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Updated on Sunday, February 7 at 03:21 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Stub-tailed Spadebill,©Sophie Webb

7 Feb Check Strange Brew in ARDem-Gaz [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
7 Feb Woodcock near Lake Sylvia [kjdillard ]
7 Feb Purple Martins Arrived in Augusta Georgia February 6, 2016 [jwdavis ]
7 Feb Lake Maumelle: Red-necked Grebe & Red-breasted Merganser [jamesdixonlr ]
7 Feb AAS News of Members [Dottie Boyles ]
6 Feb Magness Lake & Seeco Ponds [jamesdixonlr ]
6 Feb Common Loons [Karen ]
6 Feb Suggestions please [Hilda Jones ]
5 Feb eagle nest cam [Teresa & Leif ]
5 Feb FW: DoD NR Webinar Series: Avian Knowledge Network and Information Planning and Conservation System Presentation Available [Jeffrey Short ]
4 Feb Common Merganser [Kennynations ]
4 Feb Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 4 [David Arbour ]
4 Feb Trumpeter Swans [Terry Judy Butler ]
4 Feb ASCA February Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
4 Feb FW: Grand jury indicts Ammon Bundy and 15 refuge occupiers - E&E ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
3 Feb FW: 2016 National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Webinars (UNCLASSIFIED) [Jeffrey Short ]
3 Feb Re: Water Hustlers just won't stop [Jeffrey Short ]
3 Feb Fw: Greater Prairie-Chicken in Bartlesville [jwdavis ]
3 Feb 2ND YEAR WINTER HERRING GULL AT L;AKE SARACEN [JFR ]
2 Feb Re: Country Loop Road [Cheryle Sytsma ]
2 Feb FW: Sharing-Dueling Burns protests decry, support Oregon refuge occupation ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
2 Feb Fw: The Messenger bird film coming to Tulsa [jwdavis ]
1 Feb FW: Sharing ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
1 Feb I Brake for Bald Eagles...and Trumpeter Swans [dianemarie yates ]
1 Feb Re: Bird Migration Is Happening [ ]
1 Feb WINTER SUMMER TANAGER CORNUCOPIA (got any?) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
1 Feb Peent Peent ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
1 Feb ASCA Field Trip Feather ID [Dan Scheiman ]
1 Feb WOODCOCK FIELD TRIP TO LAKE WEDINGTON (near Fayetteville) FEBRUARY 27, 2016 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
1 Feb Re: Bird Migration Is Happening [Karen Garrett ]
31 Jan Miller and Clark Counties, 1/31/2016 [swamp_fox ]
31 Jan Re: Bird Migration Is Happening [Bill Thurman ]
31 Jan Bird Migration Is Happening [jwdavis ]
31 Jan Western Grebe [Karen ]
30 Jan Other Pulaski & Lonoke County birds [CK Franklin ]
30 Jan Pulaski County Merlin & Stuttgart Airport [CK Franklin ]
30 Jan Mealworm ranchers [Jeffrey Short ]
29 Jan Bird Migration Map Across Americas [jwdavis ]
28 Jan Request for information [Kelly Chitwood ]
28 Jan Re: politics [Karen Garrett ]
29 Jan enough already ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
28 Jan Possibly [Herschel Raney ]
28 Jan Re: politics [Daniel Mason ]
29 Jan Re: politics [dianemarie yates ]
28 Jan Re: politics [Daniel Mason ]
29 Jan Bald Eagles & Birds of Arkansas [dianemarie yates ]
28 Jan Re: politics ["Kate M. Chapman" ]
28 Jan Re: politics [Keith de Noble ]
28 Jan Re: politics [CK Franklin ]
28 Jan Re: politics [jonathanperry24 ]
28 Jan Re: politics [Judy & Don ]
28 Jan Re: politics ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Jan Re: politics [Kay Hodnett ]
28 Jan Politics... [dianemarie yates ]
28 Jan Re: politics [Ellen Fennell ]
28 Jan politics [Daniel Mason ]
28 Jan RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS AT LAKE MAUMELLE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Jan FW: Malheur National Forest ~ In the News ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
28 Jan FW: Additional Arrests in the Occupation of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
28 Jan Re: Pre-1986 bird record database ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 Jan Pre-1986 bird record database [Lyndal York ]
27 Jan Re: Update on the Refuge Militia [Ann Gordon ]
27 Jan Re: Update on the Refuge Militia [Janine Perlman ]
27 Jan Update on the Refuge Militia ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
27 Jan Nixing the Newbies... [dianemarie yates ]
27 Jan Re: A Brambling Thank You... [dianemarie yates ]
27 Jan Re: A Brambling Thank You... ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
27 Jan A Brambling Thank You... [dianemarie yates ]
27 Jan Re: Arkansas Brambling is a No Show [dianemarie yates ]
27 Jan Re: Arkansas Brambling is a No Show [Karen Holliday ]
26 Jan Re: Arkansas Brambling is a No Show [Karen ]
26 Jan Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 26 [David Arbour ]
26 Jan Arkansas Brambling is a No Show [CK Franklin ]
26 Jan Ducks, loons, and grebes [Don Simons ]
26 Jan Re: WELCOME TO TWITCHER’S HEAVEN [Jacque Brown ]
26 Jan Re: WELCOME TO TWITCHERS HEAVEN [Karen Konarski-Hart ]

Subject: Check Strange Brew in ARDem-Gaz
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 20:18:28 +0000
Bird humor.

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 7, 2016, at 11:42 AM, kjdillard 
> wrote: 



My dog and I were walking in the Lake Sylvia area when she pointed to a 
Woodcock on the ground near by. Another flew moments later. First I have 
actually seen with my naked eye. 


Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Woodcock near Lake Sylvia
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 11:42:00 -0600
    

My dog and I were walking in the  Lake Sylvia area when she pointed to a 
Woodcock on the ground near by.  Another flew moments later.  First I have 
actually seen with my naked eye.  

Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Purple Martins Arrived in Augusta Georgia February 6, 2016
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 09:38:19 -0600
Purple Martins arrived in Augusta, Georgia yesterday. Look for them to be 
arriving at your locations soon. May sure the Martin boxes are cleaned and 
ready for these birds. Bluebirds are also checking out nest boxes and titmice 
are singing so prepare for them as well. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR 
Subject: Lake Maumelle: Red-necked Grebe & Red-breasted Merganser
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 09:12:22 -0600
    
Visible from Hundley Road Causeway at 9 am Sunday. 1 RNGR & 6 RBMEs. Karen 
Holliday & myself.  



Jim DixonSent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
Subject: AAS News of Members
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 01:42:31 -0600
It's that time again... time for AAS members to share their adventures and 
travels for the next issue of Arkansas Birds. Deadline for submissions for the 
News of Members section is Feb. 14. 


Remember you don't have to write a novel for this section just a short 
paragraph will do. So drop me a line or two and share your latest adventures 
during the past three months. 



Thanks
Dottie Boyles 
Little Rock
Subject: Magness Lake & Seeco Ponds
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 17:13:23 -0600
    
I saw 63 Trumpeter Swans between the three bodies of water and 1 Tundra (at 
Magness ) Saturday afternoon. No Common Merganser was seen today.  



Jim DixonSent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
Subject: Common Loons
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 15:29:39 -0600
Three Common Loons have spent the entire day loafing around on Lake Willastein, 
the small lake behind my house. Over the years we'll have a single COLO 
periodically show up, but never three at one time. A Double-crested Cormorant 
has been hanging out with the flock of American Coots, along with a couple of 
Ring-billed Gulls. The 20+ Pine Siskins are still visiting our feeders. We 
normally have only 3 or 4 each winter. This winter the Siskins have outnumbered 
the Goldfinches 2 to 1. 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle-Pulaski County

 
Subject: Suggestions please
From: Hilda Jones <hjones03 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 02:23:29 +0000
My 13 y/o son, Cody, is working on a modified Big Year (within a 150 mile 
radius of Ouachita County and a minimum target of 200 birds for the year... 
hopefully more). We will be visiting the Pine Bluff / Stuttgart area tomorrow. 
Lake Saracen is first on the list then any ponds or fields we can find ducks 
and or geese. Are there any particular areas we should go? Any suggestions 
would be greatly appreciated! 


Thank you,
Hilda Jones
Subject: eagle nest cam
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 12:31:39 -0500
 A friend sent this to me this morning . If you interested in watching an eagle 
sitting on her nest. You can watch her from this link. 

http://www.berry.edu/eaglecam/

Sincerely, Teresa in Hector.

-- 
Faith  means believing the unbelievable! Life ends when you  stop believing..
Subject: FW: DoD NR Webinar Series: Avian Knowledge Network and Information Planning and Conservation System Presentation Available
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 08:26:14 -0600
FWIMC (For whom it may concern)

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Phillips, Taylor [USA] [mailto:Phillips_Taylor AT bah.com] 
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 7:57 AM
To: DoD Natural Resources
Cc: eric_kershner AT fws.gov
Subject: DoD NR Webinar Series: Avian Knowledge Network and Information
Planning and Conservation System Presentation Available

Hello All,

Thank you to everyone who participated in yesterday's call.  For those of
you who were not able to join the webinar, the webinar recording is
available on the Resources page of the NR Program web portal:
http://www.dodnaturalresources.net/Resources.html.

Taylor Phillips
DoD Natural Resources Program, DoDNaturalResources.net DoDNatRes AT bah.com
Twitter:  AT DoDNatRes
Subject: Common Merganser
From: Kennynations <kennynations AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 22:49:34 -0600
The Common Merganser (female) is still present at Magness Lake east of Heber 
Springs. 


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 4
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 21:09:47 -0600
It was mostly clear, cold, and windy on the bird survey today.  60 species
were found.  The biggest highlight of the day was finding the Golden Eagle
sitting on the levee east of the south parking area feeding on some prey it
had captured and surrounded by crows and a Northern Harrier that were
waiting and hoping for leftovers.  I spent half the survey in the woods
today now that the hunters are gone.  Here is my list for today:

 

Gadwall - 740

Mallard - 85

Northern Shoveler - 28

Northern Pintail - 318

Green-winged Teal - 10

Canvasback - 9

Ring-necked Duck - 447

Hooded Merganser - 7 

Ruddy Duck - 19

Pied-billed Grebe - 8

Double-crested Cormorant - 23

Great Blue Heron - 14

Black Vulture - 6

Turkey Vulture - 19

Bald Eagle - 1 imm.

Northern Harrier - 4

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

American Coot - 518

Killdeer - 116

Greater Yellowlegs - 7

Wilson's Snipe - 12

Mourning Dove - 30

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 3

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 190

Fish Crow - 5

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Brown Creeper - 2

Carolina Wren - 4

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Hermit Thrush - 1

Brown Thrasher - 4

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 9

Pine Warbler - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 1

Le Conte's Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 1

Song Sparrow - 5

Swamp Sparrow - 3

White-throated Sparrow - 9

White-crowned Sparrow - 12

Northern Cardinal - 10

Red-winged Blackbird - 600

Eastern Meadowlark - 28

Rusty Blackbird - 2

Common Grackle - 13

American Goldfinch - 5

 

 

Herps:

 

Southern Black Racer

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling.

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 
Subject: Trumpeter Swans
From: Terry Judy Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 20:23:00 -0600
Looks like we are down in numbers to about 70 Trumpeter swans left up here
in the Heber Springs, Wilburn area.  The Tundra had left about 2 weeks ago
but today made a reappearance.  Anyone needing a Tundra, this may be a last
chance.

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: ASCA February Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 22:58:54 +0000
Saturday, February 13th is the upcoming field trip of the Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas (ASCA).  Please see details below.  Anyone interested in 
birds is welcome to join us.  You don't have an ASCA member to participate.  
If you have questions, please feel free to contact me off list.Karen 
HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator 

 February 13, 2016Two Rivers Park, LittleRock AR Meet at 9:00 a.m. in the 
parking lot of the Two Rivers ParkBridge (also known as the “Little” Dam 
Bridge) at the start of the walkingtrail located at 4468 River Mountain Road at 
the southeast end of the TwoRivers Park peninsula.  Exit west off I-430 
ontoCantrell Rd.  At the first stop light,turn right (north) onto River 
Mountain Road. Go to the bottom of the hill then bear right to the main 
parking lot.  GPS coordinates are 34.797931, -92.384704. We’ll scope the 
river looking for water birds, gulls, and eagles from the parking lot and 
bridge, thenwe'll walk the paved trail as far as people wish to go.  You can 
turn around at any point and headback to your vehicle.  After returning toour 
cars, we’ll drive to the west entrance into Two Rivers Park and walk the 
bigfield and horse trail.  Both areas have adiverse population of sparrows and 
provides a great opportunity to work onidentifying those “little brown 
birds”. Knee-high rubber boots are recommend for the big field because of 
thecopious sand burrs.  Bring water, snacks,and your scope if you have one.  
Weshould finish around noon.  If any rareloons have been reported, birders can 
continue on to Lake Maumelle.  Loons, mergansers, ducks, and grebes areeasily 
found on the lake this time of year. If you can’t join the field trip, 
participate in the GBBC bycounting the birds in your own backyard and 
submitting your sightings to theGBBC website at www.birdcount.org. 
Subject: FW: Grand jury indicts Ammon Bundy and 15 refuge occupiers - E&E
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 20:19:34 +0000
It looks like the occupiers have missed their opportunity to go back home 
freely. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: Stearly, Michael J -FS
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 11:53 AM
To: FS-pdl r6 malheur all employees
Cc: Baker, Stephen - FS
Subject: Grand jury indicts Ammon Bundy and 15 refuge occupiers - E&E

Grand jury indicts Ammon Bundy and 15 refuge occupiers
Ben Panko, E&E reporter
Published: Thursday, February 4, 2016
Ammon Bundy and 15 others who occupied an Oregon federal wildlife refuge were 
indicted yesterday on charges of conspiracy to impede federal officers through 
intimidation, threats or force. 

The indictments, 
which were unsealed today, contend that the 16 militants did "knowingly and 
willfully conspire" to prevent officers and employees of the Fish and Wildlife 
Service from doing their job at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. 

E&E provides on-the-ground coverage of the armed occupation of Malheur National 
Wildlife Refuge and analysis of the public lands controversies that sparked it. 

The indictment also cited "overt" intimidation that the occupiers made against 
the people of Harney County, Ore., before and during the standoff. The 
occupation lost steam when Bundy and several of his top followers were arrested 
late last month 
(Greenwire, Jan. 28). 

The indictment alleges that the offenses began Oct. 5, 2015, when two of the 
defendants warned the Harney County sheriff that "extreme civil unrest" would 
occur if their demands were not met. It says the offenses continued from then 
through the indictments, as Bundy and his followers traveled to nearby Burns, 
Ore., and elsewhere to "intimidate and coerce the population of Harney County, 
Oregon, in order to effectuate the goals of the conspiracy." 

It says the militants occupied the refuge "while using and carrying firearms" 
and refused to leave and allow federal officials to return to their duties. 
They also threatened violence against anyone who tried to remove them and 
"recruited and encouraged" others to join them via social media. 

The charge of conspiracy to impede the work of federal officials is punishable 
by up to six years in prison. 

Those indicted include Ryan Bundy, Jon Ritzheimer, Joseph O'Shaughnessy, Ryan 
Payne, Brian Cavalier, Shawna Cox, Peter Santilli, Jason Patrick, Duane Ehmer 
and Dylan Anderson. 

Four holdouts who remain at the refuge were also named in the indictment: Sean 
Anderson, 47, David Lee Fry, 27, Jeff Wayne Banta, 46, and Sandra Lynn Pfeifer 
Anderson, 48. A former occupier has said the four have enough food to last for 
months if they wanted to stay 
(Greenwire, Feb. 1). 

The indictment also included Kenneth Medenbach, 62, who was arrested on Jan. 15 
while driving a federally owned truck into Burns. 

The defendants will be arraigned on the indictments Feb. 24.


[Forest Service Shield]

Michael Stearly
Acting Public Affairs Officer

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3144
c: 303-883-5176
mstearly AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd
Mailing: P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

[http://wwwstatic.fs.usda.gov/images/email/usda-logo.png][Twitter 
Logo][Facebook 
Logo] 


Caring for the land and serving people












Subject: FW: 2016 National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Webinars (UNCLASSIFIED)
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 20:42:45 -0600
FYI and participation

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2016 8:56 AM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FW: 2016 National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Webinars
(UNCLASSIFIED)

Subject: 2016 National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Webinars
(UNCLASSIFIED)

CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED

Hello Everyone,

Note that there will be a series of invasive species webinars hosted by
NISAW February 22-25, 2016.  Information on the topics and speakers with
individual registration links may be found below.

So, grab your popcorn and tune in if you see a topic that interests you.


Julie B. Marcy
Research Biologist and Certified Professional Facilitator ERDC Environmental
Lab, CEERD-EEE
3909 Halls Ferry Rd.
Bldg 3270, Office 1132
Vicksburg, MS  39180
601 634 3684
BB 601 415 4602

-----Original Message-----
From: Southeast EPPC [mailto:SE-EPPC AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On Behalf Of Chuck
Bargeron
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2016 7:42 PM
To: SE-EPPC AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] 2016 National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Webinars

Please distribute to your networks:


2016

National Invasive Species Awareness Week - Webinars

Monday, February 22 - Thursday, February 25



Hosted by:





See BlockedBlockedwww.nisaw.orgBlocked
  for more information on the
weeks events



Monday, February 22, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM EST



Let's take a hack at hack and squirt individual plant treatments


Presenter:  Stephen Enloe, Associate Professor, Agronomy Department/Center
for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida

Abstract: "Hack and squirt" is an individual plant treatment technique
widely used for woody invasive plants across the United States. The basic
method involves making a series of cuts around the circumference of a tree
and immediately applying a concentrated herbicide solution into the cuts. As
simple as this seems, there is tremendous diversity among researchers and
land managers in exactly what is meant and what is done with this technique.
In reality, hack and squirt may entail labor intensive girdling type cuts,
overlapping frill cuts, injection for evenly spaced cuts, and a myriad of
tools to accomplish these methods. We will review different types of hack
and squirt treatments, tools, and herbicides used. We will also discuss
selectivity, herbicide flashback, and how hack and squirt techniques compare
to other IPT methods. Get ready for a fun and informative lecture, and let's
take a hack at hack and squirt!

Biography: Dr. Stephen Enloe has been involved with invasive plant research
and extension for the past 19 years. He has worked throughout the western
and southeastern United States, including California, Colorado, Wyoming,
Alabama, and now Florida. Over the last eight years, Dr. Enloe has worked
extensively on cogongrass, Chinese privet, Chinese tallowtree, Japanese
climbing fern, Chinaberry tree, and a host of other invasive plants. He has
also recently worked in the area of bioenergy with an emphasis on preventing
potential bioenergy species from becoming the next big invader.

Dr. Enloe earned his Ph.D at UC Davis in Plant Biology under Joe DiTomaso, a
Master's degree in weed science from Colorado State University under Scott
Nissen, and an undergraduate degree in Agronomy from NC State.



Tuesday, February 23, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM EST



Volunteers Make a Difference in an Early Detection Rapid Response Citizen
Science Program


Presenter: Julie K. Combs, PNW IPC (Pacific Northwest Invasive Plant
Council), Seattle, WA

 Abstract: After prevention, Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) is the
most effective method to control the establishment and spread of new
populations of invasive plants. Invasive species management is often
constrained by time and resources. In 2012, the Pacific Northwest Invasive
Plant Council (PNW IPC) developed an EDRR Citizen Science Invasive Plant
Program in order to support county, state and federal management agencies
working to locate and eradicate invasive species in Washington State. To
date the PNW IPC's EDRR program has trained over 260 Citizen Scientists to
identify target EDRR species and conduct surveys in natural areas on county,
state and federal public lands in Washington and Oregon State. We will
present how our volunteers have made measurable progress in the effort to
detect report and eradicate priority invasive plants from public lands since
2012. We will also present other metrics of success, challenges and lesson
learned.

Biography: Since 2012, Dr. Julie Combs has served as director for the PNW
IPC's regional "boots-on-the-ground" Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR)
Citizen Science Program. Julie earned both her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in
Ecology and Conservation from the University of Washington. In Washington
and Oregon her research focused on invasive species and rare plant ecology
conservation and management. She was awarded an NSF- IGERT fellowship during
her doctoral work that allowed her to travel to South Africa, China and
Chile to work with international researchers on problems in the field of
pollination biology and evolution. In China, she engaged in an
interdisciplinary study examining how socio-eco-political factors affect
plant biodiversity in Jiuzhaigou National Park, China.  She has published
her research in journals such as Ecological Applications, American Journal
of Botany and the American Naturalist. She has taught numerous courses
related to ecology, conservation and management at the University of
Washington and is happiest when working on applied conservation problems.



Wednesday, February 24, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM EST



Protecting the Sierra Nevada from Invasive Plants: Incorporating Climate
Adaptation into Wildland Weed Management


Presenters: Doug Johnson, Executive Director, and Elizabeth Brusati, Sr.
Scientist (California Invasive Plant Council), LeeAnne Mila, Deputy
Agricultural Commissioner (El Dorado County Agriculture Dept.), Ed King,
Deputy Agricultural Commissioner (Placer County Agriculture Dept.), Joel
Trumbo, Sr. Environmental Scientist (California Dept. of Fish & Wildlife)

Abstract: California's Sierra Nevada mountain range is valued for its
wildlife habitat and natural beauty as well as its timber resources and role
in the state's water supply. Due to its remoteness and climatic extremes,
the Sierra has been less affected by invasive plants than most other areas
of the state. With increasing development and recreational pressures as well
as a warming climate, this is changing. Local organizations across the
region teamed with the nonprofit California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC)
to develop strategic priorities for addressing the spread of invasive plants
at the landscape level with targeted management projects. Supporting
ecological resiliency to climate change is a fundamental objective of this
effort, and was integrated into project design. We present the invasive
plant management work in the Sierra, and draw lessons about how
practitioners can integrate climate resiliency into their projects.



Thursday, February 25, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EST



Treating Firewood is a Hot Topic: seasoning, solarizing, kiln drying, and
heat treatment


Presenter: Leigh Greenwood, Don't Move Firewood campaign manager, The Nature
Conservancy

Abstract: Unfortunately, firewood is a common vector for the spread of many
forest and tree pests throughout North America. Join us for a combined NISAW
and Firewood Outreach Coordinating Initiative webinar discussing the various
effective (and potentially ineffective) ways that firewood is treated in
order to prevent the spread of forest pests. We will bring in experts from
the private sector and USDA APHIS to talk about their efforts to slow the
spread of invasive species through better firewood treatment. Comparisons of
low energy treatments such as debarking, seasoning, soaking, and solarizing
will be contrasted with heat treatment at various levels.

Biography: Leigh Greenwood began working on issues of forest pests in North
America for The Nature Conservancy in 2007. She launched the Don't Move
Firewood campaign and Firewood Outreach Coordinating Initiative, and is an
active member of the Firewood Scout working group. Learn more about these
programs atBlockedBlockedhttp://dontmovefirewood.org/Blocked
 ,
BlockedBlockedhttp://www.dontmovefirewood.org/blog/firewood-outreach-profess
ionals-newsletter.htmlBlocked
 , and
BlockedBlockedhttp://firewoodscout.org/Blocked
  , respectively. She holds
a Masters of Wildlife Biology from the University of Montana, Missoula,
where she studied the interactions between native birds and established
biological control organisms on the landscape.



Thursday, February 25, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM EST



Weed Wrangle:  A Template for Engaging Local Communities through Citywide
Invasive Plant Events


Presenter: Steven Manning, President, Invasive Plant Control, Inc.

Abstract: Inspired by national and international efforts now underway, Weed
Wrangle Nashville represents a fresh new push to stem the tide of biological
pollution in local communities. The goal is two-fold: restoration and
preservation. Organizers seek to raise awareness of the "green scourge"
before more of our native plants lose the fight for the light and nutrients
they require to survive. The Garden Club of Nashville, a member of The
Garden Club of America, and GCA members from Chattanooga, Memphis and
Knoxville are working hard to pull in other local groups to establish a
corps of organized resistance to this blight on our environment. Friends of
Warner Parks, Greenways for Nashville and the Radnor Lake State Natural Area
are just a few of the partners now backing Weed Wrangle Nashville.  The
first annual Weed Wrangle was held in Nashville, TN during the 2015 National
Invasive Species Awareness Week. This event acted as a template for other
cities in the United States to engage local communities to pull together to
learn about and manage invasive plants. Steven Manning will discuss the
financing, staffing, PR and goals behind this project including 10 sites
(from elementary schools to the Nashville Zoo) that created a circle of
natural areas around the greater Nashville area.  The 2016 event has spread
statewide and the event sponsors envision this being a national event within
two years.

Biography: Steven Manning has spent the past 24 years working on invasive
species.  He is the current President of the Pacific Northwest Invasive
Plant Council, Vice President of the Mid Atlantic Invasive Plant Council,
co-chair of the National Military Fish and Wildlife Association's Invasive
Species Working Group and serves on the board of the North Carolina Invasive
Plant Council.  He is also the founder and President of Invasive Plant
Control, Inc. (IPC) BlockedBlockedwww.invasiveplantcontrol.comBlocked
 .  IPC was
created to extend internationally its dedication to the control of invasive
species utilizing a revised Integrated Pest Management approach and has
successfully controlled hundreds of invasive species for a wide variety of
land managers including federal, state, municipal and private landowners
throughout the world.  Mr. Manning also designs and implements multiple
training courses and workshops worldwide with topics ranging from "Invasive
Species in Ports of Entry" to "On the Ground Control Techniques."   IPC
invests heavily in educational and awareness activities annually and is also
heavily involved with local, state and international industry development
projects including Volunteer Based Early Detection Networks.  In 2012, IPC
introduced a suite of software and web based tools dedicated to
environmental needs.  He is also a co-author on the publication; Miller,
J.H.: Manning, S.; Enloe, S.F.  2010  "A field guide for the management of
invasive plants in southern forests"  published by the USDA Forest Service,
Southern Research Station.
(BlockedBlockedhttp://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/36915Blocked

BlockedBlockedhttp://wiki.bugwood.org/InvplantmgmtBlocked
 ).





CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED=
Subject: Re: Water Hustlers just won't stop
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 20:30:38 -0600
A water pipeline! I would hope that the completion of this project would remove 
many semis from the Interstate roadways, and their negative impacts on the 
environment. (Maybe someday, Jacanas will walk across lily pads near the Turk 
Plant.) 


 

China has some river redirection projects underway that would seriously affect 
the fauna, flora and peoples along major river systems in Southeast Asia. Too 
bad we humans continue to make the same mistakes. 


 

Jeff Short

 

 

 

From: jwdavis [mailto:jwdavis AT cablelynx.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2016 10:25 AM
To: Undisclosed-Recipient:;
Subject: Water Hustlers just won't stop

 

The water hustlers now want to open the Red River to Navigation from Shreveport 
to Dallas via Lake Texoma. As the Red River does not run through Dallas, some 
other connecting river or new cut waterway must also be involved. Those 
interested in wildlife need to keep this in mind and not let it sneak up on 
you. 


 


http://www.texarkanagazette.com/news/texarkana/story/2016/jan/23/testing-waters-1b-plan-would-make-river-navigable-shreveport-dallas-area-increase-texarkanas-stance-transportation-hub/414109/ 

Subject: Fw: Greater Prairie-Chicken in Bartlesville
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 17:20:32 -0600

From: Reinking, Daniel L. 
Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2016 4:43 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Greater Prairie-Chicken in Bartlesville

At 4:45 today it was half a block south of Adams and half a block west of 
Rogers. 

Dan



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


From: okbirds [OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU] on behalf of Melinda Droege 
[oklagranny26 AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2016 13:42
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Greater Prairie-Chicken in Bartlesville


I got the prairie chicken around 12:45!! It had moved to the south in the 
fenced field behind the stoned church on Adams....at approximately Morton and 
8th St. It was resting under a bare tree. Looks like it is out of the traffic 
now. 


Thanks to Lena for spotting it, to Dan for the post and great photos and to 
Josh telling me to check my email! What a wonderful surprise! 


Melinda Droege
B'ville

On Wed, Feb 3, 2016 at 9:47 AM, Dan Reinking  wrote:

 Lena Larsson spotted a prairie-chicken on west Adams in Bartlesville this 
morning. This is mixed industrial and residential area. I was able to locate 
the bird on a lawn at the corner of Adams and Bucy, and obtained a few photos. 
It was still there when I left about 8:40. 


 Prairie-chickens are extremely scarce in Washington County, so having one in 
town is very unusual. 




 
http://www.suttoncenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/GPCH-Bartlesville-3Feb2016-724sm.jpg 




 
http://www.suttoncenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/GPCH-Bartlesville-3Feb2016-734sm.jpg 




 
http://www.suttoncenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/GPCH-Bartlesville-3Feb2016-716sm.jpg 




 Gallery link to the P section (scroll down to prairie-chicken): 
http://www.suttoncenter.org/education/oklahoma-birds-directory/#p 




  Dan Reinking

  Sutton Avian Research Center
Subject: 2ND YEAR WINTER HERRING GULL AT L;AKE SARACEN
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 17:01:18 -0600
This morning, I observed and photographed a 2nd winter Herring Gull at Lake 
Saracen in Pine Bluff. Additionally, there were 3 female Red-breasted 
Mergansers. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: Country Loop Road
From: Cheryle Sytsma <shalom AT CYBERBACK.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 13:59:44 -0600
Thank you, Glenn, for a very nice write up.   This is very helpful in 
looking for the birdies....   :)
Your directions and descriptions make me want to drive over to the area 
to look for some!

cheryle sytsma
faulkner county

On 2/2/2016 1:46 PM, Glenn wrote:
> I’ve heard a lot about Country Loop Road, near Holla Bend, so on 1 
> February, I took a drive out there.  If you are like me, and try to 
> find this road on Google maps, you won’t.  It is called County Road 
> 57, it starts on 154 and ends on 154.  I arrived a little after 11 AM, 
> did I ever say I’m not an early morning person?
>
> I turn onto the east portion of Country Loop Road.  During the first 
> 1/3 of the loop I saw a few Savannah Sparrows and one Red-tailed Hawk 
> and that is about it.  Just as the road turns right, with a barn on 
> the right side, I saw a bunch of little birds flying off.  I pulled 
> off right at the corner and watched out my car window.  Shortly, 
> several White-throated Sparrows showed up, picking through the grass, 
> very close to my car.  Then the Northern Cardinals, I got some very 
> nice close-up shots of males and females.  A little bird appeared and 
> was flitting through the trees, it was an Orange-crowned Warbler.  
> Wait, there is a very pale looking sparrow that just landed in the 
> tree near me.  What is it?  It sat long enough to let me get 4 
> photos.  Once I got home and looked at the photos I discovered it was 
> a Lincoln Sparrow.  A new life bird for me! By the way, my goal for 
> the day was to see my first Harris’s Sparrow.  After sitting at the 
> corner for a bit longer I also got to watch a Golden-crowned Kinglet.  
> Then a tractor and pickup went by chasing off all my birds.  Then 
> another pickup.  After that, the birds didn’t return.  So I took the 
> south-to-north portion of the loop.  There was a spot about ½ way 
> where there were several Cardinals but I kept on going.  Just before 
> the road turned right again, I saw a few Savannahs in a puddle near a 
> couple houses.  I try not to stop in front of someone’s house, and 
> definitely try not to point my camera at a house.  I got chased down 
> once by a guy that wanted to know why I was taking photos in front of 
> his home. So, I don’t do it any more.  Right turn made, and on my 
> final leg.  In a field to the left sat a female Northern Harrier, too 
> far away do get a decent photo - darn it.  Just beyond, in a tree 
> right alongside the road sat 2 hawks, one of them flew away just as I 
> spotted them.  The one that stayed was a Red-shouldered Hawk, and from 
> the quick glimpse I got, the other one was as well.  Just before the 
> end of the road I saw several sparrows fly off the road, I never saw 
> what they were.  End of the loop and no Harris’s Sparrow.
>
> Off to Holla Bend; someone reported seeing Sandhill Cranes there.  For 
> whatever reason, Holla Bend has just not been good to me.  This time 
> was no exception.  No Cranes that I could find.  I did see a juvenile 
> Bald Eagle perched in a tree in the distance.  I saw some Eastern 
> Meadowlarks.  Some Robins. A Northern Harrier flying around.  A bunch 
> of Red-winged Blackbirds.  A White-throated Sparrow or two.  That was 
> pretty much it.
>
> Now it was about 3 PM, back to Country Road Loop - I will not be 
> denied my Harris Sparrow if I can help it.  This time I took the road 
> backward, and turned into the West entrance. The first leg was almost 
> bird free.  A pretty little American Kestrel was on a wire at the very 
> start, sharing the wire with 3 Eastern Bluebirds.  I saw a few crows 
> and blackbirds out in the fields.  At the first left hand corner, a 
> couple Savannah Sparrows flew away from the puddle in front of the 
> houses. The north-to-south portion of the road was very light on 
> birds, even when I got to the corner where I had all the activity 
> earlier.  I turned left again and was now on my last 1/3 of the 
> loop.   Right after the turn I passed a couple houses then entered the 
> tree lined portion of the road. There, in the shadows in the road were 
> a couple little birds. I pulled over and binoculared them.  Three 
> White-crowned Sparrows, no four.  One adult and 3 juveniles were 
> running back and forth in the road.  So I sat.  I’ve been told I would 
> see the Harris’s Sparrow with the White-crowned.  Then, a cheep in the 
> tree right outside my window.  A beautiful Harris’s Sparrow was about 
> 10 feet up.  He posed pretty for quite some time, then flew over the 
> top of my car and settled into another tree about 8 feet up.  Good 
> thing my moon roof was open; I got a few more good photographs.  Then 
> it was gone.  A few Cardinals were also enjoying the shady road. Just 
> before I left Country Loop I spotted a single Red-winged Blackbird 
> sitting in a tree.
>
> Since I was so close, I decided to hit Carden Bottoms Road.  I still 
> haven’t seen my first Ground Dove, and one lives down that road.  
> Carden Bottoms confused me the first time I was there.  Carden Bottoms 
> Road makes an “L” shape, as does Lakeview Road.  So the two roads 
> intersect to form a square. The first intersection with Lakeview is 
> where the Ground Dove has been seen.  Right at that intersection I 
> pulled over. There were several cardinals and White-throated Sparrows 
> in the road eating a grain spill.  And one dove, but it was a Mourning 
> Dove.  I continued on down Carden Bottoms until it connected with 
> Lakeview again.  I turned onto Lakeview hoping to sneak up on that 
> Ground Dove from the other direction.  I did see a light phase 
> Red-tailed Hawk and a few Savannah Sparrows and another Mourning Dove 
> while on Lakeview but nothing else.
>
> I got to see two life birds this trip.  Can’t ask for anything more 
> than that.  And I got to see a lot of beautiful farm land.  I highly 
> recommend checking it out.  Also a special thanks to Karen Holliday 
> for telling me how to find Country Loop.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
Subject: FW: Sharing-Dueling Burns protests decry, support Oregon refuge occupation
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 15:50:31 +0000
It looks like the Pacific Patriots were outnumbered at the rally in Burns 
yesterday... 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: Stearly, Michael J -FS
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2016 4:33 PM
To: FS-pdl r6 malheur all employees
Subject: Sharing-Dueling Burns protests decry, support Oregon refuge occupation

Dueling Burns protests decry, support Oregon refuge 
occupation 
(KGW.com) 


Link to accompanying 
video 


BURNS, Ore. -- Dueling protests filled the streets of Burns on Monday. 
Supporters of the refuge occupation were outnumbered. 

Hundreds of people yelled "Stay here FBI" and waved signs with slogans like 
"God bless your passion, but please take it elsewhere - Bye bye!" and "Your 
voice is not my voice." 

Photos: Dueling protests in 
Burns 


Most of the area residents want the occupation at the Malheur National Wildlife 
Refuge to end. On Monday, only four protesters remain encamped, after the 
leader was arrested last week. 

In Monday's dueling protests, a smaller group stood in support of the 
occupiers. That group described themselves as patriots and stood in defiance 
outside the Harney County Courthouse. 


The month-long occupation by armed protesters of the national wildlife refuge 
in southeastern Oregon started out with demands that two jailed ranchers be 
freed and that the federal government relinquish 300 square miles to local 
control for ranching, mining, logging and other uses. 


It has since led to the arrest of leader Ammon Bundy and others and the fatal 
police shooting of one group member during a confrontation with authorities. 
The occupiers have dwindled to four holdouts who demand they be allowed to pass 
through a perimeter of heavily-armed law enforcement officials without being 
arrested. 



[Forest Service Shield]

Michael Stearly
Acting Public Affairs Officer

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3144
c: 303-883-5176
mstearly AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd
Mailing: P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

[http://wwwstatic.fs.usda.gov/images/email/usda-logo.png][Twitter 
Logo][Facebook 
Logo] 


Caring for the land and serving people












Subject: Fw: The Messenger bird film coming to Tulsa
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 09:04:28 -0600
Oklahoma is showing The Messenger in Tulsa and I am hoping someone is working 
to get it to Arkansas and other states. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: Dan Reinking 
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2016 8:55 AM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] The Messenger bird film coming to Tulsa

The Sutton Center is pleased to bring The Messenger to the Circle Cinema in 
Tulsa on March 12 at 5 pm. This film powerfully portrays a number of 
conservations issues facing bird populations, and uses technology and novel 
filming techniques to provide some amazing footage of songbirds in flight. A 
showing of this film that we previously provided at the joint meeting of the 
American Ornithologists’ Union and the Cooper Ornithological Society last 
summer at OU in Norman was well received. Your ticket purchase supports both 
the Sutton Center and the Circle Cinema. 


Seating is limited for this single showing. You can now watch a trailer and 
purchase tickets at www.suttoncenter.org/messenger. 


Dan Reinking

Sutton Avian Research Center
Subject: FW: Sharing
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 22:17:52 +0000
Not much change since the last update. There is a big marker set up at the 
location of the shooting and the Pacific Patriots Network is holding a rally in 
Burns today. Still 4 guys holding out at the refuge.. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: Stearly, Michael J -FS
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2016 2:04 PM
To: FS-pdl r6 malheur all employees
Subject: Sharing

Dems seek assurances on keeping militants off public lands (E&E) Monday, 
February 1, 2016 

A group of Democratic lawmakers want Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and 
Attorney General Loretta Lynch to brief Congress on how they will ensure that 
public lands aren't occupied by militants in the future. 

Rep. Jared Huffman (D-Calif.) sent a letter to Jewell and Lynch on Friday, as 
four militants continued to occupy Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. 
Earlier in the week, police had arrested the leaders of the occupation, Ammon 
and Ryan Bundy, and killed LaVoy Finicum in an encounter on an empty highway. 

The letter asks for a briefing on "how your agencies plan to respond to the 
broader pattern of threats to our public lands, the communities that neighbor 
them, and the employees who help maintain these important public natural 
resources." 

Rep. Ral Grijalva (D-Ariz.), the ranking member on the House Natural Resources 
Committee, signed the letter, along with Reps. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.), Earl 
Blumenauer (D-Ore.), Niki Tsongas (D-Mass.), Scott Peters (D-Calif.), Debbie 
Dingell (D-Mich.), Alan Lowenthal (D-Calif.) and Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.). 

They point to the 2014 standoff between Cliven Bundy and the Bureau of Land 
Management as a precursor. BLM sought to impound Bundy's cows but was forced to 
retreat when protesters showed up at the Nevada ranch with guns. Cliven Bundy, 
father to Ammon and Ryan, hasn't faced any charges. 

"To this day, federal employees and local communities in Nevada continue to 
face violent intimidation tactics, preventing critical law enforcement and 
restoration work from moving forward," the lawmakers wrote. "Numerous rural 
communities in the West worry they could be next." 

The long-running standoff at Malheur has similarly "sent a dangerous message to 
armed vigilante groups that the threat of violence is a viable political tool," 
the letter asserts. 



[Forest Service Shield]

Michael Stearly
Acting Public Affairs Officer

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3144
c: 303-883-5176
mstearly AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd
Mailing: P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

[http://wwwstatic.fs.usda.gov/images/email/usda-logo.png][Twitter 
Logo][Facebook 
Logo] 


Caring for the land and serving people












Subject: I Brake for Bald Eagles...and Trumpeter Swans
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 22:08:09 +0000
Loved the trip Saturday, and all the neat new people I met. Just wanted to 
share that as Joe and Kluie and I were leaving we had to slow down on the 
Dardanelle bridge for an eagle to fly past! Yes, right in front of us. 



This morning, at exactly 8:55AM, we stopped to look up from the Field Road at 
Little Red River on Gulf Mountain. I heard them before I saw them--14 Trumpeter 
Swans flying east above us. I couldn’t tell if old 3T4 was among them and 
haven’t seen our little flock at Miller Pond this year so this was a treat. 
I’d have posted all this sooner but my WiFi has been down. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: Bird Migration Is Happening
From: "POPHAM, JAMES T GS-11 USAF AMC 19 CES/CEIEC" <james.popham AT US.AF.MIL>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 20:31:29 +0000
I agree! Thanks Jerry. I plan on sharing this link with a lot of people. I 
think I'll even put it on my Air Force Environmental web site. 


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Karen Garrett 

Sent: Monday, February 01, 2016 4:30 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Migration Is Happening

Thanks for sharing the link. The former science teacher in me found it quite 
educational, and the birder in me loved it as well. Of course any video 
combining eye candy (every warbler) and good music (Wood Thrush) gets good 
reviews from me. 


Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Sun, Jan 31, 2016 at 8:47 PM, Bill Thurman  
wrote: 



	This is a good email and a good thing to know, Jerry. Thanks! 

	Bill Thurman

	On Jan 31, 2016 5:14 PM, "jwdavis"  wrote:
	

 Bird migration is started for some species and others will follow soon. Many 
birder know a great deal about bird migration but I think that if you watch 
this video, even the most knowledgeable birder and wildlife professional will 
find some additional insight worth your time. Your first knee jerk reaction 
will be to delete the link because it is too long but I encourage you to look 
at the video. It can be a learning tool for young and old alike and even worth 
showing to students from the first grade up. 

		 
 The arrival of some migrants like Purple Martins is only a week away for some. 
Titmice are singing and bluebirds are checking out the nest boxes. This is the 
time you need to make sure your nest boxes are clean and in good repair. It 
came to my attention this week that there are many with nest boxes and are no 
longer able to clean and maintain them as they once did maybe due to age, knee 
and hip surgery etc. You may want to provide a helping hand to help these 
continue to enjoy birds by helping out with these needs. 

		Gulf Crossing: Story of Spring – YouTube
		 
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e20qNjdcSUk 
 

		 
		Jerry W. Davis
		Hot Springs, AR 
		 


Subject: WINTER SUMMER TANAGER CORNUCOPIA (got any?)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 17:51:44 +0000
If you miss your groundhog prediction this year, consider watching the suet 
feeder. Maybe another prediction. 


Summer Tanagers typically remain around our neck of the Ozarks scattered into 
October. But starting mainly around 2002, we began to find a few birds at 
mid-winter, often visiting suet feeders. This tended to just be a bird or two 
-- until this winter. Starting around mid-December, and continuing now into 
early February, we're having a winter cornucopia of these neotropical 
songbirds. 


At this time of the year, most Summer Tanagers are in central Mexico and 
further south. According to the authoritative Birds of North American Online, 
"Occurs regularly in small numbers in winter in s. California, s. Arizona, 
elsewhere along Pacific Coast of North America, and in s. Florida ... also 
casual but regular winter occurrences along Atlantic Coast and in s. U.S.; 
recorded in winter as far north as s. Canada." 


I got pretty excited about the presence of tanagers in Fayetteville this winter 
when entomologist Don Steinkraus and his wife Jane spotted one on the suet at 
their home and subsequently photographed one eating bees from the Steinkraus 
hives. I was hoping to find this for the Fayetteville CBC (December 20). We 
didn't get the Steinkraus bird, but amazingly, we saw and photographed another 
eating bees or wasps several miles away. 


This morning Kelly Mulhollan, one of my neighbors, photographed one at is suet 
feeder, a block away. With Kelly's record, I now know of observations in 
Fayetteville (6, all different locations), Lake Fayetteville and Cave Springs 
(both by Mike Mlodinow), Bella Vista (from ebird). Almost all of these birds 
have been photographed. The approximately nine records involve the yellow 
plumage of females or first winter plumages of males. None have involved the 
typical red summer plumage. 


However, in past years, we have seen a few during winter in red male plumage 
(you can check these records on the Arkansas Audubon Society online database 
(http://www.arbirds.org/drop5.asp). A bird that remained all winter and into 
spring at a suet feeder east of Rogers eventually molted into the male's red. 

So are Summer Tanagers responding to climate change? The data I have from 
National Audubon does not list Summer Tanager. 


Mike Mlodinow and I have talked back and forth about this. One of his ideas is 
that in this El Nino year, maybe strong southerly winds have brought birds here 
that were already in the south. Or maybe this year's warmth encouraged birds to 
linger here rather than going further south. 


All of these records, and especially the high number this winter, raise all 
sorts of questions in my mind. One of these questions: are any of the rest of 
you that read the ARBIRD list seeing Summer Tanagers? 

Subject: Peent Peent
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 15:20:36 +0000
Greetings all,
I had an A. Woodcock peenting on Sat the 30th at 6:38am. (But not since.) 
Pretty sure this was a migrating bird. So it's time to get out an enjoy a neat 
wildlife show, though it may be slow for a week or so. 

If you've never experienced this amazing show, then you might consider joining 
the NW AR Audubon field trip. Seeing that many birds displaying is definitely a 
birding bucket list item. 

Peent  AT  Hector, Leif
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Feather ID
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 15:01:50 +0000
For those on Saturday's field trip to Holla Bend, the feathers we picked up 
(for identification purposes only of course) in the prairie across from the 
observation tower belong to a Mallard. Something plucked it at that spot. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: WOODCOCK FIELD TRIP TO LAKE WEDINGTON (near Fayetteville) FEBRUARY 27, 2016
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 14:47:13 +0000

February 27, 2016 (Saturday EVENING) Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will 
host an American Woodcock field trip to Lake Wedington in the Ozark NF west of 
Fayetteville. Meeting time, 5:30 PM (need to be on time). Field trip led by 
woodcock expert Dr David Krementz UA-Fayetteville who will tell us a lot about 
woodcocks at the parking site and explain what's going on for the field trip. 
If you are curious about woodcocks, this is a great opportunity. Details are 
below about the meeting place. The 15,000 acre Wedington Unit is designated as 
an Urban Forest. We need to combine into carpools in as few cars as possible to 
a spot approx. 1-mile away to observe woodcocks. 




DIRECTIONS: We are going to a different spot than in past years, with prime 
habitat and likely more woodcocks. Dr Krementz and his students may try to net 
woodcocks for a closer look. From the intersection of I-49 and Highway 16 in 
Fayetteville, travel WEST approx. 11.5 - 12 miles on HWY 16. This will take you 
to the parking lot that is on the north side of the highway. This is the 5:30 
meeting spot. If you are using GPS, go to 36 05 30.12 N and 94 22 30.07 W. The 
main entrance to the Wedington Recreation Area is a little further west - if 
you get there, you went too far. Consider a flashlight, don't wear bright 
clothes, walking shoes ok. We will wait for the woodcock displays to begin near 
and shortly after sunset. Also, lots of other birds are in the area to enjoy 
during the wait. Overall, this should be a fairly easy trip, including those 
with walking impairments. The woodcock displays should be viewable/audible near 
where we park. If you need more information can also call me at home: 479 521 
1858. 




