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Updated on Sunday, April 26 at 09:34 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Smiths Longspur,©Jan Wilczur

27 Apr Playing Hookie [diane yates ]
26 Apr Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket [Keith Newton ]
26 Apr Ninestone Birding Group [Bill Thurman ]
26 Apr Ninestone Bird Group [Bill Thurman ]
26 Apr Re: Beautiful morning! [Bill Thurman ]
26 Apr Re: Beautiful morning! [Jeffrey Short ]
26 Apr Yard birds [CK ]
26 Apr Ninestone Birding [Bill Thurman ]
26 Apr ASCA Field Trip Report [Karen ]
26 Apr Round Mountain (Morning again) [Herschel Raney ]
26 Apr Re: Colorful back yard today [martha strother ]
26 Apr Colorful back yard today [Holly Greenfield ]
26 Apr Yellow-headed Blackbird [Adam Schaffer ]
26 Apr Tennessee Warbler [Janine Perlman ]
26 Apr Re: Bander's Code Decoded [Roselie Overby ]
26 Apr Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket [Jim and Karen Rowe ]
26 Apr Re: Bird name codes [Harriet Jansma ]
26 Apr Re: bird name codes [Ragupathy Kannan ]
26 Apr Re: Beautiful morning! ["bill ." ]
26 Apr Re: Bird name codes ["bill ." ]
25 Apr Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak [Travis Certain ]
26 Apr More eBirding... [diane yates ]
25 Apr Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket [Janine Perlman ]
25 Apr Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket [Janine Perlman ]
26 Apr Bander's Code Decoded [diane yates ]
25 Apr Re: Bird name codes [Daniel Scheiman ]
26 Apr Western Willets at Centerton ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
25 Apr I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket [Keith Newton ]
26 Apr bird name codes ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
25 Apr hummer crash [Carol Meyerdirk ]
25 Apr Beautiful morning! [Bill Thurman ]
25 Apr Out All Day (Life Nest - Dunce lucks out) [Herschel Raney ]
25 Apr Re: Bird name codes [Mary Ann King ]
25 Apr Re: Oaks and birds? [Gail Miller ]
25 Apr Re: Oaks and birds? [Gail Miller ]
25 Apr Re: Bird name codes [Harriet Jansma ]
24 Apr Bird name codes [jonathanperry24 ]
25 Apr Interesting collection [Dorothy Cooney ]
25 Apr Re: Oaks and birds? [Mary Ann King ]
25 Apr Eared Grebe remains at Centerton fish hatchery. next to the NE most pond [Jacque Brown ]
25 Apr Yellow-Headed Blackbird [Ryan Risher ]
25 Apr Oaks and birds? [Bill Thurman ]
24 Apr Yellow-headed Blackbird [Cindy Barry ]
25 Apr Re: Do you use eBird data for conservation? [Ragupathy Kannan ]
25 Apr avocets at treadway's [Kenny Nichols ]
24 Apr Re: eBird's Global Big Day ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
24 Apr eBird's Global Big Day [Ragupathy Kannan ]
24 Apr Rose-breasted Grosbeaks [Janine Perlman ]
24 Apr FOS [Kenny Nichols ]
24 Apr Black-bellied Whistling Duck at contortion (Ha ! I had to leave that) Centerton Fish hatchery Friday morning. 4/24/15 [Jacque Brown ]
24 Apr Warbler insanity at Gillam Park [Jeremy Chamberlain ]
24 Apr mystery nest [zoe caywood ]
24 Apr Do you use eBird data for conservation? [Daniel Scheiman ]
24 Apr BBWD [Sandy Berger ]
24 Apr FW: 2015 Spring Migration Counts adding Jefferson 4/25 & Carroll 5/9 or 10 ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
24 Apr 2015 Spring Migration Counts ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
23 Apr FW: Greater Sage Grouse Not Listed [Jeffrey Short ]
24 Apr Lark Sparrow ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
23 Apr RBGR, etc. location [diane yates ]
23 Apr Adult Golden Eagle [Don Simons ]
23 Apr fos baltimore oriole [Alan ]
23 Apr Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
23 Apr ONLY 16 BIRDING DAYS LEFT UNTIL IMBD ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
23 Apr FOS Western Hills Park [Charles Anderson ]
23 Apr Bell's slough north [kyle winkelmann ]
23 Apr Rose-breasted Grosbeak [diane yates ]
23 Apr Rose-breasted Grosbeak [diane yates ]
23 Apr Re: Teenager [Bill Thurman ]
23 Apr Teenager [diane yates ]
23 Apr Palm Warblers, yes plural! [Ryan Risher ]
23 Apr Re: Bona Dea Trails [Bill Thurman ]
23 Apr Re: Bona Dea Trails [Cheryle Sytsma ]
22 Apr Re: Bona Dea Trails [Bill Thurman ]
22 Apr Re: Bona Dea Trails [Ryan R ]
22 Apr Bona Dea Trails [Bill Thurman ]
22 Apr Earth Day and what a way to celebrate- 1, 2, 3 .... 8, and then oh no! [Barry Haas ]

Subject: Playing Hookie
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2015 01:51:14 +0000
Yes, normally we attend church Sunday mornings. I guess I’ve been feeling a 
little down in the spirit since I learned my left hand that chorded my guitar 
with the other gospel-bluegrassers on stage will probably never close over the 
strings again even with carpal tunnel surgery. The finger joints are just too 
arthritic. So what does one do when they feel like an old car (two artificial 
joints and a shoulder rebuild within a year) ready for the junkyard, while a 
blazing mix of cotton puff-strewn heavens whisper and a mix of forest and field 
too green to be fair calls out loud? 


The answer is You get a line and I’ll get a pole, Honey…! Which is exactly 
what Joe did, while I grabbed the bino, my bird book and the paper tablet. Off 
to Holla Bend for the third weekend in a row. It was Joe who spotted the 
Yellow-Headed Blackbird in the flooded field, even before we raised our binocs. 
I don’t think the black ever looked so satin nor the yellow so blinding out 
west where I watched them skulk among the cattails of the college campus pond. 
Like back then, we found him hanging out with red-wings and grackles, then a 
little farther down the road some Wilson’s Phalaropes and Long-Billed 
Dowitchers, lifers for me, and a raft of Blue-winged Teals with one lone 
Northern Shoveler. At the fishing hole just past the Lookout Tower my Joe 
murdered a meal worm (I told him he should’ve brought corn) and I listened to 
a three-part harmony of Baltimore Oriole, Yellow-throated Warbler and Carolina 
Wren. The wren sang “Teacher--teacher--teacher” for a while but when he 
shifted to “Answer it-answer it!” I knew it was time to move on. We’d 
left the phone in the car and I intended to forget about human communication 
for at least another half hour. 


In all I listed 59 species and after uploading to eBird realized I’d missed 
the Sharp-Shinned Hawk still on my scratch list. 60 would look pretentious 
anyway.--Dianemarie 
Subject: Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 21:00:05 -0500
Thanks everyone. The young eagle was fine. Somehow it managed to get turned 
over, and landed on a much lower limb. 


I had been on my blind for a couple of hours without seeing anything, before an 
adult landed in a dead tree near me. Then it flew, just as the young eagle 
landed in the nest tree. It sat out on a branch lower than the nest until after 
Sunset, then attempted to fly up to a higher limb at nest-level. But it didn't 
quite make it. 


I had my camera on a tripod with the ISO set on 3200 not really expecting to 
get anything worth keeping, but with the shutter dressed on continuous anyway. 

The images were all blurry, but the last I could see, the young eagle was 
falling upside down for about 20' before I lost sight of it behind the 
plantation pine thicket. These trees are at the age they are most dense, before 
they smother all the thick bushes and briars underneath. 


My concern even if uninjured, and able to walk toward the field behind me, was 
the fence buried in dense thickets of brambles and Trifoliate orange. 

When I managed to make my way over close to the tree, I was pleasantly 
surprised to see it sitting on the lowest limb, silhouetted against the sky. 
Seeing that, I turned and headed for the cabin. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 26, 2015, at 9:11 AM, Jim and Karen Rowe  
wrote: 

> 
> Keith,
> 
> Thank you for keeping eyes on the eagle. If you think an eagle is sick or 
injured, please contact the AGFC wildlife officer, AGFC biologist or myself. To 
contact an officer you can call the AGFC radio room and ask that a message and 
your phone number be relayed to the officer in the appropriate county 
1-800-482-9262 

> 
> Janine is correct, it is not uncommon for young eagles to spend several weeks 
on the ground with only the ability to fly short distances or walk around and 
hop onto low branches or into shrubs. 

> 
> Yesterday I got a call about a young eagle on or near Felsenthal NWR. The 
wildlife officer checked on the eagle yesterday afternoon and found both adults 
on the ground with it, a fish at the young eagle's feet, and 2 other young 
eagles in the nest. The officer will conduct periodic checks to be sure the 
eagle looks healthy and to look for fish carcasses and other evidence that the 
eagle is being fed. 

> 
> Every year we are contacted about an eagle or two that has left the nest and 
is found on the ground. If needed and if possible, we work with the USFWS and 
landowner to close the area to prevent eagle watchers from getting to close to 
the young eagle and disturbing the adults' ability to bring food to the young 
grounded bird. Our officers and biologists check on the young eagle 
periodically to determine if its in good health and getting fed. Fortunately, 
these cases almost always have positive outcomes, eventually the young bird is 
able to fly greater distances and take to the skies. 

> 
> Last year we had a young eagle leave the nest and wander up and down the 
Arkansas River levee near Scott. We did our best to assure the doubting 
landowner that the eagle would be okay and was being fed even though it could 
initially only fly low to the ground about 30 yards. We checked on the bird 
twice a week. The landowner called us after 3 weeks to tell us the eagle was 
fine and that he was overjoyed to see all 3 hatch year eagles from "his" nest 
flying over his property. He said he had assumed that young eagles flew from 
the nest with perfect flight skills, just like it is shown on TV. Several years 
ago, 2 young eaglets entertained a subdivision in Cotter. Their nest was along 
the White River at the edge of the subdivision. As the young eagles learned to 
fly, they were observed sitting on backyard tool sheds, and even photographed 
on the back deck of one of the homes. Residents were very cooperative about 
leaving the eagles alone and staying away from them, but they did intervene and 
chase one young eagle away when it insisted on sunning in the middle of the 
road. After about 1 1/2 weeks the young eagles flew away from the area. Over 
the years we have had a number of cases where an eagle nest is blown down in a 
storm and the young birds survive the fall. The adults continue to care for the 
young in brush and thickets on the ground and the young fledge from the ground 
instead of a nest in a tree. 

