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Updated on Wednesday, July 23 at 10:53 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Crane

23 Jul Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter! [Samantha Scheiman ]
23 Jul A Chance to Reciprocate. [Jack and Pam ]
23 Jul Re: SW Arkansas Birds [ ]
23 Jul Adult Bald Eagle near Goshen [James Morgan ]
23 Jul SWAINSON'S HAWKS (2) NEAR CHEROKEE CITY THIS MORNING ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
23 Jul FIGHTING GREAT EGRETS [JFR ]
23 Jul SW Arkansas Birds [Michael Linz ]
22 Jul MOS fall meeting: Sept. 21 with photographer & ID expert Kevin Karlson [Jason Hoeksema ]
22 Jul Re: Database Update [Ann Gordon ]
22 Jul Re: Database Update [Allan Mueller ]
22 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 22 [David Arbour ]
22 Jul Database Update [Lyndal York ]
22 Jul Ruddy Ducks Part II [Doc George ]
22 Jul RUDDY DUCKS IN BREEDING PLUMAGE [JFR ]
22 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Gail Miller ]
22 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Terry Butler ]
22 Jul Re: Forest Man [Sally Jo Gibson ]
22 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Bill Shepherd ]
21 Jul Re: Long-billed wren [Michael Linz ]
21 Jul Re: Forest Man [Dorothy Cooney ]
21 Jul Dyer Lake [Sandy Berger ]
21 Jul Long-billed wren [Jerry Butler ]
21 Jul Ruddy Duck in breeding plumage [JFR ]
21 Jul NEOTROPIC AND DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS AT EAGLE WATCH, GENTRY ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Jul ArkDem 7/21/14: Birds find island as waypoint to Brazil [Barry Haas ]
21 Jul AAS News of Members ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
19 Jul Good Bird [Terry Butler ]
18 Jul Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton [Joyce Hartmann ]
18 Jul crested caracara [Danny Townsend ]
18 Jul Crested Caracara - probably not [Kelly Chitwood ]
18 Jul Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton [Dawner ]
18 Jul Crested Caracara in El Dorado [Danny Townsend ]
18 Jul some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
18 Jul Basic info about GBH killed on Centerton powerline -- birders can help ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul MESSAGES FROM A SADLY DISHEVELED FORM ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul Birds Eat Insects! Volunteer or Attend the Insect Festival of Arkansas ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
17 Jul ticket price ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
17 Jul Mulhollan Waterfowl Blind at Lake Fayetteville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul nothing to do with birds - for people near Fayetteville ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
16 Jul Magic Mix for birds [Sally Jo Gibson ]
16 Jul Forest Man [Herschel Raney ]
16 Jul Fw: Sign the petition to stop ALEC in Arkansas [ ]
15 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 15 [David Arbour ]
15 Jul PINE BLUFF BIRDING [JFR ]
15 Jul AAS Photo Contest Closed, Calendar Orders Open! [Mitchell Pruitt ]
15 Jul HALLELUJAH FOR WANDERING STORKS ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
15 Jul Robert Weiss ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
14 Jul kingbirds and cowbirds [Judy & Don ]
14 Jul Newbie [Art Weigand ]
13 Jul Western Kingbirds in Fort Smith (seen first by Bill Beale) [ ]
13 Jul Until the big heat (Beaver Lake Nursery Pond) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
12 Jul Re: Early fall migrants... a Willow and Blk-billed [Bill ]
12 Jul Dobc field trip [Alan ]
12 Jul Early fall migrants... a Willow and Blk-billed ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
12 Jul Leucistic Robin [Doc George ]
11 Jul Re: ALL GOD'S LITTLE DUCKIES [Bill Thurman ]
11 Jul Eagle nest on Lake Norrell? [Alyson Hoge ]
11 Jul new bird blind at Lake Fayetteville needs your help ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
11 Jul ALL GOD'S LITTLE DUCKIES ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
10 Jul Re: Deafness ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
10 Jul Re: Deafness [Jacque Brown ]
10 Jul Ozark Natural Science Center this Saturday night in Fayetteville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
10 Jul Re: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock [Bill Shepherd ]
10 Jul Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz Checklist Results [Dan Scheiman ]
10 Jul Re: Suet cakes? [Janine Perlman ]
10 Jul Re: Suet cakes? [Janine Perlman ]
10 Jul Re: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock [Karen And Jim Rowe ]
10 Jul Re: Suet cakes? ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
9 Jul Re: Suet cakes? [Tom Harden ]
9 Jul Re: elementary school ornithology [Gaynell Perry ]
9 Jul Re: Suet cakes? [ ]
9 Jul Re: Suet cakes? ["Elizabeth F. Shores" ]
9 Jul Re: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock ["Duzan, Steve -FS" ]
9 Jul Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock [Jim and Karen Rowe ]
9 Jul elementary school ornithology [Judy & Don ]
9 Jul ASCA July Field Trip Reminder [Karen Holliday ]

Subject: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter!
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:28:06 -0500
Arkansas birders,

As Dottie Boyles expressed, the next *Arkansas Birds* newsletter of the
Arkansas Audubon Society will be published and in your mailbox before you
know it!  While you are compiling birding news for Dottie (email your
updates to dboyles AT arkansasedc.com by August 1), consider also sharing an
additional piece for the newsletter that highlights birds, conservation
issues, Arkansas wildlife/plants/natural communities, or something
similar.

Virtually any format will do ... photos paired with captions, accounts from
your most recent birding trips near and far, artwork, haikus, editorials, news
stories, birding gear reviews, app reviews, local coverage of conservation
issues, intriguing backyard bird sightings, etc.  To get a small taste of
what I'm looking for as newsletter editor, check out the most recent *Arkansas
Birds*: http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf

For work to appear in the September issue, I need your inspired pieces by
August 15 (emailed to samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com), but know that I will
happily accept pieces anytime.

Lastly, if you don't receive *Arkansas Birds* in your mailbox, become a
member of the Arkansas Audubon Society here
 to receive this quarterly publication
and support our diverse work, which includes the Halberg Ecology Camp for
11- and 12-year-olds, Adult Natural History Workshops, educational
conventions, Arkansas's bird records committee, and so much more.  Please
join us as we strive to be a potent force in the conservation of Arkansas's
natural resources.

Many thanks,

Samantha Scheiman
Little Rock, Ark.
*Arkansas Birds* editor

-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: A Chance to Reciprocate.
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:08:17 -0700


Some of you on this list may remember the Audubon Action Alert a few months ago 
asking people to sign-on to a letter urging Cargill to  remove the hog CAFO 
from the Buffalo River watershed.  What you may not know is that the same 
Alert went out to Audubon members in Minnesota, where Cargill has its 
headquarters. 


Minnesotans responded and within 24 hours working together we generated 1300 
letters )plus another 500 in subsequent days. 


Arkansans now have a chance to return the favor.  The new Vikings stadium in 
Minneapolis is going to be a disaster for neotropical migrants if the design is 
not altered. What needs to be done is change the type of glass.  I’ve 
visited the site and have seen the drawings for the proposed stadium.  If one 
were to design a building with the express purpose of killing birds, the 
Vikings stadium might just be the winning design. 


You can help birds and support Minnesotans by adding your name to the action 
alert. 



https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=DD2452A6134BDE0737A7ECD23AA9A5CD.app304a?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1717&autologin=true&s_src=JUL14_ATD2 


Note: It is worth clicking just to see the cute picture of one of my favorite 
warblers. 


And by-the-way, if you still haven’t written to Cargill to save the Buffalo 
National River there is still time.  Doing both good deeds should only take a 
few minutes. 



http://www.audubonaction.org/site/MessageViewer?dlv_id=50603&pgwrap=n&em_id=40601.1 



If you wish to reply or have comments please send them to me rather than on 
this list serv. 


Thank you!

Jack Stewart (near the Buffalo)
Subject: Re: SW Arkansas Birds
From: Robert Wiedenmann <0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:14:19 -0400
 Sorry to be slow to post sightings from Sunday, July 20. Three of us spent 4 h 
at Bois D'Arc WMA, Hempstead County, AR. 



Black-bellied Whistling-duck - 4
Double-crested Cormorant - 6
Anhinga - 12
Least Bittern - 3
Great Blue Heron - 8
Great Egret - 40
Snowy Egret - 30
Little Blue Heron - 20
Cattle Egret - 200
Green Heron - 30
Black-crowned Night-Heron - 8
White Ibis - 4
Black Vulture - 25
Turkey Vulture – 60
Mississippi Kite - 1
Red-shouldered Hawk – 1 (Heard Only)
Red-tailed Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 30 adults (also numerous downy chicks)
Common Gallinule - 16 (also downy chicks)
Killdeer - 6
Spotted Sandpiper - 1
Least Tern - 6
Mourning Dove - 8
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 4
Belted Kingfisher - 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 5
Red-headed Woodpecker – 1 (Heard Only)
Northern Flicker – 1 (Heard Only)
Eastern Wood-pewee – 1
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 10
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 1
Blue Jay - 6
American Crow – 16
Fish Crow - 4
Tree Swallow - 15
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3
Bank Swallow - 20
Cave Swallow - 4 (two adults, two immatures)
Barn Swallow - 5
Carolina Wren - 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
Northern Mockingbird - 5
Yellow-breasted Chat – 1 (Heard Only)
Summer Tanager - 7
Northern Cardinal - 6
Blue Grosbeak - 6
Indigo Bunting - 7
Painted Bunting - 1
Red-winged Blackbird - 150
Common Grackle - 2
Orchard Oriole – 1
House Sparrow - 4

Rob Wiedenmann
Fayetteville



 
Subject: Adult Bald Eagle near Goshen
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 19:41:17 -0500
Adult Bald Eagle about a mile and half west of the intersection of AR 
295 & AR 45 while traveling west on 45 on the way into Goshen.
3 PM or so. The bird was flying north and looked like it had just 
taken off a perch and was about 30 feet in the air over the highway.

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville 
Subject: SWAINSON'S HAWKS (2) NEAR CHEROKEE CITY THIS MORNING
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 20:17:33 +0000
Two Swainsons Hawks soared over me on highway 43, 1.5 miles south of the 
intersection of highways 43 and 12. I had a single bird soar over the same area 
July 16, carrying food. So perhaps there is a nest in this area. 


This is the former Round Prairie north of Siloam Springs, west of Gentry, and 
south of Cherokee City. The roadside Tallgrass Prairie is in full bloom along 
there, too: blazing stars (along 12), sawtooth sunflower (six feet tall, but 
not yet flowering), ashy sunflower, compass plant, winged sumac, wild bergamot 
(full of bumblebees and other pollinators), hairy wild petunia, etc. Lots of 
traffic in this area, so when you stop, get off the road and keep a good eye 
out for safety. 
Subject: FIGHTING GREAT EGRETS
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:41:36 -0500
Today at Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff, I observed and photographed two Great 
Egrets in a protracted fight. I knew that Great Egrets were aggressive and have 
observed a lot of squabbles, but have never observed the aggressor to 
completely submerge its opponent. The total submergence occured twice in the 
battle. The aggressor landed on the underdog with its axis perpendicular to 
him. Ultimately, the uppermost Egret stood on the submerged neck of its 
opponent with the losers legs now positioned on either side of the aggressor. 
At battles end, both flew off, apparently neither scathed. The photos were made 
in low light, but certainly document the fight. I will be glad to share a few 
pics or a more compete series if anyone has an interest. 

John Redman










 
Subject: SW Arkansas Birds
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:00:04 -0500
I spent the weekend in SW Arkansas mostly looking for dragonflies and
wildflowers.  I did not see anything rare like a Crested Caracara but did
see the following interesting birds.  So if you are a year lister some of
these may be of interest:

Bois D'Arc
White Ibis
Least Bittern
Black-bellied Whistling Duck
Black-crowned Night Heron

Sarasota
Inca Dove

Okay Levee
Painted Buntings
I heard a little farther down than I went there were good views of an
Osprey nest

Smith Lake (I think) in the Sulfur River Area
Black-crowned Night Heron

Pictures were taken of some but I have not posted yet....

Michael
Subject: MOS fall meeting: Sept. 21 with photographer & ID expert Kevin Karlson
From: Jason Hoeksema <hoeksema AT OLEMISS.EDU>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:49:48 -0500
Arkansas birders,
The Mississippi Ornithological Society (MOS) will hold its *fall meeting*
in Greenwood, MS the weekend of September 19-21, 2014. We really hope
you'll consider a trip south to join us.  Our special guest will be
*photographer
and ID expert Kevin Karlson  *(*The
Shorebird Guide*

), 

who will give presentations on the amazing lives and varieties of
shorebirds migrating through the Delta, as well as his impressionistic
approach to bird identification. In addition, Kevin will lead an
interactive 1/2-day field workshop on Saturday to put shorebird
identification to practice and showcase Delta birding. Meeting events will
be scheduled for Friday evening through Saturday evening with field trips
Saturday and Sunday morning. During the weekend, we expect to find 14+
species of shorebirds (including American Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, and
their more cryptic cousins), along with thousands of waders (including Wood
Stork & Roseate Spoonbill), and migrant passerines. Delta birding can be
fantastic this time of year.

For *additional details* including speaker bio, lodging information, and
itinerary, please visit this page:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/fall_meeting_announcement.pdf

For online (or mail-in) meeting *registration*, please visit this webpage:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/FallMeeting.htm

Also: You can now *join MOS online*. MOS members will receive discounted
registration for this event, are eligible to register for a meet & greet
with Kevin Karlson on Sept. 19, and also will receive discounted
registration for future field trips led by Delta Wind Birds
 (who is co-sponsoring this fall MOS
meeting). To join MOS, please visit this webpage:
http://www.mississippiornithologicalsociety.com/Membership%20info.htm

We hope to see you in Greenwood in September!

best wishes,
Jason Hoeksema & J.R. Rigby
Oxford, MS
Subject: Re: Database Update
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:28:49 -0500
Yes!  Thank you Lyndal.  What a valuable research tool.


Ann



On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 6:20 PM, Allan Mueller  wrote:

> Lyndal,
>
> Thanks for keeping up with this database.  It is very valuable.
>
> Allan Mueller
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 4:31 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:
>
>> Arbirders:
>>
>> Last spring's vetted bird records have been added to the on-line archival
>> database of rare and out of season birds. The database now contains 14,379
>> records. This searchable database can be accessed at:
>>
>> www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html
>> 
 

>>
>> Good searching,
>>
>> Lyndal York,
>> Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Allan Mueller
> 20 Moseley Lane
> Conway, AR 72032
> 501-327-8952 home
> 501-339-8071 cell
>
>
> "I ain't never did no wrong."
> Elvis Presley in "One Night"
>
>
Subject: Re: Database Update
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:20:51 -0500
Lyndal,

Thanks for keeping up with this database.  It is very valuable.

Allan Mueller


On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 4:31 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:

> Arbirders:
>
> Last spring's vetted bird records have been added to the on-line archival
> database of rare and out of season birds. The database now contains 14,379
> records. This searchable database can be accessed at:
>
> www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html
> 
 

>
> Good searching,
>
> Lyndal York,
> Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
>
>
>


-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 22
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:15:00 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 63 species were found. 
Anyone wishing to see the Wood Storks can view them from the east levee of 
Lotus Lake looking east into unit 27B. There is a dead tree they like to roost 
in during the day there. There are often Neotropic Cormorants in the tree with 
them. They also like to feed and rest in the water below this tree too. For the 
best view of this tree, walk east on the south levee of unit 27B about 100 
yards from the SE corner of Lotus Lake. The best way to get to this area on 
foot would be to walk west from the middle parking area into Bittern Lake then 
cross the foot bridge near the NW corner of Bittern Lake. Also, the best place 
to find the Cave Swallows is at the first bridge on Mudline Road north of Push 
Creek. They like to roost with the Barn Swallows in a dead tree on the west 
side of the bridge. Here is my list for today: 


Black-bellied Whistling-Duck - 1
Wood Duck - 5
Pied-billed Grebe - 24
Neotropic Cormorant - 5
Anhinga - 16
Least Bittern - 2
Great Blue Heron - 26
Great Egret - 114
Snowy Egret - 67
Little Blue Heron - 29
Green Heron - 20
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 36
White Ibis - 187
Wood Stork - 26
Black Vulture - 11
Turkey Vulture - 11
Red-shouldered Hawk - 1
Red-tailed Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 2 adults (also brood of at least 3 black downy chicks.)
Common Gallinule - 5
American Coot - 1
Killdeer - 25
Spotted Sandpiper - 3
Solitary Sandpiper - 9
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 2
Least Sandpiper - 4
Pectoral Sandpiper - 3
Mourning Dove - 33
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2
Belted Kingfisher - 3
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Willow Flycatcher - 1 (with cowbird chick in tow; new breeding location.)
Eastern Phoebe - 6
Great Crested Flycatcher - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 7
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2
White-eyed Vireo - 2
Bell's Vireo - 2
American Crow - 7
Fish Crow - 5
Purple Martin - 8
Tree Swallow - 78
Cave Swallow - 5 juveniles
Barn Swallow - 50
Carolina Chickadee - 1
Tufted Titmouse - 1
Carolina Wren - 8
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2
Eastern Bluebird - 2
Gray Catbird - 1
Northern Mockingbird - 1
Prothonotary Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 12
Yellow-breasted Chat - 3
Northern Cardinal - 13
Blue Grosbeak - 2
Indigo Bunting - 12
Painted Bunting - 4
Dickcissel - 26
Red-winged Blackbird - 41
Common Grackle - 6
Brown-headed Cowbird - 3


Odonates:

Fragile Forktail
Lilypad Forktail
Regal Darner
Prince Baskettail
Halloween Pennant
Eastern Pondhawk
Slaty Skimmer
Widow Skimmer
Common Whitetail
Eastern Amberwing
Blue Dasher
Wandering Glider
Spot-winged Glider
Black Saddlebags


Good birding!


David Arbour
De Queen, AR

Visit the Red Slough Photo Gallery:  www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma
Subject: Database Update
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:31:41 -0500
Arbirders:

Last spring's vetted bird records have been added to the on-line archival
database of rare and out of season birds. The database now contains 14,379
records. This searchable database can be accessed at:

www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html

Good searching,

Lyndal York,
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Ruddy Ducks Part II
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:16:15 -0700
Following up on John Redman's post about the Ruddy Ducks at Boyd Point Waste 
Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. For anyone interested here's a link to 
two of the photos I took this morning. 


http://www.pbase.com/docg/july_2014


Doc George  
Subject: RUDDY DUCKS IN BREEDING PLUMAGE
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:51:16 -0500
This morning Doc George and I observed and photographed a pair of Ruddy Ducks 
in full breeding plumage at the Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Facility in 
Pine Bluff. The sky was clear, the water glassy and the ducks came in close to 
the shore. Today, there were two pair. The second male may well have been 
present yesterday, but was never seen. The photos of the two vibrant males 
together with their reflections in the water are striking. (I will be glad to 
share photos, when downloaded.) If anyone has not see Ruddy Ducks in breeding 
plumage, this would be a great opportunity. They are easy to spot since no 
other ducks are present. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:44:59 -0500
Looking in my ‘oldest’ bird book, Copyright 1966: Golden Guide to Field 
Identification Birds of North America; it has Long-billed Marsh Wren in it. 
Also has Short-billed Marsh Wren. At least I think that was probably my first 
bird book. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Terry Butler 
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 10:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren

I have a bird book (Audubon’s Birds of America) my grandmother gave me for 
Christmas in 1950. It has several different names for birds back then. I looked 
for the Marsh Wren but it wasn’t listed. There was a listing for the Sedge 
Wren, then called the Short-billed Marsh Wren. To list a few of the other 
names, Duck Hawk-Peregrine Falcon, Fish Hawk-Osprey, Red-backed 
Sandpiper-Dunlin, Upland Plover-Upland Sandpiper, Robin Snipe-Red Knot, Wood 
Ibis- Wood Stork, etc…… 


 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR  

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd 

Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:11 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren

 

Oh, yes! Now I remember. That's its old name--the way I first learned it. But 
I've never seen "Long-billed" without the "Marsh" before. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 

 



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
From: mplinz AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

Jerry,

I found this reference…

The Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it 
from the Sedge Wren. 


 

Michael 

 

On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 


I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the birding 
site descriptions there. I have seen references to a "long-billed wren", but I 
can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson. What is that? a 
sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled one. I'd 
appreciate some help. 


 

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler

 
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:08:21 -0500
I have a bird book (Audubon's Birds of America) my grandmother gave me for
Christmas in 1950.  It has several different names for birds back then.  I
looked for the Marsh Wren but it wasn't listed.  There was a listing for the
Sedge Wren, then called the Short-billed Marsh Wren. To list a few of the
other names, Duck Hawk-Peregrine Falcon, Fish Hawk-Osprey, Red-backed
Sandpiper-Dunlin, Upland Plover-Upland Sandpiper, Robin Snipe-Red Knot, Wood
Ibis- Wood Stork, etc..

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR  

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 9:11 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren

 

Oh, yes!  Now I remember.  That's its old name--the way I first learned it.
But I've never seen "Long-billed" without the "Marsh" before.
 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 
 

  _____  

Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
From: mplinz AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

Jerry,

I found this reference.

The Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it
from the Sedge Wren.

 

Michael 

 

On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler 
wrote:

I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the
birding site descriptions there.  I have seen references to a "long-billed
wren", but I can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson.  What is
that? a sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled one.
I'd appreciate some help.

 

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler

 
Subject: Re: Forest Man
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:43:16 -0500
After viewing this again, I think I've found a place where I can plant three 
more trees this year. Maybe even five. I have a small yard that won't support 
any more trees. If all members on ARBird list serve would plant at least one 
tree somewhere, we might make a very small difference in habitat for birds. 

SJ Gibson
Harrison

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 21, 2014, at 11:02 PM, Dorothy Cooney 
<00000061bc52899a-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Thank you Herschel, wonderful video! I finally got to watch it and it's very 
inspiring. COme on Usee, we miss you. 

>  
> Dorothy Cooney
> Wickes, AR
> 
> 
> On Wednesday, July 16, 2014 12:38 PM, Herschel Raney 
 wrote: 

> 
> 
> I am amazed.
> 
> And a shirker, a lazy man. Comparatively. I think I have planted perhaps 
thirty trees in my life. 

> 
> This is a 16 minute film. So choose your right time to click on it.
> 
> 
> http://devour.com/video/forest-man/
> 
> 
> Herschel Raney
> Conway AR (where I still have a forest)
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:11:08 -0500
Oh, yes! Now I remember. That's its old name--the way I first learned it. But 
I've never seen "Long-billed" without the "Marsh" before. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
From: mplinz AT GMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

Jerry,I found this referenceThe Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed 
Marsh Wren to distinguish it from the Sedge Wren. 



Michael 



On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 



I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the birding 
site descriptions there. I have seen references to a "long-billed wren", but I 
can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson. What is that? a 
sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled one. I'd 
appreciate some help. 




Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler

 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Long-billed wren
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 23:23:20 -0500
Jerry,
I found this reference…
The Marsh wren is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it
from the Sedge Wren.

Michael


On Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 9:15 PM, Jerry Butler 
wrote:

> I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the
> birding site descriptions there.  I have seen references to a "long-billed
> wren", but I can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson.  What is
> that? a sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled
> one.  I'd appreciate some help.
>
> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>
Subject: Re: Forest Man
From: Dorothy Cooney <00000061bc52899a-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:02:51 -0700
Thank you Herschel, wonderful video! I finally got to watch it and it's very 
inspiring. COme on Usee, we miss you. 



Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR



On Wednesday, July 16, 2014 12:38 PM, Herschel Raney 
 wrote: 

 

>
>
>I am amazed.
>
>
>And a shirker, a lazy man. Comparatively. I think I have planted perhaps 
thirty trees in my life. 

>
>
>This is a 16 minute film. So choose your right time to click on it. 
>
>
>
>
>http://devour.com/video/forest-man/
>
>
>
>
>Herschel Raney
>Conway AR (where I still have a forest)
>
>
Subject: Dyer Lake
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:12:17 -0500
So I found Dyer Lake today. Pretty cool place. Sure wish I had a kayak. From 
the boat ramp I saw Great Egret, Little Blue, Great Blue, and Snowy Egret. 
Couldn't see the whole lake from the ramp. No Wood Storks. But who knows what 
might be around the bend. 


Drove south toward the river on Gin Town. There were two wet areas with mud 
flats full of egrets, herons, and killdeer. Then I drove east to Vine Prairie 
rd and went south to the river to look downstream to Bird Island. The island 
was awash in white. Hundreds of egrets were standing on the beaches and trees. 
Lots were still flying to and fro. I guess young were still being fed. 


Nothing happening at Frog Bayou. But the Alma sewage lagoons had Black-bellied 
Whistling Ducks. And the ponds across from the lagoons were filled with cattle 
egrets. 


Swallows were sunning in the roads, and spread out to sunbathe in the tops of 
small trees. Brown Thrashers were dust bathing. Still lots of bird song. But 
many birds were just quietly moving about, looking for food, job done, waiting 
for the right time to head south. 


I saw zero Least Terns today.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Long-billed wren
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:15:30 -0500
I am soon off to Detroit Michigan and have been looking at some of the
birding site descriptions there.  I have seen references to a "long-billed
wren", but I can't find any such critter in my Sibley or Peterson.  What is
that? a sub-species, not a true wren, an archaic term or a new-fangled
one.  I'd appreciate some help.

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: Ruddy Duck in breeding plumage
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:26:31 -0500
A male Ruddy Duck in full breeding plumage arrived today at Boyd Point Waste 
Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. He was accompanied by two females. The 
male came in close to the shore for great looks and clear photos. 
Subject: NEOTROPIC AND DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS AT EAGLE WATCH, GENTRY
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:16:15 +0000
Terry Stanfill and I saw NEOTROPIC (1) AND DOUBLE-CRESTED (3) CORMORANTS at 
Eagle Watch Nature Trail just west of Gentry this morning. The birds were 
easily seen from the viewing area at the end of the short walking trail, where 
it overlooks SWEPCO Lake. We had our first sighting of a Neotropic in July 
2011, with subsequent late summer sightings in 2012 and 2013. The lake is high 
now, which appears to limit where the cormorants perch to dry off, a good thing 
if you want to see them, since one of the best places is directly east of the 
viewing platform, with excellent light in the morning. I'll post some 
photographs on both the Eagle Watch Nature Trail facebook page and on Joe Neal 
facebook this evening. If you get the view we had today, you won't have to be a 
cormorant expert to see the difference in the two species. 
Subject: ArkDem 7/21/14: Birds find island as waypoint to Brazil
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:44:01 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

There is a good article titled "Birds find island as waypoint to Brazil" on the 
front page of today's Ark. Democrat ActiveStyle section. It's about bird island 
on Lake Ouachita that purple martins and other bird species use as a roosting 
site. 


Enjoy,
Barry Haas
Subject: AAS News of Members
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:19:20 +0000
Dear ARbirders:

I am pleased to fill the News of Members editor position for the AAS 
newsletter, Arkansas Birds. A position held by Loice Lacy for many years! 


It's about time for the next issue to be published so.........Please send your 
recent adventures, anecdotes, photos, birding news, and observations to me at 
dboyles AT arkansasedc.com, by August 1 for the 
upcoming edition of the Arkansas Birds newsletter! Thank you for supporting our 
newsletter through your personal contributions! 


Thanks and good birding,
Dottie Boyles

This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Good Bird
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 18:07:30 -0500
Saw a 1st year Laughing Gull at Treadway's today.  Also 100+ Least
Sandpipers, several Western Sandpipers a few still in breading plumage, six
Green Herons, dozen Ruddy Duck's, a couple of Lesser Scaups, half dozen
American Coots, 50+ Great Egrets, Little and Great Blue Herons, Pect's, one
Semipalmated Plover, Spotted Sandpiper's, hundreds of Tree and Rough Winged
Swallows, a few Barn Swallows and several Killdeer.  Saul's ponds was to
muddy to enter. Mr. Saul in the past has told me I could look for birds but
to avoid the ponds during wet weather, please.

