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Updated on Monday, September 1 at 06:27 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Owl

2 Sep Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen [Ragupathy Kannan ]
1 Sep Gunnison Sage-Grouse April 2015 Adventure ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
1 Sep Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen [Sandy Berger ]
1 Sep Re: Honoring Martha [Jeffrey Short ]
1 Sep Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen [jwdavis ]
1 Sep Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen [David Luneau ]
1 Sep Re: Honoring Martha [Harriet Jansma ]
1 Sep Re: Honoring Martha [Janine Perlman ]
1 Sep Re: Honoring Martha [Jeffrey Short ]
1 Sep BAIRD'S AND BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
1 Sep Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen [jwdavis ]
1 Sep Bald Knob NWR ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
1 Sep More on Martha [Jeffrey Short ]
1 Sep Bald Knob [Sarah Morris ]
1 Sep Honoring Martha ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
31 Aug Bald Eagle [lynn ]
31 Aug Waders along the mighty Mississippi [Kelly Chitwood ]
31 Aug Godwit, Spoonbills still present [Dan Scheiman ]
31 Aug Re: Saturday with hummingbirds and Tana Beasley [Elizabeth Shores ]
31 Aug Saturday with hummingbirds and Tana Beasley [Alyson Hoge ]
31 Aug Sightings: bald knob national wildlife refuge [Jim Dixon ]
31 Aug Re: "Yard Birds" [Jeffrey Short ]
31 Aug Re: Spoonbills [David Ray ]
31 Aug "Yard Birds" [Bill Thurman ]
30 Aug BAIRD'S SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
30 Aug Anone see the godwit at BK Saturday? [Jim Dixon ]
30 Aug Spoonbills [Betsy's Birds ]
30 Aug Re: Godwit, spoonbills at Bald Knob [Betsy's Birds ]
30 Aug California Condor Public Release Information for those Wanting to Attend [jwdavis ]
30 Aug Saving Our Birds - NYTimes.com [jwdavis ]
30 Aug Re: They call CHIP-CHIP (Chesney) ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
30 Aug They call CHIP-CHIP (Chesney) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
29 Aug Fighting Simipalmated Sandpipers revisited [Delos McCauley ]
29 Aug BKNWR Video Slideshow [Robert Herron ]
29 Aug Re: Semipalmated Sandpipers Fighting [Terry Butler ]
29 Aug Spoonbills & Hudsonian godwit at Bald Knob [CK ]
29 Aug R Spoonbill [Karyn Dillard ]
29 Aug Alligator at Bald Knob [CK ]
29 Aug Hummingbird Migration Festival, Strawberry Plains Audubon Center, Sept 5-7 [Dan Scheiman ]
29 Aug Bald Knob godwit [CK ]
29 Aug Re: Semipalmated Sandpipers Fighting [Ragupathy Kannan ]
29 Aug Godwit, spoonbills at Bald Knob [CK ]
29 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Michael Linz ]
29 Aug The Snipe Newsletter ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
28 Aug Semipalmated Sandpipers Fighting [Delos McCauley ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Elizabeth Shores ]
29 Aug The art deco scene (Centerton) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Aug Re: BKNWR [Kenny Nichols ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Herschel Raney ]
28 Aug Ripples and miracles ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Aug FW: BKNWR [Terry Butler ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Janine Perlman ]
28 Aug Re: BKNWR [Kenny Nichols ]
28 Aug BKNWR [Terry Butler ]
28 Aug SHOREBIRDS AND RAT-TAILED MAGGOTS AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [saracnbrtltt9 ]
28 Aug Re: Bob Sargent [Elizabeth Shores ]
28 Aug Spoonbills [Lenore ]
28 Aug Re: Fall Meeting & new webpage [Ragupathy Kannan ]
27 Aug BOYD POINT SHOREBIRDS [JFR ]
27 Aug AAS Calendar Contest Winners, Pre-Orders [Mitchell Pruitt ]
27 Aug Spoonbills [Michael ]
27 Aug Ark. Democrat 8/26/14 article: "2 focus on passenger pigeon" - Bandtailed Pigeon note [jwdavis ]
27 Aug Ark. Democrat 8/26/14 article: "2 focus on passenger pigeon" [Barry Haas ]
26 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 26 [David Arbour ]
26 Aug Beaverfork - Foresters [Allan Mueller ]
26 Aug Birding with Eric's girlfriend [Sandy Berger ]
25 Aug Inca Dove [Doc George ]
25 Aug Re: MIKI's [Charles Anderson ]
24 Aug Re: MIKI's [Sarah Morris ]
24 Aug Re: MIKI's ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
24 Aug Re: MIKI's [David Starrett ]
24 Aug Re: MIKI's [Jeffrey Short ]
24 Aug Re: MIKI's [Charles Anderson ]
24 Aug Re: MIKI's [Elizabeth Shores ]
24 Aug MIKI's [CK ]

Subject: Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 07:00:48 +0800
Anyone interested in extinctions should read The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth 
Colbert. She covers all 5 mass extinctions briefly and takes a good hard look 
at the current human-caused one in progress. 



On Monday, 1 September 2014 5:30 PM, Sandy Berger  wrote:
 


Well that is simply amazing!  Thanks for sharing Jerry.  

A good read...Hope is the Thing With Feathers, a Personal Chronicle of Vanished 
Birds by Christopher Cokinos. 


Sandy B.

Sent from my iPad

On Sep 1, 2014, at 4:34 PM, jwdavis  wrote:


I am thankful for the few documents that we have of those species now gone 
and this is the time to document those that still are still here.  Arkansas 
birders are elated when they find a bird and make the post on the internet but 
it has not sunk in yet how few birds still remain. As with the Eskimo Curlew 
and 

others that are gone, people convince themselves that everything is still OK 
and 

there is another one out there somewhere. I would like to see and take a 
picture 

of every bird species on the North American Continent while they are still 
here. 

This will never be achieved, but it is something to shoot for.  We are 
losing 4% of our birds each year and today there are 40% fewer birds crossing 
our borders than there was 10 years ago. I have assessed birds in enough states 

to see that there are fewer birds.  More people need to be asking where 
have our birds gone and what can I do to help bring them back. There is more to 

saving birds and more to putting more birds on the landscape than just putting 
out feeders in the winter. Our birds need help.
 
Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
 
From: David Luneau 
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 3:44 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath 
Hen
 
Jerry, 
thanks for sharing the link to this 1918 film. It’s amazing that the film has 

survived all these years, and that it was finally found and 
digitized.
  
So, 
there seems to be one film of Heath Hens (1918) and one film of Imperial 
Woodpeckers (1956) (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=2163). 
  
I 
am very thankful that there are people who took films like these and that there 

are people who preserved and “rediscovered” the films many years 
later.
  
Now 
someone needs to find a film of Carolina Parakeets.
  
M. 
David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
Associate 
Professor of Electronics
University 
of Arkansas at Little Rock
2801 
S. University Ave.
Little 
Rock, AR 72204
  
From:The Birds of 
Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of 
jwdavis 

Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 12:25 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Archival film of the 
extinct Heath Hen
 
 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/03/07/long-extinct-heath-hen-comes-life-archival-film/X9zKEdB6dvH71Pt6rB2tFL/story.html 
Subject: Gunnison Sage-Grouse April 2015 Adventure
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:57:48 +0000
Greetings all,
I've been thinking for a couple years about visiting a critically imperiled 
Gunnison Sage-Grouse lek in Colorado. 


I plan to go in April of 2015.

There is a public viewing site or a viewing blind available for groups.
Either way there are several rules for the Grouse's well-being.
No leaving the car or trailer; no sounds; no camera flashes; no cars running 
the heater; no sudden lights or movements; no bathroom breaks until the grouse 
leave the lek; no leaving the site until the grouse leave. A mandatory meeting 
and informative conservation talk about the sp is held the evening beforehand. 
Can expect to be up by 3:30am and confined in place to 10-11am ish. A CO 
Wildlife & Parks person will be there to educate and to enforce the rules with 
violation notices, if necessary. Viewing is from a distance so scopes are a 
good thing. One last thing - it's going to be COLD sitting in one spot, so will 
need blankets and layers and layers of warm cloths!!!! 


Logistics:
If I go in my car 2 folks can go with us.
If we go as a group it could be 8-10 folks, renting a van.
It's at least 16+ hrs each way, so even I don't want to drive it all in one 
day. (Although I could; go ahead and chuckle ya'll that went to TX & CA as a 
group) So almost need to plan on 4-6 days. Should have some time for birding 
South/ Southeastern CO "low" country.... Like the NWRs, and along the AR River. 

I don't think there will be enough time to hunt for one of my nemesis birds - 
White-tailed Ptarmigan. (Not to mention that it's still winter at 13,000 ft.) 


We could share the cost of the van, the viewing trailer ($100), food and 
lodging. 

The choice of dining cost and type of motel are flexible and group decided.
I'll do the homework on other birding spots to visit, and we can make decisions 
on how to maximize species or lifers for all. 


Of course if you wanted to spend more time and drive yourself or wanted to fly 
out, then we could meet you out there. 


If we have enough interest to rent the viewing trailer I would need to make the 
reservation on Jan 2 2015. 


At this time I don't need a firm commitment, but it would be helpful to know 
how much interest there is on the adventure. 

Time of April can be flexible as well as the number of days we will be gone. So 
if there are times you can't go, or have a preference on number of days, please 
let me know. 

Since we might be space limited: People going will be based on order of reply, 
and there probably will be a wait-list in case some can't go on a certain date. 


So are you ready for some 1 species focused birding, with some fluff birding on 
the side? 

Cheers, Leif at Hector




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Subject: Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:30:07 -0500
Well that is simply amazing!  Thanks for sharing Jerry.  

A good read...Hope is the Thing With Feathers, a Personal Chronicle of Vanished 
Birds by Christopher Cokinos. 


Sandy B.

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 1, 2014, at 4:34 PM, jwdavis  wrote:
> 
> I am thankful for the few documents that we have of those species now gone 
and this is the time to document those that still are still here. Arkansas 
birders are elated when they find a bird and make the post on the internet but 
it has not sunk in yet how few birds still remain. As with the Eskimo Curlew 
and others that are gone, people convince themselves that everything is still 
OK and there is another one out there somewhere. I would like to see and take a 
picture of every bird species on the North American Continent while they are 
still here. This will never be achieved, but it is something to shoot for. We 
are losing 4% of our birds each year and today there are 40% fewer birds 
crossing our borders than there was 10 years ago. I have assessed birds in 
enough states to see that there are fewer birds. More people need to be asking 
where have our birds gone and what can I do to help bring them back. There is 
more to saving birds and more to putting more birds on the landscape than just 
putting out feeders in the winter. Our birds need help. 

>  
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs
>  
> From: David Luneau
> Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 3:44 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen
>  
> Jerry, thanks for sharing the link to this 1918 film. It’s amazing that the 
film has survived all these years, and that it was finally found and digitized. 

>  
> So, there seems to be one film of Heath Hens (1918) and one film of Imperial 
Woodpeckers (1956) (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=2163). 

>  
> I am very thankful that there are people who took films like these and that 
there are people who preserved and “rediscovered” the films many years 
later. 

>  
> Now someone needs to find a film of Carolina Parakeets.
>  
> M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
> Associate Professor of Electronics
> University of Arkansas at Little Rock
> 2801 S. University Ave.
> Little Rock, AR 72204
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of jwdavis 

> Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 12:25 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen
>  
>  
> 
http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/03/07/long-extinct-heath-hen-comes-life-archival-film/X9zKEdB6dvH71Pt6rB2tFL/story.html 
Subject: Re: Honoring Martha
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:50:29 -0500
Looks like from what I can find on the Pax Pig range
(https://www.google.com/search?q=range+of+passenger+pigeon&tbm=isch&imgil=g2
Ce6cNN4uc9IM%253A%253BKq41YhepRVpMPM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.birdwa
tchingdaily.com%25252Fblog%25252F2014%25252F01%25252F09%25252Ffrom-billions-
to-none-a-passenger-pigeon-timeline%25252F&source=iu&fir=g2Ce6cNN4uc9IM%253A
%252CKq41YhepRVpMPM%252C_&usg=__S3Aw97SmGXD8vYR0yOGgNhrVoxE%3D&sa=X&ei=WeQEV
OP-Asi6ggTDioKoDQ&ved=0CDoQ9QEwBA&biw=1280&bih=657#facrc=_&imgdii=t5wXaFuhdW
qPPM%3A%3Bg2Ce6cNN4uc9IM%3Bt5wXaFuhdWqPPM%3A&imgrc=t5wXaFuhdWqPPM%253A%3B749
0v4Mr9ujv8M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fexplorer.natureserve.org%252Fimagerepositor
y%252FGetImage%253FSRC%253D6%2526BATCH%253D48%2526FMT%253Dgif%2526RES%253D60
0X615%2526NAME%253Dectopistes_migratorius%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.carolinab
irdclub.org%252Fncbirds%252Fview.php%253Fpage%253Dmaps%2526species_id%253D12
219%2526get_ns%253D1%3B600%3B615) and Janine's paper, there could be a
strong relationship between the PaxPig breeding range and the histoplasmin
sensitivity response around the Ohio Valley.  

 

This might suggest that the PaxPig nesting areas built up more of a dropping
load while the foraging bird roosts were not as much a factor in histo; i.e.
since the foragers spread the nutrients far and wide.  (The video simulating
the PaxPig flyover must have stimulated umbrella sales!)  Any count data
about foraging roosts versus nesting sites?

 

It may be impossible to replicate this study since the "lifetime" residency
factor is probably not possible in this day-and-age. 

 

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 2:14 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Honoring Martha

 

Histo. is extremely common.  In many areas of this country (including AR)
and elsewhere in the world, the great majority of people have been infected
at some point.  It's usually not a problem.  Here's an early paper:
http://journal.publications.chestnet.org/data/Journals/CHEST/21279/649.pdf
 .  

Janine

On 9/1/2014 1:17 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:

Exposure to large bird roosts-like those of the Passenger Pigeon and more
recently blackbirds-could lead to histoplasmosis, a debilitating, fungal
disease.  Typically, "histo" is contracted by humans when the soil
underneath the trees is disturbed and the spores become airborne and are
inhaled.  Wonder how many cases of the disease went undiagnosed as former
nesting or roost sites were developed for agriculture or residential use.
Just a thought.

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 9:04 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Honoring Martha

 

Passenger Pigeons, now a century gone from earth, were celebrated yesterday,
a hot Sunday afternoon over a holiday weekend marking summer's end.
Undeterred, 78 who turned out at Hobbs State Park were guided by Nancy
McCartney, Curator of Zoology in UA-Fayetteville Museum and Doug James,
University Professor of Biological Sciences.

 

It was 100 years ago that Martha passed, and yet, even with a century of
hand-wringing about how billions could suddenly zero, the Passenger Pigeon
case remains open. Dr McCartney brought with her two pigeons as mute
reference.

 

In yesterday's presentation, McCartney recounted widespread slaughter,
barrels packed with E. migratorius and shipped to markets for nickels. This
slaughter seems inconceivable, yet as we sat in the program at Hobbs - and
in other places and in our own time -- sharks are slaughtered toward
extinction for their fins, elephants for their tusks, marine ecosystems
coated in oil, all driven by consumer demands not unlike what made Martha
the last.

 

And before we get too smug about being sophisticated moderns: acting under
laws passed in part because of what we learned from pigeons, the US Fish and
Wildlife Service has proposed protections for two increasingly rare mussels,
Neosho Mucket and Rabbitsfoot, among whom could be the bivalve version of
Martha.

 

Are the people we elect to local, state, and national office listening? Are
representatives of industry? The business community representing Arkansas's
cattle and forestry interests has combined to radically misrepresent this
listing as an economic Armageddon and purposefully distort the proposed
modest protections. In their view it's Big Government against helpless
private landowners. 

 

They may drive modern pickups and trade grain stocks and cattle futures on
the internet, but they would on the same grounds have opposed protections of
Passenger Pigeon roosts. The philosophy behind this is that the earth is
made for them, not for wild pigeons or muckets. My view: They may have been
at church on Sunday during the pigeon program, but they apparently missed
the part about Noah's Ark.

 

Every time we cast a vote for a local public official, or county JPs, or
reps to the Arkansas Legislature, we have a chance to honor Martha. This not
about Republicans, Democrats, or Independents. It is about how we see the
earth. Martha is gone for a century, but we aren't anywhere near the end. 

 
Subject: Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:34:33 -0500
I am thankful for the few documents that we have of those species now gone and 
this is the time to document those that still are still here. Arkansas birders 
are elated when they find a bird and make the post on the internet but it has 
not sunk in yet how few birds still remain. As with the Eskimo Curlew and 
others that are gone, people convince themselves that everything is still OK 
and there is another one out there somewhere. I would like to see and take a 
picture of every bird species on the North American Continent while they are 
still here. This will never be achieved, but it is something to shoot for. We 
are losing 4% of our birds each year and today there are 40% fewer birds 
crossing our borders than there was 10 years ago. I have assessed birds in 
enough states to see that there are fewer birds. More people need to be asking 
where have our birds gone and what can I do to help bring them back. There is 
more to saving birds and more to putting more birds on the landscape than just 
putting out feeders in the winter. Our birds need help. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: David Luneau 
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 3:44 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen

Jerry, thanks for sharing the link to this 1918 film. It’s amazing that the 
film has survived all these years, and that it was finally found and digitized. 


 

So, there seems to be one film of Heath Hens (1918) and one film of Imperial 
Woodpeckers (1956) (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=2163). 


 

I am very thankful that there are people who took films like these and that 
there are people who preserved and “rediscovered” the films many years 
later. 


 

Now someone needs to find a film of Carolina Parakeets.

 

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of jwdavis 

Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 12:25 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen

 

 


http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/03/07/long-extinct-heath-hen-comes-life-archival-film/X9zKEdB6dvH71Pt6rB2tFL/story.html 
Subject: Re: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen
From: David Luneau <mdluneau AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 15:44:59 -0500
Jerry, thanks for sharing the link to this 1918 film. It's amazing that the
film has survived all these years, and that it was finally found and
digitized.

 

So, there seems to be one film of Heath Hens (1918) and one film of Imperial
Woodpeckers (1956) (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=2163). 

 

I am very thankful that there are people who took films like these and that
there are people who preserved and "rediscovered" the films many years
later.

 

Now someone needs to find a film of Carolina Parakeets.

 

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of jwdavis
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 12:25 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen

 

 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/03/07/long-extinct-heath-hen-comes-lif
e-archival-film/X9zKEdB6dvH71Pt6rB2tFL/story.html
 
Subject: Re: Honoring Martha
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:34:17 +0000
My MD brothers have remarked that nearly everybody east of the Rockies has 
histo scars on his/her lungs; and most never know they've had it. However, in 
the Mississippi flyway, cases of ocular histoplasmosis are more common than in 
most other places. It can cause severe vision loss. There are a couple of 
ophthalmologists in Memphis who hardly treat anything except patients with 
ocular histo. I have a friend who contracted it in New Orleans as a young 
adult. It quieted before it made her totally blind, but she is legally blind: 
no central vision in one eye, only keyhole vision in the other. Hers was 
typical, she says, with hemorrhaging blood vessels obscuring more and more of 
her sight over a couple of decades. She believes she likely contracted it from 
a pet bird. 

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of Janine Perlman [jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET] 

Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 2:14 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Honoring Martha

Histo. is extremely common. In many areas of this country (including AR) and 
elsewhere in the world, the great majority of people have been infected at some 
point. It's usually not a problem. Here's an early paper: 
http://journal.publications.chestnet.org/data/Journals/CHEST/21279/649.pdf. 


Janine

On 9/1/2014 1:17 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
Exposure to large bird roostslike those of the Passenger Pigeon and more 
recently blackbirdscould lead to histoplasmosis, a debilitating, fungal 
disease. Typically, histo is contracted by humans when the soil underneath 
the trees is disturbed and the spores become airborne and are inhaled. Wonder 
how many cases of the disease went undiagnosed as former nesting or roost sites 
were developed for agriculture or residential use. Just a thought 


Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal 

Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 9:04 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Honoring Martha

Passenger Pigeons, now a century gone from earth, were celebrated yesterday, a 
hot Sunday afternoon over a holiday weekend marking summers end. Undeterred, 
78 who turned out at Hobbs State Park were guided by Nancy McCartney, Curator 
of Zoology in UA-Fayetteville Museum and Doug James, University Professor of 
Biological Sciences. 


It was 100 years ago that Martha passed, and yet, even with a century of 
hand-wringing about how billions could suddenly zero, the Passenger Pigeon case 
remains open. Dr McCartney brought with her two pigeons as mute reference. 


In yesterdays presentation, McCartney recounted widespread slaughter, barrels 
packed with E. migratorius and shipped to markets for nickels. This slaughter 
seems inconceivable, yet as we sat in the program at Hobbs  and in other 
places and in our own time -- sharks are slaughtered toward extinction for 
their fins, elephants for their tusks, marine ecosystems coated in oil, all 
driven by consumer demands not unlike what made Martha the last. 


And before we get too smug about being sophisticated moderns: acting under laws 
passed in part because of what we learned from pigeons, the US Fish and 
Wildlife Service has proposed protections for two increasingly rare mussels, 
Neosho Mucket and Rabbitsfoot, among whom could be the bivalve version of 
Martha. 


Are the people we elect to local, state, and national office listening? Are 
representatives of industry? The business community representing Arkansass 
cattle and forestry interests has combined to radically misrepresent this 
listing as an economic Armageddon and purposefully distort the proposed modest 
protections. In their view its Big Government against helpless private 
landowners. 


They may drive modern pickups and trade grain stocks and cattle futures on the 
internet, but they would on the same grounds have opposed protections of 
Passenger Pigeon roosts. The philosophy behind this is that the earth is made 
for them, not for wild pigeons or muckets. My view: They may have been at 
church on Sunday during the pigeon program, but they apparently missed the part 
about Noah's Ark. 


Every time we cast a vote for a local public official, or county JPs, or reps 
to the Arkansas Legislature, we have a chance to honor Martha. This not about 
Republicans, Democrats, or Independents. It is about how we see the earth. 
Martha is gone for a century, but we arent anywhere near the end. 

Subject: Re: Honoring Martha
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 14:14:12 -0500
Histo. is extremely common.  In many areas of this country (including 
AR) and elsewhere in the world, the great majority of people have been 
infected at some point.  It's /usually/ not a problem.  Here's an early 
paper: 
http://journal.publications.chestnet.org/data/Journals/CHEST/21279/649.pdf.

Janine

On 9/1/2014 1:17 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> Exposure to large bird roosts---like those of the Passenger Pigeon and 
> more recently blackbirds---could lead to histoplasmosis, a 
> debilitating, fungal disease.  Typically, "histo" is contracted by 
> humans when the soil  underneath the trees is disturbed and the spores 
> become airborne and are inhaled. Wonder how many cases of the disease 
> went undiagnosed as former nesting or roost sites were developed for 
> agriculture or residential use.  Just a thought...
>
> Jeff Short
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Joseph C. Neal
> *Sent:* Monday, September 01, 2014 9:04 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Honoring Martha
>
> Passenger Pigeons, now a century gone from earth, were celebrated 
> yesterday, a hot Sunday afternoon over a holiday weekend marking 
> summer's end. Undeterred, 78 who turned out at Hobbs State Park were 
> guided by Nancy McCartney, Curator of Zoology in UA-Fayetteville 
> Museum and Doug James, University Professor of Biological Sciences.
>
> It was 100 years ago that Martha passed, and yet, even with a century 
> of hand-wringing about how billions could suddenly zero, the Passenger 
> Pigeon case remains open. Dr McCartney brought with her two pigeons as 
> mute reference.
>
> In yesterday's presentation, McCartney recounted widespread slaughter, 
> barrels packed with E. migratorius and shipped to markets for nickels. 
> This slaughter seems inconceivable, yet as we sat in the program at 
> Hobbs -- and in other places and in our own time -- sharks are 
> slaughtered toward extinction for their fins, elephants for their 
> tusks, marine ecosystems coated in oil, all driven by consumer demands 
> not unlike what made Martha the last.
>
> And before we get too smug about being sophisticated moderns: acting 
> under laws passed in part because of what we learned from pigeons, the 
> US Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed protections for two 
> increasingly rare mussels, Neosho Mucket and Rabbitsfoot, among whom 
> could be the bivalve version of Martha.
>
> Are the people we elect to local, state, and national office 
> listening? Are representatives of industry? The business community 
> representing Arkansas's cattle and forestry interests has combined to 
> radically misrepresent this listing as an economic Armageddon and 
> purposefully distort the proposed modest protections. In their view 
> it's Big Government against helpless private landowners.
>
> They may drive modern pickups and trade grain stocks and cattle 
> futures on the internet, but they would on the same grounds have 
> opposed protections of Passenger Pigeon roosts. The philosophy behind 
> this is that the earth is made for them, not for wild pigeons or 
> muckets. My view: They may have been at church on Sunday during the 
> pigeon program, but they apparently missed the part about Noah's Ark.
>
> Every time we cast a vote for a local public official, or county JPs, 
> or reps to the Arkansas Legislature, we have a chance to honor Martha. 
> This not about Republicans, Democrats, or Independents. It is about 
> how we see the earth. Martha is gone for a century, but we aren't 
> anywhere near the end.
>
Subject: Re: Honoring Martha
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 13:17:48 -0500
Exposure to large bird roosts-like those of the Passenger Pigeon and more
recently blackbirds-could lead to histoplasmosis, a debilitating, fungal
disease.  Typically, "histo" is contracted by humans when the soil
underneath the trees is disturbed and the spores become airborne and are
inhaled.  Wonder how many cases of the disease went undiagnosed as former
nesting or roost sites were developed for agriculture or residential use.
Just a thought.

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 9:04 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Honoring Martha

 

Passenger Pigeons, now a century gone from earth, were celebrated yesterday,
a hot Sunday afternoon over a holiday weekend marking summer's end.
Undeterred, 78 who turned out at Hobbs State Park were guided by Nancy
McCartney, Curator of Zoology in UA-Fayetteville Museum and Doug James,
University Professor of Biological Sciences.

 

It was 100 years ago that Martha passed, and yet, even with a century of
hand-wringing about how billions could suddenly zero, the Passenger Pigeon
case remains open. Dr McCartney brought with her two pigeons as mute
reference.

 

In yesterday's presentation, McCartney recounted widespread slaughter,
barrels packed with E. migratorius and shipped to markets for nickels. This
slaughter seems inconceivable, yet as we sat in the program at Hobbs - and
in other places and in our own time -- sharks are slaughtered toward
extinction for their fins, elephants for their tusks, marine ecosystems
coated in oil, all driven by consumer demands not unlike what made Martha
the last.

 

And before we get too smug about being sophisticated moderns: acting under
laws passed in part because of what we learned from pigeons, the US Fish and
Wildlife Service has proposed protections for two increasingly rare mussels,
Neosho Mucket and Rabbitsfoot, among whom could be the bivalve version of
Martha.

 

Are the people we elect to local, state, and national office listening? Are
representatives of industry? The business community representing Arkansas's
cattle and forestry interests has combined to radically misrepresent this
listing as an economic Armageddon and purposefully distort the proposed
modest protections. In their view it's Big Government against helpless
private landowners. 

 

They may drive modern pickups and trade grain stocks and cattle futures on
the internet, but they would on the same grounds have opposed protections of
Passenger Pigeon roosts. The philosophy behind this is that the earth is
made for them, not for wild pigeons or muckets. My view: They may have been
at church on Sunday during the pigeon program, but they apparently missed
the part about Noah's Ark.

 

Every time we cast a vote for a local public official, or county JPs, or
reps to the Arkansas Legislature, we have a chance to honor Martha. This not
about Republicans, Democrats, or Independents. It is about how we see the
earth. Martha is gone for a century, but we aren't anywhere near the end. 
Subject: BAIRD'S AND BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 12:59:08 -0500
This morning under cloudy skies, I observed and photographed a Baird's and a 
Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine 
Bluff. Both were easily approachable. The Baird's was a different bird than 
observed on Saturday, which had an injured leg. It is of interest that the 
Buff-breasted was observed on the exact same levee, in almost the same spot, as 
a Buffy observed last year at this time. 

John Redman
Subject: Archival film of the extinct Heath Hen
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 12:25:02 -0500

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/03/07/long-extinct-heath-hen-comes-life-archival-film/X9zKEdB6dvH71Pt6rB2tFL/story.html 
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:00:57 +0000
Terry Butler called to say the Hudsonian Godwit and spoonbills were still 
present as of 11:30. 

There is a possible 2nd godwit. This one has red splotching on the front which 
is interesting because someone posted a photo on the Arkansas Birds Facebook 
page matching this description. 

There are three American Avocets and a Sanderling present.
Unfortunately a Peregrine Falcon came along and scared all the shorebirds off 
including the godwit(s). They had not returned by the time Terry headed for 
home. 


Dottie Boyles
Reporting for the Pangburn Birder

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Subject: More on Martha
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 10:30:25 -0500
 

 

http://www.weather.com/news/science/environment/passenger-pigeon-went-extinc
t-100-years-ago-20140831

 
Subject: Bald Knob
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 09:13:53 -0500
Both the hudsonian godwit and the spoonbills are still in Bald Knob.

Sarah M
Jonesboro

Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S®4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Honoring Martha
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 14:03:58 +0000
Passenger Pigeons, now a century gone from earth, were celebrated yesterday, a 
hot Sunday afternoon over a holiday weekend marking summers end. Undeterred, 
78 who turned out at Hobbs State Park were guided by Nancy McCartney, Curator 
of Zoology in UA-Fayetteville Museum and Doug James, University Professor of 
Biological Sciences. 


It was 100 years ago that Martha passed, and yet, even with a century of 
hand-wringing about how billions could suddenly zero, the Passenger Pigeon case 
remains open. Dr McCartney brought with her two pigeons as mute reference. 


In yesterdays presentation, McCartney recounted widespread slaughter, barrels 
packed with E. migratorius and shipped to markets for nickels. This slaughter 
seems inconceivable, yet as we sat in the program at Hobbs  and in other 
places and in our own time -- sharks are slaughtered toward extinction for 
their fins, elephants for their tusks, marine ecosystems coated in oil, all 
driven by consumer demands not unlike what made Martha the last. 


And before we get too smug about being sophisticated moderns: acting under laws 
passed in part because of what we learned from pigeons, the US Fish and 
Wildlife Service has proposed protections for two increasingly rare mussels, 
Neosho Mucket and Rabbitsfoot, among whom could be the bivalve version of 
Martha. 


Are the people we elect to local, state, and national office listening? Are 
representatives of industry? The business community representing Arkansass 
cattle and forestry interests has combined to radically misrepresent this 
listing as an economic Armageddon and purposefully distort the proposed modest 
protections. In their view its Big Government against helpless private 
landowners. 


They may drive modern pickups and trade grain stocks and cattle futures on the 
internet, but they would on the same grounds have opposed protections of 
Passenger Pigeon roosts. The philosophy behind this is that the earth is made 
for them, not for wild pigeons or muckets. My view: They may have been at 
church on Sunday during the pigeon program, but they apparently missed the part 
about Noah's Ark. 


Every time we cast a vote for a local public official, or county JPs, or reps 
to the Arkansas Legislature, we have a chance to honor Martha. This not about 
Republicans, Democrats, or Independents. It is about how we see the earth. 
Martha is gone for a century, but we arent anywhere near the end. 
Subject: Bald Eagle
From: lynn <lnowell AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 21:11:50 -0500
Was delighted to see two adult Bald Eagles on Greer's Ferry Lake today!

Lynn
Usually in Northern Lonoke county, just not today!

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Waders along the mighty Mississippi
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 14:57:10 -0500
After seeing over 50 Wood Storks near Moro Bay State Park last Friday, we 
decided to take a little trip, along the mighty Mississip'. 


We toured the levee from Grand Lake to Lake Chicot. Highlights included Black- 
bellied Whistling Ducks, 25 Roseate Spoonbills, Wood Storks, Osprey, Least 
Terns, Yellow-crowned Night Heron and hundreds of egrets. 



Kelly Chitwood 
Subject: Godwit, Spoonbills still present
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:34:43 +0000




Subject: Re: Saturday with hummingbirds and Tana Beasley
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 14:18:13 -0500
Very interesting report, Alyson. Three cheers for milkweed! 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2014, at 11:56 AM, Alyson Hoge  wrote:
> 
> About 30 people spent Saturday afternoon at the Arkansas Game and Fish 
Commission education center at Cook's Lake in Arkansas County to watch Tana 
Beasley talk about hummingbirds and band some of them. 

> 
> Tana was taught by Bob Sargent, and she mentioned him throughout her talk. 
> 
> For example, she recalled the time during a training session that one of 
Bob's students (not Tana) dropped hummingbird bands on the ground. The bands 
are tiny strips of metal. By the end of the day, the student had picked up all 
the bands. 

> 
> Most of the birds she banded were fledgings, but a few were adult females. No 
adult males were caught, but we did see a few fledging males with a few red 
feathers. We learned how adult females, whose tail feathers normally have a 
scalloped appearance, are rubbed off flat at the end because they hold their 
tails against nests as they feed their babies. 

> 
> Tana's audience ranged from kids to older adults, but all of them acted like 
kids at the chance to release a banded bird. Tana was patient throughout the 
day with all of us — no matter how dumb our questions, no matter how we 
crowded around her as she measured and banded a bird. She took just as much 
time with the last bird as she did the first, even though the day ended an hour 
or two later than planned. 

> 
> Alyson Hoge
> Pulaski County
> 
> P.S. The center at Cook's Lake has a milkweed patch for monarchs, and it was 
covered with the caterpillars. We saw one butterfly that had just emerged from 
a cocoon. My to-do list for next year includes growing milkweed! 

Subject: Saturday with hummingbirds and Tana Beasley
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 11:56:54 -0500
About 30 people spent Saturday afternoon at the Arkansas Game and Fish 
Commission education center at Cook's Lake in Arkansas County to watch Tana 
Beasley talk about hummingbirds and band some of them. 


Tana was taught by Bob Sargent, and she mentioned him throughout her talk. 

For example, she recalled the time during a training session that one of Bob's 
students (not Tana) dropped hummingbird bands on the ground. The bands are tiny 
strips of metal. By the end of the day, the student had picked up all the 
bands. 


Most of the birds she banded were fledgings, but a few were adult females. No 
adult males were caught, but we did see a few fledging males with a few red 
feathers. We learned how adult females, whose tail feathers normally have a 
scalloped appearance, are rubbed off flat at the end because they hold their 
tails against nests as they feed their babies. 


Tana's audience ranged from kids to older adults, but all of them acted like 
kids at the chance to release a banded bird. Tana was patient throughout the 
day with all of us  no matter how dumb our questions, no matter how we crowded 
around her as she measured and banded a bird. She took just as much time with 
the last bird as she did the first, even though the day ended an hour or two 
later than planned. 


Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County

P.S. The center at Cook's Lake has a milkweed patch for monarchs, and it was 
covered with the caterpillars. We saw one butterfly that had just emerged from 
a cocoon. My to-do list for next year includes growing milkweed! 
Subject: Sightings: bald knob national wildlife refuge
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:29:41 -0500
Hudsonian Godwit yes. Roseate spoonbills yes. Both in pond just before grain 
bins on Coal Chute road. In the half near bins. Godwit just 40 yards or maybe 
meters from road. Hundreds of other shorebirds seen but mostly regulars. Dirt 
levee road on north side of pond is passable in normal car if you don't mind 
some excitement.  



Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 
Subject: Re: "Yard Birds"
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:38:53 -0500
We’ve had an immature Red-Shouldered hawk hanging around and flying down to 
our yard grabbing something and then flying off to consume it. Got a close look 
one day and saw it grab one of our super-sized earthworms. 


 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Bill Thurman 

Sent: Sunday, August 31, 2014 7:10 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: "Yard Birds"

 

Not the old rock band. My latest birds in a little field of a valley below my 
apt. balcony and next to heavily wooded Shiloh Creek includes Red Shouldered 
Hawk who cries quite a lot and is occasionally accompnied by: 


Blue Jays
Common Crows
Carolina Wrens
Mourning Doves
A distant rooster

Also saw a MS Kite recently circling the Kroger parking lot in west 
Russellville. They are very urban these days and seem to be all over the state. 


Back to my field - I have also seen a couple of Red Headed WPs in and out of 
the large trees in the field near the creek. 


Also:

Scissortail Flycatcher 

Eastern Towhee (rarely)
Nighthawks
Blue Grosbeak  (one day)

Small flocks of Canada Geese and more flocks all over the place.
All of these have been my yard birds except for the rooster and the Mississippi 
Kite. 


                          Bill Thurman 
                           Russellville  
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 08:12:44 -0500
Spoonbills still present this morning  AT  Bald Knob NWR. 
David Ray
NLR. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 30, 2014, at 2:17 PM, Pam Clark 
<0000007e1d641ae0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> We saw them... 4...way at the back of the first pond... After you turn right 
...in front of farm equipment ... 

> 
> Pam
> 
>> On Aug 30, 2014, at 2:04 PM, Betsy's Birds  wrote:
>> 
>> Anybody see the BK spoonbills today?
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: "Yard Birds"
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 07:10:09 -0500
Not the old rock band. My latest birds in a little field of a valley below
my apt. balcony and next to heavily wooded Shiloh Creek includes Red
Shouldered Hawk who cries quite a lot and is occasionally accompnied by:

Blue Jays
Common Crows
Carolina Wrens
Mourning Doves
A distant rooster

Also saw a MS Kite recently circling the Kroger parking lot in west
Russellville. They are very urban these days and seem to be all over the
state.

Back to my field - I have also seen a couple of Red Headed WPs in and out
of the large trees in the field near the creek.

Also:

Scissortail Flycatcher

Eastern Towhee (rarely)
Nighthawks
Blue Grosbeak  (one day)

Small flocks of Canada Geese and more flocks all over the place.
All of these have been my yard birds except for the rooster and the
Mississippi Kite.

                          Bill Thurman
                           Russellville
Subject: BAIRD'S SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:53:29 -0500
This morning, I observed and photographed a solitary Baird's Sandpiper at Boyd 
Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. Kenny Nichols confirmed the 
ID. I also surprised a Willet and was only able to secure a long-range flight 
shot. 

John Redman
Subject: Anone see the godwit at BK Saturday?
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:35:01 -0500
If it was there today, I am hoping the forecast clouds and rain tonight would 
keep him there another day. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock, AR
www.JamesDixon.us
Subject: Spoonbills
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 14:04:36 -0500
Anybody see the BK spoonbills today?

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Godwit, spoonbills at Bald Knob
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 13:53:02 -0500
Anybody see the spoonbills today?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2014, at 9:22 AM, CK  wrote:
> 
> Spoonbills present. Godwit is present. I do not think it is a marbled. Kenny 
is on the way to pronounce its true identity. 

> Cindy
> 
Subject: California Condor Public Release Information for those Wanting to Attend
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:09:30 -0500
Witness endangered California condors being released to the wild


Public release will be Sept. 27 at Vermilion Cliffs National Monument

VERMILION CLIFFS, Ariz. – California condors will be released to the wild in 
the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern Arizona at 11 a.m. Saturday, 
Sept. 27. The public is invited to observe the release from a viewing area 
where spotting scopes will be set up and project personnel will be available to 
answer questions. 


This will be the 18th annual public release of condors in Arizona since the 
condor recovery program began in 1996. Condors are hatched and reared in 
captivity at The Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise, 
Idaho, and transported to Arizona for release to the wild. Condors also come to 
the release site from the Oregon Zoo, Los Angeles Zoo, and San Diego Zoo Safari 
Park. 


The release coincides with National Public Lands Day, the nation’s largest 
hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance America’s public lands. 
National Public Lands Day involves the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and other 
federal agencies, along with state and local governments and private groups. 


There are 71 condors in the wild in the rugged canyonlands of northern Arizona 
and southern Utah. Only two other wild populations exist: one in California and 
in Baja, Mexico. The wild condor population declined to just 22 individuals in 
the 1980s when the program was initiated to save the species from extinction. 


The recovery effort is a cooperative program by federal, state, and private 
partners, including The Peregrine Fund, Arizona Game and Fish Department, U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service, Arizona Strip Field Office of the Bureau of Land 
Management, Grand Canyon and Zion national parks, Utah Division of Wildlife 
Resources, and Kaibab and Dixie national forests. 


To reach the Vermilion Cliffs, take Highway 89A from Kanab or Page to the 
Vermilion Cliffs (from Flagstaff take Highway 89 to Highway 89A). Turn north 
onto BLM Road 1065 (a dirt road next to the small house just east of the Kaibab 
Plateau) and continue almost 3 miles. Participants are encouraged to bring a 
spotting scope or binoculars, sunscreen, water and snack. Shade and restroom 
facilities are available. 


For more information about condors in Arizona, visit www.azgfd.gov/condor or 
www.peregrinefund.org/condor . 
Subject: Saving Our Birds - NYTimes.com
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 11:57:33 -0500
Every species of life on Earth is always just one generation away from 
extinction and extinction is forever. Every great nation that has fallen 
depleted its natural resources. 

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/31/opinion/sunday/saving-our-birds.html?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+eNews&utm_campaign=a2816d4773-eNews_Flash_Times_OpEd_Article_31August_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-a2816d4773-277846765&_r=0 


 
Subject: Re: They call CHIP-CHIP (Chesney)
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 14:04:23 +0000
Actually they say "potato chip" and fly with the dip...  :)

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal 

Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 9:01 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: They call CHIP-CHIP (Chesney)

DR KIMBERLY G SMITH once described American Goldfinches thusly, and with a 
grin: "They call CHIP-CHIP and fly with the dip." And just as August is turning 
to September, Chesney Prairie Natural Area with its vast patches of now ripe 
Ashy Sunflowers provides chips and dips aplenty. 


We are admiring brilliant red leaves in an otherwise deep green black gum tree 
when we hear lots of high-pitched REE REE REEs. We are all puzzled: Kelly and 
Donna Mulhollan, both veterans of the Halberg ecology camps, Kelly's mom and 
birding veteran Mary Bess, and a visiting friend and birder from San Diego. 
What's that? Where is it coming from? REE REE. We keep walking. 


Suddenly bursting from the treetop, a flood of 40 goldfinches. Ah yes, REEs = 
goldfinches. Before that is absorbed, and in the same view of fleeing 
goldfinches, a Loggerhead Shrike, watching ALL as they do at times from 
treetops. 


Shrike is one we want this morning and another is Red-headed Woodpecker. As 
part of his grassland habitat improvement, Joe Woolbright girdles trees 
invading the prairie, not because he's untrue to his roots as a Sierra Club 
tree-hugger, but because they invade the native grasslands - and he knows 
hardwoods snags are bigtime Red-headed magnets. 


We've barely gotten out of the car before a brilliant adult Red-headed makes a 
looping sally out from a snag, then back. With that bird in the scope, we're 
all oooos and ahhhs. Then a second adult, then a brown-headed juvenile, all 
among bony white snags. And we haven't even gotten out into the real tall 
native grasses of the official Tallgrass Prairie. 


We're midst wilting drought in the wider world of northwest Arkansas, but not 
in Chesney's deep green. Like it hadn't heard the news or something. Big 
Bluestem Grass over our heads, plenty green, some still flowering. Elderberries 
with basketball-size cornucopias of luscious dark ripe berries. Poke plants 
with purple stalks the size of small trees and cascades of dark berries. No 
water running in the head of Sager Creek? No problem for a dense rich green 
stand of prairie cordgrass and big patches of the delicate pink trumpets of 
slender false foxglove. And on it goes. 


Prairies are made for droughts like big snags are made for Red-headed 
Woodpeckers. 


Along Airport Road, a dozen or more Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, all with the 
short tails of this year's graduating class, all perched on the fence. So 
what's up? Then I noticed grasshoppers. It's like the folks at Siloam's airport 
made this for an easy pounce, and just when they can most use the help, before 
the flight south. 
Subject: They call CHIP-CHIP (Chesney)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 14:01:21 +0000
DR KIMBERLY G SMITH once described American Goldfinches thusly, and with a 
grin: They call CHIP-CHIP and fly with the dip. And just as August is turning 
to September, Chesney Prairie Natural Area with its vast patches of now ripe 
Ashy Sunflowers provides chips and dips aplenty. 


We are admiring brilliant red leaves in an otherwise deep green black gum tree 
when we hear lots of high-pitched REE REE REEs. We are all puzzled: Kelly and 
Donna Mulhollan, both veterans of the Halberg ecology camps, Kellys mom and 
birding veteran Mary Bess, and a visiting friend and birder from San Diego. 
Whats that? Where is it coming from? REE REE. We keep walking. 


Suddenly bursting from the treetop, a flood of 40 goldfinches. Ah yes, REEs = 
goldfinches. Before that is absorbed, and in the same view of fleeing 
goldfinches, a Loggerhead Shrike, watching ALL as they do at times from 
treetops. 


Shrike is one we want this morning and another is Red-headed Woodpecker. As 
part of his grassland habitat improvement, Joe Woolbright girdles trees 
invading the prairie, not because hes untrue to his roots as a Sierra Club 
tree-hugger, but because they invade the native grasslands  and he knows 
hardwoods snags are bigtime Red-headed magnets. 


Weve barely gotten out of the car before a brilliant adult Red-headed makes a 
looping sally out from a snag, then back. With that bird in the scope, were 
all oooos and ahhhs. Then a second adult, then a brown-headed juvenile, all 
among bony white snags. And we havent even gotten out into the real tall 
native grasses of the official Tallgrass Prairie. 


Were midst wilting drought in the wider world of northwest Arkansas, but not 
in Chesneys deep green. Like it hadnt heard the news or something. Big 
Bluestem Grass over our heads, plenty green, some still flowering. Elderberries 
with basketball-size cornucopias of luscious dark ripe berries. Poke plants 
with purple stalks the size of small trees and cascades of dark berries. No 
water running in the head of Sager Creek? No problem for a dense rich green 
stand of prairie cordgrass and big patches of the delicate pink trumpets of 
slender false foxglove. And on it goes. 


Prairies are made for droughts like big snags are made for Red-headed 
Woodpeckers. 


Along Airport Road, a dozen or more Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, all with the 
short tails of this years graduating class, all perched on the fence. So 
whats up? Then I noticed grasshoppers. Its like the folks at Siloams airport 
made this for an easy pounce, and just when they can most use the help, before 
the flight south. 
Subject: Fighting Simipalmated Sandpipers revisited
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 22:24:27 -0500
Somehow my link got contaminated.  Some saw it alright and others didn't.
Here is another try.  The fight is worth watching.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/124564936 AT N06/14875319909/in/set-7215764694718
1142/lightbox/

 

Delos McCauley
Subject: BKNWR Video Slideshow
From: Robert Herron <r2herron AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:33:03 -0500
I just posted a video slideshow that I made today of the spoonbills at
BKNWR to You Tube. Also note the alligator in the third part of this
slideshow.

The link is:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBhMQHDvhNs

Hope you enjoy.
Robert
Subject: Re: Semipalmated Sandpipers Fighting
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:39:31 -0500
Also a good look at the webbing in the toes of the Semipalmated Sandpipers on 
picture 4. 


 

Terry

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan 

Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 9:24 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Semipalmated Sandpipers Fighting

 

Great photos!

 

On Thursday, 28 August 2014 9:37 PM, Delos McCauley  
wrote: 


 

I caught a couple of Semipalmated Sandpipers fighting at Boyd Point yesterday. 
They are very aggressive birds, defending their food territory. I have a series 
of 12 photos at the following link: 


 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/124564936 AT N06/14875319909/in/set-72157646947181142/lightbox/ 


 

Hope you enjoy the fight.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff

 
Subject: Spoonbills & Hudsonian godwit at Bald Knob
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:13:22 -0500
Both present at 12:30p as we left the refuge. I imagine the alligator will be 
there, too. 


Subject: R Spoonbill
From: Karyn Dillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:15:21 -0700
Same location at BK napping good for photos

Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
Subject: Alligator at Bald Knob
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:38:00 -0500
I am not making this up. Just saw an alligator in the ditch separating Humtsman 
from pond 3. Also with me Bill B, Devin M., Danny & Rhonda T. 

Cindy


Subject: Hummingbird Migration Festival, Strawberry Plains Audubon Center, Sept 5-7
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:02:10 +0000
Next weekend, Sept 5-7, is the annual Hummingbird Migration Festival at the 
Strawberry Plains Audubon Center outside Holly Springs, MS, just an hour south 
of Memphis. 



http://strawberryplains.audubon.org/hummingbird-migration-celebration-sept-5-7-2014-9am-5pm 


Although Bob Sargent won't be there this year, his highly trained colleagues 
will show everyone those flying gems up close and personal. There will be many 
other critters too, including big bats. Plus the opportunity to buy native 
plants for your yard. 


Samantha and I will be leading bird/butterfly walks and educating visitors 
about hummingbirds and other wildlife. 


See you there. 

Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Bald Knob godwit
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:35:05 -0500
Hudsonian. Present in 1st pond. No avocet. Caspian tern also in 1st pond.


Subject: Re: Semipalmated Sandpipers Fighting
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 22:24:18 +0800
Great photos!


On Thursday, 28 August 2014 9:37 PM, Delos McCauley  
wrote: 

 


I caught a couple of Semipalmated Sandpipers fighting at Boyd Point yesterday. 
They are very aggressive birds, defending their food territory. I have a series 
of 12 photos at the following link: 

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/124564936 AT N06/14875319909/in/set-72157646947181142/lightbox/ 

 
Hope you enjoy the fight.
 
Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff
Subject: Godwit, spoonbills at Bald Knob
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:22:27 -0500
Spoonbills present. Godwit is present. I do not think it is a marbled. Kenny is 
on the way to pronounce its true identity. 

Cindy

Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:19:36 -0500
I got to watch Bob banding at Mt Magazine last year and took a few
pictures.  The look on this child's face kinda sums up the joy Bob brings
to us all...

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/MtMagazineButterflyFestival#slideshow/5892528746573371330 


There are other shots in the album of Bob and the banding if you page
forward or backward.

I hope to see him out banding again soon.  A wonderful guy if you have not
every met him...

Michael(Conway)




On Thu, Aug 28, 2014 at 8:13 PM, Herschel Raney <
herschel.raney AT conwaycorp.net> wrote:

> I am in Washington state at the moment. And I have met many bird "people"
> in my life but meeting Bob and watching him work the people at the banding
> site at the fort is a memorable event. Kind, well spoken, intensely
> interested. Bob is immediately impressive. We all know what growing older
> is like. The hearing loss, the slow visual deficits. It only makes us
> appreciate what we have already seen. We have few heroes in life anymore.
> Bob is one of mine. Thank you for the communication to the wide world, your
> advocacy. Thank you for your general kindness. Remarkable enough in today's
> world. This is the sound of my applause from a deck in the conifers
> overlooking crossbills and spotted towhees. The sound of long bonded ravens
> in the distance. Thank you Bob. Thank you.
>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 14:12:28 +0000
The latest version of The Snipe newsletter has been posted to the Audubon 
Society of Central Arkansas's website. 

This issue features upcoming programs, field trips, and birding adventures of 
ASCA members from around the country. 


It can be downloaded at: http://wp.ascabird.org/

Thanks,
Dottie Boyles
Little Rock


This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Semipalmated Sandpipers Fighting
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:37:05 -0500
I caught a couple of Semipalmated Sandpipers fighting at Boyd Point
yesterday.  They are very aggressive birds, defending their food territory.
I have a series of 12 photos at the following link:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/124564936 AT N06/14875319909/in/set-7215764694718
1142/lightbox/

 

Hope you enjoy the fight.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:26:49 -0500
How nice.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 28, 2014, at 8:13 PM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 

> 
> I am in Washington state at the moment. And I have met many bird "people" in 
my life but meeting Bob and watching him work the people at the banding site at 
the fort is a memorable event. Kind, well spoken, intensely interested. Bob is 
immediately impressive. We all know what growing older is like. The hearing 
loss, the slow visual deficits. It only makes us appreciate what we have 
already seen. We have few heroes in life anymore. Bob is one of mine. Thank you 
for the communication to the wide world, your advocacy. Thank you for your 
general kindness. Remarkable enough in today's world. This is the sound of my 
applause from a deck in the conifers overlooking crossbills and spotted 
towhees. The sound of long bonded ravens in the distance. Thank you Bob. Thank 
you. 
Subject: The art deco scene (Centerton)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 01:23:02 +0000
FISH REARING IS OFFICIAL BUSINESS at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton, 
but birding is the unofficial business for visitors like me. Best today was an 
Upland Sandpiper. It flew low and over giving lots of WHIT IT! calls in a clear 
blue sky  and a second one much further off that I couldnt see. 


I spent the rest of the morning walking spring fed wet ditches on the 
hatcherys north and east sides. These confine what in pre-hatchery days was a 
wider springfed marsh ecosystem. Most prominent today: startlingly pink patches 
of flowering Swamp Milkweed. 


I understand the hatcherys official business is fish, but Im proud to report 
it is also rearing Monarch butterflies. Caterpillars of various sizes, all 
white-black-yellow stripes, were busy among leaves and yellow aphids hidden 
below milkweed flowers. 


The milkweeds hosted visits from Great Golden Digger Wasps, with reddish bodies 
and golden hairs on head and thorax. They walked in their regal fashion on the 
pink flowers. 


These marshy ditches are remnants of what was once a more widespread tallgrass 
prairie wetland ecosystem that is almost all gone in northwest Arkansas. Even 
though the marsh habitat is now confined to ditches, in migration we find 
Soras, and on rare occasions, Virginia Rail and American Bittern. In winter, 
Wilsons Snipe and Swamp Sparrow. In summer, nesting Red-winged Blackbirds. 


Today, besides Swamp Milkweed and Monarchs, I saw quite a few Great Blue 
Lobelias (Lobelia siphilitica), an Art Deco of a wetlands flower deep blue in 
color and sporting intentional stripes. The up sweep of its petals seems 
geometrically-inspired, like something from the Art Deco period. Whatever the 
origins, here it is, among milkweeds, blue money flowers, pink smartweeds, blue 
spikes of vervains -- all living elements of what remains of our wetlands. 


Overhead, a jet from our own age. And with cries of KEE DEE KEE DEE KEE DEE and 
a sudden flash of white wings, Killdeers rise from the hatchery. 
Subject: Re: BKNWR
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 20:22:37 -0500
Terry,

I'm not saying that's it's not a Hudsonian -it certainly could be. I just know 
they're easily confused with Marbled and even though they're seen every spring, 
they are extremely rare in the fall. This is due to their migration route -due 
north through the Great Plains in the spring and off the east coast in the 
fall. 


 In fact, I'd say there's *almost* as much chance that it's a Bar-tailed as a 
Hudsonian. I'll be checking in the morning. 


Kenny Nichols
Cabot 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 28, 2014, at 4:22 PM, Terry Butler  wrote:
> 
> Kenny thinks Godwit should be a Marbled. I still think Hudsonian but I could 
be wrong. Marbled wouldn’t be bad. I didn’t see it in flight. I’m sure 
not going to get into a debate with Kenny. I’d rather run for President than 
do that. Kenny is young enough to be my son but I believe in what says. Will 
update later if it hangs around. 

>  
> Take it with a grain of salt,
>  
> Terry Butler
>  
> From: Kenny Nichols [mailto:kingbird AT ymail.com] 
> Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2014 3:04 PM
> To: Terry Butler
> Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: BKNWR
>  
> A HUDSONIAN GODWIT or a Marbled? Hudsonian is extremely rare in the fall. 
>  
> Kenny
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Aug 28, 2014, at 2:34 PM, Terry Butler  wrote:
> 
> I just returned from Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge. As reported 
yesterday, the 4 Roseate Spoonbills are still present. Some other birds someone 
might find interesting to them were 1 American Avocet, 1 Hudsonian Godwit, 1 
Sanderling, and about a dozen Black Terns. No Wood Storks, but still looking! 

>  
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 20:13:59 -0500
I am in Washington state at the moment. And I have met many bird "people"
in my life but meeting Bob and watching him work the people at the banding
site at the fort is a memorable event. Kind, well spoken, intensely
interested. Bob is immediately impressive. We all know what growing older
is like. The hearing loss, the slow visual deficits. It only makes us
appreciate what we have already seen. We have few heroes in life anymore.
Bob is one of mine. Thank you for the communication to the wide world, your
advocacy. Thank you for your general kindness. Remarkable enough in today's
world. This is the sound of my applause from a deck in the conifers
overlooking crossbills and spotted towhees. The sound of long bonded ravens
in the distance. Thank you Bob. Thank you.
Subject: Ripples and miracles
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 22:14:55 +0000
I have to catch my breath when reading a list like the one Janine recounts for 
Bob and Martha. Then I think about the RIPPLES. What they do with hummers sends 
these moving waves of energy and enlightenment down among us all, including 
those of us 568 miles away from HQ for HUMMERS R US in Alabama. 


Up at Mt Magazine a couple of years ago, while describing a hummer's egg, Bob 
informed us, it's "slightly larger than a black-eyed pea." That gave all of us 
Arkies, who treasure our black-eyed peas, a good laugh, plus we know what hes 
talking about. 


Then on a more serious note, with a female in hand, he notices spider silk on a 
toe from the hummer's nest. Measuring bill length, he simultaneously explains 
"In this tiny brain half the size of a BB is all the information needed to 
build a nest and feed young hummers. That brain holds all the information 
concerning the habits of her successful ancestors . . . We get busy in our 
lives and don't notice what's going on around us," he continues. "It's a 
miracle, if we just take time to watch." 


Human beings can themselves be miracles, spreading blessings, and you just 
never know how far they go, how many seemingly unmovable mountains they move, 
in this case, all that fantastic mountain moving sponsored by CEO Bob S of 
HUMMERS R US, though as he recently informed us on this list, Martha is now in 
charge of the feeders. 



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of Janine Perlman [jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET] 

Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2014 3:15 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: [HUMNET-L] Bob Sargent

As you say, Sara, Bob and, no less, Martha, have been tireless---and 
selfless---in their research and education. 


They've educated hundreds of thousands of people about hummers and other birds, 
up close and personal. 


They've done an astonishing amount of field work. I can't even guess how many 
birds Bob has banded (and, of course, recorded and reported data on). 

He's trained hundreds of banders, and has created methods for banding 
hummingbirds that are now the standard. He's been instrumental in improving 
banding practices in Arkansas and across the country. 


He's co-author of the estimable BNA species account for RTHUs, and wrote a 
wonderful and respected book on Ruby-Throats for the public. 

He and Martha have attended (often headlined) countless festivals, conferences 
and programs, public and professional. Their Hummer Bird Study Group's 
quarterly newsletter brims with folksy stories, gorgeous photos, and 
fascinating data. 


And this is just a partial list of their activities and accomplishments.

They're also two of the kindest people you could ever meet. Their passion for 
birds and nature is part of their profound appreciation for what Bob terms 
Creation. I've known Bob, and then Martha, for 20 years. Most of Bob's notes 
have included a statement that he's the luckiest man alive. 


I hope their mailbox is stuffed with well wishes.

Janine

On 8/28/2014 1:34 PM, saracnbrtltt9 wrote:
Bob Sargent and his wife Martha drove 12 hours to Fayetteville and returned 
directly home in December, 2010 - all to photograph an Anna's Hummingbird and 
record the little bird. It was cold, they stayed maybe 90 minutes, refusing a 
meal or overnight stay. I've supported Bobs work since and always meant to go 
to Fort Morgan to observe his banding of hummers. This couple have taught many 
about birds THEY are to be supported and cared for through this difficult time 
for them. 


Sara Cain-Bartlett, MSW, LCSW, C-ASWCM
Office: 479-521-4406.  CELL:  479-466-0611
CareSupport Services, PLLC
WEBB:  www.thecaresupport.com
Geriatric Care Consultant

Sent from my IPad

On Aug 28, 2014, at 12:48 PM, Elizabeth Shores 
> wrote: 


Thank you for passing this along. I have written him a postcard.

Elizabeth

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 28, 2014, at 12:30 PM, 
"birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
wrote: 



I received the following message over the humnet listserve. I thought many of 
our arbirders would like to know. 

Donna Haynes
West Pulaski Co.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on 
Android 



________________________________
From: Lanny Chambers >;
To: >;
Subject: [HUMNET-L] Bob Sargent
Sent: Thu, Aug 28, 2014 3:26:43 PM

Friends,

As some of you may already know, Bob Sargent recently suffered complications 
from a previous heart surgery. In addition, an infection has resulted in loss 
of vision in both of his eyes. I just spoke with Martha, and Bob is at home 
now, in hospice care. He's feeling pretty lonely, and would very much 
appreciate hearing from his hummingbird-crazy friends. Please join me in 
sending a card or note for Martha to read to Bob. Here's the address: 


Bob Sargent
7570 Mack Hicks Road
Trussville AL 35173

Thanks,

Lanny

Subject: FW: BKNWR
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 16:22:35 -0500
Kenny thinks Godwit should be a Marbled. I still think Hudsonian but I could be 
wrong. Marbled wouldn’t be bad. I didn’t see it in flight. I’m sure not 
going to get into a debate with Kenny. I’d rather run for President than do 
that. Kenny is young enough to be my son but I believe in what says. Will 
update later if it hangs around. 


 

Take it with a grain of salt,

 

Terry Butler

 

From: Kenny Nichols [mailto:kingbird AT ymail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2014 3:04 PM
To: Terry Butler
Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: BKNWR

 

A HUDSONIAN GODWIT or a Marbled? Hudsonian is extremely rare in the fall. 

 

Kenny

Sent from my iPhone


On Aug 28, 2014, at 2:34 PM, Terry Butler  wrote:

I just returned from Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge. As reported yesterday, 
the 4 Roseate Spoonbills are still present. Some other birds someone might find 
interesting to them were 1 American Avocet, 1 Hudsonian Godwit, 1 Sanderling, 
and about a dozen Black Terns. No Wood Storks, but still looking! 


 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:15:54 -0500
As you say, Sara, Bob and, no less, Martha, have been tireless---and 
selfless---in their research and education.

They've educated hundreds of thousands of people about hummers and other 
birds, up close and personal.

They've done an astonishing amount of field work.  I can't even guess 
how many birds Bob has banded (and, of course, recorded and reported 
data on).
He's trained hundreds of banders, and has created methods for banding 
hummingbirds that are now the standard.  He's been instrumental in 
improving banding practices in Arkansas and across the country.

He's co-author of the estimable BNA species account for RTHUs, and wrote 
a wonderful and respected book on Ruby-Throats for the public.
He and Martha have attended (often headlined) countless festivals, 
conferences and programs, public and professional. Their Hummer Bird 
Study Group's quarterly newsletter brims with folksy stories, gorgeous 
photos, and fascinating data.

And this is just a partial list of their activities and accomplishments.

They're also two of the kindest people you could ever meet.  Their 
passion for birds and nature is part of their profound appreciation for 
what Bob terms Creation.  I've known Bob, and then Martha, for 20 years. 
Most of Bob's notes have included a statement that he's the luckiest man 
alive.

I hope their mailbox is stuffed with well wishes.

Janine

On 8/28/2014 1:34 PM, saracnbrtltt9 wrote:
> Bob Sargent and his wife Martha drove 12 hours to Fayetteville and 
> returned directly home in December, 2010 - all to photograph an Anna's 
> Hummingbird and record the little bird. It was cold, they stayed maybe 
> 90 minutes, refusing a meal or overnight stay. I've supported Bobs 
> work since and always meant to go to Fort Morgan to observe his 
> banding of hummers. This couple have taught many about birds THEY are 
> to be supported and cared for through this difficult time for them.
>
> Sara Cain-Bartlett, MSW, LCSW, C-ASWCM
> Office: 479-521-4406.  CELL:  479-466-0611
> CareSupport Services, PLLC
> WEBB: www.thecaresupport.com 
> Geriatric Care Consultant
>
> Sent from my IPad
>
> On Aug 28, 2014, at 12:48 PM, Elizabeth Shores  > wrote:
>
>> Thank you for passing this along. I have written him a postcard.
>>
>> Elizabeth
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Aug 28, 2014, at 12:30 PM, "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com 
>> " 
>> <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> I received the following message over the humnet listserve. I 
>>> thought many of our arbirders would like to know.
>>> Donna Haynes
>>> West Pulaski Co.
>>>
>>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
>>> 
>>>
>>>
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> *From: * Lanny Chambers >> >;
>>> *To: * >;
>>> *Subject: * [HUMNET-L] Bob Sargent
>>> *Sent: * Thu, Aug 28, 2014 3:26:43 PM
>>>
>>> Friends,
>>>
>>> As some of you may already know, Bob Sargent recently suffered 
>>> complications from a previous heart surgery. In addition, an 
>>> infection has resulted in loss of vision in both of his eyes. I just 
>>> spoke with Martha, and Bob is at home now, in hospice care. He's 
>>> feeling pretty lonely, and would very much appreciate hearing from 
>>> his hummingbird-crazy friends. Please join me in sending a card or 
>>> note for Martha to read to Bob. Here's the address:
>>>
>>> Bob Sargent
>>> 7570 Mack Hicks Road
>>> Trussville AL 35173
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Lanny
>>>
Subject: Re: BKNWR
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:03:56 -0500
A HUDSONIAN GODWIT or a Marbled? Hudsonian is extremely rare in the fall. 

Kenny

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 28, 2014, at 2:34 PM, Terry Butler  wrote:
> 
> I just returned from Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge. As reported 
yesterday, the 4 Roseate Spoonbills are still present. Some other birds someone 
might find interesting to them were 1 American Avocet, 1 Hudsonian Godwit, 1 
Sanderling, and about a dozen Black Terns. No Wood Storks, but still looking! 

>  
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
Subject: BKNWR
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:34:19 -0500
I just returned from Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge.  As reported
yesterday, the 4 Roseate Spoonbills are still present. Some other birds
someone might find interesting to them were 1 American Avocet, 1 Hudsonian
Godwit, 1 Sanderling, and about a dozen Black Terns.  No Wood Storks, but
still looking!

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: SHOREBIRDS AND RAT-TAILED MAGGOTS AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:01:19 -0500
I observed today that the food of choice for shorebirds at Boyd Point were the 
larvae of Drone Flys, better known as Rat-tailed Maggots, which they extract 
from the muck with great relish. These included Semipalmated Plover, 
Semipalmated Sandpipers, Least Sandpipers and Pectoral Sandpiper. 

John Redman  
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: saracnbrtltt9 <saracnbrtltt9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:34:32 -0500
Bob Sargent and his wife Martha drove 12 hours to Fayetteville and returned 
directly home in December, 2010 - all to photograph an Anna's Hummingbird and 
record the little bird. It was cold, they stayed maybe 90 minutes, refusing a 
meal or overnight stay. I've supported Bobs work since and always meant to go 
to Fort Morgan to observe his banding of hummers. This couple have taught many 
about birds THEY are to be supported and cared for through this difficult time 
for them. 


Sara Cain-Bartlett, MSW, LCSW, C-ASWCM
Office: 479-521-4406.  CELL:  479-466-0611
CareSupport Services, PLLC 
WEBB:  www.thecaresupport.com
Geriatric Care Consultant

Sent from my IPad

> On Aug 28, 2014, at 12:48 PM, Elizabeth Shores  wrote:
> 
> Thank you for passing this along. I have written him a postcard.
> 
> Elizabeth
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 28, 2014, at 12:30 PM, "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

>> 
>> 
>> I received the following message over the humnet listserve. I thought many 
of our arbirders would like to know. 

>> Donna Haynes
>> West Pulaski Co.
>> 
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>> 
>> 
>> From: Lanny Chambers ; 
>> To: ; 
>> Subject: [HUMNET-L] Bob Sargent 
>> Sent: Thu, Aug 28, 2014 3:26:43 PM 
>> 
>> Friends,
>> 
>> As some of you may already know, Bob Sargent recently suffered complications 
from a previous heart surgery. In addition, an infection has resulted in loss 
of vision in both of his eyes. I just spoke with Martha, and Bob is at home 
now, in hospice care. He's feeling pretty lonely, and would very much 
appreciate hearing from his hummingbird-crazy friends. Please join me in 
sending a card or note for Martha to read to Bob. Here's the address: 

>> 
>> Bob Sargent
>> 7570 Mack Hicks Road
>> Trussville AL 35173
>> 
>> Thanks,
>> 
>> Lanny
Subject: Re: Bob Sargent
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 12:48:10 -0500
Thank you for passing this along. I have written him a postcard.

Elizabeth

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 28, 2014, at 12:30 PM, "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> 
> I received the following message over the humnet listserve. I thought many of 
our arbirders would like to know. 

> Donna Haynes
> West Pulaski Co.
> 
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> 
> 
> From: Lanny Chambers ; 
> To: ; 
> Subject: [HUMNET-L] Bob Sargent 
> Sent: Thu, Aug 28, 2014 3:26:43 PM 
> 
> Friends,
> 
> As some of you may already know, Bob Sargent recently suffered complications 
from a previous heart surgery. In addition, an infection has resulted in loss 
of vision in both of his eyes. I just spoke with Martha, and Bob is at home 
now, in hospice care. He's feeling pretty lonely, and would very much 
appreciate hearing from his hummingbird-crazy friends. Please join me in 
sending a card or note for Martha to read to Bob. Here's the address: 

> 
> Bob Sargent
> 7570 Mack Hicks Road
> Trussville AL 35173
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Lanny
Subject: Spoonbills
From: Lenore <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 07:58:01 -0500
If anyone sees the Spoonbills today please report it.  Thanks.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Fall Meeting & new webpage
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 08:31:59 +0800
The link for the conference center in the www.arbirds.org website is wrong. It 
should be www.atu.edu/lakepoint. Not [dot] lakepoint. 




On Saturday, 23 August 2014 12:08 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:
 


Arbirders,

Information concerning the fall meeting of the Arkansas Audubon Society is 
available at www.arbirds.org . There is a downloadable pdf file containing 
information on the programs, field trips and a registration form. 



A new webpage has been added to the AAS website ( 
http://www.arbirds.org/photos_brc.html) which contains a listing of all new 
species added to the Arkansas Field List since the 1986 publication of James 
and Neal "Arkansas Birds Their Distribution and Abundance". Each species page 
contains a photo and some details about the first record for Arkansas. 



Lyndal York

AAS Webmaster
Subject: BOYD POINT SHOREBIRDS
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:46:00 -0500
Delos McCauley, Doc George and I had an enjoyable morning observing and 
photographing shorebirds at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in 
Pine Bluff. In addition to flocks of Semipalmated and Least Sandpipers, notable 
findings were: a Sanderling in molting breeding plumage with considerable 
residua of the breeding plumage, a Semipalmated Plover in full breeding 
plumage, a Semipalmated Plover in non-breeding plumage and an Am. Golden-Plover 
still in almost full breeding plumage. With the exception of the Golden-Plover, 
the birds were easily approachable. After processing, I will be glad to share 
photos. 

John Redman
Subject: AAS Calendar Contest Winners, Pre-Orders
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:51:46 -0700
Hello All,
We are proud to announce the front cover
winner of this year's calendar photo contest. John Redman, of Pine Bluff, took
the win with his stunning photo of a male Yellow Warbler. Our runners-up this 
year 

are as follows: Jacque Brown, Kelly Chitwood, Norman Lavers, Michael Linz,
Delos McCauley, Gail Miller, Kenny Nations, David Oakley, and Vic Prislipsky.
Like last year, our judges have chosen some BEAUTIFUL photos taken by talented 
photographers, 

all from Arkansas.

The calendars will be available for
purchase at the fall meeting in Russellville, with a limit of three per person.
However, we are taking pre-orders NOW. If you pre-order, you get to name the
quantity. For pre-orders, shoot me an email at mlpruitt24 at yahoo.com. 
Calendars are $20 each and checks 

can be made payable to the Arkansas Audubon Society and sent to 206 Windover
Rd., Jonesboro, AR 72401. As you know, all proceeds go to the Iola Rae Fund,
which provides outstanding Halberg Ecology Campers (and a parent or guardian)
the opportunity to attend a conference.

Our information page this year will have
important birding dates for 2015, a synopsis of the current 90-for-90
fundraiser, a photo by our greatest youth photographer, Shelby Tripcony, and 
more! 


Thank you to everyone who entered this
year and those who have supported this fundraiser. We had many great photos to
choose from and it made judging difficult!

Good birding,
Mitchell Pruitt, AAS
Subject: Spoonbills
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 12:16:50 -0500
There are 4 Roseate Spoinbills in the third pond at Bald Knob at noon Aug 
27(now). 

Terry had located them earlier today.
Michael
Subject: Ark. Democrat 8/26/14 article: "2 focus on passenger pigeon" - Bandtailed Pigeon note
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 12:01:02 -0500
 The Band-tailed pigeon is also in serious decline and in some regions it has 
declined 18.7%. What are birders doing to reverse this trend as it follows the 
Passenger Pigeon? The general public does not know the difference between the 
Rock Pigeon, Carrier Pigeon, Band-tailed Pigeon and Passenger Pigeon. The 
Band-tailed pigeon is still hunted in many western states. Maybe Nancy and Doug 
can clarify some of these points of confusion and suggest what needs to be done 
to reverse this declining trend. 


Jerry W. Davis
 Band-tailed Pigeon Patagioenas fasciata 
North American Breeding Bird Survey Trend Results

 |------1966-2012 trends-----| |-------1966-2011--------| 

 Region N Trend ( 95% CI ) N Trend ( 95% CI ) R.A12 R.A11 

Northern Pacific Rainforest 131 -2.5 ( -4.0, -1.2) 130 -2.5 ( -4.0, -1.0) 11.8 
12.2 


Great Basin 24 -6.3 (-18.7, -0.9) 24 -6.6 (-17.8, -0.5) 0.3 0.3 


Sierra Nevada 33 -0.4 ( -2.8, 2.5) 32 -0.5 ( -3.0, 3.0) 4.6 4.7 


Southern Rockies/colorado Plateau 44 -5.2 ( -9.6, -1.2) 43 -6.7 (-11.8, -2.6) 
0.2 0.3 


Coastal California 66 2.3 ( 0.8, 4.0) 65 1.8 ( 0.2, 3.3) 2.7 2.6 


Sierra Madre Occidental 20 -3.3 ( -7.0, 0.3) 20 -2.9 ( -6.6, 0.7) 1.1 1.1 


Arizona 18 -3.3 ( -7.0, 0.3) 18 -2.9 ( -6.6, 0.7) 1.1 1.1 


British Columbia 39 -4.5 (-10.8, -2.5) 38 -5.0 ( -9.5, -2.7) 11.1 11.6 


California 134 0.7 ( -0.9, 2.0) 132 0.7 ( -0.9, 2.1) 3.6 3.6 


Colorado 27 -1.3 ( -7.2, 4.2) 26 -2.1 ( -8.9, 3.5) 0.1 0.1 


New Mexico 15 -6.8 (-11.8, -1.7) 15 -9.0 (-16.0, -3.5) 0.6 0.6 


Oregon 45 -0.3 ( -2.2, 1.4) 45 -0.3 ( -2.1, 1.5) 6.6 6.5 


Utah 7 -3.7 (-14.4, 5.2) 7 -3.5 (-13.6, 5.3) 0.0 0.0 


Washington 38 0.0 ( -2.2, 2.1) 38 0.6 ( -1.4, 3.0) 5.1 5.3 


Western BBS Region 325 -2.3 ( -7.9, -1.1) 321 -2.4 ( -6.2, -1.1) 4.3 4.5 


Canada 39 -4.5 (-10.8, -2.5) 38 -5.0 ( -9.5, -2.7) 11.1 11.6 


United States 287 -0.4 ( -2.1, 0.7) 284 -0.3 ( -2.4, 0.9) 2.6 2.6 


Survey-wide 326 -2.3 ( -7.9, -1.1) 322 -2.4 ( -6.2, -1.1) 4.3 4.5 

From: Barry Haas 
Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 11:27 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Ark. Democrat 8/26/14 article: "2 focus on passenger pigeon"

Dear ARBIRDers, 

Yesterday's Arkansas Democrat had an article "2 focus on passenger pigeon" that 
included the following: 


"Professor Nancy Glover McCartney, curator of zoology at the university's 
museum, and Douglas James, a professor of biological sciences, will present 
historical data and observations at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Hobbs State Park 
Visitors Center. McCartney will bring male and female taxidermied specimens of 
the band-tailed pigeon, a close relative to the passenger pigeon, both of which 
were markedly different from "city pigeons" that many people may be familiar 
with. James will discuss ongoing DNA experiments aimed at bringing the 
passenger pigeon back from extinction." 



Those of you who live close enough to Hobbs State Park may want to attend.


The article also included some quotes from Karen Rowe, bird conservation 
program leader for the Ark. Game & Fish Commission, about how "the passenger 
pigeon provided a valuable lesson to be applied to modern existing species". 



Also, it's good to see Doug James is physically able to get back out there and 
share his wealth of knowledge with the wider public. 



From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Ark. Democrat 8/26/14 article: "2 focus on passenger pigeon"
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 11:27:14 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Yesterday's Arkansas Democrat had an article "2 focus on passenger pigeon" that 
included the following: 


"Professor Nancy Glover McCartney, curator of zoology at the university's 
museum, and Douglas James, a professor of biological sciences, will present 
historical data and observations at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Hobbs State Park 
Visitors Center. McCartney will bring male and female taxidermied specimens of 
the band-tailed pigeon, a close relative to the passenger pigeon, both of which 
were markedly different from "city pigeons" that many people may be familiar 
with. James will discuss ongoing DNA experiments aimed at bringing the 
passenger pigeon back from extinction." 


Those of you who live close enough to Hobbs State Park may want to attend.

The article also included some quotes from Karen Rowe, bird conservation 
program leader for the Ark. Game & Fish Commission, about how "the passenger 
pigeon provided a valuable lesson to be applied to modern existing species". 


Also, it's good to see Doug James is physically able to get back out there and 
share his wealth of knowledge with the wider public. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 26
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 19:49:37 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today.  70 species were
found.  Lots of good birds found today!  Good variety of shorebirds using
mudflats in units 5 & 27B.  After being absent all last week, the Wood
Storks showed up in force today in unit 27A where we are doing a drawdown.
A male Mottled duck was seen in unit 27B hanging out with some drake
Mallards in eclipse plumage.  This is the first of this species I have seen
in at least two years at RS.  A Ruddy Turnstone was a surprise as I have
only seen this species at RS 2 or 3 times before and the last time was
during Hurricane Gustav.  Haven't seen a Purple Gallinule in a couple weeks
and the Neotropic Cormorants were a no-show today.   The Hooded Merganser
sighting today was a new late record for the species at RS.  Usually they
are gone by mid summer.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 52

Gadwall - 1

Mallard - 3

Mottled Duck - 1 male

Blue-winged Teal - 34

Ring-necked Duck - 1 male

Hooded Merganser - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 24
Double-crested Cormorant - 3
Anhinga - 12

Least Bittern - 2
Great Blue Heron - 21
Great Egret - 60
Snowy Egret - 148
Little Blue Heron - 21

Tricolored Heron - 1 juv.

Green Heron - 17

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 17
White Ibis - 164

White-faced Ibis - 1

Wood Stork - 60
Black Vulture - 3
Turkey Vulture - 16

Red-shouldered Hawk - 4

Red-tailed Hawk - 1
Common Gallinule - 11

American Coot - 2
Killdeer - 49

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Lesser Yellowlegs - 2

Solitary Sandpiper - 22

Spotted Sandpiper - 3
Ruddy Turnstone - 1 (very rare at RS)

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3

Least Sandpiper - 45

Pectoral Sandpiper - 19

Stilt Sandpiper - 2

Wilson's Snipe - 4

Least Tern - 5
Mourning Dove - 25
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 6
Belted Kingfisher - 5

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

"Traill's" Flycatcher - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1
Loggerhead Shrike - 1
White-eyed Vireo - 5
Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

American Crow - 7

Tree Swallow - 30

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 10

Cave Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 5
Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 2
Carolina Wren - 6
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Gray Catbird - 1
Northern Cardinal - 5

Blue Grosbeak - 1
Indigo Bunting - 6
Dickcissel - 2
Red-winged Blackbird - 9

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Great-blue skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags 

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Beaverfork - Foresters
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 19:11:18 -0500
This is a little late, but Sunday, while paddling in Beaverfork Lake, saw
two Forester's Terns.

-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Birding with Eric's girlfriend
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:50:39 -0500
So my son's girlfriend is taking ornithology at UAFS with Dr. Kannan. She 
wanted more practice with the binoculars so we headed out this morning to visit 
Trimble Lock and Dam and a bit of Ft. Chaffee. We had a grand couple of hours 
even in the very hot morning heat. 


We saw, or heard, around 30 species from 9 to 11. First birds...an adult, and 
juvenile, Bald Eagle. Perfect! It was good to be able to compare the 
differences in the ages. Other nice sightings included a male Yellow-throated 
Vireo displaying to a female. It was calling and all puffed out. I was kind of 
surprised to see this action so late in the summer. Numerous Pewees were 
chasing each other in the same location. We saw a large flock of Blue-winged 
Teal at the Chaffee sewage treatment ponds along with Great-blues and Great 
Egrets. My favorite bird was a Solitary Sandpiper. It was still in bright 
plumage. Great eye ring. We were able to get great looks because it was so 
close. I love shorebirds. We also saw a couple of juvenile Red-headed 
Woodpeckers at the same location. A Red-shouldered Hawk escaped from us just as 
we pulled up. And there was also a white Little Blue Heron. Nothing like a 
white Little Blue to confuse a beginner. 


I'm looking forward to joining Kannan and his students for a few field trips. 
It'll be extra nice having Chelsey along. 


Sandy B.
FS, AR







Sent from my iPad
Subject: Inca Dove
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 13:29:10 -0700
This morning I photographed Inca Dove in James Griffin's back yard in Pine 
Bluff. I have four images posted on my Pbase page and for anyone interested 
they can be seen by clicking the link below. 

http://www.pbase.com/docg/aug_2014

Doc George
Subject: Re: MIKI's
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:00:39 -0500
Didn't see any this morning at Western Hills in Little Rock. Did see a
Pileated Woodpecker, which I haven't seen in a while.

Chuck Anderson


On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 9:36 PM, David Starrett 
wrote:

> Still one flying around our neighborhood today up here in Cape Girardeau,
> MO.
>
> Dave
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> David Starrett
> Cape Girardeau, MO
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:24:37 -0500
> From: bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET
> Subject: Re: MIKI's
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>
>
> No MIKIs today over the Ouachita River—at least when I was floating…
>
>
>
> Jeff Short
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Charles Anderson
> *Sent:* Sunday, August 24, 2014 5:20 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: MIKI's
>
>
>
> 4-5 still hanging out over Western Hills Park in Little Rock. One has a
> favorite perch on a semi-dead oak tree at the entrance of the park. Also
> saw one over Mid-Town in Little Rock about noon today.
>
>
>
> Chuck Anderson
>
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 4:37 PM, Elizabeth Shores 
> wrote:
>
> Ours above Piedmont (WLR) vanished at least a week ago but I continued to
> see them above Pleasant Valley. Not today, though.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> > On Aug 24, 2014, at 4:24 PM, CK  wrote:
> >
> > Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the
> neighborhood.
> > In the Heights
> > Cindy F
> >
> >
>
>
>
Subject: Re: MIKI's
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:55:35 -0500
I saw some in Bald Knob and Jonesboro today.

Sarah M
Jonesboro

On Aug 24, 2014, at 9:36 PM, David Starrett  wrote:

> Still one flying around our neighborhood today up here in Cape Girardeau, MO.
> 
> Dave
> 
>  
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> David Starrett
> Cape Girardeau, MO
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 
> 
> Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:24:37 -0500
> From: bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET
> Subject: Re: MIKI's
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> No MIKIs today over the Ouachita Riverat least when I was floating
>  
> Jeff Short
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Charles Anderson 

> Sent: Sunday, August 24, 2014 5:20 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: MIKI's
>  
> 4-5 still hanging out over Western Hills Park in Little Rock. One has a 
favorite perch on a semi-dead oak tree at the entrance of the park. Also saw 
one over Mid-Town in Little Rock about noon today. 

>  
> Chuck Anderson
>  
> On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 4:37 PM, Elizabeth Shores  
wrote: 

> Ours above Piedmont (WLR) vanished at least a week ago but I continued to see 
them above Pleasant Valley. Not today, though. 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Aug 24, 2014, at 4:24 PM, CK  wrote:
> >
> > Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the 
neighborhood. 

> > In the Heights
> > Cindy F
> >
> >
Subject: Re: MIKI's
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:43:14 -0500
I saw several at the 40/430 junction near Crystal Hill (or whatever its 
called) this afternoon.  Two or three IIRC.  I was pointing them out to 
the kids.

I've also been seeing a number of them around downtown Morrilton.

George (n. Conway Co. noticing that my concept of 'kite' and everyone 
around me is, well, kinda different)

On 8/24/2014 4:24 PM, CK wrote:
> Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the 
neighborhood. 

> In the Heights
> Cindy F
>
>

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Re: MIKI's
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:36:38 -0500
Still one flying around our neighborhood today up here in Cape Girardeau, MO.
Dave

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Cape Girardeau, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:24:37 -0500
From: bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET
Subject: Re: MIKI's
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU

No MIKIs today over the Ouachita Riverat least when I was floating Jeff Short 
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Charles Anderson 

Sent: Sunday, August 24, 2014 5:20 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: MIKI's 4-5 still hanging out over Western Hills Park in Little 
Rock. One has a favorite perch on a semi-dead oak tree at the entrance of the 
park. Also saw one over Mid-Town in Little Rock about noon today. Chuck 
Anderson On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 4:37 PM, Elizabeth Shores 
 wrote:Ours above Piedmont (WLR) vanished at least a week 
ago but I continued to see them above Pleasant Valley. Not today, though. 


Sent from my iPhone
> On Aug 24, 2014, at 4:24 PM, CK  wrote:
>
> Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the 
neighborhood. 

> In the Heights
> Cindy F
>
>  		 	   		  
Subject: Re: MIKI's
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:24:37 -0500
No MIKIs today over the Ouachita River—at least when I was floating…

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Charles Anderson 

Sent: Sunday, August 24, 2014 5:20 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: MIKI's

 

4-5 still hanging out over Western Hills Park in Little Rock. One has a 
favorite perch on a semi-dead oak tree at the entrance of the park. Also saw 
one over Mid-Town in Little Rock about noon today. 


 

Chuck Anderson

 

On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 4:37 PM, Elizabeth Shores  wrote:

Ours above Piedmont (WLR) vanished at least a week ago but I continued to see 
them above Pleasant Valley. Not today, though. 


Sent from my iPhone


> On Aug 24, 2014, at 4:24 PM, CK  wrote:
>
> Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the 
neighborhood. 

> In the Heights
> Cindy F
>
>

 
Subject: Re: MIKI's
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:20:25 -0500
4-5 still hanging out over Western Hills Park in Little Rock. One has a
favorite perch on a semi-dead oak tree at the entrance of the park. Also
saw one over Mid-Town in Little Rock about noon today.

Chuck Anderson


On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 4:37 PM, Elizabeth Shores 
wrote:

> Ours above Piedmont (WLR) vanished at least a week ago but I continued to
> see them above Pleasant Valley. Not today, though.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Aug 24, 2014, at 4:24 PM, CK  wrote:
> >
> > Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the
> neighborhood.
> > In the Heights
> > Cindy F
> >
> >
>
Subject: Re: MIKI's
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 16:37:33 -0500
Ours above Piedmont (WLR) vanished at least a week ago but I continued to see 
them above Pleasant Valley. Not today, though. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 24, 2014, at 4:24 PM, CK  wrote:
> 
> Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the 
neighborhood. 

> In the Heights 
> Cindy F
> 
> 
Subject: MIKI's
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 16:24:12 -0500
Anyone else not seeing kites today in LR? Mine seem to have left the 
neighborhood. 

In the Heights 
Cindy F