ALSO IN FEBRUARY:

  *   Trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail Saturday, February 6, meet 9 AM.
 * Great Backyard Bird Count field trip to Devil's Den State Park, Saturday 
February 13, meet 9 AM. 

Subject: Re: Bird Migration Is Happening
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2016 04:29:33 -0600
Thanks for sharing the link.  The former science teacher in me found it
quite educational, and the birder in me loved it as well.  Of course any
video combining eye candy (every warbler) and good music (Wood Thrush) gets
good reviews from me.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Sun, Jan 31, 2016 at 8:47 PM, Bill Thurman 
wrote:

> This is a good email and a good thing to know, Jerry. Thanks!
>
> Bill Thurman
> On Jan 31, 2016 5:14 PM, "jwdavis"  wrote:
>
>> Bird migration is started for some species and others will follow soon.
>> Many birder know a great deal about bird migration but I think that if you
>> watch this video, even the most knowledgeable birder and wildlife
>> professional will find some additional insight worth your time.   Your
>> first knee jerk reaction will be to delete the link because it is too long
>> but I encourage you to look at the video. It can be a learning tool for
>> young and old alike and even worth showing to students from the first grade
>> up.
>>
>> The arrival of some migrants like Purple Martins is only a week away for
>> some. Titmice are singing and bluebirds are checking out the nest boxes.
>> This is the time you need to make sure your nest boxes are clean and in
>> good repair. It came to my attention this week that there are many with
>> nest boxes and are no longer able to clean and maintain them as they once
>> did maybe due to age, knee and hip surgery etc. You may want to provide a
>> helping hand to help these continue to enjoy birds by helping out with
>> these needs.
>> Gulf Crossing: Story of Spring – YouTube
>>
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e20qNjdcSUk
>> 
 

>>
>> Jerry W. Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR
>>
>>
>
Subject: Miller and Clark Counties, 1/31/2016
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 23:32:30 -0600
I spent time photographing in Miller and Clark Counties today but didn’t 
really get any target species in particular in Clark County. While traveling 
through Miller County just after breakfast, I counted 91 Sandhill Cranes at the 
site where I had been seeing them gather. Having missed seeing them on at least 
2-3 consecutive trips during the past week, I thought they had moved on. 


In the afternoon, I went to the Arkadelphia oxidation ponds to try and 
photograph the Long-tailed Duck which, for others, had proven to be tolerant of 
close-range photography. It proved otherwise for me. I managed to get some 
identifiable images but later trashed them all. I did get a slightly closer 
image of the Cinnamon Teal and that took most of the sting away from failing to 
get a keeper image of the Long-tailed Duck. 


A trio of today’s keeper images may be seen at:

Probable Western Meadowlark
http://www.pbase.com/chazmi/image/162463730

Cinnamon Teal with 2 Gadwall
http://www.pbase.com/chazmi/image/162468409

One of 2 Spotted Sandpipers
http://www.pbase.com/chazmi/image/162468412

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503
Subject: Re: Bird Migration Is Happening
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 20:47:04 -0600
This is a good email and a good thing to know, Jerry. Thanks!

Bill Thurman
On Jan 31, 2016 5:14 PM, "jwdavis"  wrote:

> Bird migration is started for some species and others will follow soon.
> Many birder know a great deal about bird migration but I think that if you
> watch this video, even the most knowledgeable birder and wildlife
> professional will find some additional insight worth your time.   Your
> first knee jerk reaction will be to delete the link because it is too long
> but I encourage you to look at the video. It can be a learning tool for
> young and old alike and even worth showing to students from the first grade
> up.
>
> The arrival of some migrants like Purple Martins is only a week away for
> some. Titmice are singing and bluebirds are checking out the nest boxes.
> This is the time you need to make sure your nest boxes are clean and in
> good repair. It came to my attention this week that there are many with
> nest boxes and are no longer able to clean and maintain them as they once
> did maybe due to age, knee and hip surgery etc. You may want to provide a
> helping hand to help these continue to enjoy birds by helping out with
> these needs.
> Gulf Crossing: Story of Spring – YouTube
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e20qNjdcSUk
> 
 

>
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
>
Subject: Bird Migration Is Happening
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 17:13:42 -0600
Bird migration is started for some species and others will follow soon. Many 
birder know a great deal about bird migration but I think that if you watch 
this video, even the most knowledgeable birder and wildlife professional will 
find some additional insight worth your time. Your first knee jerk reaction 
will be to delete the link because it is too long but I encourage you to look 
at the video. It can be a learning tool for young and old alike and even worth 
showing to students from the first grade up. 

The arrival of some migrants like Purple Martins is only a week away for some. 
Titmice are singing and bluebirds are checking out the nest boxes. This is the 
time you need to make sure your nest boxes are clean and in good repair. It 
came to my attention this week that there are many with nest boxes and are no 
longer able to clean and maintain them as they once did maybe due to age, knee 
and hip surgery etc. You may want to provide a helping hand to help these 
continue to enjoy birds by helping out with these needs. 

Gulf Crossing: Story of Spring – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e20qNjdcSUk
Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR 
Subject: Western Grebe
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 03:59:11 -0600
During the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas' (ASCA) field trip, the 
highlights were a WESTERN GREBE at the Delaware Point Park (Hwy. 393) on Lake 
Dardanelle. One adult Lesser Black-backed Gull was also seen, and one adult 
Herring Gull, plus multiple Brown Creepers and Golden-crowned Kinglets. We did 
NOT find the Royal Tern nor the Neotropic Cormorant at the dam site on the 
Russellville side. We did find one juvenile Herring Gull. At the Holla Bend 
National Wildlife Refuge, we spotted three Bald Eagles, a small flock of Wild 
Turkeys, a few ducks, a possible Merlin, no Northern Harriers nor swans. At 
County Loop Road off Hwy. 154, a few miles from Holla Bend NWR, we found a few 
Harris's Sparrows mixed in with the White-crowned Sparrows, a Roadrunner, and 
finally a Northern Harrier, but no Bewick's Wren. It was a fun day with a huge 
flock of birders (46) and absolutely perfect weather. 

Karen Holliday 
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Other Pulaski & Lonoke County birds
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 20:42:30 -0600
It was such a nice day here in Pulaski County that Bill B & I decided to visit 
Toltec Mounds State Park southeast of Little Rock. We saw all the usual birds 
you would expect to see. Before we left, a flock of Rusty Blackbirds flew in 
and began to pick at the ground near some standing puddles of water out behind 
the classroom building. Estimated flock size 50-55 birds. 


We hadn't been to Keo for awhile so we rode on down there & headed west on 
Walter Estes Rd (Ark 232) to John Branch Rd which runs along the dry side of 
the levee. We saw a flock of Red-winged Blackbirds, estimated size 5000+ birds 
on one field. No unusual birds caught our eye. Headed north on John Branch we 
found a Red-tailed Hawk that was as black as a crow. At first I thought it was 
a very large, somewhat odd looking crow from a distance. The hawk launched 
itself & I was able to see some red on the tail. It was the blackest RTHA I've 
seen in Arkansas. 


Multiple fields are flooded north of the Keo Fish Hatchery on the England 
highway (AR 165). Whizzing past at 60 mph, I could make out NOSH & Gadwalls. 
165 is one of those roads you really don't want to stop on if you don't have 
to. 

Cindy F.
Little Rock


 		 	   		  
Subject: Pulaski County Merlin & Stuttgart Airport
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 20:13:14 -0600
Bill Shepherd asked me to post the following for him. He & his nephew spent the 
day birding. 


Bill reports the Merlin continues on Thibault Road as of this morning. The 
Merlin was sitting in a tree by itself about half way from Zuber Rd on Thibault 
to the Wellspun entrance that is blocked on Frazier Pike. He did not see any 
cranes, White-crowned Sparrows, or Rusty Blackbirds along Frazier Pike. 


They spent the afternoon at the Stuttgart airport. Bill reports the City of 
Stuttgart has removed brush and mowed the airport. As a result they saw a few 
Smith's Longspurs at the south end of the airport, no Lapwings, and only two 
Horned Larks. Bill says the Painted Bunting and Bell's Vireo habitat is no 
more. He did not get into the prairie restoration areas to check for 
Short-eared Owls. 

Cindy Franklin
Little Rock


 		 	   		  
Subject: Mealworm ranchers
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 10:01:51 -0600
Looking for more recycling opportunities?  There is an article in Chemical
and Engineering News (Oct 12, 2015:  33) noting that mealworms will eat and
digest polystyrene foams-including styrofoam-- when no better food is
available.  Nearly all (97%) of the carbon in the foam was converted into
CO2 and feces.  For more see the research in Environ. Sci. Technol. 2015,
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.5b02663.

 

Jeff Short
Subject: Bird Migration Map Across Americas
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 09:20:11 -0600
Those interested in birds may find this video insightful.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

http://wildlife.org/video-map-illustrates-bird-migrations-across-americas/
Subject: Request for information
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 21:21:06 -0600
A portion of this message has been deleted in order to follow the 
highly-anticipated/dreaded 'cease and desist' request, and doggone it was 
really good and uplifting and I threw in a cat too. Oh well. 


Back to birds:

I'm having a weird big year. I had a revelation, nay an epiphany under a RCWO 
tree, marked D15 at Felsenthal NWR (Thanks Joe Neal for your work at 
Felsenthal!) while standing underneath that awesome pine at dawn on 12/31/2015, 
I realized how much I loved and missed birding. Birding hard! But I've got more 
time limits these days. So I decided it might be fun to have 12 big days this 
year. I can bird my ass off one day per month to see how many species I can get 
with these restrictions. So far, I'm at 55 species (thanks to the trek over to 
Arkadelphia) and I plan to bird next month at Holla Bend NWR and Lake 
Dardanelle. What are some good locations surrounding the refuge? This is NOT 
the dreaded request to tag along with anyone, nor will I be begging you for 
access to a neighbor's private back yard to tick off something cool, but your 
posts help me plan my big days. Where would YOU go in February to have a big 
day? And is anyone having an Arkansas Big Year? I so love to hear about these. 


I'll check ebird too, but your posts about sightings help a lot. 



Kelly Chitwood
El Dorado, AR
Subject: Re: politics
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 19:52:35 -0600
Hang in there, Daniel.  In a group as large and diverse as this, it would
be impossible for every person on here to agree on EVERY topic with
everyone else on this list.  We are all bound by our common love of birds,
but each of us is unique.  Some of us may be more sensitive to the way
something is stated, than other people are, due to emotional issues, our
upbringing, or just having a bad day.  Something that didn't bother me on a
stress-free day, might really chap my hide on a day when everything seems
to be going wrong.  I do, personally, like to hear news of things that
could affect birds that live here, winter here, or just pass through on
occasion.  That being said, I think we could all do well to treat each
other kindly, especially with our words.  Words are powerful, in both
positive and negative ways.  If anyone has written something unkind to you,
I hope that you can forgive them, and can continue to use this forum for
whatever purposes prompted you to sign up in the first place.  I think that
birders, by and large, are wonderful people, but sometimes we say things,
in the heat of the moment, or whatever, that may be less than kind.  I wish
for all of us, peace and good birds!

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Thu, Jan 28, 2016 at 7:13 PM, Mitchell Pruitt <
0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> I, too, am one who tries to keep the naturalist in me away from political
> banter. As a matter of fact, lately I’ve tried to keep even the politicker
> in me away from political banter! My political views sometimes stray
> against the grain of those in the nature world, which can be a bit daunting
> at times, so it’s good that politics stays away from this list (and usually
> when I’m birding with the great friends I have here, although some friendly
> back-and-forth is welcome in the right setting).
>
> That said, I think those who are interested in conservation can all agree
> that this deal at Mahleur was no good and couldn’t last. Maybe not Arkansas
> news, you’re right on that, but still important to all of us. There 
didn’t 

> seem to be much up-to-date or accurate information in the news, so it was
> nice to have an insider scoop. Did I really think they were going to get
> something from all this? Not really…but as someone who LOVES America’s
> protected lands (and utilizes them nearly daily), it sure had me on edge
> for a while. Our protected lands are something we should all be proud of
> and actively involved with. It ensures us whacko nature-lovers someplace to
> play. Some of them are even far enough removed from our daily lives that we
> don’t have to dig too deep to get that much-sought-after, John Muir-esque
> feeling from stunning vistas or intimate encounters with wildlife. Heck,
> sometimes I get that feeling at Kessler Mountain (a newly PROTECTED parcel
> of land), across the street from my house in Fayetteville. These places are
> also important insurance that future generations will be able to enjoy the
> land as it was and should still be, if we humans hadn’t moved in with all
> of our needs. It’s important that everyone see the relationship between
> humans and nature, as missing that tie has been where we’ve continually
> gone so wrong throughout history. Unfortunately, that’s a perfect world and
> this is not.
>
> Politics are not for this list, but juicy inside information on a hot
> topic that could effect conservation in America? Eh, why not?
>
> We have to be thankful for what we have already and take good care of it,
> whether protected or not. Together, we can also conserve for the future. As
> someone who educates youth in ecology during the summer and is actively
> involved in research that could help the conservation of a species in the
> future, I know all about this.
>
> ~Mitchell Pruitt
>
>
> > On Jan 28, 2016, at 6:16 PM, Daniel Mason 
> wrote:
> >
> > Let me introduce myself.  My name is Daniel Mason and I live in Siloam
> Springs.  I've been a birder just a couple of years now but I've been a
> nature lover and bird watcher my entire life.  I appreciate this resource
> here.  I have personally preferred following reports on Ebird and did not
> want to get involved with a list for the entire state... but, many people
> even in this area don't report every sighting to Ebird so I gave this a
> try...
> >
> > In person, in a group you'll find me a quiet person.  One on one, I
> might seem quite normal(I think).  While I don't consider myself extremely
> odd or anything, I have in the past been diagnosed with a personality
> disorder or two.  Anxiety and depression as well..  It's not extreme by any
> means but, I sometimes struggle with what "normal" conversation is.  I
> misunderstand people and boy do I get misunderstood at times.  I consider
> myself an independent thinker and I really see a lot of things in life
> differently than most.  Often times I feel good about who I am and that I
> do not conform but, sometimes I can also feel alone.
> > Sometimes I say one thing and people hear another.  You'd think I'd be
> used to it.
> >
> > When I first started getting replies I got overwhelmed and thought "oh
> no, what did I get into..." but overall, the response could definitely have
> been worse.
> > I thank the people that have replied here and privately to offer their
> sentiments of agreement on some things.
> >
> > It's possible the type of thing I was trying to speak of, I may have
> been guilty of myself.  I don't really know.
> > Politics and such come up, and I get it.  There are just times where
> it's too much... and there are times where people assume that everyone else
> in the group(since we're all tied together by birds) believe and feel the
> same things.  And things can come across with a sort of tone that likely is
> not intentional but can rub people the wrong way.
> >
> > Something I was not clear on(I can see that now) was that my intention
> was not at all to pick on one post.  I got several messages pretty quick
> telling me that Clark was from Arkansas and people know and respect him.  I
> realized at that point that I stepped on some toes.  That was not my
> intention.  That was just the most recent example.  Some topics are
> touchy... emotions get stirred up... and, well that's something I struggle
> with I guess...
> > Scrolling past or hitting delete, something I struggle with I guess...
> :/
> >
> > I have so many thoughts bouncing around in my head at the moment... I
> feel like there's more I want to say but, nothing is coming.
> > I sure didn't mean to have this become a big thing.  Just me, sharing my
> thoughts...
>
Subject: enough already
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 01:48:45 +0000
Hi, All... I appreciate Clark keeping his friends in Arkansas up-to-date on 
what is going on at Malheur.... Special place.. I got my life Trumpeter Swan 
there in 1972... Joe's suggestion that you just hit the delete button also 
applies to your replies to the list before you send them... :) 


Thanks, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Possibly
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 19:07:11 -0600
Just to disrupt the posts titled 'Politics', yesterday, as I sat at my 
desk and looked out into the sunshine one of my Barred Owls swooped out 
of the woods and crashed into the midst of the dove flock that was 
enjoying some corn I had put out earlier. He missed every dove who are 
likely far too fast for owls in daylight. The Owl did not know of 
course. Lessons learned. Sometimes the bird activity is so intense 
around the feeders that the owls cannot stop themselves. A Screech once 
came right by me and perched on the wall, having missed all the 
sparrows. The Barred Owl stood there for a bit and then flew up into a 
cedar where it stayed for hours either in a funk or just hurrying the 
sundown. Not sure.

They are one of my favorite animals. And last night I awoke in the 
middle of the night and could hear them calling through my windowglass.

I thank Clark Reames for all the updates on Malheur. I think this whole 
thing is burning out finally. Anyone who says that this subject did not 
belong here on the Arkansas bird list is not thinking correctly. One of 
the great water resting spots in the flyways of our migratory birds was 
deeply in the news. And we were lucky to have someone there who was not 
a newsman or a politician getting us the inside information. Any other 
bird list would have been glad to have such a connection.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: politics
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 19:04:57 -0600
Please, no more private emails. The last one I got, it was difficult to not 
feel a little insulted by it. I don't need people messaging me privately to 
tell me what's what. 

I don't know what I said in my last message to prompt that but, I'm done with 
the conversation. 

Subject: Re: politics
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 00:24:08 +0000
Good for you, Daniel. Indeed, it seems no matter how we try some things just 
get misconstrued. I can remember a time when it was easier to talk to other 
people without every word, every nuance being dissected. I’d like to say 
those were the good old days but in truth those were the days when acceptance 
was being part of the status quo, and if you weren’t of the majority woe to 
you! Communication by keyboard certainly lacks the emphatic precision of 
audible speech and a missing underline can send two entirely different 
messages. But you were right when you said you didn’t think any of us sets 
out to deliberately offend another. That said, we all need to be a little less 
sensitive and when in question, give the benefit of a doubt. Empathy and 
tolerance. I just wish my pine siskins would exercise a little of these when 
some poor little cardinal gets too close to their spot on the thistle sock! 







Dianemarie








From: Daniel Mason
Sent: ‎Thursday‎, ‎January‎ ‎28‎, ‎2016 ‎6‎:‎17‎ ‎PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU





Let me introduce myself. My name is Daniel Mason and I live in Siloam Springs. 
I've been a birder just a couple of years now but I've been a nature lover and 
bird watcher my entire life. I appreciate this resource here. I have personally 
preferred following reports on Ebird and did not want to get involved with a 
list for the entire state... but, many people even in this area don't report 
every sighting to Ebird so I gave this a try... 


In person, in a group you'll find me a quiet person. One on one, I might seem 
quite normal(I think). While I don't consider myself extremely odd or anything, 
I have in the past been diagnosed with a personality disorder or two. Anxiety 
and depression as well.. It's not extreme by any means but, I sometimes 
struggle with what "normal" conversation is. I misunderstand people and boy do 
I get misunderstood at times. I consider myself an independent thinker and I 
really see a lot of things in life differently than most. Often times I feel 
good about who I am and that I do not conform but, sometimes I can also feel 
alone. 

Sometimes I say one thing and people hear another. You'd think I'd be used to 
it. 


When I first started getting replies I got overwhelmed and thought "oh no, what 
did I get into..." but overall, the response could definitely have been worse. 

I thank the people that have replied here and privately to offer their 
sentiments of agreement on some things. 


It's possible the type of thing I was trying to speak of, I may have been 
guilty of myself. I don't really know. 

Politics and such come up, and I get it. There are just times where it's too 
much... and there are times where people assume that everyone else in the 
group(since we're all tied together by birds) believe and feel the same things. 
And things can come across with a sort of tone that likely is not intentional 
but can rub people the wrong way. 


Something I was not clear on(I can see that now) was that my intention was not 
at all to pick on one post. I got several messages pretty quick telling me that 
Clark was from Arkansas and people know and respect him. I realized at that 
point that I stepped on some toes. That was not my intention. That was just the 
most recent example. Some topics are touchy... emotions get stirred up... and, 
well that's something I struggle with I guess... 

Scrolling past or hitting delete, something I struggle with I guess...  :/

I have so many thoughts bouncing around in my head at the moment... I feel like 
there's more I want to say but, nothing is coming. 

I sure didn't mean to have this become a big thing. Just me, sharing my 
thoughts... 
Subject: Re: politics
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 18:16:36 -0600
Let me introduce myself. My name is Daniel Mason and I live in Siloam Springs. 
I've been a birder just a couple of years now but I've been a nature lover and 
bird watcher my entire life. I appreciate this resource here. I have personally 
preferred following reports on Ebird and did not want to get involved with a 
list for the entire state... but, many people even in this area don't report 
every sighting to Ebird so I gave this a try... 


In person, in a group you'll find me a quiet person. One on one, I might seem 
quite normal(I think). While I don't consider myself extremely odd or anything, 
I have in the past been diagnosed with a personality disorder or two. Anxiety 
and depression as well.. It's not extreme by any means but, I sometimes 
struggle with what "normal" conversation is. I misunderstand people and boy do 
I get misunderstood at times. I consider myself an independent thinker and I 
really see a lot of things in life differently than most. Often times I feel 
good about who I am and that I do not conform but, sometimes I can also feel 
alone. 

Sometimes I say one thing and people hear another. You'd think I'd be used to 
it. 


When I first started getting replies I got overwhelmed and thought "oh no, what 
did I get into..." but overall, the response could definitely have been worse. 

I thank the people that have replied here and privately to offer their 
sentiments of agreement on some things. 


It's possible the type of thing I was trying to speak of, I may have been 
guilty of myself. I don't really know. 

Politics and such come up, and I get it. There are just times where it's too 
much... and there are times where people assume that everyone else in the 
group(since we're all tied together by birds) believe and feel the same things. 
And things can come across with a sort of tone that likely is not intentional 
but can rub people the wrong way. 


Something I was not clear on(I can see that now) was that my intention was not 
at all to pick on one post. I got several messages pretty quick telling me that 
Clark was from Arkansas and people know and respect him. I realized at that 
point that I stepped on some toes. That was not my intention. That was just the 
most recent example. Some topics are touchy... emotions get stirred up... and, 
well that's something I struggle with I guess... 

Scrolling past or hitting delete, something I struggle with I guess...  :/

I have so many thoughts bouncing around in my head at the moment... I feel like 
there's more I want to say but, nothing is coming. 

I sure didn't mean to have this become a big thing. Just me, sharing my 
thoughts... 

Subject: Bald Eagles & Birds of Arkansas
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jan 2016 00:02:51 +0000
I watched a PAIR of Bald Eagles today near my Ramsey neighbors’ pond that is 
half on the WMA (Gulf Mtn.) What a fine sight on such a fine looking day. Later 
a pair of Cardinals just as lovely on a reed with the morning sun side-lighting 
them. 


I once kept my birding interests pretty restricted, mostly just to Arkansas and 
nearby states where I might chance to visit again in my waning years. But as 
the Brambling, the Iceland Gull and the Tundra Swan remind us, there is really 
no such thing as an Arkansas bird. While they are here, I guess we can call 
them ours. But even the indigenous species all call at least one other state 
home, if not many. And our migratory birds, of course, are well travelled. 


So how do we continue to enjoy that Ceruean Warbler previously mentioned if we 
don’t preserve its habitat? And how can we do that only on its summer range 
and not consider what happens to it on its wintering ground? Yes, this is old 
and basic stuff to most of us but one of the reasons why getting too hard-core 
about the topic will do us all, and the birds we love, a dis-service over the 
long-haul. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: politics
From: "Kate M. Chapman" <kmc025 AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 16:48:48 -0600
What many people are saying is that they *do* believe that this issue is
precisely bird talk. I happen to agree.