 

Terry Butler
Subject: Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:41:19 -0500
That's great! Some good PR would probably provide a pat on the back for
cooperating as well as to raise awareness of the problem for other companies
who use wires. Thanks, Joe, for following up.you are a good example for all
of us! Joyce Hartmann, Van Buren County

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 10:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton

 

I've just gotten off the phone with a person at SWEPCO-AEP who accepted my
report on the heron powerline death, understood what I was saying, and said
he would immediately pursue getting the line marked near the hatchery. I am
quite pleased that he completely understood the problem. It is a good start
and I will report back on this when the solution is in place. I was also
able to get in a pitch for protection of the high wintering population of
raptors in the same area. 
Subject: crested caracara
From: Danny Townsend <perfectplaces AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 17:50:16 -0500
I just recieved and email with regards to bird. The picture was indeed taken in 
Texas. Sorry for all of the excitement. Would have been fun though. 
Subject: Crested Caracara - probably not
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:05:42 -0500
Dear fellow birders:


I attempted to follow-up on the sighting and learned (through friends of this 
person) that they are currently in San Antonio, and it is most likely 

that is where the image was taken. There were 5 of them! This makes more sense 
they were 

seen in TX. 


Sincerely,


Kelly Chitwood
(Who will look anyway, just in case.) 
Subject: Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton
From: Dawner <000000554a8a6ef2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:16:35 -0400
How wonderful!
?
Dawn
Izard County


-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Sent: Fri, Jul 18, 2014 10:08 am
Subject: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton

I've just gotten off the phone with a person at SWEPCO-AEP who accepted my 
report on the heron powerline death, understood what I was saying, and said he 
would immediately pursue getting the line marked near the hatchery. I am quite 
pleased that he completely understood the problem. It is a good start and I 
will report back on this when the solution is in place. I was also able to get 
in a pitch for protection of the high wintering population of raptors in the 
same area. 

Subject: Crested Caracara in El Dorado
From: Danny Townsend <perfectplaces AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:59:15 -0500
I just recieved information and a picture of a Crested Caracara in El Dorado 
that was seen in yesterday. I will post more information as it is given to me. 
I do not know the exact location as of yet. 

Subject: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:08:01 +0000
I've just gotten off the phone with a person at SWEPCO-AEP who accepted my 
report on the heron powerline death, understood what I was saying, and said he 
would immediately pursue getting the line marked near the hatchery. I am quite 
pleased that he completely understood the problem. It is a good start and I 
will report back on this when the solution is in place. I was also able to get 
in a pitch for protection of the high wintering population of raptors in the 
same area. 
Subject: Basic info about GBH killed on Centerton powerline -- birders can help
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:12:16 +0000
Here is the basic information about the killing of a Great Blue Heron on a 
SWEPCO high voltage powerline that is immediately adjacent the south boundary 
of Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton, in Benton County, Arkansas, in case 
you can encourage SWEPCO to act on this: 

-- The line runs along and immediately adjacent the entire south boundary of 
the hatchery. 

--These lines are part of the 345,000-volt transmission line associated with 
Shipe Road station built within the past few years. The line features tall 
metal poles with four wires. The bottom three wires are easily seen, but the 
top wire is smaller and less visible. 

--The hatchery itself (110 acres) and the surrounding landscape is all former 
prairie and is heavily used by all kinds of birds, including many raptors. We 
have seen all three falcons here (Peregrine, Prairie, and Kestrel, the latter 
nesting), Red-tailed Hawks, Swainsons Hawks, both vulture species, and in 
winter, regular visits to the hatchery by Bald Eagles. Obviously, they are all 
now at risk. And because these lines cover many miles, it is not clear just how 
much of a risk the top line presents. 

--I do not have any specific contact information for SWEPCO, other than what is 
available on SWEPCO.com. So starting there, the customer service number is 
1-888-216-3523. If you go to SWEPCO.com, there is a contact us email form. 

--If you contact SWEPCO, please ask them to install balls used as line 
identifiers on this particular expanse of line across the south end of the 
hatchery. Also, mention the requirement that this mortality be reported to the 
US Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent. 

I will be happy to provide to anyone my photograph of the Great Blue Heron dead 
on the powerline and a view of the powerline without the heron that shows the 
basic invisibility of the top wire (send me an email request). 

Im going to try and figure out how to get these images to SWEPCO today.
Subject: MESSAGES FROM A SADLY DISHEVELED FORM
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 19:43:02 +0000
Sometimes you see stuff that makes you sick, and sometimes it also makes you 
think. 


This morning I headed up to Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton to see if 
any more shorebirds had come south. Before I got there I saw a Solitary 
Sandpiper alongside a little farm pond, my first of the fall. 


Right before the hatchery, the road passes under the 345,000-volt transmission 
line associated with Southwestern Electrical Power Companys Shipe Road station 
near Centerton. Hawks and other birds perch on these wires and on the tall 
poles. I look down the lines where they cross a pasture immediately south of 
the Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton. You never know when a Swainsons 
Hawk might be there. 


Unfortunately, today on the otherwise largely invisible top wire I saw the 
dangled form of what I knew immediately was a Great Blue Heron. Ive seen this 
sadly disheveled form before, though not at Centerton. 


I have just posted two photographs on my facebook page. If interested, take a 
look and you dont have to be my friend to do so. There is a bird in one 
photograph, but not in the other. The fledgling heron probably never saw the 
top 1 of 4 wires, got a wing wrapped and trapped, hung and eventually died 
there. In the other photograph, taken nearby, 3 of 4 wires are easily seen, but 
the top killer is all but invisible. I assume that is what happened to this 
novice Great Blue: tried to fly above the obvious 3 wires and, until too late, 
never saw the killer. There an inescapable moral dimension to such a bold 
creature caught helplessly in the nameless jaws of modernity. 


So who is responsible for this? In my younger days I would have just pointed 
the finger at SWEPCO. Older now, I notice fingers pointing back at me, too. I 
have my lights on and the air-conditioner running in summer, using lots of 
juice. That said, shouldnt such hazards as all-but-invisible high wires be 
marked so as to improve the life chances of our fellow creatures? 


Great Blue Herons and other flying creatures are expressions of our universe, 
widely cherished by the same public that uses electricity. I am personally 
willing to add a few cents to my monthly bill to give herons a better chance. 
That is, willing to do unto others as you would have them do unto you. 


We entangle them at great cost to ourselves. When we respect them, we respect 
ourselves, too. 
Subject: Birds Eat Insects! Volunteer or Attend the Insect Festival of Arkansas
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:03:28 +0000
Dear Birders,

I love birds and I love insects. They go hand in hand. The Department of 
Entomology at the University of Arkansas will be having our 14th Insect 
Festival of Arkansas on October 2, 2014 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. It is a free 
event and we usually have 3,000+ school children and adults come to the event. 


We can always use volunteers. It is a lot of fun, and you would learn about 
insects too. 


Best of all would be if some birders would make a display of some kind about 
the interaction of birds and insects, or bring some live birds to show the 
children. I do not really know what is possible in this regard. 


We will have a fish and game aquarium there with native fish.

I have attached our poster. If you want to volunteer, please contact me by 
email. 


Otherwise, I hope you will attend. I guarantee you will be amazed. We have a 
great arthropod/insect zoo, lots of experts, a cotton patch, insect theatre, 
honey bees, and on and on. 


Best regards,
Dr. Donald C. Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology
Subject: ticket price
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:30:56 +0000
I notice that the poster for our Slow Food event tonight did not have the price 
of tickets... they are $35 each.. 




****************************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA
phone 479-575-6359  fax 479-575-4010
email kgsmith AT uark.edu
****************************************
Subject: Mulhollan Waterfowl Blind at Lake Fayetteville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 11:54:01 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society is the lead conservation organization 
working to build a modern, attractive waterfowl observation blind at Lake 
Fayetteville. This is one of our education responses to growing pressures on 
natural resources in northwest Arkansas. Please take a look at a painting of 
the blind by blind architect Michael Cockram, our introduction to Dr Mulhollan 
and his service to the natural history community, and additional material on 
the NWAAS web site. Go here: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/. 


Dr David Chapman has offered to send a copy of his excellent "The Birdlife of 
Lake Fayetteville" for donations of $100 or more. Details are on the web page. 
For those who donate $200 or more he will send a copy of his "The History of 
Lake Fayetteville" published in Flashback (vol 61, no. 3, Fall 2011). This 
fascinating history won the Walter J. Lemke Prize awarded by Washington County 
Historical Society. If cash donations are unrealistic, but you'd still like to 
help, we will need the help of many volunteer hands on several days this fall 
during construction. 
Subject: nothing to do with birds - for people near Fayetteville
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 00:57:36 +0000
well there is a chicken liver terrine... Slow Food is the opposite of fast 
food... eat locally... hope some of you can attend... you can buy tickets at 
the door or online... 




****************************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701 USA
phone 479-575-6359  fax 479-575-4010
email kgsmith AT uark.edu
****************************************



Join us tomorrow for
Fund Your 
Farmers! 


Thursday, July 17, 5-7pm
at the Garden Room
215 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville

Purchase 
Tickets! 


or call 479-799-7985



Announcing an exciting tasting menu from five local chefs:

Tomato Peach Gazpacho
vegan, gluten free
Jerrmy Gawthrop Greenhouse Grille



Sweden Creek Farm Shiitake Pate
Across the Creek Chicken Liver Terrine
Cedar Creek Farm Head Cheese
Alan Dierks, Vetro 1925



An Ozark adaptation of Elote: grilled corn on the cob smothered with bacon 
aioli, beer vinegar, candied sage, and red chile flakes 


plus vegetarian version

Dorothy Hall, 28 Springs



Round Mountain Farm Lamb-Stuffed Pasta with White River Creamery lemon-chevre 
sauce and crisp basil chiffonade 


Blue Heaven Farm Blueberry Cheesecake bites on steel-cut oat tuille from War 
Eagle Mill 


Bill Lyle, Eleven Restaurant



French Macarons made with local fruit
Robyn Bowen, The Fayetteville Pastry Shop


Purchase 
Tickets! 


or call 479-799-7985



Can't attend? You can still
make a tax-deductible 
donation. 


Proceeds will support Ozark Slow Food's Micro-Grant 
Program. 












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Ozark Slow Food | 18235 Wildlife Rd | Fayetteville | AR | 72701



Subject: Magic Mix for birds
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 12:48:23 -0500
The recipe for Magic Mix is taken from a newspaper column by Ruth Thomas:

 

MAGIC MIX:

            Melt about two cupfuls of fat, preferably bacon grease (you may
use oleo, cooking oil, poultry fat, any shortening): blend in some peanut
butter, a cup more or less, then stir in about as much heavy syrup as you
had grease; and finally work in cornmeal until the mix is stiffer than
peanut butter.

            Too much cornmeal makes the mix dry as it tends to harden if the
birds do not eat it at once.  Too little leaves the mix sticky, and on warm
days the grease will ooze to the top.  However, the birds are not critical.
Once having acquired the taste, they will eat it in almost any variation.
Nutmeats, raisins, stale cake and cookies may be added.  It is not advisable
to stir in seeds.  Serve your seed mixtures separately.  All birds relish
Magic Mix, but its greatest value is the acceptance by those species that do
not, by their nature, eat small seeds or the larger grains found in hen
scratch.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NO SPOIL BIRD SEED BALL:

1 oz. peanut butter

1 oz. shortening

1 oz. flour

4 oz. cornmeal

1 oz. bird seed

Mix and shape

 

 

 

Sally Jo Gibson

512 Yorkshire Cove

Harrison, AR 72601

Home Phone: 870-741-5805

Cell: 870-688-9950

sjogibson AT live.com

 

Life is too short to be anything but happy. 

Falling down is a part of life, Getting back up is living.

 
Subject: Forest Man
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 12:38:15 -0500
I am amazed.

And a shirker, a lazy man. Comparatively. I think I have planted perhaps
thirty trees in my life.

This is a 16 minute film. So choose your right time to click on it.


http://devour.com/video/forest-man/


Herschel Raney
Conway AR (where I still have a forest)
Subject: Fw: Sign the petition to stop ALEC in Arkansas
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 10:23:02 -0700
Many of us who care about wild birds have been working to protect places we 
(and the birds) love from threats which are made very difficult to surmount by 
powerful businesses. Issues that come to mind are the Buffalo National River 
from pig farms and our parks from too many bike trails, but there are others. 
Given this difficulty in overcoming the money wielded by powerful entities, I 
thought I should share this. If you care about our birds and their homes, 
please sign this and share. We really do need to work together to protect what 
we love. 

Joanie



On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 1:06 PM, "Nathan Empsall, SierraRise" 
 wrote: 

 


Sierra Club 
 

 
Corporate greed-monster ALEC is pushing more than 40 bills that attack our 
climate in every corner of the country. It's up to you to stop them. 


Raise your voice today -- tell Gov. Mike Beebe and your state lawmakers to 
stand firm against ALEC's attacks on clean energy! 

Dear Carol Joan,

The summer's first major heat waves have arrived -- but that won't stop ALEC 
from trying to destroy our climate in the name of corporate greed. 


With the nation's state legislatures debating more than 40 anti-climate bills, 
it's up to you, Carol Joan, to slam the brakes on ALEC's pro-polluter agenda in 
Arkansas. 


ALEC -- the American Legislative Exchange Council -- is the right-wing 
legislation factory behind Stand Your Ground laws and attacks on voting rights. 
It's bankrolled by major corporations like Koch Industries, Exxon, and Philip 
Morris. [1] 


Earlier this year, ALEC made successful attacks on clean energy in Ohio [2] and 
Oklahoma [3] -- and they're gearing up to do the same thing in several dozen 
more states. Fortunately, we have the voice to stop them. 


It's time to act: SierraRise supporters like you need to make ALEC's brand so 
toxic that no governor or state legislator will ever want to be associated with 
it again! 


Citizens need to call the shots in Arkansas, not multinational corporations. 
Email Gov. Mike Beebe and Sen. Bryan King today -- tell them to resist ALEC's 
attacks on the climate! 


Before this year's successes, ALEC was 0-for-13 in its attempts to roll back 
clean energy laws. Even in Ohio, the bill that passed didn't go nearly as far 
as ALEC wanted, thanks to the efforts of 5,000 Sierra Club activists. 