> 
> If you need to talk to me about the eagle you observed please call my work 
cell phone anytime. 870-672-2279 

>  
> Karen Rowe, AGFC Bird Conservation Program Coordinator
> 
> 
>  
> From: Keith Newton 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 7:58 PM
> Subject: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a 
thicket 

> 
> I don't think there is any way it could ever take flight from down there. 
> 
> I'm reluctant to even go over, without talking to someone. 
> 501-352-2811
> 
> I have a canvas blind bag that I might use to cover it. But it would be after 
dark before I could get it in the open for flight take off. 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
Subject: Ninestone Birding Group
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 20:44:22 -0500
Here's a better one!  The group spotted dozens and dozens of birds today. A
really good day.

Bill Thurman
Subject: Ninestone Bird Group
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 20:39:08 -0500
Here is one that is slightly better. Today the group spotted dozens and
dozens of birds!

Bill Thurman
Subject: Re: Beautiful morning!
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 20:23:18 -0500
Hi Jeff and Kenny

       My suspicion is that these (in Bona Dea Trail ponds) were
"introduced" years ago, at some point, but I don't know that for certain.
        I do know that there's been more than one and I suspect that they
have reproduced. My somewhat off-the-wall educated guess. :)

                             Bill Thurman

"up to my eyeballs in alligators"

PS I still enjoyed the birds most
On Apr 26, 2015 8:11 PM, "Jeffrey Short"  wrote:

> I do seem to remember reports of alligator sightings north of I-40, but in
> the swamps of North Carolina/Virginia.
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *bill .
> *Sent:* Sunday, April 26, 2015 3:25 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Beautiful morning!
>
>
>
> I am used to bird range maps being "out of date" and birds, flying as they
> do, turning up in odd places, but are there alligators north of I-40? The
> maps i see show them only in far sw Arkansas and far se Oklahoma. Not
> doubting your sighting, just trying to get further info on this.
> peace
> -bill
>
> from my windows phone
> ------------------------------
>
> *From: *Bill Thurman 
> *Sent: *‎4/‎25/‎2015 18:33
> *To: *ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject: *[ARBIRD-L] Beautiful morning!
>
> It was still wet in most places at the Bona Dea trails near Russellville
> this morning, but the weather was absolutely beautiful. I heard plenty of
> birds like:
> White eyed vireos
> Red eyed vireos
> Cardinals
> Carolina Wrens
> Hermit Thrushes  (beautiful songs)
> Saw white throated sparrows, crows, a cowbird pair and vultures
> But my highlights:
>
> A Yellow Warbler singing
>
> An Alligator!  swimming along the pond on the westside where the
> walkthrough is. Near the western entrance to the trails.
> 11 feet!    Big rascal!
>
>                                   Bill Thurman
>
Subject: Re: Beautiful morning!
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 20:11:07 -0500
I do seem to remember reports of alligator sightings north of I-40, but in the 
swamps of North Carolina/Virginia. 


 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of bill . 

Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2015 3:25 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Beautiful morning!

 

I am used to bird range maps being "out of date" and birds, flying as they do, 
turning up in odd places, but are there alligators north of I-40? The maps i 
see show them only in far sw Arkansas and far se Oklahoma. Not doubting your 
sighting, just trying to get further info on this. 

peace
-bill

from my windows phone

  _____  

From: Bill Thurman  
Sent: ‎4/‎25/‎2015 18:33
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Beautiful morning!

It was still wet in most places at the Bona Dea trails near Russellville this 
morning, but the weather was absolutely beautiful. I heard plenty of birds 
like: 

White eyed vireos
Red eyed vireos
Cardinals
Carolina Wrens
Hermit Thrushes  (beautiful songs)
Saw white throated sparrows, crows, a cowbird pair and vultures
But my highlights:

A Yellow Warbler singing

An Alligator! swimming along the pond on the westside where the walkthrough is. 
Near the western entrance to the trails. 

11 feet!    Big rascal!

                                  Bill Thurman
Subject: Yard birds
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 19:18:54 -0500
Birds are active this evening. Rose-breasted grosbeaks, ruby-throatedhummers, & 
all the usual residents crowding in to eat. Feels like it's going to rain. 

Cindy F
In the Heights
Little Rock


Subject: Ninestone Birding
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 19:11:27 -0500
Here is a GREAT group of people on the late side of Ninestone birding
expedition today. There were other great ones too, but they had to leave
early.

Bill Thurman
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Report
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 18:35:20 -0500
27 birders came from all over central Arkansas to meet at the Delta Rivers 
Nature Center in Pine Bluff on Saturday, April 25 for the Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas's monthly field trip. John Redman and Delos McCauley gave us 
the VIP tour of the area. The Nature Center's parking lot and feeders were 
loaded with Baltimore Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. We walked the 
Discovery Loop and the Whitetail Trails. Along the way, we spotted Swainson's 
and Wood Thrushes, Cedar Waxwings, Louisiana Waterthrushes, and Catbirds. Two 
different mixed-feeding flocks netted us a home run of the following 
warblers--Blue-winged, Bay-breasted, Golden-winged, Chestnut-sided, 
Black-throated Green, Black-and-White, Prothonotary, Tennessee, Nashville, 
Common Yellowthroat, Yellow-rumped, Northern Parula, and Redstarts, plus a 
Blue-headed Vireo. 


Next stop was the Lake Saracen reed beds. Three very cooperative Soras fed and 
fussed out in plain sight, making both birders and photographers very happy. We 
also had singing Marsh Wrens, a distant look at two Forster's Terns, and a 
couple of Double-crested Cormorants. 


On to Wilbur West Road, which is usually a great shorebird, egret, and bittern 
spot. Heavy rains Friday night made the water level too high, so there were 
only a few birds. We did find a couple of Great Egrets, an Orchard Oriole, a 
Yellow Warbler, a few Cliff and Barn Swallows, plus an Anhinga soaring with the 
Turkey Vultures. A small flock of shorebirds circled the area. Photos of the 
flock later confirmed that it contained 4 Wilson's Phalaropes and 3 Greater 
Yellowlegs. 


Last stop was the Bayou Bartholomew Trail off Hazel St. The water here was also 
high, which severely limited our access to most of the trail. Best birds were 
Prothonotary and Kentucky Warblers, plus a flyover of two Anhingas. We finished 
around 3:00 p.m., a tired, hungry, but happy group of birders and 
photographers. 

Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator 
Little Rock, AR
Subject: Round Mountain (Morning again)
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 18:00:34 -0500
Out the door at dawn and the birdsonics were up by at least 20 % from just
yesterday. The hickory tree which sits just off the corner of the porch was
hosting a rowdy mix of Baltimore Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. At
first I thought the orioles were imitating grosbeaks in the wild mix of
song they were doing. But I found them all along with a scattering of
Nashville Warblers and Red-eyed Vireos all in the same treetop. The Oriole
pack moved from treetop to treetop headed east coloring every neighborhood
I suppose off toward the horizon.

A Kentucky showed up in the creek slope off to the SE of the house and
virtually every year a single male shows up and calls in this precise slope
for 4 to 7 days and then disappears. I am not sure if Kentuckys just call
no matter what or if he specifically calls in this location because it
looks possible, like a mama Kentucky could call that piece of landscape
home. I also presume no Shetuckys have shown up there.

Golden-wings are in. I found one silent one and one very vocal one. Along
with Blue-wings which generally stay near the creek. Golden-wings are still
a luxurious warbler. A fine design, like the BMW of warblers.

Swainson's Thushes went from absent to yes-sir-another-one status. And a
virtuoso sang for me this morning early, phrase after phrase with subtle
changes in the styling, the tone. One popped up and rattled a caterpillar
for me at ten feet on the road. A bird I have seen in Alaska, in Canada, in
Montana, in Ecuador. I have never tired of them.

The Black-and-white Warbler made it through her night. I have checked on
her several times. She is dutifully setting the eggs in her pine needle
cave. I did see a male calling in a Sweetgum about 20 to 30 yards away. He
was chasing Nashville Warblers. Because, well, I guess they are annoying.
And that was his damn tree at the time. I did not check the eggs. I do not
want to bother her. And several people have told me that Cowbirds return
sometimes to check their parasitized nests and punish nests that have had
eggs removed. I find this fact dark and oppressive. A marauding angry
cowbird destroying eggs. What the hell?

Wood Pewees are in. Great Cresteds have grown more agitated. Long sequences
of chatter from high above.

I looked out on the back deck and saw two female hummers fighting over the
feeder. I immediately went out an filled the separate blue glass containers
again just because of this. Reinserted the clean glass throats. The number
of hummers overall in the woods is up. The buckeye blooms still abound. And
I watched a male who would work a group of blooms and then perch and clean
his beak: right side and left side. Then feed again. Then clean the beak.
He was no more than five feet from me as I stood stock still.

Every day at dawn for the next two weeks. Work will suffer. My coffee cup
and I will wander the oaks. What else can one do?

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: Colorful back yard today
From: martha strother <000000ad14e4acd0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 20:37:19 +0000
Where was this, Holly?

      From: Holly Greenfield 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2015 1:35 PM
 Subject: Colorful back yard today
   
[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Colorful back yard today
From: Holly Greenfield <hollygreenfield AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 14:35:01 -0400
This morning/early afternoon we had two Indigo Buntings, two Baltimore Orioles, 
a Summer Tanager, and what I think was a Black-throated Green Warbler. Several 
other warbler (or warbler-looking) birds I couldn't ID and three Hermit 
Thrushes. I think our crop of Variable Oak-leaf Caterpillars is good this 
year... :-) 
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 11:25:43 -0500
I just saw a beautiful yellow-headed blackbird while biking past the fish 
hatchery in Centerton. He was in the yard of the house there by the uppermost 
pond. Very exciting! Then my bike deraileur broke down. Not so fun. I should've 
just gone birding instead! 


Adam Schaffer

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 25, 2015, at 8:04 PM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:

> As would be expected from existing range data, the Willets (3) we saw 
yesterday morning at Centerton are from the western subspecies, inornata. These 
birds retained quite a bit of the relatively drab adult winter season plumage, 
though transition toward summer plumage is underway. 

> 
> 
> The single Black-bellied Whistling-Duck there yesterday is, so far as I know, 
only the third record for Benton County (Terry Stanfill saw ducks in 2003 and 
2004 near Gentry). Other than a few additional observations in the Fayetteville 
area, closest records are from the Alma wastewater treatment plant ponds and 
adjoining private ranch ponds in the Arkansas River Valley. The straight-line 
distance between the Alma ponds and Centerton exceeds 60 miles. 

> 
> 
> The Willets are headed northwest, to freshwater breeding areas of the Great 
Plains and elsewhere in the western US and Canada. We’ve had plenty of 
records up here of northbound transients into early May. So hopefully, more 
Willets are to come. Our old world can sure use all the Willets it can muster. 

> 
> 
> So what’s up with the ducks? That’s harder to say. As always, we’ll 
scan the ponds. Maybe this Centerton bird is some kind of pioneer. 

> 
> 
> The Eared Grebe at the hatchery yesterday has been present since at least 
April 9, when first observed. This is another bird, that like inornata, nests 
north and west of us. According to the authoritative Birds of North America 
account, breeders typically reach their summer habitats by mid-April. On the 
other hand, non-breeders may straggle, sometimes into May. 
Subject: Tennessee Warbler
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 09:58:40 -0500
Singing his little heart out, just off the porch, with an unexpected 
hour-long stay.  Rose-breasted Grosbeaks make soft, plaintive 
conversation with each other as they decide who has rights to the feeder.

A couple of weeks ago, first thing in the morning, I needed some seconds 
to recognize the sweet whistle just outside the window.  Not a songbird, 
but a Wood drake in the tree---one of four.

Today the dawn chorus was profuse. At this time of year, sorting through 
it isn't effortless---or, for me, ever entirely successful. It's an 
embarrassment of riches that I'm (mostly) content to fail at.

Screening---that low-tech material permitting open windows and 
doors---has to be right up there with the greatest-ever inventions.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: Re: Bander's Code Decoded
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 14:16:05 +0000
Most data bases (including eBird) I use allow me a choice when I start typing a 
bird name.  I don't have to type the whole name before finding my choice.  
Yep, I may have to type more than 4 letters, but it's better than typing in the 
wrong code letters and having to start over.  Roselie Overby 

 


 On Saturday, April 25, 2015 9:20 PM, diane yates  wrote: 

   

 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 14:11:01 +0000
Keith, 
Thank you for keeping eyes on the eagle.  If you think an eagle is sick or 
injured, please contact the AGFC wildlife officer, AGFC biologist or myself.  
To contact an officer you can call the AGFC radio room and ask that a message 
and your phone number be relayed to the officer in the appropriate county 
1-800-482-9262 

Janine is correct, it is not uncommon for young eagles to spend several weeks 
on the ground with only the ability to fly short distances or walk around and 
hop onto low branches or into shrubs. 

Yesterday I got a call about a young eagle on or near Felsenthal NWR.  The 
wildlife officer checked on the eagle yesterday afternoon and found both 
adults on the ground with it, a fish at the young eagle's feet, and 2 other 
young eagles in the nest.   The officer will conduct periodic checks to be 
sure the eagle looks healthy and to look for fish carcasses and other evidence 
that the eagle is being fed.  

Every year we are contacted about an eagle or two that has left the nest and 
is found on the ground.  If needed and if possible, we work with the USFWS and 
landowner to close the area to prevent eagle watchers from getting to close to 
the young eagle and disturbing the adults' ability to bring food to the young 
grounded bird.   Our officers and biologists  check on the young eagle 
periodically to determine if its in good health and getting fed.  
Fortunately, these cases almost always have positive outcomes, eventually the 
young bird is able to fly greater distances and take to the skies. 

Last year we had a young eagle leave the nest and wander up and down the 
Arkansas River levee near Scott.  We did our best to assure  the doubting 
landowner that the eagle would be okay and was being fed even though it could 
initially only fly low to the ground about 30 yards.  We checked on the bird 
twice a week.  The landowner called us after 3 weeks to tell us the eagle was 
fine and that he  was overjoyed to see all 3 hatch year eagles from "his" 
nest flying over his property.  He said he had assumed that young eagles flew 
from the nest with perfect flight skills, just like it is shown on 
TV.  Several years ago, 2 young eaglets entertained a subdivision in 
Cotter.  Their nest was along the White River at the edge of the 
subdivision.  As the young eagles learned to fly, they were observed sitting 
on backyard tool sheds, and even photographed on the back deck of one of the 
homes.  Residents were very cooperative about leaving the eagles alone and 
staying away from them, but they did intervene and chase one young eagle away 
when it insisted on sunning in the middle of the road.   After about  1 1/2 
weeks the young eagles flew away from the area.  Over the years we have had a 
number of cases where an eagle nest is blown down in a storm and the young 
birds survive the fall.  The adults continue to care for the young in brush 
and thickets on the ground and the young fledge from the ground instead of a 
nest in a tree. 

If you need to talk to me about the eagle you observed please call my work 
cell phone anytime.  870-672-2279 Karen Rowe, AGFC Bird Conservation Program 
Coordinator 


       From: Keith Newton 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 7:58 PM
 Subject: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket
   
I don't think there is any way it could ever take flight from down there. 

I'm reluctant to even go over, without talking to someone. 
501-352-2811

I have a canvas blind bag that I might use to cover it. But it would be after 
dark before I could get it in the open for flight take off. 


Sent from my iPhone

  
Subject: Re: Bird name codes
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 12:59:21 +0000
Just a reminder that this particular bird listserv includes a lot of us back 
yard birders, not scientists, much less ornithologists. So we appreciate the 
Englsh translations (as Jonathan put it). 


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of bill .  

Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2015 3:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird name codes

This is my practice also. Spell it out at first mention and afterward feel free 
to use the code to refer back to the original. 

It only becomes confusing to me when folks give a list of birds all in code. I 
lose track (and interest) quickly then. 

peace
-bill
enid ok

from my windows phone
________________________________
From: Daniel Scheiman
Sent: ?4/?25/?2015 20:58
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] Bird name codes

As someone who uses 4-letter codes all the time I will speak in defense of 
them. They are faster to write in my notebook or data sheet when listing in the 
field. They are faster to type in eBird and BirdLog search boxes to find or 
jump to a species. For ARBIRD posts, I think a reasonable compromise is to 
spell out a species at the first mention, then use the 4-letter code, just like 
you would do for an acronym. Clear writing is good writing. 


Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR
Subject: Re: bird name codes
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 11:42:37 +0000
I couldn't agree more with Leif.  I hate codes with a passion.  Almost 
everytime I used them in the past, I regretted later.  The problem has come to 
a head lately as I am entering my 30+ years of bird notes into eBird.  Were 
the SBs I used in 1983 spoonbills or spotbill ducks?  And those WT Thrushes 
were White-throated Thrushes (I think), and not Whistling Thrushes.  I bet I 
knew it very well at that time, but believe me, they don't stay in your brain 
for 30 years.       

When Sandy reported BBWDs recently, I hit delete and moved on.  I have neither 
the time nor the desire to look up coded language. What was a Blue-breasted 
Water-Dove doing in Greenwood, anyway?  I thought they were Martian.   



 On Saturday, 25 April 2015 7:57 PM, "Anderson, Leif E -FS" 
 wrote: 

   

 #yiv0406950530 #yiv0406950530 -- filtered {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 
2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv0406950530 p.yiv0406950530MsoNormal, #yiv0406950530 
li.yiv0406950530MsoNormal, #yiv0406950530 div.yiv0406950530MsoNormal 
{margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;}#yiv0406950530 a:link, 
#yiv0406950530 span.yiv0406950530MsoHyperlink 
{color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv0406950530 a:visited, #yiv0406950530 
span.yiv0406950530MsoHyperlinkFollowed 
{color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv0406950530 
span.yiv0406950530EmailStyle17 {color:windowtext;}#yiv0406950530 
.yiv0406950530MsoChpDefault {}#yiv0406950530 filtered {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 
1.0in;}#yiv0406950530 div.yiv0406950530WordSection1 {}#yiv0406950530 Greetings 
all, 1st:    I do a few bird surveys each yr (yeah maybe more than a few) 
and most don’t use these codes.  But for 3 weeks per year I have to use 
these darn codes for bird surveys at work.  They are supposed to be faster to 
use.  But because I don’t use them enough I have a cheat sheet to look them 
up and it takes me longer. 2nd:   The exceptions and what happens to the 
quality/ error factor in a data base where a code is the primary entry.  It 
would be easy to think you know them from year to year, but actually are making 
errors.  In AR it would be easy to mess up Blue-winged Warbler and 
Black-and-white Warbler.   BWWA vs BAWW.  Errors like this could matter a 
lot in bird conservation. 3rd:    My third issue is the exceptions.  WA is 
warbler so I could remember that, but in AR breeding season warblers could also 
be WW, RW, AW, NW, RE, and PA!  4th:   I have Dyslexia, and probably deal 
with it in a minor way, every day.  I try to not let it be a limitation and I 
feel I manage pretty well.  But if you’re prone to turning letters around, 
these codes become a nightmare. 5th:  Looking up the codes isn’t always easy 
since the database can contain 9000 codes.  So you wade through a bunch of 
tropical birds to find what you want. The main reason involves the majesty of 
birds.  Usually a bird name brings up an image in my brain and memories of 
past encounters.   Let’s take Painted Bunting as an example.  I bet this 
name pulled up an image for you and memories, and in some cases frustrating 
memories of this as a nemesis bird.  Does PABU pull up the same image of the 
riot of colors and wonderful song?  I think not.     Now back to Christmas 
Bird Count data entry, thankfully using words instead of codes.     Cheers, 
Leif  AT  Hector   PS:   Of course I had to use my cheat sheet for this 
email.  I may know 100’s of birds by sight or song, but probably only 5 of 
these codes.    


  
Subject: Re: Beautiful morning!
From: "bill ." <tvulture AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 03:24:46 -0500
I am used to bird range maps being "out of date" and birds, flying as they do, 
turning up in odd places, but are there alligators north of I-40? The maps i 
see show them only in far sw Arkansas and far se Oklahoma. Not doubting your 
sighting, just trying to get further info on this. 

peace
-bill

from my windows phone
________________________________
From: Bill Thurman
Sent: ‎4/‎25/‎2015 18:33
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Beautiful morning!

It was still wet in most places at the Bona Dea trails near Russellville
this morning, but the weather was absolutely beautiful. I heard plenty of
birds like:
White eyed vireos
Red eyed vireos
Cardinals
Carolina Wrens
Hermit Thrushes  (beautiful songs)
Saw white throated sparrows, crows, a cowbird pair and vultures
But my highlights:

A Yellow Warbler singing

An Alligator!  swimming along the pond on the westside where the
walkthrough is. Near the western entrance to the trails.
11 feet!    Big rascal!

                                  Bill Thurman
Subject: Re: Bird name codes
From: "bill ." <tvulture AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 03:08:24 -0500
This is my practice also. Spell it out at first mention and afterward feel free 
to use the code to refer back to the original. 

