Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Arkansas Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Tuesday, October 21 at 04:32 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


African Finfoot,©BirdQuest

21 Oct Pelicans on Beaver Lake [Betty Brown ]
21 Oct weekend arrivals [Adam Schaffer ]
21 Oct Minneapolis Star-Tribune Editorial counterpoint: What shall our 'perspective' on birds, Vikings stadium aesthetics be? [Barry Haas ]
21 Oct Re: FOS-WC Sparrow [Carol Meyerdirk ]
21 Oct Blue-headed vireo [CK Franklin ]
21 Oct Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count Sunday December 14, 2014 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 Oct Birds and History [Karen ]
20 Oct Irruption Birds (Madison County) [Alyssa DeRubeis ]
20 Oct Le Conte's Sparrow at Woolsey, Washington Co. [ ]
19 Oct Black-throated Green [Terry Butler ]
19 Oct Sightings: Two Rivers Park [Jim Dixon ]
19 Oct 1ST PLACE FOR “TRASHIEST” BUNCH ON BEAVER ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
19 Oct Editorial on tropic cascade. [Jerry Butler ]
18 Oct AAS-News of Members [Dottie Boyles ]
18 Oct King's River Falls [Sandy Berger ]
18 Oct FOS Brown Creeper [Sara Caulk ]
18 Oct Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
18 Oct FOS [Sally Jo Gibson ]
18 Oct FOS Junco [Jonathan Perry ]
18 Oct visitor [Judy & Don ]
18 Oct FOS junco [Meredith Hawkins ]
18 Oct Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective [Barry Haas ]
18 Oct Re: Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
18 Oct Juncos in Hot Springs [jwdavis ]
18 Oct Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center [Jim Dixon ]
18 Oct RED-TAILS, DARK-BROWN CALURUS TO ALMOST-WHITE KRIDER’S (Maysville) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Oct Re: Siskins [laura davis ]
17 Oct Arkies in Okie....Again [Mitchell Pruitt ]
17 Oct Siskins [Norman Lavers ]
17 Oct FOS [Judy & Don ]
17 Oct Round Robin, Blue Jay Brawl ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
17 Oct finally FOS [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
17 Oct Re: new big day world record today! [Ragupathy Kannan ]
17 Oct Re: new big day world record today! [ ]
17 Oct Re: Greetings from Lake Dardanelle [Gail Miller ]
17 Oct Re: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
17 Oct White-throated Sparrow in SW AR ["Campbell, Martin" ]
16 Oct Lake Dardanelle [Kenny Nichols ]
16 Oct New and old [Sandy Berger ]
17 Oct FOS: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
16 Oct Re: White-throated Sparrows on Fayetteville campus [Jeffrey Short ]
16 Oct FOS White-throated Sparrows en masse [Judy & Don ]
16 Oct Re: new big day world record today! [Sara Caulk ]
16 Oct Re: White-throated Sparrows on Fayetteville campus [Sara Caulk ]
16 Oct Re: new big day world record today! [Ragupathy Kannan ]
16 Oct new big day world record today! [Ragupathy Kannan ]
16 Oct White-throated Sparrows on Fayetteville campus ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
16 Oct Re: FOS Sighting - White-throated Sparrow [Ragupathy Kannan ]
16 Oct FOS Sighting - White-throated Sparrow [Gail Miller ]
16 Oct FOS White-throated sparrow [CK ]
15 Oct Re: Woolsey Wet Prairie [Michael Linz ]
14 Oct Greetings from Lake Dardanelle [Kenny Nichols ]
14 Oct Re: Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler influx at Lake Fayetteville Park [Ryan Risher ]
14 Oct Re: Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler influx at Lake Fayetteville Park [Ragupathy Kannan ]
14 Oct Small and big [jonathanperry24 ]
14 Oct Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler influx at Lake Fayetteville Park ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
14 Oct Least Flycatchers (2) at Callie's Prairie, Lake Fayetteville Park, yesterday ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
14 Oct White-faced Ibis in Boxley Valley yesterday ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
14 Oct New Yard Bird...sorta [Sheran Herrin ]
14 Oct Re: BKNWR [Michael Linz ]
14 Oct Re: BKNWR [Bob Harden ]
13 Oct New Yard Bird [Sandy Berger ]
13 Oct Re: WATCH: Hawk Takes Out Quadcopter Drone, Reclaims the Sky [Jim and Karen Rowe ]
13 Oct RTHU [Jeffrey Short ]
13 Oct Re: No Sharp-sinned Hawks at Wilson Springs [Kelly Chitwood ]
13 Oct Re: No Sharp-sinned Hawks at Wilson Springs [Ragupathy Kannan ]
13 Oct Yellow-breasted Chat [Daniel Scheiman ]
13 Oct DAN SCHEIMAN ON BIRDS AND CLIMATE CHANGE, northwest arkansas presentation DECEMBER 6 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
13 Oct No Sharp-sinned Hawks at Wilson Springs ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
13 Oct WITH HONOR IN THEIR PLUMES: BIG SIT AT WILSON SPRINGS C.A. ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
13 Oct Re: WATCH: Hawk Takes Out Quadcopter Drone, Reclaims the Sky [Jamie Gwin ]
12 Oct Two Ruby-throated hummers at our feeder just now 1815 hours Sunday [Keith Hawkins ]
12 Oct Rare hummer OK [Sandy Berger ]
12 Oct Sightings: Two Rivers Park [Jim Dixon ]
12 Oct Re: Female RTHU [Jeffrey Short ]
12 Oct Female RTHU [Jerry Schulz ]

Subject: Pelicans on Beaver Lake
From: Betty Brown <bbrown1941 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 17:04:00 -0400
We were out driving around the Lost Bridge camping area a couple of hours ago 
and as we started to enter the Lost Bridge Camping area a group of about 20 
pelicans flew over us. We love seeing pelicans and each year travel to Grove OK 
area to watch the beautiful birds. Having lived in the Bella Vista/Bentonville 
area for 7 years we have driven around Beaver Lake parks birding and never seen 
any pelicans before, so maybe this was a fluke. We have also never seen any 
mention of Pelicans in the ARBIRD emails. Does anybody have any idea where we 
can watch Pelicans on Beaver Lake? 


Thanks,

Betty and Jerry Brown
Subject: weekend arrivals
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:37:18 -0700
New-to-recent arrivals at the house this weekend included brown creepers, 
white-throated sparrows, huge flocks of robins, Dark-eyed Juncos, 
Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Yellow-rumped Warblers, 
Orange-crowned Warbler, Fox Sparrow, and Winter Wren. Soon-to-be-departeds 
included Nashville Warblers, House Wrens, and a wonderful Blue-headed Vireo. 
All could be at your houses today. Enjoy, 


Adam Schaffer
Bentonville
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune Editorial counterpoint: What shall our 'perspective' on birds, Vikings stadium aesthetics be?
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:47:27 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Those of you following the effort to get bird-safe glass installed in the new 
Minneapolis football stadium will want to read this editorial counterpoint (the 
Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial link was posted on ARBIRD four days ago). 


When I first starting reading it, I thought the newspaper had reconsidered its 
editorial position. Then I realized it was submitted by two individuals 
identified as follows at the end of the article: "Lisa Venable is co-founder of 
Minnesota Citizens for the Protection of Migratory Birds. Jerry Bahls is 
president of the Audubon Chapter-Minneapolis. 


Here's the link to the editorial counterpoint:

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/279846202.html

The editorial counterpoint includes the link below to the Javits Center in New 
York that includes the following as part of Phase II: "removal of every pane of 
glass in the main building and replacing all 8,000 of them with new, low-e 
glass leading to a higher-performing curtain wall of flat, transparent, 
bird-safe fritted glass in 5-by-10 foot modules which uses less metal and gives 
the space a more open feel": 


http://tinyurl.com/Javits-glass

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: FOS-WC Sparrow
From: Carol Meyerdirk <dmeyerdirk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:01:35 +0000
FOS White crowned sparrows - 3 showed up in our backyard yesterday. Nice to see 
them. 