Examples like these show that ALEC can be beat, but they're certainly not going 
to go down easy. Only last week, they named Lisa B. Nelson as their new 
executive director, a former aide to Newt Gingrich and top lobbyist for 
financial and telecom companies. [4] 


It will be Nelson's job to try and pass 40 more anti-climate ALEC bills before 
the end of the year. These bills don't just attack clean energy standards -- 
they also push back against the EPA's clean power climate plan, support the 
dirty Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, and fight for less fracking regulation. 
[5] 


It might be Nelson's job to try and ram those bills through, but it's our job 
to stop them. We the people should be in charge, not them the corporations. And 
here's the good news: The SierraRise community has nearly doubled in size in 
just its first year, and our grassroots voices can speak far louder than ALEC's 
pockets. 


Let's make ALEC persona non grata in every state capitol. Email your state's 
leaders today and make sure they know that ALEC puts corporate greed ahead of 
Arkansas's needs! 


In it together,

Nathan Empsall
SierraRise Senior Campaigner

P.S. Five signatures are even more powerful than one -- after you take action, 
be sure to forward this alert to your friends, family, and colleagues! 


 

 
References:

1. Graves, Lisa. "What is ALEC?" The Center for Media and Democracy.

2. Firestone, David (2014 May 29). "Ohio Rolls Back Renewables." The New York 
Times. 


3. Kroh, Kiley (2014 April 26). "Oklahoma Will Charge Customers Who Install 
Their Own Solar Panels." Climate Progress. 


4. Chokshi, Niraj (2014 July 8). "ALEC, the free-market group liberals love to 
hate, gets a new boss." The Washington Post. 


5. Phillips, Ari (2014 April 25). "Koch Brothers And ALEC Expand Fight On Clean 
Energy Users." Climate Progress. 


Image inspired by the Center for Media and Democracy

  


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Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 15
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 23:01:08 -0500
It was partly cloudy and warm on the bird survey today. 71 species were found. 
Shorebirds are starting to come back through. Looking through the large flocks 
of juvenile swallows that were perching in trees and bushes around the wetlands 
produced 3 juvenile Cave Swallows. Also finding a pair of Green-winged Teal 
seemed really odd. Here is my list for today: 


Canada Goose - 1
Wood Duck - 34
Gadwall - 1
Mallard - 4
Blue-winged Teal - 1
Green-winged Teal - 2 (pair)
Pied-billed Grebe - 10
Neotropic Cormorant - 6
Anhinga - 12
Least Bittern - 3
Great Blue Heron - 22
Great Egret - 39
Snowy Egret - 55
Little Blue Heron - 52
Tricolored Heron - 1 adult
Cattle Egret - 10
Green Heron - 10
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 9
White Ibis - 48
Wood Stork - 5
Turkey Vulture - 14
Mississippi Kite - 1
Red-shouldered Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 4 adults (also 4 downy chicks)
Common Gallinule - 19 (also 3 downy chicks)
American Coot - 1
Killdeer - 10
Solitary Sandpiper - 4
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
Least Sandpiper - 4
Pectoral Sandpiper - 2
Least Tern - 2
Mourning Dove - 18
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 10
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Pileated Woodpecker - 1
Willow Flycatcher - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 7
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1
White-eyed Vireo - 9
Bell's Vireo - 3
Red-eyed Vireo - 1
American Crow - 7
Fish Crow - 4
Purple Martin - 6
Tree Swallow - 115
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3
Cliff Swallow - 3
Cave Swallow - 3
Barn Swallow - 45
Carolina Chickadee - 3
Tufted Titmouse - 2
Carolina Wren - 8
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3
Eastern Bluebird - 4
Northern Mockingbird - 3
Prothonotary Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 7
Yellow-breasted Chat - 6
Summer Tanager - 1
Northern Cardinal - 20
Blue Grosbeak - 2
Indigo Bunting - 17
Painted Bunting - 7
Dickcissel - 42
Red-winged Blackbird - 63
Common Grackle - 14
Brown-headed Cowbird - 1
Orchard Oriole - 4


Odonates:

Fragile Forktail
Citrine Forktail
Lilypad Forktail
Common Green Darner
Cyrano Darner
Swamp Darner
Prince Baskettail
Mocha Emerald
Jade Clubtail
Halloween Pennant
Four-spotted Pennant
Eastern Pondhawk
Widow Skimmer
Common Whitetail
Slaty Skimmer
Eastern Amberwing
Blue Dasher
Wandering Glider
Spot-winged Glider
Black Saddlebags
"red" Saddlebags species


Herps:

American Alligator
Red-eared Slider
Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Green Treefrog
Bronze Frog
Bullfrog


Good birding!



David Arbour
De Queen, AR

Visit the Red Slough Photo Gallery:  www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma
Subject: PINE BLUFF BIRDING
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:29:03 -0500
Today at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility I observed and 
photographed 6 least Terns. They perched on the pilings near the levee road 
that runs between the 1st and second ponds. This is a favorite spot for both 
Black and Forester's Terns. The adults were bringing in fat gravid Gambusia to 
individuals that were most likely more junior, the only indication of an age 
difference being a faint suggestion of a dark wing bar. While photographing, a 
very vocal Willet flew overhead and I was able to get a few inflight shots. (I 
will be glad to share) At Lake Saracen I observed a flock of 10 Am White 
Pelicans. This is the earliest in the summer that I have observed Pelicans at 
Saracen. 

John Redman
Subject: AAS Photo Contest Closed, Calendar Orders Open!
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 14:50:24 -0700
Hello All,

The second annual calendar photo contest of the Arkansas Audubon Society is now 
closed! We had a great turnout this year and I have high hopes that this 
fundraiser can grow in the future. Thank you to everyone who entered and 
supported this competition and the Iola Rae Fund again this year. Having worked 
at both the Halberg Ecology Camp and Johnson Advanced Camp, I see the 
importance in getting these wonderful young people involved in the AAS, as it 
opens more doors for them. I can say from experience that it is truly life 
changing. It doesn’t take much thought to come up with that conclusion! 

 
My committee and I are very excited about this year’s calendar, which will 
feature 13 beautiful species that are representative of the diverse birding 
opportunities in the Natural State. The judging of the entries will proceed 
soon. Like last year, the calendars will be available at the fall meeting in 
Russellville for $20 each. They will be spiral-bound, 8.5”x11” and on heavy 
80 lb. gloss paper. Also featured again this year will be an “Important 
Dates” page in the back for birding events throughout 2015. 


Pre-orders for the calendar will be accepted starting now by contacting me at 
mlpruitt24 AT yahoo.com. If pre-ordering calendars, YOU set the amount that you 
want to purchase. For non pre-orders, to be purchased at the fall meeting, 
there will be a limit of three calendars per person. All proceeds from the sale 
of the calendars will go to the Iola Rae Fund. 

 
Thanks again from the calendar photo committee:
                       
                        Mitchell Pruitt
                        Joan Reynolds
Subject: HALLELUJAH FOR WANDERING STORKS
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:10:25 +0000
There is some potentially pretty good news in the juvenile Wood Stork mentioned 
by Donna Haynes yesterday (7-14-2014). Donna was referring to a post on the 
facebook page Arkansas Birders by Beth Weaver, who took the photographs. The 
bird foraged for a while in a farm pond at Kingston in Madison County, where 
Weaver lives. That's in the Ozarks by golly, far, far, from typical wandering 
stork haunts of southeastern Arkansas. 


This morning Im thinking this bird may have been part of a flight that reached 
the Ozarks; if so an extraordinarily rare event. I say this because three days 
earlier, 7-11-2014, biologist Brian Infield of Arkansas Game and Fish 
Commission, who manages Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, saw what he is pretty sure 
were two Wood Storks at Dyer Lake, just east of Frog. 


So far as I know, there are ZERO previous records anywhere in the Arkansas 
Ozarks. And while Dyer Lake is an old oxbow of the Arkansas River, and 
therefore not in the Ozarks, it is near, and so far as I know, there are ZERO 
stork records so far west in the valley. 


With support from the people of the United States through the Endangered 
Species Act, Wood Storks are rebounding, enough so that its status has been 
down-listed from Endangered to Threatened. Like the Bald Eagles continuing 
recovery in the lower 48 states, stork recovery is good for the whole country, 
not just storks and eagles. Direct and indirect economic benefits flow from 
recovery, facts conveniently ignored by the leather-lunged doomsayers who say 
the Endangered Species Act because is bad for the economy. 


Of course, three storks does not a flight make, but it is intriguing. For those 
of us in the bird choir always ready to shout hallelujah at Hopeful Signs from 
Above, the presence of wandering storks -- where storks were too few to 
previously go -- is promising news indeed. 
Subject: Robert Weiss
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 01:11:09 -0500
Quail, actually.  Get it?  Robert Weiss?  Bob White? .  .  . no?

Seriously - spotted a male running across one of the dirt roads not far 
from the house this evening.  This may not seem like a big deal but its 
the first quail I've seen in three years, maybe four.  And I've not 
heard any in the area since 2004.

So, yeah - its kind of a big deal.

George (n. Conway Co. its 1am and its hot, so I'm blaming that for 
Robert Weiss ;) )

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: kingbirds and cowbirds
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 11:58:28 -0500
Saturday morning there was a big commotion over the yard with a pair of eastern 
kingbirds chasing a fish crow round and round. While we watched Don noticed 
there were only a couple of cowbirds in the trees whereas there are usually a 
dozen or more waiting to help themselves at the feeders. I remembered they seem 
to disappear at some point during the summer but wasn't sure when. On Sunday 
morning there were no cowbirds and I have not seen or heard any today either. I 
wonder where they go after breeding season. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Newbie
From: Art Weigand <aweigand13 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 11:15:32 -0500
Hello everyone. I'm new to this list serve. I've been on the Kansas list for 
years. 8 years ago I bought a house on Beaver lake. The birding in the area is 
excellent. I think I have found most of the hot spots. I have been regularly 
reporting my sightings on e-bird. This past week I was still finding Hooded 
warblers along with the other 7 or 8 common warblers in the area during 
mid-summer. I think I've also found a good spot for Scarlet tanagers. I look 
forward to reading about Arkansas bird sightings. 


Art Weigand
Wichita KS/Beaver Lake AR
Subject: Western Kingbirds in Fort Smith (seen first by Bill Beale)
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 14:36:58 -0700
After reading Joe's post about Bill's kingbirds, I decided to go see for 
myself. (July 8) On S. 10th and B, as soon as Donald Ouellette and I got out 
of the car, we saw one, probably a fledgling, on a wire, fluttering his wings, 
'begging'; another, probably an adult, nearby, with a wasp in its beak, seemed 
to be attempting to influence the supposed fledgling, but eventually ate the 
wasp. We also saw an obvious fledgling fly from low in a tree across a street, 
and land in a lot. We eventually found the nest, where Bill Beale had 
described it (posted on AR-BIRD by Joe Neal). We watched from across the 
street through spotting scope. There were two nestlings, fed twice by an 
adult. In all we saw four birds flying, I would guess two adults and two 
fledglings, but at least one of each. Before leaving, we checked a nearby 
grain processing plant. Afterwards, in our car, leaving the area, we saw a 
fledgling, across the street from the nest, 

 attempting to fly up the wall of a building. I do not know if it was the same 
fledgling we had seen earlier, of if perhaps another bird had left the nest. I 
couldn't help but feel anxious for the little ones, but so far at least, things 
seemed to be going well. 

Joanie
Subject: Until the big heat (Beaver Lake Nursery Pond)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 12:35:33 +0000
Beaver Lake Nursery Pond is still going strong, in terms of the use of nest 
boxes there maintained by Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists, and in terms 
of their being a lot of soft mast attractive to Orchard Orioles and other 
birds. Joan Reynolds and I walked the 0.9 mile ring levee on July 12, with 
interesting results. 


In terms of Tree Swallows and Eastern Bluebirds: about 4-5 boxes each are still 
in some stage of use. On box 5, Eastern Bluebirds seem involved in a renesting 
attempt, with the male watching intently as the female inspects. Lots of 
yakking from a swallow box on the ponds west side and an adult swallow is in 
full harassment mode for all who stray too close. 


The pond levee has lots of evidence of river otters, with fecal waste full of 
crawfish parts and Green Herons (3) work the crawfish business, too. Joan 
spotted 4 sandpipers in flight over the pond that appeared to be Greater 
Yellowlegs (1) and Lesser Yellowlegs (3), both species on their southward 
migration. Not much shorebird habitat at the pond now, but we expect mudflat 
development and consequently, more action in terms of migratory shorebirds, as 
summer expands. 


A hen Mallard was escorting 6 recent hatchlings, generally staying close to 
vegetational cover. I at first thought this hen was a Blue-winged Teal, since 
her bill was so dark, but I sent a few photographs to others who picked up on 
two obvious Mallard field marks: white feathers in the tail and light colored 
bars in the speculum. 


Master Naturalists have also installed large cavity boxes typically used by 
Wood Ducks. We had two intriguing sightings that brought to mind their value. 
First, we saw two Wood Ducks, including a female that was staying very close to 
cover, as though she had young there. We did not press the matter since it will 
be easier to see them as the ducklings get older. We also spotted a female 
Hooded Merganser, another large cavity customer who has previously nested at 
Beaver Lake. This bird also remained close to cover. 


The entire 0.9 pond levee seems to be owned by what appear to be family groups 
of Orchard Orioles. No doubt the huge crop of blackberries and wild cherries 
attract them, and many other species, too. We also had Ruby-throated 
Hummingbirds at both trumpet creepers and flowering buttonbushes. As these 
sightings suggest, there are good reasons for return visits. 


Personally, Im ready to sit in a chair in the cool of an early morning and see 
who all loves cherries, at least until big heat and boiling sun drive me home. 
Subject: Re: Early fall migrants... a Willow and Blk-billed
From: Bill <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 17:03:24 -0500
Hi Leif!

 AR-Bird should have a like button like Facebook has. I would have "liked" 

your post. Cool that you saw the Willow FC and the Black billed Cuckoo.

                                      Bill Thurman

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 12, 2014, at 4:57 PM, "Anderson, Leif E -FS"  
wrote: 


> Greetings all,
> Within the last week I’ve had 2 birds show up that definitely didn’t nest 
nearby. 

