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Updated on Sunday, April 20 at 10:37 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Streaked Spiderhunter,©BirdQuest

20 Apr New One for Me ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
20 Apr new species [Judy & Don ]
20 Apr Sightings Report - Woolsey Wet Prairie, Apr 19, 2014, Fayetteville, Washington County [John Walko ]
20 Apr Allsopp Park [Dan Scheiman ]
20 Apr Centerton Fish Hatchery and Lake Atalanta, Rogers Saturday 4/19/14 [Jacque Brown ]
20 Apr SIRSASANA ON THE WATTLE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
19 Apr PIne Bluff Birding 19 April [John Redman ]
19 Apr American Bittern and SNAKES! Woolsey Wet Prairie ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
19 Apr Hawk on Martin house [Cynthia ]
18 Apr ASCA April Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
18 Apr Sighting -- oops forgot American White Pelican [Gail Miller ]
18 Apr Sighting: Pectoral Sandpipers [Gail Miller ]
18 Apr Centerton Fish Hatchery [Pruitt ]
18 Apr Yellow-headed blackbirds [Jane Steinkraus ]
17 Apr First Time [Bill ]
17 Apr Sighting: Osprey nest on Lake Conway [Gail Miller ]
17 Apr Sighting - Black-necked Stilt at Beaver Fork Lake in Conway [Gail Miller ]
17 Apr Cherry Bend: warm day with lots of small flying insects ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Apr SORAS AND AMERICAN BITTERN IN PINE BLUFF [JFR ]
17 Apr 12 Warblers [Allan Mueller ]
17 Apr FOS [Judy & Don ]
17 Apr Re: rcsp All is not lost [Elizabeth Shores ]
17 Apr Re: Now we are 4: Bald Eagle nests on Beaver Lake [TERRI WALKER ]
17 Apr rcsp All is not lost [Don Simons ]
17 Apr Now we are 4: Bald Eagle nests on Beaver Lake ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
16 Apr Big Bend - no Green Jays - YES [laura davis ]
16 Apr DOBC field trip [Alan ]
15 Apr Red Slough Bird Survey - April 15 [David Arbour ]
15 Apr Nice mix []
15 Apr Federal Plan To Save Prairie Chickens Ruffles State Feathers [Barry Haas ]
15 Apr Strange Email on the list [Certain Travis ]
15 Apr today's FOS & belated field trip thanks [Judy & Don ]
15 Apr field trip to Wattle Hollow in the Boston Mtns Saturday April 19 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
15 Apr 2014 Spring Migration Count ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
15 Apr Re: Barry [Mary Ann King ]
14 Apr No Subject [Susan Young ]
14 Apr Re: More or less AZ birds [Jacque Brown ]
14 Apr Arkansas Birders in Texas [Kelly Chitwood ]
14 Apr Horned Lark [Joyce & Harlan Shedell ]
14 Apr FOS, etc. [Sally Jo Gibson ]
14 Apr More or less AZ birds [Lyndal York ]
14 Apr First RTH west of Fayetteville [Sara Cain-Bartlett ]
14 Apr Barry [Herschel Raney ]
14 Apr Messages [Herschel Raney ]
14 Apr Re: Suspicious messages [Ann Gordon ]
14 Apr Invasion of the tiny [Adam Schaffer ]
14 Apr Warbler [Herschel Raney ]
14 Apr FOS Great-crested Flycatcher ... and 2nd hummer [Gail Miller ]
14 Apr FOS Blue Grosbeak [Lenore Gifford ]
14 Apr FOS Rose-breasted Grosbeak! [Sheran Herrin ]
14 Apr first two weeks of April. and Sibley's new book [Jacque Brown ]
14 Apr Yellow-headed Blackbirds near Highfill today ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
14 Apr Suspicious messages [Norman Lavers ]
14 Apr Not-so-stormy day at Ninestone ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
13 Apr Birds and Things: Recently Around Fayetteville [Pruitt ]
13 Apr Info: Arkansas Audubon Society Spring Convention, May 2 - 4 | Jonesboro [Samantha Scheiman ]
13 Apr Sightings: Bell Slough WMA [Jim Dixon ]
13 Apr April in Progress (Scope Adventures, Book Review) [Herschel Raney ]
13 Apr Re: Osprey Nest, Greers Ferry Lake [Kenny Nichols ]
13 Apr No Subject [David Chaffin ]
13 Apr Osprey downstream of Ponca [Thomas Lewis ]
13 Apr Osprey Nest, Greers Ferry Lake [Dan Scheiman ]
12 Apr Possible Brown-headed Nuthatch nest [Michael Linz ]
12 Apr Why's he walking like that? []
12 Apr FOS Tennessee Warbler & Scissor-tailed Flycatcher [Jim Dixon ]
12 Apr Re: And then ... there were 19! [Ed Laster ]
12 Apr Indigo Bunting (2) ["Jonathan C. Perry" ]
12 Apr Re: And then ... there were 19! [Ed Laster ]
12 Apr Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern [Elizabeth Shores ]
12 Apr Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern [Bill Shepherd ]
12 Apr And then ... there were 19! [Barry Haas ]
12 Apr FOS REVI and more WEVI & 2 COHA - Hot Springs [jwdavis ]
12 Apr Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern [Don Simons ]
12 Apr Sighting: Murray Park [Jim Dixon ]
12 Apr Black-bellied Whistling Duck at Beaverfork [Michael Linz ]
11 Apr Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern [Elizabeth Shores ]

Subject: New One for Me
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 22:14:13 -0500
You would think that as much time as I spent duck hunting I would have 
seen one by now but Friday afternoon I took the kids for a drive around 
St. Vincent (north of Morrilton) and spotted a pair of Blue-wing teal on 
a pond along Kaufman Road.  Pretty incredible birds.

We also saw a couple Great Egrets, two Great Blue Herons, a Green Heron 
(which I've not seen in years) and sundry other birds.  But the two 
Blue-wings were my "Bird of the Day"

George (n. Conway Co. enjoying the weather but not the allergies)

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: new species
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 21:40:10 -0500
Ovenbirds
Kentucky Warblers
Red-eyed Vireos…lots this morning!

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Sightings Report - Woolsey Wet Prairie, Apr 19, 2014, Fayetteville, Washington County
From: John Walko <walko AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 21:14:30 -0500
> 
> Woolsey Wet Prairie, Washington, US-AR
> Apr 19, 2014 7:15 AM - 10:15 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.5 mile(s)
> Comments: Was in town for the weekend and was able to make some time to visit 
the pot holes. Clear, 60's and rising, slight breeze. Red wing blk birds the 
most prevalent birds around this morning. Was hoping to see a Scissor -tailed 
Flycatcher and wasn't disappointed, as I was walking around one flew over me 
heading towards the road. Later as I was heading home six of the flycatchers 
were acting up at the intersection at the NE corner of the property. Finally 
got a couple of pictures. Overall good day in the field. 

> 25 species
> Canada Goose  8
> Blue-winged Teal  23
> Turkey Vulture  3
> Cooper's Hawk  1
> Killdeer  11
> Solitary Sandpiper  2
> Wilson's Snipe  5
> Mourning Dove  8
> Eastern Phoebe  2
> Eastern Kingbird  3
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  7
> Blue Jay  3
> American Crow  3
> Barn Swallow  4
> American Robin  12
> Northern Mockingbird  2
> European Starling  35
> Savannah Sparrow  7
> Song Sparrow  5
> White-throated Sparrow  6
> Red-winged Blackbird  45
> Eastern Meadowlark  7
> Common Grackle  19
> Brown-headed Cowbird  2
> House Sparrow  6
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17986998 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Allsopp Park
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 20:57:44 -0500
Samantha and I hiked Allsopp Park this morning.  Notable sightings:

Least Flycatcher - 1, FOS, repeatedly calling "che-beck"
Northern Waterthrush - 1, FOS, singing
Blue-winged Warbler - 1, FOS, great looks as it sang
Nashville Warbler - 2, singing
Common Yellowthroat - 1, singing
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 3, males in breeding plumage
Blue Grosbeak - 1, FOS male

View the entire list in eBird here 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S17986764

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR
Subject: Centerton Fish Hatchery and Lake Atalanta, Rogers Saturday 4/19/14
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 17:53:33 -0500
I had a half day to myself so I decided to stay here instead of going to Wattle 
Hollow for the field trip. 


I started at the hatchery in the morning, 

Osprey 2 (seemed to be a pair as they left together)
Shoveler 2
Mallard 4
Blue-winged Teal 16
Great Blue Heron 6
G C Cormorant 1
Lincoln Sparrow 1
White-crowned Sparrow 5
Swamp Sparrow 3
Savannah Sparrow lots flushing up
Kingfisher 1
Mourning Dove 6
Eurasion collared Dove 2
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Least Sandpiper 15
Greater Yellowlegs 2
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Pectoral Sandpiper 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler 3
Warbling Vireo 2
Red-winged Blackbirds 15
Robins 6
Mockingbird 2
Eastern Meadowlark 3
Barn Swallows
Turkey Vulture 3
Canada Geese 8

I moved on to Lake Atalanta. 

I don't know when the city is going to start "working" on this park but it was 
fairly peaceful Saturday, plenty of picnics getting started while I was there. 


White-eyed Vireo 6 at least
Blue-gray Gnatcatchers 8
Yellow-rumped Warblers 20
Northern Parula 8
Kentucky Warbler 1
Brown Thrashers 2
Goldfinch 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Robin 6
Flicker 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Downy Woodpecker 1
Barred Owl 2 calling to each other

Tree swallows
Barn Swallows

Morel Mushrooms 5

--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: SIRSASANA ON THE WATTLE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 03:06:57 +0000
For about the past 10 years, Joy Fox has invited nature enthusiasts to enjoy a 
spring field trip to Wattle Hollow Retreat Center in the Boston Mountains just 
north of Devil’s Den State Park. The retreat today is from urban northwest 
Arkansas. It’s about bird watching and wild flowers. Folks are encouraged to 
bring binoculars if they have them. 


Being this deep in the Bostons -- and so far from our urban jungle -- can be 
disorienting. Joy refers to this as “the Wattle warp.” Actual headstands that 
can relieve stress are not required 


We met in the highlands along highway 170, then slow and easy walked down a 
2-track country road past open oak woodlands, fields, deep hollows, and ponds. 
This is the high country of soulful landscapes, deep hollows falling away all 
around. We had opportunities to see canopy birds close. This included the green 
backs of Red-eyed Vireos below us and a Scarlet Tanager in the canopy only 
partially leafed-out. 


After potluck on the porch, a somewhat smaller group chose the rock-walk 
meditation down down down to Wattle Creek. We had Louisiana Waterthrush and 
Yellow-throated Vireos easily seen building a nest in a maple only 
partially-leafed out. 


Here’s a partial list for today: Wood Duck (1), Red-shouldered Hawk (2), 
Broad-winged Hawk (1), Chimney Swift (4), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (2), Great 
Crested Flycatcher (1), Eastern Kingbird (1), White-eyed Vireo (4), Red-eyed 
Vireo (6), Yellow-throated Vireo (5), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (2), Blue-gray 
Gnatcatcher (6; pair with a nest almost complete in a hanging grapevine), 
Northern Parula (3), Yellow-rumped Warbler (3), Yellow-throated Warbler (2), 
Black-and-white Warbler (4), Worm-eating Warbler (1), Louisiana Waterthrush 
(2), Hooded Warbler (2), Summer Tanager (2), Scarlet Tanager (2), Eastern 
Towhee (1), Field Sparrow (6 – lots of singing), Indigo Bunting (1-male). 


You can explore Wattle here on the web: http://www.wattlehollow.com/
Subject: PIne Bluff Birding 19 April
From: John Redman <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 13:18:10 -0700
In one spot near the intersection of Osborn Rd and Hwy 65, adjacent to a stand 
of Willows, I oberved and photographed  in rapid sucession a House Wren, Lark 
Sparrow and a Blue Grossbeak.  While shooting the Grosbeak, a Merlin flew in 
and perched on a limb, approx. 20 yds away, which allowed for clear lateral 
shots. (I will be glad to share the Merlin pics).  On Wilbur West Rd., Delos 
McCauley and I observed a flock of approx 25 Black-necked Stilts, as they 
wheeled over an extensive mud flat.  The flat was shared by numerous shorebirds 
including Greater and Lesser Yellow-legs, Pectoral , Spotted and Solitary 
Sandpipers.  A FOS male Yellow Warbler was observed at Lake Saracen  at the 
east end of the parking lot. 

John Redman
Subject: American Bittern and SNAKES! Woolsey Wet Prairie
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 00:35:18 +0000
Woolsey Wet Prairie in Fayetteville has become a reliable spot in the western 
Arkansas Ozarks to see a variety of birds, including American Bittern. We saw 
one today, my first this season, while helping with reptile and amphibian 
surveys conducted by Dr JD Willson’s MS student Philip Vogrinc, plus help from 
fellow students that today included Alex Baecher and Macayla Coleman. 


Snake business was booming, but I still managed to see a few Killdeer, Solitary 
Sandpiper (1), Wilson’s Snipe (2), and Blue-winged Teal (~12) and Savannah 
Sparrows in heavy molt. Great Horned Owls have fledged two young in the past 
few days. Adults are sitting on two active Red-tailed Hawks nests nearby. 


We were down by Owl Creek when there came loud WOOPS and sudden crashing and 
thrashing. I figured they’d caught Nessie. Phil spotted a snake and raced in 
after it. Just imagine beating a water snake in the water. Shortly, Alex waded 
across the creek with a sizable, indignant, agitated, triangle-headed, 
Yellow-bellied Watersnake. He’d already acquired his red badge of courage -- 
three bites. 


Yes, they bite to protect themselves, but what they mainly bite are frogs and 
toads. In our ignorance, water snakes are routinely killed as threats to the 
human race. Instead, and in the spirit of science, this one was bagged for a 
trip to the lab and will be returned to its pride of place in the Woolsey-Owl 
Creek ecosystem. 


Alex didn’t seem at all deterred by his bites, for we had just walked a few 
more feet when they found another almost identical snake entangled in nylon 
monofilament landscape netting. A few days before they’d found a dead black 
rate snake in an identical situation. Today’s snake was restrained while David 
Oakley used a sharp knife to cut the netting off. It too was bagged for 
measurements in the lab. 


Joan Reynolds and I collected the mass of nylon netting to haul off to the 
trash, but unfortunately there is a great deal remaining, taking a silent toll 
on wild creatures. It is ironic that we routinely kill snakes because they are 
viewed as threats, when it actually we who are the real threat. 


There was less drama, but no less interest, in capture of a small DeKay’s 
Brownsnake, a fancy Western Ribbon Snake with red and yellow racing stripes, 
and finally one of those interesting racers with smooth dark scales and 
striking yellow highlights, Eastern Yellowbellied Racer. 


Every time I’ve gone out in the field with botanists or in this case, 
herpetologists, my amazement just keeps growing at the complexity of this 
particular place – and for that matter, our home place, planet earth. 
Subject: Hawk on Martin house
From: Cynthia <Gingerspalace AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 19:28:16 -0500
Sent from my iPadI have or had two well established Martin houses. I noticed 
last week my back box appeared abandoned.We started watching a hawk lands the 
rails and is checking the holes.Any solutions? 
Subject: ASCA April Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 08:15:09 -0700
ASCA's April field trip is next Saturday, April 26.  See details below.  We 
are combining the field trip with the Master Naturalists' annual BioBlitz.  
This is a great opportunity to see colorful migrating warblers and meet others 
who have a deep interest in our environment.  Dan Scheiman and I will jointly 
lead the bird walk.  We'll also assist our friends at Audubon Arkansas by 
doing some needed trail maintenance.  You don't have to be an ASCA member to 
participate.  For questions or additional information, please contact me 
off-list, or call (501) 920-3246. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock
 
April 26, 2014
Gillam Park and Little Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)
Little Rock, AR
Meet at 7:30 a.m. at Gillam Park in the last parking lot past the swimming 
pool.  Gillam has great habitat for migrating spring warblers.  There will be 
moderate walking on fairly level but possibly muddy trails.  Master 
Naturalists participating in their annual BioBlitz will join us.  When we 
finish at Gillam, we’ll drive to the LRAC, where we’ll bird the new 
wildlife observation trail, then assist with light trail maintenance.  Bring 
work gloves and wear sturdy walking shoes or boots that you don’t mind 
getting dirty.  Last, we’ll head to Industrial Harbor Road and Terry Lock & 
Dam to look for Western Kingbirds, and Painted Buntings.  Bring water and 
snacks. 

 
Directions—Gillam Park is in southeast Little Rock near the airport.  
Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, Little Rock.  Take I-30 West heading south 
from Little Rock.  Then exit onto I-440 going towards the airport.  Take 
Springer Road Exit 1.  At the bottom of the exit ramp, turn left onto Springer 
Road.  Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC.  Turn right onto Gillam 
Park Road.  Follow it to the end and into the park to the parking lot past the 
swimming pool. 

 
AAS REMINDER:
The Early Bird registration discount has been extended to April 26th.
 
AAS Spring Convention
May 2-4, 2014
Hilton Garden Inn
Jonesboro, AR
ASCA encourages all birding enthusiasts to participate in the Arkansas Audubon 
Society (AAS) Spring 2014 Convention.  Dates are May 2-4.  All functions and 
meals will be held at the Hilton Garden Inn in Jonesboro.  The conference will 
be a mix of field trips and bird-related programs.  Complete details are in 
the AAS newsletter and on the AAS website at www.arbirds.org. 
Subject: Sighting -- oops forgot American White Pelican
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 08:44:47 -0500
I also saw a lone, American White Pelican at Lake Conway yesterday, I 
thought it was a tad bit late for one to still be around.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Sighting: Pectoral Sandpipers
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 08:42:58 -0500
I also saw, at Beaver Fork Lake (Conway) yesterday, Pectoral Sandpipers. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/beaverfork_lake

Also, added a few more photos of the Black-necked Stilt, which begin after 
the sandpiper photos.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Centerton Fish Hatchery
From: Pruitt <mlpruitt24 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 07:27:45 -0500
 On Tuesday morning, I was able to head up towards Centerton to pay a birding 
visit to the fish hatchery and surrounding areas. The goal was Yellow-headed 
Blackbirds, which was a flop, but shorebirding was starting to look good at the 
hatchery! The numbers were small, with the variety somewhat larger. Both 
yellowlegs were present, along with a mass of peeps. This big group included 
14(!) Baird's Sandpipers, 1 White-rumped Sandpiper, 1 Semipalmated Sandpiper, 
and quite a few Least Sandpipers. Also of note was a Cinnam…..nah. Just 
kidding; no Cinnamon Teal. I wish! There was a female Lesser Scaup hanging 
about though. (If there had been a Cinnamon Teal, rest assured there would not 
have been the three-day lag time in posting!) 


 The sandpipers were fairly obliging to the photographer in me as they were 
hanging out on a shore instead of a mudflat. For those interested in photos of 
the Baird's Sandpipers and Least Sandpipers, feel free to visit: 
www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents 


Good birding,
Mitchell
Subject: Yellow-headed blackbirds
From: Jane Steinkraus <janesteinkraus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 07:16:15 -0500
Beth Lowrey and I saw yellow-headed blackbirds at Woolsey Wet Prairie near
Fayetteville Wednesday evening.
Subject: First Time
From: Bill <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 20:56:46 -0500
Saw a beautiful, singing Baltimore Oriole in a sycamore tree not far from the 
Two Rivers bridge. Love the song AND the sight. 


                                   Bill Thurman

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sighting: Osprey nest on Lake Conway
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 20:21:04 -0500
I checked the two Osprey nests on Lake Conway from Brannon Landing.  The 
larger nest has at least one chick in it.  Saw one adult near by.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Sighting - Black-necked Stilt at Beaver Fork Lake in Conway
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:01:53 -0500
I saw a Black-necked Stilt at Beaver Fork Lake in Conway this afternoon 
around 3:00 p.m.  Took several photos, which I will look at in a bit, but 
here is one shot.  It was out on the 'point' where the sand volleyball court 
is.  This is a point with a picnic table, that is often under water, past 
the boat launch area.   http://www.pbase.com/image/155270940

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Cherry Bend: warm day with lots of small flying insects
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 20:52:11 +0000
Broad-winged Hawk (2), Yellow-throated Vireo (4), Red-eyed Vireo (7), 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (6), Wood Thrush (1), 
Black-throated Green Warbler (2), Cerulean Warbler (6), Black-and-white Warbler 
(4), Worm-eating Warbler (2), Ovenbird (3), Hooded Warbler (5), Scarlet Tanager 
(2). Lots of trees in bud, but not many leaves, with the understory trees like 
redbud and dogwoods dominant. Pawpaws at green petal stage (mostly). Yellow 
buckeye in bloom. Other flowers: large-flowered bellwort, Ozark spiderwort 
(white type), yellow violet, golden ragwort, blue phlox. Most striking bird: a 
female Cerulean Warbler in a hollow below so that I could see the tantalizing 
blue-green plumage of her back that is usually invisible. Also, 2 
Black-throated Green Warbler males in a competition, with an Ovenbird walking 
on the forest floor below. Warm day with lots of small flying insects. Theorem 
for today: black flies + poison ivy + snakes =s good birding. Poison ivy now 
only ankle to mid-knee high, so it possible now to visit places that will be a 
lot tougher later. 
Subject: SORAS AND AMERICAN BITTERN IN PINE BLUFF
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 15:25:35 -0500
On 15 April, Doc George and I observed and photographed a Sora in the reed bed 
on the south side of Wilbur West Rd 100 yds. east of the interstate overpass. I 
observed a Sora there, also, today. In addition, a Black-necked Stilt was 
observed across the road in a shallow wetlands. On 16 April, Doc and I observed 
an American Bittern in the same area. Today, Delos McCauley and I observed and 
photographed Soras in the extensive reed bed at the northeast corner of Lake 
Saracen. We have yet to see a Virginia Rail in this site this year. 

