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Updated on Saturday, February 28 at 11:17 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Maleos,©BirdQuest

28 Feb Re: Feeder mysteries [Gail Miller ]
28 Feb LIKE THE ARCTIC HAD COME TO US (Dardanelle) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 Feb Looking for a Speaker ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
27 Feb Re: Guess Whooo-whooo-whoo's babies are here [Elizabeth Shores ]
27 Feb Guess Whooo-whooo-whoo's babies are here [Michael Linz ]
28 Feb Full bluebird house tonight (Photo link) [Scott Branyan ]
27 Feb Glaucous Gull [Bob Harden ]
27 Feb Re: Glaucous Gull [Michael ]
27 Feb Glaucous Gull [David Oakley ]
27 Feb Yellow rumps and Yellow bellies [john sunderland ]
27 Feb Re: Feeder mysteries [Mary Ann King ]
27 Feb Re: Feeder mysteries [Stacy Clanton ]
27 Feb Re: Feeder mysteries ["Campbell, Martin" ]
27 Feb Feeder mysteries [Scott Branyan ]
27 Feb Hairy Woodpeckers [Scott Branyan ]
27 Feb Rusty Blackbird Blitz Video Tutorials [Daniel Scheiman ]
26 Feb Re: Glaucous Gull [Michael Linz ]
26 Feb Re: LAPLAND LONGSPURS IN JEFFERSON CO ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
26 Feb LAPLAND LONGSPURS IN JEFFERSON CO [JFR ]
26 Feb Re: gifts from the crows [Kenny Nichols ]
26 Feb gifts from the crows [Judy & Don ]
26 Feb Glaucous Gull [Kenny Nichols ]
26 Feb ARKANSAS VIEW OF TENKILLER LOON-A-SPHERE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Feb Doonesbury and Bachman's ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
26 Feb no saw-whetting tonight ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
25 Feb Re: Bird reflections in mirrors [Jeffrey Short ]
25 Feb Re: Bird reflections in mirrors [ ]
25 Feb Glaucous Gull - YES [Ryan Risher ]
25 Feb Glaucous Gull [Kenny Nichols ]
25 Feb Bird bonanza along Rock Creek, Little Rock [Yahoo! ]
25 Feb saw-whets another thing ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
25 Feb saw-whet chase resumes ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
25 Feb Common Redpoll, Van Buren Co. [Daniel Scheiman ]
25 Feb Saw a New Bird this Morning [Scott Branyan ]
25 Feb Astonishing Avian Assembly ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
24 Feb Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 24 [David Arbour ]
24 Feb Stuttgart Airport Today [Mitchell Pruitt ]
24 Feb Habitat Improvement Opportunities at Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission Natural Areas [Samantha Scheiman ]
23 Feb Finally [Bill Holimon ]
23 Feb Re: Halberg Ecology Camp [Ann Gordon ]
23 Feb Fwd: Centerton Fish hatchery and Vaughn Dairy's- correction [Jacque Brown ]
23 Feb Eastern Towhee in my garage [Yahoo! ]
23 Feb afternoon birds [Teresa & Leif ]
23 Feb Halberg Ecology Camp [Lyndal York ]
23 Feb Sleet birds [Dorothy Cooney ]
23 Feb Blitzing for Blackbirds: Year 2 of the Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz [Dan Scheiman ]
23 Feb feeder birds [Teresa & Leif ]
23 Feb Re: Feeder birds [CK Franklin ]
23 Feb Re: Feeder birds [Michael Linz ]
23 Feb Re: Feeder birds [Mary Ann King ]
23 Feb Feeder birds [Herschel Raney ]
22 Feb Vultures-Union County [Kelly Chitwood ]
22 Feb Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 20 Feb 2015 to 21 Feb 2015 (#2015-53) [Bob Caig ]
22 Feb Centerton Fish hatchery and Vaughn Dairy's [Jacque Brown ]
22 Feb Gray Catbird-Fayetteville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Feb Gulls again [Herschel Raney ]
22 Feb FW: Male Common Meganser [Terry Butler ]
22 Feb DESIRED WOODCOCK TSUNAMI ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Feb 7th annual Red Slough Birding Convention [David Arbour ]
22 Feb Male Common Meganser [Terry Butler ]
21 Feb Re: siskins [Michael ]
21 Feb Active Bald Eagle and Great Horned Owl Nests 100-200 m apart [Doug Raybuck ]
21 Feb Re: siskins [Melinda Gay ]
21 Feb DOBC Field trip [Alan ]
21 Feb siskins [Terry Butler ]
21 Feb Gulls [Herschel Raney ]
21 Feb Centerton Fish Hatchery, Friday morning [Jacque Brown ]
21 Feb Hooded Merganser Lake Atalanta, Rogers [Jacque Brown ]
21 Feb Stillwell bird recordings ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 Feb Evening Grosbeak Records [Dan Scheiman ]
20 Feb Re: Yard birds [Lyndal York ]
20 Feb GBBC and this week [Judy & Don ]
20 Feb Re: Yard birds [Gail Miller ]
20 Feb Re: Yard birds [Richard Crawford ]
20 Feb Yard birds [CK ]
20 Feb article about Mitchell ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]

Subject: Re: Feeder mysteries
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 09:46:36 -0600
I had a very similar situation last night .... suet feeder opened and small 
amount of suet cake was on the ground ... I think it is a raccoon here .... my 
suet feeder is attached to a tree and has a roof over it ... my ‘visitor’ 
pooped on top of the roof of the suet feeder too .... gees!!!! 


In order to keep this bird related , I offer a photo link, showing a 
Yellow-rumped Warbler visiting the suet feeder this morning. 

http://www.pbase.com/image/159298308

Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Scott Branyan 
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 10:30 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Feeder mysteries

Day before yesterday when refilling the feeders, I noticed the larger bird 
house shaped feeder had a slight more wobble to it. It's mounted on a 
galvanized fence pole and has a large overhang. I thought then perhaps a 
raccoon had been visiting and climbing on it. This morning I noticed almost a 
full 1/2 cake of suet on the ground and, sure enough, the suet cage door is 
ajar. The puzzle is, if the raccoon got it, why it left it. My son theorizes it 
didn’t like the brand of suet (Best Choice). Ha! 




What called my attention to the suet on the ground in the first place, however, 
was the red-headed woodpecker feeding on it. I’ve often wondered why red 
heads don’t come to the feeder much. Perhaps they don’t like clinging to a 
swinging feeder or the communal nature of it. They do seem to be very 
territorial. Pileated doesn't mind the swinging bird feeder at all, and its 
presence intimidates the starlings! 
Subject: LIKE THE ARCTIC HAD COME TO US (Dardanelle)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:14:17 +0000
Flying down I-40 yesterday from Fayetteville, arriving at Senator Tom Cottons 
home town of Dardanelle, and after only 1.5 hours, no truer words have ever 
been spoken than those by driver David Oakley: There arent any flies on our 
a** 


Arkansas River tail waters below the dam were a cloud of hundreds and hundreds 
of mainly Ring-billed Gulls and secondarily American White Pelicans, flying in 
low, landing gear out, skiing to picturesque stop midst the cornucopia of fish 
stunned after passage through the dam. 


We hadnt been there too long in the numbing cold before spotting the glamorous 
Glaucous Gull, latest of several found over the years by Kenny and LaDonna 
Nichols. Unfortunately, it perched 1,700 feet away, obviously quite a bit 
larger than nearby for sure Ring-billed Gulls, with a dove gray back and 
obviously white primaries. 


Now joined by David Herron, we made a run for the other side, hopefully nearer. 
Only thing, when we got there, it wasnt. Two hours of cold searching  lots of 
Ring-billed and Herring Gulls, pelicans, cormorants, and brave talk, but no 
bird. 


One search also involved walking the north shoreline, where we flushed Great 
Blue Herons (~18) together. My interpretation: grounded migrants, heading north 
for nesting. Then we went for a hamburger. 


At lunch we picked up the useful factoid that many in the Family Ardeidae share 
Roberts last name, though spelled with a single r. In the finest Arkansas 
tradition, he calls them cousins. Then it was back to business at the dam, 
where the temp had zoomed to 29. 


Unfortunately for our chase, most birds attracted by stunned fish in the 
morning were gone somewhere, presumably to loafing and digestion. That is, the 
busy morning diner was all but empty. 


So our trip seemed at an end. At this point, Bob Hardin arrived, expanding our 
threesome. If the bird is unavailable, at least there are butterfly expeditions 
to plot, sad proof our game clock was running out. From this butterfly huddle, 
David gave the audible two minute warning for return to Fayetteville. 


And then, like a crowd-stunning Hail Mary pass: midst a raft of mainly 
ring-billeds (~40), that Arctic visitor, out in the channel of the mighty 
Arkansas, a mere 900 feet away, all soft gray and white and HUGE, like the old 
river itself. 


Check it off, my old friend Charlie Wooten would have said, his voice 
dripping with the feigned cynicism of a veteran birder. I don't know if he ever 
got the chance to see the amazing sight of an adult Glaucous Gull. 


It snowed on David and I all the way back to Fayetteville, like the Arctic had 
come to us. 
Subject: Looking for a Speaker
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 23:20:25 -0600
Some of you apparently remember me making bold proclamations about a 
bird art related exhibit and event I was planning for the Rialto Gallery 
in Morrilton.  Well, that show is going forward - we're calling it "For 
the Birds" . . . or maybe "Art for the Birds".  I'll have more details 
this week but thought I'd make a request to the group.

As part of the exhibit we want to have an 'open house' event the 
afternoon/evening of 17 May.  This is the Sunday after Mother's day if 
that means anything.  Doors will open around 3pm for anyone who wants to 
stop by.  We're planning on some food, beverages, the musical stylings 
of our own Bill Thurman, and (hopefully) lots of cool bird related Art.  
At 5pm we want to have a presentation related to our avian friends 
followed by awards at 6-ish.

Here's where I need some input from the collective:  a speaker.  I'm 
open to a lot of things.  I know some of you have made some suggestions 
and I've followed up on some of those.  Unfortunately so far those I've 
contacted were unavailable.  So . . . suggestions?

You can send me your suggestions (or volunteer ;) ) off list.  If you 
have contact information for your suggestion, that would be much 
appreciated.

Thanks!

George (n. Conway Co. . . . Art keeps me off the streets ;) )

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Re: Guess Whooo-whooo-whoo's babies are here
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 23:00:33 -0600
A thrilling photo! Thanks for sharing.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 27, 2015, at 8:30 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:
> 
> I checked out the owl nest on Museum Road in Conway today.
> There were two babies and momma sitting in the nest.
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/February2015BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6120714967323619026 

> 
> Michael(Conway)
Subject: Guess Whooo-whooo-whoo's babies are here
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 20:30:21 -0600
I checked out the owl nest on Museum Road in Conway today.
There were two babies and momma sitting in the nest.


