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Updated on Tuesday, August 19 at 12:15 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Streamertail,©BirdQuest

18 Aug Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville [Sarah Morris ]
18 Aug (birding part of) Kessler Mountain Preserve bioblitz September 6-7 in Fayetteville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
3 Aug Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune article: "Council passes stadium bird resolution" re Minnesota Vikings new mostly glass exterior stadium [ ]
18 Aug ID of Bitterweed Photos [Delos McCauley ]
17 Aug Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville [Greg Pillow ]
17 Aug Just before murder (Woolsey) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
18 Aug Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville [Ragupathy Kannan ]
17 Aug SHRIMP PLANT AND RUBY THROATS [JFR ]
17 Aug Black-billed Cuckoo- Cooks Landing [ ]
16 Aug A late report from Bald Knob [CK Franklin ]
16 Aug Re: Glossy Ibis - Grand Lake [CK Franklin ]
16 Aug Continuing among the bitterweeds [Delos McCauley ]
16 Aug Glossy Ibis - Grand Lake ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
16 Aug Quality Time Among Bitterweeds [Delos McCauley ]
15 Aug JUVENILE WILSON'S PHALAROPE AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
15 Aug Fw: Take a picture for Greater Canyonlands? [ ]
13 Aug Glorious August morning (Chesney) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
12 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 12 [David Arbour ]
11 Aug Pine Bluff Piping Plover [JFR ]
11 Aug ASCA Meeting, Aug 14, The Many Benefits of Volunteering [Dan Scheiman ]
10 Aug California Gul - NO [Dan Scheiman ]
10 Aug Re: 3 adult MIKI at the nest [Terry Butler ]
10 Aug 3 adult MIKI at the nest ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
10 Aug Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville [Hilary David Chapman ]
9 Aug Frog in the mud ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
8 Aug Re: Hummers & Meal Worms [Jacque Brown ]
8 Aug Hummers & Meal Worms [Debra Hale-Shelton ]
8 Aug Re: Where are my hummers? [Jacque Brown ]
7 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 7 [David Arbour ]
7 Aug Re: Where are my hummers? [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
7 Aug Where are my hummers? [Alyson Hoge ]
7 Aug Re: they fly but they are not birds [Joe Mosby ]
7 Aug Wheels of assumption, etc (Centerton) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
7 Aug they fly but they are not birds ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
7 Aug SEDGE WRENS at Chesney Prairie Natural Area ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
5 Aug eBird Taxonomy Update [Dan Scheiman ]
4 Aug Uplands and calicoes (W. Arkansas valley) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
4 Aug Hummingbird Migration Celebration, Sept 5-7 [Dan Scheiman ]
4 Aug possible Rufous Hummingbird in Redfield, Jefferson Co. [Jim and Karen Rowe ]
4 Aug test [David Arbour ]
3 Aug Sightings: North Shore Drive [Jim Dixon ]
3 Aug Seven green buntings ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
3 Aug Black-necked Stilts and Cave Swallows in Miller County [swamp_fox ]
3 Aug Sightings: Delaware recreational area 8/3 [Jim Dixon ]
2 Aug Red Phalarope-no ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
2 Aug Bluebird on the battlefield (Pea Ridge NMP) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
1 Aug Link to Photos [Delos McCauley ]
2 Aug Passing of the Pigeon program August 31 at Hobbs ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
1 Aug Red-necked Phalarope CORRECTION [Doc George ]
1 Aug Red Phalarope & Piping Plover [Delos McCauley ]
1 Aug Red-necked Phalarope [Doc George ]
1 Aug male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD at Bentonville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
1 Aug Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune article: "Council passes stadium bird resolution" re Minnesota Vikings new mostly glass exterior stadium ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
1 Aug Minneapolis Star-Tribune article: "Council passes stadium bird resolution" re Minnesota Vikings new mostly glass exterior stadium [Barry Haas ]
1 Aug ASCA August Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
31 Jul Calhoun County Woodstorks [Kelly Chitwood ]
1 Aug Re: Rubythroat migration [Bob Sargent ]
31 Jul nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
31 Jul Re: Rubythroat migration [Jacque Brown ]
31 Jul Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton [Jeffrey Short ]
31 Jul Re: HOTTEST birding of the year: Frog and Valley Saturday August 9 [ ]
30 Jul Tricolored Heron in Pine Bluff [Delos McCauley ]
30 Jul The scion of Pinnacle Prairie ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
30 Jul eBird -- Beaver Lake--Oak Ridge Park -- Jul 30, 2014 [Art Weigand ]
30 Jul Nao Ueda [Dan Scheiman ]
29 Jul Re: Rubythroat migration [Sara Caulk ]
29 Jul Rubythroat migration [CK Franklin ]
29 Jul Re: California Gull--BIG YES! [David Ray ]
29 Jul Sage Grouse video ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Jul Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter! [Samantha Scheiman ]
28 Jul Request for Bird Walk Leaders [Dan Scheiman ]
27 Jul Starting from the prairie mounds at Agri Park ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 Jul California Gull - YES [Danny Townsend ]
27 Jul Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter! ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
27 Jul Last call for migration count data ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
26 Jul Re: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends) [Jeffrey Short ]

Subject: Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 23:48:43 -0500
There are several Mississippi Kites who love one of the trees in my backyard. 
For several weeks now, I have seen at least two in the tree, mostly at dawn and 
dusk. During the day, I see them flying around the neighborhood in different 
places. 


Sarah
Jonesboro

On Aug 17, 2014, at 6:15 PM, Greg Pillow  wrote:

> I am not in NW Arkansas, but there is a pair that have nested for 2 years 
across the street from me here in Conway. Nest should fledge any day now. 

> 
> Greg in Conway
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Aug 17, 2014, at 5:04 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 

> 
>> Seven MIKIs hang out near my house in s. Fort Smith! The highest numbers I 
have ever seen anywhere at one place. In 2006 and 2007 a pair nested in Tillis 
Park near UAFS campus. 

>> 
>> 
>> On Sunday, 10 August 2014 11:11 AM, Hilary David Chapman  
wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> My Kites are now feeding a young bird from the snag they have utilized all 
summer. I know of other sightings, including north Springdale. Who would like 
to estimate the number of birds/nesting pairs in our area? Half dozen seems not 
improbable even if some of these sightings are the same birds. 

>>  
>> David Chapman.
>> From: Joseph C. Neal 
>> Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 5:19 PM
>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.uark.edu
>> Cc: Hilary David Chapman; mamlod AT hotmail.com
>> Subject: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
>>  
>> Mike Mlodinow and I made a shorebird, actually Any Bird, round in Benton 
County today. At the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we thoroughly enjoyed 
Purple Martins (~180), Least Sandpipers (13), Semipalmated Sandpipers (4), 
Semipalmated Plovers (2), Spotted Sandpipers (2), Pectoral Sandpipers 
(probably; 2), Baird’s Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), plus Forster’s 
(5) and Black (1) Terns. At Eagle Watch Nature Trail we had Solitary Sandpipers 
(6), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), NEOTROPIC CORMORANT (1), 
Great Egret (6), Great Blue Heron (4), Snowy Egret (1; juvenile), Little Blue 
Herons (2), Green Herons (2). And lots of other stuff. 

>>  
>> On the way home I got a call from the son of a retiree friend who said he 
had a MISSISSIPPI KITE nest in his yard in Fayetteville, so we hot-footed back 
and, by golly, 50 feet up in a vine-covered post oak in the middle of a wooded, 
upscale neighborhood in northeast Fayetteville, low and behold: an advanced 
nestling kite, nest right near the tree top. Eventually we saw at least three 
adult kites, including one that fed the nestling while two others perched 
together atop an adjacent oak, seeming to keep an eye on Mike and I. By my 
calculation, kites have been moving into the Fayetteville area since about 2006 
and there has been a steady uptick in summer kite sightings since. Two birds 
seen regularly at David Chapman’s place near Lake Fayetteville must be nesting 
there. This summer there have also been sightings further north, including 
three birds seen by Joan Reynolds in Rogers last week. 

Subject: (birding part of) Kessler Mountain Preserve bioblitz September 6-7 in Fayetteville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 23:50:23 +0000
Birders have been invited to participate in a bioblitz to identify and document 
insects, plants, animals, fungi and other organisms within 24 hours in the new 
Kessler Mountain Preserve in Fayetteville. The blitz will occur during the 24 
hours between Saturday, Sept 6 starting at 3pm and ending on Sunday, Sept 7 at 
3 pm. The event is being organized by Rob Wiedenmann, birder and 
UA-Fayetteville Professor of Entomology. Overall, the blitz will work on many 
plant and animal groups in different Kessler Mountain habitats. 




Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will help in two ways. NWAAS field trip 
organizer Joe Neal will coordinate a 2-mile birding hike on trails over the top 
of the mountain on Sunday morning, September 7. NWAAS President Doug James will 
coordinate roadside birding on Kessler’s lower slopes. 




For the over-the-mountain blitz, we will organize a shuttle, starting at the 
top of Kessler Mountain Road and ending at Rock City near Frank Sharp’s place. 
This will take an estimated 3-4 hours (including shuttle) and be modestly 
vigorous. If you want to participate, meet Joe Neal and others in the parking 
lot of the old Ozark Mountain Smokehouse, on Smoke House Road, off Martin 
Luther King/highway 62, promptly at 8 AM on Sunday, September 7. We will see 
who all is available, then figure out the shuttle. 




If you’d like to participate in the auto survey lead by Doug James, please 
contact Doug at djames AT uark.edu. 




If you need more information about the bioblitz in general, or if you’re 
interested in being involved with other bioblitz efforts, contact Rob: 
rwieden AT uark.edu or 479 575 2451. 
Subject: Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune article: "Council passes stadium bird resolution" re Minnesota Vikings new mostly glass exterior stadium
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 14:16:06 -0700
Hooray!!!!!     Hooray!!!!!    HOORAY!!!!!!!!!!!
Joanie



On Friday, August 1, 2014 2:23 PM, Barry Haas  wrote:
 


Dear ARBIRDers,

On July 23 Jack Stewart posted the following:

The new Vikings stadium in Minneapolis is going to be a disaster for 
neotropical migrants if the design is not altered. What needs to be done is 
change the type of glass.  I’ve visited the site and have seen the drawings 
for the proposed stadium.  If one were to design a building with the express 
purpose of killing birds, the Vikings stadium might just be the winning design. 


You can help birds and support Minnesotans by adding your name to the action 
alert. 



https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=DD2452A6134BDE0737A7ECD23AA9A5CD.app304a?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1717&autologin=true&s_src=JUL14_ATD2 


End of Jack's post.

As a member of the National Audubon Society Board Jack was alerting us to how 
we could help stop the construction of a migrant bird killing machine. 


Well, here's a story in today's Minneapolis Star-Tribune titled "Council passes 
stadium bird resolution": 


http://www.startribune.com/local/blogs/269559301.html

I suspect that due to pressure from birders across the country change may be 
coming.  Let's hope. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: ID of Bitterweed Photos
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 10:20:51 -0500
Some has asked for IDs of the insects in my photos among the bitterweeds.  I
had the photos named but not all were able to see the names on their
screens.  Also, I had all the photos of unknown insects in the second set of
photos named as Bee 0, Bee 1, Bee 2  . because I was not able to identify
them and I realized that some were actually in the fly family and were not
bees.  However, I was not aware that bees had two pairs of wings, as Bill
Shepherd pointed out to me.  Thanks, Bill.  Below is a list of
identifications I have come up with for my photos:

 

Quality Time Among Bitterweeds:

Painted Lady (Butterfly)

Common Checkered-Skipper & Painted Lady

Phaon Crescent (Butterfly)

Fiery Skipper (F)

Fiery Skipper (M)

Eastern Amberwing (Dragonfly)

Dainty Sulphur (Butterfly)

Common Checkered-Skipper

Chickweed Geometer (Moth) (Thanks to ID by Norm Lavers)

Rambur's Forktail (Damselfly)

 

Continuing Among the Bitterweeds:

Little Yellow (Butterfly)

Sachem (Butterfly)

Dainty Sulphur (Butterfly)

Fiery Skipper (Butterfly)

(Bees and Flies I have not identified)

 

If any wants a challenge and identify the bees and flies for me, I'de
appreciate hearing from you.

 

Thanks,

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
From: Greg Pillow <gregpillow AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 18:15:14 -0500
I am not in NW Arkansas, but there is a pair that have nested for 2 years 
across the street from me here in Conway. Nest should fledge any day now. 


Greg in Conway

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 17, 2014, at 5:04 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 

> 
> Seven MIKIs hang out near my house in s. Fort Smith! The highest numbers I 
have ever seen anywhere at one place. In 2006 and 2007 a pair nested in Tillis 
Park near UAFS campus. 

> 
> 
> On Sunday, 10 August 2014 11:11 AM, Hilary David Chapman  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> My Kites are now feeding a young bird from the snag they have utilized all 
summer. I know of other sightings, including north Springdale. Who would like 
to estimate the number of birds/nesting pairs in our area? Half dozen seems not 
improbable even if some of these sightings are the same birds. 

>  
> David Chapman.
> From: Joseph C. Neal 
> Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 5:19 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.uark.edu
> Cc: Hilary David Chapman; mamlod AT hotmail.com
> Subject: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
>  
> Mike Mlodinow and I made a shorebird, actually Any Bird, round in Benton 
County today. At the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we thoroughly enjoyed 
Purple Martins (~180), Least Sandpipers (13), Semipalmated Sandpipers (4), 
Semipalmated Plovers (2), Spotted Sandpipers (2), Pectoral Sandpipers 
(probably; 2), Baird’s Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), plus 
Forster’s (5) and Black (1) Terns. At Eagle Watch Nature Trail we had 
Solitary Sandpipers (6), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), 
NEOTROPIC CORMORANT (1), Great Egret (6), Great Blue Heron (4), Snowy Egret (1; 
juvenile), Little Blue Herons (2), Green Herons (2). And lots of other stuff. 

>  
> On the way home I got a call from the son of a retiree friend who said he had 
a MISSISSIPPI KITE nest in his yard in Fayetteville, so we hot-footed back and, 
by golly, 50 feet up in a vine-covered post oak in the middle of a wooded, 
upscale neighborhood in northeast Fayetteville, low and behold: an advanced 
nestling kite, nest right near the tree top. Eventually we saw at least three 
adult kites, including one that fed the nestling while two others perched 
together atop an adjacent oak, seeming to keep an eye on Mike and I. By my 
calculation, kites have been moving into the Fayetteville area since about 2006 
and there has been a steady uptick in summer kite sightings since. Two birds 
seen regularly at David Chapman’s place near Lake Fayetteville must be 
nesting there. This summer there have also been sightings further north, 
including three birds seen by Joan Reynolds in Rogers last week. 

> 
> 
Subject: Just before murder (Woolsey)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 22:51:12 +0000
WOOLSEY WET PRAIRIE SANCTUARY is unique in Arkansas Birding. Next door neighbor 
is a sewer plant, never a bad thing. Having buried almost 10 unique acres of 
Ozark seasonal wetlands under the plant, law required mitigation of constructed 
wetlands in a 46-acre site. Through careful management and good botanical 
monitoring, at least 431 plant species are documented, making it, 
botanically-speaking, one of our top grasslands. And you don’t have to be a 
math genius to recognize so much plant diversity equals bird diversity, making 
it one of Arkansas’s Important Bird Areas. 


First bird(s) this morning is a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher family, including 
mom, dad, and short-tailed kids, all conveniently perched on a powerline. I’m 
admiring a patch of Indian Grass, Switch Grass, and Big Bluestem Grass – three 
biggies in the tallgrass prairies – when I notice a yellowish immature bird 
chipping in a low bush. No doubt, one of Roger Peterson “confusing fall 
warblers,” only another yellow bird with bold black mask flies up from the 
grass to feed it a small grasshopper: Common Yellowthroat. 


A good start, and fun to be birding when it is only hot, rather than typical 
August murder-by-humidity. In the distance I can hear but not see a Blue 
Grosbeak and Indigo Bunting. Closer up I hear chipping of first one, then 
several Dickcissels, then an adult with a large green caterpillar. Before we 
get to murder today, I will find lots of young being fed: American Robin, more 
Dickcissels, Bell’s Vireo, and Red-winged Blackbirds. 


Out there in the willows of a wetland cell is another striking yellow bird. 
With a little wholesome pishing I have a Yellow Warbler. Behind it, and all 
around, mind-dazzling tall, Rose-mallows (Hibiscus lasiocarpos), flowers big as 
your hand. Five ruffled white petals with a blushing rose center, stamen and 
pistil set deep in the rose, and a big hairy bumblebee pollinator. No wonder 
migrating Yellow Warblers like it here. Big fancy mallows have that Georgia 
O’Keeffe look. I hear amens from the bumblebees, artistes all. 


I’m all cued up for migrating Upland Sandpipers, but . . . I instead hear 
distant BOB BOB BOBs of you know who. I’m standing there mostly open-mouthed, 
listening, sweating, when WHOOSH! Two adult Northern Bobwhites flush up right 
underfoot. 


From another willow thicket comes constant PIP or PEET. This first reminds me 
of something from scissor-tails, then I correct: Alder Flycatcher calls. August 
and early September is a good time to find them and this is a good place, too. 
But despite effort, I didn’t see it. 


Now we’re down to late morning and murder-by-humidity. I’ve had enough, but not 
before a quick stop deep in the grass for a delicate pink trumpet of native 
flower, Slender-leaf False Foxglove (Agalinis tenuifolia) visited by a 
metallic, impeccably green pollinator, the Halictid sweat bee. 


Somewhere, a Northern Mockingbird is buzzing like a Loggerhead Shrike. Then I’m 
headed home. 
Subject: Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 06:04:18 +0800
Seven MIKIs hang out near my house in s. Fort Smith!  The highest numbers I 
have ever seen anywhere at one place.   In 2006 and 2007 a pair nested in 
Tillis Park near UAFS campus.  




On Sunday, 10 August 2014 11:11 AM, Hilary David Chapman  
wrote: 

 


My Kites are now feeding a young bird from the snag they have utilized all 
summer. I know of other sightings, including north Springdale.  Who would like 
to estimate the number of birds/nesting pairs in our area? Half  dozen seems 
not improbable even if some of these sightings are the same birds. 

 
David Chapman.
From:Joseph C. Neal 
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 5:19 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.uark.edu
Cc: Hilary David Chapman; mamlod AT hotmail.com
Subject: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
 
Mike Mlodinow and I made a shorebird, actually Any Bird, round in Benton County 
today. At the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we thoroughly enjoyed Purple 
Martins (~180), Least Sandpipers (13), Semipalmated Sandpipers (4), 
Semipalmated Plovers (2), Spotted Sandpipers (2), Pectoral Sandpipers 
(probably; 2), Baird’s Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), plus 
Forster’s (5) and Black (1) Terns. At Eagle Watch Nature Trail we had 
Solitary Sandpipers (6), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), 
NEOTROPIC CORMORANT (1), Great Egret (6), Great Blue Heron (4), Snowy Egret (1; 
juvenile), Little Blue Herons (2), Green Herons (2). And lots of other stuff. 

 
On the way home I got a call from the son of a retiree friend who said he had a 
MISSISSIPPI KITE nest in his yard in Fayetteville, so we hot-footed back and, 
by golly, 50 feet up in a vine-covered post oak in the middle of a wooded, 
upscale neighborhood in northeast Fayetteville, low and behold: an advanced 
nestling kite, nest right near the tree top. Eventually we saw at least three 
adult kites, including one that fed the nestling while two others perched 
together atop an adjacent oak, seeming to keep an eye on Mike and I. By my 
calculation, kites have been moving into the Fayetteville area since about 2006 
and there has been a steady uptick in summer kite sightings since. Two birds 
seen regularly at David Chapman’s place near Lake Fayetteville must be 
nesting there. This summer there have also been sightings further north, 
including three birds seen by Joan Reynolds in Rogers last week. 
Subject: SHRIMP PLANT AND RUBY THROATS
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 14:07:17 -0500
This is probably common knowledge to most Ruby Throat aficionados, but was new 
to me. This summer my wife, Anna, added a large potted Shrimp Plant (Justicia 
brandegeeena) to our collection of potted plants that surround our patio. 
Although we have several feeders in place around the patio and other flowers 
that attract Hummers, Ruby Throats nectar at least 80% of the time from the 
Shrimp Plant. Next year, many more Shrimp Plants!! 

John Redman
Subject: Black-billed Cuckoo- Cooks Landing
From: "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 08:36:25 -0700
I spotted an immature Black-billed Cuckoo this morning in the brushy area 
behind the camper and restrooms at the first parking lot.  Red eye not showing 
yet in immature bird, pale eye ring, solid black bill.  

A Blue-winged Warbler was seen in the same area.  
Donna Haynes
West Pulaski Co.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: A late report from Bald Knob
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 22:06:50 -0500
Last Sunday a group of LR birders went to Bald Knob & to Treadway's fish ponds 
in Hickory Plains. 


We saw 64 species at Bald Knob:

American Crow

Barn Swallow

Black-crowned Night-Heron

Black-necked Stilt

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Jay

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Wren

Cattle Egret

Cliff Swallow

Common Grackle

Common Yellowthroat

Cooper's Hawk

Dickcissel

Eastern Kingbird

Eastern Meadowlark

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Towhee

Field Sparrow

Gadwall

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Greater Yellowlegs

Green Heron

Hooded Merganser

House Sparrow

Indigo Bunting

Killdeer

Least Sandpiper

Lesser Yellowlegs

Little Blue Heron

Mississippi Kite

Mourning Dove

Northern Cardinal

Northern Mockingbird

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Northern Shoveler

Painted Bunting

Pectoral Sandpiper

Pied-billed Grebe

Purple Martin

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-eyed Vireo

Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-winged Blackbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruddy Turnstone  still in transition


Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Semipalmated Plover

Short-billed Dowitcher

Snowy Egret

Spotted Sandpiper

Stilt Sandpiper

Summer Tanager

Tree Swallow

Tufted Titmouse

White-eyed Vireo

White-rumped Sandpiper

Wilson's Snipe

Wood Duck

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-breasted Chat

Belted Kingfisher

 

Treadway's was pretty quiet.  We managed to find 21 species.


American Crow

Bank Swallow

Black Tern

Black Vulture

Black-necked Stilt

Canada Goose

Dickcissel

Double-crested Cormorant

Forster's Tern

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

House Sparrow

Least Sandpiper

Little Blue Heron

Mallard

Red-winged Blackbird

Ring-necked Duck

Ruddy Duck

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Snowy Egret

Turkey Vulture

 

Bill Burnham & I checked Joe Hogan Fish Hatchery in Lonoke. The hatchery was 
all but empty but there is some decent mixed habitat just south of there. We 
found 26 species in the vicinity. 



Great Blue Heron

Green Heron

Turkey Vulture

Mississippi Kite

American Robin

Barn Swallow

Cliff Swallow

Dickcissel

Downy Woodpecker

Eastern Kingbird

Eastern Meadowlark

Eurasian Collared-Dove

European Starling

House Sparrow

Indigo Bunting

Killdeer

Least Sandpiper

Loggerhead Shrike

Mourning Dove

Northern Cardinal

Northern Mockingbird

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Purple Martin

Red-winged Blackbird

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Tree Swallow

 

Cindy Franklin
Still waiting for the masses of Ruby-throated hummers to drop by for a visit. 
So far it's been a slow year for them. 

In the Heights
Little Rock



 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Glossy Ibis - Grand Lake
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 21:54:02 -0500
Trip list from today's levee trip from Kelso to Arkansas City and the circuit 
around Grand Lake. Two cars and 8 birders headed south at 6A from LR and got 
back in the city by 7P. 


We saw at least 67 species & got a nice tan today.

Canada Goose

Mallard

Northern Shoveler

Wood Stork                20+


Double-crested Cormorant

Anhinga

American White Pelican

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Snowy Egret

Little Blue Heron

Cattle Egret

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  1


White Ibis   2


Glossy Ibis   2


White-faced Ibis  4


Roseate Spoonbill   11


Turkey Vulture

Mississippi Kite

Cooper's Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Killdeer

Spotted Sandpiper

Greater Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Least Sandpiper

Pectoral Sandpiper

Least Tern

Black Tern

Eurasian Collared-Dove

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel

Eastern Phoebe

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Loggerhead Shrike

White-eyed Vireo

Bell's Vireo  1


Blue Jay

American Crow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Purple Martin

Tree Swallow

Bank Swallow

Barn Swallow

Cliff Swallow  several hundred


Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Wren

American Robin

Brown Thrasher

Northern Mockingbird

European Starling

Wilson's Warbler   1


Yellow-breasted Chat

Northern Cardinal

Indigo Bunting

Dickcissel

Red-winged Blackbird

Eastern Meadowlark

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Sparrow


Cindy Franklin
Contemplating another levee run this winter...just because
Little Rock

> Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 20:58:49 +0000
> From: DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM
> Subject: Glossy Ibis - Grand Lake
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> At least two and possibly three Glossy Ibis along with four White-faced Ibis 
and one juvenile White Ibis were just seen on the south end of Grand Lake where 
the water lotus are. There's also a Spotted Sandpiper at the boat dock. 

> 
> Dottie Boyles
> Little Rock
> 
> This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 

 		 	   		  
Subject: Continuing among the bitterweeds
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 21:22:51 -0500
Still no luck with birds today, but had a great time among the bitterweeds,
as you can see by clicking on the following Flickr link:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/124564936 AT N06/14754979987/in/set-7215764648686
2996/lightbox/

 

I am going to have my work cut out for me identifying the different species
of bees (or flies) on the bitterweeds.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: Glossy Ibis - Grand Lake
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 20:58:49 +0000
At least two and possibly three Glossy Ibis along with four White-faced Ibis 
and one juvenile White Ibis were just seen on the south end of Grand Lake where 
the water lotus are. There's also a Spotted Sandpiper at the boat dock. 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Quality Time Among Bitterweeds
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 11:59:48 -0500
Birds at Boyd Point were scarce yesterday so I spent time among the
bitterweeds.  I've posted photos on my flickr site that may be viewed at the
following link:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/124564936 AT N06/14933850141/in/set-7215764651377
3591/lightbox/

 

Delos McCauley

Pine  Bluff
Subject: JUVENILE WILSON'S PHALAROPE AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 14:49:15 -0500
Yesterday and today I observed and photographed a solitary juvenile Wilson's 
Phalarope at Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. Kenny 
Nichols established the ID. Several factors make a field ID problematic. First 
was the setting. It foraged alone in grass on a levee and never neared water. 
It also stood and walked erect much of the time with a posture resembling a 
Stilt Sandpiper. Last was the coloration, which neither resembled breeding or 
non breeding plumage of a Wilson's Phalarope. I will share images, if anyone 
has an interest. 

John Redman
Subject: Fw: Take a picture for Greater Canyonlands?
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 11:58:22 -0700
I know that many of you on the list are great photographers.  Perhaps some of 
you have birded in the Greater Canyonlands, or plan to, or care about the 
area.  I thought you would like to know about this campaign to protect that 
area, using your camera. 

Joanie



On Wednesday, August 13, 2014 4:01 PM, Rachel Briggs  wrote:
 



​Hello,

Do you have a few minutes to help us protect Greater Canyonlands?


As a part of the campaign, we have been collecting photos from our supporters 
holding signs asking the president to take administrative action and protect 
Greater Canyonlands as a national monument. At this point, we have photos from 
supporters in 48 states--but we are still missing Arkansas!  


Will you add your voice to the call for protecting this spectacular region and 
the natural and cultural treasures it contains? You can help in a few easy 
steps: 

1. Print out the attached sign
2. Write in your name and state
3. Take a picture!
4. Email that picture back to me at rachel AT suwa.org 

Thanks for your help!
Rachel



​ 

_________________________________________

Rachel Briggs
Eastern Organizer
Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance
202.266.0472 
rachel AT suwa.org
Subject: Glorious August morning (Chesney)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 11:15:33 +0000
CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA near Siloam Springs is lush. On an unseasonably 
cool, and to put it modestly, glorious August morning, I have a newly mowed 
path winding through Big Bluestem Grass way over my head, a dense sea of Ashy 
Sunflowers, some with seed, many flowering, and this morning covered with 
Spanish galleys of gold-laden pollinators. And then here comes an appreciating 
choir of seed-hungry American Goldfinches. 


And if a treasure trove of yellow petals and birds bold black and gold isn’t 
wealth enough, how about royal reddish-purples of Arkansas Ironweeds (Vernonia 
arkansana), covered with trademark long, curly bracts, native dignity in rising 
seas of green and yellow. Then, right along this path, the busy bubble of a 
SEDGE WREN, then another. How many? One is perched right here, on Big Bluestem, 
bending and swaying as brave wren eyes Hominid intruder. 


First bird out of the car this morning was an Upland Sandpiper flying low in 
pastures east of Chesney. Ditto, Loggerhead Shrike working the fenceline. 
That’s a key problem visiting Chesney: how to get out of the car. “Life's a box 
of chocolates, Forrest. You never know what you're gonna get” just as that door 
creaks open. Earlier this summer it was a Killdeer nest right at parking. On 
December 27, 2012, a PRAIRIE FALCON on the entrance post. Most winter days, 
White-crowned and a few Harris’s Sparrows. In the thicket of prairie plums it 
could be an Empidonax flycatcher, one of those greenish buntings of late 
summer, or a Northern Bobwhite covey. Or today, an Upland. 


Goldfinches were overhead all morning. It was all about CHIPPITY-DIPs and 
somewhere down in Ashy Sunflowers, CHIP CHIP CHIP, CHER CHER or is that CHORRE 
CHORE CHORE, CHEE, CHEE, CHEE? A festival of improvisations from the basic 
bright chip. 


I waded or swam through Big Bluestem toward a sunflower patch from which poured 
this goldfinch song, singer among waving turkey foot seed heads, masses of 
sunflowers, and ironweeds. My progress is abruptly arrested by sight of what 
looks like a large white bird poop, or perhaps white caterpillar in the 
browning curl of a common white-flowered plant, Late Boneset (Eupatorium 
serotinum). 


Upon closer look, what we have are mating moths, white with long white hairs on 
the thorax, scattered dark spots, legs artistically black and white. At home 
later, and with a phone and internet consultation, it resolves to Salt Marsh 
Moth, (Estigmeme acrea), a baffling fact of life for a star gazer like me. 


On the way out, several Swamp Milkweeds (Asclepias incarnate) all about pink, 
covered with monarchs and other pollinators. The same plant routinely mowed as 
“weed” by well-meaning state and local governments charged with keeping Mother 
Earth looking like a mall or an upscale lawn. 


Finally, thank you Chesney contract land steward Joe Woolbright and staff at 
Ozark Ecological Restoration, Inc for protecting and enhancing, including this 
morning’s fine trail through the glories of an August morning. 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 12
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 20:18:48 -0500
John Ault (Lawton, OK) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 62
species.  It was partly cloudy and warm but with a hint of Fall in the air.
The young Anhinga chicks seem to have doubled in size since last week.  A
few Passerine migrants were present today.  Shorebird numbers are very low
so far.  Here is our list for today:.

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 14

Pied-billed Grebe - 5
Neotropic Cormorant - 2
Anhinga - 10 (2 young in the Otter Lake nest.)
Least Bittern - 5
Great Blue Heron - 26
Great Egret - 52
Snowy Egret - 112
Little Blue Heron - 26

Cattle Egret - 1
Green Heron - 10

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 6
White Ibis - 85
Wood Stork - 5

Black Vulture - 3
Turkey Vulture - 10

Mississippi Kite - 2
Red-shouldered Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 1 adult (also 1 small downy chick.)
Common Gallinule - 9 (also 3 downy chicks.)
Killdeer - 1
Solitary Sandpiper - 5

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Lesser Yellowlegs - 1

Least Sandpiper - 2
Mourning Dove - 9
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 6
Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1
Downy Woodpecker - 2

Olive-sided Flycatcher - 1 (very early!)

Alder Flycatcher - 4
Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 6
White-eyed Vireo - 5
Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 1
American Crow - 2

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 9

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 35

Cave Swallow - 3
Barn Swallow - 13
Carolina Chickadee - 5
Carolina Wren - 9
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3
Northern Mockingbird - 2

Yellow Warbler - 7
Prothonotary Warbler - 4
Common Yellowthroat - 6
Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Summer Tanager - 1
Northern Cardinal - 7
Indigo Bunting - 24
Painted Bunting - 2 juveniles 
Dickcissel - 3
Red-winged Blackbird - 26
Common Grackle - 3

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags - 1

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Stinkpot

Watersnake species

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog 

 

 

Good Birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma 

 
Subject: Pine Bluff Piping Plover
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 15:53:28 -0500
Today Doc George, James Griffin and I observed and photographed a Piping Plover 
at Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. This undoubtedly is 
the same individual that was observed in the same location on 1 August. He is 
usually in close association with a small group of Killdeer and prefers the 
gray coarse gravel roads that top the levees. 

John Redman
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Aug 14, The Many Benefits of Volunteering
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 14:00:20 +0000
The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly meeting is this Thursday, 
August 14, at 7 PM at the Little Rock Audubon Center at 4500 Springer Blvd. 
(exit 1 off I-440). Please note the location as this is not our normal meeting 
place. Do not go to Fletcher Library this week. Our presenter will be Norm 
Berner, Little Rock Parks & Recreation Dept., who will talk about the many 
benefits of volunteering. I know this topic will resonate well with all of you 
who volunteer to serve your local Audubon Chapters, Arkansas Audubon Society, 
and many other organizations. For more details visit http://ascabird.org/ 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: California Gul - NO
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 23:24:02 +0000




Subject: Re: 3 adult MIKI at the nest
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 15:25:34 -0500
For five or six years I have seen several  MIKI's in Searcy, last year 1 in
Heber Springs.  Yesterday morning I saw three circling over my house in
Pangburn.  First I have ever seen in Pangburn. (Mississippi Kites) I knew
it, I knew it, they finally came.  

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Kimberly G. Smith
Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 12:21 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: 3 adult MIKI at the nest

 

Re: 3 adults at the MIKI nest Joe watched. one is probably a yearling helper

 

From Parker, J. W. and M. Ports. 1982. Helping at the nest by yearling
Mississippi Kites. Raptor Research 16:14-17:

Genetic relationship between these yearlings and associated adults is
unknown. In Great Plains, nests with helpers were significantly more
successful (72%, n = 81) than nests without helpers (48%, n = 396); these
data indicate that helping provides benefits to adults, eggs, and nestlings
(Parker and Ports 1982).

 

********************************

Kimberly G. Smith

University Professor of Biological Sciences

Department of Biological Sciences

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010

Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu

********************************

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Hilary David Chapman
Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 11:11 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville

 

My Kites are now feeding a young bird from the snag they have utilized all
summer. I know of other sightings, including north Springdale.  Who would
like to estimate the number of birds/nesting pairs in our area? Half  dozen
seems not improbable even if some of these sightings are the same birds.

 

David Chapman.

From: Joseph C. Neal 
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 5:19 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.uark.edu
Cc: Hilary David Chapman; mamlod AT hotmail.com
Subject: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville

 

Mike Mlodinow and I made a shorebird, actually Any Bird, round in Benton
County today. At the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we thoroughly enjoyed
Purple Martins (~180), Least Sandpipers (13), Semipalmated Sandpipers (4),
Semipalmated Plovers (2), Spotted Sandpipers (2), Pectoral Sandpipers
(probably; 2), Baird's Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), plus Forster's
(5) and Black (1) Terns. At Eagle Watch Nature Trail we had Solitary
Sandpipers (6), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), NEOTROPIC
CORMORANT (1), Great Egret (6), Great Blue Heron (4), Snowy Egret (1;
juvenile), Little Blue Herons (2), Green Herons (2). And lots of other
stuff.

 

On the way home I got a call from the son of a retiree friend who said he
had a MISSISSIPPI KITE nest in his yard in Fayetteville, so we hot-footed
back and, by golly, 50 feet up in a vine-covered post oak in the middle of a
wooded, upscale neighborhood in northeast Fayetteville, low and behold: an
advanced nestling kite, nest right near the tree top. Eventually we saw at
least three adult kites, including one that fed the nestling while two
others perched together atop an adjacent oak, seeming to keep an eye on Mike
and I. By my calculation, kites have been moving into the Fayetteville area
since about 2006 and there has been a steady uptick in summer kite sightings
since. Two birds seen regularly at David Chapman's place near Lake
Fayetteville must be nesting there. This summer there have also been
sightings further north, including three birds seen by Joan Reynolds in
Rogers last week. 
Subject: 3 adult MIKI at the nest
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 17:21:12 +0000
Re: 3 adults at the MIKI nest Joe watched... one is probably a yearling helper

From Parker, J. W. and M. Ports. 1982. Helping at the nest by yearling 
Mississippi Kites. Raptor Research 16:14-17: 

Genetic relationship between these yearlings and associated adults is unknown. 
In Great Plains, nests with helpers were significantly more successful (72%, n 
= 81) than nests without helpers (48%, n = 396); these data indicate that 
helping provides benefits to adults, eggs, and nestlings (Parker and Ports 
1982). 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Hilary David Chapman 

Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 11:11 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville

My Kites are now feeding a young bird from the snag they have utilized all 
summer. I know of other sightings, including north Springdale. Who would like 
to estimate the number of birds/nesting pairs in our area? Half dozen seems not 
improbable even if some of these sightings are the same birds. 


David Chapman.
From: Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 5:19 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.uark.edu
Cc: Hilary David Chapman; mamlod AT hotmail.com
Subject: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville

Mike Mlodinow and I made a shorebird, actually Any Bird, round in Benton County 
today. At the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we thoroughly enjoyed Purple 
Martins (~180), Least Sandpipers (13), Semipalmated Sandpipers (4), 
Semipalmated Plovers (2), Spotted Sandpipers (2), Pectoral Sandpipers 
(probably; 2), Baird's Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), plus Forster's 
(5) and Black (1) Terns. At Eagle Watch Nature Trail we had Solitary Sandpipers 
(6), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), NEOTROPIC CORMORANT (1), 
Great Egret (6), Great Blue Heron (4), Snowy Egret (1; juvenile), Little Blue 
Herons (2), Green Herons (2). And lots of other stuff. 


On the way home I got a call from the son of a retiree friend who said he had a 
MISSISSIPPI KITE nest in his yard in Fayetteville, so we hot-footed back and, 
by golly, 50 feet up in a vine-covered post oak in the middle of a wooded, 
upscale neighborhood in northeast Fayetteville, low and behold: an advanced 
nestling kite, nest right near the tree top. Eventually we saw at least three 
adult kites, including one that fed the nestling while two others perched 
together atop an adjacent oak, seeming to keep an eye on Mike and I. By my 
calculation, kites have been moving into the Fayetteville area since about 2006 
and there has been a steady uptick in summer kite sightings since. Two birds 
seen regularly at David Chapman's place near Lake Fayetteville must be nesting 
there. This summer there have also been sightings further north, including 
three birds seen by Joan Reynolds in Rogers last week. 
Subject: Re: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
From: Hilary David Chapman <dchapman AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:11:21 +0000
My Kites are now feeding a young bird from the snag they have utilized all 
summer. I know of other sightings, including north Springdale. Who would like 
to estimate the number of birds/nesting pairs in our area? Half dozen seems not 
improbable even if some of these sightings are the same birds. 


David Chapman.
From: Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2014 5:19 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.uark.edu
Cc: Hilary David Chapman; mamlod AT hotmail.com
Subject: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville

Mike Mlodinow and I made a shorebird, actually Any Bird, round in Benton County 
today. At the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we thoroughly enjoyed Purple 
Martins (~180), Least Sandpipers (13), Semipalmated Sandpipers (4), 
Semipalmated Plovers (2), Spotted Sandpipers (2), Pectoral Sandpipers 
(probably; 2), Baird's Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), plus Forster's 
(5) and Black (1) Terns. At Eagle Watch Nature Trail we had Solitary Sandpipers 
(6), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), NEOTROPIC CORMORANT (1), 
Great Egret (6), Great Blue Heron (4), Snowy Egret (1; juvenile), Little Blue 
Herons (2), Green Herons (2). And lots of other stuff. 


On the way home I got a call from the son of a retiree friend who said he had a 
MISSISSIPPI KITE nest in his yard in Fayetteville, so we hot-footed back and, 
by golly, 50 feet up in a vine-covered post oak in the middle of a wooded, 
upscale neighborhood in northeast Fayetteville, low and behold: an advanced 
nestling kite, nest right near the tree top. Eventually we saw at least three 
adult kites, including one that fed the nestling while two others perched 
together atop an adjacent oak, seeming to keep an eye on Mike and I. By my 
calculation, kites have been moving into the Fayetteville area since about 2006 
and there has been a steady uptick in summer kite sightings since. Two birds 
seen regularly at David Chapman's place near Lake Fayetteville must be nesting 
there. This summer there have also been sightings further north, including 
three birds seen by Joan Reynolds in Rogers last week. 
Subject: Frog in the mud
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 22:48:14 +0000
WELCOME RAIN of last night and today did not dampen our Northwest Arkansas 
Audubon Society field trip to Frog Bayou WMA and the western river valley. 
River Road down to Frog was a scary-slick, muddy slog for sure, but it did NOT 
rain on us and we just re-giggered the day. 


As we drove into Frog, Blue Grosbeaks flew across from a bean field. One was 
brown, the other with a head of summer blue. Indigo Buntings were in Johnson 
grass, mostly brown with streaky breasts of fledglings. Bell’s Vireo songs 
sounded rusty. 


We (12) met up at the Frog boat ramp at Dyer Bay, a cut-off channel of the 
Arkansas River. In the wide-open shallows: Great Egrets (~20), Snowy Egrets 
(~12) with golden slippers – as Peterson called them --wrapped around snaggy 
limbs, Double-crested Cormorants and Forster’s Terns (5) jockeying for a perch, 
Great Blue Herons (3), and small flights of Cattle Egrets headed down river, 
destination a small sandy island with active nests. 


We also picked up a few Little Blue Herons – blue (1), white juvenile (1) – in 
a shallow pond with clumps of a striking flower, blue waterleaf (Hydrolea 
ovata). The single most impressive flower: the huge rose-mallows (Hibiscus 
lasiocarpos) with the dazzling symmetry of 5 white petals and a deep, inviting 
rosy center, standing tall in the wetlands. 


As we were leaving Frog, NWAAS VP Joannie Patterson noticed a familiar Toyota: 
Doug James with Elizabeth at the wheel. Doug fresh out of rehab, and as fit and 
proper, with binoculars around his neck! Neither rain, humidity, mud, nor 
mending femur keeps our NWAAS President down. 


It is true muddy roads prohibited our birding Frog’s productive moist soil 
ponds, but we did make the Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility. Swallow flocks 
worked low over settling ponds, then up for brief perches on powerlines. In 
order of abundance: Cliff, Northern Rough-winged, Bank, and Tree. Banks were 
life birds for a few; we had 4-8 at times on the wires. These are also Peterson 
moments, right out of his 1947 edition. His “Swallows on a wire” (p. 162) was 
Alma WTF today. I guess that’s what they mean by the timelessness of art. 


Our main stop here was for BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS. First, two adults 
escorted 8 ducklings close enough for photographs. Then, a loudly-whistling 
flock of adults (~15) startled up from somewhere, flushed as Doug noticed by a 
hawk. And, he added, these ducks do a lot of this whistling at night, based 
upon his many trips to Texas. 


Then further west into the valley, into an old river oxbow that is now all bean 
fields and a 200-acre sod farm, often as not dependable for a couple of 
sought-after migrants: Upland (8) and Buff-breasted (16) Sandpipers, plus 
Mourning Doves, Eastern Meadowlarks, Killdeer, and other stuff a ways off and 
with at best shaky IDs in rising heat shimmers. 
Subject: Re: Hummers & Meal Worms
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 13:55:15 -0500
That's good to know. I'm going to mix the loose dried mealworms I have into 
suet when I make some for winter. I bought loose and cakes of mealworms, The 
cakes actually got the moth maggots, too. Unless the mealworms ARE moth 
maggots. At any rate they were hatching. And I just tossed that in the trash it 
was gummy and gross. Anyone who knows me knows it takes a LOT to gross me out. 


I don't get Bluebirds in The Neighborhood in Centerton, although I see them 1/2 
mile away once out of the houses. Jacque 



---- Debra Hale-Shelton  wrote: 

=============
I still am seeing hummingbirds. I've probably seen more lately because I've
been home a bit more lately before sunset. I have five feeders, two of which
are tiny hanging-basket-type feeders and always empty first. My back-yard
feeders also go faster than the one I have in our front yard. But there are
more vegetation and other feeders in the back, too. I started a raised-bed
herb garden this year and have seen at least one hummer checking out the
flowering basil a couple times.

My bluebirds -- or some other birds/critters -- eat my dried mealworms. I
put out only a few at a time and mix them with bird seed and once in a while
a few grapes as a special treat. At first, the worms went to naught. But
I guess the birds had to find them first. My suet usually goes fast, too,
though I don't have any out right now.

Debra

Conway

--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Hummers & Meal Worms
From: Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton AT ARKANSASONLINE.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 13:06:13 -0500
I still am seeing hummingbirds. I've probably seen more lately because I've
been home a bit more lately before sunset. I have five feeders, two of which
are tiny hanging-basket-type feeders and always empty first. My back-yard
feeders also go faster than the one I have in our front yard. But there are
more vegetation and other feeders in the back, too. I started a raised-bed
herb garden this year and have seen at least one hummer checking out the
flowering basil a couple times.

My bluebirds -- or some other birds/critters -- eat my dried mealworms. I
put out only a few at a time and mix them with bird seed and once in a while
a few grapes as a special treat. At first, the worms went to naught. But
I guess the birds had to find them first. My suet usually goes fast, too,
though I don't have any out right now.

Debra

Conway
Subject: Re: Where are my hummers?
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 12:54:47 -0500
I am having an up-tick in Hummers. I have had a nice bright male hanging around 
. Last weekend I saw one Thursday afternoon through Sunday, and there seems to 
be the same trend going this weekend. Only there are three more females or 
young around, too. I also have native honeysuckle blooming in the yard. 


I usually don't put out seed in Summer but I had leftovers from what I took to 
Arizona in April and most of a 50 lb bag of black oil sunflower seeds I bought 
late last winter. they usually don't stay all that fresh that long and sure 
nuff there were a few moth maggots in the seed. I put it out anyway, the birds 
seem happy. Lots of House Finches 15-20, Chickadees 2, Cardinals 5 and Mourning 
and Eurasian Dove, a few each, are hanging around my yard. I have Ashy 
Sunflowers, they are finally blooming, today I had Goldfinches checking them 
out. 


One thing everything avoids and I won't waste my money on again is the dried 
mealworms. 


Oh, I also have my House Wren that found a new girlfriend after the first nest 
failed. It was odd, I was going to clean out the 8 eggs in there a few weeks 
after I was sure it had been abandoned and the eggs were gone. So was the 
grasses and fluff. Only the stick part of the nest was still there. The 
following day the male was bringing new grasses and fluff to the nest And 
singing for a mate. They are now feeding young, I have no idea how many but 
they are both working hard at it. Jacque Brown. Centerton. 


. . 
---- Karen Konarski-Hart  wrote: 

=============
2 days ago we had a 4 way stand off for the same feeder. Never mind there were 
2 other feeders. 2 hummers, 2 chickadees w "dees" checking out both sugar and 
ant guard waters. 1 hummer and 1 dee did a side step around opposite sides of 
the feeder w a lot of agitation. Then the 2 hummers got into a tiff so the 
chickadees grabbed a drink and left for calmer climes. Throughout all this 
brouhaha a juvenile English sparrow was hunkered down in a bush next to the 
feeder probably thinking " mom didn't prep me for THIS!" Of course I had no 
camera. 

Karen Hart.  Hillcrest.  Little rock

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 7, 2014, at 5:49 PM, "Alyson Hoge"  wrote:

> I took a week off and left town. When I came back Monday, I had very few 
visitors to the nectar feeders. 

> 
> I eyed my son suspiciously. He was supposed to keep the feeders cleaned and 
filled. He wasn't sure how long the feeders had been hanging outside, but 
thought it was since a week ago Tuesday. I took them down and looked them over. 
They looked really clean. Not enough sugar, perhaps? If they had been out that 
long they should have been dirtier. 

> 
> I resumed my regular hummer feeder duties but put up just two, just in case I 
really did have a drop in visitors. 

> 
> There has been activity, but not what I had two weeks ago. 
> 
> Anyone else seeing a decline?
> 
> Alyson Hoge
> Pulaski County

--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 7
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 22:00:52 -0500
It was partly cloudy and warm on the survey today.  58 species were found.
The wader hotspot right now is unit 30.  Also, there are a few shorebirds
here to.  Alder Flycatchers are back and feeding on the Roughleaf Dogwood
berries on the Bittern Lake levees.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 22

Hooded Merganser - 1
Pied-billed Grebe - 13
Neotropic Cormorant - 2
Anhinga - 12 (there are now young in the Otter Lake nest.)
Least Bittern - 3
Great Blue Heron - 19
Great Egret - 88
Snowy Egret - 178
Little Blue Heron - 39

Tricolored Heron - 1 immature
Green Heron - 7

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 5
White Ibis - 250
Wood Stork - 5
Turkey Vulture - 8

Mississippi Kite - 4
Red-shouldered Hawk - 1
Purple Gallinule - 3
Common Gallinule - 7 (also two downy chicks.)
Killdeer - 1
Solitary Sandpiper - 6

Lesser Yellowlegs - 3
Mourning Dove - 32
Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Great-horned Owl - 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 8
Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1
Downy Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 3
Willow Flycatcher - 1 (on nesting territory.)
Eastern Phoebe - 1
Eastern Kingbird - 3
White-eyed Vireo - 5
Bell's Vireo - 2
American Crow - 5

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 10

Cliff Swallow - 10
Barn Swallow - 3
Carolina Chickadee - 4
Carolina Wren - 14
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3
Gray Catbird - 1
Northern Mockingbird - 2
Prothonotary Warbler - 1
Common Yellowthroat - 7
Yellow-breasted Chat - 2
Northern Cardinal - 13
Blue Grosbeak - 2
Indigo Bunting - 23
Painted Bunting - 2 juveniles (adults are apparently gone now.)
Dickcissel - 16
Red-winged Blackbird - 52
Common Grackle - 8

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

Carolina Saddlebags

 

 

Good Birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

http://www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Where are my hummers?
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 23:29:03 +0000
2 days ago we had a 4 way stand off for the same feeder. Never mind there were 
2 other feeders. 2 hummers, 2 chickadees w "dees" checking out both sugar and 
ant guard waters. 1 hummer and 1 dee did a side step around opposite sides of 
the feeder w a lot of agitation. Then the 2 hummers got into a tiff so the 
chickadees grabbed a drink and left for calmer climes. Throughout all this 
brouhaha a juvenile English sparrow was hunkered down in a bush next to the 
feeder probably thinking " mom didn't prep me for THIS!" Of course I had no 
camera. 

Karen Hart.  Hillcrest.  Little rock

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 7, 2014, at 5:49 PM, "Alyson Hoge"  wrote:

> I took a week off and left town. When I came back Monday, I had very few 
visitors to the nectar feeders. 

> 
> I eyed my son suspiciously. He was supposed to keep the feeders cleaned and 
filled. He wasn't sure how long the feeders had been hanging outside, but 
thought it was since a week ago Tuesday. I took them down and looked them over. 
They looked really clean. Not enough sugar, perhaps? If they had been out that 
long they should have been dirtier. 

> 
> I resumed my regular hummer feeder duties but put up just two, just in case I 
really did have a drop in visitors. 

> 
> There has been activity, but not what I had two weeks ago. 
> 
> Anyone else seeing a decline?
> 
> Alyson Hoge
> Pulaski County
Subject: Where are my hummers?
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 17:48:19 -0500
I took a week off and left town. When I came back Monday, I had very few 
visitors to the nectar feeders. 


I eyed my son suspiciously. He was supposed to keep the feeders cleaned and 
filled. He wasn't sure how long the feeders had been hanging outside, but 
thought it was since a week ago Tuesday. I took them down and looked them over. 
They looked really clean. Not enough sugar, perhaps? If they had been out that 
long they should have been dirtier. 


I resumed my regular hummer feeder duties but put up just two, just in case I 
really did have a drop in visitors. 


There has been activity, but not what I had two weeks ago. 

Anyone else seeing a decline?

Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County
Subject: Re: they fly but they are not birds
From: Joe Mosby <jhmosby AT CYBERBACK.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 16:44:39 -0500
I plan to buy this new edition due to respect for Lori Spencer and Don Simons. 
But why o why does the UA Press call him “principle photographer” and not 
“principal photographer”? 


Joe Mosby
Conway

From: Kimberly G. Smith 
Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2014 4:19 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: they fly but they are not birds

Some of you might be interested in the second edition of Arkansas Butterflies: 
http://www.uapress.com/dd-product/arkansas-butterflies-and-moths/ 


 

 

Kimberly G. Smith

University Professor of Biological Sciences

Department of Biological Sciences

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010

Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu

 

 
Subject: Wheels of assumption, etc (Centerton)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 21:38:42 +0000
We had an impressive round of thunder, big lightning, and rain this morning. I 
drove up toward the state fish hatchery at Centerton to see the shorebird 
migration. Also drove through the dairy farms area at Vaughn, and between, 
Benton County Fairgrounds. Killdeer (~95, most at fairgrounds), Greater 
Yellowlegs (1), Solitary Sandpiper (4), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Semipalmated 
Sandpiper (6), Least Sandpiper (4-7), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), Stilt Sandpiper 
(2), BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER (1; at fairgrounds, hanging with Killdeer, 
photos), Long-billed Dowitcher (1; in the rain, present briefly, very reddish, 
ID by keeks). I didn’t find Upland Sandpipers. 


With the fair opening soon, Benton County Sheriff’s Department was out with a 
prisoner work detail. Obvious and undeniable source of suspicion: little old me 
with that spotting scope on the window. Deputy pulled up next to me. When I 
explained what I was doing -- and that I had permission to be on the 
fairgrounds doing it -- he took a long silent look. Not unfriendly; just, well, 
you could see the wheels of assumption not really lining up. Older male with 
binoculars . . . birding? He said, “Well you have a good day, Sir” and as he 
drove off the prisoners looked me over too, but with broad amusement. 


So maybe this was prelude to the overture since Buff-breasted came next? Then 
an adult Red-tailed Hawk that had caught a long-tailed mammal, along with a 
claw-full of grasses from the field where it lived, and everybody chased by a 
ragged American Kestrel much in need of molt. Maybe I could teach ornithology 
at the jail. 


Also at the hatchery, I quick-counted around 100 Swamp Milkweeds (Asclepias 
incarnata) blooming in ditch lines. It’s hard to miss a lovely pink creature 
covered with pollinators, especially when the sun has just come out after 
several hours of needed rain. These plants are relics of a once much more 
extensive prairie wetland system, now almost ALL gone. What’s left is 
informally “protected” by deep wet ditches. Now modern mowers with long arms 
eliminate even this “protection.” In Arkansas it is listed as an S2, which 
means it is at high risk of extirpation. Amen. 


I had another call yesterday from AEP-SWEPCO about the powerline just south of 
the hatchery where a Great Blue Heron got hung up on an all-but-invisible top 
wire and was dead when I saw it July 17. SWEPCO is going to mark this line with 
what are called bird diverters, to be accomplished by August 22. I’ll share 
pictures on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society facebook page when this is 
completed. 
Subject: they fly but they are not birds
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 21:19:49 +0000
Some of you might be interested in the second edition of Arkansas Butterflies: 
http://www.uapress.com/dd-product/arkansas-butterflies-and-moths/ 



Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu

Subject: SEDGE WRENS at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 00:25:11 +0000
Several SEDGE WRENS were singing in the dense native grasses, especially Big 
Bluestem, at Chesney Prairie Natural Area near Siloam Springs this morning. I 
heard them on the Couch Unit, which is the westernmost part of Chesney. I’m 
unsure how many I heard – 2 or perhaps 3. It is always a surprise to find them 
outside normal migration periods, which in fall usually involves early October. 
Birds present and singing in August may have already nested this year further 
north, have just migrated in, and are trying for another nest. We have had them 
previously in summer at Chesney, as well as other similar habitats 
characterized by being low, moist, open, with dense vegetation. 


However, it was not for Sedge Wrens that I went to Chesney this morning. I was 
wanting to see if the ashy sunflowers have ripe seeds. It is time for the Great 
American Goldfinch Sunflower Festival when the seeds come in. Ashy sunflowers 
look very dramatic right now, with many still in full flower. They have their 
dazzling array of pollinating insects, well worth the trip all in of itself, 
but not yet many seeds. But as seed time draws nigh, goldfinches are starting 
to rally ‘round. 


Today they were singing from trees on the edge and dropping down into the 
sunflower patches to prospect this year’s crop. I think it’s going to be a 
humdinger of a sunflower seed crop, which means in a week or ten days, Chesney 
is going to be all lighted up with a full festival of goldfinches. 
Subject: eBird Taxonomy Update
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 07:48:07 -0500
eBird is currently undergoing its annual taxonomy update 
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/taxonomy-updating-now/. Not much 
affects North America and nothing affects Arkansas in terms of 
splitting and (the now rarely occurring) lumping. But you world 
birders may add a new species or two.

The update also adds domestic varieties, hybrids, spuhs, and slashes 
based on what is being seen in the field. To Arkansas's filters I 
added "Domestic goose sp. (Domestic type)" for when you just can't 
tell what kind of domestic goose it is.  Also "Domestic goose sp. 
(Domestic type) x Canada Goose (hybrid)" for those unclassified 
hybrids with a Canada (this one viewable only under the rare bird 
list). The nice thing about the "(Domestic type)" modifier is that 
these taxa are not added to your life list, state list, etc.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR
Subject: Uplands and calicoes (W. Arkansas valley)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 21:19:44 +0000
UPLAND SANDPIPERS (16) were at West-Ark Sod Farm south of Kibler this morning, 
some panting in the rising heat. Need to get in there and cut a bunch of sod? 
No problem. The Uplands just move to another section of the big fields. 


Along highway 64, on the way in to Frog Bayou WMA, at least 300 Cattle Egrets 
out in a hay field. Painted Buntings are still singing in the roadside bushy 
thickets with tall trees along River Road. 


Little Blue Heron calicoes (2) were at Frog. These are the first summer birds 
with some blue and some white feathers. They look strange and wild, especially 
in flight. Technically, this is a Formative Stage on the way to full adult 
plumage. 


Out on Dyer Bay of the Arkansas River adjacent, Forster’s Terns (5), plus 
numerous Great Egrets (~20), a few Double-crested Cormorants, and a bunch of 
swallows. Later, maybe three hundred of swallows on wires near Alma wastewater 
treatment facility, mostly Northern Rough-winged and Cliff, but also Tree and 
Barns. The rough-wings were preening and trying for a little shut eye. 


The valley overall looked pretty dry this morning, a good thing if you are 
trying to drive the graded roads, but not so good if you’re looking for 
shorebird migrants other than Upland Sandpipers. But dry doesn’t bother Horned 
Larks who seem perfectly at home in dusty bean fields and roadsides. 
Subject: Hummingbird Migration Celebration, Sept 5-7
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 16:52:09 +0000
The annual Hummingbird Migration Celebration at the Strawberry Plains Audubon 
Center, Holly Springs, MS (an hour south of Memphis) will be Sept 5-7. Bob 
Sargent (hummingbird banding) and Doug Tallamy (author of Bringing Nature Home) 
will be there, among many other great presenters. 


For more information visit http://tinyurl.com/m3c2poz 

Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: possible Rufous Hummingbird in Redfield, Jefferson Co.
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 09:37:29 -0700
I just received a call from Mr. Howard Aaron who has "an orange hummingbird" at 
his feeder. He says its been there all week but is rather skittish. He was able 
to verify its coloration by watching it with binoculars as it sat in a tree. If 
you would like to see this bird and identify it, please call Howard Aaron at 
501-944-6007. He is located in Redfield in extreme NW Jefferson County. 


Karen Rowe 
Subject: test
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 10:42:42 -0500




Subject: Sightings: North Shore Drive
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 20:01:15 -0500
I was bored and tried to think of a wetland I could get to in the hour and 
twenty minutes of daylight I had left. The pond on North Shore Drive is tiny 
but has been home to Black-bellied Whistling Duck and a White-Faced Ibis 
before. Today not so much but there were Least Terns at the nearby sewer pond 
and a Yellow-crowned Night-Heron flew over.  



Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: Seven green buntings
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 22:10:30 +0000
In a little over two hours I had a leisurely ride on parts of Scull Creek and 
Mud Creek bike trails in Fayetteville, round trip about 7 miles, all through 
the busy beating heart of big box northwest Arkansas. On a bike instead of in a 
car, and birding instead of shopping, I’m what painter Walter Anderson termed 
“fortune’s favorite child.” 


Cars speed along all constant clicky-clack, 6 lanes on highway 71 B where 
Fayetteville and Springdale meet. Instead of dodging traffic, I have a chance 
to look for waterthrushes because Mud Creek bike trail goes under most of that 
and often along the creek. No waterthrushes today, but here’s a nice clump of 
flowering Canada Goldenrod and a robust square-stemmed Cup Plant with yellow 
flowers. 


A male American Robin perches atop a snaggy limb in a sing-out with the rising 
crescendo of dogday cicadas and Saturday morning traffic, a difficult and 
almost always thankless task. From what I see and hear, it’s well done Mr 
Robin. 


More treasures almost hidden along the trail: a large sphinx moth, with cammo 
blotches of gray, black, and brown. It rests in the morning sun. 


We have a Mud Creek crossing at Steele Boulevard where FOR SALE signs offer as 
yet undeveloped property. Birds that love these weedy fields go about their 
business anyway. A Blue Grosbeak sings from the edge. American Goldfinches tare 
up ripe thistles. 



I spot small birds in the grass across the street from Academy sporting goods. 
Green Painted Buntings they are, likely females with young of the year. In its 
“day,” this was all Tallgrass Prairie. Maybe buntings nested in the riparian 
bushes and small trees alongside Mud Creek. As the land has changed, they still 
replenish the earth and will doubtless continue until squeezed out. 




Today’s count is one, two, then as I approach, at least seven green buntings in 
low flight. At this moment of high birding drama I’m quite pleased to have 
along on the ride my 8 x 32 binoculars. Here’s a rough list for the ride: 




Canada Goose

Red-shouldered Hawk

Mourning Dove

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Eastern Phoebe

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

White-eyed Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 8

Fish Crow - 7

Purple Martin - 4

Barn Swallow - 5

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Wren

House Wren

Eastern Bluebird

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

European Starling

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting - 7

Painted Bunting - 7-10

Red-winged Blackbird

American Goldfinch - 6+

House Sparrow
Subject: Black-necked Stilts and Cave Swallows in Miller County
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 11:29:06 -0500
I needed to stick close to home today but decided to make a spur of the moment 
quick drive to and from First Old River several hours ago any way. On my way to 
First Old River, I found what I believe was a family group (2 adults and 1 
juvenile) of Black-necked Stilts. It’s quite likely that the juvenile hatched 
locally and, if so, would probably represent the first nesting record of the 
species in Miller County. Stilts are hardly noteworthy in some sections of 
Arkansas but, in the southwestern corner, they’re pretty hard to come by. 


Between the stilt site and First Old River, I saw many “buff-rumped” swallows 
feeding over mainly cornfields on either side of Hwy 296. Those that I could 
identify with certainty were Cliff Swallows. Once at First Old River, there 
weren’t very many swallows gathered on the telephone lines and all of them were 
Northern Rough-winged; however, just west of the Queen’s Plantation 
headquarter’s, I did pick out 2 juvenile Cave Swallows, 1 juvenile Cliff 
Swallow and more Northern Rough-wingeds perched on the telephone lines. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 7550
Subject: Sightings: Delaware recreational area 8/3
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 10:14:51 -0500
Karen Holliday and I are seeing the California Gull, several Caspian tern, 
Forsters Terns, Black Terns, Least Terns, Herring Gulls, Ring-Billed Gulls, 
Belted Kingfishers, and a pair of Osprey building a nest on a channel marker. 



Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: Red Phalarope-no
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 16:10:52 +0000
Fifteen birders searched high and low for the Red Phalarope this morning but it 
was a no show. 


Dottie 
Little Rock

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this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Bluebird on the battlefield (Pea Ridge NMP)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 12:43:00 +0000
In the widest scheme of time, the difference between March 1862 -- when two 
armies fought in the fields below Elkhorn Mountain -- and August 2014 -- when 
I’m out on my bicycle SLOWLY watching birds along the seven mile battlefield 
tour road through Pea Ridge National Military Park -- isn’t really much. 
Especially if our planet is four billion years old? But of course it’s 
EVERYTHING if you are one of the 26,000 engaged here, if you are among 6,000 
causalities. The difference between shooting and being shot at, and riding a 
bicycle, binoculars around my neck, for two hours on an unseasonably cool 
August day, has to do with when you enter the stream of time. 


So it is with such metaphorical, and perhaps even metaphysical thoughts in 
mind, I’m enjoying hearing Northern Bobwhites calling in the Leetown 
Battlefield. Field Sparrows are singing in all the woody fields. There’s a 
fledgling sparrow perched on a split rail fence where Cherokee Confederates 
fought. The open oak woods that somewhat sheltered soldiers from shot and 
shell, are now full of calling Eastern Wood-Pewees and families of Summer 
Tanagers. Out on the climactic battlefield within sight of today’s visitor’s 
center, Eastern Bluebirds, Eastern Meadowlarks, and Dickcissels. 


The paved tour road is a comfortable and informative loop of 7 miles and is 
generally slow and quiet (2 hours, 15 minutes, and I walk a lot). Along its 
way, interesting habitats: extensive open grasslands, including tallgrass 
prairie, regenerating fields with bushes and small trees, woodlands maintained 
in an open condition with prescribed burning, small streams, a ridge with 
bluffs, and helpful Park Service information about what happened in this very 
spot in 1862. 


There’s a $5 entrance fee, unless you are a geezer like me, with a “lifetime” 
pass from which I hope to get more value . . . if you get my drift. 


Of course, this all changes seasonally, the birds and plants I mean. Here’s my 
list for August 1, and I never got off the pavement: 



Northern Bobwhite - 1-2 Leetown battlefield

Turkey Vulture - 3

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - numerous, 8+

Great Crested Flycatcher - 1-2

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

White-eyed Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 5

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow

Carolina Chickadee

White-breasted Nuthatch - family group +

Carolina Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 8

Eastern Bluebird - 1

American Robin

Northern Mockingbird

Northern Parula - 4

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Black-and-white Warbler - 2

Waterthrush sp. - 1

Kentucky Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Summer Tanager - 5

Scarlet Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Chipping Sparrow - 1

Field Sparrow - 8+ many singing

Northern Cardinal

Indigo Bunting - 9+ young

Dickcissel - 2

Red-winged Blackbird

Eastern Meadowlark - 3

American Goldfinch - over flights

House Sparrow
Subject: Link to Photos
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 20:42:13 -0500
I posted a couple of photos each of the Red Phalarope and the Piping Plover
at the following link:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/124564936 AT N06/14805575662/in/set-7215764569629
9689/

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: Passing of the Pigeon program August 31 at Hobbs
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 01:18:29 +0000
“Passing of the Pigeon” will be presented Sunday August 31, 2014 2 - 3 pm by 
Nancy McCartney, Curator of Zoology at the University of Arkansas Collections, 
Douglas James, Ornithologist, UA-Department of Biological Sciences, and Steve 
Chyrchel, Interpretative Naturalist at Hobbs State Park. They will help us 
discover a unique bird that has long been extinct, the Passenger Pigeon. There 
will be a male and female specimen of a Passenger Pigeon on display. It once 
numbered 3 to 5 billion and darkened the sky for days in overhead migration. 
The last one died in the Cincinnati Zoo 100 years ago this coming Labor Day. 
Meeting Place: Hobbs Visitor Center Admission: Free. Hobbs State 
Park-Conservation Area, 20201 East Highway 12, Rogers, AR 72756, Ph: (479) 
789-5000, hobbs AT arkansas.com. This program is a 
continuation of the Friends of Hobbs Speaker Series. 
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope CORRECTION
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 17:52:28 -0700
Several birders much more knowledgeable than myself have informed me that the 
Phalarope  John Redman and I photographed is a molting adult Red Phalarope and 
NOT a Red-necked Phalarope as I stated. 


John Redman found the bird and alerted several Pine Bluff area birders as to 
it's location.  Thanks John 



Doc George
Subject: Red Phalarope & Piping Plover
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 19:25:05 -0500
We have  a Red Phalarope and a Piping Plover at our Boyd Point Waste Water
Facility.  The facility is normally closed on Saturday, but I have received
permission to go in tomorrow morning.  Someone will let me in at 8:00.  If
you are interested in getting in, let me know.  My cell phone is:

 

870 550 7861

 

To get to Boyd Point, take the road north past UAPB, University drive.
Before you get to the Arkansas River Bridge, turn right on Marina Road.  You
will see a lot of signs at the turn, one of them being Boyd Point Waste
Water Treatment Facility.  The road goes up on a levee and passes between
two bodies of water.  Just past the water, take the road leaving the levee
on the right and keep on the lower road that parallels the levee.  You will
see the facility entrance on the right.  The gate will be closed but I can
let you in if you call me, or be there at 8:00.

 

I will post a link to some pictures later.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 14:36:25 -0700
John Redman called around noon today and told me he had seen a Red-necked 
Phalarope at the Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Plant in Pine Bluff.  I 
headed out that way shortly after noon and took several photos.  Three of those 
photos are posted on my Pbase page for anyone interested in taking a look.  
There are also two shots of a Black Tern from this afternoon.  They can be 
viewed by clicking the link below. 


http://www.pbase.com/docg/aug_2014

Doc George
Subject: male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD at Bentonville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 20:30:33 +0000
There is a brilliant male Rufous Hummingbird visiting a feeder in Bentonville. 
It showed up at least by July 29. I got to see it this morning, thanks to a 
neat network: a message from Donna Haynes, who'd been contacted by Cheri 
Hammonds, who after a brief round of phone tag gave me permission to come up to 
Bentonville and try for photographs. I also like the story that goes with it. 
This is a rent house, while her new home is being finished. She wanted flowers 
to go with her hummingbird feeders, but couldn't plant a garden at this place, 
so she got a bunch of potted plants and worked them in with the feeders. 
Subject: Re: Minneapolis Star-Tribune article: "Council passes stadium bird resolution" re Minnesota Vikings new mostly glass exterior stadium
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 20:28:46 +0000
Thanks Barry for letting the birding community know. And thank you Jack for 
alerting Arkansas birders to this problem. 


I have also wondered about the design of the new US Marshall's facility in Fort 
Smith. When I saw a picture of the design it too has a lot of glass and will be 
located on the river. Every time I see the design drawing I always wonder how 
many birds will die crashing into the glass. 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Barry Haas 

Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune article: "Council passes stadium bird 
resolution" re Minnesota Vikings new mostly glass exterior stadium 


Dear ARBIRDers,

On July 23 Jack Stewart posted the following:

The new Vikings stadium in Minneapolis is going to be a disaster for 
neotropical migrants if the design is not altered. What needs to be done is 
change the type of glass. I've visited the site and have seen the drawings for 
the proposed stadium. If one were to design a building with the express purpose 
of killing birds, the Vikings stadium might just be the winning design. 


You can help birds and support Minnesotans by adding your name to the action 
alert. 



https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=DD2452A6134BDE0737A7ECD23AA9A5CD.app304a?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1717&autologin=true&s_src=JUL14_ATD2 


End of Jack's post.

As a member of the National Audubon Society Board Jack was alerting us to how 
we could help stop the construction of a migrant bird killing machine. 


Well, here's a story in today's Minneapolis Star-Tribune titled "Council passes 
stadium bird resolution": 


http://www.startribune.com/local/blogs/269559301.html

I suspect that due to pressure from birders across the country change may be 
coming. Let's hope. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

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Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune article: "Council passes stadium bird resolution" re Minnesota Vikings new mostly glass exterior stadium
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 14:23:15 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

On July 23 Jack Stewart posted the following:

The new Vikings stadium in Minneapolis is going to be a disaster for 
neotropical migrants if the design is not altered. What needs to be done is 
change the type of glass. I’ve visited the site and have seen the drawings for 
the proposed stadium. If one were to design a building with the express purpose 
of killing birds, the Vikings stadium might just be the winning design. 


You can help birds and support Minnesotans by adding your name to the action 
alert. 



https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy;jsessionid=DD2452A6134BDE0737A7ECD23AA9A5CD.app304a?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1717&autologin=true&s_src=JUL14_ATD2 


End of Jack's post.

As a member of the National Audubon Society Board Jack was alerting us to how 
we could help stop the construction of a migrant bird killing machine. 


Well, here's a story in today's Minneapolis Star-Tribune titled "Council passes 
stadium bird resolution": 


http://www.startribune.com/local/blogs/269559301.html

I suspect that due to pressure from birders across the country change may be 
coming. Let's hope. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: ASCA August Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 09:57:48 -0700
The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) is headed to the Bald Knob 
National Wildlife Refuge for our August Field trip.  See details below.  Come 
one, come all, this is fun field trip!  You don't have to be an ASCA member to 
join us.  This trip can run into the afternoon if the weather isn't too hot 
and the birds are good.  Go to our website www.ascabird.org for reports from 
previous field trips, information about our monthly meetings and terrific guest 
speakers, and other birdy stuff.  Feel free to email me off-list if you have 
any questions. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock

 
August 23
Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge
Bald Knob, AR
Meet at 7:00 a.m.
in North Little Rock at the Other Center parking lot on the east side of the
lot behind McDonald’s.  The Other Center
is across from McCain Blvd. from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 West off 
US-67/167.  We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR at around 8:30 a.m. for those who 
want to 

meet us there.  The federal refuge is
also a National Audubon Important Bird Area.  We expect to see shorebirds, 
herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly 

Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills.  It
will be very hot so bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If 
you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  There is 
no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 at 

Bald Knob Exit 55 for a convenient bathroom break.  Go to 
www.fws.gov/baldknob/for driving directions and more information about the 
refuge.  GPS:  35.260233, -91.571903 
Subject: Calhoun County Woodstorks
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 22:34:57 -0500
My Camden commute this week involved a different route, to Hampton via East 
Camden, Little Bay, to 167, to Calion lake, Lock 8 and then home: 

Yellow- fringed Orchids, a variety of sunflowers, coneflowers, meadow beauty 
and liatris align highway 4 between Hampton and East Camden. It's pasture, 
forests, old cemeteries and churches and wetlands. 


If you head south on 167 towards Calion, you may see Woodstorks along the dump. 
They're always on the north side of the bridge. 


It's a nice loop, you can bird Calion lake, it's levee and Lock 8. With hwys 
63, 82, or 7/167 minutes away. 



Kelly Chitwood 
Subject: Re: Rubythroat migration
From: Bob Sargent <0000006bde984b50-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 08:39:03 -0400
To the east in Central Alabama hummingbird numbers are up  dramatically.  
Martha Sargent is now in control of hummer stuff. At  her main "cluster" of 
feedes we now spend lots of time each day watching  their antics.  The flow 
of birds through our yard daily now appears to  mostly immature birds with 
buffy feather edging on the feathers of the nape and  area of the ear.  As 
happens each year this is all right on time.  
 
Hummers do have ears.
 
Enjoy your birds guys
Bob Sargent 
Clay, Alabama
 
 
 
 
In a message dated 7/31/2014 4:52:33 P.M. Central Daylight Time,  
bluebird2 AT COX.NET writes:

I went  out of town for 4 days and came back to a really empty feeder on 
Monday. I  filled it before I left on Friday morning.  Plus I still have lots 
of  native honeysuckle blooming that the hummers usually prefer. 

---- Sara  Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote:  

=============

--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co  AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: nesting Mississippi Kites at Fayetteville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 22:19:01 +0000
Mike Mlodinow and I made a shorebird, actually Any Bird, round in Benton County 
today. At the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we thoroughly enjoyed Purple 
Martins (~180), Least Sandpipers (13), Semipalmated Sandpipers (4), 
Semipalmated Plovers (2), Spotted Sandpipers (2), Pectoral Sandpipers 
(probably; 2), Baird’s Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), plus Forster’s 
(5) and Black (1) Terns. At Eagle Watch Nature Trail we had Solitary Sandpipers 
(6), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), NEOTROPIC CORMORANT (1), 
Great Egret (6), Great Blue Heron (4), Snowy Egret (1; juvenile), Little Blue 
Herons (2), Green Herons (2). And lots of other stuff. 


On the way home I got a call from the son of a retiree friend who said he had a 
MISSISSIPPI KITE nest in his yard in Fayetteville, so we hot-footed back and, 
by golly, 50 feet up in a vine-covered post oak in the middle of a wooded, 
upscale neighborhood in northeast Fayetteville, low and behold: an advanced 
nestling kite, nest right near the tree top. Eventually we saw at least three 
adult kites, including one that fed the nestling while two others perched 
together atop an adjacent oak, seeming to keep an eye on Mike and I. By my 
calculation, kites have been moving into the Fayetteville area since about 2006 
and there has been a steady uptick in summer kite sightings since. Two birds 
seen regularly at David Chapman’s place near Lake Fayetteville must be nesting 
there. This summer there have also been sightings further north, including 
three birds seen by Joan Reynolds in Rogers last week. 
Subject: Re: Rubythroat migration
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:52:19 -0500
I went out of town for 4 days and came back to a really empty feeder on Monday. 
I filled it before I left on Friday morning. Plus I still have lots of native 
honeysuckle blooming that the hummers usually prefer. 


---- Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

=============

--
Jacque Brown
Centerton
Benton, Co AR,
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Re: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:36:23 -0500
Sorry for the delay.

Sherry Ligouri from Pacific Power (sherry.ligouri AT pacificorp.com made a
presentation at the PIF meeting (
http://www.partnersinflight.org/pubs/mcallenproc/articles/PIF09_Anthropogeni
c%20Impacts/Liguori_PIF09.pdf ).  She may have additional information that
would help retrofit the existing transmission lines or be used to prevent
collisions on the planned lines.

 

Jeff Short

From: Joseph C. Neal [mailto:joeneal AT uark.edu] 
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 4:30 PM
To: Jeffrey Short
Subject: RE: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton

 

I can forward anything to the AEP person -- thanks

  _____  

From: Jeffrey Short [bashman AT earthlink.net]
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 3:53 PM
To: Joseph C. Neal
Subject: RE: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton

There are standardized marking criteria that was discussed at the Partners
in Flight conference last Aug in Snowbird UT.  I'll see if I can locate some
contacts in my notes.

 

Jeff

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 10:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: some possibly good news on heron death at Centerton

 

I've just gotten off the phone with a person at SWEPCO-AEP who accepted my
report on the heron powerline death, understood what I was saying, and said
he would immediately pursue getting the line marked near the hatchery. I am
quite pleased that he completely understood the problem. It is a good start
and I will report back on this when the solution is in place. I was also
able to get in a pitch for protection of the high wintering population of
raptors in the same area. 
Subject: Re: HOTTEST birding of the year: Frog and Valley Saturday August 9
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 11:20:09 -0700
Donald Ouellette and I were at Frog just day before yesterday, and saw 4 Least 
Terns on the river, as well as an immature Bald Eagle there.   Most exciting 
for me was a Least Bittern at I believe Section 5 (or 4?) which sat just about 
a foot above the water in a broken cattail stab. 

Joanie



On Saturday, July 26, 2014 7:52 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:
 


 
Saturday August 9, 2014 . Western Arkansas River Valley, including Frog Bayou 
WMA and sod farms. More information about Frog and area at 
http://media.tripod.lycos.com/2020453/1274831.pdf 


Members and friends of Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society are invited to join a 
field trip to Frog Bayou WMA along the Arkansas River south of Dyer on 
Saturday, August 9. We are meeting at the Frog boat launch parking area by 
about 9:00 AM. We will visit parts of Frog, check out Black Land Road and the 
“Dyer bay” portion of the Arkansas River, and look for Black-bellied 
Whistling-Ducks at the Alma Wastewater Treatment ponds. We may take short walks 
to view a few of Frog’s moist soil units close to parking areas. Otherwise, 
most birding will be stop and look around fairly near cars rather than a lot of 
hiking. This trip should work well for everyone, including those with mobility 
limitations. There are no bathrooms or other facilities. The nearest bathrooms, 
food, etc. are just off I-40 at exit 20 (to Dyer and Mulberry) and just off 
I-40 at Alma (McDonald’s etc). Be prepared for sun and heat. Ticks and 
chiggers shouldn’t be a problem.  


DIRECTIONS: To get to the 9 AM meeting place, driving I-40 from either east 
(Little Rock) or west (Fort Smith, Fayetteville), get off I-40 at exit 20 (Dyer 
and Mulberry). Turn south onto Georgia Ridge Drive, go the short distance (0.17 
miles) past the Phillips station and café to highway 64 intersection. Turn 
right (west) onto 64 and travel about 1.35 miles: note the brown sign on the 
right marked FROG BAYOU WMA. Turn left (south) onto River Road. Pavement ends 
at 1.2 miles (intersection of River Road and Black Land Road) but continue on 
the graded road to mile 2.55. This is the end of the road. “Dyer bay” of 
the Arkansas River dead ahead! There is a gravel parking lot on the right and 
on the left, a boat launch just around the corner. We’ll meet on the gravel 
lot. 


It may be that we can also do some car pooling if there is interest and space 
in anyone’s car. If there has been a lot of rain, or rain is predicted for 
field trip day, we will modify the trip to avoid problem roads. You can call me 
on Friday evening if there are any questions 479 521-1858 . You can also reach 
me on this cell phone on field trip day: 479 935 5170. 
Subject: Tricolored Heron in Pine Bluff
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:26:53 -0500
John Redman and I observed an immature Tricolored Heron just beyond the mud
flat on Wilbur West Road (South Ohio Street) this morning.  It was a long
distance out but we were able to walk across the dry mud flat to get decent
shots.  The coming rains will prevent that.  The heron was among a Great
Blue Heron, a Great Egret, a Snowy Egret and a Little Blue Heron.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: The scion of Pinnacle Prairie
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:24:06 +0000
A BLUE GROSBEAK IS SINGING ON THE FIELD EDGE AND AUBREY SHEPHERD, scion of 
Pinnacle Prairie and adjacent World Peace Wetland Prairie, is out in the middle 
smoking a cig and photographing fetching yellow Seedbox (Ludwigia) flowers. I’m 
on my bicycle, on Pinnacle Prairie Trail, with binoculars exploring south 
Fayetteville, below campus. 


Aubrey seems oblivious to ticks and chiggers, and blackberries, too, for he’s 
wearing jean shorts and his legs have old scars and fresh blood streaks. That’s 
our Aubrey, conservationist, good government advocate, outdoors writer for the 
digital age. 


I started out at 8 this morning near intersection of highway 71 B (South 
School) and MLK Blvd for some more bicycle birding. In less than two leisurely 
hours – I mean geezer leisurely -- I’ve gone through several tunnels and 
crossed 3 or 4 fine bridges over Town Branch Creek and various tribs, each with 
a protected buffer of riparian vegetation, always an invitation to stop and 
look, plus meeting Aubrey, pure lagniappe on a bike trip. 


While Aubrey wades out in grass and brambles, I’m spotting with my bins: 
slender mountain mint, blazing stars, ashy sunflowers, blue vervain (Verbena), 
rattlesnake master, and back-and-forth flights of American Goldfinches midst 
their nesting season. 


After a visit, I’m off to nearby Walker Park Trail. While crossing the creek I 
hear familiar sharp waterthrush call notes. No problem. My dizzy pace of 
pedaling drops from 3 to 0 MPH; I lean on the rail and wait. Soon enough, here 
comes a fine Louisiana walking shady shale bedrock, with another upstream and 
unseen singing in partial song. A talkative flock of Fish Crows (4+) perches in 
a snag. Barn Swallows (7) patrol soccer fields. A White-eyed Vireo sings in 
shady bushes. 


The shale below the bridge reminds me you sometimes find pseudo fossils in the 
Fayetteville Shale Formation. Sure enough while watching the waterthrush I spot 
a nice example of turtle rocks, a sedimentary formation resembling a big turtle 
shell and maybe 300 million years old. Of more recent vintage, Red-eyed Vireo, 
Summer Tanager, and a Green Heron, fine squawk as it flies over. 


There’s art, too. Walker Park Trail passes a fabulous historical mural that 
includes my old friend, Eleanor Lincoln Johnson whose civic motto was, “One 
person’s problem is everyone’s problem.” 


The network here includes Tsa La Gi Trail, Cherokee in their own language. It 
roughly parallels the Trail of Tears route taken by Cherokees and other Native 
Americans forced from their homes in the 1830s. when Fayetteville was 500. It 
passes over a creek and under a railroad trestle, past a nice block of mature 
hardwoods, and on through what was once an industrial zone of trucking, 
milling, and storage, now fronted by strip malls and redeveloped as apartment 
complexes. 


Tsa La Gi Trail is the mix of history, nature, and memory. Going forward, this 
is a Woo Pig Sooey Zone. You never know for sure what’s ahead. Last bird: 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. 
Subject: eBird -- Beaver Lake--Oak Ridge Park -- Jul 30, 2014
From: Art Weigand <aweigand13 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 12:02:50 -0500
It was an excellent morning for birding between showers. I got great looks at a 
number of warblers. 


aweigand
Jul 30, 2014
Beaver Lake--Oak Ridge Park
Traveling
12 miles
282 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Very cool 69 degree morning with intermittent rain. Birds were very 
active between rains. 

10 Canada Goose
16 Wild Turkey
1 Great Blue Heron
1 Red-shouldered Hawk
1 Broad-winged Hawk
5 Mourning Dove
1 Greater Roadrunner
4 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
3 Red-headed Woodpecker
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
5 Downy Woodpecker
3 Pileated Woodpecker
2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
4 Eastern Phoebe
2 Eastern Kingbird
4 White-eyed Vireo
7 Red-eyed Vireo
3 Blue Jay
9 American Crow
1 Fish Crow
3 Barn Swallow
6 Carolina Chickadee
9 Tufted Titmouse
3 White-breasted Nuthatch
7 Carolina Wren
7 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5 Eastern Bluebird
1 Blue-winged Warbler
6 Northern Parula
1 Yellow-throated Warbler
3 Black-and-white Warbler
2 Ovenbird
1 Louisiana Waterthrush
2 Kentucky Warbler
1 Hooded Warbler
3 Chipping Sparrow
2 Summer Tanager
8 Northern Cardinal
2 Blue Grosbeak
13 Indigo Bunting
2 House Finch
6 American Goldfinch




Art Weigand
Wichita KS/Beaver Lake AR
Subject: Nao Ueda
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 03:08:26 +0000
Today the birding community lost our dear friend Nao Ueda. Some of you will 
know her from ASCA field trips and AAS meetings. She worked alongside me at 
Audubon Arkansas for a time. She was an outspoken environmental advocate and a 
green guru who showed us all how to live a sustainable lifestyle. Nao was well 
known in the Little Rock community for her work with the Arkansas 
Sustainability Network, for her urban homestead in downtown Little Rock, and 
for her blog, Green AR by the Day. She was in the midst of getting a degree in 
environmental law at the Bowen School of Law. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Rubythroat migration
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:32:52 -0500




Subject: Rubythroat migration
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 11:20:18 -0500
All,

Over the past few days, I hung out the majority of my feeders in 3 concentrated 
clusters around the yard. At the present time I am recording between 5-8 RTHU 
per day. Over the next 14 day period I expect that number to rise into the 
teens on a daily basis with the count approaching 20 birds per day by the 
middle of August. 


Otherwise nothing remarkable in the yard other than the smaller birds drinking 
from the ant moats even though there is fresh water available elsewhere in the 
yard. Also, the downy woodpeckers seem to enjoy enjoy the nectar nearly as much 
as the hummingbirds. 

Cindy
waiting patiently for the hummingbird onslaught here in the Heights
Little Rock


 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: California Gull--BIG YES!
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 09:29:35 -0500
I'm traveling to Atkins this afternoon and was wondering if anyone else was 
going to be California gull watching  AT  Dardenale that might give a heads up on 
any sighting today? 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2014, at 1:23 PM, Mitchell Pruitt 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> The California Gull was present from 11:45-12:50 (when we left) this morning. 
It was seen directly north of Delaware Point, perched on a piling next to a 
dock with a red roof. It then flew south, past us and sat on the water near the 
osprey nest and some logs (where I think Michael Linz's photos were taken). As 
it flew past banking over the water, Ryan Risher and I, were able to get great 
looks at the thick, dark sub-terminal band on the tail and other plumage 
characteristics. I think we both also got identifiable photos. I'll post those 
later. 

> 
> A state bird and a lifer!
> 
> There were also numerous Forster's and Black Terns, as well as 4 RB Gulls and 
a Herring Gull...huh? Gulls must be moving in early this season. 

> 
> ~Mitchell
> 
> Sent from my iPhone.
Subject: Sage Grouse video
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:27:19 +0000
Jerry Davis sent me this link to a video report on the Sage Grouse issues out 
West, particularly in Wyoming.I find these things interesting, not only because 
of Sage Grouse, but because of the numerous elements of controversy: local v 
national, energy development v conservation, wind energy v grouse conservation, 
etc. and how this all must interact with the specific biology of a specific 
species. It reminds me a great deal of the complex interactions that involved 
my years working on Red-cockaded Woodpecker issues. I am reminded in all of 
this that good willed-people occupy a variety of positions and best outcomes 
result from everyone listening before deciding: 



http://features.aol.com/video/soon-be-endangered-bird-has-big-consequences?icid=maing-grid7%7Chtmlws-main-bb%7Cdl30%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D506500 

Subject: Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter!
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:29:52 -0500
George,

You did read that right, so long as drawings fall with the scope of
the Arkansas
Audubon Society !  Feel free to send
your artwork, whether rough field sketches or masterpieces, to
samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com.  Just email me if you have further questions
about this opportunity.

Thanks,

Samantha Scheiman
*Arkansas Birds* editor
Little Rock, Ark.


On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 12:57 AM, George R. Hoelzeman 
wrote:

>  so, if I'm reading this right I could send in some drawings?
>
> I could actually do that.
>
> George (n. Conway Co.  Drawing, that I CAN do! ;))
>
>
> On 7/26/2014 10:15 AM, Norman Lavers wrote:
>
>  Would you like me to do something on insect natural history, something
> with brief text illustrated by photographs? For an example (to show you to
> see if you think it would be suitable), I am thinking right now of doing
> something on insects mimicking more dangerous insects, so that predators
> will leave them alone. I'm thinking expressly of all the insects that mimic
> bumblebees, and the ingenious methods they use, and the complexity of
> motives.
>
>  If that would work for you, I expect I could manage something on insect
> natural history on a regular basis.
>
>  Norm Lavers
>
>  PS If I send you something I would do it in my low-tech way, an email
> with pictures attached, and a note of where the pictures go. But Cheryl
> says that, with her help, I could probably make it into a "document."
> Would that make it easier for you?
>
>
>    On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:28 PM, Samantha Scheiman
>   wrote:
>
>
>   Arkansas birders,
>
>  As Dottie Boyles expressed, the next *Arkansas Birds* newsletter of the
> Arkansas Audubon Society will be published and in your mailbox before you
> know it!  While you are compiling birding news for Dottie (email your
> updates to dboyles AT arkansasedc.com by August 1), consider also sharing an
> additional piece for the newsletter that highlights birds, conservation
> issues, Arkansas wildlife/plants/natural communities, or something
> similar.
>
> Virtually any format will do ... photos paired with captions, accounts
> from your most recent birding trips near and far, artwork, haikus,
> editorials, news stories, birding gear reviews, app reviews, local
> coverage of conservation issues, intriguing backyard bird sightings, etc.
> To get a small taste of what I'm looking for as newsletter editor, check
> out the most recent *Arkansas Birds*:
> http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf
> 
 

>
>
> For work to appear in the September issue, I need your inspired pieces by
> August 15 (emailed to samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com), but know that I will
> happily accept pieces anytime.
>
>  Lastly, if you don't receive *Arkansas Birds* in your mailbox, become a
> member of the Arkansas Audubon Society here
> 
 

> to receive this quarterly publication and support our diverse work, which 
includes 

> the Halberg Ecology Camp for 11- and 12-year-olds, Adult Natural History
> Workshops, educational conventions, Arkansas's bird records committee, and
> so much more.  Please join us as we strive to be a potent force in the
> conservation of Arkansas's natural resources.
>
>  Many thanks,
>
> Samantha Scheiman
>  Little Rock, Ark.
>  *Arkansas Birds* editor
>
>   --
> “To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
> waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
>
>
>
>
> --
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County
>
>


-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: Request for Bird Walk Leaders
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:23:12 +0000
I would greatly appreciate volunteers to lead two Little Rock bird walks that I 
am unable to lead due to prior commitments. 


The annual Hillcrest Harvest is Saturday October 4 http://harvestfest.us . A 
bird walk in Allsopp Park is scheduled to meet at 7:15. There are lots of fun 
things to do after the bird walk, including a hearty pancake breakfast, the 
farmers' market, and lots of vendors and musicians. I'm sad to miss it but I'll 
be in WI. 


The Grapevine (TX) Garden Club will be touring central Arkansas at the end of 
April/beginning of May, 2015. They love birds as well as native plants, and 
have asked for a walk for 15-20 people at the Little Rock Audubon Center on 
Saturday May 2 at 8 AM. I'll be at the AAS meeting that weekend. The 
LRAC/Gillam Park is great for spring migrants. If you know native plants too, 
that's a plus. 


Please contact me off-list to be connected with event coordinators. Thanks. 

Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Starting from the prairie mounds at Agri Park
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 23:57:39 +0000
Bike trails north of the main UA-Fayetteville campus pass through and alongside 
former Tallgrass Prairie lands of the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station. 
This morning I parked at Agri Park on Garland Avenue (Highway 112), a small 
shady triangle with a notable canopy of mature oaks growing from impressive 
natural features called prairie mounds. Bird-wise, a logical place to explore a 
century and a half since the first rough frame structures were built on the 
hill dominated now by Old Main and a strange creature called a Razorback. 


From the prairie mounds at Agri Park, I rode roughly west for 1.5 miles, 
through a nifty bike tunnel under 112, then through the farm. It’s open country 
in the middle of Arkansas’s fastest growth area courtesy of research projects 
involving cows and pastures, chicken houses, experiments with native grasses, a 
watershed research project, horses, and maybe goats? Midst all that, there are 
Northern Bobwhites and Mourning Doves and an American Kestrel on a powerline. 


It’s former prairie and not strip malls because of more than a century ag 
research. Riding along, I wonder if somewhere in the genes of the Dickcissels, 
Bobwhites, and Eastern Kingbirds are there memories of Passenger Pigeons? Of 
Greater Prairie-Chickens? But there are lots of others riding the trail and I 
need to stick to business or get run over. 


Then I returned to the park and rode east, on the Meadow Valley Trail along the 
southern edge of the farm, then north on Scull Creek Trail along the farm’s 
east side. Maybe another 1.5 miles and back. There are crop fields here with 
Eastern Meadowlarks. I walk them in winter on the Fayetteville CBC looking for 
Western Meadowlarks, Horned Larks, and Lapland Longspurs. Today there are 
Red-winged Blackbirds, Fish Crows, an Eastern Phoebe feeding a Brown-headed 
Cowbird, and overhead, a Green Heron. 


I may have ridden 6 miles, leisurely (a sign that said “SLOW” is no problem for 
me), and I did all that in about 2 hours. Here’s a list. Keep in mind it’s late 
July in a heat wave and drought: 



Canada Goose - 31

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Great Blue Heron - 1

Green Heron - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

American Kestrel - 4

Killdeer

Rock Pigeon ~50

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Mourning Dove - 12

Chimney Swift - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 6

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 7

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 6

Fish Crow - 10

Barn Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Wren - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 2

American Robin – 50+

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 6

Brown Thrasher - 2

European Starling - hundreds

Northern Cardinal - 4

Indigo Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird

Eastern Meadowlark - 7

Common Grackle - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

House Finch - 7

American Goldfinch

House Sparrow
Subject: California Gull - YES
From: Danny Townsend <perfectplaces AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 15:14:13 -0500
We pulled up at Dardanelle Lock & Dam at 9:37a.m., the gull flew over at 
9:44a.m. heading down river. 

Subject: Re: Feeling Inspired? Write/Photograph/Draw for the Arkansas Birds Newsletter!
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 00:57:31 -0500
so, if I'm reading this right I could send in some drawings?

I could actually do that.

George (n. Conway Co.  Drawing, that I CAN do! ;))

On 7/26/2014 10:15 AM, Norman Lavers wrote:
> Would you like me to do something on insect natural history, something 
> with brief text illustrated by photographs? For an example (to show 
> you to see if you think it would be suitable), I am thinking right now 
> of doing something on insects mimicking more dangerous insects, so 
> that predators will leave them alone. I'm thinking expressly of all 
> the insects that mimic bumblebees, and the ingenious methods they use, 
> and the complexity of motives.
>
> If that would work for you, I expect I could manage something on 
> insect natural history on a regular basis.
>
> Norm Lavers
>
> PS If I send you something I would do it in my low-tech way, an email 
> with pictures attached, and a note of where the pictures go. But 
> Cheryl says that, with her help, I could probably make it into a 
> "document."  Would that make it easier for you?
>
>
> On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:28 PM, Samantha Scheiman 
>  wrote:
>
>
> Arkansas birders,
>
> As Dottie Boyles expressed, the next /Arkansas Birds/ newsletter of 
> the Arkansas Audubon Society will be published and in your mailbox 
> before you know it!  While you are compiling birding news for Dottie 
> (email your updates to dboyles AT arkansasedc.com 
> by August 1), consider also sharing an 
> additional piece for the newsletter that highlights birds, 
> conservation issues, Arkansas wildlife/plants/natural communities, or 
> something similar.
>
> Virtually any format will do ... photos paired with captions, accounts 
> from your most recent birding trips near and far, artwork, haikus, 
> editorials, news stories, birding gear reviews, app reviews, local 
> coverage of conservation issues, intriguing backyard bird sightings, 
> etc.  To get a small taste of what I'm looking for as newsletter 
> editor, check out the most recent /Arkansas Birds/: 
> http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf 
> 
 

>
>
> For work to appear in the September issue, I need your inspired pieces 
> by August 15 (emailed to samantha.scheiman AT gmail.com 
> ), but know that I will happily 
> accept pieces//anytime.
>
> Lastly, if you don't receive /Arkansas Birds/ in your mailbox, become 
> a member of the Arkansas Audubon Society here 
> 
 

> to receive this quarterly publication and support our diverse work, 
> which includes the Halberg Ecology Camp for 11- and 12-year-olds, 
> Adult Natural History Workshops, educational conventions, Arkansas's 
> bird records committee, and so much more.  Please join us as we strive 
> to be a potent force in the conservation of Arkansas's natural resources.
>
> Many thanks,
>
> Samantha Scheiman
> Little Rock, Ark.
> /Arkansas Birds/ editor
>
> -- 
> “To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless 
> waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
>
>
>

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Last call for migration count data
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 03:24:47 +0000
Greetings all,
I've wading through the data entry for the migration count article. I've 
received > 85 checklists from compilers and eBird, but there is still room for 
YOURS, if you haven't already sent it in. 


Because the numbers get normalized by party hours any count is worth sending. A 
count with 10 parties and 150 sp can be compared to a count by 1 party of 30 
sp. So please don't think yours isn't good enough! 


I'm planning for up to 4 count days per county.

Guidelines for data submission:
1 - Did you have > 30 species?
2 - Did you keep track of the hours?
3 - Was it in a county other than these? (Already have 4 lists from these 
counties): Arkansas, Benton, Craighead, Crittenden, Desha, Faulkner, Franklin, 
Garland, Greene, Jefferson, Logan, Marion, Pope, Pulaski, Saline, Scott, Sharp, 
Washington and White. 


If you have one, please email it to me by 8/1: leanderson "at" fs.fed.us or 
mail it to PO Box 195 Hector, AR. 72843 


Thanks to all of you that got out and enjoyed spring migration! Cheers, Leif  AT  
Hector 







This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please forward to your birder friends)
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 22:07:21 -0500
I am no fan of commercialized sports since it distracts us from other,
important things. (Sorry Kim and Doug!) But, maybe that is the idea...

My understanding of "bird-proof" glass is that it only works when the
outside light is stronger than the inside lighting:  during the daytime when
only local birds are involved in bird collisions.  There are other
ideas--like angling the glass to reduce reflectivity to birds (like at some
parts of Crystal Bridges Museum) instead of replacing all the panes with
more expensive glass.

Since most of the usage of the new Vikings complex will be during the
Fall-and-Winter, then won't migrating warblers, etc. be spared since the
largest expanse of windowed area be facing west i.e., not of interest to
north-south migrants?  I would like to hear more about the mitigating
measures planned to reduce nighttime bird collisions.  And, if there is data
from the surrounding area about building-bird collisions, it would add some
information that we could use in the fight (which may be
OBE--"overcome-by-events" at this time.

Re: Cargill-jump on them with all four feet and buy local (though the local
producers may get their little hogs from Mt. Judea).

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry Haas
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 2:43 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Your voice is needed to keep our feathered friends safe (please
forward to your birder friends)

Dear ARBIRDers,

On Wednesday Jack Stewart, Arkansas's representative on the National Audubon
Society Board of Directors, posted several links- one urging Cargill remove
the factory hog farm near the Buffalo River and the other regarding a new
football stadium to be built in Minnesota that may end up being a major
killer of migrating birds.  The connection other than negative environmental
consequences?  Cargill, for whom the hogs are produced near the Buffalo
River (they get the hogs, we get the waste), is headquartered in Minnesota.

I've already sent my comments re the new Minnesota football stadium, and
intend to do so re the factory hog farm.

Here's a commentary in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune I just came across
urging that the new stadium incorporate bird-safe glass:

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/268670942.html

And here's an artist's rendering so you can see the extent of the glass
exterior:

http://www.vikings.com/stadium/new-stadium/by-the-numbers.html

Of the estimated $975 million stadium construction cost (that's not a typo!)
$348 million is from "the state" (read taxpayers) and another $150 million
from "the city" (also the taxpayers, Minneapolis-St. Paul).  The bird-safe
glass would add $1.1 million to the cost, or 1/10 of 1% to the cost.
Wouldn't you say taxpayers have a right and responsibility given their 51%
share of the cost to demand as bird safe a stadium as possible?

What if you don't so much as lift a finger, and the migrating birds you
expect to see each fall die flying into the new stadium's glass walls?  No
or fewer birds for you- and me!  It will be too late once the stadium is
built.  How many bird's lives will be spared over the life of that stadium
for the $1.1 million investment?

Take a few seconds and voice your concerns.  Here's the link Jack provided
so you can do so:

http://tinyurl.com/nprxmfq

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas=