Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Arkansas Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Tuesday, June 28 at 02:18 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Limpkin,©Julie Zickefoose

28 Jun Re: Doug James retirement [Thomas Foti ]
28 Jun Northern Pintail [Cody Massery ]
28 Jun Re: house sparrows harass nesting barn swallows [Terry Judy Butler ]
27 Jun Update: RE: Sighting - pair of Wood Ducks [Gail Miller ]
27 Jun Re: CAWR nest [Harriet Hillis Jansma ]
27 Jun WILLET IN BREEDING PLUMAGE AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
27 Jun Re: Tejas Hummingbird feeder ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
27 Jun Re: CAWR nest [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
27 Jun Re: CAWR nest [Mary Ann King ]
27 Jun CAWR nest ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
27 Jun Re: Tejas Hummingbird feeder [Jerry Davis ]
26 Jun Tejas Hummingbird feeder ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
26 Jun Doug James [swamp_fox ]
26 Jun Doug James retirement ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Jun prairie st park, mo [Jacque Brown ]
26 Jun NWAAS website is DOWN ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Jun status of Western Kingbirds around Fort Smith-Van Buren (from Bill Beall) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
25 Jun WTSP [Sally Jo Gibson ]
25 Jun Re: RUDDY DUCKS AT BOYD POINT [Richard Baxter ]
25 Jun RUDDY DUCKS AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
25 Jun NWAAS FIELD TRIP TO CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA Saturday JULY 9, 2016 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
24 Jun WTSP [Sally Jo Gibson ]
24 Jun Least Terns in the river valley ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
23 Jun Fayetteville: Mississippi Kite Nest on U of A campus ["Kate M. Chapman" ]
23 Jun Re: WTSP [dianemarie yates ]
23 Jun WTSP [Sally Jo Gibson ]
23 Jun WTSP [Sally Jo Gibson ]
23 Jun Re: REGARDING HILARY DAVID CHAPMAN June 23, 2016 [Bill Shepherd ]
23 Jun REGARDING HILARY DAVID CHAPMAN June 23, 2016 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
23 Jun ASCA July Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
22 Jun Brown Thrashers [Lenore Gifford ]
22 Jun Bald Eagles over bull shoals dam [Alan ]
22 Jun Re: Chimney swifts and stuff [Dan Scheiman ]
22 Jun Roadrunner in Bentonville [Gmail ]
22 Jun MALE RUDDY DUCKS IN BREEDING PLUMAGE AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
22 Jun Re: Chimney swifts and stuff [donna albert ]
22 Jun Re: Chimney swifts and stuff [Cathy Marak ]
22 Jun Re: Chimney swifts and stuff [Gail Miller ]
22 Jun Chimney swifts and stuff ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
21 Jun Mississippi Kite in Fayetteville ["Kate M. Chapman" ]
21 Jun Summer Tanagers at ONSC, bear sightings [Melinda Gay ]
21 Jun Mark Adam's South American Parrot [Jerry Davis ]
21 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [Jerry Davis ]
21 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 ["Sarah A. FRANKLIN" ]
21 Jun David Chapman Thursday Lake Fayetteville 5 PM ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [Jerry Davis ]
20 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20 [David Arbour ]
20 Jun Mississippi Kites [Glenn McLean ]
19 Jun father's day gift. [Alan ]
18 Jun Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 - corrections! [David Arbour ]
18 Jun Blue Grosbeak [Lenore ]
18 Jun Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 [David Arbour ]
18 Jun Wild Turkey Poults & juvenile Great Horned Owl [Judy & Don ]
17 Jun Mississippi Kit Droppings Wanted ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
17 Jun Re: MIssissippi Kite, Fayetteville [Ashley Wardlow ]
17 Jun MIssissippi Kite, Fayetteville [jonathanperry24 ]
16 Jun Arkansas Mud Drive - Shorebird/waterfowl habitat + bird watching [Mike Budd ]
15 Jun N. Harriers [V Prislipsky ]
15 Jun swallow survey [Don Simons ]
15 Jun Fwd: Today’s most heartwarming story.... [Kay Hodnett ]
15 Jun fledglings & song [Judy & Don ]
14 Jun CONFIRMATION OF ID OF LAUGHING GULLS [JFR ]
14 Jun Bluebird Trail [Tim Tyler ]
14 Jun COMMON LOON IN JUNE AT CENTERTON ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
14 Jun PRAIRIE WARBLER ON CALLIES PRAIRIE, LAKE FAYETTEVILLE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
13 Jun Common Loon, Yes: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, no, BUT..... [Karen Garrett ]
12 Jun Road runnerlet [Don Simons ]
11 Jun LAUGHING GULLS AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
10 Jun International bird fight [Jeffrey Short ]
10 Jun Re: harness prairie [Michael Budd ]
10 Jun Environmental Expo for Arkansas [Melinda Gay ]
10 Jun harness prairie [Alan ]
10 Jun Re: west nile? [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
10 Jun Re: west nile? [Cody Massery ]
9 Jun Re: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (today's Google doodle) [Ed Laster ]
9 Jun Re: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (today's Google doodle) [Karen Konarski-Hart ]

Subject: Re: Doug James retirement
From: Thomas Foti <tfoti62 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 19:16:50 +0000
I was out of state during the festivities, but I would like to say a few 
things: 



Doug was the best teacher I ever experienced...I took the four courses he 
taught when I was there in the late 60s - Ornithology, Ecology, Natural History 
of the Vertebrates, and Animal Behavior. There was only one other class I ever 
took that could compare to any of these. His office was always closed before 
class as he prepared and he taught from a loose-leaf binder that he kept 
continuously updated with the latest information and data on the subject. 
Lectures were riveting, field trips were AWESOME! He introduced me to the 
relationships among geology, climate, soil and biota - Ecosystems. He was 
briefly my major professor until I bailed for reasons that overwhelmed my 
respect for him. He introduced me to Konecny Prairie (now a state Natural Area) 
where I hope my ashes will be spread. This note seems so superficial, but it's 
the best I can do right now. 



Tom Foti

________________________________
From: Joseph C. Neal 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2016 10:33 AM
Subject: Doug James retirement

Doug James came to the UA-Fayetteville in 1953 when he was 28 years old. This 
weekend Kim Smith and others organized events marking his retirement, at age 
90, and after 63 years on the job. 


A promising graduate student himself, but with his dissertation unfinished, he 
was hired upon recommendation of his major professor. Doug packed his stuff 
into one suitcase, came to Fayetteville on a bus, and lived for a time in a 
boarding house on Arkansas Avenue, near Old Main. 


Those who despair about the meanings or the values of their own lives may take 
comfort in the reality that from such modest beginnings Doug would eventually 
mentor more than 80 a graduates to MS and PHD degrees. They in turn have gone 
forth as conservationists and environmentalists to manage wildlife resources, 
teach, and - as Doug was a Fulbright Scholar on three occasions - demonstrate 
on an international stage the best of America. 


Many of Doug's former graduate students made long trips to see him off into 
retirement. I was particularly touched by those who remember he has always 
shown openness for finding and encouraging talent, especially among women and 
men whose undergraduate achievements were modest. He literally answered calls 
that others wouldn't answer. He answered letters. His students didn't have to 
be people with highest GRE scores. He could see something. This is stuff that 
moves life forward. 


Not long after I met Doug, he invited me on a canoe trip down the Buffalo. He 
didn't know I'd never been in a canoe, much less a canoe on the Buffalo. When 
we put the boat in at Steel Creek he asked where I wanted to sit. I didn't know 
front from back. That didn't make any difference to him. He's that kind of 
person. Thanks for giving so many of us a chance. 


Doug still has 5 graduate students, including one with 5 years to completion. 
He and Elizabeth remain in Fayetteville. So he can work with his students. So 
you can give him a holler. 


If you have stories or experiences to share, I encourage you to consider 
posting them to ARBIRDS so others can enjoy them, too. I don't know if Doug is 
still monitoring ARBIRDS, so be sure and CC to him at djames AT uark.edu. 



Subject: Northern Pintail
From: Cody Massery <cmassery AT ATU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 18:57:22 +0000
I just observed a Northern Pintail at Petit Jean River WMA. At first I thought 
he was injured and couldn't fly. After about three minutes he finally decided 
to fly off. 


Get Outlook for Android
Subject: Re: house sparrows harass nesting barn swallows
From: Terry Judy Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 10:50:59 -0500
Way to go Kannan! Sparrows give me a lot of trouble with my Purple Martins and 
Bluebirds also. 


 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan 

Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2016 9:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: house sparrows harass nesting barn swallows

 

After a long 15-yr wait, we finally have barn swallows nesting in our wide 
porch in Ft. Smith. But the nest was immediately usurped by house sparrows. The 
sparrows apparently waited till the cup-shaped mud nest was complete before 
taking over. When the sparrows were adding nest lining material, I gave them a 
lot of hints that they were not welcome (laser light on their eyes, WD-40 
sprayed straight at the nest, frequent shooing) but they took advantage of my 
being away a lot in May doing birding tours and laid their eggs anyway. I was 
finally forced me to do the unpleasant task of removing the eggs. 


 

But the barn swallows were persistent. They started nesting elsewhere in the 
porch and they are now incubating. Sparrows are nowhere around. 


 

Want to know more about how bad house sparrows are for barn swallows?  

https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/jfo/v060n03/p0323-p0328.pdf 
 


 

Or you can read our own paper on the impact of house sparrows on cliff 
swallows. 


http://www.jstor.org/stable/40600386?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents 
 


 

Incidentally, my wife was upset when I removed the sparrow eggs and 
understandably so. But here is a case where facts must over-ride feelings. I 
explained to her that if we don't remove the eggs, those eggs will make more 
sparrows that will then take over more native birds' nests. I don't know if she 
agreed but at least she does not insist that I need to go to the Ganges for a 
sin-cleansing dip. 


 

Kannan

Ft. Smith
Subject: Update: RE: Sighting - pair of Wood Ducks
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 20:24:14 -0500
Last week, around 8:00 p.m., I was in the back yard waiting for the dogs to
potty before being inside for the night, when I saw the female Wood Duck
'zoom' into the nest box in the back yard, with a big 'gafwhump';  meaning
she flew into the box FAST.  I made that word up.  :-) 

I've spent several nights sitting on the back step watching and just now, 8:
18 p.m., the female flew into the nest box.  She is actually nesting in a
box that is 30 feet from my back door.   She flew in a bit more 'gracefully'
tonight, pausing for an instant at the entrance. 

Gail Miller
Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR 

-----Original Message-----
From: Gail Miller [mailto:gail.miller AT conwaycorp.net] 
Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2016 9:43 AM
To: ARBirdlist 
Subject: Re: Sighting - pair of Wood Ducks

The Wood Ducks came back and I was able to get a photo through a closed
window.  Note, the male is behind the female in this photo.

http://www.pbase.com/image/163385568


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message-----
From: Gail Miller
Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2016 8:10 AM
To: ARBirdlist
Subject: Sighting - pair of Wood Ducks

I walked my dogs early this morning and as I came back to the house, I saw a
large bird fly into an oak tree in my back yard.  At first, I thought
Eurasian Collared Dove.  I had binoculars and when I looked, it was a female
Wood Duck.  Last year, when I had my woodwork shop built in the back yard, I
had a large oak tree cut because it was leaning too much toward the house,
which made my tree guy nervous.  I left the large trunk, which is about 25
feet high.  I'd recently bought two Wood Duck boxes to put up down by the
creek and one was still on the back porch.  Taking advantage of having the
bucket truck here, I had the guys mount one of the Wood Duck boxes high on
the tree.  This morning, after seeing the female, I glanced at the nest box
and the male was sitting on top of the box.  Surely, they wouldn't nest so
close to the house and so far from the creek???  My original thoughts on
mounting the nest box was that a Screech Owl might use it and I recently saw
Great-crested Flycatchers taking nesting material in it.  The flycatchers
have taken nesting materials into two nest boxes now, I have no idea what
their goal is, as they don't seem to have 'settled' in either box.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Re: CAWR nest
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 19:12:30 +0000
We've had three broods of house wrens hatch right outside our windows this year 
(on the south slope of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville), and a fourth pair (or 
repeat nesting) is residing now in a flower pot set in an iron ring on our 
chimney -- about 3' from where we sit for all our meals. The bird approaching 
the nest (which includes a hill of "hay" sticking up from the pot) scolds or 
sings a long time before each approach. Though the pot is somewhat protected, 
it got a very heavy rain during the night, but today's activity seems normal. 



We know that one pair nested in the rafters above the work bench in our 
(separate) garage but don't know where the other two nests were located. All 
seem to love the safety of our near yards (with a lot of pavement and a lot of 
cover) for protection of the just-hatched fledglings. The soft sounds of the 
parents just after the nestlings fledge are now easy to recognize: as soon as 
we hear them, we start to look for and count the latest brood. 



Harriet Jansma

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Karen Konarski-Hart  

Sent: Monday, June 27, 2016 8:04 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: CAWR nest

They are THE most determined birds when they lock onto their target nest site. 
They'll ignore lovely "wren houses" or seemingly other humanly sane real estate 
in favor of an old boot or in one case...The grill of a tractor that was used 
every day. 

Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 27, 2016, at 7:54 AM, Mary Ann King 
> wrote: 


Wrens seems to nest in really odd places.

MaryAnn   King
In the pine woods northwest of London
Subject: WILLET IN BREEDING PLUMAGE AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 11:50:29 -0500
This morning Doc George and I observed and photographed a single Willet in 
breeding plumage at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. 
It was foraging along the shoreline and was very approachable, which allowed 
for good photos, in particular captures of the amazing wings in flight. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: Tejas Hummingbird feeder
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 08:26:09 -0500
I thought Best 1 was different and that they had to do a redesign to prevent 
trapping birds? According to Tejas' website they make the base from metal 
still. 


That's a good recommendation though. What do you put in it for the orioles and 
woodpeckers? 


Thanks

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Jerry Davis
  wrote:

>I have used this hummingbird feeder since 1974 when it was called Best 1 
>Hummingbird feeder. It started when the original was produced by a retired 
>engineer using the metal 8 mm film canisters for the base. He died but his 
>daughter continued manufacturing it and eventually got into the plastic 
>mold.  Other people have copied its design. My hummingbirds, orioles, downy 
>and red-bellied woodpeckers use it also.
>
>Jerry W. Davis
>Hot Springs, AR
>
>-----Original Message----- 
>From: George R. Hoelzeman
>Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2016 10:56 PM
>To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>Subject: Tejas Hummingbird feeder
>
>Has anyone seen or used this feeder?  I stumbled across it online and
>its pricey, but sounds like it might be a good feeder - robust, no
>plastic, durable and large capacity (my daughter is really in to the
>hummers)
>
>Thanks
>
>George (n. Conway Co. with hummer numbers increasing daily) 
Subject: Re: CAWR nest
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 13:04:59 +0000
They are THE most determined birds when they lock onto their target nest site. 
They'll ignore lovely "wren houses" or seemingly other humanly sane real estate 
in favor of an old boot or in one case...The grill of a tractor that was used 
every day. 

Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 27, 2016, at 7:54 AM, Mary Ann King 
> wrote: 


Wrens seems to nest in really odd places.

MaryAnn   King
In the pine woods northwest of London
Subject: Re: CAWR nest
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:53:57 -0500
Wrens seems to nest in really odd places.

 

MaryAnn   King

In the pine woods northwest of London 
Subject: CAWR nest
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 12:46:37 +0000
Just discovered a wren nest at a friends house near Pottsville. He has an 
elevated rack for his canoe which sits upside down on the rack. The nest is in 
the bow of the canoe. We also have an archery target under the canoe which is 
only about 4 feet below the nest. We have been shooting at that target almost 
daily and didn't even realize the nest was there. The wren is incubating and 
sits tight despite multiple trips back and forth to pull arrows out of the 
target. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager (Acting)

Forest Service
Ozark St-Francis National Forest

p: 479-964-7231 x7231
c: 541-620-0681
f: 479-964-7518
creames AT fs.fed.us

605 West Main
Russellville, AR 72801
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people








This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: Tejas Hummingbird feeder
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:42:37 -0500
I have used this hummingbird feeder since 1974 when it was called Best 1 
Hummingbird feeder. It started when the original was produced by a retired 
engineer using the metal 8 mm film canisters for the base. He died but his 
daughter continued manufacturing it and eventually got into the plastic 
mold.  Other people have copied its design. My hummingbirds, orioles, downy 
and red-bellied woodpeckers use it also.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

-----Original Message----- 
From: George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2016 10:56 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Tejas Hummingbird feeder

Has anyone seen or used this feeder?  I stumbled across it online and
its pricey, but sounds like it might be a good feeder - robust, no
plastic, durable and large capacity (my daughter is really in to the
hummers)

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co. with hummer numbers increasing daily) 
Subject: Tejas Hummingbird feeder
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 22:56:48 -0500
Has anyone seen or used this feeder?  I stumbled across it online and 
its pricey, but sounds like it might be a good feeder - robust, no 
plastic, durable and large capacity (my daughter is really in to the 
hummers)

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co. with hummer numbers increasing daily)
Subject: Doug James
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 10:38:00 -0500
Somehow or the other, I managed to miss an announcement of the retirement 
festivities for Doug. I would’ve liked to have put in my .02 cents worth at 
one of the activities but, since I was unable to do that in person, I shall 
take a moment to do it here. 


While in the typical definition I never was one of Doug’s students, I was 
nonetheless a student and certainly became a better birder because of our 
association. Over the decades, Doug and I had more than a few debates if you 
will about bird ID or the distribution and status of a species in Arkansas. He 
would always listen as I made my case and I think that was his biggest asset. 
My opinion was never discarded out of hand if it were contrary to his. I was 
always given a chance to prove my position and I’m certain that was true for 
anyone else. I never kept score but, over time, I know I won some and lost 
some. Those debates that I lost were the ones I learned the most from. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana, TX 75503
Subject: Doug James retirement
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 15:33:48 +0000
Doug James came to the UA-Fayetteville in 1953 when he was 28 years old. This 
weekend Kim Smith and others organized events marking his retirement, at age 
90, and after 63 years on the job. 


A promising graduate student himself, but with his dissertation unfinished, he 
was hired upon recommendation of his major professor. Doug packed his stuff 
into one suitcase, came to Fayetteville on a bus, and lived for a time in a 
boarding house on Arkansas Avenue, near Old Main. 


Those who despair about the meanings or the values of their own lives may take 
comfort in the reality that from such modest beginnings Doug would eventually 
mentor more than 80 a graduates to MS and PHD degrees. They in turn have gone 
forth as conservationists and environmentalists to manage wildlife resources, 
teach, and - as Doug was a Fulbright Scholar on three occasions - demonstrate 
on an international stage the best of America. 


Many of Doug's former graduate students made long trips to see him off into 
retirement. I was particularly touched by those who remember he has always 
shown openness for finding and encouraging talent, especially among women and 
men whose undergraduate achievements were modest. He literally answered calls 
that others wouldn't answer. He answered letters. His students didn't have to 
be people with highest GRE scores. He could see something. This is stuff that 
moves life forward. 


Not long after I met Doug, he invited me on a canoe trip down the Buffalo. He 
didn't know I'd never been in a canoe, much less a canoe on the Buffalo. When 
we put the boat in at Steel Creek he asked where I wanted to sit. I didn't know 
front from back. That didn't make any difference to him. He's that kind of 
person. Thanks for giving so many of us a chance. 


Doug still has 5 graduate students, including one with 5 years to completion. 
He and Elizabeth remain in Fayetteville. So he can work with his students. So 
you can give him a holler. 


If you have stories or experiences to share, I encourage you to consider 
posting them to ARBIRDS so others can enjoy them, too. I don't know if Doug is 
still monitoring ARBIRDS, so be sure and CC to him at djames AT uark.edu. 

Subject: prairie st park, mo
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 07:46:25 -0500
I drove up to Prairie St Park in Missouri yesterday morning looking for Henslow 
Sparrows and Regal Fritillaries. 


I saw one Henslow Sparrow but it dove in the grass as soon as I saw it and 
would not perch up so I couldn’t get a photo.The Butterfly weed is blooming 
but it is still too early for most butterflies, including the Regal Fritillary. 
I saw a few Swallowtails and Sulfers. I was hoping the Nature center had a 
"throw down” fritillary on the Butterfly weed out front but Nooo! 


I did see a lot of Dickcissels, heard several Bells Vireos, an Oriole, Redwing 
Blackbirds, a few Brown-headed Cowbirds, Common Grackles, Meadowlarks, Common 
Yellowthroat, Cardinals, and a few Horned Larks. 





Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: NWAAS website is DOWN
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 12:13:02 +0000
For those of you looking for information on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon 
Society website: the site is DOWN. According to webmaster Richard Stauffacher, 
the company that hosts the site has apparently been hacked or otherwise 
compromised. It is also not clear when this situation will be fixed. If you 
have questions for NWAAS officers or Board, you can send them directly to Board 
members or otherwise I'll try to route them. I will re-post about this 
situation again when the site comes back up, or alternatively, when we begin 
the process of building a new site with a new hosting company. I don't anything 
else about this, but you can communicate directly with Richard at: etchings.org 
Subject: status of Western Kingbirds around Fort Smith-Van Buren (from Bill Beall)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 09:00:22 +0000
Received this note from Bill Beall about the status of nesting Western 
Kingbirds around Fort Smith and Van Buren: 



"A fast survey (5 hours) of previously known nesting sites seems to indicate a 
decrease in the population of weki. Toka and I located 27 birds & 8 nests at 17 
locations. It appears they are not feeding nestlings yet so it is more 
difficult to locate nests. Okla. G & E is removing and/or modernizing their 
substations which seem to form an anchor for most locations. The modern 
substations don't have the massive metal frameworks that the old stations had 
and therefore there are fewer nesting sites in the substation. Three stations 
have been completely removed. There were no birds at two of the sites. 
Originally about 4 pairs nested in and around the vicinity of the Van Buren 
station. It has been modernized and we have not been able to locate any birds 
there in 2 trips. In downtown Fort Smith we were not able to find birds in 
about 5 previous nesting areas. Hopefully we will find more birds next time." 
Subject: WTSP
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:37:34 -0500
After seeing my pictures of the White-throated Sparrows on facebook, a
friend of mine who lives at Bergman (about 9 miles north of Harrison on Hwy
7) reports that she still has two WTSP at her home.

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR
Subject: Re: RUDDY DUCKS AT BOYD POINT
From: Richard Baxter <dickbaxter100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:32:07 -0500
I would say keep looking. I took this photo of a brood on June 26, 2009

http://www.pbase.com/dickbaxter/image/114389781
On Jun 25, 2016 12:03 PM, "JFR"  wrote:

> On 22 June, I reported  a large flock of 25 male Ruddy Ducks in breeding
> plumage at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff.  In
> addition, I mentioned that a small flock of 3-5 Ruddy Ducks in breeding
> plumage had been consistently observed for at least the past month.  On the
> morning of 23 June, the large flock was gone, but the small group
> persisted. Usually, they keep to the middle of the large ponds and are
> difficult to observe, much less to photograph.  Charles Mills had advised
> me to keep an eye on them, since the species has nested rarely in Ark.
> This morning, I observed 3 male Ruddy Ducks in breeding plumage and 1
> female, doubtless the persistent group.  They were in one of the smaller
> ponds and I could see that one male was staying close to the female and
> apparently vocalizing to the other males, if they approached too closely.
> The couple also  appeared to vocalize to each other, but there was no
> courtship display by the male.  In time, the couple separated from the
> other two males and began to dive and forage near the shore. When they
> dived, I drove quickly to the area of their anticipated emergence and was
> able to get  closeup photographs of the juxtaposed pair, which I would
> think to be most unusual in Arkansas.  I  wonder  if it is too late in the
> season to expect to see hatchlings from this pair.
> John Redman
Subject: RUDDY DUCKS AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:03:01 -0500
On 22 June, I reported a large flock of 25 male Ruddy Ducks in breeding plumage 
at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. In addition, I 
mentioned that a small flock of 3-5 Ruddy Ducks in breeding plumage had been 
consistently observed for at least the past month. On the morning of 23 June, 
the large flock was gone, but the small group persisted. Usually, they keep to 
the middle of the large ponds and are difficult to observe, much less to 
photograph. Charles Mills had advised me to keep an eye on them, since the 
species has nested rarely in Ark. This morning, I observed 3 male Ruddy Ducks 
in breeding plumage and 1 female, doubtless the persistent group. They were in 
one of the smaller ponds and I could see that one male was staying close to the 
female and apparently vocalizing to the other males, if they approached too 
closely. The couple also appeared to vocalize to each other, but there was no 
courtship display by the male. In time, the couple separated from the other two 
males and began to dive and forage near the shore. When they dived, I drove 
quickly to the area of their anticipated emergence and was able to get closeup 
photographs of the juxtaposed pair, which I would think to be most unusual in 
Arkansas. I wonder if it is too late in the season to expect to see hatchlings 
from this pair. 

John Redman
Subject: NWAAS FIELD TRIP TO CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA Saturday JULY 9, 2016
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 15:21:17 +0000
Join members and friends of Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society on Saturday July 
9, 2016, for a field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area near Siloam Springs. 
Meet at the entrance to Chesney at 9 AM (you can arrive earlier or later, too 
-- not hard to see the group in open grasslands). Free and open to the public. 
This is an opportunity to see native prairie, including American Goldfinches, 
Dickcissels, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, bumblebees, Red-headed Woodpeckers. 
There are also Painted Buntings this year. Chesney will feature a good showing 
of native flowers, especially several sunflower species and dramatic purple gay 
feathers (Liatris species) and attending butterflies. Good opportunity for 
photography, for novice and pro alike. The trip will consist of an easy loop 
walk of about 1.1 miles on mowed trails. A longer trail is available; you can 
walk as much or as little as you wish and of course you don't need to stick 
with the group. Water, sunscreen, and hat are recommended. You do not have to 
be a member of the NWAAS to participate. All ages and skill levels are welcome. 
Joe Woolbright and his staff at Ozark Ecological Restorations Inc mow paths at 
Chesney to make it easier. Chiggers, ticks, and other irritations are minimal 
along the paths. How to get there: From Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, take 
highway 412 W to near Siloam Springs city limits. At the intersection of 412 & 
59, turn N onto 59. You pass the Siloam Springs airport. Approximately 1 mile 
past the airport, note an intersection: the road west is "Chesney" and the road 
east is "Bill Young." Take Bill Young Road east approximately 0.8 miles. At 
this point there is a gravel farm road going north. Go approximately 0.5 miles 
north on this road to the chicken houses at the dead end and entrance to 
Chesney. 

Subject: WTSP
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 16:50:04 -0500
The White-throated Sparrow is back for the third consecutive time, around
the same time as previous.  Today it arrived at 4:48, yesterday at 5:15 PM.
Picture will be on Facebook when I get around to it.

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR

 
Subject: Least Terns in the river valley
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 19:10:01 +0000
Nothing like a good ole really humid hothot summer day in the great valley of 
the Arkansas River near Alma. That's why David Chapman and I drove down there 
today from "cool" Fayetteville in the Ozarks. It was so humid in the valley 
that we had to run the wipers. But the trip paid off, becausea few miles down 
river from Frog Bayou WMA we spotted Least Terns (7? 10? 15?) around a big 
sandbar out in the river. 


David's Titan has clearance enough we could drive some of the roads used by 
local anglers and I suppose local youth out a-muddin'. We got a fine, if far 
off, view of the terns. In the scope: 3 Least Terns on a gravel pile on the 
island. A fourth comes in with a small fish, walks up to one of the 3, and 
offers the gift, which is accepted (nuptial ceremony of passing the fish). 


Later, we saw 2 more Least Terns at Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant. Big river 
isn't far; maybe there is another nesting isle nearby. 


We picked up Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (2) on a farm pond across from the 
wastewater plant, but did not see ducklings. We also tried three places with 
cat tails for Least Bitterns, but no luck. 


Bell's Vireos (12+) widespread. Painted Buntings (4) including one that gave us 
a wonderful view as it flew right in front of us at Frog. 


Here's a snapshot: We've parked at the wastewater plant and standing in the 
pickup bed for a view of a big pond just beyond the plant. First thing: big 
lily pads covered with generous white flowers. Then dark water with Great 
Egrets (25), Snowy Egrets (10), Great Blue Herons (2), and a single Little Blue 
Heron adult on the far side, adjacent a stand of cat tails. The whole of the 
pond lined with cattails. In the air, Cliff Swallows. Down the road overhead, 
two Mississippi Kites. 


Subject: Fayetteville: Mississippi Kite Nest on U of A campus
From: "Kate M. Chapman" <kmc025 AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 21:57:12 -0500
I first saw an adult Mississippi Kite in Fayetteville on Tuesday evening
(near the U of A campus, in a tree in the faculty lot on the southeast
corner of Leverett and Douglas). Since then, I have seen the kite sitting
on the same branch of the same tree every day, and I thought I saw what
looked like a kite nest in a differebnt tree (closeby) in the same lot.
This afternoon, I went back with a friend and found the nest (this time
with my binocs) and confirmed that a kite was indeed sitting on the nest!
Based on the fact that she was sitting (and we didn't see any nestlings),
we assume she is on eggs or very newly hatched chicks. I'm pretty sure that
the other kite I've seen sitting nearby is the male. I feel pretty
fortunate to have a MS kite nest in the lot where I park for work, just
across from my building. Anytime I want a break,  I can just pop over and
check on the nest.

If anyone wants more information about where to find the nest, feel free to
message me off list.

-Katie

Kate M. Chapman, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Psychological Science
213 Memorial Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: (479) 575-4256
Fax: (479) 575-3219
Email: kmc025 AT uark.edu
Subject: Re: WTSP
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 22:06:11 +0000
I’ve been getting WTSP off and on too, the last date: 6/19.






Dianemarie








From: Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: ‎Thursday‎, ‎June‎ ‎23‎, ‎2016 ‎1‎:‎08‎ ‎PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU






I photographed at White-throated Sparrow bathing in my pond yesterday, June 22, 
20116. 


Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10
Subject: WTSP
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 15:49:20 -0500
It's back again today.  Took more pictures.  I'll put them on facebook and
send to Lyndal.

 

Sally Jo Gibson

 

Harrison, AR
Subject: WTSP
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 13:08:34 -0500
I photographed at White-throated Sparrow bathing in my pond yesterday, June 22, 
20116. 

Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


Sent from Mail for Windows 10
Subject: Re: REGARDING HILARY DAVID CHAPMAN June 23, 2016
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:17:24 -0500
David's departure will be quite a loss for Fayetteville. I remember first 
meeting him at the Asa Wright Nature Center on Trinidad. I was there with 
Ragupathy Kannan and Doug James (et al.). 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 14:50:25 +0000
From: joeneal AT UARK.EDU
Subject: REGARDING HILARY DAVID CHAPMAN June 23, 2016
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU











With the heat over 90, the humidity over 200, and bad going-home traffic, I 
assume everyone who'd like to come out to Lake Fayetteville this afternoon in 
honor of David won't make it. So I wanted to share some comments about today's 
event. 




Most of us know David as a birder, with a special affinity for Lake 
Fayetteville. 




Prior to 1990, David had spent 18 years as a research scientist in his native 
UK. Then 26 years ago he was specifically recruited to come to UA-Fayetteville. 

 We live in the epicenter of Tyson Country. David was key to ramping-up 
research and control of poultry diseases. 




Among his scientific colleagues here and around the world, he is recognized as 
a leading figure in the study and control of coccidiosis, a significant disease 
affecting many species, including chickens. 




The person who came to Fayetteville in 1990 was not brand new to an interest in 
ecology and preservation of wild places. While on a walk, he found a 
species-rich place with plants like Green-winged Orchids now protected as 
Houghton Meadows. 

 He was involved with a place of ancient trees, Waresley Woods. Both are 
supervised by Wildlife Trusts, something like The Nature Conservancy here. 


  



I am thinking about those 26 years, especially in regard Davids involvement 
with our birding community and especially his long friendship with Mike 
Mlodinow. Since Mike started using public transit to reach local birding spots, 
they went 

 to the faraway places like Centerton in Davids car. Truly, they have been a 
dynamic duo in terms of ground covered and special birds found on our 
Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count. 




Only a block from Lake Fayetteville, from the second floor of his former home 
on Lake Road, David counted birds in his urban yard, plus with his spotting 
scope, could observe a flock of Bonapartes Gulls during fall migration over 
the lake. 

 What a great yard list: 121 species. Number 121 was a Mississippi Kite.



For several years, David was a volunteer for the Breeding Bird Survey, counting 
along the Avoca route in Benton County. Besides the Fayetteville Christmas Bird 
Count, David was a regular participant on The Nature Conservancys Tallgrass 

 Prairie CBC. How bout those Greater Prairie-Chickens!



Somewhere in here, volunteers from Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association 
took upon itself the task of restoring a historic prairie north of Lake 
Fayetteville. So here is Dr Hilary David Chapman, distinguished University 
Professor, with 

 a big chainsaw, making the world safer for prairies.



Somewhere in here, Dr Coccidiosis 
 researched the history of Lake Fayetteville. Published in the journal of 
Washington County Historical Society, Flashback, it won the Lemke Prize for the 
years best historical writing. Then he finished the book, The Bird Life of 
Lake Fayetteville, which 

 he used as a fund-raiser for construction of Mulhollan waterfowl blind.



David and Ruth have a home at Meeker, Colorado. In retirement, Grandpa David 
will be helping with the grandkids  plus another yard list. There will be an 
Arkansas birding delegation needing all those cool birds on the western slopes 
of 

 the Rockies. David has already been pumping field data into e-bird on his 
visits. Arkansas birders dream big. Think Sage Grouse. 





 		 	   		  
Subject: REGARDING HILARY DAVID CHAPMAN June 23, 2016
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 14:50:25 +0000
With the heat over 90, the humidity over 200, and bad going-home traffic, I 
assume everyone who'd like to come out to Lake Fayetteville this afternoon in 
honor of David won't make it. So I wanted to share some comments about today's 
event. 


Most of us know David as a birder, with a special affinity for Lake 
Fayetteville. 


Prior to 1990, David had spent 18 years as a research scientist in his native 
UK. Then 26 years ago he was specifically recruited to come to UA-Fayetteville. 
We live in the epicenter of Tyson Country. David was key to ramping-up research 
and control of poultry diseases. 


Among his scientific colleagues here and around the world, he is recognized as 
a leading figure in the study and control of coccidiosis, a significant disease 
affecting many species, including chickens. 


The person who came to Fayetteville in 1990 was not brand new to an interest in 
ecology and preservation of wild places. While on a walk, he found a 
species-rich place with plants like Green-winged Orchids now protected as 
Houghton Meadows. He was involved with a place of ancient trees, Waresley 
Woods. Both are supervised by Wildlife Trusts, something like The Nature 
Conservancy here. 


I am thinking about those 26 years, especially in regard David's involvement 
with our birding community and especially his long friendship with Mike 
Mlodinow. Since Mike started using public transit to reach local birding spots, 
they went to the faraway places like Centerton in David's car. Truly, they have 
been a dynamic duo in terms of ground covered and special birds found on our 
Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count. 


Only a block from Lake Fayetteville, from the second floor of his former home 
on Lake Road, David counted birds in his urban yard, plus with his spotting 
scope, could observe a flock of Bonaparte's Gulls during fall migration over 
the lake. What a great yard list: 121 species. Number 121 was a Mississippi 
Kite. 


For several years, David was a volunteer for the Breeding Bird Survey, counting 
along the Avoca route in Benton County. Besides the Fayetteville Christmas Bird 
Count, David was a regular participant on The Nature Conservancy's Tallgrass 
Prairie CBC. How 'bout those Greater Prairie-Chickens! 


Somewhere in here, volunteers from Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association 
took upon itself the task of restoring a historic prairie north of Lake 
Fayetteville. So here is Dr Hilary David Chapman, distinguished University 
Professor, with a big chainsaw, making the world safer for prairies. 


Somewhere in here, Dr Coccidiosis researched the history of Lake Fayetteville. 
Published in the journal of Washington County Historical Society, Flashback, it 
won the Lemke Prize for the year's best historical writing. Then he finished 
the book, The Bird Life of Lake Fayetteville, which he used as a fund-raiser 
for construction of Mulhollan waterfowl blind. 


David and Ruth have a home at Meeker, Colorado. In retirement, Grandpa David 
will be helping with the grandkids ... plus another yard list. There will be an 
Arkansas birding delegation needing all those cool birds on the western slopes 
of the Rockies. David has already been pumping field data into e-bird on his 
visits. Arkansas birders dream big. Think Sage Grouse. 

Subject: ASCA July Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 13:08:05 +0000
Join the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) for their July field 
trip.  See details below.  Also included are details for the August field 
trip.  Everyone is welcome.  You don't have to be an ASCA member, you just 
need to like birds and people.  Our trips are informal and provide a great 
opportunity to see many bird species and learn more about them.  ASCA also 
holds monthly meetings with great guest speakers.  For more information, go to 
our website at www.ascabird.org.  If you have questions about the field trips, 
feel free to email me off list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle 
Rock 

 July 9 Dr. Lester SitzesIII Bois D’Arc WMAHope, ARMeetat 7:00 a.m. at the 
south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430intersection at 
Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 
30off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to join 
us.  Look for  Great-tailed Grackles at McDonalds.  We should arrive at the 
Bois D’Arc WMA at9:15 a.m.  Our target birds will bePurple and Common 
Gallinules and their chicks, Least Bitterns, Anhingas,Black-bellied Whistling 
Ducks, herons, egrets, and possibly an alligator ortwo!  Very little walking 
will beinvolved.  Bring scopes, plenty of water,snacks, and lunch.  There are 
severalrestaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town.  BoisD‘Arc 
WMA is located 10 miles south of Hope. Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go 
east. Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the 
light at the big intersection, turnright onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of amile.  At 
the brown sign, turn left ontoHwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles tothe 
stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turn rightonto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4 miles.  
Turn right at the white wooden WMA sign justbefore the highway ends in the 
lake. Follow the paved road, then turn left onto the first gravel road and 
godown to the lake.  GPS: 33.558062,-93.694239 August 27Bald Knob 
NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in 
the Other Center parking lot, theeast side behind McDonald’s.  Take Exit 
1West off US-67/167.  The Other Center ison McCain Blvd. across from McCain 
Mall. We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR at around 8:30 a.m. for those who want 
tomeet us there.  Look for the line of carsparked on Coal Chute Road.  The 
federalrefuge is also a National Audubon Important Bird Area.  We expect to 
see shorebirds, herons,night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks and 
Roseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hot so bring plenty of water,snacks, 
sunscreen, and a hat.  If youhave a scope, bring it.  Very littlewalking will 
be involved.  There is nobathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’sjust off 
Hwy. 67/167 at Bald Knob Exit 55. Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/for driving 
directions and more information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903 
  
Subject: Brown Thrashers
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:59:06 -0500
In downtown I park next to a church. They recently took saws to all the bushes 
around the church. They left one as they evidently found a thrasher nest in one 
they cut down. This morning I saw the box they had sitting on the edge of the 
bush they left was on the ground. I found two baby thrashers outside the box.. 
Almost fully feathered. One of them didn't look well. Next thing I know I hear 
one of the parents squawking at me. I went on in to work and looked at them 
when I left. The one bird I'm concerned about legs are splayed. I don't know if 
that is normal. The other baby also is splayed but not as bad. This time both 
parents came squawking. It was so hard not to pick them up and cuddle them but 
I resisted. I'm thinking that since both of the parents are there that they 
will be fine. I took some pics if you want to see them email me off list. 


Lenore, near the Sardis Community in Saline County
Sent from my iPad
Subject: Bald Eagles over bull shoals dam
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 17:21:59 -0500
Hot day, so took a drive and found a summer Bald eagle over the Dam at Bull
Shoals lake. A few other regulars, makes me want fresh trout for dinner.

Alan Gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: Re: Chimney swifts and stuff
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:21:09 +0000
If anyone wants to see a similar swift tower in person, there are 4 at the 
Little Rock Audubon Center - two next to the entrance to the center and two on 
the hillside behind the center, accessible from the wildlife observation trail 
that starts at an entry gate with a Chimney Swift theme. A pair is nesting in 
one of the towers next to our front doors. Many roost in the same tower after 
the breeding season. The two by the front doors were built when the center was 
built. Of the two on the hillside, one was built by my coworkers Jon and 
Ruddie, and the other by Boy Scouts. 


http://ar.audubon.org/about-us/little-rock-audubon-center-0 

Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Cathy Marak"  
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:33:48 AM 
Subject: Re: Chimney swifts and stuff 

This was an article I saw a while ago about chimney swifts in Missouri. 
It talks about how to populate the towers: 


http://wildcatglades.audubon.org/birds/chimney-swift-tower-projects 

Cathy Marak 
Benton County 

On 6/22/2016 8:00 AM, Gail Miller wrote: 
> I had a Chimney Swift tower built at my house about 3 years ago. So far, no 
swifts. It is rock and built to specification. I think, like Purple Martins, 
they return to the same place each year and unless their usual dwelling 
disappears, they don't look for a new dwelling. Just my thoughts. I'd seen 
swifts here at home before, which is why I'd hoped I would attract them. Maybe 
next year. 

> 
> Gail Miller 
> Conway (Faulkner Co.) 
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

> Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 3:23 AM 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Subject: Chimney swifts and stuff 
> 
> After spending a bit of the day outside in the heat wishing I was inside, 
then being inside during the early evening and wishing I was outside, I finally 
found myself standing in the streets of Morrilton, which may not have been my 
best option, but I digress... 

> 
> Overhead were swarms of Chimney Swifts. Delightful to say the least. 
> Watching them got me thinking about these small birds which always remind me 
of childhood and seeing them during summer evenings just like this one. I also 
got to thinking how much I'd like to have some around the house and how I might 
attract them. 

> 
> I've seen plans (sort of) for Chimney Swift dwellings. Basically cinder block 
towers that look, well, like a chimney. Constructing a fake hollow tree could 
also be an option (a lot of long 2x10's in a circle, or something). But, it has 
been years since I've seen swifts around here - here being well back in the 
woods south of Cleveland in North Conway County. So, what are the chances of 
attracting Chimney Swifts if I build some towers? If its pretty good, it might 
be worth it. If chances are low (like with Purple Martins) I'm going to save my 
money. 

> 
> Thoughts? 
> 
> Thanks 
> 
> George (n. Conway Co. with fewer streets and even fewer chimney swifts) 
> 
Subject: Roadrunner in Bentonville
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 12:23:20 -0500
I spotted a Roadrunner near the corner of SW 16th and SW Thornton Streets in 
Bentonville just a few minutes ago. 


What a beauty!

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR
Subject: MALE RUDDY DUCKS IN BREEDING PLUMAGE AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 11:24:43 -0500
For the past month there have been 3-5 Ruddy Ducks at the Boyd Point Wastewater 
Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff, several in breeding plumage. This morning 
there was a large, loose flock of 25 males, all in breeding plumage, and one 
female. The light and the water were perfect for photographs. I believe that 
these are some of the most beautiful birds that we see in Arkansas. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: Chimney swifts and stuff
From: donna albert <donnaalbert52 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 09:31:31 -0500
Please take me off your email list.  I subscribed since I was vacationing
there from Illinois but am back home now.  I loved the Ozark area & got 1
lifelist while I was there - the Mississippi Kite.

I did go through the procedure listed to unsubscribe but since have still
gotten emails from individuals.

Thank you !

Donna

On Wed, Jun 22, 2016 at 3:23 AM, George R. Hoelzeman 
wrote:

> After spending a bit of the day outside in the heat wishing I was inside,
> then being inside during the early evening and wishing I was outside, I
> finally found myself standing in the streets of Morrilton, which may not
> have been my best option, but I digress...
>
> Overhead were swarms of Chimney Swifts.  Delightful to say the least.
> Watching them got me thinking about these small birds which always remind
> me of childhood and seeing them during summer evenings just like this one.
> I also got to thinking how much I'd like to have some around the house and
> how I might attract them.
>
> I've seen plans (sort of) for Chimney Swift dwellings.  Basically cinder
> block towers that look, well, like a chimney.  Constructing a fake hollow
> tree could also be an option (a lot of long 2x10's in a circle, or
> something).  But, it has been years since I've seen swifts around here -
> here being well back in the woods south of Cleveland in North Conway
> County.  So, what are the chances of attracting Chimney Swifts if I build
> some towers?  If its pretty good, it might be worth it.  If chances are low
> (like with Purple Martins) I'm going to save my money.
>
> Thoughts?
>
> Thanks
>
> George (n. Conway Co. with fewer streets and even fewer chimney swifts)
>
Subject: Re: Chimney swifts and stuff
From: Cathy Marak <clmarak AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 08:33:48 -0500
This was an article I saw a while ago about chimney swifts in Missouri. 
It talks about how to populate the towers:


http://wildcatglades.audubon.org/birds/chimney-swift-tower-projects

Cathy Marak
Benton County

On 6/22/2016 8:00 AM, Gail Miller wrote:
> I had a Chimney Swift tower built at my house about 3 years ago. So far, no 
swifts. It is rock and built to specification. I think, like Purple Martins, 
they return to the same place each year and unless their usual dwelling 
disappears, they don't look for a new dwelling. Just my thoughts. I'd seen 
swifts here at home before, which is why I'd hoped I would attract them. Maybe 
next year. 

>
> Gail Miller
> Conway (Faulkner Co.)
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

> Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 3:23 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Chimney swifts and stuff
>
> After spending a bit of the day outside in the heat wishing I was inside, 
then being inside during the early evening and wishing I was outside, I finally 
found myself standing in the streets of Morrilton, which may not have been my 
best option, but I digress... 

>
> Overhead were swarms of Chimney Swifts.  Delightful to say the least.
> Watching them got me thinking about these small birds which always remind me 
of childhood and seeing them during summer evenings just like this one. I also 
got to thinking how much I'd like to have some around the house and how I might 
attract them. 

>
> I've seen plans (sort of) for Chimney Swift dwellings. Basically cinder block 
towers that look, well, like a chimney. Constructing a fake hollow tree could 
also be an option (a lot of long 2x10's in a circle, or something). But, it has 
been years since I've seen swifts around here - here being well back in the 
woods south of Cleveland in North Conway County. So, what are the chances of 
attracting Chimney Swifts if I build some towers? If its pretty good, it might 
be worth it. If chances are low (like with Purple Martins) I'm going to save my 
money. 

>
> Thoughts?
>
> Thanks
>
> George (n. Conway Co. with fewer streets and even fewer chimney swifts)
>
Subject: Re: Chimney swifts and stuff
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 08:00:37 -0500
I had a Chimney Swift tower built at my house about 3 years ago. So far, no 
swifts. It is rock and built to specification. I think, like Purple Martins, 
they return to the same place each year and unless their usual dwelling 
disappears, they don't look for a new dwelling. Just my thoughts. I'd seen 
swifts here at home before, which is why I'd hoped I would attract them. Maybe 
next year. 


Gail Miller 
Conway (Faulkner Co.) 

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2016 3:23 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Chimney swifts and stuff

After spending a bit of the day outside in the heat wishing I was inside, then 
being inside during the early evening and wishing I was outside, I finally 
found myself standing in the streets of Morrilton, which may not have been my 
best option, but I digress... 


Overhead were swarms of Chimney Swifts.  Delightful to say the least.  
Watching them got me thinking about these small birds which always remind me of 
childhood and seeing them during summer evenings just like this one. I also got 
to thinking how much I'd like to have some around the house and how I might 
attract them. 


I've seen plans (sort of) for Chimney Swift dwellings. Basically cinder block 
towers that look, well, like a chimney. Constructing a fake hollow tree could 
also be an option (a lot of long 2x10's in a circle, or something). But, it has 
been years since I've seen swifts around here - here being well back in the 
woods south of Cleveland in North Conway County. So, what are the chances of 
attracting Chimney Swifts if I build some towers? If its pretty good, it might 
be worth it. If chances are low (like with Purple Martins) I'm going to save my 
money. 


Thoughts?

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co. with fewer streets and even fewer chimney swifts)
Subject: Chimney swifts and stuff
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 03:23:24 -0500
After spending a bit of the day outside in the heat wishing I was 
inside, then being inside during the early evening and wishing I was 
outside, I finally found myself standing in the streets of Morrilton, 
which may not have been my best option, but I digress...

Overhead were swarms of Chimney Swifts.  Delightful to say the least.  
Watching them got me thinking about these small birds which always 
remind me of childhood and seeing them during summer evenings just like 
this one.  I also got to thinking how much I'd like to have some around 
the house and how I might attract them.

I've seen plans (sort of) for Chimney Swift dwellings.  Basically cinder 
block towers that look, well, like a chimney.  Constructing a fake 
hollow tree could also be an option (a lot of long 2x10's in a circle, 
or something).  But, it has been years since I've seen swifts around 
here - here being well back in the woods south of Cleveland in North 
Conway County.  So, what are the chances of attracting Chimney Swifts if 
I build some towers?  If its pretty good, it might be worth it.  If 
chances are low (like with Purple Martins) I'm going to save my money.

Thoughts?

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co. with fewer streets and even fewer chimney swifts)
Subject: Mississippi Kite in Fayetteville
From: "Kate M. Chapman" <kmc025 AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 22:45:32 -0500
Saw a Mississippi kite sitting on top of a tree near the U of A campus in
Fayetteville (at the corner of Leverett and Douglas). Nice accidental
sighting!

Kate M. Chapman, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Psychological Science
213 Memorial Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: (479) 575-4256
Fax: (479) 575-3219
Email: kmc025 AT uark.edu
Subject: Summer Tanagers at ONSC, bear sightings
From: Melinda Gay <msgy.272 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 11:29:29 -0500
This morning there were two beautiful Summer Tanagers by the back kitchen
door at Ozark Natural Science Center, a male and female!

What a great start to the Arkansas Environmental Education Association's
Expo that starts today!

There have been 3 staff sightings of black bears this month at ONSC! Two
separate sightings near the top of the hill as you leave Bear Hollow (one
yesterday!) and one by King's River overlook.

Unfortunately, I wasn't one of them. I'm hoping for my first sighting of a
black bear in Arkansas soon!

Hope to see some familiar faces at the Expo!

Misty Gay
misty AT onsc.us
(479) 202-8340



​
Subject: Mark Adam's South American Parrot
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 10:13:24 -0500
I am not sure of the reality of taking on the ownership of a parrot, but Mark 
is looking for a good home for his parrot and if you can meet these needs call 
Mark at the number given below. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Little, Alett S -FS 
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:04 AM
To: Undisclosed recipients:
Subject: Mark Adam's So American Parrot

Mark is trying to sell his house and finds himself in the difficult position of 
needing to find his beloved parrot a new, loving home. The parrot is 6 years 
old and will live another 9-14 years. It’s a male, about the size of a 
mockingbird, and as Mark says, “is well-behaved, so far as birds go.” 
Mark’s number is 501-321-5303, if you or anyone you know would be interested 
in having this bird. Mark thinks that it would not be a good idea to have this 
bird in a home with cats or dogs because they sometimes eat birds. 


 


     Alett Little, AICP 
            Forest Planner
           
            Forest Service 

            Ouachita National Forest, Supervisor's Office
           
            p: 501-321-5372 
            f: 501-321-5353 
            alittle AT fs.fed.us
           
            100 Reserve Street 
            Hot Springs, AR 71901
            www.fs.fed.us 

           
            Caring for the land and serving people
           
     

 

 





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 10:08:18 -0500
Purple Martins have been in serious decline for several decades and all the 
people that want martins will not get them. Those lucky enough to have them 
need to take care of them to keep them. The Purple Martin Conservation Society 
on-line has data and suggestions of how to manage your martins and how you 
might attract martins. Many factors are involved, poor box placement, owners of 
Martin boxes being wildlife slumlords and not caring for them, not getting rid 
of predators and competitors such as house sparrows and European starlings etc. 
By looking at the website you can decide what you need to do to alter the 
habitat situation. Gourds have a greater occupancy rate than the traditional 
martin boxes because martin gourds provide more distance from other occupants 
and can get 100% occupancy whereas traditional boxes usually get 75% or less. 


I have had Purple Martin boxes up for 25 years doing the right things and have 
not gotten nesting martins yet, only roosting young of the year Martins looking 
for a place to stay until they fly to Brazil. I wish you well in your efforts 
and martins need all the help they can get. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: Sarah A. FRANKLIN 
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 9:37 AM
To: jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

We always had Martins in our house for the past forty years until 3 years ago. 
They don't even visit the house. Do you have any idea how we can get them back? 




On Tuesday, June 21, 2016 8:38 AM, Jerry Davis  wrote:





You have a housing shortage. There are 85 species of cavity nesting birds in 
the US and this problem is universal throughout the world. For cavity nesting 
birds when the nesting time comes and all pairs do not have the opportunity to 
nest, the season can be lost for these birds. I know that the Forest Service is 
broke with funds going west to fight fires and ODWC is understaffed and 
underfunded but it seems like there should be birders in Oklahoma interested in 
helping the birds with nest boxes for swallows and martins. They fly 2,000 
miles to nest and find no vacancies. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: David Arbour 
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 10:39 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 55 species were found. 
The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting silent. 
Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings from our martin 
box. We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee between Lotus and 
Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first year martins used 
it. In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows who fiercely defended it 
every time martins showed up to check it out, running the martins off. This 
year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was too many for the Tree Swallows to 
deal with so they gave up and all nested together. The swallows were in the 
vents in the attic accessed from the side of the box and the martins were in 
the main box. Interesting combination. Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting 
there but they had already won the battle with the Tree Swallows. Here is my 
list for today: 


Black-bellied Whistling Duck – 1
Wood Duck – 12
Pied-billed Grebe - 4
Neotropic Cormorant – 3
Anhinga – 13  
Least Bittern – 3 
Great-blue Heron - 7
Great Egret - 16
Little-blue Heron - 3
Cattle Egret - 2
Green Heron - 10
Black Vulture - 1
Turkey Vulture - 26
Cooper’s Hawk – 1
Broad-winged Hawk - 2
Purple Gallinule – 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)
Common Gallinule – 18 (also several broods of young.)
American Coot - 10
Mourning Dove – 8
Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 7
Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3
Downy Woodpecker – 1
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Great-crested Flycatcher - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 3
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2
White-eyed Vireo - 12
Bell's Vireo - 4
Red-eyed Vireo - 4
Blue Jay - 3
American Crow - 6
Fish Crow - 6
Purple Martin - 8
Tree Swallow – 14
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1
Barn Swallow - 32
Tufted Titmouse - 5
Carolina Wren - 7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 4
Eastern Bluebird - 2
Northern Mockingbird - 1
Pine warbler - 3
Prothonotary Warbler – 10
Common Yellowthroat - 8
Yellow-breasted Chat - 14
Summer Tanager - 1
Northern Cardinal – 21
Indigo Bunting - 28
Painted Bunting - 9
Dickcissel - 18
Red-winged Blackbird – 27
Common Grackle - 6
Brown-headed Cowbird – 1
Orchard Oriole - 3
Baltimore Oriole – 2


Odonates:

Lilypad Forktail
Common Green Darner
Regal Darner
Cyrano Darner
Prince Baskettail
Mocha Emerald
Stillwater Clubtail
Halloween Pennant
Four-spotted Pennant
Eastern Pondhawk
Slaty Skimmer
Blue Dasher
Widow Skimmer
Common Whitetail
Spot-winged Glider
Carolina Saddlebags
Black Saddlebags


Herps:

American Alligator
Red-eared Slider
Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Green Treefrog
Bronze Frog
Bullfrog



Good birding!

David Arbour
De Queen, AR



Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: "Sarah A. FRANKLIN" <franklin7480 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 14:37:59 +0000
We always had Martins in our house for the past forty years until 3 years ago. 
 They don't even visit the house. Do you have any idea how we can get them 
back? 


 On Tuesday, June 21, 2016 8:38 AM, Jerry Davis  wrote: 

 

 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: David Chapman Thursday Lake Fayetteville 5 PM
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:52:19 +0000
All -- Just a reminder of our going away gathering with our fellow birder David 
Chapman at Lake Fayetteville on Thursday, 5 PM, in the covered fishing area 
that sticks out in the lake near the dam and at the bait shop. Bring whatever 
you'd like to bring in terms of drink, food, or snacks, but no alcohol. We have 
a Richard Stauffacher card of Savannah Sparrows at Centerton to sign and anyone 
can take a few minutes to share a story. You can bring your bins, of course. 
The is ultimate informal, like going birding with David at the lake (25 
years!). 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 08:37:52 -0500
You have a housing shortage. There are 85 species of cavity nesting birds in 
the US and this problem is universal throughout the world. For cavity nesting 
birds when the nesting time comes and all pairs do not have the opportunity to 
nest, the season can be lost for these birds. I know that the Forest Service is 
broke with funds going west to fight fires and ODWC is understaffed and 
underfunded but it seems like there should be birders in Oklahoma interested in 
helping the birds with nest boxes for swallows and martins. They fly 2,000 
miles to nest and find no vacancies. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: David Arbour 
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2016 10:39 PM
To: OKBIRDS AT LISTS.OU.EDU 
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20

It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 55 species were found. 
The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting silent. 
Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings from our martin 
box. We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee between Lotus and 
Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first year martins used 
it. In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows who fiercely defended it 
every time martins showed up to check it out, running the martins off. This 
year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was too many for the Tree Swallows to 
deal with so they gave up and all nested together. The swallows were in the 
vents in the attic accessed from the side of the box and the martins were in 
the main box. Interesting combination. Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting 
there but they had already won the battle with the Tree Swallows. Here is my 
list for today: 


 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck – 1

Wood Duck – 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 4

Neotropic Cormorant – 3

Anhinga – 13  

Least Bittern – 3 

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 16

Little-blue Heron - 3

Cattle Egret - 2

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 26

Cooper’s Hawk – 1

Broad-winged Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule – 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)

Common Gallinule – 18 (also several broods of young.)

American Coot - 10

Mourning Dove – 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 7

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker – 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 8

Tree Swallow – 14

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Pine warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler – 10

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal – 21

Indigo Bunting - 28

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 18

Red-winged Blackbird – 27

Common Grackle - 6

Brown-headed Cowbird – 1

Orchard Oriole - 3

Baltimore Oriole – 2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 20
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 22:39:58 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today.  55 species were
found.  The dog days of summer seem to have set in and the birds are getting
silent.  Lots of young of the year are out now including some fledglings
from our martin box.  We placed the martin box out on the splitter levee
between Lotus and Pintail lakes about 3 or 4 years ago but this is the first
year martins used it.  In the previous years it was used by Tree Swallows
who fiercely defended it every time martins showed up to check it out,
running the martins off.  This year 3 pairs of martins showed up which was
too many for the Tree Swallows to deal with so they gave up and all nested
together.  The swallows were in the vents in the attic accessed from the
side of the box and the martins were in the main box.  Interesting
combination.  Only 2 pairs of martins ended up nesting there but they had
already won the battle with the Tree Swallows.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 4

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 13  

Least Bittern - 3 

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 16

Little-blue Heron - 3

Cattle Egret - 2

Green Heron - 10

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 26

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Broad-winged Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 15 (also 2 broods of tiny young.)

Common Gallinule - 18 (also several broods of young.)

American Coot - 10

Mourning Dove - 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 8

Tree Swallow - 14

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Pine warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler - 10

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal - 21

Indigo Bunting - 28

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 18

Red-winged Blackbird - 27

Common Grackle - 6

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

Orchard Oriole - 3

Baltimore Oriole - 2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Stillwater Clubtail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Spot-winged Glider

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Mississippi Kites
From: Glenn McLean <glennmclean1984 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 15:36:18 -0500
Just observed 6 Mississippi Kites near Searcy Post Office on Academy
Street. New life list bird for me!

Glenn McLean
Subject: father's day gift.
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 16:28:51 -0500
Had a painted bunting today as we took our father's day ride on wagner loop
up here in Harrison. Very nice gift. There were nighthawks at the summer
movie series at North Arkansas college last night.  So much fun.

Alan gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13 - corrections!
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:25:35 -0500
There's a typo.  Should have read 73 species rather than 3.  Also, my
internet was down when I sent this last week but it didn't send until today
when my service came back up.

 

David

 

From: David Arbour [mailto:arbour AT windstream.net] 
Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2016 5:00 PM
To: OKBIRDS 
Cc: ARBirds-L 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13

 

It was overcast, mild, and rainy on the survey today turning partly cloudy
near the end of the survey.  3 species were found.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 9

Wood Duck - 7

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 13  (also several nests with downy young.)

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 3 adults (also 1 downy juvenile.)

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 10

Cattle Egret - 17

Green Heron - 12

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 13

Common Gallinule - 19

American Coot - 7

Least Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 15

Rock Pigeon - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 1

Yellow-throated Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 14

Barn Swallow - 18

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 11

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 9

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 7

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 4

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 24

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 17

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 1

Baltimore Oriole - 1

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Cajun Chorus Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Blue Grosbeak
From: Lenore <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 18:12:30 -0500
After many weeks today I have a Blue
Grosbeak at the feeders. 

Lenore near the Sardis Community in Saline Co. 
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 13
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 16:59:55 -0500
It was overcast, mild, and rainy on the survey today turning partly cloudy
near the end of the survey.  3 species were found.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 9

Wood Duck - 7

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 13  (also several nests with downy young.)

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 3 adults (also 1 downy juvenile.)

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 10

Cattle Egret - 17

Green Heron - 12

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red Shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 13

Common Gallinule - 19

American Coot - 7

Least Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 15

Rock Pigeon - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 1

Yellow-throated Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 14

Barn Swallow - 18

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 11

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 9

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 7

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 4

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 24

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 17

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 1

Baltimore Oriole - 1

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Gray Treefrog

Cajun Chorus Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Wild Turkey Poults & juvenile Great Horned Owl
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 10:05:08 -0500
Both this morning and yesterday morning while Don was running on the paths that 
pass through the fields and woods he flushed three hen turkeys and at least a 
dozen poults of various ages. More youngsters were hidden unseen in the grass. 
Some were not yet ready to fly and others did fly off with the hens. 


A young Great Horned Owl begged for food from a tree right below where Don 
stood on the bluff and as it flew downstream he noticed the grayish plumage of 
the young owl. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Mississippi Kit Droppings Wanted
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 20:52:14 +0000
?Hi,


If any of you are able to collect droppings (pellets, scat, feces) from 
Mississippi kites, Ricky Corder and I would like to examine some and identify 
the prey items. 



Not sure if this is possible.  Perhaps beneath or near a nest or roosting site.


If you do find some, please call me, Don Steinkraus (479-684-8866) or email me 
 and I can either come pick them up or help you send them to 
us. 



Thanks,


Don Steinkraus

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Ashley Wardlow  

Sent: Friday, June 17, 2016 3:17 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: MIssissippi Kite, Fayetteville

There is a trio of MS Kites living in/near the Huntingdon subdivision in 
Fayetteville, located behind Butterfield Trail Elementary. Perhaps this was 
one? 


Warm regards to all -
A. Wardlow

On Friday, June 17, 2016, jonathanperry24 
> wrote: 

At 10:04 AM this morning I saw a Mississippi Kite flying south directly over 
the intersection of Township Street and Azalea Terrace in east Fayetteville. 



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: Re: MIssissippi Kite, Fayetteville
From: Ashley Wardlow <mrs.ashley.wardlow AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 15:17:17 -0500
There is a trio of MS Kites living in/near the Huntingdon subdivision in
Fayetteville, located behind Butterfield Trail Elementary. Perhaps this was
one?

Warm regards to all -
A. Wardlow

On Friday, June 17, 2016, jonathanperry24  wrote:

> At 10:04 AM this morning I saw a Mississippi Kite flying south directly
> over the intersection of Township Street and Azalea Terrace in east
> Fayetteville.
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
Subject: MIssissippi Kite, Fayetteville
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 12:59:04 -0500
At 10:04 AM this morning I saw a Mississippi Kite flying south directly
over the intersection of Township Street and Azalea Terrace in east
Fayetteville.


Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: Arkansas Mud Drive - Shorebird/waterfowl habitat + bird watching
From: Mike Budd <arkansaspfw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 10:21:56 -0500
All,

I hope you get a chance to watch a couple very short videos about the
Arkansas Mud Drive. If anything, I at least hope you enjoy the shorebird
footage....

The Arkansas Mud Drive seeks to create more shorebird habitat via flooding
of agricultural fields after crops are harvested in the late summer. The
Mud Drive will also improve water quality!

I don't claim to be an expert in any of these fields. I'm just someone who
cares a whole awful lot. I'm also not alone in this venture. Many of you
are helping and we appreciate the support.


*About the Mud Drive*:  https://youtu.be/wASwfIvNuOY

*Rainfall Simulator*:  https://youtu.be/2I_cNEkt42U


Thank you and I welcome any feedback.


Mike Budd
Subject: N. Harriers
From: V Prislipsky <vprislipsky AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:35:03 -0500
This Wednesday 5 of HSV Audubon birders went to Ed Gordon Point Remove WMA for 
a field trip. Our target was Painted Buntings which was a "mission 
accomplished". On the way back we went through the rice field roads that lead 
to the "bridge to nowhere" that crosses I40 off of 64. We crossed two down 
cable gates so I don't know if these are county roads. On the way we saw 4 
hawks gliding, swooping and diving over the rice. They were large hawks with 
white rump patches. Our immediate impression was N. Harriers- everything fit- 
except they shouldn't be here according to my state checklist and ebird. No, 
they weren't kites. Doubled checked Harris which I've seen in Texas, nope. 

Subject: swallow survey
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 16:17:29 +0000
This morning I circumnavigated the lodge to count nesting birds. Barn swallows 
have really taken advantage of many nooks and crannies the lodge has to offer. 
We found 12 seemingly unoccupied nests, 17 active nests with 38 nestlings, four 
fledglings, and at least 19 adults. Some of the unoccupied nest could be 
between broods. Northern Rough-winged swallows are harder to count since their 
nests are hidden in the stone wall along the parking lot. One indigo bunting 
nest was abandoned due to being in an area with too much human activity. She 
had four eggs. 


Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: Fwd: Today’s most heartwarming story....
From: Kay Hodnett <sallyportk AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 10:37:39 -0500

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Judy 
> Date: June 15, 2016 at 10:13:44 AM CDT
> To: Oliver Bruce , Hodnett Kay 
 

> Subject: Fwd: Today’s most heartwarming story....
> Here's the story we discussed on cruise. L, J
> 
> Sent from my iPhone - Judy
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: 
>> Date: May 28, 2016 at 4:33:30 PM CDT
>> 
>> Subject: Fw: Today’s most heartwarming story....
>> Here is the story we mentioned last night.
>>  
>>  
>> Today’s most heartwarming
>> story is brought to you from a beach in Brazil. 
>>   
>> It’s the story of a South American Magellanic penguin who swims 5,000 
miles each year to be reunited with the man who saved his life. 

>> Retired bricklayer and part time fisherman Joao Pereira de Souza, 71, who 
lives in an island village just outside Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, found the tiny 
penguin, covered in oil and close to death, lying on rocks on his local beach 
in 2011. 

>> Joao cleaned the oil off the penguin’s feathers and fed him a daily diet 
of fish to build his strength. He named him Dindim. 

>> 
>> Best buds 
>> After a week, he tried to release the penguin back into the sea. But, the 
bird wouldn’t leave. ‘He stayed with me for 11 months and then, just after 
he changed his coat with new feathers, he just disappeared one day,’ Joao 
recalls. 

>> BUT, just a few months later, Dindim was back. He spotted the fisherman on 
the beach one day and then followed him home. 

>> 
>> The prodigal penguin returns 
>> 
>> Look who’s back 
>> For the past five years, Dindim has spent eight months of the year with Joao 
and is believed to spend the rest of thetime breeding off the coast of 
Argentina and Chile. It’s thought he swims up to 5,000 miles each year to be 
reunited with the man who saved his life. 

>>   
>> 
>>   
>> ‘I love the penguin like it’s my own child and I believe the penguin 
loves me,’ Joao told Globo TV. ‘No one else is allowed to touch him. He 
pecks them if they do . He lays on my lap, lets me give him 

>> showers, allows me to feed him sardines and to pick him up. 
>> 
>> It’s thought Dindim believes the fisherman is also a penguin 
>> ‘Everyone said he wouldn’t return but he has been coming back to visit 
me for the past four years. He arrives in June and leaves to go home in 
February and every year he becomes more affectionate and he appears even 
happier to see me.’ 

>> 
>> Biologist Professor Krajewski, who interviewed the fisherman for Globo TV, 
told The Independent: ‘I have never seen anything like this before. I think 
the penguin believes Joao is part of his family and probably a penguin as well. 

>> ‘When he sees him he wags his tail like a dog and honks with delight. 
>> And, just like that, the world seems a kinder place again. 
>>   
>>  
>>  
>>  
>>  
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: fledglings & song
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 08:05:46 -0500
Yesterday as I approached the creek below the bluff, I heard the beseeching 
version of a familiar call and looked up to see three newly fledged Northern 
Rough-winged Swallows with fluttering wings, begging from the top of a dead 
sycamore. Nesting in some of the natural cavities in the stone, the adults 
wheel and curve over the valley where they will soon teach their young to catch 
insects on the wing. 


Later, in the far deep woods, I heard squeaky "peetz!" calls and stopped to 
wonder if I was hearing unseen Acadian Flycatcher fledglings. Soon a parent 
bird flew into the scene, loudly announcing "Pizza!", which (probably) 
confirmed the identity of the youngsters who were not yet using all of their 
syllables. 


This morning the Wood Thrush is singing from across the creek after a few weeks 
of quiet. It offers solace before the heat. I hope it has successfully raised 
young Wood Thrushes in the forest on the steep north facing hillside. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: CONFIRMATION OF ID OF LAUGHING GULLS
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 21:38:49 -0500
On 11 June, I reported the sighting and photography of four Laughing Gulls at 
the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. The ID was 
confirmed by Charles Mills and Kenny Nichols. This unusual visitor was a first 
for me. 

John Redman
Subject: Bluebird Trail
From: Tim Tyler <tylertim204 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 18:53:18 -0500
Oak Hills Golf course in Dewitt Arkansas has established a new Bluebird
trail within the course. In a monitoring count today 4 of the 9 nest boxes
had a total of 19 babies. One other box has 4 eggs. There have been 6
fledglings to date. We are using the Gilbertson design PVC boxes and have
no record as yet to losses due to predation. No record yet of invasive
species. So yes we are starting out lucky. Our goal is only to learn,
understand and possibly develop our natural resources as we find them.

Tim Tyler

Treasurer

OHCC
Subject: COMMON LOON IN JUNE AT CENTERTON
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 22:06:18 +0000
Whether it's yodeling on some remote wooded lake in Minnesota, or improbably, 
loafing on a pond full of fingerling crappie at Craig State Fish Hatchery in 
Centerton, a Common Loon in June is refreshing. Heath Dake at Craig hatchery 
spotted the loon on June 12. Since then, this immaculate creature - in 
something close to breeding plumage -red eye and all - has had as audience all 
kinds of local birders. 


It is one sort of thing to see a Common Loon in January, half-mile away, in its 
winter grays, across some great impoundment like Beaver Lake. Quite another in 
June, close up, on a modest-sized pond, all gussied-up in blacks and whites. 
Inspiring. Brings real Earth and life basics into refreshing focus. 


Even though it must be eating some of the fish they are rearing for release in 
area lakes, hatchery personnel I saw today had taken a strong interest in the 
bird, too. 


Most loons have passed through northwest Arkansas, and Arkansas generally, by 
early May. A map in the Birds of North America (online) shows our loons likely 
nest around the Great Lakes in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. Nesting is 
already underway during May and June. 


They don't start nesting until age 6. So it seems likely observations of single 
birds on various lakes around the state June-August (there are a few - look at 
Arkansas Audubon Society online data bases) must be young birds not eligible to 
join breeding populations. 


So why hurry to reach the Great Lakes. Maybe the Centerton loon is lingering 
somewhere between life's summer and winter, where there is food and habitat. 
Maybe a late bloomer, like some people, too. 

Subject: PRAIRIE WARBLER ON CALLIES PRAIRIE, LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 11:29:34 +0000
Callies Prairie is a prairie restoration-in-progress at Lake Fayetteville. 
Tallgrass Prairie is well-documented at todays Lake Fayetteville Park, at 
least as far back as 1859, when travelers on Butterfield stages noted prairies 
as they passed through what is now a park. Yesterday, out in the middle of the 
restoration area, a singing Prairie Warbler. Welcome back, 1859. 


Callies Prairie is north of the lake. The hard surface Lake Fayetteville Trail 
forms a boundary on the east, north, and west sides. The prairie restoration 
process was begun by volunteers from Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association. 
The effort continues as part of Fayetteville Parks and Recreation management. 


It takes me an hour or so to slow-walk this prairie section of the trail, 
stopping, standing, looking and listening. My goofy birders behavior is at 
times a source of chagrin for hard-charging bicycle riders, but also sometimes 
appreciated by other walkers. I even met one of pioneer-woman Callies 
relatives, charmed that her distant grandma was so honored. 


In expected habitat, Prairie Warbler isnt a rarity in northwest Arkansas, but 
it was a big surprise to me at Lake Fayetteville. In his book, The Bird Life of 
Lake Fayetteville, David Chapman includes a couple of other recent summer 
records, each involving the prairie restoration area. 


Besides Prairie Warbler, I also picked up Painted Bunting (3), Common 
Yellowthroat (1), Blue Grosbeak (1-2), Field Sparrow (2), Scissor-tailed 
Flycatcher (1), Eastern Towhee (2, edge), Great Flycatcher (snags), American 
Goldfinch (3), Indigo Bunting (2), Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1), plus numerous 
other bird species mainly associated with the forest edge. 


The ongoing restoration faces many challenges, including aggressive, non-native 
species like Serecia Lespedeza, long ago introduced, probably as erosion 
control, back in those halcyon days when this was considered good range 
management on what was then private land. I couldnt see old Butterfield a la 
1859, but I did see natives like Eastern Gama Grass raising its distinctive 
flowering heads above oncoming Indian Grass and Big Bluestem, all celebrating 
the return of a prairie ecosystem. 

Subject: Common Loon, Yes: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, no, BUT.....
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:26:32 -0500
For those in NWA that may not have heard, there was a Common Loon and two
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks reported at the state fish hatchery this
morning.  I went up there as soon as I read about it, but the gates were
locked, well, both of the east gates were locked, and the drive in gate was
locked on the west end.  I walked the ditch from the main entrance, almost
all of the way to Main St, but didn't spot the BBWD on that end, but of
course I couldn't see the ponds on the south side.  The loon, which is in
breeding plumage, was in the pond just to the left of the entrance.  I did
not see it dive, but it was reported earlier that it was diving, so
hopefully it's healthy.

I then went through the gate at west end and walked up to the levee between
the upper ponds.  Nothing much up there except Killdeer, one Green Heron,
and a lot of black colored birds (all of the usual suspects).  I don't know
if the gates would be open earlier in the day or not.  I just can't
physically walk the whole place anymore, no matter how bad I want those
BBWD for my state list.  (I drove some of the area roads and checked the
farm ponds, but only saw a couple of Egyptian Geese.)  If anyone sees them
(BBWD) tomorrow, and the gates are open, I would appreciate an e-mail
off-list.  Thanks much!

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the great northwest
kjgarrett84 AT gmail.com
Subject: Road runnerlet
From: Don Simons <drsimons56 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 21:39:00 -0500
This morning I watched a young road runner begging to be fed insects by its 
parent. The youngster was almost as big as the adult. 


Yesterday a visitor reported seeing a road runner with a shrew in its bill.

Two rufous-crowned sparrows were singing at there usual territories this 
morning. 


Don
Mount Magazine

Sent from my iPad
Subject: LAUGHING GULLS AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 17:35:47 -0500
This morning I observed and photographed four Laughing Gulls at the Boyd Point 
Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. Initially, the Gulls were resting 
on pylons approx., 45 yards away, with one in particular that flew around the 
pylons, vocalizing loudly. Within 8 minutes of sighting the Gulls, they all 
flew in a northerly direction and did not return. As they flew away, one Gull 
flew directly in front of me, which proved a close up photograph. I had never 
seen Laughing Gulls before and so I plan to send the photos to the Gull 
Meister, Kenny Nichols, for confirmation. In anyone has an interest in seeing 
the photos, I will be happy to provide them 

John Redman
Subject: International bird fight
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 17:54:53 -0500
FYI==Jeff Short

 

Want to see an American bald eagle fight a Canada goose? 
 


 



 



Text Box: 



	

Want to see an American bald eagle fight a Canada goose?


Photos from Vancouver Island show two symbolic birds facing off in an ultimate 
battle of national ornithological... 


	

 
Subject: Re: harness prairie
From: Michael Budd <arkansaspfw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 13:15:19 -0500
Without adequate habitat you will not be able to sustain quail. Pen raised
birds typically die within a week or less. They definitely won't make it
through a full year and are even less likely to reproduce.  I would have an
Arkansas Game & Fish Commission private lands biologist assess your
property to see if there are any areas where you can manage habitat for
quail without interfering with your livestock operation. Hopefully there
are some wild birds nearby that will move onto your farm.

There are several programs available that can provide technical and
financial assistance.

Call the Monticello office and as for a private lands biologist: (870)
367-3553

Thanks

Mike


On Fri, Jun 10, 2016 at 1:06 PM, Abby Gibson <
000000544cf96f92-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> Speaking of quail, my husband I were discussing how the turkeys have
> really rebounded the past few years on our cattle ranch, and how we wish
> the bobwhite quail would.  We have a neighbor that purchases bobwhites for
> training his bird dogs.  That got us to wondering if we could purchase
> quail and turn loose yearly and eventually have a population of quail? Does
> anyone have thoughts on that, yay or nay? We are in Drew County, Arkansas.
> Several hundred acres of pasture with mixed woods scattered around.
> Several ponds and creeks. We see turkeys on almost the whole place
> regularly. We have a substantial fire ant population but the turkeys at
> least seem to be coping.  Some coyotes. We have sheep that have a livestock
> guardian dog with them so that might keep those at bay. Thanks!
>
>
> On Friday, June 10, 2016 7:50 AM, Alan  wrote:
>
>
> I was able to bird Harness Prairie on a tour with the owner last evening.
> It was wonderful to hear so many bob-white quail. There were at least 6
> calling. The grasshopper sparrows have returned there as well.
> Alan Gregory
> Harrison
>
>
> 
 
Virus-free. 

> www.avast.com
> 
 

>
>
>
Subject: Environmental Expo for Arkansas
From: Melinda Gay <msgy.272 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 10:20:38 -0500
Environmental Enthusiasts,

I'd like to announce that the statewide Environmental Expo for the Arkansas
Environmental Education Association will be June 21-23, 2016 right here in
Northwest Arkansas!

Lots of fun activities as well as interesting talks are planned: canoeing,
caving, pontooning, climate change talk by Project Learning Tree and many
more! Ozark Natural Science Center and Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge
will be co-hosting events and talks with help from many Environmental
Organizations and Educators from the region. Registration includes a guided
tour of the wild cat rescue refuge.

Please join us for learning, networking, and experiencing our great Ozark
outdoors. Check out our website for more info: www.onsc.us.


​

Regards,




Misty Gay
Development Assistant
Ozark Natural Science Center
misty AT onsc.us
479 202-8340
1905 Madison 1305
Huntsville, AR 72740
www.onsc.us
Subject: harness prairie
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 07:49:50 -0500
I was able to bird Harness Prairie on a tour with the owner last evening. It
was wonderful to hear so many bob-white quail. There were at least 6
calling. The grasshopper sparrows have returned there as well.

Alan Gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: Re: west nile?
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 02:43:35 +0000
Corvids jays and crows were the ones really hit in central Arkansas a few years 
ago. The one we collected was a blue jay. He wasn't in the yard when we went to 
lunch. An hour later he was there dead, in a pose that I would have described 
as an epileptic seizure...stiffly contorted with wings, head and tail feathers 
spread and held at contorted angles. Glad I did not have to witness his demise. 
Karen Hart 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Cody Massery 

Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2016 8:52 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: west nile?


I did research for St. Tammy Mosquito with transmission of West Nile virus via 
birds. Most of the time the bird doesn't show clinical symptoms from WNV, they 
just act as a reservoir for the disease. The only group of birds I am farmiliar 
with that are killed from WNV are Owls. However, Scissor - tail Flycatchers are 
rare there and may have not been tested. 


Get Outlook for 
Android 



On Wed, Jun 8, 2016 at 7:50 PM -0500, "Gail Miller" 
> wrote: 

I used to be in charge of that at work. I reported dead birds to the health 
department. They did not want birds that had already started to decompose. 


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



From: Jacque Brown
Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2016 5:28 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: west nile?

I saw on the news this evening that the West Nile virus is being found in 
mosquitos in Oklahoma. 


I seem to remember a connection between that and bird deaths. One of my 
co-workers asked me today if there is someplace to report sick birds. She has 
been watching a pair of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers in the field next to the 
house and the male seems sickly. He was very robust a few weeks ago and she 
said he looks like he is losing weight and is disheveled. 


I told her probably nothing to worry about. But if the bird dies don't touch 
it, I mentioned west nile virus. And she is pregnant. 


Then I saw todays report. Should she be concerned? If she finds the bird dead 
should she call someone? 



She's not one to collect a specimen and put it in her freezer. I would, but I'm 
not hinky about putting critters in the freezer carefully wrapped. 


I'm seeing nothing but really healthy looking birds in the Centerton area. I 
think she lives near Bella Vista but I may be wrong. 



Jacque Brown
240 Township Dr
Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
bluebird2 AT cox.net




Subject: Re: west nile?
From: Cody Massery <cmassery AT ATU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 01:52:24 +0000
I did research for St. Tammy Mosquito with transmission of West Nile virus via 
birds. Most of the time the bird doesn't show clinical symptoms from WNV, they 
just act as a reservoir for the disease. The only group of birds I am farmiliar 
with that are killed from WNV are Owls. However, Scissor - tail Flycatchers are 
rare there and may have not been tested. 


Get Outlook for Android



On Wed, Jun 8, 2016 at 7:50 PM -0500, "Gail Miller" 
> wrote: 


I used to be in charge of that at work. I reported dead birds to the health 
department. They did not want birds that had already started to decompose. 


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root




From: Jacque Brown
Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2016 5:28 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: west nile?

I saw on the news this evening that the West Nile virus is being found in 
mosquitos in Oklahoma. 


I seem to remember a connection between that and bird deaths. One of my 
co-workers asked me today if there is someplace to report sick birds. She has 
been watching a pair of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers in the field next to the 
house and the male seems sickly. He was very robust a few weeks ago and she 
said he looks like he is losing weight and is disheveled. 


I told her probably nothing to worry about. But if the bird dies don't touch 
it, I mentioned west nile virus. And she is pregnant. 


Then I saw todays report. Should she be concerned? If she finds the bird dead 
should she call someone? 



She's not one to collect a specimen and put it in her freezer. I would, but I'm 
not hinky about putting critters in the freezer carefully wrapped. 


I'm seeing nothing but really healthy looking birds in the Centerton area. I 
think she lives near Bella Vista but I may be wrong. 




Jacque Brown
240 Township Dr
Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: Re: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (today's Google doodle)
From: Ed Laster <elaster523 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 13:46:09 -0500
If you never read the book about her quest and obsession, see:
Life List: A Woman's Quest for the World's Most Amazing Birds Paperback – 
March 30, 2010 

by Olivia Gentile 
 
<> 


 <>
http://www.amazon.com/Life-List-Womans-Worlds-Amazing/dp/1596911700 
 

Ed Laster
Little Rock


 <>
> On Jun 9, 2016, at 10:26 AM, Sally Jo Gibson  wrote:
> 
> Phoebe Snetsinger
Subject: Re: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (today's Google doodle)
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 16:08:29 +0000
Don’t feel bad Dottie, I spent childhood summers just spitting distance from 
Mio, Michigan and never heard about one of the rarest birds in the US until 
long after I moved to Arkansas. Then I had to go back on a ranger guided trip 
to see my first Kirtland’s Warbler (at least that I was aware of)…actually 
saw two males at once in full tilt territorial song on adjacent 
territories…so definitely worth the trip, but, oh, the birds I might have 
seen. Karen Hart Little Rock 



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Boyles, Dottie 

Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2016 10:06 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (today's Google doodle)

I remember Jeff Wilson telling that story. I still miss him. Jeff was an 
awesome person not only to bird with, but learn from. 


While I grew up with Western Tanagers visiting our backyard in Calif., it was a 
Brown Thrasher, thrashing leaves around, in the backyard where I worked in 2000 
(the house was zoned for business) that triggered my interest in birding. 


Sadly growing up in Calif., I only have two species on my state list. Western 
Tanager and Northern Mockingbird. We had numerous hummingbirds in the yard and 
saw lots of gulls where the Navy ships were docked. Back then all gulls were 
“seagulls” and all hummingbirds were just “hummingbirds.” To think of 
all the species we missed, didn’t notice, or pay attention to is rather 
bothersome. On the bright side, I saw my first California Gull at Lake 
Dardanelle in 2005, and several of the western hummingbirds have come to AR 
over the years. 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

From:  Richard Baxter
Subject: Re: Tribute to Phoebe Snetsinger (today's Google doodle)

The article said that her sighting of a Blackburnian Warbler in 1961 triggered 
her interest. Interestingly, Jeff Wilson has told the story that he was fishing 
at Wapanocca, and a Blackburnian came down and bathed in some rainwater caught 
in a spare seat in his boat. Birding then became his life's work. 

-Dick


This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. ­­