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Updated on Sunday, February 26 at 09:10 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Stygian Owl,©Barry Kent Mackay

26 Feb HARVEYS BUTTERCUP TO AMERICAN WOODCOCK: They dont make better Saturdays [Joseph Neal ]
25 Feb Woodcock! [Judy & Don ]
25 Feb Shrikes building nests already in Craighead Cty [Than Boves ]
24 Feb SW Arkansas [Michael Linz ]
24 Feb Southeast Ariz guide -finished ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
24 Feb Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS [Karen Holliday ]
24 Feb "Finding Birds in Southeast Arizona" extra copy ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
24 Feb Re: Cedar Waxwings [Charles Anderson ]
24 Feb Samsung phone lost at Woolsey Wet Prairie Sanctuary [Joseph Neal ]
24 Feb Re: Cedar Waxwings [Bill Shepherd ]
24 Feb Summary of North American Bird Conservation Initiative meeting 8-9 Feb 17 [Jeffrey Short ]
24 Feb Re: Cedar Waxwings [Bill Thurman ]
23 Feb Boyd Point [Michael Linz ]
23 Feb Re: Cedar Waxwings [Charles Anderson ]
23 Feb Re: Cedar Waxwings [Carolyn Partain ]
23 Feb Re: Cedar Waxwings [Daniel Mason ]
23 Feb Cedar Waxwings [Keith de Noble ]
23 Feb nightfall owls [Judy & Don ]
23 Feb Re: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird [Judy & Don ]
23 Feb Re: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird [Kelly Chitwood ]
23 Feb Re: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird [Janine Perlman ]
23 Feb Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird [Terry Butler ]
22 Feb Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS [Jodi Morris ]
22 Feb Disorganized Bird Club Facebook Page [Alan ]
22 Feb FISH CROW SPRING ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS [Joseph Neal ]
22 Feb Red-breasted Merganser- Faulkner [Michael ]
22 Feb Fw: Fwd: Trail camera revelations [Jerry Davis ]
21 Feb Cackling goose [Teresa Mathews ]
21 Feb Halberg Ecology Canp [Lyndal York ]
21 Feb Re: Flycatcher [John Dillon ]
21 Feb Re: Flycatcher [Leslie Peacock ]
21 Feb Re: Its sad to think that? [Sally Jo Gibson ]
21 Feb The rain did stop and I did smile because.... [Charles H Mills ]
21 Feb Re: Its sad to think that? [Bob Harden ]
21 Feb Re: Flycatcher [Judy & Don ]
21 Feb Re: Flycatcher [Judy & Don ]
21 Feb Great-tailed Grackles [Devin Moon ]
21 Feb Re: yard bird [Sally Jo Gibson ]
21 Feb Re: Hawk trifecta [Bill Shepherd ]
21 Feb Re: Flycatcher [Karen Holliday ]
21 Feb Re: Flycatcher [Elizabeth Shores ]
21 Feb Re: Flycatcher [swamp_fox ]
21 Feb yard bird [Sally Jo Gibson ]
21 Feb Hawk trifecta [Jerry Butler ]
21 Feb Re: February [David Ray ]
21 Feb Re: February [Jeffrey Short ]
21 Feb Flycatcher [Herschel Raney ]
21 Feb Re: February [Elizabeth Shores ]
21 Feb Re: Its sad to think that? [Tom Harden ]
21 Feb Re: February ["bill ." ]
20 Feb Re: NPR 2/20/17: Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say [Jeffrey Short ]
20 Feb Re: Its sad to think that? [Keith de Noble ]
20 Feb Fwd: Its sad to think that? ["Philip E. Hyatt" ]
20 Feb Its sad to think that? [Teresa Mathews ]
20 Feb Fwd: Flycatcher help ["Philip E. Hyatt" ]
20 Feb Flycatcher help [Teresa Mathews ]
20 Feb Fwd: Fw: Google Alert - Ivory-billed woodpecker [Allan Mueller ]
20 Feb Re: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering [Bill Thurman ]
20 Feb Re: NPR 2/20/17: Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say [Janine Perlman ]
20 Feb NPR 2/20/17: Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say [Barry Haas ]
19 Feb Fwd: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering ["Philip E. Hyatt" ]
19 Feb Re: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering [David Luneau ]
19 Feb Night Heron and Lousiana Water Thrush [Teresa Mathews ]
19 Feb Birds of North Central Arkansas ["Philip E. Hyatt" ]
19 Feb February [Herschel Raney ]
19 Feb What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering ["Philip E. Hyatt" ]
19 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser NO [David Ray ]
19 Feb Red-breasted Merganser NO [Gail Miller ]
18 Feb ASCA February Field Trip Report [Karen ]
18 Feb Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results [Bill Shepherd ]
18 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser no [Gail Miller ]
18 Feb GBBC at Devil's Den State Park [Joseph Neal ]
18 Feb Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results [Janine Perlman ]
18 Feb Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results [Jerry Davis ]
18 Feb Red-breasted Merganser no [Gail Miller ]
18 Feb Fwd: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results ["Philip E. Hyatt" ]

Subject: HARVEYS BUTTERCUP TO AMERICAN WOODCOCK: They dont make better Saturdays
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2017 13:59:39 +0000
One of the earliest flowers around the Ozarks in western Arkansas, Harveys 
Buttercup, is named for a 19th Century UA-Fayetteville professor, Francis Leroy 
Harvey, who provided its first scientific description. That first Harveys was 
blooming pretty-as-could-be Saturday morning on a bluff at Hobbs State 
Park-Conservation Area. 

By Saturday afternoon the scene shifted to Wedington Unit, Ozark National 
Forest, west of Fayetteville. Dr David Krementz shared American Woodcock 
displays with Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society  all 15 of us on a cold but 
productive evening. We met in the field at 5:30 and saw a Bald Eagle disappear 
over Wedington Ridge. Then first one, then two, Great Horned Owls flew into the 
field -- followed by monkeys -- Barred Owls. Then the first star at 6:30. 
Then 2-3 woodcocks. 

The morning hike at Hobbs also yielded bounty: white trout-lilies thriving in a 
glade that is now in process of restoration with removal of Eastern Red Cedars 
that tend to shade out and crowd out other native plant and animal species. The 
top of a big rock slab was covered with trout-lilies, but these appear to be 
not the widespread and common one  Erythronium albidum, but E. mesochoreum, 
the prairie tout-lily, or as I prefer to call it, the glade version of E. 
albidum. We also had several Golden-crowned Kinglets. 

Dr Douglas James, to whom Arkansans owe so much ornithologically-speaking, made 
the woodcock trips, with wife Elizabeth and two of his graduate students, Pooja 
Panwar and Anant Deswhal. Doug enjoyed woodcock peent calls, the cackles of 
chasing males, and heavenly twitters of birds in their display flights. These 
were the first woodcocks hes heard in years. This is a result of new hearing 
aids that he had especially tuned to pick up specific bird calls. 

Our Earth is interesting and diverse, if we just let it. On Saturday, Earth 
pulled out all of her stops. Pump organ players out there will know what I mean 
by all the stops. 

Subject: Woodcock!
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 16:03:36 -0600
On his morning run with the dogs Don flushed a Woodcock in one of the north 
glades near a feeder creek so there should be dancing soon! I also saw two Bald 
Eagles, and a Sharpie continues to terrorize the feeders. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Shrikes building nests already in Craighead Cty
From: Than Boves <tboves AT ASTATE.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2017 04:59:17 +0000
While monitoring banded shrikes today, I was incredibly surprised to find a 
pair of shrikes building a nest already. This is incredibly early; although I 
haven't found data for Arkansas, according to the Texas Breeding Bird Atlas, 
the earliest recorded 1st egg date in that state is March 6. I think this pair 
might beat that! 


------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dept of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, AR 72401




On Fri, Feb 24, 2017 at 10:21 PM -0600, "Michael" 
> wrote: 



That's highway 296...

> On Feb 24, 2017, at 10:11 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:
>
> Randy Robinson and I decided we would checkout all the Sandhill Cranes that 
Charles Mills has been reporting in his area. The normal amount that I see in 
Arkansas is 1-10 so the hundreds he has been reporting seemed exciting. 

>
> Randy and I went to the eBird location on highway 274 just off of highway 82. 
We quickly found the Sandhills. There was a total of 4. 

>
> After a short visit with one of the local farmers who was afraid we were 
broke down in the middle of nowhere...I could hear cranes coming in. When I 
looked at the back of the field it had gone from 4 to 40. 

>
> We continued to watch as small groups of 1 to 10 came in. The number in the 
field topped out at 163. 

>
> We traveled on down the road and decided to make a u-turn and return home on 
the back road rather then go interstate through Texarkana. As we came past the 
sandhill field two eagles buzzed the cranes. All the birds plus some in fields 
behind the one we could see all took to flight. I snapped a quick picture of 
one of the flocks. I got tired of counting but it looked like the one group had 
more than 400 birds in it. 

>
> So we went from 4 to 40 to 400...amazing sight and sound anywhere but 
especially for Arkansas. 

>
> We also saw a large flock of brewers blackbirds, pipits and a peregrine.
> A long but very nice trip.
> Thanks Charles Mills for keeping the rest of us aware of what is going on 
down south. 

>
> Michael Linz(Central Arkansas)

Subject: SW Arkansas
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 22:11:02 -0600
Randy Robinson and I decided we would checkout all the Sandhill Cranes that
Charles Mills has been reporting in his area.  The normal amount that I see
in Arkansas is 1-10 so the hundreds he has been reporting seemed exciting.

Randy and I went to the eBird location on highway 274 just off of highway
82.  We quickly found the Sandhills.  There was a total of 4.

After a short visit with one of the local farmers who was afraid we were
broke down in the middle of nowhere...I could hear cranes coming in.  When
I looked at the back of the field it had gone from 4 to 40.

We continued to watch as small groups of 1 to 10 came in.  The number in
the field topped out at 163.

We traveled on down the road and decided to make a u-turn and return home
on the back road rather then go interstate through Texarkana.  As we came
past the sandhill field two eagles buzzed the cranes.  All the birds plus
some in fields behind the one we could see all took to flight.  I snapped a
quick picture of one of the flocks.  I got tired of counting but it looked
like the one group had more than 400 birds in it.

So we went from 4 to 40 to 400...amazing sight and sound anywhere but
especially for Arkansas.

We also saw a large flock of brewers blackbirds, pipits and a peregrine.
A long but very nice trip.
Thanks Charles Mills for keeping the rest of us aware of what is going on
down south.

Michael Linz(Central Arkansas)
Subject: Southeast Ariz guide -finished
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 22:55:13 +0000
I've gotten several folks reply, so no need to reply.
Leif, at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
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use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
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immediately. 
Subject: Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 22:10:25 +0000
Heard my first Fish Crow of 2017 while standing on my back deck at 6:45 a.m. 
this morning in Maumelle.  Nice way to start the day, but then I had to go to 
work instead of going birding.  :-( 

Karen Holliday 

 On Wednesday, February 22, 2017 7:09 PM, Jodi Morris  
wrote: 

 

 Heard to Fish Crowd this morning, first in 2017, at Little Rock Central High.
On Feb 22, 2017 4:43 PM, "Joseph Neal"  wrote:

Fish Crows (2) were calling among more numerous American Crows in Boxley 
Valley, Buffalo National River February 19 (close to earliest arrival of which 
I’m aware, February 5). They were also calling this morning at Lake 
Fayetteville. Fish Crows don’t overwinter in northwest Arkansas.  My last 
one last fall was November 5, 2016, at Lost Bridge South Park on Beaver Lake. 
Fish Crows were unreported in the western Ozarks of Arkansas until the 1980s, 
but they have steadily expanded as a nesting bird throughout our area, 
apparently at least in part a result of changing climate. National Audubon 
lists Fish Crow as a “Climate Threatened” species. According to Audubon’s 
analysis: “climate model forecasts continued shifting climate space for this 
species, most troublingly with only 23% remaining stable in winter, and a 
concurrent 26% reduction in suitable winter space.” 




   
Subject: "Finding Birds in Southeast Arizona" extra copy
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 22:03:07 +0000
Greetings all,
I've got 2 brand new copies of the eight edition of "Finding Birds in Southeast 
Arizona" from 2015. I'll give 1 copy to the first person that contacts me off 
the listserver. 

Cheers, Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 15:43:05 -0600
If you want to see cedar waxwings by the hundred, head to Western Hills Park 
inLittle Rock. Ruth and I are seeing lots of flicks right now. 


Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2017, at 7:17 PM, Cynthia Patton 
<00000151b1cba27b-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> In Fayetteville, Washington County, NW AR we had a flock of between 80-100 
last Sun. In our front yard spread among 4 trees. My husband has seen two big 
flocks since then. 

> 
> Cindy
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Feb 23, 2017, at 3:57 PM, Daniel Mason  wrote:
>> 
>> Cedar waxwings are one of those birds, like robins, that migrate but can be 
found in AR year round. Not sure where in central AR you are but I pulled up a 
bar chart from pulaski county. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?cmd=decisionPage&getLocations=counties&counties=US-AR-119&yr=all&m= 

>> Looks like they're not reported as often in the summer there. Here in Benton 
county they're here year round for sure but do seem to come in waves during 
migration. I'm not sure if that migration is happening yet but I did see a 
handful of them just the other day. On that bar chart I linked, it looks like 
Mar through Apr they are reported more often so things should pick up for them 
soon. 

>> 
>>> On 2/23/2017 3:50 PM, Keith de Noble wrote:
>>> Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they may 
be migrating through central AR. 

>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Keith de Noble
>> 
>> 
>> 	Virus-free. www.avast.com
Subject: Samsung phone lost at Woolsey Wet Prairie Sanctuary
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 19:39:19 +0000
I just heard from a fellow who just found a Samsung phone at Woolsey today 
(Friday). If its yours, contact me and I'll hook you up with him. 
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 15:55:52 +0000
The absolutely best place in Arkansas to see Cedar Waxwings en masse is in 
downtown Little Rock during the month of March. They are drawn by the hundreds 
to the fruits of various hollies planted around downtown buildings and often 
meet their demise by colliding with glass windows. 



When you do see them, keep searching for the odd Bohemian. It has been decades 
since Arkansas's most recent record of the latter species. 



Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Bill Thurman  

Sent: Friday, February 24, 2017 8:31 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings

They very often like Two Rivers Park in western Little Rock area. Some of their 
favorite trees are in various parts of that park. I've seen them plenty of 
times. Bill Thurman 


On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 3:50 PM, Keith de Noble 
> wrote: 

Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they may be 
migrating through central AR. 


--
Keith de Noble
Subject: Summary of North American Bird Conservation Initiative meeting 8-9 Feb 17
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 09:29:28 -0600
 

 

 

JOIN US IN BUILDING A VISION FOR BIRD CONSERVATION FOR THE NEXT CENTURY

Answering the Challenge of Bird Conservation

A century ago, North American bird populations had declined dramatically in the 
absence of regulations and other 


efforts to protect them. Recognizing the importance of migratory birds to 
humans and the environment, in 1916 


government leaders in Canada and the United States signed a treaty committing 
to conserve these valuable 


resources that cross our borders. This groundbreaking treaty was followed 20 
years later by a similar agreement 


between Mexico and the United States. The result of these international 
agreements has been a century of 


cooperative conservation of our shared migratory birds and their habitats.

However, despite the treaties’ successes, birds still need our help. The 
State of North America’s Birds 2016 report tells 


us that while some groups of birds are thriving, others - especially 
long-distance international migrants - are in 


urgent need of conservation action.

Recognizing that continued international collaboration is vital to conserve 
migratory bird populations, our three 


nations have come together to start to build a vision for sustaining bird 
populations for the future. We invite you to 


join us as we envision the next century of bird conservation.

Why Birds and Bird Conservation Matter

Successful bird conservation efforts recognize that the health of birds – and 
their habitats – is vital not just to 


sustaining their populations, but also to building and nourishing thriving 
human communities, economies and 


cultures, connecting people with nature, and providing valuable ecological 
services and benefiting many other 


wildlife species. Conservation unites people across broad geographies and a 
variety of cultures. We build our bird 


conservation vision on three key premises.

Conservation works

􀁸 Where partners come together for conservation, birds and their habitats 
are thriving 


International cooperation brings success

􀁸 Governments and citizens are already working together to develop 
approaches to the conservation challenges 


of the future, such as ensuring resilient landscapes and adapting to changing 
conditions 


Everyone wins with bird conservation

􀁸 Bird conservation leads to healthy environments and ecosystems that 
benefit human health and human 


communities

Isabel Francolini. Red Knot, Common Nighthawk, Canada Warbler. Graphite with 
white and black ink on Fabriano. 2016. Part of the “In Fine 


Feather” art expo by students from the Department of Fine Arts at Mount 
Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. 


Our Vision for the Next 100 Years of Bird Conservation

While we have clearly made many strides over the last century, we know that to 
confront the conservation 


challenges of the next generations, we must work towards a shared vision to 
achieve hemispheric conservation for 


migratory birds. Our vision for the next century of bird conservation includes 
the following elements: 


􀁸 People value birds and their habitats for their ecological, economic, 
aesthetic, and spiritual value. 


􀁸 Bird conservation aligns with human interests, and our nations work 
together to support the clean air and 


water, food, and habitat that birds and people need.

􀁸 All sectors are committed to conservation, with governments throughout the 
Western Hemisphere, nongovernment 


organizations, the private sector and citizens working together to conserve 
birds and their habitats. 


􀁸 Bird populations and ecosystems are healthy, thanks to cooperative efforts

among government, industry, and the public.

How will we achieve our vision?

We must collectively take bold action to build on these values and protect our 
bird 


communities throughout their life cycles.

We will…

􀁸 Collaborate across sectors to demonstrate how bird conservation supports

efforts to nurture healthy environments, sustain livelihoods, and improve

economic conditions for landowners and communities by encouraging

sustainable practices

􀁸 Build partnerships toward shared goals of conservation and human 
well-being 


􀁸 Engage social scientists and economists to develop sustainable strategies 
that benefit birds and people 


􀁸 Consider long-term drivers of change, such as global climate change and 
human population growth 


􀁸 Continue to pursue scientific advances that will allow us to adopt more 
effective and innovative approaches to 


achieve both bird conservation and positive socioeconomic outcomes

􀁸 Encourage shared objectives and strategies, guided by strong science, to 
inform individual actions that achieve 


maximum return on our conservation investments and ensure resilient landscapes 
that can adapt to changing 


conditions;

􀁸 Engage people and communities in conservation and monitoring through 
citizen science and education 


􀁸 Focus efforts on our most vulnerable habitats, including oceans, tropical 
forests, and grasslands, while building 


the foundation for conservation in all habitats

􀁸 Consolidate efforts internationally to ensure efficient and effective 
research, monitoring, conservation, and 


management actions throughout the flyways of the Western Hemisphere.

Most importantly, we will do it together. A century ago we signed the first 
agreement to conserve migratory birds 


and joined forces to protect our mutual resources. In the 21st century, we will 
build and expand a network of diverse 


partners and learn from each other’s successes, challenges, and priorities. 
We will focus on habitats, flyways and 


corridors that migratory birds need in order to guarantee connectivity to 
support birds through their full migratory 


cycle.

Together, across the hemisphere, we will unite to implement a shared vision of 
bird conservation. 


Our Invitation to You: Join the Conversation

We hope that this document will start a series of conversations with partners 
throughout the hemisphere about the 


way forward for bird conservation in the next 100 years. We invite you to join 
us as we work toward developing and 


implementing a vision for the future of bird conservation.

Comments? Questions? Email us at vision AT nabci.net.
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 2017 08:31:38 -0600
They very often like Two Rivers Park in western Little Rock area. Some of
their favorite trees are in various parts of that park. I've seen them
plenty of times.                           Bill Thurman

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 3:50 PM, Keith de Noble  wrote:

> Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they
> *may* be migrating through central AR.
>
> --
> *Keith de Noble*
>
Subject: Boyd Point
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 23:40:23 -0600
I visited Boyd Point in Pine Bluff today.  Two Eared Grebe are still
present.  They are not in breeding plumage yet (see link to picture below).
There were also thousands of ducks.

I drove back highway 31 and was amazed that I did not see a single flock of
geese of any kind nor did I see large groups of ducks.

https://goo.gl/hae05f

Michael Linz(Conway, AR)
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 20:38:36 -0600
We are seeing a lot of them in Western Hills Park in Little Rock. They have 
also been coming to our water feature over the past couple of weeks. 


Chuck Anderson 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2017, at 5:53 PM, Carolyn Partain  wrote:
> 
> We have been hearing them frequently in an area located about 10 miles WNW of 
downtown Hot Springs. This is near both ours and our son's home. I don't know 
if they are year-round residents or have migrated here. 

Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
From: Carolyn Partain <cthedove AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 17:53:29 -0600
We have been hearing them frequently in an area located about 10 miles WNW of 
downtown Hot Springs. This is near both ours and our son's home. I don't know 
if they are year-round residents or have migrated here. 

Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 15:57:06 -0600
Cedar waxwings are one of those birds, like robins, that migrate but can 
be found in AR year round.  Not sure where in central AR you are but I 
pulled up a bar chart from pulaski county. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?cmd=decisionPage&getLocations=counties&counties=US-AR-119&yr=all&m= 

Looks like they're not reported as often in the summer there. Here in 
Benton county they're here year round for sure but do seem to come in 
waves during migration.  I'm not sure if that migration is happening yet 
but I did see a handful of them just the other day.  On that bar chart I 
linked, it looks like Mar through Apr they are reported more often so 
things should pick up for them soon.

On 2/23/2017 3:50 PM, Keith de Noble wrote:
> Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they 
> _may_ be migrating through central AR.
>
> -- 
> /*Keith de Noble*/




---
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Subject: Cedar Waxwings
From: Keith de Noble <kdenoble AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 15:50:20 -0600
Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they *may*
be migrating through central AR.

-- 
*Keith de Noble*
Subject: nightfall owls
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 13:04:13 -0600
Walking outside last night I was so happy to hear a Screech Owl trilling in the 
woods, while both female and male Great Horned Owls sang to one another from 
the bluff, and Barred Owls courted across the creek. 


During the day maple trees leak from holes made by Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, 
and numerous honeybees, Question Mark and Eastern Comma butterflies enjoy the 
sweetness. 


Still hoping to find Woodcocks soon.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 
Subject: Re: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 12:23:57 -0600
How interesting! Thanks, Terry and Janine.

On Feb 23, 2017, at 10:47 AM, Janine Perlman  wrote:

> Hi Terry,
> 
> At least some wild-living hummers are documented to have grit in their 
gizzards. Presumably it serves the same two purposes as in other birds: to help 
grind tough food (chitinous exoskeletons of arthropods), and as a source of 
calcium---and possibly other minerals needed in much smaller amounts. 

> 
> Very nice observation!
> 
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
> 
> On 2/23/2017 8:59 AM, Terry Butler wrote:
>> Today makes the 120th straight day it has come to my feeder this 
fall/winter. An observation I have watched. I have a 30 foot driveway that has 
a very fine rock on it. The hummer hoovers over the gravel with its feet 
touching the gravel (not landing) and sticks its beck in the gravel 8 or 10 
different location then leaves to the feeder or a perch. Have only seen this a 
couple of times. No water in the gravel, maybe insects, any ideas? 

>> 
>> Terry Butler
>> Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 11:25:37 -0600
Fascinating! Thank you both for sharing!


Kelly 

> On Feb 23, 2017, at 10:47 AM, Janine Perlman  wrote:
> 
> Hi Terry,
> 
> At least some wild-living hummers are documented to have grit in their 
gizzards. Presumably it serves the same two purposes as in other birds: to help 
grind tough food (chitinous exoskeletons of arthropods), and as a source of 
calcium---and possibly other minerals needed in much smaller amounts. 

> 
> Very nice observation!
> 
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
> 
> On 2/23/2017 8:59 AM, Terry Butler wrote:
>> Today makes the 120th straight day it has come to my feeder this 
fall/winter. An observation I have watched. I have a 30 foot driveway that has 
a very fine rock on it. The hummer hoovers over the gravel with its feet 
touching the gravel (not landing) and sticks its beck in the gravel 8 or 10 
different location then leaves to the feeder or a perch. Have only seen this a 
couple of times. No water in the gravel, maybe insects, any ideas? 

>> 
>> Terry Butler
>> Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 10:47:28 -0600
Hi Terry,

At least some wild-living hummers are documented to have grit in their 
gizzards.  Presumably it serves the same two purposes as in other birds: 
to help grind tough food (chitinous exoskeletons of arthropods), and as 
a source of calcium---and possibly other minerals needed in much smaller 
amounts.

Very nice observation!

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

On 2/23/2017 8:59 AM, Terry Butler wrote:
> Today makes the 120th straight day it has come to my feeder this 
> fall/winter.  An observation I have watched. I have a 30 foot driveway 
> that has a very fine rock on it. The hummer hoovers over the gravel 
> with its feet touching the gravel (not landing) and sticks its beck in 
> the gravel 8 or 10 different location then leaves to the feeder or a 
> perch. Have only seen this a couple of times. No water in the gravel, 
> maybe insects, any ideas?
>
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
Subject: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:59:28 -0600
Today makes the 120th straight day it has come to my feeder this
fall/winter.  An observation I have watched. I have a 30 foot driveway that
has a very fine rock on it. The hummer hoovers over the gravel with its
feet touching the gravel (not landing) and sticks its beck in the gravel 8
or 10 different location then leaves to the feeder or a perch. Have only
seen this a couple of times. No water in the gravel, maybe insects, any
ideas?

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS
From: Jodi Morris <mjodimorris AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 19:08:43 -0600
Heard to Fish Crowd this morning, first in 2017, at Little Rock Central
High.

On Feb 22, 2017 4:43 PM, "Joseph Neal"  wrote:

> Fish Crows (2) were calling among more numerous American Crows in Boxley
> Valley, Buffalo National River February 19 (close to earliest arrival of
> which I’m aware, February 5). They were also calling this morning at Lake
> Fayetteville. Fish Crows don’t overwinter in northwest Arkansas.  My last
> one last fall was November 5, 2016, at Lost Bridge South Park on Beaver
> Lake. Fish Crows were unreported in the western Ozarks of Arkansas until
> the 1980s, but they have steadily expanded as a nesting bird throughout our
> area, apparently at least in part a result of changing climate. National
> Audubon lists Fish Crow as a “Climate Threatened” species. According to
> Audubon’s analysis: “climate model forecasts continued shifting climate
> space for this species, most troublingly with only 23% remaining stable in
> winter, and a concurrent 26% reduction in suitable winter space.”
>
>
Subject: Disorganized Bird Club Facebook Page
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 17:08:52 -0600
I have created a page for North Central Arkansas birders called Disorganized
Bird Club of Harrison AR where anyone can join the group and ask questions,
start discussions, post pictures, and talk about upcoming birding trips.
This groups is for everyone from birders who are just starting out and
enjoying it as a hobby or people who have been doing this for years and are
experts. This is a casual public page and we are hoping to reach more people
and get more people interested in birds. Feel free to join and invite people
at any time. 

 



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: FISH CROW SPRING ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 22:43:32 +0000
Fish Crows (2) were calling among more numerous American Crows in Boxley 
Valley, Buffalo National River February 19 (close to earliest arrival of which 
Im aware, February 5). They were also calling this morning at Lake 
Fayetteville. Fish Crows dont overwinter in northwest Arkansas. My last one 
last fall was November 5, 2016, at Lost Bridge South Park on Beaver Lake. Fish 
Crows were unreported in the western Ozarks of Arkansas until the 1980s, but 
they have steadily expanded as a nesting bird throughout our area, apparently 
at least in part a result of changing climate. National Audubon lists Fish Crow 
as a Climate Threatened species. According to Audubons analysis: climate 
model forecasts continued shifting climate space for this species, most 
troublingly with only 23% remaining stable in winter, and a concurrent 26% 
reduction in suitable winter space. 

Subject: Red-breasted Merganser- Faulkner
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 12:44:26 -0600
Male Red-breasted Merganser on Beaverfork Lake in Faulkner County. It may be 
the same one that was hanging around the Petco parking lot. 


Michael Linz(Conway)
Subject: Fw: Fwd: Trail camera revelations
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 10:49:48 -0600
Deer predation on bird nests was also documented by Tall Timbers with their 
research showing deer predation Northern Bobwhite nests. 

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

The March/April 2017 issue of Bird Watcher’s Digest has an interesting review 
article of trail camera videos that show White-tailed Deer eat bird eggs and 
nestlings from nests 

on the ground up to the height of browse reach; and, observations of deer 
removing and devouring birds from mist nets as well as dead birds and 
squirrels. Apparently, this 

behavior occurs during the period of gestation and antler growth when deer are 
stressed for dietary calcium. Thus, in areas of high density, they may have a 
negative impact 

on bird populations.

Also the program for the upcoming meeting of the Texas Academy of Science 
(March 3-5), has an abstract of the paper reporting videos and hair samples of 
a Red Wolf from the 

Environmental Studies Area of East Texas Baptist University in Marshall, Texas.
Subject: Cackling goose
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 17:12:05 -0600
is back at  Lake Catherine State Park today. There were 6 Canada geese, it
and two blue herons today.  Raindrops got everything else hiding hopefully
in a dry area.   Teresa, Hot Springs, AR

-- 
The Future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams!
Eleanor Roosevelt
Subject: Halberg Ecology Canp
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:22:26 -0600
Arbirders:

The dates for the 2017 Halberg Ecology Camp have been confirmed. They are
June 11-16 and June 18-23.

The application and information forms are available for download on the
arbirds.org website on the camp page.

Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster
Subject: Re: Flycatcher
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 14:38:59 -0600
Teresa/all,

I'm a Louisiana birder, and I can maybe offer some assistance here. 

Most flycatchers species very very rarely show up during winter or this early 
for spring. But as far as small, drab flycatchers that might show up, I'd 
consider Western Wood-Pewee as a possibility and for 2 reasons. One, pewees 
generally return to the same perch several times before they use a separate 
perch. Empids typically don't. What Teresa describes sounds more like a pewee 
behavior. (Also, Empids constantly bob their tails like phoebes; no mention of 
that in the post.) Two, we expect someone to claim Western Wood-Pewees in 
Cameron Parish (southwestern corner of the state) about 1-3 times from about 
November through winter. I say "claim" because unless you get a vocalization 
(preferably recorded), it won't be an accepted record. Nor should it be. 


Here's why. Most birders can identify pewee songs, but visually distinguishing 
them from Empids in the field is extremely difficult for most birders. I'd 
guess the vast majority of birders can't do it by sight alone. LSU has some 
Empid specimens that have gone unidentified to species for years. That's how 
difficult they are to identify! The truth is, the field guide probably wouldn't 
have helped anyway. Vocalizations are pretty much the only way to be safe with 
most small, drab flycatchers. Now, to be clear, I'm not saying, "I know how to 
ID them all, but no one else does." I'm saying, "Many people think id-ing 
small, drab flycatchers can be done with a field guide, and that's just not the 
case most of the time for several species." It takes vocalizations, and it 
takes lots and lots and lots of familiarity with all the species. 


Anyway, I'd lean Eastern Phoebe first (and they don't bob their tails 
sometimes, particularly when they are in a place that's unlikely to have 
predators) because they're our default flycatcher herr in winter, but then I'd 
start thinking WEWP or something else unusual. If you find it again, use some 
playback (not with careless abandon) and see if it calls back. Should be worth 
checking out. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 21, 2017, at 12:01 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
> 
> I agree with Herschel too.
> J
> 
>> On Feb 21, 2017, at 10:00 AM, swamp_fox  wrote:
>> 
>> I agree with Herschel.  
>> 
>> When I read Phillip Hyatt’s post, I took it as tongue-in-cheek and not at 
all condescending or insulting. Phillip’s post didn’t even come close to 
one made last November by a “master gardener, professional birder” that 
made a big to do about getting paid to bird, who has an Audubon bird friendly 
yard and who flat out insulted one of the best all around naturalists in the 
state that happened to share a different opinion about a proposed master birder 
program. In contrast to Phillip’s post, that one made my blood boil to the 
point I questioned the list moderator as to how this person’s posting 
privileges could not at least be temporarily-if not permanently-suspended. 

>> 
>> It is important to report bird sightings-even those with uncertain IDs-to 
ARBirds, to the AAS, etc. It should also be understood the more unusual reports 
will be scrutinized by the ABRC among others but this isn’t meant to 
denigrate the observer or imply their ID was incorrect though perhaps it might 
initially appear that way to some. It is meant to insure that bogus records 
don’t find their way into the AAS database. Flycatchers, other than Eastern 
Phoebes and the occasional Say’s Phoebe, Vermilion Flycatcher, Tyrannus 
species? kingbird, or Myiarchus species? flycatcher, etc. aren’t to be 
expected in Arkansas during the winter. Even with no more information than she 
could provide, Teresa’s post to ARBird was appropriate and I would encourage 
her to keep submitting reports and ignore, real or imagined, negative posts 
made in response. Heck, I’ve had more than just a few reports questioned over 
the years (including some no less with photographs); yet, I still make them 
because, in the whole scheme of things, they belong in some fashion in the 
official record. Even if challenged, all observers do get a chance to prove 
stated ID. That was something taught to me decades ago by Doug James and the 
improvement to my birding skills because of it remains inestimable. I am 
forever grateful to him for that. 

>> 
>> Thank you Kim for hopefully allowing me this extremely rare, perhaps 
marginally relevant post. If the rain will just stop, I’ll go birding and 
maybe find some actual birds good enough to post about. Maybe they will be some 
Sandhill Cranes that surely will be departing northwestward soon. That would 
make me smile. 

>> 
>> Charles Mills
>> A non-professional but a pretty darn good birder/photographer
>> Texarkana TX 75503
>> 
>> 
>>> On Feb 21, 2017, at 7:42 AM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> The only experts I know are Nichols, Nichols and Mills. Maybe I am missing 
somebody. I don’t know. I apologize if so. If I call myself an expert than 
please feel free to mock or slap me as appropriate. 

>>> 
>>> There are no Empid experts. I think they all killed themselves. 
>>> 
>>> This bird is interesting most likely for arrival time since Teresa seems to 
know a Phoebe. In this warm year things are going to start shifting early and 
setting records. An Acadian or Alder at this date I think would be a record 
anywhere in the state. (I did not check.) Alders have a long way to go. And 
seeing bugs flying early everywhere they went they might just say “Alaska 
here I come.” They are notoriously quiet on the way north. 

>>> 
>>> I have seen bugs all week. Come on flycatchers is all I can say. And if 
Teresa is in the woods every day here then let her type what she wants to. She 
is living better than I am. 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Herschel Raney
>>> 
>>> Conway AR
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Flycatcher
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock AT ARKTIMES.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 14:32:13 -0600
Empids just make me want to say, "Quick, three beers!" and forget about it.

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Karen Holliday  wrote:

> Herschel posted one of the best lines ever-- "There are no Empid experts.
> I think they all killed themselves."  I almost fell off my chair laughing!
> I'm just an ordinary birder and Empids make me want to throw myself off a
> cliff because they never sing when you need them to!
> Karen Holliday
> Maumelle/Little Rock
>
>
> On Tuesday, February 21, 2017 7:42 AM, Herschel Raney <
> herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET> wrote:
>
>
> The only experts I know are Nichols, Nichols and Mills. Maybe I am missing
> somebody. I don’t know. I apologize if so. If I call myself an expert than
> please feel free to mock or slap me as appropriate.
> There are no Empid experts. I think they all killed themselves.
> This bird is interesting most likely for arrival time since Teresa seems
> to know a Phoebe. In this warm year things are going to start shifting
> early and setting records. An Acadian or Alder at this date I think would
> be a record anywhere in the state. (I did not check.) Alders have a long
> way to go. And seeing bugs flying early everywhere they went they might
> just say “Alaska here I come.” They are notoriously quiet on the way 
north. 

> I have seen bugs all week. Come on flycatchers is all I can say. And if
> Teresa is in the woods every day here then let her type what she wants to.
> She is living better than I am.
>
> Herschel Raney
> Conway AR
>
>
>


-- 
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*
Subject: Re: Its sad to think that?
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 19:50:42 +0000
Thanks Tom. Teresa, one of my former students told me once (about 35 years ago) 
that he saw my roll as an “encourager.” To date, as a teacher, that was the 
best compliment I every received from a student. Ignore the know-it-alls, 
arrogance, etc. We all have a place in the world. We walk to different drummers 
(my friends even sometimes call me “weird”) and I just keep on marching to 
that faraway, distant beat that is all my own. 

Thanks to all of you who are encouragers, in any field, to teach, to open eyes 
to possibilities and to be a friend to all. 

Happy birding, and keep your eyes open – up, down and faraway. Some new bird 
is just on the horizon. 

Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Bob Harden 

Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 1:40 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Its sad to think that?

Teresa....and all who might feel the same. I enjoy your posts and endeavor to 
bird that way sometime soon. There is a little arrogance on Arbird 
sometimes...and there are some people who post dumb stuff and don't want to 
learn or be corrected. There is also alot of great experience to draw from on 
this post. Please be patient and forgiving while also speaking about what you 
see and experience. 


On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 6:24 AM, Tom Harden 
> wrote: 

Sadly, I agree with Teresa. I refrain from posting anything....sorry to say it. 


Take Care,
Tom Harden

________________________________
From: Teresa Mathews 
> 

To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Sent: Monday, February 20, 2017 8:16 PM
Subject: Its sad to think that?

The reason new birders do not post on Arbird is that they get sarcasm remarks 
that I just got for my sighting. I am sorry I posted at all. Not even Leif 
would had said something so mean to me and he prides himself on being an expert 
that helps birders. Its also funny that it took someone like me? Being at a 
state park that no one goes to see such birds at all this last weekend. I leave 
ARbird to the know it all experts. 

Teresa  in Hot Springs, AR



Subject: The rain did stop and I did smile because....
From: Charles H Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 13:38:20 -0600
....I was still able to find 40 Sandhill Cranes and 36 second year White Ibis.

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Its sad to think that?
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 13:40:28 -0600
Teresa....and all who might feel the same.   I enjoy your posts and
endeavor to bird that way sometime soon.   There is a little arrogance on
Arbird sometimes...and there are some people who post dumb stuff and don't
want to learn or be corrected.  There is also alot of great experience to
draw from on this post.   Please be patient and forgiving while also
speaking about what you see and experience.

On Tue, Feb 21, 2017 at 6:24 AM, Tom Harden  wrote:

> Sadly, I agree with Teresa.  I refrain from posting anything....sorry to
> say it.
>
> *Take Care,*
> *Tom Harden*
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Teresa Mathews 
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Sent:* Monday, February 20, 2017 8:16 PM
> *Subject:* Its sad to think that?
>
> The reason new birders do not post on Arbird is that they get sarcasm
> remarks that I just got for my sighting.   I am sorry I posted at all.
> Not even Leif would had said something so mean to me and he prides himself
> on being an expert that helps birders.    Its also funny that it took
> someone like me? Being at a state park that no one goes to see such birds
> at all this last weekend.   I leave ARbird to the know it all experts.
> Teresa  in Hot Springs, AR
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Flycatcher
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 12:01:38 -0600
I agree with Herschel too.
J

On Feb 21, 2017, at 10:00 AM, swamp_fox  wrote:

> I agree with Herschel.  
> 
> When I read Phillip Hyatts post, I took it as tongue-in-cheek and not at all 
condescending or insulting. Phillips post didnt even come close to one made 
last November by a master gardener, professional birder that made a big to do 
about getting paid to bird, who has an Audubon bird friendly yard and who flat 
out insulted one of the best all around naturalists in the state that happened 
to share a different opinion about a proposed master birder program. In 
contrast to Phillips post, that one made my blood boil to the point I 
questioned the list moderator as to how this persons posting privileges could 
not at least be temporarily-if not permanently-suspended. 

> 
> It is important to report bird sightings-even those with uncertain IDs-to 
ARBirds, to the AAS, etc. It should also be understood the more unusual reports 
will be scrutinized by the ABRC among others but this isnt meant to denigrate 
the observer or imply their ID was incorrect though perhaps it might initially 
appear that way to some. It is meant to insure that bogus records dont find 
their way into the AAS database. Flycatchers, other than Eastern Phoebes and 
the occasional Says Phoebe, Vermilion Flycatcher, Tyrannus species? kingbird, 
or Myiarchus species? flycatcher, etc. arent to be expected in Arkansas during 
the winter. Even with no more information than she could provide, Teresas post 
to ARBird was appropriate and I would encourage her to keep submitting reports 
and ignore, real or imagined, negative posts made in response. Heck, Ive had 
more than just a few reports questioned over the years (including some no less 
with photographs); yet, I still make them because, in the whole scheme of 
things, they belong in some fashion in the official record. Even if challenged, 
all observers do get a chance to prove stated ID. That was something taught to 
me decades ago by Doug James and the improvement to my birding skills because 
of it remains inestimable. I am forever grateful to him for that. 

> 
> Thank you Kim for hopefully allowing me this extremely rare, perhaps 
marginally relevant post. If the rain will just stop, Ill go birding and maybe 
find some actual birds good enough to post about. Maybe they will be some 
Sandhill Cranes that surely will be departing northwestward soon. That would 
make me smile. 

> 
> Charles Mills
> A non-professional but a pretty darn good birder/photographer
> Texarkana TX 75503
> 
> 
>> On Feb 21, 2017, at 7:42 AM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> The only experts I know are Nichols, Nichols and Mills. Maybe I am missing 
somebody. I dont know. I apologize if so. If I call myself an expert than 
please feel free to mock or slap me as appropriate. 

>> 
>> There are no Empid experts. I think they all killed themselves. 
>> 
>> This bird is interesting most likely for arrival time since Teresa seems to 
know a Phoebe. In this warm year things are going to start shifting early and 
setting records. An Acadian or Alder at this date I think would be a record 
anywhere in the state. (I did not check.) Alders have a long way to go. And 
seeing bugs flying early everywhere they went they might just say Alaska here 
I come. They are notoriously quiet on the way north. 

>> 
>> I have seen bugs all week. Come on flycatchers is all I can say. And if 
Teresa is in the woods every day here then let her type what she wants to. She 
is living better than I am. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Herschel Raney
>> 
>> Conway AR
>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Flycatcher
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:59:58 -0600
Teresa, I have always enjoyed your very interesting and detailed observations. 
I still have your description of the "fallout of hummingbirds" from last May... 
fascinating. So please don't be discouraged. I believed your flycatcher 
sighting and I frequently see birds that defy identification. 

Our friend Joe Neal often calls these mystery birds "the one that got away".

Thanks, Herschel, for saying this.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 
On Feb 21, 2017, at 7:42 AM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 


> The only experts I know are Nichols, Nichols and Mills. Maybe I am missing 
somebody. I dont know. I apologize if so. If I call myself an expert than 
please feel free to mock or slap me as appropriate. 

> 
> There are no Empid experts. I think they all killed themselves.
> 
> This bird is interesting most likely for arrival time since Teresa seems to 
know a Phoebe. In this warm year things are going to start shifting early and 
setting records. An Acadian or Alder at this date I think would be a record 
anywhere in the state. (I did not check.) Alders have a long way to go. And 
seeing bugs flying early everywhere they went they might just say Alaska here 
I come. They are notoriously quiet on the way north. 

> 
> I have seen bugs all week. Come on flycatchers is all I can say. And if 
Teresa is in the woods every day here then let her type what she wants to. She 
is living better than I am. 

> 
> Herschel Raney
> 
> Conway AR
> 
> 
Subject: Great-tailed Grackles
From: Devin Moon <moondevg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:47:47 -0600
I am currently looking at 3 Great-tailed Grackles, about 200 Common Grackles 
(flyover), House Sparrows, and Starlings in the Love's travel center parking 
lot in Prescott (just off of I-30). Although this appears to be one of the 
better locales to find the GTs in SW AR, this is my first sighting of them 
here. 


Devin Moon

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: yard bird
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 17:40:57 +0000
OK.  I stand corrected.  Its a female Purple Finch according to Dan Schieman.
Sally Jo Gibson,
Harrison, AR

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Sally Jo Gibson 

Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 9:54 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: yard bird

Sitting here in my nest from Birdsview Solarium, counting birds for the GBBC 
yesterday, I didnt believe my eyes when I spotted a female Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak. I kept taking pictures, as I am wont to do every day, and dismissed 
the sighting. However, after seeing Alan Gregorys post with his picture of the 
male RBGR last evening, I went back this morning and reviewed my pictures 
(being an amateur, I take pictures, not photographs.) Sure enough, I did 
take a shot of a female RBGR at my water feature!!! First of year and very 
early. Thanks, Alan, for your picture that gave me confidence to post this. 

Sally Jo Gibson
From Birdsview Solarium
Harrison, Arkansas

PS: picture will be posted in Arkansas Birds on Facebook when I get a round 
tuit. 

Subject: Re: Hawk trifecta
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:54:50 +0000
I agree, Jerry. Wayne was three times as lucky in one day as I have been in my 
whole life! 



Bill


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Jerry Butler  

Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 8:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Hawk trifecta

One of the more spectacular observations that birdwatchers see first hand is 
the taking of prey by raptors. Wayne Lynch, of the Garland Couty Hot Springs 
Audobon Society, was lucky enough to see it three times in one day. Wayne is an 
electrician and while working on a job saw a Coopers Hawk snatch a titmouse 
from a bird feeder, later that same morning he saw a red-shoudered hawk catch a 
squirrel from the yard of the same residence. As he was retuned to the job site 
after lunch he saw another red-shoudererd dive into a ditch nearby and come up 
with a snake. With luck like that, Wayne needs to take us Oaklawn!. 


Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: Re: Flycatcher
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:47:21 +0000
Herschel posted one of the best lines ever-- "There are no Empid experts.  I 
think they all killed themselves."  I almost fell off my chair laughing!  I'm 
just an ordinary birder and Empids make me want to throw myself off a cliff 
because they never sing when you need them to!Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little 
Rock 


 On Tuesday, February 21, 2017 7:42 AM, Herschel Raney 
 wrote: 

 

 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Re: Flycatcher
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 10:24:15 -0600
Hear, hear, Charles!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 21, 2017, at 10:00 AM, swamp_fox  wrote:
> 
> I agree with Herschel.  
> 
> When I read Phillip Hyatt’s post, I took it as tongue-in-cheek and not at 
all condescending or insulting. Phillip’s post didn’t even come close to 
one made last November by a “master gardener, professional birder” that 
made a big to do about getting paid to bird, who has an Audubon bird friendly 
yard and who flat out insulted one of the best all around naturalists in the 
state that happened to share a different opinion about a proposed master birder 
program. In contrast to Phillip’s post, that one made my blood boil to the 
point I questioned the list moderator as to how this person’s posting 
privileges could not at least be temporarily-if not permanently-suspended. 

> 
> It is important to report bird sightings-even those with uncertain IDs-to 
ARBirds, to the AAS, etc. It should also be understood the more unusual reports 
will be scrutinized by the ABRC among others but this isn’t meant to 
denigrate the observer or imply their ID was incorrect though perhaps it might 
initially appear that way to some. It is meant to insure that bogus records 
don’t find their way into the AAS database. Flycatchers, other than Eastern 
Phoebes and the occasional Say’s Phoebe, Vermilion Flycatcher, Tyrannus 
species? kingbird, or Myiarchus species? flycatcher, etc. aren’t to be 
expected in Arkansas during the winter. Even with no more information than she 
could provide, Teresa’s post to ARBird was appropriate and I would encourage 
her to keep submitting reports and ignore, real or imagined, negative posts 
made in response. Heck, I’ve had more than just a few reports questioned over 
the years (including some no less with photographs); yet, I still make them 
because, in the whole scheme of things, they belong in some fashion in the 
official record. Even if challenged, all observers do get a chance to prove 
stated ID. That was something taught to me decades ago by Doug James and the 
improvement to my birding skills because of it remains inestimable. I am 
forever grateful to him for that. 

> 
> Thank you Kim for hopefully allowing me this extremely rare, perhaps 
marginally relevant post. If the rain will just stop, I’ll go birding and 
maybe find some actual birds good enough to post about. Maybe they will be some 
Sandhill Cranes that surely will be departing northwestward soon. That would 
make me smile. 

> 
> Charles Mills
> A non-professional but a pretty darn good birder/photographer
> Texarkana TX 75503
> 
> 
>> On Feb 21, 2017, at 7:42 AM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> The only experts I know are Nichols, Nichols and Mills. Maybe I am missing 
somebody. I don’t know. I apologize if so. If I call myself an expert than 
please feel free to mock or slap me as appropriate. 

>> 
>> There are no Empid experts. I think they all killed themselves. 
>> 
>> This bird is interesting most likely for arrival time since Teresa seems to 
know a Phoebe. In this warm year things are going to start shifting early and 
setting records. An Acadian or Alder at this date I think would be a record 
anywhere in the state. (I did not check.) Alders have a long way to go. And 
seeing bugs flying early everywhere they went they might just say “Alaska 
here I come.” They are notoriously quiet on the way north. 

>> 
>> I have seen bugs all week. Come on flycatchers is all I can say. And if 
Teresa is in the woods every day here then let her type what she wants to. She 
is living better than I am. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Herschel Raney
>> 
>> Conway AR
>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Flycatcher
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 10:00:11 -0600
I agree with Herschel.  

When I read Phillip Hyatt’s post, I took it as tongue-in-cheek and not at all 
condescending or insulting. Phillip’s post didn’t even come close to one 
made last November by a “master gardener, professional birder” that made a 
big to do about getting paid to bird, who has an Audubon bird friendly yard and 
who flat out insulted one of the best all around naturalists in the state that 
happened to share a different opinion about a proposed master birder program. 
In contrast to Phillip’s post, that one made my blood boil to the point I 
questioned the list moderator as to how this person’s posting privileges 
could not at least be temporarily-if not permanently-suspended. 


It is important to report bird sightings-even those with uncertain IDs-to 
ARBirds, to the AAS, etc. It should also be understood the more unusual reports 
will be scrutinized by the ABRC among others but this isn’t meant to 
denigrate the observer or imply their ID was incorrect though perhaps it might 
initially appear that way to some. It is meant to insure that bogus records 
don’t find their way into the AAS database. Flycatchers, other than Eastern 
Phoebes and the occasional Say’s Phoebe, Vermilion Flycatcher, Tyrannus 
species? kingbird, or Myiarchus species? flycatcher, etc. aren’t to be 
expected in Arkansas during the winter. Even with no more information than she 
could provide, Teresa’s post to ARBird was appropriate and I would encourage 
her to keep submitting reports and ignore, real or imagined, negative posts 
made in response. Heck, I’ve had more than just a few reports questioned over 
the years (including some no less with photographs); yet, I still make them 
because, in the whole scheme of things, they belong in some fashion in the 
official record. Even if challenged, all observers do get a chance to prove 
stated ID. That was something taught to me decades ago by Doug James and the 
improvement to my birding skills because of it remains inestimable. I am 
forever grateful to him for that. 


Thank you Kim for hopefully allowing me this extremely rare, perhaps marginally 
relevant post. If the rain will just stop, I’ll go birding and maybe find 
some actual birds good enough to post about. Maybe they will be some Sandhill 
Cranes that surely will be departing northwestward soon. That would make me 
smile. 


Charles Mills
A non-professional but a pretty darn good birder/photographer
Texarkana TX 75503


> On Feb 21, 2017, at 7:42 AM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> 
> The only experts I know are Nichols, Nichols and Mills. Maybe I am missing 
somebody. I don’t know. I apologize if so. If I call myself an expert than 
please feel free to mock or slap me as appropriate. 

> 
> There are no Empid experts. I think they all killed themselves. 
> 
> This bird is interesting most likely for arrival time since Teresa seems to 
know a Phoebe. In this warm year things are going to start shifting early and 
setting records. An Acadian or Alder at this date I think would be a record 
anywhere in the state. (I did not check.) Alders have a long way to go. And 
seeing bugs flying early everywhere they went they might just say “Alaska 
here I come.” They are notoriously quiet on the way north. 

> 
> I have seen bugs all week. Come on flycatchers is all I can say. And if 
Teresa is in the woods every day here then let her type what she wants to. She 
is living better than I am. 

> 
> 
> 
> Herschel Raney
> 
> Conway AR
> 
> 
Subject: yard bird
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:53:43 +0000
Sitting here in my nest from Birdsview Solarium, counting birds for the GBBC 
yesterday, I didnt believe my eyes when I spotted a female Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak. I kept taking pictures, as I am wont to do every day, and dismissed 
the sighting. However, after seeing Alan Gregorys post with his picture of the 
male RBGR last evening, I went back this morning and reviewed my pictures 
(being an amateur, I take pictures, not photographs.) Sure enough, I did 
take a shot of a female RBGR at my water feature!!! First of year and very 
early. Thanks, Alan, for your picture that gave me confidence to post this. 

Sally Jo Gibson
From Birdsview Solarium
Harrison, Arkansas

PS: picture will be posted in Arkansas Birds on Facebook when I get a round 
tuit. 

Subject: Hawk trifecta
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:08:38 -0600
One of the more spectacular observations that birdwatchers see first
hand is the taking of prey by raptors.  Wayne Lynch, of the Garland Couty
Hot Springs Audobon Society, was lucky enough to see it three times in one
day.  Wayne is an electrician and while working on a job saw a Coopers Hawk
snatch a titmouse from a bird feeder, later that same morning he saw a
red-shoudered hawk catch a squirrel from the yard of the same residence.
As he was retuned to the job site after lunch he saw another red-shoudererd
dive into a ditch nearby and come up with a snake.  With luck like that,
Wayne needs to take us Oaklawn!.

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
Subject: Re: February
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:07:52 -0600
I can remember that about 50 years ago, my great aunt had a place outside the 
little town of Mansfield in NW AR. She had a hammock outside that she would 
rest in and the vultures would circle above her whenever she was in it. When 
she would get up, they would leave. She thought it was very funny. 

David Ray 
NLR 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 21, 2017, at 2:39 AM, bill .  wrote:
> 
> Hi Herschel and everyone,
> 
> 
> Great story as always!
> 
> The Turkey Vulture incident reminds me of one experience here near my home in 
Enid, Ok where a Turkey Vulture did take notice of me. I was walking along a 
paved road with long zoom compact camera in hand when i saw a small group of 
Turkey Vultures perched atop some large electrical towers. It was morning and i 
assume they were waiting for the air to warm and thermals to become favorable. 
I watched for some time, but they were little more than blobs to my camera 
screen at full zoom. Finally they went from stationary to preening, then to 
extending wings. A couple tried short flights as if testing wind conditions. 
When they began to get aloft they started circling over the towers, but one 
veered off in my direction. I was pleased to finally have a possible subject 
within range, and grew more excited as it came closer. After circling low over 
me for a bit, the bird actually perched on the pole nearest me. I cautiously 
moved closer not wanting to scare it, but the vulture just sat and looked down 
at me for some time allowing some memorable (to me) pics. As i was engrossed in 
this experience, i noticed that i had moved from the side of the road and was 
standing smack on the yellow line. There was little danger as traffic is sparse 
on this particular stretch, but it occurred to me the vulture might well be 
waiting patiently for this idiot in the middle of the road to become its next 
meal! 

> 
> 
> Vultures and hummers have to be my favorite birds. An odd combination i know, 
but both majestic in their own ways. How few creatures can feed and continue to 
exist while doing little harm to others, and even fulfill useful purposes! 

> 
> 
> peace
> 
> bill
> 
> enid garfield ok
> 
> 
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Herschel Raney  

> Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2017 6:08 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] February
>  
> February 19th and all three of my Hellebore are blooming. A cure in ancient 
Greece for depression. Not the blooming, or the witnessing of the blooming, but 
some wild concoction made from the leaves. 

> 
> In Baxter county this weekend and the geese were flying northward. Several 
large flocks of Snows and some moderate sized flocks of White-fronts. The Snows 
carried some Ross’ with them. Day and night they streamed. In the evening on 
the 18th they rolled over the stars of Perseus and Cassiopeia. Making me aware, 
as they always do, of the distances. Venus was in crescent. And so bright that 
it was astounding. I kept hoping to see a goose silhouette the entire bright 
point of Venus. It never happened. But they did just brush west of the North 
star. 

> 
> The Peepers were calling in Baxter and back at my own house the Chorus frog 
concert is too intense for February. I fear for their lives these next few 
weeks. 

> 
> The door to the back deck is open as I type this. My wife calls out that the 
Barred Owls are calling in the oaks. I run down. And find silence. I make some 
whoop-woos. But get back only Carolina Wrens and the twitch of dusking 
Cardinals. 

> 
> Otherwise up in Baxter County this morning the Jays were my friends. I sat 
among them and listened as they kept switching their contact calls in four 
directions. Clearly they were just talking to each other. Some kind of 
reassurance among friends and family. Pee-jerrr calls and then high hawk 
whistles. I saw several Krider’s Red tails on the way up there to the county. 
None from my deck over the lake. But a Sharpie perched up at sundown surveying 
the sloping world down to Norfork. Scoped it. And then launched and gone, I 
don’t know the dramas afterward: failure, success, blood, sleep. I do not 
know. 

> 
> Turkey Vultures also entertained me in their beautiful tilting flight at dusk 
in north Arkansas. All headed west, towards some night perch I did not know. I 
would go and find it if I lived there. But as an alien visitor, I just 
appreciated the journeying past. I was unnoticed. Down below as usual. 
Insignificant, as I likely deserve. When I am noticed by vultures, then things 
have gone very far south. Air burial, as they have it in Asia, or did before 
all the vultures died off, is not as bad as sounds. Lifted in bites towards 
everywhere, and then gone. I can think of worse. Stardust anyway; stardust 
again. 

> 
> But not now though. Not yet. Right now, in the eyes of a gliding vulture, I 
am nothing. And this, as I say, is just what I deserve. Right now I like being 
the watcher, still awake. And hoping for more tomorrow. 

> 
> Herschel Raney
> 
> Conway AR
Subject: Re: February
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 07:44:43 -0600
Love the thought of a big roadkill a-comin'!  Patience pays-off, sometimes.

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of bill .
Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 2:39 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: February

 

Hi Herschel and everyone,

 

Great story as always!

The Turkey Vulture incident reminds me of one experience here near my home
in Enid, Ok where a Turkey Vulture did take notice of me. I was walking
along a paved road with long zoom compact camera in hand when i saw a small
group of Turkey Vultures perched atop some large electrical towers. It was
morning and i assume they were waiting for the air to warm and thermals to
become favorable. I watched for some time, but they were little more than
blobs to my camera screen at full zoom. Finally they went from stationary to
preening, then to extending wings. A couple tried short flights as if
testing wind conditions. When they began to get aloft they started circling
over the towers, but one veered off in my direction. I was pleased to
finally have a possible subject within range, and grew more excited as it
came closer. After circling low over me for a bit, the bird actually perched
on the pole nearest me. I cautiously moved closer not wanting to scare it,
but the vulture just sat and looked down at me for some time allowing some
memorable (to me) pics. As i was engrossed in this experience, i noticed
that i had moved from the side of the road and was standing smack on the
yellow line. There was little danger as traffic is sparse on this particular
stretch, but it occurred to me the vulture might well be waiting patiently
for this idiot in the middle of the road to become its next meal!

 

Vultures and hummers have to be my favorite birds. An odd combination i
know, but both majestic in their own ways. How few creatures can feed and
continue to exist while doing little harm to others, and even fulfill useful
purposes!

 

peace

bill

enid garfield ok

 

  _____  

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on
behalf of Herschel Raney 
Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2017 6:08 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] February 

 

February 19th and all three of my Hellebore are blooming. A cure in ancient
Greece for depression. Not the blooming, or the witnessing of the blooming,
but some wild concoction made from the leaves. 

In Baxter county this weekend and the geese were flying northward. Several
large flocks of Snows and some moderate sized flocks of White-fronts. The
Snows carried some Ross' with them. Day and night they streamed. In the
evening on the 18th they rolled over the stars of Perseus and Cassiopeia.
Making me aware, as they always do, of the distances. Venus was in crescent.
And so bright that it was astounding. I kept hoping to see a goose
silhouette the entire bright point of Venus. It never happened. But they did
just brush west of the North star. 

The Peepers were calling in Baxter and back at my own house the Chorus frog
concert is too intense for February. I fear for their lives these next few
weeks. 

The door to the back deck is open as I type this. My wife calls out that the
Barred Owls are calling in the oaks. I run down. And find silence. I make
some whoop-woos. But get back only Carolina Wrens and the twitch of dusking
Cardinals. 

Otherwise up in Baxter County this morning the Jays were my friends. I sat
among them and listened as they kept switching their contact calls in four
directions. Clearly they were just talking to each other. Some kind of
reassurance among friends and family. Pee-jerrr calls and then high hawk
whistles. I saw several Krider's Red tails on the way up there to the
county. None from my deck over the lake. But a Sharpie perched up at sundown
surveying the sloping world down to Norfork. Scoped it. And then launched
and gone, I don't know the dramas afterward: failure, success, blood, sleep.
I do not know. 

Turkey Vultures also entertained me in their beautiful tilting flight at
dusk in north Arkansas. All headed west, towards some night perch I did not
know. I would go and find it if I lived there. But as an alien visitor, I
just appreciated the journeying past. I was unnoticed. Down below as usual.
Insignificant, as I likely deserve. When I am noticed by vultures, then
things have gone very far south. Air burial, as they have it in Asia, or did
before all the vultures died off, is not as bad as sounds. Lifted in bites
towards everywhere, and then gone. I can think of worse. Stardust anyway;
stardust again. 

But not now though. Not yet. Right now, in the eyes of a gliding vulture, I
am nothing. And this, as I say, is just what I deserve. Right now I like
being the watcher, still awake. And hoping for more tomorrow. 

 

Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Flycatcher
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 07:42:13 -0600
The only experts I know are Nichols, Nichols and Mills. Maybe I am 
missing somebody. I don’t know. I apologize if so. If I call myself an 
expert than please feel free to mock or slap me as appropriate.

There are no Empid experts. I think they all killed themselves.

This bird is interesting most likely for arrival time since Teresa seems 
to know a Phoebe. In this warm year things are going to start shifting 
early and setting records. An Acadian or Alder at this date I think 
would be a record anywhere in the state. (I did not check.) Alders have 
a long way to go. And seeing bugs flying early everywhere they went they 
might just say “Alaska here I come.” They are notoriously quiet on the 
way north.

I have seen bugs all week. Come on flycatchers is all I can say. And if 
Teresa is in the woods every day here then let her type what she wants 
to. She is living better than I am.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Re: February
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 07:00:15 -0600
I greatly enjoyed both of these reports. I also love to read Teresa's workday 
reports. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 21, 2017, at 2:39 AM, bill .  wrote:
> 
> Hi Herschel and everyone,
> 
> 
> Great story as always!
> 
> The Turkey Vulture incident reminds me of one experience here near my home in 
Enid, Ok where a Turkey Vulture did take notice of me. I was walking along a 
paved road with long zoom compact camera in hand when i saw a small group of 
Turkey Vultures perched atop some large electrical towers. It was morning and i 
assume they were waiting for the air to warm and thermals to become favorable. 
I watched for some time, but they were little more than blobs to my camera 
screen at full zoom. Finally they went from stationary to preening, then to 
extending wings. A couple tried short flights as if testing wind conditions. 
When they began to get aloft they started circling over the towers, but one 
veered off in my direction. I was pleased to finally have a possible subject 
within range, and grew more excited as it came closer. After circling low over 
me for a bit, the bird actually perched on the pole nearest me. I cautiously 
moved closer not wanting to scare it, but the vulture just sat and looked down 
at me for some time allowing some memorable (to me) pics. As i was engrossed in 
this experience, i noticed that i had moved from the side of the road and was 
standing smack on the yellow line. There was little danger as traffic is sparse 
on this particular stretch, but it occurred to me the vulture might well be 
waiting patiently for this idiot in the middle of the road to become its next 
meal! 

> 
> 
> Vultures and hummers have to be my favorite birds. An odd combination i know, 
but both majestic in their own ways. How few creatures can feed and continue to 
exist while doing little harm to others, and even fulfill useful purposes! 

> 
> 
> peace
> 
> bill
> 
> enid garfield ok
> 
> 
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Herschel Raney  

> Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2017 6:08 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] February
>  
> February 19th and all three of my Hellebore are blooming. A cure in ancient 
Greece for depression. Not the blooming, or the witnessing of the blooming, but 
some wild concoction made from the leaves. 

> 
> In Baxter county this weekend and the geese were flying northward. Several 
large flocks of Snows and some moderate sized flocks of White-fronts. The Snows 
carried some Ross’ with them. Day and night they streamed. In the evening on 
the 18th they rolled over the stars of Perseus and Cassiopeia. Making me aware, 
as they always do, of the distances. Venus was in crescent. And so bright that 
it was astounding. I kept hoping to see a goose silhouette the entire bright 
point of Venus. It never happened. But they did just brush west of the North 
star. 

> 
> The Peepers were calling in Baxter and back at my own house the Chorus frog 
concert is too intense for February. I fear for their lives these next few 
weeks. 

> 
> The door to the back deck is open as I type this. My wife calls out that the 
Barred Owls are calling in the oaks. I run down. And find silence. I make some 
whoop-woos. But get back only Carolina Wrens and the twitch of dusking 
Cardinals. 

> 
> Otherwise up in Baxter County this morning the Jays were my friends. I sat 
among them and listened as they kept switching their contact calls in four 
directions. Clearly they were just talking to each other. Some kind of 
reassurance among friends and family. Pee-jerrr calls and then high hawk 
whistles. I saw several Krider’s Red tails on the way up there to the county. 
None from my deck over the lake. But a Sharpie perched up at sundown surveying 
the sloping world down to Norfork. Scoped it. And then launched and gone, I 
don’t know the dramas afterward: failure, success, blood, sleep. I do not 
know. 

> 
> Turkey Vultures also entertained me in their beautiful tilting flight at dusk 
in north Arkansas. All headed west, towards some night perch I did not know. I 
would go and find it if I lived there. But as an alien visitor, I just 
appreciated the journeying past. I was unnoticed. Down below as usual. 
Insignificant, as I likely deserve. When I am noticed by vultures, then things 
have gone very far south. Air burial, as they have it in Asia, or did before 
all the vultures died off, is not as bad as sounds. Lifted in bites towards 
everywhere, and then gone. I can think of worse. Stardust anyway; stardust 
again. 

> 
> But not now though. Not yet. Right now, in the eyes of a gliding vulture, I 
am nothing. And this, as I say, is just what I deserve. Right now I like being 
the watcher, still awake. And hoping for more tomorrow. 

> 
> Herschel Raney
> 
> Conway AR
Subject: Re: Its sad to think that?
From: Tom Harden <ltcnukem AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 12:24:50 +0000
Sadly, I agree with Teresa.  I refrain from posting anything....sorry to say 
it. Take Care,Tom Harden 


      From: Teresa Mathews 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Monday, February 20, 2017 8:16 PM
 Subject: Its sad to think that?
   
The reason new birders do not post on Arbird is that they get sarcasm remarks 
that I just got for my sighting.   I am sorry I posted at all.   Not even 
Leif would had said something so mean to me and he prides himself on being an 
expert that helps birders.    Its also funny that it took someone like me? 
Being at a state park that no one goes to see such birds at all this last 
weekend.   I leave ARbird to the know it all experts.Teresa  in Hot Springs, 
AR  




   
Subject: Re: February
From: "bill ." <billwx AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:39:13 +0000
Hi Herschel and everyone,


Great story as always!

The Turkey Vulture incident reminds me of one experience here near my home in 
Enid, Ok where a Turkey Vulture did take notice of me. I was walking along a 
paved road with long zoom compact camera in hand when i saw a small group of 
Turkey Vultures perched atop some large electrical towers. It was morning and i 
assume they were waiting for the air to warm and thermals to become favorable. 
I watched for some time, but they were little more than blobs to my camera 
screen at full zoom. Finally they went from stationary to preening, then to 
extending wings. A couple tried short flights as if testing wind conditions. 
When they began to get aloft they started circling over the towers, but one 
veered off in my direction. I was pleased to finally have a possible subject 
within range, and grew more excited as it came closer. After circling low over 
me for a bit, the bird actually perched on the pole nearest me. I cautiously 
moved closer not wanting to scare it, but the vulture just sat and looked down 
at me for some time allowing some memorable (to me) pics. As i was engrossed in 
this experience, i noticed that i had moved from the side of the road and was 
standing smack on the yellow line. There was little danger as traffic is sparse 
on this particular stretch, but it occurred to me the vulture might well be 
waiting patiently for this idiot in the middle of the road to become its next 
meal! 



Vultures and hummers have to be my favorite birds. An odd combination i know, 
but both majestic in their own ways. How few creatures can feed and continue to 
exist while doing little harm to others, and even fulfill useful purposes! 



peace

bill

enid garfield ok


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Herschel Raney  

Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2017 6:08 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] February

February 19th and all three of my Hellebore are blooming. A cure in ancient 
Greece for depression. Not the blooming, or the witnessing of the blooming, but 
some wild concoction made from the leaves. 

In Baxter county this weekend and the geese were flying northward. Several 
large flocks of Snows and some moderate sized flocks of White-fronts. The Snows 
carried some Ross with them. Day and night they streamed. In the evening on 
the 18th they rolled over the stars of Perseus and Cassiopeia. Making me aware, 
as they always do, of the distances. Venus was in crescent. And so bright that 
it was astounding. I kept hoping to see a goose silhouette the entire bright 
point of Venus. It never happened. But they did just brush west of the North 
star. 

The Peepers were calling in Baxter and back at my own house the Chorus frog 
concert is too intense for February. I fear for their lives these next few 
weeks. 

The door to the back deck is open as I type this. My wife calls out that the 
Barred Owls are calling in the oaks. I run down. And find silence. I make some 
whoop-woos. But get back only Carolina Wrens and the twitch of dusking 
Cardinals. 

Otherwise up in Baxter County this morning the Jays were my friends. I sat 
among them and listened as they kept switching their contact calls in four 
directions. Clearly they were just talking to each other. Some kind of 
reassurance among friends and family. Pee-jerrr calls and then high hawk 
whistles. I saw several Kriders Red tails on the way up there to the county. 
None from my deck over the lake. But a Sharpie perched up at sundown surveying 
the sloping world down to Norfork. Scoped it. And then launched and gone, I 
dont know the dramas afterward: failure, success, blood, sleep. I do not know. 

Turkey Vultures also entertained me in their beautiful tilting flight at dusk 
in north Arkansas. All headed west, towards some night perch I did not know. I 
would go and find it if I lived there. But as an alien visitor, I just 
appreciated the journeying past. I was unnoticed. Down below as usual. 
Insignificant, as I likely deserve. When I am noticed by vultures, then things 
have gone very far south. Air burial, as they have it in Asia, or did before 
all the vultures died off, is not as bad as sounds. Lifted in bites towards 
everywhere, and then gone. I can think of worse. Stardust anyway; stardust 
again. 

But not now though. Not yet. Right now, in the eyes of a gliding vulture, I am 
nothing. And this, as I say, is just what I deserve. Right now I like being the 
watcher, still awake. And hoping for more tomorrow. 


Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: NPR 2/20/17: Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 21:43:25 -0600
Pb poisoning is a serious, environmental toxicity problem for birds, whether
the Pb is consumed from eating carrion or from dabbling.  (I won't mention
the acute health effects of lead shot which are rarely overcome by the
critter.)

The ammo situation has been recognized for decades and has reasonable
replacements available.  (Is this another example of the Nat'l Rifle Ass'n
whining about ammo control?)  

Hunter education could help.  Does the AGFC discuss the non-toxic ammo
alternatives in its publications or meetings?

Aren't all waters required to obtain a Sec 404 permit from the Army Corps of
Engineers considered Federal?

Jeff Short 


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry Haas
Sent: Monday, February 20, 2017 11:26 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: NPR 2/20/17: Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To
Change, Hunters Say

Dear ARBIRDers,

You can't be more timely than this report on NPR today re lead poisoning in
wildlife:

http://www.npr.org/2017/02/20/514290612/lead-ammunition-poisons-wildlife-but
-too-expensive-to-change-hunters-say

A snip from the related article:

"On the day before President Trump's inauguration, the outgoing Obama
administration passed a last-minute directive, banning the use of lead
ammunition and fishing sinkers on federal land."

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas=
Subject: Re: Its sad to think that?
From: Keith de Noble <kdenoble AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 20:30:56 -0600
Everyone needs to knock the chip off their shoulders and look for the
positive, post positive, think positive - or keep your mouth shut and
fingers off the keyboard.

On Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 8:20 PM, Philip E. Hyatt 
wrote:

> I'm sorry you feel that way and apologize.  I was trying to explain
> reality because I was talking about myself, not you.  I find the
> flycatchers impossible to separate and rarely have my bird book when I need
> it.  I've tried desperately to figure out the flycatchers and DID give up
> on them.  pH
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Teresa Mathews 
> Date: Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 8:16 PM
> Subject: Its sad to think that?
> To: ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu
>
>
> The reason new birders do not post on Arbird is that they get sarcasm
> remarks that I just got for my sighting.   I am sorry I posted at all.
> Not even Leif would had said something so mean to me and he prides himself
> on being an expert that helps birders.    Its also funny that it took
> someone like me? Being at a state park that no one goes to see such birds
> at all this last weekend.   I leave ARbird to the know it all experts.
> Teresa  in Hot Springs, AR
>
>
>
>
> --
> pH
> www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
>



-- 
*Keith de Noble*
Subject: Fwd: Its sad to think that?
From: "Philip E. Hyatt" <sedgehead AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 20:20:19 -0600
I'm sorry you feel that way and apologize.  I was trying to explain reality
because I was talking about myself, not you.  I find the flycatchers
impossible to separate and rarely have my bird book when I need it.  I've
tried desperately to figure out the flycatchers and DID give up on them.  pH


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Teresa Mathews 
Date: Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 8:16 PM
Subject: Its sad to think that?
To: ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu


The reason new birders do not post on Arbird is that they get sarcasm
remarks that I just got for my sighting.   I am sorry I posted at all.
Not even Leif would had said something so mean to me and he prides himself
on being an expert that helps birders.    Its also funny that it took
someone like me? Being at a state park that no one goes to see such birds
at all this last weekend.   I leave ARbird to the know it all experts.
Teresa  in Hot Springs, AR




-- 
pH
www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
Subject: Its sad to think that?
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 20:16:32 -0600
The reason new birders do not post on Arbird is that they get sarcasm
remarks that I just got for my sighting.   I am sorry I posted at all.
Not even Leif would had said something so mean to me and he prides himself
on being an expert that helps birders.    Its also funny that it took
someone like me? Being at a state park that no one goes to see such birds
at all this last weekend.   I leave ARbird to the know it all experts.
Teresa  in Hot Springs, AR
Subject: Fwd: Flycatcher help
From: "Philip E. Hyatt" <sedgehead AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 19:54:08 -0600
Two thoughts.  First, you need a bigger lunch box (bird book included).
Second, those guys are notoriously difficult to ID.  If you sing the right
song of the species, you can probably get him / her to react.  But I don't
remember the songs that well and always had a hard time deciding who is
who.  I also have difficulty singing flycatcher these days.  I'd say it was
a flycatcher and let it get away, at this point in life!

Seriously, I think at least two species are best separated by song (or
shotgun for accurate measurements, which I don't recommend; you might hurt
it). pH


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Teresa Mathews 
Date: Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 7:18 PM
Subject: Flycatcher help
To: ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu


It was a Flycatcher of some kind. No idea what it was.  Lake Catherine
State Park today.   I watched it thru my binoculars for nearly my whole
break it danced out of the 10 foot bush to a buggy air space about 3 feet
away then it went back to the same tree limb. Over and over again. It was
thin body more Olive green color than grey. One of the few times I wish I
was more of birder than what I am . I was facing the marina on the back
porch of cabin 11 and the bush was on the edge of the shore to the right of
me, About 40 feet away, above where the water line would be if the lake was
full of water. But it was very definitely a fly catcher species. I know
what Phoebes look like and Peewees but when it comes to a strange
Flycatcher? I have no idea unless I have my book and I not allow to carry
that on my job. I can get by with the binoculars in my lunch box. It was
about  12:30 when I saw it the first time. Then as I was leaving it if it
was the same bird was  in a tree to the left of the visitor center doing
the same thing. Flying out  into the sky and back to the tree limb.  This
time it was about 4:30 when I saw it.   With the rain I doubt it will leave
the park   I work tomorrow but  I won't get a chance to scan the shoreline
looking for it.

  Any local experts that want to try for it?   Teresa, Hot Springs, AR
-- 




-- 
pH
www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
Subject: Flycatcher help
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 19:18:51 -0600
It was a Flycatcher of some kind. No idea what it was.  Lake Catherine
State Park today.   I watched it thru my binoculars for nearly my whole
break it danced out of the 10 foot bush to a buggy air space about 3 feet
away then it went back to the same tree limb. Over and over again. It was
thin body more Olive green color than grey. One of the few times I wish I
was more of birder than what I am . I was facing the marina on the back
porch of cabin 11 and the bush was on the edge of the shore to the right of
me, About 40 feet away, above where the water line would be if the lake was
full of water. But it was very definitely a fly catcher species. I know
what Phoebes look like and Peewees but when it comes to a strange
Flycatcher? I have no idea unless I have my book and I not allow to carry
that on my job. I can get by with the binoculars in my lunch box. It was
about  12:30 when I saw it the first time. Then as I was leaving it if it
was the same bird was  in a tree to the left of the visitor center doing
the same thing. Flying out  into the sky and back to the tree limb.  This
time it was about 4:30 when I saw it.   With the rain I doubt it will leave
the park   I work tomorrow but  I won't get a chance to scan the shoreline
looking for it.

  Any local experts that want to try for it?   Teresa, Hot Springs, AR
--
Subject: Fwd: Fw: Google Alert - Ivory-billed woodpecker
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 17:23:47 -0600
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 4:47 PM
Subject: Fw: Google Alert - Ivory-billed woodpecker
To: akcmueller AT gmail.com




*From:* Google Alerts
*Sent:* Monday, February 20, 2017 4:00 PM
*To:* unklenorm AT adelphia.net
*Subject:* Google Alert - Ivory-billed woodpecker

[image: Google]

 

Ivory-billed woodpecker
Daily update ⋅ February 20, 2017
NEWS

Last Remaining *Ivory*-*Billed Woodpecker* Really Squandering Species'
Final Weeks

 

The Onion (satire)
HOT SPRINGS, AR—Noting that what little time remained was quickly slipping
away, sources confirmed Monday that the last remaining *ivory*-*billed* ...
[image: Google Plus]

 

[image:
Facebook]

 

[image:
Twitter]

 

Flag
as irrelevant

 

See more results

 

| Edit this alert

 

You have received this email because you have subscribed to *Google Alerts*.

Unsubscribe

 

| View all your alerts

 

[image: RSS] Receive this alert as RSS feed


Send Feedback

 




-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Re: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 14:50:27 -0600
How many of you have read the wonderful book by Phillip Hoose, The Race To
Save The Lord God Bird? This book is loaded with "the thrill of victory"
and "the agony of defeat." The last confirmed sighting of the Ivorybill
anywhere near the USA was 1987, in the dense forests of Cuba. Supposedly it
hasn't been seen since around there in an officially confirmed sighting. In
the USA I believe that the Ivorybill very likely was spotted in Arkansas
near the Bayou DeView 13 or so years ago. It was one of the outstanding
things that would have ever made me want to be on this list anyway.
        But what if the count was down to only a half dozen or so
individuals, even a full dozen? There is no way these excessively Wild
birds would have a chance for the future. You can't have them as pets. Any
one or two that would land in a laboratory somewhere is doomed to die
sooner rather than later. The human damage has been done. Back in time some
people referred to them as "dinosaur birds." I can easily see why.
       Let's say that were three females and three males (or even slightly
more than that) left in the southern US. Their chances for survival are
slim to none. Habitat is ever decreasing, not the other way around. The
damage has been done. And if you think this is sad (it is) THIS is only
just the beginning of what's going to happen all over the world for the
next 75 years.


                                                                     Bill
Thurman

On Sun, Feb 19, 2017 at 9:45 PM, Philip E. Hyatt 
wrote:

> *Back yard birds.  *The Robins seem to have increased in numbers and I
> think I hear baby House Sparrows in one of the carport boxes today.  The
> cavity nesters are definitely active!
>
> *Wikipedia and Ivory-billeds *-- if that's not your interest, you can
> skip this note!
>
> Thanks!  The Fox news report may be what got me started on this topic.  I
> do a little birding in Arkansas, but mostly out the kitchen window these
> days.  So, I was just curious.  Wikipedia can, if needed, protect edits
> when someone maliciously messes with a page, or when disagreement exists.
> However, like everything else dealing with Wikipedia and computer
> programming, it takes some learning to navigate the system.  For example,
> your edits are still saved in the website records and if Wikipedia agreed
> with your findings, it might even reinstate them.  But that's biology.  As
> Jim Peck told me, "We need more dead botanists." That is, biology a
> cooperative effort.  We build on the past.  My point?  I could never have
> completed my flora of Baxt. Co. or study of Arkansas sedges without past
> botanists and my work on Arkansas *Carex* will make the flora of Arkansas
> easier to complete.
>
> As for Wikipedia, I edit pages and forget them!  I do it mostly from my
> perspective as an editor, but I have created a few, specifically on the Xin
> River after  I edited a paper on the Scaly-sided Merganser and the Mu US
> Sandyland.  The later page was "recommended for deletion" as being a
> duplicate of the Ordos Desert, but I contented formally that Chinese
> writers had published several articles supporting my claim and cited them
> in my changes.  I see over the years that Wikipedia dropped the proposal to
> drop the Mu US page without me formally or informally saying much of
> anything.  That is, if you cite publications, that will greatly support
> your changes, and if you feel strongly about them, Wikipedia is likely to
> support you, even to the point of blocking changes by others if it is
> important.  For example, they deleted another page I created for a lack of
> citations.
>
> For most of us, in 200 years, few will remember what we edited.  That's
> why my autobio has 300,000 words . . .  someone will still have a copy, I
> suspect!  Now, if I can just finish that Chinese version.  It may last
> longer than me, Wikipedia, and the Ivory-billed controversy!
>
> pH
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: David Luneau 
> Date: Sun, Feb 19, 2017 at 9:10 PM
> Subject: Re: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering
> To: ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu
>
>
> I’ll chime in here.
>
>
>
> I recall many years ago when Wikipedia was brand new and the Arkansas
> Ivory-bill story was also news, I read what it said about the then-new
> story of the Ivory-bill sightings in Arkansas. It was full of errors and
> biased opinions, so I edited it. I figured I knew about as much about the
> subject as anyone else at the time, so I felt somewhat obligated to correct
> the errors. That was the first and last time I ever contributed to a
> Wikipedia page. Someone jumped on my changes within a day and removed
> virtually everything I had contributed. I realized then that it was
> possible to support whatever agenda one might have on a Wikipedia page if
> one was willing to put the time and energy into guarding the page
> continuously. I haven’t been back to the page since, so I don’t know what
> it may say now.
>
>
>
> I still get occasional sighting reports, but nothing that gets me too
> excited. There have been (and still are, I think) active searches taking
> place in Louisiana and the Florida panhandle. There was a news report in
> January of this year regarding a paper published in the online journal
> Heliyon that you can read about and draw your own conclusions here:
> http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/01/25/extinct-or-not-
> new-study-claims-extinct-ivory-billed-woodpecker-is-still-alive.html.
> Michael Collins is the searcher that wrote the paper – some of you may be
> familiar with his searching over the past decade or so in Louisiana.
>
>
>
> If you want to read about the Ivory-bill searching in Arkansas and
> elsewhere, see historic films of an Imperial Woodpecker, and find links to
> all sorts of things related to Ivory-bills, you can start here:
> http://ibwo.org/index.php. I’ve tried to link to as many interesting IBWO
> sites as possible.
>
>
>
> To be clear, the US Fish and Wildlife Service officially accepts the 2004
> sightings and video and continues to protect the Ivory-bill under the
> Endangered Species Act, regardless of what someone might have written at
> Wikipedia or elsewhere.
>
>
>
> M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
>
> Associate Professor of Electronics
>
> University of Arkansas at Little Rock
>
> 2801 S. University Ave.
>
> Little Rock, AR 72204
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Philip E. Hyatt
> *Sent:* Sunday, February 19, 2017 4:25 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* [ARBIRD-L] What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just
> wondering
>
>
>
> The title says it all.  Wikipedia seems to think there's no real confirmed
> sightings which is probably the case.  Otherwise, it would be documented.
>
> ​
>
> Anyone working on it?​
>
>
> --
>
> pH
> www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
>
>
>
> --
> pH
> www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
>
Subject: Re: NPR 2/20/17: Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 12:07:57 -0600
Thanks, Barry.

In addition to its lethality, the protracted, severe suffering caused by 
lead poisoning should compel people to be part of the solution, and use 
non-toxic alternatives.

Janine

On 2/20/2017 11:26 AM, Barry Haas wrote:
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> You can't be more timely than this report on NPR today re lead poisoning in 
wildlife: 

>
> 
http://www.npr.org/2017/02/20/514290612/lead-ammunition-poisons-wildlife-but-too-expensive-to-change-hunters-say 

>
> A snip from the related article:
>
> "On the day before President Trump's inauguration, the outgoing Obama 
administration passed a last-minute directive, banning the use of lead 
ammunition and fishing sinkers on federal land." 

>
>  From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
Subject: NPR 2/20/17: Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:26:15 -0600
Dear ARBIRDers,

You can't be more timely than this report on NPR today re lead poisoning in 
wildlife: 



http://www.npr.org/2017/02/20/514290612/lead-ammunition-poisons-wildlife-but-too-expensive-to-change-hunters-say 


A snip from the related article:

"On the day before President Trump's inauguration, the outgoing Obama 
administration passed a last-minute directive, banning the use of lead 
ammunition and fishing sinkers on federal land." 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Fwd: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering
From: "Philip E. Hyatt" <sedgehead AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 21:45:30 -0600
*Back yard birds.  *The Robins seem to have increased in numbers and I
think I hear baby House Sparrows in one of the carport boxes today.  The
cavity nesters are definitely active!

*Wikipedia and Ivory-billeds *-- if that's not your interest, you can skip
this note!

Thanks!  The Fox news report may be what got me started on this topic.  I
do a little birding in Arkansas, but mostly out the kitchen window these
days.  So, I was just curious.  Wikipedia can, if needed, protect edits
when someone maliciously messes with a page, or when disagreement exists.
However, like everything else dealing with Wikipedia and computer
programming, it takes some learning to navigate the system.  For example,
your edits are still saved in the website records and if Wikipedia agreed
with your findings, it might even reinstate them.  But that's biology.  As
Jim Peck told me, "We need more dead botanists." That is, biology a
cooperative effort.  We build on the past.  My point?  I could never have
completed my flora of Baxt. Co. or study of Arkansas sedges without past
botanists and my work on Arkansas *Carex* will make the flora of Arkansas
easier to complete.

As for Wikipedia, I edit pages and forget them!  I do it mostly from my
perspective as an editor, but I have created a few, specifically on the Xin
River after  I edited a paper on the Scaly-sided Merganser and the Mu US
Sandyland.  The later page was "recommended for deletion" as being a
duplicate of the Ordos Desert, but I contented formally that Chinese
writers had published several articles supporting my claim and cited them
in my changes.  I see over the years that Wikipedia dropped the proposal to
drop the Mu US page without me formally or informally saying much of
anything.  That is, if you cite publications, that will greatly support
your changes, and if you feel strongly about them, Wikipedia is likely to
support you, even to the point of blocking changes by others if it is
important.  For example, they deleted another page I created for a lack of
citations.

For most of us, in 200 years, few will remember what we edited.  That's why
my autobio has 300,000 words . . .  someone will still have a copy, I
suspect!  Now, if I can just finish that Chinese version.  It may last
longer than me, Wikipedia, and the Ivory-billed controversy!

pH


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: David Luneau 
Date: Sun, Feb 19, 2017 at 9:10 PM
Subject: Re: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering
To: ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu


I’ll chime in here.



I recall many years ago when Wikipedia was brand new and the Arkansas
Ivory-bill story was also news, I read what it said about the then-new
story of the Ivory-bill sightings in Arkansas. It was full of errors and
biased opinions, so I edited it. I figured I knew about as much about the
subject as anyone else at the time, so I felt somewhat obligated to correct
the errors. That was the first and last time I ever contributed to a
Wikipedia page. Someone jumped on my changes within a day and removed
virtually everything I had contributed. I realized then that it was
possible to support whatever agenda one might have on a Wikipedia page if
one was willing to put the time and energy into guarding the page
continuously. I haven’t been back to the page since, so I don’t know what
it may say now.



I still get occasional sighting reports, but nothing that gets me too
excited. There have been (and still are, I think) active searches taking
place in Louisiana and the Florida panhandle. There was a news report in
January of this year regarding a paper published in the online journal
Heliyon that you can read about and draw your own conclusions here:
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/01/25/extinct-or-
not-new-study-claims-extinct-ivory-billed-woodpecker-is-still-alive.html.
Michael Collins is the searcher that wrote the paper – some of you may be
familiar with his searching over the past decade or so in Louisiana.



If you want to read about the Ivory-bill searching in Arkansas and
elsewhere, see historic films of an Imperial Woodpecker, and find links to
all sorts of things related to Ivory-bills, you can start here:
http://ibwo.org/index.php. I’ve tried to link to as many interesting IBWO
sites as possible.



To be clear, the US Fish and Wildlife Service officially accepts the 2004
sightings and video and continues to protect the Ivory-bill under the
Endangered Species Act, regardless of what someone might have written at
Wikipedia or elsewhere.



M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204



*From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.
UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Philip E. Hyatt
*Sent:* Sunday, February 19, 2017 4:25 PM
*To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
*Subject:* [ARBIRD-L] What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering



The title says it all.  Wikipedia seems to think there's no real confirmed
sightings which is probably the case.  Otherwise, it would be documented.

​

Anyone working on it?​


-- 

pH
www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt



-- 
pH
www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
Subject: Re: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering
From: David Luneau <mdluneau AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 21:10:58 -0600
I’ll chime in here.

 

I recall many years ago when Wikipedia was brand new and the Arkansas 
Ivory-bill story was also news, I read what it said about the then-new story of 
the Ivory-bill sightings in Arkansas. It was full of errors and biased 
opinions, so I edited it. I figured I knew about as much about the subject as 
anyone else at the time, so I felt somewhat obligated to correct the errors. 
That was the first and last time I ever contributed to a Wikipedia page. 
Someone jumped on my changes within a day and removed virtually everything I 
had contributed. I realized then that it was possible to support whatever 
agenda one might have on a Wikipedia page if one was willing to put the time 
and energy into guarding the page continuously. I haven’t been back to the 
page since, so I don’t know what it may say now. 


 

I still get occasional sighting reports, but nothing that gets me too excited. 
There have been (and still are, I think) active searches taking place in 
Louisiana and the Florida panhandle. There was a news report in January of this 
year regarding a paper published in the online journal Heliyon that you can 
read about and draw your own conclusions here: 
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/01/25/extinct-or-not-new-study-claims-extinct-ivory-billed-woodpecker-is-still-alive.html. 
Michael Collins is the searcher that wrote the paper – some of you may be 
familiar with his searching over the past decade or so in Louisiana. 


 

If you want to read about the Ivory-bill searching in Arkansas and elsewhere, 
see historic films of an Imperial Woodpecker, and find links to all sorts of 
things related to Ivory-bills, you can start here: http://ibwo.org/index.php. 
I’ve tried to link to as many interesting IBWO sites as possible. 


 

To be clear, the US Fish and Wildlife Service officially accepts the 2004 
sightings and video and continues to protect the Ivory-bill under the 
Endangered Species Act, regardless of what someone might have written at 
Wikipedia or elsewhere. 


 

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Philip E. Hyatt 

Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2017 4:25 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering

 

The title says it all. Wikipedia seems to think there's no real confirmed 
sightings which is probably the case. Otherwise, it would be documented. 



​ 

Anyone working on it?​


-- 

pH 
www.sedgehead.com   Philip E. Hyatt
Subject: Night Heron and Lousiana Water Thrush
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 20:42:50 -0600
Was my best birds today in counting.   I was having issues with the website
and called for help so it was suggested I post both on here.  The Thrush is
hanging around the creek that is in the woods near where I live. I live off
of Thornton Ferry Rd.  The Night Heron is hanging out on the big fallen
tree to the left of the Carpenter Dam Bridge as you cross it. I was looking
for the bird I saw the other day which was a really good sighting and saw
this fellow instead..  Nice view the rising rays of light highlighted him
against the reflections of the flowing waters. But its not a safe place to
pull off there so I had to go before I got smacked there.  Teresa, Hot
Springs, AR
-- 
The Future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams!
Eleanor Roosevelt
Subject: Birds of North Central Arkansas
From: "Philip E. Hyatt" <sedgehead AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 18:25:21 -0600
In 1991, Duane Moren and I privately published a booklet on the birds of
North Central Arkansas.  We used various data sources, included data now
housed by the local Audubon Society from a couple who had kept daily bird
records in their area near Mountain Home for many years.

The book needs updated.  I'm still working as a writer and editor and don't
want to take the time to sort through the data (this groups', CBC, and
other count data, etc.).

If someone is willing to re-write the book, I'd be glad to edit it.  My
wife and I work as editors editing scientific research papers.  Let me know
if you are interested.  I also no longer have an electronic copy of the
book, so it would need to be retyped.

-- 
pH
www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
Subject: February
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 18:08:43 -0600
February 19^th and all three of my Hellebore are blooming. A cure in 
ancient Greece for depression. Not the blooming, or the witnessing of 
the blooming, but some wild concoction made from the leaves.

In Baxter county this weekend and the geese were flying northward. 
Several large flocks of Snows and some moderate sized flocks of 
White-fronts. The Snows carried some Ross’ with them. Day and night they 
streamed. In the evening on the 18^th they rolled over the stars of 
Perseus and Cassiopeia. Making me aware, as they always do, of the 
distances. Venus was in crescent. And so bright that it was astounding. 
I kept hoping to see a goose silhouette the entire bright point of 
Venus. It never happened. But they did just brush west of the North star.

The Peepers were calling in Baxter and back at my own house the Chorus 
frog concert is too intense for February. I fear for their lives these 
next few weeks.

The door to the back deck is open as I type this. My wife calls out that 
the Barred Owls are calling in the oaks. I run down. And find silence. I 
make some whoop-woos. But get back only Carolina Wrens and the twitch of 
dusking Cardinals.

Otherwise up in Baxter County this morning the Jays were my friends. I 
sat among them and listened as they kept switching their contact calls 
in four directions. Clearly they were just talking to each other. Some 
kind of reassurance among friends and family. Pee-jerrr calls and then 
high hawk whistles. I saw several Krider’s Red tails on the way up there 
to the county. None from my deck over the lake. But a Sharpie perched up 
at sundown surveying the sloping world down to Norfork. Scoped it. And 
then launched and gone, I don’t know the dramas afterward: failure, 
success, blood, sleep. I do not know.

Turkey Vultures also entertained me in their beautiful tilting flight at 
dusk in north Arkansas. All headed west, towards some night perch I did 
not know. I would go and find it if I lived there. But as an alien 
visitor, I just appreciated the journeying past. I was unnoticed. Down 
below as usual. Insignificant, as I likely deserve. When I am noticed by 
vultures, then things have gone very far south. Air burial, as they have 
it in Asia, or did before all the vultures died off, is not as bad as 
sounds. Lifted in bites towards everywhere, and then gone. I can think 
of worse. Stardust anyway; stardust again.

But not now though. Not yet. Right now, in the eyes of a gliding 
vulture, I am nothing. And this, as I say, is just what I deserve. Right 
now I like being the watcher, still awake. And hoping for more tomorrow.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: What's the latest on the Ivory-billed? just wondering
From: "Philip E. Hyatt" <sedgehead AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 16:25:14 -0600
The title says it all.  Wikipedia seems to think there's no real confirmed
sightings which is probably the case.  Otherwise, it would be documented.
​
Anyone working on it?​

-- 
pH
www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser NO
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 15:47:14 -0600
No  AT  3:45
David Ray 
NLR 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 19, 2017, at 2:10 PM, Gail Miller  wrote:
> 
> I’ve been by Petco in Conway three times today and the merganser has not 
been there L I also checked the pond across the Interstate, in front of the new 
Baptist Hospital … just in case. No there as well. 

>  
> Gail Miller
> Conway
Subject: Red-breasted Merganser NO
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Feb 2017 14:10:30 -0600
I've been by Petco in Conway three times today and the merganser has not
been there :(  I also checked the pond across the Interstate, in front of
the new Baptist Hospital . just in case.  No there as well.

 

Gail Miller

Conway
Subject: ASCA February Field Trip Report
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 19:48:37 -0600
38 birders took advantage of the uncommonly balmy February weather to bird from 
morning to almost dark. We had a diverse group with birders from all over 
central Arkansas and two from as far away as Mt. Home. We started at the Two 
Rivers Park walking bridge in west Little Rock. Crossing the bridge, we spotted 
groups of American White Pelicans, 560 Double-crested Cormorants, a few 
Ring-billed Gulls, and Common Goldeneye's. Once on the peninsula, we took the 
dirt trail that skirts the far inlet. We hit the dabbling duck jackpot with 2 
male Wigeons, 2 Pintails, 160 Gadwalls, Shovelers, and Mallards. Diving ducks 
included one female COMMON MERGANSER, Scaup, Buffleheads, and the always 
present Pied-billed Grebes. Best land birds were an Orange-crowned Warbler, 
Hermit Thrush, Brown Creeper, and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. Ruby-crowned 
Kinglets were everywhere! 


The group then headed to the main entrance into Two Rivers Park. Knee boots 
pulled on, off we went to walk the open fields. Almost immediately we started 
flushing Le Conte's Sparrows. Crossing the big field, heading towards the 
river, we flushed at least 8 Le Conte's! We also had Eastern Bluebirds, 
Savannah Sparrows, and Mourning Doves. At the river we found Goldeneye's, and 
Greater and Lesser Scaup. 


A small group then decided to keep on birding. We drove to the parking lot at 
the end of the Park, then walked along the open field paralleling a small 
stream. We cleaned up on sparrows with multiple Fox, Vesper, Lincoln, Field, 
and White-throated. A Merlin flew low over our group. Best Woodpecker was a 
Hairy. We also had a large flock of Cedar Waxwings. We hit a total of 51 
species on this walk with a Killdeer as our final bird. 


At this point, we were at 3:00 p.m. with no lunch break. The group said push 
on, so we did! Next stop was Vista View on Lake Maumelle. We found groups of 
Common Loons rafting together. Mixed in was a RED-THROATED LOON and a PACIFIC 
LOON. Life birds for several! We also had Horned Grebes and more Goldeneye's. 
Last stop was Hundley Causeway. We relocated the Red-throated and Pacific Loons 
for much closer views, plus more Common Loons. A juvenile Bald Eagle and a 
Barred Owl were new birds for the day. We capped our day-long adventure at 5:15 
p.m. with a RED-BREASTED MERGANSER! An awesome day of birding with great 
birding buddies and a fantastic list of winter birds. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 21:03:35 +0000
Thank you, Karen.  That information is very helpful.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

Sent: Saturday, February 18, 2017 10:55 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results

Thanks for your thoughts and comments Michael. AR hunters and fishermen need to 
be provided with information on how deadly lead ammo and fishing tackle is to 
birds of prey. They need to know the great strides that have been made in the 
effectiveness of nontoxic ammo. Conservationists such as ourselves need to ask 
stores such as Bass Pro, Macks and Walmart to carry nontoxic ammo and fishing 
tackle and price it competitively with its toxic equivalents. 


I was rather surprised that after the outcry against using patagial tags on 
raptors, there were no comments (except yours) about the need for hunters and 
fishermen to switch to nontoxic ammo and fishing tackle. 


Are members of ARbird unaware of the prevalence of lead poisoning in wildlife?
Are members not informed on the deadly effects of even the smallest amount 
ingested lead? 

Or are members not interested in getting involved in conservation issues?
 Or is it that they don't see this forum as the place to voice their concerns 
on lead poisoning in wildlife? 

Or do they think that this is the problem for hunters and fishermen? The worse 
thing that can happen in conservation is for birders to view hunters as "us and 
them" and vice versa. So many hunters I know are great birders. We must unite 
under a common bond of protecting wildlife from toxins and get out of our 
comfort zone, if need be, and find common ground with all conservationists. 


This Red-tailed Hawk did not die in vane. This patagial tagged hawk has caused 
AGFC to initiate a project to test dead hawks and owls picked up by AGFC 
personnel, as well as live raptors taken to rehabbers, for heavy metals. The 
new AGFC veterinarian will conduct necropsies on dead birds of prey found in 
AR. We want to determine causes of death for these birds and determine the role 
that lead plays in these mortalities. 


Working with rehabbers we are finding that bald eagles that are hit by vehicles 
often have high lead levels in their blood. We believe the high amounts of lead 
in their system may cause them to feed on roadkill (too weak to hunt) and 
compromise their ability to avoid collisions with vehicles. Earlier this month 
a bald eagle hit by a vehicle was taken to a rehabilitator with severe 
injuries. AGFC pays for the lead testing of all eagles rehabbers receive. The 
blood lead level on this eagle was 0.41, blood lead levels over 0.2ppm are 
considered toxic. The eagle died before the rehabilitator could in start the 
expensive Ca ETDA treatment to try to get the lead out of the blood (AGFC pays 
for the CaEDTA rehabbers purchase to treat lead poisoned Bald and Golden 
Eagles). What this means is that the bald eagles that are found hit by a 
vehicle (dead or alive) may not have just been unlucky and unable to avoid 
deadly traffic, they may be unable to avoid traffic because the high lead 
levels negatively effect their ability to avoid vehicles. 


Karen Rowe




 From: Michael Linz 
To: Jim and Karen Rowe 
Cc: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:30 PM
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results




Karen,
Thanks for this update. It seems that this is getting to be a bigger problem 
every year and that includes right here in Arkansas. 


What is sad is that this death, and many more, could be prevented. There are 
alternatives to lead bullets and fishing weights. I hear people complain that 
laws are not being passed to require us to switch to the alternative products. 
What is more concerning to me is that we think that the government has to pass 
a law for us to do the right thing. Seems to me that we should not have do 
depend on a law to tell us to do what is right...if we can save the lives of 
hawks and eagles by using the new ammunition and tackle why would we not do it? 


Michael(Conway)

On Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Jim and Karen Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> 
wrote: 

All:

The Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission gave AGFC the go-ahead to report 
the preliminary necropsy results for the Red-tailed Hawk wearing patagial tags 
that was found dead at 5+ years age on Nature Conservancy Land near Hot Springs 
AR. 


While some people wanted to implicate the patagial tags as causing the birds 
death, the preliminary necropsy report's heavy metals tests indicate that the 
hawk died of lead poisoning. Liver lead levels higher than 6 parts per million 
(ppm) are considered lethal. The hawks liver lead level was 142.1 ppm. A very 
small piece of metal was found along with hairs and seeds in the hawk's 
proventriculus and we do not know if this was lead. 


Bird of prey get lead poisoning by ingesting animals or fish (or parts of 
animals in fish) that contain lead fishing tackle such as sinkers, or lead 
ammunition such as lead shot or lead bullet fragments. 


We are still waiting on the results of a few tests.

Karen Rowe, Bird Conservation Program Coordinator
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission



________________________________
From: "Todd, Shelley" >
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 10:38 AM
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead

Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting.

https://www.facebook.com/ media/set/?set=a. 366641567032684.1073741829. 
100010605317819&type=1&l= 
8fe8172f67 


Shelley Todd
Natural Resource Program Manager
Hot Springs National Park
101 Reserve Street
Hot Springs, AR  71901
(501) 620-6751 (office)
(501) 620-6778 (fax)
shelley_todd AT nps.gov

On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler 
> wrote: 

Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature 
Conservancy land away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR and found 
a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not stiff, had 
no "death" odor and no apparent injuries. The oddest thing about it was that on 
either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round vinyl tags 
about 3 inches in diameter. With large numbers written on them. 


John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird was 
banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those large vinyl 
tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 


Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at this 
time. 


It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have 
easily contributed to the bird's demise. I would think telemetry would be a 
better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 


Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler







Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser no
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 14:39:29 -0600
2:30 no

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 18, 2017, at 1:00 PM, Gail Miller  wrote:
> 
> Behind Petco in Conway. No at 11:00-11:30. No at 1 pm. It was here yesterday. 
Great Blue Heron and American Kestrel yes. 

> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: GBBC at Devil's Den State Park
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 20:08:02 +0000
Around 25 of us had a calm sunny morning at Devils Den State Park, helping 
with the parks Great Backyard Bird Count. We picked up most expected species. 
Red-shouldered Hawks were thick at the Den last weekend. Late in the morning I 
thought I had one  listened carefully to ensure it wasnt a talented Blue Jay. 
Got a little bit closer, then spotted none other than Dr Doug James, in his car 
 playback ... 


 Witch Hazel is in bloom along Lee Creek. With temps in the mid-60s, Spring 
Peepers were all fired up. Sap was flowing from Sugar Maples in Camp Area A, 
attended by honey bees. Many thanks to all of you who came out, making it such 
a fun day. Heres the morning GBBC list: 



Canada Goose - 5

Black Vulture - 6

Turkey Vulture - 44

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 3

Pileated Woodpecker  3

Blue Jay - 6

American Crow - 11

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 5

White-breasted Nuthatch - 5

Brown Creeper -1

Carolina Wren - 11

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 4

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Hermit Thrush - 1

American Robin - 5

Northern Mockingbird  1

Cedar Waxwing - 15

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 2

Eastern Towhee - 3

Fox Sparrow - 11

Song Sparrow - 18

White-throated Sparrow - 20

Dark-eyed Junco - 39

Northern Cardinal    8

American Goldfinch - 4
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 13:40:44 -0600
Hi Glenn,

I know you addressed your post to Karen, but the problem has been known 
for a long time and there's quite a bit of info out there.  A couple of 
places to start:

https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/lead_poisoning/

http://wildlife.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Lead08-1.pdf

Cheers (I wish),
Janine

On 2/18/2017 1:28 PM, Glenn wrote:
> Karen,
>
> I admit I am ignorant on this subject. I also never received the 
> original email in this chain. I accept the fact that you are finding 
> high levels of lead in raptors. But, how do they know where that lead 
> is coming from?  I just wonder because I just can't imagine there is 
> that much lead shot and sinkers laying around out there to cause that 
> much lead poisoning. But, again, I admit my ignorance and want to know 
> more.
>
> Thanks,
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot, AR
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
> 
>
>     On Sat, Feb 18, 2017 at 10:55 AM, Jim and Karen Rowe
>     <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote:
>
>     Thanks for your thoughts and comments Michael.   AR hunters and
>     fishermen need to be provided with information on how deadly lead
>     ammo and fishing tackle is to birds of prey. They need to know the
>     great strides that have been made in the effectiveness of nontoxic
>     ammo. Conservationists such as ourselves need to ask stores such
>     as Bass Pro, Macks and Walmart to carry nontoxic ammo and fishing
>     tackle and price it competitively with its toxic equivalents.
>
>     I was rather surprised that after the outcry against using
>     patagial  tags on raptors, there were no comments (except yours)
>     about the need for hunters and fishermen to switch to nontoxic
>     ammo and fishing tackle.
>
>     Are members of ARbird unaware of the prevalence of lead poisoning
>     in wildlife?
>     Are members not informed on the deadly effects of even the
>     smallest amount ingested lead?
>     Or are members not interested in getting involved in conservation
>     issues?
>      Or is it that they don't see this forum as the place to voice
>     their concerns on lead poisoning in wildlife?
>     Or do they think that this is the problem for hunters and
>     fishermen?  The worse thing that can happen in conservation is for
>     birders to view hunters as "us and them" and vice versa.  So many
>     hunters I know are great birders.  We must unite under a common
>     bond of protecting wildlife from toxins and get out of our comfort
>     zone, if need be, and find common ground with all conservationists.
>
>     This Red-tailed Hawk did not die in vane.  This patagial tagged
>     hawk has caused AGFC to initiate a project to test dead hawks and
>     owls picked up by AGFC personnel, as well as live raptors taken to
>     rehabbers, for heavy metals.  The new AGFC veterinarian  will
>     conduct necropsies on dead birds of prey found in AR. We want to
>     determine causes of death for these birds and determine the role
>     that lead plays in these mortalities.
>
>     Working with rehabbers we are finding that bald eagles that are
>     hit by vehicles often have high lead levels in their blood.  We
>     believe the high amounts of lead in their system may cause them to
>     feed on roadkill (too weak to hunt) and compromise their ability
>     to avoid collisions with vehicles.  Earlier this month a bald
>     eagle hit by a vehicle was taken to a rehabilitator with severe
>     injuries.  AGFC pays for the lead testing of all eagles rehabbers
>     receive.  The blood lead level on this eagle was 0.41, blood lead
>     levels over 0.2ppm are considered toxic.  The eagle died before
>     the rehabilitator could in start  the expensive Ca ETDA
>     treatment to try to get the lead out of the blood (AGFC pays for
>     the CaEDTA rehabbers purchase to treat lead poisoned Bald and
>     Golden Eagles).  What this means is that the bald eagles that are
>     found hit by a vehicle (dead or alive) may not have just been
>     unlucky and unable to avoid  deadly traffic, they may be unable to
>     avoid traffic because the high lead levels negatively effect their
>     ability to avoid vehicles.
>
>     Karen Rowe
>
>
>
>
>     *From:* Michael Linz 
>     *To:* Jim and Karen Rowe 
>     *Cc:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
>     
>     *Sent:* Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:30 PM
>     *Subject:* Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary
>     Necropsy results
>
>
>
>     Karen,
>     Thanks for this update.  It seems that this is getting to be a
>     bigger problem every year and that includes right here in Arkansas.
>
>     What is sad is that this death, and many more, could be
>     prevented.  There are alternatives to lead bullets and fishing
>     weights.  I hear people complain that laws are not being passed to
>     require us to switch to the alternative products.  What is more
>     concerning to me is that we think that the government has to pass
>     a law for us to do the right thing.  Seems to me that we should
>     not have do depend on a law to tell us to do what is right...if we
>     can save the lives of hawks and eagles by using the new ammunition
>     and tackle why would we not do it?
>
>     Michael(Conway)
>
>     On Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Jim and Karen Rowe
>     <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu
>     > wrote:
>
>         All:
>
>         The Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission gave AGFC the
>         go-ahead to report the preliminary necropsy results for the
>         Red-tailed Hawk wearing patagial tags that was found dead at
>         5+  years age on Nature Conservancy Land near Hot Springs AR.
>
>         While some people wanted to implicate the patagial tags as
>         causing the birds death,  the preliminary necropsy report's
>         heavy metals tests indicate that the hawk died of lead
>         poisoning.  Liver lead levels higher than 6 parts per million
>         (ppm) are considered lethal.  The hawks liver lead level was
>         142.1 ppm.   A very small piece of metal was found along with
>         hairs and seeds in the hawk's proventriculus and we do not
>         know if this was lead.
>
>         Bird of prey get lead poisoning by ingesting animals or fish
>         (or parts of animals in fish) that contain lead fishing tackle
>         such as sinkers, or lead ammunition such as lead shot or lead
>         bullet fragments.
>
>         We are still waiting on the results of a few tests.
>
>         Karen Rowe, Bird Conservation Program Coordinator
>         Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

>         *From:* "Todd, Shelley" >
>         *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>         *Sent:* Friday, January 13, 2017 10:38 AM
>         *Subject:* Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead
>
>         Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last
>         night's meeting.
>
>         https://www.facebook.com/ media/set/?set=a.
>         366641567032684.1073741829. 100010605317819&type=1&l=
>         8fe8172f67
> 
 

>
>         Shelley Todd
>         Natural Resource Program Manager
>         Hot Springs National Park
>         101 Reserve Street
>         Hot Springs, AR  71901
>         (501) 620-6751 (office)
>         (501) 620-6778 (fax)
>         shelley_todd AT nps.gov 
>
>         On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler
>         > wrote:
>
>             Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a
>             forested area of Nature Conservancy land  away from a road
>             or power line near Hot Springs, AR  and found a banded
>             dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not
>             stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The
>             oddest thing about it was that on either wing attached by
>             yellow plastic staples were white round vinyl tags about 3
>             inches in diameter. With large numbers written on them.
>             John has called the banding registry this AM and
>             discovered that the bird was banded in Illinois, but there
>             is as yet no information about those large vinyl tags that
>             were apparently placed there for research purposes.
>
>             Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable
>             to send them at this time.
>
>             It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both
>             wings could have easily contributed to the bird's
>             demise.  I would think telemetry would be a better way to
>             research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags
>             and would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and
>             quest for prey.
>
>             Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?
>
>             Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 13:39:49 -0600
Waterfowl was shown to have high levels of ingested lead shot back in the 
1960s. Dabbling ducks picked it up when feeding on the bottoms. I expect there 
are tons on lead shot in the marshes and wetlands where ducks are hunted. The 
condors get lead poisoning from feeding on animal remains of deer, elk and 
other animals shot. Lead also accumulates up the food chain like the mercury in 
fish that has made fish consumption from over a million acres of waterways 
unsafe from human consumption. The mercury was from coal fired power plants and 
natural geologic sources. Dogs do not contaminate their beds and make them 
unfit to live in but people do. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs



From: Glenn 
Sent: Saturday, February 18, 2017 1:28 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results

Karen, 

I admit I am ignorant on this subject. I also never received the original email 
in this chain. I accept the fact that you are finding high levels of lead in 
raptors. But, how do they know where that lead is coming from? I just wonder 
because I just can't imagine there is that much lead shot and sinkers laying 
around out there to cause that much lead poisoning. But, again, I admit my 
ignorance and want to know more. 


Thanks,
Glenn Wyatt
Cabot, AR


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


  On Sat, Feb 18, 2017 at 10:55 AM, Jim and Karen Rowe
  <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote:
 Thanks for your thoughts and comments Michael. AR hunters and fishermen need 
to be provided with information on how deadly lead ammo and fishing tackle is 
to birds of prey. They need to know the great strides that have been made in 
the effectiveness of nontoxic ammo. Conservationists such as ourselves need to 
ask stores such as Bass Pro, Macks and Walmart to carry nontoxic ammo and 
fishing tackle and price it competitively with its toxic equivalents. 


 I was rather surprised that after the outcry against using patagial tags on 
raptors, there were no comments (except yours) about the need for hunters and 
fishermen to switch to nontoxic ammo and fishing tackle. 


 Are members of ARbird unaware of the prevalence of lead poisoning in wildlife? 

 Are members not informed on the deadly effects of even the smallest amount 
ingested lead? 

  Or are members not interested in getting involved in conservation issues?
 Or is it that they don't see this forum as the place to voice their concerns 
on lead poisoning in wildlife? 

 Or do they think that this is the problem for hunters and fishermen? The worse 
thing that can happen in conservation is for birders to view hunters as "us and 
them" and vice versa. So many hunters I know are great birders. We must unite 
under a common bond of protecting wildlife from toxins and get out of our 
comfort zone, if need be, and find common ground with all conservationists. 


 This Red-tailed Hawk did not die in vane. This patagial tagged hawk has caused 
AGFC to initiate a project to test dead hawks and owls picked up by AGFC 
personnel, as well as live raptors taken to rehabbers, for heavy metals. The 
new AGFC veterinarian will conduct necropsies on dead birds of prey found in 
AR. We want to determine causes of death for these birds and determine the role 
that lead plays in these mortalities. 


 Working with rehabbers we are finding that bald eagles that are hit by 
vehicles often have high lead levels in their blood. We believe the high 
amounts of lead in their system may cause them to feed on roadkill (too weak to 
hunt) and compromise their ability to avoid collisions with vehicles. Earlier 
this month a bald eagle hit by a vehicle was taken to a rehabilitator with 
severe injuries. AGFC pays for the lead testing of all eagles rehabbers 
receive. The blood lead level on this eagle was 0.41, blood lead levels over 
0.2ppm are considered toxic. The eagle died before the rehabilitator could in 
start the expensive Ca ETDA treatment to try to get the lead out of the blood 
(AGFC pays for the CaEDTA rehabbers purchase to treat lead poisoned Bald and 
Golden Eagles). What this means is that the bald eagles that are found hit by a 
vehicle (dead or alive) may not have just been unlucky and unable to avoid 
deadly traffic, they may be unable to avoid traffic because the high lead 
levels negatively effect their ability to avoid vehicles. 


  Karen Rowe




   From: Michael Linz 
  To: Jim and Karen Rowe  
  Cc: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
  Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:30 PM
  Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results
   




  Karen, 
 Thanks for this update. It seems that this is getting to be a bigger problem 
every year and that includes right here in Arkansas. 


 What is sad is that this death, and many more, could be prevented. There are 
alternatives to lead bullets and fishing weights. I hear people complain that 
laws are not being passed to require us to switch to the alternative products. 
What is more concerning to me is that we think that the government has to pass 
a law for us to do the right thing. Seems to me that we should not have do 
depend on a law to tell us to do what is right...if we can save the lives of 
hawks and eagles by using the new ammunition and tackle why would we not do it? 


  Michael(Conway)

 On Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Jim and Karen Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote: 


    All:

 The Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission gave AGFC the go-ahead to report 
the preliminary necropsy results for the Red-tailed Hawk wearing patagial tags 
that was found dead at 5+ years age on Nature Conservancy Land near Hot Springs 
AR. 


 While some people wanted to implicate the patagial tags as causing the birds 
death, the preliminary necropsy report's heavy metals tests indicate that the 
hawk died of lead poisoning. Liver lead levels higher than 6 parts per million 
(ppm) are considered lethal. The hawks liver lead level was 142.1 ppm. A very 
small piece of metal was found along with hairs and seeds in the hawk's 
proventriculus and we do not know if this was lead. 


 Bird of prey get lead poisoning by ingesting animals or fish (or parts of 
animals in fish) that contain lead fishing tackle such as sinkers, or lead 
ammunition such as lead shot or lead bullet fragments. 


    We are still waiting on the results of a few tests.

    Karen Rowe, Bird Conservation Program Coordinator
    Arkansas Game and Fish Commission




----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    From: "Todd, Shelley" 
    To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
    Sent: Friday, January 13, 2017 10:38 AM
    Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead


 Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting. 


 https://www.facebook.com/ media/set/?set=a. 366641567032684.1073741829. 
100010605317819&type=1&l= 8fe8172f67 



    Shelley Todd 
    Natural Resource Program Manager
    Hot Springs National Park
    101 Reserve Street
    Hot Springs, AR  71901
    (501) 620-6751 (office)
    (501) 620-6778 (fax)
    shelley_todd AT nps.gov

 On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler  
wrote: 


 Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature 
Conservancy land away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR and found 
a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not stiff, had 
no "death" odor and no apparent injuries. The oddest thing about it was that on 
either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were white round vinyl tags 
about 3 inches in diameter. With large numbers written on them. 


 John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird was 
banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those large vinyl 
tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes. 


 Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at this 
time. 


 It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have 
easily contributed to the bird's demise. I would think telemetry would be a 
better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags and 
would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey. 


      Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?

      Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler








Subject: Red-breasted Merganser no
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 13:00:11 -0600
Behind Petco in Conway. No at 11:00-11:30. No at 1 pm. It was here yesterday. 
Great Blue Heron and American Kestrel yes. 



Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Fwd: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy results
From: "Philip E. Hyatt" <sedgehead AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Feb 2017 12:12:32 -0600
I've been trying to stay out of this foray but I'll throw in my two cents
worth.  First, the questions (*in bold text)*:


*Are members of ARbird unaware of the prevalence of lead poisoning in
wildlife?*
Yes and no.  I was somewhat unaware the problem was that severe.

*Are members not informed on the deadly effects of even the smallest amount
ingested lead?*
Sure, at least for me.

*Or are members not interested in getting involved in conservation issues?*
I spent my life thinking about and dealing with conservation issues.  I saw
presidents and congresses on both side unwilling to deal with many of those
issues.  Money drives the issues.  A two week course in conservation
economics introduced me to the concept of "willingness to pay."
Willingness to pay is generally not there.  A few cents or dollars less
makes a difference in favor of non-conservation.

Fortunately, I've found my niche of usefulness.  While China certainly has
a reputation for pollution, most people in the US fail to realize how many
positive steps they are taking such as greening of cities, a nationwide
high speed rail system put in since 2006, increasing windpower to 25% of
all power in the coming years, etc.  I've seen massive steps forward. Every
week am amazed by the scientific research I edit that is designed to
address China's conservation issues.  I've even seen internal government
documents probably not designed for American knowledge or consumption that
shows a government working hard to address problems.

I've more or less given up on the current US system.  I'll support agencies
and non-profits, but I'm not about to write to congress, etc.  They are
"making a list, and checking it twice."  I know too much Chinese history to
be swept up by the US Cultural Revolution that is coming.  If you don't
support the government you are for the terrorists, and conservation is low
on the current list.

* Or is it that they don't see this forum as the place to voice their
concerns on lead poisoning in wildlife?*
That's why I hesitated to respond.


*Or do they think that this is the problem for hunters and fishermen?  *
True.  There is a place, but I've known of this problem for decades.  It
goes back to willingness to pay.  It's not there.

This forum tends to be for birds, and I've had folks already hint that I've
gone too far.  I think the solution lies with those who do the damage.
However, in the case of DDT, it wasn't farmers who decided to stop using
it.  It was groups like this group that pushed the issue.  They were not
heard until the eagles disappeared.

Do I worry about it?  Not really.  When I worked in the regional office, I
quickly decided I was not in charge of everything.  I'm not king, prez, or
premier.  This is probably the wrong place for this discussion and while
hunters no long kill all the turkeys in Arkansas (I never saw one as a
kid), things to not look good for raptors.

pH

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu>
Date: Sat, Feb 18, 2017 at 10:55 AM
Subject: Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy
results
To: ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu


Thanks for your thoughts and comments Michael.   AR hunters and fishermen
need to be provided with information on how deadly lead ammo and fishing
tackle is to birds of prey. They need to know the great strides that have
been made in the effectiveness of nontoxic ammo.   Conservationists such as
ourselves need to ask stores such as Bass Pro, Macks and Walmart to carry
nontoxic ammo and fishing tackle and price it competitively with its toxic
equivalents.

I was rather surprised that after the outcry against using patagial  tags
on raptors, there were no comments (except yours) about the need for
hunters and fishermen to switch to nontoxic ammo and fishing tackle.

Are members of ARbird unaware of the prevalence of lead poisoning in
wildlife?
Are members not informed on the deadly effects of even the smallest amount
ingested lead?
Or are members not interested in getting involved in conservation issues?
 Or is it that they don't see this forum as the place to voice their
concerns on lead poisoning in wildlife?
Or do they think that this is the problem for hunters and fishermen?  The
worse thing that can happen in conservation is for birders to view hunters
as "us and them" and vice versa.  So many hunters I know are great
birders.  We must unite under a common bond of protecting wildlife from
toxins and get out of our comfort zone, if need be, and find common ground
with all conservationists.

This Red-tailed Hawk did not die in vane.  This patagial tagged hawk has
caused AGFC to initiate a project to test dead hawks and owls picked up by
AGFC personnel, as well as live raptors taken to rehabbers, for heavy
metals.  The new AGFC veterinarian  will conduct necropsies on dead birds
of prey found in AR. We want to determine causes of death for these birds
and determine the role that lead plays in these mortalities.

Working with rehabbers we are finding that bald eagles that are hit by
vehicles often have high lead levels in their blood.  We believe the high
amounts of lead in their system may cause them to feed on roadkill (too
weak to hunt) and compromise their ability to avoid collisions with
vehicles.  Earlier this month a bald eagle hit by a vehicle was taken to a
rehabilitator with severe injuries.  AGFC pays for the lead testing of all
eagles rehabbers receive.  The blood lead level on this eagle was 0.41,
blood lead levels over 0.2ppm are considered  toxic.  The eagle died before
the rehabilitator could in start  the expensive Ca ETDA treatment to try to
get the lead out of the blood (AGFC pays for the CaEDTA rehabbers purchase
to treat lead poisoned Bald and Golden Eagles).  What this means is that
the bald eagles that are found hit by a vehicle (dead or alive) may not
have just been unlucky and unable to avoid  deadly traffic, they may be
unable to avoid traffic because the high lead levels negatively effect
their ability to avoid vehicles.

Karen Rowe




 *From:* Michael Linz 
*To:* Jim and Karen Rowe 
*Cc:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
*Sent:* Thursday, February 16, 2017 11:30 PM
*Subject:* Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead - Preliminary Necropsy
results




Karen,
Thanks for this update.  It seems that this is getting to be a bigger
problem every year and that includes right here in Arkansas.

What is sad is that this death, and many more, could be prevented.  There
are alternatives to lead bullets and fishing weights.  I hear people
complain that laws are not being passed to require us to switch to the
alternative products.  What is more concerning to me is that we think that
the government has to pass a law for us to do the right thing.  Seems to me
that we should not have do depend on a law to tell us to do what is
right...if we can save the lives of hawks and eagles by using the new
ammunition and tackle why would we not do it?

Michael(Conway)

On Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 1:14 PM, Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-
request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

All:

The Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission gave AGFC the go-ahead to
report the preliminary necropsy results for the Red-tailed Hawk wearing
patagial tags that was found dead at 5+  years age on Nature Conservancy
Land near Hot Springs AR.

While some people wanted to implicate the patagial tags as causing the
birds death,  the preliminary necropsy report's heavy metals tests indicate
that the hawk died of lead poisoning.  Liver lead levels higher than 6
parts per million (ppm) are considered lethal.  The hawks liver lead level
was 142.1 ppm.   A very small piece of metal was found along with hairs and
seeds in the hawk's proventriculus and we do not know if this was lead.

Bird of prey get lead poisoning by ingesting animals or fish (or parts of
animals in fish) that contain lead fishing tackle such as sinkers, or lead
ammunition such as lead shot or lead bullet fragments.

We are still waiting on the results of a few tests.

Karen Rowe, Bird Conservation Program Coordinator
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission



------------------------------
*From:* "Todd, Shelley" 
*To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
*Sent:* Friday, January 13, 2017 10:38 AM
*Subject:* Re: Banded Red-Tailed Hawk found dead

Here's a link to a couple photos I took of the hawk at last night's meeting.

https://www.facebook.com/ media/set/?set=a. 366641567032684.1073741829.
100010605317819&type=1&l= 8fe8172f67

 


Shelley Todd
Natural Resource Program Manager
Hot Springs National Park
101 Reserve Street
Hot Springs, AR  71901
(501) 620-6751 (office)
(501) 620-6778 (fax)
shelley_todd AT nps.gov

On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Jerry Butler  wrote:

Yesterday afternoon my friend John Simpson was in a forested area of Nature
Conservancy land  away from a road or power line near Hot Springs, AR  and
found a banded dead Red -tailed Hawk. It had very recently died, was not
stiff, had no "death" odor and no apparent injuries.  The oddest thing
about it was that on either wing attached by yellow plastic staples were
white round vinyl tags about 3 inches in diameter.  With large numbers
written on them.

John has called the banding registry this AM and discovered that the bird
was banded in Illinois, but there is as yet no information about those
large vinyl tags that were apparently placed there for research purposes.

Pictures have been taken of the dead bird but I am unable to send them at
this time.

It is my impression that the large flapping tags on both wings could have
easily contributed to the bird's demise.  I would think telemetry would be
a better way to research RTHA than attaching these flapping obtrusive tags
and would be less likely to hinder the hawks flight and quest for prey.

Are there others on ARbird who can shed some light on this?

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler











-- 
pH
www.sedgehead.com Philip E. Hyatt