John Redman
Subject: 12 Warblers
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 14:22:54 -0500
Birded Bell's Slough WMA and Camp Robinson SUA this morning.  Went in
across the dam at Bell's because the parking lot at the nature trail is
flooded.  Nice morning and a few birds.

Black-and-white Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Blue-winged Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Worm-eating Warbler
Northern Parula
Prothonotary Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler

And FOS (for me) Indigo Bunting.

-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: FOS
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 12:28:52 -0500
Blue-winged Warbler this morning in the Yucca/Pecan fields below the bluffs 
where they usually show up first. 


And a large graceful female Turkey yesterday and today foraging in the yard. 
Her nest must be nearby. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: rcsp All is not lost
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 09:46:56 -0500
Great news!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 17, 2014, at 9:27 AM, Don Simons  wrote:
> 
> Thursday, April 17, 2014
>  
> At 9 a.m. I saw a rufous-crowned sparrow on porch railing on one of the 
cabins here in Mount Magazine State Park. He moved several times from porch to 
treetop to another treetop, singing at each stop. 

>  
> Hopefully, he will find a mate and neighbors to dispute his territorial 
boundaries. I hate to think he could be the only rcsp in Arkansas. 

>  
> I’ll continue to monitor the situation.
>  
> Don
Subject: Re: Now we are 4: Bald Eagle nests on Beaver Lake
From: TERRI WALKER <twalker7511 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 09:29:25 -0500
For the Star Wars fans....
My son, who is 37 and an avid Star Wars fan found a nest earlier this year
in the southern part of the state.  He said it was so big it looked like
Ewoks could live in it.


On Thu, Apr 17, 2014 at 8:41 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:

>  Good article in this morning's Northwest Arkansas Times (April 17, 2014,
> page 6A-7A) by Outdoors Editor Flip Putthoff. He and Alan Bland of the Army
> Corps of Engineers did a big loop around Beaver and found 4 -- count 'em --
> 4 active Bald Eagle nests. Putthoff, a talented musician and fisherman --
> he always reminds me of a UA professor friend who had a poster on his door
> that read "A bad day fishing is better than the best day in the office" --
> always gets memorable lines into his reporting including this morning, with
> the best description of Bald Eagle nests I've read: "Large as a washing
> machine or the bed of a pickup."
>
> According to Ranger Alan Bland, "March is when adult bald eagles here are
> at their nests, either sitting on eggs or feeding hatchlings." I love the
> news of all these nests because it shows better than anything I can imagine
> the power of people to change things when they focus. People didn't want to
> lose nesting eagles in the Lower 48 so they rose up. We may take back the
> world, eagles in the lead.
>
> The world we think we know is not all known, either. In the same Outdoors
> section this morning (page 7A) is the report of a brand new to science
> species of salamander near Hot Springs.
>
> Just when we thought Bald Eagles gone, back they come. Just when we
> thought the world all known, there's that salamander.
>
Subject: rcsp All is not lost
From: Don Simons <drsimons56 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 09:27:37 -0500
Thursday, April 17, 2014



At 9 a.m. I saw a rufous-crowned sparrow on porch railing on one of the
cabins here in Mount Magazine State Park. He moved several times from porch
to treetop to another treetop, singing at each stop.



Hopefully, he will find a mate and neighbors to dispute his territorial
boundaries.  I hate to think he could be the only rcsp in Arkansas.



I’ll continue to monitor the situation.



Don
Subject: Now we are 4: Bald Eagle nests on Beaver Lake
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 13:41:49 +0000
Good article in this morning's Northwest Arkansas Times (April 17, 2014, page 
6A-7A) by Outdoors Editor Flip Putthoff. He and Alan Bland of the Army Corps of 
Engineers did a big loop around Beaver and found 4 -- count 'em -- 4 active 
Bald Eagle nests. Putthoff, a talented musician and fisherman -- he always 
reminds me of a UA professor friend who had a poster on his door that read "A 
bad day fishing is better than the best day in the office" -- always gets 
memorable lines into his reporting including this morning, with the best 
description of Bald Eagle nests I've read: "Large as a washing machine or the 
bed of a pickup." 


According to Ranger Alan Bland, "March is when adult bald eagles here are at 
their nests, either sitting on eggs or feeding hatchlings." I love the news of 
all these nests because it shows better than anything I can imagine the power 
of people to change things when they focus. People didn't want to lose nesting 
eagles in the Lower 48 so they rose up. We may take back the world, eagles in 
the lead. 


The world we think we know is not all known, either. In the same Outdoors 
section this morning (page 7A) is the report of a brand new to science species 
of salamander near Hot Springs. 


Just when we thought Bald Eagles gone, back they come. Just when we thought the 
world all known, there's that salamander. 
Subject: Big Bend - no Green Jays - YES
From: laura davis <lauralea1959 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 23:11:46 -0700
This being a no frills adventure meant no internet or hotels, but I wouldnt 
trade sleeping in the back of my car on the beach and cold showers at the 
National Seashore for anything. I found my Green Jays at the Laguna Atascosa 
NWR as promised by one of you wonderful birders that gave me such great tips. I 
am still counting but I saw over 90 birds and believe this when I say I am 
fairly new at this and saw 40 Life birds! This includes Aransas NWR, Port 
Aransas- Charlies Pasture, The Birding Center and my favorite Paradise Pond. I 
stayed and birded the NationalSeashore and saw my first ever apair of Crested 
Caracaras! Then on to Laguna NWR which was awesome and the Green Jays were 
everywhere and my first ever Altimira Orioles, Buff Bellied Hummer and Blk 
Crested Titmouse .... Oh so much I saw and enjoyed. I have to say that God 
created the most beautiful interesting creations for us to enjoy. He blessed my 
trip all along the way. Even my 

 first hot shower at a County Park that only cost me $2.50 for camping shower 
and all. Amazing! I went to Weslaco and was thrilled with the Frontera Audobon 
Centers «thicket» there on Texas Ave. where I saw my first ever Blk Bellied 
Whistling Ducks and the Kiskadee. I visited the Estero Llano Grande SP where I 
was not impressed with the really long hike to the Visitor Center frm the 
parking lot in the 90 temp but again God blessed me with Huck and a wonderful 
two and a half hour bird hunt. He was so knowledgeble and knew where to find 
the Pauraque and her two babies, where the Altamira Oriole was building her 
nest on the wires above the road and so much detail about each Sandpiper. I 
really enjoyed this time. Then to 10th and Dove in McAllen to see the trees 
full of green Parakeets. Wierd and amazing. I decided to hit Port Aransas again 
and then head over to try and see the Prairie Chickens at Attwater NWR with o 
luck. Then over to Galeston which I 

 dont know if I was just birded out or unimpressed so I headed north. Another 
intevention from a wonderful God and I noticed this crazy activity on the side 
of the road. This was Tuesday yesterday and I decided these were not people 
picking thier kids up lining the streets so I asked a man moving very quickly 
with his bins and he said The Warblers are very active. as he rushed on. I got 
pumped up and pulled in to wht ended up being the Hook on High Island.The next 
four hours I was shown 41 birds and at least 15 were life birds for me. I saw a 
Canada a Blue Wing a Golden Wing and so many more. I took 12GB of pics in seven 
days. It ll take a minute to process. Thank you all again. I think I got to see 
all the ones you told me about. I may definately do this in April from here on 
out... 

Subject: DOBC field trip
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 17:01:35 -0500
This Sat. 8am. Lake Harrison Parking lot the Dobc bird club will got out to
a local farm and look for warblers. All are welcome.

Alan Gregory

Harrison, 



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - April 15
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 19:25:36 -0500
Mark Peterson (OK) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 79 
species. It was clear and started off cold and calm and turned mild and windy. 
New returning migrants are showing up daily. Here is our list for today: 


Canada Goose - 6
Wood Duck - 9
Gadwall - 122
American Wigeon - 2
Blue-winged Teal - 110
Northern Shoveler - 32
Ring-necked Duck - 5
Hooded Merganser - 8
Pied-billed Grebe - 24
Neotropic Cormorant - 2
Double-crested Cormorant - 17
Anhinga - 2
American Bittern - 4
Great Blue Heron - 3
Great Egret - 12
Little Blue Heron - 5
Green Heron - 1
Black Vulture - 7
Turkey Vulture - 19
Bald Eagle - 1 adult
Red-shouldered Hawk - 3
Red-tailed Hawk - 4
Purple Gallinule - 1
Common Gallinule - 4
American Coot - 265
Greater Yellowlegs - 25
Lesser Yellowlegs - 40
Least Sandpiper - 2
Pectoral Sandpiper - 10
Wilson's Snipe - 1
Wilson's Phalarope - 6
Mourning Dove - 6
Chimney Swift - 1
Belted Kingfisher - 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 8
Hairy Woodpecker - 1
Pileated Woodpecker - 1
Eastern Phoebe - 3
Eastern Kingbird - 7
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 5
Loggerhead Shrike - 1
White-eyed Vireo - 9
Blue Jay - 2
American Crow - 12
Fish Crow - 13
Tree Swallow - 149
Bank Swallow - 1
Cliff Swallow - 390
Barn Swallow - 15
Carolina Chickadee - 6
Tufted Titmouse - 4
Carolina Wren - 11
Sedge Wren - 5
Marsh Wren - 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 5
Eastern Bluebird - 3
Northern Mockingbird - 1
Brown Thrasher - 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1
Black-and-white Warbler - 1
Prothonotary Warbler - 7
Common Yellowthroat - 11
Yellow-breasted Chat - 1
Savannah Sparrow - 5
Le Conte's Sparrow - 1
Song Sparrow - 2
Lincoln's Sparrow - 4
Swamp Sparrow - 11
White-throated Sparrow - 5
White-crowned Sparrow - 9
Northern Cardinal - 19
Red-winged Blackbird - 26
Eastern Meadowlark - 5
Yellow-headed Blackbird - 1 male
Common Grackle - 17
Brown-headed Cowbird - 5
Orchard Oriole - 4
American Goldfinch - 1

Odonates:

Southern Spreadwing
Fragile Forktail
Familiar Bluet
Common Green Darner
Mantled Baskettail
Slender Baskettail
Common Baskettail
Eastern Pondhawk
Common Whitetail
Blue Corporal
Variegated Meadowhawk
Band-winged Dragonlet
Wandering Glider
Black Saddlebags
Red Saddlebags

Herps:

American Alligator
Red-eared Slider
Southern Black Racer
Cajun Chorus Frog
Green Treefrog
Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Southern Leopard Frog
Bullfrog


Good birding!



David Arbour
De Queen, AR

Don't forget to register for the Red Slough Birding Convention May 3 - 6: 
http://www.redsloughconvention.com/index.html 


Visit the Red Slough Photo Gallery:  www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma
Subject: Nice mix
From: fsbirdlady AT YAHOO.COM
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 17:03:43 -0500
Just now in my teeny yard...House Wren, Inca Dove, Northern Flicker, Cedar 
Waxwing, and Red-bellied Woodpecker. Loving Spring. 