Kate M. Chapman, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Psychological Science
213 Memorial Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: (479) 575-4256
Fax: (479) 575-3219
Email: kmc025 AT uark.edu

On Thu, Jan 28, 2016 at 4:29 PM, Keith de Noble  wrote:

> Though this may be of interest to many, there are better forums for this
> communication. Let's talk birds . . . only.
>
> Keith
>
> On Thu, Jan 28, 2016 at 4:24 PM, CK Franklin 
> wrote:
>
>> I believe it is in our interest as concerned citizens who enjoy the
>> outdoors to take note of events like this in other states because we are
>> not so far removed the same issues here. We have have both federal and
>> state lands within our borders that could become targets of the some of the
>> same philosophies expressed in Oregon.  For those of you who may be new to
>> the state, we have had an experience in the not so distant past with people
>> expressing similar sentiments to those in contention at Malheur NWR.
>>
>> I appreciate being able to visit refuges & parks here in Arkansas to
>> pursue the passion we share for birds. What a loss for all of the citizens
>> of the state if these lands were claimed by narrow commercial interests
>> with 55 gallon drums of purple paint.  The greater catastrophe would be the
>> loss of habitat for what remains of the native flora & fauna, especially
>> now that climate change has come home to roost.
>>
>> As long as the conversation stays an reasonable fact based level, I have
>> no problem receiving information like this.  I would be very disappointed
>> with our group if we did not educate ourselves about ongoing conservation
>> issues.  An if, for some reason, a person finds a particular post
>> uninformative, the delete key will oblige.
>>
>> Cindy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 20:33:09 +0000
>> > From: joeneal AT UARK.EDU
>> > Subject: Re: politics
>> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>> >
>> > For what it's worth: I delete quite a bit of the stuff that is posted
>> to ARBIRD. I encourage you to do the same. I have even heard it said this
>> is why god gave to us the delete key. Use it liberally and as needed, and
>> please feel no remorse in deleting my frequent, long-winded, and sometimes
>> off-topic postings. I don't expect that it will all be read.
>> >
>> > In terms of past practice, we are not supposed to post what is
>> exclusively political/partisan, religious, or about cats, but if any of
>> these subjects get mentioned in the course of ARBIRD's central raison
>> d'etre, they are usually tolerated, at least for a time.
>> >
>> > So since you don't see a connect between the armed take over of a
>> National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon whose central tasked with protecting
>> migratory birds, please take a look at the bird migration maps in the book
>> Arkansas Birds, or look in any ornithology that deals with migration. It is
>> all very connected. Yes, what we see in Arkansas is connected to all the
>> rest.
>> >
>> > If tolerated and as a result, replicated, the armed take over of a
>> National Wildlife Refuge threatens the entire foundation of modern
>> conservation efforts to protect birds threatened by population growth and
>> other disturbances. In Arkansas, the notion that government has no "right"
>> to manage public lands is a direct threaten to the Ozark National Forest,
>> the Ouachita National Forest, Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, the
>> Buffalo National River, the state wildlife refuges and hunting lands, etc
>> etc -- to name a few public lands whose bird species lay directly within
>> the purview of ARBIRDS. Just imagine the fate of Arkansas's nesting
>> Cerulean Warblers if the Ozark NF disappeared. I spent my entire
>> professional career helping recovery of endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
>> on the Ouachita NF. There are some, like the Bundys, who don't think we had
>> a right to do this.
>> >
>> > So yes, I agree with you ARBIRDS shouldn't just be a bunch of posts
>> about what is happening elsewhere or a political bulletin board. But if you
>> understand modern conservation efforts and you want birds to thrive in
>> Arkansas, I strongly urge you to notice what is going on that could have a
>> serious detrimental impact. That seems relevant to me, if bird conservation
>> is the topic, including Arkansas birds.
>> >
>> > ________________________________________
>> > From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
>> on behalf of Daniel Mason 
>> > Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 11:29 AM
>> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>> > Subject: politics
>> >
>> > I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my
>> opinions and beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to
>> offend people.
>> >
>> > I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly.
>> The whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book
>> about politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by
>> them.
>> >
>> > Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group
>> like this, I wish the discussion were all about birds...
>> > How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting
>> more and more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate
>> to birds IN Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used,
>> it doesn't. What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we
>> want but, we're not there... we're not part of it.
>> >
>> > Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political
>> beliefs come out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias
>> are bad?.?.
>> > I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group...
>> We're all going to believe different things.
>> > So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please
>> consider other people and their varying opinions and beliefs.
>> >
>> > I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much
>> wrong, and too little together. I hate that there are sides that people
>> cling to so tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those
>> they don't agree with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life
>> today and it saddens me greatly.
>> > While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than
>> liberal. If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were
>> criticizing conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not
>> stick around for it.
>> > That upsets me and it should upset everyone.
>> > We all love birds... we have that in common. We can be friends. :)
>> >
>> > This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my
>> opinion here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do
>> hope my thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times.
>> > We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We
>> have these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe...
>> well, I'm totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people.
>> > I don't think any of us intend to do that. but it happens.
>> >
>> > My dream is that life were simple. It is not. :/
>> > None of us have it all figured out.
>> > I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I
>> joined for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as
>> it relates to(or we find ways for it to) birds.
>> > I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens
>> when politics are discussed at times.
>> > Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered
>> when the conversations come up.
>> >
>> > If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than
>> people. Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is
>> VERY important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it...
>> our love of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each
>> other.
>> > Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm
>> feeling when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm
>> typing, I get long winded... ha.
>> > I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt
>> pretty strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up.
>> > Now I'm headed out birding...
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: politics
From: Keith de Noble <kdenoble AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 16:29:48 -0600
Though this may be of interest to many, there are better forums for this
communication. Let's talk birds . . . only.

Keith

On Thu, Jan 28, 2016 at 4:24 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:

> I believe it is in our interest as concerned citizens who enjoy the
> outdoors to take note of events like this in other states because we are
> not so far removed the same issues here. We have have both federal and
> state lands within our borders that could become targets of the some of the
> same philosophies expressed in Oregon.  For those of you who may be new to
> the state, we have had an experience in the not so distant past with people
> expressing similar sentiments to those in contention at Malheur NWR.
>
> I appreciate being able to visit refuges & parks here in Arkansas to
> pursue the passion we share for birds. What a loss for all of the citizens
> of the state if these lands were claimed by narrow commercial interests
> with 55 gallon drums of purple paint.  The greater catastrophe would be the
> loss of habitat for what remains of the native flora & fauna, especially
> now that climate change has come home to roost.
>
> As long as the conversation stays an reasonable fact based level, I have
> no problem receiving information like this.  I would be very disappointed
> with our group if we did not educate ourselves about ongoing conservation
> issues.  An if, for some reason, a person finds a particular post
> uninformative, the delete key will oblige.
>
> Cindy
>
>
>
>
> > Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 20:33:09 +0000
> > From: joeneal AT UARK.EDU
> > Subject: Re: politics
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> >
> > For what it's worth: I delete quite a bit of the stuff that is posted to
> ARBIRD. I encourage you to do the same. I have even heard it said this is
> why god gave to us the delete key. Use it liberally and as needed, and
> please feel no remorse in deleting my frequent, long-winded, and sometimes
> off-topic postings. I don't expect that it will all be read.
> >
> > In terms of past practice, we are not supposed to post what is
> exclusively political/partisan, religious, or about cats, but if any of
> these subjects get mentioned in the course of ARBIRD's central raison
> d'etre, they are usually tolerated, at least for a time.
> >
> > So since you don't see a connect between the armed take over of a
> National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon whose central tasked with protecting
> migratory birds, please take a look at the bird migration maps in the book
> Arkansas Birds, or look in any ornithology that deals with migration. It is
> all very connected. Yes, what we see in Arkansas is connected to all the
> rest.
> >
> > If tolerated and as a result, replicated, the armed take over of a
> National Wildlife Refuge threatens the entire foundation of modern
> conservation efforts to protect birds threatened by population growth and
> other disturbances. In Arkansas, the notion that government has no "right"
> to manage public lands is a direct threaten to the Ozark National Forest,
> the Ouachita National Forest, Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, the
> Buffalo National River, the state wildlife refuges and hunting lands, etc
> etc -- to name a few public lands whose bird species lay directly within
> the purview of ARBIRDS. Just imagine the fate of Arkansas's nesting
> Cerulean Warblers if the Ozark NF disappeared. I spent my entire
> professional career helping recovery of endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
> on the Ouachita NF. There are some, like the Bundys, who don't think we had
> a right to do this.
> >
> > So yes, I agree with you ARBIRDS shouldn't just be a bunch of posts
> about what is happening elsewhere or a political bulletin board. But if you
> understand modern conservation efforts and you want birds to thrive in
> Arkansas, I strongly urge you to notice what is going on that could have a
> serious detrimental impact. That seems relevant to me, if bird conservation
> is the topic, including Arkansas birds.
> >
> > ________________________________________
> > From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> on behalf of Daniel Mason 
> > Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 11:29 AM
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> > Subject: politics
> >
> > I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions
> and beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to offend
> people.
> >
> > I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly.
> The whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book
> about politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by
> them.
> >
> > Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group
> like this, I wish the discussion were all about birds...
> > How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting
> more and more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate
> to birds IN Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used,
> it doesn't. What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we
> want but, we're not there... we're not part of it.
> >
> > Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political
> beliefs come out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias
> are bad?.?.
> > I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group...
> We're all going to believe different things.
> > So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider
> other people and their varying opinions and beliefs.
> >
> > I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong,
> and too little together. I hate that there are sides that people cling to
> so tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they don't
> agree with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life today and it
> saddens me greatly.
> > While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than
> liberal. If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were
> criticizing conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not
> stick around for it.
> > That upsets me and it should upset everyone.
> > We all love birds... we have that in common. We can be friends. :)
> >
> > This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my
> opinion here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do
> hope my thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times.
> > We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We
> have these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe...
> well, I'm totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people.
> > I don't think any of us intend to do that. but it happens.
> >
> > My dream is that life were simple. It is not. :/
> > None of us have it all figured out.
> > I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I
> joined for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as
> it relates to(or we find ways for it to) birds.
> > I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens
> when politics are discussed at times.
> > Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered
> when the conversations come up.
> >
> > If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than
> people. Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is
> VERY important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it...
> our love of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each
> other.
> > Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm
> feeling when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm
> typing, I get long winded... ha.
> > I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt
> pretty strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up.
> > Now I'm headed out birding...
>
Subject: Re: politics
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 16:24:58 -0600
I believe it is in our interest as concerned citizens who enjoy the outdoors to 
take note of events like this in other states because we are not so far removed 
the same issues here. We have have both federal and state lands within our 
borders that could become targets of the some of the same philosophies 
expressed in Oregon. For those of you who may be new to the state, we have had 
an experience in the not so distant past with people expressing similar 
sentiments to those in contention at Malheur NWR. 


I appreciate being able to visit refuges & parks here in Arkansas to pursue the 
passion we share for birds. What a loss for all of the citizens of the state if 
these lands were claimed by narrow commercial interests with 55 gallon drums of 
purple paint. The greater catastrophe would be the loss of habitat for what 
remains of the native flora & fauna, especially now that climate change has 
come home to roost. 


As long as the conversation stays an reasonable fact based level, I have no 
problem receiving information like this. I would be very disappointed with our 
group if we did not educate ourselves about ongoing conservation issues. An if, 
for some reason, a person finds a particular post uninformative, the delete key 
will oblige. 


Cindy




> Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 20:33:09 +0000
> From: joeneal AT UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: politics
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> For what it's worth: I delete quite a bit of the stuff that is posted to 
ARBIRD. I encourage you to do the same. I have even heard it said this is why 
god gave to us the delete key. Use it liberally and as needed, and please feel 
no remorse in deleting my frequent, long-winded, and sometimes off-topic 
postings. I don't expect that it will all be read. 

> 
> In terms of past practice, we are not supposed to post what is exclusively 
political/partisan, religious, or about cats, but if any of these subjects get 
mentioned in the course of ARBIRD's central raison d'etre, they are usually 
tolerated, at least for a time. 

> 
> So since you don't see a connect between the armed take over of a National 
Wildlife Refuge in Oregon whose central tasked with protecting migratory birds, 
please take a look at the bird migration maps in the book Arkansas Birds, or 
look in any ornithology that deals with migration. It is all very connected. 
Yes, what we see in Arkansas is connected to all the rest. 

> 
> If tolerated and as a result, replicated, the armed take over of a National 
Wildlife Refuge threatens the entire foundation of modern conservation efforts 
to protect birds threatened by population growth and other disturbances. In 
Arkansas, the notion that government has no "right" to manage public lands is a 
direct threaten to the Ozark National Forest, the Ouachita National Forest, 
Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, the Buffalo National River, the state 
wildlife refuges and hunting lands, etc etc -- to name a few public lands whose 
bird species lay directly within the purview of ARBIRDS. Just imagine the fate 
of Arkansas's nesting Cerulean Warblers if the Ozark NF disappeared. I spent my 
entire professional career helping recovery of endangered Red-cockaded 
Woodpeckers on the Ouachita NF. There are some, like the Bundys, who don't 
think we had a right to do this. 

> 
> So yes, I agree with you ARBIRDS shouldn't just be a bunch of posts about 
what is happening elsewhere or a political bulletin board. But if you 
understand modern conservation efforts and you want birds to thrive in 
Arkansas, I strongly urge you to notice what is going on that could have a 
serious detrimental impact. That seems relevant to me, if bird conservation is 
the topic, including Arkansas birds. 

> 
>  ________________________________________
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Daniel Mason  

> Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 11:29 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: politics
> 
> I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions and 
beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to offend people. 

> 
> I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly. The 
whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book about 
politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by them. 

> 
> Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group like 
this, I wish the discussion were all about birds... 

> How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting more 
and more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate to birds 
IN Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used, it doesn't. 
What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we want but, we're 
not there... we're not part of it. 

> 
> Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political beliefs 
come out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias are bad?.?. 

> I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group... We're 
all going to believe different things. 

> So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider 
other people and their varying opinions and beliefs. 

> 
> I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong, and 
too little together. I hate that there are sides that people cling to so 
tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they don't agree 
with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life today and it saddens me 
greatly. 

> While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than liberal. 
If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were criticizing 
conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not stick around for 
it. 

> That upsets me and it should upset everyone.
> We all love birds...  we have that in common.  We can be friends.  :)
> 
> This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my opinion 
here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do hope my 
thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times. 

> We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We have 
these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe... well, I'm 
totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people. 

> I don't think any of us intend to do that.  but it happens.
> 
> My dream is that life were simple.  It is not.  :/
> None of us have it all figured out.
> I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I joined 
for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as it relates 
to(or we find ways for it to) birds. 

> I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens when 
politics are discussed at times. 

> Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered when 
the conversations come up. 

> 
> If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than people. 
Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is VERY 
important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it... our love 
of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each other. 

> Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm 
feeling when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm typing, I 
get long winded... ha. 

> I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt pretty 
strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up. 

> Now I'm headed out birding...
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: politics
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 14:49:44 -0600
Right.  This listserv is about the Birds of Arkansas, both in their numbers
and variety, and their importance in terms of our personal delight and
their place in the ecology of this state.  Necessarily, then, it must also
be about they need to survive and thrive.  Joe is our most persuasive
subscriber regarding the relationship between habitat and birds around
here, and I thank him for that.

Politics--the majority of the "political" discussions on this list focus on
how to get government agencies to do a BETTER job of managing
lands/habitats for the health of our bird populations.  I can't recall a
single "political" discussion in which the shared opinion was for those
agencies to be eliminated from that work/responsibility.  I can't see us
NOT discussing fundamental threats to that role for governmental agencies.



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

On Thu, Jan 28, 2016 at 2:33 PM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:

> For what it's worth: I delete quite a bit of the stuff that is posted to
> ARBIRD. I encourage you to do the same. I have even heard it said this is
> why god gave to us the delete key. Use it liberally and as needed, and
> please feel no remorse in deleting my frequent, long-winded, and sometimes
> off-topic postings. I don't expect that it will all be read.
>
> In terms of past practice, we are not supposed to post what is exclusively
> political/partisan, religious, or about cats, but if any of these subjects
> get mentioned in the course of ARBIRD's central raison d'etre, they are
> usually tolerated, at least for a time.
>
> So since you don't see a connect between the armed take over of a National
> Wildlife Refuge in Oregon whose central tasked with protecting migratory
> birds, please take a look at the bird migration maps in the book Arkansas
> Birds, or look in any ornithology that deals with migration. It is all very
> connected. Yes, what we see in Arkansas is connected to all the rest.
>
> If tolerated and as a result, replicated, the armed take over of a
> National Wildlife Refuge threatens the entire foundation of modern
> conservation efforts to protect birds threatened by population growth and
> other disturbances. In Arkansas, the notion that government has no "right"
> to manage public lands is a direct threaten to the Ozark National Forest,
> the Ouachita National Forest, Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, the
> Buffalo National River, the state wildlife refuges and hunting lands, etc
> etc -- to name a few public lands whose bird species lay directly within
> the purview of ARBIRDS. Just imagine the fate of Arkansas's nesting
> Cerulean Warblers if the Ozark NF disappeared. I spent my entire
> professional career helping recovery of endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers
> on the Ouachita NF. There are some, like the Bundys, who don't think we had
> a right to do this.
>
> So yes, I agree with you ARBIRDS shouldn't just be a bunch of posts about
> what is happening elsewhere or a political bulletin board. But if you
> understand modern conservation efforts and you want birds to thrive in
> Arkansas, I strongly urge you to notice what is going on that could have a
> serious detrimental impact. That seems relevant to me, if bird conservation
> is the topic, including Arkansas birds.
>
>  ________________________________________
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> on behalf of Daniel Mason 
> Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 11:29 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: politics
>
> I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions
> and beliefs may be in the minority here...  and I don't want to offend
> people.
>
> I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly.
> The whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty.  I could write a book
> about politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by
> them.
>
> Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple.  With a group
> like this, I wish the discussion were all about birds...
> How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon?  Why are we getting
> more and more updates on who is getting arrested etc?  How does that relate
> to birds IN Arkansas?  It doesn't.  No matter what political angle is used,
> it doesn't.  What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we
> want but, we're not there... we're not part of it.
>
> Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political beliefs
> come out.  The government does or does not overreach?.?.  Militias are
> bad?.?.
> I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group...
> We're all going to believe different things.
> So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider
> other people and their varying opinions and beliefs.
>
> I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong,
> and too little together.  I hate that there are sides that people cling to
> so tightly...  I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they
> don't agree with.  This is what politics do...  It's a fact of life today
> and it saddens me greatly.
> While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than
> liberal.  If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were
> criticizing conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not
> stick around for it.
> That upsets me and it should upset everyone.
> We all love birds...  we have that in common.  We can be friends.  :)
>
> This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it.  I understand that my
> opinion here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future.  I do
> hope my thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times.
> We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them.  We
> have these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe...
> well, I'm totally right about it...  So, I will push it out there on people.
> I don't think any of us intend to do that.  but it happens.
>
> My dream is that life were simple.  It is not.  :/
> None of us have it all figured out.
> I wish we could avoid political discussions here.  That's not what I
> joined for...  but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes
> as it relates to(or we find ways for it to) birds.
> I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens
> when politics are discussed at times.
> Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered
> when the conversations come up.
>
> If you're like me...  you might prefer to hang out with birds than
> people.  Wildlife might seem more important than people...  while wildlife
> is VERY important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for
> it...  our love of nature should never interfere with how we should treat
> each other.
> Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now.  I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm
> feeling when I type.  In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm
> typing, I get long winded... ha.
> I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand.  But I felt
> pretty strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up.
> Now I'm headed out birding...
>
Subject: Re: politics
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 14:37:43 -0600
Amen.

On Jan 28, 2016, at 2:33 PM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:

> For what it's worth: I delete quite a bit of the stuff that is posted to 
ARBIRD. I encourage you to do the same. I have even heard it said this is why 
god gave to us the delete key. Use it liberally and as needed, and please feel 
no remorse in deleting my frequent, long-winded, and sometimes off-topic 
postings. I don't expect that it will all be read. 

> 
> In terms of past practice, we are not supposed to post what is exclusively 
political/partisan, religious, or about cats, but if any of these subjects get 
mentioned in the course of ARBIRD's central raison d'etre, they are usually 
tolerated, at least for a time. 

> 
> So since you don't see a connect between the armed take over of a National 
Wildlife Refuge in Oregon whose central tasked with protecting migratory birds, 
please take a look at the bird migration maps in the book Arkansas Birds, or 
look in any ornithology that deals with migration. It is all very connected. 
Yes, what we see in Arkansas is connected to all the rest. 

> 
> If tolerated and as a result, replicated, the armed take over of a National 
Wildlife Refuge threatens the entire foundation of modern conservation efforts 
to protect birds threatened by population growth and other disturbances. In 
Arkansas, the notion that government has no "right" to manage public lands is a 
direct threaten to the Ozark National Forest, the Ouachita National Forest, 
Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, the Buffalo National River, the state 
wildlife refuges and hunting lands, etc etc -- to name a few public lands whose 
bird species lay directly within the purview of ARBIRDS. Just imagine the fate 
of Arkansas's nesting Cerulean Warblers if the Ozark NF disappeared. I spent my 
entire professional career helping recovery of endangered Red-cockaded 
Woodpeckers on the Ouachita NF. There are some, like the Bundys, who don't 
think we had a right to do this. 

> 
> So yes, I agree with you ARBIRDS shouldn't just be a bunch of posts about 
what is happening elsewhere or a political bulletin board. But if you 
understand modern conservation efforts and you want birds to thrive in 
Arkansas, I strongly urge you to notice what is going on that could have a 
serious detrimental impact. That seems relevant to me, if bird conservation is 
the topic, including Arkansas birds. 

> 
> ________________________________________
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Daniel Mason  

> Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 11:29 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: politics
> 
> I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions and 
beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to offend people. 

> 
> I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly. The 
whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book about 
politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by them. 

> 
> Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group like 
this, I wish the discussion were all about birds... 

> How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting more 
and more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate to birds 
IN Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used, it doesn't. 
What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we want but, we're 
not there... we're not part of it. 

> 
> Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political beliefs 
come out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias are bad?.?. 

> I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group... We're 
all going to believe different things. 

> So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider 
other people and their varying opinions and beliefs. 

> 
> I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong, and 
too little together. I hate that there are sides that people cling to so 
tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they don't agree 
with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life today and it saddens me 
greatly. 

> While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than liberal. 
If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were criticizing 
conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not stick around for 
it. 

> That upsets me and it should upset everyone.
> We all love birds...  we have that in common.  We can be friends.  :)
> 
> This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my opinion 
here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do hope my 
thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times. 

> We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We have 
these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe... well, I'm 
totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people. 

> I don't think any of us intend to do that.  but it happens.
> 
> My dream is that life were simple.  It is not.  :/
> None of us have it all figured out.
> I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I joined 
for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as it relates 
to(or we find ways for it to) birds. 

> I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens when 
politics are discussed at times. 

> Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered when 
the conversations come up. 

> 
> If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than people. 
Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is VERY 
important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it... our love 
of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each other. 

> Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm 
feeling when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm typing, I 
get long winded... ha. 

> I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt pretty 
strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up. 

> Now I'm headed out birding...
Subject: Re: politics
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 20:33:09 +0000
For what it's worth: I delete quite a bit of the stuff that is posted to 
ARBIRD. I encourage you to do the same. I have even heard it said this is why 
god gave to us the delete key. Use it liberally and as needed, and please feel 
no remorse in deleting my frequent, long-winded, and sometimes off-topic 
postings. I don't expect that it will all be read. 


In terms of past practice, we are not supposed to post what is exclusively 
political/partisan, religious, or about cats, but if any of these subjects get 
mentioned in the course of ARBIRD's central raison d'etre, they are usually 
tolerated, at least for a time. 


So since you don't see a connect between the armed take over of a National 
Wildlife Refuge in Oregon whose central tasked with protecting migratory birds, 
please take a look at the bird migration maps in the book Arkansas Birds, or 
look in any ornithology that deals with migration. It is all very connected. 
Yes, what we see in Arkansas is connected to all the rest. 


If tolerated and as a result, replicated, the armed take over of a National 
Wildlife Refuge threatens the entire foundation of modern conservation efforts 
to protect birds threatened by population growth and other disturbances. In 
Arkansas, the notion that government has no "right" to manage public lands is a 
direct threaten to the Ozark National Forest, the Ouachita National Forest, 
Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, the Buffalo National River, the state 
wildlife refuges and hunting lands, etc etc -- to name a few public lands whose 
bird species lay directly within the purview of ARBIRDS. Just imagine the fate 
of Arkansas's nesting Cerulean Warblers if the Ozark NF disappeared. I spent my 
entire professional career helping recovery of endangered Red-cockaded 
Woodpeckers on the Ouachita NF. There are some, like the Bundys, who don't 
think we had a right to do this. 


So yes, I agree with you ARBIRDS shouldn't just be a bunch of posts about what 
is happening elsewhere or a political bulletin board. But if you understand 
modern conservation efforts and you want birds to thrive in Arkansas, I 
strongly urge you to notice what is going on that could have a serious 
detrimental impact. That seems relevant to me, if bird conservation is the 
topic, including Arkansas birds. 


 ________________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Daniel Mason  

Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 11:29 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: politics

I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions and 
beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to offend people. 


I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly. The 
whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book about 
politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by them. 


Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group like 
this, I wish the discussion were all about birds... 

How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting more and 
more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate to birds IN 
Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used, it doesn't. 
What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we want but, we're 
not there... we're not part of it. 


Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political beliefs come 
out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias are bad?.?. 

I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group... We're all 
going to believe different things. 

So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider other 
people and their varying opinions and beliefs. 


I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong, and 
too little together. I hate that there are sides that people cling to so 
tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they don't agree 
with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life today and it saddens me 
greatly. 

While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than liberal. 
If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were criticizing 
conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not stick around for 
it. 

That upsets me and it should upset everyone.
We all love birds...  we have that in common.  We can be friends.  :)

This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my opinion 
here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do hope my 
thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times. 

We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We have 
these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe... well, I'm 
totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people. 

I don't think any of us intend to do that.  but it happens.

My dream is that life were simple.  It is not.  :/
None of us have it all figured out.
I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I joined 
for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as it relates 
to(or we find ways for it to) birds. 

I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens when 
politics are discussed at times. 

Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered when the 
conversations come up. 


If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than people. 
Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is VERY 
important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it... our love 
of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each other. 

Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm feeling 
when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm typing, I get long 
winded... ha. 

I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt pretty 
strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up. 

Now I'm headed out birding...
Subject: Re: politics
From: Kay Hodnett <sallyportk AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 14:57:42 -0500
I did not read the back and forth in emails that preceded this one. But I 
happened to read this one and it resonates with me. Thank you for writing this, 
Daniel. 

Kay Hidnett

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 28, 2016, at 12:29 PM, Daniel Mason  wrote:
> 
> I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions and 
beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to offend people. 

> 
> I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly. The 
whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book about 
politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by them. 

> 
> Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group like 
this, I wish the discussion were all about birds... 

> How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting more 
and more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate to birds 
IN Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used, it doesn't. 
What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we want but, we're 
not there... we're not part of it. 

> 
> Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political beliefs 
come out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias are bad?.?. 

> I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group... We're 
all going to believe different things. 

> So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider 
other people and their varying opinions and beliefs. 

> 
> I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong, and 
too little together. I hate that there are sides that people cling to so 
tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they don't agree 
with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life today and it saddens me 
greatly. 

> While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than liberal. 
If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were criticizing 
conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not stick around for 
it. 

> That upsets me and it should upset everyone.  
> We all love birds...  we have that in common.  We can be friends.  :)
> 
> This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my opinion 
here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do hope my 
thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times. 

> We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We have 
these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe... well, I'm 
totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people. 

> I don't think any of us intend to do that.  but it happens.
> 
> My dream is that life were simple.  It is not.  :/
> None of us have it all figured out.  
> I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I joined 
for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as it relates 
to(or we find ways for it to) birds. 

> I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens when 
politics are discussed at times. 

> Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered when 
the conversations come up. 

> 
> If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than people. 
Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is VERY 
important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it... our love 
of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each other. 

> Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm 
feeling when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm typing, I 
get long winded... ha. 

> I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt pretty 
strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up. 

> Now I'm headed out birding...
Subject: Politics...
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 18:14:31 +0000
If my first post, which seems to be flying around in cyberspace somewhere, 
finds its way here before or after this one, my apologies; I couldn’t 
retrieve it from the Can’t-Send pile. 


Daniel, that you mentioned PRAYING alone ought to get you a couple (but gladly 
only that many) hate-mails of itself. They point out, and it’s true, that 
religion has no place here, however it’s hard for us who subscribe to it to 
keep it out of our rhetoric--kind of like going out into the grass fields and 
coming home without stickers in your trousers. 


As you can see, this veers from our true topic too. I’m just saying I agree 
on most points except that to talk birds is our passion but to drift is human. 
As for politics, I’m afraid the activists among us will tell you that it 
isn't a party thing here, just a case of you can’t muck out the stalls 
without stepping in a little, uh--you know. 


I hope your birding went well this glorious morning as did mine. You might like 
to try one of our group outings, such as the one Karen is leading Saturday to 
Lake Dardenelle. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: politics
From: Ellen Fennell <f.ellen AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 12:11:21 -0600
I appreciate the inside information on this important refuge. I do not consider 
them a political statement at all. 


Ellen Fennell 
Little Rock

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 28, 2016, at 11:42 AM, Sandy Berger  wrote:
> 
> The man who is sending these emails to us is from Arkansas. Many of us know 
him. I don't believe he sends these because of the politics involved. I believe 
he sends them because a lot of are concerned about the refuge and how this will 
impact migration, birding, etc. 

> 
> Your email may get things going politics-wise. I hope not. These are just FYI 
emails. 

> 
> For the birds.
> 
> Sandy B.
> Ft. Smith
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Jan 28, 2016, at 11:29 AM, Daniel Mason  wrote:
>> 
>> I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions and 
beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to offend people. 

>> 
>> I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly. The 
whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book about 
politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by them. 

>> 
>> Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group like 
this, I wish the discussion were all about birds... 

>> How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting more 
and more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate to birds 
IN Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used, it doesn't. 
What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we want but, we're 
not there... we're not part of it. 

>> 
>> Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political beliefs 
come out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias are bad?.?. 

>> I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group... We're 
all going to believe different things. 

>> So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider 
other people and their varying opinions and beliefs. 

>> 
>> I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong, and 
too little together. I hate that there are sides that people cling to so 
tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they don't agree 
with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life today and it saddens me 
greatly. 

>> While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than 
liberal. If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were criticizing 
conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not stick around for 
it. 

>> That upsets me and it should upset everyone.  
>> We all love birds...  we have that in common.  We can be friends.  :)
>> 
>> This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my opinion 
here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do hope my 
thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times. 

>> We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We have 
these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe... well, I'm 
totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people. 

>> I don't think any of us intend to do that.  but it happens.
>> 
>> My dream is that life were simple.  It is not.  :/
>> None of us have it all figured out.  
>> I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I joined 
for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as it relates 
to(or we find ways for it to) birds. 

>> I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens when 
politics are discussed at times. 

>> Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered when 
the conversations come up. 

>> 
>> If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than people. 
Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is VERY 
important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it... our love 
of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each other. 

>> Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm 
feeling when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm typing, I 
get long winded... ha. 

>> I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt pretty 
strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up. 

>> Now I'm headed out birding...
Subject: politics
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 11:29:36 -0600
I am literally praying for guidance as I type this as I fear my opinions and 
beliefs may be in the minority here... and I don't want to offend people. 


I know that politics and birding sometimes go with each other... sadly. The 
whole right vs left type stuff drives me batty. I could write a book about 
politics and how messed up they are and how manipulated people are by them. 


Maybe I'm a dreamer... but I wish things were more simple. With a group like 
this, I wish the discussion were all about birds... 

How did we get to discussing the refuge in Oregon? Why are we getting more and 
more updates on who is getting arrested etc? How does that relate to birds IN 
Arkansas? It doesn't. No matter what political angle is used, it doesn't. 
What's happening up there, we can analyze and discuss all we want but, we're 
not there... we're not part of it. 


Most importantly, when we discuss these things, people's political beliefs come 
out. The government does or does not overreach?.?. Militias are bad?.?. 

I hope all realize that birders can and should be a diverse group... We're all 
going to believe different things. 

So, I plead with people... as such things are discussed, please consider other 
people and their varying opinions and beliefs. 


I believe that liberals and conservatives both are doing too much wrong, and 
too little together. I hate that there are sides that people cling to so 
tightly... I HATE that people develop attitudes towards those they don't agree 
with. This is what politics do... It's a fact of life today and it saddens me 
greatly. 

While I despise the labels, I personally lean more conservative than liberal. 
If I were to find myself in a group of liberals that were criticizing 
conservatives, I'd feel awfully uncomfortable and might not stick around for 
it. 

That upsets me and it should upset everyone.  
We all love birds...  we have that in common.  We can be friends.  :)

This isn't my group and, I'm fairly new to it. I understand that my opinion 
here isn't going to shape what topics pop up in the future. I do hope my 
thoughts may impact the way things are discussed at times. 

We all have beliefs and, some of us are quite passionate about them. We have 
these ideas that, this is how things work or, this thing I believe... well, I'm 
totally right about it... So, I will push it out there on people. 

I don't think any of us intend to do that.  but it happens.

My dream is that life were simple.  It is not.  :/
None of us have it all figured out.  
I wish we could avoid political discussions here. That's not what I joined 
for... but, I understand that those things will come up sometimes as it relates 
to(or we find ways for it to) birds. 

I don't believe most people ever set out to hurt others but it happens when 
politics are discussed at times. 

Basically, the reason I bring this all up is for that to be considered when the 
conversations come up. 


If you're like me... you might prefer to hang out with birds than people. 
Wildlife might seem more important than people... while wildlife is VERY 
important and... I believe it is our responsibility to care for it... our love 
of nature should never interfere with how we should treat each other. 

Eh, perhaps I'm rambling now. I tend to try too hard to convey what I'm feeling 
when I type. In person I don't talk a whole lot but when I'm typing, I get long 
winded... ha. 

I don't know if I'm saying things people will understand. But I felt pretty 
strongly about it and thought it wouldn't hurt to speak up. 

Now I'm headed out birding...
Subject: RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS AT LAKE MAUMELLE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 16:48:19 +0000
Red-breasted Mergansers (7 at least) were visible from Vista Point on Lake 
Maumelle yesterday. It was a treat for David Chapman, David Oakley and me 
because we don't see them often at mid-winter in extreme northwest Arkansas. 


When I got home I checked National Audubon analysis of Christmas Bird Count 
data (40 year averages) for range changes presumably associated with climate 
change; for these birds, a documented northward shift of 317 miles, one of the 
biggest shifts associated with Arkansas. As late as the mid-1980s, Arkansas 
Birds (1986) provided this analysis of mid-winter occurrence in the state: "... 
the small numbers involved suggest that all but a very few ... moved south of 
the state by December." 


We visited the usual observation spots along Maumelle's south shore, which 
provides excellent views, sun to your back in January. We enjoyed a flock of 
Greater Scaup (6-8) from Vista Point and a much larger mixed-species "bluebill" 
flock (~75) from Bufflehead Bay. For the day we saw Common Loons (~18-21) and 
Red-throated Loon (1). We had both species and most of the Commons at Vista 
Point. The walk into Bufflehead Bay included an impressive mixed flock (15-20) 
of mostly Golden-crowned Kinglets with a few Ruby-crowneds. On the way back, we 
stopped in mature shortleaf pines to round-up Brown-headed Nuthatches. 


So near to Little Rock and Big Twitch, we were tempted to pull on our cammo 
gear, sprinkle ourselves with pixie dust, and get into our best version of an 
old man's belly crawl - all for the chance to violate the Birder's Code of 
Ethics and head for the driveway that once lead to Mr Brambling. Oakley bailed, 
because he already has the photograph. Chapman bailed because being from the 
UK, he has them from Europe and maybe Asia. Neal bailed when he saw Mr 
Brambling has seemingly had enough of Arkansas's version of The Big Twitch. 


That said, I recommend that all of you with feeders, and therefore potential, 
wash your windows real good, in and out, get that parking lot ready, and fasten 
your seat belts for the next Really Big Twitch. 

Subject: FW: Malheur National Forest ~ In the News
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 16:25:47 +0000
Thought everyone might like this info too. Check out the letters to the editor 
and you can see what we are up against with our sheriff and the local 
community. I like Sheriff Ward down in Harney Co. Wish we had him up here in 
Grant. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: Burton, Shilo D -FS
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 4:33 PM
To: FS-pdl r6 malheur all employees
Cc: Baker, Stephen - FS; Sachet, Glen -FS; Gray, Kathryn L -FS; Bosworth, Joani 
-FS 

Subject: Malheur National Forest ~ In the News

PDF format attached for better viewing.


[cid:image030.png AT 01D15920.5D59B240]
Malheur National Forest ~ In the News
Jan. 21-27 2015

Follow your Forest on the web!
On the web! http://www.fs.usda.gov/malheur/
On Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/MalheurNationalForest
And even Twitter! https://twitter.com/MalheurNF

News of Interest
Grant County resident witnessed arrests of occupation leaders at FBI 
roadblock 

By EricK Bengel, EO Media Group | January 27, 2016

A Grant County resident was among the witnesses Tuesday as federal authorities 
cleared Highway 395 to confront and apprehend Malheur refuge occupation leaders 
on their way to a community meeting in John Day. 


Dave Hannibal, of Dayville, didn't see the encounter between the man who was 
fatally shot by police, but watched as others were taken in custody... 


26 days of Oregon standoff: A look back at the impact of the armed occupiers 
 

RT
The second demand was that the Malheur National Forest be handed over to the 
residents of Harney County. "Returning" the land to anyone is... 

[cid:image025.jpg AT 01D159A5.06E21210]
Photos, Prints, Drawings Grant County, Oregon. Malheur National Forest. Logs 
rolling down into ... 
 

Library of Congress
Malheur National Forest. Logs rolling down into loading yard. Logs are snaked 
out of woods with caterpillar tractors and then loaded onto trucks which ... 


1 rancher renounces federal grazing contract at Bundy event 
 

Yahoo News
(AP) - A rancher from New Mexico renounced his U.S. Forest Service.... A grader 
is used on a road at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in... 


What?s being held at Malheur refuge 
 

Bend Bulletin
The occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters is of more 
than ... The Bureau of Land Management Burns District Office and the Malheur 
National Forest's Emigrant Creek Ranger District Office, both in Hines, ... 



[http://btimesherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Ward-WEB-1132x509.jpg]Officials 
address arrests during press 
conference 

Burns Times-Herald | January 27, 2016

At a press conference on Wednesday, Jan. 27, Special Agent in Charge for the 
FBI in Oregon Greg Bretzing stated the FBI and other law enforcement agencies 
"worked diligently to bring the situation at the Malheur National Wildlife 
Refuge to a peaceful end." Bretzing said the armed occupiers were given ample 



County Court continues conversation concerning refuge 
occupation 

Burns Times-Herald | January 27, 2016
Public urged to stop visiting refuge The armed occupation of the Malheur 
National Wildlife Refuge was a major topic of discussion during the regular 
meeting of the Harney County Court on Jan. 20. Following a peaceful rally and 
march on Saturday, Jan. 2, a splinter group of militia members, including Ammon 
Bundy... 

FBI lays siege to refuge after 1 militant killed, Bundys arrested
[Road closed sign]Phil Taylor, E&E 
reporter, Wednesday, January 27, 2016 

Police closed U.S. Highway 205 about a dozen miles northwest of the refuge 
compound, where at least four occupants are believed to remain. Photo by Phil 
Taylor. 

BURNS, Ore. -- The 25-day occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge 
took a violent turn last night when police shot and killed 55-year-old militant 
LaVoy Finicum and arrested Ammon and Ryan Bundy and six of the group's other 
leaders. 

The FBI and Oregon State Police have surrounded the refuge, setting up 
roadblocks past which no one will be allowed. Anyone leaving the compound will 
be stopped and their vehicles searched, authorities said. 

A convoy of police vehicles carrying concrete highway barriers and 
porta-potties drove past a checkpoint this morning on the way to the refuge, 
suggesting police might be preparing for a long impasse. 

The shooting happened in late afternoon on U.S. Highway 395 about 20 miles 
north of Burns as the Bundy entourage was heading to John Day, Ore., to attend 
a community meeting. 

The highway was closed at its junction with U.S. Highway 20 just east of Burns, 
where a team of heavily armed police officers stood watch. 


[Mugshots]Ryan Bundy, Ammon Bundy, Brian Cavalier, Shawna Cox, Ryan Payne, 
Peter Santilli, Joseph O'Shaughnessy. Photos courtesy of Multnomah County 
Sheriff's Office. 

At around 7 p.m. local time, well-armored police guarded an ambulance that 
pulled into the Harney District Hospital, which had been placed on lockdown. 
Police would not confirm who was inside. 

In addition to the Bundys, the highway stop also resulted in the arrest of 
Brian Cavalier, 44, of Bunkerville, Nev., the Bundys' bodyguard; Shawna Cox, 
59, of Kanab, Utah; and Ryan Payne, 32, of Anaconda, Mont., an Iraq War veteran 
who helped Ammon Bundy plot the refuge takeover. They are being held at the 
Multnomah County Detention Center in Portland, Ore. 

Ryan Bundy, 43, suffered a minor gunshot wound during the conflict but was 
later treated at a local hospital and released into FBI custody, The Oregonian 
reported. 

Police also made two separate arrests in Burns of Joseph Donald O'Shaughnessy, 
45, of Cottonwood, Ariz., known by militants as "Captain O," and Pete Santilli, 
50, of Cincinnati, Ohio, a self-styled journalist who promoted the occupation 
through his online commentary and social media. 

Later in the evening, Jon Ritzheimer, 32, an Iraq War veteran who gained 
national fame for posting a video of himself trashing the sex toy gag gifts 
he'd received while at the refuge, turned himself in to the Peoria, Ariz., 
police. 

Each was arrested on a federal felony charge of "conspiracy to impede officers 
of the United States from discharging their official duties through the use of 
force, intimidation or threats," a charge that carries up to six years in 
prison. 

Authorities are scheduled to release more details on the arrests at the Harney 
County Chamber of Commerce at 2 p.m. EST. 

It was a stunning twist to the nearly monthlong occupation, one that has turned 
life upside down for Harney County residents and dozens of staff at the Fish 
and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service who have 
been unable to return to their offices since the refuge was seized Jan. 2. 

It is unclear how many occupants remain at the refuge headquarters about 30 
miles south of here. 


[Police guard ambulance.]Police officers guarded an ambulance that pulled into 
the Harney District Hospital last night. Police would not confirm who was 
inside. Photo by Phil Taylor. 

Yesterday evening, as the Bundys were being arrested, there was no sense of 
trouble on the refuge grounds. Militants sat around a crackling fire outside of 
a bunkhouse smoking cigarettes as pet dogs milled about and coyotes howled in 
the distance. The occupants' numbers appeared strong -- well over a dozen 
out-of-state vehicles were parked, despite at least nine of their key members 
being gone. 

The relative calm was shattered as news of the arrests spread.
"It's ugly," said Lee Arthur Rice of Nampa, Idaho, who was working on a 
computer earlier that afternoon at a refuge office. Occupants feared the FBI 
was planning a deadly raid of the refuge, he said. Rice left the refuge last 
night. 

What will happen next remains unclear.
In a web stream prior to his arrest, Santilli said the FBI had instructed 
O'Shaughnessy to tell the remaining occupants, "You are free to go and you must 
leave now." 

The FBI until last night had declined to disconnect power or block food 
supplies to the refuge, a tactic that was criticized by Harney County Judge 
Steve Grasty, the Burns Paiute Tribe and many area residents as too 
accommodating. Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) last week said the government's 
passive approach to the occupation is no longer acceptable. 

As of yesterday afternoon, refuge buildings had power and warmth, and drinking 
water was plentiful. But late last night, police set up roadblocks around the 
refuge and told remaining occupants that they were free to leave and should do 
so. 

The occupants -- who appeared to number in the dozens -- have now lost several 
of their top leaders. 

Militants believed to still be at the refuge headquarters include Jason 
Patrick, a self-described "peace officer" and Second Amendment advocate who 
served as an ambassador to authorities, and who is thought to now be the de 
facto leader of the group. They also include a video gamer from Ohio, David 
Fry, and Duane Ehmer of Irrigon, Ore., who has often been seeing riding his 
horse Hellboy around the refuge while carrying the American flag. 

As of last night, Blaine Cooper, 36, of Humboldt, Ariz., who had appeared 
frequently alongside Ammon Bundy at his daily press conferences from the 
refuge, apparently was still at the refuge. 

A family from Kansas with children had been at the compound until recently, but 
no children are thought to remain at the refuge now. 

"We continue to work with Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward and his deputies; 
Oregon State Police; and the United States Attorney's Office to address any 
further outstanding issues," the FBI said. "As the investigation is ongoing, we 
cannot comment further at this time." 

The Bundy-led occupation seeks to free local ranchers Dwight and Steven Hammond 
from prison, where they are serving extended sentences for their convictions of 
setting fires to BLM lands, and to transfer federal lands to local ownership. 

The occupiers have been roundly denounced by conservation groups, Harney County 
elected officials and the Hammonds themselves. County residents have said they 
agree that federal lands are hampered by environmental red tape, but they want 
Bundy and his followers to go home. 

One death
[LaVoy Finicum]There were few details of the firefight that erupted during the 
Bundys' arrest. 

According to CNN, a law enforcement official said everyone obeyed orders to 
surrender except Finicum and Ryan Bundy. Shots were fired, but it was unclear 
who fired first, CNN reported the official as saying. 


Police last night shot and killed militant LaVoy Finicum, who earlier this 
month at the refuge suggested he'd rather die than be hauled off to a jail 
cell. Photo by Phil Taylor. 

As far back as Jan. 5, Finicum signaled he wasn't going to be taken captive.
"This is going to be where I breathe my last breaths, whether I'm 90, 95 or 
55," he said then, referring to the outdoors 
(Greenwire, Jan. 6). "I'm 
going to not spend my days in a cell. This world is too beautiful to spend it 
in a cell." 

He also said, "Kids, if I don't come, you know I love you."
Finicum was one of the most visible militants at the refuge, where he wore a 
cowboy hat, glasses and wrap-around earmuffs. He ran a small number of cattle 
on Arizona's Kaibab Plateau and, like Cliven Bundy in Nevada, had stopped 
paying grazing fees to protest the federal government's domain. 

Weeks ago, the folksy rancher made the first cuts to a fence that the militants 
removed from federal lands to allow the passage of cattle. He was later 
photographed atop a ladder removing surveillance cameras from a transformer 
station that he claimed had been placed by the FBI. 

Finicum last weekend boasted that several ranchers from New Mexico and Utah had 
joined him and Cliven Bundy by refusing to pay grazing fees to the federal 
government. "You are witnessing the beginning of a Freedom revolution," Finicum 
said in a text message. 

Brown last night said the federal investigation was still "in progress."
"My highest priority is the safety of all Oregonians and their communities," 
the governor said. "I ask for patience as officials continue pursuit of a swift 
and peaceful resolution." 

Judge Grasty said he is "relieved" the occupation is closer to a resolution but 
saddened by the loss of life. "I hope and pray that those who remain at the 
Refuge will stand down peacefully," he said in a statement last night. 

Kieran Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity who 
came to the refuge last week to stage counterprotests supporting public 
ownership of the refuge, said he was also "saddened to see this standoff 
culminating in violence." 

He added, "But the Bundys and their followers showed up armed to the teeth and 
took over lands that belong to all American people. We hope and pray those 
remaining at the compound surrender peacefully and immediately." 

Prosecutors likely have a smorgasbord of charges they could file against the 
arrested militants, including theft of government property, destruction of 
Native American artifacts, trespassing, unlawful access to federal computers or 
possession of firearms in federal facilities where they're barred. 

Before he was killed, Finicum said the occupants intended to stay at the refuge 
until it was transferred to Harney County, something that the county doesn't 
want and which will likely not happen anytime soon. If police do not cut off 
power or food supplies to the refuge, the remaining occupants could possibly 
stay until supplies run out. 


SHOOTOUT, DEATH END STANDOFF
Bundy, others arrested on way to John Day Town hall carries on in John Day
Meeting was end destination of Bundy militant leaders
By George Plaven, EO Media Group
Grant County residents filled the John Day Senior Center beyond capacity 
Tuesday evening for a community meeting that was supposed to feature Ammon 
Bundy and leaders of the armed militia group occupying the Malheur National 
Wildlife Refuge. 

Instead, Bundy and four other militants were arrested by the FBI and Oregon 
State Police on Highway 395 north of Burns before they could arrive. A sixth 
member of the group was shot and killed during the encounter. The news drew 
tears and anger from militia supporters at the meeting, who described it as an 
"ambush." 

Yet the gathering pressed on, evolving into a town hall with the majority of 
speakers siding with Bundy and venting their frustrations on the federal 
government. Organizer Tad Houpt, of Canyon City, promised the crowd there would 
be another meeting in the very near future. 


[http://bluemountaineagle.or.newsmemory.com/newsmemvol2/oregon/bluemountaineagle/20160127/bme-0127-a01.pdf.0/img/Image_7.jpg]Rancher 
Bruce Strange, left, from Kimberly listens as Gordon Larson speaks at a public 
meeting at the senior center on Monday in John Day. 

"We're not going to stop," Houpt said. "We're not going to take this anymore."
Bundy and the militia leaders had been occupying the wildlife refuge near Burns 
since Jan. 2. They demanded the 187,757-acre bird sanctuary be returned to the 
county for ranching, while criticizing the federal government's overall 
ownership and management of public lands. 

The militia also protested the sentences of two Harney County ranchers, Dwight 
and Steven Hammond, who were convicted of arson and given five years in prison 
for setting fires on federal land. Bundy and supporters have called for the 
Hammonds' immediate release. 

In John Day, the majority of people who approached the microphone during the 
town hall were supportive of Bundy and the armed protest. A smaller 
counter-protest was held outside the senior center, with roughly 30 people 
holding signs directing their ire at both the militia and Grant County Sheriff 
Glenn Palmer. 

Palmer, who appeared in uniform at the beginning of the meeting, declined to 
speak with media. When it became clear Bundy would not arrive, Houpt told the 
crowd it appeared there had been an altercation somewhere between John Day and 
Burns. News later circulated about the arrests and gunfight. 

One by one, residents came to the front of the room to speak their minds. Larry 
Lent, of John Day, argued the militants had every right to be in Oregon and 
said government overreach has been going on for a long time. 

"I support the Hammonds and the Bundys 100 percent," Lent said. "To hell with 
the FBI. They don't belong here." 

Jerry Larkin, of Canyon City, said he spent a day with the militia on the 
refuge, describing them as "just like you and I." 

"The federal government has taken away ground that doesn't belong to them. It 
belongs to the people," Larkin said. "These people are genuinely trying to look 
out for these United States, just like the rest of us." 

Outside, counter-protesters held signs that read, "John Day does not support 
criminal action," and "Bundy Bunch - not in Grant County." Hans Magden, of John 
Day, held a sign that simply read "Impeach Palmer." 

"He's not doing his job," Magden said of the county sheriff. "He's not abiding 
by the laws. He's integrating his own personal beliefs ... I believe he should 
be removed from office." 

In particular, Magden said it was irresponsible to invite the militia to John 
Day. He said he believes Palmer sympathizes with their cause. 

Kay Steele, who lives in Grant County near the community of Ritter, said she 
and her husband do nature photography on the Malheur refuge. She said they see 
the militia as law-breakers. 

"These people do not speak for Grant County," Steele said. "We want the world 
to know that Grant County people don't support this. This is a very vocal 
minority." 

Back inside, militia supporters sat near the front of the room, with 
counter-protesters mostly in the back of the room. Jim Sproul, a 
fifth-generation resident of John Day, brought up the recent Canyon Creek 
Complex of wildfires that burned more than 100,000 acres last summer. 

"That wasn't an act of God. It was an act of negligence," Sproul said.
Odalis Sharp, of Auburn, Kansas, got up with her children to sing songs during 
the meeting. She described Bundy and the militia as good people, and urged the 
crowd to defend their cause. 

"You all are going to have to step up right now," Sharp said. "Somebody was 
shot on the way here. They were coming over here to tell you the truth. ... 
We'll stand for you as long as we can." 



[http://bluemountaineagle.or.newsmemory.com/newsmemvol2/oregon/bluemountaineagle/20160127/bme-0127-a18_bad.pdf.0/img/Image_1.jpg]Jimi 
Soupier of Prairie City stands with a group of anti-occupation protesters in 
front of the senior center on Tuesday in John Day. 








Sheriff to remaining militants: 'Move on'
[Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward]Phil 
Taylor, E&E reporter | Published: 
Wednesday, January 27, 2016 

Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward addresses the media in Burns, Ore., with county 
Judge Steve Grasty (right) and U.S. Attorney for Oregon Billy Williams. Photo 
by Phil Taylor. 

BURNS, Ore. -- Harney County's top law enforcement official today urged the 
remaining militants at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to decamp peacefully as 
federal, state and local police continued to patrol blockades set up around the 
refuge headquarters' perimeter, keeping this normally quiet town on pins and 
needles. 

An FBI official warned that disruptions to county residents could continue "for 
a while longer" as police await the militants' next move. 

"The armed occupiers have been given ample opportunity to leave the refuge 
peacefully," FBI Special Agent in Charge Greg Bretzing said at a briefing at 
the Chamber of Commerce before dozens of reporters and local residents. 

The remaining militants have been given a phone number to speak with 
negotiators and are urged to use it, he said. 

"They have been given the opportunity to return to their families and to work 
through the normal legal process to air their grievances," he said. "Instead, 
these individuals have chosen to threaten and intimidate the America they 
profess to love, and, through criminal actions, bring these consequences upon 
themselves." 

Earlier today, an Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter who was stationed at the 
entrance to the refuge compound estimated there were a handful of militants 
left. 

The news conference followed yesterday's arrests of eight leaders of the 25-day 
occupation, including Ammon and Ryan Bundy, and the fatal police shooting of 
LaVoy Finicum, 55, a leader of the occupation since it began Jan. 2 
(Greenwire, Jan. 
27). 

U.S. Attorney for Oregon Billy Williams said the seven individuals arrested in 
Oregon yesterday would make an initial court appearance at 1:30 p.m. PST. Jon 
Ritzheimer, a war veteran and occupant who surrendered himself to police in 
Arizona last night, will eventually be brought to Oregon for court proceedings, 
Williams said. 

Authorities offered no new details on the circumstances surrounding Finicum's 
death or the injuries sustained by Ryan Bundy, who was reportedly shot in the 
arm and later released from a local hospital. 

The Deschutes County Major Incident Team is conducting an investigation into 
the shooting involving Oregon State Police that occurred as authorities 
attempted to arrest the Bundys and their entourage. It happened about 20 miles 
north of Burns on U.S. Highway 395 as the militants were en route to a 
community meeting in John Day, Ore., last night. 

No law enforcement officers were injured.
According to CNN, a law enforcement official said everyone obeyed orders to 
surrender except Finicum and Ryan Bundy. Shots were fired, but it was unclear 
who fired first, CNN reported the official as saying. 

But refuge occupiers and their sympathizers quickly denounced the police, 
accusing them of shooting Finicum while he had his hands up. 

A Twitter feed of Nevada Assemblywoman Michele Fiore (R), long a supporter of 
the Bundy family, said Finicum was "just murdered with his hands up in Burns." 

A "Bundy Ranch" Facebook account last night posted a message saying: "America 
was fired upon by our government and one of liberty's finest patriots is 
fallen." 

Until more details are disclosed, that narrative will be shared among extremist 
opponents of federal land ownership across the country: Finicum was a martyr 
murdered by trigger-happy police. 

An emotional Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward said he was disappointed that last 
night's traffic stop "ended badly," but he said law enforcement could not allow 
the occupation to continue indefinitely. Some militants, allowed to come and go 
as they pleased, had spent significant time in Burns "trying to stir some 
issues within the community," he said. 

"If it was as simple as just waiting out some folks down there to get out of 
some buildings, we could have waited a lot longer," he said. "But this has been 
tearing our community apart. It's time for everybody in this illegal occupation 
to move on." 

Ward, who appeared to choke back tears, said he understands why people have 
concerns with the government. 

"We don't arm up and rebel. We work through the appropriate channels," he said. 
"This can't happen anymore. This can't happen in America, and it can't happen 
in Harney County." 

Militants believed to still be at the refuge headquarters include Jason 
Patrick, a self-described "peace officer" and Second Amendment advocate who 
served as an ambassador to authorities, and who is thought to now be the de 
facto leader of the group. They also include a video gamer from Ohio, David 
Fry, and Duane Ehmer of Irrigon, Ore., who has often been seen riding his 
horse, Hellboy, around the refuge while carrying the American flag. 

Fry spoke to E&ENews PM yesterday at the refuge at around the same time the 
Bundys were being arrested, though he was unaware of the police action. He 
complained of radioactive contamination from the Fukushima, Japan, nuclear 
disaster in 2011 and accused the U.S. government of arming the terrorist 
Islamic State group. 

He said he doesn't own a gun but that he believes militants would fight back if 
the FBI tries to storm the compound. 

"If they came in here with their tanks and machine guns and shooting down 
people like they did in Waco, obviously you have to fight back," he said around 
a crackling fire outside a refuge bunkhouse, where an American flag was flying 
upside down. 

"Now that we've got guns, it shows that, oh, these guys ... it can become a 
potentially nasty situation," he said. "It kind of gives us a little wall here 
to tell the feds to stay back, don't bother us." 

One of the remaining militants, Sean Anderson of Riggins, Idaho, filmed a 
video 
of himself from the refuge today, with gun in hand, saying, "They're coming to 
kill us." 

He and another militant appear heavily armed, and a backhoe is shown behind 
them moving earth. 

"The media has been waiting for a bloodbath this whole time we've been here," 
he screams into the camera. "Now there's going to be one, and they're running." 

Bretzing said the FBI is taking steps to keep tempers down.
"We will continue to look for safe, peaceful and productive ways to end this 
armed occupation," he said. "We recognize that the sooner we do that, the 
sooner the citizens of Harney County can start healing this community they 
cherish so much." 

The FBI issued a news alert early this morning asking residents to "remain 
vigilant and report any suspicious activity." 

Those attempting to leave the refuge will be stopped, their IDs checked and 
their vehicles searched by law enforcement. 



Much at risk in grazing contract protests

Blue Mountain Eagle | January 27, 2016

The armed protesters occupying the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon's 
Harney County want ranchers to tear up their federal grazing contracts and turn 
their cattle out on their allotments without paying their fees. 


We understand how ranchers might be tempted to go along with the plan, if for 
no other reason than to protest the way the federal government manages public 
lands. But that would be a mistake that could result in harsh financial 
consequences for the individual producers, and hand opponents of public lands 
grazing the ammunition they need to shut down contested allotments. 


The protesters made their pitch to Harney County ranchers last week. It's based 
on their misinterpretation of the Constitution that holds that the United 
States government can't own property within any state not purchased or 
otherwise deeded to it by that state. Public lands in the West belong to the 
states and the counties. 


Because the federal government can't own the land, it can't charge ranchers 
grazing fees or otherwise regulate the use of the range. Easy-peasy. 


That this arrangement isn't recognized by the federal government, the state of 
Oregon or the elected officials of Harney County - let alone the surviving 
members of the Burns Paiute Tribe, whose ancestors were on the land prior to 
white settlement - is of no concern. 


According to our colleagues at Oregon Public Broadcasting, LaVoy Finicum, an 
Arizona rancher who has served as the protesters' de facto spokesman, told 
ranchers that he's done it. More importantly, Cliven Bundy, the father of 
refuge occupation leader Ammon Bundy, has been doing it for more than 10 years. 


The elder Bundy owes the government more than $1 million in fees and penalties 
while continuing to graze his cattle on 90,000 acres of federal land in Nevada. 


That is probably the most persuasive argument Finicum could make. If Bundy can 
get away with it for more than a decade, all the while ignoring the Endangered 
Species Act and other federal regulations, wouldn't you be a chump to pay and 
follow the rules? 


Scott Horngren, an attorney with the Western Resources Legal Center who has 
represented ranchers in grazing lawsuits, says ranchers shouldn't use Bundy's 
case as a precedent. 


He says breaches of grazing contracts may effectively end a rancher's ability 
to ever again release livestock onto public lands. Government agencies have a 
number of legal avenues available to collect past-due accounts. 


Any of these consequences could all but end a rancher's business.

Waiting in the wings are the environmentalists who want to end grazing on 
public land. Ranchers tearing up their grazing contracts and flouting the law 
would be a boon for their agenda. 


Ranchers, farmers and loggers have legitimate disputes with the way federal 
lands are managed. The key to settling these disputes is constructive 
engagement with the government and the public at-large. 


While protest can also be an effective tool, ranchers must always be mindful 
how their actions will be judged in the court of public opinion. 



Letters to the Editor: Blue Mountain Eagle | January 27, 2016



Sheriff is professional, kind and honest

Recently several letters and opinions have been posted in the Blue Mountain 
Eagle stating Sheriff Palmer should stick to his sheriff duties and not have an 
opinion on the Malheur refuge group. 


I find it interesting that these "writers" can express their own opinions, but 
our sheriff is not allowed to do the same. In the 37 years I've lived in this 
county, I've found Sheriff Palmer to be professional yet kind and honest. Yes, 
he believes in upholding our constitutional rights. We're Americans - shouldn't 
we all be thinking along those lines? 


To date, I've not seen or heard that he has taken a stand for or against the 
group. If he garners information from persons linked to said group, that would 
be simply good detective work, not a statement he's joined up! 


In closing, I have a suggestion. You've heard the saying "Love it or leave it." 
Many westsiders are kicking the constitution to the curb. Eugene would 
certainly love to have you! 


Marsha Christensen, John Day



Nothing wrong with sheriff meeting

I don't see anything wrong with the sheriff meeting with people who voice 
concerns over constitutional issues that could affect Grant County. I attended 
that meeting and found it informational. 


The people were not the Bundy group. Sheriff Palmer listened to what they said. 
You apparently have minimal knowledge of the U.S. Constitution or you would 
recognize that the owning of more than 50 percent of 12 western states is a 
serious problem. The eastern United States has only 4 percent federal 
ownership. This whole issue is about the Hammond family being attacked by rogue 
BLM employees and a rogue U.S. attorney in an attempt to force the sale of 
their ranch to the federal government! To charge them with terrorism is 
outrageous! This could be resolved by President Obama releasing the Hammonds 
from prison. This whole incident reflects poorly on the government. Black Lives 
Matter and associated groups riot and burn cars and buildings and shoot police 
officers over what they feel are injustices. Why is a peaceful protest such a 
big deal in Eastern Oregon? 


I suspect part of it is because they are white Christians. If it was Occupy or 
any of the left wing radical Democrat organizations it would be no big deal! 


H. Stangel, Dayville



We are lucky to have sheriff Palmer

Recently there have been some letters criticizing Sheriff Palmer.

I have lived in Grant County ever since Tom Negus was sheriff. We have had a 
couple who weren't too good. I have known Glenn Palmer a long time. He has 
always been a strong supporter of the county in so many ways I have lost count. 
If he had lunch with some of the Burns occupiers, it was to find out what their 
plans were that might have affected Grant County. 


A lot of us agree with the people who are on that reserve, but not the guns. 
Don't get me wrong, I think all of us need to be armed. 


We have a fine sheriff, and those that try to detract him are wrong. No one is 
perfect all the time, but we are lucky to have Glenn. 


Joe Clarke, Long Creek



Sheriff candidate explains decision

Today, Jan. 25, after observing the sheer audacity of individuals who think 
they can dictate the course of Grant County, without the input of all, I have 
decided to file for the position of sheriff. 


I understand the magnitude of the situation and that this decision of mine can 
help steer the course of Grant County's future, no matter which way the voters 
choose. 


I believe Grant County is part of a republic, and not an oligarchy, which is 
what it appears it is trying to become. Let us keep it a republic. 


When I took my first oath of office as a reserve deputy on April 3, 2000, it 
was that I would support the Constitution and the laws of the United States and 
of the state of Oregon, and to honestly and faithfully perform the duties 
imposed upon the member under the laws of Oregon. 


I do not remember that there were any clauses that told me this was optional, 
and up to my interpretation of the Constitution and laws. 


People of Grant County, this is our county, not exclusively some individual 
group's. You have a voice. Let it be heard, as it has been heard in the past. 


Todd McKinley, John Day



Refuge occupation an attack on taxpaying citizens

The Bundy occupation is an attack on every law-abiding, tax-paying citizen of 
Oregon. They have no legal or moral right to take the law into their own hands 
and make demands. Their only power comes from their guns and the threat of 
violence. The Malheur refuge belongs to all Oregonians, and is beloved by 
thousands upon thousands of hunters, fisherman, bird watchers and outdoorsmen. 
The Bundys and their followers will take all that away, giving nothing of value 
in return. They dishonor all Americans in uniform, whether in the military or 
in law enforcement. They are anarchists, criminals and bullies. 


If you want to see what happens to citizens who act independently of Bundy and 
his vigilantes, just look to Harney County and Burns. They are shadowed, 
harassed and intimidated. Ultimately, they will be "tried" in a court of jurors 
selected by the vigilantes, judged by someone selected by the vigilantes and 
the inevitable guilt sentence will be carried out by the vigilantes. Does this 
sound like justice? Bundy and his group are trying to spread their tyranny to 
Grant County. Please stand up to them as the courageous people of Burns have 
done. Bundy is a wolf in sheep's clothing who will devour your rights to 
satisfy his lust for power. 


Ted Gaty, Salem



Were sheriff's comments personal or professional?

In response to Jan Mead's letter to the editor published in the Jan. 20 edition 
of the Blue Mountain Eagle, the editor posted a clarification saying that our 
sheriff had responded, "I don't know" when asked whether he approved of the 
occupiers at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, who are using public 
buildings and vehicles, destroying fence that is not theirs, endangering or 
destroying artifacts with their road-building, illegally using computers and 
preventing public access to public lands. 


Sheriff Palmer praised the armed occupiers as "patriots" and indicated he 
didn't go down to visit them only because Harney County Sheriff David Ward 
asked him not to. It's hard not to see that as approval of their illegal 
actions without a clear statement from him to the contrary. 


It is always difficult to separate the professional and the personal, and it's 
even more difficult in a small community. It is not clear to me at this point 
whether the sheriff was expressing himself as a private citizen or a public 
official, and whether the meetings took place on work time or when the sheriff 
was off work. I hope Sheriff Palmer and the Eagle will clarify these important 
points as soon as possible. 


If the support is purely personal, I hope the occupiers do not mistake it for 
an invitation from a public figure to come here and disrupt the life and 
economy of Grant County as they have already done to Harney County. If it was 
offered as a public figure, many of us will question the ability of our public 
servants to represent all their constituents fairly and to stick to their job 
descriptions, which are available from the county. 


Janine Goodwin, Prairie City



Government should honor commitment to veterans

Recently I went to the Veterans Hospital in Portland. The sign entering the 
approach to the hospital read "The Price of Freedom is Visible Here." It 
certainly is! 


People, men and women, with no limbs, eyes, numerous bodily injuries. It is 
appalling knowing the fact our veterans have been betrayed by our government 
officials not keeping promises/contracts. I joined the United States Marines in 
October 1969 with the promise of free health care for the rest of my life (for 
veterans honorably discharged). 


George W. Bush could not even make his Army Reserve meetings in Texas. Didn't 
have to. Daddy was a senator. No prosecution of deserting. 


Long story short, vets have lost travel pay, payment for medications, etc. 
Horrible medical care. And by the way, vets have taken cuts in their benefits 
right and left. When is the last time a senator, congressman or president took 
a pay cut? 


Tim Jewell, Kimberly



Libelous allegations shouldn't be aired in public forum

The comments in a letter to the editor written by Jan Mead and the large paid 
advertisement by Judy Schuette (both in the Jan. 20 of the Eagle), demonstrate 
the most libelous and unwarranted attacks I have ever observed in this 
newspaper. Both were aimed at Sheriff Palmer and reflect completely unbalanced 
views about what is legal and what is not. 


The list of allegations range from "supporting criminal actions" to having 
"anti-government feelings." I wonder which government these complainers 
consider themselves part of. 


Sheriff Glenn Palmer is the most law abiding and skilled member of our county's 
law enforcement community. He and his family are among the most giving and 
honorable people in Grant County. Sheriff Palmer does not sit at a desk all 
day. He is directly involved in the daily rescue operations and criminal 
investigations as well as appropriate contacts with many ongoing events. Why 
would anyone attack this valued man who has the highest ethical standards and 
puts his life on the line for our residents every day? 


The hidden agenda of the complainers has most to do with the fact that this 
Sheriff supports our U.S. Constitution while others do not. This Sheriff made 
an oath that is not to partisan politicians, not to the Forest Service and not 
to the federal government. 


Our country has been divided by the current federal administration, which has 
an incredible amount of litigation ongoing in response to their violations of 
our Constitution. Communist and Islamic factions strongly support throwing out 
our law while discrediting our law enforcement across the nation. Never before 
has a president endorsed such lawless actions and inactions in their selective 
application of laws. 


This is a time to support our law abiding sheriff. He and the other members of 
law enforcement put their lives on the line for our residents. Those who have 
joined the other "faction" need to send their allegations to an appropriate 
investigative body - not to air libelous false allegations in a public forum. 


Tom McHatton, Long Creek

Demands by standoff leaders defy logic and law, authorities say
By Les Zaitz, The Oregonian/OregonLive
BURNS - Occupiers of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge for three weeks have 
made sweeping demands that local and federal authorities say are both brazen 
and unrealistic. 

They want immediate freedom for imprisoned local ranchers. They want federal 
deeds voided and private owners to take over the property. They want the county 
to control the refuge. They want federal grazing permits vacated, leaving 
ranchers free to graze as they choose. And they say they won't go until they 
get their way. 

Interviews with lawyers, ranchers, federal authorities and others make clear: 
Little of what they want is likely to happen for reasons that include legal 
principle, basic property rights, economic forces and cost. Federal authorities 
also say the occupiers are making demands that fly in the face of the U.S. 
Constitution. 

Federal land control
A bedrock claim of the small group led by Arizona businessman Ammon Bundy is 
that the Constitution limits federal ownership of land. As a result, they say, 
the federal government is violating Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17 by 
illegally holding about 76 percent of Harney County. 

But scholars say Bundy and his followers are misreading the Constitution.
"You have to read the entire document and not just the clauses and provisions 
that you think support your case," said Elizabeth Wydra, chief counsel of the 
nonprofit Constitutional Accountability Center, which monitors legal 
application of the Constitution. 

The provision cited by Bundy and others is "mostly about the District of 
Columbia and the idea that there would be the neutral place for the government 
to be located instead of in an area belonging to a particular state. It's 
really hard for me to see how that relates to their claims." 

The more important provision, Wydra and others said, is Article IV, Section 3, 
Clause 2 - known as the "Property Clause": "The Congress shall have Power to 
dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory 
or other Property belonging to the United States." 

In a 1976 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court confronted the point Bundy is trying 
to assert. New Mexico state officials tried to keep wild burros that they had 
seized from federal land. The officials claimed what the Oregon occupiers claim 
- that the Constitution strictly limits what property the federal government 
can own or control. 

State officials argued in Kleppe v. New Mexico that Congress had no power over 
public lands without state consent. "This argument is without merit," the 
Supreme Court ruled. 

State officials confused a constitutional provision focused more narrowly on 
how the federal government oversees land it acquires from a state with the 
unlimited powers granted to the federal government under the Constitution's 
Property Clause, the court said. 

That clause trumps all, the court ruled.
Unwinding federal ownership Bundy and other leaders of the refuge takeover 
nonetheless assert that the federal government is out of bounds in Harney 
County. 

They plan to rectify ownership by voiding all deeds in the county that 
transferred land to the federal government. This would affect lands managed by 
the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish & 
Wildlife Service. 

One challenge they face is that much of the federal ownership dates to 
territorial days, so there's no earlier owner. Homesteaders subsequently 
claimed some of the land, but the federal government still retained millions of 
acres in Harney County. Over time, the government has bought or traded other 
parcels. 


[http://bluemountaineagle.or.newsmemory.com/newsmemvol2/oregon/bluemountaineagle/20160127/bme-0127-a08_bad.pdf.0/img/Image_0.jpg]The 
Burns Paiute Tribe would perhaps have the most distinct claim to much of the 
county -- by treaty, it never gave up its interest in tribal lands across the 
Great Basin. Tribal members did cede what was once the Malheur Indian 
Reservation, accepting compensation. The federal government subsequently sold 
that land to private interests, so it's not clear whether that land would be 
part of Bundy's calculation. 

The refuge occupiers have provided few details on exactly how a land transfer 
would work. Would a rancher who sold land to the government simply get the land 
back or would the rancher have to refund what the government paid for the land? 

The Harney County Committee of Safety, a group of six local residents founded 
at the instigation of Bundy and other occupiers, has been identified as among 
those who would help with the transfers. 

"We do not have a concrete plan to transfer the lands away from the feds," said 
Burns businessman Tim Smith, a committee member. "Everything is still on the 
table except the status quo of leaving the vast majority of land within the fed 
jurisdiction." 

Smith himself was given title to 10 acres of federal land in 2010, but didn't 
respond to written questions about what would become of the land under Bundy's 
plans. 

Federal grazing rights
The occupiers advocate voiding grazing permits issued by the U.S. government as 
well. 

Voiding grazing rights, though, would be a vexing development in a region where 
many ranchers count on using public lands to feed livestock. 

Occupiers say ranchers would revert to "historic" use of that land to continue 
grazing. What they seemed to have overlooked is that their plan calls for 
private ownership of the same high desert expanses that the federal government 
now rents at subsidized cost to the ranchers. They haven't answered how 
ranchers would graze on what becomes private land. 

Ranchers say the idea wouldn't work in any event. Bundy's claim to want to 
restore economic vitality to the county doesn't match the disruption his 
notions would cause for ranchers reliant on public grazing allotments. 

The occupiers haven't addressed what they would do about mining and water 
rights issued by the federal government. 

Hammonds freed
Bundy told the FBI that his group's primary demand is immediate freedom for the 
Burns area ranchers Dwight Hammond Jr. and his son, Steven. 

The father and son returned to federal prison Jan. 4 to serve the remainder of 
fiveyear sentences. They were convicted in federal court in Pendleton in 2012 
of arson for fires that burned federal land. A federal judge initially reduced 
their sentences from what the law required, saying the punishment was too 
harsh. An appellate ruling later declared that to be wrong, and the Hammonds 
last October faced a second sentencing. 

Bundy's claim for the Hammonds stems in part from his view of the Constitution. 
Since the federal government shouldn't own the land it does in Harney County, 
according to Bundy, it also lacked authority to prosecute the Hammonds. He and 
other occupation leaders want the Hammonds brought home immediately. 

That's not as easy as turning a key in a cell door at the Los Angeles-area 
prison holding the Hammonds. 

"Inmates are sometimes released from incarceration due to a sentence being 
vacated by the court, an executive order of clemency, or through a 
compassionate release/reduction in sentence," the U.S. Bureau of Prisons said 
in a statement. 

A presidential pardon could instantly free them from prison and clear their 
convictions. For this to happen immediately would take circumvention of the 
normal years-long process used by the White House to consider pardons. 

Bundy himself acknowledged to the FBI that he didn't expect this to happen.
President Obama could commute the Hammonds' sentences. That could lead to an 
immediate release but not exoneration. 

The U.S. Department of Justice may have mechanisms to go to court to vacate the 
convictions and dismiss the sentencing order. But the Justice Department 
appealed the original sentence and U.S. Attorney Billy Williams in Oregon not 
long ago publicly justified the convictions. 

The Bureau of Prisons itself could try releasing the men, but that would 
require convincing a federal judge that a compassionate reason existed to do 
so. The process likely wouldn't happen fast and wouldn't clear the Hammonds of 
the convictions. 

Oregon standoff venue changes to Grant County, where counter-protesters await
By Luke Hammill | The Oregonian/OregonLive 
 OregonLive.com 


BURNS - The armed group holding the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge may find a 
positive 
reception from 
some Grant County officials and residents when occupiers travel to John Day 
today and hold a meeting. But they'll also have to contend with 
counter-protesters who feel the militants should stay away. 

The meeting, scheduled for 6 p.m. at the John Day Senior Center, would 
officially mark the public spread of the occupiers' cause beyond Harney County, 
where they have held the bird sanctuary since Jan. 2 in protest of the federal 
government's land-use policies and the imprisonment of two local ranchers. 

Glenn Palmer, the Grant County sheriff, has met with the militants and endorsed 
two of their key demands: the dismissal of the FBI from Harney County and the 
release of Dwight Hammond Jr. and his son, Steven Hammond, from prison. The 
Hammonds were convicted of arson for starting fires that spread to public land. 

Palmer often speaks critically of the federal 
government and 
is aligned with the Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association, a 
national nonprofit that interprets the Constitution to severely limit federal 
government powers. He has clashed with the U.S. Forest Service over that 
agency's management of public land in Grant County. 

[Grant County Sheriff Glenn 
Palmer]Grant 
County Sheriff Glenn PalmerLes Zaitz | The Oregonian/OregonLive 

Militant leaders plan to attend tonight's meeting after members of their group 
met with Palmer for lunch and autographed Palmer's pocket version of the 
Constitution. The militants plan to give a presentation similar to one they 
gave in 
Crane, 
an unincorporated town in Harney County where leaders Ammon Bundy, his brother 
Ryan Bundy, Ryan Payne and others urged local ranchers to tear up their grazing 
contracts with the government. 

John Day resident Judy Schuette is organizing a counter-protest outside the 
senior center and hopes at least 50 people will bring signs and join her. 
Shuette, who said she is "certainly not a professional organizer," began to 
plan the demonstration after a letter she wrote to the Blue Mountain Eagle 
criticizing Palmer received "quite a bit of response," she said. 

"We are not protesting anyone's right to be at this meeting," Shuette said. 
"That's not the issue. The issue is we do not want the criminal Bundy element 
getting a foothold in our town and we need to let them know any way we can that 
they are not welcome here regardless of the support of the sheriff." 

Shuette thinks the Bundys "are dishonest and delusional and I do not believe 
for one second they have the welfare of the people of Harney County first and 
foremost," she said. 

Though Harney County residents have repeatedly asked the Bundys to leave Harney 
County and go home, the occupiers' message has gained traction, as many locals 
share their view that the federal government overreaches and should hand public 
land over to ranchers and loggers. 

"They are there for their own gain," Shuette said of the militants.
The militants have criticized Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward for not trying to 
block the Hammonds' imprisonment. Even though the word "sheriff" never appears 
in the Constitution, they believe the office to be the foremost law enforcement 
authority under the document because it is directly elected. 

Jason Patrick, one of the occupiers, said at the wildlife refuge Monday that 
Palmer "is more experienced and educated" than Ward. 

"He doesn't protect the people," Patrick said of Ward.
Grant County Commissioner Boyd Britton said he planned to attend tonight's 
meeting "with an open mind" but said he didn't know who would be there or what 
it would be about. He wouldn't speculate about whether the Bundys or other 
militants would be there. 

"I'm trying to think postive about this whole thing," Britton said. He said the 
county has "a good relationship with our federal partners." The situation in 
Grant County has improved substantially in recent years thanks to efforts in 
Washington, D.C. by Republican Rep. Greg Walden and Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden, 
he said. 

"The difference between now and 2010 is dramatic," Britton said, adding that 
there has been a threefold increase in timber harvests. 

Grant County commissioner Chris Labhart didn't immediately respond to a request 
for comment. Commission chair Scott Myers wasn't immediately available. 

-- Luke Hammill
 Other News



Dispute Over Cattle Grazing Blocks Patrols Of Federal Land (NPR 1/27)

Ever since a tense, armed standoff near Cliven Bundy's Nevada ranch in 2014, a 
vast and sensitive piece of federal public land adjacent to the Grand Canyon 
has gone unmanaged and uncontrolled. 
Link 




U.S. wildfire plan seen as biggest land policy change in decades (Associated 
Press 1/27) 


A year after Interior Secretary Sally Jewell shifted the national approach to 
fighting wildfires across a wide swath of sagebrush country in the West, her 
strategy is turning out to be one of the most significant federal land policy 
changes in some 80 years, public land experts, outdoor enthusiasts and 
scientists say. 
Link 




Oregon standoff spokesman Robert 'LaVoy' Finicum killed, Bundys in custody 
after shooting near Burns (Oregonian 1/26) 


Oregon standoff spokesman Robert "LaVoy" Finicum was killed and other leaders 
of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupation were arrested Tuesday after 
the FBI and state police stopped vehicles about 20 miles north of Burns. 
Link 




FBI sets up checkpoints around Oregon refuge after confrontation turns deadly 
(Reuters 1/27) 


U.S. and state officials in Oregon on Wednesday set up checkpoints around 
Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, where an armed group pledged to prolong its 
standoff with the government a day after one protester was killed and eight 
others were arrested. 
Link 




Timber collapse fuels resentment of federal policy (E&E News 1/26)

A collapsed roof at the former Hines Lumber Co. timber mill symbolizes Harney 
County's hard fall from its logging heyday. 
Link 




Is Vilsack looking for a fight with Congress on 'fire borrowing'?(Agri-Pulse 
1/27) 


Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack had been edging toward a tussle with Congress 
for over a year on "fire borrowing" budget dilemmas, but he recently raised the 
stakes when he declared USDA agencies were "not going to borrow money this 
year" to pay for 2016 fire season costs. 
Link 




Opinion: Arizona militant did NOT die for freedom (Arizona Republic 1/27)

Arizonan LaVoy Finicum gave his life for something, but it wasn't freedom. 
Link 


Oregon standoff: Will Bundy's arrest prompt remaining occupiers to leave? 
(Christian Science Monitor 1/27) 


After weeks of nonviolent impasse, several members of the militant group 
occupying an Oregon wildlife refuge were arrested Tuesday afternoon in a 
confrontation that left one man dead. 
Link 




Plan for exploratory drilling near Mount St. Helens revived (Columbian 1/27)

To the chagrin of environmental groups, a Canadian mining company has renewed 
its efforts to perform exploratory drilling in the Green River valley north of 
Mount St. Helens. 
Link 




Editorial: We'll trust the local ranchers (Baker City Herald 1/26)

Baker County ranchers need advice from Ammon Bundy and his gang about as much 
as they need the drought to persist for another decade. 
Link 




Leader of armed group at wildlife refuge speaks with FBI (Associated Press 
1/22) 


The leader of an armed group that is occupying a wildlife refuge in eastern 
Oregon has spoken with the FBI and there are plans to communicate again on 
Friday as the standoff over federal land policies nears the three-week mark. 
Link 




Forest Service hid records, opponents of Village at Wolf Creek say (Denver Post 
1/21) 


A team of environmental groups opposing a nearly 30-year-old plan to develop a 
village on Wolf Creek Pass says it has evidence that U.S. Forest Service 
officials tried to conceal documents related to the agency's review of the 
controversial project. 
Link 




US Forest Service rejects proposed forest route for pipeline (Associated Press 
1/21) 


The U.S. Forest Service has rejected the proposed route of a 550-mile natural 
gas pipeline through national forests in Virginia and West Virginia because of 
concerns over the project's impact on an endangered salamander and other 
resources. 
Link 




Hundreds attend rally to protect federal lands (Albuquerque Journal 1/22)

Although there's no measure on the table at the Roundhouse about transferring 
millions of acres of federal lands in New Mexico to state control, a crowd of 
200 to 300 gathered for a rally Thursday to let legislators know that they want 
their beloved fishing and hunting spots to stay in federal hands. 
Link 




Main Agency Involved in Oregon Land Standoff Rejects Charge of Amateurism 
(Government Executive 1/21) 


The Fish and Wild Service, whose employees have borne the brunt of troubles 
raised by the politicized occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in 
Oregon, does not agree with a recent comment by a local rancher that questioned 
the professional qualifications of FWS' regulatory staff. 
Link 




Aspen cyclists opposed to national group's push for bikes in wilderness (Aspen 
Times 1/22) 


A new national advocacy group's effort to undo the blanket ban on bicycles in 
federally designated wilderness areas has received a chilly reception in the 
Roaring Fork Valley. 
Link 




Idaho Fish and Game will keep monitoring wolves improperly collared in 
wilderness (Helena Independent Record 1/22) 


Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials intend to monitor four wolves they 
improperly radio-collared in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness 
during an elk research project. 
Link 




County, Forest Service to partner on road access to federal lands (Bozeman 
Daily Chronicle 1/21) 


Gallatin County staff are assembling a team to join with the Forest Service in 
hopes of getting newly appropriated federal highway money for improving access 
to federally managed public lands. 
Link 




Federal land grazing: key things to know (Associated Press 1/22)

Two brothers leading an armed group that has taken up residence for nearly 
three weeks at a the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Eastern Oregon plan to 
hold a ceremony Saturday for ranchers to renounce federal control of public 
land and tear up their grazing contracts. 
Link 




Forest Service rules Idaho wolf-collaring violated wilderness permit 
(Missoulian 1/21) 


The Salmon-Challis National Forest issued an order of noncompliance to Idaho's 
Department of Fish and Game for collaring four wolves in what was supposed to 
be an elk research project in a federal wilderness area. 
Link 




Study: Logging Forests Won't Increase Water Supply (KCET 1/20)

A controversial 2015 report that suggested logging California's forests could 
increase the state's water supply got it wrong, according to a new study 
released late last week. 
Link 




Conservation groups challenge exploratory drilling plan (Associated Press 1/20)

Three environmental groups have filed a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Forest 
Service's approval of a mining company's plan to do exploratory drilling about 
55 miles northeast of Boise. 
Link 




No legal grounds for militants' land claims - experts (E&E News 1/20)

As the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge stretches into its 
third week, it's becoming clear the armed occupants don't have a legal leg to 
stand on. Link 




Forest Service Takes Action After Idaho Collars Wilderness Wolves (Associated 
Press 1/20) 


The U.S. Forest Service on Wednesday issued a notice of non-compliance to the 
Idaho Department of Fish and Game after the state agency violated an agreement 
by using a helicopter in a central Idaho wilderness to put tracking collars on 
wolves. 
Link 




Opinion: Work together for effective public land management (Helena Independent 
Record 1/20) 


Over the last few weeks, we have watched a gang of self-styled revolutionaries 
take over the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. In addition to 
trespassing on public lands, these criminals have destroyed government 
property, ransacked government files, driven government vehicles and caused 
local schools to be closed. 
Link 




New Mountain Bike Group Fights to Ride Wilderness Trails (Bicycling 1/20)

Last summer, a new recreation advocacy group, the Sustainable Trails Coalition, 
began circulating a legislative proposal-the "Human-Powered Wildlands Travel 
Management Act of 2015"-to reverse a 30-year-old US Forest Service ban on 
Wilderness access for mountain bikes. 
Link 




Editorial: Ochoco doesn't need recreation area designation (Bend Bulletin 1/20)

To hear representatives of Oregon Wild tell it, the push to have more than 
300,000 acres in the Ochoco National Forest declared a national recreation area 
is a forward-looking effort to save the forest from an overcrowded future. 
Link 




When Marijuana Kills: Rat Bait at Illegal Pot Farms Is Needlessly Poisoning 
Larger Animals (Scientific American 1/20) 


The Pacific fisher, a house-cat-size member of the weasel family, lives in some 
of California's remotest forests. 
Link 





Shilo Burton

[USFS]

Shilo Burton
Public Affairs Specialist

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3008
f: 541-575-3158
sdburton AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Road
John Day, OR 97845

www.fs.fed.us
http://www.fs.usda.gov/malheur/

www.facebook.com/MalheurNationalForest 

https://twitter.com/MalheurNF

[http://fsweb.wo.fs.fed.us/esignature/images/usda-logo.png][Twitter][Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people



Subject: FW: Additional Arrests in the Occupation of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 16:11:57 +0000
There is still a few left...

[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: Stearly, Michael J -FS
Sent: Thursday, January 28, 2016 7:16 AM
To: FS-pdl r6 malheur all employees
Cc: Baker, Stephen - FS
Subject: Additional Arrests in the Occupation of Malheur National Wildlife 
Refuge 


FBI - Oregon - 01/27/16 9:48 PM
In the early morning hours of January 27, 2016, the FBI and Oregon State Police 
(OSP) established a series of checkpoints at major roads in and out of the 
refuge. In the hours prior to the checkpoints, several vehicles are known to 
have left the area. Since the establishment of checkpoints, a total of eight 
people have left the refuge. Of those, the FBI released five and arrested 
three. 


At approximately 3:30 pm, the FBI made probable cause arrests of Duane Leo 
Ehmer, age 45, of Irrigon, Oregon, and Dylan Wade Anderson, age 34, of Provo, 
Utah. At approximately, 7:40 pm, agents made a probable cause arrest of Jason 
S. Patrick, age 43, of Bonaire, Georgia. All were in contact with the FBI, and 
each chose to turn himself into agents at a checkpoint outside the Malheur 
National Wildlife Refuge. The arrests were without incident. 


Each man faces one federal felony count of conspiracy to impede officers of the 
United States from discharging their official duties through the use of force, 
intimidation, or threats, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 
372. 


All defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

The FBI and our partners continue to work around the clock to empty the refuge 
of the armed occupiers in the safest way possible. 



[Forest Service Shield]

Michael Stearly
Acting Public Affairs Officer

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3144
c: 303-883-5176
mstearly AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd
Mailing: P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

[http://wwwstatic.fs.usda.gov/images/email/usda-logo.png][Twitter 
Logo][Facebook 
Logo] 


Caring for the land and serving people












Subject: Re: Pre-1986 bird record database
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2016 13:12:24 +0000
GOOD! Thanks a lot, Lyndal, for working on this project, and your many efforts 
to keep Arkansas and its birds and birders on line. 



This was a dream -- that the card file be secure and widely available -- since 
I worked through it several times in the early 1980s with Doug James and others 
on the book that became Arkansas Birds. Observations in this database, combined 
with the existing data base for post-1986 records, is REMARKABLE. 



My old friend, now passed, Eleanor Johnson, initially gave us $1,500 from her 
retirement to get this digital process started, long ago, before it was "cool" 
to go "digital." What a great investment that just keeps on giving. I wish El 
and then Arkansas Audubon Society Curator Max Parker could see where this has 
gone -- perhaps, as the late hummer guy Bob Sargent would frame it, El and Max 
can see it, out there "where the birding is always good." 



Much of the history and herstory of birds and birding in the times since Doug 
James came to Arkansas in 1953 is now readily available to anyone interested. 



Dan Scheiman has previously covered the efforts to digitize these records 
involving many volunteers. I tip my hat to you all. Another great achievement 
that is a wonderful credit to our birding community and its many and varied 
skills. 



Again, many thanks to all who've made this possible, starting with El and 
continuing today. 


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Lyndal York  

Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 10:24 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Pre-1986 bird record database

Arbirders:

All those 38,000 or so records that were accumulated by Doug James on 3 x 5 
inch cards are now searchable on-line through the 
arbirds.org 
website. Just go to the home page and look for the database search url in the 
upper left column of the page. 


Lyndal York
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Pre-1986 bird record database
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 22:24:24 -0600
Arbirders:

All those 38,000 or so records that were accumulated by Doug James on 3  x
5 inch cards are now searchable on-line through the arbirds.org website.
Just go to the home page and look for the database search url in the upper
left column of the page.

Lyndal York
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Re: Update on the Refuge Militia
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 12:48:06 -0600
We appreciate so much your firsthand information.  It's hard to distinguish
truth from rumor on the internet.  A friend and I had already signed up for
a Road Scholar trip to the refuge in September before the events of last
evening in hopes that things would be sorted out by then.  Thank you.


Ann


On Wed, Jan 27, 2016 at 12:26 PM, Reames, Clark -FS 
wrote:

> I am sure most of you have heard that there was some developments in
> regards to the Malheur Refuge occupation last night.
>
>
>
> Myself and several other USFS employees headed down to the public meeting
> here in John Day last night.  My wife had her anti militia protest sign
> ready to go with several other protesters so we got there early.  As I was
> headed in the door of the building, our forest supervisor intercepted us to
> inform us on what happened out on Hwy 395.  The regional forester called
> him from Portland to request that we do not go into the building.  My wife
> ended up going in while I remained outside for a large portion of the
> meeting.  Sheriff Palmer was the keynote speaker but left early due to the
> events that occurred on the highway.
>
>
>
> Several arrests were made with one shooting fatality of a militia member.
> The highway is still closed as of this morning.  It is apparent that the
> FBI and OR State Patrol had this planned out and picked out a remote
> location with no cell reception, no bystanders, and a forested area with
> substantial snowpack to make their move.  Immediately thereafter, road
> blocks were put into place on all roads accessing the refuge.  A couple of
> weeks ago, I had asked a special agent why road blocks were not being used
> and he said that you would know the noose was tightening when that
> occurred, so it is finally happening.
>
>
>
> Not sure if this will put an end to it or not.  Facebook exploded last
> night with lots of folks making a martyr out of the guy that was killed.
> Hopefully that wont encourage more people to show up for the cause.  As far
> as I am concerned, it is just foolish to take on heavily armed, highly
> trained FBI agents in a shootout rather than live to argue your case
> another day.  I have prepared the kids for what they might hear at school
> today.
>
>
>
> In other news, the word is that the sympathetic Sheriff Palmer returned to
> the meeting later (after we had all left) and continued meeting with some
> other militia reps for another 2 hours.  The sheriff is not getting the
> message and hopefully this will result in the end of his political career.
> The election is coming up this year..
>
>
>
> We will be getting a briefing from law enforcement in a few minutes, so I
> might have more for you afterwhile.
>
>
>
> [image: Forest Service Shield]
>
>
> *Clark Reames Wildlife Program Manager*
>
> *Forest Service *
>
> *Malheur National Forest*
>
>
>
>
> *p: 541-575-3474 x3474 <541-575-3474%20x3474> c: 541-620-0681
> <541-620-0681> f: 541-575-3002 <541-575-3002> creames AT fs.fed.us
> *
>
> 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
> John Day, OR 97845
> www.fs.fed.us
> 
 

> [image: USDA Logo]
> 
[image: 

> Forest Service Twitter]
> 
[image: 

> USDA Facebook]
> 
 

>
> *Caring for the land and serving people*
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Update on the Refuge Militia
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 12:37:53 -0600
Thank you so much, Clark.  It's a privilege to receive reliable, 
in-depth information from someone who is on site.

Janine
Subject: Update on the Refuge Militia
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 18:26:43 +0000
I am sure most of you have heard that there was some developments in regards to 
the Malheur Refuge occupation last night. 


