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Updated on Tuesday, May 3 at 10:08 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Levant Sparrowhawks,©BirdQuest

3 May Red Slough Bird Survey - May 3 [David Arbour ]
3 May different woodpecker [Teresa & Leif ]
3 May Further adventures in May [Herschel Raney ]
3 May Re: Flash of red [Stacy Clanton ]
3 May Flash of red [Keith de Noble ]
3 May Mississippi Kite - my latest favorite yard bird [Kelly Chitwood ]
3 May Avian villian [CK Franklin ]
3 May Mississippi Kite in Fayetteville [jonathanperry24 ]
3 May ASCA May Field Trip [Karen Holliday ]
3 May Black-bellied whistling ducks [Jerry Butler ]
2 May Red breasted Nuthatches [Jerry Schulz ]
2 May Migration [Herschel Raney ]
2 May Reminder: NWA Big Half-Day Event is looking for participants and sponsors! [Butch Tetzlaff ]
2 May Re: My neck still hurts... [David Ray ]
2 May Tail Feathers ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
1 May Re: Mayday, mayday. [Karen Garrett ]
1 May Mayday, mayday. [Herschel Raney ]
1 May Re: Bobolinks [Gmail ]
1 May Bobolinks Lollie Bottoms in Conway [CK Franklin ]
1 May fos, Scarlet Tanager, eastern kingbird [Alan ]
1 May Say's No, bobolinks yes [David Ray ]
1 May Bird call [kjdillard ]
1 May Sightings: Rock Creek Trail [Jim Dixon ]
1 May Western kingbirds back [David Ray ]
1 May BIRDER'S WEEKEND AT DEVIL'S DEN -- ALL EVENTS ON SATURDAY AND SUNDAY (not Friday) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
1 May BIRDERS WEEKEND AT DEVILS DEN STATE PARK this Saturday-Sunday, May 7-8 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
30 Apr Ozark Conference Center this morning [Johnny Walker ]
30 Apr Say's Phoebe [Bob Harden ]
30 Apr Shorebirds at hyw 134 & 14 [Rosemary Seidler ]
30 Apr Sightings: Rose-breasted Grosbeak [Jim Dixon ]
30 Apr And more FOS [Dorothy Cooney ]
30 Apr Say's Phoebe [Lenore ]
30 Apr Say's phoebe [CK Franklin ]
29 Apr More FOS [Dorothy Cooney ]
29 Apr Bobolinks [Bob Harden ]
29 Apr Shorebirds at Centerton ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
29 Apr Mississippi Kites, Wood Thrush, and Summer Tanager [Stacy Clanton ]
29 Apr FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher [Glenn McLean ]
29 Apr Link to photos: [Gail Miller ]
29 Apr Wood Thrush-waiting no more! [dianemarie yates ]
28 Apr Wood Thrush [Judy & Don ]
28 Apr recent birds [Judy & Don ]
28 Apr summer tantager [Alan ]
28 Apr Baltimore Oriole [Lenore ]
28 Apr Murray birthday [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
28 Apr Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery [Butch Tetzlaff ]
27 Apr Red Slough Bird Survey - April 27 [David Arbour ]
27 Apr Re: Common Yellowthroat in Cabot [Charles Anderson ]
27 Apr Re: Centerton Fish hatchery this afternoon. [Ryan Risher ]
27 Apr Nature on PBS at 7:00 Owls [Jacque Brown ]
27 Apr Centerton Fish hatchery this afternoon. [Jacque Brown ]
27 Apr Shorebirds in the Valley ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 Apr Feathered Eye Candy! [dianemarie yates ]
27 Apr Re: FOSs [Harriet Jansma ]
27 Apr Re: FOSs [Mary Ann King ]
27 Apr FOS Rose-breasted Grosbeak [jonathanperry24 ]
27 Apr Link to Photos: Baltimore Oriole, Gray Catbird and others [Gail Miller ]
27 Apr FOSs [Dorothy Cooney ]
27 Apr Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching [Janine Perlman ]
27 Apr Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching [Jeffrey Short ]
27 Apr FOS [Sally Jo Gibson ]
27 Apr FOS Baltimore Oriole [Judy & Don ]
27 Apr Indigo Buntings ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
27 Apr Feederbirds [Joyce Hartmann ]
27 Apr Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching [cbayona ]
27 Apr Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching [Michael Budd ]
26 Apr Possible Mississippi Kite [jonathanperry24 ]
26 Apr Bald Knob [Bob Harden ]
26 Apr Re: eBird Global Big Day [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
26 Apr eBird Global Big Day [Dottie Boyles ]
26 Apr RFI: Arkansas Welcome Center HWY 167/7 in El Dorado [Kelly Chitwood ]
26 Apr Miller County Shorebirds, 4/26/2016 [swamp_fox ]
26 Apr NWAAS field trip at Ninestone [Judy & Don ]
26 Apr Indigo, finally [Stacy Clanton ]
26 Apr sandpipers [Judy & Don ]
26 Apr yesterday morning delight [Jean Crume ]

Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 3
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 22:03:59 -0500
It was partly cloudy, cool, and windy on the bird survey today.  104 species
were found.  It was fairly good for migrants early before the wind picked up
with numerous species of warblers being found in the willow rows.  Here is
my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 13

Canada Goose - 2

Wood Duck - 14

Gadwall - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 13

Hooded Merganser - 8

Pied-billed Grebe - 11

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Double-crested Cormorant - 36

Anhinga - 24 (Several sitting on nests.)

American Bittern - 4

Least Bittern - 3

Great-blue Heron - 15

Great Egret - 18

Snowy Egret - 5

Little-blue Heron - 2

Cattle Egret - 2

Green Heron - 3

White Ibis - 119 (unit 7)

Black Vulture - 7

Turkey Vulture - 14

Mississippi Kite - 1

Cooper's Hawk - 1

King Rail - 1  

Purple Gallinule - 7

Common Gallinule - 28

American Coot - 58

Killdeer - 1

Spotted Sandpiper - 3

Greater Yellowlegs - 19

Lesser Yellowlegs - 13

Wilson's Phalarope - 8

Mourning Dove - 23

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Chimney Swift - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 4

Least Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 3

Eastern Kingbird - 29

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 16

Bell's Vireo - 4

Warbling Vireo - 5

Red-eyed Vireo - 3

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 11

Fish Crow - 5

Purple Martin - 5

Tree Swallow - 32

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 18

Barn Swallow - 10

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 7

Carolina Wren - 13

Marsh Wren - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 9

Eastern Bluebird - 5

Gray Catbird - 7

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Cedar Waxwing - 60

Tennessee Warbler - 5

Nashville Warbler - 3

Yellow Warbler - 7

Magnolia Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 3

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Pine Warbler - 2

Prairie Warbler - 2

Blackpoll Warbler - 2

Black-and-White Warbler - 4

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Northern Waterthrush - 1

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 27

Hooded Warbler - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 13

Summer Tanager - 6

Eastern Towhee - 1

Chipping Sparrow - 1

Clay-colored Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 5

Lincoln's Sparrow - 12

White-crowned Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 19

Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 1

Blue Grosbeak - 4

Indigo Bunting - 33

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 15

Bobolink - 2

Red-winged Blackbird - 32

Common Grackle - 18

Brown-headed Cowbird - 11

Orchard Oriole - 3

American Goldfinch - 1

 

Odonates:

 

 

Ebony Jewelwing

Elegant Spreadwing

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Cyrano Darner

Bayou Clubtail

Jade Clubtail

Spangled Skimmer

Eastern Pondhawk

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Western Cottonmouth

Broad-banded Watersnake

Yellow-bellied Watersnake

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: different woodpecker
From: Teresa & Leif <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 21:35:34 -0400
 We tried a new suet block this week trying to attract different migrants to 
our "neck of the woods". We have usually the normal woodpeckers through out the 
year, such as Hairy, Downy, Red-bellied, Sap-suckers, Flickers, and Pilated 
Woodpeckers. But Imagine my surprise to see a Red-Headed Woodpecker out there 
this morning. Now he didn't last long for a photo and the Blue Jays chased him 
off but ? It was a nice surprise to see a woodpecker that is not found in a 
woody area like ours! Brighten my day too. Teresa, Hector, AR 



-- 

Faith consists in believing when it is beyond the power of reason to believe.
By Volaire.
Subject: Further adventures in May
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 19:50:10 -0500
The warbler groups were led this morning by the Tennessee Warblers in 
full call and volume, fluttering and chasing each other through the oak 
tops. These small warblers literally vibrate from beak to tail to make 
that loud sound. Mixed in were mostly the usual suspects of 
Black-throated Greens and Blackburnian, Redstarts, many Chestnut-sideds. 
Not one Tennessee called yesterday morning. It has been about a week 
since they were coming through in stops and starts.

Among all the followers, were four more Bay-breasted Warblers: an 
astounding event here. One female and the rest full colored males. One 
male fed right above me at about 10 feet for several minutes, eating 
caterpillars like all the rest of the warblers. There is not anything I 
would have rather been doing than watching him.

My nesting Blue Jays had had enough by about 730 am and one of them just 
started chasing warblers off. Too many flitting and singing things near 
their nest I suppose. I thought he might make a hawk call but he never 
did. A few raucous jay screams and some rusty hinge noises were all he 
could muster.

One tree was full of Philadelphia Vireos. A yearly visitor but it is odd 
how they segregate sometimes. Those buttery throats, most of them were 
silent.

By 9 AM the woods were quieter except for the locals. The Cuckoos have 
become more vocal, the Red-eyed Vireos. And of course the Tanagers and 
Indigos. One Indigo female was looking over the nest they abandoned last 
year in the front yard.

Parulas seem to have surged again. Calling after everyone else was 
quiet. And in the late morning I heard a chip near the blackberries at 
the end of the driveway that was harsher than a Waterthrush, and less 
smacky. An Ovenbird popped up and perched in one of my Cedars. He made 
some partial song and then another Ovenbird popped up very close to the 
first bird. I thought for a moment it was going to be the first pairing 
I had ever seen here. But soon the chipping increased and the orange 
mohawks flashed upward and the chase between two males was on. I have 
never had Ovenbirds stay past migration, despite my nearby wooded 
slopes. They seem to need more altitude. Whereas the Kentucky and Hooded 
Warblers seem to need less altitude. The Hooded nest just south off the 
bottom of the mountain. And the Kentucky Warblers cut up Bells hillsides 
eight miles to the east.

At the swamp in the afternoon a Red-shouldered Hawk dove in feet first. 
These hawks take crayfish and salamanders and frogs from the water. This 
one seemed to come up with nothing. Right after he left a 3 foot long 
Yellow-bellied Watersnake cruised the swamp slowly trying to flush 
frogs. I never saw a frog jump or panic. Just last week I caught the 
first juvenile Yellow-belly I have ever seen at Bell. I could not 
believe it was this species at first. (That snake now appears on my 
website watersnake page.)

The kites were swooping down on my treetops, doing the cut-winged dives. 
It is too early to be flushing cicadas or katydids. But something must 
have been worth the effort. These insect specialists are easily one of 
our most beautiful local birds. It is a joy to watch them.

Dusk approaching, the wind is down. I don’t think I found a single 
migrant warbler in the afternoon. Even the tanager songs are falling off 
in the last light. Leaving the Chickadees and the wrens, the sound of 
distant mowers circling and circling in some kind of life I can’t 
understand.

I will be up and out in the morning again. The mornings right now too 
precious for other things. But the storms have stopped. We will see what 
is moving on the mountain tomorrow with just the blue sky and the random 
fall of birds on a whim.

“I think I will stop here.”

I am glad I have someplace for them to do it.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Re: Flash of red
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton AT SAUMAG.EDU>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 21:30:31 +0000
This gives me hope! We had then summer before last in healthy number, but 
almost none last summer. While I heard one the other day, I haven't seen any. 


Stacy Clanton
NE Corner of Magnolia

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Keith de Noble 

Sent: Tuesday, May 03, 2016 3:00 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Flash of red

Sunday afternoon as I was casually walking from the house to the shop, a flash 
of red caught my eye. Using a white oak tree for cover, I slowed my pace and 
peered through the branches of low lying bushes. There it was, a summer 
tanager. For several years we had a nesting pair on the land. Last year we had 
no sightings. Hopefully they have returned to set up residence. 
Subject: Flash of red
From: Keith de Noble <kdenoble AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 15:00:10 -0500
Sunday afternoon as I was casually walking from the house to the shop, a flash 
of red caught my eye. Using a white oak tree for cover, I slowed my pace and 
peered through the branches of low lying bushes. There it was, a summer 
tanager. For several years we had a nesting pair on the land. Last year we had 
no sightings. Hopefully they have returned to set up residence. 

Subject: Mississippi Kite - my latest favorite yard bird
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 14:49:41 -0500
Upon arrival a few days ago, the MIKI couple began nest building in a tall pine 
at the edge of our driveway. 

Which is quite handy, since my deck faces the tree and makes for cheap 
entertainment. 

Their vocalizations are quite entertaining as well. I can’t wait to see the 
babies hopping around on the limbs! 


Last year, the local MIKI nesters had 3 fledge.
In 2014, 4.

I don’t know if they are the same birds (I assume they are) and I don’t 
know if the previous youth return with the parents. 

If that’s the case, mom and dad returned alone this year. Last year, there 
were four in the group that appeared to be a family. 



Still no Wood Thrushes. :-( I can’t wait to hear them!

Kelly Chitwood
El Dorado, AR
Subject: Avian villian
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 19:35:26 +0000
Well, that was interesting. I was out back moving some dirt left over from my 
recent sewer line adventure when out of the blue catastrophe struck the 
starling family's nest in the next yard. At least from their POV. A small 
accipter, had to a Sharp-shinned Hawk, jetted out of the tree with the outraged 
starling parents in frantic hot pursuit. Feathers flew, not all of them baby 
Starling, as the hawk & the parents flew over my head across the road toward 
the pine tree & looped back around the house behind me. The ever vigilant jays 
& their mockingbird neighbors joined the posse briefly while a crowd of Cedar 
Waxwings decided they had business elsewhere.  

I did not see the unfortunate victim though I'm pretty sure the Sharpie had a 
meal in talon based on the shrillness of the starlings' calls. Life isn't easy 
for baby birds. 

In other news the chickadee babies I reported on two weeks ago fledged about 
3-4 days after their big move. 

CindyIn the HeightsLittle Rock

Sent from Outlook Mobile
Subject: Mississippi Kite in Fayetteville
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 12:36:13 -0500
Soaring over Lafayette Street between College and Mission around noon.


Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: ASCA May Field Trip
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 14:03:37 +0000
Saturday, May 14th is the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas' (ASCA) monthly 
field trip.  See details below.  If you like birds, please join us.  You 
don't have to be an ASCA member to participate.  Dr. Dan "The Birdman" 
Scheiman will lead this trip.  I will be chasing birds in Brazil on that 
date.  Please feel free to contact either of us if you have questions.  

Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock May 14, 2016Gillam Park 
and theLittle Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)Little Rock,Pulaski Co. Comehelp us 
count birds for International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD).  May 14 is also the 
second annual eBird GlobalBig Day.  Celebrate the migration ofbirds moving 
from their winter non-breeding grounds in Latin America, Mexico,and the 
Caribbean to their summer nesting grounds in North America.  It will be a 
great day to be outside innature!  Meet at 7:30 a.m. in Gillam Parkat the last 
parking lot past the swimming pool. Gillam has great habitat for spring 
warblers and other migrants.  There will be moderate walking on fairlylevel, 
but possibly muddy trails.  Whenfinished at Gillam, we’ll drive to the 
Audubon Center and walk the wildlifeobservation trail.  Last, we’ll head 
toIndustrial Harbor Road and Terry Lock & Dam to look for Western Kingbirdsand 
Painted Buntings.  This is a morningtrip.  Bring water and snacks.  Wear 
sturdy walking shoes or hiking boots.  To learn more about the eBird Global 
Big Daygo to http://eBird.org/globalbigday Directions—GillamPark is in 
southeast Little Rock near the airport.  Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, 
LittleRock.  Take I-30 West heading south fromLittle Rock.  Then exit onto 
I-440 goingtowards the airport.  Take Exit1-Springer Road.  At the bottom of 
the exitramp, turn left onto Springer Road.  Goapproximately 1 mile to just 
past the LRAC. Turn right onto Gillam Park Road. Follow it into the parkto 
the last parking lot past the swimming pool. 
Subject: Black-bellied whistling ducks
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 May 2016 07:13:29 -0500
I saw a pair of Black-bellied ducks with 5 ducklings feeding in a large
puddle in a pecan grove near Toltec Archeological Park in Lonoke County..
They were 200 yds. south of the intersection of Toltec Mound Roard and
Bobby Jones Roa  They were easily visible and remained at that location all
day yesterday
Subject: Red breasted Nuthatches
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 22:33:39 +0000
I have one ( or two ) coming regularly to our sunflower feeder. The eye stripes 
are there but the reddish breast color is a little dull. Could it / they be 
feeding young ??  Does their nesting range extend this far south ??  A 
question to our learned birders. Jerry Schulz 

Little Rock, Arkansas
Subject: Migration
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 16:49:47 -0500
It is crazy in bursts. This morning I walked outside at dawn and there 
were a few Chestnut-sideds calling and the usual Cardinal and Tanager 
and Bunting start ups. I went back in and an hour later when I had to 
leave for work I opened the garage and took out the binoculars and 
focused on one hickory tree near my drive after hearing the increase in 
song.

That single tree contained:

10 Chestnut-sideds

3 Redstarts

3 Blackburnians

3 Black-and-white

6 Black-throated Greens

1 Magnolia

1 Yellow-throated Vireo

1 Blue-throated Vireo

A Gnatcatcher

Then I had to head off to work. Same tree after work presently is empty.

Tomorrow morning is my day off. I will feel like a rich man with hours 
to just watch and listen.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Reminder: NWA Big Half-Day Event is looking for participants and sponsors!
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 10:56:41 -0500
All, 

 

For those of you who have already signed up for the NWA Big Half-Day Event
this weekend, we really appreciate your support!

 

For those of you who would like to sign up, or need more information, the
form is attached.

 

For those of you who are unable to sign up, consider sponsoring another
participant!

 

 

I am sure a lot of folks have considered helping out the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology with a contribution for the International Migratory Bird Day,
but why not consider keeping your dollars local and helping out birds and
bird education here at home first? Besides, a simple $10 donation to the
Mulhollan Bird Blind fund with NWA Audubon Society, proportionally speaking,
is like donating $80,000 to Cornell. So here is a great chance to feel rich
when you may not be! Nothing against Cornell; I donate to them each year
myself, but the Big Half-Day Event sure does help promote birds on a local
level first.

 

Thank you and may your warbler count be high!

 

Butch Tetzlaff and Joe Neal

NWA Big-Half Day Event coordinator and treasurer

Bentonville and Fayetteville, AR
Subject: Re: My neck still hurts...
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 09:27:03 -0500
I guess that was the reason there were so few at Gillam Park yesterday 
morning-they were all at your house! 

David Ray 
NLR 

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 2, 2016, at 8:03 AM, Kenny Nichols 
<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> ...from looking up for several hours straight yesterday morning. As many of 
you know, LaDonna and I have a home on the south side of Lake Dardanelle. 

> Hesitant in crossing the widest part of the lake, migrants often follow the 
shoreline (and our front yard) in search of a narrow crossing. Yesterday was 
like nothing I've ever experienced. About 7:30AM, I started noticing orioles, 
grosbeaks, warblers and other migrants going over in numbers. BIG numbers -as 
in thousands and thousands and thousands. Wave after wave after wave they came, 
all moving east to west. Due to the sheer numbers and only a fraction of birds 
actually stopping, identifying the smaller birds was especially difficult. Some 
birds did stop, like Indigo Buntings and a few Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. At one 
point, just at our feeders, we had 75+ Indigo Buntings, 2 Painted Buntings, 1 
Blue Grosebeak, 4 Baltimore Orioles and 20 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. The numbers 
below are conservative estimates of what flew over in 3 hours yesterday 
morning. 

> 
> Baltimore Oriole -3000
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak -2500
> Eastern Kingbird -25
> Cedar Waxwing -200
> Indigo Bunting -200
> Orchard Oriole -100
> Scarlet Tanager -50
> Summer Tanager -50
> Red-eyed Vireo -20
> Black&white Warbler -25
> Tennessee Warbler -50
> Nashville Warbler -50
> American Redstart -100
> Northern Parula -2
> Magnolia Warbler -25
> Blackburnian Warbler -25
> Yellow Warbler -15
> Blackpoll Warbler -20
> Palm Warbler-1
> Yellow-rumped Warbler -30
> Black-throated Green Warbler -25
> UNIDENTIFIED WARBLER -2500
> 
> 
> kenny nichols 
> cabot, ar
Subject: Tail Feathers
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 May 2016 00:39:02 -0500
Coming through the area between Hector and Appleton today, which is 
mostly open fields and pastureland with some woods scattered throughout, 
I spotted several sparrow sized birds along the roadside which flew into 
the pastures as we passed.  Their tails were distinctive.  The central 
feathers were dark, almost black, while the outer feathers were brownish 
with a white trailing edge.  They looked more like a band on the ends of 
the outer tail feathers, not the entire feather being white.  The heads 
looked like they might have some pattern, but they disappeared too 
quickly to say for certain.

I also spotted a FOS yellow billed cuckoo, indigo bunting and blue 
grosbeak today.  Plus several songs I could not identify up along 
Falling Water Creek.

Unfortunately, a Rat snake raided the Phoebe nest in the eaves of the 
porch overhang here at the house.

So - interesting day. ;)

George (n. Conway co. enjoying the weather)
Subject: Re: Mayday, mayday.
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 22:40:20 -0500
My jealousy knows no bounds.  Your yard birds remind of the time that I
experienced a fallout at High Island, along about 1997, or so.  Thanks for
sharing your birds with us, even if it's vicariously.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Sun, May 1, 2016 at 6:31 PM, Herschel Raney <
herschel.raney AT conwaycorp.net> wrote:

> Out the door this morning and the first song I hear is a Chestnut-sided
> Warbler. I heard none of them the day before. The first bird, in fact, the
> first five birds I put my binoculars on in the front yard are Chestnuts.
> Then I find three Ceruleans. All silent. I hear Ceruleans every year but I
> see them only rarely on the property. Redstarts sing, a male flutters, and
> above me the full slow paced song of a Rose-breasted Grosbeak. The singsong
> Robin-like phrasing like an afterthought, it is affine song and I see male
> Grosbeaks in several directions, shifting in the sycamore tops. A long list
> of birds is calling all at once. I walk over to my porch. And my wife is
> having coffee there and placing an order for the locally grown produce for
> the week ahead. One must approach her in caution when she is this relaxed
> at coffee time. But I tell her “I think you need to go get your binoculars,
> it is one of those, well, miracle mornings.” She looks me over and decides
> to do it.
>
> I want to show her the male Grosbeaks. But the other birds are swarming to
> the east of the yard and toward the swamp. Many Chestnut-sideds are feeding
> and calling and she is impressed with them. The males marked bright. A male
> Cerulean comes down to within ten feet of the ground, a rare Cerulean
> altitude, and she gets her binoculars on it. An Ovenbird calls. Four
> different vireos are calling and I see my fifth Blue-headed Vireo of the
> morning. She spots a Black-throated Green female on her own and she likes
> her. Several zebra Black-and-whites descend close to us. And Indigo Bunting
> drops down in the road right in front of us, nearly landing on a female
> Three-toed Box Turtle.
>
> Golden-winged Warbler females appear. I find three females. Yesterday I
> saw a stunning male. I see so many birds at once I cannot point at one.
> Least Flycatcher, Eastern Wood Pewee, and then among all the
> Chestnut-sideds who are chasing each other and calling a full adult male
> Bay-breasted Warbler appears above us. I have not seen any Bay-breasteds in
> five years. I would estimate it has been eight or nine years since I saw an
> adult male. They have been the most decreased warbler of my last 15 years
> if I had to pick one. This male is a yard bird (bird #147, warbler #27),
> meaning I have not seen one on the property in the ten years we have been
> here.
>
> I come back alone a little later when things have quieted and find the
> Ovenbird along the swamp edge. It is walking and singing, tail up, like an
> Antthrush (if you have ever chased Antthrushes). It mostly ignores me as I
> stand in the road. A pair of Louisiana Waterthrushes comes winging at me
> beak to tail in high chase towards my eye and then just off my starboard
> ear. One of them doing the tumbling whistle-jumble call of agitation as
> they wing over towards the creek. Oh to be slammed in the forehead by a
> singing Waterthrush.
>
> Yesterday I watched a female cardinal tugging and tugging at a dry
> greenbrier vine. Like it was the perfect nest addition. I kept seeing this
> bird moving toward the west side of the yard and I finally see that she has
> started a nest in the Japanese Maple right outside my office window. I go
> up and look out the window right into her nest. I will have to avoid
> looming and staring at her. The Carolina Wrens this week took up nesting in
> the hanging gourd on my porch. It swings freely and is rain sheltered. I
> suppose it will do.
>
> Eight Baltimore Orioles in one sycamore top. The first Mississippi Kite
> floating over the yard. Broad-winged Hawks whistling in several directions.
> More Summer Tanagers, I think, than I have ever had. A calling Painted
> Bunting. Five Blue-headed Vireos.
>
> Mayday, mayday. Send in some help. We don’t get many of these days. But I
> know now, at least, in the midst of one, to stay and bask in the spring
> agitations.
>
> I hope you did too.
>
>
> Herschel Raney
>
> Conway AR
>
>
Subject: Mayday, mayday.
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 18:31:20 -0500
Out the door this morning and the first song I hear is a Chestnut-sided 
Warbler. I heard none of them the day before. The first bird, in fact, 
the first five birds I put my binoculars on in the front yard are 
Chestnuts. Then I find three Ceruleans. All silent. I hear Ceruleans 
every year but I see them only rarely on the property. Redstarts sing, a 
male flutters, and above me the full slow paced song of a Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak. The singsong Robin-like phrasing like an afterthought, it is 
affine song and I see male Grosbeaks in several directions, shifting in 
the sycamore tops. A long list of birds is calling all at once. I walk 
over to my porch. And my wife is having coffee there and placing an 
order for the locally grown produce for the week ahead. One must 
approach her in caution when she is this relaxed at coffee time. But I 
tell her “I think you need to go get your binoculars, it is one of 
those, well, miracle mornings.” She looks me over and decides to do it.

I want to show her the male Grosbeaks. But the other birds are swarming 
to the east of the yard and toward the swamp. Many Chestnut-sideds are 
feeding and calling and she is impressed with them. The males marked 
bright. A male Cerulean comes down to within ten feet of the ground, a 
rare Cerulean altitude, and she gets her binoculars on it. An Ovenbird 
calls. Four different vireos are calling and I see my fifth Blue-headed 
Vireo of the morning. She spots a Black-throated Green female on her own 
and she likes her. Several zebra Black-and-whites descend close to us. 
And Indigo Bunting drops down in the road right in front of us, nearly 
landing on a female Three-toed Box Turtle.

Golden-winged Warbler females appear. I find three females. Yesterday I 
saw a stunning male. I see so many birds at once I cannot point at one. 
Least Flycatcher, Eastern Wood Pewee, and then among all the 
Chestnut-sideds who are chasing each other and calling a full adult male 
Bay-breasted Warbler appears above us. I have not seen any Bay-breasteds 
in five years. I would estimate it has been eight or nine years since I 
saw an adult male. They have been the most decreased warbler of my last 
15 years if I had to pick one. This male is a yard bird (bird #147, 
warbler #27), meaning I have not seen one on the property in the ten 
years we have been here.

I come back alone a little later when things have quieted and find the 
Ovenbird along the swamp edge. It is walking and singing, tail up, like 
an Antthrush (if you have ever chased Antthrushes). It mostly ignores me 
as I stand in the road. A pair of Louisiana Waterthrushes comes winging 
at me beak to tail in high chase towards my eye and then just off my 
starboard ear. One of them doing the tumbling whistle-jumble call of 
agitation as they wing over towards the creek. Oh to be slammed in the 
forehead by a singing Waterthrush.

Yesterday I watched a female cardinal tugging and tugging at a dry 
greenbrier vine. Like it was the perfect nest addition. I kept seeing 
this bird moving toward the west side of the yard and I finally see that 
she has started a nest in the Japanese Maple right outside my office 
window. I go up and look out the window right into her nest. I will have 
to avoid looming and staring at her. The Carolina Wrens this week took 
up nesting in the hanging gourd on my porch. It swings freely and is 
rain sheltered. I suppose it will do.

Eight Baltimore Orioles in one sycamore top. The first Mississippi Kite 
floating over the yard. Broad-winged Hawks whistling in several 
directions. More Summer Tanagers, I think, than I have ever had. A 
calling Painted Bunting. Five Blue-headed Vireos.

Mayday, mayday. Send in some help. We don’t get many of these days. But 
I know now, at least, in the midst of one, to stay and bask in the 
spring agitations.

I hope you did too.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Re: Bobolinks
From: Gmail <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 15:59:16 -0500
Bobolinks are passing through Centerton/Bentonville. Saw 6 fly through this 
morning. 


Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville


> On Apr 29, 2016, at 19:18, Bob Harden  wrote:
> 
> I saw about 8 Bobolinks on Thibault Rd this afternoon about 5 PM They were on 
a power line at first and flew down onto a patch of red clover in the curve by 
the sod farm close to the Merlin Tree 

Subject: Bobolinks Lollie Bottoms in Conway
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 20:56:30 +0000
Karen Holliday, Dottie & Doris Boyles, Bill Burnham & I enjoyed listening to & 
watching a flock of 200+ Bobolinks along the east fence of the Conway airport 
about 2 hrs ago. They sure were making music. Also heard : 1 Bobwhite.Cindy 
FranklinLittle Rock 


Sent from Outlook Mobile
Subject: fos, Scarlet Tanager, eastern kingbird
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 15:55:10 -0500
On our ride from Pruitt , Buffalo River today a beautiful Scarlet Tanager
landed in a dead tree and gave us a show. I've never had such a long clear
look at one from only 15 feet away. Also saw an eastern kingbird for the
first time this year.

Just as a heads up , the ticks were so bad they almost carried us and our
horses off.

Alan gregory

Harrison, 



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Subject: Say's No, bobolinks yes
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 13:44:03 -0500
No Say's phoebe today at Holla Bend, but plenty of bobolinks and a yellow 
breasted chat hanging around the observation tower. 

David Ray 
NLR
Subject: Bird call
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 12:11:49 -0500
    
What bird call sounds like Teacher Teacher Teacher teacher???.  Think he has 
lost junior.  

Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR 
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Sightings: Rock Creek Trail
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 10:47:18 -0500
I walked Rock Creek Trail in west Little Rock Sunday morning and was greeted 
immediately by a Wood Thrush calling. In the 7/10 of a mile that I walked I 
heard or saw both Waterthrushes, my FOS Indigo Bunting, a Yellow-breasted Chat 
that would have been FOS except for yesterday, an FOS Gray Catbird, and about 
20 American Goldfinches. 


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: Western kingbirds back
From: David Ray <cardcards AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 10:41:56 -0500
Western kingbirds are back in their usual locales on Frazier Pike and Sloane 
Road off I440 in Little Rock. 

David Ray 
NLR
Subject: BIRDER'S WEEKEND AT DEVIL'S DEN -- ALL EVENTS ON SATURDAY AND SUNDAY (not Friday)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 14:11:04 +0000
All events for Birder's Weekend at Devil's Den State Park are during this 
upcoming weekend, Saturday and Sunday, May 7 and 8. There are no events on 
Friday (contrary to my posting a few minutes ago). If you need more 
information, contact Terry Elder at the park: terry.elder AT arkansas.gov 
Subject: BIRDERS WEEKEND AT DEVILS DEN STATE PARK this Saturday-Sunday, May 7-8
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 13:26:09 +0000
This coming weekend, Friday-Saturday May 7-8 is Birder's Weekend at Devil's Den 
State Park along Lee Creek in the Boston Mountains near Winslow. I am leading 
an easy Saturday May 7 bird walk in the park. Meet in the parking area at the 
lower Devil's Den Trailhead by Lee Creek bridge on Saturday morning at 9 am. 
This generally lasts a couple of hours and we see a bunch of birds. This walk 
is just one of quite a few events over the weekend. (examples below.) Karen 
Garrett is leading several interesting bird walks over the two days. 


All events are free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome, including 
beginners, experts, and inbetweeners. If you need a map, Google: 11333 West AR 
Hwy 74 West Fork, AR 72774. You can also check out the Northwest Arkansas 
Audubon Society web site for a park description: 
http://media.tripod.lycos.com/2020453/950081.pdf 


Heres an example of SOME of the Saturday programs. There are also programs all 
day on Sunday. 


7  8 am. MAYFIELD BIRD WATCH Many birds enjoy the close proximity to Lee Creek 
and the varied terrain of the Mayfield Area. Karen Garrett, leader. Meet at the 
Mayfield Area down Hwy 220. 

9  noon. CREEKSIDE BIRD WALK  Join Joe Neal and Northwest Arkansas Audubon 
Society. 

1  2 p.m. LIVE BIRDS OF PREY Nothing quite compares to the chance of meeting a 
real hawk or owl up close and personal! Learn more about Arkansass birds of 
prey as Lynn Sciumbato from Morning Star Wildlife Rehabilitation gives you that 
up close view. Meet at the amphitheater near Area E. (In case of inclement 
weather, we will meet at the Visitor Center Audio-Visual room. 

Subject: Ozark Conference Center this morning
From: Johnny Walker <johnnybacon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 21:25:57 -0500
I was at a retreat at the Ozark Conference Center outside of Solgohachia
this morning and enjoyed getting up a bit early to do some birding around
the grounds for an hour. It was overcast, but the rain held off. This is my
first spring birding in N. America, so I actually found two lifers: Lark
Sparrow (5) and Blue Grosbeak (1 male)! They were really fun to see.

Other highlights were hearing the E. Meadowlarks belt out the morning tunes
from the tops of hay bales and seeing a number of Killdeer (6). One in
particular was very curious of me as I came down the path and we stood
about 8 feet from each other for a minute or so. Then I continued down the
path and I must have been close to the nest because it fanned out its tail
and started coming towards me making a racket. After I passed it quieted
down.

The entire bird list is here on e-bird:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29316722

Happy birding,
   Johnny Walker
Subject: Say's Phoebe
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 16:05:53 -0500
Got it

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Shorebirds at hyw 134 & 14
From: Rosemary Seidler <rseidler AT CENTENARY.EDU>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 20:28:09 +0000
_Wilson's Phalarope and 12 more species present now.

Rosemary Seidler
Shreveport, LA
Subject: Sightings: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 14:26:07 -0500
Just had two male Rose-breasted Grosbeaks at my feeders in west Little Rock.

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 
Subject: And more FOS
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 14:08:12 -0500
That awful storm we had blew in several Indigo Buntings and Blue
Grosbeaks!  The RBGB is still here.  Also in the good news section, my
bluebirds have hatched!  I now am the proud grandma of 4 baby bluebirds!
Still waiting for the chickadees to hatch.

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Say's Phoebe
From: Lenore <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 12:11:17 -0500
Say's Phoebe at Holla Bend in the field on Loop Rd. GPS location lay 35.137 
long 93.04 


Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Say's phoebe
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:05:57 +0000
Say's phoebe Holla Bend in the meadow by the observation deck. Bobolinks 
continue also. 

Cindy Franklin

Sent from Outlook Mobile
Subject: More FOS
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 22:30:47 -0500
A gorgeous male Rose -breasted Grosbeak showed up today in the deluge we're
having, as did a male  Ruby- throat hummer.  I'm expecting ducks to invade
my yard any time now!  My friendly Summer Tananger is here too and was
pecking at the window as is his habit.  This is the 6th year he has come to
peck at my windows and follow me around.

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Bobolinks
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 19:18:49 -0500
I saw about 8 Bobolinks on Thibault Rd this afternoon about 5 PM     They
were on a power line at first and flew down onto a patch of red clover in
the curve by the sod farm close to the Merlin Tree
Subject: Shorebirds at Centerton
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 21:45:52 +0000
Today was NOT one of the spectacular fall-outs that have potential to turn 
casual observers into lifelong front-chasing fanatics, BUT it was a wonderful 
stormy morning. AND -- having crossed numerous municipal, state, federal, and 
international boundaries - apparently unaware WE of the Master Race have 
legally subdivided the Earth so that we may plunder at will -- shorebirds from 
the Gulf Coast, Central and south America, and only god knows for sure where 
else - were present and accounted for today at Centerton, a stopover on their 
way North, many ultimately way, way North. 


My list included Semipalmated Plover (1), Killdeer (6), Greater Yellowlegs (3), 
Lesser Yellowlegs (4), Solitary Sandpiper (4), Spotted Sandpiper (8), 
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1 - even in the gloom, saw the semi-palm!), Least 
Sandpiper (17), White-rumped Sandpiper (7), Pectoral Sandpiper (6 - now with a 
remarkable golden plumage). I would rate this as a below average day for this 
time of year, and especially because the hatchery has lots of GREAT mudflat 
habitat, but even at "below-average" it took me hours just sorting this out. 


A Northern Waterthrush was singing just north and across the street in the 
swampy woods. There are still quite a few (~25) impressive-looking Blue-winged 
Teal, too. 


I got a good and well-deserved hissing from a Canada Goose, one of four adults 
escorting two broods (6, 4 yellow downy goslings). As soon as they noticed me, 
one goose miraculously doubled its height and simultaneously went into full 
hiss mode - giving me the evil eye, bill open, tongue wagging like a serpent -- 
while the other adults moved off with the broods, their heads low and parallel 
with the water. 


It's quite remarkable really, especially when you realize that once upon a time 
we had lost our nesting Canadas, but now have them back due to efforts by 
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission and others like them who weren't willing to 
see them disappear. 

Subject: Mississippi Kites, Wood Thrush, and Summer Tanager
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton AT SAUMAG.EDU>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 18:42:24 +0000
Although Devin at Logoly State Park had reported Mississippi Kites there last 
week, I hadn't seen or heard any here in the NE corner of Magnoliauntil today 
that is. I heard the distinct cry/whistle this morning, but didn't see them. 
Then a few minutes ago, my wife came in from watering plants on the front porch 
to report a pair in the dead limbs of a tree in the neighbor's yard across the 
street, where they stayed for quite a while. Onethe male, in a courting 
display?--spread one or both of his wings repeatedly. Dare we hope that we have 
a nesting pair within a few yards of our house? 


Also, this morning was graced by the melodious song of a wood thrush right in 
our back yard. We're used to hearing them in the woods nearby, but this is the 
first time I've heard one this close. Never did spot him, however. 


We've also heard the "thumb along the teeth of a comb" sound of Summer 
Tanagers, but have yet to spot one. In the past, both male and female have been 
regular partakers of the seed and suet feasts we put out. 


Stacy Clanton
Subject: FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
From: Glenn McLean <glennmclean1984 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:52:13 -0500
I have enjoyed the arrival of the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher in Searcy
yesterday and today!

Glenn
Subject: Link to photos:
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 12:25:10 -0500
I've added more photos to my PBase site, birds around my water feature.  I 
finally got a photo of the Swainson's Thrush, also several Baltimore 
Orioles, including the female.  Cedar Waxwings, orioles and Tennessee 
Warblers are enjoying the Tulip Poplar tree, which is near the water 
feature, so birds come to the tree and the water.    If it is as rainy at 
your house today, as it is at mine, you might enjoy looking at some of the 
photos.   Photos are added to the 2016 gallery and the water feature 
gallery, in the water feature gallery, the photos are added at the end, to 
keep the water feature and the playhouse that I built in front of it at the 
top of the gallery.

2016 Photos:   http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/2016_photos

Water feature in my yard: 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/water_feature_in_my_yard

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Wood Thrush-waiting no more!
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 00:16:30 +0000
This morning at the Little Red River Field Road on Gulf Mountain--I was 
wondering why I hadn’t heard one yet and was listening hard. I walked half 
the valley before I picked up a faint, abbreviated call. I had IBird Pro with 
me and started calling. Within moments a much closer reply came--my 
long-awaited target bird of several trips over there. Also had a catbird eating 
on an orange atop a feeder pole in the yard. This day should’ve lasted a 
week! Indeed spring should last as long as winter. Or longer. Painted Bunting 
is outside my watching window as I post. And wolf-dog Kluie is upstairs on our 
bed with his head on his dad’s pillow. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Wood Thrush
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 19:23:04 -0500
Adding to the evening serenade, a Wood Thrush. 

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: recent birds
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 18:32:25 -0500
Yesterday evening American Toads trilled their peaceful harmonies along the 
creek while a Chuck-will's Widow called in the pines. Don had flushed one from 
the forest floor a while ago but this is the first we've heard the song. Flocks 
of Cedar Waxwings are moving through, bathing in the sprinkler or drinking from 
the stream. And just now a Mockingbird (rare for our yard) and our first Summer 
Tanager are serenading the world. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: summer tantager
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 18:26:32 -0500
Had my first summer tanager of the year today. Rose breasted grosbeaks
continue every evening and the hummers are  cleaning my feeders out. All
males so far. The girls have to be on their way.

Alan gregory

Harrison



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Subject: Baltimore Oriole
From: Lenore <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 17:53:01 -0500
My first in my yard. So brilliantly colored!  Wow!

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Murray birthday
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 22:11:59 +0000
Celebrated part of my bday afternoon at Murray Park. FOS Baltimore Oriole and 
scissortail flycatchers prepping to nest. Also e kingbird hawking. 

Most importantly...
The mulberry trees between the boat ramps are loaded w berries. The eastern one 
was also loaded w cedar waxwings stuffing themselves w still green berries. The 
western tree had ripening berries w 2 northern mockingbirds vacuuming in all of 
the darkest ones. Looks like the place to go for the next 2 weeks. 🐦 

Karen Hart  Little Rock

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 12:34:17 -0500
For those of you who live near Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery and have yet to
get your shorebird fix, it may be worth a trip.  Twelve species of
shorebirds this morning.  I swear every time I moved my scope I saw
something new.  48 species for the day.

 

Butch Tetzlaff

Bentonville, AR
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - April 27
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:41:51 -0500
Rebecca Crofton (WA), Walter Harmon (WA), and I surveyed birds today at Red
Slough and found 93 species.  The weather started off cool, calm, and
overcast (just after a storm) then turned hot, windy and partly cloudy by
afternoon.  Highlight of the day was a flock of 10 Fulvous Whistling Ducks
that spent some time on the Otter Lake spillway then they disappeared and 7
were later refound in unit 30E.  Also we were counting shorebirds in unit 30
when a Cooper's Hawk dove on some yellowlegs and ended up chasing one in
circles, both birds doing some incredible in flight maneuvering and the
yellowlegs escaped barely.   We had a bit of a hawk migration going today
also, with some fair numbers of Mississippi Kites moving over as well as
other raptors including a late 2nd year Golden Eagle.  Here is our list for
today: 

 

Fulvous Whistling Duck - 10

Canada Goose - 4

Wood Duck - 18

Gadwall - 9

Mallard - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 43

Northern Shoveler - 5

Green-winged Teal - 1 male

Hooded Merganser - 7

Pied-billed Grebe - 10

Neotropic Cormorant - 5 (at least 2 birds sitting on nests.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 9

Anhinga - 19 (Several sitting on nests.)

American Bittern - 2

Great-blue Heron - 26

Great Egret - 33

Snowy Egret - 18

Little-blue Heron - 7

Green Heron - 1

White-faced Ibis - 9 (unit 7)

Black Vulture - 24

Turkey Vulture - 12

Mississippi Kite - 21

Cooper's Hawk - 2  

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Swainson's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Golden Eagle - 1 (2nd year) migrant

Virginia Rail - 2

Sora - 1

Purple Gallinule - 5

Common Gallinule - 17

American Coot - 76

Spotted Sandpiper - 4

Solitary Sandpiper - 4

Greater Yellowlegs - 25

Lesser Yellowlegs - 28

Short-billed Dowitcher - 1 (unit 7, identified by call.)

Dowitcher species - 4 (probably Short-billed)

Forster's Tern - 2

Mourning Dove - 7

Barred Owl - 2

Chimney Swift - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 8

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 9

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 9

Fish Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 47

Bank Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 4

Barn Swallow - 11

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 8

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Cedar Waxwing - 23

Nashville Warbler - 1

Yellow Warbler - 2

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 9

Northern Waterthrush - 1

Kentucky Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 9

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 3

Lark Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 2

White-throated Sparrow - 1

White-crowned Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 23

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 18

Painted Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 11

Red-winged Blackbird - 23

Common Grackle - 15

Brown-headed Cowbird - 3

Orchard Oriole - 1

American Goldfinch - 3

 

Odonates:

 

Elegant Spreadwing

Fragile Forktail

Skimming Bluet

Orange Bluet

Blue-fronted Dancer

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Baskettail species

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Red Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Black Ratsnake

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Re: Common Yellowthroat in Cabot
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:42:42 -0500
Saw one in Western Hills park in Little Rock. Indigos everywhere. Can summer be 
far behind? 


Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 27, 2016, at 4:54 PM, Amy Hall 
<00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Joe and I were surprised to spot a Common Yellowthroat this morning. It 
stayed mostly hidden as it poked around on the ground among the daylily plants 
near some pine trees in our back yard. And a Rose-breasted Grosbeak has been a 
regular visitor to our feeder for the past several days. 

Subject: Re: Centerton Fish hatchery this afternoon.
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:39:17 -0500
The adult geese will actually swim like that if they sense danger to teach the 
goslings to do the same. They'll lower their profile to the water to not be as 
easily seen. 


Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 27, 2016, at 18:01, Jacque Brown  wrote:
> 
> I made a quick run through the hatchery after work. No Common Loon I could 
find. But there were Wilson’s Phalaropes in one pond, about 10, and a Willet 
in a different pond, plus several other usual suspects Shorebird species. 

> 
> There was also a Canada Goose swimming strangely. Wings folded but flat to 
the water, back low in the water, neck stretched out flat in front, the entire 
Goose looked level with the water. It’s mate was swimming normally and they 
had a least one Gosling. 

> 
> I wonder if it was hurt in the storm last night. 
> 
> There are several ponds that are mudflats now. 
> 
> 
> bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Nature on PBS at 7:00 Owls
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 18:27:29 -0500
Nature is about Owls tonight.  




Jacque Brown
bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Centerton Fish hatchery this afternoon.
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 18:01:40 -0500
I made a quick run through the hatchery after work. No Common Loon I could 
find. But there were Wilson’s Phalaropes in one pond, about 10, and a Willet 
in a different pond, plus several other usual suspects Shorebird species. 


There was also a Canada Goose swimming strangely. Wings folded but flat to the 
water, back low in the water, neck stretched out flat in front, the entire 
Goose looked level with the water. It’s mate was swimming normally and they 
had a least one Gosling. 


I wonder if it was hurt in the storm last night. 

There are several ponds that are mudflats now. 


bluebird2 AT cox.net
Subject: Shorebirds in the Valley
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:14:18 +0000
Last night's storms flooded fields and blew over trees around Kibler, in the 
Arkansas River Valley near Alma. David Chapman and I followed this weather 
hoping shorebirds had settled in fields south of Kiber and Dyer. We weren't 
disappointed. Upland Sandpipers (5) were walking short grass at West-Ark Sod. 
We picked up another in a big plowed field. Several small shorebird flocks got 
by us without IDs, but we did see Semipalmated Plover (1) and American 
Golden-Plovers (12) in big fields. 


Near Alma wastewater treatment facility we picked up Black-bellied 
Whistling-Duck (4). 


Frog Bayou Wildlife Management Area south of Dyer now has the best shallow 
water mudflat habitat I've seen there, an opinion apparently shared by 
Blue-winged Teal (at least 186) hunkered down on mudlumps and working the muddy 
shallows. Also, really excellent now for shorebirds: Killdeer, American Avocet 
(3), Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser Yellowlegs, Willet (11), Spotted Sandpiper (1), 
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), "peeps," Pectoral Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher 
(7), Wilson's Phalarope (4). We also saw White-faced Ibis (7), Snowy Egret 
(17), plus single Great Egret and Cattle Egret. 


We'd already put in a pretty good day by the time we reached Frog, so I'd rate 
our effort half-a**ed at best. The problem with so much really excellent 
shorebird habitat is that you need a fresh start on the day and some younger 
legs, too. 


Dr Chapman, long a stalwart in our northwest Arkansas birding community, is in 
process of making his final rounds here. His retirement is imminent; he and 
wife Ruth now own a home in northwestern Colorado, nearer family. We have long 
greatly valued his excellence as a birder, his generosity, and most recently 
chairing our Mulhollan blind committee; perhaps best of all, his wry sense of 
humor. People are not born with these qualities. They are made through the 
experience of living. We are all going to miss him, but between now and then, 
hopefully pack in a lot of birding. And since we have his address in Colorado, 
we will continue out there, too. Sage Grouse anyone? 

Subject: Feathered Eye Candy!
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 21:33:49 +0000
It’s almost heaven here too. Baltimore Orioles, Orchard Orioles, 
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Blue Grosbeak (a lone male) and Painted Bunting have 
been the week’s awesome feeder birds. One of the rose-breasted has even 
learned to push back at the cow-bullies. In our woods: Yellow-breasted Chat, 
B&W Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Hooded Warbler and Kentucky Warbler, as well as 
White-eyed--, Red-eyed-- and Yellow-throated Vireo. E. Towhee and Indigo 
Bunting hug the field edge but come in for snacks, while A. Goldfinches flash 
sunshine about the thickening green canopy. I counted almost 40 Pine Siskins on 
the tubes, making me wonder if they’re tanking up for the coming journey. 
Blue Jays echo the blooms of clematis twining around bird houses in the flower 
beds. Red-winged Blackbirds seem to be singing, “Vote-for-MEEE!” and I 
consider a write-in on the November ballot, perhaps as promising as any of the 
current choices! Titmice drink hummer juice--all the time.Everybody’s lining 
up at the bird bath now and hubby just drove up. He’ll need a lot more than 
hummer juice!! Happy birding. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: FOSs
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 20:17:18 +0000
The summer tanagers are again announcing their return to the tops of the trees 
in our east woods (on the south side of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville), and at 
dawn yesterday, a house wren pair brought their just-fledged four babies to our 
patio to practice their flying and food search. This area is intimate, with the 
house at one side and the garage at the other, and with a high wall covered in 
vines at the back, where the birds hide when anything startles them; so this 
isn't the first group of fledglings that have been brought to visit us in this 
safe-feeling place. 



Harriet Jansma

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Mary Ann King  

Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2016 2:50 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: FOSs

Hummer visiting flowers in the shadehouse today. :) Heard a Summer Tanager 
yesterday. 


MaryAnn   King
In the pine woods northwest of London

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney 

Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2016 12:47 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FOSs

Finally saw my first hummer of the season.. I suspect she was here for a while 
but we were on vacation. Also saw my first Baltimore Oriole. Waiting for a 
Rose-Breasted Grosbeak now. Love spring! 


--
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Re: FOSs
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 14:50:55 -0500
Hummer visiting flowers in the shadehouse today. :) Heard a Summer Tanager 
yesterday. 


 

MaryAnn   King

In the pine woods northwest of London

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney 

Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2016 12:47 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FOSs

 

Finally saw my first hummer of the season.. I suspect she was here for a while 
but we were on vacation. Also saw my first Baltimore Oriole. Waiting for a 
Rose-Breasted Grosbeak now. Love spring! 




-- 

Dorothy Cooney

Wickes, AR
Subject: FOS Rose-breasted Grosbeak
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 14:31:49 -0500
Four males at a backyard feeder in east Fayetteville while I was home for
lunch about 2 hours ago.


Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Subject: Link to Photos: Baltimore Oriole, Gray Catbird and others
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 13:00:09 -0500
I added some new photos to my PBase site, most were taken around my water 
feature in the yard.  Here is the link, should anyone like to visit it. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/gallery/2016_photos

Copied from my Facebook page:  I had several visitors that I did not get 
photos of, in spite of my spending several hours of vigilant watching from 
the 'playhouse. I saw, but did not get photos of: Blue Grosbeak, Magnolia 
Warbler, Common Yellowthroat Warbler, Swainson's Thrush and Tennessee 
Warbler. Also, three different times, a male Ruby-throated Hummingbird came 
and buzzed the water, I really think it will bathe eventually. Photos I did 
get are: Gray Catbird (came late in the day), Baltimore Oriole (adult male 
and young male), Cedar Waxwing, Carolina Wren, Eastern Phoebe, Brown 
Thrasher, Northern Cardinal, White-throated Sparrow, Brown-headed Cowbird 
and Indigo Bunting.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: FOSs
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 12:46:35 -0500
Finally saw my first hummer of the season.. I suspect she was here for a
while but we were on vacation.  Also saw my first Baltimore Oriole.
Waiting for a Rose-Breasted Grosbeak now.  Love spring!

-- 
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR
Subject: Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 12:22:59 -0500
A. aegypti females travel less than 1000 m, so Jeff is correct that 
shallow standing water around human habitation is the main threat by 
far.  (Also, natural habitats have lots of natural mosquito predators, 
some of which make rich livings on larvae and adults). Not saying 
shorebird habitats can't also have a lot of mosquitoes, but they aren't 
/at all/ likely to transmit Zika.  The ones living in/near human 
habitation are.

Janine

On 4/27/2016 12:08 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> I would expect that water contained in used tires and 
>  roadside/residential trash would be a higher risk of harboring the 
> /Aedes /mosquitoes associated with Zika transmission.  (Not to mention 
> the sexual transmission of Zika from male humans!)
>
> no me molestes mosquito
>
> Jeff Short
>
> Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
> *On Behalf Of *cbayona
> *Sent:* Wednesday, April 27, 2016 9:53 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching
>
> How is the Zika virus spreading going to play out with these plans to 
> create additional shore bird habitat which are also mosquito breeding 
> habitats? Are there things one could do to mitigate the mosquito 
> breeding such as adding certain small fish that aggressively feed on 
> mosquito larvae in the resulting shallow water fields? I ask because I 
> can see if the Zika issue becomes a serious issue and such activities 
> might be banned altogether unless there is a solution other than 
> chemicals.
>
> On 4/27/2016 7:37 AM, Michael Budd wrote:
>
>     All,
>
>     I would like to employ your help in getting more shorebird habitat
>     on the ground in the fall. We are trying to get more shallow water
>     in crop fields during the autumn migration, but it is going to
>     take a lot of outreach.
>
>     As part of our Arkansas Mud Drive I plan to piece together an
>     "About" video.  In that video I want to stress the importance of
>     eco-tourism or bird-watching and highlight that people are willing
>     to travel far and wide to see birds in crop fields.
>
>     If you could, or if you have the capabilities, can you please send
>     me a short (10-15 second) video that was recorded in the field and
>     is along the lines of:
>
>     "I am Charlie Lyon from Shreveport, Louisiana and I travel all
>     over south Arkansas for the chance to see shorebirds".
>
>     "I am Charles Mills and I spend a lot of time in the field
>     studying birds in Arkansas. Over the years I have noticed that
>     shallow water in harvested crop fields are very attractive to
>     shorebirds and waterfowl".
>
>     "I am Kelly Chitwood and I will drive 2-3 hours at the drop of a
>     hat if I hear there are good shorebirds around".
>
>     Of course you can get as creative as you would like. You can email
>     them to me at arkansaspfw AT gmail.com 
>     or use Google Drive (if you have gmail). Or post them directly to
>     facebook and send me the link to share at
>     https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArkansasMudDrive/
> 
 

>
>     Thanks everyone!
>
>     Mike
>
>
>
>
>
> -- 
> Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
> http://thepartsplace.k5nwa.com/ 
> 
 

Subject: Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 12:08:50 -0500
I would expect that water contained in used tires and roadside/residential 
trash would be a higher risk of harboring the Aedes mosquitoes associated with 
Zika transmission. (Not to mention the sexual transmission of Zika from male 
humans!) 


 

no me molestes mosquito

 

Jeff Short

Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf 
Of cbayona 

Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2016 9:53 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching

 

How is the Zika virus spreading going to play out with these plans to create 
additional shore bird habitat which are also mosquito breeding habitats? Are 
there things one could do to mitigate the mosquito breeding such as adding 
certain small fish that aggressively feed on mosquito larvae in the resulting 
shallow water fields? I ask because I can see if the Zika issue becomes a 
serious issue and such activities might be banned altogether unless there is a 
solution other than chemicals. 


On 4/27/2016 7:37 AM, Michael Budd wrote:

All, 

 

I would like to employ your help in getting more shorebird habitat on the 
ground in the fall. We are trying to get more shallow water in crop fields 
during the autumn migration, but it is going to take a lot of outreach. 


 

As part of our Arkansas Mud Drive I plan to piece together an "About" video. In 
that video I want to stress the importance of eco-tourism or bird-watching and 
highlight that people are willing to travel far and wide to see birds in crop 
fields. 


 

If you could, or if you have the capabilities, can you please send me a short 
(10-15 second) video that was recorded in the field and is along the lines of: 


 

"I am Charlie Lyon from Shreveport, Louisiana and I travel all over south 
Arkansas for the chance to see shorebirds". 


 

"I am Charles Mills and I spend a lot of time in the field studying birds in 
Arkansas. Over the years I have noticed that shallow water in harvested crop 
fields are very attractive to shorebirds and waterfowl". 


 

"I am Kelly Chitwood and I will drive 2-3 hours at the drop of a hat if I hear 
there are good shorebirds around". 


 

 

Of course you can get as creative as you would like. You can email them to me 
at arkansaspfw AT gmail.com or use Google Drive (if you have gmail). Or post them 
directly to facebook and send me the link to share at 
https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArkansasMudDrive/ 
 


 

Thanks everyone!

 

Mike







-- 
Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
http://thepartsplace.k5nwa.com/ 
 
Subject: FOS
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:54:05 -0500
Three brilliant male Baltimore Orioles just showed up.
Harrison, AR
SJ Gibson

Sent from my iPad
Subject: FOS Baltimore Oriole
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:10:30 -0500
After receiving 1/2 inch of much needed rain last night I stepped outside to a 
refreshed and much greener world this morning. The sight, song, and scratchy 
chatter of a male Baltimore Oriole in his resplendent plumage greeted me from 
trees across the drive. He flew off with a group of three more Orioles in 
silhouette against the early sun. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Indigo Buntings
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 15:49:19 +0000
Normally we only have one Indigo Bunting visit the backyard, occasionally two. 
The one that showed up earlier in the week must have told his friends about the 
good treats at our house because this morning there was at least 7 or 8. Three 
males, 1 first year male, and 3 or 4 females. What a treat. 


Several weeks ago Mom spotted an Eurasian Collared-Dove in the backyard. It 
hasn't been back since. This morning I saw one fly over the house just as I was 
leaving for work! Now it can go on MY yard list too! 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Feederbirds
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:26:36 -0500
Really excited today to see not one, but TWO male Painted Buntings at our
feeders this morning, as we sipped our coffee on the deck. First time ever
for that.Also stopping in to feed were 2 to 3 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks (male)
and a female.a Blue Grosbeak.several Indigo Buntings.Summer Tanagers
entertained us with their orgiastic sex by the well.Bluejays busy with
courtship and feeding each other. and flying all over the place, calling,
and when they land on the feeders, all the little jewel birds disappear for
a while.Male Cardinal chases.(we used to see up to a dozen male Cardinals
feeding together, but now they are claiming their territories).Siskins and
Goldfinches going after the insects on the catkins hanging from the walnut
trees.no end of entertainment outside this spring!

Joyce Hartmann

Rock'n'Pine Studio

958 Morningside Rd. N.

Clinton, AR 

501-745-6615

  www.joycehartmann.com

 





 
Subject: Re: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching
From: cbayona <cbayona AT CBAYONA.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 09:53:16 -0500
How is the Zika virus spreading going to play out with these plans to 
create additional shore bird habitat which are also mosquito breeding 
habitats? Are there things one could do to mitigate the mosquito 
breeding such as adding certain small fish that aggressively feed on 
mosquito larvae in the resulting shallow water fields? I ask because I 
can see if the Zika issue becomes a serious issue and such activities 
might be banned altogether unless there is a solution other than chemicals.

On 4/27/2016 7:37 AM, Michael Budd wrote:
> All,
>
> I would like to employ your help in getting more shorebird habitat on 
> the ground in the fall. We are trying to get more shallow water in 
> crop fields during the autumn migration, but it is going to take a lot 
> of outreach.
>
> As part of our Arkansas Mud Drive I plan to piece together an "About" 
> video.  In that video I want to stress the importance of eco-tourism 
> or bird-watching and highlight that people are willing to travel far 
> and wide to see birds in crop fields.
>
> If you could, or if you have the capabilities, can you please send me 
> a short (10-15 second) video that was recorded in the field and is 
> along the lines of:
>
> "I am Charlie Lyon from Shreveport, Louisiana and I travel all over 
> south Arkansas for the chance to see shorebirds".
>
> "I am Charles Mills and I spend a lot of time in the field studying 
> birds in Arkansas. Over the years I have noticed that shallow water in 
> harvested crop fields are very attractive to shorebirds and waterfowl".
>
> "I am Kelly Chitwood and I will drive 2-3 hours at the drop of a hat 
> if I hear there are good shorebirds around".
>
>
> Of course you can get as creative as you would like. You can email 
> them to me at arkansaspfw AT gmail.com  or 
> use Google Drive (if you have gmail). Or post them directly to 
> facebook and send me the link to share at 
> https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArkansasMudDrive/
>
> Thanks everyone!
>
> Mike



-- 
Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
http://thepartsplace.k5nwa.com/
Subject: Short video request - Shorebird/Bird-Watching
From: Michael Budd <arkansaspfw AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 07:37:37 -0500
All,

I would like to employ your help in getting more shorebird habitat on the
ground in the fall. We are trying to get more shallow water in crop fields
during the autumn migration, but it is going to take a lot of outreach.

As part of our Arkansas Mud Drive I plan to piece together an "About"
video.  In that video I want to stress the importance of eco-tourism or
bird-watching and highlight that people are willing to travel far and wide
to see birds in crop fields.

If you could, or if you have the capabilities, can you please send me a
short (10-15 second) video that was recorded in the field and is along the
lines of:

"I am Charlie Lyon from Shreveport, Louisiana and I travel all over south
Arkansas for the chance to see shorebirds".

"I am Charles Mills and I spend a lot of time in the field studying birds
in Arkansas. Over the years I have noticed that shallow water in harvested
crop fields are very attractive to shorebirds and waterfowl".

"I am Kelly Chitwood and I will drive 2-3 hours at the drop of a hat if I
hear there are good shorebirds around".


Of course you can get as creative as you would like. You can email them to
me at arkansaspfw AT gmail.com or use Google Drive (if you have gmail). Or
post them directly to facebook and send me the link to share at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArkansasMudDrive/

Thanks everyone!

Mike
Subject: Possible Mississippi Kite
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 20:09:40 -0500
Cindy and I were driving home in our separate cars and both spotted what we
each thought was a Mississippi Kite soaring near the Lutheran church on
Rolling Hills Drive in Fayetteville about an hour ago.
Subject: Bald Knob
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 18:33:43 -0500
Spent a little time at Bald Knob today.       Primary purpose to photograph
the Virginia Rail.     I located him pretty quickly and spent the next hour
hoping he would come out of the sticks and tangles that obscured any good
pictures.    I did get a few bad pictures and as I decided to see what else
was present He walked right out in the open so close my big lens could not
get some of the pics.   He actually walked under my truck.    But I did get
some great pics.     Also saw a single Bobolink, 2
Dickcissells,Short-billed Dowitchers , Sora, American Bittern, Northern
Waterthrush, 3 Yellow Breasted Chats and a large group of Indigo Buntings
and lots of the usual suspects.    Bob
Subject: Re: eBird Global Big Day
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 21:38:50 +0000
Just now. Scissor tail flycatcher on fence across from Christ the King (Rodney 
Parham & Cantrell. Karen Hart. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 26, 2016, at 4:34 PM, Dottie Boyles  wrote:
> 
> Just an FYI  In conjunction with International Migratory Bird Day on May
> 14, eBird is holding its 2nd Global Big Day.
> 
> Last year Arkansas had 57 birders participate. So how did Arkansas do on
> the first Global Big Day in 2015? Birders reported 181 species and
> submitted 133 checklists. However, out of Arkansas's 75 counties, only 23
> reported activity. That left 52 counties and their birds unaccounted for.
> (Rather sad) 
> 
> The Top Ten counties for 2015 were: 1. Benton (126 species), 2. Pulaski
> (109 species), 3. White (92 species), 4. Boone (85 species), 5. Garland (79
> species), 6. Scott (78 species), 7. Faulkner (66 species), 8. Baxter (61
> species), 9. Saline (53 species), and 10. Pope (51 species).
> 
> I cant remember how AR ranked among the 50 states but I think it was 40
> something. I know Arkansan's can do better than that....So on May 14 go out
> and bird and Submit Your Data to eBird. Its that simple. If you submit
> your birds to eBird they count. Dont worry  you dont need to be a bird
> expert, or to go out all day long. Even a half hour checklist from your
> backyard will help. Of course, you are welcome to spend the entire day in
> the field, but know that it is not required! For more information visit:
> http://ebird.org/globalbigday/
> 
> Dottie Boyles
> Little Rock
Subject: eBird Global Big Day
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 16:33:44 -0500
Just an FYI – In conjunction with International Migratory Bird Day on May
14, eBird is holding its 2nd Global Big Day.

Last year Arkansas had 57 birders participate. So how did Arkansas do on
the first Global Big Day in 2015? Birders reported 181 species and
submitted 133 checklists. However, out of Arkansas's 75 counties, only 23
reported activity. That left 52 counties and their birds unaccounted for.
(Rather sad) 

The Top Ten counties for 2015 were: 1. Benton (126 species), 2. Pulaski
(109 species), 3. White (92 species), 4. Boone (85 species), 5. Garland (79
species), 6. Scott (78 species), 7. Faulkner (66 species), 8. Baxter (61
species), 9. Saline (53 species), and 10. Pope (51 species).

I can’t remember how AR ranked among the 50 states but I think it was 40
something. I know Arkansan's can do better than that....So on May 14 go out
and bird and Submit Your Data to eBird. It’s that simple. If you submit
your birds to eBird they count. Don’t worry — you don’t need to be a bird
expert, or to go out all day long. Even a half hour checklist from your
backyard will help. Of course, you are welcome to spend the entire day in
the field, but know that it is not required! For more information visit:
http://ebird.org/globalbigday/

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock
Subject: RFI: Arkansas Welcome Center HWY 167/7 in El Dorado
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:18:24 -0500
The manager at the center wanted someone to do a presentation on birding. I can 
not on the date she needs assistance. 

She is requesting pamphlets and possibly a permanent display from Arkansas 
Audubon Society. 


I just spoke with the lady and no one has contacted her, so I thought I would 
make a broader request to the group. 

If you have brochures and pamphlets and/or checklists, she would love to 
display them. She says tourist often ask about Arkansas birds and she is in 
need of information. 


contact name and information in link:

http://www.arkansas.com/travel-tools/welcome-centers/el-dorado/

Kelly Chitwood
Subject: Miller County Shorebirds, 4/26/2016
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:09:02 -0500
In addition to the previously reported Whimbrel and 27 Semipalmated Plovers, 
there were many other shorebirds present in 3 fields south of the intersection 
of AR 134 and AAR 196. Between occasional bad lighting and the eventual 
presence of an adult Bald Eagle and Peregrine Falcon which kept the birds 
skittish and frequently moving about, here is a partial count of individuals 
present: 


South field east side134

Pectoral Sandpiper 975
Greater Yellowlegs 150
Lesser Yellowlegs 25
Whimbrel 1
American Golden-Plover 2 (dark rump)
Sanderling 1
Dunlin 1
Stilt Sandpiper 3
Semipalmated Plover 27
peep species 250

North field east side 134

Pectoral Sandpiper 24
Black-bellied Plover 1 (noted white rump and black axillars)
shorebird species 100

North field west side 134

Bald Eagle 1a
Peregrine Falcon 1
Pectoral Sandpiper 73
Solitary Sandpiper 1

Within a few miles of the intersection of AR 82 and AR 296, I had an airborne 
adult Swainson’s Hawk. Further north on AR 296 near First Old River (an oxbow 
lake near the Red River), I found 3 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks loitering 
around a small pond. 


We’ll see what the weather brings in or moves out over the next few days.

Charles Mills
Subject: NWAAS field trip at Ninestone
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 12:56:59 -0500
On Sunday, April 24th, about 30 visitors hiked around the pine and oak savannah 
and through the bluff glade, two areas that are being restored. The morning 
started off at 43 and by afternoon had climbed to around 83, pleasantly 
breezy in the sunshine. Our guide, Joe Neal, talked about the birds we heard 
and saw, including a beautiful Yellow-throated Vireo, a male Blue-gray 
Gnatcatcher singing near the nest, and a Blue-winged Warbler. Joe also 
explained our process of restoration and pointed out that as invasives are 
controlled with fire and other methods, the regeneration of native plant 
species becomes more evident. Our process at Ninestone intends not only to 
protect and restore this land and its native inhabitants, but also to educate 
our visitors about the connection between biodiversity and natural communities. 
On Sunday's field trip the renewal of native sedges, grasses, wildflowers, and 
other plants following the controlled burns in January was evident. Lance-leaf 
Coreopsis fairly carpeted areas in both habitats and will become a stunning sea 
of bright yellow flowers if we receive the promised rain this week. Violet 
Blue-eyed Mary was already in bloom but the Widow's Cross Sedum and Fame Flower 
were unusually small for April, patiently awaiting much needed precipitation in 
this small dry part of the state. We descended a natural stone stairway and 
through the woods along the base of the bluff that rises above the stream to 
look up at the arched cave entrance where Black Vultures have nested. We 
admired Columbine growing on ledges and out of cracks in the rock and saw one 
of the Great Horned Owl parents fly from a lookout tree near their grotto 
before we carefully threaded our way down the steep hill. Most hikers crossed 
Piney Creek to sit at the waterfall before enjoying a wonderful pot-luck lunch 
on the deck. Thanks to all who attended! 


Here's the list of birds we saw. Once it rains we'll probably see a lot more 
warblers, vireos, grosbeaks, other migrants, and flowers! 


Wood Duck
Great Blue Heron
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
Black Vulture
Red-shouldered Hawk
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl (flushed from tree outside their nesting grotto in the bluff)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker (two were seen mating)
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
White-eyed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
N. Rough-winged Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (one last-of-season bird ready to migrate north)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Blue-winged Warbler
Tennessee
Nashville
Northern Parula
Yellow-rumped
Yellow-throated
Pine
Black-and-White
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush 
Kentucky
Common Yellowthroat
Scarlet Tanager (in high woods across the creek)
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (just arrived last week)
Red-winged Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Indigo Bunting
Eastern Meadowlark
House Finch
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Indigo, finally
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton AT SAUMAG.EDU>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 16:07:14 +0000
After suffering for days in a jealous mire at the reports on the list of indigo 
bunting sightings, my angst was relieved (but my shoulder suffered a major blow 
from my wife's attempts to draw my attention to it) when an indigo bunting 
appeared at the back of the back yard, spotted through the breakfast room 
window. Now if only his painted cousin would put in an appearance! 


Stacy Clanton
NE Corner of Magnolia
Subject: sandpipers
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 10:50:42 -0500
Yesterday morning - one solitary Spotted Sandpiper bobbing from rock to rock in 
the stream. 

This morning - one single Solitary Sandpiper bobbing in the mud flat 
surrounding the receding pond water. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: yesterday morning delight
From: Jean Crume <crkcrm AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 14:19:37 +0000
While fixing my coffee in the morning, I watch my birdfeeders out the kitchen 
window.  On Monday, within the span of 5 minutes, I had a young adult male 
Baltimore Oriole and a male Indigo Bunting drop by!  What a pleasant surprise 
to see among my usuals - woodpeckers - downy and red-bellied, Carolina wren, 
titmice and chickadees.Hoping you have many happy birdiing surprises ~Jean 
CrumeHillcrest, Little Rock