It only becomes confusing to me when folks give a list of birds all in code. I 
lose track (and interest) quickly then. 

peace
-bill
enid ok

from my windows phone
________________________________
From: Daniel Scheiman
Sent: ‎4/‎25/‎2015 20:58
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] Bird name codes

As someone who uses 4-letter codes all the time I will speak in defense of
them. They are faster to write in my notebook or data sheet when listing in
the field. They are faster to type in eBird and BirdLog search boxes to find
or jump to a species.  For ARBIRD posts, I think a reasonable compromise is
to spell out a species at the first mention, then use the 4-letter code,
just like you would do for an acronym. Clear writing is good writing.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: Travis Certain <tcertain AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 22:30:30 -0500
We have four males and one female so far. I always love it when they arrive. 
Wish they would stay all summer. 


Travis Certain
West Little Rock behind Joe T Robinson (sorta)
tcertain AT aristotle.net
(Travis is really a girls name)



Subject: More eBirding...
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 02:22:45 +0000
When I am in the field my data sheet is a small paper tablet (3”x5”) that I 
hang on one of those camouflage neck strings with the clip. I wear it around my 
neck for quick jotting and list my birds on the left side (yes--in bander’s 
code!) and follow with a 2-letter code for the habitat type since the WMA 
contains many and I might walk/drive through several on a single trip. A few of 
mine follow. 


MF: Mixed Forest

FE: Forest Edge

BF: Brushy Field

FI: Field

PI: Pines

NW: Near Water

OW: On Water

And there are more. These not only help me to get a better picture of who can 
be found where at what time of year, but they cue my memory of a sighting when 
I look back through them. 


On the right side of the page I keep my count, a simple set of “l”s with a 
slash through every four as we were taught when children. At home I transfer to 
a thick-paged journal in pretty much the same format, converting my ticks to 
numbers below a heading that says either Maribird’s Yard or WMA, the date, 
weather info and time started and finished. 2nd line includes the specific 
location on the 40,000-plus acre Scott Henderson/Gulf Mountain WMA and the 
distance of the walk/drive. Rare birds get extra info. following the habitat 
code, for use when uploading to eBird, which is really easy even for the 
computer-half-illiterate, as I still am. Don’t be afraid, listers. In 
north-central Arkansas there are several counties that are sparsely 
represented--to the tune that for ages I have been #1 eBirder in Van Buren 
County, probably because I was the ONLY eBirder in the county! Come on, the 
rest of you, I’ve heard of some of your records and the more of us that 
report them the more credible they will become.--Dianemarie 







Marie
Subject: Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 21:43:13 -0500
Also, because the Bald Eagle enjoys special protection by law, even with 
the best of intentions, I wouldn't intervene without consulting Karen 
Rowe or someone in USFWS.
Of course if an eagle is clearly injured, or in imminent danger, it's 
fine to act....but if there's a reasonable chance that nothing's amiss 
(which seems to be true here), you're right to get expert advice!

Janine

On 4/25/2015 9:27 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> Hi Keith,
>
> From the BNA species account, what you're seeing may be pretty normal:
>
>     Up to half of nest departures unsuccessful; such young may remain
>     on ground for weeks before regaining flight ability; in most
>     cases, parents will continue to feed these young. Grounded birds
>     more vulnerable to predators, however, and may not be fed if
>     trapped in dense vegetation (Kussman 1977
> 
, 

>     Fraser 1981
> 
). 

>
>
> On 4/25/2015 7:58 PM, Keith Newton wrote:
>> I don't think there is any way it could ever take flight from down there.
>>
>> I'm reluctant to even go over, without talking to someone.
>> 501-352-2811
>>
>> I have a canvas blind bag that I might use to cover it. But it would be 
after dark before I could get it in the open for flight take off. 

>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Re: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 21:27:45 -0500
Hi Keith,

 From the BNA species account, what you're seeing may be pretty normal:

    Up to half of nest departures unsuccessful; such young may remain on
    ground for weeks before regaining flight ability; in most cases,
    parents will continue to feed these young. Grounded birds more
    vulnerable to predators, however, and may not be fed if trapped in
    dense vegetation (Kussman 1977
 
, 

    Fraser 1981
 
). 



On 4/25/2015 7:58 PM, Keith Newton wrote:
> I don't think there is any way it could ever take flight from down there.
>
> I'm reluctant to even go over, without talking to someone.
> 501-352-2811
>
> I have a canvas blind bag that I might use to cover it. But it would be after 
dark before I could get it in the open for flight take off. 

>
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bander's Code Decoded
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 01:33:10 +0000
For those dealing mainly with the birds of Eastern North America it is actually 
relatively simple to learn the code (aside from dyslexia) and its variants. I 
took my teaching from the Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds, which at first 
drove me crazy too because the description of the bird often compared it with 
similar species--all using alpha code. Aside from that it is probably the most 
detailed book for including females, non-breeders, immatures and fall plumage, 
as well as views in flight. Range maps are fairly reliable when combined with 
state Audubon references. Phyla arrangements are current and for the most part 
logical. But as for that code… 



The simple explanation is to place the greatest number of letters on the final 
word, wherein the commonest names are made of three words, so the 1st gets one 
letter, the 2nd gets one letter and the final gets two. Examples: Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak--RBGR. Chestnut-sided Warbler--CSWA. Red-eyed Vireo--REVI. Two-part 
names are where the most variants occur. For an example, where some would 
reduplicate, such as Carolina Wren and the west’s Canyon Wren, something has 
to give so WE are stuck with the variant--CARW. Another is Prairie Warbler, 
which is PRAW instead of PRWA. The idea is normally that you take the 1st two 
letters of each name part and combine. For a three-part name you use only the 
first letter of each of the 1st two parts and the 1st two of the third part. If 
this is a redundancy it’s only to drive the point home. Yes, there will be 
some we simply have to memorize. But if one owns the Crossley ID Guide one 
needs only to go to the back of the book where they all occur alphabetically, 
and we’re only talking Eastern North America, not the world. 



As I was typing this Dan Scheiman’s post came online and as an EBIRDER I have 
to agree. When I can’t find a bird in phyla it is so simple to type in the 
four-letter code--non-case sensitive-- on the Jump-to-Species line. I 
couldn’t imagine having to type out all those words, especially when I have 
several to do at once. So, as Dan says, the best way for us code-users to avoid 
making the rest pull their hair out trying to read us is to always start with 
the whole name, then use the shortened version in further reference. And for 
those who want to learn the code this very process should by its very 
repetition help you learn. I hope this is helpful to the uninitiated and if 
anyone needs further help you can email me at 
maribird AT outlook.com.--Dianemarie. I don’t claim to be an expert, I just try 
to make things as simple as possible. Happy birding. 







Marie
Subject: Re: Bird name codes
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 20:58:33 -0500
As someone who uses 4-letter codes all the time I will speak in defense of
them. They are faster to write in my notebook or data sheet when listing in
the field. They are faster to type in eBird and BirdLog search boxes to find
or jump to a species.  For ARBIRD posts, I think a reasonable compromise is
to spell out a species at the first mention, then use the 4-letter code,
just like you would do for an acronym. Clear writing is good writing.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Western Willets at Centerton
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 01:04:52 +0000
As would be expected from existing range data, the Willets (3) we saw yesterday 
morning at Centerton are from the western subspecies, inornata. These birds 
retained quite a bit of the relatively drab adult winter season plumage, though 
transition toward summer plumage is underway. 


The single Black-bellied Whistling-Duck there yesterday is, so far as I know, 
only the third record for Benton County (Terry Stanfill saw ducks in 2003 and 
2004 near Gentry). Other than a few additional observations in the Fayetteville 
area, closest records are from the Alma wastewater treatment plant ponds and 
adjoining private ranch ponds in the Arkansas River Valley. The straight-line 
distance between the Alma ponds and Centerton exceeds 60 miles. 


The Willets are headed northwest, to freshwater breeding areas of the Great 
Plains and elsewhere in the western US and Canada. Weve had plenty of records 
up here of northbound transients into early May. So hopefully, more Willets are 
to come. Our old world can sure use all the Willets it can muster. 


So whats up with the ducks? Thats harder to say. As always, well scan the 
ponds. Maybe this Centerton bird is some kind of pioneer. 


The Eared Grebe at the hatchery yesterday has been present since at least April 
9, when first observed. This is another bird, that like inornata, nests north 
and west of us. According to the authoritative Birds of North America account, 
breeders typically reach their summer habitats by mid-April. On the other hand, 
non-breeders may straggle, sometimes into May. 
Subject: I may need some Bald Eagle advice, fledgling may be down in a thicket
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 19:58:51 -0500
I don't think there is any way it could ever take flight from down there. 

I'm reluctant to even go over, without talking to someone. 
501-352-2811

I have a canvas blind bag that I might use to cover it. But it would be after 
dark before I could get it in the open for flight take off. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: bird name codes
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 00:56:41 +0000
Greetings all,
1st: I do a few bird surveys each yr (yeah maybe more than a few) and most 
don't use these codes. But for 3 weeks per year I have to use these darn codes 
for bird surveys at work. They are supposed to be faster to use. But because I 
don't use them enough I have a cheat sheet to look them up and it takes me 
longer. 

2nd: The exceptions and what happens to the quality/ error factor in a data 
base where a code is the primary entry. It would be easy to think you know them 
from year to year, but actually are making errors. In AR it would be easy to 
mess up Blue-winged Warbler and Black-and-white Warbler. BWWA vs BAWW. Errors 
like this could matter a lot in bird conservation. 

3rd: My third issue is the exceptions. WA is warbler so I could remember that, 
but in AR breeding season warblers could also be WW, RW, AW, NW, RE, and PA! 

4th: I have Dyslexia, and probably deal with it in a minor way, every day. I 
try to not let it be a limitation and I feel I manage pretty well. But if 
you're prone to turning letters around, these codes become a nightmare. 

5th: Looking up the codes isn't always easy since the database can contain 9000 
codes. So you wade through a bunch of tropical birds to find what you want. 

The main reason involves the majesty of birds. Usually a bird name brings up an 
image in my brain and memories of past encounters. Let's take Painted Bunting 
as an example. I bet this name pulled up an image for you and memories, and in 
some cases frustrating memories of this as a nemesis bird. Does PABU pull up 
the same image of the riot of colors and wonderful song? I think not. 


Now back to Christmas Bird Count data entry, thankfully using words instead of 
codes. Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector 


PS: Of course I had to use my cheat sheet for this email. I may know 100's of 
birds by sight or song, but probably only 5 of these codes. 
Subject: hummer crash
From: Carol Meyerdirk <dmeyerdirk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 23:36:11 +0000
I heard the dreaded window crash this morning and went out to find a rubythroat 
hummer on his back with a crooked wing but still breathing. I picked it up and 
folded his wing back in place and let it sit in my hand hoping it would come to 
its senses and fly off soon. After 15-20 minutes, he was beginning to look 
around. I let it lick sweet water from my finger and then from the drops fallen 
on the bench. I left it alone and went inside. His little heart was racing all 
the time. Eventually he took off much to my relief. 

