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Updated on Friday, September 30 at 03:14 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Sawwhet Owl

30 Sep NAWA [Sally Jo Gibson ]
30 Sep BIRDING THE EDGES, CALLIES PRAIRIE AFTER THE BIG MOW [Joseph Neal ]
30 Sep Re: Brown Booby Pictures [Kelly Chitwood ]
29 Sep Brown Booby Pictures [Michael Linz ]
29 Sep Re: Big Owl [Jacque Brown ]
29 Sep Re: Brown Booby - yes [Jacque Brown ]
29 Sep First Ruby-crowned Kinglet of fall [Randy ]
29 Sep Brown Booby - yes [Michael ]
29 Sep New yard bird [Sally Jo Gibson ]
29 Sep Re: Owl ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
28 Sep Owl [Herschel Raney ]
28 Sep Re: Big Owl ["bill ." ]
28 Sep Re: Big Owl [Jacque Brown ]
28 Sep Re: Big Owl ["bill ." ]
27 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 27 [David Arbour ]
27 Sep Brown Booby [Rosemary Seidler ]
27 Sep Big Owl ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
27 Sep unsubscribing ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
27 Sep FIELD TRIP TO NINESTONE LAND TRUST SUNDAY OCTOBER 9, 2016 [Joseph Neal ]
27 Sep Little River Cave Swallows [Charles Lyon ]
26 Sep Pied-billed Grebe madness [Karen Garrett ]
26 Sep Dutch police use eagles to hunt illegal drones [Barry Haas ]
26 Sep Allsopp Park [Dan Scheiman ]
26 Sep Lake Millwood Laughing Gull [Charles Lyon ]
24 Sep Brown Booby, Sabine's Gull [Charles Lyon ]
24 Sep Brown Booby Search [Daniel Scheiman ]
24 Sep Brown Booby Update [Daniel Scheiman ]
25 Sep Brown Booby Lake Greeson [Charles Lyon ]
24 Sep Brown Booby Update [Daniel Scheiman ]
24 Sep Re: Red-eye Vireo scold call [Ed Laster ]
23 Sep Fwd: Red-eye Vireo scold call [Allan Mueller ]
24 Sep Brown Booby, Lake Greeson Update [Dan Scheiman ]
23 Sep Brown Booby, Lake Greeson [Dan Scheiman ]
23 Sep hummer migration [Alan ]
23 Sep please remove me from the list [Holly Greenfield ]
23 Sep FW: new book - Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer [Jeffrey Short ]
22 Sep Re: Songbirds in Snow [Jeffrey Short ]
22 Sep Songbirds in Snow [Mary Ann King ]
20 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 20 [David Arbour ]
20 Sep Re: Louisiana Waterthrush defends nest against snake [Chuck Bartels ]
20 Sep Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Debra Grim ]
20 Sep Louisiana Waterthrush defends nest against snake [Lee Bryant ]
20 Sep Jaeger at Millwood [Charles Mills ]
20 Sep Cave Swallow [Charles Mills ]
19 Sep Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Janine Perlman ]
19 Sep Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Jerry Davis ]
19 Sep Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Jacque Brown ]
19 Sep BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES THIS WEEKEND [Joseph Neal ]
19 Sep ASCA Field Trip Saturday [Karen Holliday ]
19 Sep a new message from Meeker [Joseph Neal ]
19 Sep Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [James Morgan ]
19 Sep BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS IN WESTERN VALLEY THIS FALL [Joseph Neal ]
18 Sep Warblers and Thrushes at Hobbs [Karen Garrett ]
17 Sep Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Holly Childs ]
17 Sep Lesser Black-backed Gull and others [Karen ]
17 Sep Re: Jaeger Yes [jamesdixonlr ]
17 Sep Lesser Black-backed Gull [Lenore ]
17 Sep Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Drew Phillips ]
17 Sep Jaeger Yes [jamesdixonlr ]
17 Sep Re: Unlist me ["mnl.mcm" ]
16 Sep West Pulaski birds [Randy ]
16 Sep Red-shouldered Hawk vs. Pileated Woodpecker [Gail Miller ]
15 Sep No Subject [Patty McLean ]
15 Sep Re: White-winged Dove [kjdillard ]
15 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 14 [David Arbour ]
15 Sep Mt. Magazine [V Prislipsky ]
14 Sep Warblers Faulkner County [Michael Linz ]
14 Sep Re: Jaeger [Michael ]
14 Sep Jaeger [Sasha Bowles ]
14 Sep Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Jerry Davis ]
14 Sep Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Judy & Don ]
14 Sep These sage grouse hens hatched 862 chicks. Within two months, 700 were dead. [Barry Haas ]
14 Sep Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
14 Sep Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline [Jerry Davis ]
14 Sep TAIGA MERLIN AT WEST-ARK SOD [Joseph Neal ]
13 Sep Parasitic Jaeger Lake Millwood [Charles Lyon ]

Subject: NAWA
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Sep 2016 15:10:15 -0500
Nashville Warbler.  Took a sorry photo today, but good enough for ID.  Also
took several photos of a young doe that was investigating my back yard.

Benefits of solarium sitting, not rocking, but using a lift chair.  Ah, the
joys of old age - seriously!

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR 72601
Subject: BIRDING THE EDGES, CALLIES PRAIRIE AFTER THE BIG MOW
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 30 Sep 2016 19:27:35 +0000
On the subject of grassland birds, I know there is not much said that is 
positive. We have lost hundreds of millions of acres of native grasslands. But 
there are rays of light. We need them. 


Back before the Civil War, Butterfield stages drove through what is today 
Callies Prairie on the north side of Lake Fayetteville Park. Subsequently, and 
botanically-speaking, the prairie disappeared under a wave of settlement. But 
in defense of our natural history, private citizens under leadership of 
Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association took up chainsaws and cleared off 
encroaching forest. City of Fayetteville has been working at it since, burning 
and mowing. 


On the subject of rays of light: Butterfield stages long gone -- Big Bluestem 
and Indian Grass back. 


I have spent the last couple of these early fall, blue-sky days walking edges 
of these mowed restored prairie fields. Ive seen Least Flycatchers (3) working 
the edges. Eastern Bluebirds (4) fly over, giving that distinctive, bell-like 
flight call. Flights of American Robins (100+) make me think summer rains have 
made this a good year for wild fruit. Northern (yellow-shafted) Flickers shoot 
over, one by one. 


Gray Catbirds mew in the plum thickets. Eastern Towhees (5) call from deep in 
the thickets. Despite a lot of pishing and screech-owl whistling, they arent 
coming out. 


As the day warms, Im seeing more Monarchs low in the cut grass and in lush 
stands of goldenrod along the edges. Its great to be out in the open on a blue 
sky day, with Monarchs drifting south. Drifting Monarchs is a great boost to 
the spirit, no small affair. Were going somewhere. Im on my own version of 
the Butterfield. 


Walking the edge, I have forest on one side, restored, mowed prairie on the 
other. The edge is apparently attractive to Eastern Phoebes, House Wrens, 
Common Yellowthroats, American Redstarts, Nashville Warblers, Northern Parulas, 
and just arrived, one of my favorites, indomitable Ruby-crowned Kinglets. Downy 
Woodpeckers are courting. A couple of Red-eyed Vireos flash by, then a 
Philadelphia Vireo. 


I walk back on the Lake Fayetteville Nature Trail. It is mainly used by the 
mountain bikers, but this morning there is a tall, slender guy jogging. Its my 
old friend Milton Burke, who reminds me in passing that we first met in 1975. 
We worked at the old D-Lux Caf on Dickson Street. Back then I was an 
underground journalist and he was a Buddhist. 


None of this is ever far from Blue Jays, often with their squeaky pump handles, 
then changing over to hawks. I mean, they spend the time on a beautiful fall 
morning practicing up on their best Red-shouldered Hawk: KEE YAH, KEE YAH. 

Subject: Re: Brown Booby Pictures
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Sep 2016 08:55:58 -0500
Very nice! I particularly enjoyed the young Bald Eagle attempting to seize an 
opportunity. 

Was it the booby or the booby’s prize, I wonder?

Kelly 

> On Sep 29, 2016, at 10:38 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:
> 
> Below is a link to several pictures of the brown booby.
> 
> https://goo.gl/g56nmG 
> 
> Michael Linz
Subject: Brown Booby Pictures
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 22:38:18 -0500
Below is a link to several pictures of the brown booby.

https://goo.gl/g56nmG

Michael Linz
Subject: Re: Big Owl
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 16:52:01 -0500
I would absolutely take off work if one was in AR, MO, OK, KS, if there was a 
solid chance at seeing that Owl. Jacque 



> On Sep 28, 2016, at 5:55 PM, bill .  wrote:
> 
> Me too of course, after the first sentence. But what a jolt, followed by a 
good laugh! 

> peace
> bill
> enid garfield ok 
> 
> ------ Original message------
> From: Jacque Brown
> Date: Wed, Sep 28, 2016 17:17
> To: bill .;
> Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU;
> Subject:Re: Big Owl
> 
> I took that as being at Malhaur NWR Oregon. 
> 
> 
>> On Sep 28, 2016, at 1:37 AM, bill . > wrote: 

>> 
>> Hi all,
>> I started reading this and just about flipped out that there was a Great 
Gray Owl in Arkansas! An awesome find anywhere, just the same. That and the 
Snowy are high up on my birding bucket list! Congrats Clark! 

>> peace
>> bill
>> enid garfield ok
>> 
>> 
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List > on behalf of Reames, Clark -FS 
> 

>> Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 12:12 PM
>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Big Owl
>>  
>> Saw my first Great Gray owl here the other day. This one was sitting on a 
fence post overlooking a field in the middle of the day.. He didnt seem to 
mind that I would drive slowly past and turn around and drive slowly past 
again. I did that about 4 times. I was afraid to stop that he would flush if I 
did and I was getting very good looks even without bins. He would turn and look 
at me as I drove past but then turn back and appeared to be studying the field 
right in front of him very intently. I am assuming that he could probably hear 
voles moving around in the grass as every field out here is full of them. 

>>  
>> 
>> Clark Reames 
>> Wildlife Program Manager
>> Forest Service
>> Malheur National Forest
>> p: 541-575-3474 x3474 
>> c: 541-620-0681 
>> f: 541-575-3002 
>> creames AT fs.fed.us 
>> 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909 
>> John Day, OR 97845
>> www.fs.fed.us  
>>   
 
 

>> Caring for the land and serving people
>>  
>>  
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely 
for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or 
the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

> 
Subject: Re: Brown Booby - yes
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 16:45:30 -0500
There are advantages in knowing how to dive, dive, dive.  LOL  Jacque


> On Sep 29, 2016, at 11:52 AM, Michael  wrote:
> 
> Noon on Thursday 09/29/2016...
> The brown booby continues at Kirby Landing...but just barely. We watched it 
avoid a young eagle by diving under water. The eagle came within inches of the 
booby. 

> 
> Michael(back in Arkansas)
Subject: First Ruby-crowned Kinglet of fall
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 11:56:17 -0500
Went to Bell Slough this morning.
Ruby-crowned Kinglets 
Nashville Warblers
Redstarts
Common Yellowthroats
Northern Parulas
Black & White
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  and others
Yellow-throated Vireo
House Wrens
Sedge Wrens
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Next few days ought to be great

Randy


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Brown Booby - yes
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 11:52:47 -0500
Noon on Thursday 09/29/2016...
The brown booby continues at Kirby Landing...but just barely. We watched it 
avoid a young eagle by diving under water. The eagle came within inches of the 
booby. 


Michael(back in Arkansas)
Subject: New yard bird
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 10:44:56 -0500
VERY surprised to see a Black-headed Grosbeak on my hanging bird feeder this
morning.  Got good photos that I'll put on the Arkansas Birders site
(Facebook) later today.

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, Boone Co., AR

 
Subject: Re: Owl
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 15:15:15 +0000
FYI: The Wallowa Whitman National forest that we share a common boundary with 
has installed nesting platforms that are used annually by Great Gray's. I 
believe they will even take birders out to observe those or provide grid 
coordinates and it doesn’t seem to disturb the birds. If any of you think you 
might be in the area during the breeding season (Mar -June), I could hook you 
up with some locations. Probably later in the breeding season would be more 
accessible due to the snow pack. 


Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager
Forest Service
Malheur National Forest
p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us
431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

Caring for the land and serving people





-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Herschel Raney 

Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2016 5:01 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Owl

Guys, Great Gray Owls have to qualify for one of the least wandersome birds on 
the planet. There are essentially no records away from their standard breeding 
habitat. And they are not that common in their habitat. I have been to the 
mountainous regions many times and have not seen one yet. I look forward to it. 


Herschel Raney

Conway AR




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Owl
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 19:01:05 -0500
Guys, Great Gray Owls have to qualify for one of the least wandersome 
birds on the planet. There are essentially no records away from their 
standard breeding habitat. And they are not that common in their 
habitat. I have been to the mountainous regions many times and have not 
seen one yet. I look forward to it.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Re: Big Owl
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 22:55:48 +0000
Me too of course, after the first sentence. But what a jolt, followed by a good 
laugh! 

peace
bill
enid garfield ok

------ Original message------
From: Jacque Brown
Date: Wed, Sep 28, 2016 17:17
To: bill .;
Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU;
Subject:Re: Big Owl

I took that as being at Malhaur NWR Oregon.


On Sep 28, 2016, at 1:37 AM, bill . > 
wrote: 


Hi all,
I started reading this and just about flipped out that there was a Great Gray 
Owl in Arkansas! An awesome find anywhere, just the same. That and the Snowy 
are high up on my birding bucket list! Congrats Clark! 

peace
bill
enid garfield ok


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> on behalf of 
Reames, Clark -FS > 

Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 12:12 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Big Owl

Saw my first Great Gray owl here the other day. This one was sitting on a fence 
post overlooking a field in the middle of the day.. He didnt seem to mind that 
I would drive slowly past and turn around and drive slowly past again. I did 
that about 4 times. I was afraid to stop that he would flush if I did and I was 
getting very good looks even without bins. He would turn and look at me as I 
drove past but then turn back and appeared to be studying the field right in 
front of him very intently. I am assuming that he could probably hear voles 
moving around in the grass as every field out here is full of them. 






Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

 


Caring for the land and serving people












This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

Subject: Re: Big Owl
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 17:16:54 -0500
I took that as being at Malhaur NWR Oregon. 


> On Sep 28, 2016, at 1:37 AM, bill .  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
> I started reading this and just about flipped out that there was a Great Gray 
Owl in Arkansas! An awesome find anywhere, just the same. That and the Snowy 
are high up on my birding bucket list! Congrats Clark! 

> peace
> bill
> enid garfield ok
> 
> 
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List > on behalf of Reames, Clark -FS 
> 

> Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 12:12 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Big Owl
>  
> Saw my first Great Gray owl here the other day. This one was sitting on a 
fence post overlooking a field in the middle of the day.. He didnt seem to 
mind that I would drive slowly past and turn around and drive slowly past 
again. I did that about 4 times. I was afraid to stop that he would flush if I 
did and I was getting very good looks even without bins. He would turn and look 
at me as I drove past but then turn back and appeared to be studying the field 
right in front of him very intently. I am assuming that he could probably hear 
voles moving around in the grass as every field out here is full of them. 

>  
> 
> Clark Reames 
> Wildlife Program Manager
> Forest Service
> Malheur National Forest
> p: 541-575-3474 x3474 
> c: 541-620-0681 
> f: 541-575-3002 
> creames AT fs.fed.us 
> 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909 
> John Day, OR 97845
> www.fs.fed.us  
>   
 
 

> Caring for the land and serving people
>  
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

Subject: Re: Big Owl
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 06:37:46 +0000
Hi all,

I started reading this and just about flipped out that there was a Great Gray 
Owl in Arkansas! An awesome find anywhere, just the same. That and the Snowy 
are high up on my birding bucket list! Congrats Clark! 


peace

bill

enid garfield ok


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Reames, Clark -FS  

Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 12:12 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Big Owl


Saw my first Great Gray owl here the other day. This one was sitting on a fence 
post overlooking a field in the middle of the day.. He didn't seem to mind that 
I would drive slowly past and turn around and drive slowly past again. I did 
that about 4 times. I was afraid to stop that he would flush if I did and I was 
getting very good looks even without bins. He would turn and look at me as I 
drove past but then turn back and appeared to be studying the field right in 
front of him very intently. I am assuming that he could probably hear voles 
moving around in the grass as every field out here is full of them. 




[Forest Service Shield]


Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager


Forest Service

Malheur National Forest


p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us


431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 



Caring for the land and serving people












This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 27
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 23:14:16 -0500
It was partly cloudy and much cooler today.  A cold front came through
yesterday and really changed things.  Migrants everywhere today.  65 species
were found.  We are suddenly covered in coots and Pied-billed Grebes.  Looks
like the Purple Gallinules are all gone early this year.  Saw one yesterday
but could not find any today.  A few warblers around including one
unexpected surprise.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 31

Mallard - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 197

Northern Shoveler - 2

Hooded Merganser - 1 (HY bird)

Pied-billed Grebe - 142

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 4

Snowy Egret - 22

Little-blue Heron - 25

Cattle Egret - 7

Green Heron - 2

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1 adult

White Ibis - 19

White-faced Ibis - 1 (red eye)

"Plegadis" species - 26

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 14

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Swainson's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

American Kestrel - 1

Merlin - 1

Common Gallinule - 26

American Coot - 196

Killdeer - 11

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 22

Long-billed Dowitcher - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Rock Pigeon - 4

Mourning Dove - 3

Chimney Swift - 10

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 12

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 8 (still singing)

Blue-headed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 8

American Crow - 20

Barn Swallow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 9

Marsh Wren - 4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Gray Catbird - 6

Brown Thrasher - 14

Nashville Warbler - 3

Northern Parula - 2

"Brewster's" Warbler (backcross) - 1

American Redstart - 1 

Common Yellowthroat - 5

Wilson's Warbler - 1

Summer Tanager - 2

Northern Cardinal - 6

Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 5

 

 

Odonates:

 

Southern Spreadwing

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Softshell Turtle species

Eastern Box Turtle

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Rough Green Snake

Leopard Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Brown Booby
From: Rosemary Seidler <rseidler AT CENTENARY.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 18:47:50 +0000
Still at Kirby Landing lake Greeson.
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Joseph Neal  

Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 8:46:14 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FIELD TRIP TO NINESTONE LAND TRUST SUNDAY OCTOBER 9, 2016


Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will gather with members, friends, and 
anyone else interested, for a field trip to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll 
County on Sunday, October 9, 2016. Meet at Ninestone at 9 AM. If you arrive 
later, you can bird around until you run into us. There is a lot more 
information about Ninestone on the NWAAS web site at: 





http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/Places%20to%20Bird%20PDFs/BIRDING%20NINESTONE%20with%20images%20Feb%2013,%202013.pdf 




including directions and more description of Ninestone.



Everyone is welcome. You do not need to be a member to participate. Folks new 
to birding will find this a fun place to get started. On this field trip we 
just follow whatever is interesting including the landscape, flowers and trees, 
frogs, insects, snakes, plus birds, of course. Those with mobility impairments 
will find Ninestone a comfortable spot to look at birds, plants, waterfalls 
without need for hiking. 




Ninestone is in southern Carroll County. The awesome natural beauty and habitat 
diversity makes it a fine place to see & hear birds, plants, springs, and 
natural rock formations typical of the Ozarks. It features a variety of 
forested habitats including Piney Creek, Ozark bluffs, grassy fields, and the 
waterfall with its spring run. Glades and warm-season native grasses are being 
restored and we'll experience that, too. It is a great opportunity to see a 
variety of migrant and resident land birds typical of the western Ozarks. 




We also have a fun pot-luck style lunch, so bring some stuff to share. We can 
try a carpool from Fayetteville if anyone is interested. Please call me at 
479-521-1858 if interested. 

Subject: Big Owl
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 17:12:37 +0000
Saw my first Great Gray owl here the other day. This one was sitting on a fence 
post overlooking a field in the middle of the day.. He didn't seem to mind that 
I would drive slowly past and turn around and drive slowly past again. I did 
that about 4 times. I was afraid to stop that he would flush if I did and I was 
getting very good looks even without bins. He would turn and look at me as I 
drove past but then turn back and appeared to be studying the field right in 
front of him very intently. I am assuming that he could probably hear voles 
moving around in the grass as every field out here is full of them. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
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creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
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Caring for the land and serving people










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Subject: unsubscribing
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 16:39:42 +0000

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

Hi, All... if you want to unsubscribe this list:
In the To... line, type: 
listserv AT listserv.uark.edu 

Leave the Subject: line blank
Send the message:  unsubscribe ARBIRD-L
Delete your signature if it was automatically added to the end of the message

That's it - pretty simple
Except you must unsubscribe using the same email account that was used to 
subscribe 

If you get a message that you are not currently subscribed to ARBIRD-L when you 
try to unsubscribe, contact me and I will delete you... 


Don't send the unsubscribe message to 
ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu - that goes out 
to everyone as a message... 


Cheers, Kim

Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu

Subject: FIELD TRIP TO NINESTONE LAND TRUST SUNDAY OCTOBER 9, 2016
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 13:46:14 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will gather with members, friends, and 
anyone else interested, for a field trip to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll 
County on Sunday, October 9, 2016. Meet at Ninestone at 9 AM. If you arrive 
later, you can bird around until you run into us. There is a lot more 
information about Ninestone on the NWAAS web site at: 





http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/Places%20to%20Bird%20PDFs/BIRDING%20NINESTONE%20with%20images%20Feb%2013,%202013.pdf 




including directions and more description of Ninestone.



Everyone is welcome. You do not need to be a member to participate. Folks new 
to birding will find this a fun place to get started. On this field trip we 
just follow whatever is interesting including the landscape, flowers and trees, 
frogs, insects, snakes, plus birds, of course. Those with mobility impairments 
will find Ninestone a comfortable spot to look at birds, plants, waterfalls 
without need for hiking. 




Ninestone is in southern Carroll County. The awesome natural beauty and habitat 
diversity makes it a fine place to see & hear birds, plants, springs, and 
natural rock formations typical of the Ozarks. It features a variety of 
forested habitats including Piney Creek, Ozark bluffs, grassy fields, and the 
waterfall with its spring run. Glades and warm-season native grasses are being 
restored and we'll experience that, too. It is a great opportunity to see a 
variety of migrant and resident land birds typical of the western Ozarks. 




We also have a fun pot-luck style lunch, so bring some stuff to share. We can 
try a carpool from Fayetteville if anyone is interested. Please call me at 
479-521-1858 if interested. 

Subject: Little River Cave Swallows
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 00:39:56 -0500
AR-birders
Jeff and Jean Trahan, Rosemary Seidler and I were running around SW AR on 
Friday 9/23/16, 

and the last leg of our route took us into southwestern Little River County. We 
found a large collection 

of swallows at 33.60211 -94.34112 which included at least 17 Cave Swallows. The 
ebird report with 

embedded photos is below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S31778045

Charlie Lyon 
Shreveport, LA
Subject: Pied-billed Grebe madness
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 20:50:34 -0500
I made a quick visit to the Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton today,
hoping that the cold front brought in some birds.  After about a half-hour,
I was thinking that the only thing the cold front did was to take birds
out.  On Saturday, there were a lot of passerines, in addition to the usual
suspects like Canada Geese and Great Blue Herons.  Just as I was about to
go around the final pond, I saw a group of what I thought were small
ducks.  When I got closer I was able to see that they were all Grebes, 15
of them, to be exact.  I believe that they were all Pied-billed Grebes,
although I want to double check all of my photos to be sure.  I have never
seem more than 2 or 3 PBGR at one time, in my 27 years, or so, of birding.
They were mostly all just hanging out, not swimming, diving, or anything,
for the first 20 minutes that I was observing them.  They then started
splashing around, and preening, and only after that, a couple started
diving and swimming away from the group.  It was quite interesting.  It
seems that 15 would be too many for one family group.  Has anyone else
observed this?

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the great Northwest
Subject: Dutch police use eagles to hunt illegal drones
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 13:45:13 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

There was an interesting video segment on the PBS Newshour yesterday titled 
"Dutch police use eagles to hunt illegal drones". Here's the minute and a half 
segment for those who are interested and missed it: 


http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/dutch-police-use-eagles-hunt-illegal-drones/

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Allsopp Park
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 17:03:13 +0000
Twenty-seven birders gathered at Allsopp Park in Little Rock on Saturday 
morning for Audubon Society of Central Arkansas’s monthly bird walk. We hoped 
for migrants and were not disappointed. Highlights were Wilson’s Warbler, 
American Redstart, and Common Yellowthroat. Two Belted Kingfishers took us by 
surprise as they few through the canopy so far from the Arkansas River. A 
trail-side, stationary Eastern Tiger Swallowtail allowed everyone close looks. 


The full checklist is here http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31730786 

After the hike I took Michael Nicodemus and Jane Wiewora to Lyndal York’s 
neighborhood to add Brown-headed Nuthatch to their lists. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Lake Millwood Laughing Gull
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 00:02:02 -0500
AR-birders,
I got out on Lake Millwood on a boat with Charles Mills today hoping to 
relocate yesterdays juvenile Sabines Gull, but 

we did not have any luck. We did find and photo a very cooperative Laughing 
Gull however. The ebird list with embedded 

photos is below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31761140

Charlie Lyon 
Shreveport, LA
Subject: Brown Booby, Sabine's Gull
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 18:11:03 -0500
Brown Booby still on Lake Greeson. 
Juvenile Sabine's Gull now on Lake Millwood seen from Beard's Bluff. 
Charlie Lyon


Sent from my iPhone. C Lyon 
Subject: Brown Booby Search
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 11:44:43 -0500
Charlie Lyons is on his way to Lake Greeson. Hell be at Kirby Landing Use
Areas marina around 1:30. If he needs to rent a boat he will do it, and
invites anyone who is also there to join him. Call him to coordinate
318-453-1530.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Brown Booby Update
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 18:28:20 -0500
Charlie Lyons saw the bird in the same spot this afternoon, by a buoy at
Point 10 marker. Accessible only via the marina at Kirby Landing. Marina
owners Clay and Betty Crump are friendly (she's a former Forest Service
biologist) and willing to take birders out to see the bird.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Brown Booby Lake Greeson
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Sep 2016 00:04:13 -0500
AR-birders,
The Brown Booby reported from Lake Greeson yesterday is still present on the 
lake. I called Clay and Betty Crump this 

morning to see if they would rent me a boat, which would allow me to look for 
the bird. They are the owners 

of Kirby Landing Marina and Motel. They were amazing! Betty pulled the prior 
photo off the Facebook site, and figured out 

the exact location on the lake where the bird had been seen the previous day. 
Clay met me at the marina and took me on 

his party barge and took me to the site , where we spent well over an hour. We 
met one of his friends, Butch Anderson, who told us 

that the bird had been present about two weeks. He had no idea what it was or 
the significance of its presence. The only 

reliable way to see the Brown Booby is by boat, and Clay is willing to take 
birders out to see the bird provided they give him 

advanced notice. Their phone number which is also the number to the marina is: 
870-398-4434. This is an great 

opportunity to see a really rare bird, and the Crumps are as equally amazing. 
The link to the ebird report with embedded photos 

is below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S31743788

I also found a juvenile Sabines Gull on Lake Millwood at 6 pm, which was an 
intermediate stop on my way back home. Ill be back out there 

tomorrow in a boat and try to relocate it if it is still around and get photos. 


Charlie Lyon
Subject: Brown Booby Update
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 19:35:30 -0500
Charlie Lyons says the booby is not visible from land. It stays near an
island about 3/4 mile out. However, Betty & Clay Crump are willing to take
birders out on their barge FOR FREE. Call the marina - number is at the
bottom of this page http://kirbylandingmarina.com. With a cold front coming
Monday the bird may not stick around much longer. It has been there for at
least two weeks.

Charlie found an immature Sabines Gull on Millwood Lake today. Hes going
out on a boat tomorrow to try for photos.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR


Subject: Re: Red-eye Vireo scold call
From: Ed Laster <elaster523 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 11:29:11 -0500
Allan,

Is that the ‘tsherrr’ call or the ‘tchway’ call? I can’t find any 
song listed as a “scold” call. 


Ed Laster
Little Rock



> On Sep 23, 2016, at 10:18 PM, Allan Mueller  wrote:
> 
> A note I sent to TN-Bird that might be of interest.
> 
> Allan
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: akcmueller >
> Date: Mon, Sep 19, 2016 at 8:45 PM
> Subject: RE: Red-eye Vireo scold call
> To: dro1945 AT hotmail.com , "tn-bird AT freelists.org 
" > 

> 
> 
> Learned something today - the Red-eye Vireo scold call attracts many species. 
At Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge today at 2:30, not prime time, I heard a 
Red-eye Vireo scolding and did a play back just to see what would happen. To my 
sunrise several other species responded - Bay-breasted Warbler, Philadelphia 
Vireo, Northern Paula, Black-and-white Warbler, Red-eye Vireo, Eastern Wood 
Pewee, Summer Tanager, and Indigo Bunting. 

> 
> Later I tried it again at Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge and 
attracted American Redstart, White-eyed Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Blue-gray 
Gnatcatcher, Tufted Titmouse, Carolina Chickadee, Blue Jay, Northern Cardinal, 
and Red-bellied Woodpecker. 

> 
> This is a call I will use again.
> 
> Allan Mueller
> Conway, AR
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> 
Subject: Fwd: Red-eye Vireo scold call
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 22:18:42 -0500
A note I sent to TN-Bird that might be of interest.

Allan

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: akcmueller 
Date: Mon, Sep 19, 2016 at 8:45 PM
Subject: RE: Red-eye Vireo scold call
To: dro1945 AT hotmail.com, "tn-bird AT freelists.org" 


Learned something today - the Red-eye Vireo scold call attracts many
species.  At Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge today at 2:30, not prime
time, I heard a Red-eye Vireo scolding and did a play back just to see what
would happen.  To my sunrise several other species responded - Bay-breasted
Warbler, Philadelphia Vireo, Northern Paula, Black-and-white Warbler,
Red-eye Vireo, Eastern Wood Pewee, Summer Tanager, and Indigo Bunting.

Later I tried it again at Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge and
attracted American Redstart, White-eyed Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Blue-gray
Gnatcatcher, Tufted Titmouse, Carolina Chickadee, Blue Jay, Northern
Cardinal, and Red-bellied Woodpecker.

This is a call I will use again.

Allan Mueller
Conway, AR



Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2

-------- Original message --------
Subject: Brown Booby, Lake Greeson Update
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 01:06:50 +0000
Jim Blackwell took the photo. The bird was on a shallow water buoy near the 
main river channel of the lake, out from the marina at Kirby Landing Public Use 
Area. His friend has a nearly identical photo taken yesterday. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock 
Subject: Brown Booby, Lake Greeson
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 22:47:49 +0000
A BROWN BOOBY was photographed this morning on Lake Greeson, Pike Co. It was 
reported to me by birder and Petit Jean Park State Park Interpreter BT Jones. 
His friend photographed it. I'm awaiting details on exactly where on the lake 
the bird is. I posted a photo on the Arkansas Rare and Unusual Bird Reports 
Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ArkansasRareAndUnusualBirdReports 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: hummer migration
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:11:44 -0500
If this migration goes on much longer I'm gonna be arrested as a suspected
moonshiner because of all the sugar I'm buying. I've had more hummers than
any previous year.

Alan gregory

Harrison



---
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Subject: please remove me from the list
From: Holly Greenfield <hollygreenfield AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 19:25:17 +0000
We've moved to CT, so could you remove me from the AR list? Thanks!


HG
Subject: FW: new book - Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 09:33:43 -0500
I copied the points from the attachment below from the Partners in Flight
group.  

I am amazed that the well-known connection of cats with wizardry and
witchcraft are not discussed in the fourth bullet.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2016 4:54 AM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FW: new book - Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly
Killer
Summary points from atch-
[] 
Summary Points from Peter Marra and Chris Santella:
 
Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer

The authors in no way condone or support the inhumane treatment of any
animal. Pete Marra has devoted his life to the study and protection of all
animals, including cats. 
Core issues and arguments 

. Currently, in the United States, there are an estimated to be 90 million
owned cats and between 60 to 100 million free-ranging, unowned cats. The
numbers of outdoor cats in the US has never been higher. 

. It is clearly inhumane to let cats roam freely. Outdoor cats get hit by
cars, preyed upon other animals, and can contract - and spread - a variety
of diseases. Data on unowned outdoor cats suggest that 50 to 75 percent of
kittens born outdoors do not survive to adulthood. If kittens do reach
adulthood, their life expectancy is just two years without caregivers
providing regular food and water. Even with this intervention, life
expectancy is around 6 years, less than half that of indoor cats. 

. The impacts of cat predation on bird and other wildlife populations, on
both islands and mainland, are well documented. Cats have caused a minimum
of 33 global extinctions, and significant number of declines of at least
another 142 species of reptiles, birds, and mammals. A study published in
2013, in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications (with Marra as
senior author), confirmed that cats kill an estimated 1.3-4.0 (with a median
of 2.4) billion birds per year, with the majority of the mortality (69%)
caused by unowned cats. Mammal mortality is equally alarming with 6.3 to
22.3 (with a median of 12.3) billion mammals killed every year by outdoor
cats. Mortality for amphibians and reptiles is in the hundreds of millions -
at 95 to 299 million amphibians, and 258 to 822 million reptiles per year,
respectively. 

. Cats can also pose a threat to public health from potential transmission
of diseases, most significantly Toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma is a protozoan
parasite that reproduces sexually exclusively in felids. Dispersal into the
environment occurs in the form of many millions of microscopic oocysts in
cat feces. The oocysts can persist for years and are able to withstand harsh
environmental conditions. Unintended hosts, such as gardeners and children,
can ingest Toxoplasma oocysts and become infected (11%-22% of all Americans
are estimated to be infected). Oocysts divide and spread, eventually lodging
in various parts of the brain, with the potential to alter brain chemistry.
A growing body of literature now strongly suggests that toxoplasmosis
infection is responsible for a range of mental illnesses, including
schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and increased risk of suicide. Toxoplasma
oocysts also infect wildlife and have caused significant mortality in
species such as the endangered Hawaiian Monk Seal and threatened Sea Otters.


. Most importantly, the book outlines a clear agenda for tackling these
problems moving forward (and the consequences of inaction). This includes
addressing the persistent issue of pet abandonment, stopping the failed
practice of trap-neuter-return, and removing cats from particularly
sensitive conservation areas with highly vulnerable wildlife populations.


________________________________________
From: Dalsimer, Allyn A (Alison) CIV OSD OUSD ATL (US)
[allyn.a.dalsimer.civ AT mail.mil]
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 12:40 PM
To: Dalsimer, Allyn A (Alison) CIV OSD OUSD ATL (US)
Subject: new book - Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly
Killer

All... thanks to Steve Sekscienski for alerting me to Pete Marra's new book:
"Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer"

In case the publication is of interest, you can get info here:
Blockedhttp://press.princeton.edu/titles/10809.htmlBlocked. Additionally, so
you could get a feel for what the book is about, I took the liberty of
cutting and pasting the book's summary points into a Word doc (attached).

Neither DoD nor I, personally, endorse this book or its contents (I haven't
read it). Nor do we encourage your purchase of this publication. I provide
this information for awareness only.

thank you.

Alison A. Dalsimer
Program Director
DoD Natural Resources
4800 Mark Center Drive
Suite 16G14, Box 56
Alexandria, VA 22350
Desk: 571-372-6893
Allyn.a.dalsimer.civ AT mail.mil
Alt: DoDNatRes AT bah.com
Subject: Re: Songbirds in Snow
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 11:43:10 -0500
I still have some Songbird Forever Stamps from 2014, but they are in the
Spring and Summer plumage.  (I may have used the snowbird stamps, if there
were any, to mail Christmas Cards.)  

 

I'll check them out next time I visit my friendly USPS.  

 

I've found that Forever Stamps payback higher interest than banks.

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Mary Ann King
Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2016 10:38 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Songbirds in Snow

 

Just wondering if everyone knows there are some new postage stamps with
lovely birds (for Luddites like me who still mail checks etc.)

 

MaryAnn    

In the pine woods northwest of London

 
Subject: Songbirds in Snow
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 10:38:27 -0500
Just wondering if everyone knows there are some new postage stamps with
lovely birds (for Luddites like me who still mail checks etc.)

 

MaryAnn    

In the pine woods northwest of London

 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 20
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 22:27:50 -0500
It was partly cloudy, and miserably hot on the survey today.  Very unusual
weather for this time of year.  This whole month as been unusually hot and
wet.  45 species were found.  Most of our summer birds are leaving early and
very few migrants are coming through.  No swallows were found.  Heres my
list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 110

Blue-winged Teal - 100

Northern Shoveler - 5

Pied-billed Grebe - 50

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 12

Snowy Egret - 4

Little-blue Heron - 41

Cattle Egret - 110

Green Heron - 1

White Ibis - 10

Turkey Vulture - 20

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Merlin - 1 imm.

Purple Gallinule - 2

Common Gallinule - 34

American Coot - 18

Killdeer - 2

Rock Pigeon - 6

Mourning Dove - 5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 11 (many still singing)

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2 (one still singing)

Blue Jay - 11

American Crow - 10

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 10

Brown Thrasher - 1

European Starling - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Wilson's Warbler - 1 adult male

Hooded Warbler - 1 adult male

Summer Tanager - 3

Northern Cardinal - 8

Indigo Bunting - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Eastern Pondhawk

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

"Red/Carolina" Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Little Brown skink

Southern Leopard Frog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Louisiana Waterthrush defends nest against snake
From: Chuck Bartels <cbartels AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 16:16:47 -0500
Thanks for this!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2016, at 3:26 PM, Lee Bryant  wrote:
> 
> Hello all! My name is Lee Bryant and I am a graduate student at Arkansas 
State University. I am working with Dr. Than Boves on my MS thesis studying 
Louisiana Waterthrush and the possible impacts of eastern hemlock decline on 
the species' fitness and habitat use. Though my field sites are in Great Smoky 
Mountains National Park in Tennessee, waterthrush do breed along streams and 
rivers in Arkansas. 

> 
> While filming provisioning behavior this breeding season, I recorded a near 
depredation of a Louisiana Waterthrush nest by a juvenile ratsnake. The male 
waterthrush arrived back at the nest just in the nick of time to fend off the 
snake. Check it out at the link below: 

> 
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3HdVWtuGKo
> 
> Empirical evidence of successful parental nest defense is lacking in 
scientific literature. This video provides an opportunity to observe rarely 
seen behavior and test theories of optimal nest defense. And, it's pretty cool 
to watch! 

>  
> This project is funded in part by the Arkansas Audubon Society.
> 
> -- 
> Lee Bryant
> Graduate student, M.S. in Biology
> Department of Biological Sciences 
> Arkansas State University
> Jonesboro, AR 72401
Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Debra Grim <dsgrim02 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 16:31:59 -0400
Another great read is Bringing Nature Home by Doug Tallamy. I recommend it
to everyone.

On Mon, Sep 19, 2016 at 7:26 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <
0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> I rejoice in this discussion.!  It means people do care.  There are many
> great books about native plants, birds and other wildlife.  One I love is
> Noah's Ark.  For those without a green thumb I recommend reducing mowing,
> and growing native grasses.  Everything you do makes a difference!  More
> habitat = more birds = more fun birding.
> Joanie
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Jerry Davis 
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:01 PM
> *Subject:* Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and
> Bird Decline
>
> Thank you for your kind words and insight. You are right about the yards
> and native plants. Pam Stewart with Arkansas Audubon is trying to get
> birders and members to commit to increasing native plants in their yards
> but it seems that most members and birders are too indifferent to commit to
> such improvements. If birders are indifferent to the needs of birds and
> cannot do what is needed to save birds who is left to do so?
>
> “In the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we
> understand and we will understand only what we are taught”  Bab Dioum
>
> Why is it so difficult to get people to conserve what they are suppose to
> love?
>
> Jerry
>
>
> *From:* Donald C. Steinkraus 
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 14, 2016 11:21 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU ; jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM
> *Subject:* Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and
> Bird Decline
>
> ​Well said Jerry Davis!
>
> Humans have transformed the continent into parking lots, malls, highways,
> buildings, developments, from sea to shining sea.  Then most yards are a
> big NOTHING for insects and birds.  Then the vast monocultures of soybeans,
> corn, cotton, wheat, almonds, take up much of once prime habitats.
>
> There are people who are trying to put their properties into native
> plants, make them insect and bird friendly, but they are relatively few.
>
> Let's hope that the "savers" can save enough to preserve something of
> Earth's infinitely precious biodiversity.
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> on behalf of Jerry Davis 
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 14, 2016 10:40 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
>
> Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of
> our declining birds.  Native plants produce native insects which fuel the
> world and feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green
> and consider that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in
> the US dedicated to exotic and non-native plants which are of little value
> to native insects or birds.  Our grassland birds are in significant decline
> and people drive the highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands
> and think that is bird habitat. If you are driving these areas in the
> spring and summer and do not see meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other
> grassland birds perched on a post or wire you can bet that it is not
> habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to discard the myopic
> filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant habitat and
> what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, birds and
> other wildlife.
>
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/
> 
 

>
>
>
>
Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush defends nest against snake
From: Lee Bryant <lee.bryant AT SMAIL.ASTATE.EDU>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 15:26:40 -0500
Hello all! My name is Lee Bryant and I am a graduate student at Arkansas
State University. I am working with Dr. Than Boves on my MS thesis studying
Louisiana Waterthrush and the possible impacts of eastern hemlock decline
on the species' fitness and habitat use. Though my field sites are in Great
Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee, waterthrush do breed along
streams and rivers in Arkansas.

While filming provisioning behavior this breeding season, I recorded a near
depredation of a Louisiana Waterthrush nest by a juvenile ratsnake. The
male waterthrush arrived back at the nest just in the nick of time to fend
off the snake. Check it out at the link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3HdVWtuGKo

Empirical evidence of successful parental nest defense is lacking in
scientific literature. This video provides an opportunity to observe rarely
seen behavior and test theories of optimal nest defense. And, it's pretty
cool to watch!

This project is funded in part by the Arkansas Audubon Society.

-- 
Lee Bryant
Graduate student, M.S. in Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, AR 72401
Subject: Jaeger at Millwood
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 10:17:09 -0500
Given the size, bill structure, flight behavior and warm-toned coloration, a 
probable juvenile Parasitic Jaeger was located in the eastern end of Millwood 
Lake at approximately 10:05 a.m. 


Charles Mills

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Cave Swallow
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 09:30:52 -0500
Located at Beard's Lake Campground, Millwood Lake, Hempstead County  AT  9:25 a.m.

Charles Mills

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 20:37:06 -0500
Here's a list of sources from the Arkansas Native Plant Society: 
https://anps.org/resources/plant-sources/

On 9/19/2016 7:59 PM, Jerry Davis
wrote:
> This link below from National Audubon helps you find native plants.
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs
> 
http://www.audubon.org/native-plants?ms=digital-eng-email-ea-plants-20160919_native_plants_launch&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20160919_native_plant_launch&sourceId=141543 

> *From:* Carol Joan Patterson 
> *Sent:* Monday, September 19, 2016 6:26 PM
> *To:* jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM  ; 
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> *Subject:* Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - 
> and Bird Decline
> I rejoice in this discussion.!  It means people do care.  There are 
> many great books about native plants, birds and other wildlife.  One I 
> love is Noah's Ark.  For those without a green thumb I recommend 
> reducing mowing, and growing native grasses.  Everything you do makes 
> a difference! More habitat = more birds = more fun birding.
> Joanie
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* Jerry Davis 
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:01 PM
> *Subject:* Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - 
> and Bird Decline
> Thank you for your kind words and insight. You are right about the 
> yards and native plants. Pam Stewart with Arkansas Audubon is trying 
> to get birders and members to commit to increasing native plants in 
> their yards but it seems that most members and birders are too 
> indifferent to commit to such improvements. If birders are indifferent 
> to the needs of birds and cannot do what is needed to save birds who 
> is left to do so?
> “In the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what 
> we understand and we will understand only what we are taught”  Bab Dioum
> Why is it so difficult to get people to conserve what they are suppose 
> to love?
> Jerry
> *From:* Donald C. Steinkraus 
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 14, 2016 11:21 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  ; 
> jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM 
> *Subject:* Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and 
> Bird Decline
> ​Well said Jerry Davis!
> Humans have transformed the continent into parking lots, malls, 
> highways, buildings, developments, from sea to shining sea.  Then most 
> yards are a big NOTHING for insects and birds.  Then the vast 
> monocultures of soybeans, corn, cotton, wheat, almonds, take up much 
> of once prime habitats.
> There are people who are trying to put their properties into native 
> plants, make them insect and bird friendly, but they are relatively few.
> Let's hope that the "savers" can save enough to preserve something of 
> Earth's infinitely precious biodiversity.
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
>  on behalf of Jerry Davis 
> 
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 14, 2016 10:40 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
> Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery 
> of our declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which 
> fuel the world and feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a 
> wall of green and consider that what they see is habitat. We have 625 
> million acres in the US dedicated to exotic and non-native plants 
> which are of little value to native insects or birds.  Our grassland 
> birds are in significant decline and people drive the highways seeing 
> millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird habitat. 
> If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
> meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post 
> or wire you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird 
> recovery need to discard the myopic filters that prevents them from 
> seeing what is native plant habitat and what is exotic plants 
> occupying space needed for native plants, birds and other wildlife.
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs
> http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/ 
> 
 

>
>
Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 19:59:08 -0500
This link below from National Audubon helps you find native plants.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs



http://www.audubon.org/native-plants?ms=digital-eng-email-ea-plants-20160919_native_plants_launch&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20160919_native_plant_launch&sourceId=141543 



From: Carol Joan Patterson 
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 6:26 PM
To: jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird 
Decline 


I rejoice in this discussion.! It means people do care. There are many great 
books about native plants, birds and other wildlife. One I love is Noah's Ark. 
For those without a green thumb I recommend reducing mowing, and growing native 
grasses. Everything you do makes a difference! More habitat = more birds = more 
fun birding. 


Joanie






-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

From: Jerry Davis 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:01 PM
Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird 
Decline 



Thank you for your kind words and insight. You are right about the yards and 
native plants. Pam Stewart with Arkansas Audubon is trying to get birders and 
members to commit to increasing native plants in their yards but it seems that 
most members and birders are too indifferent to commit to such improvements. If 
birders are indifferent to the needs of birds and cannot do what is needed to 
save birds who is left to do so? 


“In the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we 
understand and we will understand only what we are taught” Bab Dioum 


Why is it so difficult to get people to conserve what they are suppose to love?

Jerry 


From: Donald C. Steinkraus 
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 11:21 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU ; jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM 
Subject: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird 
Decline 


​Well said Jerry Davis!

Humans have transformed the continent into parking lots, malls, highways, 
buildings, developments, from sea to shining sea. Then most yards are a big 
NOTHING for insects and birds. Then the vast monocultures of soybeans, corn, 
cotton, wheat, almonds, take up much of once prime habitats. 



There are people who are trying to put their properties into native plants, 
make them insect and bird friendly, but they are relatively few. 



Let's hope that the "savers" can save enough to preserve something of Earth's 
infinitely precious biodiversity. 






-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Jerry Davis  

Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 10:40 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline 

Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/


Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 18:44:12 -0500
For whoever was asking, there is also a nursery that has a pretty good 
selection of native plants, it's on Hwy 62 past Pea Ridge it's just west of 
Gateway on the north side of the road it can be pricey. Compton Gardens in 
Bentonville has a plant sale in Spring, I think the first weekend in May go 
early in the morning though. most plants are $5 to $10 a pot. everything from 
wildflowers to trees. 



> On Sep 19, 2016, at 6:26 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> I rejoice in this discussion.! It means people do care. There are many great 
books about native plants, birds and other wildlife. One I love is Noah's Ark. 
For those without a green thumb I recommend reducing mowing, and growing native 
grasses. Everything you do makes a difference! More habitat = more birds = more 
fun birding. 

> Joanie
> 
> 
> From: Jerry Davis >
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  
> Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:01 PM
> Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird 
Decline 

> 
> Thank you for your kind words and insight. You are right about the yards and 
native plants. Pam Stewart with Arkansas Audubon is trying to get birders and 
members to commit to increasing native plants in their yards but it seems that 
most members and birders are too indifferent to commit to such improvements. If 
birders are indifferent to the needs of birds and cannot do what is needed to 
save birds who is left to do so? 

>  
> “In the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we 
understand and we will understand only what we are taught” Bab Dioum 

>  
> Why is it so difficult to get people to conserve what they are suppose to 
love? 

>  
> Jerry 
>  
>  
> From: Donald C. Steinkraus 
> Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 11:21 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  ; 
jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM  

> Subject: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird 
Decline 

>  
> ​Well said Jerry Davis!
>  
> Humans have transformed the continent into parking lots, malls, highways, 
buildings, developments, from sea to shining sea. Then most yards are a big 
NOTHING for insects and birds. Then the vast monocultures of soybeans, corn, 
cotton, wheat, almonds, take up much of once prime habitats. 

>  
> There are people who are trying to put their properties into native plants, 
make them insect and bird friendly, but they are relatively few. 

>  
> Let's hope that the "savers" can save enough to preserve something of Earth's 
infinitely precious biodiversity. 

>  
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List > on behalf of Jerry Davis 
> 

> Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 10:40 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Subject: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
>  
> Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 

>  
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs
>  
> http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/ 
 
Subject: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES THIS WEEKEND
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 18:34:17 +0000
For any of you who are planning escape from this weeks Harley festival in 
Fayetteville (Bikes, Blues, and Barbecue), there are still a few "slots" open 
for Bison, Birds, Botany, and Butterflies at The Nature Conservancys Tallgrass 
Prairie Preserve in the unplowed Flint Hills north of Pawhuska, OK. Ill meet 
anyone interested at the Preserve HQ around 12 noon on Thursday, Friday, and 
Saturday. Im staying at the Hampton Inn in Bartlesville. I will meet anyone 
interested in the Hampton Inn parking lot at around 7 AM on Friday, Saturday, 
and Sunday mornings. Otherwise, see all of you who escape somewhere on the 
Preserve. This event is not just open to escapees. Everyone welcome and OF 
COURSE, you don't need to meet me or anyone else to enjoy Tallgrass. Remember 
The Nature Conservancy in your giving. The real stars -- bison, birds, 
botanicals, and butterflies -- will be appreciative! 

Subject: ASCA Field Trip Saturday
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 17:46:18 +0000
This Saturday, Sept. 24th is the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) 
field trip led by our very own Dr. Dan "The Birdman" Scheiman.    He's a 
terrific birder and has also become very knowledgeable about butterflies.  You 
get two experts for the price of one!  Since ASCA field trips are always free, 
and open to anyone who likes birds (and butterflies), this is quite a 
bargain!  See details below for the next three months of field trips.  Dan is 
also ASCA's Vice President and puts together very informative and interesting 
guest speakers and programs for our monthly meetings.  Go to our website at 
www.ascabird.org for more information about our organization and a calendar of 
our events.  

Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock

September 24Allsopp Park—Little Rock Meet Dr. Dan “The Birdman” Scheiman 
at 7:30a.m. at the lower entrance to Allsopp Park. This park has a nice mix of 
habitatsfavored by migrating fall warblers, vireos, and thrushes. The trip will 
be aslow-paced walk on both paved and gravel trails.  Wear sturdy walking 
shoes. Sandals are notrecommended. Following the field trip, treat yourself to 
a stroll through theHillcrest Farmer’s Market and enjoy the many food trucks, 
produce stalls, andcraft booths. Directions to the lower entrance: coming 
fromwest Little Rock, take Cantrell Road east to the stoplight at Cedar Hill 
Road(bottom of Cantrell hill-Riverdale area). Turn right (south), go two 
blocks. At3700 Cedar Hill Rd. turn right into the park and go to the far end 
parkingarea.  GPS:  34.762413,   -92.313165.  October 22AGFC Andrew 
Hulsey Fish Hatchery-HotSprings and Arkadelphia Oxidation Ponds Meet at7:30 
a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at I-630 and ShacklefordRoad 
in Little Rock. We will carpool to the Andrew Hulsey Fish Hatchery and meetthe 
Hatchery manager for an overview of their operation and a tour of 
thefacility.  We’ll then scan the fish pondsfor shorebirds and ducks. 
Driving around the ponds is not allowed, but theHatchery manager will shuttle 
people who can’t walk the loop up to theobservation area. Thegroup will then 
caravan to the oxidation ponds at the Arkadelphia Sewer WastewaterPlant. The 
gate will be opened when we arrive and vehicles will be allowed todrive around 
the ponds. There is a good possibility the Cinnamon Teal seenthere last year 
will return this year.  Bothlocations will entail standing and level walking 
on gravel. Bring scopes,snacks, lunch and water.  TheHatchery is located on 
the southeast end of Lake Hamilton.  Take I-30 west to Exit 97-Hwy. 84, the 
thirdMalvern exit.  Turn right onto Hwy. 84.Go 15 miles, turn right onto Hwy. 
171. Go 8 miles, then turn left onto Hwy. 290.  Follow the signs to the 
Hatchery at 350 FishHatchery Rd. Hot Springs.  GPS  34.434912, -93.063199.To 
getto the Oxidation Ponds, drive south through Arkadelphia on Hwy 67. Turn 
leftonto Caddo St. Then turn right onto South 3rd St. The ponds arelocated at 
1675 South 3rd St. approximately 5 miles south ofArkadelphia.  GPS 34.089623, 
-93.051497. November 19DeGray Lake Resort State Park—Arkadelphia Meet 
at7:30 a.m. at the commuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in 
LittleRock.  We’ll arrive around 8:45 a.m. atthe park’s Lodge for anyone 
who would like to meet us there.  Our target birds will be eagles, 
loons,ducks, mergansers, grebes, and gulls. Dress warm, the lake can be windy 
and cold.  Hats and gloves are recommended.  Bring scope, water, and 
snacks.  You can bring lunch or eat in the Lodge’srestaurant. Addressfor 
the park is:  2027 State ParkEntrance Road - Bismarck, Arkansas 71929. GPS 
coordinates are 34.24562, -93.14840. Go to www.degray.com for more information 
about the park.  
Subject: a new message from Meeker
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 17:46:23 +0000
Here's a new message from our friend David Chapman, who now lives on western 
slopes of Rockies (Meeker, Colorado): 



Meeker cemetery lies on a bluff high above the city with panoramic views of the 
White River meandering to its source in the Flat Top mountains to the east. The 
flood plain is a lush green valley, providing a stark contrast to the 
overlooking arid hills, and a stopover for migrants heading south. With my 
scope I pick out two Sandhill Cranes, a harbinger of the thousands that will 
soon pass through these upland meadows on their way to southern Arizona. The 
bushes below the bluff have an Orange-crowned Warbler and a Townsend's 
Solitaire. I climb the China Wall trail and once in the scrub oak zone find 
some unexpected but familiar birds including a Wilson's Warbler, House Wren, 
Blue Gray Gnatcatcher, and Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon race). Mountain Chickadees 
are the commonest birds on these slopes. I find two Plumbeous Vireos and flush 
seven Spotted Towhees into the sagebrush. The pair of Lewis Woodpeckers I have 
been observing are now excavating a new nest hole in the same tree they have 
used this summer.? 


Subject: Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 08:56:56 -0500
There are definitely some places to buy seed. I haven't googled for them 
lately.

For those in Fayetteville. There are two plant vendors at the 
Fayetteville Farmer's Mkt. Rachel Lyons is coming on Saturdays. Susan 
Frey is not at the market. Very knowledgeably, friendly and helpful.

Susan Frey
Wild Streak Plants (on Facebook)
(479) 935-0700

Rachel Lyons
Bee Well Gardens
at Fayettevile market on Saturdays (though might skip the Bikes Blues & 
B event this weekend).
479-313-5344

Jim Morgan - Fayetteville, AR


On 9/17/2016 9:05 PM, Holly Childs wrote:
> http://www.pineridgegardens.com/
> Mary AnnKing, London, AR.
>
> Holly Childs
> 1126 Reed Valley Rd.
> Fayetteville AR 72704-5976
>
> 479-571-1727
>
>
>
>> On Sep 17, 2016, at 11:33 AM, Drew Phillips  
>> wrote:
>>
>> Where can one purchase native plants?
>>
>> Drew M Phillips
>>
>> On Sep 14, 2016 11:28 AM, "Judy & Don" <9waterfall9 AT gmail.com 
>> > wrote:
>>
>>     Thanks, Jerry.  Excellent info!!! I have shared your words with
>>     credit and the link. J
>>
>>
>>     On Sep 14, 2016, at 10:40 AM, Jerry Davis
>>      > wrote:
>>
>>>     Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the
>>>     recovery of our declining birds. Native plants produce native
>>>     insects which fuel the world and feed birds, other wildlife and
>>>     people. Many see a wall of green and consider that what they see
>>>     is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to
>>>     exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native
>>>     insects or birds.  Our grassland birds are in significant
>>>     decline and people drive the highways seeing millions of acres
>>>     of exotic grasslands and think that is bird habitat. If you are
>>>     driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see
>>>     meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a
>>>     post or wire you can bet that it is not habitat. Those
>>>     interested in bird recovery need to discard the myopic filters
>>>     that prevents them from seeing what is native plant habitat and
>>>     what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants,
>>>     birds and other wildlife.
>>>     Jerry W. Davis
>>>     Hot Springs
>>>     http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/
>>> 
 

>>
>
Subject: BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS IN WESTERN VALLEY THIS FALL
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2016 13:46:13 +0000
Dates for our records for Buff-breasted Sandpipers in the Ozark portion of 
northwest Arkansas range from July 27 to September 28. If you look at all of 
the Arkansas records in both of the Arkansas Audubon Society bird records data 
bases (http://www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html) southward migration through the 
states seems mainly to occur from the end of July, through August, and into the 
first few weeks of September. 


Gary Graves has suggested the sod farms (there are several in this area west of 
Alma-Van Buren) could also have some other interesting species in migration. He 
sent me a link to an article about Buff-breasted Sandpipers using sod farms in 
Kansas that some of you may find as interesting as I have. 
(http://www.ksbirds.org/kos/bulletin/Vol58No3.pdf) 


I didn't start going down to the Arkansas Valley this fall until August 7. I 
found Buff-breasted Sandpipers on every trip from August 7 to September 13 (7 
trips). I also found Upland Sandpipers in modest numbers (0-5) on these trips. 
I didn't see any Buff-breasts at the sod farm yesterday, despite excellent 
conditions -- ~50 Killdeer, 0 Buffs. This year, highest (peak of 93 August 25) 
have been present in the last week of August and first week of September. 


As Gary Graves suggests, more consistent birding at sod farms in the western 
Arkansas River Valley would probably turn up many more interesting birds. I 
have heard from both Bill Beall and Sandy Berger about some of their sightings 
at sod and elsewhere. This tends to confirm Gary's suggestion. 


The sod farms are privately owned. Due to some problems several of us have had 
with another landowner in this area, a year ago I took the precaution to call 
the owners of West-Ark Sod farm to see how they felt about visiting birders. 
What I told them was that my birding involved observing from the established 
roads. They were OK with this. There are PLENTY of places to view the sod farm 
from both Crawford and Westville Roads, so there is no need to drive into the 
sod farm itself. 


If there is a need to get onto the farm, I have found on site personnel 
pleasant and agreeable. 

Subject: Warblers and Thrushes at Hobbs
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2016 00:53:47 -0500
My birding buddy and I spent several hours at Hobbs SP on Saturday, mostly
on the Sinking Stream Trail.  We didn't see an overwhelming number of
warbler species, but it was more than I had seen this time of year in many
years.  That may be because I go to the fish hatchery more.  There were 5
to 6 vocal Hooded Warblers seen and/or heard.  We also tallied 1 Parula, 1
Kentucky, and 1 Chestnut-sided, and I thought I heard a Worm-eating,
although the AAS database shows that to be unlikely in September.  The
interesting thing about the Chestnut-sided is that it was within 25 yards
or so of where I have recorded them the last two springs.  It's probably
coincidence, but it makes me think I should bird that trail more often in
the summer.  I also saw 1 Black and White Warbler on the Van Winkle side of
the Hwy while we were checking out the hummingbirds and Jewelweed

I also heard one very clear Swainson's Thrush song on Sinking Stream, as
well as hearing one call a couple of times.  I then saw two other Catharus
Thrushes on the Van Winkle Trail, one of which was almost certainly a
Swainson's, but I didn't get much of a look at the other.  We also managed
to first hear, and then see, a couple of Wood Thrushes right before we
left.  All in all, it exceeded my expectations, although not my hopes, for
what me might see.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, where we didn't see gulls or jaegers, but saw Hooded Warblers,
which is almost as good
Subject: Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Holly Childs <hollychilds AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 21:05:58 -0500
http://www.pineridgegardens.com/
Mary AnnKing, London, AR.

Holly Childs
1126 Reed Valley Rd.
Fayetteville AR 72704-5976

479-571-1727



> On Sep 17, 2016, at 11:33 AM, Drew Phillips  wrote:
> 
> Where can one purchase native plants?
> 
> Drew M Phillips
> 
> On Sep 14, 2016 11:28 AM, "Judy & Don" <9waterfall9 AT gmail.com 
> wrote: 

> Thanks, Jerry. Excellent info!!! I have shared your words with credit and the 
link. J 

> 
> 
> On Sep 14, 2016, at 10:40 AM, Jerry Davis
>  > wrote:
> 
>> Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 

>>  
>> Jerry W. Davis
>> Hot Springs
>>  
>> http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/ 
 

>>  
> 
Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gull and others
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 20:20:44 -0500
The Lesser Black-backed Gull that Lenore and I saw above the dam from the 
Russellville side of the dam was an adult. The mantle was very dark and the 
bill and legs were yellow, very clean looking bird. 


I'm pretty positive the Parasitic Jaeger did a very fast fly-by at Delaware Bay 
Recreation area before I lost it. It came from the direction of where Jim Dixon 
and Sandy Berger were seeing it moving away from them at the State Park and in 
the direction of Delaware Point. We were all there at the same time, different 
parts of the lake. I think it is worth chasing. David Ray confirmed with me 
this evening that he saw the bird from the state park sitting, then launching 
from a low post in the river. 


The Sabine's Gull was a no-show for everyone. At the dam site from the 
Dardanelle side we did have two Caspian Terns and an Osprey. At Hays inlet, we 
had an Osprey and an adult Bald Eagle. There was an Osprey at Delaware Point. 

Good luck if you chase.
Karen Holliday
Birding the Dardanelle area
Subject: Re: Jaeger Yes
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 12:58:57 -0500
    
We (and two more) saw it together this morning. To answer Mitchell's question, 
way out in the bay. This side of some of the channel markers though. I called 
Karen Holliday who I knew to be at Delaware Bay and she might have seen it from 
there soon after. 



Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5

-------- Original message --------
From: David Ray  
Date: 9/17/16  12:39  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Jaeger Yes 

I didn't see any post of her seeing it. All I saw was her question if anyone 
saw it yesterday. David Ray NLR  


Sent from my iPhone
On Sep 17, 2016, at 10:45 AM, jamesdixonlr  wrote:


    
Thanks to Sandy Berger for spotting it. From the back porch of Lake Dardanelle 
State Park at 10:30 Saturday morning. Looking northwest 



Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gull
From: Lenore <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 12:00:44 -0500
Saw an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull. Unable to locate the Sabines Gull. Karen 
possibly saw the Parasitic Jaegar from Delaware Bay Rec area looking towards 
the State Park. 


Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Drew Phillips <lrkingfisher AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 08:33:57 -0800
Where can one purchase native plants?

Drew M Phillips
On Sep 14, 2016 11:28 AM, "Judy & Don" <9waterfall9 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Thanks, Jerry.  Excellent info!!! I have shared your words with credit and
> the link. J
>
>
> On Sep 14, 2016, at 10:40 AM, Jerry Davis
>   wrote:
>
> Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of
> our declining birds.  Native plants produce native insects which fuel the
> world and feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green
> and consider that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in
> the US dedicated to exotic and non-native plants which are of little value
> to native insects or birds.  Our grassland birds are in significant decline
> and people drive the highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands
> and think that is bird habitat. If you are driving these areas in the
> spring and summer and do not see meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other
> grassland birds perched on a post or wire you can bet that it is not
> habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to discard the myopic
> filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant habitat and
> what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, birds and
> other wildlife.
>
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/
> 
 

>
>
>
>
Subject: Jaeger Yes
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 10:45:27 -0500
    
Thanks to Sandy Berger for spotting it. From the back porch of Lake Dardanelle 
State Park at 10:30 Saturday morning. Looking northwest 



Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
Subject: Re: Unlist me
From: "mnl.mcm" <mnl.mcm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 09:56:11 -0400
Unsubscribe



Sent from my MetroPCS 4G LTE Android Device
-------- Original message --------From: Randy Mann 
<00000150df9a8f09-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> Date: 9/16/16 4:45 PM 
(GMT-05:00) To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: Unlist me 

Please remove me from this list

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: West Pulaski birds
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 10:07:12 -0500
Birds this morning.
Videos
Philadelphia 4
Red-eyed 3
Warbling 2
White-eyed 3
Warblers 
Blue-winged 1
Wilson's 1
Chat 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5
Red-headed Woodpecker 1
Scarlet Tanger 1
Flycatchers 5  
And the usual ones

Randy
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk vs. Pileated Woodpecker
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 16 Sep 2016 08:48:11 -0500
This morning, as I stepped outside to walk the dogs, I heard a Pileated
Woodpecker fussing to beat the band.  Then I saw a Red-shouldered Hawk in
hot pursuit of it in the woods behind the house.  The two made a couple of
loops through the woods before flying North.  I could hear the Pileated
continue to fuss very loudly and it sounded like a second Pileated joined
in.  The chase seemed to have ended, I saw a Pileated on a snag in the
woods, then it flew East, but continued to fuss down in the woods.

 

Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR 
Subject: No Subject
From: Patty McLean <plm108 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 15:29:21 -0400
    
Unsubscribe
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 21:14:31 +0200
    




Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: Terry Butler  
Date: 05/05/2015  7:23 PM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: White-winged Dove 

I just had a White-winged Dove join in feeding with my Collared and Mourning 
doves.  He is now calling his head off. Terry ButlerPangburn, AR 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 14
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 08:39:21 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the survey today.  51 species were found.
Things are still very slow.  The biggest highlight of the day was running
into a large flock of mixed swallows sitting on power lines from which I was
able to scope and find numerous Cave Swallows, many of which were in adult
plumage.  There were probably more Caves in the group but about half the
birds were in the air flying around at any given time and they kept
switching places on the wires so it was hard to get an exact count, but I
was able to see 14 Caves at one time on the wires.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Wood Duck - 41

Mallard - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 104

Pied-billed Grebe - 34

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 1

Great-blue Heron - 15

Great Egret - 3

Snowy Egret - 2

Little-blue Heron - 25

Cattle Egret - 145

Green Heron - 1

White Ibis - 6

"dark" Ibis (Plegadis sp.) - 1

Black Vulture - 2

Turkey Vulture - 89

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 3

Common Gallinule - 35

American Coot - 13

Killdeer - 1

Mourning Dove - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 5

Red-headed Woodpecker - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 17 (many still singing)

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1 (still singing)

Blue Jay - 6

American Crow - 20

Tree Swallow - 30

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 7

Cave Swallow - 14 (including numerous adult plumaged birds.)

Barn Swallow - 2

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 1

European Starling - 6

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Summer Tanager - 6

Northern Cardinal - 9

Indigo Bunting - 3

American Goldfinch - 1

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Mt. Magazine
From: V Prislipsky <vprislipsky AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:42:07 -0500
Hot Springs Village Audubon would like to thank Mt. Magazine Park Interpreter, 
Don Simons for an enjoyable morning of birding. It's always nice to visit with 
Don; it gives us a chance to hobnob with the upper 1%- that is, relative to 
Arkansas' geographic elevation. Although, the hawk watching was quite slow, HSV 
birders were not deterred. We're often as gratified by the social aspects of a 
trip and the deliciously large lunch portions at the lodge made up for a lot. 
An added bonus was running into birder friends Alan M., Sam and Dr. Dan. 

Subject: Warblers Faulkner County
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 23:30:35 -0500
I have birded Camp Robinson SUA the past two days.  A few warblers are
showing up there.  See the list below for details.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31566415

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31586703

Michael
Subject: Re: Jaeger
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 16:54:16 -0500
Sasha,
Thanks for posting your sighting(s) quickly.  
This gave me and others the opportunity to come and see this rare bird.  
Michael Linz (Conway)

> On Sep 14, 2016, at 3:10 PM, Sasha Bowles  wrote:
> 
> Parasitic Jaeger continues on Lake Dardanelle. It was seen at 230pm out in 
the middle of the main channel between Delaware Rec Area and the Nuclear Plant 
Bay. 

Subject: Jaeger
From: Sasha Bowles <sasha.bowles AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 15:10:12 -0500
Parasitic Jaeger continues on Lake Dardanelle. It was seen at 230pm out in the 
middle of the main channel between Delaware Rec Area and the Nuclear Plant Bay. 

Subject: Re: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 12:01:05 -0500
Thank you for your kind words and insight. You are right about the yards and 
native plants. Pam Stewart with Arkansas Audubon is trying to get birders and 
members to commit to increasing native plants in their yards but it seems that 
most members and birders are too indifferent to commit to such improvements. If 
birders are indifferent to the needs of birds and cannot do what is needed to 
save birds who is left to do so? 


“In the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we 
understand and we will understand only what we are taught” Bab Dioum 




Why is it so difficult to get people to conserve what they are suppose to love?



Jerry 




From: Donald C. Steinkraus 
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 11:21 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU ; jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM 
Subject: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird 
Decline 


​Well said Jerry Davis!



Humans have transformed the continent into parking lots, malls, highways, 
buildings, developments, from sea to shining sea. Then most yards are a big 
NOTHING for insects and birds. Then the vast monocultures of soybeans, corn, 
cotton, wheat, almonds, take up much of once prime habitats. 





There are people who are trying to put their properties into native plants, 
make them insect and bird friendly, but they are relatively few. 





Let's hope that the "savers" can save enough to preserve something of Earth's 
infinitely precious biodiversity. 









-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Jerry Davis  

Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 10:40 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline 

Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/
Subject: Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 11:27:31 -0500
Thanks, Jerry. Excellent info!!! I have shared your words with credit and the 
link. J 



On Sep 14, 2016, at 10:40 AM, Jerry Davis
  wrote:

> Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 

>  
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs
>  
> http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/
>  
Subject: These sage grouse hens hatched 862 chicks. Within two months, 700 were dead.
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 11:26:58 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

I just came across this article in the Washington Post: "These sage grouse hens 
hatched 862 chicks. Within two months, 700 were dead." 


Here's a link:

ttp://tinyurl.com/hhg5e5y

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock (where there are definitely no 
sage grouse!), 

Barry Haas
Subject: Well said Jerry Davis Re: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 16:21:30 +0000
?Well said Jerry Davis!


Humans have transformed the continent into parking lots, malls, highways, 
buildings, developments, from sea to shining sea. Then most yards are a big 
NOTHING for insects and birds. Then the vast monocultures of soybeans, corn, 
cotton, wheat, almonds, take up much of once prime habitats. 



There are people who are trying to put their properties into native plants, 
make them insect and bird friendly, but they are relatively few. 



Let's hope that the "savers" can save enough to preserve something of Earth's 
infinitely precious biodiversity. 




________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Jerry Davis  

Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 10:40 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline

Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs


http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/ 

Subject: Humans are Blind To Plants - and Bird Decline
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 10:40:32 -0500
Plant blindness even with the best of birders prohibits the recovery of our 
declining birds. Native plants produce native insects which fuel the world and 
feed birds, other wildlife and people. Many see a wall of green and consider 
that what they see is habitat. We have 625 million acres in the US dedicated to 
exotic and non-native plants which are of little value to native insects or 
birds. Our grassland birds are in significant decline and people drive the 
highways seeing millions of acres of exotic grasslands and think that is bird 
habitat. If you are driving these areas in the spring and summer and do not see 
meadowlarks, Dickcissels, and other grassland birds perched on a post or wire 
you can bet that it is not habitat. Those interested in bird recovery need to 
discard the myopic filters that prevents them from seeing what is native plant 
habitat and what is exotic plants occupying space needed for native plants, 
birds and other wildlife. 

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

http://conservationmagazine.org/2016/08/plant-blindness/
Subject: TAIGA MERLIN AT WEST-ARK SOD
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 00:27:29 +0000
A Merlin made a hard swoop and chase on shorebirds this morning at West-Ark Sod 
south of Kibler. Birds in the immediate vicinity included Killdeer (~25), 
Buff-breasted Sandpiper (14), and Horned Larks (~20). It happened fast; 
initially couldn't tell who'd made the attack. But then, I noticed a falcon 
perched on the sod maybe 100 yards off. I got some photographs for study later. 
This was either an adult female or young of year with thin "mustache." This 
Taiga form is the same as we saw on Saturday at Craig State Fish Hatchery in 
Centerton. There were also Upland Sandpipers (2) at sod, but quite a ways off. 


Under attack from the Merlin, Killdeer and Buff-breasteds raced off to another 
part of the farm. Horned Larks hunkered down, in a low-perch of bare ground. 
It's where sod has been removed. Thin grass strips between the bare ground cuts 
totally hide them. It's like a marriage made in heaven. 


Studying them through my spotting scope, I could see that many of these are 
young of the year. Sibley illustrates a form which he labels a juvenile 
(April-August), but most of the birds at sod today have molted beyond that 
juvenile plumage. They are 'tweeners: not juveniles exactly, and for sure not 
adults. They haven't acquired the striking dark mast, the yellow throat. These 
young larks present a modestly bold, wide-ish eye stripe and what is almost a 
wide ring of white around the eye. On the breast is something of a smudge that 
will in time become the dark brestband of adulthood. It would be nice to make 
one of these into something radical, like a molting McCown's Longspur, but ... 

Subject: Parasitic Jaeger Lake Millwood
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2016 00:20:38 -0500
AR-birders,
Rosemary Seidler and I also had a distant light phase Parasitic Jaeger on Lake 
Millwood 

Sunday. I alerted Charles Mills and he told me he was out before us on Sunday 
and 

thought he had a jaeger as well. He was unable to get out today, but will try 
to get out 

tomorrow, and relocate it. It was too distant for photos and it was a struggle 
to keep up 

with it in the scope as it was terrorizing Black Terns. Ill give better 
details later, and will try 

to get back out there Wednesday pm after work if time permits. Hopefully 
Charles can relocate it. 

We also had a female Yellow-headed Blackbird at a restricted access site in 
Lafayette County 

Sunday afternoon. I do have photos of that one. 
Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA