak thud 
> against the house.  Given that the wind had been gusting at 30mph most 
> of the afternoon, I figured my patio furniture had finally made it 
> closer to the door, so I consciously ignored it.  About 20 minutes 
> later, I got up and looked out the window.  Much to my surprise a 
> Cooper’s Hawk was standing on the ground in the middle of my back 
> yard.  We had seen him off and on for about a month now, but it is 
> always still a surprise when he shows up.  It is wonderful opportunity 
> to see a great predator from the comfort of my kitchen and be fully 
> obscured from his view.
>
> Then it hit me…he was dining.
>
> At this point, the prey was naught but an explosion of feathers strewn 
> across the yard, so I just casually moved to another room for a better 
> view.  I figured he had picked off one of the many MODO’s that tend to 
> sit on the fence.  It’s happened before.
>
> But the feathers were all wrong especially the primaries.  They were 
> orange.
>
> I let him dine some more as I surveyed the situation.  He continued to 
> pick at the carcass leaving little left for identification.  I had 
> already suspected what it was; I just couldn’t believe a Coop could 
> nab one.  Given that we have an indoor dog, I knew I was going to have 
> to clean up the mess as soon as the Coop was finished, so I was going 
> to get my chance to know for sure.  When I decided he had had enough 
> to eat, I went outside.
>
> He took one look at me, grabbed his dinner, and flew off down wind.  
> He didn’t struggle at all.
>
> There wasn’t much left of the bird that he had caught: upper and lower 
> mandible, one left foot, and an array of feathers.  I am sorry to 
> report it was a Kestrel.  I think they are one of the coolest birds on 
> the planet.  And I never expected that a Coop would go for one of 
> those.  I am still amazed.
>
> I am saddened to know it was a Kestrel, but for one brief moment I was 
> allowed the privilege of viewing the reality of nature.  I was in the 
> world, and not just on it.
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
>
> Bentonville, AR
>
Subject: Not for the weak stomach...
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 17:09:28 -0600
While sitting in my living room this afternoon, I heard a weak thud against
the house.  Given that the wind had been gusting at 30mph most of the
afternoon, I figured my patio furniture had finally made it closer to the
door, so I consciously ignored it.  About 20 minutes later, I got up and
looked out the window.  Much to my surprise a Cooper's Hawk was standing on
the ground in the middle of my back yard.  We had seen him off and on for
about a month now, but it is always still a surprise when he shows up.  It
is wonderful opportunity to see a great predator from the comfort of my
kitchen and be fully obscured from his view.

 

Then it hit me.he was dining.

 

At this point, the prey was naught but an explosion of feathers strewn
across the yard, so I just casually moved to another room for a better view.
I figured he had picked off one of the many MODO's that tend to sit on the
fence.  It's happened before.

 

But the feathers were all wrong especially the primaries.  They were orange.

 

I let him dine some more as I surveyed the situation.  He continued to pick
at the carcass leaving little left for identification.  I had already
suspected what it was; I just couldn't believe a Coop could nab one.  Given
that we have an indoor dog, I knew I was going to have to clean up the mess
as soon as the Coop was finished, so I was going to get my chance to know
for sure.  When I decided he had had enough to eat, I went outside.

 

He took one look at me, grabbed his dinner, and flew off down wind.  He
didn't struggle at all.

 

There wasn't much left of the bird that he had caught: upper and lower
mandible, one left foot, and an array of feathers.  I am sorry to report it
was a Kestrel.  I think they are one of the coolest birds on the planet.
And I never expected that a Coop would go for one of those.  I am still
amazed.

 

I am saddened to know it was a Kestrel, but for one brief moment I was
allowed the privilege of viewing the reality of nature.  I was in the world,
and not just on it.

 

Butch Tetzlaff

Bentonville, AR

 

 

 
Subject: alot of ducks
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 17:43:12 -0500
 Are at Lake Catherine State Park today, armed with only a resume, I could just 
see the close birds looks like Mallards and Northern Shovelers. But in the main 
part of the lake was a huge lot of birds swimming out there. Then out at the 
exit going in to the Bypass I had a big Mountain Lion crossed in front of me 
which was awesome to see at anytime. Just wondering if anyone is checking out 
there for unusual birds. If I get the job i wanted there I will be more 
prepared to look next time. With the proper bird watching tools. Sigh! Teresa, 
Hot Springs, AR 
Subject: BIG DUCK INFLUX AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 2017 18:10:20 +0000
With our second huge freeze (overnight lows at Fayetteville: 5 degrees), Neil 
Nodelman went to Mulhollan Waterfowl Blind on Lake Fayetteville Sunday morning. 
He was radically surprised by a huge influx of roughly 1000 ducks. That's all I 
needed to spin the Birder's Wheel of Fortune and make the needle land on 
Mulhollan Blind, Monday morning's number one priority. 

Dr Neil's tip is much appreciated. This morning's count: 851, and that was 
compromised by two adult Bald Eagles flushing everyone. Maybe some left. My 
counting can be pretty rough in the chaos of fleeing and returning waterfowl. 

First thing I saw this morning: immaculate drake Mallards standing on an ice 
shelf right in front of the blind. Surely there is nothing more striking in 
nature than a Mallard in January. Walking on ice, those bold orange legs and 
feet, that trademark green head. 

Canada Goose (12), Gadwall (193), American Wigeon (6), Mallard (562), Northern 
Shoveler (27), Green-winged Teal (1), Canvasback (8), Common Goldeneye (4), 
Hooded Merganser (4), Pied-billed Grebe (5), Double-crested Cormorant (1), 
American Coot (28). 

Maybe I should walk back something: A January Mallard is one of Earth's 
wonders, but then in the far off part of the raft are what proves 8 
Canvasbacks, including a couple of males in a hopeful spear of morning 
sunlight. That reddish head, that jet black breast, the immaculate white back. 

My thought this morning while sorting through the great raft, my eye glued to 
the spotting scope: Lake Fayetteville -- and all such modest sized bodies of 
water -- do not overall hold a candle to the great duckeries of flooded fields 
in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain of eastern Arkansas. But when it comes to 
conservation of North American wildlife, even these small lakes perform a 
critical conservation role.