I have ribbon strips hanging down over the windows and decals, but perhaps I 
need to do more. Any suggestions? 

  
Carol WLR 
Subject: Beautiful morning!
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 18:32:40 -0500
It was still wet in most places at the Bona Dea trails near Russellville
this morning, but the weather was absolutely beautiful. I heard plenty of
birds like:
White eyed vireos
Red eyed vireos
Cardinals
Carolina Wrens
Hermit Thrushes  (beautiful songs)
Saw white throated sparrows, crows, a cowbird pair and vultures
But my highlights:

A Yellow Warbler singing

An Alligator!  swimming along the pond on the westside where the
walkthrough is. Near the western entrance to the trails.
11 feet!    Big rascal!

                                  Bill Thurman
Subject: Out All Day (Life Nest - Dunce lucks out)
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 17:58:03 -0500
I live in the woods, so on an April day like this after storms you walk out
your door at dawn and listen. Blustery and wet, immediately you could tell
the Tennessee and Nashville Warblers were much higher density than even one
day prior. They both called nonstop for hours along with the Red-eyed
Vireos. Across near the swamp, Scarlet Tanager calling, the Tanager with
laryngitis. I found him up in the oaks nabbing caterpillars between
phrases. Later in the morning I had the close Scarlets echoing the far off
Summer Tanagers.

I found a few Chestnut-sideds calling down by the creek. A few days early
for our area. In the underbrush only the second House Wren I have seen on
the property. The White-throated Sparrows are still busy and talkative.

And by nine the bird sound slows a bit and I walk my road loop. I get the
urge to trim a few branches that are pushing out into the road and I fetch
my clippers. I make my way down to close to the fork and clip two small oak
branches and toss them over on the leaves and there suddenly in the leaf
litter right in front of me is a female Black-and-white Warbler. Just five
feet away. I am amazed to watch her walk/wobble out in the road rolling and
flapping first her right wing and then left. She is wounded wing feigning
me! I freeze and look carefully around me at all the limbs. My first
thought is that I have dropped her nest with the branches I clipped. I lift
them carefully and inspect them. Nothing around me or on the clippings. She
has made it across the road and is crouched in the leaves staring back. I
back carefully onto the road and leave her to go grab my Harrison from the
house and sit on the porch. Good old Hal's book quickly clears it up.
Black-and-white's nest on the ground! I had never found a nest. Completely
had it in my head they were 10 to 15 foot tree nesters.

Hal also says they are very commonly parasitized by Cowbirds. Seems
impossible here. It is April 25th and this bird is sitting on eggs. I have
heard the cowbirds but have not caught the females sneaking through my
trees yet. Hal says the record is 8 cowbird eggs and 2 warbler eggs in
Michigan all being brooded. Good Lord. I wait an hour and walk slowly back
to the area. Hal says the nests are usually covered from above and near
trees or rocks. I peer with the binoculars up from where I first saw her
and I am stunned to see her sheltered in a pine needle cave of sorts,
brooding away, giving my the warbler eye.

In the afternoon, I get the 300 mm lens out and strap it on the tripod. I
bring a flashlight. She did not flush when I found the nest. I set the
tripod across the road and shoot a test shot down into her cave with no
light. And then I slowly slide the flashlight beam over and take two quick
shots. She never moves.

I don't know how there are any Black-and-white Warblers at all. They seem
more of a miracle now. Subject to all my snakes and raccoons, deer and
foxes. I find a Cottonmouth on the prowl and a three foot Coachwhip just
today. The Coachwhip nosing and tonguing across the ground a mere fifty
feet from this bird. I had no idea any warbler wing feigned. Never had the
Kentucky Warblers I had tracked many years ago done anything but get
agitated and then surrender. I will go tomorrow and flush her once, shoot
the eggs and remove any Cowbird eggs. Then she is on her own.

An April day amazed me once again. Hope yours was as lovely as mine. Time
to watch the sun drift down.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: Bird name codes
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 17:42:15 -0500
I've noticed that a lot of the emails give no clue to where in the state the
person lives.  I'm sure many folks know lots of the birders and know where
they live - but usually, I don't.

 

'MaryAnn' King

In the pine woods northwest of London, AR

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Harriet Jansma
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 3:09 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird name codes

 

I agree with Jonathan about the codes and also want to urge everyone to
identify the locations of bird sightings. I don't mean GPS specifics -- just
the approximate place where you were when you saw what you are reporting. 

Harriet Jansma

Mount Sequoyah, Fayetteville -- where Joe Neal has today confirmed the
likelihood of our yard sightings yesterday and today of a Clay-Colored
Sparrow and a Swainson's Thrush, two attractive and rather shy migrants that
have stopped by to feed near our house window. The fruity seeds of the
Lonicera fragrantissima that attracted them also brought our summer tanagers
down from the tops of our oak trees, their preferred habitat. 

  _____  

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  > on behalf of jonathanperry24
 >
Sent: Friday, April 24, 2015 7:24 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  
Subject: Bird name codes 

 


Fellow birders,


 

I've been birding since I was 8 years old, and my wife and I are currently
active birders, very much enjoying spring migration this year.  However,
this post is a bit of grousing (hah!) on my part.  I look forward to your
posts, especially those of you south of Fayetteville, since you're usually
alerting me to what is coming our way up here in northwest Arkansas.  BUT--I
must say that it frustrates me to no end when posts list just-seen birds by
using only the four-letter codes for their names.  I've never learned these,
so when I see them, I'm faced with three choices: a) guess, b) ignore the
post, or c) go somewhere else on the web to find a decoding page.  Usually I
just ignore them and move on to the other posts which share the news via
regular old English.  Obviously this is a matter of individual choice and
preference, and I suppose you would be justified in saying, "Jonathan, learn
the codes!"--but if you don't mind, please take just a few more moments to
type the names out.  I will greatly appreciate this.

 

Please see the excerpt I've pasted in below from the Carolina Bird Club
website (carolinabirdclub.org
 ), which speaks to this issue.
Thanks for your patience and forbearance.


 


Four-letter bird codes (FLBCs)


Four-letter codes are commonly (and too often incorrectly) used as a
short-hand way to write a bird name. Two different sets of codes are in use.
The first codes were created by the Bird Banding Laboratory
  (BBL) for
use by bird banders in submitting data; consequently the codes are
frequently referred to as "banding codes". A slightly different set of codes
has been published by the Institute for Bird Populations
  (IBP).

The basic codes were derived from a simple set of rules
  for
reducing a name to four letters. A major problem is that the rules can
create "collisions"; cases where two (or more) different names reduce to the
same four letters. In these cases, different codes had to be created ad hoc.
Unfortunately, if you want to use the codes, you simply must memorize the
special cases; there is no way around it. Worse, the BBL and IBP code sets
differ in some of these ad hoc codes.

 

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D. 

Licensed Psychologist

Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: Re: Oaks and birds?
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 16:32:44 -0500
Ah ... Sawtooth Oak; thanks Jerry and Mitchell  

Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Gail Miller 
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 4:23 PM
To: Mary Ann King ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Oaks and birds?

So ... I’ll take a bit on this one ... Mary Ann, what is the one alien 
species from Asia, I tried to Google it and came up with Cherry Bark Oak?? 


I have read, that, if you have the space, an oak tree is the most 
beneficial-to-wildlife tree you can plant. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Mary Ann King 
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 11:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Oaks and birds?

I don’t know how many are in North America, but there are 30 species of 
native oaks in Arkansas and one alien species from Asia. 


 

‘MaryAnn’ King

In the pine woods northwest of London

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Bill Thurman 

Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 9:36 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Oaks and birds?

 

How many species of oaks exist in North America? 
How many bird species nest in only one specific species of oak?
Just asking, if anyone knows.
Thanks! 

                                Bill Thurman
Subject: Re: Oaks and birds?
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 16:23:46 -0500
So ... I’ll take a bit on this one ... Mary Ann, what is the one alien 
species from Asia, I tried to Google it and came up with Cherry Bark Oak?? 


I have read, that, if you have the space, an oak tree is the most 
beneficial-to-wildlife tree you can plant. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Mary Ann King 
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 11:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Oaks and birds?

I don’t know how many are in North America, but there are 30 species of 
native oaks in Arkansas and one alien species from Asia. 


 

‘MaryAnn’ King

In the pine woods northwest of London

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Bill Thurman 

Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 9:36 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Oaks and birds?

 

How many species of oaks exist in North America? 
How many bird species nest in only one specific species of oak?
Just asking, if anyone knows.
Thanks! 

                                Bill Thurman
Subject: Re: Bird name codes
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 20:08:36 +0000
I agree with Jonathan about the codes and also want to urge everyone to 
identify the locations of bird sightings. I don't mean GPS specifics -- just 
the approximate place where you were when you saw what you are reporting. 


Harriet Jansma

Mount Sequoyah, Fayetteville -- where Joe Neal has today confirmed the 
likelihood of our yard sightings yesterday and today of a Clay-Colored Sparrow 
and a Swainson's Thrush, two attractive and rather shy migrants that have 
stopped by to feed near our house window. The fruity seeds of the Lonicera 
fragrantissima that attracted them also brought our summer tanagers down from 
the tops of our oak trees, their preferred habitat. 


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of jonathanperry24  

Sent: Friday, April 24, 2015 7:24 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird name codes

Fellow birders,

I've been birding since I was 8 years old, and my wife and I are currently 
active birders, very much enjoying spring migration this year. However, this 
post is a bit of grousing (hah!) on my part. I look forward to your posts, 
especially those of you south of Fayetteville, since you're usually alerting me 
to what is coming our way up here in northwest Arkansas. BUT--I must say that 
it frustrates me to no end when posts list just-seen birds by using only the 
four-letter codes for their names. I've never learned these, so when I see 
them, I'm faced with three choices: a) guess, b) ignore the post, or c) go 
somewhere else on the web to find a decoding page. Usually I just ignore them 
and move on to the other posts which share the news via regular old English. 
Obviously this is a matter of individual choice and preference, and I suppose 
you would be justified in saying, "Jonathan, learn the codes!"--but if you 
don't mind, please take just a few more moments to type the names out. I will 
greatly appreciate this. 


Please see the excerpt I've pasted in below from the Carolina Bird Club website 
(carolinabirdclub.org), 
which speaks to this issue. Thanks for your patience and forbearance. 


Four-letter bird codes (FLBCs)

Four-letter codes are commonly (and too often incorrectly) used as a short-hand 
way to write a bird name. Two different sets of codes are in use. The first 
codes were created by the Bird Banding 
Laboratory 
(BBL) for use by bird banders in submitting data; consequently the codes are 
frequently referred to as "banding codes". A slightly different set of codes 
has been published by the Institute for Bird 
Populations 
(IBP). 


The basic codes were derived from a simple set of 
rules 
for reducing a name to four letters. A major problem is that the rules can 
create "collisions"; cases where two (or more) different names reduce to the 
same four letters. In these cases, different codes had to be created ad hoc. 
Unfortunately, if you want to use the codes, you simply must memorize the 
special cases; there is no way around it. Worse, the BBL and IBP code sets 
differ in some of these ad hoc codes. 


Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: Bird name codes
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 07:24:47 -0500
Fellow birders,

I've been birding since I was 8 years old, and my wife and I are currently 
active birders, very much enjoying spring migration this year. However, this 
post is a bit of grousing (hah!) on my part. I look forward to your posts, 
especially those of you south of Fayetteville, since you're usually alerting me 
to what is coming our way up here in northwest Arkansas. BUT--I must say that 
it frustrates me to no end when posts list just-seen birds by using only the 
four-letter codes for their names. I've never learned these, so when I see 
them, I'm faced with three choices: a) guess, b) ignore the post, or c) go 
somewhere else on the web to find a decoding page. Usually I just ignore them 
and move on to the other posts which share the news via regular old English. 
Obviously this is a matter of individual choice and preference, and I suppose 
you would be justified in saying, "Jonathan, learn the codes!"--but if you 
don't mind, please take just a few more moments to type the names out. I will 
greatly appreciate this. 


Please see the excerpt I've pasted in below from the Carolina Bird Club website 
(carolinabirdclub.org), which speaks to this issue. Thanks for your patience 
and forbearance. 


Four-letter bird codes (FLBCs)
Four-letter codes are commonly (and too often incorrectly) used as a short-hand 
way to write a bird name. Two different sets of codes are in use. The first 
codes were created by the Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) for use by bird banders 
in submitting data; consequently the codes are frequently referred to as 
“banding codes”. A slightly different set of codes has been published by 
the Institute for Bird Populations (IBP). 


The basic codes were derived from a simple set of rules for reducing a name to 
four letters. A major problem is that the rules can create “collisions”; 
cases where two (or more) different names reduce to the same four letters. In 
these cases, different codes had to be created ad hoc. Unfortunately, if you 
want to use the codes, you simply must memorize the special cases; there is no 
way around it. Worse, the BBL and IBP code sets differ in some of these ad hoc 
codes. 



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: Interesting collection
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 12:42:30 -0500
This has been an interesting spring so far.  A Blue Grosbeak showed up this
morning, first time I'd seen one here!  An Indigo arrive a few days ago as
did Pine siskins, yes, Pine Siskins!  Aren't they supposed to be winter
birds?  My goldfinches disappeared for a while to molt.  I had forgotten
they want their privacy during that process.  They're back now in brilliant
lemon yellow coats!  The Siskins showed up at about the same time.  My
Summer Tananger is back pecking at the windows and following me around the
yard again.  WOnder what will show up next???

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Re: Oaks and birds?
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 11:52:24 -0500
I don’t know how many are in North America, but there are 30 species of 
native oaks in Arkansas and one alien species from Asia. 


 

‘MaryAnn’ King

In the pine woods northwest of London

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Bill Thurman 

Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2015 9:36 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Oaks and birds?

 

How many species of oaks exist in North America? 
How many bird species nest in only one specific species of oak?
Just asking, if anyone knows.
Thanks! 

                                Bill Thurman
Subject: Eared Grebe remains at Centerton fish hatchery. next to the NE most pond
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 11:09:52 -0500
I saw the Eared Grebe yesterday morning then didn’t when I went back through 
an hour later after going to the store despite sitting there for a while . I 
went today to look for the BBWD, it was not there. I checked the Grebe pond and 
didn’t see it, there ware 2 Pied-billed Grebe. I made a round of the ponds 
then came back by and saw a flash of gold. It is still there. It’s dark and 
appears smaller than it is I think, it’s tough to see it when the water is 
stirred up by wind, like today, plus it stays down a while when fishing. It was 
toward the north side of the pond in the middle. 

 
The Willits are still there, plus at lest 3 Semipalmated Plovers, Yellowlegs, 
an Osprey, Lots of Blue-winged Teal and a few Shovelers. There are a few other 
peeps bigger than Least but their legs are all mud brown . 




Jacque Brown
240 Township Dr
Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: Yellow-Headed Blackbird
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 09:37:10 -0500
Holla Bend coughs up another goodie. Seen at distance near field with mud flat.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Oaks and birds?
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 09:35:44 -0500
How many species of oaks exist in North America?
How many bird species nest in only one specific species of oak?
Just asking, if anyone knows.
Thanks!

                                Bill Thurman
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Cindy Barry <cbarry30 AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 20:01:35 -0500
A friend of mine, who lives near Mount Ida in Montgomery County, had a 
yellow-headed blackbird at her "feeding table" in her backyard today. She had 
never seen one before. I checked my field guide and it looks like we are near 
the eastern edge of their migration range. Is anyone else seeing this bird? Is 
this bird seen each spring in the western part of the state during migration? 
She said it was on the table with a few cowbirds. Thanks for any info. 

 
Cindy Barry
Montgomery County 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Do you use eBird data for conservation?
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 00:41:47 +0000
I just did the survey, telling them that I use my old census records and create 
30-yr old time capsules that may one day be used for conservation as climates 
and landscapes change.  I have documented multiple counts of two birds extinct 
in their areas already--Siberian Crane and Great Indian Bustard--so it's too 
late for them.  But maybe not for others.   



 On Friday, 24 April 2015 7:20 AM, Daniel Scheiman  wrote: 

   

 If you use eBird data for conservation purposes, please take this survey.
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/datause2015/ 
"If in doubt, take the survey and tell us how you use eBird data. Collectively, 
this information is important for understanding eBird’s impact on bird 
conservation." 

Dan ScheimanLittle Rock, AR 

  
Subject: avocets at treadway's
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 00:28:33 +0000
I failed to mention this earlier, but LaDonna and I birded Treadway's Minnow 
Farms yesterday and found 17 American Avocets in breeding plumage. Truly 
beautiful birds. There were a lot of shorebirds on this pond, including both 
yellowlegs, Pectoral Sandpipers, Long-billed Dowitchers, and my FOS 
Semi-palmated Sandpipers. This pond is east of their hatchery and should be 
very good for the next several days should anyone want to give it a try. In 
fact, they have another pond that has just begun to drain across the road from 
their hatchery. It should be ripe in the next few days. kenny nichols 

cabot, ar
Subject: Re: eBird's Global Big Day
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 19:32:35 +0000
Thanks! I already notified eBird that the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas 
was having a field trip that day and I would post my findings. 

Also received a nice reply back from the eBird team.

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock, AR  72201

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan 

Subject: eBird's Global Big Day

May 9 is eBird's Global Big Day. They're encouraging the submission of 
checklists from all over the world. "You don’t need to commit to a full 
24-hours of birding on May 9th: a short visit to the local pond or woodland or 
even a few minutes in your yard is still a meaningful contribution!", they say. 


I plan on a 0.8 mile walk down my wooded street :) With a Belize trip looming 
in a few hours from then, I cannot afford anything more ambitious. 


If you plan on doing something, please reply to this and let other arbirders 
know. Let's push for a flood of checklist submissions from Arkansas! 






[image] 












Global Big Day — Regional Events | 
eBird 

South America, as seen by birders. Artwork by Luke Seitz. We first shar...


View on 
ebird.org 


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indicating the error. 
Subject: eBird's Global Big Day
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 19:10:15 +0000
May 9 is eBird's Global Big Day. They're encouraging the submission of 
checklists from all over the world.  "You don’t need to commit to a 
full 24-hours of birding on May 9th: a short visit to the local pond or 
woodland or even a few minutes in your yard is still a 
meaningful contribution!", they say.  

I plan on a 0.8 mile walk down my wooded street :) With a Belize trip looming 
in a few hours from then, I cannot afford anything more ambitious.   

If you plan on doing something, please reply to this and let other arbirders 
know.  Let's push for a flood of checklist submissions from Arkansas!  

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Global Big Day — Regional Events | eBirdSouth America, as seen by birders. 
Artwork by Luke Seitz. We first shar... | 

|  |
| View on ebird.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

 
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:42:39 -0500
...have arrived today, in good numbers, both sexes.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
Subject: FOS
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:16:07 -0500
LaDonna and I just birded HWY 155 between Dardanelle and Holla Bend NWR and had 
FOS Bobolink, Dickcissel and Western Kingbird. 


Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Duck at contortion (Ha ! I had to leave that) Centerton Fish hatchery Friday morning. 4/24/15
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:13:24 -0500
I was on the way to the grocery store I grabbed the camera and bins as I 
usually do on the way to the grocery store, doesn’t everybody?. I took the 
scenic route through the Centerton fish hatchery. in the SW most pond of the 
main set of ponds there was a BBWD with some BW Teal. 


Other ponds held three Willits and the Eared Grebe was still there, too. Lots 
of Spotted Sandpipers, a Solitary Sandpiper and Yellowlegs. 


 When I came back from the store the sun was out so I ran back through there, I 
startled the BBWD from the shore, when I pulled up and it was hidden by the 
tall grass, I didn’t know they ran across the water to take off. It settled 
on the other side of the pond, though. 




Jacque Brown
240 Township Dr
Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: Warbler insanity at Gillam Park
From: Jeremy Chamberlain <jdchamberlai AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 09:11:37 -0500
There were a lot of warblers to look at this morning at Gillam Park in
Little Rock.

Highlights include:
Golden-winged warbler
Mourning warbler (lifer)
and fos chestnut-sided warbler

Other migrant birds:
Lots of black-throated green warblers
Blue-winged warbler
Kentucky warbler
Swainsons and wood thrushes
Lots of Tennessee warblers
Nashville warbler
Common yellowthroat
Yellow-rumped warbler
Northern parula
Scarlet and summer tanangers
Black and white warbler
Subject: mystery nest
From: zoe caywood <zcaywood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 08:38:37 -0500
Has anyone been watching the V shaped nest on Hwy 49, Bentonville, between
exit 72 and 102, northbound lane just south of Carr's Plumbing?  I was in
southbound lane, the traffic was horrific & I couldn't get a good look at
the regal bird standing tall in the nest.

Thanks

-- 
Zoe Caywood, War Eagle,  479 236 4086
Subject: Do you use eBird data for conservation?
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 07:19:51 -0500
If you use eBird data for conservation purposes, please take this survey.

http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/datause2015/

"If in doubt, take the survey and tell us how you use eBird data.
Collectively, this information is important for understanding eBirds impact
on bird conservation."

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR 

Subject: BBWD
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 07:07:33 -0500
I have a friend in Greenwood who has a pair on his pond.  

Sandy B.



Sent from my iPad
Subject: FW: 2015 Spring Migration Counts adding Jefferson 4/25 & Carroll 5/9 or 10
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 03:20:00 +0000
Greetings all,
 It's time to get out and enjoy spring and help count birds for the 22nd annual 
AR Migratory Bird Count. 

It would be great if you could join one of the established counties.
Or you can do a county on your own. You can even do the same county on 
different days, just keep track of your data by calendar day. 

Just pick a calendar day between 4/23 and 5/20 to do a county.
Keep track of the number of birds of each species, your miles and hours. I have 
field data sheets and data compilation spreadsheets on the pc, if you want a 
copy. 


Please return your data to me, in any format that's easiest for you, including 
eBird or handwritten, by 6/20 so I can start the newsletter article. 


You can check out the website, get a feel of the international scope of the 
project or buy t-shirts & other items. www.birdday.org 


Dates I've heard from so far:    (at equals  AT )
Sat 4/25:    Jefferson   Dottie Boyles & ASCA   dboyles at arkansasEDC.com
Fri 1st-Sun 3rd:   Crawford, Franklin, Sebastian & Scott     AAS field trips
Sat 5/2:      Logan     Don Simons   don.simons at arkansas.gov
Sat 5/2:     Newton     Tim & Stephanie Barr    timandstephbarr at hotmail.com
Wens 6th or Mon 4th: Johnson Greg Taylor & Leif Anderson gregorytaylor at 
fs.fed.us or leanderson at fs.fed.us 

Thurs 5/7:    Prairie     Terry Singleterry    tasingleterry at hotmail.com
Fri 5/8:     Pope    Sarah Davis     sadavis at fs.fed.us
Sat 5/9:      Benton     Mike Mlodinow    mamlod at hotmail.com
Sat 5/9:     Boone    Sheree Rogers    shereerogers at hotmail.com
Sat 5/9: Brookhill Ranch (Garland) Vic Prislipsky vprislipsky at gmail.com 

Sat 5/9:    Pulaski       Dan Scheiman,      birddan at comcast.net
Sat 9th or Sun 10th: Carroll Judith Griffith & Don Matt 9waterfall9 at 
gmail.com 

Sun 5/10:      Washington     Mike Mlodinow    mamlod at hotmail.com
Mon 11th:    Baxter    Alice Snyder       alice.m.snyder at gmail.com
Sat   5/16:    Faulkner      Allan Mueller     akcmueller at gmail.com

Dates not set yet:
5/?:    Garland      Marty & Wayne Lynch    wmlynch at cablelynx.com
5/?: Felsenthal NWR Richard Stich richard.stich at 
plumcreek.com 

Maybe Chicot on the 9th; Phillips on the 10th and Mississippi on the 17th?: 
Leif Anderson 

Any others?  Ya'll are welcome to join in the fun.
Any questions, please holler at me. Leaderson at 
fs.fed.us daytime and some evenings 479-284-3150 
ext 3151 Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector 
Subject: 2015 Spring Migration Counts
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 02:30:03 +0000
Greetings all,
 It's time to get out and enjoy spring and help count birds for the 22nd annual 
AR Migratory Bird Count. 

It would be great if you could join one of the established counties.
Or you can do a county on your own. You can even do the same county on 
different days, just keep track of your data by calendar day. 

Just pick a calendar day between 4/23 and 5/20 to do a county.
Keep track of the number of birds of each species, your miles and hours. I have 
field data sheets and data compilation spreadsheets on the pc, if you want a 
copy. 


Please return your data to me, in any format that's easiest for you, including 
eBird or handwritten, by 6/20 so I can start the newsletter article. 


You can check out the website, get a feel of the international scope of the 
project or buy t-shirts & other items. www.birdday.org 


Dates I've heard from so far:    (at equals  AT )
Fri 1st-Sun 3rd:   Crawford, Franklin, Sebastian & Scott     AAS field trips
Sat 5/2:      Logan     Don Simons   don.simons at arkansas.gov
Sat 5/2:     Newton     Tim & Stephanie Barr    timandstephbarr at hotmail.com
Wens 6th or Mon 4th: Johnson Greg Taylor & Leif Anderson gregorytaylor at 
fs.fed.us or leanderson at fs.fed.us 

Thurs 5/7:    Prairie     Terry Singleterry    tasingleterry at hotmail.com
Fri 5/8:     Pope    Sarah Davis     sadavis at fs.fed.us
Sat 5/9:      Benton     Mike Mlodinow    mamlod at hotmail.com
Sat 5/9:     Boone    Sheree Rogers    shereerogers at hotmail.com
Sat 5/9: Brookhill Ranch (Garland) Vic Prislipsky vprislipsky at gmail.com 

Sat 5/9:    Pulaski       Dan Scheiman,      birddan at comcast.net
Sun 5/10:      Washington     Mike Mlodinow    mamlod at hotmail.com
Mon 11th:    Baxter    Alice Snyder       alice.m.snyder at gmail.com
Sat   5/16:    Faulkner      Allan Mueller     akcmueller at gmail.com

Dates not set yet:
5/?:    Garland      Marty & Wayne Lynch    wmlynch at cablelynx.com
5/?: Felsenthal NWR Richard Stich richard.stich at 
plumcreek.com 

Maybe Chicot on the 9th; Phillips on the 10th and Mississippi on the 17th?: 
Leif Anderson 

Any others?  Ya'll are welcome to join in the fun.
Any questions, please holler at me. Leaderson at 
fs.fed.us daytime and some evenings 479-284-3150 
ext 3151 Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector 
Subject: FW: Greater Sage Grouse Not Listed
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 20:37:08 -0500
FYI

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS
Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 8:31 PM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FW: Greater Sage Grouse Not Listed

>
>Listing proposal for Bi-State DPS withdrawn U.S. Secretary of the 
>Interior Sally Jewell announced that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
>has determined that the Bi-State Distinct Population of greater 
>sage-grouse does not require the protection of the Endangered Species 
>Act (ESA). The determination is "proof that we can conserve sagebrush 
>habitat across the West while we encourage sustainable economic 
>development," Jewell said. http://www.fws.gov/greatersagegrouse/
>
>This is a success story about members of the Bi-State Local Area 
>Working Group coming together in an effort to protect the Bi-State Sage 
>Grouse by protecting their habitat through conifer removal. Website:
>www.nrcs.usda.gov
>
>Alison A. Dalsimer
>Senior Research Associate
>Conservation and Natural Resources
>4800 Mark Center Drive, Suite 16G14
>Alexandria, VA 22350
>571-372-6893
>Allyn.a.dalsimer.ctr AT mail.mil
>
>
Subject: Lark Sparrow
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 00:34:49 +0000
Today two male Indigo Buntings showed up at the feeders at 5:10 pm, just before 
I got home. While mom and I we sitting by the window waiting for the buntings 
to return an odd looking sparrow dropped in. I grabbed the binoculars for a 
closer inspection and discovered it was a Lark Sparrow! Yard bird #75!! 


At one time we had House, Lark, Chipping, and White-throated Sparrows, as well 
as the Indigo Bunting for a splash of color. 


Dottie Boyles 
Little Rock 

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Subject: RBGR, etc. location
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 22:09:00 +0000
Sorry, Karen. I’m quite new to this. Scott Henderson/Gulf Mt. WMA is 1.5 mi. 
west of Scotland, or 14 mi. west of Clinton, when using the west entrance. One 
can also approach its east entrance from downtown Scotland, on Hwy. 389, by 
turning north on Gulf Mountain Rd. across from Dunhams’ store. Scotland Farms 
sits more or less caddy-corner to me and lies on the WMA’s south boundary. 
Maribird’s Yard, the registered name for my property, is on Hwy. 389, a 
couple miles from Scotland. The best time to visit Gulf Mountain right now is 
between 8- and 10AM. Earlier and the birds aren’t yet singing, though for 
waterfowl early is better. South of the west entrance is Miller Pond, gradually 
becoming a marsh but still some water deep enough for ducks. It’s a hit or 
miss sort of place but I check it once to twice daily. You won’t find any 
fancy entrance gates or parking areas, just signs. The headquarters is roughly 
5 mi. north on the west entrance (by Miller Pond) road. Ray Holden is the 
manager and very nice to talk to if he isn’t out grading the roads or a 
myriad of other tasks. Hope to see some of you there sometime. You can email me 
first at maribird AT outlook.com if you’d like a show around. 
Subject: Adult Golden Eagle
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 21:42:07 +0000
At 3:30 I was driving through the parking lot just west of the lodge here in 
Mount Magazine State Park when I spotted a large raptor flying slowly from the 
west. It was obviously larger than nearby turkey vultures. My first thought was 
immature bald eagle. But there was no white on it anywhere. My binoculars 
showed me details like dark gray tail with a black terminal band, dark gray 
wings, and a golden nape. It made a few slow, deep flaps. As it glided I 
noticed its wings were slightly lifted not flat like a bald eagle. Of course, I 
did not have a camera with me. This is my third sighting of golden eagle on the 
mountain over a 15 year period. 



Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: fos baltimore oriole
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 16:24:10 -0500
First Baltimore oriole , and a red-headed woodpecker came to the suet
feeder.

Big thrill for me.

Alan Gregory

Harrison,



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Subject: Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 21:15:06 +0000
Request. Please post your location (town or wherever) when reporting sightings. 
Thanks. Karen Hart 


Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 23, 2015, at 2:03 PM, diane yates 
> wrote: 


The one I've been waiting for at my feeder just a little while ago (before my 
1st attempt at a post got lost in space somewhere.) Just 1 male. Usually others 
follow by the next day and orioles coincide. I'll cross my fingers. Banner 
birding today on the WMA --FOS ACFL, SWTH and BLBW which I haven't seen for two 
years. And on Scotland Farms--NRWS circling like little hawks over the water 
and occasionally pausing on the fence in front of me. 3 VIRA out on the edge of 
the island and above me 5 TRES lined up on a utility line, taking turns 
sallying out after insects too small for me to see. The migrants staying just 
ahead of the storm front, I guess. I had hoped for such a day. Hope others are 
having great birding too.--Dianemarie. 


Subject: ONLY 16 BIRDING DAYS LEFT UNTIL IMBD
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 20:26:37 +0000
Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton continues to have excellent shorebird 
mudflat habitat. This morning Mike Mlodinow and I observed Semipalmated Plover 
(2), Killdeer (6), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (4), Spotted 
Sandpiper (8), Upland Sandpiper (1; just south of hatchery), Least Sandpiper 
(4), Bairds Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (32), Wilsons Snipe (4). The 
Eared Grebe present since at least April 9 continues in the middle pond on the 
northeast corner. The assistant, Heath Dake, told us they are taking down 
another large pond, which means superior mudflat habitat just as we are heading 
into best spring shorebirding. Let me know if there is much of anything in 
western Arkansas superior to a fresh mudflat in late April. 


And by my careful calculation, there are only 16 birding days left until 
International Migratory Shorebird Day. Mike Mlodinow, IMBD compiler for Benton 
and Washington counties, has set up Saturday May 9 for Benton, and Sunday May 
10 for Washington. As many of you who have enjoyed Mikes birding and expertise 
know, he does not own a car. There is an opportunity here for someone with a 
car whod like to spend one of these days, or both, birding with Mike. Unlike 
slackers (me), Mike goes dawn to dusk, so if you are interested and available, 
get ready for a lot of very cool, life-changing birding with him. (He promises 
there will be breaks during the day.) Mike also does not have a phone, so 
contact him here: mamlod AT hotmail.com. 


Finally, today reminded me of a Doug James ornithology class field trip to the 
hatchery in the early 1980s. As today, there was a drained pond with 
shorebirds, mostly pecs and peeps, but one that was different. That one was the 
quiz. Even with open books (Golden Guide), only one student got it. That was 
Charlie Wooten, who recognized the swept-back look, scaly back, and short black 
legs of Baird's Sandpiper. 
Subject: FOS Western Hills Park
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 15:25:57 -0500
Saw a scarlet tanager today. 

First ever for me! 

Also a pair of Baltimore Orioles, blue grosbeak, indigo bunting (did not see 
him sing), and a pair of great blue herons. Also saw pine warblers, yellow rump 
warblers, brown headed nuthatch, tree sparrow, chipping sparrow, white throated 
sparrow, eastern bluebirds, and a host of little birds far away and moving 
fast. 

 Nothing spectacular but everything appreciated. 

Chuck Anderson 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bell's slough north
From: kyle winkelmann <winkelmannkyle AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 14:20:06 -0500
Quiet morning for the most part at bell's north. 56 species for the
morning. Notables were yellow-billed cuckoo, great-crested flycatcher,
rose-breasted grosbeak, and a lingering Lincoln's sparrow

Kyle Winkelmann
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 18:50:55 +0000
The one I’ve been waiting for at my feeder just a little while ago (before my 
1st attempt at a post got lost in space somewhere.) Just 1 male. Usually others 
follow by the next day and orioles coincide. I’ll cross my fingers. Banner 
birding today on the WMA --FOS ACFL, SWTH and BLBW which I haven’t seen for 
two years. And on Scotland Farms--NRWS circling like little hawks over the 
water and occasionally pausing on the fence in front of me. 3 VIRA out on the 
edge of the island and above me 5 TRES lined up on a utility line, taking turns 
sallying out after insects too small for me to see. The migrants staying just 
ahead of the storm front, I guess. I had hoped for such a day. Hope others are 
having great birding too.--Dianemarie. 
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 18:20:39 +0000
Just saw my first at one of the pole feeders while sitting out on the porch! 
I’ve been watching and waiting for this favorite of mine who is as special to 
me as a life bird. I wish they stayed longer and hope he’ll bring his 
buddies. Usually the orioles show up about the same time. Also got ACFL, SWTH 
and BLBW on the WMA, and two swallow species and a rail at Scotland Farms. That 
pond is nearly a lake, really, and it has an island in the middle. It was 
man-made but is fed by a natural stream, a finger of the Little Red River. VIRA 
were poking around the island while the NRWS were dashing from the farm fence 
over the water and back, then circling like little hawks. Five TRES lined up on 
the utility line just above me and I said Thank you, God! This must be my 
special day. I needed one since I just learned the hand I played bluegrass 
gospel with cannot be fixed--only the carpel tunnel problem but the fingers 
that won’t flex enough to press the strings are severely arthritic. No 
replacement parts like my hip, knee and shoulder. If I was an old car I’d be 
headed for the junk yard. Ah, well, since I can still hike well and raise a 
binocular I figure I’m still good for another hundred-thousand!--Dianemarie 
Subject: Re: Teenager
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 11:14:25 -0500
Hi Diane

     I've seen quite a few adult Summer Tanagers but never one of the
teenagers. :)

                              Bill T
On Apr 23, 2015 10:36 AM, "diane yates"  wrote:

>  I saw that too but didn’t comment because I figured you were calling it
> an immature in your own way!--Dianemarie
>
>
>
>
Subject: Teenager
From: diane yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 15:33:39 +0000
I saw that too but didn’t comment because I figured you were calling it an 
immature in your own way!--Dianemarie 
Subject: Palm Warblers, yes plural!
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 10:25:24 -0500
Two western race palm warblers at Holla Bend seen individually on opposite 
sides of the refuge. 


Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Bona Dea Trails
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 09:55:59 -0500
Haha! I did that just for fun. I was wondering  if anyone was going to
catch that. :)
Thank you, Cheryle!

                           Bill Thurman
On Apr 23, 2015 9:50 AM, "Cheryle Sytsma"  wrote:

>  Teenager or Tanager?????
>
> On 4/22/2015 7:40 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
>
> One Summer Teenager
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Bona Dea Trails
From: Cheryle Sytsma <shalom AT CYBERBACK.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 09:49:12 -0500
Teenager or Tanager?????

On 4/22/2015 7:40 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
> One Summer Teenager
Subject: Re: Bona Dea Trails
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 20:42:30 -0500
Hey Ryan!  That's great to hear. An Upland Sandpiper? Plover?
Imagine that around Bona Dea.

And Joan, great to hear about your nesting mockingbird that will be dive
bombing in no time at all. :-)

                             Bill Thurman
 On Apr 22, 2015 8:25 PM, "Ryan R"  wrote:

> Must have missed you. I was at other entrance and walked other trail from
> 4:30-6:30. Agree birds were definitely moving. Had an upland sandpiper on
> the other side of all things.
>
> On Wed, Apr 22, 2015 at 7:40 PM, Bill Thurman <
> bill.masterofmusic AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> It was quite bird lively around here at the Bona Dea this evening. The
>> earlier rain today must have invigorated everyone.
>> Near the front entrance (with the small pavilion) I heard:
>>
>> Baltimore Oriole  singing
>> Orchard Oriole        "
>> Redwing Blackbirds   "
>> Amer. Robins.             "
>> Cardinals
>>
>> Further in I heard or saw:
>>
>> White Throated Sparrows 9 or 10
>> Carolina Wrens
>> Tufted Titmice
>> White Eyed Vireo.       singing
>> Red Eyed Vireo.          "
>> One Summer Teenager
>> "      Great Crested Flycatcher
>> Downy Woodpecker
>> Red Bellied Woodpecker
>> Common Crow
>> Fish Crow
>>
>> A few fairly nice people
>>
>>                                Bill Thurman
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Bona Dea Trails
From: Ryan R <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 20:25:57 -0500
Must have missed you. I was at other entrance and walked other trail from
4:30-6:30. Agree birds were definitely moving. Had an upland sandpiper on
the other side of all things.

On Wed, Apr 22, 2015 at 7:40 PM, Bill Thurman 
wrote:

> It was quite bird lively around here at the Bona Dea this evening. The
> earlier rain today must have invigorated everyone.
> Near the front entrance (with the small pavilion) I heard:
>
> Baltimore Oriole  singing
> Orchard Oriole        "
> Redwing Blackbirds   "
> Amer. Robins.             "
> Cardinals
>
> Further in I heard or saw:
>
> White Throated Sparrows 9 or 10
> Carolina Wrens
> Tufted Titmice
> White Eyed Vireo.       singing
> Red Eyed Vireo.          "
> One Summer Teenager
> "      Great Crested Flycatcher
> Downy Woodpecker
> Red Bellied Woodpecker
> Common Crow
> Fish Crow
>
> A few fairly nice people
>
>                                Bill Thurman
>
>
Subject: Bona Dea Trails
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:40:33 -0500
It was quite bird lively around here at the Bona Dea this evening. The
earlier rain today must have invigorated everyone.
Near the front entrance (with the small pavilion) I heard:

Baltimore Oriole  singing
Orchard Oriole        "
Redwing Blackbirds   "
Amer. Robins.             "
Cardinals

Further in I heard or saw:

White Throated Sparrows 9 or 10
Carolina Wrens
Tufted Titmice
White Eyed Vireo.       singing
Red Eyed Vireo.          "
One Summer Teenager
"      Great Crested Flycatcher
Downy Woodpecker
Red Bellied Woodpecker
Common Crow
Fish Crow

A few fairly nice people

                               Bill Thurman
Subject: Earth Day and what a way to celebrate- 1, 2, 3 .... 8, and then oh no!
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 12:04:51 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

We started our Earth Day celebration a bit early today. Shortly after 9:00 my 
wife alerted me to suspicious activity at one of our wood duck nest boxes. The 
adult female had been in the opening several times looking around, flown to the 
ground, gone back into the box, etc. As we've learned from many past such 
experiences, that could only mean one thing- it's fledging day for her 
offspring. Just before 9:15 she flew to the ground and her young charges 
started appearing in the nest box opening and then jumping to the ground. A 
total of 8 were tallied. It's a lot easier to count them as they appear and 
then jump from the nest box than to get a head count when they are all crowded 
together on the ground or water and suddenly moving this way and that. 


At that point Mom led them down to our small pond which is right behind our 
house and easily visible through our panoramic dining room windows. That's when 
the uh oh moment happened. A ninth fledgling jumped to the ground after Mom and 
her then 8 charges were out of sight at the far end of our small pond. The 
straggler looked around and appeared to be lost as to what to do next. We've 
had late bloomers get separated from the rest of their charges in years past, 
and the options are not very good in those instances. One year we struggled all 
through our woods to capture a straggler. For a one-day old they are amazingly 
fast and agile on the ground when they don't want to be caught. 


Today turned out okay though. The straggler managed to work its way down the 
slight embankment to the pond, and at that point Mom spotted him/her and led 
her other 8 charges to make it 9. One very big bullet dodged. 


I watched them for about 1 1/2 hours until I had to keep moving. It's now 
shortly before noon, and I'm told they are still on the pond. Some years the 
adult female takes them to the pond for a very brief period and then leads them 
off into the woods never to be seen again. Sometimes she leads them straight 
into the woods and doesn't go to the pond. A few times a predator like one of 
our resident red-shouldered hawks has kept them pinned on the pond in deeper 
water for hours. Today we've seen no sign of predators, but Mrs. Woodie for 
whatever reason has decided to keep them on the pond for a lot longer than 
usual. 


My sense is she may a first-time Mom and by design had fewer offspring to learn 
the ropes. She may also be more nervous re potential danger than a veteran Mom. 
Purely conjecture on my part. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas