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Updated on Friday, October 24 at 09:09 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Eastern Screech Owl,©David Sibley

24 Oct Re: Seabirding [David Starrett ]
24 Oct Re: LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers [James Morgan ]
24 Oct Re: Irruption Birds (Madison County) [Gail Miller ]
25 Oct LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers [Ragupathy Kannan ]
24 Oct 6th Annual Lake Sweep on Lake Maumelle [Dan Scheiman ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [ ]
24 Oct Late Black-and-white Warbler [Dan Scheiman ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Gail Miller ]
24 Oct Open pipes kill birds [Jeffrey Short ]
24 Oct Re: Bald Eagle in a weird spot - Another unususal spot ["Campbell, Martin" ]
24 Oct FOS Hermits! [Judy & Don ]
24 Oct Donations to avian rehabbers [Gail Miller ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Ragupathy Kannan ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [ ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Elizabeth Shores ]
24 Oct Re: the Big Day recollection by Scott Robinson [ ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Ragupathy Kannan ]
23 Oct Donations to avian rehabbers [Barry Haas ]
23 Oct Re: Five weeks in rehab [Gail Miller ]
23 Oct Re: Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab" [Elizabeth Shores ]
23 Oct Re: IBIS ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
23 Oct Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab" [Barry Haas ]
23 Oct Re: Five weeks in rehab [Susan Hardin ]
23 Oct Re: Five weeks in rehab [Sara Caulk ]
23 Oct Five weeks in rehab [Barry Haas ]
23 Oct Bald Eagle in a weird spot [Teresa & Leif Anderson ]
23 Oct brush pile [Judy & Don ]
23 Oct Re: Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville) [Elizabeth Shores ]
23 Oct Central Arkansas/Little Rock Area Birders [Randy Robinson ]
23 Oct Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Oct IBIS [Michael Linz ]
22 Oct HERRING GULL AT LAKE SARACEN [JFR ]
22 Oct White-faced Ibis in central Arkansas [Michael ]
22 Oct Re: If it is on TV - it must be true [Ryan Risher ]
22 Oct Re: some help please [Nancy Felker ]
22 Oct If it is on TV - it must be true [Dan Bogler ]
22 Oct some help please [Charles Anderson ]
21 Oct Pelicans on Beaver Lake [Betty Brown ]
21 Oct weekend arrivals [Adam Schaffer ]
21 Oct Minneapolis Star-Tribune Editorial counterpoint: What shall our 'perspective' on birds, Vikings stadium aesthetics be? [Barry Haas ]
21 Oct Re: FOS-WC Sparrow [Carol Meyerdirk ]
21 Oct Blue-headed vireo [CK Franklin ]
21 Oct Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count Sunday December 14, 2014 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 Oct Birds and History [Karen ]
20 Oct Irruption Birds (Madison County) [Alyssa DeRubeis ]
20 Oct Le Conte's Sparrow at Woolsey, Washington Co. [ ]
19 Oct Black-throated Green [Terry Butler ]
19 Oct Sightings: Two Rivers Park [Jim Dixon ]
19 Oct 1ST PLACE FOR ďTRASHIESTĒ BUNCH ON BEAVER ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
19 Oct Editorial on tropic cascade. [Jerry Butler ]
18 Oct AAS-News of Members [Dottie Boyles ]
18 Oct King's River Falls [Sandy Berger ]
18 Oct FOS Brown Creeper [Sara Caulk ]
18 Oct Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
18 Oct FOS [Sally Jo Gibson ]
18 Oct FOS Junco [Jonathan Perry ]
18 Oct visitor [Judy & Don ]
18 Oct FOS junco [Meredith Hawkins ]
18 Oct Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective [Barry Haas ]
18 Oct Re: Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
18 Oct Juncos in Hot Springs [jwdavis ]
18 Oct Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center [Jim Dixon ]
18 Oct RED-TAILS, DARK-BROWN CALURUS TO ALMOST-WHITE KRIDERíS (Maysville) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Oct Re: Siskins [laura davis ]
17 Oct Arkies in Okie....Again [Mitchell Pruitt ]
17 Oct Siskins [Norman Lavers ]
17 Oct FOS [Judy & Don ]
17 Oct Round Robin, Blue Jay Brawl ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
17 Oct finally FOS [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
17 Oct Re: new big day world record today! [Ragupathy Kannan ]
17 Oct Re: new big day world record today! [ ]
17 Oct Re: Greetings from Lake Dardanelle [Gail Miller ]
17 Oct Re: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
17 Oct White-throated Sparrow in SW AR ["Campbell, Martin" ]
16 Oct Lake Dardanelle [Kenny Nichols ]

Subject: Re: Seabirding
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 20:41:58 -0500
Mitchell,
I had the good fortune to find a pelagic out of central Florida last month when 
I was down there on business. I had greater fortune in having that very same 
Steve Howell on the trip! I did not have any guide besides my iphone bird guide 
apps. But the trip leader had Howell's book. We had 2.5 hr trip in the dark out 
to the gulf stream and I sat with what I believe is the same book you are 
talking about, and read/studied it. It is big for an actual field guide, but on 
a pelagic a great tool to leave in on the table and study from or refer to. 
Lots of pictures, good use of the similar species approach. It had rarities and 
the common stuff. A lot of the photos were off the N Carolina coast. The book 
pointed to a lot of the small distinguishing traits. By the time we started 
seeing stuff, I was very confident in IDing it and a short time after hearing 
trip leaders calling stuff out I could confidentially ID pretty much everything 
we were seeing. That was my 4th pelagic, first on Atlantic Coast. 

I highly recommend that book.

Dave
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Cape Girardeau, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


> Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 08:25:44 -0500
> From: 0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Seabirding
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> Hey ARBIRDERS,
> I will be doing a pelagic out of North Carolina in May and am wanting to get 
prepared for IDing seabirds. Quite an undertaking, I know, but I at least want 
to have some idea since I've never done this before. Does anyone have any 
thoughts on a field guide for these species (i.e. petrels, storm-petrels, 
etc.)? 

> 
> Here's one title I found by Steve Howell:
> 
> Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America: A Photographic 
Guide 

> 
> Thanks,
> Mitchell
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:45:05 -0500
Saw 2 Scissortails in Logan County yesterday and thought it was late. 
But checked NW Arkansas seasonal distribution and it was November.
The Scissortails on our farm have left.

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville/Elkins

At 07:10 PM 10/24/2014, Ragupathy Kannan wrote:
>Four Scissortails today in our ornithology field trip to Cherokee 
>Prairie.   Class had decent looks at a nice bald eagle, lots of 
>eastern meadowlarks and a fleeting savanna sparrow, among other species.
>
>We were happy to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatchers.  They must be 
>the "LOS" birds.
Subject: Re: Irruption Birds (Madison County)
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:26:46 -0500
My sister lives in Pettigrew (Madison County). I spent 3 days and 2 nights with 
her this week; Tues. ‚Äď Thurs. and I heard a lot of Red-breasted Nuthatches at 
her house. She doesn’t feed birds because of bear, but I did love hearing the 
nuthatches while my dogs and I visited her!! 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Alyssa DeRubeis 
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 7:22 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Irruption Birds (Madison County)

In accordance with Ron Pittaway's famous "Winter Finch Forecast," the Ozark 
Natural Science Center (near Huntsville) has hosted both Red-breasted 
Nuthatches and Pine Siskins over the past two weeks. I heard the former twice 
during the second week of October; the latter I heard late last week. 



And of course, there have been other recent fall arrivals: Dark-eyed Juncos, 
Yellow-rumped Warblers, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets, and 
White-throated Sparrows. 



As a reminder, the Ozark Natural Science Center is open and free to the public 
on weekends when there aren't educational programs, which are most weekends. 
Simply contact them by phone or e-mail (see http://onsc.us/contact-all.php) and 
let them know when you plan to visit so the gate can be left open for you. 



Good birding!


Alyssa DeRubeis
Huntsville, Madison Co.
Subject: LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 00:10:41 +0000
Four Scissortails today in our ornithology field trip to Cherokee Prairie.   
Class had decent looks at a nice bald eagle, lots of eastern meadowlarks and a 
fleeting savanna sparrow, among other species.   

We were happy to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatchers.  They must be the "LOS" 
birds.   
Subject: 6th Annual Lake Sweep on Lake Maumelle
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:27:14 +0000
On Saturday November 1 please join Central Arkansas Water and Audubon Arkansas 
for the 6th Annual Lake Sweep on Lake Maumelle. Help keep waterbird habitat and 
Little Rock's drinking water supply clean by picking up litter at the lake's 
public use areas. Meet at 9:30 at Jolly Roger's Marina, 11800 Maumelle Harbor 
Rd. off Highway 10. All supplies provided, along with free Starbucks coffee, 
plus pizza for lunch for all you hard-working volunteers. Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas members help every year. 


Find the event on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/732514620151435/ 
. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:15:29 +0000
Thanks Gail!Joanie
 

 On Friday, October 24, 2014 2:06 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

   

 Here is a link to Rodney's Facebook page, should anyone be interested.  He 
works tirelessly for the raptors.... and has a fulltime job to boot!!


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Raptor-Rehab-Of-Central-Arkansas/184508031575523?ref=br_tf 


Here also is a link to photos and the story of a Red-tailed Hawk that was 
injured at my work campus.  I took it to Rodney, left him a donation, he 
rehabbed it and I was able to turn it back out at work. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/redtailed_hawk_from_work


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Gail Miller
Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 8:40 AM
To: ARBirdlist
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers

I donate to Rodney Paul at Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas.  Donations to
his efforts are tax deductible now.  I'd rather maker a check out to 'RRCA'
than to 'IRS'!!  :-)

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root


   
Subject: Late Black-and-white Warbler
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:08:51 +0000
Today at the Central Arkansas Water Grass Farm I saw an apparent female 
Black-and-white Warbler that is about two weeks late, according to the state 
checklist. Also saw my FOS Lincoln's Sparrow and White-crowned Sparrow. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:06:40 -0500
Here is a link to Rodney's Facebook page, should anyone be interested.  He 
works tirelessly for the raptors.... and has a fulltime job to boot!!


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Raptor-Rehab-Of-Central-Arkansas/184508031575523?ref=br_tf 


Here also is a link to photos and the story of a Red-tailed Hawk that was 
injured at my work campus.  I took it to Rodney, left him a donation, he 
rehabbed it and I was able to turn it back out at work. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/redtailed_hawk_from_work


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Gail Miller
Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 8:40 AM
To: ARBirdlist
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers

I donate to Rodney Paul at Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas.  Donations to
his efforts are tax deductible now.  I'd rather maker a check out to 'RRCA'
than to 'IRS'!!  :-)

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Open pipes kill birds
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:30:12 -0500
https://ojs.lib.byu.edu/spc/index.php/wnan/article/view/32779 

 

I haven't read the paper, but apparently open PVC pipes as small as 3- 4
inches diameter used as gate posts and the like, can become a deathtrap for
some species of birds.  If you use them at your place either cap them or
stuff them with hardware cloth or metal screening.

 

Maybe this could become an item to improve sustainability at our state
properties, too.

 

Jeff Short

 

As an aside, I found a toad at the bottom of a ground-level standing pipe
next to a faucet.  Tongs wouldn't work because of the depth and pipe
diameter, but an Oreck canister  vacuum-you know the kind that will pick-up
a bowling ball-with an extension tube did.  Left a temporary hickey on the
toad's back but it hopped away with a smile.
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle in a weird spot - Another unususal spot
From: "Campbell, Martin" <campbem AT HSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 17:11:52 +0000
ARBIRDERS and Teresa,

Yesterday I drove from Arkadelphia to Little Rock on I-30, passing by Benton 
about 7:40 AM and was very surprised to observe an adult Bald Eagle swoop low 
over the interstate and then fly down the interstate in my lane. There is a 
city park with several ponds about exit 116 (Sevier road) and I suspect the 
eagle was attracted to the pond and ducks. 


I don't know how others seeing your bird on the same day affects things, but 
definitely an odd place. 


Marty
Arkadelphia - HSU

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Teresa & Leif Anderson 

Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 11:50 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bald Eagle in a weird spot

 The Native Americans often considered birds to be signs of omens whenever they 
were seen on an important day of your life. I have Cherokee and Celtic in my 
bloodlines and often will pay attention to the omens each day as I see them. 
Since today was my birthday this one I took seriously since this bird is also 
my Cherokee totem. 


 I was driving on 27 North about 11:10am this morning leaving Dover, from the 
laundry mat. I was about 3 miles south of Scottsville when I noticed this big 
white thing in a mud puddle on the side of the road up ahead. It looked like a 
big white Fan spread out there. I slowed down to look closely and it leaped 
into the air turned and gracefully flew along in front of me as a full adult 
Bald Eagle. 


 Talked about a weird spot for it to be seen. I often see one sitting along 
that stretch of road in a dead tree. But never in a mud puddle that was smaller 
than the bird. Lovely sight for such a grey depressing day. Fly High and be 
Graceful is one of the meanings that I will take note of for today. Cheers: 
Teresa of Hector, AR 
Subject: FOS Hermits!
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:13:59 -0500
Exploring the dense cedar thicket at the bottom of Walnut Hollow I heard the 
first "chup" call of a Hermit Thrush. Following the sound I found the bird 
flicking its wings and calling from low branches at the edge of a wood. There 
were several answering "zeee" notes coming from other areas as well as whistled 
flight calls. All the way home I continued to hear more calls from a flock of 
Hermits that apparently arrived during the night. 


Although the Golden-crowned Kinglets have been present for several days, I was 
also treated to the first scolding call and full song of a Ruby-crowned Kinglet 
while marveling at the surrounding Hermit Thrushes. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 08:40:22 -0500
I donate to Rodney Paul at Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas.  Donations to 
his efforts are tax deductible now.  I'd rather maker a check out to 'RRCA' 
than to 'IRS'!!  :-)

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:20:53 +0000
http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
|      |
|  |
| View on www.abcbirds.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

   

 On Friday, 24 October 2014 8:08 AM, Sharon Boatright 
<000000a09993a9c3-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

   

 One of the issues that the American Bird Conservancy is involved with is 
raising awareness of the threat of domestic cats.Sharon BoatrightBaxter County 

       From: Elizabeth Shores 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 7:40 AM
 Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
   
Where could we give to help raise awareness of the threat of domestic cats?

Sent from my iPhone


On Oct 24, 2014, at 4:11 AM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 



Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
 Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course".   

Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin.  It goes a much 
longer distance that way.  I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a 
leader in wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that 
money to rehab one sick wood duckling.  I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS 
spends that much on rehab efforts annually.   

That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters.     


 On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  wrote: 

   

 Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber.  Rather than rely 
on my own response, I asked a rehabber.  The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY 
grateful for any donation."  And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so 
rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release.  A Wood 
duckling is probably $200.  A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly 
$2/meal."  That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers 
who for the most part have no reliable outside funding.  I say for the most 
part because Joe Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society 
donates $1,000 annually to rehab efforts in their corner of the state.  My 
chapter, Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited 
donations to several rehabbers.  But in general rehabbers funding comes out of 
their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work.  Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, 
but mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no 
sugar daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good.  The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts.  Strange. 


    


   

   
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Sharon Boatright <000000a09993a9c3-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:07:45 +0000
One of the issues that the American Bird Conservancy is involved with is 
raising awareness of the threat of domestic cats.Sharon BoatrightBaxter County 

       From: Elizabeth Shores 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 7:40 AM
 Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
   
Where could we give to help raise awareness of the threat of domestic cats?

Sent from my iPhone


On Oct 24, 2014, at 4:11 AM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 



Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
 Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course".   

Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin.  It goes a much 
longer distance that way.  I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a 
leader in wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that 
money to rehab one sick wood duckling.  I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS 
spends that much on rehab efforts annually.   

That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters.     


 On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  wrote: 

   

 Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber.  Rather than rely 
on my own response, I asked a rehabber.  The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY 
grateful for any donation."  And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so 
rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release.  A Wood 
duckling is probably $200.  A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly 
$2/meal."  That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers 
who for the most part have no reliable outside funding.  I say for the most 
part because Joe Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society 
donates $1,000 annually to rehab efforts in their corner of the state.  My 
chapter, Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited 
donations to several rehabbers.  But in general rehabbers funding comes out of 
their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work.  Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, 
but mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no 
sugar daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good.  The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts.  Strange. 


    


  
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 12:54:19 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society donates to our local rehabber Lynn Sciumbato 
at Morning Star Wildlife Rehabilitation Center (located a few miles from the 
state fish hatchery at Centerton) to help maintain the facility, rather than to 
any particular rehab project she undertakes. She takes in all kinds of 
creatures in need of care, including mammals and turtles, and the occasional 
protected or even rare species. She is one of the single most effective 
presenters to the public of the importance of protecting all kinds of hawks, 
owls, vultures, etc. I have never seen. Plus, a master teacher, she is both 
serious and humorous in the role. She always packs the room. It has been my 
experience that if we want to draw a crowd for any kind of an Audubon-oriented 
program, ensure that Lynn and her Turkey Vulture Igor are also giving a 
presentation. People don't turn out that well for many of our Audubon 
presentation; Lynn packs the house. My only wish is that NWAAS could donate 
more to her effort. 


She is a retired ecology teacher who continues to expand the circle of 
knowledge, a great deal by any measure. Check this out: 


http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/morning-star.html

But before you hit that link, make sure you have good control over your check 
book, because I predict you will want to help out, no matter your previous 
views about wildlife rehab, especially a la Lynn Sciumbato and her Morning 
Star. 

________________________________
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 07:40:18 -0500
Where could we give to help raise awareness of the threat of domestic cats?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 24, 2014, at 4:11 AM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 

> 
> Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course". 

> 
> Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin. It goes a much longer 
distance that way. I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a leader in 
wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that money to 
rehab one sick wood duckling. I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS spends that 
much on rehab efforts annually. 

> 
> That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters. 

> 
> 
> On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> Dear ARBIRDers,
> 
> Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an 
appropriate donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber. Rather 
than rely on my own response, I asked a rehabber. The reply: "Rehabbers are 
HUGELY grateful for any donation." And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is 
so rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 

> 
> Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release. A Wood 
duckling is probably $200. A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly $2/meal." 
That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers who for the 
most part have no reliable outside funding. I say for the most part because Joe 
Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society donates $1,000 annually 
to rehab efforts in their corner of the state. My chapter, Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited donations to several rehabbers. But 
in general rehabbers funding comes out of their own pockets day in and day out. 

> 
> My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work. Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, but 
mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no sugar 
daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 

> 
> I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.
> 
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
> 
> P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good. The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts. Strange. 

> 
Subject: Re: the Big Day recollection by Scott Robinson
From: Robert Wiedenmann <0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 06:02:04 -0400
The talk by Scott Robinson (in the link sent previously) was so wonderful on 
many levels. I used to work with Scott at the Illinois Natural History Survey 
from 1994 until he moved to the Florida Museum, and had the pleasure of 
spending time with him in Panama in 2002. I never actually met Ted Parker, but 
I sort of did in 1981. I had spent the summer in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru 
with three others, and I had taken a large number of photos. In 1981, field 
guides to the areas were limited -- Meyer de Schaunsee's Birds of Venezuela, 
maybe the Birds of Colombia (which I didn't have), and little else that was 
available to us. That meant that a large number of birds we saw were not able 
to be identified to species, as they were not in books we had. I taken had a 
few photos of a small, colorful passerine, taken in wet marshy vegetation near 
the coast, south of Lima. Someone had told me about this Ted Parker fellow at 
LSU, so I mailed him the slides (remember, 1981), a description of the location 
and asked if he could ID them. I got back a very nice, helpful note, telling me 
that what I had photographed was a Many-colored Rush Tyrant. 


In addition to Scott's recollections of the magic of Ted Parker, he gave a very 
good description of just how special southeastern Peru was in the early 80s. We 
had spent 10 days at Explorer's Inn on the Tambopata River (made famous by Ted, 
and luxurious, compared to Scott's descriptions of Coca Cashu), so I could 
recall many of the same feelings that Scott related -- you could see the 
excitement in his eyes. Scott's drawings of the place they birded along the 
river provided an excellent primer on succession and its effects on avifauna -- 
forest that flooded every year, bordered by an area that flooded about every 
decade, and so on to a narrow band that flooded annually -- made it easy to 
understand why the diversity can be so great and how so many species can be 
packed into a small area. He showed a photo looking downslope, from cloud 
forest down a valley toward the river, and related that within that one view 
resided 900 species of birds -- half the species found in Peru. Realize, too, 
that their long-standing record of 332 species from 1982 was from one site, all 
on foot (or boat), at one altitude, without playback tapes. 


To me, the best part of the interview or presentation was the very gracious 
compliment that Scott paid to the LSU ornithologists, stating strongly that 
their lasting legacy was that all of the areas the long line of LSU researchers 
had explored had become protected land, either government or private reserves, 
and those set-aside lands not only helped protect the habitats and the species 
contained, but also benefited the local economies and the people living in 
those remote and poor places. And that is the key -- if we want biodiversity to 
be maintained, it is critical to make it economically beneficial for the 
locals. We can talk of species richness, maintaining genetic diversity, 
corridors connecting important bird areas, but the locals still need to feed 
themselves and their children. Often locals are able to be trained to be 
guards, guides, or otherwise benefiting the reserve and its visitors, the 
ecotourists, us. By his praise, Scott captured very nicely the non-linear 
connection between the magical diversity of the tropics, exploring new areas, 
discovering new species, creating a network of reserves, and integrating and 
benefiting local communities -- the abstract concept of conservation writ 
large, but carried out in a series of local examples, often on a small scale, 
but very real and vitally important. 


Thanks for sharing the link to the video. If you didn't look at it when the 
link was sent out, you might do so. Maybe it was because of the connections I 
had to the players and the place, but Scott Robinson's recollection was the 
best 32 minutes I spent that day. 


 

 Rob Wiedenmann
Fayetteville

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ragupathy Kannan 
To: ARBIRD-L 
Sent: Fri, Oct 17, 2014 12:30 pm
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!



LSU just issued this press release. 
http://www.lsu.edu/ur/ocur/lsunews/MediaCenter/News/2014/10/item73041.html 

  
Also, Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world record 1982 Birding 
Big Day in Peru 



What seems very impressive is that the 1982 record was apparently done with 
little or no song playbacks. 




 


 




 

 

 

 

 



Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world recor...








View on www.youtube.com

Preview by Yahoo







 



  
 



 
 
 
 On Friday, 17 October 2014 12:13 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

  
  

 


I am truly impressed - and envious! Makes me want to go back to Peru! There are 
so many places to visit there! 

Joanie

 




 
 
 
 On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

  
  

 

Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And y'all 
call yourselves Birders?" My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two! A BIG high five to the LSU team. What an 
accomplishment. 

Sara

On Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  wrote:





They did it! Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day record 
by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru! 



The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982. 



See their exuberant twitter post at 
https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 



See the article that appeared just before this feat: 
http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 



To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species. But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles. 



Wow!


Kannan
 





  
 
  
 




  
 
  
 
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:11:00 +0000
Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
 Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course".   

Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin.  It goes a much 
longer distance that way.  I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a 
leader in wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that 
money to rehab one sick wood duckling.  I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS 
spends that much on rehab efforts annually.   

That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters.     


 On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  wrote: 

   

 Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber.  Rather than rely 
on my own response, I asked a rehabber.  The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY 
grateful for any donation."  And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so 
rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release.  A Wood 
duckling is probably $200.  A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly 
$2/meal."  That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers 
who for the most part have no reliable outside funding.  I say for the most 
part because Joe Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society 
donates $1,000 annually to rehab efforts in their corner of the state.  My 
chapter, Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited 
donations to several rehabbers.  But in general rehabbers funding comes out of 
their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work.  Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, 
but mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no 
sugar daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good.  The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts.  Strange. 


   
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 22:25:42 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber. Rather than rely on 
my own response, I asked a rehabber. The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY grateful 
for any donation." And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so rare and 
precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release. A Wood 
duckling is probably $200. A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly $2/meal." 
That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers who for the 
most part have no reliable outside funding. I say for the most part because Joe 
Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society donates $1,000 annually 
to rehab efforts in their corner of the state. My chapter, Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited donations to several rehabbers. But 
in general rehabbers funding comes out of their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work. Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, but 
mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no sugar 
daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good. The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts. Strange. 

Subject: Re: Five weeks in rehab
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:48:33 -0500
Thanks for your concern for the owl Barry.  I help transport injured raptors 
to Rodney Paul.  I am retired now, so if I am not out of town, which is 
pretty rare (just got back from three days at my sister's), I am available 
in central Arkansas for transport to Rodney.  I keep gloves and several 
sizes of carriers to assist with transports.

My land line is still listed in the phone book in my name; 501-329-2590 and 
my cell number/text is 501-450-2535



Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Barry Haas
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 12:20 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Five weeks in rehab

Dear ARBIRDers,

No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl.  One 
Saturday evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl 
was standing near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock.  I 
headed that way with a cat carrier, towel and gloves.  When I arrived, there 
was a great horned owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of 
the pavement.  Cars whizzed by in both westbound lanes.  The owl never 
flinched as cars whizzed by within feet.  Our conjecture was the owl had 
flown into a vehicle and suffered a glancing blow to the head.

Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap 
the towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier.  Just after I 
cradled the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 
10 years off my life.

Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife.  The 
vet told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to 
meet us at her clinic.  We did just that about noon that Sunday.  The vet 
examined the bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones.  She kept it 
overnight and x-rayed it the following day.  No broken bones.

Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl.  We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of 
our carrier and into a larger one of theirs.

Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition 
and progress.  Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point 
we were ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day 
since the saga began.  We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back 
to the same place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement 
community on Chenal Parkway.

That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird.  That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right.  The 
release took place about one-half hour before dusk.  Susan and Helen both 
had cameras at the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier. 
Once I had that off I got out of the way as quickly as possible.  The owl 
first hopped out of the now topless carrier then turned around and flew over 
Susan and Helen's heads and over the duplex.  This all happened in the blink 
of an eye, so quality pictures of the release were not to be had.

We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees 
in every direction.  As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over 
our heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away.  I think the owl 
was trying to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life."

And that, in my mind, is all we could do.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S.  Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier 
as we picked it up for release last Saturday.= 
Subject: Re: Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab"
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:48:30 -0500
Barry Haas, you are a good guy.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 23, 2014, at 3:45 PM, Barry Haas  wrote:
> 
> Dear ARBIRDers,
> 
> One important thing I forgot to mention in my original great horned owl rehab 
post. When we dropped the owl off at rehabber Rodney Paul's house, we 
voluntarily gave them a check made payable Raptor Rehab to more than cover the 
cost of taking care of the owl until we could hopefully release it. When we 
picked the owl up last Saturday, we asked Rodney's wife Melissa if our original 
donation covered the cost of caring for the owl. She declined to accept 
anything else. 

> 
> Avian rehabbers invest their own time and often considerable personal funds 
to help our feathered friends get well. Eleven- that's the number of federally 
licensed migratory bird rehabbers in Arkansas per the Ark. Game & Fish 
Commission website. There used to be more avian rehabbers years ago, but I 
suspect rehabbing is an expensive endeavor- meeting federal and possibly state 
guidelines in addition to the cost of caring for the birds. 

> 
> Don't know what to get for that family member or friend who has everything? 
How about making a donation to a rehabber so they can keep donating their time 
and talents to heal more birds? 

> 
> For the list of avian rehabbers use this link:
> 
> http://www.agfc.com/species/Pages/SpeciesWildlifeRehabilitation.aspx
> 
> and then click on the link to the left of the bald eagle.
> 
> Hope some on this list will send a check to a rehabber, and thank them for 
the work they do. 

> 
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
Subject: Re: IBIS
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:00 -0500
Michael/ARBIRD-
    Thanks for sharing the ibis photo.  Plegadis ID remains a complicated
ID challenge, especially in fall.  The bird that you photographed is an
immature by plumage (e.g., note lack of reddish feathering around the
shoulder area), and immatures are almost impossible to ID to species in the
fall because White-faced can have grayish facial skin, dark brown eyes, and
even a pale line between the eye and bill.  On your bird I can almost
imagine some reddish tones in the iris and maybe a pinkish tone to the pale
loral streak, which would suggest White-faced.  But, again, you almost have
to call immatures as "Plegadis sp."  At some point by late winter or spring
the immatures start to acquire more adult-like eye and face colors and are
somewhat safer to ID to species.

    The other problem is that there is considerable hybridization going on
between the two species.  Hybrids (individuals with intermediate plumage,
eye color, face color, or leg color) have been reported "anecdotally" with
increasing frequency.  But, where the complex is being studied more
intensively (e.g., OK and southwest LA), hybridization is rampant as
determined through DNA analysis and through intermediate appearance.  This
is being documented with adults in breeding plumage.  Relatively
"Glossy-like" hybrids are the easiest to pick out because, at a distance,
they appear like the much scarcer Glossy Ibis.  Hybrids at the White-faced
end of the spectrum are more difficult because they don't stand-out among
the more abundant pure White-faced. Anyway, getting back to the AR bird,
again, ID of fall immatures has not been refined, and the possibility of
hybrids will further complicate the situation.

Sincerely,

Steve Cardiff

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 11:31 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:

> I posted a listing earlier from the field for a White-faced Ibis.  When I
> got home and looked at the pictures it looks more like a Glossy Ibis to me.
>
> What do others think?
>
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/October2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6073248180369577154 

>
> Thanks
> Michael
>
Subject: Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab"
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:45:05 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

One important thing I forgot to mention in my original great horned owl rehab 
post. When we dropped the owl off at rehabber Rodney Paul's house, we 
voluntarily gave them a check made payable Raptor Rehab to more than cover the 
cost of taking care of the owl until we could hopefully release it. When we 
picked the owl up last Saturday, we asked Rodney's wife Melissa if our original 
donation covered the cost of caring for the owl. She declined to accept 
anything else. 


Avian rehabbers invest their own time and often considerable personal funds to 
help our feathered friends get well. Eleven- that's the number of federally 
licensed migratory bird rehabbers in Arkansas per the Ark. Game & Fish 
Commission website. There used to be more avian rehabbers years ago, but I 
suspect rehabbing is an expensive endeavor- meeting federal and possibly state 
guidelines in addition to the cost of caring for the birds. 


Don't know what to get for that family member or friend who has everything? How 
about making a donation to a rehabber so they can keep donating their time and 
talents to heal more birds? 


For the list of avian rehabbers use this link:

http://www.agfc.com/species/Pages/SpeciesWildlifeRehabilitation.aspx

and then click on the link to the left of the bald eagle.

Hope some on this list will send a check to a rehabber, and thank them for the 
work they do. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: Five weeks in rehab
From: Susan Hardin <whizcats AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:17:39 -0500
p.s. Rodney has a Facebook page and will have a number of photos posted there. 
I just sent the final ones to him last night. The photos were taken by Melissa 
Paul and me over the five weeks, and it's a startling change. 


I thought the bird was near death when we got it to their house in El Paso, and 
Melissa Paul was also doubting that it would make it. Great job by the 
rehabbers, and the huge flight pen that ASCA helped to support many years ago 
was certainly a good investment. 


On Sat., that bird flew beautifully, and we hope that Helen has once again 
heard a GHOW at Parkway Village! 


Susan Hardin
Also in the "deep woods"


> On Oct 23, 2014, at 12:20, Barry Haas  wrote:
> 
> Dear ARBIRDers,
> 
> No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl. One 
Saturday evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl was 
standing near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock. I headed 
that way with a cat carrier, towel and gloves. When I arrived, there was a 
great horned owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of the 
pavement. Cars whizzed by in both westbound lanes. The owl never flinched as 
cars whizzed by within feet. Our conjecture was the owl had flown into a 
vehicle and suffered a glancing blow to the head. 

> 
> Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap the 
towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier. Just after I cradled 
the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 10 years 
off my life. 

> 
> Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife. The 
vet told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to meet 
us at her clinic. We did just that about noon that Sunday. The vet examined the 
bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones. She kept it overnight and 
x-rayed it the following day. No broken bones. 

> 
> Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl. We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of our 
carrier and into a larger one of theirs. 

> 
> Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition 
and progress. Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point we 
were ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day since 
the saga began. We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back to the same 
place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement community on Chenal 
Parkway. 

> 
> That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird. That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right. The release 
took place about one-half hour before dusk. Susan and Helen both had cameras at 
the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier. Once I had that off 
I got out of the way as quickly as possible. The owl first hopped out of the 
now topless carrier then turned around and flew over Susan and Helen's heads 
and over the duplex. This all happened in the blink of an eye, so quality 
pictures of the release were not to be had. 

> 
> We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees 
in every direction. As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over our 
heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away. I think the owl was trying 
to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life." 

> 
> And that, in my mind, is all we could do.
> 
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
> 
> P.S. Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier 
as we picked it up for release last Saturday. 

Subject: Re: Five weeks in rehab
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:37:40 -0500
Thanks, Barry (and Susan) A happy ending to a great story.

Sara
Fayetteville

On Oct 23, 2014 12:20 PM, Barry Haas  wrote:
>
> Dear ARBIRDers, 
>
> No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl.  One 
Saturday evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl was 
standing near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock.  I headed 
that way with a cat carrier, towel and gloves.  When I arrived, there was a 
great horned owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of the 
pavement.  Cars whizzed by in both westbound lanes.  The owl never flinched 
as cars whizzed by within feet.  Our conjecture was the owl had flown into a 
vehicle and suffered a glancing blow to the head. 

>
> Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap the 
towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier.  Just after I cradled 
the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 10 years 
off my life. 

>
> Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife.  The 
vet told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to meet 
us at her clinic.  We did just that about noon that Sunday.  The vet examined 
the bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones.  She kept it overnight 
and x-rayed it the following day.  No broken bones. 

>
> Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl.  We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of our 
carrier and into a larger one of theirs. 

>
> Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition 
and progress.  Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point 
we were ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day 
since the saga began.  We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back to 
the same place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement community on 
Chenal Parkway. 

>
> That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird.  That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right.  The release 
took place about one-half hour before dusk.  Susan and Helen both had cameras 
at the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier.  Once I had 
that off I got out of the way as quickly as possible.  The owl first hopped 
out of the now topless carrier then turned around and flew over Susan and 
Helen's heads and over the duplex.  This all happened in the blink of an eye, 
so quality pictures of the release were not to be had. 

>
> We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees 
in every direction.  As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over 
our heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away.  I think the owl was 
trying to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life." 

>
> And that, in my mind, is all we could do. 
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, 
> Barry Haas 
>
> P.S.  Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier 
as we picked it up for release last Saturday. 
Subject: Five weeks in rehab
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:20:27 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl. One Saturday 
evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl was standing 
near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock. I headed that way 
with a cat carrier, towel and gloves. When I arrived, there was a great horned 
owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of the pavement. Cars 
whizzed by in both westbound lanes. The owl never flinched as cars whizzed by 
within feet. Our conjecture was the owl had flown into a vehicle and suffered a 
glancing blow to the head. 


Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap the 
towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier. Just after I cradled 
the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 10 years 
off my life. 


Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife. The vet 
told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to meet us 
at her clinic. We did just that about noon that Sunday. The vet examined the 
bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones. She kept it overnight and 
x-rayed it the following day. No broken bones. 


Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl. We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of our 
carrier and into a larger one of theirs. 


Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition and 
progress. Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point we were 
ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day since the 
saga began. We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back to the same 
place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement community on Chenal 
Parkway. 


That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird. That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right. The release 
took place about one-half hour before dusk. Susan and Helen both had cameras at 
the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier. Once I had that off 
I got out of the way as quickly as possible. The owl first hopped out of the 
now topless carrier then turned around and flew over Susan and Helen's heads 
and over the duplex. This all happened in the blink of an eye, so quality 
pictures of the release were not to be had. 


We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees in 
every direction. As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over our 
heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away. I think the owl was trying 
to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life." 


And that, in my mind, is all we could do.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier as 
we picked it up for release last Saturday. 
Subject: Bald Eagle in a weird spot
From: Teresa & Leif Anderson <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:49:39 -0400
 The Native Americans often considered birds to be signs of omens whenever they 
were seen on an important day of your life. I have Cherokee and Celtic in my 
bloodlines and often will pay attention to the omens each day as I see them. 
Since today was my birthday this one I took seriously since this bird is also 
my Cherokee totem. 


 I was driving on 27 North about 11:10am this morning leaving Dover, from the 
laundry mat. I was about 3 miles south of Scottsville when I noticed this big 
white thing in a mud puddle on the side of the road up ahead. It looked like a 
big white Fan spread out there. I slowed down to look closely and it leaped 
into the air turned and gracefully flew along in front of me as a full adult 
Bald Eagle. 


 Talked about a weird spot for it to be seen. I often see one sitting along 
that stretch of road in a dead tree. But never in a mud puddle that was smaller 
than the bird. Lovely sight for such a grey depressing day. Fly High and be 
Graceful is one of the meanings that I will take note of for today. Cheers: 
Teresa of Hector, AR 

Subject: brush pile
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:35:46 -0500
This morning in the misty pre-drizzle, a Wild Turkey hen clucks in the woods, 
the trees are beginning to glow with color, late wildflower seeds ripen on the 
plants, and 'possum grape vines, prickly pears, persimmon trees and pokeweeds 
are covered with fruit. The largest brush pile in the glade that is bracketed 
by two huge magenta stemmed pokes, shelters numerous birds who flit out to look 
at the dogs and I as we circle around to watch them. 

Sparrows include: White-throated, White-crowned mature and immature, dozens of 
Field Sparrows, Lincolns, and a Fox Sparrow that sang when we walked away. 
Other birds hidden in the tangled sancuary: Juncos, Titmice, Chickadees, 
Yellow-rumped Warblers, Cardinals, and of course numerous Carolina Wrens. In 
the trees and the sky are numerous Flickers, a pair of Pileated Woodpeckers, 
one seasonally appropriate Turkey Vulture atop a dead oak, and scolding Blue 
Jays. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville)
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 08:03:53 -0500
Thank you for this beautiful report.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 23, 2014, at 6:49 AM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:
> 
> Unbroken Tallgrass Prairie around contemporary Maysville is long gone in 
terms of glory days, but native birds and plants carry on old ways and habits 
of former Beaty Prairie. Yesterday, for example, FRANKLIN’S GULLS (~150-200) 
were kettling on a modest south breeze. Technically, it’s called declivity 
soaring: warm updrafts form as the breeze flows against bluffs above Spavinaw 
River valley in the immediate south. These prairie nesting gulls exploit such 
opportunities along their entire transcontinental journey as they head for 
winter in eastern South America. I’ll bet my bottom dollar prairie gulls 
riding thermals long predates even old Maysville. 

> 
> 
> And ditto that for VESPER SPARROWS, only they are on the bare or open ground, 
not thermals, and yesterday, well-distributed along unpaved roads. I saw 19 
Vespers birds in 5 spots, missed other sparrows suddenly flushing away before I 
could get bins on them -- probably more Vespers. They nest all north of us 
where there is bare ground with scattered trees and shrubs. Crop fields, fields 
with short grass, former prairies, and back in the day, ground formed of bison 
wallows and wandering herds. 

> 
> 
> Plants and their bird visitors also remember days of Sawtooth skyscrapers 
that dominated whole wet prairies like former Beaty. Modest patches of these 
elegant sunflowers remain. AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES and PINE SISKINS know them 
well. Yesterday, goldfinches (~30) and siskins (~10) hung by claws on seed 
heads 3/4-inch wide -- right-side up, sideways, upside down -- picking tiny 
seeds with their perfect conical bill tool. Ancient stuff, from long before an 
Arkansas. 

> 
> 
> I felt something akin this upon seeing elegant flowers twisting along the 
stalk of LADIES’-TRESSES ORCHIDS where a tiny patch of prairie hangs on the 
highway 72 right-of-way. Cars and trucks on their way Maysville to Gravette, 
and I'm on my knees in the roadside ditch, not praying exactly, but trying for 
a good look at small white flowers. There’s a story here, deep in the bulb, 
about the origins of orchids and did they know Greater Prairie-Chickens? 

> 
> 
> And the Gayfeathers have gone to seed, their tall wands so purple in July, 
now golden seed fluff. In these seeds a kind of keeping faith, with the past 
and with the future. 

> 
> 
> Still in the thrall, I turn down Tucker Road, last of the day. More Vesper 
Sparrows and then something truly spectacular: afternoon light caught in silky 
fluff of Swamp Milkweed seeds popping out of their pods and rising in the south 
breeze. Talk about the future beckoning! And then, of course, the present, 
where for a time we live. 

> 
> 
> Hundreds of milkweed plants and Sawtooth skyscrapers thrived in this swampy 
corner. Later, the field was mowed and apparently herbicided in favor of fescue 
and a clean fencerow. Maybe his momma didn’t teach him prairie? Maybe never 
saw milkweed seeds rising in late fall sun or golden siskins plucking seeds 
from the sky? 

> 
> 
> When the last herbicide is dumped on the last weed, they all return and 
reclaim. 
Subject: Central Arkansas/Little Rock Area Birders
From: Randy Robinson <critterkeepr AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:46:37 -0500
Is anyone or would anyone like to go birding this Saturday, October 25, in the 
Little Rock, Pulaski County area? Please contact me. Thank you, Randy 

Subject: Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:49:17 +0000
Unbroken Tallgrass Prairie around contemporary Maysville is long gone in terms 
of glory days, but native birds and plants carry on old ways and habits of 
former Beaty Prairie. Yesterday, for example, FRANKLINíS GULLS (~150-200) were 
kettling on a modest south breeze. Technically, itís called declivity soaring: 
warm updrafts form as the breeze flows against bluffs above Spavinaw River 
valley in the immediate south. These prairie nesting gulls exploit such 
opportunities along their entire transcontinental journey as they head for 
winter in eastern South America. Iíll bet my bottom dollar prairie gulls riding 
thermals long predates even old Maysville. 


And ditto that for VESPER SPARROWS, only they are on the bare or open ground, 
not thermals, and yesterday, well-distributed along unpaved roads. I saw 19 
Vespers birds in 5 spots, missed other sparrows suddenly flushing away before I 
could get bins on them -- probably more Vespers. They nest all north of us 
where there is bare ground with scattered trees and shrubs. Crop fields, fields 
with short grass, former prairies, and back in the day, ground formed of bison 
wallows and wandering herds. 


Plants and their bird visitors also remember days of Sawtooth skyscrapers that 
dominated whole wet prairies like former Beaty. Modest patches of these elegant 
sunflowers remain. AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES and PINE SISKINS know them well. 
Yesterday, goldfinches (~30) and siskins (~10) hung by claws on seed heads 
3/4-inch wide -- right-side up, sideways, upside down -- picking tiny seeds 
with their perfect conical bill tool. Ancient stuff, from long before an 
Arkansas. 


I felt something akin this upon seeing elegant flowers twisting along the stalk 
of LADIESí-TRESSES ORCHIDS where a tiny patch of prairie hangs on the highway 
72 right-of-way. Cars and trucks on their way Maysville to Gravette, and I'm on 
my knees in the roadside ditch, not praying exactly, but trying for a good look 
at small white flowers. Thereís a story here, deep in the bulb, about the 
origins of orchids and did they know Greater Prairie-Chickens? 


And the Gayfeathers have gone to seed, their tall wands so purple in July, now 
golden seed fluff. In these seeds a kind of keeping faith, with the past and 
with the future. 


Still in the thrall, I turn down Tucker Road, last of the day. More Vesper 
Sparrows and then something truly spectacular: afternoon light caught in silky 
fluff of Swamp Milkweed seeds popping out of their pods and rising in the south 
breeze. Talk about the future beckoning! And then, of course, the present, 
where for a time we live. 


Hundreds of milkweed plants and Sawtooth skyscrapers thrived in this swampy 
corner. Later, the field was mowed and apparently herbicided in favor of fescue 
and a clean fencerow. Maybe his momma didnít teach him prairie? Maybe never saw 
milkweed seeds rising in late fall sun or golden siskins plucking seeds from 
the sky? 


When the last herbicide is dumped on the last weed, they all return and 
reclaim. 
Subject: IBIS
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:31:26 -0500
I posted a listing earlier from the field for a White-faced Ibis.  When I
got home and looked at the pictures it looks more like a Glossy Ibis to me.

What do others think?


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/October2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6073248180369577154 


Thanks
Michael
Subject: HERRING GULL AT LAKE SARACEN
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:38:05 -0500
This morning Delos McCauley and I observed, and I photographed, a 1st winter 
Herring Gull, as it flew near the parking lot at Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff. 
The ID was confirmed by Kenny Nichols. 

John  Redman
Subject: White-faced Ibis in central Arkansas
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:51:04 -0500
I saw a white-faced ibis in a puddle of water south of morrilton on highway 9 . 
Cross over Arkansas river about a quarter mile past hoyts implement store. East 
side of road near irrigation device (oversized sprinkler). 


Feeding and seems to be ok with hanging around.
Subject: Re: If it is on TV - it must be true
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:45:22 -0500
If it makes you feel any better Dan, I was watching a documentary about the 
Philippines I believe the other night and for some reason an eastern wood pewee 
was incessantly singing in the background. Had to laugh.... 


Ryan 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 22, 2014, at 14:56, Dan Bogler  wrote:
> 
> On only rare occasions do I post on this forum. Mostly just read and learn 
from all the good birders we have in Arkansas 

> 
> But I just had to share this
> 
> Last night I was watching TV on the HLN Channel featuring Nancy Grace and 
they were looking at a crime scene and mentioned that there were "buzzards" 
circling above. Well, technically there are no buzzards in North America. Only 
vultures. And there is a difference as the buzzards are an Old World species 

> 
> I realize that the words buzzard and vulture are often used interchangeably 
so I wrote that little comment off as no big deal. A free pass. 

> 
> Well, I then changed to The National Geographic channel about some mountain 
man named Mick or something like that who lives in the Olympic Peninsula 
Rainforest. An all knowing sort of guy that is in tune with the wilderness that 
he calls home. Pretty interesting stuff. 

> 
> That is until he went fishing and caught this beautiful "steelhead salmon"
> 
> Now there are Steelhead (which is a sea run trout). And there are Salmon.
> 
> But there are no "Steelhead Salmon"
> 
> And I thought gee wiz - there were probably several dozen people that worked 
on this show and edited before it went on the air. And nobody caught that ? 

> 
> Remember, this is on the National Geographic channel
> 
> So I said to myself "I am sort of glad that we now have an Ebola Czar. I 
guess we sort of needed that. But what this country really needs is some sort 
of bi-partisan Taxonomic Czar 

> 
> Otherwise our kids will grow up thinking all kites have a string attached to 
them 

> 
> And I nominate my good friend Jerry Davis     
> 
> Dan Bogler
> Hot Springs
Subject: Re: some help please
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:09:34 -0500
I second that thank you! I too appreciate when you tell what you are seeing. I 
have learned so much from this site. When you list a bird I do not know I look 
it up and listen to its song. I still say "what was that" and "who was that" 
too much and my husband is getting tired of hearing it. :-) 

Nancy in Fayetteville 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 22, 2014, at 10:12 AM, Charles Anderson  wrote:
> 
> I know it's hard to identify anything from somebody else's description, but I 
heard a bird late yesterday afternoon out in the woods around my home--too dark 
to see it--that I can't remember hearing before. 

> 
> It was a very distinctive two or three chips with a long whee, sort of like 
one of those slider whistles we had as kids: 

> 
> chip, chip, wheeeee
> 
> It's probably something common as dirt, but I just don't remember the call 
and have no idea how to look for it. Any suggestions? 

> 
> Chuck Anderson 
> 
> Seeing a lot of yellow rumps, pine warblers, eastern bluebirds, northern 
flickers, eastern phoebes, pileated and other woodpeckers, sparrows, a brown 
headed nuthatch or two, one junco, and lots of TQTI (too quick to identify) 
birds out in Western Hills Park in Little Rock, especially late in the day, 
about an hour before sunset. 

> 
> BTW, I love it when you guys post what you are seeing these days, even the 
pretty common stuff, because that helps Ruth and me to know what we might be 
looking for, and often we'll identify something we've puzzled over--like the 
Nashville Warblers that passed through a week or two ago. So thanks! 

Subject: If it is on TV - it must be true
From: Dan Bogler <danbogler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:56:53 -0500
On only rare occasions do I post on this forum. Mostly just read and learn
from all the good birders we have in Arkansas

But I just had to share this

Last night I was watching TV on the HLN Channel featuring Nancy Grace and
they were looking at a crime scene and mentioned that there were "buzzards"
circling above. Well, technically there are no buzzards in North America.
Only vultures. And there is a difference as the buzzards are an Old World
species

I realize that the words buzzard and vulture are often used interchangeably
so I wrote that little comment off as no big deal. A free pass.

Well, I then changed to The National Geographic channel about some mountain
man named Mick or something like that who lives in the Olympic Peninsula
Rainforest. An all knowing sort of guy that is in tune with the wilderness
that he calls home. Pretty interesting stuff.

That is until he went fishing and caught this beautiful "steelhead salmon"

Now there are Steelhead (which is a sea run trout). And there are Salmon.

But there are no "Steelhead Salmon"

And I thought gee wiz - there were probably several dozen people that
worked on this show and edited before it went on the air. And nobody caught
that ?

Remember, this is on the National Geographic channel

So I said to myself "I am sort of glad that we now have an Ebola Czar. I
guess we sort of needed that. But what this country really needs is some
sort of bi-partisan Taxonomic Czar

Otherwise our kids will grow up thinking all kites have a string attached
to them

And I nominate my good friend Jerry Davis

Dan Bogler
Hot Springs
Subject: some help please
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:12:38 -0500
I know it's hard to identify anything from somebody else's description, but
I heard a bird late yesterday afternoon out in the woods around my
home--too dark to see it--that I can't remember hearing before.

It was a very distinctive two or three chips with a long whee, sort of like
one of those slider whistles we had as kids:

chip, chip, wheeeee

It's probably something common as dirt, but I just don't remember the call
and have no idea how to look for it.  Any suggestions?

Chuck Anderson

Seeing a lot of yellow rumps, pine warblers, eastern bluebirds, northern
flickers, eastern phoebes, pileated and other woodpeckers, sparrows, a
brown headed nuthatch or two, one junco, and lots of TQTI (too quick to
identify) birds out in Western Hills Park in Little Rock, especially late
in the day, about an hour before sunset.

BTW, I love it when you guys post what you are seeing these days, even the
pretty common stuff, because that helps Ruth and me to know what we might
be looking for, and often we'll identify something we've puzzled over--like
the Nashville Warblers that passed through a week or two ago. So thanks!
Subject: Pelicans on Beaver Lake
From: Betty Brown <bbrown1941 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 17:04:00 -0400
We were out driving around the Lost Bridge camping area a couple of hours ago 
and as we started to enter the Lost Bridge Camping area a group of about 20 
pelicans flew over us. We love seeing pelicans and each year travel to Grove OK 
area to watch the beautiful birds. Having lived in the Bella Vista/Bentonville 
area for 7 years we have driven around Beaver Lake parks birding and never seen 
any pelicans before, so maybe this was a fluke. We have also never seen any 
mention of Pelicans in the ARBIRD emails. Does anybody have any idea where we 
can watch Pelicans on Beaver Lake? 


Thanks,

Betty and Jerry Brown
Subject: weekend arrivals
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:37:18 -0700
New-to-recent arrivals at the house this weekend included brown creepers, 
white-throated sparrows, huge flocks of robins, Dark-eyed Juncos, 
Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Yellow-rumped Warblers, 
Orange-crowned Warbler, Fox Sparrow, and Winter Wren. Soon-to-be-departeds 
included Nashville Warblers, House Wrens, and a wonderful Blue-headed Vireo. 
All could be at your houses today. Enjoy, 


Adam Schaffer
Bentonville
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune Editorial counterpoint: What shall our 'perspective' on birds, Vikings stadium aesthetics be?
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:47:27 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Those of you following the effort to get bird-safe glass installed in the new 
Minneapolis football stadium will want to read this editorial counterpoint (the 
Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial link was posted on ARBIRD four days ago). 


When I first starting reading it, I thought the newspaper had reconsidered its 
editorial position. Then I realized it was submitted by two individuals 
identified as follows at the end of the article: "Lisa Venable is co-founder of 
Minnesota Citizens for the Protection of Migratory Birds. Jerry Bahls is 
president of the Audubon Chapter-Minneapolis. 


Here's the link to the editorial counterpoint:

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/279846202.html

The editorial counterpoint includes the link below to the Javits Center in New 
York that includes the following as part of Phase II: "removal of every pane of 
glass in the main building and replacing all 8,000 of them with new, low-e 
glass leading to a higher-performing curtain wall of flat, transparent, 
bird-safe fritted glass in 5-by-10 foot modules which uses less metal and gives 
the space a more open feel": 


http://tinyurl.com/Javits-glass

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: FOS-WC Sparrow
From: Carol Meyerdirk <dmeyerdirk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:01:35 +0000
FOS White crowned sparrows - 3 showed up in our backyard yesterday. Nice to see 
them. 

Carol WLR 

----- Original Message -----

From: "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

To: "ARBIRD-L"  
Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:18:37 PM 
Subject: FOS-WC Sparrow 



Just saw my FOS White-crowned Sparrow while walking to LR Zoo. 
Donna Haynes 
West Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
Subject: Blue-headed vireo
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:39:38 -0500
Hi all.

A very smartly dressed Blue-headed vireo was foraging in the oak trees in my 
yard this morning. I am also seeing Ruby-throated hummingbirds, albeit now down 
to 1-2 per day. More than the usual amount of robins were busy in the trees 
this morning. Had several ruby-crowned kinglets yesterday but did not see them 
today. 


Cindy
Watching the wildlife on the ridge overlooking the Arkansas River in the 
Heights 

Little Rock



 		 	   		  
Subject: Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count Sunday December 14, 2014
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:27:26 +0000
Fayetteville CBC will be on Sunday December 14, 2014. It is open to anyone with 
an interest in birds. Our local count dates to 1961. We hold the count on 
Sunday because that is the day with fewest traffic conflicts. If you have been 
on the Fayetteville CBC previously, please contact your party leader about 
joining this yearís count. If you havenít participated, come on out for this 
fun way to learn more about local birds. Data are used to help analyze trends 
in bird populations across the continent. 
Subject: Birds and History
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:39:19 -0500
Sunday, I was driving into Little Rock to tour the replicas of Christopher 
Columbus' original voyage vessels the Pinta and Nina, which were moored on the 
bank of the Arkansas River. Coming down Pike Ave. in North Little Rock, I 
spotted a pair of adult Bald Eagles soaring near the river. They were circling, 
dipping, and diving. It looked to be a slow, mating dance against the bright 
blue, cloudless fall sky. 


At the river, walking to the replicas along the river's edge, I spotted a very 
nervous Swamp Sparrow flying between the water's edge and a grouping of 
vegetation higher up on bank. The poor thing kept getting disturbed by all the 
people walking to the ships. I'm sure he will be very glad when the vessels 
leave and things quiet down. 


For anyone interested in history, this Wednesday the Pinta and Nina will be at 
the Lake Dardanelle State Park sailing back and forth across the lake from the 
State Park. They are being filmed by the History Channel for a special program 
about Columbus' voyage. The public is welcome to come to the park and watch the 
boats sailing with their rigging fully deployed. The crew will be in period 
dress. 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Irruption Birds (Madison County)
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 19:22:38 -0500
In accordance with Ron Pittaway's famous "Winter Finch Forecast," the Ozark
Natural Science Center (near Huntsville) has hosted both Red-breasted
Nuthatches and Pine Siskins over the past two weeks. I heard the former
twice during the second week of October; the latter I heard late last week.

And of course, there have been other recent fall arrivals: Dark-eyed
Juncos, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets,
and White-throated Sparrows.

As a reminder, the Ozark Natural Science Center is open and free to the
public on weekends when there aren't educational programs, which are most
weekends. Simply contact them by phone or e-mail (see
http://onsc.us/contact-all.php) and let them know when you plan to visit so
the gate can be left open for you.

Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Huntsville, Madison Co.
Subject: Le Conte's Sparrow at Woolsey, Washington Co.
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:11:36 -0700
Sorry to be late in posting this. Saw many sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie, in 
Fayetteville on October 18: FOS - Le Conte's, Fox, Song and Dark-eyed Junco; 
also Field, White-crowned, White-throated, Savannah, Swamp and Lincoln's. 


Same day at Centerton - many ducks, including Northern Pintail and Ruddy Ducks; 
Bald Eagle adult, American Pipits. 


Happy birding!
Joanie
Subject: Black-throated Green
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 16:47:37 -0500
Tried for a look at nature today while Deer hunting.  In with a flock of
Titmouse and Chickadee's I spiced a Black-throated Green Warbler.  It looked
like it was still in breeding plumage. 

 

Terry Butler 
Subject: Sightings: Two Rivers Park
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 12:24:37 -0500
I walked the big field and part of the horse trail Sunday morning. Present were 
FOS Yellow-rumped Warbler, a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker that lived up to his 
name, Eastern Towhees and possibly last of season Common Yellowthroat and 
Nashville Warblers (both first winter females). 


I made a quick trip to the Lake Maumelle Spillway in hopes of early loons or 
grebes but after toting my scope the half mile to the water’s edge, I was 
rewarded with only a pair of Pied-billed Grebes. These are not the grebes I am 
looking for. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.‚ÄĚ -- Thorin 
Subject: 1ST PLACE FOR ďTRASHIESTĒ BUNCH ON BEAVER
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 14:20:28 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society lists Beaver Lake Nursery Pond as one of the 
places to go birding (see our web site for details). Yesterday, generous 
volunteers from NORTHWEST ARKANSAS MASTER NATURALISTS spent their 
extraordinarily beautiful fall Saturday morning NOT decked-out in their 
Razorback reds, NOT touring back in the mountains for arts & crafts & fall 
color, NOT running their leaf blowers at full blast. Instead, they spent the 
morning (1) clearing walking trails with chainsaw and rakes, (2) cleaning and 
repairing 30+ bird boxes, (3) collecting and stacking for removal (by the Corps 
of Engineers) 2+ trailer loads of trash washed up on a particularly lovely 
finger of shortleaf pine- oak woods poking into Beaver peninsula-like. 


Results include a hill of full trash bags and an even bigger hill of styrofoam 
and boards with nails from blown-apart docks, plus tires. Their clean-up makes 
it much easier, safer, and more esthetically-pleasing to go birding. 


Bird box work directly benefits Eastern Bluebirds, Tree Swallows, Prothonotary 
Warblers, Wood Ducks, and other cavity-using species. Arkansas Audubon Society 
Trust has provided a grant in support of the bird box effort. 


The short easily-walked trail is a good place to experience native shortleaf 
pine woodlands. Overall, the nursery pond is a great place to enjoy Beaver Lake 
and you donít need a party barge or a home-on-the-lake to enjoy it. 


Other than whatís mentioned above, what is this effort worth? My estimate is a 
bare minimum of 100 hours of travel and work involved and that is without 
compensating for cost of gasoline or miles traveled to get to the nursery pond, 
chainsaw use, leather gloves, plastic bags, and additional time devoted by the 
Corps of Engineers on their part. This, and more, is what it costs to keep the 
public in public lands. 


Of course, yours truly snuck out from hauling styrofoam for a little birding. 
The pond is now a drained grassy flat with visitors including Pine Warblers 
(2), Savannah Sparrows (3), Killdeer, Eastern Bluebirds (1). A Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker flew over (FOS), as did Double-crested Cormorants (3), and Red-headed 
Woodpeckers (2). At one point I had to stop hauling a trash bag to count 
American Crows (55) flying along a high ridge above the bluffs. White-throated 
Sparrows were out in the button bushes. A lone, quite vocal Fish Crow flew over 
maybe unaware that he/she is perhaps the last of the last for this season (Fish 
Crows donít winter in northwest Arkansas Ö yet). 


By the inherent powers vested in my by No One in Particular, I hereby award to 
Master Naturalists 1st place as the ďtrashiestĒ bunch Iíve ever met. 
Subject: Editorial on tropic cascade.
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 08:17:59 -0500
An editorial I wrote re. people and birds is in today's Democrat Gazette.
If you don't get the paper and you are interested, I will be happy to
e-mail you my unedited manuscript.

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: AAS-News of Members
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 22:27:32 -0500
Dear ARbirders:

 

It's almost that time again..time for another issue of the AAS newsletter,
Arkansas Birds and we'd like to know what YOU as AAS members have been up
to. 

 

If you would like to share your recent adventures, birding news, and
observations, then please email me at dboyles AT arkansasedc.com, by November
1. 

Thank you for supporting our newsletter through your personal contributions!

 

Good birding,

Dottie Boyles




Subject: King's River Falls
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 19:03:57 -0500
FOS Winter Wren...and all the other regulars. Oh yeah, and one of my favorites, 
a Kingfisher. Gorgeous colors in some places. Not peak yet. 


Sandy B.
FS, Ar

Sent from my iPad
Subject: FOS Brown Creeper
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 18:51:13 -0500
Had our first brown creeper today.  Last year they were few and far between so 
I hope this is a good year.  We love watching them spiraling up the tree 
trunks searching for prizes then flying back to the bottom and optimistically 
repeating the show. 


Sara
Mt. Sequoyah S., Fayetteville
Subject: Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 23:06:15 +0000
Thanks a lot for helping us keep up on this. And Amen X1000 for your astute 
responses. That attitude -- that just this little bit of killing here doesn't 
mean much -- is just what adds up to killing billions of birds for no good 
reason. 

________________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of Barry Haas [bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET] 

Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2014 12:38 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in 
perspective 


Dear ARBIRDers,

I know some of you are keeping up with construction of the new football stadium 
in Minneapolis and its potential impact on migrating birds in the Mississippi 
flyway. Here's an editorial from yesterday's Minneapolis Star-Tribune: 


http://www.startribune.com/opinion/editorials/279625602.html

A few comments on the article:

1) "Altogether, fewer than 3 percent of the U.S. bird population dies each year 
from collisions with buildings." I wonder if that statement was "Altogether, 
fewer than 3 percent of Minneapolis Star-Tribune employees dies each year from 
collisions with buildings" the editorialist would still find that percentage 
underwhelming. I think not. 


2) "The addition of one glassy building in Minneapolis wonít appreciably alter 
the mortality rate of the North American bird population." That's true, but a 
meaningless statement. Using such logic one more coal-fired power plant won't 
"appreciably alter" global climate change. Nor would the next single coal-fired 
power plant. Nor the next. And so on. The problem of course is one of 
cumulative impact. It's unfortunate the editorialist seems incapable of 
separating the single building concept and its impact from multiples of single 
buildings all over the country and their very different cumulative impact. 


3) "The dispute comes down to competing values: architectural aesthetics vs. 
large-scale bird collisions that may or may not happen." Question- if the 
stadium does turn out to be a "cathedral to killing birds" as mentioned in the 
editorial, what will be done about it? Oh right, the game must go on. Patrons 
can just step around or over any scattered bird carcasses. Or workers will 
scoop up the carcasses before events so patrons won't be forced to see them. 


4) Finally, "When controversial buildings are involved, bird collisions make 
for high drama. But they donít amount to much in the larger scheme of things." 
I guess that depends on how you see the world. If your world view is humans and 
football at the center, you probably don't even realize there is a "larger 
scheme of things". If you believe living things are not to be tossed aside so 
lightly, you not only see the "larger scheme of things" you try to do something 
to make it better. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: FOS
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:38:48 -0500
Finally, FOS WTSP.  Harrison, AR

 

Sally Jo Gibson

512 Yorkshire Cove

Harrison, AR 72601

Home Phone: 870-741-5805

Cell: 870-688-9950

sjogibson AT live.com

 

Life is too short to be anything but happy. 

Falling down is a part of life, Getting back up is living.

 
Subject: FOS Junco
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:23:55 -0500
On Fossil Flats Trail, Devil's Den.

Sent from my iPad
Subject: visitor
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 14:39:20 -0500
Don looked out the front door this morning and standing on the front porch 
stone steps he saw a Greater Roadrunner that was no doubt after the skinks who 
alternately hide and sunbathe there. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: FOS junco
From: Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 12:59:40 -0500
Saw my first junco under the feeders today. My last sighting of a RT
hummingbird was Oct. 16.

Meredith Hawkins
west Little Rock
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 12:38:15 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

I know some of you are keeping up with construction of the new football stadium 
in Minneapolis and its potential impact on migrating birds in the Mississippi 
flyway. Here's an editorial from yesterday's Minneapolis Star-Tribune: 


http://www.startribune.com/opinion/editorials/279625602.html

A few comments on the article:

1) "Altogether, fewer than 3 percent of the U.S. bird population dies each year 
from collisions with buildings." I wonder if that statement was "Altogether, 
fewer than 3 percent of Minneapolis Star-Tribune employees dies each year from 
collisions with buildings" the editorialist would still find that percentage 
underwhelming. I think not. 


2) "The addition of one glassy building in Minneapolis wonít appreciably alter 
the mortality rate of the North American bird population." That's true, but a 
meaningless statement. Using such logic one more coal-fired power plant won't 
"appreciably alter" global climate change. Nor would the next single coal-fired 
power plant. Nor the next. And so on. The problem of course is one of 
cumulative impact. It's unfortunate the editorialist seems incapable of 
separating the single building concept and its impact from multiples of single 
buildings all over the country and their very different cumulative impact. 


3) "The dispute comes down to competing values: architectural aesthetics vs. 
large-scale bird collisions that may or may not happen." Question- if the 
stadium does turn out to be a "cathedral to killing birds" as mentioned in the 
editorial, what will be done about it? Oh right, the game must go on. Patrons 
can just step around or over any scattered bird carcasses. Or workers will 
scoop up the carcasses before events so patrons won't be forced to see them. 


4) Finally, "When controversial buildings are involved, bird collisions make 
for high drama. But they donít amount to much in the larger scheme of things." 
I guess that depends on how you see the world. If your world view is humans and 
football at the center, you probably don't even realize there is a "larger 
scheme of things". If you believe living things are not to be tossed aside so 
lightly, you not only see the "larger scheme of things" you try to do something 
to make it better. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:44:08 +0000
Had a euro-dove calling and calling this morning. Unusual for this time of 
year. Maybe calling the Hogs? Karen Hart Hillcrest. 1 mile from War Memorial 
Stadium. 


Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 18, 2014, at 11:17 AM, "Jim Dixon" 
> wrote: 


I walked the nature trail behind the LRAC Saturday morning. I actually donned 
tall boots and went into the tall stuff to see if I'd find more sparrows. I saw 
two FOS Purple Finch in a tree next to the building plus FOS Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker, White-throated Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Swamp Sparrow. 