> A Willow Flycatcher and Black-billed Cuckoo.  Neither stayed more than an hr.
> Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector
> 
> 
> 
> 
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Dobc field trip
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:59:47 -0500
Five of us braved the heat to visit the Fred Berry conservation center
today. We had 38 species  of the regular suspects. Yellow throated vireos,
Great crested flycatchers, Parulas, Red-tailed Hawks, Meadowlarks, Green
Herons, Barn Swallows and birds like that. We had a recent report of a black
crowned night heron that made it fun. 

The Game and Fish Commission center there on crooked creek was really nice
and quite interesting. The birding and view from the back porch was  worth
the trip. It had several nice exhibits and some shady walking trails that
were much appreciated on this day. There was even a short driving  trail
down to a bend in the creek. Nice birding area that doesn't get a lot of
crowds or attention. The staff is working to restore prairie habitats and
native plants on this 421 acre site. The birding here can only improve.

 

Alan Gregory

the casual birder

Harrison 



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Subject: Early fall migrants... a Willow and Blk-billed
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 21:57:08 +0000
Greetings all,
Within the last week I've had 2 birds show up that definitely didn't nest 
nearby. 

A Willow Flycatcher and Black-billed Cuckoo.  Neither stayed more than an hr.
Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Leucistic Robin
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 12:58:57 -0700
I photographed a Leucistic Robin today on Shadow Oaks Drive in Sherwood. 
According to my brother-in-law this bird has been hanging out here for several 
months and can be seen almost any day in the front yards of 105, 107 and 109 
Shadow Oaks Drive. 


I have five photos posted on my Pbase page and for anyone interested they can 
be viewed by clicking the link below 


http://www.pbase.com/docg/july_2014

Doc George
Subject: Re: ALL GOD'S LITTLE DUCKIES
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 13:21:14 -0600
Great post, Joe! Many of my exact sentiments contained within. I'm proud to
have gone birding with you the times we have. Let me know when any of you
want to go to "Frog" or Devil's Den again. I'll try to go with you. Thanks,
Joe!


                                                             Bill Thurman


On Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 8:03 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:

>  HEADED SOUTH ON I-49, Fayetteville to the great valley of the Arkansas
> River. Cattle Egret flights dominate summer’s sky well north of Alma. 
We’re 

> all headed southeast, more or less, toward the river valley and
> opportunities.
>
>
>  Near the river, on Black Land Road, a tractor of many huge tires discs a
> low, wet field. My count is 92 egrets, half right with the tractor, the
> rest trailing, ignoring dust, gobbling what has been turned. And yet more
> Cattle Egret flights passing over. I know where they go.
>
>
>  The big river has small sandy islands. Cattle Egrets by the hundreds and
> thousands nest on an island downriver. So do Little Blue Herons, Snowy
> Egrets, and Great Egrets. Interior Least Terns, an Endangered Species, nest
> on pebbly mounds of some islands.
>
>
>  After Black Land Road, I’m all arrived at the Arkansas Game and Fish
> Commission’s Frog Bayou WMA boat ramp that provides access to Dyer Bay and
> mother river. Most folks appreciate what’s been provided here, but
> unfortunately others burn tires, go potty and leave for the rest of us
> nasty “flowers,” and unreel enough tangled nylon fishing line to wrap the
> moon. The idea of cleaning up your own mess is as foreign Mona Lisa. My
> mother had a name for them.
>
>
>  They obviously did not have for childhood guidance Hazel Kennedy Neal,
> Queen of Bees and Death to Litter, who grew up across the river in Fort
> Smith, and considered anyone who messed up nature what we Arkansans call
> “low lifes.” It doesn't make any difference how fancy their car or how 
much 

> land they own. It's about what they do.
>
>
>  You can’t miss their mess, but there’s more important stuff here,
> including a couple of handsome new signs. One requires anglers to release
> Large-mouth Bass less than 14-inches in length. The other invites us to
> HELP PROTECT ENDANGERED LEAST TERNS, with info on habitat and law.
>
>
>  Least Terns lost historic sand island habitat when the Arkansas River
> was dammed into a series of lakes. What’s left is frequently visited by
> raccoons, anglers, and casual boaters, and unfortunately, low lifes. This
> explains why someone went out to an island this summer near Little Rock and
> used flying terns as shotgun targets.
>
>
>  I was proud to see the signs at Frog yesterday. I will be even prouder
> if my fellow Arkansans take heed. Driving a creature like Least Terns to
> the verge of extinction imposes a huge cost on our society, which means the
> idiots who shot the adults and destroyed nests impose low lifery on all of
> us.  Thank you and good luck to AG & F and other agencies offering a
> reward for their arrest.
>
>
>  From Frog I drove a few miles to the Alma wastewater treatment facility
> for Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks. A huge purple mass with multiple
> lightning streaks was coming from the southwest. Two adults, brilliant
> russet and black, escorted 15 ducklings, flowing cammo of black and downy
> yellow. As heavy rain roared in, all god’s little duckies crawled under the
> shelter of one adult, and there in their feathery ark rode out the storm.
>
>
Subject: Eagle nest on Lake Norrell?
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 13:13:12 -0500
A friend of mine has a cabin on Lake Norrell in Saline County. 

She saw an eagle fishing over the July Fourth weekend. 

Does anyone know of a nest out there?

Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County
Subject: new bird blind at Lake Fayetteville needs your help
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 15:30:59 +0000
As many of you who read this list already know, the region involving 
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers is experiencing explosive population growth and 
equally explosive pressure on natural resources. 


Those of us who have birded Lake Fayetteville see growing habitat disturbance 
to migratory and winter resident waterfowl (not to mention Wood Ducks of 
summer). David Chapman has worked to raise awareness and out his efforts and 
those of others has come an educational project that is a good fit for other 
efforts to protect natural resources at Lake Fayetteville. It could be a model 
for other communities, too. 


Part of this effort will involve a carefully-designed and beautifully built 
bird blind on the lakes southeastern edge. The blind will facilitate viewing 
waterfowl especially during migration and winter. Its use by both the birding 
community and students in aquatics education efforts will help build a 
consensus about protecting wildlife habitat. It will complement the already 
outstanding educational efforts at the Environmental Study Center. With the 
pressure northwest Arkansas is experiencing, there is plenty of work to go 
around. 


Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society is leading this effort. We now have 
architectural drawings of the blind and all needed permits from Fayetteville 
Parks and Recreation. We expect to build this fall. Use of the blind will be 
free and open to the public. Its location near Botanical Garden of the Ozarks 
will lead to use in their educational programming. It will be open for other 
schools and groups, too. 


We have about half of the estimated $9,000 raised or pledged. Could any of you 
help fill out the rest? 


Contribution checks should be made to NWAAS with a note the money is for the 
blind. These checks should be mailed to NWAAS Treasurer (6 decades of birding 
-- and still going -- and a CPA) Bill Beall: 2204 Hendricks Blvd, Fort Smith, 
Arkansas, 72903-3422. He will maintain a listing of all contributions. These 
will be separated from other NWAAS funds. Anything we raise over the needed 
amount will be retained for future maintenance. Bill will send each contributor 
an acknowledgement of the gift. All gifts to NWAAS are charitable for tax 
purposes. If you need more information about this, contact Bill at 
billtoka AT mynewroads.com. 


David Chapman has offered an autographed copy of his book, The Bird Life of 
Lake Fayetteville, to anyone who contributes $100.00 or more to the blind 
project. Those who contribute over $100.00 and want a copy of the book need 
only send David an email and a note about their contribution and a mailing 
address: dchapman AT uark.edu. 


Ill be happy to answer more questions  its a very workman-like project --
Subject: ALL GOD'S LITTLE DUCKIES
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 14:03:36 +0000
HEADED SOUTH ON I-49, Fayetteville to the great valley of the Arkansas River. 
Cattle Egret flights dominate summers sky well north of Alma. Were all headed 
southeast, more or less, toward the river valley and opportunities. 


Near the river, on Black Land Road, a tractor of many huge tires discs a low, 
wet field. My count is 92 egrets, half right with the tractor, the rest 
trailing, ignoring dust, gobbling what has been turned. And yet more Cattle 
Egret flights passing over. I know where they go. 


The big river has small sandy islands. Cattle Egrets by the hundreds and 
thousands nest on an island downriver. So do Little Blue Herons, Snowy Egrets, 
and Great Egrets. Interior Least Terns, an Endangered Species, nest on pebbly 
mounds of some islands. 


After Black Land Road, Im all arrived at the Arkansas Game and Fish 
Commissions Frog Bayou WMA boat ramp that provides access to Dyer Bay and 
mother river. Most folks appreciate whats been provided here, but 
unfortunately others burn tires, go potty and leave for the rest of us nasty 
flowers, and unreel enough tangled nylon fishing line to wrap the moon. The 
idea of cleaning up your own mess is as foreign Mona Lisa. My mother had a name 
for them. 


They obviously did not have for childhood guidance Hazel Kennedy Neal, Queen of 
Bees and Death to Litter, who grew up across the river in Fort Smith, and 
considered anyone who messed up nature what we Arkansans call low lifes. It 
doesn't make any difference how fancy their car or how much land they own. It's 
about what they do. 


You cant miss their mess, but theres more important stuff here, including a 
couple of handsome new signs. One requires anglers to release Large-mouth Bass 
less than 14-inches in length. The other invites us to HELP PROTECT ENDANGERED 
LEAST TERNS, with info on habitat and law. 


Least Terns lost historic sand island habitat when the Arkansas River was 
dammed into a series of lakes. Whats left is frequently visited by raccoons, 
anglers, and casual boaters, and unfortunately, low lifes. This explains why 
someone went out to an island this summer near Little Rock and used flying 
terns as shotgun targets. 


I was proud to see the signs at Frog yesterday. I will be even prouder if my 
fellow Arkansans take heed. Driving a creature like Least Terns to the verge of 
extinction imposes a huge cost on our society, which means the idiots who shot 
the adults and destroyed nests impose low lifery on all of us. Thank you and 
good luck to AG & F and other agencies offering a reward for their arrest. 


From Frog I drove a few miles to the Alma wastewater treatment facility for 
Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks. A huge purple mass with multiple lightning 
streaks was coming from the southwest. Two adults, brilliant russet and black, 
escorted 15 ducklings, flowing cammo of black and downy yellow. As heavy rain 
roared in, all gods little duckies crawled under the shelter of one adult, and 
there in their feathery ark rode out the storm. 
Subject: Re: Deafness
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 22:07:23 -0500
Thanks for this hopeful bit.  I've heard from several others saying 
similar things.  My brother still wants someone else to take the dog - I 
think he wants to be out from under them ASAP.  My goal, since I don't 
want any more dogs either, is to help him find good homes for as many as 
possible, particularly the deaf one (its name is Francis).

Very much appreciate this bit of hope.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co. enjoying this July)

On 7/10/2014 6:02 PM, bluebird2 AT cox.net wrote:
> When I lived in the Houston area I knew someone with a white dog. I visited 
often and after about 5 months I found out the dog was deaf. I had no idea 
since the dog seemed pretty normal, it just didn't bark at anything. As it 
turned out it was very tuned in to body language rather than verbal cues. I was 
also told pure white dogs were prone to deafness. I doubt the blue healer is 
white but it still may live a perfectly normal house dog life relying on visual 
cues. 

>
>
> ---- "George R. Hoelzeman"  wrote:
>
> =============
> We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so yay!
> Indigo buntings!  Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in
> bird observation this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I
> think they're getting bored).  This evening my oldest and I were waiting
> for her basketball practice to start and she was pointing out
> Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an unusual bird that we ultimately
> determined was a House Finch (at least I think it was - didn't look it up).
>
> Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my brother who
> has a bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling.  Thing is, one is
> apparently deaf.  This is a puppy about two months old with all its
> shots and worming and such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to
> do with it.  He's decided he doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks
> so plans to sell all the dogs, but obviously no one will buy a deaf
> hunting dog - and he's not sure if anyone will accept it even for free.
>
> So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions.  I figure if
> anyone will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it
> will be someone here.
>
> Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've noticed an
> unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching vehicles
> lately.  I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top
> of them (metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring
> traffic.  Yes, it met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't
> safely slow down any faster.
>
> The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a
> Red-tailed hawk yesterday.  Its the largest size inversion between
> aggressor and target I've yet seen.
>
> George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)
>

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Re: Deafness
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 18:02:42 -0500
When I lived in the Houston area I knew someone with a white dog. I visited 
often and after about 5 months I found out the dog was deaf. I had no idea 
since the dog seemed pretty normal, it just didn't bark at anything. As it 
turned out it was very tuned in to body language rather than verbal cues. I was 
also told pure white dogs were prone to deafness. I doubt the blue healer is 
white but it still may live a perfectly normal house dog life relying on visual 
cues. 



---- "George R. Hoelzeman"  wrote: 

=============
We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so yay! 
Indigo buntings!  Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in 
bird observation this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I 
think they're getting bored).  This evening my oldest and I were waiting 
for her basketball practice to start and she was pointing out 
Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an unusual bird that we ultimately 
determined was a House Finch (at least I think it was - didn't look it up).

Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my brother who 
has a bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling.  Thing is, one is 
apparently deaf.  This is a puppy about two months old with all its 
shots and worming and such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to 
do with it.  He's decided he doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks 
so plans to sell all the dogs, but obviously no one will buy a deaf 
hunting dog - and he's not sure if anyone will accept it even for free.

So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions.  I figure if 
anyone will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it 
will be someone here.

Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've noticed an 
unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching vehicles 
lately.  I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top 
of them (metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring 
traffic.  Yes, it met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't 
safely slow down any faster.

The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a 
Red-tailed hawk yesterday.  Its the largest size inversion between 
aggressor and target I've yet seen.

George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County

--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Ozark Natural Science Center this Saturday night in Fayetteville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 21:20:37 +0000
I just wanted to remind everyone with an interest about the special Northwest 
Arkansas Audubon Society-sponsored program on Saturday night: 


Ozark Natural Science Center has been teaching and sharing natural history and 
birds in northwestern Arkansas for 22 years. Each year hundreds of school 
children visit the center, spending the night, making discoveries on the 
trails, participating in hands-on evening classes  basically having an 
experience they will never forget. Amazingly, many people living in 
northwestern Arkansas have never heard of ONSC, or if they know about this 
unique place, have no idea of how special it is. Here is an opportunity to find 
out more: 


On Saturday, July 12, 2014, at 6:00 pm at Nightbird Books, on 205 West Dickson 
Street, Fayetteville, the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will have a 
meeting. Rob Seal will be presenting, Ozark Natural Science Center: connecting 
people with nature for 22 years. Rob has been on this team and a leader in its 
efforts for many years. 


Free and open to the public. Snacks and drinks available in the bookstore caf. 


Please help us get the word out by forwarding this on to anyone you think might 
be interested. Thanks. 
Subject: Re: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 15:24:27 -0500
And my issue of the Democrat-Gazette used a picture of a healthy LETE. They 
also got the entire species listed rather than just the interior population. 

 
Bill

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
> Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 08:44:34 -0500
> From: rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock 

> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> Not sure why Arkansasmatters ran that photo; AGFC included a photo of a dead 
tern as well as a photo of a LETE adult with a chick in our news release, 

> Karen
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Jul 9, 2014, at 3:51 PM, "Duzan, Steve -FS"  wrote:
> > 
> > Why is there a picture of a Royal Tern in this article?
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe 

> > Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2014 3:40 PM
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> > Subject: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock
> > 
> > 
http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/d/story/reward-offered-for-information-on-endangered-tern/26653/ERzi7TxcvEyuli9ePPheCA 

> > 
> > Reward offered for information on endangered tern deaths
> > 
> > LITTLE ROCK  Several dead least terns have been found on a small island in 
the Arkansas River. Least terns are protected by federal and state endangered 
species regulations. A reward of up to $8,500 is being offered for information 
leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the deaths. The 
reward is being offered by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane 
Society Wildlife Land Trust. 

> > 
> > The endangered birds are found anywhere along the Arkansas River from the 
Oklahoma state line to the Mississippi River. Their main nesting area is a 
section of the river from Clarksville downstream to Pine Bluff. 

> > 
> > The dead birds were found late last month. Several spent shotgun shells 
also were discovered on the island. In addition to the dead terns, egg shell 
fragments also were found. Earlier in June, researchers found over 50 adult 
terns and two active nests on the island. Researchers believe the birds were 
beginning re-nesting activities following a flood on June 12. 

> > 
> > The terns are protected by the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory 
Bird Treaty Act. Penalties can range from fines up to $100,000 and up to a year 
in prison, or both. Civil penalties up to $25,000 per violation can also be 
assessed. 

> > 
> > Anyone with information on the tern deaths should call the Arkansas Game 
and Fish Commission at 800-482-9262 

> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > Sadly, these terns were killed just prior to the USACOE erecting new 
educational signs at Arkansas River boat ramps (signs were up by the 4th of 
July holiday weekend). The signs, designed by USACOE, AGFC and USFWS biologists 
show a photo of least terns and ask the public to avoid sandbars where terns 
are present. The signs state that known nesting areas are posted but that the 
birds may nest outside of these marked areas and that approximately 1 out of 3 
sand/gravel bars are used by nesting colonies of least terns. The informational 
signs explain that disturbance by people, pets or vehicles can cause the nests 
to be abandoned and death of young terns. 

> > 
> > Karen Rowe, Dewitt AR
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely 
for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or 
the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz Checklist Results
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 15:28:31 +0000
In Arkansas, 92 checklists were submitted to eBird during March and April 2014 
that reported Rusty Blackbirds. Of those, 74 were submitted under the RUBL 
Blitz Protocol. The Blitz increased the number of lists submitted to eBird 
reporting RUBLs, as compared to no blitz in 2013. 


Other statistics from Blitz Coordinator Judith Scarl: 
----------------- 
During the official Blitz dates (1 March-15 June 2014), a total of 14,865 
checklists that contained at least one Rusty Blackbird observation were 
reported to eBird. New York, Ontario, and Ohio had the greatest number of 
individual checklists with Rusties reported, with 1980, 2179, and 1183 
checklists, respectively. 


The majority of these checklists were reported as Traveling Counts (9849 
checklists) or Stationary Counts (2183 checklists). Only 1586 of these 
observations were submitted under the Rusty Blackbird Blitz protocol. 3238 
total checklists were submitted under the Rusty Blackbird Blitz protocol; just 
over half of these (1652) did not contain a report of a Rusty Blackbird 
sighting. 


The greatest number of Rusty Blackbird Blitz checklists were submitted in 
Maryland (410 checklists), New York (377 checklists) and Virginia (315 
checklists). In Canada, Ontario birders submitted the greatest number of Blitz 
checklists (132), with the second-highest number of Blitz checklists submitted 
in the Yukon (85). 


The number of checklists with Rusty Blackbird observations increased 62% in 
2014 , compared with the same time period in 2013. Only 9170 checklists with 
Rusty observations were reported from March 1-June 15 in 2013, 5695 fewer than 
during the first year of the Blitz. Only three states/territories participating 
in the Blitz did not show an increase in the number of checklists reported 
containing Rusty Blackbird observations. The number of checklists containing 
Rusty Blackbird observations increased the most in Québec from 2013 to 2014 ; 
Qué bec birders submitted 857 checklists with Rusty Blackbirds in 2014, 
compared with the same period in 2013. New York and Ontario were second and 
third, with 644 and 477 more checklists, respectively. 

---------------- 

Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 09:03:08 -0500
You can also get peanut butter that doesn't contain sugar---just peanuts 
(what a concept, huh?).  That helps keep down mold growth, too.

Janine

On 7/9/2014 11:58 PM, Boyles, Dottie wrote:
> We have never added sugar to our suet recipe. The peanut butter has 
> enough on its own.
>
> Dottie Boyles
> Little Rock
>
> -----Original Message-----
> *From: *Tom Harden [ltcnukem AT SBCGLOBAL.NET 
> ]
> *Sent: *Wednesday, July 09, 2014 11:50 PM Central Standard Time
> *To: *ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject: *Re: Suet cakes?
>
> What sugar would be okay?  Is Brown Sugar an acceptable substitute?
> */Take Care,/*
> */Tom Harden/*
>
>
> On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 6:32 PM, Robert Wiedenmann 
> <0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote:
>
>
> It was kindly pointed out to me that many birds are sucrose 
> intolerant, so substituting another sugar would be wise.  I am going 
> to seek out other sugar (likelyfructose) and will change my recipe.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Elizabeth F. Shores 
> To: ARBIRD-L 
> Sent: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 4:19 pm
> Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
>
> Thanks to everyone for these recipes! Our birds will thank you, too.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* Roselie Overby 
> <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> >
> *Reply-To:* Roselie Overby  >
> *Date:* Wed, 9 Jul 2014 06:47:50 -0700
> *To:* >
> *Subject:* Re: Suet cakes?
>
> I use a similar recipe and put it in a 9 x 9 pan.  I then cut and 
> crumble some which I place on a plate on a table.  I've discovered 
> that the c. grackles will demolish a cake of the mix in a hanging 
> feeder.  This way, more birds get a bite.  N. Mockingbirds and Brown 
> Thrashers wait near the carport each morning.
> Roselie Overby
> Oak Grove, LA
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tuesday, July 8, 2014 7:56 PM, Janine Perlman  > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>  It's best not to use sucrose (aka table sugar) because many songbirds 
> (muscicapids, mimids, sturnids) are sucrose-intolerant, and it causes 
> diarrhea.
>
>  Janine
>
>
>
> On 7/8/2014 7:23 PM, Robert Wiedenmann wrote:
>
>
>     1 c chunky peanut butter
>      1 c lard
>      2 c rolled oats
>      2 c corn meal
>      1 c flour
>      1/3 c sugar
>      1 c dried fruit (blueberries, cherries, cranberries)
>
>      Melt the peanut butter together with the lard over medium heat,
>     stirring occasionally.  Add the dry ingredients and remove from
>     heat.  Stir until completely mixed.  Spoon into some sort of molds
>     -- you can use Ziploc storage boxes (spread until even, about 1"
>     deep).  I re-use the old semi-round molds from one of the
>     commercial brands of suet (the plugs went into a suet feeder) --
>     these are ideal and I have re-used them for at least 5 years.
>      Once cooled, then store in the freezer.  The birds really, really
>     love this and we feed it year-round.  In addition to woodpeckers,
>     we see cardinals, jays, Carolina wrens, nuthatches, titmice, even
>     yellow-rumped warblers, rose-breasted grosbeaks and summer
>     tanagers (and starlings really love it).  My wife claims the birds
>     have a better diet than we do.  She is probably right.
>
>      Rob Wiedenmann
>      Fayetteville
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>     -----Original Message-----
>      From: Travis Certain mailto:tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET
>     
>      To: ARBIRD-L mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>     
>      Sent: Tue, Jul 8, 2014 7:52 am
>      Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
>
>
>
>     I think basically you add cornmeal to whatever recipe you have.
>
>     Sent from my iPad
>
>     On Jul 8, 2014, at 7:23 AM, Elizabeth Shores      > wrote:
>
>     I am sorry I don't have an idea for the deaf dog. Another query:
>     Can anyone here
>     share a recipe for non-melting suet cakes?
>
>     Sent from my iPhone
>
>     > On Jul 7, 2014, at 10:32 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman"
>     >
>     wrote:
>     >
>     > We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so
>     yay! Indigo
>     buntings!  Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in bird
>     observation
>     this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I think they're
>     getting
>     bored).  This evening my oldest and I were waiting for her
>     basketball practice
>     to start and she was pointing out Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an
>     unusual bird
>     that we ultimately determined was a House Finch (at least I think
>     it was -
>     didn't look it up).
>     >
>     > Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my
>     brother who has a
>     bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling.  Thing is, one is
>     apparently
>     deaf.  This is a puppy about two months old with all its shots and
>     worming and
>     such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to do with it.
>      He's decided he
>     doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks so plans to sell all
>     the dogs, but
>     obviously no one will buy a deaf hunting dog - and he's not sure
>     if anyone will
>     accept it even for free.
>     >
>     > So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions.  I
>     figure if anyone
>     will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it
>     will be someone
>     here.
>     >
>     > Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've
>     noticed an
>     unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching
>     vehicles lately.
>     I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top of them
>     (metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring
>     traffic.  Yes, it
>     met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't safely slow
>     down any
>     faster.
>     >
>     > The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a
>     Red-tailed
>     hawk yesterday.  Its the largest size inversion between aggressor
>     and target
>     I've yet seen.
>     >
>     > George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)
>     >
>     > --
>     > George R. Hoelzeman
>     > North Conway County
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are 
> private and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to 
> whom they are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the 
> employee or agent responsible for delivering the message to the 
> intended recipient, any use of this information or dissemination or 
> copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have 
> received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by 
> telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply indicating the 
> error.   ­­ 
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 09:01:53 -0500
No, brown sugar is just table sugar with a little molasses. Fructose is 
better, but it's probably best not to add any type of sugar.

Birds that need/eat sugars in nature find them in sap, nectar and 
fruit.  In suet cakes it just encourages mold and forces birds to eat an 
unnatural mix of food-ish stuff.

Ideally, suet cakes should just contain suet.  Oats and cornmeal are 
unnatural (it doesn't do birds a favor to force them to eat starch when 
what they seek are the calories and nutrients of fat or oily seeds) and 
also contribute to mold growth; grain seeds and dried fruit should be 
offered separately.

Best,
Janine


On 7/9/2014 11:50 PM, Tom Harden wrote:
> What sugar would be okay?  Is Brown Sugar an acceptable substitute?
> */Take Care,/*
> */Tom Harden/*
>
>
> On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 6:32 PM, Robert Wiedenmann 
> <0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote:
>
>
> It was kindly pointed out to me that many birds are sucrose 
> intolerant, so substituting another sugar would be wise.  I am going 
> to seek out other sugar (likelyfructose) and will change my recipe.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Elizabeth F. Shores 
> To: ARBIRD-L 
> Sent: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 4:19 pm
> Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
>
> Thanks to everyone for these recipes! Our birds will thank you, too.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From: *Roselie Overby 
> <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> >
> *Reply-To: *Roselie Overby  >
> *Date: *Wed, 9 Jul 2014 06:47:50 -0700
> *To: *>
> *Subject: *Re: Suet cakes?
>
> I use a similar recipe and put it in a 9 x 9 pan.  I then cut and 
> crumble some which I place on a plate on a table.  I've discovered 
> that the c. grackles will demolish a cake of the mix in a hanging 
> feeder.  This way, more birds get a bite.  N. Mockingbirds and Brown 
> Thrashers wait near the carport each morning.
> Roselie Overby
> Oak Grove, LA
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tuesday, July 8, 2014 7:56 PM, Janine Perlman  > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>  It's best not to use sucrose (aka table sugar) because many songbirds 
> (muscicapids, mimids, sturnids) are sucrose-intolerant, and it causes 
> diarrhea.
>
>  Janine
>
>
>
> On 7/8/2014 7:23 PM, Robert Wiedenmann wrote:
>
>
>     1 c chunky peanut butter
>      1 c lard
>      2 c rolled oats
>      2 c corn meal
>      1 c flour
>      1/3 c sugar
>      1 c dried fruit (blueberries, cherries, cranberries)
>
>      Melt the peanut butter together with the lard over medium heat,
>     stirring occasionally.  Add the dry ingredients and remove from
>     heat.  Stir until completely mixed.  Spoon into some sort of molds
>     -- you can use Ziploc storage boxes (spread until even, about 1"
>     deep).  I re-use the old semi-round molds from one of the
>     commercial brands of suet (the plugs went into a suet feeder) --
>     these are ideal and I have re-used them for at least 5 years.
>      Once cooled, then store in the freezer.  The birds really, really
>     love this and we feed it year-round.  In addition to woodpeckers,
>     we see cardinals, jays, Carolina wrens, nuthatches, titmice, even
>     yellow-rumped warblers, rose-breasted grosbeaks and summer
>     tanagers (and starlings really love it).  My wife claims the birds
>     have a better diet than we do.  She is probably right.
>
>      Rob Wiedenmann
>      Fayetteville
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>     -----Original Message-----
>      From: Travis Certain mailto:tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET
>      To: ARBIRD-L mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>      Sent: Tue, Jul 8, 2014 7:52 am
>      Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
>
>
>
>     I think basically you add cornmeal to whatever recipe you have.
>
>     Sent from my iPad
>
>     On Jul 8, 2014, at 7:23 AM, Elizabeth Shores      > wrote:
>
>     I am sorry I don't have an idea for the deaf dog. Another query:
>     Can anyone here
>     share a recipe for non-melting suet cakes?
>
>     Sent from my iPhone
>
>     > On Jul 7, 2014, at 10:32 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman"
>     >
>     wrote:
>     >
>     > We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so
>     yay! Indigo
>     buntings!  Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in bird
>     observation
>     this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I think they're
>     getting
>     bored).  This evening my oldest and I were waiting for her
>     basketball practice
>     to start and she was pointing out Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an
>     unusual bird
>     that we ultimately determined was a House Finch (at least I think
>     it was -
>     didn't look it up).
>     >
>     > Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my
>     brother who has a
>     bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling.  Thing is, one is
>     apparently
>     deaf.  This is a puppy about two months old with all its shots and
>     worming and
>     such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to do with it.
>      He's decided he
>     doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks so plans to sell all
>     the dogs, but
>     obviously no one will buy a deaf hunting dog - and he's not sure
>     if anyone will
>     accept it even for free.
>     >
>     > So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions.  I
>     figure if anyone
>     will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it
>     will be someone
>     here.
>     >
>     > Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've
>     noticed an
>     unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching
>     vehicles lately.
>     I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top of them
>     (metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring
>     traffic.  Yes, it
>     met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't safely slow
>     down any
>     faster.
>     >
>     > The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a
>     Red-tailed
>     hawk yesterday.  Its the largest size inversion between aggressor
>     and target
>     I've yet seen.
>     >
>     > George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)
>     >
>     > --
>     > George R. Hoelzeman
>     > North Conway County
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 08:44:34 -0500
Not sure why Arkansasmatters ran that photo; AGFC included a photo of a dead 
tern as well as a photo of a LETE adult with a chick in our news release, 

Karen

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 9, 2014, at 3:51 PM, "Duzan, Steve -FS"  wrote:
> 
> Why is there a picture of a Royal Tern in this article?
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe 

> Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2014 3:40 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock
> 
> 
http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/d/story/reward-offered-for-information-on-endangered-tern/26653/ERzi7TxcvEyuli9ePPheCA 

> 
> Reward offered for information on endangered tern deaths
> 
> LITTLE ROCK – Several dead least terns have been found on a small island in 
the Arkansas River. Least terns are protected by federal and state endangered 
species regulations. A reward of up to $8,500 is being offered for information 
leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the deaths. The 
reward is being offered by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane 
Society Wildlife Land Trust. 

> 
> The endangered birds are found anywhere along the Arkansas River from the 
Oklahoma state line to the Mississippi River. Their main nesting area is a 
section of the river from Clarksville downstream to Pine Bluff. 

> 
> The dead birds were found late last month. Several spent shotgun shells also 
were discovered on the island. In addition to the dead terns, egg shell 
fragments also were found. Earlier in June, researchers found over 50 adult 
terns and two active nests on the island. Researchers believe the birds were 
beginning re-nesting activities following a flood on June 12. 

> 
> The terns are protected by the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act. Penalties can range from fines up to $100,000 and up to a year in 
prison, or both. Civil penalties up to $25,000 per violation can also be 
assessed. 

> 
> Anyone with information on the tern deaths should call the Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission at 800-482-9262 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sadly, these terns were killed just prior to the USACOE erecting new 
educational signs at Arkansas River boat ramps (signs were up by the 4th of 
July holiday weekend). The signs, designed by USACOE, AGFC and USFWS biologists 
show a photo of least terns and ask the public to avoid sandbars where terns 
are present. The signs state that known nesting areas are posted but that the 
birds may nest outside of these marked areas and that approximately 1 out of 3 
sand/gravel bars are used by nesting colonies of least terns. The informational 
signs explain that disturbance by people, pets or vehicles can cause the nests 
to be abandoned and death of young terns. 

> 
> Karen Rowe, Dewitt AR
> 
> 
> 
> 
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 04:58:39 +0000
We have never added sugar to our suet recipe. The peanut butter has enough on 
its own. 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Harden [ltcnukem AT SBCGLOBAL.NET]
Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2014 11:50 PM Central Standard Time
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?

What sugar would be okay?  Is Brown Sugar an acceptable substitute?

Take Care,
Tom Harden


On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 6:32 PM, Robert Wiedenmann 
<0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 



It was kindly pointed out to me that many birds are sucrose intolerant, so 
substituting another sugar would be wise. I am going to seek out other sugar 
(likelyfructose) and will change my recipe. 




-----Original Message-----
From: Elizabeth F. Shores 
To: ARBIRD-L 
Sent: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 4:19 pm
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?

Thanks to everyone for these recipes! Our birds will thank you, too.


________________________________
From: Roselie Overby 
<0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

Reply-To: Roselie Overby 
> 

Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 06:47:50 -0700
To: >
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?

I use a similar recipe and put it in a 9 x 9 pan. I then cut and crumble some 
which I place on a plate on a table. I've discovered that the c. grackles will 
demolish a cake of the mix in a hanging feeder. This way, more birds get a 
bite. N. Mockingbirds and Brown Thrashers wait near the carport each morning. 

Roselie Overby
Oak Grove, LA






 On Tuesday, July 8, 2014 7:56 PM, Janine Perlman 
> wrote: 





 It's best not to use sucrose (aka table sugar) because many songbirds 
(muscicapids, mimids, sturnids) are sucrose-intolerant, and it causes diarrhea. 


 Janine



On 7/8/2014 7:23 PM, Robert Wiedenmann wrote:


1 c chunky peanut butter
 1 c lard
 2 c rolled oats
 2 c corn meal
 1 c flour
 1/3 c sugar
 1 c dried fruit (blueberries, cherries, cranberries)

 Melt the peanut butter together with the lard over medium heat, stirring 
occasionally. Add the dry ingredients and remove from heat. Stir until 
completely mixed. Spoon into some sort of molds -- you can use Ziploc storage 
boxes (spread until even, about 1" deep). I re-use the old semi-round molds 
from one of the commercial brands of suet (the plugs went into a suet feeder) 
-- these are ideal and I have re-used them for at least 5 years. Once cooled, 
then store in the freezer. The birds really, really love this and we feed it 
year-round. In addition to woodpeckers, we see cardinals, jays, Carolina wrens, 
nuthatches, titmice, even yellow-rumped warblers, rose-breasted grosbeaks and 
summer tanagers (and starlings really love it). My wife claims the birds have a 
better diet than we do. She is probably right. 


 Rob Wiedenmann
 Fayetteville










-----Original Message-----
 From: Travis Certain mailto:tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET
 To: ARBIRD-L mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 Sent: Tue, Jul 8, 2014 7:52 am
 Subject: Re: Suet cakes?



I think basically you add cornmeal to whatever recipe you have.

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 8, 2014, at 7:23 AM, Elizabeth Shores 
> wrote: 


I am sorry I don't have an idea for the deaf dog. Another query: Can anyone 
here 

share a recipe for non-melting suet cakes?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 7, 2014, at 10:32 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman" 
> 

wrote:
>
> We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so yay! Indigo
buntings!  Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in bird observation
this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I think they're getting
bored).  This evening my oldest and I were waiting for her basketball practice
to start and she was pointing out Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an unusual bird 

that we ultimately determined was a House Finch (at least I think it was -
didn't look it up).
>
> Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my brother who has a
bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling.  Thing is, one is apparently
deaf.  This is a puppy about two months old with all its shots and worming and
such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to do with it. He's decided he 

doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks so plans to sell all the dogs, but
obviously no one will buy a deaf hunting dog - and he's not sure if anyone will 

accept it even for free.
>
> So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions.  I figure if anyone
will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it will be someone 

here.
>
> Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've noticed an
unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching vehicles lately. 

I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top of them
(metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring traffic. Yes, it 

met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't safely slow down any
faster.
>
> The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a Red-tailed
hawk yesterday.  Its the largest size inversion between aggressor and target
I've yet seen.
>
> George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)
>
> --
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County















This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
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this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
From: Tom Harden <ltcnukem AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 21:50:29 -0700
What sugar would be okay? Is Brown Sugar an acceptable substitute?

Take Care,
Tom Harden


On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 6:32 PM, Robert Wiedenmann 
<0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

 


It was kindly pointed out to me that many birds are sucrose intolerant, so 
substituting another sugar would be wise. I am going to seek out other sugar 
(likelyfructose) and will change my recipe.  




-----Original Message-----
From: Elizabeth F. Shores 
To: ARBIRD-L 
Sent: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 4:19 pm
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?


Thanks to everyone for these recipes! Our birds will thank you, too.



________________________________
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Reply-To: Roselie Overby 
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 06:47:50 -0700
To: 
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?

I use a similar recipe and put it in a 9 x 9 pan. I then cut and crumble some 
which I place on a plate on a table. I've discovered that the c. grackles will 
demolish a cake of the mix in a hanging feeder. This way, more birds get a 
bite. N. Mockingbirds and Brown Thrashers wait near the carport each morning. 

Roselie Overby
Oak Grove, LA






On Tuesday, July 8, 2014 7:56 PM, Janine Perlman  wrote:




It's best not to use sucrose (aka table sugar) because many songbirds 
(muscicapids, mimids, sturnids) are sucrose-intolerant, and it causes diarrhea. 


Janine 



On 7/8/2014 7:23 PM, Robert Wiedenmann wrote:



1 c chunky peanut butter
>1 c lard
>2 c rolled oats
>2 c corn meal
>1 c flour
>1/3 c sugar
>1 c dried fruit (blueberries, cherries, cranberries)
>
>Melt the peanut butter together with the lard over medium heat, stirring 
occasionally. Add the dry ingredients and remove from heat. Stir until 
completely mixed. Spoon into some sort of molds -- you can use Ziploc storage 
boxes (spread until even, about 1" deep). I re-use the old semi-round molds 
from one of the commercial brands of suet (the plugs went into a suet feeder) 
-- these are ideal and I have re-used them for at least 5 years. Once cooled, 
then store in the freezer. The birds really, really love this and we feed it 
year-round. In addition to woodpeckers, we see cardinals, jays, Carolina 
wrens, nuthatches, titmice, even yellow-rumped warblers, rose-breasted 
grosbeaks and summer tanagers (and starlings really love it). My wife claims 
the birds have a better diet than we do. She is probably right. 

>
>Rob Wiedenmann
>Fayetteville
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Travis Certain mailto:tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET
>To: ARBIRD-L mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>Sent: Tue, Jul 8, 2014 7:52 am
>Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
>
>
>
>I think basically you add cornmeal to whatever recipe you have. 
>
>Sent from my iPad
>
>On Jul 8, 2014, at 7:23 AM, Elizabeth Shores  wrote:
>
>I am sorry I don't have an idea for the deaf dog. Another query: Can anyone 
here 

>share a recipe for non-melting suet cakes?
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 7, 2014, at 10:32 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman"  
>wrote:
>> 
>> We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so yay! Indigo 
>buntings! Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in bird observation 

>this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I think they're getting 
>bored). This evening my oldest and I were waiting for her basketball practice 

>to start and she was pointing out Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an unusual 
bird 

>that we ultimately determined was a House Finch (at least I think it was - 
>didn't look it up).
>> 
>> Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my brother who has a 
>bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling. Thing is, one is apparently 
>deaf. This is a puppy about two months old with all its shots and worming and 

>such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to do with it. He's decided 
he 

>doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks so plans to sell all the dogs, but 

>obviously no one will buy a deaf hunting dog - and he's not sure if anyone 
will 

>accept it even for free.
>> 
>> So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions. I figure if anyone 

>will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it will be 
someone 

>here.
>> 
>> Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've noticed an 
>unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching vehicles 
lately.  

>I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top of them 
>(metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring traffic. Yes, 
it 

>met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't safely slow down any 
>faster.
>> 
>> The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a Red-tailed 
>hawk yesterday. Its the largest size inversion between aggressor and target 
>I've yet seen.
>> 
>> George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)
>> 
>> -- 
>> George R. Hoelzeman
>> North Conway County
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: elementary school ornithology
From: Gaynell Perry <gcperry1 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 19:19:09 -0500
Hi Judith,
Discover Birds Activity Book is a very flexible workbook and resource for 
elementary through 8th grade ornithology. Shawna could potentially even choose 
to have her students work together across grade levels on some of the parts. 


It's been used throughout Tennessee and at Black Bayou NWR in Louisiana. It was 
recently even presented in Cuba. 


You can download a FREE copy at the site below. It comes complete with a 
Teacher Curriculum Guide which I was privileged to work on. That makes even non 
birders comfortable with teaching children about ornithology. 


This is also a great blog for all educators 
http://discoverbirds.blogspot.com/p/the-discover-birds-program-inspired-by.html 


Let me know if you guys have any questions.

Best regards,
Gaynell Perry
Retired Science Teacher
Shelby County Schools
Memphis

On Jul 9, 2014, at 3:23 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:

> Shawna Miller, a friend who teaches grades 1 through 8 at the Clear Spring 
School in Eureka Springs will be teaching the kids about birds starting the 
second week of September and running through October. 

> Thanks to Joe Neal's valuable help she has some books and field trip ideas 
lined up. 

> Shawna also just sent this request. If any of you have suggestions about 
teaching the kids how awesome crows and vultures are it will definitely be 
appreciated. 

> 
> "I am also looking for a good project that the students can do to somehow 
improve bird habitat or educate the public about a certain bird species (for 
example the ever hated vultures or crows). If you have any ideas on recent hot 
topics in the birding community I would appreciate it." 

> 
> Thanks from me, the crows, and the vultures.
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>  
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
From: Robert Wiedenmann <0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 19:32:08 -0400
It was kindly pointed out to me that many birds are sucrose intolerant, so 
substituting another sugar would be wise. I am going to seek out other sugar 
(likely fructose) and will change my recipe. 

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Elizabeth F. Shores 
To: ARBIRD-L 
Sent: Wed, Jul 9, 2014 4:19 pm
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?


Thanks to everyone for these recipes! Our birds will thank you, too.



From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Reply-To: Roselie Overby 
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 06:47:50 -0700
To: 
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?

I use a similar recipe and put it in a 9 x 9 pan. I then cut and crumble some 
which I place on a plate on a table. I've discovered that the c. grackles will 
demolish a cake of the mix in a hanging feeder. This way, more birds get a 
bite. N. Mockingbirds and Brown Thrashers wait near the carport each morning. 

Roselie Overby
Oak Grove, LA
 


 
 
 
  On Tuesday, July 8, 2014 7:56 PM, Janine Perlman  wrote:
  
  

 
 It's best not to use sucrose (aka table sugar) because many songbirds 
(muscicapids, mimids, sturnids) are sucrose-intolerant, and it causes diarrhea. 

 
 Janine 
 
 
 
On 7/8/2014 7:23 PM, Robert Wiedenmann wrote:
 
 

1 c chunky peanut butter
 1 c lard
 2 c rolled oats
 2 c corn meal
 1 c flour
 1/3 c sugar
 1 c dried fruit (blueberries, cherries, cranberries)
 
 Melt the peanut butter together with the lard over medium heat, stirring 
occasionally. Add the dry ingredients and remove from heat. Stir until 
completely mixed. Spoon into some sort of molds -- you can use Ziploc storage 
boxes (spread until even, about 1" deep). I re-use the old semi-round molds 
from one of the commercial brands of suet (the plugs went into a suet feeder) 
-- these are ideal and I have re-used them for at least 5 years. Once cooled, 
then store in the freezer. The birds really, really love this and we feed it 
year-round. In addition to woodpeckers, we see cardinals, jays, Carolina wrens, 
nuthatches, titmice, even yellow-rumped warblers, rose-breasted grosbeaks and 
summer tanagers (and starlings really love it). My wife claims the birds have a 
better diet than we do. She is probably right. 

 
 Rob Wiedenmann
 Fayetteville
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
 From: Travis Certain mailto:tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET
 To: ARBIRD-L mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 Sent: Tue, Jul 8, 2014 7:52 am
 Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
 
 
 
I think basically you add cornmeal to whatever recipe you have. 

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 8, 2014, at 7:23 AM, Elizabeth Shores  wrote:

I am sorry I don't have an idea for the deaf dog. Another query: Can anyone 
here 

share a recipe for non-melting suet cakes?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 7, 2014, at 10:32 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman"  
wrote:
> 
> We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so yay! Indigo 
buntings!  Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in bird observation 
this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I think they're getting 
bored).  This evening my oldest and I were waiting for her basketball practice 
to start and she was pointing out Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an unusual bird 

that we ultimately determined was a House Finch (at least I think it was - 
didn't look it up).
> 
> Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my brother who has a 
bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling.  Thing is, one is apparently 
deaf.  This is a puppy about two months old with all its shots and worming and 
such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to do with it. He's decided he 

doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks so plans to sell all the dogs, but 
obviously no one will buy a deaf hunting dog - and he's not sure if anyone will 

accept it even for free.
> 
> So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions.  I figure if anyone 
will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it will be someone 

here.
> 
> Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've noticed an 
unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching vehicles lately. 

I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top of them 
(metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring traffic. Yes, it 

met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't safely slow down any 
faster.
> 
> The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a Red-tailed 
hawk yesterday.  Its the largest size inversion between aggressor and target 
I've yet seen.
> 
> George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)
> 
> -- 
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County
 
  
 

 
 


  
 
  
 


Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
From: "Elizabeth F. Shores" <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 16:19:40 -0500
Thanks to everyone for these recipes! Our birds will thank you, too.



From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Reply-To: Roselie Overby 
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 06:47:50 -0700
To: 
Subject: Re: Suet cakes?

I use a similar recipe and put it in a 9 x 9 pan.  I then cut and crumble
some which I place on a plate on a table.  I've discovered that the c.
grackles will demolish a cake of the mix in a hanging feeder.  This way,
more birds get a bite.  N. Mockingbirds and Brown Thrashers wait near the
carport each morning.
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove, LA
 


 
 
 
  On Tuesday, July 8, 2014 7:56 PM, Janine Perlman 
wrote:
  
  

 
 It's best not to use sucrose (aka table sugar) because many songbirds
(muscicapids, mimids, sturnids) are sucrose-intolerant, and it causes
diarrhea.
 
 Janine 
 
 
 
On 7/8/2014 7:23 PM, Robert Wiedenmann wrote:
 
 
> 1 c chunky peanut butter
>  1 c lard
>  2 c rolled oats
>  2 c corn meal
>  1 c flour
>  1/3 c sugar
>  1 c dried fruit (blueberries, cherries, cranberries)
>  
>  Melt the peanut butter together with the lard over medium heat, stirring
> occasionally.  Add the dry ingredients and remove from heat.  Stir until
> completely mixed. Spoon into some sort of molds -- you can use Ziploc storage 

> boxes (spread until even, about 1" deep).  I re-use the old semi-round molds
> from one of the commercial brands of suet (the plugs went into a suet feeder)
> -- these are ideal and I have re-used them for at least 5 years. Once cooled, 

> then store in the freezer.  The birds really, really love this and we feed it
> year-round.  In addition to woodpeckers, we see cardinals, jays, Carolina
> wrens, nuthatches, titmice, even yellow-rumped warblers, rose-breasted
> grosbeaks and summer tanagers (and starlings really love it).  My wife claims
> the birds have a better diet than we do.  She is probably right.
>  
>  Rob Wiedenmann
>  Fayetteville
>   
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
>  
> -----Original Message-----
>  From: Travis Certain mailto:tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET
>  To: ARBIRD-L mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>  Sent: Tue, Jul 8, 2014 7:52 am
>  Subject: Re: Suet cakes?
>  
>  
>  
> I think basically you add cornmeal to whatever recipe you have.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Jul 8, 2014, at 7:23 AM, Elizabeth Shores  wrote:
> 
> I am sorry I don't have an idea for the deaf dog. Another query: Can anyone
> here 
> share a recipe for non-melting suet cakes?
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> > On Jul 7, 2014, at 10:32 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman" 
> wrote:
>> > 
>> > We've been seeing more Indigo buntings this year than usual, so yay! 
Indigo 

> buntings! Both of the kids seem to have gotten interested in bird observation 

> this year (or at least in the last couple weeks - I think they're getting
> bored). This evening my oldest and I were waiting for her basketball practice 

> to start and she was pointing out Sissor-tailed flycatchers and an unusual
> bird 
> that we ultimately determined was a House Finch (at least I think it was -
> didn't look it up).
>> > 
>> > Anyway, while we're sitting there I get an e-mail from my brother who has 
a 

> bunch of Bluetick hounds that he's been selling.  Thing is, one is apparently
> deaf. This is a puppy about two months old with all its shots and worming and 

> such, but because its deaf he doesn't know what to do with it.  He's decided
> he 
> doesn't want to continue breeding Blueticks so plans to sell all the dogs, 
but 

> obviously no one will buy a deaf hunting dog - and he's not sure if anyone
> will 
> accept it even for free.
>> > 
>> > So I thought I'd ask if anyone here has any suggestions.  I figure if
>> anyone 
> will know how to find a way to a happy future for a deaf dog it will be
> someone 
> here.
>> > 
>> > Meanwhile, although I've not encoutered any deaf birds, I've noticed an
> unusual number seem to be giving less attention to approaching vehicles
> lately.  
> I've had several Indigo buntings sit tight until I was on top of them
> (metaphorically), and one crow that sat on a roadkill ignoring traffic.  Yes,
> it 
> met its demise on the bumper only because I couldn't safely slow down any
> faster.
>> > 
>> > The kids also rather enjoyed watching a female Indigo go after a 
Red-tailed 

> hawk yesterday.  Its the largest size inversion between aggressor and target
> I've yet seen.
>> > 
>> > George (n. Conway Co. where it rained again today.)
>> > 
>> > -- 
>> > George R. Hoelzeman
>> > North Conway County
>  
>   
>  
 
 


  
 
  
 

Subject: Re: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock
From: "Duzan, Steve -FS" <sduzan AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 20:51:00 +0000
Why is there a picture of a Royal Tern in this article?

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe 

Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2014 3:40 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock


http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/d/story/reward-offered-for-information-on-endangered-tern/26653/ERzi7TxcvEyuli9ePPheCA 


Reward offered for information on endangered tern deaths

LITTLE ROCK – Several dead least terns have been found on a small island in 
the Arkansas River. Least terns are protected by federal and state endangered 
species regulations. A reward of up to $8,500 is being offered for information 
leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the deaths. The 
reward is being offered by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane 
Society Wildlife Land Trust. 


The endangered birds are found anywhere along the Arkansas River from the 
Oklahoma state line to the Mississippi River. Their main nesting area is a 
section of the river from Clarksville downstream to Pine Bluff. 


The dead birds were found late last month. Several spent shotgun shells also 
were discovered on the island. In addition to the dead terns, egg shell 
fragments also were found. Earlier in June, researchers found over 50 adult 
terns and two active nests on the island. Researchers believe the birds were 
beginning re-nesting activities following a flood on June 12. 


The terns are protected by the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act. Penalties can range from fines up to $100,000 and up to a year in 
prison, or both. Civil penalties up to $25,000 per violation can also be 
assessed. 


Anyone with information on the tern deaths should call the Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission at 800-482-9262 





Sadly, these terns were killed just prior to the USACOE erecting new 
educational signs at Arkansas River boat ramps (signs were up by the 4th of 
July holiday weekend). The signs, designed by USACOE, AGFC and USFWS biologists 
show a photo of least terns and ask the public to avoid sandbars where terns 
are present. The signs state that known nesting areas are posted but that the 
birds may nest outside of these marked areas and that approximately 1 out of 3 
sand/gravel bars are used by nesting colonies of least terns. The informational 
signs explain that disturbance by people, pets or vehicles can cause the nests 
to be abandoned and death of young terns. 


Karen Rowe, Dewitt AR




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Subject: Least Terns killed on Arkansas River island south of LIttle Rock
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 13:40:17 -0700
http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/d/story/reward-offered-for-information-on-endangered-tern/26653/ERzi7TxcvEyuli9ePPheCA 


Reward offered for information on endangered tern deaths
 
LITTLE ROCK – Several dead least terns have been found on a small island in 
the Arkansas River. Least terns are protected by federal and state endangered 
species regulations. A reward of up to $8,500 is being offered for information 
leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the deaths. The 
reward is being offered by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, The Humane Society of the United States and the Humane 
Society Wildlife Land Trust. 

 
The endangered birds are found anywhere along the Arkansas River from the 
Oklahoma state line to the Mississippi River. Their main nesting area is a 
section of the river from Clarksville downstream to Pine Bluff. 

 
The dead birds were found late last month. Several spent shotgun shells also 
were discovered on the island. In addition to the dead terns, egg shell 
fragments also were found. Earlier in June, researchers found over 50 adult 
terns and two active nests on the island. Researchers believe the birds were 
beginning re-nesting activities following a flood on June 12. 

 
The terns are protected by the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act. Penalties can range from fines up to $100,000 and up to a year in 
prison, or both. Civil penalties up to $25,000 per violation can also be 
assessed. 

 
Anyone with information on the tern deaths should call the Arkansas Game and 
Fish Commission at 800-482-9262 





Sadly, these terns were killed just prior to the USACOE erecting new 
educational signs at Arkansas River boat ramps (signs were up by the 4th of 
July holiday weekend). The signs, designed by USACOE, AGFC and USFWS biologists 
show a photo of least terns and ask the public to avoid sandbars where terns 
are present. The signs state that known nesting areas are posted but that the 
birds may nest outside of these marked areas and that approximately 1 out of 3 
sand/gravel bars are used by nesting colonies of least terns. The informational 
signs explain that disturbance by people, pets or vehicles can cause the nests 
to be abandoned and death of young terns. 


Karen Rowe, Dewitt AR
Subject: elementary school ornithology
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 15:23:27 -0500
Shawna Miller, a friend who teaches grades 1 through 8 at the Clear Spring 
School in Eureka Springs will be teaching the kids about birds starting the 
second week of September and running through October. 

Thanks to Joe Neal's valuable help she has some books and field trip ideas 
lined up. 

Shawna also just sent this request. If any of you have suggestions about 
teaching the kids how awesome crows and vultures are it will definitely be 
appreciated. 


"I am also looking for a good project that the students can do to somehow 
improve bird habitat or educate the public about a certain bird species (for 
example the ever hated vultures or crows). If you have any ideas on recent hot 
topics in the birding community I would appreciate it." 


Thanks from me, the crows, and the vultures.
Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 
Subject: ASCA July Field Trip Reminder
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 10:19:02 -0700
Just a reminder that this Saturday, July 12, is the upcoming field trip of the 
Audubon 

Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  See details below.  Anyone interested in 
birds is welcome to join us.  You don't have to be an ASCA member to 
participate.  As an added treat after the field trip, on the drive back to 
Little Rock we'll stop at the TA Truck Stop at Prescott (Exit 44 off I-30) to 
see the Great-tailed 

Grackles.  This will be an all-day field trip.  Drive time from Little Rock to 
Hope is 2 hours. Go to our website at www.ascabird.org for more information 
about 

previous field trips, upcoming monthly programs, our quarterly newsletter, 
birding hot spots, photos, and other bird-related content. Please feel free to 

contact me off-list if you have any questions.  My phone number is 
501-920-3246 if you need to reach me that day. 


Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock


July 
12
Dr. 
Lester Sitzes III Bois D’Arc WMA
Hope, 
AR
Meet 
at 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430 
intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.We will stop at the McDonalds 
in Hope (Exit 

30 off I-30) around 9:00 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to 
join 

us.Or, meet us at Bois D’Arc WMA at 
9:30 a.m.Our first stop will be at the 
end of the first gravel road to your left after you turn into the WMA.  Our 
target birds will be Purple and Common Gallinules and their young, Least 
Bittern, Anhingas, Black-bellied Whistling Duck, herons, egrets, and possibly 
an 

alligator or two!Very little walking 
will be involved.Bring scopes, plenty 
of water, snacks, and lunch.There 
are several restaurants inHope if you prefer not to bring your lunch.