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Updated on Friday, July 3 at 11:53 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Pied Puffbird,©Sophie Webb

3 Jul Persimmon airport [Teresa & Leif ]
3 Jul Re: Birding with sound [Joyce Hartmann ]
3 Jul Re: Birding with sound [Jeffrey Short ]
3 Jul Birding with sound [Philip Vogrinc ]
2 Jul SWAINSON'S HAWK and maybe B.j. calurus? -- Maysville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
1 Jul Fwd: Earth 'entering new extinction phase' - US study - BBC News [jonathanperry24 ]
1 Jul Re: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what? [Bill Thurman ]
1 Jul Re: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what? [Jeffrey Short ]
30 Jun Re: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what? [ ]
30 Jun Bird Calls Going Wild [jwdavis ]
30 Jun Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what? ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
30 Jun Spider-tailed viper from Iran [Jeffrey Short ]
30 Jun Re: Bobwhite question [Richard Baxter ]
30 Jun Bobwhite question [Judy & Don ]
29 Jun Bobwhite in meadow out front! [Judy & Don ]
27 Jun Adult Nature Workshops the weekend of Sept. 19-20 at Ferncliff Camp, Ferndale, Arkansas [Barry Haas ]
26 Jun Woodcocks in the garden [Holly Childs ]
25 Jun FW: national pollinator strategy [Jeffrey Short ]
24 Jun Re: Fwd: Looking for info on a location in Eastern AR [Gail Miller ]
24 Jun Re: Great Crested flycatcher questions [Jim and Karen Rowe ]
24 Jun Fwd: Looking for info on a location in Eastern AR [Richard Baxter ]
24 Jun Where have the herons and egrets gone? [diane yates ]
24 Jun Tricolored Heron [Richard Baxter ]
23 Jun Red Slough bird survey - June 23 [David Arbour ]
23 Jun Singing Towhee [Bill Thurman ]
23 Jun Re: Great Crested flycatcher questions [Elizabeth Shores ]
23 Jun Great Crested flycatcher questions [Alan ]
23 Jun Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks [Allan Mueller ]
23 Jun ASCA July Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
23 Jun Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds?? [David Arbour ]
22 Jun Black-bellied Whistling Ducks [Jerry Butler ]
22 Jun Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds?? [Pam Clark ]
22 Jun NWAAS FIELD TRIP TO CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA Saturday JULY 11, 2015 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Jun Yard Birds [diane yates ]
22 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Jamie Gwin ]
21 Jun probable effects of climate change on Willow Flycatchers in Arkansas ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Jun Willow Flycatchers [diane yates ]
21 Jun Willow Flycatchers at Baker Prairie Natural Area ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 Jun Beaver Lake Plan Revision - learn more about this ugent matter [ ]
20 Jun Re: White-winged Dove [Jacque Brown ]
20 Jun The recording [diane yates ]
20 Jun Carol T.--recording [diane yates ]
20 Jun Carol T.--recording [diane yates ]
20 Jun Brown Thrasher and other nesters [Lynn ]
19 Jun Dead raptor, NLR EMERALD PARK [Jodi Morris ]
19 Jun Re: I found no storm birds [Michael ]
19 Jun crayfish is a tried and true behavior of birds [Gail Miller ]
19 Jun Re: I found no storm birds [Kenny Nichols ]
19 Jun Re: I found no storm birds [Ryan Risher ]
19 Jun Re: Hooded Mergansers at Centerton [Bill Thurman ]
19 Jun White-winged Dove [Terry Butler ]
19 Jun Hooded Mergansers at Centerton ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
19 Jun I found no storm birds [Jacque Brown ]
19 Jun Re: ID bird call? [David Luneau ]
19 Jun Golden Eagle on Hwy 192, Garland Co., AR [ ]
18 Jun Re: bird app [David Starrett ]
18 Jun NEIL BEFORE THE BUFFALO ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
18 Jun Re: bird app ["bill ." ]
18 Jun fos [Alan ]
18 Jun Re: bird app [Sally Jo Gibson ]
18 Jun Re: bird app [Ryan Risher ]
18 Jun Re: bird app [CK Franklin ]
17 Jun Re: bird app [John Walko ]
17 Jun bird app [Mary Ann King ]
17 Jun Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds?? [David Arbour ]
16 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 16 [David Arbour ]
16 Jun Tropical Storm Bill's birds?? ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
15 Jun Re: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, nest, 4 chicks, in Calhoun County, AR. [James Morgan ]
15 Jun Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, nest, 4 chicks, in Calhoun County, AR. [Keith Newton ]
15 Jun War on Birds conf call tonight [Lance Runion ]
14 Jun ASCA Field Trip [Karen ]
14 Jun Re: Two weeks in Missouri [Jeffrey Short ]
14 Jun Western Kingbird [Bo Verser ]
13 Jun Two weeks in Missouri [Ryan R ]
13 Jun BIOBLITZ AT NINESTONE LAND TRUST IN CARROLL COUNTY ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
13 Jun Immature Bald Eagle [Teresa & Leif ]

Subject: Persimmon airport
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 12:50:24 -0400
 The Old Washer Machine Piping has been the site of the Carolina Wrens nest. 
With my container garden all around it. I go out there to work in there and 
find the parents hoping in and around grabbing the bugs to feed their young. I 
been leaving extra dog hair out there earlier for their nest building. And the 
one adult bird got where they came to sit on my shoulder while I was working 
out there. Chatting in my ear as I twine the bean vines around a pole 
yesterday. They apparently knew that it was me putting an extra worm or two 
where they could get it and they were thanking me. I thank them for protecting 
my plants. 


 The 2 inch diameter Persimmon Tree Trunk is right at an angle there outside 
the opening of the pipe being used as the wrens airport. They fly there, look 
around, ignoring me . Then fly in to the pipe opening to the nest. Like a front 
porch for their unusual nest. 


 I just came back from the Post Office in Hector with my dogs and there they 
are the whole family lined up on that trunk. One parent in the bush next to me, 
one parent at the top of the line shoving a child off to fly .( which I saw 
them do it! The child is hanging onto the trunk squeaking in fright and the 
parent peck them in the head and shoved it off! ) 

 Which landed at our feet. My dogs just watch as I said no. The little wren in 
fright struggled back up into the air and made it to the staging bush where the 
other parent is singing praises to them. No camera of course . I hop into the 
place as fast as I could to grab it and of course the last bird got shoved off 
the trunk to land in the nearby bush 3 young and 2 parents out in there now 
singing in relief that their little ones made it to the great outdoors. So 
while I got one shot off when it would had been neat to get the shot of them 
lined up on that trunk? Wasn't meant to be. 


 The one parent was out there on the bean pot when I took the dogs off with me 
. No doubt they decided" Hey the human and animals just drove off. Get those 
kids out here so we can leave!" Ha. Teresa in Hector. 



-- 
A good character is the best 
  tombstone.Those who loved you will 
  remember. Carve your name on hearts, not on marble.
Subject: Re: Birding with sound
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 11:18:07 -0500
And even when he was there…birds are so attuned to the seasons…

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jeffrey Short 

Sent: Friday, July 03, 2015 9:39 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Birding with sound

 

Very nice!

 

I recall that Roger Tory Peterson had once said something to the effect, that 
he could be blindfolded and put out anywhere on earth and could determine where 
he was (geographically) by listening to the birds. 


 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Philip Vogrinc 

Sent: Friday, July 03, 2015 6:13 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  
Subject: Birding with sound

 

Fantastic short video about a blind birder here 
 


 

 

 




 

-- 

Phil Vogrinc MS Student

Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Ferr 218  (479) 575 4979

 
Subject: Re: Birding with sound
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 09:38:34 -0500
Very nice!

 

I recall that Roger Tory Peterson had once said something to the effect, that 
he could be blindfolded and put out anywhere on earth and could determine where 
he was (geographically) by listening to the birds. 


 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Philip Vogrinc 

Sent: Friday, July 03, 2015 6:13 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Birding with sound

 

Fantastic short video about a blind birder here 
 


 

 

 




 

-- 

Phil Vogrinc MS Student

Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Ferr 218  (479) 575 4979

 
Subject: Birding with sound
From: Philip Vogrinc <pnvogrin AT EMAIL.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 19:12:53 +0800
Fantastic short video about a blind birder here






-- 
*Phil Vogrinc *MS Student
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Ferr 218  (479) 575 4979
Subject: SWAINSON'S HAWK and maybe B.j. calurus? -- Maysville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 13:23:10 +0000
Yesterday (July 1, 2015) an adult SWAINSON'S HAWK flew over me a few miles 
north of Maysville, on the upper section of Wet Prairie Road. This is not big 
news, since we have records of Swainson's in summer back into the 1960s. This 
bird was an adult. It appears their summer range in northwest Arkansas is 
steadily shrinking, so I am always glad to find one. 



When I was at Maysville on June 27, I saw a hawk perched along a fenceline just 
off highway 43 a mile north of the Maysville Handistop. This bird caught my 
attention because of its distinctly reddish appearance. I managed to get off 
the road and 3 photos before it flew. It may be an adult Western Red-tailed 
Hawk (B.j. calurus). It has the dark throat, tawny brown head and apparently 
dark eye. Underparts vary from creamy with streaking to reddish/tawny. Could be 
some kind of intergrade though, of course, that almost defines red-tail 
hawkness. 



We see a dizzying variety of Red-tailed Hawks, including many from the west, in 
winter at Maysville, but I can't remember ever seeing one like this in summer. 
Anyone who'd like to take a crack at the ID, just ask and I'll send you the 3 
photographs. I could use the help. It would be nice to sort this one out. 



In terms of this tawny brown buteo, I know that I'm running way, way ahead of 
the facts here, but when Mike Mlodinow and I were talking about how climate 
change is impacting bird distribution in northwest Arkansas, we touched briefly 
on the possibility that accelerated warming could be having impacts on 
east-west distributions, too, and not just the obvious ones involving 
north-south. 
Subject: Fwd: Earth 'entering new extinction phase' - US study - BBC News
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 09:12:17 -0500
I forgot to post this link to the listserv a couple of weeks ago when I
first saw it. Bad news.
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Jonathan C. Perry" 
Date: Jul 1, 2015 9:09 AM
Subject: Earth 'entering new extinction phase' - US study - BBC News
To: "jonathanperry24 AT gmail.com" 
Cc:

 http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-33209548



 Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone
Subject: Re: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what?
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 08:29:22 -0500
More species world wide are being extincted than being discovered.
Thanks for your excellent message, Joe!
Believe it or not, there are quite a few people on Twitter (how funny) that
are really into bird info, bird photograpy and just birds for their own
sake. Many photos are beautiful and of birds I will probaby never see for
the rest of my life.
    On Facebook?  Not so much.
Facebook is a poor "place" to be in my humble nature boy opinion.
       There are a huge amount of young people on Twitter. You might
actually be able to reach out to some of them where birds and wildlife are
concerned.

                             Bill Thurman
On Jul 1, 2015 8:12 AM, "Jeffrey Short"  wrote:

> Maybe implicitly included already but  I might add an (18):  Share your
> knowledge, insights and experience;  mentor future generations on the
> interconnections of the natural world.
>
>
>
> Jeff Short
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Joseph C. Neal
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 30, 2015 12:19 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what?
>
>
>
> 1. Extinction is a teacher. Let’s use the experience.
>
> 2. Support the Endangered Species Act and additions as scientifically
> warranted.
>
> 3. Join and support a conservation group. Civic activism is democracy’s
> workshop.
>
> 4. Bring Back the Natives. Native flowers and native insect pollinators
> are foundational.
>
> 5. Take a look at your inner Conquistador. Consider the idea that we are
> part of nature.
>
> 6. Support environmental education for the young, like summer camps.
>
> 7. Find your place. Birding is sport, science, society, meditation, art,
> politics.
>
> 8. Do we consider ourselves Too Big To Fail? Consider the Passenger
> Pigeon’s billions.
>
> 9. Can the planet afford our lifestyle? If not, what alternative models do
> we have?
>
> 10. Include thoughts on social media about how we limit human-caused
> extinctions.
>
> 11. Birds reflect our planet’s long evolutionary history. Consider this
> mirror.
>
> 12. Send a kid to nature camp, especially those underprivileged who can’t
> otherwise go.
>
> 13. Photograph birds and nature, and share these freely with schools and
> mass media.
>
> 14. Expand skills and vision by attending a bird or ecology camp for
> adults.
>
> 15. Volunteer to be an officer or committee chair in your local Audubon or
> other conservation group.
>
> 16. “Raise less corn and more hell.” There’s little but despair on the
> metaphorical couch.
>
> 17. Think globally about issues, act locally to accomplish them.
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what?
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 08:11:37 -0500
Maybe implicitly included already but  I might add an (18):  Share your
knowledge, insights and experience;  mentor future generations on the
interconnections of the natural world. 

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 12:19 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what?

 

1. Extinction is a teacher. Let's use the experience.

2. Support the Endangered Species Act and additions as scientifically
warranted.

3. Join and support a conservation group. Civic activism is democracy's
workshop.

4. Bring Back the Natives. Native flowers and native insect pollinators are
foundational.

5. Take a look at your inner Conquistador. Consider the idea that we are
part of nature. 

6. Support environmental education for the young, like summer camps.

7. Find your place. Birding is sport, science, society, meditation, art,
politics.  

8. Do we consider ourselves Too Big To Fail? Consider the Passenger Pigeon's
billions.  

9. Can the planet afford our lifestyle? If not, what alternative models do
we have?

10. Include thoughts on social media about how we limit human-caused
extinctions.

11. Birds reflect our planet's long evolutionary history. Consider this
mirror.

12. Send a kid to nature camp, especially those underprivileged who can't
otherwise go. 

13. Photograph birds and nature, and share these freely with schools and
mass media.

14. Expand skills and vision by attending a bird or ecology camp for adults.

15. Volunteer to be an officer or committee chair in your local Audubon or
other conservation group. 

16. "Raise less corn and more hell." There's little but despair on the
metaphorical couch. 

17. Think globally about issues, act locally to accomplish them.

 
Subject: Re: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what?
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 23:49:10 +0000
Amen!  Let's spread this word!  Many thanks Joe.

      From: Joseph C. Neal 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 12:19 PM
 Subject: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what?
   
 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Bird Calls Going Wild
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:36:09 -0500
Have you ever been in a group of people with the same cellphone ringtones going 
of at the same time and maybe not knowing whether it is your phone or not? I 
have had this experience and thought that a way to make nature more a part of 
our daily lives would be to change the phone ringtone and increase awareness of 
our natural world. There are many sites that have free ringtones and Kentucky 
is one state with ringtones gone wild. You could have a free ringtone of the 
Bobwhite, Wood thrush, American Robin or other birds, elk, or even frogs. Why 
not consider getting a little nature into our electronic world with a ringtone 
that reminds people that there are other species out there that we need to 
think about? Most likely your ringing cellphone will not sound like all the 
others. Why not get out of the box and start a new national trend of “Ringing 
In The Birds”? 

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

http://fw.ky.gov/Kentucky-Afield/Pages/Ringtones-Gone-Wild.aspx
Subject: Passenger Pigeons are gone, but we are here ... Now what?
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:19:28 +0000
1. Extinction is a teacher. Let's use the experience.
2. Support the Endangered Species Act and additions as scientifically 
warranted. 

3. Join and support a conservation group. Civic activism is democracy's 
workshop. 

4. Bring Back the Natives. Native flowers and native insect pollinators are 
foundational. 

5. Take a look at your inner Conquistador. Consider the idea that we are part 
of nature. 

6. Support environmental education for the young, like summer camps.
7. Find your place. Birding is sport, science, society, meditation, art, 
politics. 

8. Do we consider ourselves Too Big To Fail? Consider the Passenger Pigeon's 
billions. 

9. Can the planet afford our lifestyle? If not, what alternative models do we 
have? 

10. Include thoughts on social media about how we limit human-caused 
extinctions. 

11. Birds reflect our planet's long evolutionary history. Consider this mirror.
12. Send a kid to nature camp, especially those underprivileged who can't 
otherwise go. 

13. Photograph birds and nature, and share these freely with schools and mass 
media. 

14. Expand skills and vision by attending a bird or ecology camp for adults.
15. Volunteer to be an officer or committee chair in your local Audubon or 
other conservation group. 

16. "Raise less corn and more hell." There's little but despair on the 
metaphorical couch. 

17. Think globally about issues, act locally to accomplish them.
Subject: Spider-tailed viper from Iran
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 08:56:21 -0500
Watch the video to see the behavioral attraction of this unique adaptation.

Jeff Short

 

 

 

This terrifying snake has a tail that looks like a spider 
 



 


 

  image

 

 

 

 

 


  This terrifying snake 
has a tail that looks like a spide... 


Meet the animal that combines two of our primal terrors.

	


  View on www.vox.com

Preview by Yahoo

	


 

								

 
Subject: Re: Bobwhite question
From: Richard Baxter <dickbaxter100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 08:36:38 -0500
Absolutely.
On Jun 30, 2015 8:23 AM, "Judy & Don" <9waterfall9 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> The Bobwhite is calling again loudly and repeatedly this morning from the
> meadow and vicinity east of the house. James and Neal indicate the call is
> most frequently heard in June. According to Cornell this is the typical
> territorial call of the male and I was fascinated to listen to the
> recordings of the other sounds these quail make.
>
> Does anyone know if Bobwhite wander (walk or fly?) through patches of
> woods between fields? Although I have not heard "countersinging" from other
> males, I have heard this typical call coming from different areas a few
> minutes apart.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Bobwhite question
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 08:23:18 -0500
The Bobwhite is calling again loudly and repeatedly this morning from the 
meadow and vicinity east of the house. James and Neal indicate the call is most 
frequently heard in June. According to Cornell this is the typical territorial 
call of the male and I was fascinated to listen to the recordings of the other 
sounds these quail make. 


Does anyone know if Bobwhite wander (walk or fly?) through patches of woods 
between fields? Although I have not heard "countersinging" from other males, I 
have heard this typical call coming from different areas a few minutes apart. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Bobwhite in meadow out front!
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 15:06:59 -0500
Just now I heard the Bobwhite out in the meadow that runs along both sides of 
the drive. This area connects to the bluff glade and has been part of the 
restoration process of burning and removing fescue and lespedeza cunea in order 
to improve the habitat for wildlife like this quail! Don heard it about three 
weeks ago and I am so excited I heard it even closer to the house! 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Adult Nature Workshops the weekend of Sept. 19-20 at Ferncliff Camp, Ferndale, Arkansas
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 15:04:33 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

The Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) is once again offering adult natural history 
workshops this fall. We are repeating one workshop, "Landscaping with Native 
Plants for Birds and other Wildlife" by instructor Pam Stewart. We are also 
offering two new workshops this year, "Aquatic Biology" and "Reptiles and 
Amphibians in Arkansas". The Aquatics workshop instructor will be Robin Buff, 
recently retired A.P science teacher at Fayetteville High School and current 
director of the AAS youth ecology camps. The Reptiles and Amphibians workshop 
instructor will be Kory Roberts who is a teacher, longtime herps instructor at 
the Halberg Ecology Camp and webmaster of the Herps of Arkansas website 
(herpsofarkansas.com). 


These weekend workshops were first offered in fall 2003 in response to requests 
by adults that AAS offer a natural science learning experience like we do for 
11- and 12-year-old youth at the Halberg Ecology Camp. 


Let me know (bhaas AT sbcglobal.net) if you would like me to send you the workshop 
flyer and registration form that includes much more detailed information. 


Sincerely,
Barry Haas
Adult Workshop Treasurer
Subject: Woodcocks in the garden
From: Holly Childs <hollychilds AT ME.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 02:34:40 -0500
On the family mountain between Leslie and Mountain View, out from Oxley in 
Stone county, there is a garden enclosed with a six foot board fence. I am told 
that multiple woodcocks hop around in there catching lunch. 


Holly Childs
1126 Reed Valley Rd.
Fayetteville AR 72704-5976

479-571-1727


Subject: FW: national pollinator strategy
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 15:31:04 -0500
Something here for everyone.  See pg 36 for best management practices for
putting apiaries on BLM and USFS lands. 

http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/BMPs/
[] 
Jeff Short
Subject: Re: Fwd: Looking for info on a location in Eastern AR
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 19:09:54 -0500
Jeff’s photos are still on PBase. He talks a lot about Ensley Bottoms, one 
area he calls ‘the pits’, but so far I don’t see any reference to ‘clay 
pits’. One could possibly link one of his documented sightings to a photo on 
his PBase pages. Here is a page that talks about ‘the pits’. 
http://www.pbase.com/ol_coot/phalaropes 


The Ensley Bottoms Complex 
http://www.tnbirds.org/IBA/SitePages/EnsleyBottoms.htm

Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Richard Baxter 
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2015 3:09 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Fwd: Looking for info on a location in Eastern AR

All,

If anyone knows the location that Jeff Wilson referred to as the clay pits, 
please contact Mark Greene directly. See below. 


Thanks,

Dick Baxter

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mark Greene 
Date: Wed, Jun 24, 2015 at 8:54 AM
Subject: Re: Looking for info on a location in Eastern AR
To: Richard Baxter 



Dick,


Would you mind forwarding this message to the AR Birds listserv, please? 
Thanks! 



Hello,

I am still in the process of entering the late Jeff R. Wilson's bird records 
into eBird. I'm up to mid 2005 so I'm making great progress but I've still got 
a ways to go as much as the "Ol' Coot" birded! :o) 


He keeps making reference a location in eastern AR called the "Clay Pits" just 
across the river from Memphis where he had shorebird and waterfowl sightings 
from time to time. Do y'all have any idea where the specific location of this 
area is? I never went there with Jeff and I've asked a few others and they 
weren't familiar with the location either. Any help is appreciated. 


Thanks!

Mark Greene
Trenton, TN
greenesnake AT yahoo.com



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     


Subject: Re: Great Crested flycatcher questions
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 20:42:09 +0000
From Cornell's Birds of North America online series:
"Infrequently parasitized by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), 
possibly because of Great Crested Flycatcher’s aggressive behavior and habit 
of nesting in cavities; parasitism records exist for Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Maryland, Illinois, New York, and Ontario (Friedmann 1963, Friedmann et al. 
1977). In Ontario, only 6 of 218 (2.8%) nests had cowbird eggs (Peck and James 
1987).Bent (1942) cites a case of 1 nest containing 6 Great Crested eggs (being 
incubated) and one fresh European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) egg; illustrates 
keen competition for nest sites, but probably not of significance as record of 
brood parasitism."also"Agonistic BehaviorNo detailed study. In territorial 
encounters, often raises crown-feathers to appear crested, frequently leans 
forward on its perch, nodding or pumping its head in an almost lizard-like 
manner (Ridgely and Tudor 1994), and snaps its bill loudly. Intolerant and 
aggressive toward other birds and small mammals that approach nest cavity and 
to other individuals of its species that enter the territory. Mated birds 
defending territories will engage in short chases. “Countersinging” by 
neighboring males is particularly common when territorial boundaries are 
disputed (Smith and Smith 1996a)." 

The following may be of interest:"Effectiveness Of ManagementMeasuresWill 
accept nest boxes of appropriate size. Smaller nest boxes (15 x 15 x 20 cm, 
with a 5-cm-diameter entrance) were preferred over larger boxes (25 x 25 x 50 
cm, with a 7.5-cm-diameter entrance; Caine and Marion 1991). Experiments with 
nest boxes (14 x 14 cm floor dimensions, with 5.1-cm-diameter entrance) located 
1.8 m and 4.8 m above ground showed no preference for height (Miller 2002, 
2010). May use nest boxes hung in open woodlands from flexible wire or chain, 
perhaps preferring them to nest boxes mounted on trees or poles (Morrison 
1988)." 



Miller, Karl E. and Wesley E. Lanyon. 2014. Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus 
crinitus), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell 
Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: 
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/300 

  
Karen Rowe     From: Elizabeth Shores 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2015 5:44 PM
 Subject: Re: Great Crested flycatcher questions
   
GCFCs once successfully nested in a flicker box in our yard. That is all I 
know. I love hearing them. They sound like drunken frogs. 


Sent from my iPhone


On Jun 23, 2015, at 5:21 PM, Alan  wrote:



#yiv8163888097 #yiv8163888097 -- _filtered #yiv8163888097 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 
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1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv8163888097 div.yiv8163888097WordSection1 {}#yiv8163888097 I 
have a Pair of GCFC’s  nesting in a nestbox  in my yard for the first time. 
It is so fun. Mom is sitting on four eggs at the  moment. My question is about 
GCFC’s and house sparrows. I had a house sparrow sitting on the box today and 
a battle royal for a while. After all I have seen them do to my bluebirds I was 
wondering who would win between the flycatcher and sparrow.  I tried to 
discourage the sparrow several times  but remain worried as to the outcome. 
Does anybody out there have any practical experience with these species? Are 
GCFC’s usually able to protect their nest from house sparrows or not?My next 
question is about cowbirds? Do they lay eggs in GCFC’s nests.? I think I saw 
one sneaking about and wonder if she parasitized the nest. The fly catcher has 
been sitting for several days so maybe they are safe as far as time frames go 
from what I read on the internet. Anyone know about this? Thanks for the 
help.Alan GregoryHarrison 



| | This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. 

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Subject: Fwd: Looking for info on a location in Eastern AR
From: Richard Baxter <dickbaxter100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:09:12 -0500
All,

If anyone knows the location that Jeff Wilson referred to as the clay pits,
please contact Mark Greene directly. See below.

Thanks,

Dick Baxter
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mark Greene 
Date: Wed, Jun 24, 2015 at 8:54 AM
Subject: Re: Looking for info on a location in Eastern AR
To: Richard Baxter 


Dick,

Would you mind forwarding this message to the AR Birds listserv, please?
Thanks!

Hello,

I am still in the process of entering the late Jeff R. Wilson's bird
records into eBird. I'm up to mid 2005 so I'm making great progress but
I've still got a ways to go as much as the "Ol' Coot" birded! :o)

He keeps making reference a location in eastern AR called the "Clay Pits"
just across the river from Memphis where he had shorebird and waterfowl
sightings from time to time. Do y'all have any idea where the specific
location of this area is? I never went there with Jeff and I've asked a few
others and they weren't familiar with the location either. Any help is
appreciated.

Thanks!

Mark Greene
Trenton, TN
greenesnake AT yahoo.com

  ------------------------------
Subject: Where have the herons and egrets gone?
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 13:52:26 +0000
I’ve seen only Great Blue Heron this season on Gulf Mtn. WMA, and that over a 
month ago. Last year most of the small ponds with shoreline habitat dried up so 
maybe the loss of aquatic life in these is the culprit. The one very large pond 
that was not affected produced good waterfowl counts in winter but is a bust 
for shore birds now; too young, I think, to have many marsh plants or good 
cover. 



Bobwhite are pretty consistent, as are wild turkeys, the former densest in the 
old tornado blow-down, some of which has been plowed and replanted as field 
grasses. Yesterday as I entered the Hwy. 389 “South Road” I saw a pair of 
Painted Buntings on the gravel, the male fluttering his wings almost like a 
hummingbird and spinning a slow circle. All this energetic display and the 
female seemed unimpressed. She finally flew to a nearby shrub thicket and I 
drove on. 



I heard the first Blue-Winged Warbler on my property coming back in from the 
WMA, and what I think is the first Yellow-throated Warbler.--Dianemarie 
Subject: Tricolored Heron
From: Richard Baxter <dickbaxter100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 08:45:43 -0500
Had an adult Tricolored Heron fly over me on my way into work this morning
(on Hwy 67 near McCain). He/ she was flying west.

In the past few years, I have had Yellow-crown, Black-crown, Barn Owl and
now, Tricolored Heron fly over while driving in within a .25 mile stretch
just north of McCain.

-Dick Baxter
Subject: Red Slough bird survey - June 23
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 21:33:03 -0500
Billy Heldt (TX), Rodney Huffman (TX), Mike Dillon(TX) and I surveyed birds
today at Red Slough and found 66 species.  It was mostly clear and very hot.
Before the others joined me I found a singing Eastern Towhee at yet another
location.  This makes four locations currently with calling towhees at Red
Slough.  Here is our list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Wood Duck - 8

Ring-necked Duck - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 

Anhinga - 13 (also lots of near fledgling young sitting in rookery.)

Least Bittern - 1 (sitting on nest.)

Great Blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 56

Snowy Egret - 5

Little-blue Heron - 31

Cattle Egret - 16

Green Heron - 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 5

White Ibis - ~500

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 11

Mississippi Kite - 6

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 8 (1 sitting on nest; 1 feeding a crayfish to small
chicks.)

Common Gallinule - 12

American Coot - 4

Mourning Dove - 44

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 16

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 24

Barn Swallow - 22

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 7

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Kentucky Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 9

Yellow-breasted Chat - 5

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 17

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 20

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 17

Red-winged Blackbird - 23

Common Grackle - 14

Brown-headed Cowbird - 7

Orchard Oriole - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Skimming Bluet

Orange/Vesper Bluet

Blue-fronted Dancer

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald 

Halloween Pennant

Stillwater Clubtail

Jade Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Golden-winged Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

Southern Copperhead

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Singing Towhee
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 20:28:00 -0500
I got to hear an eastern towhee singing in the thick second growth tree
area in back of my apartments which has an edge area, field meets forest,
really a lovely place in its own way. The thick trees and other people's
pastures extend far beyond.
        I also saw a tiny hummingbird fly from the thick growth of sumac,
honeysuckle, black-eyed susans, tall weeds, cedar and the rest of the thick
growth to about 30 yards away to another densely grown area.
       About a minute apart there were flyovers by great blue heron and
green heron.
        The singing towhee was like hearing the voice of an old friend.
Robins were caroling sweetly even though the humidity factor felt like
99.99 percent. All of this . . . and just a few days before I leave here.

                              Bill Thurman
                              Shiloh Creek
                              Pope County
Subject: Re: Great Crested flycatcher questions
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:44:51 -0500
GCFCs once successfully nested in a flicker box in our yard. That is all I 
know. I love hearing them. They sound like drunken frogs. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 23, 2015, at 5:21 PM, Alan  wrote:
> 
> I have a Pair of GCFC’s nesting in a nestbox in my yard for the first time. 
It is so fun. Mom is sitting on four eggs at the moment. My question is about 
GCFC’s and house sparrows. I had a house sparrow sitting on the box today and 
a battle royal for a while. After all I have seen them do to my bluebirds I was 
wondering who would win between the flycatcher and sparrow. I tried to 
discourage the sparrow several times but remain worried as to the outcome. Does 
anybody out there have any practical experience with these species? Are 
GCFC’s usually able to protect their nest from house sparrows or not? 

> My next question is about cowbirds? Do they lay eggs in GCFC’s nests.? I 
think I saw one sneaking about and wonder if she parasitized the nest. The fly 
catcher has been sitting for several days so maybe they are safe as far as time 
frames go from what I read on the internet. Anyone know about this? Thanks for 
the help. 

> Alan Gregory
> Harrison
> 
> 
>   			 			
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. 
> www.avast.com
> 
> 
Subject: Great Crested flycatcher questions
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:21:23 -0500
I have a Pair of GCFC's  nesting in a nestbox  in my yard for the first
time. It is so fun. Mom is sitting on four eggs at the  moment. My question
is about GCFC's and house sparrows. I had a house sparrow sitting on the box
today and a battle royal for a while. After all I have seen them do to my
bluebirds I was wondering who would win between the flycatcher and sparrow.
I tried to discourage the sparrow several times  but remain worried as to
the outcome. Does anybody out there have any practical experience with these
species? Are GCFC's usually able to protect their nest from house sparrows
or not?

My next question is about cowbirds? Do they lay eggs in GCFC's nests.? I
think I saw one sneaking about and wonder if she parasitized the nest. The
fly catcher has been sitting for several days so maybe they are safe as far
as time frames go from what I read on the internet. Anyone know about this?
Thanks for the help.

Alan Gregory

Harrison



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Subject: Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 13:30:03 -0500
Jerry,

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are moving into the state more and more every
year.  They are cavity nesters.

Allan Mueller​

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 7:00 PM, Jerry Butler 
wrote:

> In Lonoke County, I spotted a pair of black-bellied whistling ducks on Hi
> Way 15 south of Bevis Road as I was on my way to work about 7:30 AM.  When
> I passed the location on the way home at 5:30 PM they were still there.
> Could they be nesting on the premises? Do they nest in cavities? or on the
> ground?   They were on the east side of the road in a low spot of a corn
> field.  I gather that it was too wet to plant there earlier in the year.  I
> had seen snipe and greater white-fronted geese in that area at times past
> so I always check that spot out for the unusual.  There is a house at 3608
> Hi Way 15 and the ducks were mid way between that house and Bevis Road.
>
> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>



-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: ASCA July Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 16:48:26 +0000
Saturday, July 11th is ASCA's upcoming field trip.  See details below.  The 
trip will take most of the day.  It is a little over a two-hour drive from 
Little Rock.  Bois D'Arc WMA in Hempstead County is a great place to pick up 
several species normally seen only in the southern part of the state.  Anyone 
is welcome to join us.  Please feel free to email me off-list if you need 
additional information.  Be advised, there are no bathrooms at the WMA.  Our 
website is www.ascabird.org if you would like more information about our 
Audubon Chapter. 

Karen HollidayField Trip CoordinatorAudubon Society of Central Arkansas
Little Rock, AR
 July 11, 2015
Dr. Lester Sitzes III Bois D’ArcWMAHope, ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. at the southend 
of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430 intersection at ShacklefordRoad 
in Little Rock.  We will stop at theMcDonald's in Hope (Exit 30 off I-30) 
around 9:00 a.m. for those in southArkansas who would like to join us.  
Great-tailed Grackles hang out at this McDonald's.  Or,meet us at Bois D’Arc 
WMA around 9:30 a.m. Our target birds will be Purple and Common Gallinules and 
their young,Least Bittern, Anhingas, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, herons, 
egrets, andpossibly an alligator or two!  Verylittle walking will be 
involved.  Bringscopes, plenty of water, snacks, and lunch. Or, there are 
several restaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town. Bois D‘Arc 
WMA is located 10miles south of Hope.  Take Exit 30 offI-30 and turn east.  
Go past McDonald’s,then under the railroad overpass.  At thelight at the big 
intersection, turn right onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of a mile.  At the brown sign, 
turn left onto Hwy.174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles to thestop sign at Spring 
Hill.  Turn rightonto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4 miles.  Turn right at the 
white wooden WMA sign justbefore the highway ends in the lake. Follow the 
paved road and take the first gravel road to the left down tothe lake.  GPS 
coordinates:  33.558062, -93.694239  
Subject: Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds??
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 06:02:44 -0500
Pam and anyone else interested:

 

Red Slough is a walk in use area.  Currently the hottest spots for birds is
in our large reservoirs area (Pintail and Lotus Lakes) which requires a walk
of about a mile to get in to where it is really good birding.  You can reach
these areas by walking west from the north and middle parking areas.  There
are several observation platforms that are fairly close to the road though
that will allow you to see neat birds such as White Ibis.  If you come down
during the week I would be happy to show you around and you can drive in
behind the gates with me so you don't have to walk.  Just contact me to
schedule a tour.  The tours are free of course.  This offer extends to all.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

Date:    Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:42:37 -0500

From:    Pam Clark <0000007e1d641ae0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>

Subject: Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds??

 

David.(or anyone else) could you provide some information about a first time
visit to Red Slough.  We have read some information online but the
information isn't clear as to how far you need to walk to the platforms?
What areas are best for viewing birds?  This time of year I am assuming
snakes could be an issue..  We have a special needs daughter who might be
with us.. while Lily is very mobile...we like to have as much info as we can
so we can better decide if she would be able to make the trip..your reports
have teased us many times! Any info regarding the difficulty of the trail(s)
or distance from parking to the platforms would be appreciated.  If you
would prefer to email me directly that is fine.. Thank you in advance for
your help. 

 
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 19:00:50 -0500
In Lonoke County, I spotted a pair of black-bellied whistling ducks on Hi
Way 15 south of Bevis Road as I was on my way to work about 7:30 AM.  When
I passed the location on the way home at 5:30 PM they were still there.
Could they be nesting on the premises? Do they nest in cavities? or on the
ground?   They were on the east side of the road in a low spot of a corn
field.  I gather that it was too wet to plant there earlier in the year.  I
had seen snipe and greater white-fronted geese in that area at times past
so I always check that spot out for the unusual.  There is a house at 3608
Hi Way 15 and the ducks were mid way between that house and Bevis Road.

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds??
From: Pam Clark <0000007e1d641ae0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:42:37 -0500
David.(or anyone else) could you provide some information about a first time 
visit to Red Slough. We have read some information online but the information 
isn't clear as to how far you need to walk to the platforms? What areas are 
best for viewing birds? This time of year I am assuming snakes could be an 
issue.. We have a special needs daughter who might be with us.. while Lily is 
very mobile...we like to have as much info as we can so we can better decide if 
she would be able to make the trip..your reports have teased us many times! Any 
info regarding the difficulty of the trail(s) or distance from parking to the 
platforms would be appreciated. If you would prefer to email me directly that 
is fine.. Thank you in advance for your help. 

Subject: NWAAS FIELD TRIP TO CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA Saturday JULY 11, 2015
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:57:23 +0000
Join members and friends of Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society on Saturday July 
11, 2015, for a field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area near Siloam Springs. 
Meet at the entrance to Chesney at 9 AM (you can arrive earlier or later, too; 
not hard to see the group in open grasslands). Free and open to the public. I 
would like to make a special invitation to other conservation groups for this 
field trip, especially, since it is not specifically a birding trip. 


This is an opportunity to see native prairie, including birds, bumblebees, 
flower beetles, thread-waisted wasps. Chesney will feature a good showing of 
native flowers, especially several sunflower species and dramatic purple gay 
feathers (Liatris species) and attending butterflies. Good opportunity for 
photography, for novice and pro alike. Many open country birds like 
Dickcissels, American Goldfinches, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Loggerhead 
Shrikes, Bell's Vireo, Blue Grosbeak, and others are often seen here or nearby. 
The trip will consist of an easy loop walk of about 1.1 miles on mowed trails. 
A longer trail is available; you can walk as much or as little as you wish and 
of course you don't need to stick with the group unless you want to. Water, 
sunscreen, and hat are recommended. You do not have to be a member of the NWAAS 
to participate. All ages and skill levels are welcome. 


For directions to Chesney, go to the NWAAS web site at 
http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/index.html and follow the link on the left: Places 
to bird in northwest Arkansas and follow that to Chesney. Joe Woolbright and 
his staff at Ozark Ecological Restorations Inc mow paths at Chesney to make it 
easier to get around. Chiggers, ticks, and other irritations are not much of a 
problem along the paths. 

Subject: Yard Birds
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 11:31:20 +0000
The latest Red-bellied Woodpecker fledgling out my window has (for now) an 
all-white head. Last week Dad was gathering peanut chips and suet chunks, then 
feeding “her” in the birch tree. I assume Mom is on her third nest as she 
calls but rarely feeds with them; the first fledgling showed up at the feeders 
only one day and was gone. So our new youngster seems to be thinking like a 
teenager this morning--”Sorry Dad, but I can do it myself now!”--Dianemarie 
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Jamie Gwin <aarongwin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 01:44:23 +0000
I am feeding and watering doves in my backyard.  Last year I would have 8 E. 
C. Doves for each Mourning Dove.  This year it is about 7 to 1 ratio. Talked 
to a friend this morning at church and he said out in  the country it is just 
the opposite ratio.  He said E. C. Doves are town birds. 

Guess I am slow because I have never though to compare the ratio of them 
between town and country. 

When I was a lister I never listed one at Wapanocca but never though about town 
and country doves.  I have one that has a white head, white tail, and white 
places on his body but it is not a white dove.  Been a while since I saw one 
of those  over here next to the big river.  I did get photos of the white 
dove but none of my friends were impressed by the white dove. 

  
THO   "The Old Man" 
Aaron Gwin 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Terry Butler"  
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Friday, June 19, 2015 4:32:59 PM 
Subject: White-winged Dove 



Haven’t seen the dove for more than two weeks.  Decided he was gone for 
good, then today guess who came by!  White-winged Dove.  Where have you been 
staying. 


  

Terry Butler 

Pangburn, AR 
Subject: probable effects of climate change on Willow Flycatchers in Arkansas
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 13:28:08 +0000
Those of you interested in the nesting season Willow Flycatcher situation in 
Arkansas may want to take a quick look at this: 



http://climate.audubon.org/birds/wilfly/willow-flycatcher


When Doug James and I were working on Arkansas Birds in the 1980s, it was hard 
to grasp why efforts to protect particular parcels, especially the once 
productive Willow Flycatcher nesting habitat in what became Konecny Grove 
Natural Area at Slovak in Prairie County, didn't work out as intended. Brooke 
Meanley had documented 17 pairs in 18 acres in the early 1950s, but this number 
had fallen by half by the late 1960s and by 1983, none. (An interesting note by 
Meanley is in Wilson Bulletin Vol 64: 111-112). Impacts of changing climate on 
bird distribution was not on my radar in the 1980s. 



My point in resurrecting this history is to note that in Arkansas there has 
been a lot habitat change over the almost 200 years since Audubon collected his 
type specimen (April 17, 1822, at what is now called Arkansas Post), but it may 
well be that in addition to human-caused landscape change and habitat loss, a 
factor in Arkansas losing almost all of its nesting Willow Flycatchers is of 
more recent origin and involves changing climate, pushing the flycatcher's 
effective nesting range well to the north. 



If, as seems likely, climate change is important here, we absolutely should NOT 
just throw up our hands and act as though protecting habitat is not worthwhile. 
If anything, we must be MORE pro-active in protecting habitat, since we must 
also now deal with climate change, and not just because the Pope told us. But 
many thanks to the Pope, for making clear moral dimensions involved in climate 
change, especially how impacts are borne unfairly by the poor, and in this 
case, Willow Flycatchers nesting in Arkansas. 

Subject: Willow Flycatchers
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 01:08:21 +0000
I wasn’t aware how uncommon they’re becoming. I spotted one this very 
morning on my way down the big hill on Gulf Mtn. WMA and it actually sat still 
long enough to give me a very good look. I could hear the “thwiiiick” sound 
that precedes the 3-beers; also recorded this species once last week, though 
usually only once or twice a year. 
Subject: Willow Flycatchers at Baker Prairie Natural Area
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 01:02:38 +0000
WILLOW FLYCATCHERS are fairly common migrants through Arkansas, but as for 
nesting birds, Baker Prairie Natural Area in Harrison is now the last known 
location. This is a far cry from 1822, when John James Audubon found the bird 
in southeastern Arkansas Territory. He provided the first scientific 
description of the bird he named Traill's Flycatcher. 


I was at Baker Prairie today, along with a Northwest Arkansas Master 
Naturalists group lead by Joan Reynolds. We had two of these flycatchers in the 
wet thicket adjacent a water retention pond on the school side of the Natural 
Area. The same wet thicket also had Bell's Vireo, Blue Grosbeak, and 
Dickcissels. 


There were Painted Buntings along the tall fencerow adjacent Goblin Stadium and 
another in the Martha Milburn tract. We also had more Dickcissels, Common 
Yellowthroat, Yellow-breasted Chat, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, American 
Goldfinches, and calling Northern Bobwhites. 


Sad to say, we have witnessed a steady downward march of Willow Flycatchers 
nesting in the state since Audubon. Thirty years ago, they still nested in wet 
thickets near the Bentonville airport. That habitat disappeared under 
apartments and shopping, now just a memory for a few us who enjoyed birding 
there. 


It's not like near extirpation in Arkansas is the same as rangewide extinction. 
We can go north of Arkansas and still find Willow Flycatchers in wet thickets. 
That said, this loss illustrates sobering and instructive realities faced by 
many of our native birds: steady, bit by bit, loss of the natural heritage upon 
which we have built our history. 

Subject: Beaver Lake Plan Revision - learn more about this ugent matter
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 20:40:59 +0000
All bird lovers should be interested in the following:
On Sunday July 12, 2015 at noon, the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will 
have a meeting at Hobbs State Park in the Discovery Room.  Alan Bland, Park 
Ranger Beaver Lake Project Office, will give a talk about the Beaver Lake Plan 
Revision.  Free and open to the public. 

Please come and learn about how this plan will affect wildlife, including 
birds. 

Joanie

Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:34:46 -0500
I’ll go days without seeing the one in my neighborhood , then it shows up 
like it did this morning for a while. Of course I am not home all day during 
the week and lately it has been first thing in the morning when it is seen. 



Jacque


> On Jun 19, 2015, at 4:32 PM, Terry Butler  wrote:
> 
> Haven’t seen the dove for more than two weeks. Decided he was gone for 
good, then today guess who came by! White-winged Dove. Where have you been 
staying. 

>  
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
Subject: The recording
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:41:53 +0000
Sorry to post twice; also that ssomebody already ID’d it. I wasn’t aware my 
WiFi was down and hadn’t caught up on my email, nor was it sending so I 
resubmitted before seeing the problem. 




I think I am up and running and to date now.
Subject: Carol T.--recording
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:24:36 +0000
Your bird is an Eastern Phoebe. Good birding to you!--Dianemarie
Subject: Carol T.--recording
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 14:20:29 +0000
Your bird is an Eastern Phoebe. Good birding to you!--Dianemarie
Subject: Brown Thrasher and other nesters
From: Lynn <lynn.nowell33 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 08:13:48 -0500
First time to have Brown Thrashers nesting near the house. They have been fun 
to watch. 

I had a half grown baby in my garage yesterday. The parents were close by going 
crazy. I shooed him out and right back he came! I Last saw him on the front 
porch being followed by an adult. 

This morning the adults are verbal, appear to be calling to him. 
Hope he makes it!

I've lost two nests, a bluebird house was robbed and 4 mocking bird babies/eggs 
disappeared on hatch day. 


The martins are have been fledging all month (although I still have a few yet 
to hatch) and the hawk pressure is increasing. But most will make it. I had 
terrible mites in the gourds with babies jumping too early and had to treat 
with Sevin dust last week. 


And the Canada geese babies are looking flight ready , but it's funny to see a 
large mass of them running across the lawn. Wish there were not so many, poop 
is every where! 


Hope everyone has a birdy good day!

Lynn
Northern Lonoke County
Subject: Dead raptor, NLR EMERALD PARK
From: Jodi Morris <mjodimorris AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 19:22:10 -0500
Dead hawk on emerald park trail just behind Fort root. No visible cause of
death, had to have died within short time of discovery. -
Subject: Re: I found no storm birds
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 18:47:51 -0500
Conway (faulkner county) pretty quiet as well. Checked Cadron flats (terns 
nesting in the fields there too), Beaverfork and lake conway dam area. Only 
expected summer birds. 

Michael ( conway)


> On Jun 19, 2015, at 5:09 PM, Kenny Nichols  wrote:
> 
> I've been checking Lake Dardanelle today and all I've seen, besides the usual 
White Pelicans, are 12 Black Terns and 2 CommonTerns. 

> 
> Kenny Nichols
> Cabot 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jun 19, 2015, at 1:33 PM, Jacque Brown  wrote:
>> 
>> I went to the Centerton Fish hatchery this morning and didn’t see anything 
unusual. A lot of Canada Guess, one Green Heron, Killdeer, Meadowlarks, two 
Loggerhead Shrikes, Various Blackbirds and Robins. No Gulls, Terns, etc that 
might come up with a large weather system. Bill was largely a rain event not a 
wind event. 

>> 
>> I also drove the roads around that part of Centerton and Vaughn. Lots of 
Scissor-tailed Flycatchers. The painted Bunting on Buckhorn Flats was up on a 
wire. On Daisy Rd was another Loggerhead Shrike working the grasses below from 
barb wire. I stayed right beside it for at least 1/4 mile, it didn’t seem to 
mind. I was trying to capture its travels along the fence. a sort of sideways 
hopping that reminded me of a Lemer running on the ground. I didn’t have a 
lot of luck with that,I got a few shots but it’s back was to me so you 
couldn’t really see it hunched over with it’s feet off the wire. I did see 
it attack a few unsuspecting insects,one beetle, one very tiny Praying mantis, 
and some sort of caterpillar, then it worked it’s way back up to the top wire 
before eating it’s catch. I heard frogs at the end of the road but I didn’t 
stick around to see what would happen when it got there. 

>> 
>> 
>> Jacque Brown
>> bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: crayfish is a tried and true behavior of birds
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:49:28 -0500
When I find owl pellets here, I nearly always take them apart to see what 
the owls have eaten.  Often I find crayfish claws.  A lot of my property is 
in a flood zone, so there is an abundance of crayfish here.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Re: I found no storm birds
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:09:10 -0500
I've been checking Lake Dardanelle today and all I've seen, besides the usual 
White Pelicans, are 12 Black Terns and 2 CommonTerns. 


Kenny Nichols
Cabot 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 19, 2015, at 1:33 PM, Jacque Brown  wrote:
> 
> I went to the Centerton Fish hatchery this morning and didn’t see anything 
unusual. A lot of Canada Guess, one Green Heron, Killdeer, Meadowlarks, two 
Loggerhead Shrikes, Various Blackbirds and Robins. No Gulls, Terns, etc that 
might come up with a large weather system. Bill was largely a rain event not a 
wind event. 

> 
> I also drove the roads around that part of Centerton and Vaughn. Lots of 
Scissor-tailed Flycatchers. The painted Bunting on Buckhorn Flats was up on a 
wire. On Daisy Rd was another Loggerhead Shrike working the grasses below from 
barb wire. I stayed right beside it for at least 1/4 mile, it didn’t seem to 
mind. I was trying to capture its travels along the fence. a sort of sideways 
hopping that reminded me of a Lemer running on the ground. I didn’t have a 
lot of luck with that,I got a few shots but it’s back was to me so you 
couldn’t really see it hunched over with it’s feet off the wire. I did see 
it attack a few unsuspecting insects,one beetle, one very tiny Praying mantis, 
and some sort of caterpillar, then it worked it’s way back up to the top wire 
before eating it’s catch. I heard frogs at the end of the road but I didn’t 
stick around to see what would happen when it got there. 

> 
> 
> Jacque Brown
> bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Re: I found no storm birds
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:06:13 -0500
I agree Jacque. It's a bummer it didn't have a ton of wind although we got the 
eastern side of the storm which is better than nothin. It's pretty quiet in SW 
AR. I think I had a little too much faith in Bill to throw somethin into Ar. 
Usual suspects thus far at Millwood Lake and Bois dArc..maybe tomorrow I'll get 
lucky. 


Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 19, 2015, at 13:33, Jacque Brown  wrote:
> 
> I went to the Centerton Fish hatchery this morning and didn’t see anything 
unusual. A lot of Canada Guess, one Green Heron, Killdeer, Meadowlarks, two 
Loggerhead Shrikes, Various Blackbirds and Robins. No Gulls, Terns, etc that 
might come up with a large weather system. Bill was largely a rain event not a 
wind event. 

> 
> I also drove the roads around that part of Centerton and Vaughn. Lots of 
Scissor-tailed Flycatchers. The painted Bunting on Buckhorn Flats was up on a 
wire. On Daisy Rd was another Loggerhead Shrike working the grasses below from 
barb wire. I stayed right beside it for at least 1/4 mile, it didn’t seem to 
mind. I was trying to capture its travels along the fence. a sort of sideways 
hopping that reminded me of a Lemer running on the ground. I didn’t have a 
lot of luck with that,I got a few shots but it’s back was to me so you 
couldn’t really see it hunched over with it’s feet off the wire. I did see 
it attack a few unsuspecting insects,one beetle, one very tiny Praying mantis, 
and some sort of caterpillar, then it worked it’s way back up to the top wire 
before eating it’s catch. I heard frogs at the end of the road but I didn’t 
stick around to see what would happen when it got there. 

> 
> 
> Jacque Brown
> bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Re: Hooded Mergansers at Centerton
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 16:53:44 -0500
Hi Joe

      I feel pretty disappointed in so much habitat loss for northwest
Arkansas although a few remaining places might be hanging on. It's like a
plague of locusts that drive SUVs have descended on the greater area just
chewing everything down.
        I hope that more college kids and future "planners" will listen to
you and the people like you who try to call attention to the land and the
"chain of life" that are all connected to that land. The Mergansers and the
crayfish are great examples of that connection.

                               Bill Thurman
On Jun 19, 2015 2:50 PM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:

>  There are Hooded Mergansers (2) at Craig State Fish Hatchery in
> Centerton. The plumage appears to me somewhere between juvenal and
> formative, with poorly developed white chin and just a hint of crest, but
> with distinctly white bellies. Neither bird looks like an adult female or
> adult male. So here’s some wild speculation: These could be birds that
> hatched last summer and just have not yet acquired definitive adult plumage
> (first alternate plumage). Maybe that’s why they are at Centerton, rather
> than further east or north, where most nesting occurs.
>
>
>  These current observations at Centerton are much like a dozen or so
> other records stretching back into the 1980s. These have included an
> instance or two of adults with young. So some nesting does occur in
> northwest Arkansas, but my assumption is that most of those we see at
> Centerton (and a few other places) are probably not breeding birds.
>
>
>  This morning's Hooded Mergansers were diving and bringing up crayfish.
> Foraging on crayfish is a tried and true behavior of birds we see at the
> hatchery, where crayfish are abundant and obviously attractive to all kinds
> of wildlife. I am reminded, again, of how important such places are to
> wildlife in general, and birds in particular, as so much aquatic habitat
> supporting crayfish is being rapidly lost to development in northwest
> Arkansas. The main business of the hatchery is providing fish for release
> in area lakes and streams, but hitching right along with that primary
> mission is the reality that many of our native birds require such habitats,
> and species like crayfish, for their survival.
>
>
>
Subject: White-winged Dove
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 16:32:59 -0500
Haven't seen the dove for more than two weeks.  Decided he was gone for
good, then today guess who came by!  White-winged Dove.  Where have you been
staying.

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Hooded Mergansers at Centerton
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 19:50:00 +0000
There are Hooded Mergansers (2) at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. The 
plumage appears to me somewhere between juvenal and formative, with poorly 
developed white chin and just a hint of crest, but with distinctly white 
bellies. Neither bird looks like an adult female or adult male. So here's some 
wild speculation: These could be birds that hatched last summer and just have 
not yet acquired definitive adult plumage (first alternate plumage). Maybe 
that's why they are at Centerton, rather than further east or north, where most 
nesting occurs. 


These current observations at Centerton are much like a dozen or so other 
records stretching back into the 1980s. These have included an instance or two 
of adults with young. So some nesting does occur in northwest Arkansas, but my 
assumption is that most of those we see at Centerton (and a few other places) 
are probably not breeding birds. 


This morning's Hooded Mergansers were diving and bringing up crayfish. Foraging 
on crayfish is a tried and true behavior of birds we see at the hatchery, where 
crayfish are abundant and obviously attractive to all kinds of wildlife. I am 
reminded, again, of how important such places are to wildlife in general, and 
birds in particular, as so much aquatic habitat supporting crayfish is being 
rapidly lost to development in northwest Arkansas. The main business of the 
hatchery is providing fish for release in area lakes and streams, but hitching 
right along with that primary mission is the reality that many of our native 
birds require such habitats, and species like crayfish, for their survival. 

Subject: I found no storm birds
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 13:33:58 -0500
I went to the Centerton Fish hatchery this morning and didn’t see anything 
unusual. A lot of Canada Guess, one Green Heron, Killdeer, Meadowlarks, two 
Loggerhead Shrikes, Various Blackbirds and Robins. No Gulls, Terns, etc that 
might come up with a large weather system. Bill was largely a rain event not a 
wind event. 


I also drove the roads around that part of Centerton and Vaughn. Lots of 
Scissor-tailed Flycatchers. The painted Bunting on Buckhorn Flats was up on a 
wire. On Daisy Rd was another Loggerhead Shrike working the grasses below from 
barb wire. I stayed right beside it for at least 1/4 mile, it didn’t seem to 
mind. I was trying to capture its travels along the fence. a sort of sideways 
hopping that reminded me of a Lemer running on the ground. I didn’t have a 
lot of luck with that,I got a few shots but it’s back was to me so you 
couldn’t really see it hunched over with it’s feet off the wire. I did see 
it attack a few unsuspecting insects,one beetle, one very tiny Praying mantis, 
and some sort of caterpillar, then it worked it’s way back up to the top wire 
before eating it’s catch. I heard frogs at the end of the road but I didn’t 
stick around to see what would happen when it got there. 



Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Re: ID bird call?
From: David Luneau <mdluneau AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 12:53:05 -0500
Eastern Phoebe.

They are here (Little Rock) year-round, but they do migrate.

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
Associate Professor of Electronics
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
2801 S. University Ave.
Little Rock, AR 72204

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Carol Traphagan
Sent: Friday, June 19, 2015 11:42 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] ID bird call?


Please forgive the poor quality of this recording but can someone identify
for me? Wonder if it's migratory - it is on our local hospital grounds. 
Subject: Golden Eagle on Hwy 192, Garland Co., AR
From: Mary ann Creemer <000000f6ec9bf65e-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 15:21:31 +0000
Posted for Teresa Mathews: Saw a Golden Eagle on Hwy 192 a mile from Mountain 
Pine traveling east toward Jessiville at 9:45 am.  Garland County, Arkansas. 
Subject: Re: bird app
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 23:31:02 -0500
As I understand it, the new eBird app will replace bird log (all of the 
geographic versions of them as well). I downloaded it and it is pretty much the 
same set of functions as birdlog. 


I have downloaded pretty much all of the previously mentioned apps. One not 
mentioned that I really like on the iPad is the Waite's Birds app which is a 
cousin to IBird Pro. On my iPhone I use iBird Pro as my favorite. 

For calls I use the separate BirdTunes. 
I use Birdwatcher's Diary as my favorite app for recording birds seen in the 
field. It is very versatile. 

Lastly I like Birdseye for finding what birds are being seen in a particular 
area. The coolest feature s that it reads from eBird and knows what birds you 
have seen. You can go to a particular area and ask what birds are being seen 
and it will tell you but will also let you know which specific birds are not on 
your life list. 

OK, so I am a bit of a technophile...
Dave

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Cape Girardeau, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 09:13:04 -0500
From: meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: bird app
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU




I think the question is can you have too many bird apps on your phone. The 
answer depends on how much memory & how many other apps you have installed on 
the phone. 


I use the Audubon combo app Birds & Butterflies since I am interested in both. 
Bill B. likes Birdjam. Years ago I purchased the Stokes CD's for the Eastern 
US, the Rocky Mountans, & the LRGV. They reside as playlists in Itunes I use in 
the field for call identification and sometimes limited playback. I 
alphabetized the lists and grouped the birds into categories when needed such 
as warblers, hawks, shorebirds, etc. Ex: Warbler Common Yellowthroat. Heresy I 
know. I find an alphabetized & grouped list much easier to use than the 
taxonomical order. I can sample a number of possible species in rapid 
succession to match recording and field call. 

I use BirdLog to record my field list at eBird. I know Audubon has recently 
come out with their own reporting app. I have not downloaded or tried that one 
to date. Perhaps we can get some observations & comparisons from those who 
have. 

  		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: NEIL BEFORE THE BUFFALO
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 21:39:48 +0000
ELLEN COMPTON gave a family history powerpoint show today at Compton Gardens 
and Conference Center in Bentonville. Daughter of Neil and Laurene Compton, she 
grew up midst the, long complex struggle to stop dam construction on the 
Buffalo River (1956-1966), founding of the Ozark Society (1962), and 
proclamation of the Buffalo National River (1972). But her talk was NOT 
politics. It was ROOTS, about growing up BEFORE THE BUFFALO. She shared the 
natural background from which eventually emerged Dr Compton of the Buffalo 
crusade. Her hour lecture was accompanied by a gallery show of photographs by 
Terry Stanfill, of Eagle Watch Nature Trail. Terry lives in the same country 
forming the backdrop for much of Ellen's lecture. His photographs of native 
birds, wildflowers, springs, hollows, and historical places evoke the 
environment that shaped young Neil. In Ellen's program, I liked the old 
black-and-white of young Neil parked in front of a slate board trying to write 
his name; waving his hands in joy as he slides down a hay mountain; Laurene and 
Neil on a swimming trip to the White River. Neil Compton was not a born 
dam-stopper. He absorbed lessons of a natural world well documented by Terry 
Stanfill's photographs and along the way acquired skills that would deliver our 
first National River. There are little Neils and Laurenes out there right now; 
we have that good reason to save as much nature as possible in the "Natural 
State." We'll give Neil the last words here: "For those who feel in their 
hearts a compassion, whether inborn or acquired, for the beauty of our land, 
there remain a multitude of places, some hidden, and some well known, in need 
of the attention of anyone willing to strive to preserve them." 

Subject: Re: bird app
From: "bill ." <tvulture AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 16:28:07 -0500
Unfortunately no. I love my Windows phones, but they are lacking in app 
choices. I use the Sibley guide purchased from the Microsoft store on phone for 
about $20. Occasionally they have a sale. This is the only good NA bird app for 
win so far as i know. And i am yet to find a butterfly guide useful to me. I 
encourage anyone using win phones/tablets to nag MS for more nature apps! 

peace
-bill
enid ok

from my windows phone
________________________________
From: Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: ‎6/‎18/‎2015 9:47
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] bird app

My new phone is a Nokia 1520, with Windows 8. Are the bird apps you folks are 
mentioning just for IPhones? 

Sally Jo Gibson, Harrison, AR

Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: Ryan Risher
Sent: ‎6/‎18/‎2015 9:19 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: bird app

IBird Pro Guide to Birds is a great app. It's $15 and I don't personally have 
it but I had it on the work ipad I used in Missouri. I really liked it, it has 
over 900 species for North America and it was very user friendly. Multiple 
audio recordings for species in most cases, etc. Would highly recommend that. 


Ryan
(Pope co)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2015, at 20:47, Mary Ann King  wrote:
>
> Just got a new Iphone 5.  What’s the best bird app to download?
>
> ‘MaryAnn’ King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
Subject: fos
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 16:19:51 -0500
I heard my first of the year yellow-billed cuckoo today. Rain crows, the old
timers called them and it was certainly doing that today. Love their call.

Great-crested flycatchers nesting in my bluebird box. How do they get in? I
don't know. The neighborhood cat that killed my cardinals is still roaming
around so I'm on guard duty every evening and morning.  Anybody know if
cowbirds bother those nests? I think I saw one of those sneaking about. It's
the first GCFC to nest in my yard so I'm overly excited.

Alan Gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: Re: bird app
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 09:46:47 -0500
My new phone is a Nokia 1520, with Windows 8. Are the bird apps you folks are 
mentioning just for IPhones? 

Sally Jo Gibson, Harrison, AR

Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: Ryan Risher
Sent: ‎6/‎18/‎2015 9:19 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: bird app

IBird Pro Guide to Birds is a great app. It's $15 and I don't personally have 
it but I had it on the work ipad I used in Missouri. I really liked it, it has 
over 900 species for North America and it was very user friendly. Multiple 
audio recordings for species in most cases, etc. Would highly recommend that. 


Ryan
(Pope co)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2015, at 20:47, Mary Ann King  wrote:
>
> Just got a new Iphone 5.  What’s the best bird app to download?
>
> ‘MaryAnn’ King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
Subject: Re: bird app
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 09:18:46 -0500
IBird Pro Guide to Birds is a great app. It's $15 and I don't personally have 
it but I had it on the work ipad I used in Missouri. I really liked it, it has 
over 900 species for North America and it was very user friendly. Multiple 
audio recordings for species in most cases, etc. Would highly recommend that. 


Ryan
(Pope co)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2015, at 20:47, Mary Ann King  wrote:
> 
> Just got a new Iphone 5.  What’s the best bird app to download?
>  
> ‘MaryAnn’ King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>  
Subject: Re: bird app
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 09:13:04 -0500
I think the question is can you have too many bird apps on your phone. The 
answer depends on how much memory & how many other apps you have installed on 
the phone. 


I use the Audubon combo app Birds & Butterflies since I am interested in both. 
Bill B. likes Birdjam. Years ago I purchased the Stokes CD's for the Eastern 
US, the Rocky Mountans, & the LRGV. They reside as playlists in Itunes I use in 
the field for call identification and sometimes limited playback. I 
alphabetized the lists and grouped the birds into categories when needed such 
as warblers, hawks, shorebirds, etc. Ex: Warbler Common Yellowthroat. Heresy I 
know. I find an alphabetized & grouped list much easier to use than the 
taxonomical order. I can sample a number of possible species in rapid 
succession to match recording and field call. 

I use BirdLog to record my field list at eBird. I know Audubon has recently 
come out with their own reporting app. I have not downloaded or tried that one 
to date. Perhaps we can get some observations & comparisons from those who 
have. 


Cindy F.
Little Rock.




Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 22:09:49 -0500
From: walko AT BELLSOUTH.NET
Subject: Re: bird app
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

I have all of the below and use and like the Audubon the most, they also have 
others in the set like the Butterfly Guide. I use all with my iPad as reference 
when away from home and use Audubon on the phone when in the field. 

In the following order:
Audubon Birds, A Field Guide to North American BIRDSSibley Birds, eGuide to 
North AmericaNational Geographic birds, Field guide North AmericaPeterson guide 
to birds of North AmericaIbird Pro Hd 

Jay WalkoCollierville, Tn

Sent from my iPad
On Jun 17, 2015, at 8:47 PM, Mary Ann King  wrote:

Just got a new Iphone 5. Whats the best bird app to download? MaryAnn King 
In the pine woods northwest of London 
Subject: Re: bird app
From: John Walko <walko AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 22:09:49 -0500
I have all of the below and use and like the Audubon the most, they also have 
others in the set like the Butterfly Guide. I use all with my iPad as reference 
when away from home and use Audubon on the phone when in the field. 


In the following order:

Audubon Birds, A Field Guide to North American BIRDS
Sibley Birds, eGuide to North America
National Geographic birds, Field guide  North America
Peterson guide to birds of North America
Ibird Pro Hd

Jay Walko
Collierville, Tn

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 17, 2015, at 8:47 PM, Mary Ann King  wrote:

> Just got a new Iphone 5.  What’s the best bird app to download?
>  
> ‘MaryAnn’ King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>  
Subject: bird app
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 20:47:20 -0500
Just got a new Iphone 5.  What's the best bird app to download?

 

'MaryAnn' King

In the pine woods northwest of London

 
Subject: Re: Tropical Storm Bill's birds??
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 08:08:44 -0500
Yes I agree; I've already had my eye on this storm and will be watching
closely at Red Slough the next couple days!  J   The potential is the
greatest, I believe, for coastal terns and frigatebirds.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

------------------------------

From ARBirds listserve:

 

Greetings all,

This is all a guess, but you never know....

Tropical storm Bill didn't spend much time over the Gulf of Mexico, and
certainly is not near as big or as strong as recent hurricanes.  But he did
make landfall in the right part of TX to send birds flying towards us on the
counterclockwise winds.  I'm guessing maybe not many (or none at all)
pelagic birds.  But I sure wonder about a potential first state record
Reddish Egret.

 

Of course those same winds could push coastal TX birds into calmer LA/MS.

 

Based on the projected timing and track I'd consider checking Kitchens
Bayou,  Millwood and other good heron marshes of the SW, on late Wens
evening and Thurs AM.

And of course Red Slough, OK maybe the biggest potential of all.

 

I'm in class Thurs/Fri so I can't chase it.  Not sure I would chase it, even
if I could, but if I lived in SW  AR I'd be getting twitchin fever and happy
feet.

 

Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector

 

------------------------------

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 16
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 20:19:22 -0500
It was mostly cloudy and warm with a shower on the bird survey today.  66
species were found.  Big surprise was an adult Roseate Spoonbill which I
have only seen an adult once before at Red Slough.  Also nice was one adult
Wood Stork which roosted with the Anhingas at their rookery in Pintail Lake.
Lots of White Ibis feeding in units 30, 40, 47W, and 7.    Here is my list
for today:

 

Wood Duck - 12 

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 6 

Anhinga - 20

Least Bittern - 2 (1 sitting on nest.)

Great Blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 53

Snowy Egret - 3

Little-blue Heron - 6

Cattle Egret - 15

Green Heron - 6

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 587

Roseate Spoonbill - 1 adult

Wood Stork - 1 adult

Black Vulture - 7

Turkey Vulture - 15

Mississippi Kite - 3

Purple Gallinule - 9

Common Gallinule - 13

American Coot - 4

Least Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 25

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 3

Bell's Vireo - 7

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 6

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 13

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 4

Tree Swallow - 41

Cliff Swallow - 10

Barn Swallow - 16

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 6

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Kentucky Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 12

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Summer Tanager - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 18

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 7

Dickcissel - 19

Red-winged Blackbird - 50

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Common Grackle - 44

Brown-headed Cowbird - 15

Orchard Oriole - 6

 

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Swamp Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Stillwater Clubtail

Jade Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Southern Black Racer

Western Cottonmouth

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Tropical Storm Bill's birds??
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 23:15:45 +0000
Greetings all,
This is all a guess, but you never know....
Tropical storm Bill didn't spend much time over the Gulf of Mexico, and 
certainly is not near as big or as strong as recent hurricanes. But he did make 
landfall in the right part of TX to send birds flying towards us on the 
counterclockwise winds. I'm guessing maybe not many (or none at all) pelagic 
birds. But I sure wonder about a potential first state record Reddish Egret. 


Of course those same winds could push coastal TX birds into calmer LA/MS.

Based on the projected timing and track I'd consider checking Kitchens Bayou, 
Millwood and other good heron marshes of the SW, on late Wens evening and Thurs 
AM. 

And of course Red Slough, OK maybe the biggest potential of all.

I'm in class Thurs/Fri so I can't chase it. Not sure I would chase it, even if 
I could, but if I lived in SW AR I'd be getting twitchin fever and happy feet. 


Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector
Subject: Re: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, nest, 4 chicks, in Calhoun County, AR.
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 19:55:46 -0500
Do the YC Night Herons have as much "siblicide" 
as their larger relative (e.g. Great Blue Heron)?
4 chicks sounds like a few getting shoved out to me?

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville,


At 06:19 PM 6/15/2015, Keith Newton wrote:
>Saturday afternoon I headed down to our cabin 
>between Hampton and EoDorado. The temperature 
>was around 80 with a few showers passing 
>through. I couldn't drive in the weekend before, 
>due to the Ouachita River flood crest being over 
>the road, so I stayed in LR. I listened to the 
>audio of a frog chorus on the security. There 
>were Copes, Fowlers, Green Treefrogs, and 
>Bird-voiced so loud that they must have been 
>right up in our yard. Since the flood-crest had 
>passed and the water dropped 2', I didn't expect 
>the frogs to be calling, and I was right. About 
>this time of year, I usually start focusing on 
>dragonfly safaris, but was disappointed that I 
>only saw 2 in flight in the last 20 miles while 
>driving in, and none at my usual hot-spots. I 
>don't know what to think about that.
>
>I didn't get up as early as I should to get out 
>to the YCNH nest. I'm still hoping to get pics 
>of one of the adults feeding the chicks, but my 
>timing has been off. I had my canoe tied to a 
>Cypress tree, and held my camera on the nest 
>waiting for something interesting to happen for 
>about an hour, watching them, watching me, doing 
>nothing until my arms  tired. I had been 
>watching crayfish crawling around just under the 
>surface of  the water on the trees I was parked 
>in. At one time, I counted 9 just on one small 
>tree about 3' away. Most of them spooked when I 
>tried to turn my camera on them, but I got one 
>shot with 4. Before that, I was wondering how 
>far the adults normally fly to hunt for food to 
>feed these 4 chicks, so the answer seemed right 
>before me. However, some years the floods are so 
>high, that it may be two miles before there 
>would be any land for their usual wade-hunting. 
>I was wondering if they couldn't do pretty well 
>by landing on these limbs at water-level and 
>catching them as they came up. They are so 
>skittish, that I can't ever recall seeing them 
>when I've been out night fishing, which was a lot over the years.
>
>While watching the crayfish, the second adult 
>flew in to the nest. If it fed the chicks I 
>missed it, but the activity picked up, and I did 
>get some decent shots. I put a few on my Flickr 
>site that you can see at the link below.
>
>  I found the nest before the cypress leaves 
> came on, and knew that it was new, but couldn't 
> for the life of me tell there was a bird 
> sitting from any viewing angle. Finally by 
> paddling my canoe until it was between me and 
> the Sun, I could make out it's shape. I've got 
> a few shots, that if you don't know it's there, 
> you would have a hard time making it out. I'll 
> drag a few of those into the folder to, since I mentioned it.
>
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/7391658 AT N03/sets/72157652281816764
Subject: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, nest, 4 chicks, in Calhoun County, AR.
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 18:19:18 -0500
Saturday afternoon I headed down to our cabin between Hampton and EoDorado. The 
temperature was around 80 with a few showers passing through. I couldn't drive 
in the weekend before, due to the Ouachita River flood crest being over the 
road, so I stayed in LR. I listened to the audio of a frog chorus on the 
security. There were Copes, Fowlers, Green Treefrogs, and Bird-voiced so loud 
that they must have been right up in our yard. Since the flood-crest had passed 
and the water dropped 2', I didn't expect the frogs to be calling, and I was 
right. About this time of year, I usually start focusing on dragonfly safaris, 
but was disappointed that I only saw 2 in flight in the last 20 miles while 
driving in, and none at my usual hot-spots. I don't know what to think about 
that. 


I didn't get up as early as I should to get out to the YCNH nest. I'm still 
hoping to get pics of one of the adults feeding the chicks, but my timing has 
been off. I had my canoe tied to a Cypress tree, and held my camera on the nest 
waiting for something interesting to happen for about an hour, watching them, 
watching me, doing nothing until my arms tired. I had been watching crayfish 
crawling around just under the surface of the water on the trees I was parked 
in. At one time, I counted 9 just on one small tree about 3' away. Most of them 
spooked when I tried to turn my camera on them, but I got one shot with 4. 
Before that, I was wondering how far the adults normally fly to hunt for food 
to feed these 4 chicks, so the answer seemed right before me. However, some 
years the floods are so high, that it may be two miles before there would be 
any land for their usual wade-hunting. I was wondering if they couldn't do 
pretty well by landing on these limbs at water-level and catching them as they 
came up. They are so skittish, that I can't ever recall seeing them when I've 
been out night fishing, which was a lot over the years. 


While watching the crayfish, the second adult flew in to the nest. If it fed 
the chicks I missed it, but the activity picked up, and I did get some decent 
shots. I put a few on my Flickr site that you can see at the link below. 


 I found the nest before the cypress leaves came on, and knew that it was new, 
but couldn't for the life of me tell there was a bird sitting from any viewing 
angle. Finally by paddling my canoe until it was between me and the Sun, I 
could make out it's shape. I've got a few shots, that if you don't know it's 
there, you would have a hard time making it out. I'll drag a few of those into 
the folder to, since I mentioned it. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/7391658 AT N03/sets/72157652281816764
Subject: War on Birds conf call tonight
From: Lance Runion <000000d4f8891ec6-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 21:00:03 +0000
Audubon
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| AudubonDear Friend, I want to make sure you didn't miss my email on Saturday. 
You're invited to join Audubon's national conference call tonight at 7:30 PM 
EDT o... | 

|  |
| View on www.audubonaction... | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

  Lance RunionLittle Rock
Subject: ASCA Field Trip
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 21:55:52 -0500
The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas headed to the newly opened Sunset Trail 
located on Lower Lake DeGray, Clark Co. This area is relatively unknown to most 
people. Our 22 birders had the trail to ourselves, which meant we had a lovely, 
slow stroll. We skirted the lower lake which had Great Egrets, Great Blue 
Herons, and Kingfishers. The trail veered off into a varied wooded habitat of 
pines and large, old hardwoods, with some open spaces. We were able to focus on 
the birds and help our birders learn some of the songs and calls of species who 
nest in Arkansas during the summer. Our target bird was Cerulean Warbler, which 
was a no-show. A female Black and White Warbler fooled several birders into 
thinking we had a Cerulean, but closer looks confirmed it was the Black and 
White. A very cooperative Northern Parula perched on low bare branches giving 
our newer birders a terrific close-up view. Pine Warblers also put on a show. A 
Yellow-throated Warbler called repeatedly but wouldn't come in close. Orchard 
Orioles provided good looks. Yellow-billed Cuckoos were heard throughout the 
morning, but only one came close for a better view. Indigo Buntings were found 
in the open spaces. At the picnic area, we had two Prothonotary Warblers 
singing incessantly, plus a couple dozen Purple Martins, two Eastern Bluebirds, 
Eastern Kingbirds, and an Eastern Phoebe. The trail holds a lot of promise for 
a future ASCA spring migrant field trip. This shallower, lower lake area will 
be a great field trip for the Arkansas Audubon Society's fall conference 
November 13-15, which is being held at the Lake DeGray State Park Lodge. 


Speaking of the Lodge, we ate lunch there after the field trip. The food was 
great and the parking lot was full of birds. Best birds to finish the trip were 
chattering Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, an Orchard Oriole, and Chipping 
Sparrows. All were a nice finish to the trip, plus our lunch break helped us 
dodged the rain showers that rolled through. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Little Rock, AR
Subject: Re: Two weeks in Missouri
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 10:44:42 -0500
Anyone know about the MO management strategies for Bobwhites and how they may 
differ from AR? 


 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ryan R 

Sent: Saturday, June 13, 2015 9:56 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Two weeks in Missouri

 

Evening all,

 

I just rounded out a two-week camping trek circumventing the north-central 
region of Missouri conducting wetland surveys for waterbirds/secretive marsh 
birds on various private tracts of lands. With water levels still far too high 
down on the Red River to round out some of my least tern field work, I took 
this opportunity to see a different part of the country and do some work that I 
haven't been able to do in a few years. Oddly enough I left one flooded state 
to enter another one where flooding seemed to throw a curve ball into some 
areas I had to travel, go figure... 


 

I was fortunate to begin by birding some beautiful prairies documenting nesting 
dickcissels, meadowlarks, common yellowthroats, chats, henslow's, field, and 
grasshopper sparrows. The one bird that was somewhat mind blowing to me 
personally were the numerous bobwhite in this state. Every area I camped at or 
worked at, their calls resonated around the clock and was something I never 
tired of. Even in remote stretches of the state I stayed at sleeping in the 
back of my truck with no one around for miles, no service, no thing, their 
calls were truly humbling. 


 

I primarily conducted wetland surveys which had me up at 0430 each morning to 
start my surveys before sunrise. While the surveys were somewhat slow, likely 
due to many of my 'target' species being dispersed due to the flooding, over 
the course of my time there, I was able to document several sora, 
yellow-crowned night herons, numerous great blue herons, blue-winged teal, 
numerous wood ducks with young, American bitterns, and my personal favorite of 
the trip, three least bitterns all within a stone's throw of one another. 
Unfortunately, no other rails such as kings, virginias, yellows or blacks got 
the memo. The upside to this gig was being done by 8-10 in the morning leaving 
what seemed like plenty of time personal birding. Unforunately, even that was 
slow since migration in Missouri seemed to have slowed down as well. 


 

Nonetheless, it was a great trip that seems like a blur now. I didn't get to 
snag some birds I really wanted to see there, such as greater prairie chickens, 
which I haven't seen in a couple of years..I tallied just over 100 birds for 
the state, picked up about a dozen year birds, one lifer (Black-capped 
chickadee), and met some really great folks in my travels (though few given the 
solitary style of being on the go almost every day). 


 

1,000+ miles later of driving, cooking deer, catfish and rice in the skillet 
over an open campfire, and of course birding, it's time for a good night's rest 
and a day to clean one MUDDY truck tomorrow. 


 

Best all!

 

Ryan (Pope Co)
Subject: Western Kingbird
From: Bo Verser <bo.verser1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 05:15:56 -0500
I saw a Western Kingbird yesterday afternoon along Sawmill road about 1/2
mile SW of this road's  intersection with HWY 16 near Pearson. This is
about 5 miles or so SW of Heber Springs.

Nearby is Bettis Mountain Road and Bettis Mountain Estates where
Grasshopper Sparrows were perched up singing and Painted Buntings are
nesting.

Bo Verser
Heber Springs
Subject: Two weeks in Missouri
From: Ryan R <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 21:56:24 -0500
Evening all,

I just rounded out a two-week camping trek circumventing the north-central
region of Missouri conducting wetland surveys for waterbirds/secretive
marsh birds on various private tracts of lands. With water levels still far
too high down on the Red River to round out some of my least tern field
work, I took this opportunity to see a different part of the country and do
some work that I haven't been able to do in a few years. Oddly enough I
left one flooded state to enter another one where flooding seemed to throw
a curve ball into some areas I had to travel, go figure...

I was fortunate to begin by birding some beautiful prairies documenting
nesting dickcissels, meadowlarks, common yellowthroats, chats, henslow's,
field, and grasshopper sparrows. The one bird that was somewhat mind
blowing to me personally were the numerous bobwhite in this state. Every
area I camped at or worked at, their calls resonated around the clock and
was something I never tired of. Even in remote stretches of the state I
stayed at sleeping in the back of my truck with no one around for miles, no
service, no thing, their calls were truly humbling.

I primarily conducted wetland surveys which had me up at 0430 each morning
to start my surveys before sunrise. While the surveys were somewhat slow,
likely due to many of my 'target' species being dispersed due to the
flooding, over the course of my time there, I was able to document several
sora, yellow-crowned night herons, numerous great blue herons, blue-winged
teal, numerous wood ducks with young, American bitterns, and my personal
favorite of the trip, three least bitterns all within a stone's throw of
one another. Unfortunately, no other rails such as kings, virginias,
yellows or blacks got the memo. The upside to this gig was being done by
8-10 in the morning leaving what seemed like plenty of time personal
birding. Unforunately, even that was slow since migration in Missouri
seemed to have slowed down as well.

Nonetheless, it was a great trip that seems like a blur now. I didn't get
to snag some birds I really wanted to see there, such as greater prairie
chickens, which I haven't seen in a couple of years..I tallied just over
100 birds for the state, picked up about a dozen year birds, one lifer
(Black-capped chickadee), and met some really great folks in my travels
(though few given the solitary style of being on the go almost every day).

1,000+ miles later of driving, cooking deer, catfish and rice in the
skillet over an open campfire, and of course birding, it's time for a good
night's rest and a day to clean one MUDDY truck tomorrow.

Best all!

Ryan (Pope Co)
Subject: BIOBLITZ AT NINESTONE LAND TRUST IN CARROLL COUNTY
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 21:53:51 +0000
OPENING DAY OF THE BIOBLITZ AT NINESTONE LAND TRUST IN CARROLL COUNTY started 
bright and early with a singing Pine Warbler. Don Matt hauled our part of the 
birding contingent (me and NWA Master Naturalist Kathleen Holloway) to a high 
glade in the far northwest corner. From there our job involved hiking back 
across a couple of other glades, down through the valley of Piney Creek, along 
a high bluff line, through native Shortleaf Pines, across hay fields ... all on 
mowed trails ... Tough job for a couple of retirees on a Saturday morning in 
mid-June. By "job" I mean: identifying birds like Scarlet Tanagers, wild plants 
on glades like Old-Plainsman, a leaping Wood Frog, encountering the ground nest 
with two eggs of a big brown Chuck-will's-widow, mating Clymene Moths -- that 
sort of thing. Kim Smith and Doug James led other birding contingents. Here's a 
selection from this morning: Great Blue Heron, both vulture species, many 
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Belted Kingfisher, Red-headed Woodpecker (big pine 
snags), Pileated Woodpecker, Great Crested Flycatcher; White-eyed, 
Yellow-throated (feeding young), and Red-eyed Vireos; Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. In 
the warbler dept: Blue-winged, Northern Parula, Yellow-throated, 
Black-and-white, Ovenbird, Louisiana Waterthrush, Kentucky, Common 
Yellowthroat, Yellow-breasted Chat. Eastern Towhee, Blue Grosbeak, Indigo 
Bunting, both tanager species, etc. And that involved just a few of 25+ folks 
pursuing Ninestone's diverse biota. Our morning ended with flowering prickly 
pears and a fine Field Sparrow singing on a glade that is being restored with 
selective cutting and prescribed burning. We were up to at least 51 bird 
species when Kim and I left ... but not until after a remarkable lunch ... in 
front of Ninestone's justifiably famous waterfalls. 

Subject: Immature Bald Eagle
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 15:32:17 -0400
 Just before the Road Runner spot that I call it since I always see one there 
early morning around 9-10. I was 3 tenths of a mile from that spot where I saw 
an immature Bald Eagle feeding on road kill in the middle of the road. He had 2 
white tail feathers and a sprinkling of more white on his tail. Wasn't too 
knowledgeable about trucks though, as I carefully dodge hitting him. It was 
11:21am on Hwy 164 between Moreland and Dover, AR. It was raining. I was going 
East and was 1 mile and 3 tenths from the jct of hwy 124 & 164 when I saw him. 
He was still sitting them when I glanced back in the rear view mirror. Here 
hopeful he didn't get hit there. Teresa Mathews, Hector, AR 



-- 
"The secret of getting ahead is getting started."  Mark Twain