I then Harper Road and Frazier Pike in hopes of fancy doves and/or cranes. I 
had to settle for one Peregrine Falcon, six Kestrels, and a dozen Euros. They 
have collars right? Maybe that is fancy enough. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock

"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after." -- Thorin 
Subject: Juncos in Hot Springs
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 11:37:37 -0500
Juncos are here in Hot Springs this morning joining the White-throated sparrows 
that arrived on Thursday. A ruby-throated hummingbird female stopped to refuel 
on Thursday and moved on. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Subject: Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 11:16:44 -0500
I walked the nature trail behind the LRAC Saturday morning. I actually donned 
tall boots and went into the tall stuff to see if I’d find more sparrows. I 
saw two FOS Purple Finch in a tree next to the building plus FOS Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker, White-throated Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Swamp Sparrow. 


I then Harper Road and Frazier Pike in hopes of fancy doves and/or cranes. I 
had to settle for one Peregrine Falcon, six Kestrels, and a dozen Euros. They 
have collars right? Maybe that is fancy enough. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.‚ÄĚ -- Thorin 
Subject: RED-TAILS, DARK-BROWN CALURUS TO ALMOST-WHITE KRIDERíS (Maysville)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 05:59:56 +0000
Western hawks wintering in northwest Arkansas have returned (FOS). A Kriderís 
Hawk, the white subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk nesting in the northern Great 
Plains, was near Cherokee City yesterday. Brilliant white hard to miss, 
including white head, back, and pinkish tail. Later, the opposite southwest of 
Maysville: ďWesternĒ Red-tailed Hawk, B. j. calurus almost entirely deep 
chocolate brown/black, reddish tail and typical red-tail vocalizations. 


Also southwest of Maysville, in a former wet prairie area, the graded county 
roads are lined Sawtooth Sunflowers, often 8-10 feet in height, and loaded with 
seedheads. In two areas, they were swarmed by Pine Siskins, flocks ranging from 
20 to 40 or so. In the same places: White-crowned, Swamp, Song, White-throated, 
and Dark-eyed Juncos no doubt attracted by the same bountiful small seed crop 
on the ground. 


During late summer the Sawtooths are covered with yellow flowers. Now seed 
heads on several skyscrapers total 30-50, each one full of seeds. A great leap 
of imagination isnít required to recognize the vast natural resource involved 
here, and the significant consequent loss to seed-eating birds since these 
native plants are usually mowed as undesirable weeds. Happily, as todayís bird 
showing, not always mowed. 


Otherwise, in All The (Bird) News Fit To Print: A flock of 43 American Pipits 
walked and bobbed through a harvested bean field. A flock of 23 Yellow-rumped 
Warblers worked a tree and brush-lined county road. In two places, Loggerhead 
Shrikes had fresh stuff hung from barbs along the road. Most of these were 
grasshoppers, but in one place, two small mammals, I think Northern 
Short-tailed Shrews, with heads missing. 
Subject: Re: Siskins
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 17:09:22 -0700
------------------------------
On Fri, Oct 17, 2014 5:46 PM CDT Norman Lavers wrote:

>Two Siskins were at Scatter Creek W.M.A., Lancaster unit in Greene County 
today along with Am. Goldfinches, White-throated Sparrows, Song Sparrows and an 
Orange-crowned Warbler. 

>The masses of native asters were feeding Monarchs on their way south.
>
>Cheryl Lavers, Jonesboro
Subject: Arkies in Okie....Again
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 18:54:12 -0500
David Oakley, Jacque Brown, and I are en route to the Black Mesa. The trip 
started off with a bang this afternoon, with close looks at the Costa's 
Hummingbird in Osage County. This bird isn't far for us western Arkansans and 
well worth the trip. It's an adult male. Heads up to those interested....it's 
still around! 


~Mitchell

Sent from my iPhone.
Subject: Siskins
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 15:46:06 -0700
Two Siskins were at Scatter Creek W.M.A., Lancaster unit in Greene County today 
along with Am. Goldfinches, White-throated Sparrows, Song Sparrows and an 
Orange-crowned Warbler. 

The masses of native asters were feeding Monarchs on their way south.

Cheryl Lavers, Jonesboro
Subject: FOS
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:46:12 -0500
Several Golden-crowned Kinglets were calling from trees along one of the wooded 
paths this morning and I saw our first Junco. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Round Robin, Blue Jay Brawl
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 18:45:55 +0000
Dozens and dozens of attendees to the Round Robin ‚Äď Blue Jay brawl in the 
Boyles backyard. A single Northern Flicker acted as mediator as many skirmishes 
broke out over control of one tree. 

Observer wasted lots of time watching the bird show. A lot more entertaining 
than raking leaves. 


Doris Boyles
Little Rock

Apparently, while my mom was out raking leaves yesterday, a large flock of 
American Robins and Blue Jays landed in one of the trees in the backyard at the 
same time. A huge fight broke out as birds scrambled to sit on the same branch 
already occupied by another bird. A single Northern Flicker (aka “Spotted 
Sandpiper‚ÄĚ) quietly hung on the trunk of the tree while skirmishes broke out 
around it. The chickadees and titmice were cautiously watching while snacking 
from the feeders. After about 15 minutes the robins and jays all flew off to 
continue the brawl elsewhere. Mom, went back to raking leaves. 


Dottie Boyles
(My apologies to Dr. Kannan if ‚ÄúRound Robin‚ÄĚ shows up on one of his 
Ornithology lab exams as an actual species.) 


This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: finally FOS
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 18:16:11 +0000
Our FOS white-throated sparrow … 2 abbreviated song notes this morning at 
daybreak in the hedge. Better put out more scratch seed. Karen Hart Hillcrest 
LR 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan 

Sent: Friday, October 17, 2014 12:30 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!

LSU just issued this press release. 
http://www.lsu.edu/ur/ocur/lsunews/MediaCenter/News/2014/10/item73041.html 


Also, Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world record 1982 Birding 
Big Day in Peru 


What seems very impressive is that the 1982 record was apparently done with 
little or no song playbacks. 





[Image removed by sender. 
image] 












Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world 
recor... 



View on 
www.youtube.com 


Preview by Yahoo







On Friday, 17 October 2014 12:13 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


I am truly impressed - and envious! Makes me want to go back to Peru! There are 
so many places to visit there! 

Joanie

On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And y'all 
call yourselves Birders?" My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two! A BIG high five to the LSU team. What an 
accomplishment. 

Sara
On Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  wrote:
They did it! Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day record 
by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru! 


The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982. 


See their exuberant twitter post at 
https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 


See the article that appeared just before this feat: 
http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 


To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species. But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles. 


Wow!

Kannan



Subject: Re: new big day world record today!
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 17:30:09 +0000
LSU just issued this press 
release. http://www.lsu.edu/ur/ocur/lsunews/MediaCenter/News/2014/10/item73041.html 
 Also, Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world record 1982 Birding 
Big Day in Peru 

What seems very impressive is that the 1982 record was apparently done with 
little or no song playbacks.   

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world recor... |
|  |
| View on www.youtube.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

   

 On Friday, 17 October 2014 12:13 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

   

 I am truly impressed - and envious!  Makes me want to go back to Peru!  
There are so many places to visit there!Joanie 

 

 On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

   

 Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And 
y'all call yourselves Birders?"  My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two!  A BIG high five to the LSU team.  
What an accomplishment.SaraOn Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan 
 wrote: 



They did it!  Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day 
record by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru!  

The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982.   

See their exuberant twitter post 
at https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 

See the article that appeared just before this 
feat: http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 

To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species.  But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles.   

Wow!
Kannan 

    

   
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 10:13:53 -0700
I am truly impressed - and envious! Makes me want to go back to Peru! There are 
so many places to visit there! 

Joanie



On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

 


Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And y'all 
call yourselves Birders?" My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two! A BIG high five to the LSU team. What an 
accomplishment. 

Sara
On Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  wrote:

They did it! Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day record 
by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru! 


The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982. 


See their exuberant twitter post at 
https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 


See the article that appeared just before this feat: 
http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 


To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species. But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles. 


Wow!

Kannan
Subject: Re: Greetings from Lake Dardanelle
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 11:34:07 -0500
I haven’t seen a Red-breasted Nuthatch here at home in YEARS!!! Maybe heard 
one a few years ago. I used to have them every winter. I sure do miss them!!!! 
I had one that ate out of my hand in 2008. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/image/111068228 Maybe had one in 2009, but not 
since then, I don’t think. Sad!!! 



Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Kenny Nichols 
Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 9:10 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Greetings from Lake Dardanelle

Always nice to see and hear, LaDonna and I had a Red-breasted Nuthatch here 
last weekend. Today, while driving in, we flushed a small sparrow that teed up 
nicely in an elm sapling. It turned out to be a LeConte's Sparrow which spent 
the entire afternoon in a small patch of the yard that is, not surprisingly, 
the same place I had a Nelson's Sparrow several years ago. The LeConte's was 
yard bird #230. 


kenny nichols
cabot, ar
Subject: Re: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 13:19:21 +0000
No Harris's to report at our house (that would really be exciting) but my mom 
spotted the first Dark-eyed Junco of the season looking for food. While I 
really like watching the junco's, White-throated and other sparrows, I also 
know winter is not too far behind. Ugggg! 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock, AR  72201

From: Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 7:42 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FOS: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow
This morning started with peeping roosts of White-throated Sparrows in my yard 
and neighborhood in Fayetteville. Later, Dark-eyed Juncos and Harris's Sparrows 
(both FOS) were part of mixed species sparrow flocks in the vicinity of 
Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport this morning. 




This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
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Subject: White-throated Sparrow in SW AR
From: "Campbell, Martin" <campbem AT HSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 03:56:13 +0000
Excited by the FOS posts of White-throated sparrows in Fayetteville (and later 
FS), I went out to my woods' edge around noon, and guess what should appear but 
my FOS White-throated. It was chip note communicating with another that I could 
not see a 100 feet away. 




What will tomorrow bring??



Marty Campbell

Arkadelphia
Subject: Lake Dardanelle
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:53:54 -0500
One adult Lesser Black-backed Gull near Delaware Rec Area today. 

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle 

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