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Updated on Saturday, July 30 at 12:06 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Aquatic Warbler,©Jan Wilczur

30 Jul Re: Piping plover-Lonoke [CK Franklin ]
30 Jul Piping plover-Lonoke [CK Franklin ]
30 Jul Purple Martin roost in north Rogers (Benton County) [Karen Garrett ]
29 Jul A few shorebirds at Centerton today [Joseph Neal ]
29 Jul Muddy fields between Scott & Keo [CK Franklin ]
29 Jul PIPING PLOVER AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
29 Jul Piping Plover Boyd Point Waste Treatment Plant [CK Franklin ]
29 Jul Re: Recycling ? [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
29 Jul Re: Recycling ? [Sally Jo Gibson ]
29 Jul Re: Recycling ? [ ]
29 Jul Re: Recycling ? [Judy & Don ]
29 Jul Recycling ? [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
28 Jul Re: from David Chapman in northwest Colorado ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
28 Jul from David Chapman in northwest Colorado [Joseph Neal ]
27 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 27 [David Arbour ]
28 Jul Re: Martin roost LR Port [CK Franklin ]
28 Jul Martin roost LR Port [CK Franklin ]
27 Jul FOS corrections [Terry Judy Butler ]
27 Jul BKNWR [Terry Judy Butler ]
27 Jul Dickcissel dawn chorus [Joseph Neal ]
27 Jul Red crossbill in Little Rock [Bill Holimon ]
26 Jul Purple Martins on wires at Centerton [Joseph Neal ]
25 Jul addition [Terry Judy Butler ]
25 Jul BKNWR [Terry Judy Butler ]
23 Jul JUVENILE WHITE IBIS IN PINE BLUFF [JFR ]
23 Jul twilight [Judy & Don ]
22 Jul SHOREBIRDS AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
22 Jul Wilson's Phalarope at Centerton [Joseph Neal ]
21 Jul Re: new park on west markham? [Bill Shepherd ]
21 Jul Re: new park on west markham? ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
21 Jul godwits? [Celia Storey ]
21 Jul Re: Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered [Charles Anderson ]
20 Jul Re: Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered [Kevin Breault ]
20 Jul Fwd: Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered [Allan Mueller ]
19 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 19 [David Arbour ]
19 Jul WTSP [Sally Jo Gibson ]
19 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron question [David Ray ]
19 Jul Re: Little Blue Heron question [Daniel Mason ]
19 Jul Turkeys? [Daniel Mason ]
18 Jul Do not open recent email from Barry Haas [Susan Hardin ]
19 Jul Important Document (Secure Sent Via Encrypted TLS ) [Barry Haas ]
18 Jul North American Birds ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
18 Jul Birds of North America ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
15 Jul Re: BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS AT CENTERTON [Jacque Brown ]
15 Jul BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS AT CENTERTON [Joseph Neal ]
14 Jul ASCA Cancelled [Dan Scheiman ]
13 Jul summer issue of Arkansas Birds - now online [Samantha Scheiman ]
13 Jul AAS Adult Workshops, Aquatic Biology, The Monarch Butterfly, Bird Friendly Yard [Norman Lavers ]
13 Jul 2016 Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp Slideshows [Barry Haas ]
12 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 12 [David Arbour ]
11 Jul Spring Records [Lyndal York ]
11 Jul ASCA Meeting July 14 - Theo Witsell [Dan Scheiman ]
11 Jul Eagle Optics lifetime warranty [Gail Miller ]
10 Jul Re Joe Neal's Binocular Comments [Barry Haas ]
10 Jul ONLINE BINOCULAR PURCHASES CONSIDER THIS [Joseph Neal ]
9 Jul ASCA Field Trip Report [Karen ]
9 Jul This Evening [Herschel Raney ]
9 Jul Centerton area [Karen Garrett ]
9 Jul Can't flood spirits (Chesney Prairie Natural Area) [Joseph Neal ]
8 Jul Willow Beach ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
7 Jul Re: Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville [Michael Linz ]
7 Jul Re: Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville [Bill Shepherd ]
7 Jul Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville [Joseph Neal ]
7 Jul 57th Supplement to the AOU's Checklist of North American Birds [swamp_fox ]
6 Jul Nature 7 pm PBS Supernature - Wild Flyers continues tonight. [Jacque Brown ]
6 Jul ASCA July Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
5 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 5 [David Arbour ]
4 Jul Great frigate birds found able to fly for months at a time [Barry Haas ]
4 Jul Purple Martin Roost at LR Port [Jeffrey Short ]
4 Jul Your opportunity to comment on rule changes affecting Bald & Golden Eagles ends tomorrow [Barry Haas ]
4 Jul Re: Purple Martins at the LR Port? [David Luneau ]
4 Jul Re: Purple Martins at the LR Port? [Will Britton ]
4 Jul Purple Martins at the LR Port? [Alyson Hoge ]
4 Jul Bird song [Herschel Raney ]
3 Jul Wood Duck nest boxes [Janine Perlman ]
3 Jul Fund raiser in Tulsa - 27 August ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]

Subject: Re: Piping plover-Lonoke
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 17:05:13 +0000
They are working on the ponds near Hwy 70 today. No signs today & no one has 
told me to leave. 


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On Sat, Jul 30, 2016 at 12:03 PM -0500, "David Ray"  
wrote: 






So I'm assuming that they are allowing people back in. Last time I went there, 
there were signs up saying that no one was allowed in the hatchery. Good to 
know. 

David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 30, 2016, at 11:27 AM, CK Franklin  wrote:
>
> I am currently looking at a Piping Plover in the company of 2 Semi-Palm 
Plover at Joe Hogan Fish Hatchery in Lonoke. Also present at least one Stilt 
Sandpiper. 

> Cindy F
> LR
>
> Get Outlook for iOS
>
Subject: Piping plover-Lonoke
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 16:27:26 +0000
I am currently looking at a Piping Plover in the company of 2 Semi-Palm Plover 
at Joe Hogan Fish Hatchery in Lonoke. Also present at least one Stilt 
Sandpiper.Cindy FLR 


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Subject: Purple Martin roost in north Rogers (Benton County)
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 05:35:50 -0500
Some of you may recall that Joe Neal and others reported a large Purple
Martin roost along the Razorback Greenway in Rogers, just SE of Sam's
Club.  I live near there but hadn't had a chance to check that same
location this year.  A couple of nights ago, while taking photos of a
double rainbow, I heard many martins and saw a lot of birds east of my
house.  After zooming in, I saw around 1,000 PUMA on and near one of the
old-fashioned red and white communication towers near last years roost.
Friday evening, I was finally able to take the camera and check it out.  I
only saw a few near the tower, and decided to check things out from the
north.  Lucky for me, the PUMA are here, and were on the utility wires
along N 35th St, just to the left of Stribling Packaging. Actually, there
were many on top of Stribling Packaging as well. Maybe I have a short
memory, but I think that there are more birds this year than last.  I would
estimate that there were 6 to 8 thousand.  At times, when most of them
would take off, circle around, and then come back in, I felt like I was in
the midst of a Purple Martin tornado.  It was a noisy tornado, with some
singing, and a lot of calling.

For those who are interested in this experience, and I highly recommend it,
here are the directions from I-49:  take Hudson Rd/SE 14th St/ aka Hwy 102
east from interstate.  Turn right (south) on Bekaert Dr, just east of the
Walmart Neighborhood Market.  Bekaert Dr will go east/left at the east
entrance of Sam's Club.  N 35th St is just a couple of blocks from that
intersection, on the right, just past Ro-ark.  It would be an awesome
experience, even for non-birders.  You can see 2 photos on the eBird
checklist.  I will post more on Arkansas Birders fb page after I have a
chance to bring the file sizes down.
 http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30900302

Karen Garrett
Rogers
Subject: A few shorebirds at Centerton today
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 21:36:04 +0000
A good shower at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton turned part of a pond 
that is being scraped-out (to remove vegetation) into a small but interesting 
mudflat. Mostly on that mudflat: Killdeer (48), Greater Yellowlegs (1), 
Solitary Sandpiper (4), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Least Sandpiper (3), Pectoral 
Sandpiper (6). 

Subject: Muddy fields between Scott & Keo
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 17:59:31 +0000
On our way back from PB, we took the scenic route through Sherrill & Tucker to 
England & came up the England highway US165 back to I440. There were 2 muddy & 
semi-watered covered bare fields with lots of yummy looking mud. Both were on 
the west side of the road (right hand side headed south). One was in front of 
Toltec mounds. The other was just south of Keo. Both had birds on them. I had 
an appt in LR & could not stop. Parking is an issue if you decide to go look. 

My new right knee is now well enough to get back to car birding. Woo hoody 
hooo!Cindy FLR 


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Subject: PIPING PLOVER AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 12:36:08 -0500
This morning, Cindy Franklin, Bob Burnham and I observed and photographed a 
solitary foraging Piping Plover in non breeding plumage at the Boyd Point 
Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. 

John Redman 
Subject: Piping Plover Boyd Point Waste Treatment Plant
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 17:33:47 +0000
Today at Boyd Point in Pine Bluff, John Redmon, Bill B. & I observed a Piping 
Plover amongst many Killdeer present. Photos were taken.  As we were leaving 
the facility, the mowing squad arrived & John opined the plover would move on 
due to the commotion.Cindy FPine Bluff this AM 


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Subject: Re: Recycling ?
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 15:21:10 +0000
Thanks for all the ideas...I probably have enough to supply all of these 
suggested places! 


Many years ago I saw a spoof of a research paper that determined the earth was 
going to implode from the weight of all the hoarded National Geographics. 
Although I still like the tactile and visual experience of reading paper, I 
guess digital format may have saved us from that potential outcome. Karen 


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of POPHAM, JAMES T GS-11 USAF AMC 19 CES/CEIEC 

Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:55 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Recycling ?

Maybe a local school?

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Judy & Don 

Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 7:35 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Recycling ?

I take mine to the library.
J

On Jul 28, 2016, at 11:03 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 


> Other than the usual paper recycling is there any place that has a use for 
old birding magazines? Pinnacle Mountain used to collect them. 

> Karen Hart.  
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Recycling ?
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 10:17:04 -0500
My local DAR society takes magazines, books, etc. to the VA center.  There
is one in Little Rock, Fayetteville, and close to Harrison at Branson, MO.
S Gibson


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of POPHAM, JAMES T GS-11 USAF
AMC 19 CES/CEIEC
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:55 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Recycling ?

Maybe a local school?

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 7:35 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Recycling ?

I take mine to the library.
J

On Jul 28, 2016, at 11:03 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart 
wrote:

> Other than the usual paper recycling is there any place that has a use for
old birding magazines?   Pinnacle Mountain used to collect them.   
> Karen Hart.  
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Recycling ?
From: "POPHAM, JAMES T GS-11 USAF AMC 19 CES/CEIEC" <james.popham AT US.AF.MIL>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 14:54:49 +0000
Maybe a local school?

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Judy & Don 

Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 7:35 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Recycling ?

I take mine to the library.
J

On Jul 28, 2016, at 11:03 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 


> Other than the usual paper recycling is there any place that has a use for 
old birding magazines? Pinnacle Mountain used to collect them. 

> Karen Hart.  
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Recycling ?
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 07:34:45 -0500
I take mine to the library.
J

On Jul 28, 2016, at 11:03 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 


> Other than the usual paper recycling is there any place that has a use for 
old birding magazines? Pinnacle Mountain used to collect them. 

> Karen Hart.  
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Recycling ?
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 04:03:47 +0000
Other than the usual paper recycling is there any place that has a use for old 
birding magazines? Pinnacle Mountain used to collect them. 

Karen Hart.  

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: from David Chapman in northwest Colorado
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 14:11:35 +0000
We had recently done a literature review to update our goshawk mgt in OR and 
more recent research has found them to be more flexible in their nesting 
habitat than was originally thought. It has also been determined that they are 
more common in the west than originally thought as they can be pretty secretive 
and normal survey procedures weren’t detecting them as effectively as we once 
believed. 


Got some good looks at a male blue grosbeak yesterday at Holla Bend. I was 
trying to call him “just another indigo” but something didn’t look right 
until I could bring the bins to bear on him. He was very cooperative in posing 
for us. 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager (Acting)

Forest Service
Ozark St-Francis National Forest

p: 479-964-7231 x7231
c: 541-620-0681
f: 479-964-7518
creames AT fs.fed.us

605 West Main
Russellville, AR 72801
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people




From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Joseph Neal 

Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 6:22 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: from David Chapman in northwest Colorado


Those of you who are friends of David Chapman, who just retired from 
UA-Fayetteville, and those with an interest in birds on the western slopes of 
the Rockies, will appreciate this note from David: 



"Our new home is a small town called Meeker at an elevation of about 6,000 feet 
in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in northwest Colorado. The land rises 
steeply from the torrential White river and passes through several dry habitat 
zones including sagebrush, pinon-juniper, scrub oak, and grassland. A steep 
trail (called the China Wall trail because it is overlooked by an open cliff 
exposure) allows energetic birding all the way to the top. Walking this trail 
early one morning I was assailed by a repeated screeching and looking up found 
a juvenile Northern Goshawk peering down at me from a nearby Juniper. The bird 
then flew down to the ground and hopped along a few yards keeping up the 
commotion. I moved on to avoid disturbing the bird and then saw an empty stick 
nest about 10 feet up in another tree. Continuing upwards I found a 
Townsend’s Solitaire, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Virginia's Warbler, 
​Spotted Towhee, and a family of Rock Wrens. Emerging at the top I have seen 
Clarks Nutcrackers and Golden Eagles soaring past but not on this visit. 


The bird guides say that Northern Goshawks breed in dense coniferous dominated 
forests, usually at high elevations, and so I was surprised to find them 
breeding here on the lower slopes. Prey items could include the numerous ground 
squirrels or perhaps the ubiquitous Eurasian Collared Doves that have colonized 
almost every street corner of this small town. 


Those interested in a complete bird list will be able to find it on ebird, 
explore hotspots, Meeker." 









This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: from David Chapman in northwest Colorado
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 11:21:44 +0000
Those of you who are friends of David Chapman, who just retired from 
UA-Fayetteville, and those with an interest in birds on the western slopes of 
the Rockies, will appreciate this note from David: 



"Our new home is a small town called Meeker at an elevation of about 6,000 feet 
in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in northwest Colorado. The land rises 
steeply from the torrential White river and passes through several dry habitat 
zones including sagebrush, pinon-juniper, scrub oak, and grassland. A steep 
trail (called the China Wall trail because it is overlooked by an open cliff 
exposure) allows energetic birding all the way to the top. Walking this trail 
early one morning I was assailed by a repeated screeching and looking up found 
a juvenile Northern Goshawk peering down at me from a nearby Juniper. The bird 
then flew down to the ground and hopped along a few yards keeping up the 
commotion. I moved on to avoid disturbing the bird and then saw an empty stick 
nest about 10 feet up in another tree. Continuing upwards I found a Townsend's 
Solitaire, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Virginia's Warbler, ?Spotted Towhee, 
and a family of Rock Wrens. Emerging at the top I have seen Clarks Nutcrackers 
and Golden Eagles soaring past but not on this visit. 


The bird guides say that Northern Goshawks breed in dense coniferous dominated 
forests, usually at high elevations, and so I was surprised to find them 
breeding here on the lower slopes. Prey items could include the numerous ground 
squirrels or perhaps the ubiquitous Eurasian Collared Doves that have colonized 
almost every street corner of this small town. 


Those interested in a complete bird list will be able to find it on ebird, 
explore hotspots, Meeker." 



Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 27
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 22:18:24 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot on most of the survey today but became overcast
with light rain near the end of the survey.  61 species were found.  Waiting
for fall migration to start.  Only one species today would be considered a
migrant and that was the shrike.  They leave RS in April but always show
back up in mid-August.  Today's bird was two weeks earlier than normal.
They actually breed in the county just north of us in upland pastures.  Unit
44 is slowly drying up and there is starting to get to be a nice
concentration of waders feeding there including White Ibis and
Yellow-crowned Night-Herons.  This is the spot that Wood Storks and
Spoonbills will probably first show up at when they arrive.  Here is my list
for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3

Wood Duck - 58  (also 1 brood seen.)

Northern Bobwhite - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 11

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 24 

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 44

Snowy Egret - 37

Little-blue Heron - 40

Cattle Egret - 43

Green Heron - 3

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 10

White Ibis - 17

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 17

Mississippi Kite - 38

Purple Gallinule - 5 

Common Gallinule - 18 (also 7 chicks.)

American Coot - 9

Least Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 20

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 8

Northern Flicker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 6

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 2

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 8

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 17

Cliff Swallow - 2

Barn Swallow - 42

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Gray Catbird - 4

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 3

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 4

Field Sparrow - 1

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 21

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 6

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 25

Common Grackle - 1

House Sparrow - 6

 

Odonates:

 

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Flag-tailed Spinyleg

Two-striped Forceptail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

"red" Saddlebags species

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Martin roost LR Port
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 00:34:49 +0000
Following up on my previous post, at least 5000 birds, probably more. Between 
5-10% are Cliff Swallows. No Barns or Northern Rough-wings so far. 


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On Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 7:12 PM -0500, "CK Franklin"  
wrote: 






The martin roost is active. I'm sitting here looking at approximately 3000 
birds sitting on the high wires, the telephone lines, & sweeping the fields. 
Also 5 Western Kingbirds. 

Cindy FLittle Rock
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Subject: Martin roost LR Port
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 00:12:20 +0000
The martin roost is active. I'm sitting here looking at approximately 3000 
birds sitting on the high wires, the telephone lines, & sweeping the fields. 
Also 5 Western Kingbirds. 

Cindy FLittle Rock
Get Outlook for iOS
Subject: FOS corrections
From: Terry Judy Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 15:54:59 -0500
1st this fall to see, Stilt sandpipers at BKNWR.

 

 
Subject: BKNWR
From: Terry Judy Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 15:52:24 -0500
Went to BKNWR again this morning.  No Ruddy turnstone!  200+ Pectoral
sandpipers, a dozen or so Least sandpipers, 5 Lessor Yellowlegs, several
Little Blue and Great Blue Herons, 12 Snowy Egrets, 5 or 6 Spotted
Sandpipers, 1 Cliff swallow, 1 Mississippi Kite and several Northern
Rough-winged and Barn swallows.  Also my FOS 6 Stilt sandpipers.

 

I came across another birder, Randy Roberson,  who told me he had seen a
Caspian tern for about a 15 minute period. 

 

Later update next week,

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Dickcissel dawn chorus
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 20:05:00 +0000
With the heat and humidity, 4 AM seemed perfect to head down to Arkansas River 
Valley and Frog Bayou WMA south of Dyer. Felt cool before sunrise. With just a 
little crack of orange-rainy day dawn light, first singer at the bean fields 
along River Road: Blue Grosbeak, Painted Bunting, Indigo Bunting. Beanfields 
along Blackland Road were choruses of singing Dickcissels. Reminded me of late 
April-early May when hayfields overflow with the vigorous choruses of 
northbound spring migrant Dickcissels. They sing the open country. 


Down toward Frog Bayou WMA, Trumper Creepers were in full bloom. The flowers 
were being visited by Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. I never realized (1) hummers 
were THAT small, or alternatively, (2) Trumper Creepers are THAT big. Hummers 
were going half way or more into the trumpets, with just the tail and a blur of 
wings showing. 


By mid-morning I'd made it all the way around to Alma Wastewater Treatment 
Facility. I got permission to check out the ponds. Spotted Sandpipers (15+) 
were all over rip-rap that helps reinforce banks of settling ponds. A single 
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck was standing up on one of the pond levees, while 
another adult escorted advanced young (8) on one of the ponds. 


At Frog Bayou WMA boat ramp, where the public can fish, bird watch, launch a 
boat and park a trailer for free, vandals have torn down an information sign, 
HELP PROTECT LEAST TERNS. Terns nest on the river nearby. Also gone: Largemouth 
Bass limits. Arkansas Game and Fish, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and Army 
Corps of Engineers are trying to protect Interior Least Terns along the river 
as well as manage game fish for everyone's benefit. 


Unfortunately, a generation or two of our fellow Arkansans have been taught 
nothing good or valuable is associated with government. One consequence is they 
do not value public lands. Reminds me of the people who a few months ago 
"liberated" and vandalized Malhuer NWR in Oregon. My modest suggestion is that 
we load all these vandals up and send them off to Somolia or some other no-laws 
paradise where they can then enjoy all the many benefits of a society with 
plenty of guns but no functioning government. 


My best estimate is they wouldn't be in their no-government-rules paradise for 
more than a few weeks before they'd be begging to return to the country trying 
to save Least Terns. They might also begin to appreciate managing fish 
populations so everyone has a chance to catch a few. 


I'm a generous person, so I'd let 'em back in the good ole US of A, but they'd 
have a lot of community service to accomplish. Starting with putting up HELP 
PROTECT LEAST TERNS signs and Largemouth Bass regs at the Frog ramp. 

Subject: Red crossbill in Little Rock
From: Bill Holimon <billh AT ARKANSASHERITAGE.ORG>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 13:40:06 +0000
I had an adult male red crossbill in our yard yesterday afternoon when I got 
home from work. I heard it as soon as I got out of my car and initially tried 
to turn it into a goofy sounding house finch but it was quickly apparent that 
it was a crossbill. I ran inside to get my binoculars, ran back outside, and 
after some searching found it preening on a branch on a large shortleaf pine in 
the front yard. I think it likely had been to our bird bath. It circled the 
yard going from one large pine to another and after a couple of minutes at most 
it flew off and has not been seen again. Most likely an anomaly, but it is 
another good reason to keep fresh water available for your birds. 
Unfortunately, my ears were too rusty to determine its call type (they will 
soon be refreshed with some homework). It definitely livened up an otherwise 
uneventful day. 




Bill Holimon
Chief of Research
Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission
323 Center Street, Suite 1500
Little Rock, AR 72201
501-324-9761, Fax 501-324-9618

Your partner in preserving our natural heritage
www.naturalheritage.org
#AuthenticArkansas
Subject: Purple Martins on wires at Centerton
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 23:59:44 +0000
Post-nesting season Purple Martins have been gathering on wires at Craig State 
Fish Hatchery in Centerton for many years. Today, around 135 were packed on 
wires near the entrance gate. They periodically took off to forage over the 
ponds and adjoining fields. Based upon past experiences, these numbers could 
keep increasing into August before the birds all head south. Some truly massive 
roosts around northwest Arkansas in past years: roughly 12,000+ near Springdale 
airport in mid-July 2012; an estimated 5000+ in Rogers in mid-July 2015. We 
don't know the source of all these martins, but Birds of North America Online 
indicates these post-breeding congregations may draw birds from natal sites as 
far as 50 miles away. 

Subject: addition
From: Terry Judy Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 18:33:15 -0500
I forgot to mention in my earlier post there was 1 Ruddy Turnstone in
breeding plumage at BKNWR this afternoon also.

 

Terry Butler
Subject: BKNWR
From: Terry Judy Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 18:30:38 -0500
Took a quick trip over to BKNWR this afternoon.  About 150 Pictorial
sandpipers, 15+ Least sandpipers, 25+ Lessor yellowlegs, 25+ Little Blue
herons, several Great Blue herons and Great egrets. (A couple of Deer)  Very
little mud but was told by the Refuge Manager he will have mud in a couple
of weeks.

 

Best to all,

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: JUVENILE WHITE IBIS IN PINE BLUFF
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 11:46:41 -0500
For the past four days Doc George, Delos McCauley and I have observed and 
photographed 2-3 juvenile White Ibis in Pine Bluff. The location is a large 
"borrow pit" located near the intersection of Osborn Road and Hwy. 63 in Pine 
Bluff. They are usually in the company of a flock of Great Egrets, Little Blue 
Herons and Black Bellied-whistling Ducks. Hopefully, it may be great habitat 
for Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills in the next several weeks. 

John Redman
Subject: twilight
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 11:12:30 -0500
Yesterday evening as I walked down the driveway, a Great Horned Owl glided up 
the drive toward me and landed low in a great old tree known as Grandfather 
Pine. We both stopped for a split second. The owl noticed me, pivoted, and 
silently flew back in the direction it had come. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: SHOREBIRDS AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2016 17:05:36 -0500
This morning at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff 
there were 10 Least Sandpipers, 20 Spotted Sandpipers and 1 Pectoral Sandpiper. 
80% of the Least Sandpipers were in full breeding plumage, several of which 
were quite striking due to their very dark breasts. 

John Redman
Subject: Wilson's Phalarope at Centerton
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 22 Jul 2016 21:29:24 +0000
A male Wilson's Phalarope at Craig state fish hatchery in Centerton today was 
notable. While a common northbound migrant in spring - seeing 10 or 15 or more 
is not exceptional in late April and May -- Wilson's is quite usual in fall. 
Our fall migration peak count over the years has only been 5 birds. Mike 
Mlodinow and I saw it in a small pool of water in one of the ponds being 
cleaned out by hatchery personnel. Overall shorebirds were sparse: Least 
Sandpiper (4), Spotted Sandpiper (1), and Killdeer (15-20). 


In addition to the phalarope, Purple Martins (~80) were gathered in a 
pre-migration roost. There were quite a few Barn Swallows (~30), including some 
feeding young out of the nest. In one spot along the fence there were 25+ 
Mourning Doves. Pied-billed Grebes (2) may also be migrants. One of these had 
the remains of juvenile tiger stripes and the start of a ring on its bill. 


An adult Red-tailed Hawk appears to still be tending two screaming fledglings. 
We had a chance to study the adult: white at the base of the bill, grayish 
head, white chin, brownish-buffy on each side of a white upper breast and very 
little black streaking in the area often occupied by a darker belly band. It is 
not an atypical plumage for an eastern Red-tailed Hawk adult. We initially 
tried to make it a Swainson's Hawk, at initial long range, in very bright 
sunlight, with heat rising over 90. 


None of this stopped a Warbling Vireo, though its singing seemed a little 
half-hearted. 


Also today: the City of Centerton has done a major ditch clean-out on two sides 
of the hatchery. For a while at least, this will probably improve storm flow 
drainage and make things a little easier on people commuting past the hatchery 
during heavy rains. On the down side, the clean-out wipes out a significant 
patch of Swamp Milkweed, a premier Monarch Butterfly plant. 


Swamp Milkweed grew in profusion when the village of Centerton had 200 people. 
Increasingly, the City of Centerton, at well over 10,000, accommodates human 
expansion in a disappearing prairie wetland landscape. There is still Swamp 
Milkweed where the tractor didn't dig. It will still flourish there, if it 
escapes mowing. 

Subject: Re: new park on west markham?
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 17:50:12 -0500
Though I haven't visited it myself, there's another one in the Panky community 
on the north side of Highway 10/Cantrell Road. Could that be what Laura has in 
mind instead of West Markham? 

 
Of course, Rock Creek Trail is very close to West Markham at its eastern end 
and ends up at its western end on Chenal Parkway. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 17:06:30 +0000
From: DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM
Subject: Re: new park on west markham?
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU






There is a new walking trail behind the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission 
building. It's not a park though, if that's what you're thinking of. It located 
on Natural Resources Dr. not far from Markham and Shackelford Rd. 

Dottie










Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone





-------- Original message --------

From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

Date: 07/21/2016 11:50 AM (GMT-06:00) 

To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 

Subject: new park on west markham? 



Didn't someone me tion a new park on west Markham? If so can you give the 
location please 



Sent
 from Yahoo Mail on Android



This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 

     		 	   		  
Subject: Re: new park on west markham?
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 17:06:30 +0000
There is a new walking trail behind the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission 
building. It's not a park though, if that's what you're thinking of. It located 
on Natural Resources Dr. not far from Markham and Shackelford Rd. 


Dottie



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: 07/21/2016 11:50 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: new park on west markham?

Didn't someone me tion a new park on west Markham? If so can you give the 
location please 


Sent from Yahoo Mail on 
Android 


This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: godwits?
From: Celia Storey <cstorey AT ARKANSASONLINE.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 11:58:38 -0500
Forgive a clueless person’s question. Have any Bar-Tailed Godwits been seen 
in Arkansas? 

I see in the database that Marbled Godwits and Hudsonian Godwits have been 
sighted. 


Celia Storey
cstorey AT arkansasonline.com
Subject: Re: Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 11:01:29 -0500
Too many mosquitoes. Too much poison ivy.

Chuck Anderson

On Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 3:09 PM, Kevin Breault 
wrote:

> What, you guys don't do that in AR?
>
> Kevin Breault
> Brentwood, TN
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 20, 2016, at 2:50 PM, Allan Mueller  > wrote:
>
> Birds Seen Naked!!!!
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Cynthia Anne Routledge 
> Date: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 2:01 PM
> Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
> To: Tn Bird 
>
>
> As a follow-up to Mort’s post below let me add that I met Christian 
Hagenlocher 

> in Maine earlier this summer and his “big year” is much more than just
> about birds but about the people who love birds and those he’s met along
> the way.  I invite everyone to check out this young man’s adventures at:
> http://www.thebirdingproject.com
> 
 

>
>
> Cheers!
> <")
>   ( \
>   / |`   Cyndi Routledge
> Southeastern Avian Research
> Specializing in Winter Hummingbird banding
> 1515 N. Willow Bend Court
> Clarksville, TN  37043
> 931-206-3517
>
> From:  on behalf of Morton Massey <
> massey6932 AT comcast.net>
> Reply-To: 
> Date: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 at 10:35 AM
> To: Tn Bird 
> Subject: [TN-Bird] ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
>
> I saw Richard Blanton’s post this morning and thought I would share a
> little more information about what is going on with ABA Big Years this
> year.  As the blog post states, it looks like there will be 4 individuals
> who will make it over 700 this year.  But two of the individuals will
> easily exceed 750 and probably will end up around 775.  What most folks
> don’t know about the current leader, John Weigel, is he is from Australia.
> He started birding in the US on January 1 and plans on birding till
> December 31st this year without taking a break.  An incredible
> commitment.  He did back to back Big Years in Australia in 2013 and 2014
> and broke the Australian record both years.  John is 61 and an incredibly
> nice humble guy.
>
>
>
> Olaf Danielson (currently at 748) has done a US Big Year but it was a
> “Birds seen Naked Big Year”.  Yes, this is true.  Amongst other places he
> went to Attu that year and all the participants had to endure him birding
> naked.  Not sure what his total was but I heard he set a record.
>
>
>
> The other two birders, Christian Hagenlocher and Laura Keene set out to
> just make it to 700, which it appears they will do.
>
>
>
> I had the pleasure of being one of the 11 birders who got to go to Attu
> this year.  John, Christian and Laura were on that trip along with the
> current record holder Neil Haywood and Brandon Reo who had over 700 ABA
> birds doing a Big Year last year.  Rather intimidating to be with 5 birders
> who will have seen 700 ABA birds in one year while it took me 45 years.
> But oh what a great experience to be with so many fascinating and dedicated
> birders.  Oh, and I got to meet Olaf briefly at the Adak airport. He was
> arriving to go on a 3 day pelagic as we were leaving.  He did have his
> clothes on fortunately.
>
>
>
> Morton Massey
>
> Knoxville, TN
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Allan Mueller
> 20 Moseley Lane
> Conway, AR 72032
> 501-327-8952 home
> 501-339-8071 cell
>
>
> "I ain't never did no wrong."
> Elvis Presley in "One Night"
>
>
Subject: Re: Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
From: Kevin Breault <kbreault AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 15:09:13 -0500
What, you guys don't do that in AR?

Kevin Breault
Brentwood, TN

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 20, 2016, at 2:50 PM, Allan Mueller  wrote:
> 
> Birds Seen Naked!!!!
> 
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Cynthia Anne Routledge 
> Date: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 2:01 PM
> Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
> To: Tn Bird 
> 
> 
> As a follow-up to Mort’s post below let me add that I met Christian 
Hagenlocher in Maine earlier this summer and his “big year” is much more 
than just about birds but about the people who love birds and those he’s met 
along the way. I invite everyone to check out this young man’s adventures at: 
http://www.thebirdingproject.com 

> 
> Cheers! 
> <")
>   ( \
>   / |`   Cyndi Routledge
> Southeastern Avian Research
> Specializing in Winter Hummingbird banding
> 1515 N. Willow Bend Court
> Clarksville, TN  37043
> 931-206-3517
> 
> From:  on behalf of Morton Massey 
 

> Reply-To: 
> Date: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 at 10:35 AM
> To: Tn Bird 
> Subject: [TN-Bird] ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
> 
> I saw Richard Blanton’s post this morning and thought I would share a 
little more information about what is going on with ABA Big Years this year. As 
the blog post states, it looks like there will be 4 individuals who will make 
it over 700 this year. But two of the individuals will easily exceed 750 and 
probably will end up around 775. What most folks don’t know about the current 
leader, John Weigel, is he is from Australia. He started birding in the US on 
January 1 and plans on birding till December 31st this year without taking a 
break. An incredible commitment. He did back to back Big Years in Australia in 
2013 and 2014 and broke the Australian record both years. John is 61 and an 
incredibly nice humble guy. 

> 
>  
> 
> Olaf Danielson (currently at 748) has done a US Big Year but it was a 
“Birds seen Naked Big Year”. Yes, this is true. Amongst other places he 
went to Attu that year and all the participants had to endure him birding 
naked. Not sure what his total was but I heard he set a record. 

> 
>  
> 
> The other two birders, Christian Hagenlocher and Laura Keene set out to just 
make it to 700, which it appears they will do. 

> 
>  
> 
> I had the pleasure of being one of the 11 birders who got to go to Attu this 
year. John, Christian and Laura were on that trip along with the current record 
holder Neil Haywood and Brandon Reo who had over 700 ABA birds doing a Big Year 
last year. Rather intimidating to be with 5 birders who will have seen 700 ABA 
birds in one year while it took me 45 years. But oh what a great experience to 
be with so many fascinating and dedicated birders. Oh, and I got to meet Olaf 
briefly at the Adak airport. He was arriving to go on a 3 day pelagic as we 
were leaving. He did have his clothes on fortunately. 

> 
>  
> 
> Morton Massey
> 
> Knoxville, TN
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Allan Mueller
> 20 Moseley Lane
> Conway, AR 72032
> 501-327-8952 home
> 501-339-8071 cell
> 
> 
> "I ain't never did no wrong."
> Elvis Presley in "One Night"
> 
Subject: Fwd: Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 14:50:12 -0500
Birds Seen Naked!!!!


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Cynthia Anne Routledge 
Date: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 at 2:01 PM
Subject: [TN-Bird] Re: ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered
To: Tn Bird 


As a follow-up to Mort’s post below let me add that I met Christian 
Hagenlocher 

in Maine earlier this summer and his “big year” is much more than just
about birds but about the people who love birds and those he’s met along
the way.  I invite everyone to check out this young man’s adventures at:
http://www.thebirdingproject.com

Cheers!
<")
  ( \
  / |`   Cyndi Routledge
Southeastern Avian Research
Specializing in Winter Hummingbird banding
1515 N. Willow Bend Court
Clarksville, TN  37043
931-206-3517

From:  on behalf of Morton Massey <
massey6932 AT comcast.net>
Reply-To: 
Date: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 at 10:35 AM
To: Tn Bird 
Subject: [TN-Bird] ABA Big Year Record Being Shattered

I saw Richard Blanton’s post this morning and thought I would share a
little more information about what is going on with ABA Big Years this
year.  As the blog post states, it looks like there will be 4 individuals
who will make it over 700 this year.  But two of the individuals will
easily exceed 750 and probably will end up around 775.  What most folks
don’t know about the current leader, John Weigel, is he is from Australia.
He started birding in the US on January 1 and plans on birding till
December 31st this year without taking a break.  An incredible commitment.
He did back to back Big Years in Australia in 2013 and 2014 and broke the
Australian record both years.  John is 61 and an incredibly nice humble guy.



Olaf Danielson (currently at 748) has done a US Big Year but it was a
“Birds seen Naked Big Year”.  Yes, this is true.  Amongst other places he
went to Attu that year and all the participants had to endure him birding
naked.  Not sure what his total was but I heard he set a record.



The other two birders, Christian Hagenlocher and Laura Keene set out to
just make it to 700, which it appears they will do.



I had the pleasure of being one of the 11 birders who got to go to Attu
this year.  John, Christian and Laura were on that trip along with the
current record holder Neil Haywood and Brandon Reo who had over 700 ABA
birds doing a Big Year last year.  Rather intimidating to be with 5 birders
who will have seen 700 ABA birds in one year while it took me 45 years.
But oh what a great experience to be with so many fascinating and dedicated
birders.  Oh, and I got to meet Olaf briefly at the Adak airport. He was
arriving to go on a 3 day pelagic as we were leaving.  He did have his
clothes on fortunately.



Morton Massey

Knoxville, TN











-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 19
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 19:17:32 -0500
It was partly cloudy and hot with a light breeze on the bird survey today.
60 species were found.  Very few species still singing.  2 Black Terns in
mostly breeding plumage were a surprise on Lotus Lake this morning.  Its
been probably 10 years or more since I saw this species at Red Slough this
time of year.  I ran into the forest service technician who was checking
duck boxes and found out that we currently have 4 Black-bellied Whistling
Ducks sitting on eggs now.  Juvenile Neotropic Cormorants and Anhingas are
all over the place now that most of them have fledged.  Here is my list for
today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5

Wood Duck - 56  (also 2 broods seen.)

Mallard - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 1

Neotropic Cormorant - 7

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 25 

American Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 18

Great Egret - 39

Snowy Egret - 19

Little-blue Heron - 12

Cattle Egret - 91

Green Heron - 13

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 3

Black Vulture - 66

Turkey Vulture - 16

Mississippi Kite - 26

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 8 (also 2 broods.) 

Common Gallinule - 24 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 9

Killdeer - 1

Least Tern - 2

Black Tern - 2 (still mostly in breeding plumage.)

Mourning Dove - 6

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 3

Bell's Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 11

Fish Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 12

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 15

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Carolina Wren - 12

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 13

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 11

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 30

Brown-headed Cowbird - 1

Orchard Oriole -2

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Two-striped Forceptail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer 

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

"red" Saddlebags species

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: WTSP
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 12:51:28 -0500
I just photographed a White-throated sparrow in my backyard!

Sally Jo Gibson

From Birdsview Solarium,

Harrison, AR
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron question
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 11:50:33 -0500
There are some at Bois d' Arc near Hope in sw Arkansas.
David Ray 
NLR 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2016, at 11:36 AM, Daniel Mason  wrote:
> 
> According to the Ebird bar charts for my area(Benton County) I still have 
another month or two to be looking but, I sure haven't seen any yet... nor have 
I seen many reports for them around here so far. 

> I've only been birding a few years so I can't say a lot. Last year I found 
one a couple of times at City Lake in Siloam Springs... and maybe one at the 
eagle watch trail in Gentry. The summer before there was more than one at 
Gentry, including a nice white juvenile that some confused with the snowy 
egrets that were there. 

> I'm hoping as the summer goes along there will still be more opportunities 
for them but so far, it's been pretty quiet. 

> I don't know if that's a trend or not.
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron question
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 11:36:37 -0500
According to the Ebird bar charts for my area(Benton County) I still have 
another month or two to be looking but, I sure haven't seen any yet... nor have 
I seen many reports for them around here so far. 

I've only been birding a few years so I can't say a lot. Last year I found one 
a couple of times at City Lake in Siloam Springs... and maybe one at the eagle 
watch trail in Gentry. The summer before there was more than one at Gentry, 
including a nice white juvenile that some confused with the snowy egrets that 
were there. 

I'm hoping as the summer goes along there will still be more opportunities for 
them but so far, it's been pretty quiet. 

I don't know if that's a trend or not.
Subject: Turkeys?
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 11:32:13 -0500
If anyone has any suggestions where to find some wild turkeys in Benton county 
I'd appreciate it. Or even general thoughts on habitat(specific) or even best 
times of day to look. visiting New England last year we seemed to find them 
everywhere. We live near the Ozark National Forest and have had them in our 
neighborhood in the past but, I've done a lot of birding this year and just 
haven't been seeing them. 

Subject: Do not open recent email from Barry Haas
From: Susan Hardin <whizcats AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 22:32:38 -0400
This email went out supposedly from Barry Haas. He did not send it and do not 
click on the attached document. 


Susan Hardin

> Important Document (Secure Sent Via Encrypted TLS )
> Reply-To: Ba

By way of mobile phone. 
Subject: Important Document (Secure Sent Via Encrypted TLS )
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 00:56:35 +0000
Google Docs An Important Document Has Been Shared Via Google :Secure 
DocumentOpen 

| 
|  |  |  |
|  |  |  |
|  |  |  |

 |  | 
|  |  |  |
|  |  |  |
|  |  |  |

 |


| Google Drive: Have all your files within reach from any device. |  |
Subject: North American Birds
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 20:28:39 +0000
Thanks for everyone's suggestions... I have several libraries that are 
interested... Thanks, Kim 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Birds of North America
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 15:38:50 +0000
I am looking for a home for a complete set of the printed Birds of North 
America - about 500 accounts in 18 sleeves... about 9 feet of shelf space... 

Let me know if you are interested or have a suggestion...

Thanks, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Re: BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS AT CENTERTON
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 16:41:21 -0500
I just checked my photos and I have one of the Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 
seen there April 24, 2015. It was hanging around Blue-winged Teal. 




Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net



> On Jul 15, 2016, at 4:09 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:
> 
> Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (2) were foraging in a pond at Craig State Fish 
Hatchery in Centerton today during an all-morning rain. Rod Wittenberg saw two 
in the same area on July 13. The ducks remained through much of the morning. 
They were foraging in a small drained pond in a way that reminded me of 
Blue-winged Teal  bills down in the watery mud. In addition to these ducks: 
Semipalmated Plover (1), Killdeer (16), Lesser Yellowlegs (3), Spotted 
Sandpiper (2), Semipalmated Sandpiper (8), Least Sandpiper (~30), Pectoral 
Sandpiper (6), Long-billed Dowitcher (1). The dowitcher was quite a ways off, 
in the gloomy rainy light, so I wasnt certain at first about the species. 
However, a bolt of lightning, followed by a stunning thunder clap, brought 
forth loud KEEK KEEK KEEKs and WOW WOW WOW from me. It also knocked out the 
internet connection at the hatchery. 

> 
> 
Subject: BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS AT CENTERTON
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 21:09:28 +0000
Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (2) were foraging in a pond at Craig State Fish 
Hatchery in Centerton today during an all-morning rain. Rod Wittenberg saw two 
in the same area on July 13. The ducks remained through much of the morning. 
They were foraging in a small drained pond in a way that reminded me of 
Blue-winged Teal - bills down in the watery mud. In addition to these ducks: 
Semipalmated Plover (1), Killdeer (16), Lesser Yellowlegs (3), Spotted 
Sandpiper (2), Semipalmated Sandpiper (8), Least Sandpiper (~30), Pectoral 
Sandpiper (6), Long-billed Dowitcher (1). The dowitcher was quite a ways off, 
in the gloomy rainy light, so I wasn't certain at first about the species. 
However, a bolt of lightning, followed by a stunning thunder clap, brought 
forth loud KEEK KEEK KEEKs and WOW WOW WOW from me. It also knocked out the 
internet connection at the hatchery. 

Subject: ASCA Cancelled
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 23:34:23 +0000




Subject: summer issue of Arkansas Birds - now online
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 23:35:31 -0500
Arkansas birders,

The summer issue of *Arkansas Birds*, the newsletter of the Arkansas
Audubon Society, is available online: http://arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf

Enjoy! If you encounter any viewing issues, try using another web browser.

Cheers,
Samantha Scheiman
Little Rock, Ark.

-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: AAS Adult Workshops, Aquatic Biology, The Monarch Butterfly, Bird Friendly Yard
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 21:37:09 +0000
Dear  ARbirders,
I'm attaching information on this year's  AAS Adult Workshops. Please find 
below 1) a description of the workshops, 2) information on costs and lodgings 
etc. 3) a registration form and 4) a two page schedule with bios of presenters 
for the BFY workshop. 


Those of you who have previously attended the workshops know that while you 
learn a lot you also get to enjoy the company of like-minded nature lovers in a 
lovely setting, Ferncliff just west of Little Rock. 

 Aquatic Biology will be taught by Robin Buff, new V.P. for AAS, Director of 
the Halberg Ecology Camps and formerly A.P. science teacher in Fayetteville 
(those lucky kids!). Ferncliff has a stream and lake to explore. You won't 
believe the variety of organisms a tiny drop of water has swimming in it until 
you look through the microscopes. It's hard to tear yourself away! 


Ruth Andre is an accomplished butterfly rearer and wrangler at her home in 
Tilly in the Ozarks. She also presents programs on butterflies and will 
undoubtedly bring some of her "friends" along with her. Anyone wishing to help 
reverse the decline of the Monarchs would benefit from this workshop. As a 
former 4th grade teacher she is especially well-placed to help teachers who 
might want to raise Monarchs with their classes. Participants will be eligible 
for 10 Prof. Development hours from the ADE. 

Pam Stewart has put together a new approach to the workshops having lined up a 
number of presenters to address the topic of how to make your yard more 
attractive and less dangerous for birds and how to participate in citizen 
science projects to help the birds. What can seem like an overwhelming task can 
be achieved one plant at a time.  Our yards can help replace the vital bird 
habitat we are losing so rapidly. 

We would appreciate any help you can give us to get the word out and fill these 
workshops,thanks, 

 Cheryl Lavers



Subject: 2016 Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp Slideshows
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 16:35:52 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

You can use this link:

http://www.arbirds.org/halberg_ecology_camp.html

to go to this year's Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) Halberg Ecology Camp 
slideshows. Scroll down to see the links for all four 2016 slideshows as well 
as those from last year. 


There are two slideshows for each of two sessions. The Pass It On Down 
slideshow is shorter, running between 4-5 minutes. The Week in Review slideshow 
is longer at 10-11 minutes. The slideshows will give you a good idea what the 
assorted 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls experienced during their Sunday to 
Friday Ecology Camp experience. 


This was the 37th year for the Ecology Camp. In 1995 when AAS celebrated its 
40th anniversary the camp was named in honor of Edith and Henry Halberg. They 
had a lot to do along with Bill Shepherd, Art and Martha Johnson, and others in 
dreaming up what became this exceptional hands-on learning experience. They 
chose 11- and 12-year-old youth as being old enough to absorb new information 
like sponges, but not old enough to where the hormones had kicked in. Or so I 
was told many years ago by someone assumedly in the know. 


The bad news? We had 100 openings for first-year campers last month, but we 
only managed to fill 77 of those spots. That's 23 more opportunities for youth 
to learn about nature in depth, opportunities forever lost. That's the lowest 
number of first-year campers since we went to two sessions in 2001. We run 
statewide and regional ads in newspapers, use social media, e-mail blasts, AAS 
members and word of mouth by parents of former campers, and still we fell far 
short of our goal. 


Is it because of the mesmerizing influence of small, bright phone and tablet 
screens? Lack of interest in nature? Or what? 


Please feel free to share the link above in hopes a young girl or boy fixing to 
turn 11 or 12 by next June will learn of this opportunity to experience nature 
in a unique way. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 12
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 21:25:24 -0500
It was partly cloudy, warm, and very windy on the bird survey today.  60
species were found.  Things have really slowed down.  Very little singing
going on now.  The high winds caused birds to be scarce as well.  Here is my
list for today:

 

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Canada Goose - 6

Wood Duck - 4

Mallard - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 3

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 23 (also nests with young.)

Great-blue Heron - 8

Great Egret - 13

Snowy Egret - 25

Little-blue Heron - 7

Cattle Egret - 72

Green Heron - 5

White Ibis - 2

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 12

Mississippi Kite - 7

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 4 

Common Gallinule - 15 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 7

Killdeer - 1

Mourning Dove - 21

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 2

Tree Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 32

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 6

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 8

Yellow-breasted Chat - 14

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 27

Blue Grosbeak - 8

Indigo Bunting - 27

Painted Bunting - 11

Dickcissel - 28

Red-winged Blackbird - 23

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 7

Orchard Oriole - 4

Baltimore Oriole - 1

 

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Blue-fronted Dancer

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Two-striped Forceptail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Golden-winged Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Red Saddlebags

Carolina Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Spring Records
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 15:18:12 -0500
Arbirders:

The rare and out of season bird records for the past spring season, March -
May, that were approved by the Arkansas Bird Records Committee have been
uploaded to the searchable online database at
http://www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html .

Notable were three Burrowing Owls reported in three different locations.

Good Searching,

Lyndal York
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: ASCA Meeting July 14 - Theo Witsell
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 13:48:07 +0000

This Thursday, July 14, is Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly 
meeting. This month's speaker is our state's genius botanist Theo Witsell with 
AR Natural Heritage Commission. His topic is "The Natural State of The Natural 
State: A Brief Tour of Arkansas’s Natural Heritage." Theo’s talk will 
explore the state’s natural communities past and present, visit remnants of 
rare landscapes, and meet rare, endemic, and otherwise unique flora and fauna. 
Emphasis will be on how ecosystem processes, including anthropogenic 
management, shaped the native biota, and how modern conservationists are 
working to secure the future of our natural heritage. 





We meet at 7 PM at the Fletcher Library on H St. in Little Rock. As always our 
meetings are free and open to the public. www.ascabird.org 






Dan Scheiman 


Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Eagle Optics lifetime warranty
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 08:23:47 -0500
I would like to speak up on this as well.  Years ago one of my dogs chewed
on a pair of my Eagle Optic Ranger binoculars.  I doubted that Eagle would
repair them, as they had very obvious tooth prints on them.  BUT, they did
repair them, free of charge, with not a single comment about the condition
of the bins.

 

Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
Subject: Re Joe Neal's Binocular Comments
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 21:23:09 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Having just read Joe Neal's post re buying binoculars from a seller who charges 
a restocking fee, it's a good time to tell the story of the binoculars 
purchased for the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) Halberg Ecology Camp in 2005 
and 2007. At the time the Camp binoculars wee mismatched with pairs being added 
to the camp's "collection" over some period of years. Well, our own Joe Neal 
suggested, rather strongly I might add, that the camp youth deserved to be 
looking through quality bins. 


So in 2005 and 2007 we got 28 pairs of Audubon Equinox 8 x 42 bins from Eagle 
Optics. At the time Eagle Optics had a buy one get one free offer for 
non-profits like AAS, so we got 28 bins for the price of 14 at a cost of a 
little over $4,000. But the best part in addition to the quality optics is the 
bins came with a lifetime warranty. 


You may not know this, but 11- and 12-year-old youth can be kind of hard on 
bins. I keep them stored at our house other than during camp sessions three 
weeks each summer plus occasionally at an adult nature workshop in the fall. 
Each spring when I check each pair to make sure they are problem free, I find a 
number of pairs that have tight focus wheels, tight diopter rings or some other 
problem, likely from non-use over a period of months. For just the cost of 
postage I mail those to Eagle Optics, and they repair them and mail them back 
to me. Never a gripe or grumble. 


The Audubon brand bins are no longer made, so the past few years when one or 
two pairs of the originals could no longer be repaired (Eagle Optics saves 
scrap parts from discontinued bin models, but that only works for so long), 
they replaced them with a comparable pair of Eagle brand bins at no cost. 


I was so impressed with the camp bins that I bought a pair of Audubon Equinox 
10 x 42 for our personal use along with a more expensive pair, both purchased 
years ago. We've had no problems with either of those bins, but if we do I know 
Eagle Optics will most likely still be in business and honor the guarantee. 


Note- I'm not promoting Eagle Optics only, just saying that is who I have had 
positive personal experiences with. I'm sure there are other reputable sellers 
who are equally good. 


Remember the old adage: "You get what you pay for."

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock (where we got 2 1/2" of much 
needed rain this afternoon), 

Barry Haas

P.S. The AAS Johnson Advanced Camp ended this morning at Mount Eagle near 
Shirley, Arkansas (north central). On the drive home on Highway 9 toward 
Highway 65 a road runner came out of the high grass on my side of the road. I 
swerved, but had the road runner not done a fast U turn back into the tall 
grass alongside the road it would have bought the farm. Not sure if the 
roadrunner's heart was beating as fast as mine. 
Subject: ONLINE BINOCULAR PURCHASES CONSIDER THIS
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 16:19:30 +0000
For three decades or thereabouts, Ive been purchasing binoculars, spotting 
scopes, etc. Over time, I have bought the expensive and the inexpensive. I have 
taken the heat for buying BMW equivalents while living in a house with a leaky 
roof, for spending more on bins than a car. 


At the very least, when we are out on field trips, it makes for interesting 
conversation. 


Bins and scopes come in a vast array of brands, styles, purposes, and prices. 
Until a few years ago, there wasnt a retailer near here that had anything but 
Bushnell or Nikon, so it wasnt easy to figure-out what fit my personal needs. 


I started shopping an on-line retailer, Eagle Optics. I could discuss with a 
real human being what they sold that might fit my needs. Eagle is also involved 
in the birding scene. In fact they donated bins to our summer camp. Anything 
that I have purchased from them that I decided wasnt going to work could be 
returned, without question, and without a restocking fee. 


This compares with at least some purchases on-line, like Amazon, that allows 
sellers to collect this fee on returns unless the item is obviously defective. 
Amazon allows up to 20%; $100 on a $500 purchase that is returned just because, 
for whatever reason, you didnt like it. 


Recently I looked at one of the new offerings from Nikon, the Monarch 7, and 
ordered it from ABCD Sales through Amazon. For me, it was not much of an 
improvement over earlier versions, so I immediately returned it, in brand new 
condition, per Amazon return policy. ABCD Sales returned $315.00 on a charge of 
$373.14. They pocketed the difference as a restocking fee. 


I dont know how common practices like this are. It is the first time in all my 
many purchases of bins. The restocking fee could have provided a years 
membership in The Natural Conservancy or National Audubon. I am not saying 
people should never shop through Amazon, but keep this in mind. 


In addition, northwest Arkansas now has a few national chains, camera, and 
sporting goods stores selling a range of bins. They usually accept returns 
without restocking fees. Our neighbors work in these stores. That helps makes 
shopping with them, even with modestly higher prices, worthwhile. 

Subject: ASCA Field Trip Report
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 21:09:47 -0500
Waking up at 5:45am to thunder, lightning, and rain for Saturday's ASCA's trip 
to south Arkansas is a field trip coordinator's worst nightmare. A quick check 
of the radar was encouraging, showing the line of rain only through central 
Arkansas. However, having only five people show at the departure site was 
discouraging. On the two hour trip south, passing through several heavy rain 
squalls, I questioned my rule that trips are only cancelled if there is snow or 
ice predicted. Finally, a few miles from Hope, the clouds thinned and the rain 
stopped. Rounding up additional birders at McDonald's in Hope, after making 
sure everyone saw the Great-tailed Grackles, we headed to the Bois D'Arc WMA. 
The rain had stopped and we had a nice cloud cover for most of the morning, 
which kept the temperature down. For July, the fact that we never got above 92 
degrees was a nice bonus. 


At the WMA, we met up as arranged with Brad Townsend and Cameron Tatom, AGFC 
biologists for the WMA. They upped our people count to a total of twenty-two. 
They were so generous, spending their Saturday helping us find birds and 
educating us about the WMA. Our first stop netted Purple and Common Gallinules 
and their chicks. We witnessed a fierce battle among five Purple Gallinules, 
but there were no casualties. Anhingas, Little Blue, Great Blue, and Green 
Herons, Cattle and Great Egrets, and one juvenile Snowy Egret were our water 
birds. We also had a nice mix of woods birds, which included Red-headed 
Woodpeckers, Yellow-throated Vireos, Common Yellowthroat, Summer Tanagers, 
Eastern Wood-peewee, Eastern Kingbirds, Black and Turkey Vultures. 


Highlights at the second stop were more Anhingas, Gallinules, and Green Herons, 
plus Tree Swallows, Black Terns, and a bonus Common Tern. We also had a very 
large alligator, which caused quite a stir with the group. 


On the back side of the dam, an adult Bald Eagle sat patiently in a tree right 
on the gravel road for great looks and lots of photos. Moving just a few feet, 
we found an adult Painted Bunting and everyone jumped back out of the cars to 
spend 15 minutes admiring it and it's singing as it moved from bare branch to 
bare branch for great looks. We also found a second alligator. 


On to the Cattle Egret rookery which hosts close to 400 birds. Very busy with 
lots of nests and juveniles. A Black-crowned Night-heron and its chick were 
spotted tucked up in the middle of the rookery. A second BCNH flew in and 
circled the nesting island giving us great looks. 


Last stop was the back side of the lake and our last hope for Black-bellied 
Whistling Ducks. No BBWDs. Big disappointment. But, we finally got our Least 
Bittern, which gave us good looks! Plus, we had a fly-over of another 
Black-crowned Night-heron. 


The group called it a day around 1:30pm, having missed the rain while birding, 
netting lots of great south Arkansas birds and alligators, and pulling into the 
world of birding two enthusiastic AGFC biologists. We had way too much fun 
birding on a hot day in July. 

Karen Holliday 
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator 
Subject: This Evening
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 20:44:52 -0500
Dusk-Singing, Hieroglyphic, Lyric and Scissor-grinder Cicadas singing 
over Summer Tanagers and the solo Wood Thrush above the chittering of my 
back deck hummers. The thrush has been silent since the last time I 
posted about him. He sang for about twenty minutes tonight, shifting 
perch positions several times. The last phrase was at 8:31 pm. It would 
take an oboe, a flute and two good whistlers to try and imitate him. I 
just listen. The hummers stopped about the time he did. Youngsters 
already outnumbering adults the last week. Filling the feeder with more 
sugar water every day.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Centerton area
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 20:40:32 -0500
Late this afternoon, I did a little birding in the SE Bentonville, Vaughn,
Centerton area.  There were still quite a few birds singing, including both
the Indigo and Painted Buntings, Bell's Vireo, and Field Sparrows.  I think
that the American Goldfinches win the noisy activity award, although the
Indigos were also quite vocal.  The best bird that I KNOW I saw was a
juvenile Lark Sparrow.  I don't think I have ever seen a Lark Sparrow in
the summer.  It was cooperative for the time for me to take one decent
photo.  The best bird that I THOUGHT I saw was a male Rose-breasted
Grosbeak.  I was engrossed in watching a family of Barn Swallows while
listening to one of the Indigos, and when I looked to see the bunting I saw
the back of a black and white patterned bird, more black than white.  When
I reached for the binoculars, it flew.  I certainly would not expect to see
one here in July, but I can't think of what else it might have been.  It
was not anywhere that I could follow it, unfortunately.  Perhaps I have a
mental block about what else it might have been, so if something springs to
mind, please let me know

In the bad news department, there was a Great Blue Heron that had been run
over just east of the fish hatchery.  I don't know why it would have been
in the road to get run over.  There had been some flooding in that area in
the wee hours in the morning, and we did have a lot of lightning, so I'm
guessing that one of those things led to its' demise.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the great Northwest
Subject: Can't flood spirits (Chesney Prairie Natural Area)
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 20:47:49 +0000
Two inches of rain that fell in Benton County last night flooded all the 
fields, but didn't flood spirits of folks who came out for the Northwest 
Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area this 
morning. Everything was wet for sure, but it never rained on us. Flooded fields 
were full of rising and falling nasal choruses ... rolling WAAAAAAAAAsof 
Eastern Narrowmouth Toads, kings and queens of these warm shallow floods. 
Didn't keep Red-headed Woodpeckers (3) from performing on snags. Did not slow 
Dickcissels, constantly singing, and now feeding young out of the nest. Did not 
seem to hinder Northern Bobwhites (5? 10?) we saw and heard all over Chesney, 
spilling cheerful BOBs and more BOBs into adjacent farmland. We picked this 
date for Chesney in hopes our native Tallgrass Prairie's most spectacular & 
production life in god's own floral department -- tall purple spikes of Prairie 
Gayfeather, Liatris pycnostachya var. pycnostachya - would be up and at it. And 
despite all the rain, and despite all the flooding, and despite all the bad 
news that the world as we know it is in full collapse from which it cannot 
possibly recover - despite ALL of that, Prairie Gayfeathers have risen in vast 
multitudes from the prairie landscape, dominating the low sky. And on many of 
them their common pollinators: great, hairy, busy bumblebees hard at work and 
confident, too, because nary a one I saw even bothered to carry an umbrella -- 
despite dire predictions of further deluge and on TV (for you poor devils who 
stayed home and didn't make the field trip) predictions of The End. I don't 
have a medical degree, but if you truly think the End Is Near, check out the 
Prairie Gayfeathers. Ashy Sunflowers are just starting to bloom. Eastern 
Goldfinches are flying over the prairie to encourage opening and seed-making 
among the sunflowers. 

Subject: Willow Beach
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2016 02:57:40 +0000
On the way to visit Toltec Mounds Archeological State Park this morning, Mom 
and I stopped by Willow Beach Park (in Scott). 

We saw 8 Least Terns flying along the Arkansas River. We also counted 88 
Northern Rough-winged Swallows perched on wires in two locations. 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock



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Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 21:37:32 -0500
When I pulled into my yard today, there were two adults and two juvenile
Mississippi kites sitting in one of my trees.  So it looks like mine are
even farther in the cycle than Bill's kites. Their nest was across the
street from my house and they fledged a couple of weeks ago.
I could hear cicadas calling in the trees.  My kites must have gotten lazy
as they normally eat on the wing but today they were sitting in the trees
eating cicadas.  There were two more kites circling above my yard.

To tie more similarities to Joe's story I was coming home from shopping at
Target (not Super Saver) and there were birds circling the Target but not
kites, mine were Least Terns.  I have not seen them there in the past
couple of years but in previous years they had nested on top of the Belk's
store next to the Target.  So maybe they have came back.

When I got to the top of the drive the Roadrunner was sitting in the front
yard eating worms.  I liked this a lot better than him sitting in the
backyard.  I watched him ignore me trying to run him off and eat a
Chickadee in the back yard earlier this week.

So for not birding...three good birds on a very hot afternoon.

Michael (Conway, Faulkner Co)


On Thu, Jul 7, 2016 at 5:08 PM, Bill Shepherd  wrote:

> From my home in Little Rock, I heard a fledgling Mississippi Kite calling
> for food the first of this week.  Coupled with Joe's kites building a nest
> in Fayetteville, that makes for quite an extended breeding season.
>
> Bill Shepherd
>
> Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964
> Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com (501) 375-3918
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 21:15:53 +0000
> From: joeneal AT UARK.EDU
> Subject: Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>
> Last week, in downtown Fayetteville, a shopping trip to Super Saver (old
> IGA) was much enlivened when two Mississippi Kites suddenly appeared, low
> above the parking lot. If you don’t know Fayetteville, Old Main on the UA
> campus is within sight, to the west. Though we have been seeing nesting
> season kites now for about 10 years, seeing them in such bold flight, right
> over the commercial center of Fayetteville, remains an exciting novelty.
>
>
> I had bins with me and watched as they drifted a few blocks north, soaring
> over Washington Elementary and green neighborhoods not far from where I
> live. They were catching what I think were dragonflies and eating them on
> the wing. Wonder where they are nesting?
>
>
> I suppose someone was reading my mind, because this week I had an email
> from a member of our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society group. She reported
> kites near a well-used walking trail, in a leafy green neighborhood full of
> mature trees like post oaks and sycamores.
>
>
> This morning I went over to check this out.
>
>
>  Besides perching and preening in the early light, I saw one of the kites
> bring a dogday cicada to perch and consume it. Starting around a week ago
> or thereabouts, we had the annual grand opening of Great Dogday Cicada
> Screaming and Wailing that announces Arkansas summer full-blown. Yes,
> Sisters and Brothers, dogdays of summer have arrived. And now, so have
> these nesting kites. I’ll bet they are tanking up on these big cicadas.
>
>
> On three occasions, one of the kites carried sticks and leaf bunches up to
> a partial nest that looks to be 60-70 feet high. I witnessed them copulate
> once. In known kite nesting phenology, second week in July is a relatively
> late start, but not unprecedented. If the birds lay 1-2 eggs, hatching
> occurs in the second week of August, fledging around mid-September.  Another
> kite nest in Fayetteville held a large nestling on July 31, 2014.
>
>
> Lots of people were walking their little dogs right under kites perched on
> snaggy limbs sticking above the canopy. Kites were giving us all, birder
> included, the evil eye. But nooooo …  didn’t see any kite swoops on dogs.
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 17:08:11 -0500
From my home in Little Rock, I heard a fledgling Mississippi Kite calling for 
food the first of this week. Coupled with Joe's kites building a nest in 
Fayetteville, that makes for quite an extended breeding season. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 

 
Date: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 21:15:53 +0000
From: joeneal AT UARK.EDU
Subject: Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU








Last week, in downtown Fayetteville, a shopping trip to Super Saver (old IGA) 
was much enlivened when two Mississippi Kites suddenly appeared, low above the 
parking lot. If you dont know Fayetteville, Old Main on the UA campus is 
within 

 sight, to the west. Though we have been seeing nesting season kites now for 
about 10 years, seeing them in such bold flight, right over the commercial 
center of Fayetteville, remains an exciting novelty. 




I had bins with me and watched as they drifted a few blocks north, soaring over 
Washington Elementary and green neighborhoods not far from where I live. They 
were catching what I think were dragonflies and eating them on the wing. Wonder 

 where they are nesting?



I suppose someone was reading my mind, because this week I had an email from a 
member of our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society group. She reported kites near 
a well-used walking trail, in a leafy green neighborhood full of mature trees 

 like post oaks and sycamores. 



This morning I went over to check this out.



 Besides perching and preening in the early light, I saw one of the kites bring 
a dogday cicada to perch and consume it. Starting around a week ago or 
thereabouts, we had the annual grand opening of 

 Great Dogday Cicada Screaming and Wailing that announces Arkansas summer 
full-blown. Yes, Sisters and Brothers, dogdays of summer have arrived. And now, 
so have these nesting kites. Ill bet they are tanking up on these big cicadas. 




On three occasions, one of the kites carried sticks and leaf bunches up to a 
partial nest that looks to be 60-70 feet high. I witnessed them copulate once. 
In known kite nesting phenology, second week in July is a relatively late 
start, 

 but not unprecedented. If the birds lay 1-2 eggs, hatching occurs in the 
second week of August, fledging around mid-September. 

 Another kite nest in Fayetteville held a large nestling on July 31, 2014.



Lots of people were walking their little dogs right under kites perched on 
snaggy limbs sticking above the canopy. Kites were giving us all, birder 
included, the evil eye. But nooooo  

 didnt see any kite swoops on dogs.



 		 	   		  
Subject: Mississippi Kite nest in downtown Fayetteville
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 21:15:53 +0000
Last week, in downtown Fayetteville, a shopping trip to Super Saver (old IGA) 
was much enlivened when two Mississippi Kites suddenly appeared, low above the 
parking lot. If you don't know Fayetteville, Old Main on the UA campus is 
within sight, to the west. Though we have been seeing nesting season kites now 
for about 10 years, seeing them in such bold flight, right over the commercial 
center of Fayetteville, remains an exciting novelty. 


I had bins with me and watched as they drifted a few blocks north, soaring over 
Washington Elementary and green neighborhoods not far from where I live. They 
were catching what I think were dragonflies and eating them on the wing. Wonder 
where they are nesting? 


I suppose someone was reading my mind, because this week I had an email from a 
member of our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society group. She reported kites near 
a well-used walking trail, in a leafy green neighborhood full of mature trees 
like post oaks and sycamores. 


This morning I went over to check this out.

 Besides perching and preening in the early light, I saw one of the kites bring 
a dogday cicada to perch and consume it. Starting around a week ago or 
thereabouts, we had the annual grand opening of Great Dogday Cicada Screaming 
and Wailing that announces Arkansas summer full-blown. Yes, Sisters and 
Brothers, dogdays of summer have arrived. And now, so have these nesting kites. 
I'll bet they are tanking up on these big cicadas. 


On three occasions, one of the kites carried sticks and leaf bunches up to a 
partial nest that looks to be 60-70 feet high. I witnessed them copulate once. 
In known kite nesting phenology, second week in July is a relatively late 
start, but not unprecedented. If the birds lay 1-2 eggs, hatching occurs in the 
second week of August, fledging around mid-September. Another kite nest in 
Fayetteville held a large nestling on July 31, 2014. 


Lots of people were walking their little dogs right under kites perched on 
snaggy limbs sticking above the canopy. Kites were giving us all, birder 
included, the evil eye. But nooooo ... didn't see any kite swoops on dogs. 

Subject: 57th Supplement to the AOU's Checklist of North American Birds
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Jul 2016 14:01:07 -0500
The latest supplement to the AOU checklist may be downloaded here:

http://aoucospubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1642/AUK-16-77.1 
 


I’m still sorting things out as it relates to Arkansas birds but there was a 
significant reshuffling in the sequential arrangement of orders between 
Galliformes (Northern Bobwhite, Wild Turkey, etc.) and Coraciiformes (Belted 
Kingfisher). There’s one name change so far due to a split: Green Violetear 
becomes Mexican Violetear. The details for that and the other changes are 
contained in the supplement. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503
Subject: Nature 7 pm PBS Supernature - Wild Flyers continues tonight.
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 17:49:09 -0500
Supernature ... Wild Flyers part 2 is on tonight on PBS. 


 Followed by NOVA part 2 of a making North America series. Also interesting. In 
the previews they show a shot of the Monument Rocks in western Kansas, I was 
there in March. It seems the water was as high or higher than the rocks at one 
time. They are a pretty special feature in the really flat part of Kansas, my 
home state. 


I love Wednesdays on PBS.




Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: ASCA July Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 19:49:09 +0000
Join us for the July field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central 
Arkansas (ASCA).  Everyone is welcome, you don't have to be an ASCA members.  
Details for the July and August field trips are below.  Please feel free to 
contact me off-list if you have any questions.  For more information about 
ASCA, go to our website at www.ascabird.org. 

Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 July 9 Dr. Lester SitzesIII Bois D’Arc WMAHope, ARMeetat 7:00 a.m. at the 
south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430intersection at 
Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 
30off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to join 
us.  Look for  Great-tailed Grackles at the McDonalds.  We should arrive at 
the Bois D’Arc WMA at9:15 a.m.  Our target birds will bePurple and Common 
Gallinules and their chicks, Least Bitterns, Anhingas,Black-bellied Whistling 
Ducks, herons, egrets, and possibly an alligator ortwo!  Very little walking 
will beinvolved.  Bring scopes, plenty of water,snacks, and lunch.  There are 
severalrestaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town.  BoisD‘Arc 
WMA is located 10 miles south of Hope. Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go 
east. Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the 
light at the big intersection, turnright onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of amile.  At 
the brown sign, turn left ontoHwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles tothe 
stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turn rightonto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4 miles.  
Turn right at the white wooden WMA sign justbefore the highway ends in the 
lake. Follow the paved road, then turn left onto the first gravel road and 
godown to the lake.  GPS: 33.558062,-93.694239 August 27Bald Knob 
NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in 
the Other Center parking lot, theeast side behind McDonald’s.  Take Exit 
1West off US-67/167.  The Other Center ison McCain Blvd. across from McCain 
Mall. We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR at around 8:30 a.m. for those who want 
tomeet us there.  Look for the line of carsparked on Coal Chute Road past the 
headquarters building.  The federalrefuge is also a National Audubon Important 
Bird Area.  We expect to see shorebirds, herons,night-herons, egrets, and 
possibly Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hot so bring 
plenty of water,snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If youhave a scope, bring it.  
Very littlewalking will be involved.  There is nobathroom on-site.  There are 
bathrooms at McDonald’sjust off Hwy. 67/167 at Bald Knob Exit #55. Go to 
www.fws.gov/baldknob/for driving directions and more information about the 
refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903   
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 5
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 21:55:37 -0500
It was mostly cloudy, warm, and windy on the survey today.  70 species were
found.  Not much singing going on now.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Canada Goose - 6

Wood Duck - 25

Pied-billed Grebe - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 5

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 25 (also nests with young.)

Least Bittern - 3

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 20

Little-blue Heron - 13

Cattle Egret - 34

Green Heron - 5

White Ibis - 2

Black Vulture - 11

Turkey Vulture - 30

Mississippi Kite - 9

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 6 

Common Gallinule - 20 (also several broods.)

American Coot - 8

Killdeer - 9

Peep species (Pectoral?) - 1 flyover

Mourning Dove - 11

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Great-horned Owl - 1

Chimney Swift - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 9

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 5

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 20

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 10

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3

Cliff Swallow - 5

Barn Swallow - 11

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 5

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 18

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 23

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 27

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 15

Orchard Oriole - 3

 

 

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Familiar Bluet

Swamp Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Two-striped Forceptail

Jade Clubtail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Red Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

Southern Black Racer

Green Anole

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Great frigate birds found able to fly for months at a time
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 22:45:02 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

My brother sent the link to "Great frigate birds found able to fly for months 
at a time": 


http://phys.org/news/2016-07-great-frigate-birds-months.html

Make sure you watch the 4-minute video.  What an amazing bird.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Purple Martin Roost at LR Port
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 17:23:21 -0500
Adams Field's  standard remark, "LARGE CONCENTRATIONS OF BIRDS INVOF (in
vicinity of) ARPT; MOST ACTIVITY BTN SR-SS (sunrise to sunset) UP TO 1500 FT
MSL (ground to ~1000 feet) should be updated when the Purple Martins arrive
because of their extreme numbers and habits.  Last year I notified the
operations folks of the influx. 

 

If work to improve the runways (as reported in yesterday's ARK DEM-GAZ)
proceeds as planned, the smaller, north-south runway will close for work by
Aug 1 which will force the smaller general aviation aircraft to use the two
larger runways.  The southern-most runway (4R/22L) will be shut down in
mid-Aug. for work to replace lights.  Also, the safety overrun will be
extended to the Arkansas River.  I think this is the runway closest to the
roost coordinates reported last year.

 

Please continue to pass along unusual bird activity around our airports so
they can be avoided as much as possible.  

 

Jeff Short
Subject: Your opportunity to comment on rule changes affecting Bald & Golden Eagles ends tomorrow
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 16:16:03 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Tomorrow is the deadline to submit comments on proposed rules that would grant 
wind companies 30 year permits to kill bald and golden eagles. Permits are 
currently issued for 5 years. You can submit your comments at the link: 


http://tinyurl.com/jrprj4q

Below are the comments I submitted. I took the draft comments of the National 
Audubon Society, and personalized them with some of my own experiences and 
thoughts: 


"As someone who is deeply concerned with conservation, I urge you to revise the 
pending permit rule under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act to allow 
authorization only for 5-year permits or less, perhaps three (3) years. Think 
about it- it's called the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, not the Bald 
and Golden Eagle Decimation Act. These majestic birds survived our negligence 
once. Think DDT. Must they now fight for their very existence again due to 
human ignorance or apathy? 


Roughly a quarter of a century ago here in Arkansas we fought against what were 
called "depredation permits" issued by federal/state agencies that allowed fish 
farmers to legally kill a vast number of avian species, including some birds so 
uncommon they made the rare bird hotline. Birders would flock to see these 
rarities, given the chance. Why include such species in a permit for fish 
farmers to kill birds? That way fish farmers didn't have to know what they were 
shooting, just blast away. 


A far better solution, and I say this as a proponent of non-fossil fuel energy 
sources, is to (1) site wind farms away from known avian migration routes and 
(2) design windmills that are safer for birds, and bats too. Do we humans not 
have the mental capacity in 2016 to design our power sources in a way that 
doesn't destroy other living things? We sent men to the moon almost half a 
century ago, and yet we are incapable of designing windmills that don't kill 
countless thousands or millions of birds annually? 


Of particular concern in the announcement proposing the 30-year permits, U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service itself noted that Golden Eagle populations are either 
already declining slightly or in the early stages of a decline due to a high 
rate of human-caused mortality. 


The Bald Eagle--the very symbol of America--and the majestic Golden Eagle, 
deserve strong protection. I urge you to reject the outrageously long 30 year 
permit duration. It's unacceptable, and unnecessary. One can more sanely argue 
for a shorter permit period, say 3 years, rather than one six times longer than 
at present." 



If we bird lovers won't take a few minutes of our time to protect bald and 
golden eagles, what's the measure of our "independence"? 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: Purple Martins at the LR Port?
From: David Luneau <mdluneau AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 15:52:35 -0500
In 2006 there were tens of thousands there in early June.

 

In 2009 there were thousands there on May 18.

 

I don’t know about any other years.

 

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Will Britton 

Sent: Monday, July 04, 2016 3:11 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] Purple Martins at the LR Port?

 

The Purple Martin Roost at LR Port was first reported on August 3rd last year. 


On Monday, July 4, 2016, Alyson Hoge  
> wrote: 


Does anyone know when purple martins might start converging in the evening at 
the LR Port? 


Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County



-- 

Will Britton

Searcy, AR

501.278.6824

wabritton AT harding.edu  

 
Subject: Re: Purple Martins at the LR Port?
From: Will Britton <wabritton AT HARDING.EDU>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 15:10:33 -0500
The Purple Martin Roost at LR Port was first reported on August 3rd last
year.

On Monday, July 4, 2016, Alyson Hoge  wrote:

> Does anyone know when purple martins might start converging in the evening
> at the LR Port?
>
> Alyson Hoge
> Pulaski County



-- 
Will Britton
Searcy, AR
501.278.6824
wabritton AT harding.edu
Subject: Purple Martins at the LR Port?
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 15:03:18 -0500
Does anyone know when purple martins might start converging in the evening at 
the LR Port? 


Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County
Subject: Bird song
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 14:33:48 -0500
Sitting on the back porch this morning, reading Charles Wright: the 
vireos, the tanagers, the Pileated Woodpecker.

Then out of nowhere west, a Wood Thrush flute. A rising of phrase. A 
layering. These birds do not nest in my woods. To hear one on July the 
4th is a puzzle. Has he been displaced? Has he lost his mate and his 
nest? And now he seeks what? Listeners? He has one.

On his second run I bring the binoculars to the edge of the yard and I 
find him. Sitting up. His throat opening for the phrases. You are 
ethereal I want to say. I am amazed at how rufus the back is. The spots 
on the breast, when he turns, a fine constellation. He sings. He pauses. 
He sings.

And he makes a third song run later in the morning. I stop my reading 
again. Charles commenting on a nightingale song. "Extended 
improvisations, liquid riffs and breaks" Charles says about his 
nightingale. I have not heard one in the far east. At the moment I hear 
the thrush. And again, when I walk over to the road to trim the privet, 
the peppervine, the honeysuckle back from bending onto my road. My 
father is coming. He likes a neat road. The thrush is singing there. 
Egging me on. The flutist of my dreams. He softens the heat. He softens 
the day. And when I look back up the road, littered with leavings, I try 
to whistle back. Like I have some voice that a thrush would know. Like I 
know anything at all about song, about singing.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Wood Duck nest boxes
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2016 14:49:18 -0500
We have four Wood Duck nest boxes, each mounted on a dock corner post 
with large custom metal baffles.  For a nest base, rather than shavings 
and leaves, I've used CareFresh small-pet bedding (recycled paper with 
no ink or aromatics) for several years, and the ducks accept it without 
problem.  (In one case, it allowed me to /just/ save a clutch that had a 
fire ant invasion well underway from the bottom.  I don't think natural 
substrate would have compartmentalized the ants nearly as well.)
Each box was used for at least two clutches this year.  The last 
ducklings launched sometime this past week.

There appeared to be at least 6 successful hatches.  There were also two 
disasters (one involving fire ants; the other warping and water during 
that super-rainy couple of weeks in spring).  And there was at least one 
instance of a large rat snake either circumventing the intact baffle or 
dropping ~15' from a tree to reach a box.  I almost felt that whatever 
she did to gain access earned her some eggs (though I think the 
ducklings had already departed).

Lots of up-to-date and interesting info on boxes and nesting can be 
found here http://www.woodducksociety.com/qanda.htm.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: Fund raiser in Tulsa - 27 August
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2016 04:26:34 +0000
Hi, this is a fund raiser for the Sutton Avian Research Center located in 
Bartlesville OK… they recently lost their affiliation with the University of 
Oklahoma, so fund raising is now critical for them… Think about going to this 
event in Tulsa (Peggy and I are going) or make a donation… Thanks, Kim 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************

From: Wild Brew [mailto:newsletter=wildbrew.org AT mail204.atl81.rsgsv.net] On 
Behalf Of Wild Brew 

Sent: Thursday, June 30, 2016 10:45 AM
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Subject: Launch Party Invite & Ticket Discount

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