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Updated on Saturday, March 7 at 09:09 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Rufous Motmot,©Jan Wilczur

7 Mar Weasel vs. gull video [jwdavis ]
7 Mar Another Red Crossbill (Madison Co.) [Alyssa DeRubeis ]
7 Mar Hawks and owls [Gail Miller ]
7 Mar Re: Long/tailed duck Yes [David Ray ]
7 Mar Re: American Crows [Kay Hodnett ]
7 Mar Re: Long/tailed duck Yes [Allan Mueller ]
7 Mar Re: American Crows [Jerry Schulz ]
7 Mar American Crows [Lenore Gifford ]
7 Mar Long/tailed duck Yes [Michael ]
7 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Keith Newton ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Jeffrey Short ]
6 Mar Art for the Birds ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
6 Mar American Woodcock!!! [Judy & Don ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
6 Mar Long-tailed Duck, Lake Conway [Daniel Scheiman ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Richard Baxter ]
6 Mar FW: Elk Country Chronicles ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Bill Shepherd ]
6 Mar Winter Birds [Terry Butler ]
6 Mar ducks at lake Harrison [Alan ]
6 Mar Ozark Natural Science Center Bioblitz registration open [Alyssa DeRubeis ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Jim and Karen Rowe ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Roselie Overby ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
6 Mar Wood Ducks, etc. [Judy & Don ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [jwdavis ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Joyce Hartmann ]
6 Mar Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Janine Perlman ]
6 Mar Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
6 Mar Fwd: Thanks for the binoculars - from Rishi Valley School, India. [Barry Haas ]
6 Mar Re: Birds...what else [Don Simons ]
6 Mar Fwd: Thanks for the binoculars - from Rishi Valley School, India. [Ragupathy Kannan ]
5 Mar Birds...what else [Sandy Berger ]
5 Mar LAPLAND LONGSPURS IN THE SNOW [JFR ]
5 Mar Suet eater - Sapsucker and Creeper behavior [Gail Miller ]
5 Mar Undeterred [Janine Perlman ]
5 Mar Barred Owl [Herschel Raney ]
5 Mar Re: Junco's in my backyard [Jacque Brown ]
5 Mar 4 Stillwell pieces with photos ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
5 Mar Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [jwdavis ]
5 Mar Re: Where have the birds gone? [CK Franklin ]
5 Mar feederbirds [Teresa & Leif ]
5 Mar Re: Junco's [Judy & Don ]
5 Mar Re: Where have the birds gone? [Dan Scheiman ]
5 Mar feeder birds [Teresa & Leif ]
5 Mar Re: Junco's [Jacque Brown ]
5 Mar Re: Where have the birds gone? [Bob Harden ]
5 Mar Birds [Herschel Raney ]
5 Mar Re: Where have the birds gone? [Norman Lavers ]
5 Mar Re: Where have the birds gone? [Terry Butler ]
5 Mar Re: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Janine Perlman ]
5 Mar FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds [Jeffrey Short ]
5 Mar Re: Where have the birds gone? [jwdavis ]
5 Mar Re: Where have the birds gone? [Gail Miller ]
5 Mar Feeder birds [Teresa & Leif ]
5 Mar Where have the birds gone? [Lyndal York ]
5 Mar snow & birds [Mary Ann King ]
5 Mar AVIAN ECHOES: THE STILLWELLS IN FAYETTEVILLE (CONCLUSION, PART 4) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
5 Mar FW: POSTPONED: DoD Natural Resources Program Webinar Series: Source/Sink Dynamics of Birds on DoD Lands- 5 March 2pm ET [Jeffrey Short ]
5 Mar Re: Junco's in my backyard ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
4 Mar Re: Junco's in my backyard [Robert Bays ]
4 Mar Re: Junco's [ ]
4 Mar Glaucous Gull [Randy Robinson ]
4 Mar Re: Junco's [Jerry Davis ]
4 Mar Re: Junco's [Bob Harden ]
4 Mar Re: Junco's [Jerry Davis ]
4 Mar Junco's [Terry Butler ]
4 Mar very colorful western juncos in snow ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
4 Mar FW: Arkansas Outdoors Weekly Newsletter - March 4, 2015 Edition ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
4 Mar Re: AVIAN ECHOES: THE STILLWELLS IN FAYETTEVILLE (PART 3) [Bill Thurman ]
4 Mar feeder birds ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
4 Mar AVIAN ECHOES: THE STILLWELLS IN FAYETTEVILLE (PART 3) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
4 Mar Rare bird observations [Lyndal York ]
4 Mar Toad Suck Gulls [Michael Linz ]
3 Mar Re: birds calling at golf tournaments [Jacque Brown ]

Subject: Weasel vs. gull video
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:38:24 -0600

From: William Diffin 
Sent: Saturday, March 07, 2015 4:14 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Weasel vs. gull video

As followup up to the recent photos of the Green Woodpecker, I offer this video 
which is a little closer to home, 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3k319DbHU80.

Bill Diffin, OKC
Subject: Another Red Crossbill (Madison Co.)
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:25:11 -0600
Today was some day for Red Crossbills! I was fortunate enough to see the
seven birds--albeit distantly--at Hobbs State Park (near Rogers) this
morning. Then when I visited a friend's house on the King's River, nearby
the King's River Overlook (Huntsville), I heard a male singing for 1-2
minutes straight. It was perched at the top of a Shortleaf Pine, although I
was never able to see it. I was probably on the wrong side of the tree.

So keep your eyes and ears open for Red Crossbills! Apparently they're on
the move. Good birdin',

Alyssa DeRubeis
Huntsville, Madison Co.
Subject: Hawks and owls
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 18:56:20 -0600
2013 - I watched a Great-horned Owl nest at work (Conway Human Development 
Center - aka CHDC), Museum Road frontage of the campus.  It was in an old 
Red-tailed Hawk nest.  I saw a new hawk nest in 2014, which now, in 2015, 
has an active Great-horned nest on it.  3 photos from today: 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/great_horned_owl_nest_at_chdc

Yesterday, I saw a pair of Red-tailed Hawks across Museum.  As I was turning 
around, to avoid a jogger that was making weird (and almost unsettling) 
screaming noises, I observed the male Red-tail fly over and breed the female 
while they were sitting near a power pole.  I possibly could have gotten a 
photo, had I not been trying to avoid the jogger .. grrrrr   So, I assume 
the Red-tails will nest there this year as well.  I wonder, if one of the 
hawks could be the injured one that I rescued, took to Rodney Paul for 
rehabilitation, then released back on campus.  Photos of it here: 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/image/146381172

2013 - Coopers Hawk nest on my property.  Though I frequently see one of the 
hawks storm my feeder station, I did not see a nest in 2014.  This morning 
as I walked the dogs in my woods, I was able to observe the pair of Cooper's 
fly in the woods.  Had my bins, so I got a good look at the red eye.  I 
assume they will have a nest here this year.  Photos from 2013 here: 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/coopers_hawk_nest

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Re: Long/tailed duck Yes
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 18:44:43 -0600
As of 4:00 pm long-tailed duck still present. 
David Ray 
NLR 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 7, 2015, at 6:06 PM, Allan Mueller  wrote:
> 
> As of noon, the long-tailed Long-tailed Duck was still there. Beautiful bird. 

> 
> At Lollie Bottom - Brewer's Blackbirds and Western Meadowlarks, although the 
meadowlarks sounded like an Eastern/Western mix. 

> 
> Allan Mueller
> 
>> On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 8:47 AM, Michael  wrote:
>> Duck still at Lake Conway highway 89 bridge at Mayflower.
>> 
>> Michael
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Allan Mueller
> 20 Moseley Lane
> Conway, AR 72032
> 501-327-8952 home
> 501-339-8071 cell
> 
> 
> "I ain't never did no wrong."
> Elvis Presley in "One Night"
> 
Subject: Re: American Crows
From: Kay Hodnett <sallyportk AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:05:58 -0500
Well. Crows are smart, sometimes ingenious. I admire them in a way. But they 
are big and can eat enuf to put a big hole in your bird food budget. Over the 
years the crows in my yard have regularly found a way to balance precariously 
on the suet feeder dangling from a chain and eat a good bit. Send over my way 
the crows that don't eat expensive suet ! 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 7, 2015, at 4:50 PM, Jerry Schulz  wrote:
> 
> Re: the Crows. About 7 or 8 years ago at my wife's request, I put out a crow 
feeder on top of a 6' piece of conduit. I put out cheapo dog food from Walmart. 
In the years since we have enjoyed their antics and watched their young learn 
to feed. They are 30 to 40 ft from the house and 20 ft from the other feeders 
and have not bothered our other birds. Three years ago, one learned to land on 
the dbl. shepherds hook suet feeder and precariously perch on the suet basket 
and peck out chunks. A second soon followed. Apparently only those two have 
learned the trick of sliding down the hook. There's always a lot of flapping 
and cawing. This attention to the suet feeder only seems to occur during the 
winter months with snow or ice on the ground. If they are learning at your 
feeders. I hope you come to enjoy them as much as we do. 

>  
> Jerry Schulz
> Little Rock, Arkansas
> 
> 
> On Saturday, March 7, 2015 1:19 PM, Lenore Gifford  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> I have what are probably resident crows that come to my yard regularly and 
usually eat sunflower seeds and what little corn might be in the wild bird 
feed. The last couple of days at least one of the crows has taken to eating 
suet. It flies up to the suet feeder and grabs a piece and then drops to the 
ground. This is the first time that I've seen this in the 6.5 years I've lived 
here. 

>  
> I also had a single Pine Warbler on Thursday.  No Pine Siskin though.
>  
> Lenore
> Near the Sardis community in Saline County
>  
>  
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Long/tailed duck Yes
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 18:06:03 -0600
As of noon, the long-tailed Long-tailed Duck was still there.  Beautiful
bird.

At Lollie Bottom - Brewer's Blackbirds and Western Meadowlarks, although
the meadowlarks sounded like an Eastern/Western mix.

Allan Mueller

On Sat, Mar 7, 2015 at 8:47 AM, Michael  wrote:

> Duck still at Lake Conway highway 89 bridge at Mayflower.
>
> Michael
>



-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Re: American Crows
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:50:51 -0800
Re: the Crows. About 7 or 8 years ago at my wife's request, I put out a crow 
feeder on top of a 6' piece of conduit. I put out cheapo dog food from Walmart. 
In the years since we have enjoyed their antics and watched their young learn 
to feed. They are 30 to 40 ft from the house and 20 ft from the other feeders 
and have not bothered our other birds. Three years ago, one learned to land on 
the dbl. shepherds hook suet feeder and precariously perch on the suet basket 
and peck out chunks. A second soon followed. Apparently only those two have 
learned the trick of sliding down the hook. There's always a lot of flapping 
and cawing. This attention to the suet feeder only seems to occur during the 
winter months with snow or ice on the ground. If they are learning at your 
feeders. I hope you come to enjoy them as much as we do. 


 
Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas


On Saturday, March 7, 2015 1:19 PM, Lenore Gifford  wrote:
 


 
I have what are probably resident crows that come to my yard regularly and 
usually eat sunflower seeds and what little corn might be in the wild bird 
feed. The last couple of days at least one of the crows has taken to eating 
suet. It flies up to the suet feeder and grabs a piece and then drops to the 
ground. This is the first time that I've seen this in the 6.5 years I've lived 
here. 

 
I also had a single Pine Warbler on Thursday.  No Pine Siskin though.
 
Lenore 
Near the Sardis community in Saline County
Subject: American Crows
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:19:07 -0600
I have what are probably resident crows that come to my yard regularly and
usually eat sunflower seeds and what little corn might be in the wild bird
feed.  The last couple of days at least one of the crows has taken to eating
suet.  It flies up to the suet feeder and grabs a piece and then drops to
the ground.  This is the first time that I've seen this in the 6.5 years I
ve lived here.

I also had a single Pine Warbler on Thursday.  No Pine Siskin though.

Lenore 
Near the Sardis community in Saline County
Subject: Long/tailed duck Yes
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 08:47:09 -0600
Duck still at Lake Conway highway 89 bridge at Mayflower.

Michael
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 03:22:52 -0600
George, try a Google search with 
Prescribed Burning for Quail, which might be a good option for your property. 
I'm loving the habitat change I'm seeing on the Moro Big Pine WMA near our 
cabin down in Calhoun county. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 6, 2015, at 10:13 PM, Jeffrey Short  wrote:
> 
> I really love this learning aspect of the listserv. 
>  
> Jeff Short
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd 

> Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 5:39 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>  
> And the best proof of what Karen writes below is the land in Scott County 
that the Forest Service manages for short-leaf pine and bluestem grasses. If 
you haven't been there, you ought to visit it. It lies west of Needmore, a spot 
on U.S. 71 south of Waldron. 

>  
> Bill Shepherd
> 
> Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 

>  
> Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 22:16:23 +0000
> From: rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> George, have you had an AGFC private lands biologist do a management plan for 
your property? If the pastures were fescue or Bermuda grass, they will NOT 
revert to native warm season grasses which are the best nesting habitat for 
quail. Those 2 invasive non-native grasses are terrible for quail and grassland 
nesting birds. They form a thick thatch, unlike the clumps structure of 
natives. Quail and other birds can walk on the ground in the native clump 
grasses and not be seen by predators and can find bugs to each. They can't move 
or walk in the Bermuda or fescue (sort of like you and I trying to walk through 
a blackberry thicket) because its a dense mat. 

>  
> Karen  
>  
> From: George R. Hoelzeman 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Sent: Friday, March 6, 2015 2:45 PM
> Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>  
> Our fence rows are a mess but our quail population has all but vanished in 
the last 18 years. When we first bought the place around 1997 we could reliably 
encounter three coveys, sometimes four. Now its a rarity to find even one. We 
did virtually no clearing when we built the house (only cleaned up about one 
acre and it was already open) and the previous owner removed his cattle after 
we bought the place. The pasture is largely reverting to native grasses (I 
guess) and a tornado in 08 put a lot more ground cover down on the south end. 

> 
> So why would our quail population disappear? Coyotes? Raccoons? Marauding 
deer (I knew I should lock my car at night! ;) ), something else? 

> 
> George (n. Conway Co. missing the springtime calls of Bob White)
> 
>  
> 
> On 3/6/2015 10:57 AM, Joyce Hartmann wrote:
> As you drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how clean the fence 
rows are…everyone trying to “keep up with the Joneses” removes a lot of 
good quail habitat, too…Joyce Hartmann, Clinton 

>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

> Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>  
> David George Haskell, ecologist and author of The Forest Unseen, has a 
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer 
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee. Everything he discusses 
applies to birds of Arkansas. The book is well worth reading for its beauty and 
fascination, as well as its excellent science. 

> 
> -Janine
> On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
> Some speculation on bobwhite declines.  
> When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen things 
happen. I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and they are often, 
and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by humans. The transformation 
of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide cover 
for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds, insects as the run under 
bunch grasses. 

> It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a thousand 
cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer. I think we all know that 
deer populations are out of control due to the loss of native predators 
(wolves, cougars). The forestry people say that deer are permanently altering 
eastern forests, and not for the better. I can imagine that with the high deer 
populations on rural properties I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail 
eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives. 

>  
> The Thousand Cuts
> Bermuda/fescue pastures
> Feral Cats
> Deer predation on nests
> Hunting
> Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators
> Parasites, diseases
>  
> Just speculation on my part.
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM] 

> Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
> The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating 
Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also have deer 
nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume animal 
material in their diets to balance needs. 

>  
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>  
> From: Jeffrey Short
> Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>  
> Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary
> 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

>  
>  
> -- 
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County
>  
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 22:13:25 -0600
I really love this learning aspect of the listserv.  

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 5:39 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 

And the best proof of what Karen writes below is the land in Scott County
that the Forest Service manages for short-leaf pine and bluestem grasses.
If you haven't been there, you ought to visit it.  It lies west of Needmore,
a spot on U.S. 71 south of Waldron.
 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 
 

  _____  

Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 22:16:23 +0000
From: rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

George, have you had an AGFC private lands biologist do a management plan
for your property?  If the pastures were fescue or Bermuda grass, they will
NOT revert to native warm season grasses which are the best nesting habitat
for quail.  Those 2 invasive non-native grasses are terrible for quail and
grassland nesting birds.  They form a thick thatch, unlike the clumps
structure of natives.  Quail and other birds can walk on the ground in the
native clump grasses and not be seen by predators and can find bugs to each.
They can't move or walk in the Bermuda or fescue (sort of like you and I
trying to walk through a blackberry thicket) because its a dense mat.

 

Karen  
  

  _____  

From: George R. Hoelzeman 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Friday, March 6, 2015 2:45 PM
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 

Our fence rows are a mess but our quail population has all but vanished in
the last 18 years.  When we first bought the place around 1997 we could
reliably encounter three coveys, sometimes four.  Now its a rarity to find
even one.  We did virtually no clearing when we built the house (only
cleaned up about one acre and it was already open) and the previous owner
removed his cattle after we bought the place.  The pasture is largely
reverting to native grasses (I guess) and a tornado in 08 put a lot more
ground cover down on the south end.

So why would our quail population disappear?  Coyotes?  Raccoons?  Marauding
deer (I knew I should lock my car at night! ;) ), something else?

George (n. Conway Co. missing the springtime calls of Bob White)

 

On 3/6/2015 10:57 AM, Joyce Hartmann wrote:

As you drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how clean the
fence rows are.everyone trying to "keep up with the Joneses" removes a lot
of good quail habitat, too.Joyce Hartmann, Clinton

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 

David George Haskell, ecologist and author of The Forest Unseen, has a
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee.  Everything he
discusses applies to birds of Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading for
its beauty and fascination, as well as its excellent science.  

-Janine

On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:

Some speculation on bobwhite declines.   

When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen things
happen.  I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and they are
often, and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by humans.  The
transformation of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do
not provide cover for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds,
insects as the run under bunch grasses.  

It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a
thousand cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer.  I think we
all know that deer populations are out of control due to the loss of native
predators (wolves, cougars).  The forestry people say that deer are
permanently altering eastern forests, and not for the better.  I can imagine
that with the high deer populations on rural properties I know about, if
deer are eating bobwhite quail eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives.


 

The Thousand Cuts

Bermuda/fescue pastures

Feral Cats

Deer predation on nests

Hunting

Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators

Parasites, diseases

 

Just speculation on my part.


  _____  


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on
behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM]
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating
Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also have
deer nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume animal
material in their diets to balance needs.

 

Jerry W. Davis

Hot Springs, AR 

 

From: Jeffrey Short   

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM

To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 

Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 

Also, some of the "blog" replies are scary

http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-168944
0870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook

&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

 

 

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County

 
Subject: Art for the Birds
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:23:50 -0600
A fair number of everyone has asked about the art exhibit I mentioned 
back in December.  It is a "go" and I have some literature if anyone is 
interested.  In order not to clog the list with an attachment(s) if 
anyone wants a copy of the press release, poster (i'll send a small 
version) or the general information on the show just e-mail me and I'll 
send you a word or pdf file and a jpeg of the poster (I kind of like the 
poster).

Of course, if anyone is interested in entering something I'll happily 
send you one of those forms as well. ;)

Thanks!

George (n. Conway Co. promoting birds through the Arts and the Arts 
through birds)

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: American Woodcock!!!
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:19:22 -0600
At dusk Venus was shining and the owls were silent. Waiting just near the house 
I heard Timberdoodle 'peents' where I've heard them for 20 years, since before 
I had a clue as to their origin. Then a sudden twittering flight, arcing very 
high up over the yard and silence. Where did it go? I followed the direction of 
the flight and heard peenting again in the woods near the creek, nearly drowned 
out by the snowmelt waterfall. Peent, peent, peent...wait for itthen the 
twittering flight back up over mature pines, sycamores and oaks with a chirpy 
little song at the apexand descending back into the original area across the 
drive. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 19:19:22 -0600
That's interesting about habitat disturbance.

When we bought the place the owner had more cattle grazing the pasture 
than the pasture could handle.  They ate the grass down to the dirt.  
Golf greens have longer blades than we had.  Quail were everywhere.  
Once the cows went I bush hogged the place a couple times a year, but 
the thatch layer developed.  I know there is bermuda, possible fescue 
and I was told some lespedeza was growing. I eventually got to where I 
wasn't mowing at all.  The sage is as tall as my shoulder now, along 
with a lot of other stuff, and it can be a challenge to walk through.  
So I suspect some work is in order.

Thanks for this input!

George (n. Conway Co. thinking of quail)

On 3/6/2015 6:09 PM, Richard Baxter wrote:
>
> Also, even if it is native grass, it requires active management. 
> Disking, burning, rotational grazing etc. More than any other species, 
> bobwhite require habitat disturbance.
>
> On Mar 6, 2015 4:16 PM, "Jim and Karen Rowe" 
> > wrote:
>
>     George, have you had an AGFC private lands biologist do a
>     management plan for your property?  If the pastures were fescue or
>     Bermuda grass, they will NOT revert to native warm season grasses
>     which are the best nesting habitat for quail.  Those 2 invasive
>     non-native grasses are terrible for quail and grassland nesting
>     birds.  They form a thick thatch, unlike the clumps structure of
>     natives.  Quail and other birds can walk on the ground in the
>     native clump grasses and not be seen by predators and can find
>     bugs to each.  They can't move or walk in the Bermuda or fescue
>     (sort of like you and I trying to walk through a blackberry
>     thicket) because its a dense mat.
>
>     Karen
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     *From:* George R. Hoelzeman      >
>     *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>     *Sent:* Friday, March 6, 2015 2:45 PM
>     *Subject:* Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer
>     Eating Birds
>
>     Our fence rows are a mess but our quail population has all but
>     vanished in the last 18 years.  When we first bought the place
>     around 1997 we could reliably encounter three coveys, sometimes
>     four.  Now its a rarity to find even one.  We did virtually no
>     clearing when we built the house (only cleaned up about one acre
>     and it was already open) and the previous owner removed his cattle
>     after we bought the place.  The pasture is largely reverting to
>     native grasses (I guess) and a tornado in 08 put a lot more ground
>     cover down on the south end.
>
>     So why would our quail population disappear? Coyotes?  Raccoons? 
>     Marauding deer (I knew I should lock my car at night! ;) ),
>     something else?
>
>     George (n. Conway Co. missing the springtime calls of Bob White)
>
>
>
>     On 3/6/2015 10:57 AM, Joyce Hartmann wrote:
>     As you drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how
>     clean the fence rows are…everyone trying to “keep up with the
>     Joneses” removes a lot of good quail habitat, too…Joyce Hartmann,
>     Clinton
>     *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
>     [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Janine Perlman
>     *Sent:* Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
>     *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>     *Subject:* Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer
>     Eating Birds
>     David George Haskell, ecologist and author of *The Forest Unseen*,
>     has a different---and arguably larger and more
>     informed---perspective on deer populations....and birds, and much
>     more, in Tennessee.  Everything he discusses applies to birds of
>     Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading for its beauty and
>     fascination, as well as its excellent science.
>
>     -Janine
>     On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
>
>         Some speculation on bobwhite declines.
>         When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then
>         unforeseen things happen.  I have read a little about bobwhite
>         quail declines and they are often, and certainly may be,
>         related to habitats altered by humans.  The transformation of
>         our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not
>         provide cover for the quail, or bare soil where they can find
>         seeds, insects as the run under bunch grasses.
>         It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying
>         from a thousand cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now,
>         deer.  I think we all know that deer populations are out of
>         control due to the loss of native predators (wolves,
>         cougars).  The forestry people say that deer are permanently
>         altering eastern forests, and not for the better. I can
>         imagine that with the high deer populations on rural
>         properties I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail
>         eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives.
>         The Thousand Cuts
>         Bermuda/fescue pastures
>         Feral Cats
>         Deer predation on nests
>         Hunting
>         Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators
>         Parasites, diseases
>         Just speculation on my part.
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>         *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
>         [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>         ] on behalf of jwdavis
>         [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM ]
>         *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
>         *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>         
>         *Subject:* Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>         The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed
>         deer eating Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground
>         nesting birds also have deer nest predation. As pointed out
>         deer and other herbivores consume animal material in their
>         diets to balance needs.
>         Jerry W. Davis
>         Hot Springs, AR
>         *From:*Jeffrey Short 
>         *Sent:*Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
>         *To:*ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>         
>         *Subject:*FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>         Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary
> 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

> 
 

>
>
>     -- 
>     George R. Hoelzeman
>     North Conway County
>
>
>

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Long-tailed Duck, Lake Conway
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 18:13:23 -0600
Jim Belote posted to the Arkansas Birders Facebook page a photo of a
Long-tailed Duck on Lake Conway. He saw it from the Highway 89 bridge at
2:30.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Richard Baxter <dickbaxter100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 18:09:29 -0600
Also, even if it is native grass, it requires active management. Disking,
burning, rotational grazing etc. More than any other species, bobwhite
require habitat disturbance.
On Mar 6, 2015 4:16 PM, "Jim and Karen Rowe" 
wrote:

> George, have you had an AGFC private lands biologist do a management plan
> for your property?  If the pastures were fescue or Bermuda grass, they will
> NOT revert to native warm season grasses which are the best nesting habitat
> for quail.  Those 2 invasive non-native grasses are terrible for quail and
> grassland nesting birds.  They form a thick thatch, unlike the clumps
> structure of natives.  Quail and other birds can walk on the ground in the
> native clump grasses and not be seen by predators and can find bugs to
> each.  They can't move or walk in the Bermuda or fescue (sort of like you
> and I trying to walk through a blackberry thicket) because its a dense mat.
>
> Karen
>
>  ------------------------------
>  *From:* George R. Hoelzeman 
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Sent:* Friday, March 6, 2015 2:45 PM
> *Subject:* Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
> Our fence rows are a mess but our quail population has all but vanished in
> the last 18 years.  When we first bought the place around 1997 we could
> reliably encounter three coveys, sometimes four.  Now its a rarity to find
> even one.  We did virtually no clearing when we built the house (only
> cleaned up about one acre and it was already open) and the previous owner
> removed his cattle after we bought the place.  The pasture is largely
> reverting to native grasses (I guess) and a tornado in 08 put a lot more
> ground cover down on the south end.
>
> So why would our quail population disappear?  Coyotes?  Raccoons?
> Marauding deer (I knew I should lock my car at night! ;) ), something else?
>
> George (n. Conway Co. missing the springtime calls of Bob White)
>
>
>
> On 3/6/2015 10:57 AM, Joyce Hartmann wrote:
>
>  As you drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how clean the
> fence rows are…everyone trying to “keep up with the Joneses” removes a 
lot 

> of good quail habitat, too…Joyce Hartmann, Clinton
>
>  *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [
> mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU ] *On
> Behalf Of *Janine Perlman
> *Sent:* Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
> David George Haskell, ecologist and author of *The Forest Unseen*, has a
> different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer
> populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee.  Everything he
> discusses applies to birds of Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading for
> its beauty and fascination, as well as its excellent science.
>
> -Janine
>  On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
>
>  Some speculation on bobwhite declines.
>  When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen
> things happen.  I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and they
> are often, and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by humans.
> The transformation of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns,
> do not provide cover for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds,
> insects as the run under bunch grasses.
>  It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a
> thousand cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer.  I think we
> all know that deer populations are out of control due to the loss of native
> predators (wolves, cougars).  The forestry people say that deer are
> permanently altering eastern forests, and not for the better.  I can
> imagine that with the high deer populations on rural properties I know
> about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail eggs, it might be a rare nest that
> survives.
>
>  The Thousand Cuts
>  Bermuda/fescue pastures
>  Feral Cats
>  Deer predation on nests
>  Hunting
>  Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators
>  Parasites, diseases
>
>  Just speculation on my part.
>  ------------------------------
>  *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU]
> on behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM]
> *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>    The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer
> eating Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also
> have deer nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume
> animal material in their diets to balance needs.
>
>  Jerry W. Davis
>  Hot Springs, AR
>
>   *From:* Jeffrey Short 
>  *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
>  *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>  *Subject:* FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
>   Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary
>
> 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

> 
 

>
>
>
> --
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County
>
>
>
>
Subject: FW: Elk Country Chronicles
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 23:50:35 +0000
After getting bummed out talking about quail habitat, thought you guys might 
like an actual habitat success story. This short video clip is a project that 
we worked with RMEF which was completed a year ago in Dec. The Malheur NF 
picked up an additional 13,000 acres of private land through the efforts of a 
lot of donors. It was a $7 mill project. That doesn't happen everyday. Prime 
wildlife habitat that still has wild runs of Chinook salmon and threatened bull 
trout. Lots of ruffed grouse in there too to keep things bird related. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: Hollowell, Dustin L -FS
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 11:52 AM
To: Reames, Clark -FS; Blackhorse, Mariah R -FS
Cc: Armichardy, Daniel J -FS; Hollowell, Renee C -FS
Subject: FW: Elk Country Chronicles

Short clip on the headwaters project.

From: Dustin [mailto:dustinhollowell AT hotmail.com]
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 11:50 AM
To: Hollowell, Dustin L -FS
Subject: FW: Elk Country Chronicles



________________________________
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:38:48 -0700
Subject: Elk Country Chronicles
From: webmaster AT rmef.org
To: dustinhollowell AT hotmail.com
[http://www.rmef.org/Portals/0/Newsletters/header.jpg]
[http://www.rmef.org/Portals/0/Newsletters/ECC_JohnDay.jpg]

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This e-mail advertisement was sent to 
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You received this e-mail as a valued supporter of the Rocky Mountain Elk 
Foundation. 

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Here. 

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MT 59808. 



NEW1338153





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Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:38:46 -0600
And the best proof of what Karen writes below is the land in Scott County that 
the Forest Service manages for short-leaf pine and bluestem grasses. If you 
haven't been there, you ought to visit it. It lies west of Needmore, a spot on 
U.S. 71 south of Waldron. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 22:16:23 +0000
From: rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer  RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

George, have you had an AGFC private lands biologist do a management plan for 
your property? If the pastures were fescue or Bermuda grass, they will NOT 
revert to native warm season grasses which are the best nesting habitat for 
quail. Those 2 invasive non-native grasses are terrible for quail and grassland 
nesting birds. They form a thick thatch, unlike the clumps structure of 
natives. Quail and other birds can walk on the ground in the native clump 
grasses and not be seen by predators and can find bugs to each. They can't move 
or walk in the Bermuda or fescue (sort of like you and I trying to walk through 
a blackberry thicket) because its a dense mat. 

Karen  
        From: George R. Hoelzeman 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, March 6, 2015 2:45 PM
 Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer  RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
   

    Our fence rows are a mess but our quail population has all but
    vanished in the last 18 years.  When we first bought the place
    around 1997 we could reliably encounter three coveys, sometimes
    four.  Now its a rarity to find even one.  We did virtually no
    clearing when we built the house (only cleaned up about one acre and
    it was already open) and the previous owner removed his cattle after
    we bought the place.  The pasture is largely reverting to native
    grasses (I guess) and a tornado in 08 put a lot more ground cover
    down on the south end.
    
    So why would our quail population disappear?  Coyotes?  Raccoons? 
    Marauding deer (I knew I should lock my car at night! ;) ),
    something else?
    
    George (n. Conway Co. missing the springtime calls of Bob White)
    
    

On 3/6/2015 10:57 AM, Joyce Hartmann
      wrote:
    
    
      
        As you
            drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how clean
            the fence rows areeveryone trying to keep up with the
            Joneses removes a lot of good quail habitat, tooJoyce
            Hartmann, Clinton 
           
        
          
            From:
                The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
                [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Janine
                Perlman
                Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
                To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
                Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras
                Catch Deer Eating Birds 
          
        
           
        David George
          Haskell, ecologist and author of The Forest Unseen,
          has a different---and arguably larger and more
          informed---perspective on deer populations....and birds, and
          much more, in Tennessee.  Everything he discusses applies to
          birds of Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading for its
          beauty and fascination, as well as its excellent science.  
          
          -Janine 
        
          On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus
            wrote: 
        
        
          
            Some
                speculation on bobwhite declines.    
            
              When
                  nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then
                  unforeseen things happen.  I have read a little about
                  bobwhite quail declines and they are often, and
                  certainly may be, related to habitats altered by
                  humans.  The transformation of our countryside to
                  fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide
                  cover for the quail, or bare soil where they can find
                  seeds, insects as the run under bunch grasses.   
            
            
              It
                  seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be
                  dying from a thousand cuts: fragmented habitat, feral
                  cats, and now, deer.  I think we all know that deer
                  populations are out of control due to the loss of
                  native predators (wolves, cougars).  The forestry
                  people say that deer are permanently altering eastern
                  forests, and not for the better.  I can imagine that
                  with the high deer populations on rural properties I
                  know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail eggs, it
                  might be a rare nest that survives.   
            
            
                 
            
            
              The
                  Thousand Cuts 
            
            
              Bermuda/fescue
                  pastures 
            
            
              Feral
                  Cats 
            
            
              Deer
                  predation on nests 
            
            
              Hunting 
            
            
              Coyotes,
                  skunks, and other medium predators 
            
            
              Parasites,
                  diseases 
            
            
                 
            
            
              Just
                  speculation on my part. 
              
                
                  
                
                  From: The
 Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 

                      on behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM]
                      Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
                      To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
                      Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer
                      Eating Birds 
                
                
                  
                    
                      
                        The
                            Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has
                            photographed deer eating Northern Bobwhite
                            eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds
                            also have deer nest predation. As pointed
                            out deer and other herbivores consume animal
                            material in their diets to balance needs. 
                      
                      
                          
                      
                      
                        Jerry
                            W. Davis 
                      
                      
                        Hot
                            Springs, AR  
                      
                      
                        
                          
                              
                          
                          
                            
                              From: Jeffrey
                                    Short  
                            
                            
                              Sent:
                                  Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM 
                            
                            
                              To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
                                   
                            
                            
                              Subject: FW:
                                  Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds 
                            
                          
                        
                        
                            
                        
                      
                      
                        
                          Also, some of the
                              blog replies are scary 
 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

                        
                      
                    
                  
                
              
            
          
        
           
      
    
    
    -- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
  

     		 	   		  
Subject: Winter Birds
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:28:13 -0600
Over the last two days I have had lots of birds, 1,093 Grackles, 1402
Cowbirds, 3 Cardinals, 1 House Finch.  That's about it, of course that was
an estimate on some of the birds mentioned.  Low estimate!

 

Best to all,

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: ducks at lake Harrison
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:21:42 -0600
Our little lake Harrison has Canvasbacks, gadwall, shovlers and ring-bills
right now. I know that's not very exciting but for our little lake its quite
a sight. Even a pipit has been sighted there.

 

As for the quail discussion my vote is for the cats. I have a few quail
still around our land and every time a new neighbor moves in with a cat I
can note the decrease in the number of quail. There are very few left here
where there were once many. Clearing of blackberry thickets hurts them as
well but my personal observations can see a direct decline with the
increased number of wondering cats in my area. They slaughter my chipmunks
as well but not a bird .

 

Alan Gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Subject: Ozark Natural Science Center Bioblitz registration open
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 16:36:32 -0600
Registration (required for all participants), along with other information
about the Spring Bioblitz, is now available on our website:
http://www.onsc.us/pageb.php?pg=bioblitz-spring-2015.

For those who didn't read the post I sent about a month ago, here it is
again:

The Ozark Natural Science Center (in Huntsville, Madison Co.) is hosting a
Spring Bioblitz on Saturday, April 18. The purpose of a bioblitz is to find
and identify every living thing in a given area to species (or as close to
species as possible). That means that there will be surveys for birds,
insects, reptiles and amphibians, plants, aquatic critters, fungi, small
mammals, and bats.

It is a free event for people of all ages. Food will be provided. This is a
great opportunity to help out ONSC, meet new people, and maybe even learn a
thing or two.

I have a flyer that I can provide to individuals--please reply off-channel
if you are interested. Feel free to reply to me off-channel if you have
questions or comments as well.

Thank you, and good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 22:16:23 +0000
George, have you had an AGFC private lands biologist do a management plan for 
your property?  If the pastures were fescue or Bermuda grass, they will NOT 
revert to native warm season grasses which are the best nesting habitat for 
quail.  Those 2 invasive non-native grasses are terrible for quail and 
grassland nesting birds.  They form a thick thatch, unlike the clumps 
structure of natives.  Quail and other birds can walk on the ground in the 
native clump grasses and not be seen by predators and can find bugs to each.  
They can't move or walk in the Bermuda or fescue (sort of like you and I trying 
to walk through a blackberry thicket) because its a dense mat. 

Karen  
       From: George R. Hoelzeman 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, March 6, 2015 2:45 PM
 Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
   
 Our fence rows are a mess but our quail population has all but vanished in the 
last 18 years.  When we first bought the place around 1997 we could reliably 
encounter three coveys, sometimes four.  Now its a rarity to find even one.  
We did virtually no clearing when we built the house (only cleaned up about one 
acre and it was already open) and the previous owner removed his cattle after 
we bought the place.  The pasture is largely reverting to native grasses (I 
guess) and a tornado in 08 put a lot more ground cover down on the south end. 

 
 So why would our quail population disappear?  Coyotes?  Raccoons?  
Marauding deer (I knew I should lock my car at night! ;) ), something else? 

 
 George (n. Conway Co. missing the springtime calls of Bob White)
 
 

On 3/6/2015 10:57 AM, Joyce Hartmann wrote:
  
 
#yiv9777215355 #yiv9777215355 -- _filtered #yiv9777215355 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 
6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv9777215355 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 
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none;}#yiv9777215355 .yiv9777215355MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered 
#yiv9777215355 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv9777215355 
div.yiv9777215355WordSection1 {}#yiv9777215355 As you drive around and view 
ranchland and farmland, note how clean the fence rows are…everyone trying to 
“keep up with the Joneses” removes a lot of good quail habitat, too…Joyce 
Hartmann, Clinton   From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

 Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds   
David George Haskell, ecologist and author of The Forest Unseen, has a 
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer 
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee.  Everything he 
discusses applies to birds of Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading for 
its beauty and fascination, as well as its excellent science.  

 
 -Janine  On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:  
 Some speculation on bobwhite declines.   When nature is out of balance, due 
to human activity, then unforeseen things happen.  I have read a little about 
bobwhite quail declines and they are often, and certainly may be, related to 
habitats altered by humans.  The transformation of our countryside to fescue 
or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide cover for the quail, or bare soil 
where they can find seeds, insects as the run under bunch grasses.   It seems 
to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a thousand cuts: 
fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer.  I think we all know that deer 
populations are out of control due to the loss of native predators (wolves, 
cougars).  The forestry people say that deer are permanently altering eastern 
forests, and not for the better.  I can imagine that with the high deer 
populations on rural properties I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail 
eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives.     The Thousand Cuts 
Bermuda/fescue pastures Feral Cats Deer predation on nests Hunting Coyotes, 
skunks, and other medium predators Parasites, diseases   Just speculation on 
my part. From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM] 

 Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds The Tall Timbers Research 
Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating Northern Bobwhite eggs and I 
expect other ground nesting birds also have deer nest predation. As pointed out 
deer and other herbivores consume animal material in their diets to balance 
needs.   Jerry W. Davis Hot Springs, AR   From: Jeffrey Short Sent: Thursday, 
March 05, 2015 2:57 PM To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: FW: Field 
Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds   Also, some of the “blog” replies are 
scary 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

     
 -- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County 

  
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 14:45:43 -0600
Our fence rows are a mess but our quail population has all but vanished 
in the last 18 years.  When we first bought the place around 1997 we 
could reliably encounter three coveys, sometimes four.  Now its a rarity 
to find even one.  We did virtually no clearing when we built the house 
(only cleaned up about one acre and it was already open) and the 
previous owner removed his cattle after we bought the place.  The 
pasture is largely reverting to native grasses (I guess) and a tornado 
in 08 put a lot more ground cover down on the south end.

So why would our quail population disappear?  Coyotes?  Raccoons? 
Marauding deer (I knew I should lock my car at night! ;) ), something else?

George (n. Conway Co. missing the springtime calls of Bob White)

On 3/6/2015 10:57 AM, Joyce Hartmann wrote:
>
> As you drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how clean 
> the fence rows areeveryone trying to keep up with the Joneses 
> removes a lot of good quail habitat, tooJoyce Hartmann, Clinton
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Janine Perlman
> *Sent:* Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
> David George Haskell, ecologist and author of *The Forest Unseen*, has 
> a different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on 
> deer populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee.  
> Everything he discusses applies to birds of Arkansas.  The book is 
> well worth reading for its beauty and fascination, as well as its 
> excellent science.
>
> -Janine
>
> On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
>
>     Some speculation on bobwhite declines.
>
>     When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then
>     unforeseen things happen.  I have read a little about bobwhite
>     quail declines and they are often, and certainly may be, related
>     to habitats altered by humans.  The transformation of our
>     countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide
>     cover for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds,
>     insects as the run under bunch grasses.
>
>     It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from
>     a thousand cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer.  I
>     think we all know that deer populations are out of control due to
>     the loss of native predators (wolves, cougars).  The forestry
>     people say that deer are permanently altering eastern forests, and
>     not for the better.  I can imagine that with the high deer
>     populations on rural properties I know about, if deer are eating
>     bobwhite quail eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives.
>
>     The Thousand Cuts
>
>     Bermuda/fescue pastures
>
>     Feral Cats
>
>     Deer predation on nests
>
>     Hunting
>
>     Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators
>
>     Parasites, diseases
>
>     Just speculation on my part.
>
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>     *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
>     [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU ]
>     on behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM
>     ]
>     *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
>     *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>     *Subject:* Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
>     The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer
>     eating Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting
>     birds also have deer nest predation. As pointed out deer and other
>     herbivores consume animal material in their diets to balance needs.
>
>     Jerry W. Davis
>
>     Hot Springs, AR
>
>     *From:*Jeffrey Short 
>
>     *Sent:*Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
>
>     *To:*ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>
>     *Subject:*FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
>     Also, some of the blog replies are scary
>
> 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

>

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 20:14:49 +0000
I've read speculation that the loss of bunching grasses like big and little 
bluestem have negatively impacted ground nesting birds.  The thick stands of 
those grasses more readily hide nests.Roselie Overby 


 On Friday, March 6, 2015 11:46 AM, "Reames, Clark -FS"  
wrote: 

   

 #yiv7118866030 #yiv7118866030 -- _filtered #yiv7118866030 
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{margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv7118866030 div.yiv7118866030WordSection1 
{}#yiv7118866030 There is no doubt that quail populations are closely linked to 
man’s land management techniques and the current “balance”  definitely 
does not lend itself to strong quail populations.  Back in the days of booming 
quail numbers, the “balance” at that time created a favorable environment 
for quail but I believe that it also came at a cost to other species.  During 
that time, avian quail predators were suppressed considerably as compared to 
today and small mammalian predator populations were also lower than today (fur 
trapping was bigger then).  I am not blaming it all on predators but they are 
a factor.  Of course, the non-native grass pastures were not as prevalent 
either.  Deer numbers were considerably lower than today.  These along with 
many other factors all came together to produce the quail boom.  Quail 
populations then were probably higher than they would have been in a natural 
setting without the influence of man.   Today, the balance has shifted away 
from quail.  I don’t know what the true balance would be in a natural 
setting, because we are so far away from that now.  Those of us that have been 
around long enough to remember the quail boom (I caught the tail end of it as a 
kid), miss those days of jumping coveys everywhere.  They were in our yard all 
the time and I haven’t seen that in years now.  I wish we could find a 
balance point but man’s management results in a pendulum rather than a 
balance.       

| 
| 
|   | 
| Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager  |
| Forest Service Malheur National Forest  |
| p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681 
f: 541-575-3002 
creames AT fs.fed.us  |
| 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us 
  |
| Caring for the land and serving people  |

 |

 |

 |

     From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU]On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 8:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds   
David George Haskell, ecologist and author ofThe Forest Unseen, has a 
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer 
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee.  Everything he 
discusses applies to birds of Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading for 
its beauty and fascination, as well as its excellent science.  


-Janine On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote: 
Some speculation on bobwhite declines.   When nature is out of balance, due to 
human activity, then unforeseen things happen.  I have read a little about 
bobwhite quail declines and they are often, and certainly may be, related to 
habitats altered by humans.  The transformation of our countryside to fescue 
or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide cover for the quail, or bare soil 
where they can find seeds, insects as the run under bunch grasses.   It seems 
to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a thousand cuts: 
fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer.  I think we all know that deer 
populations are out of control due to the loss of native predators (wolves, 
cougars).  The forestry people say that deer are permanently altering eastern 
forests, and not for the better.  I can imagine that with the high deer 
populations on rural properties I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail 
eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives.     The Thousand Cuts 
Bermuda/fescue pastures Feral Cats Deer predation on nests Hunting Coyotes, 
skunks, and other medium predators Parasites, diseases   Just speculation on 
my part. From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM] 

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds The Tall Timbers Research 
Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating Northern Bobwhite eggs and I 
expect other ground nesting birds also have deer nest predation. As pointed out 
deer and other herbivores consume animal material in their diets to balance 
needs.   Jerry W. Davis Hot Springs, AR   From:Jeffrey Short Sent: Thursday, 
March 05, 2015 2:57 PM To:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: FW: Field Cameras 
Catch Deer Eating Birds   Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

   



This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 


   
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 17:45:13 +0000
There is no doubt that quail populations are closely linked to man's land 
management techniques and the current "balance" definitely does not lend itself 
to strong quail populations. Back in the days of booming quail numbers, the 
"balance" at that time created a favorable environment for quail but I believe 
that it also came at a cost to other species. During that time, avian quail 
predators were suppressed considerably as compared to today and small mammalian 
predator populations were also lower than today (fur trapping was bigger then). 
I am not blaming it all on predators but they are a factor. Of course, the 
non-native grass pastures were not as prevalent either. Deer numbers were 
considerably lower than today. These along with many other factors all came 
together to produce the quail boom. Quail populations then were probably higher 
than they would have been in a natural setting without the influence of man. 


