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Updated on Sunday, August 28 at 11:56 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Red-bellied Woodpecker,©David Sibley

28 Aug Re: ASCA field trip report-Bald Knob [Michael Linz ]
28 Aug Re: Common Nighthawk question [Allan Mueller ]
29 Aug Re: Common Nighthawk question ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
28 Aug Red-neck Phalarope [Randy ]
28 Aug Common Nighthawk question [Jim Dixon ]
28 Aug bald knob [Alan ]
28 Aug roadrunners [Teresa & Leif ]
28 Aug Red-necked Phalarope [Karen ]
27 Aug Red-necked Phalalope [Karen ]
27 Aug ASCA field trip report-Bald Knob [Karen ]
27 Aug A decidely Monarch sort of day [Joseph Neal ]
27 Aug Cave Swallows in Miller County [swamp_fox ]
27 Aug Popups create armchair theory [Jeffrey Short ]
26 Aug Message from Meeker (David Chapman) [Joseph Neal ]
26 Aug Re: Nebraska Crane Festival [zoe caywood ]
26 Aug ASCA Field Trip This Saturday [Karen Holliday ]
26 Aug Re: bald cardinal ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
26 Aug Re: Nebraska Crane Festival [James Morgan ]
26 Aug white ibis [Sarah Morris ]
26 Aug Re: Nebraska Crane Festival [Gmail ]
26 Aug Re: Nebraska Crane Festival [Bob Harden ]
25 Aug Cook's Landing-No Terns [Karen ]
25 Aug Valley birds [Joseph Neal ]
25 Aug Re: Nebraska Crane Festival ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
25 Aug Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile [Jeffrey Short ]
25 Aug Public Service Announcement [Jeffrey Short ]
25 Aug Re: bald cardinal [Joseph Neal ]
24 Aug Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile [Jeffrey Short ]
24 Aug Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile [Karen Garrett ]
24 Aug Re: bald cardinal [Melissa Versiga ]
24 Aug Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile [Ann Gordon ]
24 Aug Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile [Karen Garrett ]
24 Aug Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile [Kelly Chitwood ]
24 Aug Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
24 Aug Phalaropes at Boyd Point [Delos McCauley ]
24 Aug AT EAGLE WATCH (GENTRY) [Joseph Neal ]
23 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23 [David Arbour ]
23 Aug Fwd: Juv Red-neck Phalarope [Michael ]
23 Aug Juv Red-neck Phalarope [Michael ]
23 Aug Re: Java Sparrows in Fayetteville? [Jacque Brown ]
23 Aug Royal Tern Yes [Dottie Boyles ]
23 Aug Java Sparrows in Fayetteville? ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
23 Aug Re: road runner brood 2 ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
23 Aug Re: MS Kites [Sarah Morris ]
22 Aug Re: MS Kites [Randy ]
22 Aug SW AR shorebirds and White Ibis 8-20-16 [Charles Lyon ]
22 Aug Re: Mississippi Kites [akcmueller ]
22 Aug Re: Shorebirds, and Swamp Milkweed, at Centerton [Jacque Brown ]
22 Aug road runner brood 2 [Don Simons ]
22 Aug Bald Knob NWR 8-19-16 [Charles Lyon ]
21 Aug Bald Knob Sunday [Karen ]
21 Aug eBird: Swallow-tailed Kite [Daniel Scheiman ]
21 Aug Royal Tern Yes. [jamesdixonlr ]
21 Aug Fw: Bald Knob and the rain [Bill Shepherd ]
21 Aug Shorebirds, and Swamp Milkweed, at Centerton [Joseph Neal ]
21 Aug Mulhollan Blind, Lake Fayetteville Park [Joseph Neal ]
20 Aug Bald Knob in the rain [Allan Mueller ]
20 Aug Cook's Landing [Karen ]
20 Aug Re: Is this a Gila Woodpecker in Arkansas? [Melissa Versiga ]
19 Aug Cooks Landing birds [Karen ]
19 Aug Re: Is this a Gila Woodpecker in Arkansas? [Drew Phillips ]
19 Aug Is this a Gila Woodpecker in Arkansas? [Melissa Versiga ]
19 Aug Bald Knob [Charles Lyon ]
18 Aug ASCA Bald Knob Field Trip August 27 [Karen Holliday ]
18 Aug WILSONíS SNIPE FOS, CENTERTON [Joseph Neal ]
17 Aug Sharptail Sandpiper-no [David Ray ]
17 Aug The next 67 species MINUS 5 ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
17 Aug AGFC News Article-Sharp-tailed Sandpiper [Karen Holliday ]
17 Aug Re: Lonoke [Dan Bogler ]
17 Aug Re: ETERNAL RAIN, UMBRELLAS and AFTER the SHARP-TAIL [Jacque Brown ]
17 Aug Bald Knob [Randy ]
17 Aug Lonoke [Dan Bogler ]
16 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - August 16 [David Arbour ]
16 Aug Re: Brown Booby on Lake Hamilton ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
16 Aug Ruddy Turnstone [Tammy Wortham ]
16 Aug ETERNAL RAIN, UMBRELLAS and AFTER the SHARP-TAIL [Joseph Neal ]

Subject: Re: ASCA field trip report-Bald Knob
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 23:52:52 -0500
Below is a link to a few pictures from the ASCA trip to Bald Knob yesterday
(just birds...not people pictures).  The first one is a short video of the
Red-necked Phalarope.  Only the first 11 pictures are Bald Knob and then it
goes to a series from Pine Bluff....

http://goo.gl/K0tj9f

Michael



On Sat, Aug 27, 2016 at 8:57 PM, Karen  wrote:

> Saturday, fifty-five birders descended on the Bald Knob National Wildlife
> Refuge at 8:30 a.m. on a mission to locate the rarities that had been seen
> during the previous week.  Bald Knob is designated an Important Bird Area
> (IBA) and it did not disappoint.  Best birds are listed below.  With the
> many eyes scattered all over the refuge and sightings quickly reported
> among the birders, we were able to move the group around so that everyone
> was able to see the rarities.  We had two special guest groups.  Birders
> from the Greater Ozarks Audubon Society at Springfield, Missouri who came
> down to scout Bald Knob as a possible future field trip.  We also had the
> 4-H Circuit Board Club from Brinkley, with eight school members and two
> group leaders, who got up very early to drive to the refuge, meet us, and
> experience their first birding trip.
>
> First stop was the Refuge's headquarters building.  Paul Provence, Refuge
> Manager, made arrangements to have the building open for the day.  They
> have a very impressive collection of mounted species, an educational
> representation of the birds and mammals that can be seen at Bald Knob. Mr.
> Provence also had water levels at the ponds managed to provide good
> shorebird habitat.  Each pond was full of of herons, egrets, ducks, teal,
> and shorebirds, including those hard to identify peeps.  The main pond
> along Coal Chute Road and the three ponds on the road from the grain bins
> to the low water bridge held all the birds seen. The Black-crowned
> Night-Herons were seen at the BCNH/YCNH rookery which is on the road to the
> left of the low water bridge.
>
> A good learning experience was the dark Ibis. It was determined it was a
> juvenile with a dark eye. Experts say that dark-eyed juvenile Ibis species
> cannot be told apart without DNA testing. For those who submit their trip
> list to eBird, you should list it as a Glossy/White-faced Ibis.
>
> The heat didn't get oppressive until close to noon, which allowed everyone
> to stay on the refuge until lunchtime.  This was such a productive day,
> finding terrific birds and visiting with birders from all over.  We ended
> the day with a total count of 42 species.
>
> Best Birds of the day:
> RED-NECKED PHALAROPE-1
> Dark Glossy/White-faced Ibis-1 Juvenile
> While Ibis-2 juveniles
> Roseate Spoonbill-1
> Black-bellied Plovers-4
> Marbled Godwit-2
> Black-crowned Night-Heron-4
> American Avocet-4
> Black Tern-3
> Black-necked Stilt-40
> Stilt Sandpiper-3
> America White Pelicans-60 soaring over the refuge
> Bald Eagle-1
> Wilson's Snipe-3
>
> Karen Holliday
> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
> Maumelle/Little Rock
>
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawk question
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 22:03:30 -0500
Yes, migration

Allan

On Sun, Aug 28, 2016 at 9:45 PM, Jane Wiewora  wrote:

> Migration.
> To South America
>
> On Aug 28, 2016, at 8:39 PM, Kimberly G. Smith  > wrote:
>
> Peggy and I saw about a dozen nighthawks tonight from our patio in south
> eastern Fayetteville around 7:30 headed south.. they were also silent…
>
>
>
> ********************************
>
> Kimberly G. Smith
>
> Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
>
> Department of Biological Sciences
>
> University of Arkansas
>
> Fayetteville, AR 72701
>
> Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
>
> Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
>
> ********************************
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.
> UARK.EDU ] *On Behalf Of *Jim Dixon
> *Sent:* Sunday, August 28, 2016 4:20 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> *Subject:* Common Nighthawk question
>
>
>
> I’ve spotted 10 or so Common Nighthawks flying in the parking lot lights
> of the almost next door Whole Foods twice in the last week. It was well
> after sunset about 9 or so. They were silent. Earlier in the year they
> would call quite often but that was also earlier in the evening, twilight
> rather than dark. I was wondering if this behavior was a matter of season,
> hour of the day, something else, or if it was even known why?
>
>
>
> Jim Dixon
> Little Rock
> "There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You
> certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite
> the something you were after.‚ÄĚ -- Thorin
>
>


-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawk question
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 01:39:11 +0000
Peggy and I saw about a dozen nighthawks tonight from our patio in south 
eastern Fayetteville around 7:30 headed south.. they were also silent… 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jim Dixon 

Sent: Sunday, August 28, 2016 4:20 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Common Nighthawk question

I’ve spotted 10 or so Common Nighthawks flying in the parking lot lights of 
the almost next door Whole Foods twice in the last week. It was well after 
sunset about 9 or so. They were silent. Earlier in the year they would call 
quite often but that was also earlier in the evening, twilight rather than 
dark. I was wondering if this behavior was a matter of season, hour of the day, 
something else, or if it was even known why? 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.‚ÄĚ -- Thorin 
Subject: Red-neck Phalarope
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 16:31:28 -0500
Still at Bald Knob 3 pond middle back edge swimming 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Common Nighthawk question
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 16:20:01 -0500
I’ve spotted 10 or so Common Nighthawks flying in the parking lot lights of 
the almost next door Whole Foods twice in the last week. It was well after 
sunset about 9 or so. They were silent. Earlier in the year they would call 
quite often but that was also earlier in the evening, twilight rather than 
dark. I was wondering if this behavior was a matter of season, hour of the day, 
something else, or if it was even known why? 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.‚ÄĚ -- Thorin 
Subject: bald knob
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 15:40:48 -0500
Sounds like it was a fantastic trip. Wish I could have gone. All I had here
on wagner loop was two roadrunners , a green heron and a blue grosbeak.

Jealous,

Alan Gregory

harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: roadrunners
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 16:33:20 -0400
 Haven't been driving my laundry mat route till today coming home at 1:15pm in 
the curve that I call the Road Runner curve 1.5 miles west of Moreland on Hwy 
164. To my surprise there were not one but two Road Runners pecking at a snake 
on the shoulder there. What caught my eye was they were hopping up and down 
like Jack in a box style.! 

 Two persimmon trees are located in that curve behind them. The only persimmon 
trees on that whole short cut. I get 1/4 mile past them and another one pop 
across the road in front of me to the same side there on the left . ( it would 
be on the right if you coming from Hwy 124). Sort of made me laugh! Usually I 
am lucky to see one a year and today there are 3 of them? How lucky can I be? 
Teresa , Hector, AR 



-- 

"Your greatest opposition is when you are closest to your biggest miracle."
 By Albert Einstein
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 06:30:57 -0500
Correction--the Red-necked Phalarope at the Bald Knob NWR was found swimming in 
the water on the south end of the THIRD pond located on Huntsman Road. Come 
down Coal Chute Rd. from Bald Knob, turn right at the grain bins onto Huntsman 
Rd. The bird was in the third pond on your right. Good luck! 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Red-necked Phalalope
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 21:15:37 -0500
Best bird seen at the Bald Knob NWR Refuge today during the ASCA field trip 
Saturday, was a Red-necked Phalalope. It was seen in the second pond after you 
turn off Coal Chute Road onto the road that runs from the grain bins to the low 
bridge. You can also drive the dirt road that runs across the back side of the 
three ponds. It is solid unless it has rained. 

I've posted a more detailed report of everything that was seen today.
Karen Holliday 
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: ASCA field trip report-Bald Knob
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 20:57:09 -0500
Saturday, fifty-five birders descended on the Bald Knob National Wildlife 
Refuge at 8:30 a.m. on a mission to locate the rarities that had been seen 
during the previous week. Bald Knob is designated an Important Bird Area (IBA) 
and it did not disappoint. Best birds are listed below. With the many eyes 
scattered all over the refuge and sightings quickly reported among the birders, 
we were able to move the group around so that everyone was able to see the 
rarities. We had two special guest groups. Birders from the Greater Ozarks 
Audubon Society at Springfield, Missouri who came down to scout Bald Knob as a 
possible future field trip. We also had the 4-H Circuit Board Club from 
Brinkley, with eight school members and two group leaders, who got up very 
early to drive to the refuge, meet us, and experience their first birding trip. 


First stop was the Refuge's headquarters building. Paul Provence, Refuge 
Manager, made arrangements to have the building open for the day. They have a 
very impressive collection of mounted species, an educational representation of 
the birds and mammals that can be seen at Bald Knob. Mr. Provence also had 
water levels at the ponds managed to provide good shorebird habitat. Each pond 
was full of of herons, egrets, ducks, teal, and shorebirds, including those 
hard to identify peeps. The main pond along Coal Chute Road and the three ponds 
on the road from the grain bins to the low water bridge held all the birds 
seen. The Black-crowned Night-Herons were seen at the BCNH/YCNH rookery which 
is on the road to the left of the low water bridge. 


A good learning experience was the dark Ibis. It was determined it was a 
juvenile with a dark eye. Experts say that dark-eyed juvenile Ibis species 
cannot be told apart without DNA testing. For those who submit their trip list 
to eBird, you should list it as a Glossy/White-faced Ibis. 


The heat didn't get oppressive until close to noon, which allowed everyone to 
stay on the refuge until lunchtime. This was such a productive day, finding 
terrific birds and visiting with birders from all over. We ended the day with a 
total count of 42 species. 


Best Birds of the day:
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE-1
Dark Glossy/White-faced Ibis-1 Juvenile 
While Ibis-2 juveniles 
Roseate Spoonbill-1
Black-bellied Plovers-4
Marbled Godwit-2
Black-crowned Night-Heron-4
American Avocet-4
Black Tern-3
Black-necked Stilt-40
Stilt Sandpiper-3
America White Pelicans-60 soaring over the refuge
Bald Eagle-1
Wilson's Snipe-3

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator 
Maumelle/Little Rock 
Subject: A decidely Monarch sort of day
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 22:24:17 +0000
This morning we had a few shorebirds for Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society's 
field trip to Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton: Killdeer, Solitary 
Sandpiper, Spotted Sandpiper, and Least Sandpiper (a few of each). Hawks: 
Mississippi Kite, Cooper's Hawk, Red-shouldered Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, and 
America Kestrel. Belted Kingfishers and two heron species. Otherwise, this has 
been a decidedly Monarch kind of day. 


Arkansas Game and Fish folks have left unmowed until this fall several areas to 
protect Swamp Milkweed, a plant with limited distribution in Arkansas. Half of 
the 35-40 folks who turned out for birding were interested enough in the 
milkweed patch to walk along the fence north of the hatchery alongside one of 
several natural spring runs. The milkweed is in full, aromatic glory, a fact 
also noticed by butterflies and other pollinators. An insect festival of sorts 
with Monarchs, Black Swallowtails, other butterfly and numerous bee, wasp, 
beetle and other insects species. 


As we were moving in for closer looks, we noticed some odd, moth-like creature. 
What is it? It perched on one of my favorite wet ground plants, Yellow 
Nutsedge. Later and at home in Fayetteville, I tried Googling "moth on yellow 
nutsedge." There was nothing helpful, but you know you are probably in trouble 
when what Googles up are mainly herbicides ads. The nutsedge thrives where 
nature intends wet meadow and seasonally-wet prairie - and plants like Swamp 
Milkweed. Generally, though, people want lawn and pasture, hence a thriving 
herbicide industry. 


David Oakley and Mitchell Pruitt figured out later that what perched on the 
nutsedge was the False Crocus Geometer Moth, Xanthotype urticaria. At this 
point, I can't find any Arkansas records for this moth. To say the least, an 
unexpected moth in a patch of habitat protected from mowing is an interesting 
development on a bird watching field trip. 


Ecologically-speaking, presence of X. urticaria, in a patch of unusual plants 
like Swamp Milkweed and others, and all attended by numerous pollinator species 
- provides a good description for a wetland ecosystem disappearing under a 
tsunami of development. 


It is a system important to birds and other native creatures. When American 
Golden-Plovers migrate through northwest Arkansas in spring, they are looking 
for these wet meadows. Seldom seen: an entire ecosystem of snakes, frogs, 
salamanders. Green Herons forage along the spring runs. 


Today, as we admired Swamp Milkweed from the bank, it was American Goldfinches 
down in the spring run, foraging in a patch of brilliant green algae. 

Subject: Cave Swallows in Miller County
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 11:34:31 -0500
I counted at least 4 and perhaps 6 young Cave Swallows in Miller County this 
morning approximately 1/2-2/3 mile north of the intersection of Hwy 296 and 
Miller County 27. 


Charles Mills
Subject: Popups create armchair theory
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 09:44:53 -0500
While reading through the link that Kannan provided about splitting Yellow 
Rumped Warblers, I noticed another link 
(http://phys.org/news/2016-08-evolution-bird-reproduction.html) barely 
noticeable between the ones relating to ‚Äėworst carbs over 50‚Äô and 
‚Äėavoiding dementia‚Äô as well as the related stories at the bottom 
(http://phys.org/news/2013-09-songbirds-dna-fuel-migration.html#nRlv) . 


 

This last link refers to isotopic differences in the environments of the 
Audubon’s and Myrtle Warblers affecting mitiochondrial efficiencies (viz. , 
O2 consumption). Could these isotope impacts be related to the proximity of 
different soils in this region (So. UT, No. AZ) and plant-uptake--and 
consequently animal ingestion through feeding, water, dust bathing, etc? This 
region is known for its mining of various minerals, and particularly for 
extraction of Uranium with all its isotopic ‚Äúdaughters‚ÄĚ. 


 

Another question: has the isotope ratios and genetics present in the embryos 
been documented, before the fledged birds were exposed directly to the 
environmental differences on their travels? 


 

Jeff Short

Doing anything to keep from working outside

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan 

Sent: Friday, August 26, 2016 6:57 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: butter-butt may be split

 

Our yellow-rumped warbler may be three different species. 

 

http://phys.org/news/2016-08-butterbutt-warbler-species-dna-reveals.html 
 

Subject: Message from Meeker (David Chapman)
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 23:58:18 +0000
Below is some more from David Chapman as he explores the western slope of the 
Rockies: 



I have a lot to learn about the distribution and migratory behavior of birds on 
the western slope of the Colorado Rockies. With this in mind, I hope to 
complete a monthly bird survey in Meeker, like a Christmas count, visiting as 
many habitats within the town boundaries as possible in a day. Results will be 
posted on ebird. Yesterday was a case in point, a blackish woodpecker high up 
in a dead tree with a yellow crown, with a plain white area along its back. 
This was a first for me; the Rocky Mountain race of Three-toed Woodpecker. 
Supposedly an uncommon inhabitant of extensive montane coniferous forests its 
presence was a surprise since this habitat is absent in Meeker. The Lewis 
Woodpecker was perched on the same tree as before and was unfazed by a 
commotion that turned out to be three Clarks Nutcrackers. Other woodpeckers 
were Downy, Hairy, and Red-shafted Flicker. Four Golden Eagles, an Osprey, 
Red-tail, and Sharp-shinned Hawk were seen but no Goshawk. Magpies are common 
here and it is not unusual to see flocks of a dozen or so at lower elevations. 
On the few occasions when I forget to bring the cat food inside these garrulous 
birds will come right up onto the deck to grab a morsel. Another "new" Corvid 
found here is the Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay, a recent taxonomic split from Western 
forms. ? 



David C.
Subject: Re: Nebraska Crane Festival
From: zoe caywood <zcaywood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 16:35:57 -0500
Here's my experience for viewing the Crane migration in NE -- #1 it is a
must see experience for all birders and nature lovers.  Make a reservation
with the Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at the Rowe Sanctuary in Gibbon, NE
for viewing the birds coming into the Platte in the evening or the morning
(2 different reservations).  These are wooden blinds with openings for full
views of the sights and sounds with the thousands of sandhills that roost
on the Platte River.  The cacophony and the birds numbering so many that
they create a sandbar themselves, is something unforgettable.  The guides
give a good overview of the birds and the migration in the center before
the short walk to the blinds.  I can't stress enough to dress warmly as
this is Nebraska not Arkansas.  Feel comfortable with exiting off
Interstate 80 on the southern sand roads to see the birds in the fields
during the day.  Make reservations early for hotels in Kearny, they are
limited.

On the trip north, be sure to make a stop at the Squaw Creek National
Wildlife Refuge, just minutes west of Hwy. 29 to see what's there.  It is
an easy drive around a large lake (with NO facilities).

I did not attend the festival so have no info.  But, make your destination
the Rowe Sanctuary, and you must make these reservations early as well, as
it is limited.  Phone 308 468 5285, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sundays 1 p.m. - 4
p.m.   www.RoweSanctuary.org

On Thu, Aug 25, 2016 at 10:53 AM, Pam Clark <
0000007e1d641ae0-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> Has anyone been to see the Sandhill Cranes in Nebraska when they gather in
> March of each year? Did you go to the festival  or just  went on your own?
> Any suggestions.. dos or don'ts you could offer for someone planning to
> go?  Thank you in advance for your help..
>



-- 
Zoe Caywood 479 236 4086
Co-builder of War Eagle Mill
Cookbook author
Subject: ASCA Field Trip This Saturday
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 16:10:34 +0000
Quick Reminder--ASCA's field trip to the Bald Knob NWR is this Saturday, August 
27.  See details below.  Some really nice migrating shorebirds and wading 
birds have already been seen at the refuge.  Be careful when stepping into the 
grassy areas.  There can be snakes hanging out in the grass.  Mitchell Pruitt 
can attest to that! 


BONUS-Paul Provence, the refuge manager, will have the headquarters building 
unlocked and one of his staff will be there to show us their visitor's center 
and let us use the restrooms.  The headquarters building is located on Coal 
Chute Road and will be on your left about a half mile after you leave the 
pavement where the gravel starts. Please stop and visit the new facility before 
going on into the refuge. The headquarters will be open from 8:00 a.m. until 
around 1:00 p.m.  All birders are welcome.  Feel free to contact me off list 
if you have any questions.  Come join us!Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip 
CoordinatorLittle Rock August 27Bald Knob NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, 
ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot, 
theeast side behind McDonald’s.  Take Exit 1West off US-67/167.  The Other 
Center ison McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall. We’ll arrive at Bald Knob 
NWR at around 8:30 a.m. for those who want tomeet us there.  Look for the line 
of carsparked on Coal Chute Road.  The federalrefuge is also a National 
Audubon Important Bird Area.  We expect to see shorebirds, 
herons,night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills.  
It will be very hot so bring plenty of water,snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If 
youhave a scope, bring it.  Very littlewalking will be involved. There is a 
McDonald’sjust off Hwy. 67/167 Exit 55 at Bald Knob. Go to 
www.fws.gov/baldknob/for driving directions and more information about the 
refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903 

Subject: Re: bald cardinal
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 15:17:09 +0000
I saw a bald cardinal just the other day on my window sill. It looked pretty 
bad. I thought it had been pecked by other birds, or possibly caught by a cat 
and had escaped after having some feathers pulled out. Or alternatively was 
sick, infested with lice, mites, etc. I wish I had photographed it because it 
was only two feet from me. First one I have ever seen. 

________________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Joseph Neal 

Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2016 7:06 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: bald cardinal

I wrote this a few years ago for a local newspaper up here, mainly 
tongue-in-cheek, after the same question had come up: 


DONíT HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT BALD-HEADED CARDINALS:
YOUR BIRD-WATCHERíS HEALTH CARE PLAN FOR A WORRY-FREE AMERICA,
PLUS A FREE VISIT TO THE BIRD DOCTORíS OFFICE & AVIARY

Many years ago, I rented an apartment from an elderly woman who loved 
cardinals. She would hum and whistle, PRETTY BOY PRETTY in apparent imitation 
of a male cardinalís song. Of course, now that Iím an elder myself, Iím not so 
sure what she meant by humming PRETTY BOY PRETTY BOY. But I digress. 


What Iím prepared to explain here-- not having to worry about bald-headed 
cardinalsóis likely to stir up controversy among our ever vigilant Tea Party 
folks who are always very justifiably concerned about things that socialize 
America Ė the post office that hand-delivers Grandmaís check from Social 
Security, her doctorís visit courtesy of another socialist program, Medicare, 
water out of the tap from our socialize water supply, Beaver Lake, etc. But 
again, I digress. 


Explaining this tawdry bidness about bald-headed cardinals is part of my 
overall plan for a Worry-Free America. America! Are you ready? 


So, first question in this FREE visit to the bird doctorís office: ever seen a 
bald-headed cardinal? Thereís quite a lot of misinformation out there. Letís 
clear up some of it before we move on to the truth. 


1.      Cardinals donít really suffer from ďmale pattern baldness.Ē
2.      Arenít bald because of global warming or President Obama.
3. Arenít bald because of recent windstorms that blew tin off of local chicken 
houses and didnít even blow feathers off roosterís heads! 

4. Arenít bald because of toxic waste in the White River or hair-killing 
impurity in their seeds 

5.      Arenít bald because of feather-pulling squabbles
6. Arenít bald because of a shortage of feather-wings in appropriate styles, 
colors or 4X sizes 

7.      Arenít bald-headed because he flew into a chicken house fan.
8.      Etc.

So if anyone out there Ė even a single one of you Ė have read this far, you 
deserve to know what causes bald-headedness in our cardinals. In theory it 
COULD be any of items 1-8 (above, including the handy generalization, ďetc.Ē). 
Since we see most baldies in summer & fall, it may just be molt, in which new 
feathers replace old ones. It may also result from nutritional deficiencies, or 
even lice or mites. If you can figure out which cardinal is which out in the 
yard, youíll notice that within a few weeks old baldy is getting new feathers. 


________________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Melissa Versiga  

Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 6:26 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: bald cardinal

This is a photo of a male Cardinal that has been banging his head against our 
windows on the house and cars for months. In May he still had feathers on his 
head but he is bald now. He thinks he is fighting off the competition for his 
little lady. 


I see on some of the posts that they molt, but I wouldn't think it would be 
this bad! And why just their head? 


Melissa
Subject: Re: Nebraska Crane Festival
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 09:26:47 -0500
We didn't go during the festival.

Going to one of the Rowe Sanctuary Blinds prior to dusk is a must.
It is regulated and you may need a reservation earlier in the day 
depending on the number there. During the Festival, if lots of folks 
are there, may be hearder.
One of the most awe inspiring, religious-nature, experience in our life.
In the blind. Hear a crane or two gliding into to roost on river 
sandbars per 4-5 minutes. Within another 10 minutes, a couple of 
cranes a minute. Then 1 every five seconds. Within half hour, you can 
see 50-100 gliding in in one view at one time. Plus all trumpeting. 
By then you can't hear anything but cranes.

The festival might have more education, more group activities. 
Probably depends on whether you want birding experiences in the areas 
around Kearney more by your self or with 20-50 others (but that is 
just a guess)

Birded a lot of places, but that blind at Sundown at Rowe Sanctuary was unique.
The only way it could have been better was if it had been the call of 
the Greater Sandhill Cranes from the west. I think there bugle is 
even more other wordly than the S H Cranes around here.

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville


At 05:41 PM 8/25/2016, you wrote:
>I've been to the location in Kearney - there were gobs of cranes 
>there this past spring.   But I've not been to the festival.  From 
>what I saw and heard from the locals, its kind of a big deal.
>
>Not sure where you're thinking of going but Kearney is kinda 
>cool.  And the river where the cranes gather has a hiking trail 
>along an old railroad.  Not much scenery except at the river which 
>has an impressive boardwalk/bridge.  Bring binoculars at the least, 
>obviously.  Parking in the place where I went was somewhat 
>limited.  From what I read the little state park near Kearney is a 
>major stopover, but I think there are others.  I was out until about 
>sundown and the cranes had not come to roost - but I saw hundreds in 
>the fields to the east.
>
>I think there are other locations where they may be observed so this 
>may not be helpful at all.
>
>When and where is this festival?
>
>George (n. Conway Co. no cranes but a lot of rain for August)
>
>
>On 8/25/2016 10:53 AM, Pam Clark wrote:
>>Has anyone been to see the Sandhill Cranes in Nebraska when they 
>>gather in March of each year? Did you go to the festival  or 
>>just  went on your own? Any suggestions.. dos or don'ts you could 
>>offer for someone planning to go?  Thank you in advance for your help..
Subject: white ibis
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 09:13:31 -0500
Two juvenile white ibises were still at Bald Knob NWR around 5:30 p.m.
Thursday along Coal Chute Road. I saw the spoonbill early Wednesday
morning, but not Thursday. I believe I also saw the marbled godwit both
days as well.

Sarah M
Jonesboro
Subject: Re: Nebraska Crane Festival
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 06:58:14 -0500
I've been there, too, a number of years ago for an academic bird conference. I 
can only echo everyone else's thoughts. It was a great birding experience! 


Having said that, it was not during the crane festival. I have heard the 
"craniacs" come in droves for that making hotel rooms hard to come by. You 
might want to make your reservations well in advance. If you just want to see 
the cranes (and hundreds of thousands of Snow Geese, which are just as 
impressive when they are airborne), they cranes are in the Kearney area for 
more than just that week. 


Happy birding!
Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR


> On Aug 26, 2016, at 06:00, Bob Harden  wrote:
> 
> I went to Kearney 3 years ago. The cranes will be scattered all up and down 
around the Platte River there. You can go to one of the blinds at the Audobon 
place or just go to any of the river access at dawn or dusk. All during the day 
there are thousands of cranes in all the cornfields up and down the river. It 
was estimated there were 170,000 cranes the weekend we were there .....and we 
saw most of them. Very impressive to be there in the dark and hear them, and 
the lighter it gets you just keep seeing them lined up by the thousands and 
thousands starting to take off to feed for the day. Well worth the trip. I also 
recommend the Prairie Chickens....Google Calamus Outfitters for a great 
experience. Bob 

> 
>> On Thu, Aug 25, 2016 at 7:08 PM, Ben Cowens 
<0000016361581b89-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote: 

>> I've also never been to the festival but have visited the Platte in March. 
It's worth the visit. When I was there I saw thousands of Sandhills - quite the 
experience on its own merit. I even saw two Whoopers on migration, which is 
among the coolest birding experiences I've ever enjoyed. 

>> 
>> Also I would suggest visiting a Greater Prairie Chicken lek if you have 
time. There are commercially visited leks within 90 minutes of the river (There 
might be some closer) or you could get online and try to find one on your own. 
The crane/chicken combo made for a really nice experience. It was 19 degrees at 
5 am the morning I visited the lek, but to see them in action was totally worth 
it! 

>> 
>> Hope this helps...
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> > On Aug 25, 2016, at 5:41 PM, George R. Hoelzeman  
wrote: 

>> >
>> > I've been to the location in Kearney - there were gobs of cranes there 
this past spring. But I've not been to the festival. From what I saw and heard 
from the locals, its kind of a big deal. 

