Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Arkansas Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Saturday, November 22 at 08:47 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hooded Warbler,©Mimi Hoppe Wolf

22 Nov ASCA's Red-breasted Mergansers [Karen ]
22 Nov TAIGA (OR BOREAL) MERLIN AT BEAVER LAKE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Nov Re: Not Arkansas but Calliope Hummingbird confirmed in Ozark, MO [David Ray ]
21 Nov FWS Wetlands Mapper [Jeffrey Short ]
21 Nov RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS (12) AT LAKE SEQUOYAH ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Nov Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
21 Nov Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES [Judy & Don ]
21 Nov Re: Saw Whet [Gail Miller ]
21 Nov Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES [Gail Miller ]
21 Nov Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES [Ragupathy Kannan ]
21 Nov BLEST BE THE TIE THAT BINDS (Maysville) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Nov Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES [Ann Gordon ]
21 Nov Saw Whet [Herschel Raney ]
21 Nov Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES [Mitchell Pruitt ]
19 Nov Lake Conway [Michael Linz ]
19 Nov Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs [Daniel Scheiman ]
19 Nov ASCA November Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
19 Nov Red Slough Birds Now at 318 [jwdavis ]
18 Nov Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 18 ...7 wren day! [David Arbour ]
19 Nov WONDER WHAT WINTERING HAWKS THINK OF THAT? ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
19 Nov 115th Christmas Bird Counts - adding Conway, Ilinois Bayou, Pine Bluff & Hot Springs NP ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
18 Nov Re: AAS Calendar [Gail Miller ]
18 Nov Re: AAS Calendar [Michael Linz ]
18 Nov Re: AAS Calendar [Judy & Don ]
18 Nov Loons at Beaverfork [Michael ]
18 Nov Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar) [Jane Steinkraus ]
18 Nov AAS Calendar [Gail Miller ]
17 Nov New Sibley Book [Dan Bogler ]
17 Nov Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar) [saracnbrtltt9 ]
18 Nov Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar) [Mitchell Pruitt ]
17 Nov Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar) [Terry Butler ]
18 Nov SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Nov New Sibley Book [Dan Bogler ]
17 Nov Re: Moberly Pond [Ann Gordon ]
17 Nov Drunk birds sober up in Environment Yukon holding tank | CBCNews.ca Mobile [Chuck Bartels ]
16 Nov Re: Lesser black-backed gull YES [Ryan Risher ]
16 Nov Lesser black-backed gull YES [Michael ]
16 Nov Sightings: Two Rivers Park 11/16/14 [Jim Dixon ]
16 Nov some December dates with birds in northwest Arkansas ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
15 Nov Re: Not Arkansas but Calliope Hummingbird confirmed in Ozark, MO [Sally Jo Gibson ]
15 Nov Not Arkansas but Calliope Hummingbird confirmed in Ozark, MO [Jim Dixon ]
14 Nov Purple finches. [Bob Harden ]
15 Nov Doug James and Trumepter Swan recovery efforts ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
14 Nov Re: Sightings: Cooper's Hawk ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
14 Nov TOSOs are back [Don Simons ]
14 Nov Pekin/Mallard [Jerry Butler ]
14 Nov Sightings: Cooper's Hawk [Jim Dixon ]
14 Nov TWO SWANS, PROBABLY TRUMPETERS, MAKE A DAY ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
13 Nov Re: Birds are back [Elizabeth Shores ]
13 Nov Birds are back [Alyson Hoge ]
13 Nov Re: Trumpeter Swans [Karyn Dillard ]
13 Nov FOS Pine Siskin [Judy & Don ]
12 Nov Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 12 [David Arbour ]
13 Nov Splat.....and Snow Geese ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
12 Nov Trumpeter Swans [Terry Butler ]
12 Nov Boyd Point [V Prislipsky ]
12 Nov Buffalo River Foundation fund-raiser Thursday night ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
12 Nov Holla Bend NWR [Kelly Chitwood ]
12 Nov FOS [Dorothy Cooney ]
12 Nov Orange-crowned Warbler [Edie Calaway ]
11 Nov bald eagle ["hudsonre AT aristotle.net" ]
11 Nov Magellanic Woodpecker [Bill Thurman ]
11 Nov Snow geese... [Sandy Berger ]
11 Nov Just saw a V of about 25 Snow Geese fly over my house [Jim Dixon ]
11 Nov swans on Bob Kidd Lake this afternoon ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
11 Nov Blackbird roost (?) [Ricky Corder ]
11 Nov CAW Grass Farm [Dan Scheiman ]
11 Nov Remnants of Fall [Herschel Raney ]
11 Nov Re: Behavior question, picking ticks from deer [James Morgan ]
11 Nov Re: Behavior question, picking ticks from deer [Keith Newton ]
11 Nov WATERFOWL INFLUX AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
11 Nov Re: Behavior question, picking ticks from deer [Janine Perlman ]
11 Nov Behavior question, picking ticks from deer [Keith Newton ]
10 Nov Re: Avian extinctions [Bill Thurman ]
10 Nov eagle on the buffalo fos [Alan ]
9 Nov ASCA Meeting, Birds in a Changing Climate [Daniel Scheiman ]

Subject: ASCA's Red-breasted Mergansers
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 19:18:50 -0600
Today was ASCA's November's field trip. We had 21 birders, including two 
students from Dr. McDonald's ornithology class at UCA, who braved stormy 
weather predictions to do a three-lake birding tour. First stop was Lake 
Nimrod's dam site. Perched above the river on the spillway side was an adult 
Bald Eagle and a second-year bird. This area is a known nesting site for the 
eagles. We dodged light rain as we checked additional spots along the lake and 
found two more Bald Eagles. We also found numerous American White Pelicans, 
Ruddy Ducks, Gadwalls, Scaup, a few Mallard's, lots of Ring-billed Gulls, and 
Double-crested Cormorants. 


Trying to stay ahead of the rain, we didn't spend much time checking the woods 
birds. However, we found both Kinglets, Brown-headed Nuthatches, Goldfinches, 
and a confused and very faded Eastern Meadowlark sitting in a tree on the edge 
of the lake. Not normal Meadowlark habitat. 


Next stop was Harris Break Lake. Best bird was the returning Trumpeter Swan. We 
also had Bonaparte's Gulls, Buffleheads, Coots, and hundreds of Gadwalls and 
Double-crested Cormorants. On the back side of the lake, we found a Woodcock, a 
Winter Wren, and a Hairy Woodpecker. 


Our final lake was a check of Lake Maumelle. We hit the jackpot at Vista View. 
We found an amazing ELEVEN Red-breasted Mergansers! There may have been a 
couple more because they were popping everywhere! The one male had plenty of 
ladies to choose from! In addition to the Mergansers, stops at Vista View, Loon 
Point, and Jolly Rogers Marina netted us lots of Common Loons, American 
Goldeneyes, Horned Grebes, Scaup, several Bald Eagles, more Ring-billed Gulls 
and Buffleheads. We finished around 3:30 p.m with lots of sunshine for the last 
part of the trip and the temperature at 65 degrees. It was fun showing our 
newer birders some hot spots for good birds. 

Karen Holliday 
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator 
Subject: TAIGA (OR BOREAL) MERLIN AT BEAVER LAKE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 23:05:17 +0000
During a brief respite from a day long rain, Joan Reynolds and I spotted a 
Merlin at Prairie Creek Park on Beaver Lake this morning. We first observed it 
in flight near the marina, then studied it as it perched in a tree at the park. 
Its plumage was too dark to be a prairie Merlin like we sometimes see in open 
country. The well-marked breast had a rich rufous background, the head an 
obvious mustache and thin eyeline, the back deep blue. This fits well for an 
adult male Taiga or Boreal Merlin. It reminded me of one that we saw with 
regularity late fall 2012 and early 2013 at Fayetteville Country Club during 
during visits mainly to observe Red Crossbills. We didnt see todays Merlin 
chase anything, but at the time big flocks of American Robins were nearby. 
Subject: Re: Not Arkansas but Calliope Hummingbird confirmed in Ozark, MO
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 10:10:42 -0600
Calliope Yes! I am visiting my son & family in Nixa, Mo. & drove about 15 min 
to Ozark & was rewarded with another life bird! 

David Ray 
North Little Rock 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 15, 2014, at 8:47 PM, Jim Dixon  wrote:
> 
> I read about it on the MoBirds list. Not too far from Harrison I think. Maybe 
we'll get our own rarity. 

> 
> 
> Jim Dixon
> Little Rock
> www.JamesDixon.us 
> Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: FWS Wetlands Mapper
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 16:02:54 -0600
The mapper could become an important research tool for ecological studies, 
birding and other wildlife issues. 


I wonder how many wetland areas will be transited by the planned Valero 
pipeline across Arkansas as well as the proposed Keystone pipeline. 


Jeff Short



Here is the link to the mapper home page.


 http://www.fws.gov/wetlands/Data/Mapper.html







 a.. VIDEO: How to find and use the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service's Wetlands 
Mapper 










-- 

Bill Wilen
National Wetlands Inventory 
703-358-2278
Subject: RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS (12) AT LAKE SEQUOYAH
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:02:44 +0000
Red-breasted Mergansers (12), Common Goldeneye (5), Bufflehead (3), 
Double-crested Cormorant (30), Bald Eagle (2 adults), Gadwall (2), Ring-billed 
Gull (2), a few Pied-billed Grebes -- at Lake Sequoyah, an old water supply for 
Fayetteville on White River. Most these, including mergansers and goldeneyes, 
were directly across from the cut-off bridge near the dam site. 
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 14:34:05 +0000
Niiiice… You scored on that one Mitchell! Those rarities make all your 
efforts worthwhile… 


Clark Reames, Wildlife Biologist
NR Staff Officer (Acting)

Forest Service
Shoshone National Forest

p: 307-578-5134 x5134
c: 541-620-0681
f: 307-578-5112
creames AT fs.fed.us

808 Meadowlane Ave.
Cody, WY 82414
www.fs.fed.us

[http://fsweb.wo.fs.fed.us/esignature/images/usda-logo.png][Twitter][Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Mitchell Pruitt 

Sent: Friday, November 21, 2014 1:25 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES

Tonight, Dr. Kimberly Smith and I went out to the Ozark Natural Science Center 
in rural Madison County. Their property boasts the perfect combination of pine, 
deciduous, and cedar understory…perfect for saw-whet owls, that is. With 
excitement, we got the nets set, fired up the playback, and gave a program to 
30 kiddos. Hours later, during our 10:15pm net check, I startled a bird that 
flushed from a cedar near the set up. I did not get any looks, just the nearly 
silent rustle of something…probably an owl slipping away into the dark 
forest. Adrenaline high, we checked the nets again at 11:00pm. This time we 
were stopped in our tracks by a RESPONSE to the playback. This was no 
screech-owl playing games, this was a full-on, saw-whet whistle response that 
happened three times while we listened in shock. Alyssa DeRubeis (an ONSC 
teacher/naturalist) and I headed off into the dense cedar to find the bird 
while Dr. Smith stayed behind in the net field. As we trampled around, waking 
up White-throated Sparrows, an angry, raspy “chit-chit” was heard from Dr. 
Smith’s direction. I looked at Alyssa, who has had experience banding 
saw-whets up north, thinking it was probably a chipmunk or something. She said, 
“that sounded like an agitated saw-whet!” This was confirmed by an 
exclamation from Kim as he saw a small, light owl coast over him and into the 
trees. Two saw-whets. What else could they be? With nets empty, we headed back 
to the main building to warm up and bide our next wait time. At 11:30, we 
excitedly headed out again. Near the field with the nets, I shone a spotlight 
in a tree to reveal a gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl, whose light color made my 
heart skip several beats, initially. Moving into the field, I immediately 
spotted something hanging motionless in the bottom tier of one of our 4 mist 
nets. Running towards it, we realized it was our first Northern Saw-whet Owl. A 
life bird for me, but more importantly a first capture for the great state of 
Arkansas. We are ecstatic here in Northwest Arkansas tonight, to the point 
where I’m not sure how I’ll sleep. This “after second year” bird 
weighed exactly 86 grams, with a wing chord of 142mm; a scale-tipping adult 
female! 


Now for the part everyone’s been waiting for: WEATHER PERMITTING, and there 
is a small chance of rain tomorrow night, we will be going out again. ONSC will 
be closed tomorrow, but we will work on making it happen there again tomorrow 
night. If not, we will be trying at another location. Stay tuned, if the 
weather fates align, birders are welcome. 


For photos of tonight’s bird, visit: http://www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents

Good birding….and good night! (or good morning I should say)

~Mitchell Pruitt




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 08:32:56 -0600
This is more fantastic every time I think about it. 
Love the photos and agree with Gail.
Come on back on a moonless night, Mitchell, Kim and Anant! We need to find the 
Saw-whets at Ninestone! 


Judith

On Nov 21, 2014, at 8:07 AM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 


> Awesome and congrats!! I was just about to email you if you had any success 
with Saw whets!! 

> 
> It's always good to see Arkansas Audubon Society Trust grant dollars put to 
great use!!!! 

> 
> 
> On Friday, 21 November 2014 2:25 AM, Mitchell Pruitt 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> 
> Tonight, Dr. Kimberly Smith and I went out to the Ozark Natural Science 
Center in rural Madison County. Their property boasts the perfect combination 
of pine, deciduous, and cedar understoryperfect for saw-whet owls, that is. 
With excitement, we got the nets set, fired up the playback, and gave a program 
to 30 kiddos. Hours later, during our 10:15pm net check, I startled a bird that 
flushed from a cedar near the set up. I did not get any looks, just the nearly 
silent rustle of somethingprobably an owl slipping away into the dark forest. 
Adrenaline high, we checked the nets again at 11:00pm. This time we were 
stopped in our tracks by a RESPONSE to the playback. This was no screech-owl 
playing games, this was a full-on, saw-whet whistle response that happened 
three times while we listened in shock. Alyssa DeRubeis (an ONSC 
teacher/naturalist) and I headed off into the dense cedar to find the bird 
while Dr. Smith stayed behind in the net field. As we trampled around, waking 
up White-throated Sparrows, an angry, raspy chit-chit was heard from Dr. 
Smiths direction. I looked at Alyssa, who has had experience banding saw-whets 
up north, thinking it was probably a chipmunk or something. She said, that 
sounded like an agitated saw-whet! This was confirmed by an exclamation from 
Kim as he saw a small, light owl coast over him and into the trees. Two 
saw-whets. What else could they be? With nets empty, we headed back to the main 
building to warm up and bide our next wait time. At 11:30, we excitedly headed 
out again. Near the field with the nets, I shone a spotlight in a tree to 
reveal a gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl, whose light color made my heart skip 
several beats, initially. Moving into the field, I immediately spotted 
something hanging motionless in the bottom tier of one of our 4 mist nets. 
Running towards it, we realized it was our first Northern Saw-whet Owl. A life 
bird for me, but more importantly a first capture for the great state of 
Arkansas. We are ecstatic here in Northwest Arkansas tonight, to the point 
where Im not sure how Ill sleep. This after second year bird weighed 
exactly 86 grams, with a wing chord of 142mm; a scale-tipping adult female! 

> 
> Now for the part everyones been waiting for: WEATHER PERMITTING, and there 
is a small chance of rain tomorrow night, we will be going out again. ONSC will 
be closed tomorrow, but we will work on making it happen there again tomorrow 
night. If not, we will be trying at another location. Stay tuned, if the 
weather fates align, birders are welcome. 

> 
> For photos of tonights bird, visit: http://www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents
> 
> Good birding.and good night! (or good morning I should say)
> 
> ~Mitchell Pruitt
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Saw Whet
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 08:26:51 -0600
I feel quite sure that Bob Sargent watched that entire process from above last 
night!! 


How exciting. 

Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Herschel Raney 
Sent: Friday, November 21, 2014 6:43 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Saw Whet

I wish Bob Sargent had been here for the first AR Saw Whet netting report. Bob 
was netting them in his yard for years before he passed away this year. He told 
me that he thought that if there were this many in his yard south of us that 
every area of good habitat in Arkansas likely had them. 



It is impressive you heard a tooting vocalization. I think he said he never 
once had an audible response that he heard, but they certainly came to the 
recorded calls in his net array. It is good to think they around me in my 
cedars. He also said he often visually located them with the assistance of 
chickadees and scolding birds. They are barely the size of a cardinal. And that 
they are remarkably invisible otherwise in daylight. 



Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 08:23:59 -0600
Outstanding .... I’m voting for this photo to be on the cover of next 
year’s Audubon calendar. http://www.pbase.com/image/158302847 

I assume it was banded?  Great work folks!!!

Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Mitchell Pruitt 
Sent: Friday, November 21, 2014 2:25 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES

Tonight, Dr. Kimberly Smith and I went out to the Ozark Natural Science Center 
in rural Madison County. Their property boasts the perfect combination of pine, 
deciduous, and cedar understory…perfect for saw-whet owls, that is. With 
excitement, we got the nets set, fired up the playback, and gave a program to 
30 kiddos. Hours later, during our 10:15pm net check, I startled a bird that 
flushed from a cedar near the set up. I did not get any looks, just the nearly 
silent rustle of something…probably an owl slipping away into the dark 
forest. Adrenaline high, we checked the nets again at 11:00pm. This time we 
were stopped in our tracks by a RESPONSE to the playback. This was no 
screech-owl playing games, this was a full-on, saw-whet whistle response that 
happened three times while we listened in shock. Alyssa DeRubeis (an ONSC 
teacher/naturalist) and I headed off into the dense cedar to find the bird 
while Dr. Smith stayed behind in the net field. As we trampled around, waking 
up White-throated Sparrows, an angry, raspy “chit-chit” was heard from Dr. 
Smith’s direction. I looked at Alyssa, who has had experience banding 
saw-whets up north, thinking it was probably a chipmunk or something. She said, 
“that sounded like an agitated saw-whet!” This was confirmed by an 
exclamation from Kim as he saw a small, light owl coast over him and into the 
trees. Two saw-whets. What else could they be? With nets empty, we headed back 
to the main building to warm up and bide our next wait time. At 11:30, we 
excitedly headed out again. Near the field with the nets, I shone a spotlight 
in a tree to reveal a gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl, whose light color made my 
heart skip several beats, initially. Moving into the field, I immediately 
spotted something hanging motionless in the bottom tier of one of our 4 mist 
nets. Running towards it, we realized it was our first Northern Saw-whet Owl. A 
life bird for me, but more importantly a first capture for the great state of 
Arkansas. We are ecstatic here in Northwest Arkansas tonight, to the point 
where I’m not sure how I’ll sleep. This “after second year” bird 
weighed exactly 86 grams, with a wing chord of 142mm; a scale-tipping adult 
female! 


Now for the part everyone’s been waiting for: WEATHER PERMITTING, and there 
is a small chance of rain tomorrow night, we will be going out again. ONSC will 
be closed tomorrow, but we will work on making it happen there again tomorrow 
night. If not, we will be trying at another location. Stay tuned, if the 
weather fates align, birders are welcome. 


For photos of tonight’s bird, visit: http://www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents

Good birding….and good night! (or good morning I should say)

~Mitchell Pruitt
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 14:07:38 +0000
Awesome and congrats!!  I was just about to email you if you had any success 
with Saw whets!! 

It's always good to see Arkansas Audubon Society Trust grant dollars put to 
great use!!!! 


 On Friday, 21 November 2014 2:25 AM, Mitchell Pruitt 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

   

 Tonight, Dr. Kimberly Smith and I went out to the Ozark Natural Science Center 
in rural Madison County. Their property boasts the perfect combination of pine, 
deciduous, and cedar understory…perfect for saw-whet owls, that is. With 
excitement, we got the nets set, fired up the playback, and gave a program to 
30 kiddos. Hours later, during our 10:15pm net check, I startled a bird that 
flushed from a cedar near the set up. I did not get any looks, just the nearly 
silent rustle of something…probably an owl slipping away into the dark 
forest. Adrenaline high, we checked the nets again at 11:00pm. This time we 
were stopped in our tracks by a RESPONSE to the playback. This was no 
screech-owl playing games, this was a full-on, saw-whet whistle response that 
happened three times while we listened in shock. Alyssa DeRubeis (an ONSC 
teacher/naturalist) and I headed off into the dense cedar to find the bird 
while Dr. Smith stayed behind in the net field. As we trampled around, waking 
up White-throated Sparrows, an angry, raspy “chit-chit” was heard from Dr. 
Smith’s direction. I looked at Alyssa, who has had experience banding 
saw-whets up north, thinking it was probably a chipmunk or something. She said, 
“that sounded like an agitated saw-whet!” This was confirmed by an 
exclamation from Kim as he saw a small, light owl coast over him and into the 
trees. Two saw-whets. What else could they be? With nets empty, we headed back 
to the main building to warm up and bide our next wait time. At 11:30, we 
excitedly headed out again. Near the field with the nets, I shone a spotlight 
in a tree to reveal a gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl, whose light color made my 
heart skip several beats, initially. Moving into the field, I immediately 
spotted something hanging motionless in the bottom tier of one of our 4 mist 
nets. Running towards it, we realized it was our first Northern Saw-whet Owl. A 
life bird for me, but more importantly a first capture for the great state of 
Arkansas. We are ecstatic here in Northwest Arkansas tonight, to the point 
where I’m not sure how I’ll sleep. This “after second year” bird 
weighed exactly 86 grams, with a wing chord of 142mm; a scale-tipping adult 
female! 

Now for the part everyone’s been waiting for: WEATHER PERMITTING, and there 
is a small chance of rain tomorrow night, we will be going out again. ONSC will 
be closed tomorrow, but we will work on making it happen there again tomorrow 
night. If not, we will be trying at another location. Stay tuned, if the 
weather fates align, birders are welcome.  

For photos of tonight’s bird, visit: http://www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents
Good birding….and good night! (or good morning I should say)
~Mitchell Pruitt

   
Subject: BLEST BE THE TIE THAT BINDS (Maysville)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 13:25:08 +0000
Yesterday at Maysville, on the far edge of a harvested soybean field, I was 
sitting and trying to sort out a flock of 30-40 small, far away birds. It is a 
known, and oft-supported Law of Birdics, that the further the bird, the more 
likely it is the one desired. And so, in conformity to law, these had to be 
Lapland Longspurs, and that, even despite many circles around the field, with 
nary a rattle or TEW, which would have them, or at least one, a Lap for sure. 


There were Killdeer, Western Meadowlarks, and a for sure flock of Horned Larks 
(~20). There were two adult Bald Eagles soaring in the west. A passing flock of 
White-crowned Sparrows included a couple of Harriss Sparrows. Yes, the 
unknowns as American Pipits did occur to me. 


But sitting there, watching the field, and long before I could sort any of this 
out, that old hymn, Blest be the tie that binds, crept into my head. Where 
does this stuff come from? Loosened somehow from childhood memories of summer 
tent revivals with folding chairs? From desires of our many bird watcher 
friends up there in birders heaven somewhere, watching with golden bins? 


Even with yesterdays calm and warmth, there didnt seem to be enough sunlight, 
not to mention ears, to hold White-crowned Sparrow choirs, roaming Maysville 
like so many itinerant Baptist preachers. I get my fun at times trying to 
figure out, in English, what they say. Yesterday, it was ALL-ALL IS WELL-WELL. 
They couldnt seem to sing fast enough to catch the rising temps. 


Just up the road, and just 10 minutes before, I had tried, for the 6th time 
this fall, to sneak up on a black buteo that always is perched on a certain 
handy snag in the middle of the field. Despite my sneaky best, it always 
flushes to the far field. I have never taken a shot at this bird. My guess: 
adult Harlans. Im going to keep trying. 


Later, in a big harvested field on Wet Prairie Road, many Killdeer, Brewers 
Blackbirds (50+) and twice as many American Pipits, walking the plowed field in 
their patented pipitty, tail-bobbing way. They walked right up to the car, so 
there was no mistaking this time. No rattles and no TEWS despite a long sit in 
warm sun that, in late November, makes you linger, and sleepy. 


Finally, most leaves in Maysville have fallen, but I saw a dramatic re-leafing. 
At first I thought most leaves were Red-winged Blackbirds, but when they flew, 
15-20 meadowlarks remained. With their chucks and gargles I think many of these 
were Westerns, but there are many Easterns in the same area, too. 
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 06:54:25 -0600
Marvelous!  Such exciting news and great photos, too.

Ann


On Fri, Nov 21, 2014 at 2:25 AM, Mitchell Pruitt <
0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> Tonight, Dr. Kimberly Smith and I went out to the Ozark Natural Science
> Center in rural Madison County. Their property boasts the perfect
> combination of pine, deciduous, and cedar understory…perfect for saw-whet
> owls, that is. With excitement, we got the nets set, fired up the playback,
> and gave a program to 30 kiddos. Hours later, during our 10:15pm net check,
> I startled a bird that flushed from a cedar near the set up. I did not get
> any looks, just the nearly silent rustle of something…probably an owl
> slipping away into the dark forest. Adrenaline high, we checked the nets
> again at 11:00pm. This time we were stopped in our tracks by a RESPONSE to
> the playback. This was no screech-owl playing games, this was a full-on,
> saw-whet whistle response that happened three times while we listened in
> shock. Alyssa DeRubeis (an ONSC teacher/naturalist) and I headed off into
> the dense cedar to find the bird while Dr. Smith stayed behind in the net
> field. As we trampled around, waking up White-throated Sparrows, an angry,
> raspy “chit-chit” was heard from Dr. Smith’s direction. I looked at 
Alyssa, 

> who has had experience banding saw-whets up north, thinking it was probably
> a chipmunk or something. She said, “that sounded like an agitated
> saw-whet!” This was confirmed by an exclamation from Kim as he saw a small,
> light owl coast over him and into the trees. Two saw-whets. What else could
> they be? With nets empty, we headed back to the main building to warm up
> and bide our next wait time. At 11:30, we excitedly headed out again. Near
> the field with the nets, I shone a spotlight in a tree to reveal a
> gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl, whose light color made my heart skip
> several beats, initially. Moving into the field, I immediately spotted
> something hanging motionless in the bottom tier of one of our 4 mist nets.
> Running towards it, we realized it was our first Northern Saw-whet Owl. A
> life bird for me, but more importantly a first capture for the great state
> of Arkansas. We are ecstatic here in Northwest Arkansas tonight, to the
> point where I’m not sure how I’ll sleep. This “after second year” 
bird 

> weighed exactly 86 grams, with a wing chord of 142mm; a scale-tipping adult
> female!
>
> Now for the part everyone’s been waiting for: WEATHER PERMITTING, and
> there is a small chance of rain tomorrow night, we will be going out again.
> ONSC will be closed tomorrow, but we will work on making it happen there
> again tomorrow night. If not, we will be trying at another location. Stay
> tuned, if the weather fates align, birders are welcome.
>
> For photos of tonight’s bird, visit: http://www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents
>
> Good birding….and good night! (or good morning I should say)
>
> ~Mitchell Pruitt
>
Subject: Saw Whet
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 06:43:41 -0600
I wish Bob Sargent had been here for the first AR Saw Whet netting report.
Bob was netting them in his yard for years before he passed away this year.
He told me that he thought that if there were this many in his yard south
of us that every area of good habitat in Arkansas likely had them.

It is impressive you heard a tooting vocalization. I think he said he never
once had an audible response that he heard, but they certainly came to the
recorded calls in his net array. It is good to think they around me in my
cedars. He also said he often visually located them with the assistance of
chickadees and scolding birds. They are barely the size of a cardinal. And
that they are remarkably invisible otherwise in daylight.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owls--YES
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2014 02:25:09 -0600
Tonight, Dr. Kimberly Smith and I went out to the Ozark Natural Science Center 
in rural Madison County. Their property boasts the perfect combination of pine, 
deciduous, and cedar understory…perfect for saw-whet owls, that is. With 
excitement, we got the nets set, fired up the playback, and gave a program to 
30 kiddos. Hours later, during our 10:15pm net check, I startled a bird that 
flushed from a cedar near the set up. I did not get any looks, just the nearly 
silent rustle of something…probably an owl slipping away into the dark 
forest. Adrenaline high, we checked the nets again at 11:00pm. This time we 
were stopped in our tracks by a RESPONSE to the playback. This was no 
screech-owl playing games, this was a full-on, saw-whet whistle response that 
happened three times while we listened in shock. Alyssa DeRubeis (an ONSC 
teacher/naturalist) and I headed off into the dense cedar to find the bird 
while Dr. Smith stayed behind in the net field. As we trampled around, waking 
up White-throated Sparrows, an angry, raspy “chit-chit” was heard from Dr. 
Smith’s direction. I looked at Alyssa, who has had experience banding 
saw-whets up north, thinking it was probably a chipmunk or something. She said, 
“that sounded like an agitated saw-whet!” This was confirmed by an 
exclamation from Kim as he saw a small, light owl coast over him and into the 
trees. Two saw-whets. What else could they be? With nets empty, we headed back 
to the main building to warm up and bide our next wait time. At 11:30, we 
excitedly headed out again. Near the field with the nets, I shone a spotlight 
in a tree to reveal a gray-phase Eastern Screech Owl, whose light color made my 
heart skip several beats, initially. Moving into the field, I immediately 
spotted something hanging motionless in the bottom tier of one of our 4 mist 
nets. Running towards it, we realized it was our first Northern Saw-whet Owl. A 
life bird for me, but more importantly a first capture for the great state of 
Arkansas. We are ecstatic here in Northwest Arkansas tonight, to the point 
where I’m not sure how I’ll sleep. This “after second year” bird 
weighed exactly 86 grams, with a wing chord of 142mm; a scale-tipping adult 
female! 


Now for the part everyone’s been waiting for: WEATHER PERMITTING, and there 
is a small chance of rain tomorrow night, we will be going out again. ONSC will 
be closed tomorrow, but we will work on making it happen there again tomorrow 
night. If not, we will be trying at another location. Stay tuned, if the 
weather fates align, birders are welcome. 


For photos of tonight’s bird, visit: http://www.pbase.com/mpruitt/recents 
 


Good birding….and good night! (or good morning I should say)

~Mitchell Pruitt
Subject: Lake Conway
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 23:00:14 -0600
I stopped by Lake Conway on highway 89 today.
There were hundreds of White Pelicans.  The gull numbers are picking up but
I did not see any unusual gulls.  I did see a cattle egret which is a
little late in the season for it.

A few shots from the lake...

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/November2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6083645048245340962 


Michael(Conway)
Subject: Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 22:49:49 -0600
ARBirders,

This is an open invitation to participate in the Lonoke (Sunday Dec 14) and
Little Rock (Saturday Dec 20) Christmas Bird Counts. All experience levels
welcome. Please RSVP off-list and specify which count(s) you will help with.

Both counts have a great mix of habitats, plenty of waterfowl, a few
shorebirds and raptors.  Both can tally over 100 species, though Lonoke does
so more consistently.  Rarities found in the recent past include Rufous
Hummingbird, Long-tailed Duck, Glaucous Gull,
Says Phoebe, and the state's first Ash-throated Flycatcher!

If you can't get into the field but live inside the count circle please be a
FEEDERWATCHER (record tallies and duration). Maps of both counts are here
http://www.pbase.com/birddan/inbox.

Dan Scheiman, Compiler
Little Rock. AR


Subject: ASCA November Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:56:32 -0800
Quick reminder that this Saturday, Nov. 22 is the ASCA field trip. See details 
below. There is a 60% chance of rain Saturday and the temp will be around 55 
degrees, so be sure to dress warm and bring rain gear. Anyone interested in 
birds is welcome to join us. You don't have to be an ASCA member. Please email 
me off-list if you need additional information. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock

 
November 22
Nimrod Lake and Harris Brake Lake—Perryville 
Meet at
7:30 a.m. at the west Little Rock Wal Mart parking lot (northwest corner) on
Hwy. 10/Cantrell Rd.  We’ll caravan to
the dam site at Nimrod Lake and start our exploration with a short walk across
the dam.  We’ll then travel to various
access points along the lake.  Nimrod
Lake is Arkansas’s oldest reservoir, created by the Army Corps of Engineers 
in 

1942 by damming the Fourche LaFave River. Next, we’ll drive to Harris Brake 
Lake and look for more waterfowl. Harris Brake Lake was built in 1955 and is 

the third largest lake owned by AGFC. The lake is located one mile south of 
Perryville. Our target birds will be eagles, ducks, 

mergansers, loons, and Osprey.  Walking
will be limited.  No boots are
needed.  Dress in warm layers.  The lakes can be chilly if the wind is
blowing.  Bring binoculars, scopes,
drinks, snacks, and lunch.  We should be
back to Little Rock by mid-afternoon. Time permitting, we can check Lake 
Maumelle on the way back to Little 

Rock.
 
For more
information about Nimrod Lake, go to 
www.swl.usace.army.mil/parks/nimrod/index.htm. 
Subject: Red Slough Birds Now at 318
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 09:17:43 -0600
With the finding of the Rock Wren at Red Slough on David Arbour’s 7 wren day, 
this now makes 318 bird species found at Red Sough. The paperwork for Red 
Slough and many other areas for being classified as an Important Bird Area has 
been done for several years but the IBA designations in Oklahoma and other 
areas have been sitting without action. The frustration level for those that 
spent hundreds of hours documenting data and filling out forms is very high. 
This does not speak well for those administering the IBA program or the ones 
that are suppose to see the process to completion at the higher levels. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 18 ...7 wren day!
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 20:28:19 -0600
It was cold, clear, and windy on the bird survey today.  66 species were
found.  Temps dropped down to 17 degrees last night and there was some ice
around on the lakes and wetlands.  Highlight of the day was finding a Rock
Wren feeding on the ground on a mowed levee.  I was able to get some decent
pics and will post them later.  After finding this bird I realized I only
needed 3 more wren species to make it a 7 wren day; so I made a little extra
effort and easily found the 3 wrens I needed.  I regularly find 6 wren
species at Red Slough in the fall and winter but usually only find all six
on the same day once or twice a year, so it was a fun accomplishment to get
7 species today.   Also had the adult Golden Eagle soaring over the
reservoirs again today.  This second cold front that came through Sunday
night apparently pushed a bunch of our ducks further south as well as a lot
of our passerines.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 91

Gadwall - 407

Mallard - 974

Blue-winged Teal - 1

Northern Shoveler - 34

Northern Pintail - 29

Green-winged Teal - 330

Ring-necked Duck - 97

Hooded Merganser - 75

Ruddy Duck - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 15

Double-crested Cormorant - 78

Great Blue Heron - 19

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 7

Bald Eagle - 3 (2 adults & 1 imm.)

Northern Harrier - 6

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 5

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

American Coot - 125

Wilson's Snipe - 6

Bonaparte's Gull - 6

Ring-billed Gull - 10

Mourning Dove - 6

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 7

Eastern Phoebe - 8

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 3

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Carolina Wren - 2

Bewick's Wren - 1

House Wren - 2

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 1

Rock Wren - 1 (New species for RS!)

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

American Pipit - 2

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 24

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Chipping Sparrow - 1

Field Sparrow - 3

Savannah Sparrow - 9

LeConte's Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 15

Swamp Sparrow - 12

White-throated Sparrow - 4

White-crowned Sparrow - 5

Dark-eyed Junco - 5

Northern Cardinal - 3

Red-winged Blackbird - 140

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 380

American Goldfinch - 3

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour 

 

 
Subject: WONDER WHAT WINTERING HAWKS THINK OF THAT?
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 01:06:23 +0000
A blackish hawk perches on a snag in the middle of the field. Im slow driving 
on highway 264 in Siloam, near the intersection with highway 59. Need a place 
to pull off and get the spotting scope on it. Alternately fascinated, then 
frustrated; thats how I describe looking at the non-typical Red-tailed Hawks 
wintering on former prairies in northwest Arkansas. 


Non typical  wonder what the wintering hawks think of that?

Click-click  a few quick digiscope images. Then I notice a white hawk in the 
same tree, down in a tangle of vines. Click-click. Then, if it just doesnt 
beat all, a third hawk, this one mostly dark, but with a distinctly white upper 
breast. Click-click. 


White-crowned Sparrows have been chorusing the entire time below the trees. 
When the fields here are covered with snow, the roadsides get covered with 
Savannah Sparrows, Horned Larks, and Lapland Longspurs. 


The hawks are obviously buteos, some kind of Red-tailed Hawks, but what?

Todays black hawk number 1: Im going for Western Red-tailed Hawk, dark 
intermediate morph on this one. I can see a little of the undertail and the 
overall dark tawny plumage. But Im unsure. 


White hawk: Im going for Kriders on this one. It is blindingly white in all 
the right places with pale markings elsewhere. I couldnt see the tail. 


Dark hawk number 2: This one exhibits several characters of dark western red 
tails, including dark throat, tawny plumage, and that striking white upper 
breast above a broad dark belly band. 


Unless I get perfect views, in great light, and the plumages are typical 
adults, Im pretty sure Ill never be able to properly ID these winter hawks. 
After 30 years of trying, this is not about petulance. Surely there must be 
certainty here, but after 30 years, Im fairly sure there isnt. They are 
fruits of a vast and varied continent. They bring with them all that vast 
diversity. I guess Ill keep trying as long as I can lift the old bins. 


Theres an adult Bald Eagle on a snag in the middle of Roberts field just east 
of Chesney Prairie Natural Area. No mistaking that one. 
Subject: 115th Christmas Bird Counts - adding Conway, Ilinois Bayou, Pine Bluff & Hot Springs NP
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 00:26:37 +0000
Greetings all,
It's getting close to the coolest (figuratively & literally) birding of the 
year. 


The Christmas Bird Counts are held around the Americas from 12/14 through 1/5. 
Counts have been done for 115 years - the oldest bird database in the world. 

Any birding skill level is fine.
Any length of time is welcome.
Just contact a compiler for details and join in the fun.
It's FREE for all.
I'll repost, as more dates are selected.



You're welcome to contact me for general information - Leanderson "at" 
fs.fed.us or leave a message at 479-284-3150 ext 3151 

"at" =  AT   in the list below.

Dec 14th Sun:
FAYETTEVILLE; Joe Neal; joeneal "at" uark.edu; Co-compiler Mike Mlodinow mamlod 
"at" hotmail.com 


Sponsored by NorthWest AR Audubon.

JONESBORO;    Virginie Rolland;   vrolland "at" astate.edu

LONOKE;  Dan Scheiman;  birddan at comcast.net

15th Mon:
HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE; Chris Cash; c52cash "at" sbcglobal.net Sponsored by Hot 
Springs Village Audubon 


MOUNTAIN HOME;  Alice Snyder;  alice.m.snyder "at" gmail.com



17th Wens:

NORTH FORK of the ILLINOIS BAYOU (near Hector); Sarah Davis; sadavis "at" 
fs.fed.us; Sponsored by US Forest Service. 






18th Thurs:

MISSISSIPPI RIVER SP (near Marianna); Tara Gillanders; tara.gillanders "at" 
arkansas.gov 




20st Sat:
ARKADELPHIA;  Evelyn & Glenn Good;   theoldcrow "at" sbcglobal.net

CROOKED CREEK (near Harrison);  Alan Gregory;  quattro "at" windstream.net

FORT SMITH; Bill Beall; billtoka "at" mynewroads.com (Bill has been compiling 
for 64 years!!) 


LITTLE ROCK; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon 
Society of Central AR 


VILLAGE CREEK SP;  Heather Runyan;   heather.runyan "at" arkansas.gov



21st Sun:

CONWAY; Allan Mueller; akcmueller "at" gmail.com Co-compiler Michael Linz 
mplinz "at" gmail.com 




27th Sat:

WAPANOCCA NWR; Dick Preston; dickpreston "at" bigriver.net Co-compiler of TN 
side Van Harris shelbyforester1223 "at" bigriver.net 




29th Mon:

PINE BLUFF; Rob Doster; calcarius "at" comcast.net Sponsored by Three Rivers 
Audubon Society 




Jan 1st Thurs:

LAKE DARANELLE;    Kenny Nichols;   kingbird "at"  ymail.com



2nd Fri:

LAKE GEORGIA PACIFIC/ FELSENTHAL NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us 




3rd Sat:

HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK;  Shelley Todd;   shelley_todd "at" nps.gov

MOUNT MAGAZINE;   Don Simons;    don.simons "at" arkansas.gov



5th Mon:

HOLLA BEND NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Holla 
Bend NWR & the Friends of Holla Bend NWR. 




Possible counts - dates to be set latter:

BAYOU DeVIEW (near Brinkley);  Steve Osborne;  jsteveosborne "at" gmail.com

BIG LAKE NWR;   alreams469 "at" msn.com

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER EAST (near Buffalo Point on Hwy 14); Roy Stovall; 
roy.stovall "at" suddenlink.net; 


Co-compiler Jack Stewart; jampack1 "at" mac.com; Sponsored by Buffalo National 
River Partners. 


MAGNOLIA/ LAKE COLUMBIA; Darrell & Debbie Chatelain; darrell1951 "at" 
suddenlink.net 


TEXARKANA;   Don Kyle;   rondokyle "at" windstream.net

WHITE RIVER NWR;   Keith Sutton;   catfishdude at sbcglobal.net



cheers, Leif  AT  Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: AAS Calendar
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 18:09:21 -0600
I pre-ordered six calendars. Mitchell dropped them off on his way through 
Conway a few weekends ago. I was able to deliver one to my friend Lillian 
Franklin this past weekend. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Michael Linz 
Sent: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 4:35 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: AAS Calendar

While I think a lot of Mitchell too... 
If you really appreciate the time he and others have put into the calendar, the 
way to show it is to send him a note and tell him how many calendars you want. 


This is a worthy cause and if you were not someone who helped, design, 
coordinate, donate art work, judge, advertise, sell... 

Then now is the time for you to make your contribution to the calendar effort 
by buying one or more calendars. 


Michael (Conway)

Subject: Re: AAS Calendar
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 16:35:00 -0600
While I think a lot of Mitchell too...
If you really appreciate the time he and others have put into the calendar,
the way to show it is to send him a note and tell him how many calendars
you want.

This is a worthy cause and if you were not someone who helped, design,
coordinate, donate art work, judge, advertise, sell...
Then now is the time for you to make your contribution to the calendar
effort by buying one or more calendars.

Michael (Conway)



On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 1:11 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> I completely agree!
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
> On Nov 18, 2014, at 8:57 AM, Gail Miller 
> wrote:
>
> > I too think Mitchell should have a photo in each year’s calendar!!  He
> work’s tireless to keep everyone up to date of sightings, as well as
> sharing his beautiful photos!!!  Not to mention the work he does on the
> calendar.
> >
> > Gail Miller
> > Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
> > See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
> > See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
>
Subject: Re: AAS Calendar
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 13:11:10 -0600
I completely agree! 