Myself and several other USFS employees headed down to the public meeting here 
in John Day last night. My wife had her anti militia protest sign ready to go 
with several other protesters so we got there early. As I was headed in the 
door of the building, our forest supervisor intercepted us to inform us on what 
happened out on Hwy 395. The regional forester called him from Portland to 
request that we do not go into the building. My wife ended up going in while I 
remained outside for a large portion of the meeting. Sheriff Palmer was the 
keynote speaker but left early due to the events that occurred on the highway. 


Several arrests were made with one shooting fatality of a militia member. The 
highway is still closed as of this morning. It is apparent that the FBI and OR 
State Patrol had this planned out and picked out a remote location with no cell 
reception, no bystanders, and a forested area with substantial snowpack to make 
their move. Immediately thereafter, road blocks were put into place on all 
roads accessing the refuge. A couple of weeks ago, I had asked a special agent 
why road blocks were not being used and he said that you would know the noose 
was tightening when that occurred, so it is finally happening. 


Not sure if this will put an end to it or not. Facebook exploded last night 
with lots of folks making a martyr out of the guy that was killed. Hopefully 
that wont encourage more people to show up for the cause. As far as I am 
concerned, it is just foolish to take on heavily armed, highly trained FBI 
agents in a shootout rather than live to argue your case another day. I have 
prepared the kids for what they might hear at school today. 


In other news, the word is that the sympathetic Sheriff Palmer returned to the 
meeting later (after we had all left) and continued meeting with some other 
militia reps for another 2 hours. The sheriff is not getting the message and 
hopefully this will result in the end of his political career. The election is 
coming up this year.. 


We will be getting a briefing from law enforcement in a few minutes, so I might 
have more for you afterwhile. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people





Subject: Nixing the Newbies...
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:19:46 +0000
There is a bulldozer parked next to Miller Pond at Gulf Mountain-- also next to 
a stubborn stand of privet that seems to have survived the last assault. First, 
many thanks to AGFC for the new fire lanes and foot trails, especially the one 
leading to a hidden waterfall. In keeping with the axiom: Guns don’t kill 
people; people do, it’s also true that dozers don’t destroy habitat; policy 
does. 


Am I hereby defending the invading privet and take-over cedar? Well, yes and 
no. This is where the hundred or so robins, dozens of crows and myriad sparrows 
were hanging out today--as is typical. Move out into the carefully cleared 
areas and see no birds, not so much as a chickadee. 



I miss the old tangled mass of what ever had evolved along with the birds that 
had evolved to eat it. Some might call this adaptation rather than evolution 
but the only hairs I’m good at splitting are on my head! Do we pretend to 
play God in freezing time on our public lands? It (time) will win in the end, 
just as it does with human birthdays. Meanwhile birds are looking for cover and 
food that was and is no more. The seed-eaters among them are all at my house. 
Walmart, Tractor Supply and French’s Feed salute me. 



Okay, so left unchecked the invading flora will do what invading humans did to 
this continent. I suppose I should be sent back where I came from too, except 
that it would be rather painful parceling me up and leaving one itsy-bit here 
while shipping the rest to England, Ireland, Italy, Germany and Spain. To 
fast-forward this--while Native Americans probably don’t need replacements 
for us, (or our freeways and high-rises,) the birds and other wildlife still 
need berrying plants and dense cover. Somebody should be going behind the 
dozers and planting these much better natives in the muddy wake.--D’ Marie 
Subject: Re: A Brambling Thank You...
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 16:18:27 +0000
Thank you for the heads up, Dottie--which isn’t to say those field guides 
aren’t useful to birders if they can find them. 







Dianemarie








From: Boyles, Dottie
Sent: ‎Wednesday‎, ‎January‎ ‎27‎, ‎2016 ‎9‎:‎06‎ ‎AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU






This Carl Hunter is NO relation to the Carl Hunter you are talking about.

His father is still very much alive and in fact lives next door.

 

Dottie Boyles

Little Rock

 



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of dianemarie yates 

Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 8:16 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: A Brambling Thank You...

 



Does anyone know if this is the same Carl Hunter whose late father wrote the 
plant field guides for Arkansas? If so, those whom he hosted could show their 
gratitude by purchasing one or all of the fine books on our native flora, as 
used by the Master Gardeners. I have them all and use them regularly. 




 


Dianemarie




 

This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. ­­ 
Subject: Re: A Brambling Thank You...
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 15:06:00 +0000
This Carl Hunter is NO relation to the Carl Hunter you are talking about.
His father is still very much alive and in fact lives next door.

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of dianemarie yates 

Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 8:16 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: A Brambling Thank You...

Does anyone know if this is the same Carl Hunter whose late father wrote the 
plant field guides for Arkansas? If so, those whom he hosted could show their 
gratitude by purchasing one or all of the fine books on our native flora, as 
used by the Master Gardeners. I have them all and use them regularly. 


Dianemarie



This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: A Brambling Thank You...
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 14:15:41 +0000
Does anyone know if this is the same Carl Hunter whose late father wrote the 
plant field guides for Arkansas? If so, those whom he hosted could show their 
gratitude by purchasing one or all of the fine books on our native flora, as 
used by the Master Gardeners. I have them all and use them regularly. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: Arkansas Brambling is a No Show
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 14:02:47 +0000
Yes, Karen, I expect there will be several first-of-years for many of us, even 
if nothing rare, at Dardanelle. Like others, I would have loved to see the 
Brambling, knowing it would have been a once-in-lifetime chance, but I 
couldn’t bring myself to impose on that gracious man along with what I knew 
would be a record crowd. Every new bird is a thrill unmatched but our 
reputation as a birding community in general needs to remain above reproach. 


Joe and I and Kluie will see you all Saturday at Delaware Bay.






Dianemarie







From: Karen Holliday
Sent: ‎Wednesday‎, ‎January‎ ‎27‎, ‎2016 ‎7‎:‎58‎ ‎AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU






Sorry for the incomplete and not spell-checked post. Checking emails this 
morning I just realized that it accidentally got sent. I put my IPad down last 
night to answer a phone call and my cat jumped on the couch and was walking 
around on my IPad. I didn't think anything of it and turned my IPad off without 
checking. Note to self, always close the IPad to keep marauding cats from 
sending emails! This is not the first time this has happened, so I'm a slow 
learner! 






Even though the Brambling is gone, maybe we"ll pick up some good birds this 
Saturday on the ASCA field trip to Lake Dardanelle and Holla Bend NWR. 



Karen Holliday

Maumelle/Little Rock








On Tuesday, January 26, 2016 10:58 PM, Karen  wrote:







I would like to add how thrilled I am with how wonderful our Arkansas birding 
group was when tMr. Hunter told us that no birders have tried to visit his site 
this week at his request. You have done the entire birding community proud by 
setting aside your desire to see a first state record bird. I feel your 
frustration. Just know that several of our highly regarded birders are 
complying also o compile with with the homeowner's request and are missing any 
chance of seeing a first state record bird, which is much harder for them to 
miss than us newbies. I'm sorry that none has 







On Jan 26, 2016, at 8:05 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:






All,

Karen Holliday & I went out to visit with Mr. Hunter this evening. He reports 
the Brambling has not been seen since mid-day on Sunday. The Hunter family has 
been watching their various feeding stations without success. 


As Karen said in her response to Joe Neal's Twitchers' Heaven post, Mr. Hunter 
says he was overwhelmed by the response to the announcement of the Brambling's 
presence & did not understand how rare than bird is in North America until he 
witnessed the group's reaction when the bird returned. Mr. Hunter seemed 
pleased with the gift certificate to Wild Birds. He also stated he appreciated 
everyone's consideration regarding his request regarding no birding during the 
work week. Karen & I would like to second that and thank all of you out there 
who were planning your trips over here to Little Rock this weekend for the 
courtesy all of you extended to Mr. Hunter and his family. Good job, folks. 



It seems like Arkansas has been having a run of extraordinary luck in the rare 
bird department this winter. Do we thank El Niño for directing traffic our way 
and politely ask what's up next on the list? Or do we lay low and wait for Maw 
Nature to send more bird our way to see if we are paying attention? 




Cindy Franklin
Little Rock
Subject: Re: Arkansas Brambling is a No Show
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jan 2016 13:56:54 +0000
Sorry for the incomplete and not spell-checked post.  Checking emails this 
morning I just realized that it accidentally got sent.  I put my IPad down 
last night to answer a phone call and my cat jumped on the couch and was 
walking around on my IPad.  I didn't think anything of it and turned my IPad 
off without checking.  Note to self, always close the IPad to keep marauding 
cats from sending emails!  This is not the first time this has happened, so 
I'm a slow learner! 


Even though the Brambling is gone, maybe we"ll pick up some good birds this 
Saturday on the ASCA field trip to Lake Dardanelle and Holla Bend NWR. 

Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little Rock 

    On Tuesday, January 26, 2016 10:58 PM, Karen  wrote:
 

 I would like to add how thrilled I am with how wonderful our Arkansas birding 
group was when tMr. Hunter told us that no birders have tried to visit his 
site this week at his request.  You have done the entire birding community 
proud by setting aside your desire to see a first state record bird.  I feel 
your frustration. Just know that several of our highly regarded birders are 
complying also o compile with with the homeowner's request and are missing any 
chance of seeing a first state record bird, which is much harder for them to 
miss than us newbies. I'm sorry that  none has  



On Jan 26, 2016, at 8:05 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:


#yiv3695540892 #yiv3695540892 --.yiv3695540892hmmessage 
P{margin:0px;padding:0px;}#yiv3695540892 
body.yiv3695540892hmmessage{font-size:12pt;font-family:Calibri;}#yiv3695540892 
All, 


Karen Holliday & I went out to visit with Mr. Hunter this evening.  He reports 
the Brambling has not been seen since mid-day on Sunday.  The Hunter family 
has been watching their various feeding stations without success.  


As Karen said in her response to Joe Neal's Twitchers' Heaven post, Mr. Hunter 
says he was overwhelmed by the response to the announcement of the Brambling's 
presence & did not understand how rare than  bird is in North America until he 
witnessed the group's reaction when the bird returned. Mr. Hunter seemed 
pleased with the gift certificate to Wild Birds.  He also stated he 
appreciated everyone's consideration regarding his request regarding no birding 
during the work week.  Karen & I would like to second that and thank all of 
you out there who were planning your trips over here to Little Rock this 
weekend for the courtesy all of you extended to Mr. Hunter and his family. Good 
job, folks. 


It seems like Arkansas has been having a run of extraordinary luck in the rare 
bird department this winter.  Do we thank El Niño for directing traffic our 
way and politely ask what's up next on the list?  Or do we lay low and wait 
for Maw Nature to send more bird our way to see if we are paying attention? 


Cindy Franklin
Little Rock


 


  
Subject: Re: Arkansas Brambling is a No Show
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 22:58:15 -0600
I would like to add how thrilled I am with how wonderful our Arkansas birding 
group was when tMr. Hunter told us that no birders have tried to visit his site 
this week at his request. You have done the entire birding community proud by 
setting aside your desire to see a first state record bird. I feel your 
frustration. Just know that several of our highly regarded birders are 
complying also o compile with with the homeowner's request and are missing any 
chance of seeing a first state record bird, which is much harder for them to 
miss than us newbies. I'm sorry that none has 




> On Jan 26, 2016, at 8:05 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:
> 
> All,
> 
> Karen Holliday & I went out to visit with Mr. Hunter this evening. He reports 
the Brambling has not been seen since mid-day on Sunday. The Hunter family has 
been watching their various feeding stations without success. 

> 
> As Karen said in her response to Joe Neal's Twitchers' Heaven post, Mr. 
Hunter says he was overwhelmed by the response to the announcement of the 
Brambling's presence & did not understand how rare than bird is in North 
America until he witnessed the group's reaction when the bird returned. Mr. 
Hunter seemed pleased with the gift certificate to Wild Birds. He also stated 
he appreciated everyone's consideration regarding his request regarding no 
birding during the work week. Karen & I would like to second that and thank all 
of you out there who were planning your trips over here to Little Rock this 
weekend for the courtesy all of you extended to Mr. Hunter and his family. Good 
job, folks. 

> 
> It seems like Arkansas has been having a run of extraordinary luck in the 
rare bird department this winter. Do we thank El Niño for directing traffic 
our way and politely ask what's up next on the list? Or do we lay low and wait 
for Maw Nature to send more bird our way to see if we are paying attention? 

> 
> Cindy Franklin
> Little Rock
> 
> 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 26
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 20:34:43 -0600
It was partly cloudy, cool, a little windy on the bird survey today.  74
species were found.  There is a hint of spring in the air.  Red Maples and
Spring Beauties are blooming.  Frogs are calling.  Hooded Mergansers are
inspecting the duck nest boxes.  Yesterday the temperature was around 70
degrees and butterflies, snakes, and alligators were out.  Found some good
birds today.  Also, had an Inca Dove on Fossil Valley Rd. (formerly
Appleberry Lane) but unfortunately it was outside my count area.  Here is my
list for today:

 

Canada Goose - 3

Wood Duck - 5

Gadwall - 855

American Wigeon - 2

Mallard - 147

Northern Shoveler - 75

Northern Pintail - 107

Green-winged Teal - 266

Canvasback - 9

Ring-necked Duck - 633

Bufflehead - 2

Hooded Merganser - 9 

Ruddy Duck - 28

Wild Turkey - 18

Pied-billed Grebe - 16

Eared Grebe - 1

Horned Grebe - 1

Double-crested Cormorant - 8

Great Blue Heron - 11

Turkey Vulture - 21

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 4

American Kestrel - 1

King Rail - 1 (responded with grunting call to Virginia Rail tape.)

Virginia Rail - 1

American Coot - 637

Killdeer - 102

Greater Yellowlegs - 5

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Mourning Dove - 45

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Rock Pigeon - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 9

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 6

Loggerhead Shrike - 2

Blue Jay - 4

American Crow - 20

Fish Crow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 11

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 4

Winter Wren - 2

Marsh Wren - 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 7

Hermit Thrush - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1 

Brown Thrasher - 3

American Pipit - 40

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 7

Palm Warbler - 1 (along Red Slough Rd. {formerly Mudline Rd.} by
footbridge.)

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 3

Le Conte's Sparrow - 3

Fox Sparrow - 3

Song Sparrow - 11

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 4

White-throated Sparrow - 18

White-crowned Sparrow - 1

Dark-eyed Junco - 9

Northern Cardinal - 16

Red-winged Blackbird - 10

Eastern Meadowlark - 21

Western Meadowlark - 1

Rusty Blackbird - 1 (very scarce this year.)

Common Grackle - 32

American Goldfinch - 7

 

 

Herps:

 

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling.

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Arkansas Brambling is a No Show
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 20:05:40 -0600


All,

Karen Holliday & I went out to visit with Mr. Hunter this evening. He reports 
the Brambling has not been seen since mid-day on Sunday. The Hunter family has 
been watching their various feeding stations without success. 


As Karen said in her response to Joe Neal's Twitchers' Heaven post, Mr. Hunter 
says he was overwhelmed by the response to the announcement of the Brambling's 
presence & did not understand how rare the bird is in North America until he 
witnessed the group's reaction when the bird returned. Mr. Hunter seemed 
pleased with the gift certificate to Wild Birds. He also stated he appreciated 
everyone's consideration regarding his request regarding no birding during the 
work week. Karen & I would like to second that and thank all of you out there 
who were planning your trips over here to Little Rock this weekend for the 
courtesy all of you extended to Mr. Hunter and his family. Good job, folks. 


It seems like Arkansas has been having a run of extraordinary luck in the rare 
bird department this winter. Do we thank El Nio for directing traffic our way 
and politely ask what's up next on the list? Or do we lay low and wait for Maw 
Nature to send more bird our way to see if we are paying attention? 

Cindy Franklin
Little Rock



 		 	   		  
Subject: Ducks, loons, and grebes
From: Don Simons <drsimons56 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 19:53:32 -0600
This morning we three birding amigos found a Henslow's sparrow at Rick Evan's 
prairie. 


At the Arkadelphia oxidation ponds we found a female long-tailed duck, a male 
cinnamon teal, a greater scaup, and at least two red heads. 


At Vista Point on Lake Maumelle we found a Pacific loon, a red-throated loom, a 
common loon, horned grebes, and a red-necked grebe. 


I'll write a more detailed report. About our thousand mile Arkansas trek after 
I recoverable. 


Don

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: WELCOME TO TWITCHER’S HEAVEN
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 17:04:52 -0600
AAAUGG! Say it isnt so... :-(  



Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net



> On Jan 26, 2016, at 1:56 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 

> 
> Ok until the hover board catches on fire. 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Jan 26, 2016, at 1:44 PM, Karen Holliday > wrote: 

> 
>> Loved it Joe! Thank you for injecting a little light-hearted humor into the 
funk of disappointed birders. Hold on to your credit card and delay your Green 
Tarp purchase and taxi franchise. I spoke with the homeowner a couple of hours 
ago and the sad news is he has NOT seen Mr. Brambling since Sunday. 
Unfortunately, it seems Mr. Brambling has gone a-rambling. Cindy and I are 
headed to Mr. Hunter's residence late this afternoon to present him with a gift 
card to Wild Birds Unlimited from AAS and ASCA. Mr. Hunter told me that after 
he got over the shock of 50 people crammed into his small home, he said he 
realized just how big a deal this bird was when a huge collective gasp arose 
from the crowd when the Brambling made a 3 minute appearance, with cameras 
firing furiously, then all the high-fives and giant grins on everyone's faces 
as they added a first state and life bird notch to their bird nerd belts. You 
are to be admired for sticking with leading your field trip in the face of such 
a sighting. I may very well have deserted my field trip leader post if faced 
with such a dilemma. 

>> Karen Holliday
>> AAS President
>> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
>> Maumelle/Little Rock
>> 
>> 
>> On Tuesday, January 26, 2016 1:15 PM, Joseph C. Neal > wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> When To See and When Not to See,
>> That is the Question 
>>  
>> Ole errant Brambling in Little Rock has my heart all aflutter. I made a 
solemn oath in callow youth I would never again miss a chance to help Verify a 
First State Record. Sadly, I missed the January 24 announced Brambling show. 

>>  
>> We cant put it on the State List without proper documentation. So yes, ole 
Brambling needs lots and lots of verifin. I would like to help with the 
verifin, but looks like its a no go (who in the heck gave weeks only one 
Sunday anyway?) But, then, I got to thinking about this  What if the two main 
organizations involved in directing traffic and holding peace parleys with the 
land owner all got together and set up a Tarp Curtain-Blind that would run the 
100 yards from Kanis Road up to the feeder. Say about 100 yards. 

>> 
>> It could be a green tarp, which would make it environmentally friendly. 
People could catch a cab and just be dropped off where the Green Tarp 
Curtain-Blind begins on Kanis. This would alleviate the parking problem. From 
there, people could use a hover board, skate board, golf cart, or just walk 
along with the dogs, all the way up the hill to the vicinity of the feeder. No 
parking lot, no disturbing the feeder. The thing could run a 7-11. 

>> 
>> Each Verifier could cut a personal peep hole in the tarp, at the correct 
height, to fit whether long or short, sitting or standing, taking a nap, little 
point-and-shoot or massive camera, and one for the dog if it wants to verify, 
too. 

>> 
>> When this idea came to me I immediately checked Home Depot and Lows to see 
what we are talking about, dollar-wise, for the Green Tarp Curtain-Blind. 
Green, which is more enviro, costs a little more and so do green poles. Looks 
like you could do the whole thing for $899.63, installation labor donated. 

>> 
>> Of course this doesnt make any profit for the homeowner, so I called my Tax 
Man to see about sweeteners. My Tax Man is actually a Woman; she allowed that 
with ole mega-super Brambling, it ought to be worth at least $100/per visiting 
Verifier. So it would work this way: Verifiers visiting the Green Tarp 
Curtain-Blind would be free, but the land-owner would be permitted to take a 
$100 deduct on 2016 taxes for each of us. 

>> 
>> That should make Verifiers and landowners happy. It should keep the feeder 
open at all times. And be sure you get there early; as in the case of Black 
Friday, if you snooze, you lose. 

>> 
>> Finally, we will need a proper road sign for our Green Tarp Curtain-Blind. 
How about: WELCOME TO TWITCHERS HEAVEN. Or, BIG TWITCH HERE. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: WELCOME TO TWITCHERS HEAVEN
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jan 2016 19:56:46 +0000
Ok until the hover board catches on fire.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 26, 2016, at 1:44 PM, Karen Holliday 
> wrote: 


Loved it Joe! Thank you for injecting a little light-hearted humor into the 
funk of disappointed birders. Hold on to your credit card and delay your Green 
Tarp purchase and taxi franchise. I spoke with the homeowner a couple of hours 
ago and the sad news is he has NOT seen Mr. Brambling since Sunday. 
Unfortunately, it seems Mr. Brambling has gone a-rambling. Cindy and I are 
headed to Mr. Hunter's residence late this afternoon to present him with a gift 
card to Wild Birds Unlimited from AAS and ASCA. Mr. Hunter told me that after 
he got over the shock of 50 people crammed into his small home, he said he 
realized just how big a deal this bird was when a huge collective gasp arose 
from the crowd when the Brambling made a 3 minute appearance, with cameras 
firing furiously, then all the high-fives and giant grins on everyone's faces 
as they added a first state and life bird notch to their bird nerd belts. You 
are to be admired for sticking with leading your field trip in the face of such 
a sighting. I may very well have deserted my field trip leader post if faced 
with such a dilemma. 

Karen Holliday
AAS President
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock


On Tuesday, January 26, 2016 1:15 PM, Joseph C. Neal 
> wrote: 



When To See and When Not to See,
That is the Question 

Ole errant Brambling in Little Rock has my heart all aflutter. I made a solemn 
oath in callow youth I would never again miss a chance to help Verify a First 
State Record. Sadly, I missed the January 24 announced Brambling show. 


We cant put it on the State List without proper documentation. So yes, ole 
Brambling needs lots and lots of verifin. I would like to help with the 
verifin, but looks like its a no go (who in the heck gave weeks only one 
Sunday anyway?) But, then, I got to thinking about this  What if the two main 
organizations involved in directing traffic and holding peace parleys with the 
land owner all got together and set up a Tarp Curtain-Blind that would run the 
100 yards from Kanis Road up to the feeder. Say about 100 yards. 


It could be a green tarp, which would make it environmentally friendly. 
People could catch a cab and just be dropped off where the Green Tarp 
Curtain-Blind begins on Kanis. This would alleviate the parking problem. From 
there, people could use a hover board, skate board, golf cart, or just walk 
along with the dogs, all the way up the hill to the vicinity of the feeder. No 
parking lot, no disturbing the feeder. The thing could run a 7-11. 


Each Verifier could cut a personal peep hole in the tarp, at the correct 
height, to fit whether long or short, sitting or standing, taking a nap, little 
point-and-shoot or massive camera, and one for the dog if it wants to verify, 
too. 


When this idea came to me I immediately checked Home Depot and Lows to see what 
we are talking about, dollar-wise, for the Green Tarp Curtain-Blind. Green, 
which is more enviro, costs a little more and so do green poles. Looks like you 
could do the whole thing for $899.63, installation labor donated. 


Of course this doesnt make any profit for the homeowner, so I called my Tax 
Man to see about sweeteners. My Tax Man is actually a Woman; she allowed that 
with ole mega-super Brambling, it ought to be worth at least $100/per visiting 
Verifier. So it would work this way: Verifiers visiting the Green Tarp 
Curtain-Blind would be free, but the land-owner would be permitted to take a 
$100 deduct on 2016 taxes for each of us. 


That should make Verifiers and landowners happy. It should keep the feeder open 
at all times. And be sure you get there early; as in the case of Black Friday, 
if you snooze, you lose. 


Finally, we will need a proper road sign for our Green Tarp Curtain-Blind. How 
about: WELCOME TO TWITCHERS HEAVEN. Or, BIG TWITCH HERE.