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/February2015BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6120714967323619026 


Michael(Conway)
Subject: Full bluebird house tonight (Photo link)
From: Scott Branyan <000000b1c4abb4fb-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 00:12:49 +0000
Saw a tail sticking out of the entrance and took this photo just before dark. 
Snowy evening and full house. 


http://www.scottbranyan.com/images/branyan_fullbirdhouse022715.jpg

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Scott BranyanRogers, AR
Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:03:11 -0600
Glaucous Gull is on the wall right down from 350 marker

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Glaucous Gull
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:43:13 -0600
Kenny mentioned "adult" in his original note but it did not register to me.
Yesterday they told me that this was the first adult in the state. It looks 
different than the others I had seen. The back was a pale gray...prettier than 
the young ones I had seen in previous years. 



> On Feb 27, 2015, at 2:16 PM, David Oakley  wrote:
> 
> Still at the dam!
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: David Oakley <gdosr AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:16:34 -0600
Still at the dam!

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Yellow rumps and Yellow bellies
From: john sunderland <000000cc7a4a88b4-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 20:09:32 +0000
 On two cold but bright afternoons this month at my farm house on Old Hickory 
Rd. in western Conway Co. I have observed yellow-rumped warblers feeding with 
a yellow-bellied sapsucker.  I watched the sapsucker fly from a winged elm to 
a black walnut sapling.  The warblers followed and seemed to be paying an 
unusual amount of attention to the bark of the black walnut. I finally realized 
that they were feeding at the sapsucker wells.  With the sun at my back I 
could actually see a droplet of sap on a warblers beak as he fed.  This is 
probably common behavior, but I have not seen it before.John 
Sunderland      
Subject: Re: Feeder mysteries
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 13:16:38 -0600
I feed shelled sunflower kernels and have downies, hairies & red-bellied
woodpeckers regularly at the feeders.  It's amusing to watch the red-bellies
clamp the edges of the hanging, swinging feeders with their feet & then
reach over & eat sunflower kernels.

'MaryAnn' King
In the pine woods northwest of London

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Stacy Clanton
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 12:07 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Feeder mysteries

Downies And red-bellieds are semi-regulars at our feeders, the latter at the
seed cake and the former at both the cake and the suet feeder. Red-headeds
are very rare at the feeders, but common in the neighborhood.

Envy you those pileateds. We've heard them in the trees, but if I saw one at
the suet cake, I'd be as excited as I would be if the ivory-billed flew off
my wife's license plate and landed at the feeder.

Stacy
Northeast corner of Magnolia

Sent from my iPad, so excuse unnoticed typos.

On Feb 27, 2015, at 11:11 AM, Campbell, Martin
> wrote:

Wow, I am impressed you get Pileateds to come to a suit feeder.  In 10 plus
years of feeding I don't think I have ever seen my Pileateds on it.

Marty
Arkadelphia

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:] On Behalf Of Scott
Branyan
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 10:30 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Feeder mysteries

Day before yesterday when refilling the feeders, I noticed the larger bird
house shaped feeder had a slight more wobble to it. It's mounted on a
galvanized fence pole and has a large overhang. I thought then perhaps a
raccoon had been visiting and climbing on it. This morning I noticed almost
a full 1/2 cake of suet on the ground and, sure enough, the suet cage door
is ajar. The puzzle is, if the raccoon got it, why it left it. My son
theorizes it didn't like the brand of suet (Best Choice). Ha!



What called my attention to the suet on the ground in the first place,
however, was the red-headed woodpecker feeding on it. I've often wondered
why red heads don't come to the feeder much. Perhaps they don't like
clinging to a swinging feeder or the communal nature of it. They do seem to
be very territorial. Pileated doesn't mind the swinging bird feeder at all,
and its presence intimidates the starlings!
Subject: Re: Feeder mysteries
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton AT SAUMAG.EDU>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 18:07:06 +0000
Downies And red-bellieds are semi-regulars at our feeders, the latter at the 
seed cake and the former at both the cake and the suet feeder. Red-headeds are 
very rare at the feeders, but common in the neighborhood. 


Envy you those pileateds. We've heard them in the trees, but if I saw one at 
the suet cake, I'd be as excited as I would be if the ivory-billed flew off my 
wife's license plate and landed at the feeder. 


Stacy
Northeast corner of Magnolia

Sent from my iPad, so excuse unnoticed typos.

On Feb 27, 2015, at 11:11 AM, Campbell, Martin 
> wrote: 


Wow, I am impressed you get Pileateds to come to a suit feeder. In 10 plus 
years of feeding I dont think I have ever seen my Pileateds on it. 


Marty
Arkadelphia

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:] On Behalf Of Scott 
Branyan 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 10:30 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Feeder mysteries

Day before yesterday when refilling the feeders, I noticed the larger bird 
house shaped feeder had a slight more wobble to it. It's mounted on a 
galvanized fence pole and has a large overhang. I thought then perhaps a 
raccoon had been visiting and climbing on it. This morning I noticed almost a 
full 1/2 cake of suet on the ground and, sure enough, the suet cage door is 
ajar. The puzzle is, if the raccoon got it, why it left it. My son theorizes it 
didnt like the brand of suet (Best Choice). Ha! 




What called my attention to the suet on the ground in the first place, however, 
was the red-headed woodpecker feeding on it. Ive often wondered why red heads 
dont come to the feeder much. Perhaps they dont like clinging to a swinging 
feeder or the communal nature of it. They do seem to be very territorial. 
Pileated doesn't mind the swinging bird feeder at all, and its presence 
intimidates the starlings! 

Subject: Re: Feeder mysteries
From: "Campbell, Martin" <campbem AT HSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:12:29 +0000
Wow, I am impressed you get Pileateds to come to a suit feeder. In 10 plus 
years of feeding I don’t think I have ever seen my Pileateds on it. 


Marty
Arkadelphia

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:] On Behalf Of Scott 
Branyan 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 10:30 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Feeder mysteries

Day before yesterday when refilling the feeders, I noticed the larger bird 
house shaped feeder had a slight more wobble to it. It's mounted on a 
galvanized fence pole and has a large overhang. I thought then perhaps a 
raccoon had been visiting and climbing on it. This morning I noticed almost a 
full 1/2 cake of suet on the ground and, sure enough, the suet cage door is 
ajar. The puzzle is, if the raccoon got it, why it left it. My son theorizes it 
didn’t like the brand of suet (Best Choice). Ha! 




What called my attention to the suet on the ground in the first place, however, 
was the red-headed woodpecker feeding on it. I’ve often wondered why red 
heads don’t come to the feeder much. Perhaps they don’t like clinging to a 
swinging feeder or the communal nature of it. They do seem to be very 
territorial. Pileated doesn't mind the swinging bird feeder at all, and its 
presence intimidates the starlings! 


Subject: Feeder mysteries
From: Scott Branyan <000000b1c4abb4fb-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:30:07 +0000
Day before yesterday when refilling the feeders, I noticed the larger bird 
house shaped feeder had a slight more wobble to it. It's mounted on a 
galvanized fence pole and has a large overhang. I thought then perhaps a 
raccoon had been visiting and climbing on it. This morning I noticed almost a 
full 1/2 cake of suet on the ground and, sure enough, the suet cage door is 
ajar. The puzzle is, if the raccoon got it, why it left it. My son theorizes it 
didn’t like the brand of suet (Best Choice). Ha! 


What called my attention to the suet on the ground in the first place, however, 
was the red-headed woodpecker feeding on it. I’ve often wondered why red 
heads don’t come to the feeder much. Perhaps they don’t like clinging to a 
swinging feeder or the communal nature of it. They do seem to be very 
territorial. Pileated doesn't mind the swinging bird feeder at all, and its 
presence intimidates the starlings! 
Subject: Hairy Woodpeckers
From: Scott Branyan <000000b1c4abb4fb-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:53:54 +0000
Assuming these are hairies from the length of the bill and overall size. Had 
the pair on the feeder this morning. I often see the female, but rarely the 
male. 


http://www.scottbranyan.com/images/branyan_hairywoodpeckers022715.jpg

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Subject: Rusty Blackbird Blitz Video Tutorials
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 07:19:47 -0600
In preparation for the Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz
(http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/) that starts Sunday,
here are two tutorial videos that explain how to enter data. The first is
also a good primer on how to get started with eBird.

1.  If you are new to eBird and want to be walked through the entire data
submission process.  7.5 minutes long.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjqOLXyJLro&feature=youtu.be

2.  If you are comfortable with eBird but want more information about how,
when, and what to submit to the Blitz. ~4 minutes long.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETRXujTSsZQ

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Re: Glaucous Gull
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 21:24:51 -0600
I saw it too....unlike other recent gulls it let me take a few pictures...


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/February2015BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6120359145797217554 


Michael(Conway)

On Thu, Feb 26, 2015 at 1:22 PM, Kenny Nichols  wrote:

> ...is still here. It's on the water below the dam at Dardanelle.
>
> Kenny Nichols
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Re: LAPLAND LONGSPURS IN JEFFERSON CO
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 20:38:50 -0600
Where is Jefferson Co. and what town is this near?

George (n. Conway Co. who should probably look up a county map before 
asking stupid questions.)


On 2/26/2015 7:47 PM, JFR wrote:
> Today, Delos McCauley and I observed a large flock of approx. 200 Lapland 
Longspurs in the fields along Morgan Rd, in Jefferson Co., just west of the 
intersection of King Bayou Rd. They were foraging from plants that emerged from 
the 6" snow and many times were easily photographed near the road. Many of the 
males already had a marked rufous nape. 

> John Redman

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: LAPLAND LONGSPURS IN JEFFERSON CO
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 19:47:08 -0600
Today, Delos McCauley and I observed a large flock of approx. 200 Lapland 
Longspurs in the fields along Morgan Rd, in Jefferson Co., just west of the 
intersection of King Bayou Rd. They were foraging from plants that emerged from 
the 6" snow and many times were easily photographed near the road. Many of the 
males already had a marked rufous nape. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: gifts from the crows
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 18:09:06 -0600
Neat story. 

KN

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 26, 2015, at 5:35 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
> 
> http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026
Subject: gifts from the crows
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:35:45 -0600
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026
Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 13:22:04 -0600
...is still here. It's on the water below the dam at Dardanelle. 

Kenny Nichols

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: ARKANSAS VIEW OF TENKILLER LOON-A-SPHERE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:32:25 +0000
The wind was calm yesterday and Tenkiller Lake wavy with loon renderings as 
they dived into a looking glass of water. Common Loons (180) filled deep water 
near the dam. I counted them twice, dodging dump trucks crossing the bridge; 
surely a Pacific Loon was somewhere in there. 




During the next 5 hours, Common Loons totaled 314. I picked up a flock of 
Red-throated Loons (4) near the shoreline. More than 500 Horned Grebes were in 
a huge string; I finally just gave up counting. It ended with a soaring 
American White Pelican, Ring-billed Gull, and adult Bald Eagle. Total pelicans 
for the day, 94. 




Fayetteville is a bit more than hour away, but events rising in Fayetteville 
eventuate directly in Tenkiller's loon-a-sphere. And I dont mean a sometimes 
loony me rising early and driving over there. I mean the line between northwest 
Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma is ecologically fictional. 




Tenkiller is an impoundment of the Illinois River. Fayetteville is surrounded 
by a belt of seasonal wetland former prairies that drain into the Illinois 
watersheds just a few miles west of Fayetteville. That is, directly connected. 




As Common Loons and other native birds decline, it is intellectually dishonest 
to ignore roots of these declines close to home. In just the watershed of one 
Illinois tributary, Clabber Creek, what are the impacts on Common Loons 
courtesy of Fayetteville from ever-expanding I-49, an auto park, a warehouse 
wholesaler, big box shopping center, subdivisions, road relocations? 




Its not just loss of nesting Common Loons or loss of huge American 
Golden-Plover flights. The damage is also to migrating American and Least 
Bitterns, Soras, Nelsons and Henslows Sparrows, Osage Burrowing Crayfish, 
Grahams Crayfish Snake, Smallmouth Salamanders, Crayfish Frog, Swamp Milkweed, 
a dozen rare wetland sedges, the associated insect communities, including many 
native pollinators. Sadly, these losses are well-documented. 




Most recently within the Clabber Creek ecosystem: a mega church was permitted 
to bury a wetland in a shroud of gravel on behalf of an 800-car parking lot. A 
2-lane road is now a 4-lane boulevard destroying habitat where Trumpeter Swans 
(3) wintered last year. 




I had a boss years ago who was fond of saying life is ALL about priorities. 
Fayetteville, which prides itself for being environmentally friendly, has some 
thinking to do. 




When in 1953 Doug James came to the UA to teach biology and ornithology, these 
seasonal wetlands near Clabber Creek at the head of the Illinois River 
ecosystem provided habitat hosting thousands of migrating American 
Golden-Plovers. That habitat is gone. What is left of those fields in northern 
Fayetteville is what you see today from highway 112 and I-49. 




Since the land is privately owned, it will be developed, but in exchange for 
zoning decisions, we should receive appropriate mitigation of the losses that 
entails demonstrable protections of populations of these plant and animal 
species within suitable habitat within the City of Fayetteville, including 
long-term professional management. 
Subject: Doonesbury and Bachman's
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 00:41:14 -0600
So, the online version of Doonesbury I read has been reprising a series 
from 1981 in which Lacey Davenport and her husband are searching for a 
Bachman's Warbler.  This got me curious about the Bachman's, which I 
thought I recalled someone having seen here in Arkansas.  However, most 
of what I read indicates that the bird is extinct - but not unlike the 
Ivory Billed Woodpecker, unsubstantiated sightings still persist.

So - what's the story on the Bachman's?  Is it officially extinct or 
does anyone still hold out hope?  Has anyone on the list ever seen one?

George (n. Conway Co. reading Doonesbury with no Bachman's but a whole 
lot of Dark-eyed Juncos)

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: no saw-whetting tonight
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 00:15:04 +0000
We have cancelled out for tonight... may try again over the weekend if weather 
improves... 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Re: Bird reflections in mirrors
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:33:31 -0600
I think Woolite would work for eweJ  

 


Woolite provides a UV reflectivity for windows, much like the decals or tape, 
and would disrupt the reflection in mirrors (though I have never used it on a 
mirror). The liquid is soapy so it helps clean the substrate when it is 
removed. 


 

I use Woolite (dark formula) on my big windows by using a roller to “paint” 
vertical stripes about every 4-6 inches. It reduced my strikes by 2/3. 


 

Jeff Short

 

 

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Carol Joan Patterson 

Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2015 4:45 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird reflections in mirrors

 

The American Bird Conservancy sells translucent tape at very low cost. Easy to 
put on windows. 


 

  _____  

From: Stacy Clanton 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2015 9:37 AM
Subject: Re: Bird reflections in mirrors

 

I haven’t had such an event in several years, but AFTER the last one, I read 
somewhere that one could smear Vaseline over the window or mirror until the 
feisty fellow moves on. A mess to clean up, but then so is what the male leaves 
around the reflecting surface. 


 

Stacy Clanton

 

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jerry Butler 

Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2015 9:35 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird reflections in mirrors

 

Every birder has seen male birds challenging their reflections in mirrors and 
windows. Does any one have any suggestions or experience in discouraging such 
antics that persist regularly for more than a month? 


 

 I am writing a story about it, and would appreciate some feedback off the list 
server. I would also welcome seeing any photographs of birds exhibiting such 
behavior. 


 

Have a good GBBC!

 

Peace and Birds    Jerry Butler

 
Subject: Re: Bird reflections in mirrors
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 22:44:58 +0000
The American Bird Conservancy sells translucent tape at very low cost.  Easy 
to put on windows. 

      From: Stacy Clanton 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2015 9:37 AM
 Subject: Re: Bird reflections in mirrors
   
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1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv9063837568 div.yiv9063837568WordSection1 {}#yiv9063837568 I 
haven’t had such an event in several years, but AFTER the last one, I read 
somewhere that one could smear Vaseline over the window or mirror until the 
feisty fellow moves on.  A mess to clean up, but then so is what the male 
leaves around the reflecting surface.   Stacy Clanton   


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU]On Behalf Of Jerry Butler 

Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2015 9:35 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird reflections in mirrors   Every birder has seen male birds 
challenging their reflections in mirrors and windows.  Does any one have any 
suggestions or experience in discouraging such antics that persist regularly 
for more than a month?     I am writing a story about it, and would 
appreciate some feedback off the list server.  I would also welcome seeing any 
photographs of birds exhibiting such behavior.    Have a good GBBC!   Peace 
and Birds    Jerry Butler 


  
Subject: Glaucous Gull - YES
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:54:47 -0600
Snuck out of class a little early. Currently looking at gull. At the 200' mark 
on the lock with back to me. Nice find Kenny! Beautiful bird, lifer! 


Ryan Risher 
Pope Co

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:27:13 -0600
FYI- just found an adult Glaucous Gull below the dam at Dardanelle. It is 
currently perched on the rail near the lock. Beautiful bird. 


Kenny & LaDonna Nichols
Cabot

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bird bonanza along Rock Creek, Little Rock
From: Yahoo! <000000cb59c2c1b9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:50:04 +0000
Yesterday, in the melting snow and sunshine, I saw a lot of winter birds along 
the Rock Creek trail between Bowman and Chenal Parkway. They were busy! And 
oblivious to my presence. Highlights: a flock of cedar wax wings in the sweet 
gums; a fox sparrow, a hermit thrush, many white throated sparrows, several 
song sparrows; at least a dozen Eastern towhees; ruby-crowned kinglets with 
their crown on display; several woodpeckers, downy, red-bellied, a female 
sapsucker, and a fly-over piliated; a chattering kingfisher; a field sparrow 
and a chipping sparrow; a red-shoulder, red tail, and turkey vulture; and 2 
brown thrashers.  A giant flock of grackles filled my trees, as I made my way 
home here in West Little Rock. For good measure, the brown headed nuthatches 
greeted me at my feeder, at the end of my few hours of winter birding along 
Rock Creek. 

Judy HuntLittle Rock
Subject: saw-whets another thing
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:43:32 +0000
I forgot to mention that it may be too windy to net tonight... the forecast is 
for 10-20 mph winds tonight... so we will have to pay attention to that... 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: saw-whet chase resumes
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:39:07 +0000
After a week of exams (Mitchell is a student after all...) and some bad 
weather, we plan to start netting tonight at the Ozark Natural Science Center 
if it is not snowing... Mitchell and I will be leaving Fayetteville around 7 
pm... my cell is 479-530-0568 if you want to double-check on us going... 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Common Redpoll, Van Buren Co.
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 08:12:16 -0600
A friend who lives near Scott Henderson Gulf Mountain WMA in Van Buren Co.
just saw a COMMON REDPOLL at her feeder. "My 1st impression was Pine Siskin
with a red blotch on top of head. Then it turned to face me and I could see
a small blackish bib and cardinal-like black shadowing around the bill.
Shes waiting with her camera to get a photo. In past winters she has
photographed a Spotted Towhee that regularly visited her yard.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Saw a New Bird this Morning
From: Scott Branyan <000000b1c4abb4fb-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:40:08 +0000
Saw a new bird near the feeder this morning early, a creeper (perhaps the brown 
creeper--lighting was not good). It was creeping upward on the mockernut and 
then flew to two adjacent trees and crept up them also. I cannot recall having 
ever seen one before. 

Scott BranyanRogers, AR
Subject: Astonishing Avian Assembly
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 11:30:43 +0000
A KETTLE OF BALD EAGLES (28), both adults and subadults, drifted east as I 
drove on highway 102 towards Maysville yesterday. Not in the kettle: at least 
another 10 eagles, either low flying nearby or perched in trees, plus 
Red-tailed Hawks and a few Turkey Vultures. This is at the big corner near the 
Decatur Assembly of God. 


Lots of big chicken trucks pass through here, so I got myself off the road as 
best I could, to view this astonishing avian assembly rising and heading  well 
where? Maybe to isolated trees in the Spavinaw River bottoms at Gravette, to 
rest, digest, and who knows, maybe reflect and worship? 


There was a thin blanket of snow on the ground when I left Fayetteville. A Gray 
Catbird was foraging around my feeder and the cardinals were starting to sing. 
Just north of town, no snow. The gray sky of the past few days was giving it up 
for sun shine. 


The Larder Theory concerning why shrikes capture and impale their prizes on 
barbs got some support yesterday at Maysville. Just east along highway 72, a 
large headless shrew (I assume Short-tailed rather than Least Shrew) had been 
hung on barbs right along the road. This one looked fresh. Sure enough, along 
came the shrike, perched near and commenced to remove stringy chunks of red 
meat. All shrikes (7) I saw around Maysville were Loggerheads. 


American Kestrels dont impale prey, but just a mile or two from this shrike, a 
kestrel perched on a metal fencepost was consuming another of what through the 
spotting scope also looked like a large shrew. (I can see tail length v body 
length in my photographs). 


A big sycamore tree just northeast of Maysville sported a big freshen nest of 
sticks, and on it, a Red-tailed Hawk  my first such of the season. 


Horned Larks were singing in the big open fields.
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 24
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 21:40:09 -0600
It was calm, overcast, and cold (low 40's), with a light coating of snow on
the ground, on the bird survey today.  In spite of the poor weather, 81
species were found.  I ran into Berlin Heck and his wife Pat near the end of
my survey and they joined me for a while.  Here is my list for today:

 

Greater White-fronted Geese - 150

Snow Geese - 163

Ross' Geese - 21

Canada Goose - 1

Wood Duck - 4

Gadwall - 452

American Wigeon - 1

Mallard - 58

Blue-winged Teal - 2

Northern Shoveler - 28

Northern Pintail - 65

Green-winged Teal - 27

Ring-necked Duck - 28

Hooded Merganser - 15

Ruddy Duck - 13

Pied-billed Grebe - 12

American White Pelican - 43

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Great Blue Heron - 8

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 14

Bald Eagle - 1 adult

Northern Harrier - 3

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 5

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 2

Merlin - 1 adult

Virginia Rail - 4

American Coot - 335

Killdeer - 8

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Pectoral Sandpiper - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 2

Mourning Dove - 68

Barred Owl - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-headed Woodpecker - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 7

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Blue-headed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 8

American Crow - 65

Carolina Chickadee - 8

Tufted Titmouse - 7

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 8

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 2

Marsh Wren - 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 4

Hermit Thrush - 1

American Robin - 15

Gray Catbird - 1 

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 6

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4

Pine Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 4

Fox Sparrow - 5

Song Sparrow - 5

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 2

White-throated Sparrow - 4

White-crowned Sparrow - 31

Dark-eyed Junco - 2

Northern Cardinal - 14

Red-winged Blackbird - 255

Eastern Meadowlark - 51

Rusty Blackbird - 19

Common Grackle - 4

American Goldfinch - 9

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Stuttgart Airport Today
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 18:54:23 -0600
Birded Stuttgart Airport this afternoon with Dr. JD Willson, Jacque Guzy, Phil 
Vogrinc, and Mark Vukovich (of South Carolina). We had a knockout of over 60 
Smith's Longspur. Closer to dark we had at least 20 Northern Harriers milling 
around getting ready to roost in the tall grass. Among them, two Short-eared 
Owls. The owl was a lifer for Jacque and the longspur was a lifer for Mark. 


A quick trip all the way from Fayetteville, but awesome birding!

~Mitchell Pruitt

Sent from my iPhone.
Subject: Habitat Improvement Opportunities at Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission Natural Areas
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 13:41:52 -0600
Arkansas birders,

The Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission (ANHC) is hosting three volunteer
events in March, so please consider participating to improve habitat on
natural areas and discover new places to bird! Event details include the
following:

   -  *Saturday, March 7* - 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., general cleanup at Slippery
   Hollow Natural Area (Marion County)
   -  *Saturday, March 14 - *10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Great American Cleanup
   event focused on trash removal at Terre Noire Natural Area (Clark County)
   -  *Saturday, March 21 - *9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., tree planting event at
   Devil's Eyebrow Natural Area (Benton County)

Volunteers should meet at the parking area for each natural area (or in the
case of the Terre Noire cleanup, the TNC Prairie Ridge Preserve/Terre Noire
Preserve parking lot) and bring sturdy work boots, a sack lunch, and
clothing that can get dirty and provide protection from scratches. Drinking
water, first aid kits, and work equipment will be provided. If you'd like a
map with directions to any or all of these events, reply to me off-list.

Should you need other information (e.g., the event's status if inclement
weather is in the forecast), please contact the Arkansas Natural Heritage
Commission's volunteer program coordinator, Toby Von Rembow, at
toby AT arkansasheritage.org or (501) 683-4084.

Thanks, and good birding.

Samantha Scheiman
Little Rock, Ark.
-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: Finally
From: Bill Holimon <billh AT ARKANSASHERITAGE.ORG>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:26:30 -0600
A fox sparrow this winter season during sleet or snow.  

That was in the backyard. Looking out the front window later we unexpectedly 
watched a male kestrel pluck and then consume a mockingbird. It was quite the 
treat (for us, not the mockingbird) to see during what was a pretty good snow 
shower at the time. What a brilliantly marked bird. 


Sent from my iPhone
-- 


DISCLAIMER:
Emails sent to or received from this agency are subject to the Freedom of 
Information Act, Ark. Code Ann. Sec. 25-15-201 et. seq.
Subject: Re: Halberg Ecology Camp
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:21:56 -0600
If you know an eleven or twelve year old who loves nature and the
out-of-doors (son, daughter, niece, nephew, grandchild, neighbor, church
member, student) please pass on the information about this FABULOUS camp!




On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 3:12 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:

> The application form for the 2015 session of the Halberg Ecology Camp is
> available as a Word "doc" file at http://www.arbirds.org/jun_app_pak15.doc
> or as a pdf file at http://www.arbirds.org/jun_app_pak15.pdf .
>
> A brochure describing the camp is available at
> http://www.arbirds.org/camp_brochure15.pdf .
>
> Lyndal York
> Webmaster - Arkansas Audubon Society
>
Subject: Fwd: Centerton Fish hatchery and Vaughn Dairy's- correction
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:03:40 -0600
Did it again,  Loggerhead Shrikenot northern.  sorry!!

> Begin forwarded message:
> 
> From: "Joseph C. Neal" 
> To: Jacque Brown 
> Subject: RE: Centerton Fish hatchery and Vaughn Dairy's
> Date: February 22, 2015 at 7:00:06 PM CST
> 
> Northern Shrike?
> ________________________________________
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of Jacque Brown [bluebird2 AT COX.NET] 

> Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2015 3:54 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Centerton Fish hatchery and Vaughn Dairy's
> 
> I left out about noon today when it started snowing. I went to the fish 
hatchery first, the many hundreds of geese were gone along with most ducks. 

> 
> I found 20 Shovelers, 15 Mallards, 16 Bufflehead, probably 80 Ring-necked 
Ducks, (they flushed) 1 Northern Pintail, and 155 GW Teal. Plus a Northern 
Shrike, 15 Meadowlarks, and a murder of Crows flyover of 6. 

> 
> On the dairy rounds, Dynamic Dairy had blackbirds at the back of the property 
and over the hill so I couldnt get species for numbers. There were 4 
Meadowlarks hanging with 30 Starlings roadside. 

> 
> Over to Triple A Dairy, also lots of blackbirds but closer, mostly Brown- 
headed and Starlings in the holding pens I could see Great-tailed close to the 
road but behind the brush so couldnt see well enough to get a count, I saw 15 
but there was many more. The silage pits were both active. Left side 100 
White-crowned Sparrows, 3 harris Sparrows, 3 Song Sparrows, 15 Common 
Grackles, 30 Brown-headed Cowbirds, about the same Red-winged Blackbirds, 
mostly female, and Rusties galore. At one point I was able to get 10 in one 
photo, 9 in another photo and 19 at the rear of the pit one right after 
another. so I feel comfortable saying 38. 

> 
> What was nice is that they spent a lot of time close to the opening. So many 
different patterns. 

> 
> There were 2 Red-tailed Hawks working the area. Both were pale in color. One 
kept flushing the birds on the left side, It usually circled and came at me 
head on but a few times it used the car as a blind and flew over me into the 
pit. I finally managed a photo of it as it banked before the car. I dont think 
it had any successful strikes. 

> 
> As I was leaving I passed the other pit, which usual isnt as active for some 
reason, and the rear held 60-70 Starlings, 10 Cardinals,and a few Sparrows. one 
was a Harris Sparrow but it could have been one seen on the other side. 

Subject: Eastern Towhee in my garage
From: Yahoo! <000000cb59c2c1b9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 22:39:42 +0000
Leaving my garage open for a few minutes this afternoon while I filled bird 
feeders, I was startled to find a flutter of birds inside who were also 
startled by my return! One Eastern Towhee was bewildered: how to get out 
through this window in a door! He figured it out, but I had long enough to 
enjoy his presence. There have been no Towhees at my feeder. Where have they 
been? 

Judy HuntLittle Rock
Subject: afternoon birds
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:31:11 -0500
 The flock of everything reported are still there. Eating just as frantic as 
before! Feeders are nearly empty already and they were filled only this 
morning! 

 The Jays went home to whereever their home is. Now, I have Hermit Thrushes of 
two out there, Sapsucker, Two Red Bellied Woodpeckers taking turns on the suet 
feeder. Hairy, Downy woodpeckers perched in line. They look so pretty in the 
white snow background. A Fox Sparrow hopping around so plump and nice. White 
Breasted Nuthatch on the suet too along with the Chickadees and Titmouses. Just 
pecking away. Two crows drop in for a snack, while one lone Turkey Vulture 
flown overhead. A Pilated Woodpecker hit the feeder with a bang. He looked so 
funny hanging on that since he was a larger size than the feeder. Of course no 
camera within reach in the few seconds he was there.. Still snowing here to my 
dismay. With hopes it will be gone within the day. I, no doubt share the same 
idea with the birds. Nice weather hurry up and come! Have a nice warm day. 
Teresa, Hector, ArR 
Subject: Halberg Ecology Camp
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:12:08 -0600
The application form for the 2015 session of the Halberg Ecology Camp is
available as a Word "doc" file at http://www.arbirds.org/jun_app_pak15.doc
or as a pdf file at http://www.arbirds.org/jun_app_pak15.pdf .

A brochure describing the camp is available at
http://www.arbirds.org/camp_brochure15.pdf .

Lyndal York
Webmaster - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Sleet birds
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:00:05 -0600
It's been sleeting here all day and the birds are mobbing everything!  I
put out a new suet cake today and in short order saw a Ruby-crowned
kinglet, thrush (wood, I think, but couldn't get a good look), 3 kinds of
woodies, and all the regulars.

On my sunflower seed feeder were dozens of goldfinches, purple finches,
titmice, chickadees, cardinals, and bluejays.  Below the feeder were maybe
20 cardinals, goldies, and one, single, solitary junco.  Normally, I'm
swamped with juncos, but this is the first and only one I've seen this
year.  How did he find his way here and not the usual crowd?  Need spring!

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Blitzing for Blackbirds: Year 2 of the Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 20:18:38 +0000
Rusty Blackbirds made a big splash last week with their unprecedented visits to 
backyard feeders during the Great Backyard Bird Count. Starting March 1 is 
another call for you citizen scientists to count this species for the annual 
Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz. 






http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/ 





In 2014, the International Rusty Blackbird Working Group, in partnership with 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Vermont Center for Ecostudies, eBird, 
and many other state, federal, and local partners, launched a three-year Rusty 
Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz that challenged birders to scour the landscape 
for Rusty Blackbirds during this species’ northward migration. Between 1 
March and 15 June, 4750 birders submitted 13,400 checklists containing Rusty 
Blackbird observations to eBird, a hugely successful first season that has 
allowed the working group to start looking at potential Rusty Blackbird 
migratory hotspots, habitat use, and potential migratory pathways. 




I hope you’ll consider participating in Year 2 of the Blitz this spring! 
It’s easy- bird as you normally do during the Blitz window (March 1-31 for 
Arkansas) and submit your data to eBird using the “Rusty Blackbird Spring 
Migration Blitz” observation type. Bird anywhere, this year this is special 
emphasis for birders to revisit places where you Rusty Blackbirds were found 
last year to assess the consistency of habitat use and migratory timing. Check 
out our map of Areas of Interest for 2015 at 
http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/2015-areas-of-interest/ 





To learn more about Rusty Blackbirds and the Blitz effort, please visit the 
Migration Blitz website ( http://rustyblackbird.org/outreach/migration-blitz/ 
), or check out our Blitz Facebook page ( 
https://www.facebook.com/rustyblackbirdspringblitz ). 




Make your birding count for the Rusty Blackbirds! 




Dan Scheiman 


Little Rock, AR 
Subject: feeder birds
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 14:04:28 -0500
 Pretty amusing that the Jays are playing" catch you if I can" on the huge 
flock of Goldfinches & Purple Finches that are out there. So I been keeping a 
list of Bird Smashing in the window each day. We have the Cardinals, Brown 
Thrasher, who both duck under the feeder platform then peering out to see if 
the coast is clear. The Mourning Doves & E.Collar Doves that duck back behind 
the huge Oak tree that stands guard over the feeders. Pine Siskens merge with 
the others as so do the White-Throated Sparrows and Juncos. A wave of color as 
the Jays Swoop down in Delight in the falling snow flurries. Then just as they 
all deem it safe? 


 The Jay in his swooping pass has a bigger shadow as the resident Cooper Hawk 
tired of watching them play decides that lunch is the time to make his Pass! 
Ouch! As walking the dogs outside we get clobbered by hundreds of scared birds 
flying for their life. The hawk sits upon our trailer roof to fuss at us for 
being in his way. For if we had not been there blocking his flight? He would 
had gotten his lunch just right! 


So now sitting back at my computer as my dogs watch the birds at the window 
which is their favorite pastime. We see the Jays starting their game again. Its 
quite amusing both inside and out to see them play in the snow as they feed for 
the coming storm. 

Teresa in Hector, AR
Subject: Re: Feeder birds
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 12:50:54 -0600
I suspect my neighbors think I'm not quite right as it is. Were I to unlimber 
my telescope to look at yard birds, well.... 

Cindy F.
Watching the wildlife in the Heights but not that closely,
Little Rock




Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:52:50 -0600
From: mplinz AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Feeder birds
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

Herschel brings to light something a lot of people never think to do. When 
birds are close all too often we think a naked eye view or a look with the bins 
is a good look. I would encourage you to follow Herschel's example and examine 
the details of some of these amazing patterns (in colors and shapes) with a 
scope at close view. It is truly amazing!!! 

Michael(Conway)
On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 10:11 AM, Herschel Raney 
 wrote: 

First Siskin of the winter appeared. And a few Purples returned. I was watching 
the three Rusty Blackbirds through the binoculars and admiring the complex 
combination of blacks and creams and rufus when I decided to go out and get the 
scope out of the car. 


Each Rusty is distinct at high power. And the one aggressive bird with the very 
rufus cap of feathers on her head did not appreciate the other two Rusties 
anywhere near her. One of the others was certainly a male. I think the third 
was a male as well. Amazing rust edges on the primaries and secondaries. In the 
scope you can see individual fringe lines on the coverts and back. Cream eye 
line. I could hear the sharp Rusty call notes through the window. 


While I had the scope out I pulled up a Fox Sparrow and they are even more 
complex. Stunned by the intense rufus of the upper tail coverts. Red all the 
way out to the fringes. And the delicate white tips on the secondaries. The 
blend of rufus and steely on the head. The Foxies face filled the scope. And 
the skill of the beaks on those sunflower hulls. Faster than a 3rd baseman at 
the World Series. 


More snow down. The mealworm cake is a lumpen memory in the bottom of the 
basket. Wait, it just fell through and the Goldfinches are down for it. A 
bluebird never found it but I have been shocked at the attention that cake has 
gotten. 


Herschel Raney
Conway AR


 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Feeder birds
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:52:50 -0600
Herschel brings to light something a lot of people never think to do.  When
birds are close all too often we think a naked eye view or a look with the
bins is a good look.  I would encourage you to follow Herschel's example
and examine the details of some of these amazing patterns (in colors and
shapes) with a scope at close view.  It is truly amazing!!!

Michael(Conway)

On Mon, Feb 23, 2015 at 10:11 AM, Herschel Raney <
herschel.raney AT conwaycorp.net> wrote:

> First Siskin of the winter appeared. And a few Purples returned. I was
> watching the three Rusty Blackbirds through the binoculars and admiring the
> complex combination of blacks and creams and rufus when I decided to go out
> and get the scope out of the car.
>
> Each Rusty is distinct at high power. And the one aggressive bird with the
> very rufus cap of feathers on her head did not appreciate the other two
> Rusties anywhere near her. One of the others was certainly a male. I think
> the third was a male as well. Amazing rust edges on the primaries and
> secondaries. In the scope you can see individual fringe lines on the
> coverts and back. Cream eye line. I could hear the sharp Rusty call notes
> through the window.
>
> While I had the scope out I pulled up a Fox Sparrow and they are even more
> complex. Stunned by the intense rufus of the upper tail coverts. Red all
> the way out to the fringes. And the delicate white tips on the secondaries.
> The blend of rufus and steely on the head. The Foxies face filled the
> scope. And the skill of the beaks on those sunflower hulls. Faster than a
> 3rd baseman at the World Series.
>
> More snow down. The mealworm cake is a lumpen memory in the bottom of the
> basket. Wait, it just fell through and the Goldfinches are down for it. A
> bluebird never found it but I have been shocked at the attention that cake
> has gotten.
>
> Herschel Raney
> Conway AR
>
Subject: Re: Feeder birds
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:33:12 -0600
Maybe 40 goldfinch at the feeders & on the deck just now. One lone pine siskin 
& one lone pine warbler. 2 bluejays just showed up & everybody vanished. 


Maybe ½ inch snow here in the pine woods northwest of London.

 

‘MaryAnn’ King

 

First Siskin of the winter appeared. And a few Purples returned. I was watching 
the three Rusty Blackbirds through the binoculars and admiring the complex 
combination of blacks and creams and rufus when I decided to go out and get the 
scope out of the car. 


Each Rusty is distinct at high power. And the one aggressive bird with the very 
rufus cap of feathers on her head did not appreciate the other two Rusties 
anywhere near her. One of the others was certainly a male. I think the third 
was a male as well. Amazing rust edges on the primaries and secondaries. In the 
scope you can see individual fringe lines on the coverts and back. Cream eye 
line. I could hear the sharp Rusty call notes through the window. 


While I had the scope out I pulled up a Fox Sparrow and they are even more 
complex. Stunned by the intense rufus of the upper tail coverts. Red all the 
way out to the fringes. And the delicate white tips on the secondaries. The 
blend of rufus and steely on the head. The Foxies face filled the scope. And 
the skill of the beaks on those sunflower hulls. Faster than a 3rd baseman at 
the World Series. 


More snow down. The mealworm cake is a lumpen memory in the bottom of the 
basket. Wait, it just fell through and the Goldfinches are down for it. A 
bluebird never found it but I have been shocked at the attention that cake has 
gotten. 


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Feeder birds
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:11:13 -0600
First Siskin of the winter appeared. And a few Purples returned. I was
watching the three Rusty Blackbirds through the binoculars and admiring the
complex combination of blacks and creams and rufus when I decided to go out
and get the scope out of the car.

Each Rusty is distinct at high power. And the one aggressive bird with the
very rufus cap of feathers on her head did not appreciate the other two
Rusties anywhere near her. One of the others was certainly a male. I think
the third was a male as well. Amazing rust edges on the primaries and
secondaries. In the scope you can see individual fringe lines on the
coverts and back. Cream eye line. I could hear the sharp Rusty call notes
through the window.

While I had the scope out I pulled up a Fox Sparrow and they are even more
complex. Stunned by the intense rufus of the upper tail coverts. Red all
the way out to the fringes. And the delicate white tips on the secondaries.
The blend of rufus and steely on the head. The Foxies face filled the
scope. And the skill of the beaks on those sunflower hulls. Faster than a
3rd baseman at the World Series.

More snow down. The mealworm cake is a lumpen memory in the bottom of the
basket. Wait, it just fell through and the Goldfinches are down for it. A
bluebird never found it but I have been shocked at the attention that cake
has gotten.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Vultures-Union County
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 21:17:36 -0600
Friends living along the Ouachita River at Moro Bay reported seeing a kettle of 
300-500 vultures as the storms came through the region around 3pm Saturday. 
From their photographs and descriptions, it was pretty amazing. Maybe a 
caracara joined them? Ha! We can hope a little. Although, they could have been 
enjoying the ride and represent the local population instead. 


Kelly Chitwood 
El Dorado
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 20 Feb 2015 to 21 Feb 2015 (#2015-53)
From: Bob Caig <caig AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 20:49:00 -0600
Can you change our email address from caig AT sbcglobal.net to bccaig AT gmail.com?

Thanks!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 22, 2015, at 12:00 AM, ARBIRD-L automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

> 
> There are 10 messages totaling 870 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. article about Mitchell
>  2. Stillwell bird recordings
>  3. Hooded Merganser Lake Atalanta, Rogers
>  4. Centerton Fish Hatchery, Friday morning
>  5. Gulls
>  6. siskins (3)
>  7. DOBC Field trip
>  8. Active Bald Eagle and Great Horned Owl Nests 100-200 m apart
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 11:32:42 -0600
> From:    DeLynn Hearn <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
> Subject: Re: article about Mitchell
> 
> Excellent!
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> D. DeLynn Hearn
> Independent Consultant
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> 501-472-8769
> 
>> On Feb 19, 2015, at 7:25 PM, "Kimberly G. Smith"  wrote:
>> 
>> For those of you that may have missed the article today about Mitchell and 
saw-whets, here is the link: 

>> Please see: A bird in the hand
>> 
>> ********************************
>> Kimberly G. Smith
>> University Professor of Biological Sciences
>> Department of Biological Sciences
>> University of Arkansas
>> Fayetteville, AR 72701
>> Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
>> Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
>> ********************************
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 18:15:32 +0000
> From:    "Joseph C. Neal" 
> Subject: Stillwell bird recordings
> 
> In the 1950s, Jerry and Norma Stillwell produced 3 LPs based upon their 
recordings. They spent part of this time living and recording in Fayetteville. 

> 
> I would like to obtain the vinyl long play records, mainly for nostalgia, and 
down the road, possibly to get them in a local archive. 

> 
> I was able to purchase copies of cassette tape versions of these records, and 
using them, I put the 3 records on CDs. While my techniques are basic, I'll bet 
they sound better on the CDs than on any existing vinyls and will last a lot 
longer than tapes. As far as I know, there are no commercial CD versions of 
these recordings -- a pity. 

> 
> I mention this, because if anyone has these vinyls and they are just 
collecting dust, I will trade the CD versions for the vinyls. Again, this is 
mostly a nostalgia thing. I also plan to at minimum make a few of my longish 
ARBIRD posts about the Stillwell sojourn in the Natural State, and up here in 
hog heaven, for any of you still reading. 

> 
> As part of a trade, I can also convert them to MP3s, if that would be 
preferable. 

> 
> The Stillwell recordings are now relatively old, but the recordings are 
superlative, and the voices of Jerry and Norma narrating sounds just like home. 
Remember, if you can, that excitement when you realized how variable is the 
song of even the basic cardinal in your "dooryard," as the Stillwells put it. 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 13:45:12 -0600
> From:    Jacque Brown 
> Subject: Hooded Merganser Lake Atalanta, Rogers
> 
> A few weeks ago Joanie Patterson had mentioned she had seen a Hooded 
Merganser at Lake Atalanta. I went last weekend before the snow and found it 
right along the edge of the lake where the ducks hang out near the creek and 
little wood bridge. It’s a female, It stayed in the same spot pretty much for 
a good half hour diving, there were also lots of camera friendly Gadwalls and 
Lesser Scaup. 

> 
> Yesterday I grabbed the dog and camera and went back to see if I could get 
better photos of the Hooded Merganser , I got there around 11:30 am. The 
merganser was in the same location but doing more paddling around than diving, 
I was able to get some nice photos. Unfortunately I was also there when the 
emergency rescue crews were there after some teenagers Jeep went into the water 
down at the Dam end of the lake. I didn’t know exactly what had happened 
until I watched the news later in the day. 

> 
> When I went last weekend the road around the lake was fairly treacherous. Pot 
holes are deep and close together everywhere but on the actual dam. The city of 
Rogers is letting it deteriorate so it will be a bike path. I can’t imagine 
trying to drive that road with ice pack on it. So If anyone goes to bird and 
tries to drive around the lake it is very hard on the tires and shocks. 

> 
> 
> Jacque Brown
> 240 Township Dr
> Centerton, AR 72719
> 
> 479-224-6099
> bluebird2 AT cox.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 14:01:16 -0600
> From:    Jacque Brown 
> Subject: Centerton Fish Hatchery, Friday morning
> 
> Yesterday I stopped at the fish hatchery before I went to Lake Atalanta. 
Actually I would have stayed at the hatchery longer but the roads around the 
ponds were packed snow and I wasn’t entirely comfortable driving on them. Nor 
did I want to flush the birds. 

> 
> Some did anyway but came back later. Almost all of the birds were in the 
largest 4 ponds to the East. Most standing on Ice. 

> 
> There were a lot of Canada Geese, there had to have been 250 or more. I saw 
one Greater-white Fronted and 2 Snow Geese but I couldn’t tell if either of 
those were Ross’s. One was pretty small but the Canada’s are pretty large. 

> 
> The first batch of Canada Geese I came to were standing on one of the berms 
and 4 of those were Cackling Geese an a little group. Very small bills and very 
small bodies. I first thought they were ducks as I had back views until I got 
close enough to see they weren’t and could see the bills. That batch did 
flush and you could see a dramatic size difference air-born. There were also 
many many ducks, about the only thing I didn’t see were Redhead Ducks and 
Canvasbacks. There were Scaup but I couldn’t tell what kind, I hadn’t 
loaded the scope and didn’t want to get any closer. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> Jacque Brown
> 240 Township Dr
> Centerton, AR 72719
> 
> 479-224-6099
> bluebird2 AT cox.net
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 14:06:37 -0600
> From:    Herschel Raney 
> Subject: Gulls
> 
> Stopped by Toadsuck after the rains dropped off and work was over this
> morning. The Fish Crows are carrying nesting material in town. And they are
> calling actively along the river.
> 
> Flow through the dam is high after all this rain and sleet in the state and
> the gulls are actively feeding. Found my beautiful 2nd year bird who is
> slightly molted into the third. Clearly the same bird by markings that has
> stayed all month. And also a full third year bird and a 4+ year old winter
> adult with full pale eye. Very uncommon sight in my area. Eight White
> Pelicans below the dam. Usually seen on the lake, not common at Toadsuck.
> 
> Makes four weeks in a row for Herring Gull at Toadsuck and the first
> February records in all the weeks so far in all the 100 years of
> observation here.
> 
> Herschel Raney
> Conway AR
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:01:55 -0600
> From:    Terry Butler 
> Subject: siskins
> 
> In the early winter I had 25+ Pine Siskins coming to my feeders then after a
> week they left.  The last few days 1 to 4 have been back.  Today 25+ again.
> More yellow in the wings now.
> 
> 
> 
> Terry Butler
> 
> Pangburn, AR
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:08:04 -0600
> From:    Alan 
> Subject: DOBC Field trip
> 
> We went out to Lake Harrison today despite the snow cover and light freezing
> rain. The  reward was the most ducks and geese I have ever seen at our
> little lake. I don't know if there is such a thing as a waterfowl fallout
> but we had an awesome time.
> 
> There were 100+ Canada Geese,
> 
> As well as 100+ Gadwall.
> 
> There was a lone Ross's goose, a pair of ring billed ducks .
> 
> The usual raft of Mallards was larger than normal.
> 
> The rest of our list were the expected birds and one lone Lincoln sparrow.
> 
> 
> 
> After that we scouted out a new trail at Savannah Meadows and found a few
> sparrows and goldfinch on a marshy pond.
> 
> Alan Gregory
> 
> Harrison
> 
> 
> 
> ---
> This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus 
protection is active. 

> http://www.avast.com
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:06:58 -0600
> From:    Melinda Gay 
> Subject: Re: siskins
> 
> One lone Green-winged Teal male on our West Fork pond.
> 
> Misty Gay
> Biologist/Audubon zealot
>> On Feb 21, 2015 4:02 PM, "Terry Butler"  wrote:
>> 
>> In the early winter I had 25+ Pine Siskins coming to my feeders then after
>> a week they left.  The last few days 1 to 4 have been back.  Today 25+
>> again.  More yellow in the wings now.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Terry Butler
>> 
>> Pangburn, AR
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:54:44 -0600
> From:    Doug Raybuck 
> Subject: Active Bald Eagle and Great Horned Owl Nests 100-200 m apart
> 
> I was with Than and Emily Boves today along Rte 1 near the
> Craighead/Poinsett county line today, and we stopped to scope out a large
> nest that we had noticed a month or so ago. None of us had noticed a second
> large nest at that time, but today there is an active Bald Eagle nest
> approx. 100-200 meters from an active Great Horned Owl nest. Both nests are
> about the same size, and it is likely that the Great Horned Owls took over
> a previous Bald Eagle nest. The Bald Eagles apparently built a new nest in
> close proximity to their old nest, which could provide for some interesting
> drama, although perhaps the two pairs have a truce (I won't eat your young
> if you don't eat mine). One eagle was perched on the rim of its nest,
> looking inside for a minute or so before settling down to sit low on the
> nest. The other eagle was in a tree midway between the two nests, and the
> Great Horned Owl was sitting on its nest with the top part of its head
> visible. The nests are easily seen from Route 1 in a row of trees within ag
> fields, off to the West of Rte. 1, about a mile south of the beer/liquor
> stores that are located on the Craighead/Poinsett county line.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sat, 21 Feb 2015 17:10:27 -0600
> From:    Michael 
> Subject: Re: siskins
> 
> Similar experience at my house.
> 18 pine Siskins and 50+ goldfinch today after two years with no Siskins.  
> 
> At Beaverfork a raft of scaup proved to be mostly greater scaup which is the 
opposite of what I normally see. 18 round greenish cast heads and one pointed 
purple one. 

> 
> Michael (faulkner county)
> 
> 
>> On Feb 21, 2015, at 4:01 PM, Terry Butler  wrote:
>> 
>> In the early winter I had 25+ Pine Siskins coming to my feeders then after a 
week they left. The last few days 1 to 4 have been back. Today 25+ again. More 
yellow in the wings now. 

>> 
>> Terry Butler
>> Pangburn, AR
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 20 Feb 2015 to 21 Feb 2015 (#2015-53)
> **************************************************************
Subject: Centerton Fish hatchery and Vaughn Dairy's
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 15:54:25 -0600
I left out about noon today when it started snowing. I went to the fish 
hatchery first, the many hundreds of geese were gone along with most ducks. 


I found 20 Shovelers, 15 Mallards, 16 Bufflehead, probably 80 Ring-necked 
Ducks, (they flushed) 1 Northern Pintail, and 155 GW Teal. Plus a Northern 
Shrike, 15 Meadowlarks, and a murder of Crows flyover of 6. 


On the dairy rounds, Dynamic Dairy had blackbirds at the back of the property 
and over the hill so I couldn’t get species for numbers. There were 4 
Meadowlarks hanging with 30 Starlings roadside. 


Over to Triple A Dairy, also lots of blackbirds but closer, mostly Brown- 
headed and Starlings in the holding pens I could see Great-tailed close to the 
road but behind the brush so couldn’t see well enough to get a count, I saw 
15 but there was many more. The silage pits were both active. Left side 100 
White-crowned Sparrows, 3 harris’ Sparrows, 3 Song Sparrows, 15 Common 
Grackles, 30 Brown-headed Cowbirds, about the same Red-winged Blackbirds, 
mostly female, and Rusties galore. At one point I was able to get 10 in one 
photo, 9 in another photo and 19 at the rear of the pit one right after 
another. so I feel comfortable saying 38. 


What was nice is that they spent a lot of time close to the opening. So many 
different patterns. 


There were 2 Red-tailed Hawks working the area. Both were pale in color. One 
kept flushing the birds on the left side, It usually circled and came at me 
head on but a few times it used the car as a blind and flew over me into the 
pit. I finally managed a photo of it as it banked before the car. I don’t 
think it had any successful strikes. 


 As I was leaving I passed the other pit, which usual isn’t as active for 
some reason, and the rear held 60-70 Starlings, 10 Cardinals,and a few 
Sparrows. one was a Harris’ Sparrow but it could have been one seen on the 
other side. 

Subject: Gray Catbird-Fayetteville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 21:18:15 +0000
Catbirds are rare up here in winter -- we hardly ever see them after 
mid-October here. However, Mike Mlodinow found one at Lake Fayetteville just 
before the CBC. I've seen two this winter. The first was January 28, in cane 
thickets at the Steel Creek Campground on the Buffalo National River. Now I've 
just seen another, in the messy bird feeder thicket in my front yard. I snuck 
around through my carport and managed a few pictures -- I'll post these on my 
facebook page in case anyone is interested. Catbirds nest in my yard, but I 
think this may be the first one I've seen in winter in the yard in 20 years. 
Subject: Gulls again
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 14:32:37 -0600
About 400+ birds now feeding in the heavy dam flow at Toadsuck. Half
resting and half in the great spiral of competing gulls. Had 1 1st year, 4
second year and 1 third year Herring. Did not find the adult. Though the
3rd year was closing on full adult plumage. I may have some sort of
watching-gulls-in-the-scope-in-flight addiction.

This completes all four weeks of Feb and Michael Linz informed me he had
quite a few Herring records from Beaverfork last year. That he sent to
ebird but not Herschbird. Including some March records and an April record.
This means we have about five times more Herring records in the last two
years than in the prior 98 years. Some of that is clearly Michael Linz has
a scope. And lives near Beaverfork. But I have never seen 6 Herrings at
Toadsuck even with a shad die off. So something else has happened as well.

Anyway, it is a joy to have other gulls show up in the scope while I scan
hundreds of Ring-bills for that first AR Mew Gull. I'd put my money on
Kenny (with Ladonna's eyes along) and the Dardanelle gull mass to find it
first. But still.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: FW: Male Common Meganser
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 11:54:45 -0600
For anyone that would like to check on them.

 

Terry Butler

 

From: Lynn [mailto:lynn.nowell33 AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Terry Butler
Subject: Re: Male Common Meganser

 

Terry, if this bird is of interest to some, I have had a pair here in North 
Lonoke county for a week. They are on the pond now. For a few days I thought 
they were wood ducks as I neglected to look closely and wood ducks nest here 
every year. 


I can't post to Ar-birds right now, ( email issue) but if it's of enough 
interest you can post for me. 


The birds are on a pond on hickory Hills drive, off Lewisburg road, Austin, 
this is north of Cabot. Road is only 1/2 mile long. 


They do spook easy to loud noises.

 

Lynn Nowell






On Feb 22, 2015, at 10:28 AM, Terry Butler  wrote:

I got a call this morning from Kenny Nations of Heber Springs, he had a Male 
Common Merganser at Magness lake. I drove up to have a look myself. A 
beautiful, beautiful bird. Wanted to alert others that might be interested in 
seeing the bird. By the way there is still 22 Trumpeter swans at Abram ponds on 
Hiram rd. 


 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: DESIRED WOODCOCK TSUNAMI
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 16:59:57 +0000
Saturday night February 21 was AMERICAN WOODCOCK night at Wedington Wildlife 
Management Area. Our group of a dozen or bakers dozen first heard a Barred 
Owl, then noticed the first star (actually a planet), and then had first one, 
then a second, woodcock overflight. But before that happened, woodcock expert 
and UA-Fayetteville professor Dr David Krementz gave us a short lecture and 
research update, complete with wing specimens and the unique way woodcocks use 
them. Then he turned the program over to his graduate student, Joe Moore, who 
explained how he is using radio transmitters mounted on woodcocks to track 
migration, about which there is apparently little data. These tiny transmitters 
are solar powered and broadcast to a satellite. From his laptop, Moore checks 
locations of these birds every few days. Welcome to Wildlife Management 2015. 
Aldo Leopold would be amazed and proud. Then a flock of Canada Geese honked 
over. Then, again out by the cars, a Barred Owl shared entirely satisfying 
WHOOO-OWWWs. Krementz was disappointed by the number of woodcocks seen, and by 
the fact we didnt hear much. He thinks we may be a little early, suggesting a 
week from now might be more in the center of the migration. It could then be 
good for viewing and hearing for the following week or two. I was NOT a bit 
disappointed, but I did go home wondering why, if it is possible to put a solar 
collector on a 7 ounce woodcock and reach a satellite, it is so difficult to 
figure how to use solar to power more of our own universe? David Chapman, who 
attended last nights session, continues to monitor woodcocks near his home at 
Lake Fayetteville, as does Judith Griffith at Ninestone Land Trust. They are 
getting similar results, so maybe the desired woodcock tsunami is just now on 
its way. 
Subject: 7th annual Red Slough Birding Convention
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 10:29:07 -0600
I am happy to announce the 7th annual Red Slough Birding Convention to be
held in Idabel, McCurtain County, Oklahoma on May 9-12, 2015.  This year our
keynote speaker will be Dr. Jay Huner who is a bird and agricultural
wetlands researcher and active birder from southern Louisiana.   Our other
speaker will be Dr. Jeff Kelly, director of the Oklahoma Biological Survey.
The convention's daily tours include morning birding trips to the Red Slough
WMA, Little River NWR, and the McCurtain County Wilderness Area.  There are
afternoon tours to see dragonflies and butterflies, prairie wildflowers, and
state champion trees.  Our expert guides will show you rare birds to
Oklahoma such as Purple Gallinules, King Rails, Swainson's Warblers, and
Red-cockaded Woodpeckers.  We usually average around 150 species of birds
seen during the convention.  For more information visit our website at :

http://www.redsloughconvention.com/  .  

 

David Arbour
Subject: Male Common Meganser
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 10:28:42 -0600
I got a call this morning from Kenny Nations of Heber Springs, he had a Male
Common Merganser at Magness lake.  I drove up to have a look myself.  A
beautiful, beautiful bird.  Wanted to alert others that might be interested
in seeing the bird.  By the way there is still 22 Trumpeter swans at Abram
ponds on Hiram rd.

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: siskins
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 17:10:27 -0600
Similar experience at my house.
18 pine Siskins and 50+ goldfinch today after two years with no Siskins.  

At Beaverfork a raft of scaup proved to be mostly greater scaup which is the 
opposite of what I normally see. 18 round greenish cast heads and one pointed 
purple one. 


Michael (faulkner county)


> On Feb 21, 2015, at 4:01 PM, Terry Butler  wrote:
> 
> In the early winter I had 25+ Pine Siskins coming to my feeders then after a 
week they left. The last few days 1 to 4 have been back. Today 25+ again. More 
yellow in the wings now. 

>  
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
Subject: Active Bald Eagle and Great Horned Owl Nests 100-200 m apart
From: Doug Raybuck <dwraybuck AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:54:44 -0600
I was with Than and Emily Boves today along Rte 1 near the
Craighead/Poinsett county line today, and we stopped to scope out a large
nest that we had noticed a month or so ago. None of us had noticed a second
large nest at that time, but today there is an active Bald Eagle nest
approx. 100-200 meters from an active Great Horned Owl nest. Both nests are
about the same size, and it is likely that the Great Horned Owls took over
a previous Bald Eagle nest. The Bald Eagles apparently built a new nest in
close proximity to their old nest, which could provide for some interesting
drama, although perhaps the two pairs have a truce (I won't eat your young
if you don't eat mine). One eagle was perched on the rim of its nest,
looking inside for a minute or so before settling down to sit low on the
nest. The other eagle was in a tree midway between the two nests, and the
Great Horned Owl was sitting on its nest with the top part of its head
visible. The nests are easily seen from Route 1 in a row of trees within ag
fields, off to the West of Rte. 1, about a mile south of the beer/liquor
stores that are located on the Craighead/Poinsett county line.
Subject: Re: siskins
From: Melinda Gay <msgy.272 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:06:58 -0600
One lone Green-winged Teal male on our West Fork pond.

Misty Gay
Biologist/Audubon zealot
On Feb 21, 2015 4:02 PM, "Terry Butler"  wrote:

> In the early winter I had 25+ Pine Siskins coming to my feeders then after
> a week they left.  The last few days 1 to 4 have been back.  Today 25+
> again.  More yellow in the wings now.
>
>
>
> Terry Butler
>
> Pangburn, AR
>
Subject: DOBC Field trip
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:08:04 -0600
We went out to Lake Harrison today despite the snow cover and light freezing
rain. The  reward was the most ducks and geese I have ever seen at our
little lake. I don't know if there is such a thing as a waterfowl fallout
but we had an awesome time.

There were 100+ Canada Geese,

As well as 100+ Gadwall.

There was a lone Ross's goose, a pair of ring billed ducks .

The usual raft of Mallards was larger than normal.

The rest of our list were the expected birds and one lone Lincoln sparrow.

 

After that we scouted out a new trail at Savannah Meadows and found a few
sparrows and goldfinch on a marshy pond.

Alan Gregory

Harrison



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Subject: siskins
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 16:01:55 -0600
In the early winter I had 25+ Pine Siskins coming to my feeders then after a
week they left.  The last few days 1 to 4 have been back.  Today 25+ again.
More yellow in the wings now.

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Gulls
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 14:06:37 -0600
Stopped by Toadsuck after the rains dropped off and work was over this
morning. The Fish Crows are carrying nesting material in town. And they are
calling actively along the river.

Flow through the dam is high after all this rain and sleet in the state and
the gulls are actively feeding. Found my beautiful 2nd year bird who is
slightly molted into the third. Clearly the same bird by markings that has
stayed all month. And also a full third year bird and a 4+ year old winter
adult with full pale eye. Very uncommon sight in my area. Eight White
Pelicans below the dam. Usually seen on the lake, not common at Toadsuck.

Makes four weeks in a row for Herring Gull at Toadsuck and the first
February records in all the weeks so far in all the 100 years of
observation here.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Centerton Fish Hatchery, Friday morning
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 14:01:16 -0600
Yesterday I stopped at the fish hatchery before I went to Lake Atalanta. 
Actually I would have stayed at the hatchery longer but the roads around the 
ponds were packed snow and I wasn’t entirely comfortable driving on them. Nor 
did I want to flush the birds. 


Some did anyway but came back later. Almost all of the birds were in the 
largest 4 ponds to the East. Most standing on Ice. 


There were a lot of Canada Geese, there had to have been 250 or more. I saw one 
Greater-white Fronted and 2 Snow Geese but I couldn’t tell if either of those 
were Ross’s. One was pretty small but the Canada’s are pretty large. 


The first batch of Canada Geese I came to were standing on one of the berms and 
4 of those were Cackling Geese an a little group. Very small bills and very 
small bodies. I first thought they were ducks as I had back views until I got 
close enough to see they weren’t and could see the bills. That batch did 
flush and you could see a dramatic size difference air-born. There were also 
many many ducks, about the only thing I didn’t see were Redhead Ducks and 
Canvasbacks. There were Scaup but I couldn’t tell what kind, I hadn’t 
loaded the scope and didn’t want to get any closer. 





Jacque Brown
240 Township Dr
Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: Hooded Merganser Lake Atalanta, Rogers
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 13:45:12 -0600
A few weeks ago Joanie Patterson had mentioned she had seen a Hooded Merganser 
at Lake Atalanta. I went last weekend before the snow and found it right along 
the edge of the lake where the ducks hang out near the creek and little wood 
bridge. It’s a female, It stayed in the same spot pretty much for a good half 
hour diving, there were also lots of camera friendly Gadwalls and Lesser Scaup. 


Yesterday I grabbed the dog and camera and went back to see if I could get 
better photos of the Hooded Merganser , I got there around 11:30 am. The 
merganser was in the same location but doing more paddling around than diving, 
I was able to get some nice photos. Unfortunately I was also there when the 
emergency rescue crews were there after some teenagers Jeep went into the water 
down at the Dam end of the lake. I didn’t know exactly what had happened 
until I watched the news later in the day. 


When I went last weekend the road around the lake was fairly treacherous. Pot 
holes are deep and close together everywhere but on the actual dam. The city of 
Rogers is letting it deteriorate so it will be a bike path. I can’t imagine 
trying to drive that road with ice pack on it. So If anyone goes to bird and 
tries to drive around the lake it is very hard on the tires and shocks. 



Jacque Brown
240 Township Dr
Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: Stillwell bird recordings
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 18:15:32 +0000
In the 1950s, Jerry and Norma Stillwell produced 3 LPs based upon their 
recordings. They spent part of this time living and recording in Fayetteville. 


I would like to obtain the vinyl long play records, mainly for nostalgia, and 
down the road, possibly to get them in a local archive. 


I was able to purchase copies of cassette tape versions of these records, and 
using them, I put the 3 records on CDs. While my techniques are basic, I'll bet 
they sound better on the CDs than on any existing vinyls and will last a lot 
longer than tapes. As far as I know, there are no commercial CD versions of 
these recordings -- a pity. 


I mention this, because if anyone has these vinyls and they are just collecting 
dust, I will trade the CD versions for the vinyls. Again, this is mostly a 
nostalgia thing. I also plan to at minimum make a few of my longish ARBIRD 
posts about the Stillwell sojourn in the Natural State, and up here in hog 
heaven, for any of you still reading. 


As part of a trade, I can also convert them to MP3s, if that would be 
preferable. 


The Stillwell recordings are now relatively old, but the recordings are 
superlative, and the voices of Jerry and Norma narrating sounds just like home. 
Remember, if you can, that excitement when you realized how variable is the 
song of even the basic cardinal in your "dooryard," as the Stillwells put it. 
Subject: Evening Grosbeak Records
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 22:07:05 +0000
According to Birds of North America Online: 

The breeding range of the Evening Grosbeak underwent a significant expansion in 
historic times. The contemporary scientific literature documented eastward 
movement, with the species regularly appearing in areas east of its known 
range, perhaps a result of the establishment of box elder ( Acer negundo ) in 
eastern cities as an ornamental planting. The abundant seeds of the box elder 
persist on the tree through the winter, providing a stable food supply. 
Outbreaks of forest insects may also have allowed this bird to extend its 
breeding range to the east. Local populations often increase markedly in 
response to spruce budworm outbreaks. 


According to National Audubon's online field guide: 
Extended its breeding range eastward during the late 19th century and early 
20th century. In recent decades, eastern population has declined again, but 
reasons are poorly understood. 

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/evening-grosbeak 


There probably are not enough Evening Grosbeaks in the East to have an 
irruption like the crossbills have. Though a look at eBird's map for sightings 
over the last 10 years shows records in neighboring states. 
http://tinyurl.com/mb4w5qz 

Including this one http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21663610 (and 
others) in central Oklahoma THIS MONTH! 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Lyndal York"  
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Friday, February 20, 2015 3:42:20 PM 
Subject: Re: Yard birds 

As I understand it, the migration of northern wintering birds to the south is 
triggered by a lack of seed availability in their wintering grounds not the 
severity of the weather. No one has reported an Evening Grosbeak to the 
Arkansas Bird Records Committee since the Lake Village CBC in 2000. 


Lyndal York 
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society 

On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:50 PM, Richard Crawford < 
richardkcrawford AT hotmail.com > wrote: 



I haven't seen Evening Grosbeaks in the south since early 80's. This winter has 
strangely resembled the late 70's and 80's weather wise. Have there been any 
sighting? 

Richard Crawford 

Sent from my iPhone 

> On Feb 20, 2015, at 12:24 PM, "CK" < meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM > wrote: 
> 
> The birds have been feeding nonstop all morning in the yard. Fox sparrows are 
back & I've had a yellow-rumped warbler visiting the suet feeders. This level 
of feeding activity at this time of year usually presages an oncoming storm. 

> Cindy F 
> Watching the wildlife in the Heights 
> Little Rock 
> 




Subject: Re: Yard birds
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:42:20 -0600
As I understand it, the migration of northern wintering birds to the south
is triggered by a lack of seed availability in their wintering grounds not
the severity of the weather. No one has reported an Evening Grosbeak to the
Arkansas Bird Records Committee since the Lake Village CBC in 2000.

Lyndal York
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society

On Fri, Feb 20, 2015 at 12:50 PM, Richard Crawford <
richardkcrawford AT hotmail.com> wrote:

> I haven't seen Evening Grosbeaks in the south since early 80's. This
> winter has strangely resembled the late 70's and 80's weather wise. Have
> there been any sighting?
> Richard Crawford
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Feb 20, 2015, at 12:24 PM, "CK"  wrote:
> >
> > The birds have been feeding nonstop all morning in the yard. Fox
> sparrows are back & I've had a yellow-rumped warbler visiting the suet
> feeders. This level of feeding activity at this time of year usually
> presages an oncoming storm.
> > Cindy F
> > Watching the wildlife in the Heights
> > Little Rock
> >
>
Subject: GBBC and this week
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:40:04 -0600
In addition to the usual yard and woodland species, here's a list of my 
favorite GBBC birds: 


American Woodcock - 2 flushed up directly in front of me
Great-horned Owl - 2 sightings of adult on limb outside nest cave in bluff 
Barred Owl - called most evenings from nesting territory across creek
Red-shouldered Hawk - 2 exhibiting courtship behavior
Bald Eagles - 2 soaring every day, mostly mature, one sub-adult
Red-headed Woodpecker - 2 first winter, in standing dead post oaks and 
shortleaf pines 

Black Vulture - mated pair hanging out near their nest cave in bluff
Cedar Waxwing - hundreds in mixed flocks with American Robins and Eastern 
Bluebirds 

Eastern Towhee - male and female in woods shuffling through leaves
Hermit Thrush - 3 talking softly one evening and going to roost

And these species showed up this week - after the count of course:

Pine Warbler - 1 male vibrantly colored eating suet  
Blue-winged Teal - 1 male and 1 female on creek
Rusty Blackbird - 2 daily and 8 today at ground feeder
Eastern Towhee - 1 male 1 female at ground feeder 
White-crowned Sparrow - 1adult and 1 first winter finally showed up today

The feeders are covered over with birds today and I expect this will increase 
throughout the week as more wintry weather arrives. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Yard birds
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 14:07:56 -0600
I had a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker feeding at a suet feeder this morning. 
Since I was awake after mid-night this morning (finishing a book), I heard 
the Great-horned Owl, saw my Barred Owl in her daily roost tree; heard a 
Pileated Woodpecker as I walked the dogs in the woods.  Fox Sparrow, Eastern 
Towhee and Brown Thrasher at the pasture edge of the woods.  A lone 
Yellow-rumped Warbler at a suet feeder, also a White-breasted Nuthatch. 
Lots of Whited-throated Sparrows, Cardinals, Titmice, Chickadees, House 
Finch, Red-winged Blackbirds and Grackles.  Woodpeckers at the feeder 
include the Downy and the male and female Red-bellied.



Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: CK
Sent: Friday, February 20, 2015 11:24 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Yard birds

The birds have been feeding nonstop all morning in the yard. Fox sparrows 
are back & I've had a yellow-rumped warbler visiting the suet feeders. This 
level of feeding activity at this time of year usually presages an oncoming 
storm.
Cindy F
Watching the wildlife in the Heights
Little Rock

= 
Subject: Re: Yard birds
From: Richard Crawford <richardkcrawford AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 13:50:40 -0500
I haven't seen Evening Grosbeaks in the south since early 80's. This winter has 
strangely resembled the late 70's and 80's weather wise. Have there been any 
sighting? 

Richard Crawford

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 20, 2015, at 12:24 PM, "CK"  wrote:
> 
> The birds have been feeding nonstop all morning in the yard. Fox sparrows are 
back & I've had a yellow-rumped warbler visiting the suet feeders. This level 
of feeding activity at this time of year usually presages an oncoming storm. 

> Cindy F
> Watching the wildlife in the Heights
> Little Rock
> 
Subject: Yard birds
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 11:24:21 -0600
The birds have been feeding nonstop all morning in the yard. Fox sparrows are 
back & I've had a yellow-rumped warbler visiting the suet feeders. This level 
of feeding activity at this time of year usually presages an oncoming storm. 

Cindy F
Watching the wildlife in the Heights
Little Rock

Subject: article about Mitchell
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 01:25:03 +0000
For those of you that may have missed the article today about Mitchell and 
saw-whets, here is the link: 

Please see: A bird in the 
hand 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************