Sandy B.
Fort Smith

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Federal Plan To Save Prairie Chickens Ruffles State Feathers
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 16:25:04 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

I heard part of this audio "Federal Plan To Save Prairie Chickens Ruffles State 
Feathers" on NPR this afternoon: 



http://ualrpublicradio.org/post/federal-plan-save-prairie-chickens-ruffles-state-feathers 


Some of you will find it of interest.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Several days ago I posted about the 19 wood ducklings that emerged from 
one of our nest boxes. Looking back at past records, it turns out that was not 
the highest number ever. There is this from 2009: April 20, 2010, 20+ 
fledglings, 6 unhatched eggs, 1 fledgling grabbed immediately and carried off 
by a red-shouldered hawk, plus 1 fledgling that emerged from the nest box after 
the others were gone and was left behind (taken to rehabber) by the adult 
woodie. That's 20+ because those little darlings move around so much it is nigh 
unto impossible to get a precise count sometimes! And that was one of those 
times. Use a photo you say? Well, try counting the chicks behind the adult or 
behind each other. Sigh. 

Subject: Strange Email on the list
From: Certain Travis <tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 14:15:33 -0500
Is Jo-Ann Jennier on our list? I have been getting spam that has her name as 
the sender. 

Travis Certain
West Little Rock behind Joe T Robinson (sorta)
tcertain AT aristotle.net
(Travis is really a girls name)



Subject: today's FOS & belated field trip thanks
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 11:27:26 -0500
Heard the first Kentucky Warbler and (possibly the last) Winter Wren on this 
24° morning hike after the eclipse. 


A Belated THANKS to all who attended the field trip at Ninestone on Sunday, 
April 13th! The few raindrops we felt did not even get us wet, but we did have 
a lovely day, a relaxing pot luck on the deck, and we counted at least 35 
species. Joe Neal, our fearless leader, wrote a fine report of the event posted 
to ARBIRD. Joe added that all visitors to Ninestone "were just in awe and 
thunderstruck by the beauty and bird-habitat utility of Don Matt's brush/wood 
piles". 


Here's a partial list of the migrating birds observed on Sunday, April 13th - 
some here to breed, some just passing through: 


Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (5)
Sparrows - White-throated, Lincoln's, Swamp, Field, Chipping
Louisiana Waterthrushes - several territories along the stream
Goldfinches
White-eyed Vireo (we didn't hike to the Yellow-throated Vireo's territory)
Eastern Towhees
Warblers - Yellow-rumped, Yellow-throated. Pine, Northern Parula, 
Black-and-White 

Rough-winged Swallows
Indigo Buntings (FOS brilliant males)
Fish Crows
Blue-gray Gnatcatchers (busy gathering nesting materials)
Orchard Oriole (FOS male)
Ruby-crowned Kinglets

Resident nesters included: Wood Duck, Eastern Towhee, Red-shouldered Hawk, 
Pileated, Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Carolina Wren, Bluebird 
(just one later that evening), AND Great-horned Owls whose 2 youngsters showed 
themselves to only a lucky few. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: field trip to Wattle Hollow in the Boston Mtns Saturday April 19
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 13:27:51 +0000
On Saturday, April 19, join Joe Neal and others from Wattle Hollow Retreat 
Center, just north of Devil's Den State Park, for an exploration of hardwood 
forest, small farm, and stream environments with good views of birds and plants 
typical of the highland forests of Boston Mountains. Meet up along highway 170, 
where you turn into Wattle, by 9 AM for the leisurely & birdy stroll on a 
graded road comfortably downhill to the retreat center. Or, if you sleep in, 
just get to the retreat center around 9:30-10 AM. After we reach the retreat 
center, at some point we will head down the hillside forest to the creek. It is 
a unique opportunity for a look at nature, hilltop to creek bottom, in the 
heartland of the Bostons, and relatively far from the maddening crowds. 


Please also bring something to share for the pot luck lunch at noon at the 
retreat center. NO, contrary to what you may have heard, you will not be 
required to stand on your head and meditate, though of course you are always 
welcome to do so. Despite what the pundits are claiming, you will not be 
forcibly converted to Buddhism or be required to engage in satanic rites. This 
is walk is free and open to the public. There is no need to register. If you 
have walking impairments, the porch at the retreat center is a wonderful place 
to see birds and a vast mountainous landscape in comfort. All ages and 
abilities are welcome. 


DIRECTIONS: Starting in Fayetteville, take I-540 south to the Devil's Den exit 
at West Fork exit #53. Turn right (west) towards the park, following highway 
170 and Devil's Den SP signs for about 14 miles. At the sign that says "Devil's 
Den State Park, 4 miles," continue on Hwy 170 another half mile, there is 
usually a Wattle Hollow sign on the left, just before the driveway (note: there 
is a stone cairn also on the left, and a small white house with mailboxes on 
the right). This is the meeting place by 9 AM. You should see at least me and 
the old Toyota along 170. If you are in the 10 AM group, go left down the 
driveway; after 1 mile, take the (only) right fork in the drive which is 
well-marked, and continue to the retreat center end of the road. 


Check out digital Wattle Hollow Retreat Center here: 
http://www.wattlehollow.com/ or flesh & blood Wattle on Saturday. For more 
info: phone: (479) 225-2381 or email: joyfoxwath AT aol.com. 
 I will be glad to carpool from Fayetteville if 
there is interest. I will be leaving Fayetteville at 7:30. Return after a 
leisurely potluck lunch. 
Subject: 2014 Spring Migration Count
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 12:52:08 +0000
Greetings all,
 It's time to get out and enjoy spring and help count birds for the 22nd annual 
AR Migratory Bird Count. 

It would be great if you could join one of the established counties.
Or you can do a county on your own.
Just pick a calendar day between 4/23 - 5/20 to do a county.
Keep track of the number of birds of each species, your miles and hours. I have 
field data sheets and data compilation spreadsheets on the pc, if you want a 
copy. 


If you compile by spreadsheet, showing each party, I'd love to put it into 
eBird. But I don't want you to go to extra trouble. 


Please return your data to me, in any format that's easiest for you, including 
handwritten, by 6/20 so I can start the newsletter article. 


You can check out the website, get a feel of the international scope of the 
project and even buy T-Shirts. www.birdday.org 


Dates I've heard from so far:
Thur 4/24:    Pope     Sarah Davis     sadavis AT fs.fed.us
Wens 4/30:    Johnson    Greg Taylor & Leif Anderson    gregorytaylor#fs.fed.us
Sat 5/3:       Hobbs SP       hobbs AT arkansas.com
Sat 5/3:      Logan     Don Simons   don.simons AT arkansas.gov
Sat 5/10:      Benton     Mike Mlodinow    mamlod AT hotmail.com
Sat 5/10:    Pulaski       Dan Scheiman,      birddan AT comcast.net
Sun   5/11:    Faulkner      Allan Mueller     akcmueller AT gmail.com
Sun 5/11:      Washington     Mike Mlodinow    mamlod AT hotmail.com
Wens 5/14:    Prairie     Terry Singleterry    tasingleterry AT hotmail.com

Any questions, please holler at me. Leaderson AT fs.fed.us 479-284-3150 ext 3151 
Cheers, Leif 





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: Barry
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 03:03:15 -0500
Apparently this has happened to me also as I received a number of 'failed
mailings' on Sunday.  Apparently have no virus though.

 

MaryAnn 

In the pine woods northwest of London (AR)

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Herschel Raney
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 6:18 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Barry

 

I spoke incorrectly. Actually anyone with Barry's address on their computer
on the list could have been infected and then it jut used Barry's address as
its tag location. His computer may be as clean as a whistle. But it seems to
like his address as a tag, where ever it is actually originating. 

 

Herschel
Subject: No Subject
From: Susan Young <staymoreark AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 23:54:48 -0500
sign off ARBIRD-L
Subject: Re: More or less AZ birds
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:50:42 -0500
I tried for the Sinaloa Wren twice...this one is at Tubac south of where I was 
on HWY 19.... I missed glimpsing it both times by 1/2 to 1 hr at different 
times of day. I ran into some people that went 19 times before they saw the 
bird. I did see 2 Perigren Falcons fly over one of the days while at the wren 
location and there is a Common Raven nest at the same place. 


I was going to go to Ft Huachuca for the supposedly more predicable wren on the 
way home Saturday and decided to blow it off as I had a 12 hr drive to Amarillo 
by Saturday night plus a two hr time variance and didn't break camp til 7:30 
with little sleep the night before because it was soooo windy. 


Not a problem with me since I was still doing the Trogon dance. You should have 
heard the stories going around on the Trogon grapevine that week, you really 
had no idea what to believe. Jacque 







---- Lyndal York  wrote: 

=============
Ken Dayer (formerly of LR) and I birded the Sierra Vista, AZ neighborhood
while Jacque Brown was over in the Santa Ritas. We spent most of the 9th
looking for the Sinola Wren which had been frequently reported in Huachuca
Canyon--lower picnic area (stakeout *Sinaloa Wren* spot).since the middle
of December. No luck! It was  last *reported*: Fri, Apr 11th, 7:20am. After
a tough climb up Miller Canyon we did find the Spotted Owl ( complete with
a good photo) the only new species. Well two, if you count the split of the
Winter Wren. Perhaps there is a new species lurking over in Santa Barbara,
CA.

Lyndal York
Not in the piney woods of West LR

--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Arkansas Birders in Texas
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 20:56:29 -0500
Edie and I traveled to High Island last Wednesday and birded the area from The 
Trinity river near Wallisville, Anahuac NWR, the Smith Oak Sanctuary at High 
Island, the Boy Scout Woods, Rollover Pass (where the pirates rolled their 
barrels out), Bolivar Flats, Fort Travis, Horseshoe Lake to Frenchtown Road. 
We're still counting birds and processing images, but so far our species count 
is nearing 130. Not too shabby, considering we hired no guides nor did we sink 
our cash into expensive blinds and the warblers were slow. 


Fellow birders were the best at assisting us. In fact, at the big store near 
Crystal Beach, we began talking to a couple about our sightings and offered 
directions to a pair of displaying Clapper Rails, Edie and I had the good 
fortune to find. Eventually the "where are y'all from?" question was asked and 
within moments, we realized we were visiting with Larry Jernigan and his wife! 


Edie and I mentioned we were thinking about hitting Anahuac later that day to 
search for Crested Caracaras. Now get this: the Jernigans tell us about one 
they saw a couple of years ago and approximately where they saw it, near the 
Skillern Tract at Anahuac. 


So Edie and I birded the refuge and on the way back, I'm a little disappointed 
since the long shot didn't pay off, we see this same dead skunk in the middle 
of the road (and it was stinking to high heaven). Except that's not the only 
black and white we see. A gorgeous Crested Caracara is dining on it's flesh! 
How cool is that? It was one of the most exciting life birds ever! 


I'm still hoarse from screaming (sorry Edie). So, if you're on FB, we have a 
page called COW Birders. It's a bit silly, because we prefer it that way and if 
you'd like to see that image and more from the trip, go "Like" our page. Or 
just visit! But have fun! 


Thanks to the Jernigans. We owe you! I hope you found that flock of 
Yellow-headed Blackbirds and Clapper Rails. 


The shorebirds were fantastic. We needed help with IDs, and if you want to take 
a stab at them, we'd appreciate your help. Otherwise, it's going to take some 
reading, studying our Sibley's, Nat Geo, and "All About Birds" to muddle 
through. Plus eBird's range maps to narrow our choices down. 


If Texas only had the same kind of information on their checklists! What a gem 
we have in AAS' field list! I always miss having something similar abroad. 



Cheers!

Kelly Chitwood 
El Dorado, AR
Subject: Horned Lark
From: Joyce & Harlan Shedell <jhshed AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 20:48:03 -0500
I tried to find the Yellow-headed Blackbirds that Joe Neal mentioned near
Highfill, Benton County, (didn't find any). Those same hay fields hold other
amazing birds if you have the patience to stop and search with your
binoculars.  There were Baird's sandpipers-that seemed strange in a hay
field instead of a mud flat. 

 

Over the past 2 weeks, I have observed several Horned Larks. Evidently they
have been here much longer because today I saw a baby Horned Lark.  It was
just a little ball of fluff the same color as the ground around it. I could
only spot it when it was running after the adult.  The adult would fly away
then return to within about 6 feet of the baby and the baby would run to it.
One time I did observe the adult feeding it. Joe tells me they are known to
be early nesters. It was exciting to see a baby bird this early in the
spring.
Subject: FOS, etc.
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 20:05:51 -0500
At backyard feeder:

 

April 11: 1 Indigo Bunting

April 13: 1 male Ruby Throated Hummingbird

Purple Finch

Seen daily throughout winter:  65+ American Goldfinch 

 

Not seen for several days: Fox Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco, Towhee

 

Baker Prairie:  On wire near Goblin Drive:

Today, April 14: 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

 

 

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR
Subject: More or less AZ birds
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:46:06 -0500
Ken Dayer (formerly of LR) and I birded the Sierra Vista, AZ neighborhood
while Jacque Brown was over in the Santa Ritas. We spent most of the 9th
looking for the Sinola Wren which had been frequently reported in Huachuca
Canyon--lower picnic area (stakeout *Sinaloa Wren* spot).since the middle
of December. No luck! It was  last *reported*: Fri, Apr 11th, 7:20am. After
a tough climb up Miller Canyon we did find the Spotted Owl ( complete with
a good photo) the only new species. Well two, if you count the split of the
Winter Wren. Perhaps there is a new species lurking over in Santa Barbara,
CA.

Lyndal York
Not in the piney woods of West LR
Subject: First RTH west of Fayetteville
From: Sara Cain-Bartlett <saracnbrtltt9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:31:20 -0500
The first RTH arrived Saturday, April 12.  Yesterday I had four males.
Tonight 6.  We are to get a hard freeze tonight of 25 degrees, sadly our
apple trees are in full bloom.  My earliest RTH in NW AR was April 9.  

 

Sara Cain-Bartlett, LCSW

Fayetteville, Arkansas 

HOME:  479-521-3125

OFFICE:  479-521-4406

Cell:  479-466-0611

 
Subject: Barry
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 18:18:14 -0500
I spoke incorrectly. Actually anyone with Barry's address on their computer
on the list could have been infected and then it jut used Barry's address
as its tag location. His computer may be as clean as a whistle. But it
seems to like his address as a tag, where ever it is actually originating.

Herschel
Subject: Messages
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 18:10:28 -0500
I have received them four times from Barry Haas and once from another
address I believe.

Yes, never click on php files. From anyone.

But I believe at least Barry was infected. And if you clicked on the link
from Barry your comp needs a viral and worm scrub as well.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: Suspicious messages
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 18:02:31 -0500
I've seen two.  Both were supposedly from Barry Haas.  I marked them as
SPAM and deleted without reading.

Ann



On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 1:27 PM, Norman Lavers  wrote:

> There seem to be several suspicious e-mails appearing on the listserv with
> no message and links that don't look feathered bird related...beware.
>
> Cheryl Lavers
>
Subject: Invasion of the tiny
From: Adam Schaffer <adamschaffer2 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 15:52:13 -0700
  Early yesterday morning the woods behind my house were invaded by tiny 
songbirds.  They were covered up with gnatcatchers, parulas, and ruby-crowned 
kinglets.  My morning walk yielded rough counts of 30, 20, and 12, 
respectively.  The highly numerous gnatcatchers included a pair on a nest in a 
large cherry tree with fledgling leaves of its own.  This brought back to me a 
lovely hour or so spent at the Ozark Natural Science Center watching a 
gnatcatcher build a nest.  He worked like an assembly line worker, first to a 
small cherry for tent caterpillar webbing, then to a crook in a large oak to 
spackle it on, then to the base of the oak for lichens, back for more 
spackling, and repeat.  I'm sure he grabbed a few caterpillars for fuel along 
the way.  I punched my clock before he did.  I'm not sure how long he spent at 
it, but I do know that despite knowing the exact location of that nest, I never 
found it again.  His camouflage was quite 

 spectacular.  Many of the new arrivals yesterday seemed to be spending time on 
the ground enjoying an emergence of even tinier winter stoneflies from our 
creek.  These stoneflies typically don't fly to save energy in colder weather. 
 Among all of the new arrivals of individuals, the only new species' arrival 
appeared to be that of a Nashville Warbler.  Larger than a gnacatcher wouldn't 
typically rule much out, but yesterday was a lovely exception.  Despite all of 
that, we're still waiting for our first hummingbird.  Any day now, I'm sure. 


Adam Schaffer
Bentonville
Subject: Warbler
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:51:21 -0500
After sending out yesterday's note, I went back out on the porch in the
rain that was just starting. I pulled the scope back a bit from the
drizzle. And after spotting about fifteen more Yellow-rumps I put the scope
on a Worm-eating Warbler in the front yard. I watched it frisk some oak
catkins and shake itself off in the rain. Sibley says it is 'a rich caramel
and olive color.' A beautiful if muted warbler that I have only seen about
three times in Faulkner county. This was a first for the yard. A new week
for the county. And the 26th warbler for the property.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: FOS Great-crested Flycatcher ... and 2nd hummer
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:44:41 -0500
I hear my FOS Great-crested Flycatcher today.  Also saw a 2nd male 
ruby-throated Hummingbird.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: FOS Blue Grosbeak
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:42:00 -0500
I had my first of season Blue Grosbeak in my yard today.  I had just thought
before I sat down was some had reported their FOS Indigo Bunting and I
wondered where mine were.  Then I looked out on the ground and there it was.

I went to Bell Slough on Saturday.  I didn't stay as long I as I had planned
but I was thrilled to death when I identified a Black and White Warbler all
by myself.  

Have a great evening.

Lenore
Saline County
Subject: FOS Rose-breasted Grosbeak!
From: Sheran Herrin <sjherrin AT CSWNET.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:41:10 -0500
It was one of those blink and you almost miss something amazing!! My computer 
sits right by the window that looks out on my feeders. Very convenient most of 
the time, except when I have a project that needs to be finished in a timely 
manner. Not so today, so I was glancing out a lot more than I was reading my 
emails. Rain has stopped, hopefully for awhile, but it is still really windy. 
Wind chimes and singing and all the usual suspects are busy chowing down. 
Glance away for just a moment and look back and a beautiful male Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak is enjoying the sunflower seed! WOW what a lovely surprise! After 
watching him for a couple of minutes, I decide to pull up AR BIRD and post my 
discovery. In the 10 seconds it took for me to do that he was gone! 

Also have had several other FOS in the past couple of days. A small flock (10) 
cattle egrets, a pair of Eastern Kingbirds, at least 4 ruby-throats battling 
over feeder dominance and a pair of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers. 


Sheran Herrin, just north of Beebe, guessing there is a Copper’s close by- 
feeders empty! 
Subject: first two weeks of April. and Sibley's new book
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 13:51:50 -0500
Man O Man! I go away for two weeks and come back to a two headed Bluebird. 

I went back to Arizona this year for my vacation, Besides the fact it is 
beautiful out there I also wanted to try for a few birds I missed two years 
ago. 


I spent the whole time at Madera Canyon and around Patagonia. I saw an Elegant 
Trogon on my last day there. I added at least 9 lifers this trip, and got a lot 
of photos of birds that were to fast for me two years ago. 



Violet-crowned hummer
Blue-throated Hummer
Dusky-capped Flycatcher
Hepatic Tanager
Hutton's Vireo
Gray Hawk
Townsend's Warbler
Yellow-eyed Junco
Elegant Trogon


I need to review but I took a LOT of empid photos. 
I am certain of Hammond's and Cordilleran Flycatchers and am hoping for a Dusky 
and a Gray Flycatcher. 


On the way out of town on April 1st I saw my local FOS Scissor-tailed 
Flycatcher , on the way back they were in the Texas Panhandle. 


Interestingly enough the New Sibley Book was a conversation maker. I went 
through it page by page with several people from around the country comparing 
it to the Old Sibley's and there were as many comments that the colors in the 
old book looked more faded than they should be as there were that the colors in 
the new book looked too bright. And it wasn't because the old book is old. The 
font is smaller because the images are larger. I particularly liked the added 
beak detail for the empidonex flycatchers since I was looking for several of 
those this trip. 


--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbirds near Highfill today
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 18:31:35 +0000
Male Yellow-headed Blackbirds (3) were associated with a flock of about 400 
blackbirds, mostly female Red-winged Blackbirds, but also a few Brown-headed 
Cowbirds. Mike Mlodinow and I were coming back from the state fish hatchery at 
Centerton. The flock was near Highfill in the big fields along Malone Road, 0.2 
miles east of intersection with Digby Road.The bold white patch was striking in 
the middle of the mass of blackbirds stringing out on the former prairie 
grassland on the two birds I saw best. Oops! So were those yellow heads! A big 
cold front came in here last night, so of course we had HIGH hopes of big time 
shorebird fall out. It wasn’t big comparatively-speaking, but interesting: 
Killdeer (a few pairs), Greater Yellowlegs (5), Lesser Yellowlegs (18), Spotted 
Sandpiper (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (2), Least Sandpiper (10), Baird’s 
Sandpiper (13), Pectoral Sandpiper (11), Wilson’s Snipe (9), Wilson’s Phalarope 
(2). Blue-winged Teal (34) and Northern Shovelers (19) still present. No 
Green-winged Teal today. 
Subject: Suspicious messages
From: Norman Lavers <asilidman AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 11:27:12 -0700
There seem to be several suspicious e-mails appearing on the listserv with no 
message and links that don't look feathered bird related...beware. 


Cheryl Lavers
Subject: Not-so-stormy day at Ninestone
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 11:12:15 +0000
Sunday’s Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Ninestone Land Trust 
in Carroll County was not the predicted blow-out with angry squall lines and 
severe thunderstorms. Instead, we had flocks of White-throated Sparrows, 
individuals with throats and head stripes brilliantly white and golden lores, 
singing in voluminous choruses. We couldn’t have heard thunder if there had 
been any. 


Instead of squall lines we had brush piles on mountain glades with singing 
Field Sparrows and migrating flocks including Swamp and Lincoln’s Sparrows. 


We did walk the glades. In subdued light, the moss on sandstone bedrock was 
emerald green, decorated with thick yellow-rich stands of that low-growing 
glade lover, Selenia. Nearby, another rock flower, shining white like those 
spring stripes on sparrows, Palmer’s Saxifrage. Alongside the pulsating spring 
flows of the waterfalls, fresh blooms of our special trillium, Ozark wake 
robin. And yes, even though the day was predicted a birding wash-out, Louisiana 
Waterthrushes apparently didn’t get the news, because we found them in their 
usual haunts along Piney Creek and as always, their singing trumped all. 


We did not get blown off the high bluffs. The predicted rain-out didn’t keep us 
from climbing up and around. Delicate green foliage of columbines decorated 
seeps, spicebush is covered with yellow flowers, and there are two Great Horned 
Owl chicks in an inaccessible high-up grotto. I didn’t get to see the chicks 
myself, but I did see what’s left after dinner, including regurgitated remains 
and black feathers. So now we know why at this brood-rearing time of year, 
crows raise so much hell when parent owls are out and about in daylight. 


So Ninestone is just the best on an un-rainy day. You explore stuff to your 
heart’s content ‘til deluge, then during deluge, enjoy potluck on a broad porch 
fronting Piney Creek and the waterfalls. We never had deluge, but that didn’t 
stop potluck or bird feeders. 


With pre-lunch dessert in hand, I got my FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird (at 
least 3) – and it was OK to be all-but-speared for sitting too near the feeder. 
And His Very Most Indigo Majesty (Indigo Buntings, fresh plumaged males), and 
FOS male Orchard Oriole, all black and brick red. Excellent birder’s fare in a 
rainy day, and no worse in any respect for storms that never happened -- except 
for a squall line of spring wildflowers, migrating birds, and even a few 
butterflies, including a couple of falcate orange tip butterflies that also 
missed stormy day predictions. 


Finally, but briefly, and back to the glades, we had close encounters with 
cryptobiotic species. Enjoyed figuring out just what all of that actually means 
at potluck. Great fare for the genuinely un-rainy day. 
Subject: Birds and Things: Recently Around Fayetteville
From: Pruitt <mlpruitt24 AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 22:47:21 -0500
 Being cooped up studying for upcoming tests, I managed to get out a few times 
here and there last week. Migrants are starting to move through and the 
breeding residents seem to be arriving in droves. To start, I was able to get 
away for a bit on Thursday to help Dr. J.D. Willson and several of his students 
with herp surveys at Woolsey Wet Prairie. American Golden-Plovers, Greater 
Yellowlegs, Solitary Sandpiper, and their buddies, all the while checking out a 
Prairie Kingsnake and Graham's Crayfish Snake. The rehabilitated Woolsey never 
ceases to amaze me, it's as if the prairie was never gone. While out there, 
J.D. showed me a thicket where there has been a covey of bobwhite for the last 
few weeks. He said, in walking by, that you can usually see them running around 
among the briars. As we passed, the quail didn't fail; about 15 burst into 
flight and landed in a nearby fencerow. 

 Later in the week I was able to sneak out to Lake Fayetteville for a quick 
getaway. The usual first arrivals were in decent numbers: BG Gnatcatcher, BandW 
Warbler, and a really good-looking Yellow-rumped Warbler….gone was his drab 
winter outfit. I say in "decent numbers" here because this was no comparison to 
another quick outing to Wilson Hollow Road south of town. Rolling onto the 
newly-graded gravel road, before even slowing down, I could tell gnatcatchers 
would be dominating the woodland chorus. And they were, 30 total along the 
4(ish) mile stretch of road. Continuing along, an Osprey caught a fish out of 
the river, creating an awesome backdrop while I was watching Yellow-throated 
Warbler, Nashville Warbler, and N. Parula play around along the bank. Warblers 
are to birders what fine gemstones are to jewelers and when they're in a 
redbud, a birder's heart beats fast and, boy, were there redbuds. Speaking of 
yellow throated birds, Yellow-throated Vireos were also in high numbers along 
Wilson Hollow. At one point, two came together for a courtship display. One 
vireo sat watching as the other (I'm assuming the male) puffed up and began 
walking back and forth along a branch. I didn't stick around to see what 
happened next, but she looked pretty impressed! By the time I back-tracked to 
head home, the scolding gnatcatchers had been hushed by the din of a huge flock 
of Am. Goldfinch, beginning to don their summer best. 


 To end my post, I was able to get photos of many of these goodies. You're sure 
to not be disappointed, so for those interested feel free to visit: 
www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents 


And since I mentioned it, for our herp-loving friends out there: 
http://www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recentherps 


Enjoy!
Mitchell Pruitt
P.S. I know, I know, I have work to do. Just a short jaunt helps me keep my 
sanity though. 

Subject: Info: Arkansas Audubon Society Spring Convention, May 2 - 4 | Jonesboro
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 20:23:57 -0500
Arkansas birders,

The Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) spring convention is fast approaching,
and you won't want to miss it!  Experience spring migration at its peak;
learn about birds, butterflies, and salamanders from ecology experts;
mingle with other wildlife enthusiasts; and more!

The convention will be held May 2 - 4 at the Hilton Garden Inn in
Jonesboro; call 870.931.7727 to reserve a room for this event.  A
downloadable brochure about the society, convention registration form, and
complete meeting agenda are available at http://www.arbirds.org/.  Note
that the early-bird registration fee of $15 per person runs through April
18.

Additional details about this convention are in the press release below my
signature, as well as on the AAS Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/ArkansasAudubonSociety

Feel free to email me if you have any questions.  I hope to see you at the
convention!

Samantha Scheiman
AAS publicity chair


Birders flock to Jonesboro for convention

 Arkansas Audubon Society to convene May 2 - 4



Experience the height of spring migration at the 2014 Arkansas Audubon
Society (AAS) spring convention, which will meet Friday, May 2 through
Sunday, May 4 at the Hilton Garden Inn in Jonesboro.  The convention will
feature birding field trips, biology student presentations, and keynote
speakers covering the characteristics of the black-capped vireo and
cerulean warbler, as well as the nesting ecology of the western slimy
salamander.  Additionally, participants will enjoy a silent auction, door
prizes, and opportunities to network with other wildlife enthusiasts.  Friday
registration lasts from 4 - 6 p.m. in the Ouachita/Delta Ballroom.



Field trip participants will enjoy seeing a cornucopia of migrating birds,
such as colorful buntings, grosbeaks, and warblers, perhaps even the rare
Cape May or black-throated blue warbler.



Friday afternoon's field trip destinations will encompass the Crowley's
Ridge Nature Center and St. Francis Sunken Lands Wildlife Management
Area/Hatchie Coon Island.  Saturday field trips will include Friday's
destinations plus Craighead Forest Park, Wapanocca National Wildlife
Refuge, and Scatter Creek Wildlife Management Area.



Friday evening's speaker is Dr. Stanley Trauth, professor of zoology at
Arkansas State University and author of *The Amphibians and Reptiles of
Arkansas.  *He will share his knowledge of the western slimy salamander's
fascinating nesting habits.



Saturday evening's highlight is Dr. Than Boves, assistant professor of
ecology at Arkansas State University, who will deliver a presentation
entitled, "Black and Blue: The Life and Times of the Black-capped Vireo and
the Cerulean Warbler."



Also Saturday, several biology students will educate participants on their
areas of research, as follows: Baltimore checkerspot oviposition (Stephen
Robertson, University of Arkansas - Little Rock), winter roosting in
eastern bluebirds in northwest Arkansas (Jessica Fowler, Arkansas State
University), and the effects of chronic noise from gas extraction on bird
communities and their songs in the Fayetteville shale (Maiya Block and
Meghan McFadden, Hendrix College).

Convention registration is $15 per person if registered by April 18; after
that, it is $20 per person.  To reserve a room at the Hilton Garden Inn,
call 870.931.7727 and request that you want a room in the Audubon block.  The
convention is open to non-members.  Children under 16 are free.  Meals are
an additional charge.  A downloadable brochure about the society,
convention registration form, and complete meeting agenda are available at
http://www.arbirds.org/.



If you have questions about the convention, please contact Karen Holliday
at ladyhawke1 AT att.net.



The biannual AAS conventions are excellent opportunities to watch birds,
meet other birders, learn, and have fun. Find us on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/ArkansasAudubonSociety.



The Arkansas Audubon Society, a nonprofit all-volunteer organization
founded in 1955, aims to foster a greater knowledge of Arkansas's natural
history through observation, investigation, education and publication; and
to be a potent force in the conservation of all of the state's natural
resources.

###











-- 
"To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part." -Aldo Leopold
Subject: Sightings: Bell Slough WMA
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 16:55:47 -0500
Karen Holliday and I birded Bell Slough Sunday morning. I would have bet we’d 
be caught in a downpour but it never happened. We saw 45 species. Highlights 
were Green Heron, White-eyed, Red-eyed, and Yellow-throated Vireo, Northern 
Rough-winged Swallow, Prothonotary Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Common 
Yellowthroat, Hooded Warbler, Lincoln’s Sparrow, and a Barred Owl who was 
very concerned about who cooked for us. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock, AR
Subject: April in Progress (Scope Adventures, Book Review)
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 16:48:42 -0500
Sunshine and blustery Saturday, working by the creek with binoculars at the
ready. Sitting between stints of brier and brush work. Nashville Warblers
in. Black-throated Green Warblers in. Great Crested Flycatchers in. Summer
Tanagers in. Warbling Vireos in. The female crow continues at her brooding.
And she is sneaky about it. While on a sit-in-the-chair-and-listen spell a
bird dropped in that is arguably the loveliest bird in North America. He
was 25 feet away in my shallow swamp. The breeding plumage, full array,
dazzling sunshine light on the male Wood Duck. I had to wait until he
drifted behind a tree trunk to reach down on the ground for the binoculars.
In hand, I moved up closer, staying behind the tree and then watched him
swim and feed and occasionally stop to make that wheezing high whistle he
makes. He opens his beak for it. I watched him until he swam to the far
side.


I waited to get Sibley's new book until after I returned from South
America. Too distracting beforehand. And once I got it, I took it out on
the porch and had both the old and new versions with me. And my binoculars.
The first bird I looked at for comparison was the Tufted Titmouse. The
first bird I ever identified on my own at age 11. And really, if someone
claims to be a bird artist (I do not) then the test you want to give them
is not to draw the male Wood Duck or the Painted Bunting. If you want to
know the Zen drawing power of someone, you ask them to draw a Titmouse or a
Song Sparrow. In the case of the Titmouse I think Sibley #1 wins. The new
book washes some olives into the image. Probably from some printing anomaly
and not from Sibley's actual image. I doubt he modified the Titmouse image.
It looks essentially unchanged otherwise. But the bird right on my suet
cake, ten feet away looked more like Sibley color version #1.


Of course, after seeing the Wood Duck, I took it to the test. And the
larger images of the new Sibley version certainly win in almost every case
in direct comparison. He clearly did some touch up on the Woodie male
however. And really, when would your image of a Wood Duck male ever be
finished? I think Sibley himself lamented the fact that his drawings never
seem perfected. I can only imagine. I sometimes have trouble with a
paragraph. Which has no comparison with a paragraph created by nature. And
when I was looking at the Wood Duck through the binoculars, I noted the few
golden creamy feathers on the hind flank, back there past the golden patch,
above the rufous and bronze rump patch were a few sharp feathers cutting
down into the rufous. I have almost certainly never noticed them before.
Sibley has four little faint pale lines up there. I am not sure there were
four. And I think the hind several were darker than the golden forefeathers
in that row. I want another look. Sibley did do something to the bird's
back. And the white foreslash up front seems to have changed shape. I don't
envy a man with a thousand bird images to go through. Or however damn many
there are in there.


And today in the bluster and the continuous threat of rain, I watched my
wife garden while I had the sudden revelation that the scope was on the
porch for the crows anyway, why not scope every bird that I can see? You
don't do this in the woods. Too much trouble in the shaded high speed
migratory febrile woods of April and May. But in the rain sheltered and
wind sheltered shade of my porch? You still need speed and accuracy,
flipping back and forth between 12 power and 50 power. Smoothly gliding
after the bird whichever way they go in the wind rattled leaves. It is like
photography with one of those 400 or 500 millimeter mega lenses. Only at 50
power you are up in the equivalent of a camera lens the size of a bazooka
and a field of view barely bigger than the length of the warbler you are
looking at. The rewards, when you get it, are large. First year female
Parula, better than I have ever seen her. A Black-throated Green male that
made me gasp. And Sibley gets applause in both #1 and #2 for showing the
yellow wash below the black throat necklace. I had never noted it. I have
seen hundreds or BTGWs. I am a dunce. I don't think the BTGW images have
changed. And his warblers in the first book were generally superb anyway. I
got the scope on a Blue-winged Warbler that was making an odd single noted
drawn call that still sounded Blue-winged-ish but I thought for a minute it
was going to be a hybrid bird. It was however a true BW and in the scope,
it pretty much made my day.


I watched several Ruby-throats and they were active all day. Nearly the
first bird I saw at 7 am was a male who came onto the porch and frisked my
wife's new flower pot and then came and buzzed the white emblem on the
black t-shirt I was wearing. I think I felt some wing wash. With the scope
I found can actually tell males apart by the shape of the small white
featherings behind the eye. I was amazed at that. Males were doing the
sexual air dance over several females who showed up. And one male tried it
on a White-throated Sparrow. That little guy may be in for some surprises.
Today was the day I went through the ritual of cooking the first sugar
water. And putting out feeder number one. Several birds checked it out.
Some were definitely first timers as they fumbled to get the flower and the
beak in the right alignment.


In Summary: 1) try porch scoping with whatever scope you have. 2) Fill your
hummer feeders. It is supposed to be 29 degrees on Tuesday morning. 3) Tell
me what you find out on the golden feather array on the hind end of your
nearest Wood Duck.


And 4) David Sibley deserves for everyone who looks at birds in North
America to buy one of his books. The work involved is almost more than I
can truly believe came from one paint set, one set of eyes. I hope he has
children who can paint. And when version three gets here in 10 or 15 years,
if I am still listening for new birds in another April with my scope duct
taped to my walker, I will buy that one too.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Re: Osprey Nest, Greers Ferry Lake
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 14:19:07 -0500
A pair has once again built on Lake Dardanelle. Both birds were at the nest 
yesterday. 


Kenny Nichols
Cabot

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 13, 2014, at 12:56 PM, Dan Scheiman  wrote:
> 
> Carolyn Kuykendall shared photos of an Osprey nest (a pair with one 
fledgling) on Greers Ferry Lake, at the very end of Hurricane Creek Cove on the 
left side, at the top of a dead tree. 

> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
Subject: No Subject
From: David Chaffin <davchaffin AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 07:54:27 +0100
http://sepantadp.com/modules/mod_araticlhess/youinvited.php
Subject: Osprey downstream of Ponca
From: Thomas Lewis <td_lewis AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 11:01:50 -0700
There is an Osprey on the Ponca to Kyle's section of the Buffalo River, about a 
mile above the Steele Creek campground. 

 

________________________________
 From: Dan Scheiman 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 12:56 PM
Subject: Osprey Nest, Greers Ferry Lake
  


Carolyn Kuykendall shared photos of an Osprey nest (a pair with one fledgling) 
on Greers Ferry Lake, at the very end of Hurricane Creek Cove on the left side, 
at the top of a dead tree. 



Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR
Subject: Osprey Nest, Greers Ferry Lake
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 17:56:20 +0000
Carolyn Kuykendall shared photos of an Osprey nest (a pair with one fledgling) 
on Greers Ferry Lake, at the very end of Hurricane Creek Cove on the left side, 
at the top of a dead tree. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Possible Brown-headed Nuthatch nest
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 21:35:21 -0500
Today at Beaverfork I located a possible Brown-headed Nuthatch next hole.
I saw this guy twice (11:00 and 3:30) in tho hole today for 15 minutes at a
time.


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/April2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6001593950514964306 


I did not see the Black-bellied Whistling Duck or the Lark Sparrow.

Michael (Conway)
Subject: Why's he walking like that?
From: fsbirdlady AT YAHOO.COM
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 21:13:36 -0500
David and I went to Hawksbill Crag today. I picked up a few FOS birds. It seems 
odd that I heard my first Chimney Swifts flying high over the mountains. There 
were lots of Ovenbirds singing. Heard my first Yellow-throated Vireos, and 
found a last years nest. But the best bird was the one on the road as we drove 
back down the mountain. We went around a curve to see, standing in the middle 
of the road, an American Woodcock. He was slowly doing his "stroll" across the 
road. David, in surprise, yelled, "Why's he walking like that?" My response, 
sounding way short of scientific was, "Because that's what he does." Haha. I've 
held injured Woodcocks, seen them do their mating display, and found a dead one 
in a parking lot, a lot that the previous spring had been woods, but I've never 
seen one stroll across a road. 


Good stuff on a great day to be out.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

Sent from my iPad
Subject: FOS Tennessee Warbler & Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 21:03:29 -0500
On Wye Mountain Saturday afternoon I heard a Tennessee Warbler singing up a 
storm then while driving home just after sunset saw a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 
doing aerial acrobatics. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock, AR
Subject: Re: And then ... there were 19!
From: Ed Laster <elaster523 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 19:10:05 -0500
Oops, grammar problem. Maybe it was a landing site, but still had to have been 
quite a sight. 

Ed Laster

On Apr 12, 2014, at 4:18 PM, Ed Laster  wrote:

> Every spring I look forward to hearing about the “woodies” at the Haas house. 
Thanks for keeping us updated. That had to be quite a site watching so many 
jump to the ground. 

> 
> Ed Laster
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 12, 2014, at 12:05 PM, Barry Haas  wrote:
> 
>> Dear ARBIRDers,
>> 
>> Over the years we have shared our experiences with nesting wood ducks behind 
our house. Our large picture windows allow us a panoramic view of the next 
boxes on the far side of our small pond. 

>> 
>> We have two nest boxes, an east and a west, separated by about 50 feet. 
Shortly after 9:00 this morning my wife alerted me that an adult female wood 
duck was sitting in the opening of the east nest box looking back and forth. 
That's almost always a sign she has young that hatched the day before and that 
she will be bringing out into the world shortly. 

>> 
>> Once, twice, three, four times she backed into the box only to reappear in 
the opening a few minutes later. Not sure if she spotted some threat to her 
soon to be emerging young, or just wasn't quite ready until the mood struck. 

>> 
>> Finally, she dropped to the ground. The young began appearing in the nest 
box opening and jumping to the ground below, one by one. Some of the ducklings 
sat perched in the opening before making their leap, while others almost in a 
single motion were up in the opening and then down to the ground. 

>> 
>> We counted them one by one until the number stopped at 19. Wow! That would 
seem to indicate some dumping by other females. The adult female led her 19 
under a nearby brush pile we call "the fort", debris from long ago ice storms 
with the wood put to good use as predator protection for numerous bird species. 

>> 
>> 'Mom' led them down to our small pond. They stayed close to her as they 
experienced water for the first times in their lives. About a half hour after 
they emerged from the nest box, she led them up the pond levee embankment and 
around the east side of our house to a larger pond just to our north. 

>> 
>> As is our practice, I got a ladder and checked the nest box. Four eggs 
remained unhatched. They were removed and left on the ground nearby as food for 
some critter(s). Fortunately, there were no live young in the box, something 
that has faced us several times over the past 15 years or so of watching 
woodies emerge from the boxes. The wood chips were replaced and the east nest 
box is now ready for round two should another female choose to begin laying her 
eggs in that box. 

>> 
>> I'm not sure if the west nest box is in use at present.
>> 
>> Phoebes are nesting outside our front door under the porch overhang. Red 
buckeyes are blooming all around our acreage. Hummers are here. I think the 
bluebirds are still feeding young in one of the nest boxes. 

>> 
>> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
>> Barry Haas
Subject: Indigo Bunting (2)
From: "Jonathan C. Perry" <jperry AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 23:22:21 +0000
In our back yard, on the ground underneath feeder. East Fayetteville.

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: And then ... there were 19!
From: Ed Laster <elaster523 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 16:18:02 -0500
Every spring I look forward to hearing about the “woodies” at the Haas house. 
Thanks for keeping us updated. That had to be quite a site watching so many 
jump to the ground. 


Ed Laster



On Apr 12, 2014, at 12:05 PM, Barry Haas  wrote:

> Dear ARBIRDers,
> 
> Over the years we have shared our experiences with nesting wood ducks behind 
our house. Our large picture windows allow us a panoramic view of the next 
boxes on the far side of our small pond. 

> 
> We have two nest boxes, an east and a west, separated by about 50 feet. 
Shortly after 9:00 this morning my wife alerted me that an adult female wood 
duck was sitting in the opening of the east nest box looking back and forth. 
That's almost always a sign she has young that hatched the day before and that 
she will be bringing out into the world shortly. 

> 
> Once, twice, three, four times she backed into the box only to reappear in 
the opening a few minutes later. Not sure if she spotted some threat to her 
soon to be emerging young, or just wasn't quite ready until the mood struck. 

> 
> Finally, she dropped to the ground. The young began appearing in the nest box 
opening and jumping to the ground below, one by one. Some of the ducklings sat 
perched in the opening before making their leap, while others almost in a 
single motion were up in the opening and then down to the ground. 

> 
> We counted them one by one until the number stopped at 19. Wow! That would 
seem to indicate some dumping by other females. The adult female led her 19 
under a nearby brush pile we call "the fort", debris from long ago ice storms 
with the wood put to good use as predator protection for numerous bird species. 

> 
> 'Mom' led them down to our small pond. They stayed close to her as they 
experienced water for the first times in their lives. About a half hour after 
they emerged from the nest box, she led them up the pond levee embankment and 
around the east side of our house to a larger pond just to our north. 

> 
> As is our practice, I got a ladder and checked the nest box. Four eggs 
remained unhatched. They were removed and left on the ground nearby as food for 
some critter(s). Fortunately, there were no live young in the box, something 
that has faced us several times over the past 15 years or so of watching 
woodies emerge from the boxes. The wood chips were replaced and the east nest 
box is now ready for round two should another female choose to begin laying her 
eggs in that box. 

> 
> I'm not sure if the west nest box is in use at present.
> 
> Phoebes are nesting outside our front door under the porch overhang. Red 
buckeyes are blooming all around our acreage. Hummers are here. I think the 
bluebirds are still feeding young in one of the nest boxes. 

> 
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
Subject: Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 15:36:15 -0500
Don, thank you again. I suppose I was thinking of wildlife that occupies the 
canopy being displaced. 


My husband and I actually spent a few hours with some friends at Mt Mag today. 
I got to see what I suppose is the first wave of spring blooms and wish I could 
return every week to see the succession. 


I could imagine some fascinating dissertations about the post-storm changes on 
the north face. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 12, 2014, at 11:24 AM, Don Simons  wrote:
> 
> Habitat where the rcsp was found, along the south facing bluff line, received 
very little damage from the winter storms. However, there was a lot of damage 
to our hardwood forests. Most of our trails were closed for a couple of months 
due to fallen trees and dangling widow makers. There will be some areas where 
the canopy will open out to allow sunlight to reach the forest floor. 

>  
> Changes to habitats occur from time to time. “Devastation” is in the mind 
of the beholder. These changes will add some diversity to the mountaintop. I 
look forward to witnessing natural changes that develop. 

>  
> Hopefully, we will be able to do some prescribed burning to reduce all the 
extra wildfire fuels built up due to the winter storms. This will release 
decades of wildflower seeds that have been waiting to germinate. Therefore, we 
should have more butterflies and berries. Rotting logs will provide more 
insects for bears. Happy bears indicate a rich habitat. 

>  
> Don
>  
>  
> From: Elizabeth Shores [mailto:efshores AT swbell.net] 
> Sent: Friday, April 11, 2014 10:12 PM
> To: Don Simons
> Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern
>  
> Mr. Simons, thank you for this information. We will all cross our fingers.
>  
> The December ice damage at the top of the mountain was devastating to the 
trees, was it not? Do you expect noticeable changes in vegetation because of 
greater sunlight? 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Apr 11, 2014, at 3:31 PM, Don Simons  wrote:
> 
> I started working here on Mount Magazine in 2000 and have been checking the 
population of Rufous-crowned Sparrows found along the southern rim. Records 
indicate them to be year round residents. We estimate the population to be 
steady around six pair. However, I have not been able find any since early 
December 2013. 

>  
> Today was a perfect day to search for them. Winds were calm and the 
temperature was very warm. Males should have been singing. I checked all their 
known sites from cabin 13 to a half mile west of cabin 1. 

>  
> I hoped they had simply moved to lower elevations to escape the prolonged 
periods of ice and snow we endured last winter. The worst case scenario is the 
population was wiped out. 

>  
> I will continue to check for them.
>  
>  
> Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
> Certified Heritage Interpreter
> Mount Magazine State Park
> 16878 HWY 309 South
> Paris, AR 72855
>  
> don.simons AT arkansas.gov
> phone: 479-963-8502
> FAX: 479-963-1031
>  
Subject: Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 14:50:50 -0500
I'm sorry to learn that, Don, but far from distraught. If State Parks keeps 
managing the habitat on Magazine Mountain with thinning and periodic prescribed 
fire, I'm fairly confident that the species will repopulate your mountain from 
other (smaller) populations in western Arkansas. Over the past 42 years, we 
have accumulated records of isolated pairs and isolated individuals at several 
locations between Pinnacle Mountain in Pulaski County and the OK line. So we 
know they have the ability to disperse. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 20:31:58 +0000
From: Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV
Subject: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU









I started working here on Mount Magazine in 2000 and have been checking the 
population of Rufous-crowned Sparrows found along the southern rim. Records 
indicate them to be year round residents. We estimate the population to be 
steady around 

 six pair. However, I have not been able find any since early December 2013. 

 
Today was a perfect day to search for them. Winds were calm and the temperature 
was very warm. Males should have been singing. I checked all their known sites 
from cabin 13 to a half mile west of cabin 1. 


 
I hoped they had simply moved to lower elevations to escape the prolonged 
periods of ice and snow we endured last winter. The worst case scenario is the 
population was wiped out. 

 
I will continue to check for them. 
 
 
Don R. Simons,
Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855
 
don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
 
 		 	   		  
Subject: And then ... there were 19!
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 12:05:31 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Over the years we have shared our experiences with nesting wood ducks behind 
our house. Our large picture windows allow us a panoramic view of the next 
boxes on the far side of our small pond. 


We have two nest boxes, an east and a west, separated by about 50 feet. Shortly 
after 9:00 this morning my wife alerted me that an adult female wood duck was 
sitting in the opening of the east nest box looking back and forth. That's 
almost always a sign she has young that hatched the day before and that she 
will be bringing out into the world shortly. 


Once, twice, three, four times she backed into the box only to reappear in the 
opening a few minutes later. Not sure if she spotted some threat to her soon to 
be emerging young, or just wasn't quite ready until the mood struck. 


Finally, she dropped to the ground. The young began appearing in the nest box 
opening and jumping to the ground below, one by one. Some of the ducklings sat 
perched in the opening before making their leap, while others almost in a 
single motion were up in the opening and then down to the ground. 


We counted them one by one until the number stopped at 19. Wow! That would seem 
to indicate some dumping by other females. The adult female led her 19 under a 
nearby brush pile we call "the fort", debris from long ago ice storms with the 
wood put to good use as predator protection for numerous bird species. 


'Mom' led them down to our small pond. They stayed close to her as they 
experienced water for the first times in their lives. About a half hour after 
they emerged from the nest box, she led them up the pond levee embankment and 
around the east side of our house to a larger pond just to our north. 


As is our practice, I got a ladder and checked the nest box. Four eggs remained 
unhatched. They were removed and left on the ground nearby as food for some 
critter(s). Fortunately, there were no live young in the box, something that 
has faced us several times over the past 15 years or so of watching woodies 
emerge from the boxes. The wood chips were replaced and the east nest box is 
now ready for round two should another female choose to begin laying her eggs 
in that box. 


I'm not sure if the west nest box is in use at present.

Phoebes are nesting outside our front door under the porch overhang. Red 
buckeyes are blooming all around our acreage. Hummers are here. I think the 
bluebirds are still feeding young in one of the nest boxes. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: FOS REVI and more WEVI & 2 COHA - Hot Springs
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 11:47:20 -0500
My Red-eyed vireos were here this morning along with more white-eyed vireos. A 
mature male Cooper’s hawk came in late yesterday and the immature Cooper’s 
hawk that drowned the chipmunk has been back twice this morning. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
Subject: Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 16:24:00 +0000
Habitat where the rcsp was found, along the south facing bluff line, received 
very little damage from the winter storms. However, there was a lot of damage 
to our hardwood forests. Most of our trails were closed for a couple of months 
due to fallen trees and dangling widow makers. There will be some areas where 
the canopy will open out to allow sunlight to reach the forest floor. 


Changes to habitats occur from time to time. “Devastation” is in the mind 
of the beholder. These changes will add some diversity to the mountaintop. I 
look forward to witnessing natural changes that develop. 


Hopefully, we will be able to do some prescribed burning to reduce all the 
extra wildfire fuels built up due to the winter storms. This will release 
decades of wildflower seeds that have been waiting to germinate. Therefore, we 
should have more butterflies and berries. Rotting logs will provide more 
insects for bears. Happy bears indicate a rich habitat. 


Don


From: Elizabeth Shores [mailto:efshores AT swbell.net]
Sent: Friday, April 11, 2014 10:12 PM
To: Don Simons
Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern

Mr. Simons, thank you for this information. We will all cross our fingers.

The December ice damage at the top of the mountain was devastating to the 
trees, was it not? Do you expect noticeable changes in vegetation because of 
greater sunlight? 


Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 11, 2014, at 3:31 PM, Don Simons 
> wrote: 

I started working here on Mount Magazine in 2000 and have been checking the 
population of Rufous-crowned Sparrows found along the southern rim. Records 
indicate them to be year round residents. We estimate the population to be 
steady around six pair. However, I have not been able find any since early 
December 2013. 


Today was a perfect day to search for them. Winds were calm and the temperature 
was very warm. Males should have been singing. I checked all their known sites 
from cabin 13 to a half mile west of cabin 1. 


I hoped they had simply moved to lower elevations to escape the prolonged 
periods of ice and snow we endured last winter. The worst case scenario is the 
population was wiped out. 


I will continue to check for them.


Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031

Subject: Sighting: Murray Park
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 10:51:23 -0500
I birded Murray Park with Robert Bays & Mary Carol West Saturday morning. We 
saw 40 species with the best being FOS Baltimore Oriole, Eastern Kingbird, and 
Osprey. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock, AR
www.JamesDixon.us
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Duck at Beaverfork
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 00:33:50 -0500
I talked to some of the fisher men and they said that weird duck had been
hanging around with the coots for 2 or 3 days.  So maybe he will stay
around for a few days.

I took a few pictures of the Black-bellied Whistling Duck at Beaverfork...7
pictures then other stuff


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/April2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6001260555830036306 



Michael (Conway)
Subject: Re: Rufous-crowned sparrow concern
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 22:12:26 -0500
Mr. Simons, thank you for this information. We will all cross our fingers.

The December ice damage at the top of the mountain was devastating to the 
trees, was it not? Do you expect noticeable changes in vegetation because of 
greater sunlight? 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 11, 2014, at 3:31 PM, Don Simons  wrote:
> 
> I started working here on Mount Magazine in 2000 and have been checking the 
population of Rufous-crowned Sparrows found along the southern rim. Records 
indicate them to be year round residents. We estimate the population to be 
steady around six pair. However, I have not been able find any since early 
December 2013. 

>  
> Today was a perfect day to search for them. Winds were calm and the 
temperature was very warm. Males should have been singing. I checked all their 
known sites from cabin 13 to a half mile west of cabin 1. 

>  
> I hoped they had simply moved to lower elevations to escape the prolonged 
periods of ice and snow we endured last winter. The worst case scenario is the 
population was wiped out. 

>  
> I will continue to check for them.
>  
>  
> Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
> Certified Heritage Interpreter
> Mount Magazine State Park
> 16878 HWY 309 South
> Paris, AR 72855
>  
> don.simons AT arkansas.gov
> phone: 479-963-8502
> FAX: 479-963-1031
>