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Updated on Sunday, April 2 at 09:11 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-throated Magpie-Jay,©Jan Wilczur

2 Apr FW: turkey # 1 Pic [Jeffrey Short ]
2 Apr Down to the Mulberry [jonathanperry24 ]
30 Mar White-tailed Kite [Don Simons ]
30 Mar Re: Early birds [Herschel Raney ]
29 Mar Whip [Janine Perlman ]
31 Mar Re: FOS American Bittern [twbutler1941 ]
29 Mar FOS American Bittern [Delos McCauley ]
1 Apr another Whip-poor-will in the yard! [Janine Perlman ]
29 Mar GREEN HERON (fos) [Joseph Neal ]
31 Mar Neotropic Cormorant at Lonoke [Bill Shepherd ]
1 Apr FOY birds at Devils Den SP (Washington Co.); campaign continues; looking for volunteers [Alyssa DeRubeis ]
31 Mar Whippoorwill haven! [Bill Thurman ]
30 Mar FOS Indigo Bunting, Hot Springs, AR [Jerry Davis ]
1 Apr GREAT EGRET/GREAT BLUE HERON ROOKERY IN PINE BLUFF [JFR ]
1 Apr Bell Slough WMA Saturday [Karen ]
1 Apr Flanagan Prairie [Sandy Berger ]
1 Apr A few fun sightings [jonathanperry24 ]
2 Apr Rebsammen park [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
1 Apr Re: another Whip-poor-will in the yard! [Bill Thurman ]
31 Mar TEAL JACKPOT IN THE VALLEY [Joseph Neal ]
29 Mar Birders Needed! [David Arbour ]
29 Mar black-and-white warbler [Meredith Hawkins ]
29 Mar migration research [Butch Tetzlaff ]
29 Mar FOS Scissor-tailed flycatcher [Dustin Meadows ]
29 Mar Re: chorus [Judy & Don ]
29 Mar Re: chorus [Gmail ]
28 Mar Red Slough Bird Survey - March 28 [David Arbour ]
29 Mar Prairie Merlin [Glenn ]
28 Mar Swallows [Sally Jo Gibson ]
28 Mar chorus [Judy & Don ]
28 Mar Re: Does Tragedy 'count'? ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
28 Mar L-B DOWITCHER AT WOOLSEY [Joseph Neal ]
27 Mar FW: Luc Hoffman Obit [Jeffrey Short ]
27 Mar Re: Whip-poor-will [Ed Laster ]
27 Mar Whip-poor-will [Janine Perlman ]
27 Mar STKI Record [Lyndal York ]
27 Mar Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society -- April field trips [Joseph Neal ]
26 Mar Re: Belize AAST fund-raiser trip [Bill Thurman ]
26 Mar Yard Bird Dreaming: Rewarded [Herschel Raney ]
26 Mar AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS [Joseph Neal ]
22 Mar Female hummer(s) [Janine Perlman ]
23 Mar LOON MIGRATION AT BEAVER LAKE [Joseph Neal ]
23 Mar FOS [Judy & Don ]
24 Mar Seeing Birds Help People Destress [Jerry Davis ]
21 Mar Enhanced Newsletter [Lyndal York ]
22 Mar Fund my master's project on AR grassland birds [Alyssa DeRubeis ]
24 Mar ASCA Field Trip Sill On [Karen ]
23 Mar eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village [Daniel Scheiman ]
25 Mar Subtle shiftings [Herschel Raney ]
23 Mar Please help us recruit 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls for this June's halberg Ecology Camp [Barry Haas ]
23 Mar Does Tragedy 'count'? ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
22 Mar Inca Dove at Feeder [J J lun ]
25 Mar Re: New field trip binoculars [David Ray ]
23 Mar FOS female hummingbird ["data _null_;" ]
24 Mar FOS RUTH in Benton, AR [Tom Harden ]
23 Mar Reception at UACCM ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
24 Mar Migration maps [Gmail ]
24 Mar Re: Does Tragedy 'count'? [Don Simons ]
21 Mar AAS Spring Meeting info url [Lyndal York ]
24 Mar TREE SWALLOWS AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND BOXES [Joseph Neal ]
25 Mar New field trip binoculars [Karen ]
24 Mar Re: eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village [Gmail ]
25 Mar Very light hawk [jamesdixonlr ]
22 Mar FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies [Jeffrey Short ]
22 Mar Ruby-throated Hummingbirds [Jerry Davis ]
22 Mar Red Slough Bird Survey - Mar. 22 [David Arbour ]
21 Mar Crossbills at shores lake [Daniel Mason ]
21 Mar FOS [Judy & Don ]
23 Mar Red thread [Janine Perlman ]
23 Mar DeGray Bird Count Cancelled [Kay ]
23 Mar Ruby-throated Hummingbird [Jim Dixon ]
25 Mar Bald Knob Field Trip Sarurday [Karen ]
25 Mar Logoly State Park Birding [Devin Moon ]
26 Mar In the Ozarks [Sandy Berger ]
22 Mar The Snipe is now Online [Dottie Boyles ]
23 Mar Re: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies [Sandy Berger ]

Subject: FW: turkey # 1 Pic
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 20:59:46 -0500
[] There are those of us that have had, and those of us that will.

[] 

Beautiful feathers, though.

 

Jeff Short

 

 



 
Subject: Down to the Mulberry
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 18:21:05 -0500
A brief addendum to my post about Lake Fayetteville yesterday: while
walking across the field towards the Mulhollan blind, we were entertained
by a goodly number of Tree Swallows.  I realize that this is not in any way
especially unusual, but my goodness, are they beautiful and charming!  That
was a nice start.

This morning Cindy and I decided on a linear birding outing, down highway
16 from Fayetteville to the junction with highway 23, thence to the
junction with highway 215, and from there along the Mulberry to Wolf Pen
campground.  The weather was quite acceptable until we were just finishing
our picnic at Wolf Pen, when it started to rain.  Our last bites and sips
were most propitiously timed.

Notable for us along the way were our first-of-season Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher, on a wire in Elkins along the highway between its two "urban"
centers; many many many Black-and-white Warblers, Yellow-throated Warblers,
Parulas, and Gnatcatchers; Chipping Sparrows; and Field Sparrows.  Again, I
know some of these aren't especially surprising or unusual, but they gave
us great pleasure.  We heard our first-of-season Louisiana Waterthrush down
in a holler just north of East Fly Gap Road.  From the various pull-outs
along the way, we enjoyed mightily that early spring green fuzziness of
trees on hillsides, perhaps my favorite time of year, going back to my days
at Hendrix.

Redding Campground was mostly quiet, except for quite a few Fish Crows, but
the Mulberry was up and gorgeous, and the drive to Wolf Pen was
delightful.  Wolf Pen itself was another thing altogether.  It was VERY
birdy, at least in terms of the sheer number of birds (species were good
too, but probably no more than 15 total).  Beside Gnatcatchers,
Black-and-whites, Yellow-throated Warblers, Parulas, and Pine Warblers, we
added Brown Creeper, Towhee, and first-of-season Yellow-throated Vireo and
Broad-winged Hawk.  There were so many birds to ID that we were finally
just about worn out, with serious cases of birder's neck and shoulders.
When the rains came, we headed straight home.

A couple of observations: Wolf Pen was good.  Wolf Pen was very good.  We
may have just caught it on a particularly good day, but the river was
beautiful and I've already described its avifauna.  I commend it to your
attentions.  Secondly, we drove the loop road Madison Co. 5340, maybe a
mile south of the county line on highway 16.  For us old-timers, we know
this as once part of 16 itself until a more direct routing relegated it to
mere side road. As such it is very quiet, an easy drive, and much more
pleasant than we remembered it from the olden days.  The one-lane bridge
over Cannon Creek is a very nice depression-era (around 1936) structure,
and it crosses the creek at a lovely series of waterfalls.  The fields in
the area were alive with Field Sparrows, Grackles, Red-winged Blackbirds,
and Eastern Meadowlarks.  We also saw a sub-adult Bald Eagle there.  Again,
commended to a few minutes of your time if you're on 16 thereabouts.  And
finally, we saw a good number of Eastern Phoebes today, and not a single
one was tail-wagging.  Thoughts, anyone?

Good birding!

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: White-tailed Kite
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 19:36:50 +0000
I was on my lunch break when a flicker flew past my window. Grabbing binoculars 
I keep on a window seal, I looked up to see a large white bird riding the wind 
just above trees along the northern rim of the mountain. I often see vultures, 
eagles, and hawks riding on that up draft. 


My first thought was gull, but no. Then I thought osprey, but too much white. 
It was mostly white underneath except for dark primaries and black wrist spots. 


This is the second white-tailed kite I've seen on Mount Magazine. The first was 
during a large prescribed burn. The forest service has been burning in the 
Ouachita Mountains a lot lately. Perhaps that is why the kite was in the area. 


Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: Re: Early birds
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 06:30:15 -0500
We have one outlier date of 15 March for Nighthawk in Faulkner county, 
normal arrival is after April 7th and usually a week after that. 
Chimneys are expected now.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR


On 3/29/2017 10:30 PM, Sandy Berger wrote:
> On my neighborhood walk tonight I had a Chimney Swift and a Nighthawk. 
> This is the earliest I've seen these birds in Fort Smith.  Haven't 
> checked the arrival dates yet.
>
> Sandy B.
Subject: Whip
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 19:46:35 -0500
...right outside the window, right now!  Wheee!!

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: Re: FOS American Bittern
From: twbutler1941 <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 18:26:34 -0500
I also saw an American Britton at BKNWR today. Also got a great look at a Broad 
winged hawk. 15 feet away. A fly over Peregrine falcon and a couple of Tom 
turkey as well. 

TERRY BUTLER


Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
-------- Original message --------From: Glenn 
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> Date: 3/31/17 10:13 AM 
(GMT-06:00) To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: FOS American Bittern 

Seen this morning at Bald Knob NWR.  It was way in the bushes.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
Subject: FOS American Bittern
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 15:08:18 -0500
Just saw my first of season American Bittern in its favorite habitat on
Wilbur West Road, the ditch just south of the road.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: another Whip-poor-will in the yard!
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 19:55:59 -0500
More birds, and closer, this year than in many years put together!!

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: GREEN HERON (fos)
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 20:48:15 +0000
We had a rainy, stormy spring morning, but that didnt stop a Green Heron 
working edges of an artesian-fed spring pond adjacent Craig State Fish Hatchery 
in Centerton. As far as I know, this is the earliest spring arrival date for 
northwest Arkansas. Previous early date was April 3. Theres no telling where 
this bird was before it found this mornings spring run, but they winter along 
Gulf coast, down through Mexico all the way into northern South America. 


Partially flooded field just north of Anglin Road (1-mile south of hatchery) 
was full of birds: American Golden-Plovers (18), Greater Yellowlegs (4), 
Pectoral Sandpipers (~40), Wilsons Snipe (~25), plus Blue-winged Teal (~70), 
Green-winged Teal (~25), a few Mallards and Gadwalls. In addition, one Western 
Meadowlark giving chup calls. Egyptian Geese (2) at a farm pond across the 
road. 


Wilsons Snipe in the field were quite vocal. I was puzzled by the calls, most 
unfamiliar to me: a rising WOOO WOOO WOOO WOOO, totally different than the 
typical rasps given by birds flushed in winter. I tried to look this up in 
Cornells Birds of North America  sounds a little like what they term 
Winnowing  a tremulous hu-hu-hu reminiscent of one vocalization of Eastern 
Screech-Owl  but birds were giving these calls on the ground, so not sure  
Realized in the process that I had been hearing this during my last few trips 
to Frog Bayou WMA. After 40 years of this, I still come home wondering ... 
There is a 12-step program where they say "keep coming back, it works if you 
work it" -- true for birding, too. 


At the hatchery: American Golden-Plover (1), Killdeer (a few), Greater 
Yellowlegs (1), Least Sandpiper (7), Pectoral Sandpiper (4), Wilsons Snipe 
(1). Waterfowl: Canada Goose (1 bird apparently on a nest), Mallard (3), 
Blue-winged Teal (40), Northern Shoveler (5), Bufflehead (4). 

Subject: Neotropic Cormorant at Lonoke
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 20:31:51 +0000
Ragan Sutterfield and I were birding this morning among the ponds of the Joe 
Hogan State Fish Hatchery at Lonoke and noticing an occasional Double-crested 
Cormorant in the air when a group of three or four cormorants flew over of 
which one bird, an adult, was markedly smaller than the others. Bingo! A 
Neotropic Cormorant. 



Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 
Subject: FOY birds at Devils Den SP (Washington Co.); campaign continues; looking for volunteers
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 20:43:03 -0500
A friend and I checked out Devils Den State Park this, and the birds we
heard and observed were similar to those that others found today.
First-of-year bird sightings for me included Yellow-throated Vireo,
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Northern Parula, Black-and-white Warbler, and many a
Louisiana Waterthrush. I encountered a lingering Yellow-bellied
Sapsucker--not sure how much longer they'll stick around. Almost had a
Broad-winged Hawk too, until it turned into a Blue Jay. April Fool's joke I
guess! Overall a great spring day to be out, listening to all the returning
summer residents singing.

My gofundme campaign for my Master's project is still going strong, and I
want to thank folks that have donated. I'm looking for more help. To read
more about it and to donate, visit this link:
https://www.gofundme.com/alyssas-grassland-bird-research-2017/.

Lastly, let me know if you're interested in volunteering with the project
this summer. I haven't made an official flyer yet, but in short it will
take place in northwest Arkansas and duties include locating grassland bird
nests, surveillance camera maintenance (i.e. switching out heavy marine
batteries), and vegetation sampling. There are few things more rewarding or
fun (or sometimes frustrating) than finding bird nests! I'd love to have
you join me for prairie adventures. :)

Thanks, and good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.
Subject: Whippoorwill haven!
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 21:23:46 -0500
I made my annual pilgrimage to my favorite spot near Lake Sylvia to hear
the whippoorwills this evening. (But I missed last year) When it got just
dark enough one begin to call. Then more in the distance. I heard
distinctly four whips. There were likely more. It was a beautiful magical
evening, the kind I've had in the past with the crescent moon and the soft
starlight mixed with the branches and pine needles to form a lovely
twilight.
        I was happy to make it out there. My legs are stronger and less
swollen now from clotting and I can scramble around more. I plan for a lot
more trips. The whips really made my little evening like they always do.
Life would be incomplete  without them. They should be in full force this
April there in the Lake Sylvia Hills.
                               Bill Thurman
Subject: FOS Indigo Bunting, Hot Springs, AR
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 19:37:46 -0500
A lone male Indigo Bunting arrived at my home in Hot Springs, AR at 2:30 PM 
today. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR 
Subject: GREAT EGRET/GREAT BLUE HERON ROOKERY IN PINE BLUFF
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 14:45:21 -0500
There is a large rookery of primarily Great Egrets with several nests of Great 
Blue Herons, which is easily visible from the highway in Pine Bluff. It is 
located on the north side of Interstate 530 between exits 42 (Hazel St.) & 41 
(Old Warren Rd.) The best viewing is from the east bound side of the hwy. 
(viewing across 4 lanes of traffic) 100 yds west of the Hazel St. exit. The 
vehicular traffic is heavy, but there is ample room to park a safe distance 
from the shoulder. The rookery is easily spotted and is located in the tops of 
5-6 tall pine trees, which are approx. 40 yds from the shoulder. The Egrets are 
in full breeding plumage and give great looks at courtship displays and nest 
construction. There is a regular traffic of birds carrying large sticks, which 
provides numerous opportunities for inflight photos against a blue sky on clear 
days. This morning 6 Anhingas were circling the rookery. A pair in breeding 
plumage lit on exposed branch near an Egret nest and engaged in an extensive 
courtship display, which I had not observed before. It is probable that the 
Anhingas will also be nesting in the rookery. If anyone has not seen a rookery, 
this would be great opportunity to do so. 

John Redman
Subject: Bell Slough WMA Saturday
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 20:31:37 -0500
Allan Mueller and I birded both sides of Bell Slough this morning. Our target 
birds were Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, both Waterthrushes, and Prothonotary 
Warbler. We tanked on all. It must be a tad bit too early for them here because 
Bell is a reliable spot for them. 


We started at the spillway entrance. It was a gorgeous morning with lots of 
birds singing. The spillway was loaded with at least 50 Black Vultures hanging 
out on the rocks and in the trees. Off to one side, was a tree full of 20 Great 
Egrets. A juvenile Bald Eagle had claimed his own tree. An additional tree had 
still more Black Vultures and one Great Egret in breeding plumage. The Egret 
was oblivious to the vultures sharing the tree in spite of all the vultures 
flapping and hopping around and more coming in to land and pushing and shoving 
each other off their branches. Fish Crows were flying around fusing. We saw one 
who who was carrying nesting material. We also had a nice group of Pelicans, a 
Green Heron, a Killdeer, a very vocal Mockingbird, a Spotted Sandpiper, 
Bluebirds, a Pied-billed Grebe, Cormorants, a Phoebe, and a male Purple Martin. 


Crossing the spillway, we immediately heard and saw Common Yellowthroat, Black 
and White Warbler, White-eyed Vireo, Red-eye Vireo, Northern Parula, Eastern 
Towhee, and White-throated Sparrows. At what I call "Parula Corner", we had 
more singing Parulas. We turned and walked down to Grassy Lake. We heard 
several Yellow-throated Vireos, and saw a Pileated Woodpecker. At the lake, we 
had a busy group of lots of Blue-winged Teal and one Wood Duck. Included was a 
nice surprise of 10+ female Hooded Mergansers, plus one male who was trying to 
decide which female to chase! Finishing our walk, we had more Towhees, some 
Gadwalls and one Mallard, plus an adult Bald Eagle and an Osprey fly over. 
Blue-gray Gnatcatchers and Yellow-rumpled Warblers (some in gorgeous breeding 
plumage) were everywhere. 


On to the main entrance at Bell Slough. It was now 10:45 a.m and it was much 
quieter than the other entrance. Best birds were the swallows. We had a Tree 
Swallow and lots of chattering Barn Swallows. Plus, after Allan left, I stopped 
on the bridge over Phalarm Creek and saw a small group of Cliff Swallows flying 
up and down the creek. Two adult Bald Eagles spent some time circling each 
other, then flying off. We had a lot of the same species as we had at the other 
entrance, but in much smaller numbers. 


We finished around noon. We knew we were early for the big migration push, but 
it was too nice a morning not to be out birding. The great group of birds we 
saw were a promise of more to come. Spring migration, it's just around the 
corner! 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Flanagan Prairie
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 21:58:50 +0000
I joined Dr. Kannan and his ecology class for a field trip today to
Cherokee and Flanagan Prairie.  First of season birds included
Scissortailed Flycatcher, Great Egret, Barn Swallow, Solitary Sandpiper,
and Rough-winged Swallow.  But as we were leaving Flanagan Dr. Kannan
yells, "Osprey".  Sure enough, an osprey flew into the middle of the
prairie, sat in a dead tree and proceeded to eat a fish he caught from who
knows where.
In the bird world, you never know what you'll see.

Sandy
Subject: A few fun sightings
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 18:01:04 -0500
Cindy and I spent a couple of hours this morning at Lake Fayetteville.  Our
first little effort was a trudge across the field west of the parking lot
for the trailhead next to the Botanical Garden, where some big to-do,
complete with a bluegrass band, was in its introductory phase.  We headed
for the Mulhollan blind and were surprised--and pleased, if my guess about
them is correct--to see a new bridge and a fancy boardwalk headed towards
the blind.  We're hoping that this is an effort to make the blind
accessible to the less mobile, or at least something that will incidentally
make it so.

When we arrived at the blind, we were greeted by a singing Northern Parula
and by a splendid Osprey perched on a snag directly east of the blind.  It
took off and soared over that part of the lake for a good five minutes
before heading off and out of sight to the north.  On the lake itself were
Blue-winged Teal, a couple of Mallards, and a small raft (12 to 15
individuals) of Lesser Scaup.  Before we left, we were able to visually
locate the Parula, again just east of the blind. We also saw Blue-gray
Gnatcatcher before heading back to our car to drive over to the
Environmental Center.

There we found our first-of-season Yellow-throated Warbler, just west of
the center.  From the fishing pier Cindy spotted a pair of Bald Eagles,
mature and sub-mature, far to the west, probably on the other side of Lewis
& Clark.  We had another couple of Gnatcatchers and killer views of a
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker at close range (15 feet or less).  Like most of
the other birds we saw, its spring plumage was stunning.

Singing Goldfinches and chipping Yellow-rumps were everywhere.  Altogether
a fine couple of hours in the field.

I forgot to post a few days ago that while we were enjoying glasses of wine
on our back deck, a fox wandered into and through our neighbor's yard to
the east of us.  We watched it for several minutes as it snooped and
sniffed around.  It looked to be in splendid shape.  I don't know whether
to be happy about this or not.  But it was certainly beautiful and
unexpected.  We live in the East Oaks neighborhood of Fayetteville, in the
area bounded by Crossover, Mission, and Township, and while there are still
quite a few trees and a good bit of brushy stuff in our area, it's hard for
me to believe that this was a good sign.  Oh well.



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: Rebsammen park
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 03:45:34 +0000
THE mulberry bush by the boat ramp is LOADED w green berries. Looking forward 
to spring car-birding bonanza. Karen Hart Little Rock 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 1, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Karen  wrote:
> 
> Allan Mueller and I birded both sides of Bell Slough this morning. Our target 
birds were Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, both Waterthrushes, and Prothonotary 
Warbler. We tanked on all. It must be a tad bit too early for them here because 
Bell is a reliable spot for them. 

> 
> We started at the spillway entrance. It was a gorgeous morning with lots of 
birds singing. The spillway was loaded with at least 50 Black Vultures hanging 
out on the rocks and in the trees. Off to one side, was a tree full of 20 Great 
Egrets. A juvenile Bald Eagle had claimed his own tree. An additional tree had 
still more Black Vultures and one Great Egret in breeding plumage. The Egret 
was oblivious to the vultures sharing the tree in spite of all the vultures 
flapping and hopping around and more coming in to land and pushing and shoving 
each other off their branches. Fish Crows were flying around fusing. We saw one 
who who was carrying nesting material. We also had a nice group of Pelicans, a 
Green Heron, a Killdeer, a very vocal Mockingbird, a Spotted Sandpiper, 
Bluebirds, a Pied-billed Grebe, Cormorants, a Phoebe, and a male Purple Martin. 

> 
> Crossing the spillway, we immediately heard and saw Common Yellowthroat, 
Black and White Warbler, White-eyed Vireo, Red-eye Vireo, Northern Parula, 
Eastern Towhee, and White-throated Sparrows. At what I call "Parula Corner", we 
had more singing Parulas. We turned and walked down to Grassy Lake. We heard 
several Yellow-throated Vireos, and saw a Pileated Woodpecker. At the lake, we 
had a busy group of lots of Blue-winged Teal and one Wood Duck. Included was a 
nice surprise of 10+ female Hooded Mergansers, plus one male who was trying to 
decide which female to chase! Finishing our walk, we had more Towhees, some 
Gadwalls and one Mallard, plus an adult Bald Eagle and an Osprey fly over. 
Blue-gray Gnatcatchers and Yellow-rumpled Warblers (some in gorgeous breeding 
plumage) were everywhere. 

> 
> On to the main entrance at Bell Slough. It was now 10:45 a.m and it was much 
quieter than the other entrance. Best birds were the swallows. We had a Tree 
Swallow and lots of chattering Barn Swallows. Plus, after Allan left, I stopped 
on the bridge over Phalarm Creek and saw a small group of Cliff Swallows flying 
up and down the creek. Two adult Bald Eagles spent some time circling each 
other, then flying off. We had a lot of the same species as we had at the other 
entrance, but in much smaller numbers. 

> 
> We finished around noon. We knew we were early for the big migration push, 
but it was too nice a morning not to be out birding. The great group of birds 
we saw were a promise of more to come. Spring migration, it's just around the 
corner! 

> Karen Holliday
> Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Re: another Whip-poor-will in the yard!
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 20:25:00 -0500
That's great news, Janine! The world would be a better place with more
whippoorwills.

Bill Thurman
On Apr 1, 2017 7:56 PM, "Janine Perlman"  wrote:

> More birds, and closer, this year than in many years put together!!
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
>
Subject: TEAL JACKPOT IN THE VALLEY
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 12:04:51 +0000
My strategy for birding big moist soil units at Frog Bayou WMA in the Arkansas 
River Valley is pile down on a pond bank, out of the wind, look & listen. But 
not yesterday. 


From farther reaches of Unit 6 I hear the sirens call on the wind. Sounds like 
a flock of AT LEAST 1,000 American Golden-Plovers  cant see em  so off my 
butt and get a-walking. Walk eventually brings me to clear view of the sirens. 
No plovers. Green-winged Teal, in watery cover, males courting females. A 
veritable cacophony of peeping, in the wind. Earths big gold nuggets, well 
hidden from prying eyes. 


By the time I got back to the car Id observed Canada Goose (2), Wood Duck (4), 
Gadwall (10), American Wigeon (~20), Mallard (2), BLUE-WINGED TEAL (~350), 
Northern Shoveler (~70), Northern Pintail (3), GREEN-WINGED TEAL (~125), Lesser 
Scaup (2), Hooded Merganser (~25), Pied-billed Grebe (~20), American Coot 
(147), ETC. 


American Bitterns (2) flushed from emergent vegetation along the north edge of 
Unit 5. A flock (38) of Great Egrets on another unit along Denman Road maybe 
were recent arrivals? 


Drove 2-miles west to Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility and again hit the 
jackpot. TEAL TEAL TEAL. This time it was a shallow pond adjacent the facility 
with Blue-winged Teal (300-400) and Green-winged Teal (~50) in full view. There 
are still a few Canvasbacks (2), Ring-necked Ducks (4), Lesser Scaup (8), and 
Ruddy Ducks (6), on the big facility pond. 


An American Pipit walking the rip-rap has adult buffy feathers of the nesting 
season showing among streaks of winter  perfect for the end of March, and 
northward migrations onset. 



Brian Infield, Arkansas Game and Fish manager for Frog, saw BLACK-BELLIED 
WHISTLING-DUCKS on a farm pond just west of the facility this week. FOS for me 
were BBWDs (2) yesterday. They flew into a pond, foraged, copulated a couple of 
times, flew off. 

Subject: Birders Needed!
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 13:57:39 -0500
McCurtain County Tourism Authority's ad agency is wanting to do a photo
shoot at Red Slough on Sunday April 30th.  They want to not only photograph
birds but birders in the act of birding.  I will be guiding the tour so you
will get to see lots of good birds, as that time of year is prime.  If you
are interested, contact me off list.

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: black-and-white warbler
From: Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 12:39:21 -0500
Walking in the woods yesterday (sans binoculars) and watched  FOS b & w
warbler within  4-6 feet for several minutes. A treat!

Meredith Hawkins
Little Italy, AR
Subject: migration research
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 13:25:53 -0500
There's an interesting article in this month's Auk (academic publication
about birds) about migration and how our common perception about migration
(long-distance obligate migration) may not actually be the norm.

 

Even though it is in an academic publication, it is a pretty accessible
read.

 

Enjoy!

 

http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1642/AUK-16-228.1?utm_source=March+2017+Co
ntent+Alert

&utm_campaign=March+2017+Content+Alert&utm_medium=email

 

Butch Tetzlaff

Bentonville
Subject: FOS Scissor-tailed flycatcher
From: Dustin Meadows <Dustin_Meadows AT SWN.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 18:28:35 +0000
Today in Damascus.

Dustin Meadows


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Subject: Re: chorus
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 08:00:58 -0500
Yes! I'm sure you did hear them. And here the Ruby-crowned Kinglets have been 
singing like crazy too. 

J

On Mar 29, 2017, at 6:48 AM, Gmail  wrote:

> Well that explains why I heard Parula and L. Waterthrush at the Mulhollan 
blind yesterday. I thought it was my imagination, since I never did get a view 
of either one. 

> 
> Butch
> Bentonville
> 
> 
> 
>> On Mar 28, 2017, at 17:00, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
>> 
>> Today our first Northern Parula Warbler joined the beautiful songs of 
Louisiana Waterthrush, Yellow-throated Warbler, Black-and-White Warbler, Hermit 
Thrush, and others over the sound of rushing water. More rain in the forecast 
so the frogs are all singing too. 

>> 
>> Judith
>> Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: chorus
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 06:48:53 -0500
Well that explains why I heard Parula and L. Waterthrush at the Mulhollan blind 
yesterday. I thought it was my imagination, since I never did get a view of 
either one. 


Butch
Bentonville



> On Mar 28, 2017, at 17:00, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
> 
> Today our first Northern Parula Warbler joined the beautiful songs of 
Louisiana Waterthrush, Yellow-throated Warbler, Black-and-White Warbler, Hermit 
Thrush, and others over the sound of rushing water. More rain in the forecast 
so the frogs are all singing too. 

> 
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - March 28
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 23:23:50 -0500
Jena Donnell (OK), Chris Lynch (OK), Mike Weber (TX), and I surveyed birds
today at Red Slough and found 80 species.  The day started off cool,
overcast, and a bit breezy and turned partly cloudy and warm.  Lots of new
birds arriving!  The highlight of the day were numerous king Rails.  I made
an effort to find as many as I could today so we visited numerous places
that have held birds in the past.  At one spot I played callback and a King
came running toward us calling and in the process he ran into a Sora which
he attacked and sent flying into the air in front of us as they broke cover
into the open.  We probably would have missed Sora for the day if that King
Rail had not flushed it for us.  At another spot there was an extremely
bold, fearless King Rail that came running out of cover into the open on the
levee.  Cameras started clicking as he put a show on for us.  Suddenly I
looked up and here came a Cooper's Hawk in a dive straight for the exposed
calling King Rail who instantly ran for cover as I ran at the hawk causing
it to veer up just before hitting the rail.  Close call!   Usually Kings
just come to the edge of the cover and just peek out.  Its rare to find one
as bold as this one was.  At one point he was five feet from me.   Here is
my list for today:

 

Canada Geese - 4

Wood Duck - 20

Gadwall - 22

Blue-winged Teal - 194

Northern Shoveler - 105

Green-winged Teal - 14

Ring-necked Duck - 2

Hooded Merganser - 26

Wild Turkey - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 8

American White Pelican - 11

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Double-crested Cormorant - 17

Anhinga - 19

American Bittern - 4

Great-blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 18

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3

Black Vulture - 25

Turkey Vulture - 13

Northern Harrier - 3

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

King Rail - 6

Virginia Rail - 4

Sora - 1

Common Gallinule - 8

American Coot - 320

Greater Yellowlegs - 19

Wilson's Snipe - 14

Mourning Dove - 6

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 6

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 35

Cliff Swallow - 20

Barn Swallow - 3

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 5

House Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 5

Marsh Wren - 5

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Brown Thrasher - 1

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Northern Parula - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 20

Yellow-throated Warbler - 3

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 6

Eastern Towhee - 3

Field Sparrow - 6

Savannah Sparrow - 6

LeConte's Sparrow - 4

Song Sparrow - 3

Swamp Sparrow - 6

White-throated Sparrow - 8

White-crowned Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 27

Eastern Meadowlark - 11

Common Grackle - 20

Brown-headed Cowbird - 8

American Goldfinch - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Skimming Bluet

Orange Bluet

Southern Spreadwing

Common Green Darner

Common Baskettail 

Eastern Pondhawk

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Variegated Meadowhawk

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth - DOR

Gray Treefrog - calling

Green Treefrog - calling

Spring Peepers - calling

Cajun Chorus Frog - calling

Blanchard's Cricket Frog - calling

Southern Leopard Frog - calling

Bullfrog - calling

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Prairie Merlin
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:14:37 +0000
Joe Tucker and I spotted a Prairie Merlin and a Peregrine Falcon today at Bald 
Knob NWR. Both birds were near the grain elevator. I didn't realize it was a 
Prairie Merlin until Will Britton saw my photos. Thanks Will. 

Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: Swallows
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 22:02:28 +0000
Sheree Rogers asked that I put this on ARBird.  Her email is down.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Hank and Sheree went over to the old bridge at Lead Hill Saturday in hopes of 
seeing shorebirds. None present at that time. 

However, they tallied four species of Swallows: 6+ Tree Swallows; 1 
Rough-winged Swallow; 1 Barn Swallow and 3 Cliff Swallows. There were 16 Horned 
Grebe present also. 

Subject: chorus
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 17:00:13 -0500
Today our first Northern Parula Warbler joined the beautiful songs of Louisiana 
Waterthrush, Yellow-throated Warbler, Black-and-White Warbler, Hermit Thrush, 
and others over the sound of rushing water. More rain in the forecast so the 
frogs are all singing too. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 16:11:55 +0000
Back in the 90's when I worked for Eglin Air Force Base down in FL, we were 
able to identify the remains of an RTHU that was found during routine 
maintenance of an F-15 engine. It did not affect the performance of the engine 
in any way but the maintenance folks still had concerns as to what bird species 
they were dealing with. 


Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager
Forest Service
Malheur National Forest
p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us
431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

Caring for the land and serving people






-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jeffrey Short 

Sent: Friday, March 24, 2017 7:06 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?

So...if the vehicle is an aircraft, the "something" else is a birdstrike. If 
the birdstrike occurs over an airfield and the remains are collected they can 
be identified. If all that is left is a bloody spot--or "snarge"--then the bird 
can sometimes be identified to species or at least family based on the unique 
characteristics of the embedded feather fragements, or nowadays using DNA 
comparisons. 


Thanks to the staff of the Smithsonian, the feather experts in various 
countries, diligent groundcrews and aircrews, Federal agencies, commercial 
airlines, and taxpayers, many hundreds of birdstrikes are identified each year. 
This helps fine-tune the wildlife hazard prevention efforts on our airfields 
and saves resources and treasure every day. 


Applied biology works for us all, even Air Force One. Dance with the one that 
brung-ya: biology. 


Jeff Short


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2017 11:53 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Does Tragedy 'count'?

So...

Say one is driving down the road when a bird flies in front of the vehicle. The 
driver sees the bird and can tell roughly what genus it is, but doesn't have 
time to make a clear identification or an adequate swerve or stop before the 
bird finds its way into the vehicle's grill (or windshield). After stopping, 
the unfortunate avian is clearly identified. 


Does that "count" for one's life list?  Or is it considered...something else?

I know this is a weird question but this time of year things can happen.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co being careful with cars)




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immediately. 
Subject: L-B DOWITCHER AT WOOLSEY
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 13:03:58 +0000
Woolsey Wet Prairie Wildlife Sanctuary adjacent Fayettevilles westside 
wastewater treatment facility now has some excellent shorebird habitat, a 
result of cutting willows and other invasive natives that were taking over the 
entire place, and a subsequent, effective prescribed burn. The area is now more 
open habitat than in several years. With around 5 inches of recent rain, there 
is shallow open water all over the place. My prediction: this spring will be 
very productive in terms of shorebird and dabbling duck migration. 


Yesterday featured Wood Duck (2), Blue-winged Teal (8), Green-winged Teal (2), 
and Hooded Merganser (2). For shorebirds: Killdeer (8), Greater Yellowlegs (6), 
Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Solitary Sandpiper (3), Pectoral Sandpiper (20), 
Long-billed Dowitcher (1), Wilsons Snipe (5). 


The dowitcher is a relatively early one for northwest Arkansas, only a day 
later than our earliest arrival ever. It looks to me like a fairly typical 
adult in winter plumage. The general grays remind me of the dowitchers that go 
through Centerton hatchery in late October-November. It looks nothing at all 
like gorgeously-attired dowitchers that will stream through here heading for 
far-far north tundras in late April and May. 

Subject: FW: Luc Hoffman Obit
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 21:19:34 -0500
A little outdated-I am definitely behind my reading-but an inspiring
conservationist.  Jeff Short

[] 

 

http://www.economist.com/news/obituary/21703339-luc-hoffmann-ornithologist-a
nd-conservationist-died-july-21st-aged-93-obituary-luc 
Subject: Re: Whip-poor-will
From: Ed Laster <elaster523 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 21:19:32 -0500
Heard mine very close by at 8:30 this morning… performed by my resident 
Mockingbird. Awaiting the real thing. 


Ed Laster
Little Rock



> On Mar 27, 2017, at 8:01 PM, Janine Perlman  wrote:
> 
> ...just heard in the distance. We don't hear them every year, and this is the 
earliest that I recall. 

> 
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: Whip-poor-will
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 20:01:38 -0500
....just heard in the distance.  We don't hear them every year, and this 
is the earliest that I recall.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: STKI Record
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 12:01:47 -0500
I have a nice photo of a Swallow-tailed Kite taken on 9/18/2016 at 9:30am
with a Canon EOS REBEL T5. Attached is a cropped photo of the bird. If you
recognize this photo, please send me information on where and who took the
photo. It would be a good record for the AAS rare bird database.

Lyndal York
Curator, AAS    
Subject: Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society -- April field trips
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:47:31 +0000
Lots of opportunities in April for bird-oriented field trips in northwest 
Arkansas. My calendar shows the following: (1) Wattle Hollow Retreat Center 
near Devil's Den on Sunday April 9, (2) Earth Day walk at World Peace Wetland 
Prairie in Fayetteville Sunday April 16, (3) a leisurely walk from Botanical 
Gardens of the Ozarks to Mulhollan Blind on Lake Fayetteville Saturday April 
22, (4) and a field trip to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll County Sunday April 
30. That's the minimum. If interested, mark your calendars. You don't have to 
be a member, expert, or anything else, other than just interested. Feed your 
head. Get outdoors. 



Here are details on Wattle Hollow. Details for others a little closer to dates:


Join us on Sunday, April 9, at Wattle Hollow Retreat Center, just north of 
Devil's Den State Park, for an exploration of hardwood forest, small farm, and 
stream environments with good views of birds and plants typical of the highland 
forests of Boston Mountains. Meet up along highway 170, where you turn into 
Wattle, by 9 AM for the leisurely & birdy stroll on a graded road comfortably 
downhill to the retreat center. Please DONT park along the highway SOUTH of 
the turn down to Wattle, but north of the turn or on other side of highway is 
OK. Or, if you sleep in, just get to the retreat center around 9:30-10 AM. 
After we reach the retreat center, at some point we will head down the hillside 
forest to the creek. It is a unique opportunity for a look at nature, hilltop 
to creek bottom, in the heartland of the Bostons, and relatively far from the 
maddening crowds. 




Please also bring something to share for the pot luck lunch at noon at the 
retreat center. NO, contrary to what you may have heard, you will not be 
required to stand on your head and meditate, though of course you are always 
welcome to do so. Nor will you be forcibly converted to Buddhism. This is walk 
is free and open to the public. There is no need to register. If you have 
walking impairments, the porch at the retreat center is a wonderful place to 
see birds and a vast mountainous landscape in comfort. All ages and abilities 
are welcome. 




DIRECTIONS: Starting in Fayetteville, take I-49 south to the Devil's Den exit 
at West Fork exit. Turn right (west) towards the park, following highway 170 
and Devil's Den SP signs for about 14 miles. At the sign that says "Devil's Den 
State Park, 4 miles," continue on Hwy 170 another half mile, there is usually a 
Wattle Hollow sign on the left, just before the driveway (note: there is a 
stone cairn also on the left, and a small white house with mailboxes on the 
right). This is the meeting place by 9 AM. If you are late, go left down the 
driveway; after 1 mile, take the (only) right fork in the drive which is 
well-marked, and continue to the retreat center end of the road. 




Check out digital Wattle Hollow Retreat Center here: 
http://www.wattlehollow.com/ or flesh & blood Wattle on Saturday. For more 
info: phone: (479) 225-2381. 

Subject: Re: Belize AAST fund-raiser trip
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:35:58 -0500
That was great that your tour raised funds for such a good cause, Kannan.
If only thousands more causes for birds and wildlife conservation could
receive real funding that makes a real difference. All over the country and
around the world.
Congratulations to you and your friends!

Bill Thurman
On Mar 26, 2017 9:12 AM, "Ragupathy Kannan" <
0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> With an all-time high of 261 species, the March 2017 tour was a great
> success, thanks to a bunch of (almost) indefatigable birders. The tour
> raised $1,000 for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust's endowment.
>
> Highlights of the tour included great views of:
>
> 1. Agami Heron in Black Creek
> 2. Orange-breasted Falcons at nest in 1000-foot falls
> 3. a male Lovely Cotinga scoped at Mountain Pine Ridge
> 4. About 30 Jabirus in a Crooked Tree teeming with waterbirds, and,
> 5. a personal favorite, a singing Northern Schiffornis in Blue Hole.
>
> Many thanks to my wonderful group for a fantastic week in the balmy
> tropics!
> Kannan
>
Subject: Yard Bird Dreaming: Rewarded
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 20:34:02 -0500
Amazingly, I was on the front porch with my Birds of Faulkner County, 
Arkansas, Third Edition, 2006 (11 years ago! JOHNSON, JOHNSON, Mueller 
and Raney) looking at arrival dates and wondering when I would find a 
new land or yard bird. And listening for new arrivals (I still haven't 
heard a Gnatcatcher yet?) with my wife. The last new yard bird was the 
Wood Thrush last fall. Rarities and habitat limited birds are mainly 
what I have not seen here. And a slew of flyover ducks or flyover 
shorebirds. I mean, no Pintail is going to land here in my trees or my 
shallow hardwood swamp. And it is not a good time to watch for flyover 
ducks.

Anyway, I was pointing out sounds to my wife (Hermit Thrush wheeets but 
no singing) when I thought I heard a Killdeer flying overhead. They nest 
in the fields just to the east of my mailbox. But I stepped out to see 
it and something didn't sound quite right. The only thing in the sky was 
a raptor, circling, and my mind said Sharp-shin which I am not sure I 
have ever heard make a sound after I thought about it. My binoculars 
were right there. So I grabbed them and watched a Merlin in circling 
flight break and head southward. It kept making that repeated 
vocalization. Bird number 149. It has been recorded for this week in 
March in the county. But I had not seen one since last year. And it was 
certainly not over my house.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 12:40:27 +0000
American Golden-Plovers (108) were spread over a wet pasture just west of 
Northwest Arkansas Regional airport yesterday. Between there and the state fish 
hatchery in Centerton, we also saw Killdeer, Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser 
Yellowlegs, Pectoral Sandpiper, and Wilsons Snipe. We also picked up 
Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, a few other duck species, and a flock of 
Great-tailed Grackles (~50) at Vaughn dairy farms. 

Subject: Female hummer(s)
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 16:26:41 -0500
Our neighbor, and then we, just had visits from a female 
hummer---whether the same one, or two different birds, I know not. :)

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: LOON MIGRATION AT BEAVER LAKE
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 21:58:38 +0000
Three Common Loons have been at Lake Fayetteville since at least March 17. 
These birds are all in some state of transition between plain winter browns to 
striking black-and-whites of breeding season. So I was quite pleased this 
morning when David Oakley and I saw at least 12 Common Loons on Beaver Lake, at 
the Prairie Creek boat ramp on highway 12. These birds are also all over the 
place from one that looks mostly winter brown, to others 98% to 
black-and-white, and all between. We had close views  the flock began swimming 
towards us, enough so that David had to scramble back to the car for his camera 
and I was about to pass out from the excitement of loon fever. Besides these, 
there were a couple of Horned Grebes, including one transitioned to the mostly 
black of summer, with brilliant golden horns. 

Subject: FOS
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 16:56:39 -0500
Saw the first Northern Rough-winged Swallow today. I've been hearing them for a 
while but their calls were mixed with Phoebe chatter at nesting sites near 
bluffs, so it was good confirmation to hear and see one zooming across the yard 
today. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Seeing Birds Help People Destress
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 15:00:46 -0500
Some insight into birds benefits to people.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

http://wildlife.org/seeing-birds-can-help-people-de-stress/
Subject: Enhanced Newsletter
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 14:44:59 -0500
The enhanced version of the AAS newsletter is now on the arbirds.org
website.

Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster
Subject: Fund my master's project on AR grassland birds
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 11:20:39 -0500
Hi everyone,

I am a Master's student under Kim Smith at the University of Arkansas.
Starting next month, I will be researching nesting success of grassland
birds in restored and remnant prairies in northwest AR. Although I've
applied to nine grants and have received a few of them (including a
donation from NWAAS), the surveillance camera setups are expensive, so I'm
asking for your help.

Every donation helps! Please feel free to share with others outside of the
list-serve too. Here is the link:

https://www.gofundme.com/alyssas-grassland-bird-research-2017/.

If you're interested in volunteering for this project, stay tuned... :-)
And if you have any questions about the campaign or volunteering, don't
hesitate to ask me off the list-serve. Thanks much!

As an aside, I checked out Woolsey Prairie (Fayetteville) yesterday
morning. They did a burn about a month ago, so it felt like a shortgrass
prairie instead of a tallgrass prairie! Nothing out of the ordinary
bird-wise. Good birding--

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington County
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Sill On
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 12:43:17 -0500
Tomorrow, Saturday, is the ASCA field trip to Bald Knob. It is still a go in 
spite of the rain predicted. It may still be raining when we meet at the Other 
Center in North Little Rock, but should be almost past us soon after we get to 
Bald Knob. The temperature will hover around 60 degrees and it will be breezy. 
Tonight, a line of storms will move through during the night, which will 
hopefully set the birds down and we'll get some interesting migrating 
shorebirds. Bring rain gear and shoes that will stay dry. Terry Butler birded 
Bald Knob earlier this week and reported a nice mix of ducks, shorebirds, 
herons, raptors, and Pelicans. See below for the field trip details. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator

> This Saturday, March 25th is the field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society 
of Central Arkansas (ASCA). See details below. Anyone who likes birds is 
welcome. You don't have to be an ASCA member. For more information about ASCA, 
go to our website at www.ascabird.org. If you have questions about the field 
trip, feel free to contact me off list. 

> Karen Holliday
> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
> Little Rock
>  
> March 25, 2017
> Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge
> Bald Knob, White Co.
> Meet at 7:30 a.m. in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center 
parking lot behind McDonald’s. The Other Center is located across from McCain 
Mall, on McCain Blvd. Take Exit 1 West, off Hwy. 67/167. We’ll arrive at the 
Bald Knob NWR around 8:45 a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for 
the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road. The refuge is also a National 
Audubon Important Bird Area (IBA). Target birds will be lingering ducks and 
early-arriving shorebirds, herons, egrets, and night-herons. Very little 
walking will be involved. If you have a scope, bring it. Bring water, snacks or 
lunch. There is no bathroom on-site. There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 
67/167 at the Bald Knob Exit 55. Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for driving 
directions and more information about the refuge. GPS Coordinates: 35.260233, 
-91.571903 

>  
>  
Subject: eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 22:44:52 -0500
A second state record BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER was photographed on the
Magellan Beaver Dam Trail in Hot Springs Village on March 13 by Laurie
Clemens. This submitted the photo under passerine sp. with a note about
thinking it was a Black-and-white Warbler but not being sure. Some other
eBird user out there flagged the photo (which sends it to my review queue)
with a note that the bird is a Blackpoll Warbler. The face and flank stripes
say otherwise, and I think I see the yellow lore. See for yourself.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35163201

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Subtle shiftings
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 15:34:56 -0500
This past three days the Dogwoods have emerged into their scattered 
whitenesses. This is the time of year when they are brief royalty, the 
landing zones of Tigers, likely visible from passing aircraft.

The wind makes sea noises in all the trees. The creek speaks louder 
after last evenings passing storms.

The Juncos out front have thinned out. And I find myself wishing them 
gone, fleeting them towards Ottawa and Minnetonka. One must be careful 
of urging things on too quickly, even subconsciously. And this morning 
the first male Ruby-throat arrived, looking none the lesser after his 
salt water crossing.

My Blue Jays have chosen a tree fork finally. A few days ago, what I 
presume was the male placed a light piece of something in another fork. 
In a few minutes it blew out in the wind and drifted down somewhere in 
the yard like a feather. I could not find it in my leaves. I looked. But 
now they are weaving oak branches in another nearby fork. I tried to 
estimate how many forkings I have in just my back yard. I decided on 
thousands. The male brings the female new twigs and she takes them and 
inserts them in some plan she has or doesn’t have, turning about with 
that white trimmed tail in the air. It is magic really and looks 
fragile. I am amazed its filigreed tatters didn’t blow out in the 
blusters last night.

Thinking of thrushes, I hear one across the creek. It is too early for 
Swainson’s to arrive. And this one, when the wind dies down reveals 
itself to be a Hermit Thrush doing its full phrasing calls. I get up and 
walk down to the corner of the back fence, wanting to get as close as I 
can. There is a brief time in Arkansas in April when one could 
conceivably hear five different thrushes singing. I have never managed 
more than three in one day. The Veery is the troublesome one, and you 
must catch a Hermit in the mood to sing. I think Veery prefer richer 
more isolated woods than I have. I have never heard one on my personal 
patch.

I sit by my swamp at one point, just because it looked so quiet. The 
water already tea colored and emergent with the first Carex rushes. I 
watch Green Darners wend the water and tussle in aerial territories. 
Above my red chair the Goldfinches sing their full song. The 
Ruby-crowned Kinglets sing their full song. The Goldfinches appear to be 
eating the new winged elm seeds. I hear also the full song of the 
remaining Purple Finches over in the yard. A Red-bellied Woodpecker 
reveals its nest hole in a dead sweetgum spire over the water. The 
entrance is horizontally elongate. The male disappears inside 
periodically making his slight coughing call. I never see the female. 
But the red on the males head and nape has a sheen of reflection, a new 
kind of red. I will keep an eye on him.

