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Updated on Monday, March 20 at 07:50 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Lesser Scaup,©Barry Kent Mackay

20 Mar Re: Miller County, 3/19/2017 [Elizabeth Shores ]
20 Mar Re: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2 [Elizabeth Shores ]
20 Mar Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2 [Dottie Boyles ]
19 Mar Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure [Karen ]
19 Mar The Renderings I Cannot Do [Herschel Raney ]
19 Mar Miller County, 3/19/2017 [swamp_fox ]
19 Mar Yellow-throated Warbler [akcmueller ]
19 Mar FOS RTHU [Jeffrey Short ]
19 Mar FW: King of the Sky [Jeffrey Short ]
19 Mar Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies [Mary Ann King ]
19 Mar Hummer [Randy ]
19 Mar Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies [Barry Haas ]
19 Mar FOS Louisiana Waterthrush [Judy & Don ]
16 Mar No Subject [Thomas Pate ]
16 Mar SURF SCOTER AT ALMA WASTEWATER (again? still?) [Joseph Neal ]
15 Mar Zinke era [Jeffrey Short ]
15 Mar Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds. [Jacque Brown ]
16 Mar Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note [Norman Lavers ]
18 Mar Blue Heron Rookery [Teresa Mathews ]
15 Mar Re: Nesting Ospreys [Dan Scheiman ]
16 Mar Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
16 Mar Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note [Jerry Davis ]
15 Mar Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery [Daniel Mason ]
14 Mar Re: Yard questions [Jack and Pam ]
18 Mar Soundings [Herschel Raney ]
15 Mar GOLDEN-PLOVERS AT FROG [Joseph Neal ]
14 Mar Re: Yard questions [Janine Perlman ]
18 Mar woodcocks dancing inthe streets [Teresa Mathews ]
18 Mar Purple Martin's in El Dorado. [Dottie Boyles ]
14 Mar Re: Yard questions ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
14 Mar Red Slough Bird Survey - March 14 [David Arbour ]
15 Mar Re: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds. [Jacque Brown ]
18 Mar Re: Northern Saw-whet [Judy & Don ]
15 Mar Re: Juncos now???? [Kara K Beach ]
18 Mar Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF [Joseph Neal ]
15 Mar FW: Buffalo River--Opportunity to speak out DUE 17 Mar 1 [Jeffrey Short ]
16 Mar Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note [Janine Perlman ]
14 Mar Re: Yard questions [Nancy Felker ]
16 Mar "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher [Stacy Clanton ]
14 Mar Re: Yard questions [Sally Jo Gibson ]
15 Mar Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery [Gmail ]
14 Mar Re: Yard questions [Mary Ann King ]
17 Mar Cerulean Warblers in Northwestern Arkansas ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
17 Mar RED-B MERGANSER AND COMMON LOONS AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE [Joseph Neal ]
18 Mar CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS [Joseph Neal ]
15 Mar Juncos now???? [Dorothy Cooney ]
17 Mar Re: Black & White Warblers... [Judy & Don ]
15 Mar Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery [Jacque Brown ]
18 Mar Re: Soundings [Elizabeth Shores ]
15 Mar Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery [Jacque Brown ]
16 Mar FIRST SPRING SONGS BY BROWN THRASHER [Joseph Neal ]
17 Mar Re: Black & White Warblers... [Janine Perlman ]
14 Mar HERMIT THRUSH, BUT NOT TAPER-TIP, AT NEW LAKE ATALANTA [Joseph Neal ]
17 Mar Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher [Jeffrey Short ]
16 Mar Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note [Jerry Davis ]
15 Mar eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery [Dan Scheiman ]
16 Mar Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note [Judy & Don ]
16 Mar Good info on the swine CAFO [Jeffrey Short ]
18 Mar Re: CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS [Daniel Mason ]
16 Mar Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note [Jerry Davis ]
16 Mar Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note [Jerry Davis ]
14 Mar Re: Yard questions [Judy & Don ]
15 Mar Re: Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project Hats for Next Season [Debra Grim ]
16 Mar Yellow-headed Blackbird [Lenore Gifford ]
11 Mar Best Management Practices for small arms firing ranges [Jeffrey Short ]
9 Mar reply from state wildlife veterinarian Fwd: CWD and scavengers [Judy & Don ]
8 Mar Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map [Jeffrey Short ]
8 Mar Sandhill Cranes [kjdillard ]
8 Mar CROSSBILLS-YES. SCOTER-NO. [Joseph Neal ]
7 Mar Art for the Birds III ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
7 Mar Red Slough Bird Survey - March 7 [David Arbour ]
7 Mar Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this? [Judy & Don ]
8 Mar FOS Purple martins [Tim Tyler ]
8 Mar Henslow's Sparrow at Kingsland Prairie NA [Devin Moon ]
8 Mar White-winged Dove [Delos McCauley ]
7 Mar Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this? [Judy & Don ]

Subject: Re: Miller County, 3/19/2017
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:38:12 -0500
How many times and at how many spots have you observed them during this 
Sandhill season? More than anyone, ever, in SW AR? Maybe there often are 
lingerers and you are the first to recognize that. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 19, 2017, at 7:26 PM, swamp_fox  wrote:
> 
> A brief photo outing east of Texarkana yielded a few American Golden-Plovers, 
my first Scissor-tailed Flycatcher of the year and one surprise. 6 Sandhill 
Cranes were still lingering at one of their less consistent locations from the 
2016-2017 winter season. I was expecting all of them to have departed long 
before now. 

> 
> Charles Mills
> Texarkana TX 75503
Subject: Re: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:32:13 -0500
Great reports! Thank you.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:12 AM, Dottie Boyles  wrote:
> 
> First of all I'd like to thank Karen Holliday not only for the nice
> write-up, but for going along with our crazy idea and doing the driving. It
> was a whirlwind trip!
> 
> The adventure for Mom and I began Friday, March 17, (while Karen was at
> work) with a trip to south Arkansas to visit Arkansas Historic Preservation
> Program (AHPP) passport stamping stations in Crossett and El Dorado and of
> course state parks in the area. State Parks included Moro Bay, where the
> pine trees were dripping with singing Pine Warblers, we saw a large flock of
> Chipping Sparrows with Dark-eyed Juncos mixed in; next we ate lunch at the
> South Arkansas Arboretum while being serenaded by a Northern Mockingbird
> doing great imitations of a Brown-headed Nuthatch. After a visit to the
> Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources we headed to Logoly SP. The park was
> really quiet, not a single bird singing, but we found a very special bird-er
> --Devon Moon, who works at the park!  After Logoly we raced to White Oak
> Lake SP where the park staff was nice enough to stay a few minutes late
> until we could arrive at 5:02 and buy a park patch. They were a super group
> and fun to visit with. We heard more singing Pine Warblers and a Pileated
> Woodpecker. Last stop of the day was to Poison Springs Battleground SP
> before heading home to pack our bags for the northwest Arkansas trip on Sat.
> and Sun. with Karen. 
> 
> Most numerous bird of the day--Turkey Vulture. I have no idea how many we
> saw altogether, but to say close to 100 would not be an exaggeration! We
> never saw a Black Vulture, just TV's.
> 
> It was a fun three days. We finished the AHPP passport program by visiting
> seven stamping stations, visited 12 State Parks (Devil's Den was the only
> park that was also a stamping station), drove or rode just under 1,000
> miles, and met a lot of nice people along the way! I have now visited 46 of
> the 52 Arkansas State Parks and Mom, 42. She is catching up fast with me!
> 
> Dottie
> Little Rock
Subject: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 00:12:35 -0500
First of all I'd like to thank Karen Holliday not only for the nice
write-up, but for going along with our crazy idea and doing the driving. It
was a whirlwind trip!

The adventure for Mom and I began Friday, March 17, (while Karen was at
work) with a trip to south Arkansas to visit Arkansas Historic Preservation
Program (AHPP) passport stamping stations in Crossett and El Dorado and of
course state parks in the area. State Parks included Moro Bay, where the
pine trees were dripping with singing Pine Warblers, we saw a large flock of
Chipping Sparrows with Dark-eyed Juncos mixed in; next we ate lunch at the
South Arkansas Arboretum while being serenaded by a Northern Mockingbird
doing great imitations of a Brown-headed Nuthatch. After a visit to the
Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources we headed to Logoly SP. The park was
really quiet, not a single bird singing, but we found a very special bird-er
--Devon Moon, who works at the park!  After Logoly we raced to White Oak
Lake SP where the park staff was nice enough to stay a few minutes late
until we could arrive at 5:02 and buy a park patch. They were a super group
and fun to visit with. We heard more singing Pine Warblers and a Pileated
Woodpecker. Last stop of the day was to Poison Springs Battleground SP
before heading home to pack our bags for the northwest Arkansas trip on Sat.
and Sun. with Karen. 

Most numerous bird of the day--Turkey Vulture. I have no idea how many we
saw altogether, but to say close to 100 would not be an exaggeration! We
never saw a Black Vulture, just TV's.

It was a fun three days. We finished the AHPP passport program by visiting
seven stamping stations, visited 12 State Parks (Devil's Den was the only
park that was also a stamping station), drove or rode just under 1,000
miles, and met a lot of nice people along the way! I have now visited 46 of
the 52 Arkansas State Parks and Mom, 42. She is catching up fast with me!

Dottie
Little Rock
Subject: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 21:55:03 -0500
In May of 2016, Dottie and Doris Boyles decided to participate in the 50th 
Anniversary of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program to visit all 26 
historic stamping stations scattered around the state and get their "passport" 
stamped with each sites's unique stamp. All sites are on the National Register 
of Historic Places in Arkansas. Smart ladies that they are, they realized they 
could combine traveling to the stamping stations, add to their goal of visiting 
all 52 Arkansas state parks, and squeeze in birding along the way. Last July, 
following the ASCA field trip to Bois D'Arc WMA south of Hope, they convinced 
me to sign up for the program when we visited the stamping station at the Bill 
Clinton Birthplace Historic Site. I've been tagging along ever since on their 
grand adventure. Due to my work schedule, I'm several stamping stations behind 
the ladies. 


This weekend was Dottie and Doris' big push to visit their last few stations 
with a big loop through Northwest Arkansas. We left Maumelle Saturday morning 
and headed to St. Joe to visit their historic train station and get our 
passport stamped. While there, we saw only a few Yellow-rumped Warblers and a 
Phoebe, but we enjoyed learning about the history of the train line and 
station. Next stop was the stamping station at the Carnegie Library in Eureka 
Springs. We didn't realized Saturday was their annual St. Patrick's Day Parade, 
which explained the huge crush of people. No birds were noticed because we were 
distracted by the colorfully dressed all-in-green, feather-wrapped, sequined, 
and tight-skirted participants--and that was just the men! We got out of town 
just ahead of the start of the parade! 


Next stop was Hobb's State Park. Best bird at the feeders was a stunning male 
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, and for we central Arkansas birders, we were excited 
to see a pair of PURPLE FINCHES. Last stop of the day was the Prairie Grove 
Battlefield State Park. We had Turkey Vultures coming into roost on the chimney 
tower and in the trees. At the battlefield overlook, the field was full of 
about FOUR HUNDRED Cowbirds, plus a smattering of Meadowlarks. In a small 
partially drained pond were a dozen Wilson's Snipe, four Pectoral Sandpipers, 
and one Least Sandpiper. We then called it a day and headed to our hotel in 
Fayetteville. 


Sunday morning, our first stop was Devil's Den State Park. Not much bird 
action. Lots of Turkey Vultures riding the thermals. Fish Crows, White-breasted 
Nuthatches, and YS Flickers were also seen. Next stop was Lake Fort Smith State 
Park. The history of the building of the dam and the flooding of the lake 
included the loss of important farm land that was part of Frog Bayou, which 
included strawberry farms. Best bird on the lake was a male RED-BREASTED 
MERGANSER in full breeding plumage. On to the Drennen-Scott House stamping 
station in Van Buren. What an informative history of the port and barge traffic 
and again a mention of Frog Bayou! Who knew that Frog was a such big deal back 
then?! We saw our FOY BROAD-WINGED HAWK. 


FINAL stamping station was the Ozark Area Train Depot Museum on the Arkansas 
River at Ozark, which at the time in the 1920's was a vital transfer port of 
goods for the locals and for the river traffic. We spotted a few Ring-billed 
Gulls and DC Cormorants. Congratulations to Dottie and Doris who at this stop 
had completed visiting all 26 stamping stations in less than two years! 


Our final destination Sunday was Mt. Nebo, which Doris had never visited. We 
left Ozark going to Paris, then got on Hwy. 22 heading toward Dardanelle and 
Mt. Nebo. We couldn't pass by Delaware Point without stopping to check the 
lake. At Delaware we found two OSPREY sitting on a NEST on a platform on one of 
the big channel markers! Near the same channel marker, we had a LESSER 
BLACK-BACKED GULL. We also had Scaup, Pelicans, Ring-billed and Herring Gulls, 
Coots, and Horned Grebes, plus an adult Bald Eagle. 


We then headed up to the top of Mt. Nebo. Great views from all directions. At 
1,800 feet, we were higher than the soaring Turkey Vultures! Very little bird 
activity so late in the day, so we headed back down the mountain and home. 
Great weather this weekend for a awesome adventure of historical touring and 
birding! Birding can be incorporated into any travel wherever you are. What a 
great hobby! 