>> >
>> > Not sure where you're thinking of going but Kearney is kinda cool. And the 
river where the cranes gather has a hiking trail along an old railroad. Not 
much scenery except at the river which has an impressive boardwalk/bridge. 
Bring binoculars at the least, obviously. Parking in the place where I went was 
somewhat limited. From what I read the little state park near Kearney is a 
major stopover, but I think there are others. I was out until about sundown and 
the cranes had not come to roost - but I saw hundreds in the fields to the 
east. 

>> >
>> > I think there are other locations where they may be observed so this may 
not be helpful at all. 

>> >
>> > When and where is this festival?
>> >
>> > George (n. Conway Co. no cranes but a lot of rain for August)
>> >
>> >
>> >> On 8/25/2016 10:53 AM, Pam Clark wrote:
>> >> Has anyone been to see the Sandhill Cranes in Nebraska when they gather 
in March of each year? Did you go to the festival or just went on your own? Any 
suggestions.. dos or don'ts you could offer for someone planning to go? Thank 
you in advance for your help.. 

>> >>
> 
Subject: Re: Nebraska Crane Festival
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 06:00:31 -0500
I went to Kearney 3 years ago.   The cranes will be scattered all up and
down around the Platte River there.   You can go to one of the blinds at
the Audobon place or just go to any of the river access at dawn or dusk.
All during the day there are thousands of cranes in all the cornfields up
and down the river.   It was estimated there were 170,000 cranes the
weekend we were there .....and we saw most of them.    Very impressive to
be there in the dark and hear them, and the lighter it gets you just keep
seeing them lined up by the thousands and thousands starting to take off to
feed for the day.  Well worth the trip.   I also recommend the Prairie
Chickens....Google Calamus Outfitters for a great experience.   Bob

On Thu, Aug 25, 2016 at 7:08 PM, Ben Cowens <
0000016361581b89-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> I've also never been to the festival but have visited the Platte in March.
> It's worth the visit. When I was there I saw thousands of Sandhills - quite
> the experience on its own merit. I even saw two Whoopers on migration,
> which is among the coolest birding experiences I've ever enjoyed.
>
>  Also I would suggest visiting a Greater Prairie Chicken lek if you have
> time. There are commercially visited leks within 90 minutes of the river
> (There might be some closer) or you could get online and try to find one on
> your own. The crane/chicken combo made for a really nice experience. It was
> 19 degrees at 5 am the morning I visited the lek, but to see them in action
> was totally worth it!
>
> Hope this helps...
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Aug 25, 2016, at 5:41 PM, George R. Hoelzeman 
> wrote:
> >
> > I've been to the location in Kearney - there were gobs of cranes there
> this past spring.   But I've not been to the festival.  From what I saw and
> heard from the locals, its kind of a big deal.
> >
> > Not sure where you're thinking of going but Kearney is kinda cool.  And
> the river where the cranes gather has a hiking trail along an old
> railroad.  Not much scenery except at the river which has an impressive
> boardwalk/bridge.  Bring binoculars at the least, obviously.  Parking in
> the place where I went was somewhat limited.  From what I read the little
> state park near Kearney is a major stopover, but I think there are others.
> I was out until about sundown and the cranes had not come to roost - but I
> saw hundreds in the fields to the east.
> >
> > I think there are other locations where they may be observed so this may
> not be helpful at all.
> >
> > When and where is this festival?
> >
> > George (n. Conway Co. no cranes but a lot of rain for August)
> >
> >
> >> On 8/25/2016 10:53 AM, Pam Clark wrote:
> >> Has anyone been to see the Sandhill Cranes in Nebraska when they gather
> in March of each year? Did you go to the festival  or just  went on your
> own? Any suggestions.. dos or don'ts you could offer for someone planning
> to go?  Thank you in advance for your help..
> >>
>
Subject: Cook's Landing-No Terns
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 22:02:19 -0500
I checked Cook's Landing from the hydroelectric plant for terns on the sandbar 
this afternoon after work on Thursday. No terns. However, there was an Osprey 
circling the area, plus a Belted Kingfisher. Other birds present were Am. White 
Pelicans, Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, and Mallards. 

Karen Holliday 
Maumelle/Little Rock 
Subject: Valley birds
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 23:19:57 +0000
Hot, dry, and dusty in the Arkansas River Valley south of the Kibler-Alma area 
today. Arnold Road south of Kibler is a dustbowl, of sorts - a Horned Lark flew 
out of the soybean fields there and took a dust bath in the middle of the road. 
There were a few shorebirds in tiny wet spots: Killdeer (14), Least Sandpiper 
(2), Solitary Sandpiper (1) - but overall, not much suitable shorebird habitat 
and LOTS of lark bath dust. 


Westark Sod uses their big sprinklers to keep the grass green. They were 
rolling up the sod today. Where they weren't working, Buff-breasted Sandpipers 
(93 on the ground at one point) ruled and a mass of Cliff Swallows (500+) were 
also perching briefly on the green grass. Maybe they are being held up by the 
current south wind conditions. 


At Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility, Least Sandpipers (8) perched on long 
cables on top of the water. From there they grabbed bugs emerging from the 
water. Spotted Sandpipers (8) flushed from riprap supporting pond banks. 
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (4). In the air over the largest settling pond, 
Black Terns (12) and Least Tern (1). 


If you go there, and the gate is open, be sure and drive toward the back and 
check in with the friendly staff. 


A nice mudflat has developed on a big pond on private land just east of the 
facility. From atop the treatment facility's southwest most pond, I had a 
somewhat frustrating distant view: Killdeer (~20), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), 
Western Sandpiper (1-2), Least Sandpiper (~25), Baird's Sandpiper (3), Pectoral 
Sandpiper (2), Stilt Sandpiper (4), Dowitcher species (1). Also, Blue-winged 
Teal (2). 


There were also several (7-10 when I first looked) large white egrets - Great 
Egret and Snowy Egret for sure. I didn't pay them much attention because of the 
peeps. It was too far, and too bright, for me to be comfortable about my peep 
work. A Snowy Egret landed in a buttonbush near me and watched while I 
struggled with peep ID. A Monarch was working Swamp Milkweed flowers. 


Alma Wastewater is across the street from King ranch. Northern Shovelers (2) 
and an immature Little Blue Heron on one of the farm ponds. One tree out in the 
middle of the field made a nice cow shade. Joining them in the shade, Cattle 
Egrets (~75). 

Subject: Re: Nebraska Crane Festival
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 17:41:52 -0500
I've been to the location in Kearney - there were gobs of cranes there 
this past spring.   But I've not been to the festival.  From what I saw 
and heard from the locals, its kind of a big deal.

Not sure where you're thinking of going but Kearney is kinda cool.  And 
the river where the cranes gather has a hiking trail along an old 
railroad.  Not much scenery except at the river which has an impressive 
boardwalk/bridge.  Bring binoculars at the least, obviously.  Parking in 
the place where I went was somewhat limited.  From what I read the 
little state park near Kearney is a major stopover, but I think there 
are others.  I was out until about sundown and the cranes had not come 
to roost - but I saw hundreds in the fields to the east.

I think there are other locations where they may be observed so this may 
not be helpful at all.

When and where is this festival?

George (n. Conway Co. no cranes but a lot of rain for August)


On 8/25/2016 10:53 AM, Pam Clark wrote:
> Has anyone been to see the Sandhill Cranes in Nebraska when they gather in 
March of each year? Did you go to the festival or just went on your own? Any 
suggestions.. dos or don'ts you could offer for someone planning to go? Thank 
you in advance for your help.. 

>
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 08:14:04 -0500
I have even been made sprawl on the tarmac with M-16s pointed at me, while in 
military uniform and accompanied by the Wing Safety Officer (who also had to 
assume the position). 


 

Water treatment plants or power plant water discharge points‚ÄĒespecially 
nuclear plants‚ÄĒare closely watched, too. 


 

Maybe we should carry those little cards, ‚ÄúBirders Mean Business‚ÄĚ . 
Remember to tell the police what you are doing and take them out slowly… 


 

Jeff

 

 

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan 

Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2016 7:28 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, 
Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile 


 

Birding around airports as a brown-skinned American is the worst! 

It happens so often to me that I even acknowledged the patience of the Ft Smith 
Police Department in one of my papers. 


 

On Wednesday, 24 August 2016 9:36 PM, Jeffrey Short  
wrote: 


 

Try doing that as a non-saltine American and see what happens…

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Karen Garrett 

Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 6:30 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, 
Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile 


 

I haven't had any residents call about me, but I have been contacted twice by 
officers who just happened to be passing by and wondered what I was doing with 
my binoculars. 


 

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 5:33 PM, Ann Gordon  wrote:

Laugh-out-loud funny! Especially to those of us who know the "perp," who shall 
remain nameless. Not JN .. "No one was hurt..." 


 

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 4:53 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 


Ok I leave the state for one week and THIS happens!  Karen Hart


http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/aug/24/investigating-reports-man-rifle-and-jungle-clothes/ 
 



Sent from my iPhone

 

 

 
Subject: Public Service Announcement
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 07:58:45 -0500
The link is to an entertaining video discussing addiction(s) vs.
connection(s).  Addiction does not explicitly relate to bird-watching,
unless perhaps referring to "twitchers".  The "connection" could come from
birdwatching and all its facets, such as getting outdoors, some semblance of
exercise, personal learning,  and expanding horizons.

 

After the first video, other presentations about the life, the universe and
everything -which clearly extrapolates to birds-will  queue-up which are
just a cleverly done.  Enjoy.  

 

Jeff Short

 

 

 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao8L-0nSYzg&app=desktop

 
Subject: Re: bald cardinal
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 12:06:07 +0000
I wrote this a few years ago for a local newspaper up here, mainly 
tongue-in-cheek, after the same question had come up: 


DONíT HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT BALD-HEADED CARDINALS: 
YOUR BIRD-WATCHERíS HEALTH CARE PLAN FOR A WORRY-FREE AMERICA,
PLUS A FREE VISIT TO THE BIRD DOCTORíS OFFICE & AVIARY

Many years ago, I rented an apartment from an elderly woman who loved 
cardinals. She would hum and whistle, PRETTY BOY PRETTY in apparent imitation 
of a male cardinalís song. Of course, now that Iím an elder myself, Iím not so 
sure what she meant by humming PRETTY BOY PRETTY BOY. But I digress. 


What Iím prepared to explain here-- not having to worry about bald-headed 
cardinalsóis likely to stir up controversy among our ever vigilant Tea Party 
folks who are always very justifiably concerned about things that socialize 
America Ė the post office that hand-delivers Grandmaís check from Social 
Security, her doctorís visit courtesy of another socialist program, Medicare, 
water out of the tap from our socialize water supply, Beaver Lake, etc. But 
again, I digress. 

 
Explaining this tawdry bidness about bald-headed cardinals is part of my 
overall plan for a Worry-Free America. America! Are you ready? 


So, first question in this FREE visit to the bird doctorís office: ever seen a 
bald-headed cardinal? Thereís quite a lot of misinformation out there. Letís 
clear up some of it before we move on to the truth. 


1.	Cardinals donít really suffer from ďmale pattern baldness.Ē
2.	Arenít bald because of global warming or President Obama.
3. Arenít bald because of recent windstorms that blew tin off of local chicken 
houses and didnít even blow feathers off roosterís heads! 

4. Arenít bald because of toxic waste in the White River or hair-killing 
impurity in their seeds 

5.	Arenít bald because of feather-pulling squabbles
6. Arenít bald because of a shortage of feather-wings in appropriate styles, 
colors or 4X sizes 

7.	Arenít bald-headed because he flew into a chicken house fan.
8.	Etc.

So if anyone out there Ė even a single one of you Ė have read this far, you 
deserve to know what causes bald-headedness in our cardinals. In theory it 
COULD be any of items 1-8 (above, including the handy generalization, ďetc.Ē). 
Since we see most baldies in summer & fall, it may just be molt, in which new 
feathers replace old ones. It may also result from nutritional deficiencies, or 
even lice or mites. If you can figure out which cardinal is which out in the 
yard, youíll notice that within a few weeks old baldy is getting new feathers. 


________________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Melissa Versiga  

Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 6:26 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: bald cardinal

This is a photo of a male Cardinal that has been banging his head against our 
windows on the house and cars for months. In May he still had feathers on his 
head but he is bald now. He thinks he is fighting off the competition for his 
little lady. 


I see on some of the posts that they molt, but I wouldn't think it would be 
this bad! And why just their head? 


Melissa
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 21:35:36 -0500
Try doing that as a non-saltine American and see what happens…

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Karen Garrett 

Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 6:30 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, 
Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile 


 

I haven't had any residents call about me, but I have been contacted twice by 
officers who just happened to be passing by and wondered what I was doing with 
my binoculars. 


 

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 5:33 PM, Ann Gordon  wrote:

Laugh-out-loud funny! Especially to those of us who know the "perp," who shall 
remain nameless. Not JN .. "No one was hurt..." 


 

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 4:53 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 


Ok I leave the state for one week and THIS happens!  Karen Hart


http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/aug/24/investigating-reports-man-rifle-and-jungle-clothes/ 
 



Sent from my iPhone

 

 
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 18:29:58 -0500
I haven't had any residents call about me, but I have been contacted twice
by officers who just happened to be passing by and wondered what I was
doing with my binoculars.

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 5:33 PM, Ann Gordon  wrote:

> Laugh-out-loud funny!  Especially to those of us who know the "perp," who
> shall remain nameless.  Not JN ..   "No one was hurt..."
>
> On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 4:53 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <
> karen AT konarskiclinic.com> wrote:
>
>> Ok I leave the state for one week and THIS happens!  Karen Hart
>>
>> http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/aug/24/investigating-
>> reports-man-rifle-and-jungle-clothes/
>> 
 

>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
Subject: Re: bald cardinal
From: Melissa Versiga <melvcf AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 18:26:21 -0500
This is a photo of a male Cardinal that has been banging his head against our 
windows on the house and cars for months. In May he still had feathers on his 
head but he is bald now. He thinks he is fighting off the competition for his 
little lady. 


I see on some of the posts that they molt, but I wouldn't think it would be 
this bad! And why just their head? 


Melissa
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 17:33:54 -0500
Laugh-out-loud funny!  Especially to those of us who know the "perp," who
shall remain nameless.  Not JN ..   "No one was hurt..."

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 4:53 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <
karen AT konarskiclinic.com> wrote:

> Ok I leave the state for one week and THIS happens!  Karen Hart
>
> http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/aug/24/investigating-reports-man-
> rifle-and-jungle-clothes/
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 17:07:30 -0500
I bet I know who that was.  That's hilarious, and if I'm right, this isn't
the first time someone thought he was up to no-good when he's birding.

Karen Garrett

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 4:53 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <
karen AT konarskiclinic.com> wrote:

> Ok I leave the state for one week and THIS happens!  Karen Hart
>
> http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/aug/24/investigating-reports-man-
> rifle-and-jungle-clothes/
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 17:07:02 -0500
Joe Neal? How did that go?

:-)

Kelly Chitwood



> On Aug 24, 2016, at 4:53 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 

> 
> Ok I leave the state for one week and THIS happens!  Karen Hart
> 
> 
http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/aug/24/investigating-reports-man-rifle-and-jungle-clothes/ 

> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Investigating reports of man with rifle and jungle clothes, Fayetteville police find birdwatcher - Mobile
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 21:53:32 +0000
Ok I leave the state for one week and THIS happens!  Karen Hart


http://m.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/aug/24/investigating-reports-man-rifle-and-jungle-clothes/ 



Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Phalaropes at Boyd Point
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 15:59:39 -0500
My Wednesday morning birding group just observed three Wilson's Phalaropes,
nonbreeding plumage, at the Boyd Point Waste Water Facility this morning.
There were also about 30 Black Terns as well.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: AT EAGLE WATCH (GENTRY)
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 11:18:33 +0000
Water in Gentry's SWEPCO Lake is used to cool generators in the coal-fired 
electric-generating plant. Even with some rain, lake levels are starting to 
modestly drop, exposing muddy shoreline now available to migrants. From the 
viewing platform yesterday I enjoyed this splendid wildlife landscape: Wood 
Ducks (10, most juveniles) in the shallows, reddish-looking Least Sandpipers 
and Solitary Sandpipers with their backs white-speckled black exploring narrow 
bands of mud. Behind them: a green curtain of smartweed, the extravagant type 
with impressive pink flowers. 


Yesterday's shorebirds included: Semipalmated Plover (1), Killdeer (12), 
Greater yellowlegs (1), Solitary Sandpiper (2), Spotted Sandpiper (3), and 
Least Sandpiper (7). All cormorants (11) were Double-cresteds. I looked through 
the big white birds for an ibis, but all (6) were Great Egrets. 


On the walk back, several squawking Green Herons, Yellow Warbler (1) and a 
probable Northern Waterthrush that got away from me in the Buttonbush while I 
was admiring Eastern Tiger Swallowtails perched on "buttons." The prairie 
restoration near the parking area is covered with an expansive stand of native 
Indian Grass, in flower. I got up close to look at these flowers and noticed a 
native thistle, also in flower, covered with energetic, little, green 
pollinators, Halictid bees. 

Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 22:08:10 -0500
It was mild and overcast in the morning turning mostly sunny and hot and in
the afternoon and windy all day.  70 species were found today.  Passerines
were tough today and I had to work hard to get what I did as they were
mostly silent and the wind had them in deep cover.  I was on the Pintail
Lake observation platform this morning when I heard a Common Gallinule give
an alarm call fairly close to me.  I looked just in time to see a juvenile
Cooper's Hawk flying across the levee and into a dense patch of American
Lotus in Pintail Lake.  He was followed by a very agitated adult Common
Gallinule who went into the lotus after him after following the hawk across
open water from the levee.  I heard a lot of commotion and gallinules
calling from the lotus patch.  I figured the hawk had to have ended up in
the water and probably had caught a gallinule chick.  I waited for several
minutes but the hawk never came out.  So I started walking down the levee to
get closer.  Suddenly the hawk came swimming out of the Lotus into the edge
of the open water followed closely by two adult gallinules.  As I got closer
the hawk suddenly flushed from the water as easily as a duck and flew off
with empty talons.  Apparently what I thought was a water logged hawk trying
to make it to shore was really a hawk chasing after its prey on the swim.  I
knew they would run on the ground through brush chasing down prey but
swimming after prey was a new one.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 19

Wood Duck - 21

Mallard - 9

Blue-winged Teal - 9

Northern Shoveler - 2

Northern Pintail - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 21

Neotropic Cormorant - 2

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 11

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 14

Cattle Egret - 136

Green Heron - 1

White Ibis - 49

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 48

Mississippi Kite - 7

Cooper's Hawk - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Purple Gallinule - 4

Common Gallinule - 32 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 11

Killdeer - 1

Least Sandpiper - 1 

Rock Pigeon - 4

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Mourning Dove - 17

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Chimney Swift - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 10

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 5

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Bell's Vireo - 3 (adult feeding fledglings.)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 71

Purple Martin - 2

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 30

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 35

Barn Swallow - 3

Cave Swallow - 1 juvenile 

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 11

Yellow Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 2

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 14

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 4

Oriole species - 1 (juvenile in bad light at a distance.)

House Sparrow - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red/Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Western Cottonmouth

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Fwd: Juv Red-neck Phalarope
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 17:40:22 -0500
I may have jumped the gun...
Charles has me questioning the id.
Looking for better views.

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Charles Mills 
> Date: August 23, 2016 at 5:15:49 PM CDT
> To: Michael 
> Subject: Re: Juv Red-neck Phalarope
> 
> I hate single photos but this looks more like a Wilson's from this angle.
> 
> C. Mills 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 23, 2016, at 4:56 PM, Michael  wrote:
>> 
>> At Joe Hogan in Lonoke....
>> Now!
>> 
>> 
>> 
Subject: Juv Red-neck Phalarope
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 16:56:36 -0500
At Joe Hogan in Lonoke....
Now!
Subject: Re: Java Sparrows in Fayetteville?
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 16:39:21 -0500
Did someone leave the cage open? 


Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net



> On Aug 23, 2016, at 2:03 PM, Kimberly G. Smith  wrote:
> 
> My colleague Bill Etges saw birds last week with black caps, white faces, and 
red grosbeak bills with greenish wings in trees near his house on north side of 
Mount Sequoyah… as far as I can tell, they appear to be Java Sparrows (or 
Java Rice Birds)… so Fayetteville birders be on the look out… 

>  
> Kimberly G. Smith
> Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas
> Fayetteville, AR 72701
> Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
> Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu 
Subject: Royal Tern Yes
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:10:26 -0500
In response to Jim Dixon's email Sunday afternoon about the Caspian and
Royal Terns, Mom and I decided to head over to Cook's Landing (North Little
Rock) and try our luck, arriving sometime around 5:30 pm.

We found five of the Caspian Terns and the Royal Tern along with a
juvenile White Ibis, lots of Great Egrets and white pelicans along the sand
bar.
Poor lighting made identifying the Royal Tern a little challenging, but
after 15 minutes the light reflection on the river changed and we could see
the white on the head. It also appeared to sit slightly lower than the
other terns. After it turned to face another tern, it was evident it was
indeed sitting lower than the other terns and not standing in hole.

At the far left of the sandbar stood six Mallards. After a while the ducks
decided to join the ibis, who apparently wasn't in a sociable mood so it
flew off. The ducks seemed a bit distressed over this and started looking
around and chatting (although I couldn't hear them). After a couple of
minutes the ducks started marching, all in a row, stopping between us and
the terns. Between the ducks now blocking our view of the terns and the
horrible dead fish odor, we decided to call it quits and head home.

Thanks Jim for re-finding Karen's Royal Tern. We saw our first one in the
state earlier this year at Lake Dardanelle and now a second one has
appeared a few months later in Central Arkansas.

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock 
---------
From: jamesdixonlr
Sent: Sunday, August 21, 2016 3:15 PM
Subject: Royal Tern Yes.

Yesterday Sam Dixon and I looked for Karen Holiday's Royal Tern but did
not find it. Today I took Sam to college so she did not see this but at 3
p.m. I spotted the Royal Tern with six Caspian Terns on the green sandbar
along with American White Pelicans and Great  Egrets and Great Blue Herons.
Set up scope on causeway between power station and dam and look toward
I430. They were on left hand side of sand bar.

Jim Dixon
Subject: Java Sparrows in Fayetteville?
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 19:03:14 +0000
My colleague Bill Etges saw birds last week with black caps, white faces, and 
red grosbeak bills with greenish wings in trees near his house on north side of 
Mount Sequoyah... as far as I can tell, they appear to be Java Sparrows (or 
Java Rice Birds)... so Fayetteville birders be on the look out... 


Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu

Subject: Re: road runner brood 2
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 16:39:10 +0000
According to Birds of North American, roadrunners commonly breed more than once 
in a breeding season... 


Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Don Simons 

Sent: Monday, August 22, 2016 2:57 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: road runner brood 2

Back in June I reported watching a road runner feeding a chick almost as big as 
herself on Overlook Drive here on Mount Magazine. Well she has another chick 
begging for food. I did not know they nested twice in one season. The lizard 
population has been wiped out in that area. 


Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: Re: MS Kites
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 08:19:34 -0500
I am still seeing MS Kites in Jonesboro.

On Mon, Aug 22, 2016 at 10:35 PM, Randy  wrote:

> Had one circling the field today.
> West Pulaski county
> Randy Robinson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Aug 22, 2016, at 6:57 PM, Beverly Sullivan <000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-
> request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> <000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu>> wrote:
>
> I have noticed this last week that the MS Kites that have been flying over
> our homes in Marion, AR are now gone.  Is this the case with everyone
> else?  I will miss them until next year when they come back.  I have really
> enjoyed them for several years now.
> Beverly Sullivan
> Marion, Ar
>
>
Subject: Re: MS Kites
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:35:30 -0500
Had one circling the field today.
West Pulaski county
Randy Robinson 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 22, 2016, at 6:57 PM, Beverly Sullivan 
<000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> I have noticed this last week that the MS Kites that have been flying over 
our homes in Marion, AR are now gone. Is this the case with everyone else? I 
will miss them until next year when they come back. I have really enjoyed them 
for several years now. 

> Beverly Sullivan
> Marion, Ar
Subject: SW AR shorebirds and White Ibis 8-20-16
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 22:34:48 -0500
AR-birders,
On our way back home to LA, Jeff and Jean Trahan and I briefly stopped by some 
wet fields in 

eastern Miller County, and found a few birds that may be of interest to some of 
you all. The list and embedded 

photos are below.
Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S31206873
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kites
From: akcmueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:19:26 -0500
Yes


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S‚ĄĘ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date:08/22/2016 20:06 (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Mississippi Kites
Do Mississippi Kites kettle? D. DeLynn Hearn 317 West K Ave. N. Little Rock, AR 72116 (501)472-8769
Subject: Re: Shorebirds, and Swamp Milkweed, at Centerton
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 16:35:55 -0500
I was there Sunday morning and there were 4 Avocets as well. 



Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net



> On Aug 21, 2016, at 8:21 AM, Joseph Neal  wrote:
> 
> Mudflat habitat at Craig State Fish Hatchery yesterday yielded seven 
shorebird species: Killdeer (~20), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Solitary Sandpiper 
(2), Spotted Sandpiper (5), Least Sandpiper (47), Pectoral Sandpiper (2), Stilt 
Sandpiper (4). In addition, Great Egret (3), Black Tern (6), and Monarch 
Butterflies. 

> 
> The Centerton area, including the hatchery, is right now glowing bright pink 
with Swamp Milkweed in full bloom, attended by many butterflies, especially 
Monarchs. This summerís moisture seems to have done this important plant a lot 
of good. Thereís Swamp Milkweed inside and outside the hatchery fence, and more 
in fields throughout the area Ė basically wherever you look. 

> 
> Hard to believe Swamp Milkweed is listed in Arkansas as S2 Ė ďimperiled.Ē 
Hard to believe, that is, until you recognize how limited is its Arkansas range 
-- and considering what is happening now and in the near future within that 
range. Other than the hatchery itself, most fields where we saw pink yesterday 
will be drained and paved into shopping, housing, and highways as part of the 
northwest Arkansas growth juggernaut. 

> 
> We will look for shorebirds, other bird species, and the spring-fed Swamp 
Milkweed community of native plants and insects during next Saturdayís (August 
27) field trip to the state fish hatchery. 

> 
> 
Subject: road runner brood 2
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 19:57:13 +0000
Back in June I reported watching a road runner feeding a chick almost as big as 
herself on Overlook Drive here on Mount Magazine. Well she has another chick 
begging for food. I did not know they nested twice in one season. The lizard 
population has been wiped out in that area. 


Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: Bald Knob NWR 8-19-16
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 02:03:38 -0500
AR-birders,
Jeff and Jean Trahan and I made a trip to Bald Knob NWR on Friday and had a 
good day. There were multitudes of birds present and I felt like we were in a 
SW Louisiana refuge. 

While there we met the new refuge manager, Paul Provence, who is without a 
doubt a great guy. He immediately recognized my ďeye of the tigerĒ otherwise 
unmarked LSU hat, 

and proudly proclaimed he was an LSU graduate. He has been taught by Van 
Remsen, a friend and one of the top PhD Ornithologists in the world (not an 
exaggeration), and has 

a great understanding of management practices in regards to shorebirds and 
other non-game avian species. I suspect he will be an amazing resource and the 
people of Arkansas 

are lucky to have him. The bird list is below with a number of photos embedded. 
If you single tap on the photo in the comments section, three will pop up. if 
you tap again on each of these 

you will note Marbled Godwits in one, a Roseate Spoonbill in the next, and 
juvenile White Ibis in the last. I noted you all found a Ruddy Turnstone and 
Willet at BK NWR on 21Aug, so Iíll 

have to keep trying, as I am still looking for these in AR. I wish Bald Knob 
was closer to home. 

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31192656
Subject: Bald Knob Sunday
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 20:15:36 -0500
Twenty birders spent Sunday morning playing musical ponds at the Bald Knob NWR, 
dashing back and forth around the refuge. One group would find a target bird in 
one pond and cell phones would start buzzing as the message was relayed. Then 
another group would find a different target bird, cell phones would go off 
again and the dash was on to the next pond. My carload alone must have made 
five circles starting around 8:00a.m. and finally calling it quits around 2:30 
p.m. All target birds were seen by everyone except the Neotropic Cormorant. 
Michael Linz beat the crowd to the refuge that morning, arriving shortly after 
7:00 a.m., and saw the Neotropic Cormorant fly. We were unable to relocate it. 
Target birds seen were: 

Marbled Godwits-some said 4, others swore there were only 3
Roseate Spoonbill-1
Ruddy Turnstone-1
Black-bellied Plover-3, two in full breeding plumage-nice!
American Avocets-5
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron-3 juveniles 
Willet- 1, this was a surprise bird

We saw lots of the more common shorebirds and loads of herons, egrets, and 
Black-necked Stilts. Some ducks are arriving. The Refuge is really hopping! 
Next Saturday's ASCA field trip to the Refuge should be a lot of fun to see 
what new birds show up, along with the nice birds that are already there. 


When entering the list of birds seen into eBird, I came to American Coot, of 
which we saw several. There are now two choices: American Coot and American 
Coot (Red-shielded). I checked with Dr. Dan Scheiman, the eBird Editor for 
Arkansas, and he confirmed that we are to select the Red-shielded option for 
Arkansas coots. Hope to see everyone next Saturday for the ASCA field trip. Go 
to www.ascabird.org for more information. 

Karen Holliday 
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator 
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kite
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 16:29:22 -0500
A birder from NY reports seeing a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over I-30 outside
Benton today. "Soaring white bird with black borders on wings and forked
tail. Seen clearly from I-30W.≤  Coordinates 34.4997, -92.6959.  Be on the
lookout.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR


Subject: Royal Tern Yes.
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 15:14:53 -0500
    
Yesterday Sam Dixon and I looked for Karen Holiday's Royal Tern but did not 
find it. Today I took Sam to college so she did not see this but at 3 p.m. I 
spotted the Royal Tern with six Caspian Terns on the green sandbar along with 
American White Pelicans and Great  Egrets and Great Blue Herons.Set up scope 
on causeway between power station and dam and look toward i430. They were on 
left hand side of sand bar. 



Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
Subject: Fw: Bald Knob and the rain
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 19:38:09 +0000
From: Bill Shepherd 
Sent: Sunday, August 21, 2016 2:27 PM
To: Blake Kennedy; Marian Berry; Thomas Kennedy
Subject: Fw: Bald Knob and the rain



Marian Berry, Blake Kennedy, and I spent two hours there Saturday morning and 
saw some of the same burds that Allan reported. But we left in mid-morning, 
when the deluge hit. Among those species that we missed were Allan's Semi 
Plovers, his Least Terns, and his Hydroponic Cormorants. 



But we enjoyed what we did see.


Before scurrying back to the Rock, we also enjoyed strawberry shortcake at the 
Bull Dog in Bald Knob. 



Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918 



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Allan Mueller  

Sent: Saturday, August 20, 2016 8:31 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bald Knob in the rain

Today at Bald Knob NWR - three Marbled Godwits, Semi Plovers, Stilt Sandpipers, 
Least Sandpiper, Neotropic Cormorants, Pectoral Sandpipers, Least Sandpipers, 
Stilt Sandpipers, American Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, dowitchers sp., Semi 
Plovers, Killdeer, Black Terns,Least Terns, Pecs, many egrets and herons, one 
possible White-rumped Sandpiper, one Roseate Spoonbill, Lesser Yellowlegs, and 
one Wilson's Snipe. 



--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Shorebirds, and Swamp Milkweed, at Centerton
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 13:21:20 +0000
Mudflat habitat at Craig State Fish Hatchery yesterday yielded seven shorebird 
species: Killdeer (~20), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Solitary Sandpiper (2), Spotted 
Sandpiper (5), Least Sandpiper (47), Pectoral Sandpiper (2), Stilt Sandpiper 
(4). In addition, Great Egret (3), Black Tern (6), and Monarch Butterflies. 


The Centerton area, including the hatchery, is right now glowing bright pink 
with Swamp Milkweed in full bloom, attended by many butterflies, especially 
Monarchs. This summer's moisture seems to have done this important plant a lot 
of good. There's Swamp Milkweed inside and outside the hatchery fence, and more 
in fields throughout the area - basically wherever you look. 


Hard to believe Swamp Milkweed is listed in Arkansas as S2 - "imperiled." Hard 
to believe, that is, until you recognize how limited is its Arkansas range -- 
and considering what is happening now and in the near future within that range. 
Other than the hatchery itself, most fields where we saw pink yesterday will be 
drained and paved into shopping, housing, and highways as part of the northwest 
Arkansas growth juggernaut. 


We will look for shorebirds, other bird species, and the spring-fed Swamp 
Milkweed community of native plants and insects during next Saturday's (August 
27) field trip to the state fish hatchery. 

Subject: Mulhollan Blind, Lake Fayetteville Park
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 12:41:19 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society is "back on the air." Our website 
disappeared when the company hosting it apparently also disappeared. NWAAS 
webmaster Richard Stauffacher moved us to a new host and has been rebuilding 
our web site. Much (but not yet all) of it is back in operation. Check it out: 
http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/ 


Construction of the Paige and Mary Bess Mulhollan Waterfowl Observation Blind 
at Lake Fayetteville Park, sponsored by NWAAS, is completed. We expect to put 
on a formal dedication this fall, but you can visit the blind anytime. It's 
about a 0.5 mile walk from parking, with birding opportunities along the way. 
For more about Mulhollan Blind, and a map that shows how to get there 
http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/mulhollanblind.htm 


Next NWAAS field trip is this coming Saturday, August 27, at Craig State Fish 
Hatchery in Centerton. Meet 9 AM. We will be looking for migrating shorebirds, 
terns, and at the spring-fed ecological community that features Swamp Milkweed, 
now in full bloom and full of butterflies. 

Subject: Bald Knob in the rain
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 20:31:15 -0500
Today at Bald Knob NWR - three Marbled Godwits, Semi Plovers, Stilt
Sandpipers, Least Sandpiper, Neotropic Cormorants, Pectoral Sandpipers,
Least Sandpipers, Stilt Sandpipers, American Avocets, Black-necked Stilts,
dowitchers sp., Semi Plovers, Killdeer, Black Terns,Least Terns, Pecs, many
egrets and herons, one possible White-rumped Sandpiper, one Roseate
Spoonbill, Lesser Yellowlegs, and one Wilson's Snipe.


-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Cook's Landing
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 18:29:57 -0500
On my way back from Little Rock to Maumelle, at 4:30p.m. today, I checked the 
sandbar upstream from the hydroelectric plant at Cook's Landing. No Avocets. 
There were at least 20 Black Terns in all stages of breeding and non-breeding 
plumage, plus 3 Forster's Terns, and 35 Am. White Pelicans. The Caspian Tern 
count has increased to four. One Caspian from yesterday that was still there 
today has me wondering if it might be a Royal Tern. It has a fair amount of 
white on it's forehead and partially through the center of it's crown. None of 
my books show that much white on a Caspian. It looked a little smaller and 
slimmer, but that could have been the way it was positioned relative to the 
CATE's. All four were sitting on the grassy sandbar. The distance, plus the 
vibration from the hydro plant jiggling my scope meant I didn't get a super 
clear look at it. I know we've had a lot of weather that has been coming up 
from the south for over a week, which could have brought up a ROTE. The other 
three are definitely CATE's in full breeding plumage. Any thoughts from you 
experts out there? 

Karen Holliday 
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Re: Is this a Gila Woodpecker in Arkansas?
From: Melissa Versiga <melvcf AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 11:00:22 -0500
I guess I need to add the word fledgling when I am searching images to identify 
birds! That makes sense though and it makes me happy that it's a fledgling red 
bellied woodpecker. I knew I had a nest with chicks but our tree guy hit the 
tree, after we told him to stay away, and the top part of the tree fell and 
snagged on another tree. I was hoping the momma got the chicks out before it 
completely fell a few weeks later. 


I have been lucky this year to have a view right outside my windows where I got 
to see this bird. I have also seen adults feeding baby downy woodpeckers, hairy 
woodpeckers, nuthatch, chickadees, red breasted grosbeak (very cute) and most 
recently a summer tanager pair brought their fledgling to my suet feeder. The 
last few weeks have been the only time since I moved to Eureka Springs that 
I've seen the summer tanagers at my feeders. Now I have the male goldfinch 
flying around like they are protecting a nest. 


Thanks for helping me identify my bird!
Melissa
Subject: Cooks Landing birds
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 20:11:55 -0500
I stopped at Cooks Landing in North Little Rock after work about 5:30pm 
tonight, Friday. I scoped the sandbar that you can see upstream from the 
hydroelectric plant. Seen were 3 Caspian Terns, 5 Avocets, 25 Am. White 
Pelicans, a Snowy Egret, and lots of Great Egrets and Great Blue Herons, plus a 
couple of Fish Crows. 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Re: Is this a Gila Woodpecker in Arkansas?
From: Drew Phillips <lrkingfisher AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 19:18:32 -0500
I believe it is a fledgling Red Bellied Woodpecker.

Drew Phillips
On Aug 19, 2016 7:05 PM, "Melissa Versiga"  wrote:

> My husband said he saw a brown woodpecker today and it reminded that I
> needed to find out what bird this was.  He didn't get a good look at the
> one today, but I am attaching two pictures that I took in June 2016 at our
> house.  I think it is a Gila Woodpecker.  I know All About Birds says it is
> from the dry deserts in Arizona and Mexico, so maybe it is something else.
>
> Any help in confirming or identifying it would be great.
>
> Happy birding,
> Melissa
> West Eureka Springs, AR
>
Subject: Is this a Gila Woodpecker in Arkansas?
From: Melissa Versiga <melvcf AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 18:55:27 -0500
My husband said he saw a brown woodpecker today and it reminded that I needed 
to find out what bird this was. He didn't get a good look at the one today, but 
I am attaching two pictures that I took in June 2016 at our house. I think it 
is a Gila Woodpecker. I know All About Birds says it is from the dry deserts in 
Arizona and Mexico, so maybe it is something else. 


Any help in confirming or identifying it would be great.

Happy birding,
Melissa
West Eureka Springs, AR
Subject: Bald Knob
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 13:15:04 -0500
3 Marbled Godwits, Black-bellied Plover, 3 Neotropic Cormorants, Roseate 
Spoonbill, 60 White Pelicans, plus a host of others at BK NWR now. 

Charlie Lyon

Sent from my iPhone. C Lyon 
Subject: ASCA Bald Knob Field Trip August 27
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 21:42:15 +0000
ASCA's field trip to the Bald Knob NWR is Saturday, August 27.  See details 
below.  Some really nice shorebirds and wading birds are already being seen at 
the refuge.  BONUS-Paul Provence, the refuge manager, will have the 
headquarters building unlocked and one of his staff will be there to show us 
their visitor's center and let us use the restrooms.  The headquarters 
building is on Coal Chute Road and will be on your left about a half mile after 
you leave the pavement and the gravel starts. Please stop and visit the new 
facility before going on into the refuge. All birders are welcome.  Feel free 
to contact me off list if you have any questions.  Come join us!Karen 
HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock August 27Bald Knob 
NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in 
the Other Center parking lot, theeast side behind McDonald’s.  Take Exit 
1West off US-67/167.  The Other Center ison McCain Blvd. across from McCain 
Mall. We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR at around 8:30 a.m. for those who want 
tomeet us there.  Look for the line of carsparked on Coal Chute Road.  The 
federalrefuge is also a National Audubon Important Bird Area.  We expect to 
see shorebirds, herons,night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks and 
Roseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hot so bring plenty of water,snacks, 
sunscreen, and a hat.  If youhave a scope, bring it.  Very littlewalking will 
be involved. There is a McDonald’sjust off Hwy. 67/167 Exit 55 at Bald 
Knob. Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/for driving directions and more information 
about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903   
Subject: WILSONíS SNIPE FOS, CENTERTON
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 21:04:37 +0000
Birding at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton this morning, with cool air 
and rain coming in. Most surprising: first of season (for me) Wilsonís Snipe, 
probing that almost 2.5 inch-long bill deep into the soft mud of a 
freshly-drained fish pond, down almost to those dark pools of its large eyes. I 
just couldnít get enough of it in its fresh, colorful plumage and that hint of 
the exotic far away, come here among us, in our backyards. It is also an 
all-winter bird at Centerton, as long as springs remain unfrozen. 


Killdeer (20+), Solitary Sandpiper (2), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Upland Sandpiper 
(1), Least Sandpiper (7), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), Wilsonís Snipe (1). The Least 
Sandpipers carry the bright reddish plumage of juveniles, making their first 
southbound migration. Besides a few Great Blue Herons and Green Heron, there 
were also Great Egrets (2). 

Subject: Sharptail Sandpiper-no
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 19:20:07 -0500
Searched Joe Hogan Fish Hatchery from 4:00 pm until 6:30 pm and did not see the 
sandpiper today. 

David Ray
NLR
Subject: The next 67 species MINUS 5
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 21:05:48 +0000
Greetings all,
A while ago several folks made predictions on what the next species would be, 
adding to the state checklist. 


Since the article the following have been seen:
Crested Caracara was #1, (157 points).
Greater Black-backed Gull was #2, (139 pts).
Iceland Gull was #7, (61 pts)
Brambling was #67, (1 pt).
Then the latest addition was the Sharped-tailed Sandpiper #45, (9 pts).

Found by Kenny & LaDonna Nichols at the AGFC Joe Hogan State Fish Hatchery at 
Lonoke. 


Interestingly, only Kenny voted for the species to show up, so it got 9 votes 
out of 157 possible. ALL the rest of us that voted, somehow missed this 
species. 



The top ten are now:
Shiny Cowbird (78 points); Reddish Egret (68 pts); Golden-crowned Sparrow (66 
pts); Harris's Hawk (63 pts); Great Kiskadee (61 pts); Allen's Hummingbird (61 
pts); Bronzed Cowbird (58 pts); Clark's Grebe (58 pts); Tropical Kingbird (55 
pts); and Mew Gull (54 pts) 


Congratulations Kenny & LaDonna.

And THANKYOU for all your knowledge and long hours birding the state!
Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector






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immediately. 
Subject: AGFC News Article-Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 19:49:18 +0000
The AR Game & Fish Commission publishes a weekly newsletter called "Arkansas 
Outdoors".  The lead story is an article about the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at 
the AGFC Joe Hogan Fish Hatchery.  Go to www.agfc.com.  Click on "Press 
Room", then click on "Arkansas Outdoors Newsletter", then click on "AR Outdoors 
Newsletter" again.  They give credit to Kenny and LaDonna for finding the 
bird, and also mentions Karen Rowe and Dick Baxter. 

I was on the phone just now with the AGFC fish hatcheries division director Mr. 
Tommy Laird and he mentioned we should watch for the story.  He said they are 
all very excited about the sighting.  I receive the newsletter by email each 
week and it just now popped up in my email account.  It may take a little 
longer for AGFC to post it to their website.  It's a good article. 

I was talking with Mr. Tommy Laird asking if all AGFC hatcheries are all under 
the bio-hazard restriction that the Joe Hogan hatchery now has, which is no 
longer allowing public vehicles to drive the levee roads around the hatchery 
ponds.  Mr. Laird said it is a new restriction and each hatchery is 
implementing the restriction at their own pace.  He suggested that we call a 
hatchery before birding it to ask what their policy is.  You can find phone 
numbers for each hatchery on the AGFC's website.  He said birders are very 
respectful of all the AGFC properties and their staff are all very appreciative 
of our willingness to abide by the rules.  The restriction is because some 
invasive species and organisms are getting into hatchery ponds and tanks.  He 
said it's not a huge problem yet, but they are trying to be proactive about 
preventing incursions. 

Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Re: Lonoke
From: Dan Bogler <danbogler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 09:11:48 -0500
Oops Joe not Ben Hogan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 17, 2016, at 5:40 AM, Dan Bogler  wrote:
> 
> Anyone going to Ben Hogan today ?
> 
> Dan Bogler
> Cell - 501-545-0094
Subject: Re: ETERNAL RAIN, UMBRELLAS and AFTER the SHARP-TAIL
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 08:02:53 -0500
Joe, you need to bring that bird up here for the Centerton fish hatchery field 
trip. 



Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net



> On Aug 16, 2016, at 4:51 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:
> 
> After Kenny Nicholsí astounding discovery yesterday of our First State Record 
SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPER at Joe Hogan State Fish Hatchery in Lonoke, this morning 
three of us left foggy Fayetteville at 4 AM, hit a heavy rain in central 
Arkansas that continued eternally, including our 2-golden hours at the 
hatchery. Returned to a sunny Fayetteville 1 PM. 

> 
> Trip with UA graduate students Mitchell Pruitt and Alyssa DeRubeis. Never had 
a better 2-hours under umbrellas. A special variety of birding. 

> 
> Saw long time friend Bill Shepherd and stopped to visit Ė under umbrellas Ė 
while Mitchell took off for the sharp-tail, hopefully in the drained fish 
ponds. It was one of the first 3 birds he saw! I enjoyed the visit with Bill 
and other friends brought together by the excitement. Later, Alyssa spotted 
what we at first thought two Stilt Sandpipers; later she realized the 
same-sized but somewhat different-looking second ďstiltĒ was likely The Bird. 

> 
> Joe Hogan hatchery is presently loaded with a huge variety of interesting 
birds. I had the distinct impression we saw only part of the possible Ė the 
rain, after all, was minute-by-minute expanding the meaning of mudflat to 
consume much of the world. Of shorebirds, and in addition to Sharp-tailed 
Sandpiper, my counts and estimates are as follows: Black-bellied Plover (2-3), 
Semipalmated Plover (~25), PIPING PLOVER (1), Killdeer (~40), Black-necked 
Stilt (1), Greater Yellowlegs (3), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper 
(3), Marbled Godwit (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (~75), Western Sandpiper (2), 
Least Sandpiper (~125), Pectoral Sandpiper (1-2), Stilt Sandpiper (1-2), 
dowitcher species (1). Leif Anderson and Michael Nicodemus spotted the godwit. 
Alyssa noticed the Piping was not banded. 

> 
> Others: Black-bellied Whistling Duck (1), Green Heron, Great Blue Heron, 
Great Egret (~65), Cooperís Hawk (1), LEAST TERN (21), Black Tern (~15), 
Swallows Ė several species, including Bank. Most of the Great Egrets were in 
fields adjacent the hatchery. Two of these species Ė Least Tern (interior 
breeding population) and Piping Plover Ė are Federally-listed. 

> 
> Gratefully, thankfully, watching all those birds today, I recall those days 
of yore before bins and scopes were waterproof. When algae grew inside optics 
too long out and exposed on a wonderful rainy birding day. Blessings to those 
who developed waterproofs. 

> 
> 
Subject: Bald Knob
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 07:55:55 -0500
The 3 Godwit sill present.8:00 am

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Lonoke
From: Dan Bogler <danbogler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 05:40:04 -0500
Anyone going to Ben Hogan today ?

Dan Bogler
Cell - 501-545-0094
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 16
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 23:08:40 -0500
It was overcast & mild with sporadic light rain on the survey today.  69
species were found.  We just received 4 inches of rain and it was too wet to
drive the grass covered levees to a lot of the locations I usually visit.
Had to stick to graveled roads and levees and walking in to certain areas.
The extra rainfall we have received this summer has resulted in water levels
in the wetland units to be still fairly deep which means we have no
shorebird habitat this year and is undoubtedly why no storks or spoonbills
have showed up yet, since they require drying up wetlands for feeding in.
The first fall migrant ducks and warblers showed up today.  Also had the
opportunity to watch a family of Common Gallinules with 2 newly hatched
chicks (their 2nd brood) and also 2 full-sized juveniles from their first
brood.  The adults as well as the juveniles helped with the feeding of the
chicks.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 7

Wood Duck - 48

Mallard - 7

Blue-winged Teal - 3

Northern Shoveler - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 12

Double-crested Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 22

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 22

Snowy Egret - 4

Little-blue Heron - 14

Cattle Egret - 181

Green Heron - 5

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 4

White Ibis - 80

Black Vulture - 18

Turkey Vulture - 10

Mississippi Kite - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 6

Common Gallinule - 37 (also 2 small chicks.)

American Coot - 9

Sandpiper species - 1 (heard briefly at a distance; either Spotted or
Solitary)

Rock Pigeon - 6

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Mourning Dove - 13

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 7

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 3

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 4

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 13

Purple Martin - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 43

Barn Swallow - 10

Cave Swallow - 2 juveniles 

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 4

Northern Cardinal - 13

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 6

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red/Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 
Subject: Re: Brown Booby on Lake Hamilton
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 20:42:05 -0500
The first one in Arkansas IIRC was at Lake Norell off Stagecoach (I 
think).  A few months after that one left one appeared on Lake Ouachita 
(a juvenile I seem to recall).  I thought it was 2011 but it could have 
been later.  I have the commemorative t-shirt around here somewhere. ;)

Any ideas why these birds seem to have drifted this way?

Pretty cool sighting, either way.

George (n. Conway Co. with no Boobies but a few quail and a bunch of 
turkey).


On 8/16/2016 9:34 AM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> As I recall, I think the Brown Booby was seen in this area around the 
> Mazarn in  2012 or 2013.    Jeff Short
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Donna Haynes
> *Sent:* Tuesday, August 16, 2016 7:13 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Brown Booby on Lake Hamilton
>
> I got a little more info.  Looks like the booby was seen actually in a 
> cove off of the Ouachita River near Charles Stover Rd.  Near Royal.
>
> Donna
>  Haynes
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
> 
 

>
>     On Mon, Aug 15, 2016 at 11:12 PM, Karen Garrett
>
>     > wrote:
>
>     Wow, why is central Arkansas hogging all of the good birds?  I
>     could pick up a few life birds.
>
>     Also, not Arkansas, but a Long-tailed Jaeger was reported, with
>     photos, on Stockton Lake, MO (a little north of Springfield), over
>     the weekend. It hasn't been reported on eBird since Saturday.
>
>     Karen Garrett
>
>     On Mon, Aug 15, 2016 at 10:49 PM, Donna Haynes
>     <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu
>     > wrote:
>
>     I got a private message today containing a photo of a Brown Booby
>     photographed on Lake Hamilton near Royal Arkansas.  That is all
>     the info I have at this time.
>
>     Donna Haynes
>
>     West Pulaski Co.
>
>     Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> 
 

>
Subject: Ruddy Turnstone
From: Tammy Wortham <msiinc AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 18:38:13 -0500
Today on Lollie Rd conway
Subject: ETERNAL RAIN, UMBRELLAS and AFTER the SHARP-TAIL
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 21:51:05 +0000
After Kenny Nichols' astounding discovery yesterday of our First State Record 
SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPER at Joe Hogan State Fish Hatchery in Lonoke, this morning 
three of us left foggy Fayetteville at 4 AM, hit a heavy rain in central 
Arkansas that continued eternally, including our 2-golden hours at the 
hatchery. Returned to a sunny Fayetteville 1 PM. 


Trip with UA graduate students Mitchell Pruitt and Alyssa DeRubeis. Never had a 
better 2-hours under umbrellas. A special variety of birding. 


Saw long time friend Bill Shepherd and stopped to visit - under umbrellas - 
while Mitchell took off for the sharp-tail, hopefully in the drained fish 
ponds. It was one of the first 3 birds he saw! I enjoyed the visit with Bill 
and other friends brought together by the excitement. Later, Alyssa spotted 
what we at first thought two Stilt Sandpipers; later she realized the 
same-sized but somewhat different-looking second "stilt" was likely The Bird. 


Joe Hogan hatchery is presently loaded with a huge variety of interesting 
birds. I had the distinct impression we saw only part of the possible - the 
rain, after all, was minute-by-minute expanding the meaning of mudflat to 
consume much of the world. Of shorebirds, and in addition to Sharp-tailed 
Sandpiper, my counts and estimates are as follows: Black-bellied Plover (2-3), 
Semipalmated Plover (~25), PIPING PLOVER (1), Killdeer (~40), Black-necked 
Stilt (1), Greater Yellowlegs (3), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper 
(3), Marbled Godwit (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (~75), Western Sandpiper (2), 
Least Sandpiper (~125), Pectoral Sandpiper (1-2), Stilt Sandpiper (1-2), 
dowitcher species (1). Leif Anderson and Michael Nicodemus spotted the godwit. 
Alyssa noticed the Piping was not banded. 


Others: Black-bellied Whistling Duck (1), Green Heron, Great Blue Heron, Great 
Egret (~65), Cooper's Hawk (1), LEAST TERN (21), Black Tern (~15), Swallows - 
several species, including Bank. Most of the Great Egrets were in fields 
adjacent the hatchery. Two of these species - Least Tern (interior breeding 
population) and Piping Plover - are Federally-listed. 


Gratefully, thankfully, watching all those birds today, I recall those days of 
yore before bins and scopes were waterproof. When algae grew inside optics too 
long out and exposed on a wonderful rainy birding day. Blessings to those who 
developed waterproofs.