Carol WLR 

----- Original Message -----

From: "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

To: "ARBIRD-L"  
Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:18:37 PM 
Subject: FOS-WC Sparrow 



Just saw my FOS White-crowned Sparrow while walking to LR Zoo. 
Donna Haynes 
West Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
Subject: Blue-headed vireo
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:39:38 -0500
Hi all.

A very smartly dressed Blue-headed vireo was foraging in the oak trees in my 
yard this morning. I am also seeing Ruby-throated hummingbirds, albeit now down 
to 1-2 per day. More than the usual amount of robins were busy in the trees 
this morning. Had several ruby-crowned kinglets yesterday but did not see them 
today. 


Cindy
Watching the wildlife on the ridge overlooking the Arkansas River in the 
Heights 

Little Rock



 		 	   		  
Subject: Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count Sunday December 14, 2014
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:27:26 +0000
Fayetteville CBC will be on Sunday December 14, 2014. It is open to anyone with 
an interest in birds. Our local count dates to 1961. We hold the count on 
Sunday because that is the day with fewest traffic conflicts. If you have been 
on the Fayetteville CBC previously, please contact your party leader about 
joining this year’s count. If you haven’t participated, come on out for this 
fun way to learn more about local birds. Data are used to help analyze trends 
in bird populations across the continent. 
Subject: Birds and History
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:39:19 -0500
Sunday, I was driving into Little Rock to tour the replicas of Christopher 
Columbus' original voyage vessels the Pinta and Nina, which were moored on the 
bank of the Arkansas River. Coming down Pike Ave. in North Little Rock, I 
spotted a pair of adult Bald Eagles soaring near the river. They were circling, 
dipping, and diving. It looked to be a slow, mating dance against the bright 
blue, cloudless fall sky. 


At the river, walking to the replicas along the river's edge, I spotted a very 
nervous Swamp Sparrow flying between the water's edge and a grouping of 
vegetation higher up on bank. The poor thing kept getting disturbed by all the 
people walking to the ships. I'm sure he will be very glad when the vessels 
leave and things quiet down. 


For anyone interested in history, this Wednesday the Pinta and Nina will be at 
the Lake Dardanelle State Park sailing back and forth across the lake from the 
State Park. They are being filmed by the History Channel for a special program 
about Columbus' voyage. The public is welcome to come to the park and watch the 
boats sailing with their rigging fully deployed. The crew will be in period 
dress. 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Irruption Birds (Madison County)
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 19:22:38 -0500
In accordance with Ron Pittaway's famous "Winter Finch Forecast," the Ozark
Natural Science Center (near Huntsville) has hosted both Red-breasted
Nuthatches and Pine Siskins over the past two weeks. I heard the former
twice during the second week of October; the latter I heard late last week.

And of course, there have been other recent fall arrivals: Dark-eyed
Juncos, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets,
and White-throated Sparrows.

As a reminder, the Ozark Natural Science Center is open and free to the
public on weekends when there aren't educational programs, which are most
weekends. Simply contact them by phone or e-mail (see
http://onsc.us/contact-all.php) and let them know when you plan to visit so
the gate can be left open for you.

Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Huntsville, Madison Co.
Subject: Le Conte's Sparrow at Woolsey, Washington Co.
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:11:36 -0700
Sorry to be late in posting this. Saw many sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie, in 
Fayetteville on October 18: FOS - Le Conte's, Fox, Song and Dark-eyed Junco; 
also Field, White-crowned, White-throated, Savannah, Swamp and Lincoln's. 


Same day at Centerton - many ducks, including Northern Pintail and Ruddy Ducks; 
Bald Eagle adult, American Pipits. 


Happy birding!
Joanie
Subject: Black-throated Green
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 16:47:37 -0500
Tried for a look at nature today while Deer hunting.  In with a flock of
Titmouse and Chickadee's I spiced a Black-throated Green Warbler.  It looked
like it was still in breeding plumage. 

 

Terry Butler 
Subject: Sightings: Two Rivers Park
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 12:24:37 -0500
I walked the big field and part of the horse trail Sunday morning. Present were 
FOS Yellow-rumped Warbler, a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker that lived up to his 
name, Eastern Towhees and possibly last of season Common Yellowthroat and 
Nashville Warblers (both first winter females). 


I made a quick trip to the Lake Maumelle Spillway in hopes of early loons or 
grebes but after toting my scope the half mile to the water’s edge, I was 
rewarded with only a pair of Pied-billed Grebes. These are not the grebes I am 
looking for. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: 1ST PLACE FOR “TRASHIEST” BUNCH ON BEAVER
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 14:20:28 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society lists Beaver Lake Nursery Pond as one of the 
places to go birding (see our web site for details). Yesterday, generous 
volunteers from NORTHWEST ARKANSAS MASTER NATURALISTS spent their 
extraordinarily beautiful fall Saturday morning NOT decked-out in their 
Razorback reds, NOT touring back in the mountains for arts & crafts & fall 
color, NOT running their leaf blowers at full blast. Instead, they spent the 
morning (1) clearing walking trails with chainsaw and rakes, (2) cleaning and 
repairing 30+ bird boxes, (3) collecting and stacking for removal (by the Corps 
of Engineers) 2+ trailer loads of trash washed up on a particularly lovely 
finger of shortleaf pine- oak woods poking into Beaver peninsula-like. 


Results include a hill of full trash bags and an even bigger hill of styrofoam 
and boards with nails from blown-apart docks, plus tires. Their clean-up makes 
it much easier, safer, and more esthetically-pleasing to go birding. 


Bird box work directly benefits Eastern Bluebirds, Tree Swallows, Prothonotary 
Warblers, Wood Ducks, and other cavity-using species. Arkansas Audubon Society 
Trust has provided a grant in support of the bird box effort. 


The short easily-walked trail is a good place to experience native shortleaf 
pine woodlands. Overall, the nursery pond is a great place to enjoy Beaver Lake 
and you don’t need a party barge or a home-on-the-lake to enjoy it. 


Other than what’s mentioned above, what is this effort worth? My estimate is a 
bare minimum of 100 hours of travel and work involved and that is without 
compensating for cost of gasoline or miles traveled to get to the nursery pond, 
chainsaw use, leather gloves, plastic bags, and additional time devoted by the 
Corps of Engineers on their part. This, and more, is what it costs to keep the 
public in public lands. 


Of course, yours truly snuck out from hauling styrofoam for a little birding. 
The pond is now a drained grassy flat with visitors including Pine Warblers 
(2), Savannah Sparrows (3), Killdeer, Eastern Bluebirds (1). A Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker flew over (FOS), as did Double-crested Cormorants (3), and Red-headed 
Woodpeckers (2). At one point I had to stop hauling a trash bag to count 
American Crows (55) flying along a high ridge above the bluffs. White-throated 
Sparrows were out in the button bushes. A lone, quite vocal Fish Crow flew over 
maybe unaware that he/she is perhaps the last of the last for this season (Fish 
Crows don’t winter in northwest Arkansas … yet). 


By the inherent powers vested in my by No One in Particular, I hereby award to 
Master Naturalists 1st place as the “trashiest” bunch I’ve ever met. 
Subject: Editorial on tropic cascade.
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 08:17:59 -0500
An editorial I wrote re. people and birds is in today's Democrat Gazette.
If you don't get the paper and you are interested, I will be happy to
e-mail you my unedited manuscript.

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: AAS-News of Members
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 22:27:32 -0500
Dear ARbirders:

 

It's almost that time again..time for another issue of the AAS newsletter,
Arkansas Birds and we'd like to know what YOU as AAS members have been up
to. 

 

If you would like to share your recent adventures, birding news, and
observations, then please email me at dboyles AT arkansasedc.com, by November
1. 

Thank you for supporting our newsletter through your personal contributions!

 

Good birding,

Dottie Boyles




Subject: King's River Falls
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 19:03:57 -0500
FOS Winter Wren...and all the other regulars. Oh yeah, and one of my favorites, 
a Kingfisher. Gorgeous colors in some places. Not peak yet. 


Sandy B.
FS, Ar

Sent from my iPad
Subject: FOS Brown Creeper
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 18:51:13 -0500
Had our first brown creeper today.  Last year they were few and far between so 
I hope this is a good year.  We love watching them spiraling up the tree 
trunks searching for prizes then flying back to the bottom and optimistically 
repeating the show. 


Sara
Mt. Sequoyah S., Fayetteville
Subject: Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 23:06:15 +0000
Thanks a lot for helping us keep up on this. And Amen X1000 for your astute 
responses. That attitude -- that just this little bit of killing here doesn't 
mean much -- is just what adds up to killing billions of birds for no good 
reason. 

________________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of Barry Haas [bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET] 

Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2014 12:38 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in 
perspective 


Dear ARBIRDers,

I know some of you are keeping up with construction of the new football stadium 
in Minneapolis and its potential impact on migrating birds in the Mississippi 
flyway. Here's an editorial from yesterday's Minneapolis Star-Tribune: 


http://www.startribune.com/opinion/editorials/279625602.html

A few comments on the article:

1) "Altogether, fewer than 3 percent of the U.S. bird population dies each year 
from collisions with buildings." I wonder if that statement was "Altogether, 
fewer than 3 percent of Minneapolis Star-Tribune employees dies each year from 
collisions with buildings" the editorialist would still find that percentage 
underwhelming. I think not. 


2) "The addition of one glassy building in Minneapolis won’t appreciably alter 
the mortality rate of the North American bird population." That's true, but a 
meaningless statement. Using such logic one more coal-fired power plant won't 
"appreciably alter" global climate change. Nor would the next single coal-fired 
power plant. Nor the next. And so on. The problem of course is one of 
cumulative impact. It's unfortunate the editorialist seems incapable of 
separating the single building concept and its impact from multiples of single 
buildings all over the country and their very different cumulative impact. 


3) "The dispute comes down to competing values: architectural aesthetics vs. 
large-scale bird collisions that may or may not happen." Question- if the 
stadium does turn out to be a "cathedral to killing birds" as mentioned in the 
editorial, what will be done about it? Oh right, the game must go on. Patrons 
can just step around or over any scattered bird carcasses. Or workers will 
scoop up the carcasses before events so patrons won't be forced to see them. 


4) Finally, "When controversial buildings are involved, bird collisions make 
for high drama. But they don’t amount to much in the larger scheme of things." 
I guess that depends on how you see the world. If your world view is humans and 
football at the center, you probably don't even realize there is a "larger 
scheme of things". If you believe living things are not to be tossed aside so 
lightly, you not only see the "larger scheme of things" you try to do something 
to make it better. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: FOS
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:38:48 -0500
Finally, FOS WTSP.  Harrison, AR

 

Sally Jo Gibson

512 Yorkshire Cove

Harrison, AR 72601

Home Phone: 870-741-5805

Cell: 870-688-9950

sjogibson AT live.com

 

Life is too short to be anything but happy. 

Falling down is a part of life, Getting back up is living.

 
Subject: FOS Junco
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:23:55 -0500
On Fossil Flats Trail, Devil's Den.

Sent from my iPad
Subject: visitor
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 14:39:20 -0500
Don looked out the front door this morning and standing on the front porch 
stone steps he saw a Greater Roadrunner that was no doubt after the skinks who 
alternately hide and sunbathe there. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: FOS junco
From: Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 12:59:40 -0500
Saw my first junco under the feeders today. My last sighting of a RT
hummingbird was Oct. 16.

Meredith Hawkins
west Little Rock
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial 10/17/14: Keep bird deaths in perspective
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 12:38:15 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

I know some of you are keeping up with construction of the new football stadium 
in Minneapolis and its potential impact on migrating birds in the Mississippi 
flyway. Here's an editorial from yesterday's Minneapolis Star-Tribune: 


http://www.startribune.com/opinion/editorials/279625602.html

A few comments on the article:

1) "Altogether, fewer than 3 percent of the U.S. bird population dies each year 
from collisions with buildings." I wonder if that statement was "Altogether, 
fewer than 3 percent of Minneapolis Star-Tribune employees dies each year from 
collisions with buildings" the editorialist would still find that percentage 
underwhelming. I think not. 


2) "The addition of one glassy building in Minneapolis won’t appreciably alter 
the mortality rate of the North American bird population." That's true, but a 
meaningless statement. Using such logic one more coal-fired power plant won't 
"appreciably alter" global climate change. Nor would the next single coal-fired 
power plant. Nor the next. And so on. The problem of course is one of 
cumulative impact. It's unfortunate the editorialist seems incapable of 
separating the single building concept and its impact from multiples of single 
buildings all over the country and their very different cumulative impact. 


3) "The dispute comes down to competing values: architectural aesthetics vs. 
large-scale bird collisions that may or may not happen." Question- if the 
stadium does turn out to be a "cathedral to killing birds" as mentioned in the 
editorial, what will be done about it? Oh right, the game must go on. Patrons 
can just step around or over any scattered bird carcasses. Or workers will 
scoop up the carcasses before events so patrons won't be forced to see them. 


4) Finally, "When controversial buildings are involved, bird collisions make 
for high drama. But they don’t amount to much in the larger scheme of things." 
I guess that depends on how you see the world. If your world view is humans and 
football at the center, you probably don't even realize there is a "larger 
scheme of things". If you believe living things are not to be tossed aside so 
lightly, you not only see the "larger scheme of things" you try to do something 
to make it better. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 16:44:08 +0000
Had a euro-dove calling and calling this morning. Unusual for this time of 
year. Maybe calling the Hogs? Karen Hart Hillcrest. 1 mile from War Memorial 
Stadium. 


Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 18, 2014, at 11:17 AM, "Jim Dixon" 
> wrote: 


I walked the nature trail behind the LRAC Saturday morning. I actually donned 
tall boots and went into the tall stuff to see if I'd find more sparrows. I saw 
two FOS Purple Finch in a tree next to the building plus FOS Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker, White-throated Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Swamp Sparrow. 


I then Harper Road and Frazier Pike in hopes of fancy doves and/or cranes. I 
had to settle for one Peregrine Falcon, six Kestrels, and a dozen Euros. They 
have collars right? Maybe that is fancy enough. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock

"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after." -- Thorin 
Subject: Juncos in Hot Springs
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 11:37:37 -0500
Juncos are here in Hot Springs this morning joining the White-throated sparrows 
that arrived on Thursday. A ruby-throated hummingbird female stopped to refuel 
on Thursday and moved on. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Subject: Sightings: Little Rock Audubon Center
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 11:16:44 -0500
I walked the nature trail behind the LRAC Saturday morning. I actually donned 
tall boots and went into the tall stuff to see if I’d find more sparrows. I 
saw two FOS Purple Finch in a tree next to the building plus FOS Yellow-bellied 
Sapsucker, White-throated Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Swamp Sparrow. 


I then Harper Road and Frazier Pike in hopes of fancy doves and/or cranes. I 
had to settle for one Peregrine Falcon, six Kestrels, and a dozen Euros. They 
have collars right? Maybe that is fancy enough. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: RED-TAILS, DARK-BROWN CALURUS TO ALMOST-WHITE KRIDER’S (Maysville)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 05:59:56 +0000
Western hawks wintering in northwest Arkansas have returned (FOS). A Krider’s 
Hawk, the white subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk nesting in the northern Great 
Plains, was near Cherokee City yesterday. Brilliant white hard to miss, 
including white head, back, and pinkish tail. Later, the opposite southwest of 
Maysville: “Western” Red-tailed Hawk, B. j. calurus almost entirely deep 
chocolate brown/black, reddish tail and typical red-tail vocalizations. 


Also southwest of Maysville, in a former wet prairie area, the graded county 
roads are lined Sawtooth Sunflowers, often 8-10 feet in height, and loaded with 
seedheads. In two areas, they were swarmed by Pine Siskins, flocks ranging from 
20 to 40 or so. In the same places: White-crowned, Swamp, Song, White-throated, 
and Dark-eyed Juncos no doubt attracted by the same bountiful small seed crop 
on the ground. 


During late summer the Sawtooths are covered with yellow flowers. Now seed 
heads on several skyscrapers total 30-50, each one full of seeds. A great leap 
of imagination isn’t required to recognize the vast natural resource involved 
here, and the significant consequent loss to seed-eating birds since these 
native plants are usually mowed as undesirable weeds. Happily, as today’s bird 
showing, not always mowed. 


Otherwise, in All The (Bird) News Fit To Print: A flock of 43 American Pipits 
walked and bobbed through a harvested bean field. A flock of 23 Yellow-rumped 
Warblers worked a tree and brush-lined county road. In two places, Loggerhead 
Shrikes had fresh stuff hung from barbs along the road. Most of these were 
grasshoppers, but in one place, two small mammals, I think Northern 
Short-tailed Shrews, with heads missing. 
Subject: Re: Siskins
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 17:09:22 -0700
------------------------------
On Fri, Oct 17, 2014 5:46 PM CDT Norman Lavers wrote:

>Two Siskins were at Scatter Creek W.M.A., Lancaster unit in Greene County 
today along with Am. Goldfinches, White-throated Sparrows, Song Sparrows and an 
Orange-crowned Warbler. 

>The masses of native asters were feeding Monarchs on their way south.
>
>Cheryl Lavers, Jonesboro
Subject: Arkies in Okie....Again
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 18:54:12 -0500
David Oakley, Jacque Brown, and I are en route to the Black Mesa. The trip 
started off with a bang this afternoon, with close looks at the Costa's 
Hummingbird in Osage County. This bird isn't far for us western Arkansans and 
well worth the trip. It's an adult male. Heads up to those interested....it's 
still around! 


~Mitchell

Sent from my iPhone.
Subject: Siskins
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 15:46:06 -0700
Two Siskins were at Scatter Creek W.M.A., Lancaster unit in Greene County today 
along with Am. Goldfinches, White-throated Sparrows, Song Sparrows and an 
Orange-crowned Warbler. 

The masses of native asters were feeding Monarchs on their way south.

Cheryl Lavers, Jonesboro
Subject: FOS
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:46:12 -0500
Several Golden-crowned Kinglets were calling from trees along one of the wooded 
paths this morning and I saw our first Junco. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Round Robin, Blue Jay Brawl
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 18:45:55 +0000
Dozens and dozens of attendees to the Round Robin – Blue Jay brawl in the 
Boyles backyard. A single Northern Flicker acted as mediator as many skirmishes 
broke out over control of one tree. 

Observer wasted lots of time watching the bird show. A lot more entertaining 
than raking leaves. 


Doris Boyles
Little Rock

Apparently, while my mom was out raking leaves yesterday, a large flock of 
American Robins and Blue Jays landed in one of the trees in the backyard at the 
same time. A huge fight broke out as birds scrambled to sit on the same branch 
already occupied by another bird. A single Northern Flicker (aka “Spotted 
Sandpiper”) quietly hung on the trunk of the tree while skirmishes broke out 
around it. The chickadees and titmice were cautiously watching while snacking 
from the feeders. After about 15 minutes the robins and jays all flew off to 
continue the brawl elsewhere. Mom, went back to raking leaves. 


Dottie Boyles
(My apologies to Dr. Kannan if “Round Robin” shows up on one of his 
Ornithology lab exams as an actual species.) 


This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: finally FOS
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 18:16:11 +0000
Our FOS white-throated sparrow … 2 abbreviated song notes this morning at 
daybreak in the hedge. Better put out more scratch seed. Karen Hart Hillcrest 
LR 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan 

Sent: Friday, October 17, 2014 12:30 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!

LSU just issued this press release. 
http://www.lsu.edu/ur/ocur/lsunews/MediaCenter/News/2014/10/item73041.html 


Also, Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world record 1982 Birding 
Big Day in Peru 


What seems very impressive is that the 1982 record was apparently done with 
little or no song playbacks. 





[Image removed by sender. 
image] 












Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world 
recor... 



View on 
www.youtube.com 


Preview by Yahoo







On Friday, 17 October 2014 12:13 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


I am truly impressed - and envious! Makes me want to go back to Peru! There are 
so many places to visit there! 

Joanie

On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And y'all 
call yourselves Birders?" My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two! A BIG high five to the LSU team. What an 
accomplishment. 

Sara
On Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  wrote:
They did it! Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day record 
by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru! 


The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982. 


See their exuberant twitter post at 
https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 


See the article that appeared just before this feat: 
http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 


To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species. But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles. 


Wow!

Kannan



Subject: Re: new big day world record today!
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 17:30:09 +0000
LSU just issued this press 
release. http://www.lsu.edu/ur/ocur/lsunews/MediaCenter/News/2014/10/item73041.html 
 Also, Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world record 1982 Birding 
Big Day in Peru 

What seems very impressive is that the 1982 record was apparently done with 
little or no song playbacks.   

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world recor... |
|  |
| View on www.youtube.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

   

 On Friday, 17 October 2014 12:13 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

   

 I am truly impressed - and envious!  Makes me want to go back to Peru!  
There are so many places to visit there!Joanie 

 

 On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

   

 Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And 
y'all call yourselves Birders?"  My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two!  A BIG high five to the LSU team.  
What an accomplishment.SaraOn Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan 
 wrote: 



They did it!  Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day 
record by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru!  

The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982.   

See their exuberant twitter post 
at https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 

See the article that appeared just before this 
feat: http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 

To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species.  But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles.   

Wow!
Kannan 

    

   
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 10:13:53 -0700
I am truly impressed - and envious! Makes me want to go back to Peru! There are 
so many places to visit there! 

Joanie



On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

 


Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And y'all 
call yourselves Birders?" My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two! A BIG high five to the LSU team. What an 
accomplishment. 

Sara
On Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  wrote:

They did it! Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day record 
by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru! 


The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982. 


See their exuberant twitter post at 
https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 


See the article that appeared just before this feat: 
http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 


To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species. But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles. 


Wow!

Kannan
Subject: Re: Greetings from Lake Dardanelle
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 11:34:07 -0500
I haven’t seen a Red-breasted Nuthatch here at home in YEARS!!! Maybe heard 
one a few years ago. I used to have them every winter. I sure do miss them!!!! 
I had one that ate out of my hand in 2008. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/image/111068228 Maybe had one in 2009, but not 
since then, I don’t think. Sad!!! 



Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Kenny Nichols 
Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 9:10 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Greetings from Lake Dardanelle

Always nice to see and hear, LaDonna and I had a Red-breasted Nuthatch here 
last weekend. Today, while driving in, we flushed a small sparrow that teed up 
nicely in an elm sapling. It turned out to be a LeConte's Sparrow which spent 
the entire afternoon in a small patch of the yard that is, not surprisingly, 
the same place I had a Nelson's Sparrow several years ago. The LeConte's was 
yard bird #230. 


kenny nichols
cabot, ar
Subject: Re: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 13:19:21 +0000
No Harris's to report at our house (that would really be exciting) but my mom 
spotted the first Dark-eyed Junco of the season looking for food. While I 
really like watching the junco's, White-throated and other sparrows, I also 
know winter is not too far behind. Ugggg! 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock, AR  72201

From: Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 7:42 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FOS: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow
This morning started with peeping roosts of White-throated Sparrows in my yard 
and neighborhood in Fayetteville. Later, Dark-eyed Juncos and Harris's Sparrows 
(both FOS) were part of mixed species sparrow flocks in the vicinity of 
Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport this morning. 




This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: White-throated Sparrow in SW AR
From: "Campbell, Martin" <campbem AT HSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 03:56:13 +0000
Excited by the FOS posts of White-throated sparrows in Fayetteville (and later 
FS), I went out to my woods' edge around noon, and guess what should appear but 
my FOS White-throated. It was chip note communicating with another that I could 
not see a 100 feet away. 




What will tomorrow bring??



Marty Campbell

Arkadelphia
Subject: Lake Dardanelle
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:53:54 -0500
One adult Lesser Black-backed Gull near Delaware Rec Area today. 

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: New and old
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:32:30 -0500
Was surprised to find Snowy Egrets and Cattle Egrets near Frog Bayou today. 
White-throated Sparrows arrived en masse here in the valley too. Along with 
Swamp, Song, Savannah, and White-crowned. Had a few Least Sandpipers hanging 
out at the sewage ponds along with a couple hundred Killdeer. No BBWD. Two 
adults, and one juvenile Red-headed Woodpecker, were having a grand time in a 
flooded woodland area...until a Kestrel came along and ruined everything. 
Heading to Frog Bayou again tomorrow with Kannan's ornithology class. AGFC crew 
is "remodeling" some of the wet units. So it's kind of not so great for marsh 
birds right now. 


Sandy B.
FS, AR


Sent from my iPad
Subject: FOS: Dark-eyed Junco, Harris's Sparrow
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 00:42:11 +0000
This morning started with peeping roosts of White-throated Sparrows in my yard 
and neighborhood in Fayetteville. Later, Dark-eyed Juncos and Harris's Sparrows 
(both FOS) were part of mixed species sparrow flocks in the vicinity of 
Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport this morning. 


Up by the airport, I first found a Savannah Sparrow flock (40-50 birds) 
associated with a strip of johnson grass in a big field. Further, several 
mixed-species flocks that included White-crowned (12), White-throated (4), 
Swamp (4), Song (2), Lincoln's (1), Field (2), Chipping (20), Harris's (2), 
Dark-eyed Junco (2), and Clay-colored (2) Sparrows. Also, my first Northern 
Mockingbird with near perfect Great-tailed Grackle diction. 


I was able to slow drive and stop-as-I-wished along a graded road just east of 
the airport. Sparrow-rich wild fencerows, just as god intended, under a blue 
sky, with Monarchs, nicely illuminated mare's tails and a flock of migrating 
Blue Jays (10). 


Yesterday, we got surprisingly close on foot to a young Red-tailed Hawk (no red 
tail; instead numerous dark, narrow bands) at Woolsey Wet Prairie that 
basically ignored us. I saw another one just like it this morning. I suspect 
these are migrants from successful nesting up north. 


Finally at the state fish hatchery in Centerton: Long-billed Dowitcher (1), 
Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Least Sandpiper (10), Wilson's Snipe (5), Killdeer (3), 
American Pipit (1), and a single adult Bald Eagle. 
Subject: Re: White-throated Sparrows on Fayetteville campus
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:56:48 -0500
I assume the glass walkways are lighted which could be the attractant. Maybe
changing the type of lighting would help reduce the strikes.

Also, some smartphones have a GPS capability.  How could those coordinates
be collected and mapped to provide feedback to the citizen scientists and
documentation?

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Kimberly G. Smith
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 11:20 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: White-throated Sparrows on Fayetteville campus

I picked up 2 dead WTSP this morning on the Fayetteville campus.  Both had
hit glass walkways during the night...  this is part of our bird-friendly
campus project to document problem areas on campus for bird strikes...

http://wordpress.uark.edu/sustain/2014/09/15/campus-bird-friendly-help-us-fi
nd/


Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences Department of Biological
Sciences Note new office:  SCEN 724 University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR
72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Gail Miller
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:31 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FOS Sighting - White-throated Sparrow

I was walking the dogs in my woods near the creek this morning when I heard
my first-of-season White-throated Sparrow.  I love their sound.  In 2000, I
lost one of my beloved dogs, Meieli, on October 16.  The day I buried her, I
heard my FOS White-throated Sparrow.  The next year, 2001, I lost Meieli's
son Alec on October 18.  That year, while burying Alec, I heard my FOS
White-throated Sparrow.  One might think that hearing that song, one of my
favorites, would be sad for me, but it tells me the hot summer is behind me
... finally ... and I can begin to enjoy cooler weather!  So today's
beautiful sparrow song, on the death-date of Meieli.  Right on time, cool
enough for a jacket for our walk!

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: FOS White-throated Sparrows en masse
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:37:28 -0500
The brush at Ninestone was full of flocks of White-throated Sparrows this 
morning. This must have been the day they arrived en masse to many locations in 
NWAR. I heard their calls and rustlings and saw them everywhere I walked. 


For the past week I have enjoyed hearing Great Horned Owls every evening.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:41:31 -0500




Subject: Re: White-throated Sparrows on Fayetteville campus
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 12:24:47 -0500
We had our FOS White-throated Sparrows (2+) at and under our feeders 
yesterday.  Ours were upright and mobile! 


Sara
Fayetteville

On Oct 16, 2014 11:20 AM, "Kimberly G. Smith"  wrote:
>
> I picked up 2 dead WTSP this morning on the Fayetteville campus.  Both had 
hit glass walkways during the night...  this is part of our bird-friendly 
campus project to document problem areas on campus for bird strikes... 

>
> 
http://wordpress.uark.edu/sustain/2014/09/15/campus-bird-friendly-help-us-find/ 

>
>
> Kimberly G. Smith 
> University Professor of Biological Sciences 
> Department of Biological Sciences 
> Note new office:  SCEN 724 
> University of Arkansas 
> Fayetteville, AR 72701 
> Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010 
> Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu 
>
>
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Gail Miller 

> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:31 AM 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Subject: FOS Sighting - White-throated Sparrow 
>
> I was walking the dogs in my woods near the creek this morning when I heard 
my first-of-season White-throated Sparrow.  I love their sound.  In 2000, I 
lost one of my beloved dogs, Meieli, on October 16.  The day I buried her, I 
heard my FOS White-throated Sparrow.  The next year, 2001, I lost Meieli's son 
Alec on October 18.  That year, while burying Alec, I heard my FOS 
White-throated Sparrow.  One might think that hearing that song, one of my 
favorites, would be sad for me, but it tells me the hot summer is behind me ... 
finally ... and I can begin to enjoy cooler weather!  So today's beautiful 
sparrow song, on the death-date of Meieli.  Right on time, cool enough for a 
jacket for our walk! 

>
> Gail Miller 
> Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR 
> See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent 
> See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root 
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:02:10 +0000
They did it on October 14, actually, two days before schedule.   

 On Thursday, 16 October 2014 2:52 PM, Ragupathy Kannan 
 wrote: 

   

 They did it!  Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day 
record by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru!  

The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982.   

See their exuberant twitter post 
at https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 

See the article that appeared just before this 
feat: http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 

To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species.  But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles.   

Wow!
Kannan 

   
Subject: new big day world record today!
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 19:51:59 +0000
They did it!  Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day 
record by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru!  

The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982.   

See their exuberant twitter post 
at https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 

See the article that appeared just before this 
feat: http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 

To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species.  But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles.   

Wow!
Kannan 
Subject: White-throated Sparrows on Fayetteville campus
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:20:01 +0000
I picked up 2 dead WTSP this morning on the Fayetteville campus. Both had hit 
glass walkways during the night... this is part of our bird-friendly campus 
project to document problem areas on campus for bird strikes... 


http://wordpress.uark.edu/sustain/2014/09/15/campus-bird-friendly-help-us-find/


Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
Note new office:  SCEN 724
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Gail Miller 

Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:31 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FOS Sighting - White-throated Sparrow

I was walking the dogs in my woods near the creek this morning when I heard my 
first-of-season White-throated Sparrow. I love their sound. In 2000, I lost one 
of my beloved dogs, Meieli, on October 16. The day I buried her, I heard my FOS 
White-throated Sparrow. The next year, 2001, I lost Meieli's son Alec on 
October 18. That year, while burying Alec, I heard my FOS White-throated 
Sparrow. One might think that hearing that song, one of my favorites, would be 
sad for me, but it tells me the hot summer is behind me ... finally ... and I 
can begin to enjoy cooler weather! So today's beautiful sparrow song, on the 
death-date of Meieli. Right on time, cool enough for a jacket for our walk! 


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Re: FOS Sighting - White-throated Sparrow
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:44:10 +0000
The Canadians liken the song to "Sow wheat, Canada, Canada, Canada", which is 
so different from how the Americans hear it: "Old Sam, peabody, peabody, 
peabody".   

 

 On Thursday, 16 October 2014 8:31 AM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

   

 I was walking the dogs in my woods near the creek this morning when I heard 
my first-of-season White-throated Sparrow.  I love their sound.  In 2000, I 
lost one of my beloved dogs, Meieli, on October 16.  The day I buried her, I 
heard my FOS White-throated Sparrow.  The next year, 2001, I lost Meieli's 
son Alec on October 18.  That year, while burying Alec, I heard my FOS 
White-throated Sparrow.  One might think that hearing that song, one of my 
favorites, would be sad for me, but it tells me the hot summer is behind me 
... finally ... and I can begin to enjoy cooler weather!  So today's 
beautiful sparrow song, on the death-date of Meieli.  Right on time, cool 
enough for a jacket for our walk!

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root


   
Subject: FOS Sighting - White-throated Sparrow
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 08:31:11 -0500
I was walking the dogs in my woods near the creek this morning when I heard 
my first-of-season White-throated Sparrow.  I love their sound.  In 2000, I 
lost one of my beloved dogs, Meieli, on October 16.  The day I buried her, I 
heard my FOS White-throated Sparrow.  The next year, 2001, I lost Meieli's 
son Alec on October 18.  That year, while burying Alec, I heard my FOS 
White-throated Sparrow.  One might think that hearing that song, one of my 
favorites, would be sad for me, but it tells me the hot summer is behind me 
... finally ... and I can begin to enjoy cooler weather!  So today's 
beautiful sparrow song, on the death-date of Meieli.  Right on time, cool 
enough for a jacket for our walk!

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: FOS White-throated sparrow
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 07:53:38 -0500
One bird sitting on the fence looking for something to eat this AM in LR. Still 
have 2 ruby-throated hummers lurking in the bushes. 

Cindy


Subject: Re: Woolsey Wet Prairie
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 23:52:58 -0500
As usual the fellowship and birding in NW Arkansas was great.  Thanks
Mitchell, David and Joe for showing me around.

This was my favorite shot of the day...


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/October2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6070654120593222562 


The slideshow of the day start here if you want to see more (includes a few
shorebirds from Centerton)


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/October2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6070653635589828866 


Michael (Conway)

On Wed, Oct 15, 2014 at 10:04 AM, Pruitt <
0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

>         This morning, I spent some time out at Woolsey in Fayetteville
> with Michael Linz, David Oakley, and Joe Neal. We had more of the usuals
> this time of year, including Sora and Sedge Wren. We also had FOS Vesper
> Sparrow, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Savannah Sparrow, and Western Meadowlark.
> I had high hopes for Ammodramus today, but no luck in that department.
> Maybe next time.
>
> ~Mitchell Pruitt
Subject: Greetings from Lake Dardanelle
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 19:10:29 -0700
Always nice to see and hear, LaDonna and I had a Red-breasted Nuthatch here 
last weekend. Today, while driving in, we flushed a small sparrow that teed up 
nicely in an elm sapling. It turned out to be a LeConte's Sparrow which spent 
the entire afternoon in a small patch of the yard that is, not surprisingly, 
the same place I had a Nelson's Sparrow several years ago. The LeConte's was 
yard bird #230. 

 
kenny  nichols
cabot, ar
Subject: Re: Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler influx at Lake Fayetteville Park
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 14:09:21 -0500
Saw an influx myself on Sunday around Dardenelle Lake...

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 14, 2014, at 13:06, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 

> 
> Not a single Yellow-rumped in the UAFS campus yet. Looks like they are all 
still in NW Arkansas and have not crossed the river valley yet. 

> 
> 
> On Tuesday, 14 October 2014 11:13 AM, Joseph C. Neal  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> The south wind was so strong yesterday I didn't expect much in the way of 
land birds in Lake Fayetteville Park, but near the Environmental Study Center I 
started seeing and hear CHECK CHECK calls of Yellow-rumped Warblers and 
eventually had 24+ fly past me as I stood in one place. And yes, they were 
exploring poison ivy vines in the trees. I assume these birds had pushed south 
into northwest Arkansas just ahead of the cold front we have here today. This 
is the first of the big flocks and fairly typical here. First they dribble in, 
then dribble becomes flood with a big cold front especially in the second week 
of October. 

> 
> 
Subject: Re: Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler influx at Lake Fayetteville Park
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 18:06:23 +0000
Not a single Yellow-rumped in the UAFS campus yet.  Looks like they are all 
still in NW Arkansas and have not crossed the river valley yet.   


 On Tuesday, 14 October 2014 11:13 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote: 

   

 #yiv3436374082 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}The south wind was so strong 
yesterday I didn't expect much in the way of land birds in Lake Fayetteville 
Park, but near the Environmental Study Center I started seeing and hear CHECK 
CHECK calls of Yellow-rumped Warblers and eventually had 24+ fly past me as I 
stood in one place. And yes, they were exploring poison ivy vines in the trees. 
I assume these birds had pushed south into northwest Arkansas just ahead of the 
cold front we have here today. This is the first of the big flocks and fairly 
typical here. First they dribble in, then dribble becomes flood with a big cold 
front especially in the second week of October. 



   
Subject: Small and big
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 11:39:00 -0500
We have had a female Ruby-throated Hummingbird coming to the feeder on our
deck for about a week, with last sighting late yesterday afternoon.  We
live in east Fayetteville.  While on my morning exercise walk around Lake
Fayetteville today, I heard FOS White-throated Sparrow just before the
2-mile marker, then later watched two mature Bald Eagles soaring over the
Botanical Garden and the east end of the lake.

Jonathan Perry
Subject: Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler influx at Lake Fayetteville Park
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:12:45 +0000
The south wind was so strong yesterday I didn't expect much in the way of land 
birds in Lake Fayetteville Park, but near the Environmental Study Center I 
started seeing and hear CHECK CHECK calls of Yellow-rumped Warblers and 
eventually had 24+ fly past me as I stood in one place. And yes, they were 
exploring poison ivy vines in the trees. I assume these birds had pushed south 
into northwest Arkansas just ahead of the cold front we have here today. This 
is the first of the big flocks and fairly typical here. First they dribble in, 
then dribble becomes flood with a big cold front especially in the second week 
of October. 
Subject: Least Flycatchers (2) at Callie's Prairie, Lake Fayetteville Park, yesterday
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 15:49:10 +0000
We had rain and strong S winds yesterday. During a 2.5 hour rain break in the 
afternoon, I enjoyed a hike through tall native grasses of Callie's Prairie at 
Lake Fayetteville Park. I couldn't identify most of the sparrows flushed, but 
finally had decent looks at White-throated (3) and Lincoln's (1) Sparrows, plus 
House Wrens (5). Clumps of plum, sumac, persimmon, etc made wind breaks on 
their north-facing sides. I found two Least Flycatchers at one such thicket, 
catching tiny flying insects in the sun and out of wind. I did not hear calls, 
so ID was based upon bold eyerings, prominent wingbars, overall grayish 
appearance with slightly darker gray on the breast, modest bill size, modest 
wing projection. These are among the latest records for the state. There 
appears to be something of a pattern of Least occurrences in the first half of 
October, but nothing after October 14. In northwest Arkansas, we have recorded 
a silent Empidonax flycatcher as late as October 27, though records are few 
after September. 
Subject: White-faced Ibis in Boxley Valley yesterday
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 15:27:28 +0000
Don Nelms sent me some excellent photographs of a White-faced Ibis he saw in 
Boxley Valley yesterday. This is in the general area of the mill ponds, in a 
shallow pool created by rain. Wood Ducks were in the same area. It is one of 
the dark Plegadis ibises, with no obvious "white face," but the eyes are bright 
red in Don's photographs. I have seen Plegadis ibises in quite a few places 
around northwest Arkansas, but as far as I know, this is a first for Newton 
County and perhaps in the upper Buffalo National River area. 
Subject: New Yard Bird...sorta
From: Sheran Herrin <sjherrin AT CSWNET.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 10:23:24 -0500
On Saturday morning a good friend, but very novice birder came over for a 
visit. Even though it had rained and was a little chilly, she wanted to sit out 
on our porch. She loves watching all the birds that come to my feeders. Her 
favorite of the day was a “white breasted horn tooter”!! She love the way 
it walked up and down the tree, poked it’s little head out and snatched a 
sunflower seed before retreating to the upper branches! Dr. Kannan, guess you 
have two new species to watch out for on your next quiz! LOL 

Still seeing RTHUs daily.  
Sheran Herrin, just outside Beebe and glad to see the sun and blue sky!  
Subject: Re: BKNWR
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 08:07:42 -0500
I was at BWKWR yesterday after the storms and saw Bob there.  The info he
mentions is what we were told yesterday by the officers there.  So hot of
the press...

This is the info from they web site:

The waterfowl sanctuary is closed to all public use November 15 - February
28.

Access

Access to the refuge is limited due to unimproved roads and few facilities
have been developed. All-terrain vehicle (ATV) trails provide the only
access to the Mingo Creek Unit of the refuge year round and to the Farm
Unit from November 15 to February 28. These trails are also opened for foot
traffic. All vehicles must stay on established roads and trails.
  Link to info on refuge:
http://www.fws.gov/southeast/pubs/bldgen.pdf

Keep in mind their are people that will be hunting during some of those
times so wearing orange may be good...

What we saw yesterday...

Bald Eagle
Peregrine Falcon
American Kestrel
Norther Harrier

American Advocet (12)
Great Blue Heron
Little Blue Heron
Great Egret

Green-winged Teal
American Wigeon
Northern Pintail
Gadwall
Northern Shoveler

Dowitchers (200+)
Lesser and Greater Yellowleg
Chimney Swift
Palm Warblers
Red-wing Blackbirds
Swallows...

A good time but no rarities that we could ID...

A few pictures....

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/October2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6070042555602945714 


Michael(Conway)

On Tue, Oct 14, 2014 at 6:59 AM, Bob Harden  wrote:

> The inner part of the refuge will be closed to Vehicles but not to four
> wheelers and foot traffic on Nov. 15.   I am not exactly sure when it
> reopens.
>
> On Mon, Oct 13, 2014 at 9:51 PM, birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com <
> 00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:
>
>> I have been asked if the refuge is closed to birders at any time and if
>> so, what dates?
>> Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
>> Donna Haynes
>> West Pulaski Co.
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>> 
 

>>
>
>
Subject: Re: BKNWR
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2014 06:59:37 -0500
The inner part of the refuge will be closed to Vehicles but not to four
wheelers and foot traffic on Nov. 15.   I am not exactly sure when it
reopens.

On Mon, Oct 13, 2014 at 9:51 PM, birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com <
00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> I have been asked if the refuge is closed to birders at any time and if
> so, what dates?
> Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
> Donna Haynes
> West Pulaski Co.
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> 
 

>
Subject: New Yard Bird
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 19:18:56 -0500
90ish Greater White-fronted Geese just flew over my house. I heard them coming, 
and it was still just light enough to get a quick count. I was outside with my 
dog. 


Sandy B.
Fort Smith, AR

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: WATCH: Hawk Takes Out Quadcopter Drone, Reclaims the Sky
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 19:44:58 +0000
I too thought this was a neat video at first but then wondered about the 
well-being of the raptor.According to one of our state's falconers who's also a 
pilot, the redtail most likely did not "reclaim the sky" and instead was badly 
injured.  With Cody's permission, here are his comments on the video and what 
most likely happened to the hawk after its encounter with the quadcopter: 

" I have one of those quads, ( its not mine but was assigned to me so to speak 
to learn how to fly). Its nothing like the tiny one I had at the picnic. THe 
quad is designed so that if you shut the power all the way down, it does not 
stop the engines because the quad would fall out of the sky. Instead, bringing 
the power all the way off reduces the power to start a slow decent so the the 
9" blades would only be turning about 9,000 rpm's instead of 10,000.  I am so 
fearful of those blades that i take them completely off the quad until it is 
ready to takeoff. (in the video) one or more of the quads blades was broken on 
some part of the hawk, prob its feet or the quad wouldnt have crashed. It has 
gyros that stabilized itself and make corrections for upset so i know it lost a 
blade or two. That bird is seriously hurt. Google quad copter injury images if 
you want to see the damage they can do." 

As Aaron said, these quadcopters and drones are one more dangers the birds 
must face. 

 
       From: Jamie Gwin 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2014 7:39 PM
 Subject: Re: WATCH: Hawk Takes Out Quadcopter Drone, Reclaims the Sky
   
The hawk could have been injured and died later.
One more danger the birds must face.  Aaron Gwin


From: "Barry Haas" 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 10:35:59 PM
Subject: WATCH: Hawk Takes Out Quadcopter Drone, Reclaims the Sky

Dear ARBIRDers,

Some of you have likely seen this video touted today on assorted media.  In 
case you've missed it, enjoy: 



https://www.yahoo.com/tech/watch-hawk-takes-out-quadcopter-drone-reclaims-the-99643089314.html 


Sort of makes me feel good to see nature win out once in awhile.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas


  
Subject: RTHU
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 13:57:20 -0500
Still here on the Ouachita River.

 

Jeff Short
Subject: Re: No Sharp-sinned Hawks at Wilson Springs
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 13:27:12 -0500
After joyfully posting my first Loggerhead"ed" Shrike sighting, I received an 
email from someone who suggested I purchase a 

guide and learn my species. Ah, the cardinal sins of an ordinary birder. I 
should have blamed it spell-check. :-) 




Kelly Chitwood








On Oct 13, 2014, at 12:41 PM, Ragupathy Kannan wrote:

> Don't worry, Joe, I once called the Great Indian Bustard the "Great Indian 
Bastard", thanks to annoying spell check programs. Your bloopers are 
less-sinful in comparison. 

> 
> 
> On Monday, 13 October 2014 9:19 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:
> 
> 
> OK, I've done it again, or as Ronald Reagan said it, "There you go again." 
> 
> Last week I found a Double-headed Cormorant and my friends were alternately 
(1) Hoping they could get one for their Life List, and (2) Wonder if the heads 
were looking in the same directions. 

> 
> Today it is a Sharp-sinned Hawk, and at Birdside Baptist, no less. As Don 
Steinkraus put it, "Perhaps as a preacher you can help the hawk repent." 

> 
> 
Subject: Re: No Sharp-sinned Hawks at Wilson Springs
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 17:41:28 +0000
Don't worry, Joe, I once called the Great Indian Bustard the "Great Indian 
Bastard", thanks to annoying spell check programs.  Your bloopers are 
less-sinful in comparison.   


 On Monday, 13 October 2014 9:19 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote: 

   

 #yiv8170208405 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}OK, I've done it again, or as 
Ronald Reagan said it, "There you go again." 


Last week I found a Double-headed Cormorant and my friends were alternately (1) 
Hoping they could get one for their Life List, and (2) Wonder if the heads were 
looking in the same directions. 


Today it is a Sharp-sinned Hawk, and at Birdside Baptist, no less. As Don 
Steinkraus put it, "Perhaps as a preacher you can help the hawk repent." 


   
Subject: Yellow-breasted Chat
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 12:12:44 -0500
There is a Yellow-breasted Chat in my yard here in Hillcrest.  It is not
only a new yard bird but also a late record by about two weeks.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: DAN SCHEIMAN ON BIRDS AND CLIMATE CHANGE, northwest arkansas presentation DECEMBER 6
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 15:27:02 +0000
Dr. Dan Scheiman, Bird Conservation Director for Audubon Arkansas, is traveling 
to northwest Arkansas in early December to present his program based upon 
Audubon’s climate change report. He will present the basic science, including 
specifics relevant to northwest Arkansas, to the public and members of 
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society as part of the Guest Speaker Series 
sponsored by Friends of Hobbs. Dan’s presentation will be at 2 PM, Saturday 
December 6, 2014, at the Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area visitor’s center. 
This event is free and open to the public. 


NWAAS will host a winter waterfowl outing in the morning at nearby Ricky Branch 
Park on Beaver Lake that morning. Meet at Rocky Branch Marina parking by 9 AM. 
If you arrive later, just come down to the area of the Corps of Engineers 
campground on the lake shore. We will go birding, then head for Dan’s talk 
which is nearby. We will quit birding, even if the Grand Wazoo herself lands on 
the lake in front of us. 


In support of Dan’s talk, NWAAS President Doug James decided to cancel a 
long-planned election of officers meeting on the same day at Nightbird Books. 
Instead, the election will occur at Hobbs just before Dan’s talk. We want 
people to hear Dan’s report and felt a second meeting on the same day would be 
a distraction. Please make this change on your calendars. 


Joanie Patterson was going to present a powerpoint program about a birding trip 
to Trinidad. She has agreed to hold that presentation for our next meeting. 
Subject: No Sharp-sinned Hawks at Wilson Springs
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 14:19:40 +0000
OK, I've done it again, or as Ronald Reagan said it, "There you go again."

Last week I found a Double-headed Cormorant and my friends were alternately (1) 
Hoping they could get one for their Life List, and (2) Wonder if the heads were 
looking in the same directions. 


Today it is a Sharp-sinned Hawk, and at Birdside Baptist, no less. As Don 
Steinkraus put it, "Perhaps as a preacher you can help the hawk repent." 
Subject: WITH HONOR IN THEIR PLUMES: BIG SIT AT WILSON SPRINGS C.A.
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 14:00:06 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Land Trust put on its second fall Big Sit birding event 
yesterday at Wilson Spring Conservation Area (WSCA) alongside I-49 in northwest 
Fayetteville. I was among 15 or so who tallied 30+ bird species. Favorites 
among my group were Sedge Wren, Marsh Wren, and Swamp Sparrow. 


A Great Horned Owl flew right over Doug James’ head where he sat with another 
group. Mitchell Pruitt’s bunch found Yellow-rumped Warblers and Sharp-sinned 
Hawk, both fall arrivals, plus stragglers like Indigo Buntings. Blue Jays were 
imitating Red-shouldered Hawks. Or were they hawks? There were also Monarchs. 


Fun and casual, Big Sit generates basic bird data in 120 biologically-rich 
acres smack midst the boomingest part of booming northwest Arkansas. Terri 
Lane, who directs the Trust, also uses the event to make the case for 
preservation and restoration. She terms this “A tail-gate birding event.” I am 
also thinking Sunday afternoon at Birdside Baptist, with the pioneer tradition 
of drinks and dinner on the ground. 


Northwest Arkansas now exceeds 300,000 people, will go to 500,000 soon; full 
speed ahead to predicted 700,000. Almost all is built, and will be built, on 
former grassy, flower-rich Tallgrass Prairies, including endemic Osage 
Burrowing Crayfish-rich wetlands like WSCA. If you can’t differentiate between 
a parking lot and a former prairie field, this is the place. There are clumps 
of Indian Grass with honor in their plumes. Welcome to your heritage, with 
Sawtooth Sunflowers. 


Wilson Spring CA is dominated by its remnant prairie flora like Rattlesnake 
Master and two perennial free-flowing springs plus Clabber Creek. It has a 
small colorful fish, the Arkansas Darter. But what really makes WSCA 
distinctive is EXISTENCE. Similar springs and prairie streams have been 
bulldozed and concreted into oblivion in Bentonville, Rogers, Springdale, and 
Fayetteville. The existence of Wilson Springs tests the proposition that Soras 
and delicate pink flowers like False Foxglove are as valuable as Cracker 
Barrels. 


Wilson Springs came within a hair of this fate. Most of our 1830 landscape has 
morphed into profitable cornucopias. A big prize adjacent I-49, with the 
region’s highest traffic counts, its survival tests the proposition of whether 
or not we as a community are ready to recognize 1830 is over. We’ve driven 
Henslow’s Sparrows out of our fields and turned native grasslands into 
Henslow’s Sparrow Drive and Kentucky bluegrass lawns. 


Yesterday, Mitchell Pruitt saw a big darner (type of dragonfly) that he didn’t 
recognize. That points toward the future. That’s what this is all about. I’ll 
bet it’s been here since 1830. Come the annual Fayetteville Christmas Bird 
Count, I’ll be at Wilson Springs CA hoping for Sedge Wrens again. 


In assuming responsibility, Northwest Arkansas Land Trust has given us some 
time to figure just how these ecologically rich 120 acres fit into our future. 
In that respect, the votes have not yet been all counted. 
Subject: Re: WATCH: Hawk Takes Out Quadcopter Drone, Reclaims the Sky
From: Jamie Gwin <aarongwin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 00:39:58 +0000
The hawk could have been injured and died later. 
One more danger the birds must face.  
  
Aaron Gwin 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Barry Haas"  
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 10:35:59 PM 
Subject: WATCH: Hawk Takes Out Quadcopter Drone, Reclaims the Sky 

Dear ARBIRDers, 

Some of you have likely seen this video touted today on assorted media.  In 
case you've missed it, enjoy: 



https://www.yahoo.com/tech/watch-hawk-takes-out-quadcopter-drone-reclaims-the-99643089314.html 


Sort of makes me feel good to see nature win out once in awhile. 

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, 
Barry Haas 
Subject: Two Ruby-throated hummers at our feeder just now 1815 hours Sunday
From: Keith Hawkins <kdrjnest AT IGLOU.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 18:14:51 -0500
One small female, very plump and another one buzzing about-hope they beat
the front out of here!

 

Keith Hawkins

The Heights, Little Rock
Subject: Rare hummer OK
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 14:49:41 -0500
There's a Costa's Hummer in Sand Springs, OK today. Be on the lookout for 
unusual migrants at your feeders. 


Sandy B.
Fort Smith

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Sightings: Two Rivers Park
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 13:07:51 -0500
I walked the big field and horse trail area of the park Sunday morning. They 
haven’t cut the field yet so maybe they won’t and we’ll have some sparrow 
habitat this fall and winter. 31 species in all, good birds were FOS Winter 
Wren, FOS Lincoln’s Sparrow, FOS Vesper Sparrow, and FOY House Wren. 


Something I found interesting was the sight of an American Crow half-heartedly 
harassing a much smaller Sharp-shinned Hawk. 


Also saw a few Monarchs, one Common Buckeye, and one Eastern Tailed-Blue.

Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: Re: Female RTHU
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 12:01:54 -0500
Saw RTHUs at our feeders yesterday; not yet today.

 

Jeff Short
Subject: Female RTHU
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 09:17:11 -0700
 A very plump and fluffed up RTHU is feeding in Pleasant Forest right now. She 
will probably be on her way soon. Good Luck. 



Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas