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Updated on Sunday, May 29 at 06:01 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Painted Storks,©BirdQuest

29 May Black Terns [Hilda Jones ]
29 May Fall out of hummnigbirds [Teresa & Leif ]
29 May Black terns? [Hilda Jones ]
28 May Re: N. Bobwhite [Joyce Hartmann ]
28 May Friday at the Centerton fish hatchery [Jacque Brown ]
28 May Least Terns [Cody Massery ]
28 May Squirrel baffle [Dorothy Cooney ]
27 May Kluie alive and getting well; another friend was the [dianemarie yates ]
27 May Migratory birds and the Black River Bridge [Sarah Morris ]
27 May WIND AND THE WOODTHRUSH [dianemarie yates ]
27 May Hear the mountains (Lake Leatherwood, Eureka Springs) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 May Re: Bird plumage question [Than Boves ]
27 May Re: Bird plumage question [Jerry Davis ]
27 May Re: N. Bobwhite ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
27 May Re: N. Bobwhite [dianemarie yates ]
27 May Re: N. Bobwhite ["bill ." ]
27 May Re: N. Bobwhite ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
27 May Bird plumage question [Michael Linz ]
26 May Re: Squirrel baffle question [Ed Laster ]
26 May Squirrel baffle question [Dorothy Cooney ]
26 May AM. AVOCET IN BREEDING PLUMAGE AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
26 May N. Bobwhite [V Prislipsky ]
26 May Sonic Scarecrow [Jeffrey Short ]
26 May FIELD TRIP TO CAVE MOUNTAIN & UPPER BUFFALO RIVER SUNDAY JUNE 5, 2016 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
25 May SHOREBIRDS CONTINUE AT CENTERTON + SHRIKES FLEDGE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
25 May ASCA June Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
25 May Catching up on local birds [Michael Linz ]
24 May Red Slough Bird Survey - May 24 [David Arbour ]
24 May THE VALUE OF LEARNING BIRD SONGS [JFR ]
23 May Minneapolis Star-Tribune-: Popular bird-nest cams often show the ugly side of nature [Barry Haas ]
23 May Buffalo River float ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
22 May Re: Rookery Question [Lucy c Weberling ]
22 May Re: Nighthawks [Karen Garrett ]
22 May Nighthawks [Bob Harden ]
22 May Pied-billed Grebe family [dianemarie yates ]
21 May Orioles in Siloam Springs ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 May Why is a cardinal red and not yellow [Lyndal York ]
21 May Terns [Charles Lyon ]
21 May Dark-eyed Junco [dianemarie yates ]
21 May flycatching Cedar Waxwings [Judy & Don ]
21 May birds yesterday and today [Jacque Brown ]
21 May Just when I though [Randy ]
21 May Just when I thought [Randy ]
20 May Wye Mountain being serenaded by whip-poor-wills and widows [jamesdixonlr ]
20 May PLEASE FORWARD: The Halberg Ecology Camp is looking for a few good campers: 11-year-old boys and girls [Barry Haas ]
20 May screech owl [Alan ]
20 May Honking of Geese (Centerton) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 May Link: Photos Greater Roadrunner [Gail Miller ]
20 May FW: Eagle owl [Jeffrey Short ]
20 May Goose Convention! [dianemarie yates ]
19 May Re: Kite Convention ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
19 May Re: Kite Convention [Jim Dixon ]
19 May Black Terns [Butch Tetzlaff ]
19 May Link: Photos from Beaverfork Lake in Conway [Gail Miller ]
18 May new arrivals [Judy & Don ]
18 May Red Slough Bird Survey - May 18 [David Arbour ]
18 May Re: Bullies in the Bird World [dianemarie yates ]
18 May Re: Bullies in the Bird World [Elizabeth Shores ]
18 May Bullies...Just kidding! [dianemarie yates ]
18 May Bullies... [dianemarie yates ]
18 May Bullies in the Bird World [dianemarie yates ]
18 May Re: Crow with egg ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
18 May Re: Crow with egg [Janine Perlman ]
18 May Crow with egg [Gail Miller ]
18 May Re: Empty bluebird nest [dianemarie yates ]
17 May Re: Empty bluebird nest [Jeffrey Short ]
17 May LEAST TERNS AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
17 May BOBOLINKS IN PINE BLUFF [JFR ]
17 May Re: Empty bluebird nest [Stephan Coger ]
17 May Bird gods spake fallout at Centerton ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 May Empty bluebird nest [Kay Hodnett ]
17 May Re: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior [dianemarie yates ]
17 May Re: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior [dianemarie yates ]
17 May Re: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior [Joyce Hartmann ]
17 May Re: Long-billed Curlew ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
17 May Re: Lake Fayetteville on IMBD -- from David Chapman [Karen Garrett ]

Subject: Black Terns
From: Hilda Jones <hjones03 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 22:55:23 +0000
Cody and I spent the day birding at Bois D'Arc Creek WMA and then Rick Evans 
Grandview Prairie. Highlights at Bois D'Arc were Black Terns, Purple 
gallinules, Snowy egret (and two American Alligators). If you love wild 
flowers, now's the time to visit the Prairie! We were on the hunt for Painted 
buntings at the Prairie... entered at the northern gate, drove and / or walked 
EVERY SINGLE ROAD in the Prairie, hearing buntings everywhere, seeing lots of 
neat birds including Indigo buntings, a Mississippi Kite, & Yellow Breasted 
Chats, but not seeing a single Painted bunting anywhere... We were on our way 
out the southern end of the Prairie (over 2 and 1/2 hours later) when we heard 
a bunting singing again.... FINALLY!!! We found a gorgeous male singing his 
heart out in a tall slim tree just before the last building on the left!!! Bird 
#121 for Cody Jones Big Year and my nemesis bird of 20 years of casual birding! 


Thanks everyone for your input on the Black terns! They were a first for both 
of us! Very striking birds! 


Happy birding!
Hilda & Cody

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Fall out of hummnigbirds
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 17:00:54 -0400
Except for one male at the first of the month I haven't had any till this week. 
Ruby Throated hummingbirds. Then one day last week a female came and sat on my 
shoulder to chatter in my ear. Figuring that it was the female that I had made 
friends with last year that came back? I refreshed the feeders and put them in 
almost the same places. Sure enough the pair came and would dance around before 
sitting on my knee. They just talked away I guess telling me about their 
adventures. 


Today around quarter to 3. I was out there and the tree above the feeder was 
alive with hummingbird sounds. So the dogs and I sat down on the porch with the 
camera. Wearing a pink shirt was not a good idea! There were hummingbirds 
swirling around there alot of hummingbirds. A literally cloud of them descended 
upon the feeders while my two tried to defend their area. I counted 22 males, 8 
females. As they swirl around the feeders grabbing a sip here and there. For a 
hour they were at it. I ducked several times as the cloud darted here and there 
checking me out as food. The Air filled with their chatter. Forget about a 
photo, they were too fast. Weaving and dancing among the green leaves. They 
stayed for about a hour. Then they lifted up as a cloud the strangers to our 
area. Only one or two stayed behind. Our female still hidden in my Sunchokes 
growing in a pot. Where she took refuge when all of those males saw her they 
went after her. With my button feeder I put it in the pot with her so she could 
feed in peace. 


 Not looking at the weather map till now I assume they drop down for a brief 
while to avoid the storms in the state I see now on the radar. For whatever 
reason? I never have seen that many at one time. It was an awesome experience. 
I was so amuse watching them that I forgot I had the camera in hand. For a 
lonely holiday weekend it was a nice surprise. Teresa, Hector, AR 



-- 


Faith consists in believing when it is beyond the power of reason to believe.
By Volaire.
Subject: Black terns?
From: Hilda Jones <hjones03 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 17:04:47 +0000
Cody and I are at Bois D'Arc Creek WMA south of Hope. Not sure how common it is 
to see them.here but we saw a group of birds flying over the 
water. Black heads, black lower bodies, pale colored wings and back. Looking in 
Sibley's we found Black terns but no others with the same markings. Anyone have 
any thoughts? 


Thanks,
Hilda & Cody

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID
Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 20:59:33 -0500
Bob made a comment about that this evening...heard four singing this 
morning...he thinks the gas well next to us with its nice grass strips along 
the gravel road might be helping our population...also we had a fly-over of 
about two dozen Canada Geese, and he made another comment about how they like 
all the new ponds that were constructed in the area for gas development...so 
guess this is another example of bird populations fitting in with human 
activities...and some good that came out of it...here's to solar energy, 
though...Joyce Hartmann, Van Buren County 


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

Sent: Friday, May 27, 2016 1:44 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite

Same out our way.  We're seeing quail for the first time in a decade.  
Not sure if its just something this year, or if this is a trend. Either way, 
I'll take it and hope that its a trend. 


George (n. Conway Co. seeing but not hearing quail)


On 5/26/2016 9:27 AM, V Prislipsky wrote:
> My recent roaming in the timberlands around HSVillage suggests that there is 
a significant increase in N. Bobwhite this year. Perhaps related, I've also 
been seeing/hearing more Prairie Warblers. 

>
Subject: Friday at the Centerton fish hatchery
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 18:23:45 -0500
Yesterday I woke up at 6:30, late for me, and decided I’d skip the current 
yard project and go birding and headed for the fish hatchery. There was not 
much to see at 7 AM. I had a hard time finding any peeps. 


I headed to Stump Prairie near Siloam Springs to see if there was still some 
Grass-Pink Orchids and Prairie Fringe Orchids , Lots of the Prairie Fringe 
variety and I found 5 past prime Pink Orchids. I went over to Chesney Prairie 
and found the same, only just one way past prime Grass Pink . 


It was very windy so I did not find a lot bird wise at Chesney. Heard or saw 
Bob White Quail, Dickcissels, Crows, Mockingbirds, American Goldfinch, 
Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Robins. On the way out, by the farm, there was a 
Killdeer and two hatchlings. I had not seen the baby Killdeer that small 
before, and brooding under her wings. 


Afterward I went back to the fish hatchery, around 10 am. More Sandpipers had 
arrived, I don’t pretend know most of the smaller Sandpipers, Going by size 
and leg color I’d say Semi-palmated Sandpiper and White-rumped made up the 
majority. I need to do a sandpiper wall of fame to learn these better. I did 
see a very nice Dunlin in the pond that currently looks like potholes, and is 
growing algae. AND it was on my side of the pond. I couldn’t get much closer. 
Usually it’s in the middle of one of the big ponds. Yippee! 


 There were also 8 Wilson’s Phalaropes. In the same pond as the Phalaropes I 
just happened to park next to a Killdeer with 4 new hatchlings, I watched these 
babies for over an hour. poor mom, at one time she had 4 extra sets of legs. 
The mate was keeping the sandpipers away. I took a lot of photos but haven’t 
had time to load them on the computer, I have weeded out the blurry ones. the 
babies move so fast there were a lot of blurry photos. 


It started to rain around noon so I left. 

I went back at 3 PM. 

The Phalaropes had moved to the pond the Dunlin was in, and it was still there. 
The pond had a lot of what looked like fly’s. The Phalaropes were snatching 
them up and paying no mind to the black Jeep. Two, a male and female wandered 
closer and closer, I was finally able to get a photo of a male and female 
together, in good light, that I won’t have to crop. So it was a good day. A 
Dunlin that I don’t have to crop, a Killdeer family and Wilson Phalaropes. 


I was going to go back this morning before heading to my cousins but the gates 
were shut. We decorate the cemetery in Galina, Ks on Memorial day. I went by 
the hatchery around 5 this afternoon. No Dunlin, a few Phalaropes, most birds 
were in the large fairly recently drained pond and it looks like they may be 
drawing the large pond next to that one down. 







Jacque Brown
240 Township Dr
Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: Least Terns
From: Cody Massery <cmassery AT ATU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 18:08:59 +0000
The past two evenings I have made a trip out to Beaverfork Lake in Conway, AR 
at around 4 p.m. Both times two least terns have been present, there was also 
other terns but they were a few hundred yards away and I couldn't identify 
them. Both times they have been hanging out on the peninsula next to the boat 
ramp with the volleyball court. Typically one individual (I'm assuming the 
male) is hunting around the peninsula while the other sits on one of the "no 
wake zone" buoy, just left of the peninsula. 
Subject: Squirrel baffle
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 10:31:13 -0500
Thanks to all the folks who responded to my query!  I got so many different
suggestions it's mind boggling!  I'll save them for future problems.  In
the end, I'd forgotten I have an old baffle that comes apart and clips into
place in the depths of my garage ( a hard hat area).  I'll get hubby to put
it up for me today.  I so appreciate all of you taking the time to send me
solutions, even pictures!  What a great group!

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Kluie alive and getting well; another friend was the
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 18:24:18 +0000
one who died. Sorry for the confusion. Kluie had a mini-stroke which left him 
lethargic for a few days and kind of confused. His toys remained in their pile 
and we had to lift him into the truck. 


Since then he is improving. His appetite is back, he can jump into the truck 
and walk his normal distance and he plays with Hedgehog, Armadillo, 
Big-Blue-Puppy and Lambie just like before. But he no longer remembers which is 
which when I ask for one of them and I think his hearing has suffered. 


The friend “we” buried was a dear lady who first invited us to our church 
and the aunt to the pastor. But I know it is just a matter of time now for our 
precious Kluie. So we will savor every moment of it. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Migratory birds and the Black River Bridge
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 10:48:08 -0500
A coworker, Stan Morris — no relation to me, had a story in today's
Jonesboro Sun about the demolition for the Black River Bridge in Pocahontas
being delayed due to migratory birds nesting at the site. Figured you all
might want to know.

Sarah M.
Jonesboro

The story is below (I got permission from the newspaper before I posted):
Migratory birds ground bridge deconstruction

By Stan Morris
POCAHONTAS — Black River Bridge is for the birds.

A demolition planned to begin in July on the historically registered
landmark will not take place until later in the year because migratory
birds have nested at the site.

State regulations prohibit dismantling a bridge that migratory birds have
nested in.

Under the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department's special
provision, "Nesting Sites of Migratory Birds," demolition of a bridge used
as a nesting site for migrating birds is prohibited between March 1 and
Aug. 31.

Randolph County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Tim Scott said the
birds were not discovered until after a bid was accepted March 23 for the
demolition.

"The destruction and construction of the bridge on U.S. 67 at Black River
is in a state of delay at the moment," Scott said. "The reason we are given
for that delay are the cliff dwellers and barn swallows. Those are the two
kinds of birds, we are told, that are nesting underneath the bridge.
Nothing can be done on the project until those birds are either removed or
hatch their eggs and then leave where they are nesting."

Scott said three construction meetings had already been postponed until the
bird issue can be settled.

District Construction Engineer Alan Walter with the Arkansas Highway and
Transportation Department (AHTD) said in March that the department would do
everything possible to avoid allowing nesting birds to delay the project
significantly.

"If the birds occupied that, we would seek every measure to get an
exception, or if we couldn't do it, we wouldn't close the bridge until we
could begin construction," he said in March.

Walter said the bridge would remain open until demolition could begin later
in the year.

Scott said personnel are waiting to begin as soon as possible.

"The local and state highway personnel are keeping very close watch on what
is happening, and they will be ready to go at a moment's notice," Scott
said.
Subject: WIND AND THE WOODTHRUSH
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 15:09:59 +0000
don’t usually come together, even though the latter can carry his voice at 
least a mile. The quieter Black & White Warblers, Prairie Warblers, Northern 
Parulas and Common Yellowthroats wait for the wind to get tired enough to 
become a breeze, then join in. Still the thrush sings on through it all, as 
does the Cardinal, the Blue Jay and the relentless Chat. Here or there a 
Bobwhite. Or an angry White-eyed Vireo telling Kluie and me we’re too close 
to the nest. Maaow! Much like a Catbird, who a quarter mile later adds his 
genuine yowl to the mix. 




Warm wind from the south begins to do battle with a cool one out of the west. 
Hmmm. Time to keep a watch on the color of the sky. 


Even though a tornado took out our barn and turned our Nissan truck into junk, 
I still live for spring, however short. The birdsong, the flowers, the pale 
greens that gradually deepen. Yes, I pluck ticks and scratch chigger tracks on 
my ankles. I fight anxiety when we get in a watch-box. So does the dog. He 
follows me everywhere and curls up against my feet the moment I incline. Or 
crawls under the table while I’m on the computer. But all too soon it will 
give way to steamy heat and the perpetual drone of the air conditioner. Turning 
the bird monitor up so high to hear over it that I’m stuck with that 
radio-static akin to electronic devices. 


Like today. A kind of transition time, my ears split between two worlds--the 
music of mating birds and the lazy quiet of dogs stretched out under shade 
trees. This week Kluie had a TIA (mini-stroke) and we buried a dear friend. 
Mortality speaks all around me. So I look out my watching window and wait for 
the Painted Bunting. And for our lonely male Ruby-throat Hummer to find himself 
a partner. The honeysuckle is almost done with its bloom. 



Dianemarie
Subject: Hear the mountains (Lake Leatherwood, Eureka Springs)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 14:59:44 +0000
A full-throated Orchard Oriole whistles CHUCK, CHUCK WHICHA-ZEE from atop a 
flower catalpa near the boat dock at Eureka Spring's Lake Leatherwood. 


Flip Putthoff is unloading his black Buffalo canoe for our paddle around the 
lake. In the grass, two Chipping sparrows, their red crowns moving through 
green blades. It is the loudest Orchard Oriole I've ever heard. And from way 
across the lake, where the forest Ozarks rise above flat water, CHEER-REE CHUR, 
CHUR WEE CHEE of a Red-eyed Vireo. 


It takes me a bit to realize the oriole sounds so loud because it's so ver-ree 
quiet here. No horizon dominated by the ambient freeway hum. No BEEP BEEP BEEP 
of backing tractors. It's a public park where you hear mountains. I'm not 
tensed up for the next round of emergency sirens racing up Fayetteville's 
College Avenue. 


Overhead, CHUCK CHUCK of Common Grackles, carrying food. Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird visiting a feeder at the boat dock. Kentucky Warbler songs 
somewhere up the lake. Then it's just the SWISH of paddles in the water, a 
little squeak as Flip casts his line. We're off for a couple of hours paddling. 


Eastern Kingbird, Tufted Titmouse, more Common Grackles and Red-eyed Vireos, a 
distant Yellow-throated Vireo, YANK YANKs of White-breasted Nuthatch, and then 
as we enter a small cove, sudden flight of two Great Blue Herons. Flip catches 
and releases a Large-mouth Bass and as he does, there's the high-pitch WHISTLE 
of a Broad-winged Hawk, pursued with vigor directly overhead by a Red-winged 
Blackbird. 


The anchor for this 1,600 acre municipal park comes into close view: a dam 
composed of artistic sturdy limestone blocks from the 1930s Great Depression. 
Out of work hill folks taken into the Civilian Conservation Corps built it from 
stone they quarried on site. A Louisiana Waterthrush flushes up from the 
spillway, sharp CHIP CHIP CHIP as it flies. A migrating spotted Sandpiper flies 
low along the shoreline. 


Imagine trying to build something like this in 2016 - it would be denounced as 
communism. The loud, ardent rejecters of all things government would be too 
busy with politics to notice a Green Heron overhead. 


As we swing around on the lake's east side I'm picking up both American and 
Fish Crows, Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Summer Tanager, 
Ovenbird, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, White-eyed Vireo, then the sizzling rising 
buzz of a Prairie Warbler in the cedars. An Eastern Phoebe darts out and picks 
up something on the water's surface. 


In the shallows back near the boat dock, we reach an observation blind built by 
local birder and carpenter, J. Pat Valentik. From Flip's canoe we have good 
views of Canada Geese escorting three downy young, a male Wood Duck and three 
Blue-winged Teal. 


Besides birds, we've seen two boats and six people. That's two hours of hearing 
mountains. 

Subject: Re: Bird plumage question
From: Than Boves <tboves AT ASTATE.EDU>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 09:51:50 -0500
We catch Prothonotary Warblers all the time that have a variety of stains on 
their crown feathers (from bright red to dark brown). Although we haven’t 
figured each individual stain out for certain, there are a variety of potential 
explanations: 



1- Stains from eating early berries during migration (e.g. mulberries in 
southern Texas in March) 


2- Mud from foraging near ground/collecting moss or other nesting 
material/exploring nest cavities (even males collect lots of moss for their 
nests) 


3- Blood from violence with neighbors…these birds can be pretty vicious. We 
have seen lots of violence and documented head injuries from (likely) being 
pecked in disputes over nest sites/other resources (sunken eyes, scalped heads) 


Your photo looks more like a mud stain to me

Than Boves



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Than J. Boves, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, AR 72467
Office Phone: 870-972-3320
Website: http://boveslab.weebly.com/





From: Michael Linz
Sent: Friday, May 27, 2016 12:40 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird plumage question

Today I observed a Prothonotary Warbler whose head was brown on top. I have 
never seen this before. I googled it and found several pictures that were the 
same. The comments all said something like...I don't know what caused this 
weird brown color on the birds head. 


Does anyone know what cause this?


http://goo.gl/FpKYNB 


Michael(Conway)
Subject: Re: Bird plumage question
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 09:14:06 -0500
Two yellow warblers that I saw like this on the Texas Coast was due to oil, 
probably feeding in oil contaminated vegetation. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs 

From: Michael Linz 
Sent: Friday, May 27, 2016 12:40 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Bird plumage question

Today I observed a Prothonotary Warbler whose head was brown on top. I have 
never seen this before. I googled it and found several pictures that were the 
same. The comments all said something like...I don't know what caused this 
weird brown color on the birds head. 


Does anyone know what cause this?


http://goo.gl/FpKYNB



Michael(Conway)
Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 12:46:52 +0000
I remember back when I used to do quail call counts at Ft. Chaffee (and before 
I was familiar with the YB Chat). I kept hearing the chats do that single note 
that sounded to me just like the “bob” in “bob-white”. I even wondered 
if a quail was cutting his call short before figuring out it was a chat that I 
was hearing… 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager (Acting)

Forest Service
Ozark St-Francis National Forest

p: 479-964-7231 x7231
c: 541-620-0681
f: 479-964-7518
creames AT fs.fed.us

605 West Main
Russellville, AR 72801
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people




From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of dianemarie yates 

Sent: Friday, May 27, 2016 6:29 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite

Gulf Mountain WMA is getting a lot more bobwhite now too. I hear them almost 
daily and see pairs or even groups often. I know AGFC is taking steps to make 
habitat--mainly clearing brush and understory. To an extent this is 
great--returning areas to their pre-fire suppression state. 

They need, though, to not get over zealous since not only songbirds but the 
quail themselves use varied habitats, including blowdowns and dense hedgerows 
for cover and nesting. 

Dianemarie


From: bill .
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎May‎ ‎27‎, ‎2016 ‎2‎:‎26‎ ‎AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

I have seen and heard them at parks here in Enid, Ok but could never be sure if 
they were native or escapees from the Grand National Quail "Hunt." 


Last weekend i heard quite a few very good "bob-white" calls at Perry Lake , 
Ok. I never saw one, but did see a couple Northern Mockingbirds about. The 
quail calls did not seem to be associated with those of other birds, such as a 
NOMO would make, yet i can't be sure they weren't just mimics. Can anyone 
comment on the liklihood of either? 


peace
-bill
enid garfield ok


> Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 01:43:32 -0500
> From: vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM
> Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] N. Bobwhite
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>
> Same out our way. We're seeing quail for the first time in a decade.
> Not sure if its just something this year, or if this is a trend. Either
> way, I'll take it and hope that its a trend.
>
> George (n. Conway Co. seeing but not hearing quail)
>
>
> On 5/26/2016 9:27 AM, V Prislipsky wrote:
> > My recent roaming in the timberlands around HSVillage suggests that there 
is a significant increase in N. Bobwhite this year. Perhaps related, I've also 
been seeing/hearing more Prairie Warblers. 

> >




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Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 11:29:12 +0000
Gulf Mountain WMA is getting a lot more bobwhite now too. I hear them almost 
daily and see pairs or even groups often. I know AGFC is taking steps to make 
habitat--mainly clearing brush and understory. To an extent this is 
great--returning areas to their pre-fire suppression state. 




They need, though, to not get over zealous since not only songbirds but the 
quail themselves use varied habitats, including blowdowns and dense hedgerows 
for cover and nesting. 



Dianemarie








From: bill .
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎May‎ ‎27‎, ‎2016 ‎2‎:‎26‎ ‎AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU





I have seen and heard them at parks here in Enid, Ok but could never be sure if 
they were native or escapees from the Grand National Quail "Hunt." 


Last weekend i heard quite a few very good "bob-white" calls at Perry Lake , 
Ok. I never saw one, but did see a couple Northern Mockingbirds about. The 
quail calls did not seem to be associated with those of other birds, such as a 
NOMO would make, yet i can't be sure they weren't just mimics. Can anyone 
comment on the liklihood of either? 


peace
-bill
enid garfield ok




> Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 01:43:32 -0500
> From: vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM
> Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] N. Bobwhite
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> Same out our way. We're seeing quail for the first time in a decade. 
> Not sure if its just something this year, or if this is a trend. Either 
> way, I'll take it and hope that its a trend.
> 
> George (n. Conway Co. seeing but not hearing quail)
> 
> 
> On 5/26/2016 9:27 AM, V Prislipsky wrote:
> > My recent roaming in the timberlands around HSVillage suggests that there 
is a significant increase in N. Bobwhite this year. Perhaps related, I've also 
been seeing/hearing more Prairie Warblers. 

> >
Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 02:25:40 -0500
I have seen and heard them at parks here in Enid, Ok but could never be sure if 
they were native or escapees from the Grand National Quail "Hunt." 


Last weekend i heard quite a few very good "bob-white" calls at Perry Lake , 
Ok. I never saw one, but did see a couple Northern Mockingbirds about. The 
quail calls did not seem to be associated with those of other birds, such as a 
NOMO would make, yet i can't be sure they weren't just mimics. Can anyone 
comment on the liklihood of either? 


peace
-bill
enid garfield ok



> Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 01:43:32 -0500
> From: vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM
> Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] N. Bobwhite
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> Same out our way.  We're seeing quail for the first time in a decade.  
> Not sure if its just something this year, or if this is a trend.  Either 
> way, I'll take it and hope that its a trend.
> 
> George (n. Conway Co. seeing but not hearing quail)
> 
> 
> On 5/26/2016 9:27 AM, V Prislipsky wrote:
> > My recent roaming in the timberlands around HSVillage suggests that there 
is a significant increase in N. Bobwhite this year. Perhaps related, I've also 
been seeing/hearing more Prairie Warblers. 

> >
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 01:43:32 -0500
Same out our way.  We're seeing quail for the first time in a decade.  
Not sure if its just something this year, or if this is a trend.  Either 
way, I'll take it and hope that its a trend.

George (n. Conway Co. seeing but not hearing quail)


On 5/26/2016 9:27 AM, V Prislipsky wrote:
> My recent roaming in the timberlands around HSVillage suggests that there is 
a significant increase in N. Bobwhite this year. Perhaps related, I've also 
been seeing/hearing more Prairie Warblers. 

>
Subject: Bird plumage question
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 00:40:48 -0500
Today I observed a Prothonotary Warbler whose head was brown on top.  I
have never seen this before.  I googled it and found several pictures that
were the same. The comments all said something like...I don't know what
caused this weird brown color on the birds head.

Does anyone know what cause this?

http://goo.gl/FpKYNB

Michael(Conway)
Subject: Re: Squirrel baffle question
From: Ed Laster <elaster523 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 19:55:39 -0500
I replied to Dorothy with the following, but have omitted the photo for Arbird. 


I am not aware of any stove pipe baffle that wraps around. However, you can 
make one that works. A squirrel cannot climb a 3” PVC pipe. You can attach a 
PVC pipe to a Shepherds Hook if you remove (hack saw) the side spike which most 
of them have from the bottom. You must then make a bulkhead to go inside of the 
PVC pipe. Measure the ID of the pipe, cut a circular bulkhead out of a 2x4 
piece of lumber to fit inside the pipe. Bore a hole in the center of the 
bulkhead a little greater than the diameter of the hook. Slide the bulkhead up 
the hook to be 5’ above the ground. Place a hose clamp below it and tighten. 
Drill 3 -4 holes (big enough for nails or screws you want to use) into the PVC 
pipe, 3/4” below the top. Slide the piece of PVC (at least 3’ long) up the 
hook and over the bulkhead. Screw or nail it to the bulkhead. This will stop a 
squirrel provided it’s 10’ away from a jumping point. However, to make it 
raccoon proof you must add the “witches hat” shown in the photo. They are 
available at Farmer’s COOP. Let me know if you need additional info. 


Ed Laster
Little Rock


> On May 26, 2016, at 4:46 PM, Dorothy Cooney  wrote:
> 
> Can anyone advise me as to what kind of squirrel baffle would work best on a 
fixed shepherd's hook (meaning the "arms" cannot be removed)? I have a 
wrap-around baffle that does not work very well. Does anyone make a stovepipe 
type baffle that wraps around? I'd appreciate any advise. We are having a 
squirrel population explosion and they are eating me out of house and home! 

> 
> -- 
> Dorothy Cooney
> Wickes, AR
Subject: Squirrel baffle question
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 16:46:20 -0500
Can anyone advise me as to what kind of squirrel baffle would work best on
a fixed shepherd's hook (meaning the "arms" cannot be removed)?  I have a
wrap-around baffle that does not work very well.  Does anyone make a
stovepipe type baffle that wraps around?  I'd appreciate any advise.  We
are having a squirrel population explosion and they are eating me out of
house and home!

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: AM. AVOCET IN BREEDING PLUMAGE AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 13:09:38 -0500
This morning Doc George and I observed and photographed at close range an Am. 
Avocet in full breeding plumage at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility 
in Pine Bluff. This was a first time experience for each of us to see the 
Avocet in full breeding plumage. What a beautiful bird! 

John Redman
Subject: N. Bobwhite
From: V Prislipsky <vprislipsky AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 09:27:31 -0500
My recent roaming in the timberlands around HSVillage suggests that there is a 
significant increase in N. Bobwhite this year. Perhaps related, I've also been 
seeing/hearing more Prairie Warblers. 

Subject: Sonic Scarecrow
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 07:59:06 -0500
The Economist (16-22 Apr 2016; pg 67) notes the development of a sonic
device (2-10 kHz) that apparently inhibits birds' ability to communicate and
reducing their populations in the affected area
(http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21696922-new-way-shoo-
birds-away-airports-sonic-scarecrow ) .  The article explains the theory
which seems to go-along with some of the papers presented at BSCE/IBSC
meetings over the years regarding bioacoustics, engine noise, etc.  

 

Dr. John Swaddle, College of William and Mary, in Virginia, USA, is the
prime researcher and has published in Ecological Applications.  Please
forward that article if you have access to it.

 

Cheers,

 

Jeff Short
Subject: FIELD TRIP TO CAVE MOUNTAIN & UPPER BUFFALO RIVER SUNDAY JUNE 5, 2016
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 00:53:57 +0000
Y'all are invited to join Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society on a field trip to 
Cave Mountain & the upper Buffalo River in Newton County. This area is rich in 
both avian and plant treasures. Birding AND botanizing go hand-in-hand on this 
field trip. Everyone is welcome & you do not need to be a member to 
participate. All ages & experience levels welcome. This is mostly stops at 
various places with only a little walking -- no extensive hiking. There is a 
general guide on the NWAAS web site. Upper Buffalo PDF at: 
http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/id17.html. 



TIME & PLACE: Sunday June 5, 2016, meet at 9 AM, Boxley Bridge over the 
Buffalo, intersection of highway 21 & Cave Mountain Road. Cave Mountain is 
south of Boxley on 21. Look Using the intersections of Arkansas 43 & 21 as 
reference, the Boxley Baptist Church is 0.5 miles south of the intersection; 
our meeting point adjacent the bridge over the Buffalo is 1.2 miles south of 21 
& 43. If you are moderately late, head up Cave Mountain Road & find us. If you 
are fashionably late, you may need to find us along 21 somewhere between Cave 
Mountain Road and the Ponca store (snacks). 



Public lands include Buffalo National River, Upper Buffalo Wilderness, and 
Ozark National Forest. There are also private farms. We will seek fabulous 
breeding birds including warblers like Cerulean, Hooded, Worm-eating, American 
Redstart, Scarlet Tanager, Wood Thrush, and we will be on the look-out for 
interesting native plants. 

Subject: SHOREBIRDS CONTINUE AT CENTERTON + SHRIKES FLEDGE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 21:35:47 +0000
A great bounty of fresh mudflat awaits any and all shorebirds passing through 
the area of Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. While big northbound peak 
has passed, there is still plenty of interest. For example: Killdeer (10+ 
including 2 fledglings several days old but still closely guarded by adults), 
Spotted Sandpiper (2), Yellowlegs (2 -- probably Lesser or maybe both; no call 
notes and size difference hard for me to determine); Semipalmated Sandpiper 
(32), White-rumped Sandpiper (7), Dunlin (1). 


I have been watching Loggerhead Shrikes around the hatchery. Birds that I 
assumed were nesting seemed to have disappeared so I assumed the nest failed. 
Today I noticed an adult flying into a thorny tangle with food and figured it 
was an active nest. But then, I heard a bunch of hisses and growls like I 
assume you'd hear from baby alligators - and spotted 4 shrikes above me on the 
wire. From within my car "blind," it was a tough angle for looking -- plus the 
sun was right overhead -- so I'm unsure how many were fledglings. That one with 
spider legs hanging off the beak look like a newly-minted shrike for sure. But 
whatever the number, it is good news. 


According to The Birds of North America Online, "Despite its wide distribution, 
the Loggerhead Shrike is one of the few North American passerines whose 
populations have declined continent wide in recent decades. Changes in human 
land-use practices, the spraying of biocides, and competition with species that 
are more tolerant of human-induced changes appear to be major factors 
contributing to this decline." 

Subject: ASCA June Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 15:06:45 +0000
Saturday, June 4th is the upcoming field trip of the Audubon Society of Central 
Arkansas (ASCA).  See details below.  Come join us!  You don't have to be an 
ASCA member to participate. Both trails are paved, so comfortable walking shoes 
will be sufficient. There are bathrooms in the parking lot of the Kingfisher 
Trail.  If you have questions, please feel free to email me off-list. ASCA's 
website is www.ascabird.org for more information about our Society, previous 
field trips, and our great monthly meetings and terrific guest speakers.Karen 
HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock 


June 4Kingfisher andArboretum Trails, Pinnacle Mountain State ParkWest Little 
RockMeet at 7:30 a.m. in the park’s West Summit parking lot nearthe picnic 
area restrooms at the base of Pinnacle Mountain.  See directions below.  The 
Kingfisher Trail is a ½ mile paved level looptrail.  It runs along the Little 
MaumelleRiver through a bottomland forest with huge Bald Cypress trees.  Along 
the trail we’ll find birds, unique plants,wildflowers, and butterflies.  
Next,we’ll caravan to the Arkansas Arboretum Trail. This trail is a ¾ mile 
paved loop trail with a slight incline.  Ovenbirds, Louisiana Waterthrush, and 
othersummer residents will be our target birds.  Bring water and light 
snacks.  This is a half day trip. Directions to Kingfisher Trail:  Take Exit 
9 off I-430.  Go 7 miles west on Hwy. 10, then 2 milesnorth on Hwy. 300.  
Turn right into thepicnic area parking lot.  GPS: 34.839211,-92.493480.  
Arkansas Arboretum Trail:  from the Kingfisher Trail, go one mile northon Hwy. 
300, turn right onto Pinnacle Valley Road.  Go 1.5 miles until you see the 
ArkansasArboretum sign and parking lot on your right. 

Mark these dates on your calendar: July 9 Dr. Lester SitzesIII Bois D’Arc 
WMAHope, ARMeetat 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the 
I-630/I-430intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at 
the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 30off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south 
Arkansas who would like to join us.  Look for  Great-tailed Grackles at 
McDonalds.  We should arrive at the Bois D’Arc WMA at9:15 a.m.  Our target 
birds will bePurple and Common Gallinules and their chicks, Least Bitterns, 
Anhingas,Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, herons, egrets, and possibly an 
alligator ortwo!  Very little walking will beinvolved.  Bring scopes, plenty 
of water,snacks, and lunch.  There are severalrestaurants in Hope if you 
prefer to eat lunch in town.  BoisD‘Arc WMA is located 10 miles south of 
Hope. Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go east. Continue past McDonald’s, then 
under the railroad overpass.  At the light at the big intersection, turnright 
onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of amile.  At the brown sign, turn left ontoHwy. 174.  
Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles tothe stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turn rightonto 
Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4 miles.  Turn right at the white wooden WMA sign 
justbefore the highway ends in the lake. Follow the paved road, then turn left 
onto the first gravel road and godown to the lake.  GPS: 
33.558062,-93.694239 August 27Bald Knob NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, 
ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot, 
theeast side behind McDonald’s.  Take Exit 1West off US-67/167.  The Other 
Center ison McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall. We’ll arrive at Bald Knob 
NWR at around 8:30 a.m. for those who want tomeet us there.  Look for the line 
of carsparked on Coal Chute Road.  The federalrefuge is also a National 
Audubon Important Bird Area.  We expect to see shorebirds, 
herons,night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills.  
It will be very hot so bring plenty of water,snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If 
youhave a scope, bring it.  Very littlewalking will be involved.  There is 
nobathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’sjust off Hwy. 67/167 at Bald Knob 
Exit 55. Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/for driving directions and more 
information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903   
Subject: Catching up on local birds
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 09:42:54 -0500
For those that expressed concern of my safety in Brazil...I have made it
back to Arkansas safely.  I survived the mountains hikes, the mosquitos,
possible terrorists/drug cartels and was not lured away by any of the
cuties on Ipanema Beach.
Of course after a daylight till dark birding to relax when I got home I had
to go birding in my own state to check for recent sighting by others.

I started off with my roadrunner in my yard.  I did not locate any of the
reported birds I was looking for but had fun looking.  Mayflies were thick
at Dardanelle and the birds were having a feast.  Mostly Eastern Kingbirds,
Scissortail flycatchers and Orioles.
I was unable to relocated the Canada Warblers and Bewick's Wren reported at
Camp Robinson SUA.  I did locate 3 Bachman's Sparrows along the underside
of the ridge off Green Lake Road.  The first sighting was at the same
location as I saw them 2 weeks ago.  I had to walk about 3/4 mile down the
lane to locate one perched up singing to allow a picture(link below).  This
time I did not get distracted by a oddly colored Field Sparrow with a mouth
full of grasshopper that showed up with Bachman's last time (sorry for not
checking the pictures more closely before posting last time and thanks to
those that pointed out my error).  Hairy Woodpeckers and Willow Flycatcher
were highlights of the day.

Photos from Lake Dardanelle and Camp Robinson SUA.
Link to slideshow of photos for the month (in reverse date sequence with
newest photo first):
http://goo.gl/mOygx0

Bachman's Sparrow link:
http://goo.gl/6Bj5am

Michael (In Conway for a couple of weeks)
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 24
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 22:40:09 -0500
It was overcast, warm, and a bit windy on the survey today.  72 species were
found.  The only migrants I saw today were a group of Black Terns and a
couple flyover Black-necked Stilts.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 8

Wood Duck - 7

Mallard - 5 (also one brood of 8 small young with hen.)

Blue-winged Teal - 5

Hooded Merganser - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 9 (one on nest.)

Neotropic Cormorant - 8

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 16 (Several sitting on nests.)

Least Bittern - 5 (1 sitting on nest.)

Great-blue Heron - 14

Great Egret - 22

Snowy Egret - 1

Cattle Egret - 8

Green Heron - 8

Black Vulture - 33

Turkey Vulture - 7

Mississippi Kite - 5

Cooper's Hawk - 2

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

King Rail - 1  

Purple Gallinule - 11

Common Gallinule - 27 (one pair with 7 small chicks.)

American Coot - 12

Killdeer - 3

Black-necked Stilt - 2

Black Tern - 11

Mourning Dove - 13

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 5

Willow Flycatcher - 2 (calling on nesting territories)

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 8

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 6

Bell's Vireo - 6

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 28

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Wood Thrush - 2

Cedar Waxwing - 7

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Pine warbler - 2

Prairie Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 8

Common Yellowthroat - 12

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal - 22

Indigo Bunting - 23

Painted Bunting - 7

Dickcissel - 29

Red-winged Blackbird - 25

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 34

Brown-headed Cowbird - 6

Orchard Oriole - 5

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Vesper Bluet

Common Green Darner 

Cyrano Darner

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Broad-banded Watersnake

Yellow-bellied Watersnake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: THE VALUE OF LEARNING BIRD SONGS
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 17:16:27 -0500
The past week I have had as an objective photography of a Bell's Vireo, which I 
have never seen, but should be expected as a summer resident in the Pine Bluff 
area. To facilitate my search, I have been listening to the various 
vocalizations of the Bell's on my IBird Plus ap on my IPhone. The vocalizations 
are quite unique. This morning I was near the intersection of Hwy. 63 and 
Osborn Rd in Pine Bluff and in the process of photographing a male and female 
Northern Bobwhite, which were close-up and close together, when I heard a loud, 
unique bird song. I didn't recognize it immediately, but then I thought I have 
heard that before, it's a Bell's Vireo. I couldn't spot it in a thicket of 
Sumac and short Persimmon trees, but with a call-back it popped up for nice 
close-up pics. Hopefully, the song is now well imprinted in my databank. 

John Redman 
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune-: Popular bird-nest cams often show the ugly side of nature
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 20:47:48 -0500
For those into bird nest cams it isn't all fun and games:

http://tinyurl.com/htpt6vq
Subject: Buffalo River float
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 13:48:44 +0000
Floated about 10 miles of the Buffalo after putting in at Woolum on Saturday. 
We were on the river by 0700 to beat the crowd. It was more of fishing/floating 
trip than a birding trip but I kept my eyes and ears open. Heard more Parula's 
and waterthrushes than I could count. I even got to see several of the 
tail-bobbers along the shoreline. Several GB herons and Green herons, REVI's, 
HOWA's, INBU's, kingfishers. Only heard a couple of wood thrushes and would 
have expected more of those. Just going by memory here. Excellent weather and 
water level (and the smallmouth were biting good early). The prize of the day 
was watching an otter on the shoreline... 


In other news, while doing a bike ride outside of Russellville, early Sunday 
morning, I surprised a doe with a new fawn in the road ditch. The doe actually 
jumped over the fawn and the fawn just folded up and dropped straight down into 
the grass to hide. I passed by no more than about 6 feet away and could see the 
fawn as he was hiding there. He had literally disappeared from plain sight in 
the blink of an eye. I am always impressed by that instinctive survival 
response... I have even seen a dog walk within a few feet of a hiding fawn, 
never realizing it was there. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager (Acting)

Forest Service
Ozark St-Francis National Forest

p: 479-964-7231 x7231
c: 541-620-0681
f: 479-964-7518
creames AT fs.fed.us

605 West Main
Russellville, AR 72801
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people








This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
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Subject: Re: Rookery Question
From: Lucy c Weberling <lucyoga AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 21:10:03 -0500
How can I get my messages to come in digest form rather than individual 
emails??? 


Sent from my iPhone
Lucyoga AT mac.com
918-633-8890

> On May 22, 2016, at 12:26 PM, Lynn  wrote:
> 
> How long will egrets stay on the nest? I am keeping an eye on the Egrets 
nesting in the trees just west of Ed Haymes road in Lonoke County, expecting 
them to vacate soon. They are so far off the road I can't see much except blurs 
of white. 

> Wish I could see the babies but even with binoculars I can't tell much. Just 
wondering how long they will stay. 

> 
> A side note- my husband reports a road runner visiting the yard and even in 
our deck. If he will just let me see him that will be a new yard bird for me. 

> 
> Lynn Nowell
> Northern Lonoke County
Subject: Re: Nighthawks
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 18:28:17 -0500
We saw ~ 30 at Siloam Springs City Lake yesterday around noon, after the
official end of the NWAAS field trip.  I had never seen more than 5 at a
time.

Karen Garrett

On Sun, May 22, 2016 at 12:24 PM, Bob Harden  wrote:

> Last night (Sat.) I was sitting on my deck with family and a flock of
> Common Nighthawks flew over at treetop height.  At least 20.   When I
> pointed them out, my daughter said one landed right over us.   It stayed
> there apparently napping till dark and provided me with a Photo Op.
>
Subject: Nighthawks
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 12:24:52 -0500
Last night (Sat.) I was sitting on my deck with family and a flock of
Common Nighthawks flew over at treetop height.  At least 20.   When I
pointed them out, my daughter said one landed right over us.   It stayed
there apparently napping till dark and provided me with a Photo Op.
Subject: Pied-billed Grebe family
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 00:29:54 +0000
Momma and three chicks were scuttling through the water lilies in Miller Pond 
this morning. 




At home, a female scarlet tanager shares the oranges with a catbird most of the 
day, with a cardinal checking them out for a sip. Didn’t know cardinals had a 
sweet tooth. 



Dianemarie
Subject: Orioles in Siloam Springs
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 22:39:49 +0000
Baltimore Orioles and Orchard Orioles made quite a showing in the fringe of 
trees along Siloam Springs City Lake during this morning's Northwest Arkansas 
Audubon Society-sponsored trip. In terms of impact, everywhere we walked 
orioles were closely followed by Warbling Vireos in full song. During the 3 
hours, one or the other or all three were singing. 


This is our first NWAAS field trip to Siloam City Lake. Dan Mason helped set 
this up and this morning, with help from his son Elijah. Dan, Joe Woolbright, 
and Terry Stanfill have all been networking with the City of Siloam Springs as 
it plans land use changes around the lake. It is a popular bank fishing spot 
for locals, and an easy place to slow walk and look at birds. 


We also spotted two active Baltimore Oriole nests, though maybe "spotted" is 
not such great word choice. The first nest was where we parked, 20 feet up on 
an outer limb and functionally invisible in a clump of black walnut leaves. We 
knew it was there, though, because both female and male flew to it and 
disappeared. By careful looking, we could see a bit of woven basket. Looked 
like the orioles wove in colorful fishing line, discarded by anglers on the 
lakeshore. 


Of Orchard Orioles, maybe biggest impression was made by a first breeding 
season male, immaculate gold with gray wings and that amazing black throat. 


Migrants are still coming through - we picked up Swainson's Thrush (2), 
probable Gray-cheeked Thrush (1), Chestnut-sided Warbler (1), Mourning Warbler 
(2), Olive-sided Flycatcher (2), Yellow Warblers (5+) and quite a few Alder 
Flycatchers (8 or so). 


Mike Mlodinow pointed out that we are now in the usual peak migration period 
for Alders, so the relatively high number is not that unusual. Siloam has 
swampy willow habitat very much like where we have always found them in numbers 
at Lake Fayetteville. 


Looking out on the lake we saw a Spotted Sandpiper, flying low on those stiff 
wings, then joined by a second, then third, then forth; finally 5 Spotteds 
together just above the water and then out of sight. It was in this part of the 
walk where we saw Red-headed Woodpeckers (2) perched on a snag, with colors 
brilliant in morning sun. 


Most if not all of the Cedar Waxwings we saw are also migrants. They tend to 
remain in late May- early June, taking advantage of ripening fruit, like 
mulberries, before moving north. One large, spreading mulberry tree out in a 
pasture near the dam was full of red fruit and waxwings. 


Wild hydrangeas are blooming on the north slope above the lake where there are 
huge, virgin native trees. Come August, down in wetland fields alongside the 
lake, there will be more brilliant oriole-like color: Swamp Milkweed and 
pollinators, like Monarch Butterflies. 

Subject: Why is a cardinal red and not yellow
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 16:43:31 -0500
It is all in the genes! Read about it here:
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-36302791.

Lyndal York
Little Rock



 

Virus-free.
www.avast.com

 

<#DDB4FAA8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
Subject: Terns
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 15:24:58 -0500
At Treadway Fish Farm now. 
24 Common Terns
85 Franklin's Gulls
1 Caspian Tern
1 Ring-billed Gull
Charlie Lyon

Sent from my iPhone. C Lyon 
Subject: Dark-eyed Junco
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 19:49:22 +0000
Had to look twice--er, ten times to believe it--out on my deck tray where I 
photographed it alongside an indigo bunting pair for proof. As usual, I can’t 
upload the photos but since nobody sent snail-mail contacts for the HESP, 
I’ll bring both to the August Bald Knob field trip if I don’t go to one 
sooner. 







Dianemarie
Subject: flycatching Cedar Waxwings
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 13:52:50 -0500
Yesterday evening Don and I watched Cedar Waxwings exhibit flycatching 
behavior, coming out of treetops along the stream to catch hatching insects and 
returning to their perches. I read this is not uncommon for this species but we 
had never witnessed it before. 


One Wood Thrush continues to sing on cloudy days from a wooded hillside across 
the creek. 


And I still see one female Rose-breasted Grosbeak that returns to the sunflower 
feeder every day although I have not seen the males since Wednesday. The 
female, and I'm only assuming it's the same bird, also scolded me from the top 
of a pecan tree on Thursday and then flew back into a thick copse of cedars and 
oaks between fields. It might be a good place to check for a nest just in case 
she is nesting this far south of their range. 


Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are drinking quarts of sugar water daily and feed 
from the red trumpets of the new native honeysuckle vine [Lonicera 
semprevirens] in bloom beside their feeders. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: birds yesterday and today
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 12:31:05 -0500
Yesterday I started out fairly early at the fish hatchery in Centerton. 
Foggy/rainy. Not a lot of species and numbers were low. I saw Joe Neal and 
David Chapman there. I left and went to lake Fayetteville but the rain held out 
longer than I did. I went back to to fish hatchery in Centerton. right around 2 
pm I was going to call it a day when a Black-bellied Plover flew in for three 
quick photos, not very good ones at that, and left towards the east. 


I ended up going home and having a pretty good afternoon in the back yard. I 
have Cedar Waxwings coming to my little cherry tree. The cherries are just 
stating to turn red. I am wondering if I’ll get any of them this year. I 
usually end up with about 5 large coffee cans full that are picked in the 
evenings and on weekends. Then I turn the rest over to the birds. 


The Robin with the nest in the Star Magnolia tree next to the cherry tree 
isn’t happy about the new neighbors. 


I saw a spotted young Brown Thrasher was out and about with a parent. My native 
trumpet Honeysuckle had a visit by a male and a female Baltimore Oriole at 
different times. The first I have seen this year. I watched them grab a bunch 
of the flowers, break one off, and squeeze the nectar out running the beak down 
the flower. 


I put out an orange and it remains untouched. 

I was going to go back to the hatchery this morning for a while before I went 
into work for a few hours . It was Really Foggy, the gates were not open and I 
didn’t have time to walk in. I drove around Vaughn and realized if I 
couldn’t see the cows 50’ awayI probably wouldn’t have seen any birds 
either, after the sun got high enough the fog burned off in about 5 minutes. 


I just got home from work,walked out back and see the female Baltimore Oriole 
on the fence. 


I think I’ll grab the camera, move the chair strategically close and see if I 
can’t get a better photo. 







Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Just when I though
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 10:45:28 -0500
I forgot to add 
5 Chestnut-sided Warblers

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Just when I thought
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 10:33:51 -0500
Just when I thought the warblers were finished moving thur the yard this 
morning I saw. 

5 Wilson warblers
3 Redstarts
3 Red-eyed Viero
1 Common Yellowthroat 

Randy Robinson
West Pulaski County

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Wye Mountain being serenaded by whip-poor-wills and widows
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 22:39:44 -0500
    
I'm on Wye Mountain trying to take pictures of Jupiter and Mars between the 
clouds and listening to two whip-poor-wills trying to out sing four or more 
chuck-wills-widows. They are losing the contest. 



Jim DixonSent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
Subject: PLEASE FORWARD: The Halberg Ecology Camp is looking for a few good campers: 11-year-old boys and girls
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 18:22:01 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

We are actively recruiting 11- and 12-year old boys and girls for the two June 
sessions of the Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp. The 1st session 
will be Sunday June 12 until Friday June 17. The 2nd session will begin on 
Sunday June 19 and end Friday June 24. 


This is the 37th year for this incredible, hands-on Ecology Camp. Each session 
we are looking for 50 first-year students who are interested in hands-on nature 
study. If you know of any 11- or 12-year old youth who are interested in the 
natural sciencesornithology, herpetology, mammalogy, aquatic biology, 
entomology, geology and botanyplease make sure they and their families are 
made aware of this exceptional educational opportunity. 


As of today we have 65 of the 100 first-year campers in process, leaving an 
opportunity for 35 more youth to learn about nature from experts. 

 
The staff consists of 12 instructors who teach in pairs (for example, two 
ornithology instructors sharing their knowledge with a group of 8-10 campers), 
a camp director and assistant director to oversee and coordinate camp 
activities, an activities director, a full-time registered nurse and a kitchen 
staff that serves tasty and nutritious meals. Instructors include high school 
science teachers, graduate students, college instructors and working 
professionals. 


We rent the entire Camp Clearfork facilities, near Crystal Springs off Highway 
270, from the Forest Service. Camp Clearfork is closed to outsiders during our 
camp weeks, and our staff is very security conscious. 

 
Rather than trying to describe everything about the camp to you, I suggest you 
visit the Ecology Camp website: 

 
http://www.arbirds.org/halberg_ecology_camp.html
 
You'll find information about the Ecology Camp plus a downloadable application 
form and camp brochure. Near the bottom of the Ecology Camp page are links to 
slide shows of last year's camp sessions. If you still have questions, please 
contact me: bhaas AT sbcglobal.net 

 
Camper applications are matched up with available scholarships and tuition 
assistance for applicants whose families show true financial need. Tuition for 
first-year campers is $325, but our cost is about $425 per camper. Our great 
supporters help fund the balance through our annual Fall Appeal fundraising 
letter and other donations. 

 
Remember this can be your child, grandchild or any other 11- or 12-year old 
girl or boy you know. Campers need a recommendation from their teacher, and 
must have an interest in the study of nature. The application has more details. 
Please help us find some good nature loving youth who will benefit from this 
exceptional nature experience. 


Please help us spread the word by forwarding this e-mail to others who may have 
an interest. A camp flyer is attached. 

 
Thanks,
Barry Haas, Treasurer
Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp

Subject: screech owl
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 17:44:30 -0500
Our screech owl babies left the nest today and fledged into the world. One
went a little like a wood duck. Plop! One had a pretty good glide path but
tumbled on impact. You can hardly tell them from the adults already. Good
luck my babies.!!

Alan gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Subject: Honking of Geese (Centerton)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 19:24:15 +0000
Another rainy foggy morning at the Craig state fish hatchery in Centerton. 
Still some waders and terns, but diversity and numbers lower than earlier in 
the week: Semipalmated Plover (1), Killdeer (8), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), 
Solitary Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (4), Semipalmated Sandpiper (28), 
Least Sandpiper (2), White-rumped Sandpiper (12). Terns: Forster's Tern (2), 
Black Tern (3). 


We also picked up Bank Swallows (10) and Cliff Swallow (30), along with Barn 
and Rough-winged. Blue-winged Teal are still hanging in - about 6 today, also a 
drop. Canada Geese have produced respectable batches of young, that size-wise, 
are half adults and molting dark. This morning there was also one family group 
that included three recently hatched young. 


With the shorebird migration dropping off, this morning the hatchery belonged 
to the honking of geese, OH KEE LAHs of Red-winged Blackbirds, and SEE REE OH 
REEs of Eastern Meadowlarks. And, a respectable turn-out of Friday morning 
birders. 


On the way out we noticed a fresh Loggerhead Shrike kill hanging on the fence. 
I think probably a Cotton Rat, about the size of a shrike itself. I once saw a 
shrike fly with one, but barely. With such a heavy load, flight was low and 
loopy, and as you might imagine, not very far. 

Subject: Link: Photos Greater Roadrunner
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 13:21:20 -0500
Yesterday, I stepped into the hallway of my house and saw that the Greater 
Roadrunner sitting on the railing of the back porch. It dropped down to the 
ground, so I stepped into the kitchen to retrieve my camera. As luck would 
have it, the back door was standing open. I stepped into the doorway and the 
roadrunner darted up on the deck of my woodwork shop in the back yard. I 
assumed it saw me and was fleeting. Then it zoomed behind a plant stand and 
grabbed a lizard/skink.

I have four photos of it, starting with this link, then click next for the 
remaining three photos.

http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/image/163259794

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: FW: Eagle owl
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 10:15:32 -0500
 

 

 

Eagle owl chick in Croatia meets human for first time - BBC News 
 


 



 



Text Box: 




   


Eagle owl chick in Croatia meets human for first time - BBC News


Footage has captured an eagle owl chick in Croatia meeting a human for the 
first time. 


	

 
Subject: Goose Convention!
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 11:46:58 +0000
Mom and Dad and three chicks moved from Scotland Farms pond to Miller pond the 
other day--right down the middle of the highway. Of course this so-called 
highway used to be called Wilderness Trail, like its unpaved portion to the 
west. Without gas well traffic the local walkers can still stroll down its 
center fairly safely. 


So we come up on this goose family, Mom and Dad’s rumps waggling, the 
chicks’ little downy legs running furiously to keep up. We try to pass but 
Dad will have no part of it. He’s going to take a chomp out of our right 
front fender if we proceed another inch! So we settle in, turn the flashers on, 
just in case our neighbor with the beat-up pickup that is to him a sports car 
comes up from behind. We follow the little flock for most of the half mile to 
the next swimming hole, at least until a truck coming the other way flushes the 
parents skyward. 


We wait and watch until they circle back and regather their brood. Then someone 
is behind us--someone who needs to get to Walmart for the evening shift. So 
when “Dad” is looking the other way we stealthfully pass, go on up to the 
WMA. By the time we return it’s dark and we’ll have to wonder for a night 
how the “migration” all played out, praying there will be no downy splats 
in the road come sunup. 


As I go to turn in at Miller Pond for my morning waterfowl/shorebird check, I 
am rewarded with the arrogance of Daddy Goose, warning me away, his wife and 
three young’ns gleefully gathering grit from the ground behind him. Everybody 
looks whole and healthy. I’d say these chicks’ll make it safely into a 
goose’s equivalent of the terrible teens, and hopefully beyond. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: Kite Convention
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 16:59:51 +0000
That must be an impressive sight!

Several years ago, my mom took a couple visiting from New Jersey to Two Rivers 
Park (Little Rock) and experienced the same thing. The man was really 
fascinated. He had never seen so many kites in one place. 

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

From: Donna Haynes
Subject: Kite Convention

Two-rivers Park right now between 20-30 Mississippi Kites are hunting the mowed 
fields . I've never seen so many together. Looked for a Swallow-tailed Kite 
among them with no luck. 

Donna Haynes
West Pulaski Co.



This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
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this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Re: Kite Convention
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 11:53:19 -0500
Wow

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 


From: Donna Haynes 
Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2016 11:46 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Kite Convention

 Two-rivers Park right now between 20-30 Mississippi Kites are hunting the 
mowed fields . I've never seen so many together. Looked for a Swallow-tailed 
Kite among them with no luck. 

      Donna Haynes
      West Pulaski Co.  

      Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
     
Subject: Black Terns
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 11:37:14 -0500
There were a couple of Black Terns hanging around Charlie Craig Fish
Hatchery this morning.

 

Not much else was around.  The shorebirds seem to have bugged out with the
clear skies.

 

Butch Tetzlaff

Bentonville, AR
Subject: Link: Photos from Beaverfork Lake in Conway
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 07:58:01 -0500
Yesterday, I photographed a Spotted Sandpiper and a Common Loon at 
Beaverfork Lake in Conway (Faulkner Co. AR).  A few photos can be viewed 
here:
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/beaverfork_lake

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: new arrivals
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 21:56:21 -0500
Tuesday May 17 - I heard Common Nighthawks flying above the trees for the first 
time this spring. 

Wednesday May 18 - we heard them again and Don counted 14.

Also tonight - Wednesday May 18 - the first Mourning Warbler this season in 
mid-story second growth near the house. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 18
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 21:23:08 -0500
It was mostly overcast, cool, and windy on the bird survey today.  Ford
Hendershot and I found 87 species.  A few migrants were grounded today and
we did especially good with the flycatchers.  The biggest highlight of the
day was finding a couple King Rails, one of which was very tame and allowed
me to get some good pics of him.  Here is our list for today:  

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 21

Wood Duck - 15

Mallard - 4

Blue-winged Teal - 7

Hooded Merganser - 6

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Double-crested Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 17 (Several sitting on nests.)

Least Bittern - 5 (1 sitting on nest.)

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 20

Snowy Egret - 3

Little-blue Heron - 1

Green Heron - 1

Black Vulture - 11

Turkey Vulture - 19

Mississippi Kite - 1

King Rail - 2  

Purple Gallinule - 5

Common Gallinule - 10

American Coot - 14

Killdeer - 4

Spotted Sandpiper - 7

Lesser Yellowlegs - 7

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 13

Dunlin - 1

Least Tern - 2

Black Tern - 1

Rock Pigeon - 2

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Mourning Dove - 12

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 4

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Least Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 29

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 13

Bell's Vireo - 5

Warbling Vireo - 1

Philadelphia Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 3

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 3

Tree Swallow - 13

Bank Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 3

Barn Swallow - 6

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 4

Cedar Waxwing - 41

Nashville Warbler - 1

Yellow Warbler - 6

Chestnut-sided Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Mourning Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 16

Wilson's Warbler - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 8

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Chipping Sparrow - 1

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 13

Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 1

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 13

Painted Bunting - 10

Dickcissel - 34

Bobolink - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 19

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 21

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 4

 

Odonates:

 

Orange Bluet

Eastern Pondhawk

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Black Saddlebags

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Bullies in the Bird World
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 18:17:56 -0500
I tried not refilling them a couple days. Cowbirds are the last to leave at 
night and the first to arrive for filled feeders-- no matter how long the wait. 


Sent from my iPod

> On May 18, 2016, at 5:48 PM, Elizabeth Shores  wrote:
> 
> I have never seen one bird attack another in that way. When we have invasions 
of starlings, rather than allow them to scarf up everything in sight and create 
an unholy loud mess, I take the feeders down for a day or two so they will 
leave. 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On May 18, 2016, at 4:32 PM, dianemarie yates  wrote:
>> 
>> I’ve never been nearly as fond of crows as my husband is. But they seem 
like saints compared to the two Red-winged Blackbirds that landed yesterday on 
a feeder hook on either side of the sickly siskin that has lingered unable to 
migrate. One of them pecked at its head, then started tearing the feathers out 
until it flew. Then the RWBL literally ate the feathers! 

>> Just now I watched as cowbirds trumped the redwings. Not only do they sit 
all day at the feeders, emptying them out while other birds take time to tend 
families, but when every hopper is empty they cling to the triple-tube meant 
for finches and buntings. I cringe as I see them shove the little indigo 
buntings and painted buntings off, then fly over to the empty hoppers being 
checked by cardinals and mourning doves, and shove them off too. I have one 
small tube feeder on the porch six feet from my chair where they (the cowbirds) 
know I won’t tolerate it--I slap the glass with a piece of newspaper to scare 
them off. One of the painteds has come to it now for refuge. Now an indigo. A 
cowbird lands in the birch just beyond and is leaning toward the tube. I glare 
BULLETS! I’ve tried to make peace but oh how I hate them! Might be we humans 
made them what they are. But why could they not park themselves in cow pastures 
and groom the backs of Herefords? Other birds have adapted to change in 
positive ways. 

>> 
>> Dianemarie
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Re: Bullies in the Bird World
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 17:47:43 -0500
I have never seen one bird attack another in that way. When we have invasions 
of starlings, rather than allow them to scarf up everything in sight and create 
an unholy loud mess, I take the feeders down for a day or two so they will 
leave. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On May 18, 2016, at 4:32 PM, dianemarie yates  wrote:
> 
> I’ve never been nearly as fond of crows as my husband is. But they seem 
like saints compared to the two Red-winged Blackbirds that landed yesterday on 
a feeder hook on either side of the sickly siskin that has lingered unable to 
migrate. One of them pecked at its head, then started tearing the feathers out 
until it flew. Then the RWBL literally ate the feathers! 

> Just now I watched as cowbirds trumped the redwings. Not only do they sit all 
day at the feeders, emptying them out while other birds take time to tend 
families, but when every hopper is empty they cling to the triple-tube meant 
for finches and buntings. I cringe as I see them shove the little indigo 
buntings and painted buntings off, then fly over to the empty hoppers being 
checked by cardinals and mourning doves, and shove them off too. I have one 
small tube feeder on the porch six feet from my chair where they (the cowbirds) 
know I won’t tolerate it--I slap the glass with a piece of newspaper to scare 
them off. One of the painteds has come to it now for refuge. Now an indigo. A 
cowbird lands in the birch just beyond and is leaning toward the tube. I glare 
BULLETS! I’ve tried to make peace but oh how I hate them! Might be we humans 
made them what they are. But why could they not park themselves in cow pastures 
and groom the backs of Herefords? Other birds have adapted to change in 
positive ways. 

> 
> Dianemarie
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Bullies...Just kidding!
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:07:11 +0000
Nobody likes soggy cereal.






Dianemarie
Subject: Bullies...
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:01:10 +0000
On a brighter note--yes, a bright male Baltimore Oriole is on one of the 
oranges right now. Unmolested. Apparently cowbirds don’t have a sweet tooth. 
So then--smother the seed in pepper powder to repel squirrels? Then perhaps we 
can soak it in orange juice to protect it from bully cowbirds! 







Dianemarie
Subject: Bullies in the Bird World
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 21:32:49 +0000
I’ve never been nearly as fond of crows as my husband is. But they seem like 
saints compared to the two Red-winged Blackbirds that landed yesterday on a 
feeder hook on either side of the sickly siskin that has lingered unable to 
migrate. One of them pecked at its head, then started tearing the feathers out 
until it flew. Then the RWBL literally ate the feathers! 


Just now I watched as cowbirds trumped the redwings. Not only do they sit all 
day at the feeders, emptying them out while other birds take time to tend 
families, but when every hopper is empty they cling to the triple-tube meant 
for finches and buntings. I cringe as I see them shove the little indigo 
buntings and painted buntings off, then fly over to the empty hoppers being 
checked by cardinals and mourning doves, and shove them off too. I have one 
small tube feeder on the porch six feet from my chair where they (the cowbirds) 
know I won’t tolerate it--I slap the glass with a piece of newspaper to scare 
them off. One of the painteds has come to it now for refuge. Now an indigo. A 
cowbird lands in the birch just beyond and is leaning toward the tube. I glare 
BULLETS! I’ve tried to make peace but oh how I hate them! Might be we humans 
made them what they are. But why could they not park themselves in cow pastures 
and groom the backs of Herefords? Other birds have adapted to change in 
positive ways. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: Crow with egg
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 15:48:10 -0500
We have guineas that keep the ticks out of the yard. The crows literally line 
up outside the coop in the morning waiting for them to be released so they (the 
crows) can go in and take the eggs. 


I've found shells as far as a half mile away.

George (n. Conway co. Operating a corvid breakfast bar)

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Gail Miller  wrote:

>I was sitting in my front yard when a crow landed on the ground in my pasture. 
It had something white in its beak. I had binoculars with me and saw that it 
had a rather large egg, possibly a hawk's egg. 

>
>Gail Miller
>Conway
>
>Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Crow with egg
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 12:43:11 -0500
We recently found a crow-eaten Wood Duck egg(shell) a few hundred feet 
(as the crow flies) from our nest boxes.  Ducks here sometimes lay eggs 
on the dock, rather than in a box.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

On 5/18/2016 12:33 PM, Gail Miller wrote:
> I was sitting in my front yard when a crow landed on the ground in my 
pasture. It had something white in its beak. I had binoculars with me and saw 
that it had a rather large egg, possibly a hawk's egg. 

>
> Gail Miller
> Conway
>
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Crow with egg
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 12:33:39 -0500
I was sitting in my front yard when a crow landed on the ground in my pasture. 
It had something white in its beak. I had binoculars with me and saw that it 
had a rather large egg, possibly a hawk's egg. 


Gail Miller
Conway

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Empty bluebird nest
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 07:11:41 -0500
Our Bluebirds are nesting in an older box just beyond the back porch. I watched 
them finishing the nest last week & they "moved in" Thursday. Another pair 
nested out front & should have had young by now but the box appears abandoned. 


Sent from my iPod

> On May 17, 2016, at 5:19 PM, Jeffrey Short  wrote:
> 
> Our working box is on its second clutch of four.
>  
> Jeff Short
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Stephan Coger 

> Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 4:56 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Empty bluebird nest
>  
> After a period of a Bluebird couple occupying my bluebird house, I came home 
to find two areas of feathers, and assumed that the Sharp-shinned Hawk had made 
a strike, now, weeks later, a new male Bluebird started checking out the 
deserted nest, then a female with him, and now they have moved in. 

>  
> On Tue, May 17, 2016 at 12:19 PM, Kay Hodnett  wrote:
> I was away from Little Rock from first week of January until May 10. I 
believe I left a nest inside my blue bird box because I had read that would 
provide cozier shelter for birds in winter than an empty house. But I am not 
certain whether I left the nest or pulled it out. 

> 
> Now a male and female bluebird are hanging around the box, peering in but I 
am not sure that I have seen them go inside. They are eating dried mealworms I 
put out. I have not seen them with nesting materials in their beaks but of 
course I am not watching them all the time. 

> 
> Isn't it correct that the birds would not accept an old nest and that they 
would not build on top of an old nest? Do you think I should pull the nest out 
and throw it away? 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
>  
Subject: Re: Empty bluebird nest
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 17:18:50 -0500
Our working box is on its second clutch of four.

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Stephan Coger 

Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2016 4:56 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Empty bluebird nest

 

After a period of a Bluebird couple occupying my bluebird house, I came home to 
find two areas of feathers, and assumed that the Sharp-shinned Hawk had made a 
strike, now, weeks later, a new male Bluebird started checking out the deserted 
nest, then a female with him, and now they have moved in. 


 

On Tue, May 17, 2016 at 12:19 PM, Kay Hodnett  wrote:

I was away from Little Rock from first week of January until May 10. I believe 
I left a nest inside my blue bird box because I had read that would provide 
cozier shelter for birds in winter than an empty house. But I am not certain 
whether I left the nest or pulled it out. 


Now a male and female bluebird are hanging around the box, peering in but I am 
not sure that I have seen them go inside. They are eating dried mealworms I put 
out. I have not seen them with nesting materials in their beaks but of course I 
am not watching them all the time. 


Isn't it correct that the birds would not accept an old nest and that they 
would not build on top of an old nest? Do you think I should pull the nest out 
and throw it away? 


Sent from my iPhone

 
Subject: LEAST TERNS AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 17:15:34 -0500
This morning at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility I counted 21 Least 
Terns. There was little foraging with the bulk of the Terns resting on the 
pilings. This is the largest number that I have seen to date at the facility. 
In addition there were 2 Black Terns. 

John Redman
Subject: BOBOLINKS IN PINE BLUFF
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 17:08:15 -0500
For the last 2 days a small flock of approx. 75 Bobolinks have been forging in 
a field adjacent to Osborn Rd. about 500 yds. south of the junction with Hwy. 
63 in Pine Bluff. Of interest is that the flock is comprised of 80% females. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: Empty bluebird nest
From: Stephan Coger <stevecoger AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 16:56:04 -0500
After a period of a Bluebird couple occupying my bluebird house, I came
home to find two areas of feathers, and assumed that the Sharp-shinned Hawk
had made a strike, now, weeks later, a new male Bluebird started checking
out the deserted nest, then a female with him, and now they have moved in.

On Tue, May 17, 2016 at 12:19 PM, Kay Hodnett  wrote:

> I was away from Little Rock from first week of January until May 10.  I
> believe I left a nest inside my blue bird box because I had read that would
> provide cozier shelter for birds in winter than an empty house.  But I am
> not certain whether I left the nest or pulled it out.
>
> Now a male and female bluebird are hanging around the box, peering in but
> I am not sure that I have seen them go inside.  They are eating dried
> mealworms I put out.  I have not seen them with nesting materials in their
> beaks but of course I am not watching them all the time.
>
> Isn't it correct that the birds would not accept an old nest and that they
> would not build on top of an old nest?  Do you think I should pull the nest
> out and throw it away?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bird gods spake fallout at Centerton
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 22:00:53 +0000
On a rainy, misty day, with north wind, bird gods spake fallout at state fish 
hatchery in Centerton. When I drove in the gates a little after 8, I was 
greeted by American Avocets in brilliant breeding plumage. Then it just kept 
getting better. Here's 17 shorebird species this morning: 


Black-bellied Plover (8), Semipalmated Plover (11), Killdeer (4-5), American 
Avocet (3), Lesser Yellowlegs (40), Spotted Sandpiper (7), Hudsonian Godwit 
(2), Ruddy Turnstone (1), Sanderling (2 together - one winter, one breeding), 
Semipalmated Sandpiper (~120), Least Sandpiper (6), White-rumped Sandpiper 
(~several hundred), Pectoral Sandpiper (4), Dunlin (3), Stilt Sandpiper (65), 
Short-billed Dowitcher (26; I assume these are the prairie race, hendersoni), 
Wilson's Phalarope (12). 

It was also a tern day: Caspian Tern (9), Forster's Tern (18), Least Tern (1), 
and Black Tern (15). 


I was at the hatchery from 8 - 2. An adult Bald Eagle was present the entire 
time. Low passes flushed some shorebirds, but mostly they ignored it. Turns 
out, I think the eagle was after fish, frogs, or turtles in the shallows of one 
partially drained pond. 


In 30 plus years of fairly regular visits to the hatchery, I can only recall a 
few mornings like this, when migration planets came to such remarkable 
alignment. Drained ponds, light north wind, misty overcast and cloudy, in the 
middle of May. A remarkable day in former prairies of northwest Arkansas. This 
evening I am going to post photographs from today on my facebook page, in case 
you're interested in how it looked. 

Subject: Empty bluebird nest
From: Kay Hodnett <sallyportk AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 12:19:59 -0500
I was away from Little Rock from first week of January until May 10. I believe 
I left a nest inside my blue bird box because I had read that would provide 
cozier shelter for birds in winter than an empty house. But I am not certain 
whether I left the nest or pulled it out. 


Now a male and female bluebird are hanging around the box, peering in but I am 
not sure that I have seen them go inside. They are eating dried mealworms I put 
out. I have not seen them with nesting materials in their beaks but of course I 
am not watching them all the time. 


Isn't it correct that the birds would not accept an old nest and that they 
would not build on top of an old nest? Do you think I should pull the nest out 
and throw it away? 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 12:05:02 -0500
It is said that they are pecking at their reflection--a presumed competitor.

Sent from my iPod

> On May 16, 2016, at 10:46 AM, Dorothy Cooney  wrote:
> 
> First, thank you for the advice on how to transfer my birding info to ebird. 
It looks like a formidable task, but it has to be done. 

> 
> I've had a male Summer Tananger summering here every year for 6 years. His 
behavior has fascinated me! He pecks on the window if I'm in the house, and 
literally follows me around outside. He won't come to me, but is always close 
by. Now his beautiful mate is pecking on the window! She has been at it for 2 
hours now, 3 feet from where I'm sitting at the computer! Tanny (the male) now 
has company. Another male showed up this morning and they chase each other 
around. Are they vieing for the female? I'm baffled and intrigued by their 
behavior! Thoughts? 

> 
> -- 
> Dorothy Cooney
> Wickes, AR
Subject: Re: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 12:01:59 -0500
Seems like over & over I read of all the birds people get in Mulberry trees. 
I'm too old to see one grow up but perhaps we should plant one for posterity. 
Meanwhile our river birches have accrued quite a list. 


Sent from my iPod

> On May 17, 2016, at 11:15 AM, Joyce Hartmann  wrote:
> 
> We have had similar experiences…The last two years we’ve had a male 
Summer Tanager who pecked and flew at his reflections in our windows and 
skylights. And also looked like he wanted to come in our door and picture 
window, just sitting on the sills and pecking at it…we thought maybe in his 
winter tropical home, the houses may have been open air and full of nice tasty 
spiders or other goodies, and he just wondered why our house had all this glass 
on it. This year we have at least one male Summer Tanager who just sings his 
“Nippy tuckytuck” song and sits in plain view on our mulberry tree near our 
house, but does not come near the windows, so it’s obviously a different 
bird. Who knows what they think??! They sure are beautiful…Joyce Hartmann, 
Choctaw (Van Buren County) 

>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney 

> Sent: Monday, May 16, 2016 10:46 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior
>  
> First, thank you for the advice on how to transfer my birding info to ebird. 
It looks like a formidable task, but it has to be done. 

> 
> I've had a male Summer Tananger summering here every year for 6 years. His 
behavior has fascinated me! He pecks on the window if I'm in the house, and 
literally follows me around outside. He won't come to me, but is always close 
by. Now his beautiful mate is pecking on the window! She has been at it for 2 
hours now, 3 feet from where I'm sitting at the computer! Tanny (the male) now 
has company. Another male showed up this morning and they chase each other 
around. Are they vieing for the female? I'm baffled and intrigued by their 
behavior! Thoughts? 

> 
> --
> Dorothy Cooney
> Wickes, AR
Subject: Re: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 11:14:46 -0500
We have had similar experiences…The last two years we’ve had a male Summer 
Tanager who pecked and flew at his reflections in our windows and skylights. 
And also looked like he wanted to come in our door and picture window, just 
sitting on the sills and pecking at it…we thought maybe in his winter 
tropical home, the houses may have been open air and full of nice tasty spiders 
or other goodies, and he just wondered why our house had all this glass on it. 
This year we have at least one male Summer Tanager who just sings his “Nippy 
tuckytuck” song and sits in plain view on our mulberry tree near our house, 
but does not come near the windows, so it’s obviously a different bird. Who 
knows what they think??! They sure are beautiful…Joyce Hartmann, Choctaw (Van 
Buren County) 


 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney 

Sent: Monday, May 16, 2016 10:46 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Avisys to ebird and tananger behavior

 

First, thank you for the advice on how to transfer my birding info to ebird. It 
looks like a formidable task, but it has to be done. 


I've had a male Summer Tananger summering here every year for 6 years. His 
behavior has fascinated me! He pecks on the window if I'm in the house, and 
literally follows me around outside. He won't come to me, but is always close 
by. Now his beautiful mate is pecking on the window! She has been at it for 2 
hours now, 3 feet from where I'm sitting at the computer! Tanny (the male) now 
has company. Another male showed up this morning and they chase each other 
around. Are they vieing for the female? I'm baffled and intrigued by their 
behavior! Thoughts? 




-- 

Dorothy Cooney

Wickes, AR
Subject: Re: Long-billed Curlew
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 15:03:19 +0000
A minor point.. his name was Merritt (2 ts) Gordon Vaiden... he was a famous 
collector of birds in Mississippi... his collection of 3500 specimens is at the 
University of Mississippi... I contacted the curator and he said that Jerry 
Jackson reviewed all of Vaiden's extensive records several years ago... 

I suspect that Jerry found the date in Arkansas Birds was wrong and contacted 
Doug about it... I looked at the card in the files and the change appears to be 
in Doug's handwriting... 


I will ask Doug about it...

Cheers, Kim

Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Daniel Scheiman 

Sent: Friday, May 13, 2016 11:20 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Long-billed Curlew

The 1933 vs. 1934 record in question has the typed "Oct 5, 1934" crossed out 
and "31 Oct. 1933" written in by hand. When and by whom, I have no idea. The 
person who transcribed the card for the Cardinal Club made the right decision, 
in my opinion, according to what is on the card. Perhaps Doug or Joe know the 
backstory. 


Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 5/13/16, 6:36 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of Kenny 
Nichols"  on 
behalf of 
0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
wrote: 


As a long-standing Life Member of the Arkansas Audubon Society and someone who 
started birding BC (before cellphones), I would like to nominate Terry Butler 
and David Finch as Arkansas Birders of the Month for discovering a LONG-BILLED 
CURLEW (LBCU) this morning at Bald Knob NWR. It was a long drive from 
Dardanelle, but LaDonna and I made it in (probably record) time to find David 
along with Dottie and Doris Boyles keeping an eye on The Bird. When Terry first 
called, I asked him if it might be a Whimbrel instead. The timing was perfect 
for Whimbrel and LBCU is extraordinarily rare, with less than 10 records on 
file. He was insistent that it was indeed a LBCU. Indeed it was. We watched the 
bird for well over an hour as it probed for prey items in a small wetland not 
less than 50 feet from Coal Chute Road. Often the very long bill buried up in 
it's entirety in pursuit of unseen goodies. Once, we noticed that it had 
captured a rather large crayfish. It took several attempts, but finally managed 
to get the mud bug turned just right before swallowing it whole -much needed 
protein for the journey north. This was State Bird #380 for us and the first 
LBCU we've seen in many years. Now, I'm looking forward to the next Friday the 
13th. 


The AAS database at Arkansas Audubon 
Society 
lists a grand total of six records for LBCU. I took the liberty of listing them 
below. 



Arkansas Audubon Society
Arkansas Audubon Society website, sponsor of Halberg Ecology Camp, AAS Trust 
funds bird research, biannual conve... 





1. Two birds at Lonoke, Lonoke 31 Oct 1933 (Merrit G. Vaiden)
2. One bird east of Texarkana, Miller 9 Dec 1961 (Charles Gardner)
3. One bird southeast of Stuttgart, Arkansas 18 Nov 1967 (Edith & Henry 
Halberg, Ted & Marian Johnston) 

4. One bird at Arkadelphia, Clark 21 Apr 1980 (Thomas Duncan)
5. One bird along the Mississippi River, Crittenden 7 Nov 1987 (Jeff Wilson)
6. One bird near Chesney Prairie, Benton 10 Apr 2008 (Joe Neal, Joe Woolbright, 
Brandon Schmidt) 

7. One bird at Bald Knob NWR,  White 13 May 2016 (Terry Butler, David Finch)

Curiously, ARKANSAS BIRDS Their Distribution and Abundance (James & Neal, 1986) 
lists a record of two birds at Lonoke 5 October 1934. I'm not sure what the 
explanation might be, but this is very similar to the 1933 record. 


kenny nichols
dardanelle, ar
Subject: Re: Lake Fayetteville on IMBD -- from David Chapman
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 03:41:58 -0500
We got 14 species of warblers, total, in Benton County on Saturday, 12
species on Sinking Stream Trail at Hobbs.  Unfortunately they were all in
onesies and twosies, and more often seen than heard.  Probably would have
been better without the wind.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Mon, May 16, 2016 at 9:52 PM, Adam Schaffer <
000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> Saturday's Benton County IMBC treated me well.  I had 85 species between
> the woods behind my house, Whitney Mountain, and Devil's Eyebrow.  My 13
> species of warblers included Cerulean and Canada.
>
> Adam Schaffer
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Joseph C. Neal 
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Sent:* Monday, May 16, 2016 6:49 PM
> *Subject:* Lake Fayetteville on IMBD -- from David Chapman
>
> Not often do we get a classic "fall-out" on migration count day but this
> morning (May 15) for about two hours or so the environmental center at Lake
> Fayetteville was alive with birds. Neil Nodelman and I had a hard time
> keeping up with migrants moving through. My final tally will be about 80
> species, about 17 of which were warblers, and a male Red-breasted Merganser
> late for spring.
>
> I wonder whether the same phenomenon was observed else where in Arkansas?
>
> David Chapman
>
>
>
>