Today, the balance has shifted away from quail. I don't know what the true 
balance would be in a natural setting, because we are so far away from that 
now. Those of us that have been around long enough to remember the quail boom 
(I caught the tail end of it as a kid), miss those days of jumping coveys 
everywhere. They were in our yard all the time and I haven't seen that in years 
now. I wish we could find a balance point but man's management results in a 
pendulum rather than a balance. 




[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 8:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

David George Haskell, ecologist and author of The Forest Unseen, has a 
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer 
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee. Everything he discusses 
applies to birds of Arkansas. The book is well worth reading for its beauty and 
fascination, as well as its excellent science. 


-Janine
On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
Some speculation on bobwhite declines.
When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen things 
happen. I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and they are often, 
and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by humans. The transformation 
of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide cover 
for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds, insects as the run under 
bunch grasses. 

It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a thousand 
cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer. I think we all know that 
deer populations are out of control due to the loss of native predators 
(wolves, cougars). The forestry people say that deer are permanently altering 
eastern forests, and not for the better. I can imagine that with the high deer 
populations on rural properties I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail 
eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives. 


The Thousand Cuts
Bermuda/fescue pastures
Feral Cats
Deer predation on nests
Hunting
Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators
Parasites, diseases

Just speculation on my part.
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on behalf of 
jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM] 

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating 
Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also have deer 
nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume animal 
material in their diets to balance needs. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Jeffrey Short
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

Also, some of the "blog" replies are scary


http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Wood Ducks, etc.
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 11:22:00 -0600
There were at least 10 Wood Ducks on the Otter Pond this morning as the dogs 
and I walked the path through the wooded creek bottom. One called as it flew 
off. Most were beautifully marked males, peeping like ducklings at our presence 
and floating on the water deepened by snow melt. Two females emerged from a 
secret hiding spot near the bank behind fallen tree limbs. More females might 
have glided into view had I waited but I disappeared to avoid frightening them 
further. 


For the past few mornings I've seen one adult Bald Eagle heading east on its 
usual flight path. Yesterday afternoon, as snow and ice vanished in the 
sunlight, I saw 5 Bald Eagles flying toward the north, the leading pair engaged 
in courtship behavior. 


On Saturday a pair of Red-tailed Hawks screamed and flew circles through the 
falling snow, apparently upset by a threat to their nest which I have not yet 
located. Their original nest was destroyed by the ice storm 6 years ago and I 
have yet to find the new one because I am easily distracted. 


Both pairs of Red-shouldered Hawks have given territorial displays over the 
past few days. They also have a new nest that I want to find. 


A Pine Warbler in plumage now more brilliant yellow than green has been 
visiting the suet feeder throughout the winter weather. 


This evening it will be fun to go look and listen for Woodcocks again now that 
the frigid weather is fleeing. Hopefully I'll hear some peents and see some of 
their dancing this weekend! 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 11:21:45 -0600
You are right. Clean fencerows are a major factor for Northern Bobwhites 
decline. Regrettably it has become a status symbol to have the fencerows 
looking like the Southfork Ranch on the Dallas TV show. People need to realize 
that status does not come from how clean the fencerows are or the kind of house 
etc., but true status comes from the quality of person you are not by what you 
have or own. There are over 40 species of birds that need the same kind of 
habitat that Northern Bobwhites need – native warm season grasses, and shrubs 
for cover etc. Cover across the pastures should not be further away than you 
can throw a softball. They are all in decline because of missing habitat 
elements and compounded by all of the other impacting factors. Our birds are to 
the point that every factor makes a difference. People rationalize that they 
will let someone else do the recovery and that will not get the job done. The 
problem was created by one person at a time and will have to be solved by 
everyone contributing to the solution. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs  

From: Joyce Hartmann 
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 10:57 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

As you drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how clean the fence 
rows are…everyone trying to “keep up with the Joneses” removes a lot of 
good quail habitat, too…Joyce Hartmann, Clinton 


 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 

David George Haskell, ecologist and author of The Forest Unseen, has a 
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer 
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee. Everything he discusses 
applies to birds of Arkansas. The book is well worth reading for its beauty and 
fascination, as well as its excellent science. 


-Janine

On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:

  Some speculation on bobwhite declines.   

 When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen things 
happen. I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and they are often, 
and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by humans. The transformation 
of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide cover 
for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds, insects as the run under 
bunch grasses. 


 It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a thousand 
cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer. I think we all know that 
deer populations are out of control due to the loss of native predators 
(wolves, cougars). The forestry people say that deer are permanently altering 
eastern forests, and not for the better. I can imagine that with the high deer 
populations on rural properties I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail 
eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives. 


   

  The Thousand Cuts

  Bermuda/fescue pastures

  Feral Cats

  Deer predation on nests

  Hunting

  Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators

  Parasites, diseases

   

  Just speculation on my part.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM] 

  Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
  To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
  Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating 
Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also have deer 
nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume animal 
material in their diets to balance needs. 


   

  Jerry W. Davis

  Hot Springs, AR 

   

  From: Jeffrey Short 

  Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM

  To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 

  Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

   

  Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary

 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 


 
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 10:57:51 -0600
As you drive around and view ranchland and farmland, note how clean the
fence rows are.everyone trying to "keep up with the Joneses" removes a lot
of good quail habitat, too.Joyce Hartmann, Clinton

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Friday, March 06, 2015 10:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 

David George Haskell, ecologist and author of The Forest Unseen, has a
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee.  Everything he
discusses applies to birds of Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading for
its beauty and fascination, as well as its excellent science.  

-Janine

On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:

Some speculation on bobwhite declines.   

When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen things
happen.  I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and they are
often, and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by humans.  The
transformation of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do
not provide cover for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds,
insects as the run under bunch grasses.  

It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a
thousand cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer.  I think we
all know that deer populations are out of control due to the loss of native
predators (wolves, cougars).  The forestry people say that deer are
permanently altering eastern forests, and not for the better.  I can imagine
that with the high deer populations on rural properties I know about, if
deer are eating bobwhite quail eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives.


 

The Thousand Cuts

Bermuda/fescue pastures

Feral Cats

Deer predation on nests

Hunting

Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators

Parasites, diseases

 

Just speculation on my part.

  _____  

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 ] on behalf of jwdavis
[jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM  ]
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  
Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating
Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also have
deer nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume animal
material in their diets to balance needs.

 

Jerry W. Davis

Hot Springs, AR 

 

From: Jeffrey Short   

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM

To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU   

Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

 

Also, some of the "blog" replies are scary

http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-168944
0870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook
 &utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

 
Subject: Re: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 10:51:51 -0600
David George Haskell, ecologist and author of *The Forest Unseen*, has a 
different---and arguably larger and more informed---perspective on deer 
populations....and birds, and much more, in Tennessee.  Everything he 
discusses applies to birds of Arkansas.  The book is well worth reading 
for its beauty and fascination, as well as its excellent science.

-Janine

On 3/6/2015 9:18 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
> Some speculation on bobwhite declines.
> When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen 
> things happen.  I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and 
> they are often, and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by 
> humans.  The transformation of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda 
> pastures, lawns, do not provide cover for the quail, or bare soil 
> where they can find seeds, insects as the run under bunch grasses.
> It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a 
> thousand cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer.  I think 
> we all know that deer populations are out of control due to the loss 
> of native predators (wolves, cougars).  The forestry people say that 
> deer are permanently altering eastern forests, and not for the better. 
>  I can imagine that with the high deer populations on rural properties 
> I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail eggs, it might be a 
> rare nest that survives.
>
> The Thousand Cuts
> Bermuda/fescue pastures
> Feral Cats
> Deer predation on nests
> Hunting
> Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators
> Parasites, diseases
>
> Just speculation on my part.
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM]
> *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
> The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer 
> eating Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds 
> also have deer nest predation. As pointed out deer and other 
> herbivores consume animal material in their diets to balance needs.
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> *From:* Jeffrey Short 
> *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> *Subject:* FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
>
> Also, some of the blog replies are scary
>
> 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

>
Subject: Bobwhite and Deer RE: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:18:35 +0000
Some speculation on bobwhite declines.
When nature is out of balance, due to human activity, then unforeseen things 
happen. I have read a little about bobwhite quail declines and they are often, 
and certainly may be, related to habitats altered by humans. The transformation 
of our countryside to fescue or Bermuda pastures, lawns, do not provide cover 
for the quail, or bare soil where they can find seeds, insects as the run under 
bunch grasses. 

It seems to me that quail, like other organisms, may be dying from a thousand 
cuts: fragmented habitat, feral cats, and now, deer. I think we all know that 
deer populations are out of control due to the loss of native predators 
(wolves, cougars). The forestry people say that deer are permanently altering 
eastern forests, and not for the better. I can imagine that with the high deer 
populations on rural properties I know about, if deer are eating bobwhite quail 
eggs, it might be a rare nest that survives. 


The Thousand Cuts
Bermuda/fescue pastures
Feral Cats
Deer predation on nests
Hunting
Coyotes, skunks, and other medium predators
Parasites, diseases

Just speculation on my part.
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of jwdavis [jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM] 

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 4:47 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating 
Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also have deer 
nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume animal 
material in their diets to balance needs. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Jeffrey Short
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

Also, some of the blog replies are scary


http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 
Subject: Fwd: Thanks for the binoculars - from Rishi Valley School, India.
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 08:48:23 -0600
Dear ARBIRDers,

Here's the back story. Years ago a forester and Arkansas Audubon Society 
stalwart named Joe Neal, who has an abiding interest in the AAS Halberg Ecology 
Camp, strongly suggested we get better binoculars. The ones the Camp had were a 
motley bunch, and I suspect mostly accumulated through donations of a pair here 
and a pair there. 


 Joe's fierce lobbying (okay, maybe that's a little too strong) carried the 
day, and at his suggestion the Camp Committee agreed to purchase Audubon 
Equinox HP 8 x 42's from Eagle Optics. At that time Eagle offered a 
buy-one-get-one-free for nonprofits like the Camp. We spent a little over 
$4,000 to buy 28 pairs. I assume that was the first time ever ornithology 
instructors at Camp (2 instructors working with a class of 8-10 youth) had the 
luxury of every camper using the same optics. 


The new binoculars have served us well. As you might suspect, 11- and 
12-year-old youth can be hard on binoculars. As an extreme example, a camper 
last summer dropped one of the eyepieces into the lake at Camp Clearfork. 
Kerplunk (or at least I imagine kerplunk)! Since these binoculars are no longer 
being made, parts from one pair now have to be scavenged by Eagle Optics with 
parts from another pair to cobble together a single working pair. The lifetime 
warranty on the new binoculars and Eagle Optics professionalism in repairing 
and returning them to us in good repair, at least until there are no longer any 
needed spare parts, will extend the useful life of these binoculars for many 
years. 


So to the thank you e-mail below, the thanks goes not to me but to everyone who 
has financially supported the Halberg Ecology Camp. Their generosity made it 
possible for us to buy new binoculars. Every summer up to 136 youth get to use 
the new binoculars as they learn about nature in all is wonder. And the old 
binoculars finally found a new home where they too will be useful and valued. 


By the way, we are looking for 100 total 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls to 
attend Camp this June. You can visit the Camp website and download an 
application and camp brochure: 


http://arbirds.org/halberg_ecology_camp.html

From the deep woods of west Little Rock,
Barry Haas


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Ragupathy Kannan 
> Date: March 6, 2015 4:14:20 AM CST
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Fwd: Thanks for the binoculars - from Rishi Valley School, India.
> Reply-To: Ragupathy Kannan 
> 
> From: Santharam V 
> 
> 
> Date: Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 9:45 PM
> 
> Dear Mr Barry Haas,
> On behalf of the Rishi Valley School and The Institute of Bird Studies and 
Natural History, Rishi Valley, India, I wish to thank you for the gift of 
binoculars that you sent through Dr Ragupathy Kannan, Prof of Biology, Univ of 
Arkansas, Fort Smith. 

> We have an active birdwatching group in our school and we regularly go 
birdwatching each week-end in our campus and its neighborhood, where we have 
recorded over 225 species of birds so far. We have also been participating in 
the Great Backyard Bird Count and organizing Bird Races in the campus. The 
binoculars you have kindly gifted to our Institution will be of great help in 
furthering our goals of getting children interested in Nature. 

> Thank you so much for your kind gesture.
> A copy of a recent write-up on our participation in the GBBC that appeared in 
the national newspaper THE HINDU is attached for your kind information. 

> Best wishes and regards,
> V. Santharam
> 
> -- 
> V. Santharam
> Institute of Bird Studies & Natural History
> Rishi Valley Education Centre,
> Rishi Valley 517 352
> Chittoor Dt., AP.
> Ph: 08571- 280571
> 
Subject: Re: Birds...what else
From: Don Simons <drsimons56 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 06:29:46 -0800
Ditto from sw Loisiana.

Sent from my iPod

On Mar 5, 2015, at 6:29 PM, Sandy Berger  wrote:

> Wish I could tell you I was seeing juncos. Or what was, or wasn't, at my 
feeders. I see that lots of folks must have had a snow day with all the emails 
I'm just now checking. I've been busy getting life birds here in Florida. 😁 

> 
> Seriously, I hope everyone is well in AR after this last round of winter 
weather. 

> 
> Sandy B.
> FS, AR
> 
> Sent from my iPad
Subject: Fwd: Thanks for the binoculars - from Rishi Valley School, India.
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 10:14:20 +0000
From: Santharam V 


Date: Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 9:45 PM

Dear Mr Barry Haas,
On behalf of the Rishi Valley School and The Institute of Bird Studies and 
Natural History, Rishi Valley, India, I wish to thank you for the gift of 
binoculars that you sent through Dr Ragupathy Kannan, Prof of Biology, Univ of 
Arkansas, Fort Smith. 

We have an active birdwatching group in our school and we regularly go 
birdwatching each week-end in our campus and its neighborhood, where we have 
recorded over 225 species of birds so far. We have also been participating in 
the Great Backyard Bird Count and organizing Bird Races in the campus. The 
binoculars you have kindly gifted to our Institution will be of great help in 
furthering our goals of getting children interested in Nature. 

Thank you so much for your kind gesture.
A copy of a recent write-up on our participation in the GBBC that appeared in 
the national newspaper THE HINDU is attached for your kind information. 

Best wishes and regards,
V. Santharam

-- 
V. Santharam
Institute of Bird Studies & Natural History
Rishi Valley Education Centre,
Rishi Valley 517 352
Chittoor Dt., AP.
Ph: 08571- 280571
    
Subject: Birds...what else
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:29:01 -0600
Wish I could tell you I was seeing juncos. Or what was, or wasn't, at my 
feeders. I see that lots of folks must have had a snow day with all the emails 
I'm just now checking. I've been busy getting life birds here in Florida. 😁 


Seriously, I hope everyone is well in AR after this last round of winter 
weather. 


Sandy B.
FS, AR

Sent from my iPad
Subject: LAPLAND LONGSPURS IN THE SNOW
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:24:32 -0600
Today, Delos McCauley an I took advance of a clear, bright day in Jefferson Co. 
following a very significant snowfall. We returned to Morgan Rd and the fields 
just immediately west of the New Gascony sign. Our target birds were Lapland 
Longspurs and we were not disappointed. We again encountered a flock of approx. 
200 birds, many of which approached within 10 ft. of our truck. Against the 
snow and close up, the photos were "tack-sharp" and the colors crisp. They 
probably thought hat they were in Lapland. 

John Redman
Subject: Suet eater - Sapsucker and Creeper behavior
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:43:39 -0600
I've recently had a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker eating suet, on a rather 
regular basis.  I don't think I've noticed that here before.

I've also seen a Brown Creeper, near my feeders but it seems more interested 
in searching crevices in a cedar for seeds that other birds have cached.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Undeterred
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 18:30:43 -0600
This afternoon we flushed a Wood drake from the small area of open water 
at the inlet of our pond.  Surely at least one duck is brooding in a box 
there.

Snow, schmow.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: Barred Owl
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:21:12 -0600
One of my local owls is sitting in the tallest pine tree outside my home
office window. And is watching all the small birds in motion at 5:15 and
after.

When should I make my move?

How much of this do I have to take?

Beautiful as always through the binoculars. Going to get the scope.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: Junco's in my backyard
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:50:16 -0600
Don’t you love spell what every the heck this is? I apparently live in 
Contortion now. 



> On Mar 5, 2015, at 2:04 AM, George R. Hoelzeman  wrote:
> 
> We just throw a butter tub of black oil sunflower seed across the deck each 
morning. A fair bit falls on the ground (sunflowers come up every spring). The 
juncos and other birds seem to be quite enthusiastic with that arrangement. 
We've even had nuthatches and a brown creeper work the deck for the seed. 

> 
> George (n. Conway Co. lots of juncos and an inch or so of ice)
> 
> On 3/4/2015 9:21 PM, Robert Bays wrote:
>> Juncos are eating seeds that are in a large plastic saucer. They share with 
northern cardinals, mourning doves & bluejays. The juncos also find seeds that 
have fallen in the grass. Everything is fine until grackles & blackbirds show 
up & take over. 

>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> M
>> On Mar 4, 2015, at 8:55 PM, Beverly Sullivan 
<000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> wrote: 

> 
> -- 
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County
Subject: 4 Stillwell pieces with photos
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 22:47:50 +0000
If anyone is interested in the 4 pieces I've done on the Stillwells, I have put 
them together as a single document, added some photographs, and converted it to 
a 2.5 mb PDF. I'll be glad to send this to anyone who requests it. Send me a 
private email (joeneal AT uark.edu). 
Subject: Re: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:47:07 -0600
The Tall Timbers Research Station in Georgia has photographed deer eating 
Northern Bobwhite eggs and I expect other ground nesting birds also have deer 
nest predation. As pointed out deer and other herbivores consume animal 
material in their diets to balance needs. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR 

From: Jeffrey Short 
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:57 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds

Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary


http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:46:09 -0600
No lack of birds up here on the hill yesterday or today. Haven't seen any Fox 
sparrows today, but that doesn't mean they aren't around. 

Cindy
In the Heights, Little Rock




Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 22:28:52 +0000
From: birddan AT COMCAST.NET
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

After "can you help me ID this bird?" the question "where have all the birds 
gone?" is the most frequently asked one I get when people call Audubon Arkansas 
looking for answers. Or the variant "where has species X gone?" As you can tell 
from the various responses, there is a lot of natural, local variation from 
place to place and day to day, regardless of the weather. It is interesting to 
read about this variation, even within Little Rock. 

Certainly this scale of variation is no cause for concern. It is the long-term, 
large-scale changes that should be of concern. Changes that are made visible by 
making observations over long periods and large areas. That's why it is so 
important to participate in such data collection efforts, namely citizen 
science projects like Audubon's Christmas Bird Count, the Great Backyard Bird 
Count, the Breeding Bird Survey, and eBird. 


Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

From: "Norman Lavers" <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2015 3:36:38 PM
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?

Like Lyndal we have noticed fewer of our regular birds at the feeder all day. 
There are some White-throats but not the normal good numbers and only 1 or 2 of 
the 4 or 5 Fox sparrows are showing up today. There was one Field sparrow for a 
while. The Mourning Dove flock is down to 5 or 6 from 16 or more. We have had 
one visit from a Coopers when everyone either split or stayed very still for a 
while but that is a normal occurrence and has not caused the birds to stay away 
for long in the past. 

Amongst the small number of Grackles and Red-wings we have had one Rusty 
Blackbird. 

Cheryl and Norman Lavers, Jonesboro 

 On Thursday, March 5, 2015 3:29 PM, Terry Butler  
wrote: 

    

 Lyndal, I had birds at my feeder all day but only about 20% of the number of 
birds I had yesterday. I started to post this, then I thought no one would 
believe me. No Fox sparrows, No Towhees or No Rustys on this snow day. Terry 
ButlerPangburn, AR From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Lyndal YorkSent: Thursday, 
March 05, 2015 1:33 PMTo: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDUSubject: Where have the 
birds gone? My usual flock of feeder birds were very busy yesterday emptying 
the feeders. Today very few birds are around. I gather the sleet/snow storm 
pushed them south. Anyone else experience their feeder birds disappearing 
overnight? Lyndal YorkLittle Rock 


      
 		 	   		  
Subject: feederbirds
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:45:54 -0500
Unless they will eat dog food? We are out of bird seed here. No way out to get 
any either. They can come visit you. Teresa, Hector. 
Subject: Re: Junco's
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:44:10 -0600
Here, the Juncos always eat off the ground or the surface of the deck. They do 
not go to the hanging feeders or eat suet as some of you have reported. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

On Mar 5, 2015, at 4:25 PM, Jacque Brown  wrote:

> I have the Juncos in the small tree and bushes but they always go to the 
sunflower seeds I broadcast on the ground rather than go to the platform 
feeders in my yard. Jacque Brown, contortion. 

> 
> 
>> On Mar 4, 2015, at 7:06 PM, Bob Harden  wrote:
>> 
>> My Junco's seem to love the suet, but they are not very good at hanging on 
to it. and they like the elevated feeder well 

>> 
>> 
>> On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 6:14 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:
>> My juncos eat suet daily and also take seed from the elevated mixed seed
>> feeders above the ground. This happens regardless of weather.
>> 
>> Jerry W. Davis
>> Hot Springs.
>> 
>> 
>>  I have never had a Junco feeding off the ground at my feeders.  Just now I
>> > saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet feeder about 6 feet off the ground.
>> > No
>> > bushes close by.  Maybe the Sleet?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Terry Butler
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 22:28:52 +0000
After "can you help me ID this bird?" the question "where have all the birds 
gone?" is the most frequently asked one I get when people call Audubon Arkansas 
looking for answers. Or the variant "where has species X gone?" As you can tell 
from the various responses, there is a lot of natural, local variation from 
place to place and day to day, regardless of the weather. It is interesting to 
read about this variation, even within Little Rock. 


Certainly this scale of variation is no cause for concern. It is the long-term, 
large-scale changes that should be of concern. Changes that are made visible by 
making observations over long periods and large areas. That's why it is so 
important to participate in such data collection efforts, namely citizen 
science projects like Audubon's Christmas Bird Count, the Great Backyard Bird 
Count, the Breeding Bird Survey, and eBird. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Norman Lavers" <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2015 3:36:38 PM 
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone? 

Like Lyndal we have noticed fewer of our regular birds at the feeder all day. 
There are some White-throats but not the normal good numbers and only 1 or 2 of 
the 4 or 5 Fox sparrows are showing up today. There was one Field sparrow for a 
while. The Mourning Dove flock is down to 5 or 6 from 16 or more. We have had 
one visit from a Coopers when everyone either split or stayed very still for a 
while but that is a normal occurrence and has not caused the birds to stay away 
for long in the past. 

Amongst the small number of Grackles and Red-wings we have had one Rusty 
Blackbird. 


Cheryl and Norman Lavers, Jonesboro 


On Thursday, March 5, 2015 3:29 PM, Terry Butler  
wrote: 



Lyndal, I had birds at my feeder all day but only about 20% of the number of 
birds I had yesterday. I started to post this, then I thought no one would 
believe me. No Fox sparrows, No Towhee’s or No Rusty’s on this snow day. 

Terry Butler 
Pangburn, AR 
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Lyndal York 

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 1:33 PM 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Where have the birds gone? 
My usual flock of feeder birds were very busy yesterday emptying the feeders. 
Today very few birds are around. I gather the sleet/snow storm pushed them 
south. Anyone else experience their feeder birds disappearing overnight? 

Lyndal York 
Little Rock 


Subject: feeder birds
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:28:28 -0500
Well they cleaned me out. No more food for them. Here's the estimated list of 
what we had today 

300 Goldfinches
90 Juncos
50 Purple finches
50 Pine Siskens
17 Cardinals
100 White-Throated Sparrows
2 Pine Warblers
3 Carolina Wrens
3 Mourning Doves
1 E.Collar Dove
2 Downy Woodpeckers
1 Red-Bellied Woodpecker
6 BlueJays
1 Pilated Woodpecker
1 Sapsucker
2 Flickers
6 Titmouse
6 Chickadees
2 White Nuthatches
1Hermit Thrush
1 Fox Sparrow
2 Crows
1 Towee
The two that were missing was the Brown Thrasher and the Cooper's Hawk. They 
may had seen the ground being covered that thick and thought? GEE! There no 
room for me! And they decided not to come and join the party. That I got to say 
is the most I have ever seen at our feeder! We are out of food so now they can 
come and visit you all who have food. Teresa In Hector, AR 
Subject: Re: Junco's
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:25:53 -0600
I have the Juncos in the small tree and bushes but they always go to the 
sunflower seeds I broadcast on the ground rather than go to the platform 
feeders in my yard. Jacque Brown, contortion. 



> On Mar 4, 2015, at 7:06 PM, Bob Harden  wrote:
> 
> My Junco's seem to love the suet, but they are not very good at hanging on to 
it. and they like the elevated feeder well 

> 
> 
> On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 6:14 PM, Jerry Davis > wrote: 

> My juncos eat suet daily and also take seed from the elevated mixed seed
> feeders above the ground. This happens regardless of weather.
> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs.
> 
> 
>  I have never had a Junco feeding off the ground at my feeders.  Just now I
> > saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet feeder about 6 feet off the ground.
> > No
> > bushes close by.  Maybe the Sleet?
> >
> >
> >
> > Terry Butler
> >
> >
> >
> >
> 
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 16:08:37 -0600
Large numbers at the feeders again today.  All the usual White Throated
sparrows, Juncos, goldfinches, Blue Jays  at least 35 Cardinals  8 Rusties
on a regular basis and the last two days lots of redwing blackbirds Brown
headed cowbirds along with large numbers of the usual Common Grackles.
Only thing different I had one chipping sparrow and one Juv. White crowned
Sparrow.   first of either this year in the yard.  Takes a lot of seed to
feed them all'

On Thu, Mar 5, 2015 at 3:36 PM, Norman Lavers <
0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> Like Lyndal we have noticed fewer of our regular birds at the feeder all
> day. There are some White-throats but not the normal good numbers and only
> 1 or 2 of the 4 or 5 Fox sparrows are showing up today. There was one Field
> sparrow for a while. The Mourning Dove flock is down to 5 or 6 from 16 or
> more.  We have had one visit from a Coopers when everyone either split or
> stayed very still for a while but that is a normal occurrence and has not
> caused the birds to stay away for long in the past.
> Amongst the small number of Grackles and Red-wings we have had one Rusty
> Blackbird.
>
> Cheryl and Norman Lavers, Jonesboro
>
>
>   On Thursday, March 5, 2015 3:29 PM, Terry Butler 
> wrote:
>
>
> Lyndal, I had birds at my feeder all day but only about 20% of the number
> of birds I had yesterday.  I started to post this, then I thought no one
> would believe me. No Fox sparrows, No Towhee’s or No Rusty’s on this snow
> day.
>
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Lyndal York
> *Sent:* Thursday, March 05, 2015 1:33 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Where have the birds gone?
>
> My usual flock of feeder birds were very busy yesterday emptying the
> feeders. Today very few birds are around. I gather the sleet/snow storm
> pushed them south.  Anyone else experience their feeder birds disappearing
> overnight?
> Lyndal York
> Little Rock
>
>
>
Subject: Birds
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 15:46:17 -0600
Again, with the no work. Sigh. And filling the feeders. I put some corn
cobs out in the deer path and on the road in front of the house. In just a
few hours the local king and queen crows found them. They brought in a
third crow and systematically ate them all. The crows can hold a cob and
pound off the kernels. They can also fly carrying a full half cob. At one
point a Red-shouldered Hawk flew in suddenly, frightening the smaller
birds. The crows did not flinch or stop eating.

Grackle flocks in waves now. Since they have discovered the yard.

A Rusty Blackbird "singing" out the window this morning.

No chance to brave the roads over to Toadsuck. Will check the gulls
tomorrow.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 21:36:38 +0000
Like Lyndal we have noticed fewer of our regular birds at the feeder all day. 
There are some White-throats but not the normal good numbers and only 1 or 2 of 
the 4 or 5 Fox sparrows are showing up today. There was one Field sparrow for a 
while. The Mourning Dove flock is down to 5 or 6 from 16 or more.  We have had 
one visit from a Coopers when everyone either split or stayed very still for a 
while but that is a normal occurrence and has not caused the birds to stay away 
for long in the past. 

Amongst the small number of Grackles and Red-wings we have had one Rusty 
Blackbird. 

Cheryl and Norman Lavers, Jonesboro 

 On Thursday, March 5, 2015 3:29 PM, Terry Butler  
wrote: 

   

 #yiv8111828793 #yiv8111828793 -- _filtered #yiv8111828793 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 
4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv8111828793 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 
4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv8111828793 {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 
4 2 4;}#yiv8111828793 #yiv8111828793 p.yiv8111828793MsoNormal, #yiv8111828793 
li.yiv8111828793MsoNormal, #yiv8111828793 div.yiv8111828793MsoNormal 
{margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv8111828793 a:link, 
#yiv8111828793 span.yiv8111828793MsoHyperlink 
{color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8111828793 a:visited, #yiv8111828793 
span.yiv8111828793MsoHyperlinkFollowed 
{color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8111828793 
span.yiv8111828793EmailStyle17 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv8111828793 
.yiv8111828793MsoChpDefault {} _filtered #yiv8111828793 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 
1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv8111828793 div.yiv8111828793WordSection1 {}#yiv8111828793 
Lyndal, I had birds at my feeder all day but only about 20% of the number of 
birds I had yesterday.  I started to post this, then I thought no one would 
believe me. No Fox sparrows, No Towhee’s or No Rusty’s on this snow day. 
 Terry ButlerPangburn, AR  From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Lyndal York 

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 1:33 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Where have the birds gone?  My usual flock of feeder birds were very 
busy yesterday emptying the feeders. Today very few birds are around. I gather 
the sleet/snow storm pushed them south.  Anyone else experience their feeder 
birds disappearing overnight? Lyndal YorkLittle Rock 


   
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 15:28:46 -0600
Lyndal, I had birds at my feeder all day but only about 20% of the number of
birds I had yesterday.  I started to post this, then I thought no one would
believe me. No Fox sparrows, No Towhee's or No Rusty's on this snow day.

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Lyndal York
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 1:33 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Where have the birds gone?

 

My usual flock of feeder birds were very busy yesterday emptying the
feeders. Today very few birds are around. I gather the sleet/snow storm
pushed them south.  Anyone else experience their feeder birds disappearing
overnight? 

Lyndal York

Little Rock
Subject: Re: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 15:14:58 -0600
This has been known (and caught on camera) for many years.  Horses 
sometimes eat frogs, too, and there are numerous other examples from all 
over the world.  Indeed, few if any herbivores don't occasionally eat 
animal-sourced foods.  It's perfectly natural, and they do it because 
plants (and soils) can't always supply all required minerals, and 
possibly other less-well-characterized nutrients.

But what's old is new again......

On 3/5/2015 2:57 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary
>
> 
http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

>
Subject: FW: Field Cameras Catch Deer Eating Birds
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:57:45 -0600
Also, some of the “blog” replies are scary


http://io9.com/field-cameras-catch-deer-eating-birds-wait-why-do-deer-1689440870?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook 
 
&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:33:39 -0600
I experienced the same situation as Gail. When the Cooper’s or Sharp-shinned 
hawks are anywhere around they take to the cover until they are gone. They do 
recognize their hawks and the resident red-shoulder hawk can be perched on on 
of the feeders and they continue. The birds were at the feeders yesterday until 
almost dark and at it at daylight this morning and all day. There were several 
flushes to the bushes this morning, but I did not see a hawk. I think the 
action was in reaction to the paranoid flocks of red-winged blackbirds and 
grackles. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: Gail Miller 
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 2:20 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?

Maybe you have a hawk in your yard .... that is what usually happens here, when 
my birds disappear. I often hear the warning of the Blue Jays first, or the 
sound of a bird glance against the kitchen window as they all scatter from my 
feeder station. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Lyndal York 
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 1:33 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Where have the birds gone?

My usual flock of feeder birds were very busy yesterday emptying the feeders. 
Today very few birds are around. I gather the sleet/snow storm pushed them 
south. Anyone else experience their feeder birds disappearing overnight? 



Lyndal York

Little Rock
Subject: Re: Where have the birds gone?
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:20:14 -0600
Maybe you have a hawk in your yard .... that is what usually happens here, when 
my birds disappear. I often hear the warning of the Blue Jays first, or the 
sound of a bird glance against the kitchen window as they all scatter from my 
feeder station. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Lyndal York 
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 1:33 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Where have the birds gone?

My usual flock of feeder birds were very busy yesterday emptying the feeders. 
Today very few birds are around. I gather the sleet/snow storm pushed them 
south. Anyone else experience their feeder birds disappearing overnight? 



Lyndal York

Little Rock
Subject: Feeder birds
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 14:36:55 -0500
 I have over 500 birds at my feeder the last few days. So if you missing birds 
they must had come here. You name it? I most likely have it! And we got before 
it started to melt this morning 4 inches of snow without sleet last night. 
Teresa, Hector, AR 
Subject: Where have the birds gone?
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 13:33:12 -0600
My usual flock of feeder birds were very busy yesterday emptying the
feeders. Today very few birds are around. I gather the sleet/snow storm
pushed them south.  Anyone else experience their feeder birds disappearing
overnight?

Lyndal York
Little Rock
Subject: snow & birds
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 12:42:48 -0600
Several inches of rain yesterday & then snow late with an inch to inch & a
half of accumulation but the sun is shining brightly now & melting.  :)

 

Today there are a dozen pine siskins on the deck & at the feeders - more
than I've seen this winter.  Also, 15 juncos along with purple finch male &
female, nuthatch, chickadees, several downy woodpeckers plus the big
red-bellied woodpecker  Cardinals, 2 dozen goldfinch, lots of white throated
sparrows & titmice.    A lone pine warble.    The goldfinch are certainly
squabbling.

 

'MaryAnn' King

In the pine woods northwest of London.

 
Subject: AVIAN ECHOES: THE STILLWELLS IN FAYETTEVILLE (CONCLUSION, PART 4)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 15:20:52 +0000
THE BOOK OF SONGBIRDS by Leon Hausman, published in 1956, was an ambitious 
effort at environmental education for children. The format is 9 x 12 inches, 
sold for $1.95, with wonderful Ned Smith paintings of common species. Inside 
covers are paintings of bird nests. The bluebird box opening is a label of a 
78 RPM recording of authentic bird songs captured by recording in their 
natural habitats by Jerry and Norma Stillwell. 


Starting in the late 1940s, the Stillwells traveled North America collecting 
bird songs in their natural habitats. Since fall of 1950, they had returned 
from these journeys to Avian Echoes, their home in Fayetteville. Here they 
relaxed, edited miles of tape, and created three of LPs, BIRD SONGS OF 
DOORYARD, FIELD AND FOREST (1952, 1953, and 1956). 


Spring 1959 found the Stillwells along the Atlantic coast north to Maine, 
working on a hoped for fourth LP. Unfortunately, in some places they found that 
summer homes had  completely monopolized the land. The few shorebirds were 
wary and silent. 


Norma would write a charming and often humorous account of these travels, 
sparing neither joys nor travails: BIRD SONGS, ADVENTURES AND TECHNIQUES IN 
RECORDING THE SONGS OF AMERICAN BIRDS (1964). 


The scenery was wonderful along the Atlantic, but the shore birds we had hoped 
for failed to cooperate. At last it became clear that our dream of a record of 
water and game birds was not to be, for us. They left Avian Echoes and 
returned to Dallas. Jerry was sick. After a long hospital stay, the technical 
guy of this dynamic duo died in Dallas, September 1959. 


No maudlin adieu, BIRD SONGS is pure celebration, as good in 2015 as 1964. Like 
Kenn Kaufmann in KINGBIRD HIGHWAY (1997), she shares a passion that the 
inexorable passage of time cannot diminish. 


Back in those years before Avian Echoes, and before bird song recordings, Norma 
was a botanist. Native plants, and the connection to the health of native 
birds, are palpable in BIRD SONGS. She had published KEY AND GUIDE TO NATIVE 
TREES, SHRUBS AND WOODY VINES OF DALLAS COUNTY in 1939. Ill bet she returned 
to it, after Jerry and bird songs. Someone in the Texas botany/birding 
community will have the details. 


This is a lifes work, after all. No doubt she pursued it until her own 
passing, in October 1978. 


As far as I know, there is ONE circulating copy of BIRD SONGS in the Natural 
State of Arkansas  a few used copies available on line. ZERO circulating 
copies of the vinyl LPs in Arkansas  check interlibrary loans. Cassette tapes 
with modest sound quality problems ($8.95 + shipping). MP3 files can be 
downloaded from iTunes. Mitchell Pruitt told me yesterday the ones he listened 
to sound good. 


Younger recorders now scout the shores and crouch in the bulrushes, according 
to Norma. Heres hoping. Go git 'em you bulrush crouchers. North America is 
ready for you now. 
Subject: FW: POSTPONED: DoD Natural Resources Program Webinar Series: Source/Sink Dynamics of Birds on DoD Lands- 5 March 2pm ET
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 09:20:01 -0600
FYI, for all you that wanted to participate.  Jeff Short

 

From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS
Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 8:21 AM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: POSTPONED: DoD Natural Resources Program Webinar Series:
Source/Sink Dynamics of Birds on DoD Lands- 5 March 2pm ET

 

Due to the winter storm that has blanketed much of the eastern US and closed
a large number of gov't offices (including DC and our speakers office), we
are postponing this webinar to another date in the near future.

 

Rich

 

From: , Rich Fischer 
Date: Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 1:11 AM
To: "DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU" 
Cc: "Marra, Peter" , "Ryder, Thomas" ,
"Sillett, Scott" , Jonathon Valente
, "Betts, Matt" ,
James Saracco , Tammy Wilbert
, Clark Rushing , "Hostetler,
Jeffrey" , "calandra.stanley AT gmail.com"
, "Boice, L P CIV (US)"
, "Dalsimer, Allyn A (Alison) CTR (US)"
, "DoDNatRes AT bah.com" 
Subject: REMINDER TODAY: DoD Natural Resources Program Webinar Series:
Source/Sink Dynamics of Birds on DoD Lands- 5 March 2pm ET

 

The next in a series of DoD Natural Resources Program webinars will occur
this Thursday, 5 March, at 2pm EST.  Our speaker will be Dr. Pete Marra.
Pete is Head of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and a conservation
scientist where he studies the annual cycle ecology of several species of
migratory birds, including the American redstart and wood thrush.  His
primary interests lie in understanding the factors that control population
dynamics so Pete's research examines the roles of climate, habitat, food and
invasive species such as cats as sources of mortality on individuals and
their populations.  

 

Pete's presentation, which is a SERDP-funded investigation, is titled,
"Using a Hierarchical Approach to Model Source-Sink Dynamics For
Neotropical-Nearctic Songbirds."

 

Abstract:  The spatial distribution and temporal stability of animal
populations is a function of habitat quality, habitat selection, and
dispersal. Source-sink dynamics - how local and regional processes structure
populations and influence their persistence - comprise an essential aspect
of population stability. Understanding source-sink dynamics for migratory
bird populations is especially challenging and timely because these species
can move among multiple habitats and between continents during their annual
cycles, and many have declined in abundance over the past three decades. The
Department of Defense (DoD) manages nearly 25 million acres of land, much of
which is high-value bird habitat that often is considered source habitat
because of the relative size of contiguous habitat blocks and lack of
fragmentation.  Multiple methods are available to investigate source-sink
dynamics, each varying in degree of effort and expense.  DoD primarily uses
point counts and the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS)
protocol to monitor avian populations and inform the management of bird
species on its properties. However, the value of various monitoring
techniques used by DoD that could be used to quantify avian source-sink
dynamics at both local and regional scales has never been rigorously
assessed or validated. Our work, which is funded by SERDP, focuses on the
wood thrush, Hylocichla mustelina, a DoD Mission-sensitive Priority Species.
I will present some of our preliminary findings from four years of testing
multiple methods (i.e., point counts, MAPS, intensive demographic sampling)
of quantifying source sink dynamics, and discuss the importance of full
life-cycle conservation for migratory birds to the DoD.

 

Call-in Info:  Toll free number: (866) 754-8761

Participant pass code: 9971582

DCO link is: https://connectcol.dco.dod.mil/r39oxb5m06o/

Those participants that do not have a DCO account can login as a guest.

If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before: Test your
connection:https://connectcol.dco.dod.mil/common/help/en/support/meeting_tes
t.htm

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Junco's in my backyard
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 02:04:19 -0600
We just throw a butter tub of black oil sunflower seed across the deck 
each morning.  A fair bit falls on the ground (sunflowers come up every 
spring).  The juncos and other birds seem to be quite enthusiastic with 
that arrangement.  We've even had nuthatches and a brown creeper work 
the deck for the seed.

George (n. Conway Co. lots of juncos and an inch or so of ice)

On 3/4/2015 9:21 PM, Robert Bays wrote:
> Juncos are eating seeds that are in a large plastic saucer. They share 
> with northern cardinals, mourning doves & bluejays. The juncos also 
> find seeds that have fallen in the grass. Everything is fine until 
> grackles & blackbirds show up & take over.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> M
> On Mar 4, 2015, at 8:55 PM, Beverly Sullivan 
> <000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> > wrote:

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Re: Junco's in my backyard
From: Robert Bays <baysrr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 21:21:51 -0600
Juncos are eating seeds that are in a large plastic saucer. They share with 
northern cardinals, mourning doves & bluejays. The juncos also find seeds that 
have fallen in the grass. Everything is fine until grackles & blackbirds show 
up & take over. 


Sent from my iPhone
M
> On Mar 4, 2015, at 8:55 PM, Beverly Sullivan 
<000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Juncos have always eaten off the ground at my place. They also eat at the 
feeders and suet feeders but have loved the seeds I put on the ground. 

> Beverly Sullivan, Marion, AR
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jerry Davis 
> To: ARBIRD-L 
> Sent: Wed, Mar 4, 2015 7:22 pm
> Subject: Re: Junco's
> 
> Thank you. My suet is not in the wire baskets but put holes in a 3
> inch
> diameter cedar limb and they along with chickadees, titmouse,
> Carolina
> wrens and Pine Warblers do OK with hanging on the lip of the holes. I
> use
> the peanut delight no melt suet dough which with my yard bird studies
> is
> preferred over all other suet combinations by a greater number of
> species.
> I no longer buy the greasy mess that is stuffed with mixed seeds and
> the
> birds have to clean their bills after eating it.
> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot
> Springs
> 
> 
> 
>  My Junco's seem to love the suet, but they are not very good at
> hanging on
> > to it.  and they like the elevated feeder well
> >
> >
> > On Wed,
> Mar 4, 2015 at 6:14 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:
> >
> >> My
> juncos eat suet daily and also take seed from the elevated mixed seed
> >>
> feeders above the ground. This happens regardless of weather.
> >>
> >> Jerry W.
> Davis
> >> Hot Springs.
> >>
> >>
> >>  I have never had a Junco feeding off the
> ground at my feeders.  Just
> >> now I
> >> > saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet
> feeder about 6 feet off the
> >> ground.
> >> > No
> >> > bushes close by.  Maybe
> the Sleet?
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Terry Butler
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >
Subject: Re: Junco's
From: Beverly Sullivan <000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 21:55:39 -0500
Juncos have always eaten off the ground at my place. They also eat at the 
feeders and suet feeders but have loved the seeds I put on the ground. 

Beverly Sullivan, Marion, AR



-----Original Message-----
From: Jerry Davis 
To: ARBIRD-L 
Sent: Wed, Mar 4, 2015 7:22 pm
Subject: Re: Junco's


Thank you. My suet is not in the wire baskets but put holes in a 3
inch
diameter cedar limb and they along with chickadees, titmouse,
Carolina
wrens and Pine Warblers do OK with hanging on the lip of the holes. I
use
the peanut delight no melt suet dough which with my yard bird studies
is
preferred over all other suet combinations by a greater number of
species.
I no longer buy the greasy mess that is stuffed with mixed seeds and
the
birds have to clean their bills after eating it.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot
Springs



 My Junco's seem to love the suet, but they are not very good at
hanging on
> to it.  and they like the elevated feeder well
>
>
> On Wed,
Mar 4, 2015 at 6:14 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:
>
>> My
juncos eat suet daily and also take seed from the elevated mixed seed
>>
feeders above the ground. This happens regardless of weather.
>>
>> Jerry W.
Davis
>> Hot Springs.
>>
>>
>>  I have never had a Junco feeding off the
ground at my feeders.  Just
>> now I
>> > saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet
feeder about 6 feet off the
>> ground.
>> > No
>> > bushes close by.  Maybe
the Sleet?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Terry Butler
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>

 
Subject: Glaucous Gull
From: Randy Robinson <critterkeepr AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 20:12:43 -0600
Glaucous Gull still at dam site on wall 300 mark.Nice adult also 3 Herring 
Gulls. 11:00am 

Subject: Re: Junco's
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 20:22:47 -0500
Thank you. My suet is not in the wire baskets but put holes in a 3 inch
diameter cedar limb and they along with chickadees, titmouse, Carolina
wrens and Pine Warblers do OK with hanging on the lip of the holes. I use
the peanut delight no melt suet dough which with my yard bird studies is
preferred over all other suet combinations by a greater number of species.
I no longer buy the greasy mess that is stuffed with mixed seeds and the
birds have to clean their bills after eating it.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs



 My Junco's seem to love the suet, but they are not very good at hanging on
> to it.  and they like the elevated feeder well
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 6:14 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:
>
>> My juncos eat suet daily and also take seed from the elevated mixed seed
>> feeders above the ground. This happens regardless of weather.
>>
>> Jerry W. Davis
>> Hot Springs.
>>
>>
>>  I have never had a Junco feeding off the ground at my feeders.  Just
>> now I
>> > saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet feeder about 6 feet off the
>> ground.
>> > No
>> > bushes close by.  Maybe the Sleet?
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Terry Butler
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>
Subject: Re: Junco's
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 19:06:35 -0600
My Junco's seem to love the suet, but they are not very good at hanging on
to it.  and they like the elevated feeder well


On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 6:14 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:

> My juncos eat suet daily and also take seed from the elevated mixed seed
> feeders above the ground. This happens regardless of weather.
>
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs.
>
>
>  I have never had a Junco feeding off the ground at my feeders.  Just now I
> > saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet feeder about 6 feet off the ground.
> > No
> > bushes close by.  Maybe the Sleet?
> >
> >
> >
> > Terry Butler
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
Subject: Re: Junco's
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 19:14:40 -0500
My juncos eat suet daily and also take seed from the elevated mixed seed
feeders above the ground. This happens regardless of weather.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs.


 I have never had a Junco feeding off the ground at my feeders.  Just now I
> saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet feeder about 6 feet off the ground.
> No
> bushes close by.  Maybe the Sleet?
>
>
>
> Terry Butler
>
>
>
>
Subject: Junco's
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 17:48:15 -0600
I have never had a Junco feeding off the ground at my feeders.  Just now I
saw 3 Junco's eating suet on my suet feeder about 6 feet off the ground. No
bushes close by.  Maybe the Sleet?

 

Terry Butler

 
Subject: very colorful western juncos in snow
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 22:25:03 +0000
Joan Reynolds just sent me some fine close photographs of juncos on her back 
deck, just east of Rogers. These are juncos obviously derived from basic Oregon 
stock rather than basic slate-colored (our more typical stock), but I can't 
tell if these are first year female Oregons (as shown in big Sibley, p 530) or 
perhaps the stable intergrade, cismontanus, shown on p 531 and labeled "Adult 
female Canadian Rocky Mountains." Whatever they are, they just look fabulous in 
their winter dress, and 2X so in this snow. There is just no end of fun in 
trying to sort out juncos, especially these. Sadly, departing soon, to where 
ever they are from. I think she is going to post some these on facebook, either 
on her own page or perhaps that of Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society. 
Subject: FW: Arkansas Outdoors Weekly Newsletter - March 4, 2015 Edition
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 20:31:24 +0000
Looks like the long arm of the law caught up to an eagle shooter…

[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: Arkansas Game and Fish Commission [mailto:kastephens AT agfc.state.ar.us]
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 11:58 AM
To: Reames, Clark -FS
Subject: Arkansas Outdoors Weekly Newsletter - March 4, 2015 Edition


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[Arkansas Outdoors]

Arkansas Outdoors Weekly Newsletter
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
Keith Stephens 501-223-6342, e-mail: 
kastephens AT agfc.state.ar.us 





March 4, 2015



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Today's Topics

  *   AGFC to celebrate centennial with open houses
  *   Arkansas trout trip weighs big with Kansas angler
  *   Sheridan man cited for shooting Bayou Meto bald eagle
  *   Little Bennett Lake has history in its background
  *   Used AGFC boats, motors, trailers and ATVs to be sold at Mayflower
  *   Annual fishing tournament benefits Arkansas Hunters Feeding the Hungry
  *   AGFC stocks over 119,400 fish during January






[http://d31hzlhk6di2h5.cloudfront.net/20150304/77/6b/97/43/06e671011c28623d1692995c_205x123.jpg] 


AGFC to celebrate centennial with open houses

LITTLE ROCK – The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission will celebrate 100 years 
of conservation with special events across the state in coming weeks. 


The AGFC was created March 11, 1915, by Act 124. It was followed by state 
agencies dealing with parks, forests, soil and water, along with conservation 
courses in schools. 


Gov. Asa Hutchinson will read a proclamation observing the centennial at 2 
p.m., Wednesday, March 11, at the Capitol. Open houses at AGFC nature centers, 
fish hatcheries and other facilities across Arkansas will be held 1-4 p.m., 
Saturday, March 14. Keep an eye on the AGFC website – 
www.agfc.com/calDocs/OpenHouse.pdf 
– and its Facebook page for information about other events planned for coming 
months. All events are free and open to the public. 


The AGFC has published two books reflecting the centennial. “A Century of 
Conservation” tells the story of the agency’s first 100 years and “A 
Celebration of Conservation” includes 100 recipes from AGFC employees, 
families and friends. Both are for sale – along with centennial baseball caps 
and T-shirts – at nature centers and at agfc.com. There also a YouTube video 
that explores The Natural State's breathtaking scenery and abundant fish and 
wildlife resources while examining some of the state's most important 
conservation milestones available at 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEXz29ayl0M&feature;=em-share_video_user. 


“We invite everyone in Arkansas to participate in many of the centennial 
events that will be coming up,” said AGFC Director Mike Knoedl. “The 
natural resources of Arkansas belong to all the people, and we are privileged 
to look after the wildlife and the fish within our borders.” 


AGFC Chairman Ron Duncan said, “This is a milestone anniversary for all 
Arkansas, not just the Game and Fish Commission. We have the abundant and 
productive hunting and fishing today because of the foresight of Arkansas 
leaders a century ago. Without the support of citizens, this could not have 
been successful.” 


The outlook for conservation in 1915 was dark for several reasons. Europe had 
become embroiled in a world war, and the U.S. would be pulled in two years 
later. Mexican revolutionaries crossed into American territory. In Arkansas, 
elk, bison and swans were gone, deer were drastically reduced, bears extremely 
scarce, and ducks and geese in decline. 


Creation of a state agency to look after wildlife and fish failed in the 
Arkansas Legislature in 1913. With renewed efforts, it passed two years later 
through intense efforts by State Sen. J.M. Futrell of Paragould and State Rep. 
Lee Miles of Little Rock. Act 124 was signed into law March 11, 1915, by Gov. 
George Washington Hays. 


The AGFC’s birth came in a period of nationwide movements to protect natural 
resources. Spearheaded by President Theodore Roosevelt, numerous state and 
national agencies were created during a dozen or so years. The Migratory Bird 
Act passed in 1918, which effectively ended market hunting. The death of the 
last passenger pigeon came in 1914. Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge was 
created in northeastern Arkansas in 1915. 


Later came amendments to the state Constitution. In 1945, Amendment 35 gave the 
AGFC semi-autonomous status; in 1996, Amendment 75 gave it secure revenue with 
the 1/8-Cent Conservation Sales Tax. 











[http://d31hzlhk6di2h5.cloudfront.net/20150304/3c/62/b9/d7/7ebf4db2e8cdd4303ed7c7ea_205x135.jpg] 


Arkansas trout trip weighs gig with Kansas angler

COTTER – Arkansas’s trout tailwaters are famous for incredible scenery, 
fast action and some of the biggest brown trout in the world – just ask 
Kansas angler Calvin Johnston. 


Johnston, a resident of Olathe, Kansas, was enjoying his first trout-fishing 
trip to The Natural State Friday, February 27, when he hooked into a fish that 
will have people up and down the White River talking for years. 


“I’m a bass angler,” Johnston said. “But we have a few ponds in Kansas 
that are stocked with some small rainbow trout. I’ve gone to one of them a 
couple of times and maybe caught five or six rainbows, but this was my first 
real trout fishing trip and my first brown trout ever.” 


Johnston grew up in Little Rock and graduated J.A. Fair High School before 
moving to Kansas. He says his brother and brother’s friends from the Bryant 
Police Department always go to Rainbow Drive Resort on the White River for a 
trout trip during this time of year. This year he decided to join them to see 
what the trout fishing was like. 


“I used the same rod and setup that I use to drop-shot fish for bass,” 
Johnston said. “A medium-light six-foot, nine-inch spinning rod with 
15-pound-test braid tied to a 10-pound-test fluorocarbon leader.” 


When the group arrived, the current was flowing too heavily to wade more than a 
few feet from shore, and the cold weather had most of the party taking a break 
to warm up Friday afternoon. 


“It was getting to be sundown, and I know that’s always a great time to 
fish for bass,” Johnston said. “So I headed down to the bank to cast a 
little. I didn’t even have any waders or a net and just cast from the bank. 
That’s when she hit.” 


Johnston says nearly all the line peeled off the reel on the fish’s first 
run. 


“I’ve never fought a fish like that before,” Johnston said. “She was 
running around rocks and grass and there were several times I thought I’d 
lose her. It felt like I fought this fish for 20 minutes.” 


Without a net to land the fish or even waders to go in after it, Johnston was 
stuck. “I started to yell for anyone to help,” he said. “One man finally 
asked what was going on. When he saw the fish roll at the surface, he ran to 
get a net. He said he’s been fishing there since he was seven years old and 
had never seen a fish like that in his life.” 


After a few tries, the pair finally managed to get the trout’s head in the 
net and pull her to shore. 


“Everyone started to come out of their cabins to see the fish,” Johnston 
said. “One man brought out a handheld Rapala scale, and the fish measured 40 
pounds on it. That’s when I knew I needed to call the Game and Fish and get 
this thing weighed officially.” 


AGFC Trout Management Program Coordinator Christy Graham and District Fisheries 
Biologist Jeremy Risley met Johnston to weigh the fish on certified scales at 
the Mountain Home Field Office. 


“It’s official weight and length was 38 lbs, 7 oz., and it was 36.6 inches 
long,” Graham said. “I’ve looked into former records for brown trout in 
Arkansas, and can only find official records of two brown trout being larger 
–Rip Collins’ former world-record from the Little Red River that weighed 40 
lbs. 4 oz. and the previous world-record fish from the Norfork Tailwater that 
weighed 38 lbs. 9 oz. 


“This is the biggest brown ever recorded for the White River,” Graham said. 
“We are extremely pleased by Mr. Johnston’s catch. The White and North Fork 
Rivers have always been known as world-class trout fisheries and this is just 
further evidence that anglers still have the opportunity to catch trophy 
fish.” 











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Sheridan man cited for shooting Bayou Meto bald eagle

HUMPHREY – Enforcement officials with the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission 
have cited a Sheridan man who shot and wounded a bald eagle Monday on Bayou 
Meto Wildlife Management Area. Garrett P. Davis admitted to shooting the eagle 
on the WMA in January. 


After authorities were alerted to the juvenile eagle, it was quickly taken to a 
rehabilitator and has recovered. The eagle was shot in the right wing, 
resulting in a fractured right ulna. The steel pellet is going to remain in the 
wing and did not affect the healing process. The eagle has been nursed back to 
health and is scheduled to be released Saturday at 11 a.m. at the Wrape 
Plantation on Bayou Meto WMA near Stuttgart. 


Davis was cited for the illegal taking of raptors. He has agreed to pay a fine 
of $2,500. 


Karen Rowe, nongame migratory bird coordinator with AGFC, said a pair of duck 
hunters fished the eagle out of the water. “They wrapped the eagle in a 
hunting coat, put the eagle in their boat and called the wildlife officers to 
meet them at the boat ramp,” Rowe said. 


Heavy penalties and jail sentences can be assessed to anyone shooting a bald 
eagle. Information can be made anonymously by phone at 800-482-9262 or by text 
to TIP411 (847411). 


Rowe suggested donations to the rehabilitation facility to help with expense of 
care for the injured eagle. She said, “Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas is 
the nonprofit raptor rehab facility that will spend its own money and time 
caring for this eagle until it can be released. You can make a PayPal donation 
help pay for the care of this eagle and other raptors at 
http://www.rrca-raptors.org/.” 











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Little Bennett Lake has history in its background

Little Bennett Lake has history in its background GREENBRIER – On most any 
day on the larger lakes in Arkansas, bass fishermen work out of $40,000 boat 
rigs and sometimes compete for thousands of dollars in prizes. 


At the same time someone will be at Bennett Lake catching a few bream or maybe 
a couple of nice channel catfish. The Lake Bennett angler may have $40 or less 
in his or her angling gear. 


Bennett Lake is a nice little Faulkner County asset. It’s in Woolly Hollow 
State Park near Greenbrier and is just 40 acres in size. It is historic as well 
as fishable. 


The lake was the first one built in the nation by the federal Soil Conservation 
Service, now the Natural Resource Conservation Service. It was a Depression-era 
project, a forerunner of small watershed lakes all over the country to offset 
erosion, to slow flooding -- and to provide recreational fishing. 


The lake was built in 1935, part of the massive Franklin D. Roosevelt work 
programs, and it was named for the head of the Soil Conservation Service, Dr. 
Hugh Bennett. Just 40 acres, the lake is modest compared to Lake Conway and 
even nearby Beaverfork Lake. 


Once upon a time, Bennett Lake was the only water-sports facility in Central 
Arkansas. 


The Arkansas River was inaccessible, untamed and virtually unusable. Bennett 
Lake had been here 16 years before Lake Conway was built, but the latter meant 
nothing to recreational boaters and water skiers. 


Many Faulkner County families made outings to Lake Bennett, picnicking and 
taking short rides in boats. They skied on it, and they were joined by many 
more from the Little Rock area. 


There wasn't a park then. The state park didn't arrive until the 1970s. Lake 
Bennett was reached by a bumpy, dusty gravel road. Visitors spread blankets or 
quilts, found what shade they could and enjoyed themselves. 


Boat ramp? It was a dirt and gravel thing, tricky in wet weather.

Beaverfork, Greers Ferry Lake, Lake Maumelle and others pushed Bennett Lake far 
to the sidelines for boaters. It regained some status when the park was created 
in 1972. 


The park has pedal boats for rent, and some visitors bring canoes. A flatbottom 
boat with a trolling motor works well for fishermen. 


An addition a few years ago was a handicapped-accessible fishing pier. Campers 
and picnickers now have plentiful shade trees. Part of the camping area has 
electrical hookups, with some sites also having water hookups. A concession 
offers snacks, drinks and other items. 


Bennett Lake and Woolly Hollow State Park are about 18 miles north of Conway or 
six miles northeast of Greenbrier via U.S. 65 and Arkansas Highway 285. They 
are open year-round. 











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Used AGFC boats, motors, trailers and ATVs to be sold at Mayflower

MAYFLOWER – Used Arkansas Game and Fish Commission boats, motors, trailers, 
ATVs and vehicles will be available for viewing and sealed bid submission at 
the agency’s enforcement training center in Mayflower beginning next week. 
Viewing and bid submission will be available March 10-13 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
and again on March 14 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 


The AGFC enforcement training center is located at 213 Arkansas Highway 89 
South just to the east of Mayflower. 


All bids must be submitted on site by 12 noon, March 16. Bid opening is the 
week of March 23-27 at the AGFC headquarters, 2 Natural Resources Drive in 
Little Rock. Bid winners will be notified between April 1-3. 


Only money orders and cashier’s check will be accepted. No credit cards, 
personal checks or cash will be accepted. For a list of items for sale, please 
visit www.agfc.com. 












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Annual fishing tournament benefits Arkansas Hunters Feeding the Hungry

HOT SPRINGS – The annual Arkansas Hunters Feeding the Hungry team fishing 
tournament will be held March 14 at the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission fish 
hatchery ramp on Lake Hamilton near Hot Springs. All of the proceeds from the 
tournament will go to the organization that helps to feed those less fortunate 
in Arkansas. 


Prizes included $2,000 for first place, $1,000 for second place and $500 for 
third place. Entry fee is $100 per boat. There will be gift bags and door 
prizes available. Big bass winner gets a $500 shopping spree at Academy Sports. 


For more information, contact Steve Wilson at 501-304-6305 or Ronnie Ritter at 
501-282-0006. Tournament sponsors include No-Way Pulpwood, Greeson’s, 
Zimmerman’s Sports Center, Legacy Printers and Supplies, and Academy Sports 
and Outdoors. Entry forms are available at online at 
www.arkansashunters.org. 












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AGFC stocks over 119,400 fish during January

LITTLE ROCK – Fishing may not be on everyone’s mind with ice and snow 
seemingly falling each week in Arkansas. That doesn’t mean it’s not a good 
time to hit some of the state’s fisheries. 


Fisheries crews from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission stocked over 119,400 
fish in Arkansas lakes and rivers during January. The total stocking weighed 
almost 59,200 pounds. Sportfish stocked included trout and bream. 


January stockings:
Amon’s Lake, Baxter County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Atalanta, Benton County, 1,173 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Bentonville, Benton County, 587 catchable rainbow trout
Boyle Park Pond, Pulaski County, 683 catchable rainbow trout
Cabot Community Pond, Lonoke County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Catherine, Garland County, 8,630 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Cherrywood, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Conway Station Park, Faulkner County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Craighead Forest Kids Pond, Craighead County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Dieffenbacher, Miller County, 547 catchable rainbow trout
Entergy Park Lake, Garland County, 600 catchable rainbow trout
Family Park Lake, Garland County, 508 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Hamilton, Garland County, 5,620 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Hamilton, Garland County, 1,500 catchable rainbow trout
Little Missouri River, Montgomery County, 2,700 catchable rainbow trout
John Benjamin Glenwood Community Pond, Pike County, 508 catchable rainbow trout 

Little Missouri River, Montgomery County, 1,051 catchable rainbow trout
Mike and Janet Huckabee Kids Pond, Pike County, 508 catchable rainbow trout
Mike Freeze England Community Pond, Lonoke County, 6,500 fingerling bluegill 
bream 

Mirror Lake, Stone County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
Murphy Park Lake, Washington County, 587 catchable rainbow trout
Narrows Dam Tailwater, Pike County, 13,692 catchable rainbow trout
Narrows Dam Tailwater, Pike County, 1,130 catchable rainbow trout
Narrows Dam Tailwater, Pike County, 400 adult brown trout
Ouachita River, Hot Spring County, 1,618 catchable rainbow trout
Paradise Lake, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Pleasant View Park Pond, Pope County, 600 catchable rainbow trout
Rich Mountain Community College Pond, Polk County, 331 catchable rainbow trout
Rock Creek, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Salem City Lake, Fulton County, 405 catchable rainbow trout
Searcy City Lake, White County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Sherwood City Pond, Pulaski County, 500 catchable rainbow trout
Spring River, Fulton County, 3450 catchable rainbow trout
Springdale Lake, Washington County, 587 catchable rainbow trout
Lake Valencia, Pulaski County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
War Memorial Park Pond, Pulaski County, 343 catchable rainbow trout
West Memphis City Park Lake, Crittendon County, 1,000 catchable rainbow trout
White River, Baxter, Izard, Marion and Stone counties, 13,314 catchable rainbow 
trout 

Greers Ferry National Fish Hatchery
Little Red River, Cleburne County, 8,040 catchable rainbow trout
Norfork National Fish Hatchery
Beaver Tailwater, Carroll County, 3,760 fingerling brown trout
Beaver Tailwater, Carroll County, 4,000 catchable rainbow trout
Norfork River, Baxter County, 3,867 fingerling brown trout
Norfork River, Baxter County, 2,100 catchable rainbow trout
White River, Baxter, Izard and Marion counties, 19,520 catchable rainbow trout










Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
2 Natural Resources Drive | Little Rock, AR 72205 | (800) 364-4263 - (501) 
223-6300 | www.agfc.com 





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Subject: Re: AVIAN ECHOES: THE STILLWELLS IN FAYETTEVILLE (PART 3)
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 14:22:05 -0600
Hey, Joe

        Have you heard some of the more extreme versions of the Bobolink
songs? He is undoubtedly among the Frank Zappa school of bird
singing/composing. Definitely a bizarre little song. Great stuff about the
Stillwells by the way.



        Bill Thurman




On Wed, Mar 4, 2015 at 12:03 PM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:

>  In the 1950s, Jerry and Norma Stillwell used the living room of their
> Fayetteville home, Avian Echoes, as an editing studio and generally as a
> retreat from bird recording travels across North America. However, they
> also taped local birds.
>
>
>  One Fayetteville subject was American Goldfinch, published on their
> first LP, BIRD SONGS OF DOORYARD, FIELD AND FOREST (1952). To reinforce
> learning, Norma imitates in a lilting voice two main songs, followed by
> recordings that, though from 60 years ago, are as clear as yesterday. In
> the background:  Northern Bobwhites, Mourning Doves, American Crows, and
> chickens from nearby broiler houses. The poultry industry was then just
> beginning.
>
>
>  All recordings are introduced, and variations in songs explained, with
> Jerry and Norma swapping duties as in their field work. First up is
> Northern Cardinal, recorded in Jerry’s home town Erie, Kansas. Jerry
> explains, “No wonder the cardinal is popular. He’s a friendly dooryard 
bird 

> with a variety of musical songs with glides and crescendos, lyrics of a
> prima donna.”
>
>
>  Between 1952 and 1956, they published three LPs with songs and calls of
> 165 species. Where it was useful, they included multiple songs, often
> placing songs of similar species together to illustrate technical
> differences and sometimes manipulating tape speed to reveal internal song
> structure.
>
>
>  Introducing Ovenbirds, Norma claims one sings “Keep keep keep” while the
> neighbor sings “Keep it keep it keep it.” Providing an example of
> complexity in Veerys, Jerry slows the tape, producing a one octave drop,
> like a track from 2001 Space Odyssey. The Stillwells were for sure
> exploring space for ornithological education.
>
>
>  Off the road and back from months of recording, I can easily imagine the
> Stillwells at Avian Echoes, trying to figure out what to say as
> introductions to voices of their avian treasures. There must have been fun
> in the work of cutting plastic tape and putting it back together since the
> final products are replete with colloquial humor, the sort always shared on
> good field trips.
>
>
>  “Yellow-headed Blackbirds must have frogs in their throats” says Norma.
>
> Jerry thinks flickers say, “IF IF IF.”
>
> Gambel’s Quail call, “Where are you all?” according to Norma.
>
> Jerry views the Red-headed Woodpecker as “a mischievous chatterbox.”
>
> And Norma, who was studying violin when she met Jerry, views Northern
> Mockingbirds as “musical acrobats.”
>
>
>  Think back to 1948, when the Stillwells started their odyssey. There was
> no Arkansas Audubon Society. No iPhones with instantly available MP3
> recordings of 800 bird species. Field recordings of birds had been ongoing
> since 1931, but it was tough.
>
>
>  So you know when in February 1954 the Stillwells visited Little Rock as
> guests of Herb Daniels, then president of Little Rock Ornithological
> Society, their recordings must have made a deep impression. There was a
> dinner in the Stillwell’s honor. According to Norma, “We gave a bird-song
> recital for a gathering of folks who expressed heart-warming appreciation.”
>
>
>  Wouldn’t you like to have been there.
>
>
>  (Next, Part 4 and conclusion).
>
Subject: feeder birds
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 19:45:33 +0000
We have quite the weather event underway in northwest Arkansas. First it rained 
this morning. Around 9, that turned to sleet. Now sleet has turned to snow. 
Through it all, I still have a Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Gray Catbird coming to 
the feeder. It is quite a sight to see a catbird up on a block of suet in 
driving snow. ditto, kinglet. 
Subject: AVIAN ECHOES: THE STILLWELLS IN FAYETTEVILLE (PART 3)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 18:03:58 +0000
In the 1950s, Jerry and Norma Stillwell used the living room of their 
Fayetteville home, Avian Echoes, as an editing studio and generally as a 
retreat from bird recording travels across North America. However, they also 
taped local birds. 


One Fayetteville subject was American Goldfinch, published on their first LP, 
BIRD SONGS OF DOORYARD, FIELD AND FOREST (1952). To reinforce learning, Norma 
imitates in a lilting voice two main songs, followed by recordings that, though 
from 60 years ago, are as clear as yesterday. In the background: Northern 
Bobwhites, Mourning Doves, American Crows, and chickens from nearby broiler 
houses. The poultry industry was then just beginning. 


All recordings are introduced, and variations in songs explained, with Jerry 
and Norma swapping duties as in their field work. First up is Northern 
Cardinal, recorded in Jerrys home town Erie, Kansas. Jerry explains, No 
wonder the cardinal is popular. Hes a friendly dooryard bird with a variety of 
musical songs with glides and crescendos, lyrics of a prima donna. 


Between 1952 and 1956, they published three LPs with songs and calls of 165 
species. Where it was useful, they included multiple songs, often placing songs 
of similar species together to illustrate technical differences and sometimes 
manipulating tape speed to reveal internal song structure. 


Introducing Ovenbirds, Norma claims one sings Keep keep keep while the 
neighbor sings Keep it keep it keep it. Providing an example of complexity in 
Veerys, Jerry slows the tape, producing a one octave drop, like a track from 
2001 Space Odyssey. The Stillwells were for sure exploring space for 
ornithological education. 


Off the road and back from months of recording, I can easily imagine the 
Stillwells at Avian Echoes, trying to figure out what to say as introductions 
to voices of their avian treasures. There must have been fun in the work of 
cutting plastic tape and putting it back together since the final products are 
replete with colloquial humor, the sort always shared on good field trips. 


Yellow-headed Blackbirds must have frogs in their throats says Norma.
Jerry thinks flickers say, IF IF IF.
Gambels Quail call, Where are you all? according to Norma.
Jerry views the Red-headed Woodpecker as a mischievous chatterbox.
And Norma, who was studying violin when she met Jerry, views Northern 
Mockingbirds as musical acrobats. 


Think back to 1948, when the Stillwells started their odyssey. There was no 
Arkansas Audubon Society. No iPhones with instantly available MP3 recordings of 
800 bird species. Field recordings of birds had been ongoing since 1931, but it 
was tough. 


So you know when in February 1954 the Stillwells visited Little Rock as guests 
of Herb Daniels, then president of Little Rock Ornithological Society, their 
recordings must have made a deep impression. There was a dinner in the 
Stillwells honor. According to Norma, We gave a bird-song recital for a 
gathering of folks who expressed heart-warming appreciation. 


Wouldnt you like to have been there.

(Next, Part 4 and conclusion).
Subject: Rare bird observations
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 10:50:15 -0600
It is time to submit your rare or out of season birds observations for the
winter season (Dec. 1 through Feb. 28) to the Arkansas Bird Record
Committee. Go to http://www.arbirds.org/rbreports.html to file your reports.
Please submit your reports by March 15.

Lyndal York
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Toad Suck Gulls
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 07:13:25 -0600
I went by to see the local gulls at Toad Suck Dam (Faulkner County) that
Herschel had been reporting on.  There were two Herring Gulls and two
Bonaparte Gulls.  Several hundred Ring-billed Gulls.  I also saw two dark
headed gulls.  One looks like a Franklin Gull and the other a Laughing Gull.

While I will not pretend to be a gull expert this is my assessment of the
two dark headed gulls.

The first gull (first 5 pictures):
Larger down turned bill
Smaller eye ring
No black tip on wing
Larger black on wing
Under wing not clear/white black it starting to extent to primaries

The second gull (rest of pictures):
Smaller bill
Larger eyeing
White tips on wings
Small black on wings
Under wing is clear/white

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/IDHelp#slideshow/6122214162278264578

Thanks
Michael
Subject: Re: birds calling at golf tournaments
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 17:20:44 -0600
Hey now, I’ve had Canyon Wrens in the hill country of TX, at Enchanted Rock 
St Park. 

    Jacque Brown


> On Mar 3, 2015, at 2:14 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis  wrote:
> 
> Comedian Brian Regan covers this exact issue in one of his skits, and he does 
a fine job: https://vimeo.com/5357559 
. 
Although I've never heard of a Blue-breasted Whip-poor-willow... 

> 
> Enjoy!
> 
> Alyssa DeRubeis
> Huntsville, Madison Co.
> 
> On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:37 PM, Leslie Peacock > wrote: 

> hilarious!
> 
> On Tue, Mar 3, 2015 at 12:35 PM, Kimberly G. Smith > wrote: 

> Some of you might remember CBS’s attempt at enhancing bird calls on golf 
tournament broadcasts in 2000: 

> 
>  
> 
> CBS admits to bird-brained scheme
> 
>  
> 
> By Garry Smits
> 
> Times-Union sports writer,
> 
> It's a beautiful day on the golf course, the sun is shining and birds are 
singing. 

> 
>  
> 
> Well, as CBS has been forced to admit, two out of three isn't bad.
> 
>  
> 
> The network came clean earlier this week and confessed that it has been 
mixing in taped sounds of birds singing with live golf telecasts, most recently 
at the World Golf Championship NEC Invitational two weeks ago in Akron, Ohio. 

> 
>  
> 
> Not only that, but according to bird-call experts asked by the New York Post 
to watch and listen to videotape of CBS broadcasts, the network isn't even 
getting the birds in the correct geographic area. 

> 
>  
> 
> The Post reported that the taped bird calls were used by CBS during the 
playing of the NEC Invitational, the PGA Championship in Louisville, Ky., and 
the Buick Open in Warwick Hills, Mich. CBS spokeswoman Leslie Ann Wade said the 
bird calls were used to get "ambient sound" for broadcasts, and were only a 
last resort. 

> 
>  
> 
> The first resort: putting dishes of birdfeed near microphones at tournament 
sites. Wade said when that doesn't produce the desired sounds of nature, they 
go to the tape. 

> 
>  
> 
> Bird-watchers interviewed by the Post said the worst part is that someone at 
CBS didn't research which birds were indigenous to Ohio, Kentucky and Michigan. 
One, John Malcolm of Gaithersburg, Md., said he heard a canyon wren, which 
lives only west of Texas, on a Buick Open tape; and a white-throated sparrow, 
found only in the North during the summer, on tapes from the PGA and NEC 
Invitational. 

> 
>  
> 
> "Why not just dub in harp music for certain crucial holes," Malcolm said. 
"It's deceitful." 

> 
>  
> 
> PGA Tour officials didn't view Birdgate as a serious issue.
> 
>  
> 
> "TV puts sensative mikes all over the course to catch birds, leaves rustling 
. . . things to convey to the viewers the sounds of a golf course,'' said Bob 
Combs, senior vice-president for public relations and communications. ''That's 
really on a subconscious level, and the action is what's carrying the day. CBS 
did a fine job with those three telecasts, with all those birdies . . . of 
every kind." 

> 
>  
> 
> Kimberly G. Smith
> 
> University Professor of Biological Sciences
> 
> Department of Biological Sciences
> 
> Note new office:  SCEN 724
> 
> University of Arkansas
> 
> Fayetteville, AR 72701
> 
> Phone:  479-575-6359   fax: 479-575-4010 
> Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Leslie Peacock
> Managing Editor
> Arkansas Times
> 501-492-3981