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
On Nov 18, 2014, at 8:57 AM, Gail Miller  wrote:

> I too think Mitchell should have a photo in each years calendar!! He works 
tireless to keep everyone up to date of sightings, as well as sharing his 
beautiful photos!!! Not to mention the work he does on the calendar. 

> 
> Gail Miller
> Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
> See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
> See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Loons at Beaverfork
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 12:28:23 -0600
There have been 2 common loons at Beaverfork (Faulkner county) the last 2 days.

About 25 species including a thousand or so ducks.

Michael (Conway)
Subject: Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar)
From: Jane Steinkraus <janesteinkraus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 09:36:38 -0600
Is it still possible to order calendars, or are they sold out now?



On Tue, Nov 18, 2014 at 6:42 AM, Edie Calaway <
00000066d9cc52d5-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> Thank you Joe for that , I love the work Mitchell does and I have been so
> sad that we don't have one of his pictures in the calender. I hope that can
> be resolved in the future.
>
> Edie Calaway
> Little Rock
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 17, 2014, at 7:49 PM, "Joseph C. Neal"  
> 

> wrote:
>
>  I’ve been trying my best to cure Mitchell Pruitt of his modesty, but it
> doesn’t seem to be doing any good. I got to thinking about this morning
> while logging in some dates onto my Arkansas Audubon Society 2015 Calendar,
> that cost me .054 cents per day -- $20 for the year. What a deal. I know
> Mitchell is editor and designer of this calendar, and that he is an
> outstanding photographer of birds, BUT, try as hard as I have this morning,
> I don’t see a credit for Mitchell anywhere and not a single Mitchell
> photograph. Not that the competition for getting in wasn’t obviously stiff.
>
>
>
> I had a January 2015 date to put on my calendar this morning, and there,
> watching me do it, Kelly Chitwood’s Eastern Screech-Owl, all wide-eyed from
> a perch at entrance to a big hole in a massive old pine. It is such an
> engaging photograph I could barely take my eyes off it to write up the
> meeting date. And so it goes, January-December, and all through the
> calendar.
>
>
>
> Dear Audubon friends, I predict you are going to be unhappy with yourself
> come January, if, to save .054 cents per day, you don’t have Kelly’s
> screech-owl measuring you for a mouse. The money earned on this calendar
> goes for a great cause looking to the future. Also looking to the future,
> if Mitchell continues with this project, please encourage him to find a
> spot to note that he solicited the photographs, arranged for picking those
> for 2016, and include his name as designer. AND, please make sure we get to
> enjoy one of his photographs in the 2016 calendar. I know, fairness and
> all, but this can be resolved.
>
>
>
> These calendars are a limited edition. If you want, get now from Mitchell.
> I JUST TALKED TO Mitchell and learned Karen H has some in Little Rock.
>
>
Subject: AAS Calendar
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 08:57:06 -0600
I too think Mitchell should have a photo in each year’s calendar!! He 
work’s 

tireless to keep everyone up to date of sightings, as well as sharing his 
beautiful photos!!!  Not to mention the work he does on the calendar.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: New Sibley Book
From: Dan Bogler <danbogler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 22:26:16 -0600
I forgot to mention that most book stores will have the 2nd Edition- 1st
Printing until they sell out.

If you buy it at a  book store be sure that is says "Second Edition - March
2014" and then under it should read "Second Printing - July 2014"

This will be found on the back side of page 2

Otherwise you will get the copy that has the grey text that no one seemed
to like. And the drawings are not as dark as the first printing

But the one Buteo/ ABA Books sells is the most recent one

I am saving my 2nd Edition/ First Printing for some long cold winter night
when I run out of firewood
Subject: Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar)
From: saracnbrtltt9 <saracnbrtltt9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 21:24:27 -0600
This is reminding me of Dave Noland, who for so many years supported our 
Audubon Society and I think it was Dave that started the photo contest? Early 
90s or late 80's? Dave was a good and kind man, he died so young, and he is 
missed. 


Sara Cain-Bartlett, MSW, LCSW, C-ASWCM
Office: 479-521-4406.  CELL:  479-466-0611
CareSupport Services, PLLC 
WEBB:  www.thecaresupport.com
Geriatric Care Consultant

Sent from my IPad

> On Nov 17, 2014, at 9:18 PM, Mitchell Pruitt 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Thank you Joe. I (and the AAS) appreciate the support of those who entered 
the contest and purchased calendars this year. I was planning on sending out an 
update to the membership tomorrow on the calendar sales. As Joe mentioned, the 
calendars are limited, but we do have some left! Though it is a fundraiser for 
the Arkansas Audubon Society, you do not have to be a member to purchase one. 
All proceeds go to the Iola Rea Scholarship Fund to provide registration and 
room to an outstanding ecology camper and a parent or guardian to attend a 
meeting of the society. As someone who has taught at this camp for several 
years now, I see the value in keeping youth involved with conservation, birds, 
and nature. It is a great cause and something that is very close to all of us, 
not to mention the calendars look beautiful this year thanks some of the 
state’s best photographers. 

> 
> As Joe stated, I do have a major hand in the design and selection process, 
but I enjoy doing it so it’s never a big deal. 

> 
> Thank you,
> 
> ~Mitchell Pruitt
> 
> 
> On Monday, November 17, 2014 7:50 PM, Joseph C. Neal  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> I’ve been trying my best to cure Mitchell Pruitt of his modesty, but it 
doesn’t seem to be doing any good. I got to thinking about this morning while 
logging in some dates onto my Arkansas Audubon Society 2015 Calendar, that cost 
me .054 cents per day -- $20 for the year. What a deal. I know Mitchell is 
editor and designer of this calendar, and that he is an outstanding 
photographer of birds, BUT, try as hard as I have this morning, I don’t see a 
credit for Mitchell anywhere and not a single Mitchell photograph. Not that the 
competition for getting in wasn’t obviously stiff. 

>  
> I had a January 2015 date to put on my calendar this morning, and there, 
watching me do it, Kelly Chitwood’s Eastern Screech-Owl, all wide-eyed from a 
perch at entrance to a big hole in a massive old pine. It is such an engaging 
photograph I could barely take my eyes off it to write up the meeting date. And 
so it goes, January-December, and all through the calendar. 

>  
> Dear Audubon friends, I predict you are going to be unhappy with yourself 
come January, if, to save .054 cents per day, you don’t have Kelly’s 
screech-owl measuring you for a mouse. The money earned on this calendar goes 
for a great cause looking to the future. Also looking to the future, if 
Mitchell continues with this project, please encourage him to find a spot to 
note that he solicited the photographs, arranged for picking those for 2016, 
and include his name as designer. AND, please make sure we get to enjoy one of 
his photographs in the 2016 calendar. I know, fairness and all, but this can be 
resolved. 

>  
> These calendars are a limited edition. If you want, get now from Mitchell. I 
JUST TALKED TO Mitchell and learned Karen H has some in Little Rock. 

> 
> 
Subject: Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar)
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 03:18:23 +0000
Thank you Joe. I (and the AAS) appreciate the support of those who entered the 
contest and purchased calendars this year. I was planning on sending out an 
update to the membership tomorrow on the calendar sales. As Joe mentioned, the 
calendars are limited, but we do have some left! Though it is a fundraiser for 
the Arkansas Audubon Society, you do not have to be a member to purchase one. 
All proceeds go to the Iola Rea Scholarship Fund to provide registration and 
room to an outstanding ecology camper and a parent or guardian to attend a 
meeting of the society. As someone who has taught at this camp for several 
years now, I see the value in keeping youth involved with conservation, birds, 
and nature. It is a great cause and something that is very close to all of us, 
not to mention the calendars look beautiful this year thanks some of the 
state’s best photographers.  

As Joe stated, I do have a major hand in the design and selection process, but 
I enjoy doing it so it’s never a big deal.  

Thank you,

~Mitchell Pruitt 

 On Monday, November 17, 2014 7:50 PM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote: 

   

 #yiv0961279694 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}I’ve been trying my best to 
cure Mitchell Pruitt of his modesty, but it doesn’t seem to be doing any 
good. I got to thinking about this morning while logging in some dates onto my 
Arkansas Audubon Society 2015 Calendar, that cost me .054 cents per day -- $20 
for the year. What a deal. I know Mitchell is editor and designer of this 
calendar, and that he is an outstanding photographer of birds, BUT, try as hard 
as I have this morning, I don’t see a credit for Mitchell anywhere and not a 
single Mitchell photograph. Not that the competition for getting in wasn’t 
obviously stiff. I had a January 2015 date to put on my calendar this morning, 
and there, watching me do it, Kelly Chitwood’s Eastern Screech-Owl, all 
wide-eyed from a perch at entrance to a big hole in a massive old pine. It is 
such an engaging photograph I could barely take my eyes off it to write up the 
meeting date. And so it goes, January-December, and all through the 
calendar. Dear Audubon friends, I predict you are going to be unhappy with 
yourself come January, if, to save .054 cents per day, you don’t have 
Kelly’s screech-owl measuring you for a mouse. The money earned on this 
calendar goes for a great cause looking to the future. Also looking to the 
future, if Mitchell continues with this project, please encourage him to find a 
spot to note that he solicited the photographs, arranged for picking those for 
2016, and include his name as designer. AND, please make sure we get to enjoy 
one of his photographs in the 2016 calendar. I know, fairness and all, but this 
can be resolved. These calendars are a limited edition. If you want, get now 
from Mitchell. I JUST TALKED TO Mitchell and learned Karen H has some in Little 
Rock. 


   
Subject: Re: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar)
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 20:16:49 -0600
Joe, I got four calendar's to give as Christmas gifts.

 

I know it's early but Merry Christmas to all,

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR

 

 

"A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a
song."  Maya Angelou

 

 

 

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Monday, November 17, 2014 7:50 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar)

 

I've been trying my best to cure Mitchell Pruitt of his modesty, but it
doesn't seem to be doing any good. I got to thinking about this morning
while logging in some dates onto my Arkansas Audubon Society 2015 Calendar,
that cost me .054 cents per day -- $20 for the year. What a deal. I know
Mitchell is editor and designer of this calendar, and that he is an
outstanding photographer of birds, BUT, try as hard as I have this morning,
I don't see a credit for Mitchell anywhere and not a single Mitchell
photograph. Not that the competition for getting in wasn't obviously stiff. 

 

I had a January 2015 date to put on my calendar this morning, and there,
watching me do it, Kelly Chitwood's Eastern Screech-Owl, all wide-eyed from
a perch at entrance to a big hole in a massive old pine. It is such an
engaging photograph I could barely take my eyes off it to write up the
meeting date. And so it goes, January-December, and all through the
calendar. 

 

Dear Audubon friends, I predict you are going to be unhappy with yourself
come January, if, to save .054 cents per day, you don't have Kelly's
screech-owl measuring you for a mouse. The money earned on this calendar
goes for a great cause looking to the future. Also looking to the future, if
Mitchell continues with this project, please encourage him to find a spot to
note that he solicited the photographs, arranged for picking those for 2016,
and include his name as designer. AND, please make sure we get to enjoy one
of his photographs in the 2016 calendar. I know, fairness and all, but this
can be resolved. 

 

These calendars are a limited edition. If you want, get now from Mitchell. I
JUST TALKED TO Mitchell and learned Karen H has some in Little Rock.
Subject: SCREECH-OWL MEASURING YOU FOR A MOUSE (AAS 2015 calendar)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 01:49:46 +0000
Ive been trying my best to cure Mitchell Pruitt of his modesty, but it doesnt 
seem to be doing any good. I got to thinking about this morning while logging 
in some dates onto my Arkansas Audubon Society 2015 Calendar, that cost me .054 
cents per day -- $20 for the year. What a deal. I know Mitchell is editor and 
designer of this calendar, and that he is an outstanding photographer of birds, 
BUT, try as hard as I have this morning, I dont see a credit for Mitchell 
anywhere and not a single Mitchell photograph. Not that the competition for 
getting in wasnt obviously stiff. 




I had a January 2015 date to put on my calendar this morning, and there, 
watching me do it, Kelly Chitwoods Eastern Screech-Owl, all wide-eyed from a 
perch at entrance to a big hole in a massive old pine. It is such an engaging 
photograph I could barely take my eyes off it to write up the meeting date. And 
so it goes, January-December, and all through the calendar. 




Dear Audubon friends, I predict you are going to be unhappy with yourself come 
January, if, to save .054 cents per day, you dont have Kellys screech-owl 
measuring you for a mouse. The money earned on this calendar goes for a great 
cause looking to the future. Also looking to the future, if Mitchell continues 
with this project, please encourage him to find a spot to note that he 
solicited the photographs, arranged for picking those for 2016, and include his 
name as designer. AND, please make sure we get to enjoy one of his photographs 
in the 2016 calendar. I know, fairness and all, but this can be resolved. 




These calendars are a limited edition. If you want, get now from Mitchell. I 
JUST TALKED TO Mitchell and learned Karen H has some in Little Rock. 
Subject: New Sibley Book
From: Dan Bogler <danbogler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 19:08:08 -0600
I just received my new Sibley. This is the Second Edition - Second Printing
version that we have all waited so long for.

Buteo  Books now has them in stock

MUCH EASIER TO READ !

No comparison
Subject: Re: Moberly Pond
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 17:14:19 -0600
Amen, Adam!  The Russellville meeting was great and the Fort Smith
conference should be fantastic!

Ann


On Mon, Nov 17, 2014 at 4:34 PM, Adam Schaffer <
000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

>  I've checked out Moberly Pond off of Moberly here in Bentonville several
> times lately.  It has been a happening place every time.  It's had several
> hundred ducks and assorted waterfowl in a small area you can completely
> encircle for your choice of best viewing angle.  The best highlight for me
> has been a hooded merganser in driving snow as I returned from this
> weekend's Arkansas Audubon Society fall meeting.  Today again had the
> merganser, shovelers doing some sort of energetic circle dance, and a
> dawdling great egret that I enjoyed watching.  Doesn't he know he's
> supposed to be somewhere near the Gulf of Mexico by now!
>  The AAS fall conference in Russellville was quite a hit as well.
> Ninety-some folks braved cold weather and even scarier weather forecasts to
> view over 100 species of birds and other assorted nature bits.
> Brown-headed Nuthatches and American Beautyberry were well worth the
> two-hour drive south for me.  I really enjoyed seeing everyone as well.  I
> hope to see all of you and many more at our spring meeting held jointly
> with the Oklahoma Ornithological Society in Fort Smith May 1-3.  Thanks
> again,
>
> Adam Schaffer
> Bentonville
>
Subject: Drunk birds sober up in Environment Yukon holding tank | CBCNews.ca Mobile
From: Chuck Bartels <cbartels AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 2014 12:48:53 -0600
Cheers to wintery weather...


www.cbc.ca/m/news/canada/north/drunk-birds-sober-up-in-environment-yukon-holding-tank-1.2836281 


Download the official Twitter app here 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Lesser black-backed gull YES
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 15:24:22 -0600
LBBG continues with good looks from Del Rec Area. Dress warm!

Ryan Risher 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2014, at 13:03, Michael  wrote:
> 
> With the wind down I was able to relocate the lesser black/backed gull at 
Delaware rec area. 

> Sitting on platform....
> Michael (Conway)
Subject: Lesser black-backed gull YES
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 13:03:30 -0600
With the wind down I was able to relocate the lesser black/backed gull at 
Delaware rec area. 

Sitting on platform....
Michael (Conway)
Subject: Sightings: Two Rivers Park 11/16/14
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 12:05:42 -0600
It was cold and damp and dreary but very little wind and so was bearable. My 
target bird was Orange-crowned Warbler but it was not meant to be. I got 35 
species which included one late Nashville Warbler, one Mute Swan, Lesser Scaup, 
Common Goldeneye, one Gray Catbird (they are known to winter in the park), and 
about 31 less notable species. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: some December dates with birds in northwest Arkansas
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2014 13:47:13 +0000
It was all boots, heavy coats, gloves, and hats for 18 souls present for 
yesterdays wintry Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society-sponsored waterfowl trip 
to Lake Fayetteville. Even though waterfowl were relatively sparse, we still 
managed Bufflehead (approx. 20 with a very close fly by), Common Goldeneye 
(3-4), Hooded Merganser (1 female), Ruddy Duck, Horned Grebe (7), Bald Eagle (2 
or 3 adults); they perched pretty close, keeping close eye on American Coots. A 
small group of us followed David Chapman over to where the Paige Mulhollan 
Waterfowl blind is being constructed. 


UP NEXT IN DECEMBER (all free and open to the public (and you dont need to be 
a bird watchin heavyweight to participate): 


On Saturday December 6, (1) Audubons Dan Scheiman is presenting a program on 
effects of climate change on Arkansas birds at Hobbs State Park-Conservation 
Area Visitors Center at 2 PM. (2) At 1:30, just before Dr Scheimans 
presentation, and in the same room, NWAAS will hold its annual, brief, 
membership meeting for election of officers. (3) At 10 AM on the same day, 
NWAAS will host a field trip to Rocky Branch on Beaver Lake. Meet at 10 AM in 
the Rocky Branch Marina parking area. We will scan the lake along the shoreline 
and finish up by noon, in order to give folks a chance for lunch before the 
membership meeting and Dr Scheimans talk. 


The Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count, which started in 1961, will be performed 
on Sunday December 14. No ticket needed for attendance and looking to be our 
best ever. You dont have to be a bird expert to participate. 
Subject: Re: Not Arkansas but Calliope Hummingbird confirmed in Ozark, MO
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 21:46:51 -0600
Ozark isn't too far south of Springfield, mo. I'm keeping a close watch on my 
feeders hoping for crossbills. Had about 40 goldfinch today, purple finch, 
house finch, juncos, etc. fourteen species total. Also had brief spell of 
sleet. Missed seeing everyone at the AAS meeting, but I'm just too darned old 
to brave bad weather these days! 

SJ Gibson
Harrison

Sent from my iPad

> On Nov 15, 2014, at 8:47 PM, Jim Dixon  wrote:
> 
> I read about it on the MoBirds list. Not too far from Harrison I think. Maybe 
we'll get our own rarity. 

> 
> 
> Jim Dixon
> Little Rock
> www.JamesDixon.us 
> Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: Not Arkansas but Calliope Hummingbird confirmed in Ozark, MO
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 20:47:54 -0600
I read about it on the MoBirds list. Not too far from Harrison I think. Maybe 
we'll get our own rarity.  



Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: Purple finches.
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 21:19:09 -0600
I had at least 5 purple finches at my feeders today.  2 males and 3 females.
Subject: Doug James and Trumepter Swan recovery efforts
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 01:24:22 +0000
Some of you who follow the affairs of Trumpeter Swans in Arkansas might enjoy 
seeing Doug James with one bird that he was holding as part of a release 
project headed up by Karen Rowe of Arkansas Game and Fish. This photo is from 
February 2010 and is posted on the facebook page for Northwest Arkansas Audubon 
Society. Just for scale, take a look at the size of Doug's hands and the size 
of swan 4P0's feet. For the picture, go here: 



https://www.facebook.com/pages/Northwest-Arkansas-Audubon-Society/172133076185122?ref=ts&fref=ts 
Subject: Re: Sightings: Cooper's Hawk
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 21:20:30 +0000
I got to witness a Sharpie pick off a starling in the backyard here the other 
day. I was impressed with her target selection.. ☺ 


Clark Reames, Wildlife Biologist
NR Staff Officer (Acting)

Forest Service
Shoshone National Forest

p: 307-578-5134 x5134
c: 541-620-0681
f: 307-578-5112
creames AT fs.fed.us

808 Meadowlane Ave.
Cody, WY 82414
www.fs.fed.us

[http://fsweb.wo.fs.fed.us/esignature/images/usda-logo.png][Twitter][Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jim Dixon 

Sent: Friday, November 14, 2014 7:45 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Sightings: Cooper's Hawk

I went out to start the cars this morning and startled a Cooper's Hawk working 
on his breakfast in my front yard. He took his meal and flew to the yard across 
the street and settled there keeping an eye on me and using his wings to 
protect his meal. Couldn't tell what he had but it was probably mockingbird 
sized. 



Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: TOSOs are back
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 21:06:57 +0000
This afternoon calm winds inspired me to check some cedar trees for Townsend's 
solitaires. Sure enough I found two. One was south of the first overlook on 
Cameron Bluff Drive. The other was just west of Brown Springs picnic area. 

At the second site I heard a soft "tooting." It had a tone very similar to saw 
whet owl. But I could not zero in on it before it quit. 

I made quick stops at a few other locations where I have seen TOSO before with 
no luck. Also, still no rufous-crowned sparrows. 



Don R. Simons
Mount Magazine State Park
Subject: Pekin/Mallard
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 09:49:19 -0600
I just received a note from a friend who is photographing a Pekin duck with
ducklings near his condo in St Pete, FL.  The Pekin population there is
merging with the mottled ducks and the mallards, so much so that he has
been calling them "Muddled ducks."

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: Sightings: Cooper's Hawk
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 08:45:12 -0600
I went out to start the cars this morning and startled a Cooper's Hawk working 
on his breakfast in my front yard. He took his meal and flew to the yard across 
the street and settled there keeping an eye on me and using his wings to 
protect his meal. Couldn't tell what he had but it was probably mockingbird 
sized. 



Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: TWO SWANS, PROBABLY TRUMPETERS, MAKE A DAY
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2014 13:12:40 +0000
TWO SWANS, PROBABLY TRUMPETERS, were at Bob Kidd Lake just west of Prairie 
Grove on November 11, 2014. They were pretty far out, and in afternoon sun, but 
after a long study I thought I could see the blotchy plumage characteristic of 
juvenile Trumpeters. They reminded me a lot of the Trumpeters that spent last 
winter between Lake Fayetteville and a big prairie-like wetland pond off Van 
Asche Drive (that no longer exists with the widening and straightening of Van 
Asche). 


When I got home, I contacted David Krementz, leader of the Arkansas Coop Unit 
in Department of Biological Sciences UIA-Fayetteville and also posted to 
ARBIRD, since I know Karen Rowe of Arkansas Game and Fish would see the posting 
there. 


The deal is, restoration of Trumpeters Swans is ongoing. The Arkansas duck 
hunting season is about to open. Bob Kidd is popular in that respect in 
northwest Arkansas. 


Mitchell Pruitt had a chemistry lab yesterday  and a lot more stuff to do, 
both as student and getting ready for the Arkansas Audubon Society meeting at 
Russellville  but as soon as the lab was finished, he was game for taking a 
canoe out on a 30 degree day. So we canoed Bob Kidd, hopefully to get better 
views and some photographs. We didnt find the swans, but while we were there 
we encountered Mark Hutchings, AG & F Urban Wildlife Biologist. He and Dr 
Krementz had talked about the swans. He had made some signs and was posting 
them around Bob Kidd, alerting hunters that swans were using the lake and that 
they are protected. 


Theres no telling where the swans are right now, but I personally felt better 
about the whole deal. It is obvious there is a community of wildlife 
professionals and a public who share a noble goal, swan recovery. I wanted to 
see the swans with Mitchell, but all in all, I was WILDLY pleased to see the 
response to their presence. 


Go ahead and make my day, as Clint Eastwood famously put it. This response to 
wild swans really made my day. 
Subject: Re: Birds are back
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 20:33:56 -0600
Same here on all points.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 13, 2014, at 7:42 PM, Alyson Hoge  wrote:
> 
> Up until now, birds were not interested in my offerings of black oil 
sunflower seed. 

> 
> The fruit trees and berry-bearing bushes and vines have been heavy with 
fruit. I would see birds far away in the trees, but not at feeders. 

> 
> Only the occasional chickadee or titmouse dropped in for a snack. 
> 
> But now my old friends are back, and it cheers me up. 
> 
> Goldfinches, dark-eyed juncos and a downy woodpecker were there today. In the 
distance are the eastern phoebe and bluebird. 

> 
> There's also a little bird with olive sides and yellow breast. I didn't have 
time to study it to see if it's a pine warbler. 

> 
> The birds that come during the winter make these months bearable. 
> 
> Alyson Hoge
> Pulaski County
Subject: Birds are back
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 19:42:33 -0600
Up until now, birds were not interested in my offerings of black oil sunflower 
seed. 


The fruit trees and berry-bearing bushes and vines have been heavy with fruit. 
I would see birds far away in the trees, but not at feeders. 


Only the occasional chickadee or titmouse dropped in for a snack. 

But now my old friends are back, and it cheers me up. 

Goldfinches, dark-eyed juncos and a downy woodpecker were there today. In the 
distance are the eastern phoebe and bluebird. 


There's also a little bird with olive sides and yellow breast. I didn't have 
time to study it to see if it's a pine warbler. 


The birds that come during the winter make these months bearable. 

Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County
Subject: Re: Trumpeter Swans
From: Karyn Dillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 16:43:50 -0800
Thanks I was wondering if they might come in early this year. Any news on 
Sandhill Cranes? 


Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
Subject: FOS Pine Siskin
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 11:28:49 -0600
For the past couple of weeks there have been numerous mostly female House 
Finches at the feeder. Their calls sometimes fooled me into thinking I was 
hearing Red Crossbills, and their appearance made me anticipate the arrival of 
Pine Siskins. 

Just a little while ago I finally saw my first Pine Siskin of the season 
perched right outside the studio window. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 12
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 21:16:00 -0600
It was partly cloudy, cold and windy on the bird survey today.  Temps
dropped down to 29 degrees last night and the high today was in the low
forties.  Amazingly, 70 species were found.  The cold front moved a lot of
ducks down our way.  Black-bellied Whistling Ducks are lingering for a new
late date for RS.  Also, a late Black-throated Green Warbler was a surprise
as it fed in a wind blown willow on one of the lake levees.  I saw an adult
Golden Eagle twice today as it harassed the mass of ducks on Pintail and
Lotus lakes.  Then a large flock of crows dropped down from high in the sky
and harassed the eagle in flight for about 15 minutes.  The first Rusty
Blackbirds of the season have shown up.  I seldom see Lesser Scaups at Red
Slough anymore so a small flock on Otter Lake was a treat.  I heard two
flocks of Snow Geese migrating up high but they must have really been up
there as I couldn't see them.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 16

Snow Goose - 5

Canada Goose - 10

Wood Duck - 25

Gadwall - 1,445

American Wigeon - 6

Mallard - 1,036

Northern Shoveler - 44

Northern Pintail - 7

Green-winged Teal - 720

Ring-necked Duck - 568

Lesser Scaup - 4

Ruddy Duck - 9

Pied-billed Grebe - 18

Double-crested Cormorant - 45

Great Blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 18

Bald Eagle - 1 subadult

Northern Harrier - 5

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 4

Golden Eagle - 1 adult

American Kestrel - 1

American Coot - 180

Killdeer - 34

Greater Yellowlegs - 2

Wilson's Snipe - 39

Ring-billed Gull - 1

Mourning Dove - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 6

Eastern Phoebe - 6

Blue Jay - 4

American Crow - 122

Fish Crow - 4

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Carolina Wren - 3

House Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 2

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 2

American Robin - 80

Northern Mockingbird - 1

American Pipit - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1

Black-throated Green Warbler - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Field Sparrow - 7

Savannah Sparrow - 4

LeConte's Sparrow - 3

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 15

Swamp Sparrow - 7

White-throated Sparrow - 6

White-crowned Sparrow - 8

Northern Cardinal - 7

Red-winged Blackbird - 200

Eastern Meadowlark - 12

Rusty Blackbird - 6

Common Grackle - 175

American Goldfinch - 11

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour 

 
Subject: Splat.....and Snow Geese
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2014 02:20:35 +0000
Started out my day with an accident. Without going into details and while 
waiting for an ambulance I looked up and saw a flock of about 40-50 Snow Geese 
flying over downtown Little Rock. For a moment I forgot how much pain I was in 
and just enjoyed the view. 

Dottie
Little Rock

This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Trumpeter Swans
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 20:01:45 -0600
Kenny Nations of Heber Springs called me tonight  and reported there were
about 20 Trumpeter Swans now at Magness Lake.

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Boyd Point
From: V Prislipsky <vprislipsky AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:01:26 -0600
The Hot Springs Village Audubon trip to Boyd Point , 11/12, was a complete 
success thanks to the help of Delos and Hazel McCauley and a little early 
scouting by John Redman. Blustery late Fall weather may mean cold fingers but 
it also means ducks, in this case, lots of them. It was a nice to see 
Canvasbacks, a species we hardly ever see in the Village. Close looks at Earred 
Grebes meant firsts for several of our members. The honking from skeins of high 
flying Snowgeese provided the morning's sound track. 

Subject: Buffalo River Foundation fund-raiser Thursday night
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 20:59:56 +0000
Nothing to do with birds really, but a worthy cause (and a fun time)...

There will be a fund raiser for the Buffalo River Foundation tomorrow evening 
(Thursday) starting at 6:00pm downstairs at U. S. Pizza on Dickson Street in 
Fayetteville... 


The 4th Rock the River fund raiser with live music by Cindy Woolf and Mark 
Bilyeu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTtwYcUlXGU 


Make a donation of your choice at the door....

Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
Note new office:  SCEN 724
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu

Subject: Holla Bend NWR
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 14:32:25 -0600
Greetings all,

 I will be leading a small tour to the refuge as well as Petit Jean in a few 
days and would appreciate any observations made during the 

upcoming, Arkansas Audubon fall meeting. Our primary focus will be raptors and 
wildlife. We plan to hike the levee trail, which in the past has proven most 
interesting: 

A Golden Eagle on it's kill (Turkey Vulture) and later a fantastic, adrenaline 
pumping run-in with a herd of bucks in full rut. 


 We've dubbed the trail "Marlin Perkins" because of the excitement, but I would 
be really happy to view a Long-eared Owl in the cedars this time. 



Keep us posted, good luck this upcoming weekend and drive safely to the 
meeting! I hope you guys find a Snowy Owl! :-) 



	Kelly Chitwood
	El Dorado, AR
Subject: FOS
From: Dorothy Cooney <00000061bc52899a-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 10:28:52 -0800
I saw my FOS White-throated sparrow today working the leaf litter in my yard. 
Still waiting for the rest. 


 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Orange-crowned Warbler
From: Edie Calaway <00000066d9cc52d5-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 06:50:55 -0600
FOS Orange-crowned Warbler , this is the earliest I have seen one in  
my yard! Should be an interesting winter.

Edie Calaway
Little Rock
oxfordgirlsmom AT aol.com
Subject: bald eagle
From: "hudsonre AT aristotle.net" <hudsonre@ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 23:01:54 -0600
Gorgeous mature bald eagle today flying from area of Bull Shoals Dam over our 
house toward lake. 

First I've seen this fall. A beautiful sight on Veteran's Day. Thanks to all 
who have served and to 

their families

Anna Lee Hudson
Army "Brat", Navy Mom, Air Force Widow
Subject: Magellanic Woodpecker
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 21:51:33 -0600
Saw a great short documentary about Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego the kand
at the ends of the earth. One of the featured birds was the Magellanic
Woodpecker, one of the largest of his family left on earth. (Now that the
Ivorybill and the Imperial woodpeckers are pretty much gone)
       It is a.member of the campephilus family (double raps) just like the
Ivorybill. May it and the old growth forests of Patagonia survive!
       It was also amazing to view the Andean Condor. One of the largest
wingspans in the bird world. Very enjoyable to see all of this. I hope they
will survive the test of time and encroachment.

             Bill Thurman
Subject: Snow geese...
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 20:16:41 -0600
...heading south over Fort Smith tonight. No cloud cover so they're flying 
high. But you can still hear their faint calls. 


Sandy B.

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Just saw a V of about 25 Snow Geese fly over my house
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 18:59:49 -0600
about 90 minutes after sunset, illuminated by city lights. Probably the first 
time ever that light pollution was good for something. 



Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: swans on Bob Kidd Lake this afternoon
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 23:19:42 +0000
Two swans were on Bob Kidd Lake just of Prairie Grove today, along with ducks. 
They were a long ways off, in glare, but what I could make of bill shape and 
plumage reminded me of the Trumepter Swans that wintered in Fayetteville in 
2013-2014 (that pond has been drained and is now part of a brand spanking new 
street). The swans were in the extreme western part of the lake which so far as 
I know is almost inaccessible. Reliable identification awaits a better 
opportunity, if these birds remain at Bob Kidd. 
Subject: Blackbird roost (?)
From: Ricky Corder <rfcorder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 17:17:19 -0600
I don't know much about roosts, but I'm assuming what I see each evening is
one...thousands of blackbirds gathering just before sunset. It's a mile or
two east of the Crossover & Mission intersection in Fayetteville on Hwy 45
(Mission).

Has anyone else noticed it?

Ricky
Fayetteville, AR
Subject: CAW Grass Farm
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 20:50:23 +0000
This morning at the Central Arkansas Water Grass Farm a flock of about 100 
American Goldfinches had about 10 PINE SISKINS among them. They fed in the 
treetops with flocks of bluebirds, robins, waxwings, and starlings. Seeing the 
commotion and pine cones, I gave Red Crossbill playback a shot, to no avail. An 
OSPREY perched atop a tree until three American crows chased it off ("don't you 
crows know that Osprey eat fish?"). Waves of Snow Geese by the hundreds 
streamed southwards overhead, with Greater White-fronted Geese among them. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Remnants of Fall
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 14:27:08 -0600
Yesterday, on the side of the road in suburbia I watched a Cooper’s Hawk
make a parabolic dive down for what was at least a twenty pound pet dog. Up
and up afterward to the top of a power pole. The owner of the dog, standing
nearby, was oblivious. The Coopers shook itself off and looked around like
puppy diving is what you are supposed to do in fall.



This morning, driving out of my property, two deer were standing roadside
with ears alert. They are sheltering from the world of gunfire on the
hillsides to the west. But perched within eight feet of them at my eye
level was an adult Red-shouldered Hawk. I stopped the truck. Nobody moved.
I have no idea what the hawk was doing. I have seen them eat crayfish and
salamanders in cold weather. I have not seen them cowbirding deer for the
last fall grasshoppers if that is what she was doing. We looked each other
over at any rate.And I left them all to their thoughts.



The snows and blues have replaced the Greater White-fronted Geese in the
passover hieroglyphics. Noisier but less pleasant to the musical part of
the brain, it is all W’s and V’s, Y’s and M’s. Something about May or 
vows, 

I am not sure. It may be another language, one with no written vowels like
Arabic. The geese though, no doubt, are fleeing the arctic blast or the
Canadian blitz or whatever they are calling this one. Goose minds shifting
towards Pine Bluff, Bossier City and Baton Rouge. I may be dreaming of
Louisiana soon myself.



I miss sometimes the swans in Montana that seemed so undaunted by
everything. White or green weather, no fear, dropping with curved wings
onto ice or snow. It is still a month from winter here and I am daunted
already, unwinged, less brave I have learned, than any wild swan. The
winter birds and I will push on through though. Or try. I passed a Sugar
Maple today that almost made me wreck: shimmering in the north wind, so
many colors between gold and orange I did not know were there. Either I
have forgotten the capabilities of a Sugar Maple or this one was superb and
extraordinary. Memory failure seems more likely, the mind taunting and
protecting us at the same time. From so many winters, erasing all those
other fall maples, so this one can make me, once more, swerve and gasp like
a fool struck down by the ungodly remnants of fall.


My warning? My savior?

I still don't know.


Herschel Raney

http://www.hr-rna.com/RNA/

Conway AR
Subject: Re: Behavior question, picking ticks from deer
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 13:28:13 -0600
Cowbirds will pick off ticks from cows. Assumed they would do this for deer.
Though that behavior was strongly selected against, especially back 
in the days when DDT was used on cattle. Was taught about that in my 
70s Ecology class.

In the last several years have on occasion seen cowbirds on both 
sheep & cattle.

Regards
Jim Morgan
Fayetteville, AR

At 10:47 AM 11/11/2014, Janine Perlman wrote:
>E. Phoebe?  I've seen them fly-catch off deer.
>
>
>
>On 11/11/2014 8:34 AM, Keith Newton wrote:
>>Yesterday, I was watching a deer from a long distance, through 
>>small openings in underbrush. There was a Mockingbird sized bird 
>>flying excitedly around it, which I assumed might have been picking 
>>ticks, but it was also singing, but not a call that I'm familiar with.
>>
>>The deer didn't seem to pay  any attention to it. Does anyone have 
>>a suggestion what bird this might be?
>>
>>The location was Calhoun County, Ouachita R floodplain.
>>
>>Also got a nice look at a FOS Winter Wren feeding in undrbrush, 
>>then hopping up onto a moss covered rich pine stump, where, like a 
>>little rooster, it sang out to the world that the Sun was rising. 
>>Or more likely, to its friends, "hey, I'm over here", made me happy 
>>to be among.
>>
>>Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Behavior question, picking ticks from deer
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 13:17:28 -0600
Janine you were right. I just played the flight song from my app, which is what 
I think I heard. 


Also, this morning I decided I'd better get out for a paddle in my canoe before 
the front that just got here, arrived and blew all the cypress leaves off, 
which are at their peak Fall color. While I was composing a photo, I noticed a 
couple of birds in the background brush flying around in the same manner that 
made me think this was the same bird. I was able to get some decent shots, and 
Eastern Phoebe is what it turned out being. So thanks for your expert advice. K 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 11, 2014, at 10:47 AM, Janine Perlman  wrote:
> 
> E. Phoebe?  I've seen them fly-catch off deer.
> 
> 
> 
>> On 11/11/2014 8:34 AM, Keith Newton wrote:
>> Yesterday, I was watching a deer from a long distance, through small 
openings in underbrush. There was a Mockingbird sized bird flying excitedly 
around it, which I assumed might have been picking ticks, but it was also 
singing, but not a call that I'm familiar with. 

>> 
>> The deer didn't seem to pay any attention to it. Does anyone have a 
suggestion what bird this might be? 

>> 
>> The location was Calhoun County, Ouachita R floodplain.
>> 
>> Also got a nice look at a FOS Winter Wren feeding in undrbrush, then hopping 
up onto a moss covered rich pine stump, where, like a little rooster, it sang 
out to the world that the Sun was rising. Or more likely, to its friends, "hey, 
I'm over here", made me happy to be among. 

>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: WATERFOWL INFLUX AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 18:07:58 +0000
Yesterdays warmth and strong south winds turned overnight into modest north 
winds and temps near freezing. Snow Geese were overhead when I went out this 
morning and kept coming over the entire time I was at Lake Fayetteville, 
8:30-1045. 


Here are some results: Snow Goose (flocks overhead), Wood Duck (2), Gadwall 
(~40), Mallard (10), Northern Shoveler (~75), Green-winged Teal (~80), 
Canvasback (3), Redhead (20), Ring-necked Duck (19), Greater Scaup (1), Lesser 
Scaup (~75), Bufflehead (27), Hooded Merganser (3), Red-breasted Merganser (2), 
Ruddy Duck (10), Common Loon (1), Pied-billed Grebe (~35), Horned Grebe (7), 
American Coot (~200). An adult Bald Eagle made relentless shallow passes over 
the rafts. 


I dont wish hardship and discomfort on our fellow citizens Up North, but the 
hard truth is that  when they freeze and pile up snow  their birds have 
nowhere else ... to go  but here. 


Thats just the fundamentals behind observing 14 duck species here. This 
weather is bound to boost waterfowling opportunities during this weekends 
Arkansas Audubon Society meeting. Lake Dardenelle and Holla Bend NWR will 
probably be wall-to-wall waterfowl. If you cant make that, Saturdays 
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Lake Fayetteville remains 
available for your waterfowling pleasures. 


So my birding friends: Bestir thyself ... shake thy tail feathers ... go see'm 
ducks. 
Subject: Re: Behavior question, picking ticks from deer
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 10:47:47 -0600
E. Phoebe?  I've seen them fly-catch off deer.



On 11/11/2014 8:34 AM, Keith Newton wrote:
> Yesterday, I was watching a deer from a long distance, through small openings 
in underbrush. There was a Mockingbird sized bird flying excitedly around it, 
which I assumed might have been picking ticks, but it was also singing, but not 
a call that I'm familiar with. 

>
> The deer didn't seem to pay any attention to it. Does anyone have a 
suggestion what bird this might be? 

>
> The location was Calhoun County, Ouachita R floodplain.
>
> Also got a nice look at a FOS Winter Wren feeding in undrbrush, then hopping 
up onto a moss covered rich pine stump, where, like a little rooster, it sang 
out to the world that the Sun was rising. Or more likely, to its friends, "hey, 
I'm over here", made me happy to be among. 

>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Behavior question, picking ticks from deer
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 08:34:56 -0600
Yesterday, I was watching a deer from a long distance, through small openings 
in underbrush. There was a Mockingbird sized bird flying excitedly around it, 
which I assumed might have been picking ticks, but it was also singing, but not 
a call that I'm familiar with. 


The deer didn't seem to pay any attention to it. Does anyone have a suggestion 
what bird this might be? 


The location was Calhoun County, Ouachita R floodplain.

Also got a nice look at a FOS Winter Wren feeding in undrbrush, then hopping up 
onto a moss covered rich pine stump, where, like a little rooster, it sang out 
to the world that the Sun was rising. Or more likely, to its friends, "hey, I'm 
over here", made me happy to be among. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Avian extinctions
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 17:25:57 -0600
I've said this before - several times. Nothing will get better for birds
and animals anywhere, not just North America, until about 90 percent of the
humans are just wiped out.
Then if and when THEY recover the the whole syndrome of ignorance,
destruction and neglect will start all over again.


                                                            Bill Thurman

On Sun, Nov 9, 2014 at 11:09 AM, Janine Perlman  wrote:

>  The paper available here
>
> 
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266554543_Present-day_risk_assessment_would_have_predicted_the_extinction_of_the_passenger_pigeon_%28Ectopistes_migratorius%29 

> 
 

> shows that species with steeply declining populations are at great risk of
> extinction, *even if local populations are abundant.*
>
> A large fraction of "our" species are at great risk, as Mel White reminded
> us
>
> 
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/06/130621-threats-against-birds-cats-wind-turbines-climate-change-habitat-loss-science-united-states/ 

> 
 

>
> Will our great-grandchildren see us as too stupid, selfish, and
> short-sighted to have done everything possible to reverse the accelerating
> catastrophe?
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: eagle on the buffalo fos
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 16:05:46 -0600
Saw my first bald eagle of the year while riding the buffalo river today. I
miss their calls. What a great day! Not much else but an awful lot of song
sparrows.

Alan Gregory

Harrison

 



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Birds in a Changing Climate
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2014 20:26:21 -0600
This Thursday, November 13, at 7 PM is the free monthly meeting of Audubon
Society of Central AR at the Fletcher Library on H St. in Little Rock.  Our
presentation will be Birds in a Changing Climate by Lynsy Smithson-Stanley
who is National Audubon Societys Deputy Director for Climate Change and
Strategic Initiatives.  For more information including directions, follow
this link http://ascabird.org/?p=1288.

For more information about how climate change is affecting birds, visit
http://climate.audubon.org.

Dan