On and off all day I hear waxwings. And on the back deck I search for 
them and finally find a good sized group west of me in the biggest 
hickory I have on the land. I put the scope on them and find amazingly 
that they are eating the emergent greenery of the hickory like it is 
salad. The buds look mostly like they have erupted into a sexual 
vegetation. A few weeks ago the waxies were mobbing the cedar berries 
and the privet berries. Now this seems the king of food choices and must 
be only a few days old. The group builds to over two hundred birds. And 
then I go out to the drive in front of the garage and stare up into this 
eighty foot hickory. The lowest buds I see are at twenty feet or so. I 
get out my largest of the three free standing garage ladders and prop it 
precariously upwards and get my limb trimming tool with its extended 
arm. I reach with some wobbly difficulty and trim off a single twig tip 
which flutters down to my leaf litter. I climb down and find that it is 
indeed almost all sexual except the very tip, which is just tiny 
emerging leaves. It is branching and dense, not like catkins on an oak, 
but related somehow. I don’t know the official name of this structure on 
a hickory. It smells slightly like broccoli and I pop some in my mouth. 
It is very tender and has only a slight finishing tang of hickoriness. 
It must be an extremely rich food. Steamed a bit with a little dressing, 
it might be fine. In a pinch, lost in the woods in late March it might 
save someone, as long as you managed to get lost with a twenty foot 
ladder and a trimming tool.

The owls nesting west of the swamp let loose randomly during the recent 
days with their wild discussions. I still think I hear four of them. I 
can’t tell in the all the wild whoops if it is mostly joy or agitation. 
Possible both: joyous agitation. My parliament of Barreds proclaiming 
among themselves: “We are owls. We are together. It is spring.”

You know, just the important stuff.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR

http://www.hr-rna.com/RNA/
Subject: Please help us recruit 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls for this June's halberg Ecology Camp
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 14:25:43 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

We need your help! The Arkansas Audubon Society needs your help to recruit 11- 
and 12-year-old boys and girls for this June's Halberg Ecology Camp sessions. 
Campers get a sampling of seven disciplines, ornithology, mammalogy, aquatic 
biology, herpetology, entomology, geology and botany, during the Sunday to 
Friday sessions. A group of 8-10 first-year campers are taught by two 
instructors who work together in each class. It's intense, it's expensive and 
it works! 


We only filled 77 of the 100 available first-year camper spots last June. 
That's 23 lost opportunities to teach youth about nature that we can never get 
back. Please be on the lookout for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls who love 
nature, and who would be good applicants to attend camp this June. For families 
who can't afford the regular tuition we have available funds that can be used 
for scholarships and tuition assistance. Tuition for first-year campers is $325 
versus our roughly $425 cost per camper. 


The important thing is to get the families of nature loving youths to complete 
and submit applications. 


Here's a link to a digital copy of the camp brochure you can share with others:

http://www.arbirds.org/camp16bro.pdf

And here's a digital copy of the single-page flyer used to recruit campers:



And finally, here's a digital copy of the 2017 application:



Feel free to share any of these materials with others willing to help recruit 
youth for this June's camp sessions. And please let me know if you have any 
questions about the Halberg Ecology Camp. 


Barry
Subject: Does Tragedy 'count'?
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:53:03 -0500
So...

Say one is driving down the road when a bird flies in front of the 
vehicle.  The driver sees the bird and can tell roughly what genus it 
is, but doesn't have time to make a clear identification or an adequate 
swerve or stop before the bird finds its way into the vehicle's grill 
(or windshield).  After stopping, the unfortunate avian is clearly 
identified.

Does that "count" for one's life list?  Or is it considered...something 
else?

I know this is a weird question but this time of year things can happen.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co being careful with cars)
Subject: Inca Dove at Feeder
From: J J lun <dovekie123 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 17:50:11 +0000
Guy saw an Inca Dove at our feeder at 11am today.


Joan Luneau

Sherwood, Arkansas
Subject: Re: New field trip binoculars
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 17:47:14 -0500
Very nice!
David Ray 
NLR 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 25, 2017, at 5:29 PM, Karen  wrote:
> 
> I forgot to mention in my field trip report that the Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas recently voted to purchase binoculars to have available on 
ASCA field trips for participants who don't own binoculars. A lack of 
binoculars has especially been a problem when college students join our trips. 
Thanks to ASCA's generosity and Eagle Optics providing a very nice discount, I 
now have four pair of excellent Eagle Optics binoculars to loan out during 
trips. At today's field trip, two of our participants thoroughly enjoyed the 
use of our new loaner bins. Thank you ASCA! 

> Karen Holliday
> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator 
> Little Rock
Subject: FOS female hummingbird
From: "data _null_;" <datanull AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 22:51:05 +0000
Hopper, Montgomery Co
Subject: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
From: Tom Harden <ltcnukem AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 22:11:06 +0000
 Take Care,Tom Harden
Subject: Reception at UACCM
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:45:16 -0500
The University of Arkansas Community College in Morrilton is hosting an 
art exhibit in the college library inspired by endangered and threatened 
species from now until some time in April.  There will be a reception 
for this exhibit Tuesday 28 March from 12noon until 1:30pm.  Kitty 
Harvill and Christoph Hrdina will be the guest speakers.

The exhibit features a number of works from the group "Artists and 
Biologists United for Nature" (ABUN) which was founded by Harvill and 
Hrdina to engage artists in efforts to raise awareness about endangered 
species and promote efforts to protect and restore necessary habitat for 
these species.  As you might imagine, a number of the species featured 
are birds from various parts of the world.  Harvill and Hrdina live and 
work in Brazil promoting sustainable agriculture and re-forestation.  
They have some impressive credentials and experience and their 
presentation promises to be quite interesting and enlightening.

Artists in Our Midst, a local artists group, helped organize this 
exhibit.  43 works were received, 25 of which are on display at the 
UACCM library.  The additional 18 works are on display at the Morrilton 
Area Chamber of Commerce at 112 E. Broadway in downtown Morrilton.  If 
you come to see the show, be sure to stop by the Chamber and view the 
additional works.

Hope to see you on Tuesday!

George (n. Conway Co just me, the birds and Art)
Subject: Migration maps
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 07:47:48 -0500
For those interested in such things, this animated map shows a lot of avian 
movement in the southeast last night as birds took advantage of the strong 
southern breezes. There was little to no movement behind the weather fronts. 
The little blue "explosions" on the map are birds taking flight picked up by 
radar. 


Pretty amazing view.

http://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/2017-3-23/

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville
Subject: Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 14:00:28 +0000
If you follow ABA rules, no. The bird must be alive and free. Otherwise you 
could count passenger pigeons in a museum. 


However, for data collecting purposes, I add window strikes for our records. A 
few species are on our checklist only through specimens found dead. 


Don

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2017 11:53 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Does Tragedy 'count'?

So...

Say one is driving down the road when a bird flies in front of the vehicle. The 
driver sees the bird and can tell roughly what genus it is, but doesn't have 
time to make a clear identification or an adequate swerve or stop before the 
bird finds its way into the vehicle's grill (or windshield). After stopping, 
the unfortunate avian is clearly identified. 


Does that "count" for one's life list?  Or is it considered...something else?

I know this is a weird question but this time of year things can happen.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co being careful with cars)
Subject: AAS Spring Meeting info url
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 08:32:59 -0500
Arbirders:

As some of you found, the url for the download of info. for the AAS spring
meeting did not work. An extra space crept in the url.

The correct url is:

http://www.arbirds.org/2017Meeting.pdf
Subject: TREE SWALLOWS AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND BOXES
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 12:44:26 +0000
Tree Swallows were busily investigating nesting boxes yesterday around Beaver 
Lake Nursery pond east of Rogers, a warm sunny day with flying insects. At 
least 15 birds perched in a small leafless shrub out in the pond. Others were 
busy at boxes  perched on top, looking into cavities, going inside, flying low 
and around the boxes in groups of 3-4. My estimate: 30-40 Tree Swallows. 




Tree Swallows winter from our Gulf coast down through Mexico into northern 
Central America. We occasionally see birds in northwest Arkansas by late 
February and early March. They become more numerous with spring warm ups and 
the initial spring flush of flying insects. 




All of yesterdays birds wore immaculate, intense blue-grey feathers on back, 
but with Tree Swallows it is difficult and often impossible to separate males 
and females. According to Cornells Birds of North America, Males usually 
arrive and defend nest cavity up to several days prior to female arrival  but 
sexes may occasionally arrive simultaneously. It is thought that pairing begins 
as soon as females arrive on breeding grounds  however, patterns of pair 
association are difficult to follow through repeated absences from vicinity of 
nest-boxes occasioned by unpredictably cold spring weather. Females may 
continue to visit other males after initial pairing for one to several days  




The Nursery Pond is a joint wildlife management project involving the Corps of 
Engineers with fish production by Arkansas Game and Fish. Boxes around the top 
of the dam are maintained by Northwest Master Naturalists. Besides swallows, 
these boxes are used by Eastern Bluebirds and Prothonotary Warblers. Canada 
Geese (2), Great Blue Herons (2), Mallards (16), Wood Ducks (4), and 
Blue-winged Teal (6) were present yesterday. Adjacent Shortleaf Pines featured 
singing by Pine Warblers and Yellow-throated Warblers. 

Subject: New field trip binoculars
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 17:29:21 -0500
I forgot to mention in my field trip report that the Audubon Society of Central 
Arkansas recently voted to purchase binoculars to have available on ASCA field 
trips for participants who don't own binoculars. A lack of binoculars has 
especially been a problem when college students join our trips. Thanks to 
ASCA's generosity and Eagle Optics providing a very nice discount, I now have 
four pair of excellent Eagle Optics binoculars to loan out during trips. At 
today's field trip, two of our participants thoroughly enjoyed the use of our 
new loaner bins. Thank you ASCA! 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator 
Little Rock
Subject: Re: eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 07:36:47 -0500
I am going to suggest a highly melanistic Black-and-White Warbler (BAWW) 
instead. The key being the comment "watched him for five minutes climbing on 
tree trunks" given by the observer. All of the sources I looked through clearly 
mentioned this trait for BAWW and never mention it for Black-throated Grays 
(BTYW). In fact, Pete Dunne in his Field Guide Companion notes that that 
behavior is a key difference between them as BTYW look and act like warblers as 
they hop and flutter on outer twigs and should not be confused with BAWW, which 
concentrate on the inner portion of the tree and act more similar to a nuthatch 
by climbing on trunks (p. 558). 


Just my two cents...

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR


> On Mar 23, 2017, at 22:44, Daniel Scheiman  wrote:
> 
> A second state record BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER was photographed on the 
Magellan Beaver Dam Trail in Hot Springs Village on March 13 by Laurie Clemens. 
This submitted the photo under “passerine sp.” with a note about thinking 
it was a Black-and-white Warbler but not being sure. Some other eBird user out 
there flagged the photo (which sends it to my review queue) with a note that 
the bird is a Blackpoll Warbler. The face and flank stripes say otherwise, and 
I think I see the yellow lore. See for yourself. 

> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35163201 
> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
Subject: Very light hawk
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 12:43:51 -0500
    
Just saw an interesting raptor flying over West Little Rock. It had dark wrist 
patches like a rough-legged hawk but the body was almost solid white. The tail 
might have had slight reddish color and I'm assuming it was a Red-tailed Hawk. 
But most hawks including the red-tail do not have the dark wrist patch. There 
was no belly band. 



Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
Subject: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 17:01:26 -0500
Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:12 PM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies

For those of us who have been around the birding world for a few decades,
and who were lucky enough to meet Chan Robbins, news of his death brings
sadness but also a smile. In his 98 years on this earth, Chan really made
his mark in the world of ornithology... We are indebted to him for the
achievements he made. 

OBITUARY
Pioneering federal ornithologist dies at 98 
Dylan Brown, E&E News reporter
Published: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 

Chandler Robbins 
Renowned ornithologist Chandler Robbins. Photo by Barbara Dowell, courtesy
U.S. Geological Survey. 

Legendary ornithologist Chandler Robbins, whose career as a federal
scientist spanned nearly eight decades and was the genesis of songbird
conservation, died Monday. He was 98.

When Robbins first arrived at the Patuxent Research Refuge just outside
Washington in 1943, studying birds usually meant shooting them. Robbins knew
a different way.

The Belmont, Mass., native was only a few years out of Harvard University,
where he had studied under Ludlow Griscom, an ornithology trailblazer who
pioneered studying birds by plumage and behavior.

Then, in 1946, Robbins was part of a team that began confronting DDT's
impact on birds. His colleague and editor, Rachel Carson, went on to use
that work in her 1962 book "Silent Spring," which helped give momentum to
the environmental movement.

The toxic pesticide was devastating songbirds, but Robbins quickly realized
that the federal government, fixated on game species, lacked any real data
on their populations, or the money to get it.

So Robbins spent the next five decades enlisting an army of amateur birders
across the country and Canada, after a bit of unsanctioned diplomacy. The
group is now known as the North American Breeding Bird Survey.

Robbins also pioneered banding birds to track them. In 1956, he banded a
Laysan albatross nicknamed Wisdom. In 2002, he replaced the band on the leg
of the world's oldest known banded bird.

Robbins remained a senior author of the "Field Guide to Birds of North
America" until his death. The National Audubon Society named him one of 100
Champions of Conservation of the 20th Century.

Jerome Ford, assistant director of the Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory
Bird Program, called Robbins the "dean" of bird conservation, whose legacy
will live on.

Robbins technically retired from the U.S. Geological Survey in 2005, but
continued to spent countless hours in his Patuxent office with a sign over
the door that read "Emeritus War Room."

Despite ornithology's progress, Robbins said, bird populations are still a
mystery in many ways. Species that are not endangered go understudied, and
habitat destruction and climate change take their toll.

"There are big changes taking place in our forests," he told E&E News in
2015 (Greenwire, Aug. 27, 2015).

Former colleague David Klinger summed up Robbins by "his worn-out old pair
of government binoculars." He called them "dented, heavy as lead and beat to
hell."

Klinger said, "I hope they go into a [FWS] museum someday. He could have
afforded the finest optics in the world, but he was comfortable with what he
had. His acuity of eye and ear exceeded the powers of mere physics."

Those eyes didn't get to see everything, even a lifetime after 11-year-old
"Chan" made his first list of birds, but Robbins just shrugged and laughed.

"I wouldn't want to burn that much gas just to see a California condor, but
if other people get to see them, I'm satisfied," he said.

Alison A. Dalsimer
Program Director
DoD Natural Resources 
4800 Mark Center Drive
Suite 16G14, Box 56
Alexandria, VA 22350
Desk: 571-372-6893
Allyn.a.dalsimer.civ AT mail.mil 
Alt: DoDNatRes AT bah.com 
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbirds
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 14:44:03 -0500
A male Ruby-throated hummingbird arrived at my feeders at 2:30 PM today. In 
looking at the migration map they are already as far north as Harrison, AR, 
Oklahoma City and Tulsa. I hope you have your feeders out. 



http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Mar. 22
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 22:49:13 -0500
It was overcast, cool, and windy on the survey today.  77 species were
found.  More migrants arriving every day.  On my way home near Haworth I had
a FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 16

Gadwall - 27

Mallard - 3

Blue-winged Teal - 154

Northern Shoveler - 133

Green-winged Teal - 10

Ring-necked Duck - 18

Hooded Merganser - 18

Pied-billed Grebe - 8

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Double-crested Cormorant - 72

Anhinga - 9

American Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 9

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 11

Northern Harrier - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

King Rail - 3

Virginia Rail - 4

Common Gallinule - 5

American Coot - 420

American Golden-Plover - 1

Killdeer - 1

Greater Yellowlegs - 18

Lesser Yellowlegs - 5

Upland Sandpiper - 1

Pectoral Sandpiper - 16

Dowitcher species - 4

Wilson's Snipe - 23

Rock Pigeon - 1

Mourning Dove - 11

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 5

Blue Jay - 4

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 3

Tree Swallow - 27

Barn Swallow - 6

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Sedge Wren - 4

Marsh Wren - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Hermit Thrush - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 6

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 4

Song Sparrow - 4

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 4

White-throated Sparrow - 13

White-crowned Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 11

Red-winged Blackbird - 250

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Meadowlark species - 17

Common Grackle - 12

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

American Goldfinch - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Baskettail species

Common Whitetail

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Spring Peepers - calling

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bullfrog

 

Other sightings:

 

Monarch butterfly

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Crossbills at shores lake
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 10:39:10 -0500
I hope this works.  My memory isn't spectacular and I don't often start 
conversations so I forget if I can simply start an email and have it go 
through.

I ended up taking 3 of the kids out to Shores Lake to see if we could 
find these birds.  We got there and found the brown gate that Joe 
mentioned.  We sat there... and sat there... and sat there.  We managed 
to find a couple of brown-headed nuthatches, another life bird for us.  
Had white and red-breasted show up as well.  Decent amount of pine 
warbler activity.  Butterflies in the mud and in the air.  In fact, the 
butterflies were a little frustrating at times.  Nice eastern tiger 
swallowtails... a few here, a few there...  and they were often flying 
up through the tree tops so you'd see something fly by and start looking 
for a bird and it was just another butterfly.  This happened quite a few 
times.

We were there for a few hours and we used a little playback and we'd 
think we heard certain calls off in the distance that way... or, that 
way...  We never were 100% sure(99% maybe) that we were hearing what we 
thought and nothing ever came close in to that gate.  Eventually we had 
to start thinking about heading home. But, a few times I thought for 
sure I heard those calls back down the road a ways.  I joked with my 
oldest daughter that I should walk down the road and leave her there to 
watch the younger kids. She didn't approve of that idea.  We finally 
backed out of the spot and headed back up the road to where I thought I 
heard them... started a playback and sure enough, there they were.  We 
literally spent 2.5 hours down by that gate... and I'm sure they heard 
our calls.  They just didn't want to be there?  We got a few good looks 
at the three including a nice view of the typical fledgling behavior 
where the wings are shaking as a parent fed it.  I can't say we got good 
enough looks to describe the bill or anything but good enough to see 
they were crossbills.  Loved seeing the red in the sunlight.  It's 
pretty easy to know these are the same birds that everyone else has been 
seeing so when it comes down to narrowing down the type, I can feel 
pretty comfortable with the work and knowledge others have put into 
them.  :)  We did get to listen to them for a while before we left.  
Other than a paid app, is there a good source for comparing the call 
types?  The audubon field guide app has call 1, call 2, etc but those 
aren't call types necessarily as they have those for every species.

If anyone else heads to that area, that brown gate may be a good 
starting point especially if you have good ears but want to mention we 
only got to see them when I parked on the side of the road between the 
brown gate and the beginning of the road we came in on... about halfway 
between those spots I'd say.

I'm also curious about shores lake in general.  We drove down there to 
the lake for a few minutes and there was not a lot going on.  It's not a 
huge lake but I expected something.  No human activity and yet, no 
herons, grebes, ducks, etc.  seemed odd to me.  Also seeming odd to me 
is the lake's color.  Even the creek flowing into it has this blueish 
green color, some sort of silt perhaps?  I'm curious as to what that may 
be.  You don't see a lot of lakes and creeks with that color.

We only managed about 24 species in the almost 3 hours we were there 
which isn't bad but I was surprised we didn't find a few more.  
Woodpeckers for instance.  We heard one pileated and saw one flicker and 
that's it.  Though we didn't see a ton of species, the ones that were 
there were quite active so that was enjoyable. Those little nuthatches 
especially.  All in all, worth the trip. 2 new life birds for my 
daughter and myself.  That's a goal for the year this year, finding new 
life birds.  We're up to 3 so far.

Anyway, thanks for all the reports and details for those crossbills.  
Not sure when we would have ever found some around here without this 
list... and without them possibly having nested there.  The other year 
some were reported out at Hobbs but I went out the next day and found 
none.  LOTS of pines in some areas and they're often just passing 
through so it's a matter of hard work in searching and pure luck 
sometimes.  I'm glad these ones offered a better opportunity for us.


Daniel Mason


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Subject: FOS
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 19:56:59 -0500
Heard the first Yellow-throated Warbler today singing from a sycamore above a 
feeder creek into the Piney. 

First Fish Crows "cronked" over the glade this afternoon.
And Morpheus, the bachelor Big Brown Bat, was roosting between two close deck 
roof rafters as he prefers when the weather is too hot for his usual daytime 
bed. 

Serviceberry tree growing sideways from St. Peter sandstone atop the bluff is 
finally in bloom. 

Chipping Sparrows began to sing this week.
Meanwhile... the Great Horned Owl sits brooding in the cave.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Red thread
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 15:00:46 -0500
Lots of aerial, vocal Red-shouldered Hawk activity for the past couple 
of weeks.  Just now there were two vocal pairs in the immediate area.  
One pair alighted in a tree and mated twice within a few minutes.  One 
bird from the other pair landed in a tree ~100 yards away.  I didn't see 
antagonistic behavior between the two pairs, and hope both have nests 
nearby.

We've also had multiple visits from male and female hummingbirds.

This morning I had the rare (for me) treat of listening to a Purple 
Finch sing just outside the kitchen door.

And it looks like there may be three pairs of Wood Ducks nesting at the 
pond.

Birds with no red: Chickadees are using a newly mounted nest box, and 
phoebes are rebuilding on a nest that they haven't used for at least 10 
years.  The place they'd moved to---on top of a hanging gourd under the 
deck---proved untrustworthy and has been destroyed (by wind?) more than 
once.  It's good to see them back on a sturdy plank, safely tucked into 
a corner.

The phoebes, at least, should be safe from two large rat snakes we've 
seen this week.   Life is good.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: DeGray Bird Count Cancelled
From: Kay <mcafeekay AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 19:53:53 +0000
Due to lack of interest, the event scheduled at the Simonson Research Lab for 
this Saturday, March 25, has been cancelled. Please inform anyone you know who 
had planned to participate. 


Thank you!  - Kay McAfee

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 18:34:12 -0500
Got my first of season ruby-throat today at 6:30 PM in west Little Rock. Not my 
earliest but earlier than usual I think. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: Bald Knob Field Trip Sarurday
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 15:58:36 -0500
Twenty-six birders joined the ASCA field trip to the Bald Knob NWR Saturday 
morning. Cool and very windy conditions made it a bit challenging to scan for 
shorebirds through jiggling scopes. Everything was very muddy due to the heavy 
rains the night before. We were lucky the rain had ended before we got to the 
refuge. We had good numbers of ducks with a nice mix of Gadwalls and Shovelers, 
Coots, a lot of Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal, two Buffleheads, and one 
Pintail. Best shorebirds were the 20+ American Golden Plovers and 5 
Black-necked Stilts. Other shorebirds included Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, 
Pectoral, Least, and Solitary Sandpipers, plus a few Snipe. A Bald Eagle, 40+ 
American White Pelicans, and a Northern Harrier were also spotted. 


It was birdy at the refuge headquarters' building. We saw or heard Field, Song, 
and Savannah Sparrows, Bluebirds, Brown Thrasher, Meadowlarks, Flicker, 
Carolina Wren, and a Cardinal. 


A very hefty Cottonmouth was curled up on a leafy bush at the edge of one pond 
towards the end of the morning. It was very close to where we were stopped. We 
admired it from a respectful distance until it decided we were annoying and 
slid off into the water. By noon the wind had increased significantly, so most 
birders gave up and headed for home. 


Note--The storms Friday night knocked out power to the area of the town of Bald 
Knob closest to the Hwy. 67/167 freeway. The McDonald's at the main Bald Knob 
exit was hit hardest and it's giant Golden Arches sign had blown down and had 
taken the big power lines down with it. Traffic on the freeway was blocked and 
was being re-routed around Bald Knob, creating quite a big traffic backup. We 
also saw significant damage to trees and buildings in the area of the main exit 
at Beebe when we stopped to pick up one of our group. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Little Rock
Subject: Logoly State Park Birding
From: Devin Moon <moondevg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 16:00:25 -0500
This morning, I led a birding workshop at Logoly State Park.  I had 3
attendees and we found a good mixture of residents and new arrivals.  We
walked our main road which is a pine-deciduous mixed forest.  We all got
good looks at White-eyed Vireos.  We called in a Black-and-white Warbler
and a Ruby-crowned Kinglet to get decent views of them.  We got a scope on
a First of Year *Great Crested Flycatcher *(early by about 2 weeks).  We
rejoiced at such a lovely bird.  There was a FOY Hooded Warbler singing
from the understory.  This guy didn't seem too keen on such jubilation, but
a beautiful song of "wheetee wheetee wheetee-oh" was given, nonetheless.
Near the end of our outing we started hearing more and more Blue-gray
Gnatcatchers and Yellow-throated Vireos.  A Pileated Woodpecker made a
flyby, much to everyone's amazement, and male-female duet of Red-bellied
Woodpeckers circled a white oak in the parking lot.

It was a beautiful morning for birding and we tallied 26 species altogether.

Devin Moon
Logoly State Park, McNeil, AR
Subject: In the Ozarks
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 01:40:16 +0000
Warblers are back in the Ozarks.  Black-throated Greens were everywhere
today as we birded and shot waterfalls east of White Rock Mountain.
Yesterday it was Louisiana Waterthrush, Northern Parula, Black and White
Warbler, and Yellow-throated Warbler along Shepherd's Springs Rd in
Crawford County.

Sandy B.
Subject: The Snipe is now Online
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 21:46:01 +0000
For those interested…the latest issue of The Snipe has been posted to the 
ASCA website at: http://wp.ascabird.org/?p=1734 


Dottie Boyles
Newsletter Editor
Audubon Society of Central Arkansas
Little Rock
Subject: Re: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:12:58 +0000
Thankful I met Chan Robbins at a Maryland OS meeting a few years ago.
David Sibley was the keynote speaker. It was a humdinger of a meeting.

Sandy B.


On Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 5:01 PM Jeffrey Short  wrote:

> Jeff Short
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
> [mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
> ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
> Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:12 PM
> To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
>
> For those of us who have been around the birding world for a few decades,
> and who were lucky enough to meet Chan Robbins, news of his death brings
> sadness but also a smile. In his 98 years on this earth, Chan really made
> his mark in the world of ornithology... We are indebted to him for the
> achievements he made.
>
> OBITUARY
> Pioneering federal ornithologist dies at 98
> Dylan Brown, E&E News reporter
> Published: Wednesday, March 22, 2017
>
> Chandler Robbins
> Renowned ornithologist Chandler Robbins. Photo by Barbara Dowell, courtesy
> U.S. Geological Survey.
>
> Legendary ornithologist Chandler Robbins, whose career as a federal
> scientist spanned nearly eight decades and was the genesis of songbird
> conservation, died Monday. He was 98.
>
> When Robbins first arrived at the Patuxent Research Refuge just outside
> Washington in 1943, studying birds usually meant shooting them. Robbins
> knew
> a different way.
>
> The Belmont, Mass., native was only a few years out of Harvard University,
> where he had studied under Ludlow Griscom, an ornithology trailblazer who
> pioneered studying birds by plumage and behavior.
>
> Then, in 1946, Robbins was part of a team that began confronting DDT's
> impact on birds. His colleague and editor, Rachel Carson, went on to use
> that work in her 1962 book "Silent Spring," which helped give momentum to
> the environmental movement.
>
> The toxic pesticide was devastating songbirds, but Robbins quickly realized
> that the federal government, fixated on game species, lacked any real data
> on their populations, or the money to get it.
>
> So Robbins spent the next five decades enlisting an army of amateur birders
> across the country and Canada, after a bit of unsanctioned diplomacy. The
> group is now known as the North American Breeding Bird Survey.
>
> Robbins also pioneered banding birds to track them. In 1956, he banded a
> Laysan albatross nicknamed Wisdom. In 2002, he replaced the band on the leg
> of the world's oldest known banded bird.
>
> Robbins remained a senior author of the "Field Guide to Birds of North
> America" until his death. The National Audubon Society named him one of 100
> Champions of Conservation of the 20th Century.
>
> Jerome Ford, assistant director of the Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory
> Bird Program, called Robbins the "dean" of bird conservation, whose legacy
> will live on.
>
> Robbins technically retired from the U.S. Geological Survey in 2005, but
> continued to spent countless hours in his Patuxent office with a sign over
> the door that read "Emeritus War Room."
>
> Despite ornithology's progress, Robbins said, bird populations are still a
> mystery in many ways. Species that are not endangered go understudied, and
> habitat destruction and climate change take their toll.
>
> "There are big changes taking place in our forests," he told E&E News in
> 2015 (Greenwire, Aug. 27, 2015).
>
> Former colleague David Klinger summed up Robbins by "his worn-out old pair
> of government binoculars." He called them "dented, heavy as lead and beat
> to
> hell."
>
> Klinger said, "I hope they go into a [FWS] museum someday. He could have
> afforded the finest optics in the world, but he was comfortable with what
> he
> had. His acuity of eye and ear exceeded the powers of mere physics."
>
> Those eyes didn't get to see everything, even a lifetime after 11-year-old
> "Chan" made his first list of birds, but Robbins just shrugged and laughed.
>
> "I wouldn't want to burn that much gas just to see a California condor, but
> if other people get to see them, I'm satisfied," he said.
>
> Alison A. Dalsimer
> Program Director
> DoD Natural Resources
> 4800 Mark Center Drive
> Suite 16G14, Box 56
> Alexandria, VA 22350
> Desk: 571-372-6893
> Allyn.a.dalsimer.civ AT mail.mil
> Alt: DoDNatRes AT bah.com
>