Karen Holliday
(Back home in Maumelle)
Subject: The Renderings I Cannot Do
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 21:38:13 -0500
If you want to judge a bird artist, just look at his (or her) Wood Duck. 
Either sex will do (artist or duck), but clearly the male image is a 
daunting undertaking. A pair landed in a tall oak in my back yard this 
morning, and though nervous, they stayed while I went in for the scope 
and set it up. Both birds could be seen in the field of view: the yellow 
rim of the female’s eye and the bright red rim of the male with the red 
actual iris on the male. The female’s eye just looks dark inside its 
yellow rim. Highlighted further by the white orbicular feathering that 
fades back in the line towards her nape. They stayed for an hour or 
more, same branch. I kept the scope on them the whole time. And I went 
to get Sibley to hold next to the scope. And the Third Edition of Nat 
Geo Birds.

In the scope, of course, there is no hope for an artist. Against several 
million years of design, a duck made of stardust and time, I would kick 
over my palette and go have a drink. And in Nat Geo, the Woodies were 
done by Cynthia House. I know nothing else of her. People forget the 
fine Nat Geo book has over twenty artists working on it. Sibley, on the 
other hand, did them all. Every bird. Good Lord is what I say again to 
this fact.

The male is a wonder of subtle color blends in the scope. And both 
artists go a little too yellow on that long flank patch. Miss House 
perhaps wins there though neither captures the intricate fine barring 
inside the cream patch. The feathers above this are a looping row of 
black and white offset, coming to delicate overlapping tips. Behind this 
is that striking deep purple area with three, count them, three orange 
streaks coming down to highlight this purple zone. These are poorly 
rendered by Miss House. Sibley has four dashes of orange there. But they 
are really fine clusters of hairs gently curving down over the purples. 
Long triangles of eyelash, a fineness likely not reproducible in 
ordinary art.

And the head of the male is a complete other matter. Sibley seems to 
miss the yellow ring on the female’s eye. He does better with the 
blending of blues and greens on the male head above those triangles of 
orange and red up right and left from the beak. The stark white linings 
of the neck and face are well done in both. The white streaking in that 
handsome fall back tuft of erectile feathers is frankly impossible to 
recreate outside the eye, outside reality. In my opinion. It is a bird 
to stare at and forget again and again in all its details. And a dead 
one in hand surely does not express all that this animal can be.

It inspired me after they left to go rescue my duck box. It has been on 
an oak tree on the west side of my swamp for years. But this 
multi-hundred year old tree cracked across its rotten heartwood in the 
wind recently. And this brought the box down to head high, the remnant 
tree leaning in all its previously wondrous spiring against another oak. 
I took off the screws and gave it a new rook plank, cleaned its inside 
and moved it to the east side, where I can see it from the road. It will 
be among Barred Owls, I hope this does not make a duck family uneasy.

I heard the duck pair whistle back into the swamp at dusk this evening, 
with the frog chorus starting back up and the four Barred Owls 
chattering to each other with wild echoing cacks and whoops and monkey 
cries, the quizzing about the cooks gone mad and frenzied. These mad 
owls were feeding before the sun went down, dropping into my leaves, 
fluttering up into my cedars. The owls may already have young mouths to 
feed. The woodies, well, I await further word.

(All respects to House and Sibley for even making any efforts at putting 
such birds on paper. )

And if you can stare at a Wood Duck in a scope anytime soon. Do it. Do 
it and be amazed again.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR

(Thanks to the birdlist peoples who sent me notes this week.)
Subject: Miller County, 3/19/2017
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 19:26:57 -0500
A brief photo outing east of Texarkana yielded a few American Golden-Plovers, 
my first Scissor-tailed Flycatcher of the year and one surprise. 6 Sandhill 
Cranes were still lingering at one of their less consistent locations from the 
2016-2017 winter season. I was expecting all of them to have departed long 
before now. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503
Subject: Yellow-throated Warbler
From: akcmueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 19:16:50 -0500

Yellow-throated Warbler and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher at Grassy Lake in Faulkner 
County today 


Allan Mueller
Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: FOS RTHU
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 18:57:01 -0500
Today about 5p.  Earliest at our place since we have been here (2006). 

 

Jeff Short

Bottom loop of the backwards "S" on the continuation of the Ouachita River

(2 mi downstream of Remmel Dam) 
Subject: FW: King of the Sky
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 15:25:38 -0500
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This came from a gentleman who runs a 2,000-acre corn farm up around Barron,
WI, not far from Oshkosh He used to fly F-4Es and F-16s for the Guard and
participated in the first Gulf War.

 

His story:



I went out to plant corn for a bit, to finish a field before tomorrow
morning and witnessed 'The Great Battle'.  A golden eagle -- big, with about
a six-foot wingspan - flew right in front of the tractor.  It was being
chased by three crows that were continually dive bombing it and pecking at
it.  The crows do this because the eagles rob their nests when they find
them.

Description: cid:X.MA1.1468812593 AT aol.com
 
Description: cid:X.MA2.1468812593 AT aol.com


Description: cid:X.MA5.1468812593 AT aol.com
At any rate, the eagle banked hard right in one evasive maneuver, then
landed in the field about 100 feet from the tractor.  This eagle stood about
3 feet tall.  The crows all landed too and took up positions around the
eagle at 120 degrees apart, but kept their distance at about 20 feet from
the big bird.  The eagle would take a couple steps towards one of the crows
and they'd hop backwards and forward to keep their distance.  Then the
reinforcement showed up.  I happened to spot the eagle's mate hurtling down
out of the sky at what appeared to be approximately Mach 1.5.  Just before
impact, the eagle on the ground took flight, (obviously a coordinated
tactic; probably pre-briefed) and the three crows that were watching the
grounded eagle also took flight -- thinking they were going to get in some
more pecking on the big bird.

Description: cid:X.MA4.1468812593 AT aol.com

The first crow being targeted by the diving eagle never stood a snowball's
chance.  There was a mid-air explosion of black feathers, and that crow was
done.

                                                                            

                                                                     
The diving eagle then banked hard left in what had to be a 9G climbing turn,
using the energy it had accumulated in the dive, and hit crow #2 less than
two seconds later.  Another crow dead.

Description: cid:X.MA6.1468812593 AT aol.com

The grounded eagle, which was now airborne and had an altitude advantage on
the remaining crow that was streaking eastward in full burner, made a short
dive, then banked hard right when the escaping crow tried to evade the hit.
It didn't work -  crow #3 bit the dust at about 20 feet AGL.  This aerial
battle was better than any air show I've been to, including the War Birds
show at Oshkosh  The two eagles ripped the crows apart, and ate them on the
ground; and, as I got closer and closer working my way across the field, I
passed within 20 feet of one of them as it ate its catch.  It stopped and
looked at me as I went by, and you could see in the look of that bird that
it knew who's Boss of the Sky.  What a beautiful bird!
Description: cid:X.MA7.1468812593 AT aol.com
Not only did they kill their enemy, they ate them.  One of the best Fighter
Pilot stories I've seen in a long time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Subject: Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 15:15:45 -0500
Hooray Barry!!!

MaryAnn   King
 In the pine woods northwest of London, AR
Subject: Hummer
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 14:36:35 -0500
Just had first hummer
Randy
West Pulaski County 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 12:26:56 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

I know from past posts that some on this list prefer there be no "politics" 
posted or discussed here. This is a bird listserv, and host Kim Smith has 
pointed that out numerous times in the past when the discussion has gone 
astray. 


That said, we won't be able to continue enjoying birds like we do while also 
ignoring the diminishment of their needs including suitable habitat, sufficient 
food when they need it most like during breeding season, etc. The issues are 
inseparable. 


We have easy access to data showing a number of avian species are declining, 
some precipitously. The National Audubon Society has been doing what it could 
to educate the general public about the threat climate change poses to birds. 
We can continue to do nothing more than watch birds until the last one is gone 
(what I call the head in the sand approach), or we can as birders and members 
of the larger community do our best to be part of the solution to keep that 
from happening. 


Here's a letter by someone who thinks we must do both, enjoy birds while 
working to ensure they are around for future generations: 


http://www.arkccl.org/our-blog/bird-lovers-should-press-for-climate-policies

This is just one example of an organization working on climate change that 
impacts whether, what kind and how many birds we can focus our binoculars on 5, 
10, 20 years down the road. Is this our generation's challenge to avoid a 
"Silent Spring"? 


Those who prefer to leave the "politics" to others probably stopped reading 
this post after the first sentence. That's their prerogative. Those of you who 
are still with me are probably the very people doing everything you know how to 
make the planet habitable not just for birds, but for humans as well. 


Will we do enough in time?

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Wood duck activity on our pond and in our nest boxes this spring is 
somewhat confusing. We have two pairs of woodies on the pond most days, but 
we've not observed a female entering or leaving the nest box as often as usual. 
So we aren't sure if one of our boxes is being used, or not. A wood duck egg 
was discovered by the edge of the pond last week. Another mystery. We've seen 
red-breasted nuthatch, golden-crowned and ruby-crowned kinglets, sapsucker, 
brown creeper along with the usual suspects at this time of year. And a 
Cooper's hawk has spent time hunting behind the house in the woods. The 
Cooper's recently had a female cardinal trapped within the dense vines of a 
native honeysuckle. The cardinal was too smart to leave its safe haven, and the 
Cooper's finally moved on sans that cardinal as its next meal. 
Subject: FOS Louisiana Waterthrush
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 07:56:29 -0500
I just heard the first few notes of a Louisiana Waterthrush song, brightly 
ringing from where the waterfall flows into the creek. 


And the first male Cowbirds were at the feeder yesterday.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: No Subject
From: Thomas Pate <thpate111 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 19:45:14 +0000
I have moved to Guatemala.  Please remove me from the list.
Subject: SURF SCOTER AT ALMA WASTEWATER (again? still?)
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 22:03:53 +0000
A single Surf Scoter was among a diverse group of ducks at Alma Wastewater 
Treatment Facility today. Plumage-wise, todays scoter looked similar to the 
bird I photographed in same place March 7 (what I interpret as a juv first 
winter molting into an adult female). So did the assemblage of several hundred 
ducks: Gadwall, American Wigeon, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, 
Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Redhead, Ring-necked duck, Lesser Scaup, Surf 
Scoter, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, Ruddy Duck. Most numerous: Northern 
Shoveler, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, and Rudy Duck. In my excitement at 
refinding (? or finding?) the scoter, I left my headlights on and ran down the 
battery. A kind man working at the facility gave me a much-appreciated jump. 

Subject: Zinke era
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 21:02:15 -0500
"Living on Earth" has a segment on the new Interior Secretary and addresses
the lead bullet reversal
http://www.loe.org/shows/shows.html?programID=17-P13-00010 

 

Jeff Short

 

)Apologies for cross-posting(
Subject: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 16:24:57 -0500
I’m not sure if I’ve seen this before but plan to watch it anyway. It’s 
pledge time so allow for the extra half hour. Jacque Brown, Centerton. 
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 18:22:25 +0000
Really interesting info. Thanks.We watch the hummers go along our cedars to 
pick off the little spiders.  When our big Argiope spiders go missing from 
their webs at night (and not just to make an egg nest somewhere) we know 
someone, perhaps a Screech Owl, had a substantial meal. 

Norman has been looking at spiders closely this last couple of years and has 
found well over 100 species of spiders in our never-sprayed yard of less than 1 
acre. A few species we have only seen when wasps dropped them on their way to 
stock their mud nests, they are far better at finding them than we are.  The 
variety of ways in which spiders make their living, the many kinds of webs, the 
tunnels like trap-doors and pursewebs, the way that jumping spiders respond to 
us with their big eyes, the ways in which some species care for their young, it 
is all fascinating and makes me feel very sorry for arachnophobes who are 
missing out on all that. Go out at night with a headlamp fixed near your eye 
level and look at the ground in Spring and Summer. It will sparkle like the 
night sky with the eyes of hundreds of (mainly) wolf spiders. Then you will get 
a sense of their numbers. 


Cheryl Lavers

 

 On Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:51 AM, Janine Perlman  
wrote: 

 

 That's terrific information, Jerry.  Birds specifically choose spiders 
because their nestlings require them.  Insects are deficient in taurine, which 
is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.  

 Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for 
successful propagation of our native avian species. 

 
 Janine
 
 On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis 
 wrote:
  
 This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals 
with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat 
health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough 
insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to 
eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see 
evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a 
healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see 
birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control 
of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.    Jerry W. Davis Hot 
Springs, AR   Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs USA TODAY 
Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests 
each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 
85 million elephants. That’s a lot of bugs. Put another way, all humans 
together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. 
Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the world’s 
total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other 
seafood. The study, published in the European journal The Science of Nature, is 
the first to make such a global estimate of spiders’ eating habits. Most 
spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, 
grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and 
tundra areas. The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, 
especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect 
plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study 
lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.     

 
 

   
Subject: Blue Heron Rookery
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 20:10:45 -0500
Is across from the visitor's center at Lake Catherine State Park on the
other side of the Lake. I found out from one of the guys today about it.
Its directly across from Cabins 15 & 16 in the woods there.   We been
hearing strange noises that even I couldn't Id as a bird? But one of the
rangers said there is a big rookery in there of Blue Herons. That why there
are so many that hang around the lake.   Teresa , Hot Springs, AR

-- 
We Must let go of the life we planned . So to accept the one that is
waiting for us. Bad or Good Life is under the bridge flowing down the river
. Here's an instant? Gone in a moment.  Just let it go. Don't hang to it.
God will do the plan not you.
Subject: Re: Nesting Ospreys
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 21:22:28 +0000
Search the Bird Records Database to see the nesting records. 
http://www.arbirds.org/searchspecies.asp 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 


----- Original Message -----

From: "Glenn" <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 3:56:54 PM 
Subject: Nesting Ospreys 

We found an Osprey building a nest today, near North Little Rock. I haven't 
heard of Ospreys nesting in Arkansas. Is this normal? Thanks. 


Glenn Wyatt 
Cabot 
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 17:11:08 +0000
Spiders are indeed important in the ecology of our terrestrial ecosystems. But, 
all spiders are carnivores, and primarily need insects and other arthropods to 
eat. 



It is my observation that insects are declining in numbers. I attribute this to 
a number of factors. Homo sapiens is have a drastic impact by our activities, 
particularly, so-called "development" and "progress". In NW AR we are seeing 
this more and more. Farmland, natural areas, are being converted into houses, 
malls, highways, chem lawns, exotic plants in the landscape, pesticide treated 
areas, asphalt, concrete, warehouses, everywhere. 



A healthy ecosystem is full of native plants, free of pesticides, many insects, 
and the creatures that depend on them, the spiders and birds. 



The question is: who will slow and stop "development", the crush of humanity 
upon the Earth? 




________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Janine Perlman  

Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:50:47 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - 
A Note 


That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because 
their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is 
required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment. 

Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for 
successful propagation of our native avian species. 


Janine

On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:
This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with 
birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat 
health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough 
insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to 
eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see 
evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a 
healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see 
birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control 
of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR


Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs

USA TODAY

Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests 
each year, according to a new study. Thats equal to the weight of more than 85 
million elephants. 


Thats a lot of bugs.

Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of 
meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of 
seafood, while the worlds total seabird population eats an estimated 77million 
tons of fish and other seafood. 


The study, published in the

European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global 
estimate of spiders eating habits. 


Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, 
grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and 
tundra areas. 


The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in 
forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees 
by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author 
Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. 



Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 12:11:04 -0500
Great information. there is a wealth of knowledge out there that we need to 
know. Thanks for sharing. 


Jerry 

From: Janine Perlman 
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:50 AM
To: jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - 
A Note 


That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because 
their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is 
required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment. 

Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for 
successful propagation of our native avian species. 


Janine


On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis 
wrote:

 This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals 
with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat 
health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough 
insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to 
eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see 
evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a 
healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see 
birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control 
of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds. 


  Jerry W. Davis
  Hot Springs, AR
  Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs 

  USA TODAY

 Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests 
each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 
85 million elephants. 


  That’s a lot of bugs.

 Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of 
meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of 
seafood, while the world’s total seabird population eats an estimated 
77million tons of fish and other seafood. 


  The study, published in the

 European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global 
estimate of spiders’ eating habits. 


 Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, 
grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and 
tundra areas. 


 The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in 
forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees 
by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author 
Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. 





Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 15:06:29 -0500
I just happened to see the photo on ebird this morning before the list 
went through.  Took a couple kids out there and got there just a few 
minutes before 11.  No luck.  Asked a guy driving b y who said they 
hadn't seen it since the report.  Being next to the building they were 
all in, they scared it when they went to look at it.  I don't know if it 
moved on but we searched the area for over an hour and a half.  No 
luck.  That bird is on my need list and every time it's reported, it's 
gone before I get a chance to look.  Some day.
There was a group of ducks on one of the ponds, about 35ish that looked 
like a mixed group of scaups(greater and lesser) with a female 
canvasback in there.  Blue-winged and green-winged teal as well as 
mallards and buffleheads on a few other ponds.  1 least sandpiper and 15 
pectoral.  Saw only 4 when we pulled in but just a while later the group 
had grown.  Also had a harrier fly over for a minute.  Counted about 39 
species in all so still a good day but still bummed about that 
blackbird.    Some rusties are still there.  I've seen people report 
brewer's there lately but I haven't had any confirmed looks at any yet.  
Some of those rusties can be very dark it seems and throw me.  Speaking 
of rusties... been a lot lately out at city lake in Siloam as well.  A 
few times I've been there I've seen 50 or more at a time.  I've only 
been doing this a few years but this is the first winter I've seen so many.

Daniel Mason

On 3/15/2017 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman wrote:
> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407
>
> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location 
> given in an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the 
> location name to be taken to a Google map.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Subject: Re: Yard questions
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 16:09:35 +0000
Are you all aware of the Arkansas Audubon Society "Bird Friendly Yard" 
certification program?  The dream is to turn Arkansas into the America's 
largest bird sanctuary by creating a statewide network of yards and parks 
planted with native plants.   So far there are 17 certified yards around the 
state from Jonesboro to Fayetteville to Hot Springs with a concentration in 
Little Rock neighborhoods.  The program is just getting started.  For details 
contact Pam Stewart at bfaudubon AT gmail.com and/or take a look at the Arkansas 
Audubon website yard bird page. 

   http://www.arbirds.org/Yard/yard_bird_program.htm Note: We are working on 
some updates to the information contained on the page. The most significant 
addition is a $20 dollar registration fee and a "working to become bird 
friendly" category.  The fee covers a useful book, a yard flag, and access to 
our budding mentoring program. 

In addition, check out the National Audubon Society's cool new Plants for Birds 
site.  Put in your zip code and get a list of native plant suggestions for 
your location as well as a list of sources for native plants in your area. 

Plants for Birds   http://www.audubon.org/plantsforbirds Note: you need to 
scroll down below the stunning hummingbird picture to see the button for 
entering your zip code. 


Finally, in spite of all the words and criteria you'll see listed on the bird 
friendly yard page we are still open to suggestions and help.   If you want to 
get involved at any level, please contact us.  Thanks 

One more "finally"- On September 16, Buffalo National River Partners plan a 
massive stilt-grass removal at Boxley Valley (Buffalo National River), 
volunteers welcome. This invasive, non-native plant threatens the spectacular 
wildflower display along the popular Lost Valley Trail. 

Jack StewartNewton Countywhere privet and Japanese Honeysuckle cringe at our 
approach. 

 

 On Monday, March 13, 2017 7:45 PM, Elizabeth Shores  
wrote: 

 

 I have declared for many years that at some time I will turn my life over to 
elimination of privet. 


Sent from my iPhone
On Mar 13, 2017, at 6:57 PM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 



 
I have spent 15 years clearing privet from my 12 acres of woods. There will 
still be privet here when I die or when I move away. It takes several years to 
clear any given area with pry bar and clippers and chain saw. Every root tries 
to come back. Every scattering of seed from the shoot of a remnant stump makes 
more swaths of seedling plants. They do not die back in winter. Sure they make 
seeds, good-god-loads-of-them, and the birds do eat them. The Hermit Thrushes 
will even bother with them in the deepest cold, if I am not uprooting privet 
and worms and grubs from the ground. Some years Robins roost by the thousands 
in my cedar groves and they eat privet berry. I have watched a Blue-headed 
Vireo take some in the heart of winter. And waxwings of course: it is a berry. 
Though I swear they would rather eat anything else.  Waxies will even take 
Nandina, another scourge. 

 I cannot walk anywhere on my property without bending to stoop for another 
starter privet here or there. I have some beautiful sections that are entirely 
privet free. I have no lawn, just leaf cover and flora and tree. The deer sleep 
outside my bathroom window. In my high bush blueberry, cleared of priver. And 
the deer do eat the privet in winter when I pile the clippings on the ground. I 
find them the next day, sleek and leggy, staring at me, radaring me with those 
great deer ear cups. 

 The plant should be banned for sale in the US. It was a bad experiment. We 
should now know better. But we don't. Bell has the scourge as well. And no one 
is really working on it now that Kenny is long gone. 

 It is a great shame all around when I find woods overtaken by them. Holla 
Bend. Ozark river valleys. Ah, the world. I would surrender and just go do 
privet work every day if I could. RIght now. I still may. 

  Don't test me. 
  Herschel Raney Conway AR
  
 On 3/13/2017 12:44 PM, Reames, Clark -FS wrote:
  
 
#yiv5131958626 #yiv5131958626 -- _filtered #yiv5131958626 
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{}#yiv5131958626 After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head 
start on my privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also 
realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the rest of my 
days.  If your land is privet free now,  DO NOT INTRODUCE IT.  You will 
regret it.  I didn’t introduce it on my place but I sure wish that somebody 
else didn’t many years prior…   

|  
|  
|    |  
|  Clark Reames 
 Wildlife Program Manager  |
|  Forest Service  Malheur National Forest  |
|  p: 541-575-3474 x3474 
 c: 541-620-0681 
 f: 541-575-3002 
 creames AT fs.fed.us  |
|  431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909 
 John Day, OR 97845
 www.fs.fed.us 
   |
|  Caring for the land and serving people  |

  |

  |

  |

     From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores 

 Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 Subject: Re: Yard questions   I think Janet does a good job of promoting the 
use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on 
invasive Bradford pears: “Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.”  
  

 On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson  wrote:   
I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!! SJG     Sent 
from Mail for Windows 10   From: Mary Ann King 

 Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
 To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 Subject: RE: Yard questions   While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in 
her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive 
as well.  I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she 
recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & 
grasses.  Proof?  Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu 
and on & on.   Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds.  
Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for 
protein & rearing their young.   MaryAnn   King In the pine woods northwest 
of London         UA Cooperative Extension Service.  Janet Carson in the 
Little Rock office is an expert on yards. Sally Jo Gibson Harrison, AR       
  Hi all,   This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike.  We live 
in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and 
well-lawned.  This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another 
of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors 
fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns.  The result in the 
summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets.  We've resisted, 
with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground.  
We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively 
low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and 
plants).  We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative 
to lawn grasses.  Thoughts?     

 Jonathan Perry, Ph.D. Licensed Psychologist Fayetteville, Arkansas 

      Elizabeth Findley Shores
 4408 Sam Peck Rd.
 Little Rock, AR 72223       
 
 
 
 This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 

 

   
Subject: Soundings
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 20:07:55 -0500
In the recent mornings, the first sound through the bedroom glass is the 
back porch Carolina Wrens. Singing and singing at first light. 
“Cheeseburger cheeseburger cheeseburger.” We have back porch and front 
porch wrens. They call all day.

And thus the season is shifting. I am always glad to be present for it. 
I may be happier each year. I hope to be. The frog chorus now and last 
night was tremendous. The first Gray Treefrogs were sounding off in the 
warmth today, separate and elevated . Up in, well, the trees. A signal 
song for me. A part of my life soundtrack. What will I miss when I am 
gone? It is on the list.

And the first Broad-winged Hawk aloft. I saw a hawk circling above my 
car and I slowed on Military drive. Was astounded to see the Broad-wing. 
And thought, surely that is early. And I found it was, back at my 
trusty, highly marked up Faulkner county bird book later. Usually my 
first Broad-wing is a whistle above the trees, a whistle that stops me 
doing whatever I am doing. I go and trace the hawk, the first whistling 
hawk. Coming from northern South America (I have seen them migrating in 
masses across the Panama narrows), they average 70 miles a day heading 
to be with us. This one launched early. This was a new week and new 
early date for my county. Which made me immediately miss Martha Johnson. 
She is not here for it now. But I would have told her about if she was. 
“Martha, the hawks are back.”

Jays in pairs in the backyard. They nest there every year. I also think 
I heard the Pileated Woodpeckers hammering on the tree they nested in 
last year just this afternoon. The Barred Owls are calling every day in 
the swamp. I call back. I have never found the nest, but their ghostly 
goings in the day may have given me a hint this year. I will look in a 
few days.

The first Black-and-white Warbler call. I am obsessed with finding 
another nest this year. I will watch and stalk. I will sit quietly in 
the leaves with my binoculars. Folded like a Zen student. I will be the 
lump, the stump with odd colors.

And then this evening at dusk, which is now at 7 pm and 7:15 since the 
time change: two distant dogs, a Robin in full chattery repetitious song 
and then the sudden chipping-in of the first Louisiana Waterthrush. 
Another signal call for me. An orienting call. The whistle of the 
Broad-wing, the jumbled call of the Waterthrush: these are the things. 
And after the first chips, the Waterthrush called and called every six 
or seven seconds for a long time. It made me put down Raymond Carver. It 
made me put on my glasses. The Pileateds crying, the Waterthrush over 
and over, crows, the fading Cardinals competing in their various 
directions. So much happening in my world on this warm day. The 
Waterthrush always makes me stop and orient: the earth on its way around 
the sun in its ellipse and its tilted angle, the solar system tilted 
itself against the ply of the galaxy, the galaxy of 250 thousand million 
stars. The local group of forty galaxies moving together, the Laniakea 
stranding of galaxies like some mesh of spider web through dense dark 
space. It is hard to pull back farther. We are nothing.

We are nothing. But this nothing has ears. And I am happy to hear the 
sounds of the tilt and the roar. We ride through space and the 
Waterthrush doesn’t give a damn. He just sings and sings. Trying to find 
a partner one more time in this dance. I will take his happenstance 
music and be grateful. And the Waterthrush, well, he will just make more 
Waterthrushes for me soon. And some days, just being the one who guards 
over the place that he does this, well, that is far more than enough for 
me. Far more than I should have been given.

I am grateful. At the start of my 58^th vernal passage, I am grateful. I 
am going to walk over to the frog chorus now, and bask in it.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR

http://www.hr-rna.com/RNA/
Subject: GOLDEN-PLOVERS AT FROG
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 23:37:04 +0000
American Golden-Plovers (28) were at Frog Bayou WMA in the Arkansas River 
Valley today. Other shorebirds in the valley (including a brief stop at Alma 
Wastewater) included Killdeer, Greater Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, Pectoral 
Sandpiper, and Wilsons Snipe. 


Duck migration is going in the Valley too: Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, 
Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Ring-necked 
Duck, Lesser Scaup, Hooded Merganser, and Ruddy Duck. 


A flock of about 40 Rusty Blackbirds were foraging in a wet grassy field at 
Frog. 

Subject: Re: Yard questions
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 14:39:46 -0500
Doug Tallamy has enlightened and inspired many (including me!): 
http://www.bringingnaturehome.net/

On 3/14/2017 2:32 PM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
>
> Birds and Insects and Plants are Interconnected
>
>
> The invasive plants, nationwide, worldwide, along with invasive 
> insects, exotic plant pathogenic fungi, etc. have wreaked havoc on our 
> ecosystems and will continue to do so.  All one has to think of is: 
> American chestnut (wiped out by exotic fungus), American elm 
> (essentially decimated by exotic fungus), ash trees (under great 
> threat from exotic Emerald ash borer), all our hardwoods (from exotic 
> Asian longhorn beetle), etc. etc.
>
>
> I agree with Mary Ann and other writers below that for the sake of the 
> birds, invasive plants be removed when in our power.
>
>
> Honestly, the horticulture industry and USDA scientists that promoted 
> plants such as Callery (Bradford) pears, Sericea lespideza, multiflora 
> rose, Bermuda grass, fescue, Johnson grass, ailanthus trees, privet, 
> bush honeysuckle, Japanese honeysuckle, English ivy, Nandina, and so 
> many other plants, have greatly harmed the abundance and diversity of 
> our native moths and other insects (that feed the birds) and 
> therefore, bird life.
>
>
> Like others on this listserv I am trying to walk the walk and kill and 
> remove all the invasives above, but I recognize it is not in my power 
> to do anything but mitigate the problem a bit.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
>  on behalf of Mary Ann King 
> 
> *Sent:* Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:17:24 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Yard questions
>
> Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of 
> natives when asked.  I certainly wasnt disparaging her knowledge.  
> And I didnt mean she endorsed Bradford pears  when I spoke of the 
> Bradford pears, I was only using it as an example of the perils of 
> planting invasive species.  Id just like to see her not suggesting 
> using invasives at all.  I dont have a problem with her recommending 
> most non natives 
>
> We have way too many invasive species that are being sold -
>
> MaryAnn   King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
> [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Jim and Karen Rowe
> *Sent:* Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Yard questions
>
> I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if 
> you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you 
> only want to plant natives.  I gave a Master Garden presentation about 
> landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's 
> presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I 
> stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives 
> because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.
>
> Karen Rowe
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> *From:*Sally Jo Gibson >
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> *Sent:* Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
> *Subject:* Re: Yard questions
>
> Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
>
> SJG
>
> Sent from Mail  for 
> Windows 10
>
> *From: *Mary Ann King 
> *Sent: *Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> *To: *'Sally Jo Gibson' ; 
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> *Subject: *RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does 
> often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well.  I 
> have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends 
> for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. 
> Proof?  Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and 
> on & on.
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds.  Oaks are at 
> the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for 
> protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service.  Janet Carson in the Little Rock 
> office is an expert on yards.
>
> Sally Jo Gibson
>
> Harrison, AR
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike.  We live in a 
> neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and 
> well-lawned.  This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or 
> another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of 
> our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their 
> lawns.  The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully 
> mowed carpets.  We've resisted, with the result that our front and 
> back yards are largely pretty bare ground.  We would like some advice 
> on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and 
> benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants).  We're 
> trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn 
> grasses.  Thoughts?
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>
> Licensed Psychologist
>
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
Subject: woodcocks dancing inthe streets
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 20:07:03 -0500
of Thornton Ferry Road in Hot Springs there is woods on the left about 2.5
miles from the Harps at the jct of 227 and 270.  In the early dusk before
dawn all this week been woodcocks.  This morning it was a pair doing their
mating dance right there to the side as my headlights reflected off of
their merry little dance.  Sort of amusing to see right close home on a
dusky street before dawn as I go to work. where they should be but I
haven't seen any yet along that drive into the state park.  Teresa In Hot
Springs, AR

-- 
We Must let go of the life we planned . So to accept the one that is
waiting for us. Bad or Good Life is under the bridge flowing down the river
. Here's an instant? Gone in a moment.  Just let it go. Don't hang to it.
God will do the plan not you.
Subject: Purple Martin's in El Dorado.
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 04:01:06 +0000
We saw some Purple Martin's in El Dorado this afternoon. They were in the top 
part of the Purple Martin house and House Sparrows in the bottom half. 


Also there were lots of Pine Warblers singing in the trees at Moro Bay State 
Park. Chipping Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos too. 


At the South Arkansas Arboretum a mocking bird did a perfect Brown-headed 
Nuthatch immatation and almost fooled me, until it switched tunes. It must hear 
the nuthatches a lot as it repeated the song several times during the serenade 


Dottie
Little Rock





Subject: Re: Yard questions
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 19:32:59 +0000
Birds and Insects and Plants are Interconnected


The invasive plants, nationwide, worldwide, along with invasive insects, exotic 
plant pathogenic fungi, etc. have wreaked havoc on our ecosystems and will 
continue to do so. All one has to think of is: American chestnut (wiped out by 
exotic fungus), American elm (essentially decimated by exotic fungus), ash 
trees (under great threat from exotic Emerald ash borer), all our hardwoods 
(from exotic Asian longhorn beetle), etc. etc. 



I agree with Mary Ann and other writers below that for the sake of the birds, 
invasive plants be removed when in our power. 



Honestly, the horticulture industry and USDA scientists that promoted plants 
such as Callery (Bradford) pears, Sericea lespideza, multiflora rose, Bermuda 
grass, fescue, Johnson grass, ailanthus trees, privet, bush honeysuckle, 
Japanese honeysuckle, English ivy, Nandina, and so many other plants, have 
greatly harmed the abundance and diversity of our native moths and other 
insects (that feed the birds) and therefore, bird life. 



Like others on this listserv I am trying to walk the walk and kill and remove 
all the invasives above, but I recognize it is not in my power to do anything 
but mitigate the problem a bit. 



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Mary Ann King  

Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:17:24 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Yard questions

Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of natives 
when asked. I certainly wasnt disparaging her knowledge. And I didnt mean she 
endorsed Bradford pears  when I spoke of the Bradford pears, I was only using 
it as an example of the perils of planting invasive species. Id just like to 
see her not suggesting using invasives at all. I dont have a problem with her 
recommending most non natives  


We have way too many invasive species that are being sold -

MaryAnn   King
In the pine woods northwest of London
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe 

Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface 
your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant 
natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for 
birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for 
the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear 
Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and 
weather. 


Karen Rowe
________________________________
From: Sally Jo Gibson >
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Yard questions

Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
SJG


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Mary Ann King
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; 
ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 

Subject: RE: Yard questions

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often 
recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been 
fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive 
species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, 
Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on. 


Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top 
of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their 
young. 


MaryAnn   King
In the pine woods northwest of London




UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an 
expert on yards. 

Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR




Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a 
neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This 
time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn 
maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and 
spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very 
green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our 
front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice 
on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and 
benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find 
out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts? 




Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - March 14
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 21:28:35 -0500
It was mostly clear, cool, and a little windy on the bird survey today.  77
species were found.  Returning Neotropic migrant Passerines are starting to
show up.  A Common Gallinule is back (first seen yesterday).  A couple more
swallow species have showed up also.  Here is my list for today:

 

Canada Geese - 7

Wood Duck - 5

Gadwall - 107

Mallard - 28

Blue-winged Teal - 33

Northern Shoveler - 185

Green-winged Teal - 13

Ring-necked Duck - 55

Hooded Merganser - 7

Pied-billed Grebe - 24

Double-crested Cormorant - 41

Great-blue Heron - 14

Great Egret - 8

Black Vulture - 16

Turkey Vulture - 46

Northern Harrier - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 4

Merlin - 1

King Rail - 3

Virginia Rail - 6

Common Gallinule - 1

American Coot - 412

Killdeer - 7

Greater Yellowlegs - 8

Wilson's Snipe - 32

Rock Pigeon - 2

Mourning Dove - 3

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 8

White-eyed Vireo - 1 (new early date for RS by one day.)

Blue Jay - 7

American Crow - 48

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 9

Tree Swallow - 26

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 2

Barn Swallow - 2

Carolina Chickadee - 8

Tufted Titmouse - 8

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 6

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 5

Marsh Wren - 7

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1 (new early date by two days.)

Eastern Bluebird - 7

Hermit Thrush - 2

American Robin - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Brown Thrasher - 3

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 45

Pine Warbler - 7

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Field Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 20

Le Conte's Sparrow - 2

Fox Sparrow - 3

Song Sparrow - 7

Swamp Sparrow - 5

White-throated Sparrow - 8

White-crowned Sparrow - 12

Northern Cardinal - 21

Red-winged Blackbird - 15

Meadowlark species - 8

Common Grackle - 2

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

American Goldfinch - 3

 

Odonates:

 

Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Common Baskettail 

 

 

Herps:

 

Red-eared Slider

Spring Peepers - calling

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 
Subject: Re: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 18:30:20 -0500
Thanks Sara, My 7 PM  turned to just PM, sorry people!   Jacque 


> On Mar 15, 2017, at 5:46 PM, sara caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Hummingbirds program is scheduled to be on tonight from 7 - 830 on AETN 
(PBS). It was a new program when it aired last October. Great program! 

> 
> On Mar 15, 2017 4:24 PM, Jacque Brown  wrote:
>> 
>> I’m not sure if I’ve seen this before but plan to watch it anyway. 
It’s pledge time so allow for the extra half hour. Jacque Brown, Centerton. 

Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 10:35:18 -0500
Wow!!!
J

On Mar 18, 2017, at 9:24 AM, Warbling Vireo 
<0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


> I walked out of the Conference Center at Lake DeGray State Park last night at 
10:00pm, and immediately heard loud and clear a repetitive call. My first 
thought was, "No, it can't be." I quickly opened Cornell Labs vocalization 
while it persisted. When it paused, I turned on by he playback, and it 
answered! Went back into the lodge, got a friend, and, of course, met with 
silence back in the parking lot. Onc again, it answered the door playback! 

> 
> Northern Saw-whet at Lake DeGray State Park Lodge. I'd love for someone else 
to come check it out! 

> 
> D. DeLynn Hearn
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> (501)472-8769
Subject: Re: Juncos now????
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 13:44:16 -0500
I think that is because they have been at my house all winter! The seed was 
getting low yesterday and I saw them eating from the suet cakes. 


 

Kara

Timbo, AR

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney 

Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 12:16 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Juncos now????

 

All winter, I've been waiting for juncos to arrive. All winter, not a one. Now 
that it's almost spring, they're here. I don't get it! Also, the few 
goldfinches I had are gone. This has been a very strange year bird-wise. 




-- 

Dorothy Cooney

Wickes, AR
Subject: Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 20:19:37 +0000
Several of us showed up a bit early for this morning's Northwest Arkansas 
Audubon Society field trip to the Shores Lake area in Ozark NF north of 
Mulberry. A few of us soon heard, then sighted, 3 crossbills in about the same 
place where we have spotted them in the last couple of weeks. These birds were 
originally found March 4 by Bill Beall and Jim Nieting approx. 0.8 mile south 
of the Shores Lake day use area, in a mature stand of shortleaf pines; still in 
same area. This morning's crossbills were in a leafless mid-story hardwood, 
providing excellent looks. The bills looked larger than I had previously 
thought, much like the song type 2 crossbills (Ponderosa Pine Crossbill). This 
was my third trip for them and I feel fairly confident they must have nested in 
the Shores Lake pine stands. 



More on that later. Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar obtained audio recordings of 
the calls that have been sent to Matt Young at Cornell for identification of 
song type. 
Subject: FW: Buffalo River--Opportunity to speak out DUE 17 Mar 1
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 20:47:09 -0500
Rec'd yesterday. This may have been sent around earlier.  )Apologies for
cross-posting(.  Note due date.

 

Jeff Short

 

From: Jeffrey Short [mailto:jjshort50 AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 8:37 PM
To: Jeff & Joye Short
Subject: Fwd: Buffalo River

 





Subject: Buffalo River 

 

In 2012 the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality quickly and quietly
issued a permit to allow C & H Hog Farm to build a facility on the Buffalo
River watershed.  This "factory farm" keeps over 6000 pigs in confined
quarters.  The waste produced is sprayed over hundreds of acres along Big
Creek, a Buffalo River tributary.

 

C & H is now applying for a new state permit which would supercede a federal
permit that required regular review and a five year expiration.  The state
permit requires no review and no expiration and would add an additional 599
acres to the spray area.  Research has shown that Big Creek is already
showing higher levels of nitrates downstream from the C & H fields than
above.

 

The Buffalo River Watershed Alliance insists the original permit was
improperly and hastily approved.  For this, and the very real threat of
pollution to the Buffalo, they are asking ADEQ to deny the new permit.  The
period for public comment on renewing the C & H permit ends March 17.  If
you would like to help protect the Buffalo River by removing this facility
from its totally inappropriate location you can make comments to the ADEQ at
Water-Draft-Permit-Comment AT adeq.state.ar.us  and to Govenor Asa Hutchinson
at the website  governor.arkansas.gov    

 

I am sorry for the short notice.  I didn't have all the information until
recently.  Please feel free to pass this on to friends.  This may be our
last chance.

 

Phyllis Anderson

 
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 11:50:47 -0500
That's terrific information, Jerry.  Birds specifically choose spiders 
because their nestlings require them.  Insects are deficient in taurine, 
which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.
Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary 
for successful propagation of our native avian species.

Janine

On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:
> This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which 
> deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator 
> for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If 
> there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed 
> your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little 
> value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, 
> burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to 
> support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds 
> feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get 
> control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> *Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs *
>
> USA TODAY
>
> Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other 
> pests each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight 
> of more than 85 million elephants.
>
> That’s a lot of bugs.
>
> Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million 
> tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 
> million tons of seafood, while the world’s total seabird population 
> eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.
>
> The study, published in the
>
> European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a 
> global estimate of spiders’ eating habits.
>
> Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in 
> forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, 
> urban areas and tundra areas.
>
> The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, 
> especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to 
> protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, 
> according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of 
> Basel in Switzerland.
>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 16:54:58 -0600
Going back to Jonathan's original question, what other reference book would 
someone recommend besides Carl Hunter. I have done the same thing with my yard 
years ago stopping yard service. So much comes up that is not native such as 
dandelion, purple dead nettle, and clover it is hard to know what to pull out. 
I mow high and let whatever green grow. I do enjoy moss. 

Nancy
Fayetteville 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 14, 2017, at 1:17 PM, Mary Ann King  
wrote: 

> 
> Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of natives 
when asked. I certainly wasn’t disparaging her knowledge. And I didn’t mean 
she endorsed Bradford pears – when I spoke of the Bradford pears, I was only 
using it as an example of the perils of planting invasive species. I’d just 
like to see her not suggesting using invasives at all. I don’t have a problem 
with her recommending most non natives – 

>  
> We have way too many invasive species that are being sold -
>  
> MaryAnn   King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe 

> Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>  
> I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you 
preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to 
plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard 
for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants 
for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear 
Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and 
weather. 

>  
> Karen Rowe 
> 
> From: Sally Jo Gibson 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>  
> I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
> SJG
>  
>  
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>  
> From: Mary Ann King
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>  
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often 
recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been 
fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive 
species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, 
Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on. 

>  
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top 
of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their 
young. 

>  
> MaryAnn   King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>  
>  
>  
>  
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is 
an expert on yards. 

> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>  
>  
>  
>  
> Hi all,
>  
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a 
neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This 
time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn 
maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and 
spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very 
green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our 
front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice 
on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and 
benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find 
out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts? 

>  
>  
> 
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>  
>  
Subject: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton AT SAUMAG.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 20:24:23 +0000
We have been seeing a brown thrasher with an eye problem. The right eye seems 
to be missing, and in its place there appears to be a growth of some kind. It 
at first appeared to be white, but when the bird came to a suet feeder (a 
strange behavior for a brown thrasher) which was near a window, I saw that the 
growth was (or is now) greyish brown and quite lumpy. The bird seems to get 
along-we often see him or her under a worm feeder, and the bird doesn't seem to 
be wasting away. The bird doesn't move as much I think of thrashers doing, 
however. 


Any ideas what this could be?

Oh, and "Sullivan"? On a trip to Ireland this summer, we learned that the name 
may (or may not) mean "one-eye." 


Stacy Clanton
Northeast corner of Magnolia
Subject: Re: Yard questions
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:55:01 +0000
Thanks, Karen. I am a huge supporter of UAEX as my husband retired from that 
entity after 37 years with them. My son-in-law is director of the UA research 
station at Bethesda. I'm also aware of a lot of beneficial programs that take 
place through UA that the public is unaware of. 

I'm still birding and make/keep my yard as bird friendly as possible. And spend 
lots of money on bird seed and yard upkeep. (Too old to do it myself, anymore.) 
I’ve even bought and paid someone to plant Crepe Myrtle, Euonymus (sp?) and 
Nanina’s. Then, when I discovered these plants weren’t “for the birds,” 
paid someone to remove them. 

There are people on this site with more than one opinion. I sometimes get the 
feeling that if you don’t agree with certain people who post on ARBIrd, that 
you may suddenly find yourself one of those who the “sanctified” want 
removed. 

I'll stay off my individual soap box on here from now on.
Sally Jo Gibson


From: Jim and Karen Rowe [mailto:rollingrfarm AT rocketmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
To: Sally Jo Gibson ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface 
your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant 
natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for 
birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for 
the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear 
Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and 
weather. 


Karen Rowe
________________________________
From: Sally Jo Gibson >
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
SJG


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Mary Ann King
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; 
ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 

Subject: RE: Yard questions

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often 
recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been 
fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive 
species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, 
Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on. 


Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top 
of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their 
young. 


MaryAnn   King
In the pine woods northwest of London




UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an 
expert on yards. 

Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR




Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a 
neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This 
time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn 
maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and 
spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very 
green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our 
front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice 
on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and 
benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find 
out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts? 




Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas


Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 15:57:30 -0500
I went at 1:30pm and saw everything that others have seen. No yellow-headed 
though either. 


Hopefully, he'll stick around and be seen again.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville



> On Mar 15, 2017, at 15:44, Jacque Brown  wrote:
> 
> I went to the hatchery about 12:30. I did not see the Yellow-headed 
Blackbird. I did see a flock of 38 Scaup and a female Canvasback, Mallards, 
Buffleheads, Blue-winged Teal, Canada Geese, Great-blue Heron, 1 American 
Pipit, 3 Savannah Sparrows, 2 Song Sparrows, a Swamp Sparrow, Meadowlarks, 
Starlings, 2 Rusty Blackbirds, some Red-winged Blackbirds, 2 Red-tailed Hawks, 
1 Kestrel, Mockingbird, Robins, Cardinals, and a Belted Kingfisher. Also 15 
Pectoral Sandpipers, 2 Wilson Snipe, Killdeer, and a Least Sandpiper. 

> 
> I drove around the area looking for flocks of birds that have been around for 
several months in open fields, Buckhorn Flats, Rainbow Farm Rd, Opal, and the 
dairy circuit in Vaughn. I finally found a large flock of about 3000 
Brown-headed Cowbirds at one of the dairy's, a flock of about 1000 Starlings at 
a different dairy, scattered Red-wing Blackbirds, no Yellow-headed with any of 
them. Other birds were E Bluebirds, Loggerhead Shrike, Blue Jays, Juncos, 
White-crowned Sparrows, White-throated Sparrows. 

> 
> Jacque Brown, Centerton
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman  wrote:
>> 
>> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407 

>> 
>> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in 
an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be 
taken to a Google map. 

>> 
>> Dan Scheiman
>> Little Rock, AR
> 
Subject: Re: Yard questions
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 14:17:24 -0500
Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of natives 
when asked. I certainly wasn’t disparaging her knowledge. And I didn’t mean 
she endorsed Bradford pears – when I spoke of the Bradford pears, I was only 
using it as an example of the perils of planting invasive species. I’d just 
like to see her not suggesting using invasives at all. I don’t have a problem 
with her recommending most non natives – 


 

We have way too many invasive species that are being sold - 

 

MaryAnn   King

In the pine woods northwest of London

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe 

Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Yard questions

 

I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface 
your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant 
natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for 
birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for 
the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear 
Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and 
weather. 


 

Karen Rowe 

  _____  

From: Sally Jo Gibson  >
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU   
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Yard questions

 

I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!

SJG

 

 

Sent from Mail   for Windows 10

 

From: Mary Ann King  
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'  ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 

Subject: RE: Yard questions

 

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often 
recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been 
fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive 
species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, 
Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on. 


 

Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top 
of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their 
young. 


 

MaryAnn   King

In the pine woods northwest of London

 

 

 

 

UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an 
expert on yards. 


Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR

 

 

 

 

Hi all,

 

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a 
neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This 
time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn 
maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and 
spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very 
green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our 
front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice 
on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and 
benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find 
out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts? 


 

 




Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.

Licensed Psychologist

Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

 
Subject: Cerulean Warblers in Northwestern Arkansas
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 19:38:11 +0000
We have a grant from the ANHC to survey Washington and Benton cos. for 
Ceruleans this year... Please report any sightings to me 
(kgsmith AT uark.edu) or Jen Mortensen 
(mortejen AT gmail.com)... 


We are also looking for volunteers to help with the surveys... if you would 
like to spend a few days looking for Ceruleans in May and June, contact Jen... 


Thanks, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: RED-B MERGANSER AND COMMON LOONS AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 23:03:24 +0000
Waterfowl at Lake Fayetteville this afternoon included Wood Duck (4), Gadwall 
(1), Mallard (3), Blue-winged Teal (13), Green-winged Teal (7), Hooded 
Merganser (1), Red-breasted Merganser (1 male), Common Loon (3), Horned Grebe 
(1). Common Loons are in heavy molt; two of them had pretty much transitioned 
to summer black and whites. Great Horned Owl still sitting on its nest, visible 
from Mulhollan Blind. And finally, a fine chorus of Spring Peepers, even with 
highway traffic, even with airplanes flying over from Springdale airport. 

Subject: CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 23:29:51 +0000
Several of us on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip this morning 
saw Red Crossbills near Shores Lake in the Ozark National Forest. The birds 
were first observed by Bill Beall and Jim Nieting on March 4 and have been 
found subsequently, more or less in the same area, including today. We had 
clear looks at three birds this morning. Joan Reynolds and I saw 5-6 in the 
same area on March 5. On that date, we observed one crossbill feed another. A 
photo of the bird that was fed shows it is a streaky fledgling. This is 
supportive of the hypothesis that Red Crossbills nested in the Shores Lake area 
over winter 2016-2017. 


Some unfamiliar with crossbill nesting behavior are a little shocked about the 
hypothesis that crossbills may have nested here, with at least one fledgling on 
the wing by at least early March. In terms of Arkansas, it is pretty unusual, 
but then we are fortunate that Bill Beall has been birding the area for many 
years and has many other crossbill records. One difference this time is that we 
managed to photograph birds because they are close to the highway. Bill and Jim 
Nieting let us know right away when they observed them. 


Data for Red Crossbill in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Birds of North America 
indicates food as the most important factor influencing timing of nesting. Egg 
dates in North America from mid-Dec to early Sep  Also, Red Crossbill's 
annual breeding cycle is apparently regulated by photoperiod, with 
opportunistic responses to food supply and social factors superimposed on this 
cycle. 


Shortleaf Pine forest where we are seeing these crossbills has been thinned. 
Tree stands are now open and park-like, dominated by mature Shortleaf Pines, 
with many mature trees heavy with pine cones  ideal for crossbills. The Forest 
Service manages this way because it is suitable for natural reproduction of 
pines in managed forests and secondarily because it produces high-quality 
natural habitat for all kinds of native wildlife, both plant and animal. It may 
very well have fostered nesting by Red Crossbills in the state, too. 


Red Crossbill populations are divided by call types. These different call types 
may reflect separate species under the umbrella name Red Crossbill. 
UA-Fayetteville graduate students Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar collected 
sound files from these birds on March 8, edited the files, which were then sent 
to Matt Young at Cornell. Hopefully we have enough data that Young can identify 
these crossbills to call type. 


More than 20 years ago, Bill Holiman, now Chief of Research at Arkansas Natural 
heritage Commission, encouraged me to record crossbill call types for birds I 
saw and heard in the Ouachita NF. I didnt follow through at the time. 
Subsequently, I have managed to record birds in northwest Arkansas. With help 
from Matt Young, we have identified three call types from crossbills in 
Arkansas. The birds currently in the Ozark NF would be the first identified 
that may have nested here. 

Subject: Juncos now????
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 12:15:39 -0500
All winter, I've been waiting for juncos to arrive.  All winter, not a
one.  Now that it's almost spring, they're here.  I don't get it!  Also,
the few goldfinches I had are gone.  This has been a very strange year
bird-wise.

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Re: Black & White Warblers...
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 13:17:02 -0500
Wow, this is wonderful to hear!!! 
J

On Mar 17, 2017, at 1:14 PM, Janine Perlman  wrote:

> Here, too, this morning.  :)
> 
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co,
> 
> On 3/17/2017 1:03 PM, Kenny Nichols wrote:
>> ..singing in Dardanelle.
>> 
>> Kenny Nichols
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 12:12:43 -0500
I guess I need to head that way, thanks for the post Dan. Jacque Brown, 
Centerton. 




> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman  wrote:
> 
> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407 
 

> 
> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in 
an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be 
taken to a Google map. 

> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
Subject: Re: Soundings
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 21:54:43 -0500
Thank you for this.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 18, 2017, at 8:07 PM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 

> 
> In the recent mornings, the first sound through the bedroom glass is the back 
porch Carolina Wrens. Singing and singing at first light. “Cheeseburger 
cheeseburger cheeseburger.” We have back porch and front porch wrens. They 
call all day. 

> 
> And thus the season is shifting. I am always glad to be present for it. I may 
be happier each year. I hope to be. The frog chorus now and last night was 
tremendous. The first Gray Treefrogs were sounding off in the warmth today, 
separate and elevated . Up in, well, the trees. A signal song for me. A part of 
my life soundtrack. What will I miss when I am gone? It is on the list. 

> 
> And the first Broad-winged Hawk aloft. I saw a hawk circling above my car and 
I slowed on Military drive. Was astounded to see the Broad-wing. And thought, 
surely that is early. And I found it was, back at my trusty, highly marked up 
Faulkner county bird book later. Usually my first Broad-wing is a whistle above 
the trees, a whistle that stops me doing whatever I am doing. I go and trace 
the hawk, the first whistling hawk. Coming from northern South America (I have 
seen them migrating in masses across the Panama narrows), they average 70 miles 
a day heading to be with us. This one launched early. This was a new week and 
new early date for my county. Which made me immediately miss Martha Johnson. 
She is not here for it now. But I would have told her about if she was. 
“Martha, the hawks are back.” 

> 
> Jays in pairs in the backyard. They nest there every year. I also think I 
heard the Pileated Woodpeckers hammering on the tree they nested in last year 
just this afternoon. The Barred Owls are calling every day in the swamp. I call 
back. I have never found the nest, but their ghostly goings in the day may have 
given me a hint this year. I will look in a few days. 

> 
> The first Black-and-white Warbler call. I am obsessed with finding another 
nest this year. I will watch and stalk. I will sit quietly in the leaves with 
my binoculars. Folded like a Zen student. I will be the lump, the stump with 
odd colors. 

> 
> And then this evening at dusk, which is now at 7 pm and 7:15 since the time 
change: two distant dogs, a Robin in full chattery repetitious song and then 
the sudden chipping-in of the first Louisiana Waterthrush. Another signal call 
for me. An orienting call. The whistle of the Broad-wing, the jumbled call of 
the Waterthrush: these are the things. And after the first chips, the 
Waterthrush called and called every six or seven seconds for a long time. It 
made me put down Raymond Carver. It made me put on my glasses. The Pileateds 
crying, the Waterthrush over and over, crows, the fading Cardinals competing in 
their various directions. So much happening in my world on this warm day. The 
Waterthrush always makes me stop and orient: the earth on its way around the 
sun in its ellipse and its tilted angle, the solar system tilted itself against 
the ply of the galaxy, the galaxy of 250 thousand million stars. The local 
group of forty galaxies moving together, the Laniakea stranding of galaxies 
like some mesh of spider web through dense dark space. It is hard to pull back 
farther. We are nothing. 

> 
> We are nothing. But this nothing has ears. And I am happy to hear the sounds 
of the tilt and the roar. We ride through space and the Waterthrush doesn’t 
give a damn. He just sings and sings. Trying to find a partner one more time in 
this dance. I will take his happenstance music and be grateful. And the 
Waterthrush, well, he will just make more Waterthrushes for me soon. And some 
days, just being the one who guards over the place that he does this, well, 
that is far more than enough for me. Far more than I should have been given. 

> 
> I am grateful. At the start of my 58th vernal passage, I am grateful. I am 
going to walk over to the frog chorus now, and bask in it. 

> 
> Herschel Raney
> 
> Conway AR
> 
> http://www.hr-rna.com/RNA/
> 
Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 15:44:28 -0500
I went to the hatchery about 12:30. I did not see the Yellow-headed Blackbird. 
I did see a flock of 38 Scaup and a female Canvasback, Mallards, Buffleheads, 
Blue-winged Teal, Canada Geese, Great-blue Heron, 1 American Pipit, 3 Savannah 
Sparrows, 2 Song Sparrows, a Swamp Sparrow, Meadowlarks, Starlings, 2 Rusty 
Blackbirds, some Red-winged Blackbirds, 2 Red-tailed Hawks, 1 Kestrel, 
Mockingbird, Robins, Cardinals, and a Belted Kingfisher. Also 15 Pectoral 
Sandpipers, 2 Wilson Snipe, Killdeer, and a Least Sandpiper. 


I drove around the area looking for flocks of birds that have been around for 
several months in open fields, Buckhorn Flats, Rainbow Farm Rd, Opal, and the 
dairy circuit in Vaughn. I finally found a large flock of about 3000 
Brown-headed Cowbirds at one of the dairy's, a flock of about 1000 Starlings at 
a different dairy, scattered Red-wing Blackbirds, no Yellow-headed with any of 
them. Other birds were E Bluebirds, Loggerhead Shrike, Blue Jays, Juncos, 
White-crowned Sparrows, White-throated Sparrows. 


Jacque Brown, Centerton




> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman  wrote:
> 
> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407 
 

> 
> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in 
an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be 
taken to a Google map. 

> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
Subject: FIRST SPRING SONGS BY BROWN THRASHER
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 13:04:29 +0000
Most Brown Thrashers depart from northwest Arkansas for winter. We do usually 
get a few on the Fayetteville CBC , but birds that nest in my yard do not 
winter here. So it is always a pleasure to hear them when they start singing 
again. My yard is in the heavily urbanized section of Fayetteville, but I have 
for many years managed it as wildlife habitat, taking into account needs of 
wild birds like thrashers. Mid-March is the usual time for their return. A 
thrasher is out there this morning, singing away, with Northern Cardinals, 
Carolina Wrens, Northern Flickers, etc. 

Subject: Re: Black & White Warblers...
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 13:14:50 -0500
Here, too, this morning.  :)

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co,

On 3/17/2017 1:03 PM, Kenny Nichols wrote:
> ..singing in Dardanelle.
>
> Kenny Nichols
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: HERMIT THRUSH, BUT NOT TAPER-TIP, AT NEW LAKE ATALANTA
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 09:40:44 +0000
Remodeled Lake Atalanta in Rogers includes an attractive kiosk with detailed 
information about birds. Like info in Mulhollan Blind at Lake Fayetteville 
Park, this is a good-faith effort to encourage the general public. Auduboners 
have gone birding at Lake Atalanta for several decades. We provided bird data 
to the City  hopefully to help planning, and eventually for this kiosk. 


Over the past couple of years Rogers has spent millions at Lake Atalanta 
building the kiosk, attractive new bathrooms, picnic areas, a complex system of 
paved and unpaved trails, and a boardwalk along part of the lake. Mountain bike 
trails wind and rewind up and down and all around hollows through which flow 
springs that form Prairie Creek -- that flow then to Beaver Lake. 


A few years ago, some of us predicted City planners were going overboard -- too 
much trail impacting too much forest would be detrimental to rare and unusual 
wildlife, both animal and plant. But that said, yesterday I enjoyed a handsome 
winter resident, Hermit Thrush, along Frisco Spring run. But just beyond the 
Hermit Thrush, I was distressed that a significant patch of an unusual plant, 
Taper-tip Ginger (Asarum canadense var. acuminatum) was wiped-out by 
construction of a broad concrete trail. 


In place of Taper-tip: trail side replanted with what appears non-native grass. 
Ironically, taper-tip is featured on a kiosk plaque celebrating the parks 
unique plant communities. I was also pleased to see White-throated Sparrows, 
but not at elimination of much of a Pawpaw thicket we have always enjoyed on 
past field trips. Some of this will hopefully come back. 


Many places to enjoy wildlife remain in new Lake Atalanta, but hillside trails 
now impact hillside wildlife. Not surprisingly, when I walked one of those 
trails yesterday, a Turkey Vulture flushing from a probable nest told me no 
trail should ever have been built there  IF we value our nesting vultures. We 
warned City planners about such  specifically, introducing extensive, 
recurring disturbances into steep hillside forest communities. 


REALLY BAD: dirt work in the park resulted in placement of plastic garden 
netting designed to reduce soil erosion. This durable stuff is a well-known 
animal killer: birds that get trapped under loose sections, small mammals, 
young turtles, snakes, salamanders. Killer plastic is now resident throughout 
the park, holding soil disturbed along spring runs, lake sides, and broad 
concrete trails. 


I think this new design of an old park will please many people who like upbeat 
modern, with native stone rustic. But for this nature pays significant price: 
increasing levels of environmental damage in ecologically fragile Ozark spring 
hollers. 


Out flying low over the lake today, just-arrived Northern Rough-winged 
Swallows, FOS for me. Reminded me of former Lake Atlanta. 

Subject: Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 08:27:46 -0500
Sounds probable and underscores the need to keep feeders spiffy-clean. Probably 
should disinfect the suet feeder in this case. 


 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Karen And Jim Rowe 

Sent: Friday, March 17, 2017 7:11 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher

 

Could it be avian pox?


https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/publications/field_manual/chapter_19.pdf

 

https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/other_diseases/avian_pox.jsp

 

 

Karen Rowe

 

Sent from my iPhone


On Mar 16, 2017, at 3:24 PM, Stacy Clanton  wrote:

We have been seeing a brown thrasher with an eye problem. The right eye seems 
to be missing, and in its place there appears to be a growth of some kind. It 
at first appeared to be white, but when the bird came to a suet feeder (a 
strange behavior for a brown thrasher) which was near a window, I saw that the 
growth was (or is now) greyish brown and quite lumpy. The bird seems to get 
along—we often see him or her under a worm feeder, and the bird doesn’t 
seem to be wasting away. The bird doesn’t move as much I think of thrashers 
doing, however. 


 

Any ideas what this could be?

 

Oh, and “Sullivan”? On a trip to Ireland this summer, we learned that the 
name may (or may not) mean “one-eye.” 


 

Stacy Clanton

Northeast corner of Magnolia
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 13:46:05 -0500
Thanks for sharing. I hope that your insight will inspire others to support 
spiders and insects. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Norman Lavers 
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:22 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - 
A Note 


Really interesting info. Thanks.
We watch the hummers go along our cedars to pick off the little spiders. When 
our big Argiope spiders go missing from their webs at night (and not just to 
make an egg nest somewhere) we know someone, perhaps a Screech Owl, had a 
substantial meal. 


Norman has been looking at spiders closely this last couple of years and has 
found well over 100 species of spiders in our never-sprayed yard of less than 1 
acre. A few species we have only seen when wasps dropped them on their way to 
stock their mud nests, they are far better at finding them than we are. The 
variety of ways in which spiders make their living, the many kinds of webs, the 
tunnels like trap-doors and pursewebs, the way that jumping spiders respond to 
us with their big eyes, the ways in which some species care for their young, it 
is all fascinating and makes me feel very sorry for arachnophobes who are 
missing out on all that. Go out at night with a headlamp fixed near your eye 
level and look at the ground in Spring and Summer. It will sparkle like the 
night sky with the eyes of hundreds of (mainly) wolf spiders. Then you will get 
a sense of their numbers. 



Cheryl Lavers





On Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:51 AM, Janine Perlman  
wrote: 





That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because 
their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is 
required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment. 

Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for 
successful propagation of our native avian species. 


Janine


On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis 
wrote:

 This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals 
with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat 
health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough 
insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to 
eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see 
evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a 
healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see 
birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control 
of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds. 


  Jerry W. Davis
  Hot Springs, AR

  Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs 
  USA TODAY
 Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests 
each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 
85 million elephants. 

  That’s a lot of bugs.
 Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of 
meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of 
seafood, while the world’s total seabird population eats an estimated 
77million tons of fish and other seafood. 

  The study, published in the
 European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global 
estimate of spiders’ eating habits. 

 Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, 
grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and 
tundra areas. 

 The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in 
forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees 
by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author 
Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. 





Subject: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 17:05:37 +0000
This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407 


If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in an 
eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be 
taken to a Google map. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 13:43:54 -0500
Thanks to all of you for this wonderful information, and for loving spiders. I 
do too. 

Judith

On Mar 16, 2017, at 1:22 PM, Norman Lavers 
<0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


> Really interesting info. Thanks.
> We watch the hummers go along our cedars to pick off the little spiders. When 
our big Argiope spiders go missing from their webs at night (and not just to 
make an egg nest somewhere) we know someone, perhaps a Screech Owl, had a 
substantial meal. 

> Norman has been looking at spiders closely this last couple of years and has 
found well over 100 species of spiders in our never-sprayed yard of less than 1 
acre. A few species we have only seen when wasps dropped them on their way to 
stock their mud nests, they are far better at finding them than we are. The 
variety of ways in which spiders make their living, the many kinds of webs, the 
tunnels like trap-doors and pursewebs, the way that jumping spiders respond to 
us with their big eyes, the ways in which some species care for their young, it 
is all fascinating and makes me feel very sorry for arachnophobes who are 
missing out on all that. Go out at night with a headlamp fixed near your eye 
level and look at the ground in Spring and Summer. It will sparkle like the 
night sky with the eyes of hundreds of (mainly) wolf spiders. Then you will get 
a sense of their numbers. 

> 
> Cheryl Lavers
> 
> 
> 
> On Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:51 AM, Janine Perlman  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because 
their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is 
required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment. 

> Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for 
successful propagation of our native avian species. 

> 
> Janine
> 
> On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis 
> wrote:
>> This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals 
with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat 
health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough 
insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to 
eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see 
evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a 
healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see 
birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control 
of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds. 

>>  
>> Jerry W. Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR
>>  
>> Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs
>> USA TODAY
>> Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests 
each year, according to a new study. Thats equal to the weight of more than 85 
million elephants. 

>> Thats a lot of bugs.
>> Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons 
of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of 
seafood, while the worlds total seabird population eats an estimated 77million 
tons of fish and other seafood. 

>> The study, published in the
>> European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global 
estimate of spiders eating habits. 

>> Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, 
grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and 
tundra areas. 

>> The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in 
forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees 
by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author 
Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. 

>>  
>>  
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Good info on the swine CAFO
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 17:12:20 -0500
 

From: Carolyn Shearman [mailto:tucshea AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:05 PM
To: tucshea AT gmail.com
Subject: Sierra Club Meeting March 21st

 

[] Parts of email omitted-Jeff Short

 

Website:

Here is a link to the excellent Sierra Online Magazine article on the C&H
Hog Farm in the Buffalo River Watershed:
http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/green-life/buffalo-river-hog-cafo-threatens
-america-s-first-national-river 

 

And, please look for further announcements and outings on the website.
These links are always changing so please check them often.

sierraclub.org/arkansas     - for the
state-wide Arkansas Chapter and all the things Glen Hooks, our Chapter
Director, is working on!!!!

sierraclub.org/arkansas/central 
- for our Central Arkansas Group

sierraclub.org/arkansas/ozark 
- for the Ozark Headwaters Group

 

Carolyn Shearman

Sierra Club, Central Arkansas Group

Executive Committee

  Description: Description: Description:
Description: Description: Description: Description: Description:
Description: Description: Description: Click our logo for the Sierra Club
homepage.

 

 

 
Subject: Re: CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 21:20:11 -0500
Always glad to see these reports.  I was tempted to try after the first 
sightings but I often go an hour or so for a bird and then never find 
it.  Happens more often than not with the less common ones.  I don't get 
to go too far too often so I don't push it for many but if they're still 
down there, I may have to drag the whole family with me.  :)    
Crossbills would be a lifebird.  So would the brown-headed nuthatch if 
we can find that.  I wonder if there's anything else I might look for 
down there that I might not find up here in Benton county.
We're thinking about visiting late Monday morning.  We've never been 
down that way.  Any info we can use to find our way around as far as 
finding the birds?  I'm hoping with a young bird still being fed they're 
not going to be on the move quiet yet and we'll have luck.  Any thoughts 
on the nuthatches there as well?  And is there anything at this park 
like a playground to keep my younger kids busy?  :)
Also, I'd like to hear more about crossbills in general.  When it comes 
to species like this that have different "types" that can be told apart 
by sound I have to wonder if they're really different or, just making 
different sounds.  Obviously I'm not questioning other people's 
knowledge on this.  There has to be more to it than "they sound 
different" to decide they're different types if not different species.  
I just haven't read enough about them.  I question everything I need to 
in order to learn more.  And, so many species and subspecies splitting 
and joining from time to time, a person does have to wonder.  Redpolls 
for instance.  They even look different but then, perhaps they're the 
same after all. If the experts that have all the say so are still 
figuring these things out, I don't think it's unreasonable for me to 
wonder about these crossbills.  Basically, I'm not going to be too 
concerned with trying to figure out which type I might see but I'll be 
quite content(and happy) to fine any crossbill at all.  Unless I put it 
on my list and then they decide to split it and I then don't know what I 
had.  that could be a problem.  HA.
Anyway, thanks for the reports and that's quite interesting to hear.

On 3/18/2017 6:29 PM, Joseph Neal wrote:
>
> Several of us on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip 
> this morning saw Red Crossbills near Shores Lake in the Ozark National 
> Forest. The birds were first observed by Bill Beall and Jim Nieting on 
> March 4 and have been found subsequently, more or less in the same 
> area, including today. We had clear looks at three birds this morning. 
> Joan Reynolds and I saw 5-6 in the same area on March 5. On that date, 
> we observed one crossbill feed another. A photo of the bird that was 
> fed shows it is a streaky fledgling. This is supportive of the 
> hypothesis that Red Crossbills nested in the Shores Lake area over 
> winter 2016-2017.
>
>
> Some unfamiliar with crossbill nesting behavior are a little shocked 
> about the hypothesis that crossbills may have nested here, with at 
> least one fledgling on the wing by at least early March. In terms of 
> Arkansas, it is pretty unusual, but then we are fortunate that Bill 
> Beall has been birding the area for many years and has many other 
> crossbill records. One difference this time is that we managed to 
> photograph birds because they are close to the highway. Bill and Jim 
> Nieting let us know right away when they observed them.
>
>
> Data for Red Crossbill in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Birds of 
> North America indicates food as the most important factor influencing 
> timing of nesting. Egg dates in North America from mid-Dec to early 
> Sep  Also, Red Crossbill's annual breeding cycle is apparently 
> regulated by photoperiod, with opportunistic responses to food supply 
> and social factors superimposed on this cycle.
>
>
> Shortleaf Pine forest where we are seeing these crossbills has been 
> thinned. Tree stands are now open and park-like, dominated by mature 
> Shortleaf Pines, with many mature trees heavy with pine cones  ideal 
> for crossbills. The Forest Service manages this way because it is 
> suitable for natural reproduction of pines in managed forests and 
> secondarily because it produces high-quality natural habitat for all 
> kinds of native wildlife, both plant and animal. It may very well have 
> fostered nesting by Red Crossbills in the state, too.
>
>
> Red Crossbill populations are divided by call types. These different 
> call types may reflect separate species under the umbrella name Red 
> Crossbill. UA-Fayetteville graduate students Anant Deshwal and Pooja 
> Panwar collected sound files from these birds on March 8, edited the 
> files, which were then sent to Matt Young at Cornell. Hopefully we 
> have enough data that Young can identify these crossbills to call type.
>
>
> More than 20 years ago, Bill Holiman, now Chief of Research at 
> Arkansas Natural heritage Commission, encouraged me to record 
> crossbill call types for birds I saw and heard in the Ouachita NF. I 
> didnt follow through at the time. Subsequently, I have managed to 
> record birds in northwest Arkansas. With help from Matt Young, we have 
> identified three call types from crossbills in Arkansas. The birds 
> currently in the Ozark NF would be the first identified that may have 
> nested here.
>
>



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 12:30:28 -0500
Thanks for your insight. Research has shown that 40% of the population has a 
utilitarian attitude toward wildlife and natural resources and only 13% have an 
ecologistic attitude toward wildlife. Very few are willing to give up progress 
motivated by greed to support a healthy system and our natural resources. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Donald C. Steinkraus 
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:11 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - 
A Note 


Spiders are indeed important in the ecology of our terrestrial ecosystems. But, 
all spiders are carnivores, and primarily need insects and other arthropods to 
eat. 




It is my observation that insects are declining in numbers. I attribute this to 
a number of factors. Homo sapiens is have a drastic impact by our activities, 
particularly, so-called "development" and "progress". In NW AR we are seeing 
this more and more. Farmland, natural areas, are being converted into houses, 
malls, highways, chem lawns, exotic plants in the landscape, pesticide treated 
areas, asphalt, concrete, warehouses, everywhere. 




A healthy ecosystem is full of native plants, free of pesticides, many insects, 
and the creatures that depend on them, the spiders and birds. 




The question is: who will slow and stop "development", the crush of humanity 
upon the Earth? 








-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Janine Perlman  

Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:50:47 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - 
A Note 


That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because 
their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is 
required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment. 

Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for 
successful propagation of our native avian species. 


Janine


On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis 
wrote:

 This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals 
with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat 
health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough 
insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to 
eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see 
evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a 
healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see 
birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control 
of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds. 


  Jerry W. Davis
  Hot Springs, AR
  Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs 

  USA TODAY

 Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests 
each year, according to a new study. Thats equal to the weight of more than 85 
million elephants. 


  Thats a lot of bugs.

 Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of 
meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of 
seafood, while the worlds total seabird population eats an estimated 77million 
tons of fish and other seafood. 


  The study, published in the

 European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global 
estimate of spiders eating habits. 


 Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, 
grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and 
tundra areas. 


 The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in 
forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees 
by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author 
Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. 





Subject: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 11:19:52 -0500
This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with 
birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat 
health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough 
insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to 
eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see 
evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a 
healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see 
birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control 
of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs 

USA TODAY

Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests 
each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 
85 million elephants. 


That’s a lot of bugs.

Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of 
meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of 
seafood, while the world’s total seabird population eats an estimated 
77million tons of fish and other seafood. 


The study, published in the

European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global 
estimate of spiders’ eating habits. 


Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, 
grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and 
tundra areas. 


The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in 
forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees 
by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author 
Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. 



Subject: Re: Yard questions
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 18:27:23 -0500
Sally Jo and All,
 
I am glad you have had good experiences and observed beneficial programs 
offered by the extension services. My reference was based on information I 
recently received from a NRCS/USDA staffer who told me they were still actively 
planting introduced invasives such as sericea lespedeza and fescue, but that 
they will not assist with efforts to eradicate the plants. 

So, my apologies if I was misinformed. 

Judith

On Mar 14, 2017, at 5:55 PM, Sally Jo Gibson  wrote:

> Thanks, Karen. I am a huge supporter of UAEX as my husband retired from that 
entity after 37 years with them. My son-in-law is director of the UA research 
station at Bethesda. I'm also aware of a lot of beneficial programs that take 
place through UA that the public is unaware of. 

> I'm still birding and make/keep my yard as bird friendly as possible. And 
spend lots of money on bird seed and yard upkeep. (Too old to do it myself, 
anymore.) Ive even bought and paid someone to plant Crepe Myrtle, Euonymus 
(sp?) and Naninas. Then, when I discovered these plants werent for the 
birds, paid someone to remove them. 

> There are people on this site with more than one opinion. I sometimes get the 
feeling that if you dont agree with certain people who post on ARBIrd, that 
you may suddenly find yourself one of those who the sanctified want removed. 

> I'll stay off my individual soap box on here from now on.
> Sally Jo Gibson
> 
>  
> From: Jim and Karen Rowe [mailto:rollingrfarm AT rocketmail.com] 
> Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
> To: Sally Jo Gibson ; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>  
> I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you 
preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to 
plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard 
for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants 
for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear 
Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and 
weather. 

>  
> Karen Rowe 
> 
> From: Sally Jo Gibson 
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>  
> Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
> SJG
>  
>  
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>  
> From: Mary Ann King
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>  
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often 
recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been 
fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive 
species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, 
Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on. 

>  
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top 
of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their 
young. 

>  
> MaryAnn   King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>  
>  
>  
>  
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is 
an expert on yards. 

> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>  
>  
>  
>  
> Hi all,
>  
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a 
neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This 
time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn 
maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and 
spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very 
green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our 
front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice 
on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and 
benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find 
out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts? 

>  
>  
> 
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>  
>  
> 
Subject: Re: Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project Hats for Next Season
From: Debra Grim <dsgrim02 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 14:10:23 -0400
Mitchell
Is this a ball cap? If so, I would like to order one please.
Debra Grim

On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 5:07 PM, Mitchell Pruitt <
0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> We are happy to announce that Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project hats are now
> available for pre-order! Hats will be $15.00 each and all proceeds will go
> towards funding our project during the 2017 season. Order one now to wear
> around town, out owling, or abroad!
>
> If you would like to order one, please contact me as soon as possible via
> email (mlpruitt24 AT yahoo.com), as there will be a limited supply! They
> should be in-hand and ready for delivery later this month.
>
> The hats are charcoal gray, with a saw-whet owl embroidered on the front
> and "Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project” embroidered on the back.
>
> We are excited to be gearing up for next season...no doubt the team will
> all be wearing their new hats!
>
> As it warms, I am still detecting 2 saw-whets with transmitters in Madison
> County! When will they move north?
>
> Best,
> Mitchell Pruitt
>
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:00:04 -0500
If anyone tries for the YHBL today and sees it. Please post it.  Thanks. 

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
From work in Little Rock
Subject: Best Management Practices for small arms firing ranges
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Mar 2017 15:52:43 -0600
I ran across a couple of documents from the Interstate Technology Regulatory
Council relating to our discussions a week or so ago on lead ammo.
Wildlife exposure to a variety of contaminants-especially lead-is a concern.

 

http://www.itrcweb.org/Guidance/ListDocuments?TopicID=26

&SubTopicID=25 

 

Please note that these best management practices relate to ranges that will
accumulate large amounts of lead and other contaminants associated with
shooting at targets.  The levels across the landscape during roaming-hunting
will not be as concentrated as at a firing ranges.  (For what it's worth,
the remote firing ranges I have used in Arkansas would probably have high
environmental contaminant levels of concern and I have not observed any BMPs
at those sites.)

 

Remediation of firing ranges can be a costly affair.  Using ammo that does
not create unnecessary contamination is a more cost-effective alternative.

 

Apologies for cross-posting to members of all three listservs.

 

Jeff Short

 

 

 
Subject: reply from state wildlife veterinarian Fwd: CWD and scavengers
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2017 14:54:53 -0600

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Barry Haas 
> Subject: Re: CWD and scavengers
> Date: March 9, 2017 1:06:03 PM CST
> To: Judith Griffith <9waterfall9 AT gmail.com>
> 
> Judith,
> 
> You may want to share this on ARBIRD for the benefit of those folks who 
followed this thread there, and who don't subscribe to the Fellowship of Wings 
listserv. 

> 
> Thanks for sharing this.
> 
> Barry
> 
> 
> On Mar 9, 2017, at 12:32 PM, Judy & Don wrote:
> 
>> Thank you, Dr. Ballard. I will share this with 
FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU so other birders can read your information. 

>> In the future we will contact a field agent regarding probable CWD deer to 
collect samples. 

>> 
>> Judith
>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>> 
>> On Mar 9, 2017, at 12:15 PM, "Ballard, Jenn"  
wrote: 

>> 
>>> Ms. Griffith,
>>> Thank you for contacting me regarding this issue. I apologize for the 
delayed response, I have been working in the field. I do not believe there is 
any evidence to suggest that birds would become infected or develop disease 
from the CWD prion. Prions can pass through the GI tract of birds, but it would 
be virtually impossible for us to try to prevent scavenging of deer carcasses 
by these species. If sick or recently dead deer are observed, please notify our 
agency so that CWD samples can be collected. 

>>> Sincerely,
>>> Jennifer Ballard
>>>  
>>> Jennifer R. Ballard, DVM, PhD
>>> State Wildlife Veterinarian
>>> Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
>>> #2 Natural Resources Drive
>>> Little Rock, Arkansas 72205
>>> Office 501-223-6366
>>> Cell 501-291-8926
>>>  
>>> From: Judy & Don [mailto:9waterfall9 AT gmail.com] 
>>> Sent: Thursday, March 2, 2017 11:09 AM
>>> To: Ballard, Jenn 
>>> Subject: Fwd: CWD and scavengers
>>>  
>>> Hi, Dr. Ballard.
>>>  
>>> I posted to ARBIRD earlier this week about bald eagles consuming a deer 
that had possibly died of CWD. Many questions arise from the transmission of 
prions in droppings, to transmission of the disease itself in birds and animals 
that are not cervids. 

>>>  
>>> Thanks for sharing your knowledge of the situation.
>>>  
>>> Judith Ann Griffith
>>> Ninestone Land Trust
>>> Carroll County, AR
>>>  
>>> Begin forwarded message:
>>> 
>>> 
>>> From: Karen And Jim Rowe 
>>> Subject: Re: CWD and scavengers
>>> Date: March 2, 2017 10:32:23 AM CST
>>> To: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>, Barry Haas 
>>>  
>>> AGFC has recently hired a veterinarian with experience with CWD as well as 
birds of prey. I suggest you contact Dr. Jenn Ballard with your question about 
disease transmission between avian scavengers and cervids. Her email is 
Jennifer.Ballard AT agfc.ar.gov 

>>> 
>>> Karen Rowe AGFC
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Mar 2, 2017, at 9:07 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that 
possibly died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging 
behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas 
asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most recent 
understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease was only 
transmissible to other corvids. So this week I inquired about the latest 
findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other avians, as well 
as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the manager of the Elk 
Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming meeting should soon be 
available on the AGFC website. 

>>> 
>>> Judith
>>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>>> 
>>> 
>>> The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric 
building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be 
available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response 
yet. Will let you know. 

>>>  
>>>  
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 08:28:20 -0600
I have heard reports about how our warmer winter have been the highest ever,
but were surpassed by the temperatures in 2012.  

Checking the 2012 hummingbird map shows arrivals in central Arkansas by 15
Mar.  

Suppose it is time to get our feeders ready.  (Dang; missed the Senior
Discount Day at Kroger to buy some sugar!)

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis 
Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 8:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map

 

The Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are arriving along our coast.  It is time to
get your feeders cleaned and ready to be put out. Follow the progress on the
link below. Other species in the west may have a similar arrival. 

 

http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html

 

 

Jerry W. Davis

Hot Springs
Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 16:39:08 -0600
    
Does anyone know if the Sandhill Cranes are still in the Texarkana area?
Thanks for the feedback.
Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR Kjdillard AT sbcglobal.net 


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Subject: CROSSBILLS-YES. SCOTER-NO.
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 21:22:27 +0000
Red Crossbills were still present in the Ozark NF near Shoes Lake. Bill Beall 
and Jim Nieting found 4 there on Saturday. Joan Reynolds and I saw 5-6 on 
Sunday. I was out there today again with two UA-Fayetteville graduate students, 
Pooja Panwar and Anant Deswhal, both with field bird song recording experience. 
They collected sound files that will be analyzed by Matthew Young at Cornell 
for determination of song types. (More on that to come). 


We were joined by Charlie Lyons and Nancy Young. What an incredibly beautiful 
morning to visit magnificent Shortleaf Pine stands in the Ozarks. So lovely it 
wasnt easy to keep looking up into the pine canopy for foraging crossbills  
but we did. We also got the nuthatch trifecta (White-breasted, Red-breasted, 
Brown-headed). 


On the way back, we stopped at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility for the Surf 
Scoter present yesterday. Lots of ducks, good diversity, fine views of male 
shovelers in all their glory -- but no scoter. 

Subject: Art for the Birds III
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 21:51:29 -0600
Art for the Birds III, an exhibit of bird themed works in any media, 
will be held at the Rialto Gallery in Morrilton from April 28 through 
May 8.  I will then move the works to various other venues around 
Morrilton so that they get maximum exposure without risk of damage from 
renters at the Rialto.

We are going to try to organize some prizes for Best of Show, 1st, 2nd, 
and 3rd place.  If we get enough sponsors we'll even include the Vox 
Populi award ('voice of the people', meaning you get to vote at the 
reception).

The reception for this exhibit is being planned for Saturday evening 6 
May at 6:00-8:00pm.  We are planning to have live music, food, a 
presentation and awards.

To help raise money for the reception we will actually need to charge an 
entry fee for this competition.  $10 for the first entry and $5/entry 
for the next two with a maximum of 3 entries per artist.  Anyone who is 
willing to 'sit' the Gallery during the week so it can be open to the 
public for a few hours will have their fee waived.

Also, in order to try to organize a little better, I have an entry form 
that I'd like to use for this one.

We can hang around 50 works in the Rialto Gallery, so we're encouraging 
everyone to enter this exhibit.  PM me with an e-mail address to get the 
entry form.

Thanks!

George (n. Conway County doing the exhibit at least one more time!)
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - March 7
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 20:41:26 -0600
It started off overcast and cool then turned windy, warm, and clear on the
bird survey today.  74 species were found.  The Purple Martins finally
showed up as well as Barn Swallows.  Pied-billed Grebes are starting to
yodel.  A few geese were moving today also.  Here is my list for today:

 

Greater White-fronted Geese - 12

Snow Geese - 5

Ross' Goose - 1

Canada Geese - 4

Wood Duck - 7

Gadwall - 113

American Wigeon - 1

Mallard - 52

Blue-winged Teal - 34

Northern Shoveler - 180

Northern Pintail - 3

Green-winged Teal - 17

Ring-necked Duck - 135

Hooded Merganser - 10

Pied-billed Grebe - 18

Double-crested Cormorant - 10

Anhinga - 1

Great-blue Heron - 12

Great Egret - 2

Black Vulture - 11

Turkey Vulture - 60

Northern Harrier - 5

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 6

King Rail - 3

Virginia Rail - 6

American Coot - 562

Greater Yellowlegs - 3

Wilson's Snipe - 51

Rock Pigeon - 4

Mourning Dove - 7

Great-horned Owl - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 9

Eastern Phoebe - 8

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 70

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 51

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 3

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 2

Marsh Wren - 4

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 4

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Hermit Thrush - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Brown Thrasher - 5

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 33

Pine Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Field Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 21

Le Conte's Sparrow - 2

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 9

Swamp Sparrow - 5

White-throated Sparrow - 21

White-crowned Sparrow - 13

Northern Cardinal - 21

Red-winged Blackbird - 23

Eastern Meadowlark - 5

Rusty Blackbird - 2

Common Grackle - 2

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darners

Baskettail species

Damselfly species

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Spring Peepers - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

 

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 10:08:01 -0600
But if "the duck hunters get it" then why did Ducks Unlimited support this 
order as it appears in the article Suzie Liles sent? 


http://www.ducks.org/press-room/news-releases/secretary-zinke-shows-support-for-sportsmen-on-first-day-in-office?poe=pressRoom 


Judith

On Mar 6, 2017, at 8:17 PM, Ed Laster  wrote:

> Karen is right. Education is the key. Most who hunt and fish dont want to 
damage the environment, but they may not understand why a .22 bullet in a 
squirrel that gets away could be fatal to a Red-tail. The story of why lead is 
bad needs to be told. 

> 
> The duck hunters get it. The problem was well defined and communicated and 
it has been accepted. The problems with gun barrels, chokes and shotshells 
have been addressed and hunters understand the change. We can do the same thing 
with bullets and fishing weights, but we need to address the need for education 
as Karen pointed out. 

> 
> Rifle bullets are a challenge and from what I can find, several manufacturers 
are making good progress in matching ballistics with their non-lead 
alternatives. Smaller bullets seem to be more of a challenge and the .22 
rimfire, which makes up a large amount of the ammo consumed, doesnt seem to 
have the accuracy in tin (one of the options) as lead. Lots of technical 
reasons for that but they continue to work on it and Im convinced they will 
find a better solution. 

> 
> Most of the major ammo manufacturers are working to solve this problem. If 
you want to know who and how, do what Karen said, Google it. 

> 
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:43 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

>> 
>> My apologies for typos and grammar error - my fat fingers hit something on 
my phone that sent the message while I was retreading it for errors. I hope the 
information makes sense despite these sentence structure mistakes. 

>> 
>> Karen Rowe
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

>> 
>>> A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of 
lead for waterfowl hunting. 

>>> 
>>> The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get 
their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies 
to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies 
and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before 
a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on 
all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to 
provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All 
this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on 
several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on 
comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law. 

>>> 
>>> As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large 
educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the 
second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer 
burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or 
game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, 
the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead 
poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing 
tackle as compared to lead alternatives. 

>>> 
>>> The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and 
the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this 
vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. 
Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well. 

>>> 
>>> A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted 
without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained 
without a massive education campaign. 

>>> 
>>> Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know 
what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control 
by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are 
nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form? 

>>> 
>>> All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal 
Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to 
hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then 
communication is how we can begin a change. 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
>>> On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short  wrote:
>>> 
>>>> When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of 
North Amerca) in the late 70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was 
imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement. 

>>>>  
>>>> Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldnt AGFC ban the use 
of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldnt the main sellers 
(e.g., Walmart) support that decision? 

>>>>  
>>>> Jeff Short
>>>>  
>>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Judy & Don 

>>>> Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
>>>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>>>> Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>>>>  
>>>> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking 
about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl 
lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered 
using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had 
stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets. 

>>>> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested. 
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> J
>>>>  
>>>> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds  wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why 
banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner. 

>>>>  
>>>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols 
<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote: 

>>>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years 
(and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, 
Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump 
and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it 
was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last 
day purely for political purposes..knowing the incoming administration would 
most likely overturn the order. 

>>>>  
>>>> Kenny
>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>> 
>>>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban 
on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges. 

>>>> 
>>>> 
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition 

> 
Subject: FOS Purple martins
From: Tim Tyler <tylertim204 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 12:57:12 -0600
Three Purple martins just arrived to check out the Martin house. Almyra, Ar
Subject: Henslow's Sparrow at Kingsland Prairie NA
From: Devin Moon <moondevg AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 10:31:44 -0600
Randy Robinson and I birded Kingsland Prairie Natural Area yesterday (3/7),
searching for the Henslow's Sparrow.  This locale is just east of Kingsland
(Cleveland Co.), southwest of Pine Bluff.  We found a single Henslow's
Sparrow, with help, just to the right of the sign and gate.  This was a
lifer for both of us.  We got some great views pictures of it as it perched
about 10 ft away from us in a sapling pine.  We walked around for 2 hours
and found about 6 Eastern Towhees and probably just as many Brown-headed
Nuthatches.  Also, there were several Variegated Fritillaries about, which
were first of the year for us.

After Kingsland, we went to Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff.  We found a lone,
male Red-breasted Merganser and a very fidgety wren among several Swamp and
Song Sparrows in the reeds.  We came away with no ID but had an inkling
that this was our target, the Marsh Wren.

We continued from Lake Saracen to another known hotbed of Marsh Wrens,
Wilbur West Rd. Wetlands.  We found gobs of ducks, mostly Green-winged
Teals, and several Red-winged Blackbirds were singing around the wetland
area.  A Cooper's Hawk and Red-tailed Hawk were seen flying overhead.
Nearly at the end of our search, we came upon a stand of reeds and rushes
that were rattling away.  We did a little playback to get glimpses of one
Marsh Wren and we could hear the song of a second nearby.

Devin Moon
East End, AR
Subject: White-winged Dove
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 15:14:31 -0600
For the past four days we have been having a White-winged Dove visit our
feeder in our backyard.  It sometimes comes in the morning but more often in
the afternoon, after 4:00.  If you care to camp out at our dining room
window for a chanced sighting, you are welcome.  Just give us a call.

 

Delos McCauley

Phone 870 550 7861 (cell)

1405 Silver Fox Lane

Pine Bluff, AR  71603
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 10:04:52 -0600
But if "the duck hunters get it" then why did Ducks Unlimited support this 
order as it appears in the article Suzie Liles sent? 


http://www.ducks.org/press-room/news-releases/secretary-zinke-shows-support-for-sportsmen-on-first-day-in-office?poe=pressRoom 


Judith

On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:43 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


> My apologies for typos and grammar error - my fat fingers hit something on my 
phone that sent the message while I was retreading it for errors. I hope the 
information makes sense despite these sentence structure mistakes. 

> 
> Karen Rowe
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe 
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
>> A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of 
lead for waterfowl hunting. 

>> 
>> The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get 
their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies 
to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies 
and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before 
a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on 
all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to 
provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All 
this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on 
several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on 
comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law. 

>> 
>> As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large 
educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the 
second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer 
burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or 
game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, 
the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead 
poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing 
tackle as compared to lead alternatives. 

>> 
>> The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and the 
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this 
vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. 
Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well. 

>> 
>> A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted 
without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained 
without a massive education campaign. 

>> 
>> Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know 
what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control 
by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are 
nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form? 

>> 
>> All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal 
Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to 
hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then 
communication is how we can begin a change. 

>> 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>> On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short  wrote:
>> 
>>> When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of 
North Amerca) in the late 70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was 
imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement. 

>>>  
>>> Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldnt AGFC ban the use 
of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldnt the main sellers 
(e.g., Walmart) support that decision? 

>>>  
>>> Jeff Short
>>>  
>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Judy & Don 

>>> Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
>>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>>> Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>>>  
>>> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking 
about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl 
lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered 
using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had 
stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets. 

>>> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested. 
>>> Thanks,
>>> J
>>>  
>>> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds  wrote:
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why 
banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner. 

>>>  
>>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols 
<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote: 

>>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years 
(and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, 
Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump 
and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it 
was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last 
day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would 
most likely overturn the order. 

>>>  
>>> Kenny
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
>>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on 
using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges. 

>>> 
>>> 
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition 

>>>  
>>>