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Updated on Sunday, February 1 at 07:10 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Broad-billed Sapayoa,©BirdQuest

1 Feb Re: RFI - NW Arkansas/NE Oklahoma Birds [Josh Adams ]
1 Feb Re: Gull [Jacque Brown ]
1 Feb Weekend, Winter [Herschel Raney ]
31 Jan Stuttgart [Michael Linz ]
31 Jan Birds, Hogs and Guns ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
31 Jan Re: Gull [ ]
31 Jan Roadrunner - yes [Betsy's Birds ]
31 Jan Roadrunner -yes [Betsy's Birds ]
31 Jan Loon fever (Tenkiller version) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
30 Jan Re: 250 species in 24 hours [Leslie Peacock ]
30 Jan 250 species in 24 hours [Jeffrey Short ]
30 Jan New Website [Jack and Pam ]
30 Jan Stuttgart Airport [kjdillard ]
30 Jan Juvenile great blue heron [Alyson Hoge ]
30 Jan Roadrunner [Teresa Mathews ]
30 Jan Sandhill Cranes any sitings [kjdillard ]
30 Jan Jeff "Ol Coot" Wilson on PBASE [Kelly Chitwood ]
29 Jan GBBG [Ryan Risher ]
29 Jan Lollie Bottoms (Faulkner County) [Michael Linz ]
29 Jan Re: Gull [Michael Linz ]
29 Jan Re: Gull [Lyndal York ]
29 Jan Gulls. Toadsuck [Herschel Raney ]
29 Jan Re: Gull [Jacque Brown ]
29 Jan Gull [kjdillard ]
29 Jan A different kinbd of sofa (Buffalo NR) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
29 Jan saw-whet hunt ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
28 Jan Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl Banding [kjdillard ]
28 Jan Arkansas Northern Saw-whet Owl makes the News ["Boyles, Dottie" ]
28 Jan Saw-whet hunt tonight at the ONSC ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
28 Jan Rusty Blackbirds Return [Jeffrey Short ]
28 Jan RFI: Large Red-winged Blackbird Roost [Dan Scheiman ]
27 Jan Research Project- Help Requested [Nicole Davis ]
27 Jan Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 27 [David Arbour ]
27 Jan Gull [Herschel Raney ]
27 Jan Alan Bland Coming Around ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 Jan ASCA Field Trip Report [Karen Holliday ]
27 Jan FW: Final Fall Distribution Packet for the CCMB (attached) [Jeffrey Short ]
27 Jan Re: Another news stroy! [Craig Provost ]
26 Jan Re: RFI - NW Arkansas/NE Oklahoma Birds [ ]
26 Jan THV GBBG Web story link [ ]
26 Jan GBBG - no [Michael ]
26 Jan out the window [Judy & Don ]
26 Jan Re: Gull [Lyndal York ]
26 Jan GREATER SCAUP ON MOBERLY STORM WATER RETENTION POND, BENTONVILLE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Jan EAGLE WATCH FIELD TRIP, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 7, 2015 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Jan Re: Gull [Jim Dixon ]
26 Jan Re: Dardanelle Lock & Dam [Michael Linz ]
26 Jan Re: Gull ["bill ." ]
25 Jan Re: Dardanelle Lock & Dam [Erin Tripcony ]
25 Jan Dardanelle Lock & Dam [Kenny Nichols ]
25 Jan Passenger Pigeon talk on Tuesday night in Fayetteville ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
25 Jan Herring Gull at Lake Saracen [Delos McCauley ]
25 Jan saw-whet trip cancelled tonight ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
25 Jan Gulls [Herschel Raney ]
25 Jan Re: Danger in Columbia [Ragupathy Kannan ]
25 Jan Danger in Columbia [Lyndal York ]
25 Jan Re: Sightings at Ninestone ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
25 Jan Sightings at Ninestone [Judy & Don ]
25 Jan Re: Great Black-backed Gull - YES [Daniel Scheiman ]
25 Jan RFI - NW Arkansas/NE Oklahoma Birds [Josh Adams ]
25 Jan Re: Great Black-backed Gull - YES [Erin Tripcony ]
25 Jan Re: binocular recommendation request [Craig Provost ]
25 Jan TOSO [Don Simons ]
25 Jan GBBG still here [Dan Scheiman ]
25 Jan old binoculars donation [Ragupathy Kannan ]
25 Jan Great Black-backed Gull - YES [Dan Scheiman ]
25 Jan GBBG [David Oakley ]
25 Jan The great saw-whet owl hunt ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
25 Jan Re: The next 67 species MINUS 1 [Nick Anich ]
25 Jan Re: binocular recommendation request [Jack Stewart ]
24 Jan Re: Life [Elizabeth Shores ]
24 Jan Re: Life [Bill Thurman ]
24 Jan Life [Bill Thurman ]
24 Jan Re: binocular recommendation request ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
24 Jan Re: binocular recommendation request [Barry Haas ]
24 Jan Re: binocular recommendation request [John Walko ]

Subject: Re: RFI - NW Arkansas/NE Oklahoma Birds
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 15:40:27 -0800
Hello all,
I just wanted to give a public thank you to the many birders who reached
out to me with advice for my target species last week. I ended up doing
even better than expected.

American Woodcock - I hit the Weddington WMA Small Game Area early morning
on Tuesday (which was relatively warm) in hopes of seeing some birds
displaying a few weeks early. No luck on that front, so I walked one of the
fields. About a quarter mile in away from my vehicle I flushed a Woodcock
from just inside the treeline (ID'd by its wing whistles). I walked back to
my car a few yards inside the tree line and flushed 2-3 more (I may have
flushed the same bird twice).

Northern Bobwhite - Based on some excellent direction I walked down the
fence line headed east parallel to the farm buildings. I quickly heard and
then saw a large covey of 20-30 Bobwhite spread out between the cattle
field behind the farm buildings and the trail I was walking on.

Le Conte's Sparrow - One flushed and briefly sat well enough to ID inside
some brush in the tall grass east of where I saw the Bobwhite. One other
likely candidate flushed later from the same area, but was only seen poorly
in flight. Another interesting bird was a Marsh Wren that flushed from the
same area and perched for diagnostic views of the wing and nape patches. I
didn't realize it at the time, but it appears this species is unusual in
this area in winter. It looks like the

Eastern Screech-Owl - I was invited to stop by a private residence where a
bird had been roosting for several days. Unfortunately, the bird was
sleeping down at the bottom of the box and never popped up for me. I made a
few evening/morning attempts to call in birds, but was unsuccessful.

Lapland Longspur - I drove the area around Wet Prairie Road north of
Maysville, but didn't locate any Longspurs. Several Horned Larks were
feeding in the fields and singing.

Smith's Longspur - I didn't end up having any time to drive to the
locations suggested to me in MO and OK.

The three lifers I saw were all birds I have spent many hours looking for
in Louisiana in previous years, so it was especially great to finally find
them. Thanks again to everyone who emailed me with suggestions and tips. It
never ceases to amaze me how much you can learn from other birders. If any
of you happen to find yourselves in western Washington I hope I can return
the favor.

Josh Adams
Nervously watching the superbowl just north of Seattle, WA.



On Sun, Jan 25, 2015 at 9:03 AM, Josh Adams  wrote:

> Hello all,
> I will be in Bentonville for work this week, but should have some extra
> time to do some birding while I'm there. I've done a bit of scouting in
> eBird and there are a few potential lifers or other desirable birds while
> I'm in the area. A few of these seem to be more likely in NE Oklahoma. I'm
> hoping to have a day to drive out there and will be posting an RFI to that
> listserv when I get approved to join, but if any of you have experience in
> that region I'd love to hear it as well.
>
>
> American Woodcock - It looks like these are present this time of year, but
> I'm a few weeks early for breeding displays? Any tips to finding them when
> they're not displaying?
>
> Northern Bobwhite - Chesney Prairie and Woolsey Wet Prairie are both
> hotspots with these birds present. I assume this is a "spend some time and
> hope to get lucky" species?
>
> Eastern Screech-Owl - I don't hold out much hope for this bird. Probably
> not singing this time of year and not easy to locate otherwise, but just in
> case someone has a hot tip.
>
> Le Conte's Sparrow - Looks like the same hotspots with Bobwhite sometimes
> have these as well.
>
> Smith's Longspur - Much more of a E. Oklahoma bird it would appear. I've
> read some tips from the Tulsa Audobon on the Longspur species (
> http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/longspurs.htm ). I may head over to Tallgrass
> Prairie if I can wrangle a day free.
>
> Lapland Longspur - Not a lifer, but a bird which I've only seen extremely
> poorly. Bare wheat fields?
>
>
> Thanks for any help you can provide.
>
> Josh Adams
> Lynnwood, WA
>
Subject: Re: Gull
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 15:41:26 -0600
I went Friday from 1:30 to 5:30. I think I saw it on the shoal with the 
pelicans, the light was wrong and the heat shimmers were terrible but it’s back 
looked dark and the head and breast looked white. It also looked larger than 
the brown Herring Gull it was next to. That dark backed bird flew up to rest on 
the grate that was between the upper and lower dam, you could see it from the 
upper parking area but the light was bad there too and I couldn’t get a photo 
even good enough to ID. 


 Around 4:30 I saw what was most likely the Gull on the dam once with no other 
birds for a size reference. It took a dive off the other side just before I 
snapped a photo. Jacque 




On Jan 29, 2015, at 10:59 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:

> I looked yesterday afternoon for the gull from 2 till dark and did not see it 
either. 

> Has anyone seen the gull since Tuesday morning (Herschel's report)?
> 
> At one point I heard a voice from above call to me. It said "The gull you are 
looking for is here". For a minute I thought I was getting some divine 
assistance. Then I figured out it was one of the guys that worked on the dam. 
He had ask someone what they were looking for the other day and had done a 
quick training of himself to understand what it looked like. He had found 
Waldo...it was just the odd one he found was a Herring gull. I took the 
opportunity to do a little more training. He said he would bring his camera 
with him to work and get a picture of it. It seems he is able to get a little 
closer than the rest of us. 

> 
> This is the third instance this month that I have ran into non-birders that 
have taken a real interest in what I have been doing. 

> 
> In Texas I had a local landowner that did a U-turn and went around the long 
way to avoid driving across the area where we had a Striped Sparrow staked out. 
He also ask if I got a picture to send hime one. When I sent him a picture he 
replied with a very nice note. 

> 
> In Faulkner County, I had a local landowner tell me the gates he put up were 
not for good people like us birders and that the people in my party could go 
around the gate on his property anytime to check out his birds. 

> 
> All too often we reference the difficult people we run into when we are in 
the field. Hope you guys don't mind the I mention the guys with a more positive 
attitude. I personally think there are more GOOD GUYS out there than bad 
guys... 

> 
> Michael(Conway)
> 
> 
> 
> On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 8:46 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:
> Edie Calaway and I searched for THE BIRD from around 3 until 5:15 pm. NO 
show! Searched both sides of the dam. The wind was terrific. Plenty of gulls 
around especially during the last half hour. 

> 
> Lyndal York
> Little Rock
> 
> On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 12:32 PM, kjdillard  wrote:
> 
> Has anyone seen the gull today, if so please share location. We are at the 
dam now. Thanks. Karyn Dillard 

> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> 
Subject: Weekend, Winter
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 13:02:45 -0600
Started in the morning yesterday with a sound from the north side of the
swamp. Difficult to localize as I walked the dogs over toward the general
direction of the sound. It resolved itself into a very large grackle flock,
but at the first distance sounded like continuously breaking glass. The
mass of black birds shifted and scattered toward the east eventually
quieting.


Rode the Lollie valley on the bike yesterday, before the rains were
supposed to start. It is not impossible to bird at speed on a bike but it
is more an appreciation of the greater picture. I did hear a single Western
Meadowlark call. Fox Sparrows fled into the brush. Crows cawed at me like
this might do something. Several large flocks of what sounded like pure
Brewer’s Blackbirds lifted and shifted near the road. They do not flee like
they would from a car, but still they don’t stay to watch this ratcheting
huffpuffery of mechanics go by.


Today in the drizzle the birds talked around me. Hermits making their
zhheeeet notes. Robins in all directions doing their full call and the
laugh, warning cackles and general Robin interaction noises. They were
feeding on berries and keeping their eye on me. White-throats sang
variations of the pure whistle they have. The one they seem to sing at all
times of year. You can pish up a White-throat but they will also come up
for whistlers. I did some short whistled runs of “oh sweet” and tagged some
varied extravagant whistled endings onto it. Birds came up to see. Thinking
either “wow, I hope this guy does not live where I live” with such virtuoso
skills, or else just wanting to see the bird that they thought to
themselves “would never ever breed with anything.”


Mockers came to do some slow whispered songs in the rain. Just watching
over their territories. I hear a few notes of White-throat mixed in. Wrens
and jays, some Robin notes. One of the Mockerlings truly believes the
persimmon tree that juts over my mailbox is the center of his universe. I
give him that. He gives my maibox the dottings of what he eats everyday.  The
winter voice of the Mocker is more wistful. I do know this. It is like
birdsong on the radio in the other room. And I cannot imitate it.


On the road, soaked, walking back, I step into jay feathers on the gravel
here and there. I look up in the pines but it is just rain and quiet coming
at me. One of my Cooper’s off somewhere no doubt with a belly full of Jay,
the cerulean dismantlings windblown here on the road and the leaves with me
now. Jays are smart and gregarious birds. You would think I would find
Robin feathers ten times for every jay scatter aftermath I see in these
woods. Bad luck or bravado, not sure, for this formerly raucous one. I
wonder how good of a survivor I would be, with death always watching from
the other trees. Even soaked on the road, beat up by privet and mud, my
life seems soft in comparison. But I will think about it some more, later,
out from under the midwinter sky. I always do.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Stuttgart
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 23:13:53 -0600
I took a slow drive on back roads with friends to Stuttgart today. The
fields were full of ducks, geese, killdeer and snipes.  Roth Prairie
provided good looks at Greater Yellowlegs, Sedge Wrens and LeConte
Sparrows.  The airport highlights were Northern Harriers and two Barn Owls.

Field stops on the way home were odd to say the least.  The first stop was
next to an owl that had been hit by a car and we had to stomp out a grass
fire at the last stop.

A couple of pictures...

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/January2015BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6110734174333128834 


Michael
Subject: Birds, Hogs and Guns
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 22:12:59 -0600
OK, so yes, I was birding, but mostly I was waterfall hunting and the 
birds were a bonus.  To make a long story short I was deep in the Ozark 
National Forest on Evans Mountain, down in a 200 ft ravine 3 miles from 
the truck and found myself face to face with a pair of wild hogs.  I'll 
skip the tale of how I (probably stupidly) addressed the matter but the 
hogs chose to run rather than confront . . . at least this time.

The telling of this tale in its fuller form has elicited a lot of 
response, usually containing advice about carrying a gun when out hiking 
the forest, specifically when way out in remote areas.  My question is 
this:  There are several AGFC and Forestry people on this list, and 
others who have more experience than I in the deep wilds.  What are the 
rules about being armed in the woods off-season?  What is the best way 
to handle a hog encounter if unarmed (counting down to someone saying 
'yell woo pig sooie' ;) )?

And, finally, does anyone have experience with snake chaps or gaiters?  
I didn't know there were as many moccasins up in the hills that there 
apparently are.

Thanks for advice and suggestions (yes, I do let someone know where I'm 
going, but go alone since I've yet to meet anyone who can keep up or is 
willing to go where I go).

George (n. Conway Co. preferring to eat pork to being eaten by pork)

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: Re: Gull
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 18:44:33 +0000
Michael - thanks for this email.  I do believe that we birders can often draw 
in others to the love and interest in birds.... 


      From: Michael Linz 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:59 PM
 Subject: Re: Gull
   
I looked yesterday afternoon for the gull from 2 till dark and did not see it 
either.  Has anyone seen the gull since Tuesday morning (Herschel's report)? 


At one point I heard a voice from above call to me.  It said "The gull you are 
looking for is here".  For a minute I thought I was getting some divine 
assistance.  Then I figured out it was one of the guys that worked on the 
dam.  He had ask someone what they were looking for the other day and had done 
a quick training of himself to understand what it looked like.  He had found 
Waldo...it was just the odd one he found was a Herring gull.  I took the 
opportunity to do a little more training.  He said he would bring his camera 
with him to work and get a picture of it.  It seems he is able to get a little 
closer than the rest of us. 

This is the third instance this month that I have ran into non-birders that 
have taken a real interest in what I have been doing.   

In Texas I had a local landowner that did a U-turn and went around the long way 
to avoid driving across the area where we had a Striped Sparrow staked out.  
He also ask if I got a picture to send hime one.  When I sent him a picture he 
replied with a very nice note. 

In Faulkner County, I had a local landowner tell me the gates he put up were 
not for good people like us birders and that the people in my party could go 
around the gate on his property anytime to check out his birds. 

All too often we reference the difficult people we run into when we are in the 
field.  Hope you guys don't mind the I mention the guys with a more positive 
attitude.  I personally think there are more GOOD GUYS out there than bad 
guys... 

Michael(Conway)




On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 8:46 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:

Edie Calaway and I searched for THE BIRD from around 3  until 5:15 pm. NO 
show!  Searched both sides of the dam. The wind was terrific. Plenty of gulls 
around especially during the last half hour. 


Lyndal York
Little Rock

On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 12:32 PM, kjdillard  wrote:


Has anyone seen the gull today,  if so please share location.  We are at the 
dam now.  Thanks. Karyn Dillard 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone





  
Subject: Roadrunner - yes
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 11:34:57 -0600
In tree line immediately to the east of Barber Road  AT  11:00 am

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Teresa Mathews 
> Date: January 30, 2015 at 11:52:44 AM CST
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Roadrunner
> Reply-To: ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET
> 
> I been on hwy 164 the last couple days between Moreland & Dover. 2 miles west 
of Moreland there been a Roadrunner running across the highway there. Its woods 
on the one side with several persimmon trees there. Only place on that stretch 
of highway that has those. A field on the other side with a pond in the 
background. Coming from Dover, the trees are on the left. Every year I see one 
in that same place several times during a year. There are no houses in that one 
area 1/2 mile either side of it. Its usually around 10am-noon that I keep 
seeing this bird species I assume its the same bird. Teresa from Hector, AR 
Subject: Roadrunner -yes
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 11:03:30 -0600
In tree line immediately left of Barber Road on north side of 164

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2015, at 11:52 AM, Teresa Mathews  
wrote: 

> 
> I been on hwy 164 the last couple days between Moreland & Dover. 2 miles west 
of Moreland there been a Roadrunner running across the highway there. Its woods 
on the one side with several persimmon trees there. Only place on that stretch 
of highway that has those. A field on the other side with a pond in the 
background. Coming from Dover, the trees are on the left. Every year I see one 
in that same place several times during a year. There are no houses in that one 
area 1/2 mile either side of it. Its usually around 10am-noon that I keep 
seeing this bird species I assume its the same bird. Teresa from Hector, AR 
Subject: Loon fever (Tenkiller version)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 13:08:21 +0000
When we went netting with Kim Smith and Mitchell Pruitt for Northern Saw-Whet 
Owls on Wednesday evening January 28 at Ozark Natural Science Center, Mitchell 
had read OKBIRDS about Jim Arterburn’s latest loon census. Like tom-toms in the 
birder’s jungle, Mitchell passed the word: 347 Common Loons on January 27, plus 
a few Red-throated, Pacific, and Yellow-billed Loons, all on Tenkiller Lake. 


Yikes! This just makes my poor ole gray hair stand on end. Commons in high 
numbers, and three other species know northeastern Oklahoma’s Tenkiller, an 
hour and maybe 15 from Fayetteville – so within striking distance. For us in 
northwest Arkansas, closest, best-est loon option. 


Among that evening’s owl helpers, what Arterburn had seen would be life birds. 
For others, with loon fever, an incurable congenital disorder, irresistible 
flare up. So on Friday, in full loon fever, David Chapman and I filled the rear 
partial seat in his pickup with necessary junk and headed for Tenkiller. With 
no room left in the inn, we invited others to caravan. 


While we didn’t do as well as Tenkiller’s acknowledged loon pro, we spotted a 
respectable 274, including Red-throated (5), Pacific (3), the rest Commons. 
Loon fever almost palliated, we also observed American White Pelicans (185), 
Horned Grebes (256), Common Goldeneyes (10, the only ducks), Bald Eagles (3 
adults), both Bonaparte’s and Ring-billed Gulls, and Red-headed Woodpeckers 
chattering vividly in oak woodlands. 


Message for all of you with as yet untreated loon fever: they are still out 
there, and now barking and yodeling. 
Subject: Re: 250 species in 24 hours
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock AT ARKTIMES.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 19:49:33 -0600
Is there a way to bird Lillie bottoms by car or wheelchair?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2015, at 6:40 PM, Jeffrey Short  wrote:
> 
> Anyone up for this one?  Cornell eBirders won last one.
> http://www.champions-of-the-flyway.com/
>  
> Jeff Short
Subject: 250 species in 24 hours
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 18:40:06 -0600
Anyone up for this one?  Cornell eBirders won last one.

http://www.champions-of-the-flyway.com/ 

 

Jeff Short
Subject: New Website
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 22:32:37 +0000
If you want to explore the new Audubon website take a look by going 
to http://www.audubon.orgIt may take you some time as the site is very content 
rich.I'd be interested in what you all think. 

Jackcurrently escaped from Newton County to warmer climate
Subject: Stuttgart Airport
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 15:40:40 -0600
Great fun watching the Harrier pair work the fields.  Think I also a Bald 
Eagle.  Worth the trip. 

Karyn 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Juvenile great blue heron
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 14:19:41 -0600
All — 

I apologize for the delay in getting this out; it's been one of those weeks. 

The experts weighed in, and the bird I saw Jan. 17 at Crystal Bridges was a 
juvenile great blue heron. 


I posted his picture at 501pets.com.

Alyson Hoge
alycat14 AT me.com
Subject: Roadrunner
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 12:52:44 -0500
I been on hwy 164 the last couple days between Moreland & Dover. 2 miles west 
of Moreland there been a Roadrunner running across the highway there. Its woods 
on the one side with several persimmon trees there. Only place on that stretch 
of highway that has those. A field on the other side with a pond in the 
background. Coming from Dover, the trees are on the left. Every year I see one 
in that same place several times during a year. There are no houses in that one 
area 1/2 mile either side of it. Its usually around 10am-noon that I keep 
seeing this bird species I assume its the same bird. Teresa from Hector, AR 
Subject: Sandhill Cranes any sitings
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 11:38:41 -0600
Has anyone seen them recently,  if so please post locations.   Thanks

KARYN DILLARD 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Jeff "Ol Coot" Wilson on PBASE
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 10:12:45 -0600
I was going through some older email correspondences/conversations and stopped 
to read through older messages with Jeff Wilson. 

I successfully followed an image link to Jeff Wilson's PBASE account of a 
Prairie Falcon. This link was provided by Wilson after I posted and retracted 

 a misidentified "rare" bird. He sent a consolation email and a few photos to 
assist in the future. 


The unbroken link pleased me immensely. Did someone pay to keep his legacy to 
birding online? I've been afraid to check, 

because I didn't want to be disappointed! 

For new list members, Jeff Wilson provided informative photographic images and 
ID tips on his PBase account. If I photographed an unusual bird, 

he was one of the birders I contacted. He liked helping other birders this way. 

I only met him once, but he answered every email and query I had with 
enthusiasm. 

He once said he birded every day for  30 +/- years.
(There may have been one day his missed, if I remember correctly.) 

Here's his PBASE and please take the time to view his watercolors, where the 
following words are listed at the top of the gallery: 


"While going through my old slides, I ran across a few of my watercolors,
my passion prior to birding. I can't feature a life path undriven by a 
passion." Jeff Wilson 




http://www.pbase.com/ol_coot


RARITIES: http://www.pbase.com/ol_coot/tennesse_rarities

ID POINTS: http://www.pbase.com/ol_coot/id_points

And his AMAZING watercolor collection: http://www.pbase.com/ol_coot/watercolors



He is missed. 


Good luck chasing the Great Black-backed Gull, folks! I am ecstatic we had such 
great fortune last Sunday when driving through the area. 

For those who haven't seen it, may your luck change soon.


Kelly Chitwood
El Dorado, AR







Subject: GBBG
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:15:34 -0600
Likely continues. About 95% sure I saw it again on water below dam at 3pm. Only 
had about 10 mins to glass before heading to dardenelle for prior obligation. 
Light was tough for good look but saw very large, heavy billed gull 
substantially large compared to nearby cormorant. I think early morning/late 
evening offers best time for those who want to observe gull. If anyone wants to 
chase it at either time, let me know since I live in town. I can look in am or 
pm for you. My number is 8563055236. Just shoot me a text or email or call. 


Ryan 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Lollie Bottoms (Faulkner County)
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:09:27 -0600
I birded Lollie Bottoms in Faulkner County with the Townsends' this
afternoon.
The highlights for me were:
5 Northern Harriers
Vespers, Field and Harris' Sparrows
Northern Pintails
Merlin (eating what appeared to be a meadowlark)

4 pictures from the day

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/January2015BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6109990263321688498 


Michael
Subject: Re: Gull
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 22:59:37 -0600
I looked yesterday afternoon for the gull from 2 till dark and did not see
it either.
Has anyone seen the gull since Tuesday morning (Herschel's report)?

At one point I heard a voice from above call to me.  It said "The gull you
are looking for is here".  For a minute I thought I was getting some divine
assistance.  Then I figured out it was one of the guys that worked on the
dam.  He had ask someone what they were looking for the other day and had
done a quick training of himself to understand what it looked like.  He had
found Waldo...it was just the odd one he found was a Herring gull.  I took
the opportunity to do a little more training.  He said he would bring his
camera with him to work and get a picture of it.  It seems he is able to
get a little closer than the rest of us.

This is the third instance this month that I have ran into non-birders that
have taken a real interest in what I have been doing.

In Texas I had a local landowner that did a U-turn and went around the long
way to avoid driving across the area where we had a Striped Sparrow staked
out.  He also ask if I got a picture to send hime one.  When I sent him a
picture he replied with a very nice note.

In Faulkner County, I had a local landowner tell me the gates he put up
were not for good people like us birders and that the people in my party
could go around the gate on his property anytime to check out his birds.

All too often we reference the difficult people we run into when we are in
the field.  Hope you guys don't mind the I mention the guys with a more
positive attitude.  I personally think there are more GOOD GUYS out there
than bad guys...

Michael(Conway)



On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 8:46 PM, Lyndal York  wrote:

> Edie Calaway and I searched for THE BIRD from around 3  until 5:15 pm. NO
> show!  Searched both sides of the dam. The wind was terrific. Plenty of
> gulls around especially during the last half hour.
>
> Lyndal York
> Little Rock
>
> On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 12:32 PM, kjdillard 
> wrote:
>
>>
>> Has anyone seen the gull today,  if so please share location.  We are at
>> the dam now.  Thanks. Karyn Dillard
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: Gull
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:46:48 -0600
Edie Calaway and I searched for THE BIRD from around 3  until 5:15 pm. NO
show!  Searched both sides of the dam. The wind was terrific. Plenty of
gulls around especially during the last half hour.

Lyndal York
Little Rock

On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 12:32 PM, kjdillard  wrote:

>
> Has anyone seen the gull today,  if so please share location.  We are at
> the dam now.  Thanks. Karyn Dillard
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
>
Subject: Gulls. Toadsuck
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:09:25 -0600
Have now been by my closer Dam several times this week at Toadsuck after
seeing some Herrings and having a bird fly in that circled and left which
appeared to be a first year Thayers. It was gone too quick though I saw it
in perfect flight profile.

Today on the rocks below the dam a second year bird, the only non-Ringy in
the whole area. And it did not fly so I could not put it in the Thayers
world safely. But it had the right face and profile. I find it hard to
believe there might be two at once on this river site. None of the 15 to 20
Herring animals I saw at Dardanelle looked like Thayers. So hopefully I
don't have Thayeritis Eyeball. I have never seen Thayers in my county
before. Still monitoring.

Three first year Ringeys among the 250 or so birds today. I believe that
first year bird numbers are down this year having scanned the scores and
scores at Dardanelle. No Bonies today at the dam with 5 or 6 feeding there
earlier in the week. And as always, no Mews either (the imaginary gull for
our state).

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
Subject: Re: Gull
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:43:57 -0600
Please do, I will get off early enough tomorrow to make the drive down for an 
evening viewing attempt. I have two strikes so far!! Jacque brown 



On Jan 29, 2015, at 12:32 PM, kjdillard  wrote:

> 
> Has anyone seen the gull today, if so please share location. We are at the 
dam now. Thanks. Karyn Dillard 

> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Gull
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:32:40 -0600
Has anyone seen the gull today,  if so please share location.  We are at the 
dam now.  Thanks. Karyn Dillard 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: A different kinbd of sofa (Buffalo NR)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:09:20 +0000
ALONG BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER, a gravel bar on the upper end of Steel Creek 
campground is piled and inviting as a sofa. Sand, gravels of sandstone and 
limestone -- and “asphaltite,” ground down artistically abraded “cobbles” born 
of pavements from wash-out highways. In yesterday’s astounding 70 degrees and 
blue sky, I lean back, let my body conform, take in the flowing river, admire 
high bluffs through sagging eyelids. I own the whole thing … and promptly fall 
asleep. 


Thus the Life of Riley. Or more accurately, thus the Life of Retiree, who 
missed many such days along the career path. 


Above the gravelbar: two Turkey Vultures, maybe a pair, maybe at the start of 
what will be the nesting season, perch atop a white oak tree, itself perching 
atop a shapely bluff. One effortless step and off they soar into blue skies of 
opportunity. 


Back-and-forth, back-and-forth, female and male Belted Kingfishers, a joyful 
rattling in what seems territorial flights. Two sub adult Bald Eagles fly over. 
Carolina Wrens t-kettling from 4 directions. Pileated Woodpeckers trumpeting 
the whole valley, echoing off stately bluffs. 

Father Time is for sure thus recorded along the Buffalo. How long have I been 
here? Sadly, not on the Buffalo clock, I check my watch. Duty in Fayetteville 
now calls. 


However, there’s time to see impossible stands of Ashe’s Juniper growing in 
fissures up on the sheer bluff, thickly endowed with dense, hanging coat, not 
of many colors, but of greenish usnea lichen. Northern Parulas doubtless know 
this spot. 


And not before walking alongside the rivercane, from which emerges Northern 
Cardinals (2), White-throated Sparrows (4), Eastern Towhees (2; both males), 
and biggest surprise of all, Gray Catbird (1), a rare bird here in January. 


Driving back in the traffic of highway 412, and still in happy delirium, I 
remember a sunny winter day warm enough for flying insects, three decades ago, 
with Sissy Anderson, then 80, on Horn Island, just off the Mississippi Gulf 
coast from her home in Ocean Springs. 


We were there in honor of the life of her husband, artist Walter Anderson. She 
rested on the side of a dune, wrapped in the memories of a young woman in love, 
the older one now well-supported by the sands of Horn Island. 
Subject: saw-whet hunt
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 07:53:23 +0000
Another nice group of people this evening, and a beautiful night to be out in 
the woods, but no birds... 


Weather this weekend looks bad, and of course there will be the demise of the 
seahawks on Sunday (bird reference! Haha) 


We will probably start again on Monday night but based on weather... will make 
a post about our plans... 


Best, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet Owl Banding
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 19:06:30 -0600
Hi. Just saw you on Ch 11 with the little owl.  Handsome pair. 

Karyn Dillard


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
Date: 12/16/2014  8:55 AM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owl Banding 

Hi everyone,
Just a heads up, due to inclement weather possibilities, our planned netting at 
Mt. Magazine this Thursday and Friday is cancelled. We will try for Mt. 
Magazine again after Christmas. Stay tuned! 


Merry Christmas,
Mitchell Pruitt
Subject: Arkansas Northern Saw-whet Owl makes the News
From: "Boyles, Dottie" <DBoyles AT ARKANSASEDC.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:48:15 +0000
Just got this from a co-worker.


http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2015/jan/28/arkansas-researchers-document-first-northern-saw-w/ 


Dottie Boyles
Little Rock


This E-mail and any files and attachments transmitted with it are private and 
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are 
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent 
responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, any use of 
this information or dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly 
prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us 
immediately by telephone at 501-682-1121 or return the email by reply 
indicating the error. 
Subject: Saw-whet hunt tonight at the ONSC
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:29:51 +0000
Mitchell and I will be going out again tonight at the Ozark Natural Science 
Center, leaving Fayetteville at about 7 pm... nets are already up, so we should 
be starting at 8 pm... 


There was a full page story in the Eureka Springs newspaper last week and 2 
people have come forward with saw-whet stories... one hit a window in Eureka 
Springs 2 years ago and another was reported sitting in a cedar tree along a 
driveway in Holiday Island on 11 January 2015... 


The University of Arkansas did a story about us today: 
http://newswire.uark.edu/articles/26427/researchers-capture-document-first-northern-saw-whet-owl-in-arkansas 


KUAF, the Fayetteville NPR station, will be doing a piece about us this week on 
Ozarks at Large - noon and 7pm... 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds Return
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 10:25:57 -0600
Pretty much right on-schedule as previous years, even though I have removed
many leaves, the Rusty Blackbirds are here again, with some female
Red-Winged Blackbirds in the group of ~100.

 

Jeff Short

At the bottom loop of the backwards S on the continuation of the Ouachita
River
Subject: RFI: Large Red-winged Blackbird Roost
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:11:52 +0000
A documentary film crew from the UK will be in Arkansas in early February to 
film a piece about Red-winged Blackbird flocks. They'd like to film birds going 
to/from their nightly roost. If you know where there is a reliable roost of 
mostly or all RWBLs they can film please tell me exactly where to find it. 
Thanks. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Research Project- Help Requested
From: Nicole Davis <nad002 AT EMAIL.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 22:05:58 -0600
Hi everyone,
I am a biology student at the University of Arkansas studying ornithology.
This semester I am starting a research project concerning the nesting
habits of raptors, and I would like your help. If you have seen any:

   - Red tailed hawks
   - Red shouldered hawks
   - American kestrels

or, especially,

   - Mississippi kites

flying or nesting, could you please contact me? If you know the location of
any nests, please send me the GPS coordinates if possible.
My email address is nad002 AT uark.edu
Thank you.
Nicole Davis
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 27
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 22:04:27 -0600
It was clear and warm (mid 70's) today on the bird survey.  80 species and
one hybrid were found.  I surveyed more in wooded areas today than I
normally do.  Duck hunting season is over and the Mallards have scattered
all over the area now making it difficult to get high counts like I do when
the hunting pressure keeps them concentrated in the refuge area.  The
Gadwalls and Green-winged Teal are still mostly holding in the refuge area.
The "Brewer's Duck" which is a Mallard X Gadwall hybrid was seen on Lotus
Lake in with the Gadwalls.  I actually saw him last week on the count too
but forgot to mention him.  A very nice looking bird.  Here are my results
from today:

 

Canada Goose - 4

Wood Duck - 2

Gadwall - 1365

"Brewer's Duck" - 1 male

American Wigeon - 5

Mallard - 180

Northern Shoveler - 39

Northern Pintail - 41

Green-winged Teal - 2000

Ring-necked Duck - 109

Hooded Merganser - 10

Ruddy Duck - 9

Pied-billed Grebe - 19

Double-crested Cormorant - 5

Great Blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 18

Bald Eagle - 1 imm.

Northern Harrier - 4

Cooper's Hawk - 3

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 12

American Kestrel - 1

Virginia Rail - 14

American Coot - 1425

Killdeer - 97

Greater Yellowlegs - 12

Ring-billed Gull - 1

Mourning Dove - 17

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 3

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-headed Woodpecker - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 7

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 6

Downy Woodpecker - 5

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 7

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 6

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 600

Fish Crow - 5

Carolina Chickadee - 10

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Brown Creeper - 2

Carolina Wren - 5

Bewick's Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 3

Marsh Wren - 5

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 5

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Hermit Thrush - 6

American Robin - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Brown Thrasher - 1

European Starling - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 5

Pine Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Spotted Towhee - 2

Eastern Towhee - 3

Savannah Sparrow - 16

LeConte's Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 7

Song Sparrow - 21

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 7

White-throated Sparrow -12

White-crowned Sparrow - 24

Dark-eyed Junco - 1

Northern Cardinal - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 1750

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Rusty Blackbird -21

Brewer's Blackbird - 4

Common Grackle - 3

American Goldfinch - 3

House Sparrow - 3

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Missouri River Cooter

Southern Painted Turtle

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Spring Peeper - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

 

Also:  

 

Checkered White butterfly

Question Mark butterfly

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: Gull
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 15:58:58 -0600
Golden windless morning when I pulled into the upper dam area on the
Russellville side at about 840 AM. All the gulls in the world were perched
on every structure and wall I could see. Nothing seemed to be flying at the
dam itself except cormorants and skeins of geese headed out toward the open
lake. Fixed the scope and looked down the long row of birds along the
upstream wall. Seeing more Herring Gulls in this span of birds alone than I
will see for five years at home in Conway. Everyone seeming to get along
and the Ring-bills outnumbering all Herring ages by hundreds to one.


Atop the dam structure itself some suspect looking Black Vultures. They
always look like guilty hoodlums anyway. In the scope they look like toughs
on break with their collars pulled up. The gull group up there away from
the vultures holds a Lesser Black-backed youngster and six or seven more
Herring Gulls. Who knows the hierarchy of what birds sleep where?


Driving down to the downstream wall I park tail in and scan with the
binoculars where I locate Mister Gull over the 500 wall marking. All the
birds and the wall are in excellent light. The wall so gull poop washed, I
assume no one has recently or perhaps ever done gull poop duty on the high
walkway. But there he is, Mister Gull: Larus marinus. Though he is no more
marinus than most. Certainly even this youngster should have been Larus
maximus. We could have just gone with Great Gull or Massive Shouldered Gull
but the Pacific seabirders would have been jealous.


He (or she, we’ll call him he) was sitting a few feet away from an adult
non-breeding Herring Gull. I never see full adult Herrings except at
Dardanelle in Arkansas. It gave good comparison for awhile. The Herring
looking dainty for a gull that weighs 2 ½ pounds. Maximus weighs 3 and a
half to 4 pounds. He is heftier than a large Jaeger with a wingspan of five
feet or more. This one looks well groomed. That is a fairly dangerous
looking beak, which in the scope I can see has a pearl colored hook on the
black length of it. I have both the Herring adult, who is four years old at
least, and the one year old (or less) Great in the scope field at the same
time. And while I watch Mister Maximus he turns and takes a few short
sidling steps over and hanks on the tail of the Herring with said
pearl-tipped dangerous bill. Herring drops over the wall and flies down and
away.


Harrison says, “…at all ages pugnacious, predatory and domineering.” 
Young 

behemoth just wanted some extra space. “Head on out grandpa.” About 9:15
the Great dropped over himself and seemed to head down river. Down there in
the scope I found feeding echelons of Pelican and Cormorant. These were
often accompanied by Herring youngsters sticking close, trying to snatch
something. I assumed Mister Gull would be doing the same. I never saw him
do it. A group of Goldeneye was also shadowed down river by Herring Gulls.
The ducks having to come up to swallow their prizes and facing Herring
hunger and the Herring beak. I figured if Mister Gull landed nearby to try
this with any ducks the ducks would just panic and fly off. Pelicans seemed
more the size for the Great. Ducks, no, as a duck I would run like hell.
And who can forget the video of Greater Black-Backeds taking adult puffins
in the air?




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7WH0j6S56k


A fine morning at a dam anyway. At least 15 to 20 Herring Gulls noted,
definitely the most in one day I have seen there. And nice to see Robert
again. (Hope he returned for you.) And thanks to Kenny and Ladonna for the
spotting and pointing. (Even knowing Charles would surely hear.)



Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Alan Bland Coming Around
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 20:18:24 +0000
I was just on the phone with Alan Bland, Park Ranger for the Corps of Engineers 
at Beaver Lake. Alan is a former officer in Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society. 
Many folks know him as a result of his long time efforts to keep up with Bald 
Eagle populations on Beaver Lake and as a volunteer guide with the popular 
Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area eagle watching boat tours. 


He’s of the Bland family, the same of Bland Chapel at Rocky Branch on Beaver 
Lake, the family that inspired one of by Kelly and Donna Mulhollan’s (Still on 
the Hill) songs on their CD about Beaver Lake, “Once A River.” We in the bird 
watchin’ and conservation community long ago learned he is a good friend to all 
who care for and respect the integrity of Beaver Lake and its huge watershed, 
central to the well-being of northwest Arkansas. He’s one of us for sure. 


So here’s the news: He was in an accident last week and was air-lifted 
afterwards to Washington Regional Medical Center here in Fayetteville. I got 
through to his room today. Amazingly, to Park Ranger Bland himself, who in his 
description, is rapidly recovering from concussion, broken bones, and punctured 
lung, already looking at a return to work. 


He said he will be out of hospital in a day or two at most, then at Health 
South for a few days of rehab. You can send him a Get Well Soon email at 
thesnakeman AT cox.net or to his home, 1406 W. 
Callahan Drive, Rogers, AR 72758. What a cool thing. After a serious accident, 
Alan Bland is coming around. 
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Report
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:40:35 -0800
January 24th was the first ASCA field trip of
2015 and it was a humdinger!  Our
itinerary was to start at Delaware Point, bird Lake Dardanelle, then spend the
afternoon at Holla Bend NWR.  Kenny
Nichols’ sighting of the first state record Great Black-backed Gull the day
before the trip changed everything.  We
arrived at 8:15 a.m. at the Russellville side of the lock and dam where The 
Gull 

had been hanging out the day before.  No
gull.  It had been seen by some early
birders just before we arrived.  Even
with 38 pairs of eyes scouring the area for 2 hours, it was nowhere to be
found.  Hundreds of Ring-billed Gulls,
several juvenile and adult Herring Gulls, two juvenile Bald Eagles, numerous
American White Pelicans and Double-crested Cormorants, and a Belted Kingfishers
were the birds seen from the dam.  At the
boat launch, we found Eastern Bluebirds, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Downy and
Red-bellied Woodpeckers.  
 
We finally gave up and went to Delaware Point. The wind had picked up and the 
sunshine was 

causing severe heat shimmers, so it was difficult to see much more than the
American Coots, a couple of Horned Grebes, and some Common Goldeneys up close,
plus a lot of distant gulls.  A Greater
Roadrunner put on quite a show on the road into Delaware Point.
 
Next, we headed to Holla Bend.  As people were finishing their lunch and
paying their registration fee, I got a call from Ed Laster. He had spotted The 
Gull from the Dardanelle side 

of the dam.  Several people opted to stay
at Holla Bend.  The rest headed back to
the dam.  Another very cooperative
Roadrunner was seen as we drove into the Delaware Natural Rock recreation
area. An hour later, still no gull. I sent a group to the Russellville side of 

the dam to search, while I took a group to the State Park hoping The Gull was
hanging out in the marina inlet at the RV park. Found Ring-billed, a Herring, 
and several Bonaparte gulls, but not The 

Gull.  Back to the dam, spirits sagging
because it was getting close to 4:00 p.m. and we were getting desperate. 
Birders were stationed from the top of the 

dam, to below the spillway, and one carload at the boat launch. At 4:30 p.m. 
David Ray called from his spot 

in the lower parking lot and said he had a big gull with a white head and neck,
and a dark back.  I announced his
find.  Car doors slamming, engines
reviving, the group raced off to David’s location. Hallelujah, he had THE 
GULL! Cheers, high 5’s all around, multiple life bird 

dances, everyone was giddy with delight. We watched as the big guy fought off 
other gulls as he guarded something 

dead floating in the water.  He then
joined a large raft of gulls roosting on a sandbar in the middle of the
river.  After much preening, the GBBG tucked
his head and settled down to sleep.  It
was getting dark, so the very happy group of birders headed home.
Karen Holliday
Field Trip
Coordinator
Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA)

Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: FW: Final Fall Distribution Packet for the CCMB (attached)
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 08:19:48 -0600
Due to restrictions on the listserv, I will forward the attachments by
request.  The upcoming webinars are listed at the end of this message.  Jeff
Short

 

From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS
Sent: Monday, January 26, 2015 10:10 PM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FW: Final Fall Distribution Packet for the CCMB (attached)

 

I meant to pass this along before the holidays.  Attached are several
documents, guidelines, etc. from USFWS that you might find useful.

 

Rich

 

 

Subject: [EXTERNAL] Final Fall Distribution Packet for the CCMB (attached)
Resent-From: 

 

Hello all!  You've recently received two other important emails from our
branch over here at FWS regarding the upcoming deadline for Presidential
Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award nomination submissions, and, a
request for a fatal flaw review of the 2013 Council Report. This is our
third and final note to you for the day, and includes all the information
from our Fall Distribution Packet.  But first, I want to thank everyone for
taking the time to schedule a meeting with me over the past couple of
months.  It was been wonderful getting to know everyone, and I look forward
to working more with all of you as we move into 2015.   

 

During our annual interviews, I shared some of the documents from our Fall
Distribution Packet with many of you (this will be new to those of you who I
haven't been able to meet with yet). These documents were part of a larger
menu of options you may use in your own way to help you achieve many of the
goals set forth by the Council- including of course, information related to
our theme 'Facilities Management'.  That full menu of items is attached to
this email.  We encourage you to adapt them for use in your agency in a way
that is the most efficient and productive, and of course, applicable to your
own needs.  I should note that some of these items have been updated
slightly since I first introduced them to you during the interviews. 

 

This information may also help you achieve success in answering some of the
specific questions on the upcoming survey. For example, you may find the
recorded webinars useful in fulfilling some of your training goals for staff
(related to Section 3(e)(12) of the EO and questions #22-24 on the survey).
In addition, the list of measures from item 3 below and the list of bird
data and information resources from item 5 may help you fulfill your needs
for tools to use in project development or assessing project-related impacts
in your environmental documents (Sections 3(e)(1) and 3(e)(4)  of the EO and
questions #4, 5, and 11 on the survey). We hope the other items help you to
examine how you and your fellow staff can take steps to avoid or minimize
the production of stressors to birds at federal facilities, so that we can
work to make our federal infrastructure "bird-safe".

 

The list of attachments are as follows:


(1) a memo to use as a tool to help explain the background of Facilities
Management as a theme of the Council to fellow staff in your agency;


(2) a PDF of a trifold pamphlet containing building occupant measures that
reduce the likelihood of bird collisions at the buildings we work in (often
referred to as the lunch room flyer);


(3)- A list of measures for use at all project development sites nationwide
with the goal of reducing impacts to birds and their habitats;


(4)- A list of recorded webinars that our office has provided in the past
(which can be viewed as many times as you like);


(5)- A list of bird data and information resources for helping staff to
improve land management planning, develop conservation programs, or analyze
project-related impacts in an environmental document; 


(6)- A summary of guidelines for communication tower design, siting,
construction, operation, retrofitting, and decommissioning; 

 

and


(7)- Low to No Cost Measures for Reducing Bird Impacts at Federal Facilities


 

 

Please don't hesitate to ask for any clarification on these items or how to
use them.  I look forward to seeing you all again soon. Have a wonderful
weekend!

 

-- 

*********************************

Lesley Kordella

US Fish & Wildlife Service Headquarters

Division of Migratory Bird Management

5275 Leesburg Pike 

Falls Church, VA 22041-3803

Lesley_Kordella AT fws.gov

703-358-1963 (office)

[] 

 

WEBINARS 

Stressor Management (Charisa Morris and Eric Kershner, USFWS - 6/5/14) 

View this webinar if you would like to learn more about how to reduce all of
your impacts on birds and improve your NEPA analysis. This webinar is a
basic introduction to stressor management concepts. It will introduce
participants to the approach of identifying and addressing project-related
impacts to migratory birds and their resources and builds a framework for
agencies to use while developing their NEPA analyses. 

http://nctc.adobeconnect.com/p62eeyzw07j/ 

Reducing bird collisions with communications towers: new cost-effective
opportunities for agencies and tower owners (Dr. Joelle Gehring, FCC -
7/9/14) 

View this webinar if you would like to learn more about how to manage tower
lighting to save birds and money. Every year at least 7 million migratory
songbirds collide with communications towers in North America. Learn about
the new FAA lighting recommendations that make possible a 70% reduction in
bird collisions while reducing tower lighting costs. 

http://nctc.adobeconnect.com/p844pllecfj/ 

Building Glass and Lighting Conservation Measures Webinar (Dr. Al Manville,
USFWS) 

View this webinar if you would like to learn more about how to reduce bird
mortality at your building sites. This webinar will highlight effective
measures that can be implemented to reduce bird fatalities at federal
facilities. The presentation will highlight simple, low or no cost options
that can be employed to effectively to reduce the risk posed by building
glass and lighting. 

Avian Powerline Interaction Committee Best Practices (Dr. Al Manville) 

View this webinar if you would like to learn more about how to reduce bird
powerline collisions and electrocutions. The Avian Powerline Interaction
Committee has been a successful partnership that has developed best
practices for avoiding or minimizing bird powerline collisions and
electrocutions. 

Both of the above webinars can be found at 

http://nctc.fws.gov/topic/online-training/webinars/migratory-birds.html
Subject: Re: Another news stroy!
From: Craig Provost <craig-daleprovost AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2015 07:09:22 -0700
Great photos! Thanks for posting the link!
Craig Provost

On Jan 26, 2015, at 16:27, "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


> 
> Theba Lolley with THV 11 has just posted an online piece about her first 
experience going out on a field trip with the ASCA. Make sure to scan through 
the photos at the bottom, you may see someone you know. 

> 
http://www.thv11.com/story/news/local/2015/01/26/bird-watching-theba-great-black-back-gull/22365835/ 

> Donna Haynes
> West Pulaski Co.
> 
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: Re: RFI - NW Arkansas/NE Oklahoma Birds
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 21:57:32 +0000
Josh,Check the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society website for birding locations 
in this area.  Also, there is a local Screech Owl here in Fayetteville.  
Check the bird list for recent sightings on this. Happy Birding!Joanie 

      From: Josh Adams 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2015 11:03 AM
 Subject: RFI - NW Arkansas/NE Oklahoma Birds
   
Hello all,I will be in Bentonville for work this week, but should have some 
extra time to do some birding while I'm there. I've done a bit of scouting in 
eBird and there are a few potential lifers or other desirable birds while I'm 
in the area. A few of these seem to be more likely in NE Oklahoma. I'm hoping 
to have a day to drive out there and will be posting an RFI to that listserv 
when I get approved to join, but if any of you have experience in that region 
I'd love to hear it as well.  


American Woodcock - It looks like these are present this time of year, but I'm 
a few weeks early for breeding displays? Any tips to finding them when they're 
not displaying? 

Northern Bobwhite - Chesney Prairie and Woolsey Wet Prairie are both hotspots 
with these birds present. I assume this is a "spend some time and hope to get 
lucky" species?  

Eastern Screech-Owl - I don't hold out much hope for this bird. Probably not 
singing this time of year and not easy to locate otherwise, but just in case 
someone has a hot tip.  

Le Conte's Sparrow - Looks like the same hotspots with Bobwhite sometimes have 
these as well.  

Smith's Longspur - Much more of a E. Oklahoma bird it would appear. I've read 
some tips from the Tulsa Audobon on the Longspur species 
( http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/longspurs.htm ). I may head over to Tallgrass 
Prairie if I can wrangle a day free.  

Lapland Longspur - Not a lifer, but a bird which I've only seen extremely 
poorly. Bare wheat fields?  



Thanks for any help you can provide.
Josh AdamsLynnwood, WA

  
Subject: THV GBBG Web story link
From: "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request@LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 12:59:07 -0800
Here is a link to the Web story on THV.  They will also be running a story 
during the 6pm television broadcast.  


http://www.thv11.com/story/news/local/russellville/2015/01/26/non-native-bird-found-in-arkansas-giving-bird-watchers-a-surprise/22359247/ 


Donna
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
Subject: GBBG - no
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 12:11:14 -0600
GBBG pulled a no show as of noon today for a group of 5 birders (unnamed as 
they may have been playing hookie from somewhere). 


I kept thinking it was 5 o'clock somewhere...
I suspect he only goes off central time.
So better luck to the afternoon shift...

Michael(conway)
Subject: out the window
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 12:05:39 -0600
This morning the garden outside the kitchen windows was suddenly full of 
hundreds of Cedar Waxwings that descended from perches high in the bare oaks to 
land in the viburnums, deciduous azaleas, and small maples. The birdbath was 
covered with up to 25 birds at once gathered beside brilliant Bluebirds and one 
Goldfinch all bobbing and drinking and sipping from the fish pond as well. 
Brilliant red spots of "wax" on a few secondaries were visible, and all had 
buttercup yellow tips on their tail feathers with the exception of one bird who 
had yellow tips on the left half and bright orange tips on the right. The 
plumage was just dazzling in the January sunlight. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Gull
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 11:42:10 -0600
Bill, the Arkansas Audubon Society website contains the information you
desire. Just go to www.arbirds.org/photos_brc.html . This page contains
birds added to the Arkansas List since the publication of the last
checklist in 2009. Photos and a brief description of the record can be
found on the page.

Lyndal York
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society



On Mon, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:01 AM, bill .  wrote:

> I was groom at 2 of them. Sure wish i had been a birder then, chasing a
> first state bird instead! Just sayin...
>
> On a more serious note, how can i better keep up with changes in the
> official Arkansas bird list? I've been trying to help reconcile some state
> checklists for the author of a free cross-platform little known birding
> software program called Scythebill (which i use and love). I would at least
> like to keep up to date on any changes in the checklist and review species
> list for our two states.
> peace
> -bill
> enid ok
>
>
>
>
> > Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 08:45:51 -0600
> > From: sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM
> > Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Gull
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> >
> > Why, oh why, do people have to get married, in the middle of the day,
> when a first state bird shows up???? Ugh!!!
> >
> > Sandy B.
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
>
Subject: GREATER SCAUP ON MOBERLY STORM WATER RETENTION POND, BENTONVILLE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 14:21:57 +0000
Three Greater Scaups were paddling around the 10-acre storm water retention 
pond associated with Moberly Manor apartments in Bentonville on January 22. At 
one point, and clearly smaller, a Lesser Scaup provided good contrast with the 
two males and one female Greater. The female Greater is pretty distinctive 
because the white patch at the base of her bill is stained orange. Most other 
“ducks on the pond” (as Dizzy Dean would have put it, in an entirely different 
context) were ring-necks, plus a sprinkling of others. 


Relatively small in size (compared to local lakes), Moberly is a good place to 
see Greater Scaups, among the least common of wintering waterfowl in northwest 
Arkansas. We have seen them regularly, in low numbers, at Moberly, since at 
least 2007. The pond is completely enclosed by a metal fence that I assume is 
mainly there for the safety of children who live in adjacent apartments. This 
fence also seems to work for waterfowl, who suffer fewer intrusions by people, 
dogs, etc. Fence bars are just wide enough for bins or spotting scope. 


The pond retains and therefore slows the flow of storm water, which reduces 
flooding, thus contributes to protecting private property and water quality. 
What a cool and amazingly logical thing, that midst noble public purposes, we 
have Greater Scaups. And over the years, almost all duck species passing 
through our area. And close views, too. Using our brains and common sense, we 
may survive in spite of ourselves. 


If you are birding in the Bentonville-Rogers area, and have an interest in 
local wintering waterfowl, Moberly is worth a stop, ˝ block off I-49 at 
intersection with 102. We have a brief guide on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon 
Society website here: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/id17.html 
Subject: EAGLE WATCH FIELD TRIP, SATURDAY FEBRUARY 7, 2015
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 12:44:37 +0000
Members, friends, and curious are invited to join the Northwest Arkansas 
Audubon Society field trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail on SWEPCO Lake just west 
of Gentry Saturday, February 7, 2015. Meet up time is 9 AM in the parking lot 
right on highway 12. The event is free and open to the public. Anyone with an 
interest is welcome. Trip co-leader Terry Stanfill. Terry is an active 
photographer so this has usually been a good trip for photography. There is a 
one-forth mile long easily-walked trail to a viewing platform where we often 
see numerous Bald Eagles, plus many other species of birds. Terry usually keeps 
a sharp eye out for spots near Gentry where we can expect to see more birds. 
Last year we saw 54 eagles in one place just a few miles away. 


Directions: Notice Highway 59 on your Arkansas highway map. Gentry is at the 
intersection of 59 and Highway 12. From this intersection, travel WEST on 12 
for approx. two miles. Eagle Watch is approx. 1 mile WEST of the city limits on 
the SOUTH side of the highway. Look for the parking lot on the SOUTH side, 
immediately EAST of the highway bridge spanning Little Flint Creek. There is a 
map and information sign in the parking area. 


In case you can't make it February 1, or just want more details, check EWNT on 
the NWAAS web site here: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/id17.html. You can also 
explore the place on facebook: Eagle Watch Nature Trail at SWEPCo Lake. 
Subject: Re: Gull
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 05:25:40 -0600
Ebird.org will provide you that information.

Jim Dixon
Little Rock

“There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly 
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something 
you were after.” -- Thorin 


From: bill . 
Sent: Monday, January 26, 2015 12:01 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Gull

I was groom at 2 of them. Sure wish i had been a birder then, chasing a first 
state bird instead! Just sayin... 


On a more serious note, how can i better keep up with changes in the official 
Arkansas bird list? I've been trying to help reconcile some state checklists 
for the author of a free cross-platform little known birding software program 
called Scythebill (which i use and love). I would at least like to keep up to 
date on any changes in the checklist and review species list for our two 
states. 

peace
-bill
enid ok





> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 08:45:51 -0600
> From: sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Gull
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> Why, oh why, do people have to get married, in the middle of the day, when a 
first state bird shows up???? Ugh!!! 

> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Dardanelle Lock & Dam
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 00:36:04 -0600
A couple of shots from Dardanelle Dam this afternoon...
The gulls start to head in from the night about dark.
The GBBG seems to settle for the night around 5:00 on the lock wall visible
from the Russellville side of the dam.  Great for viewing but not enough
light for good pictures.


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/January2015BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6108532485623790978 


For some reason I believed the weather that it would be sunny today...wrong
so I still need to get pictures with some sun light.
I'll keep trying....

Michael

On Sun, Jan 25, 2015 at 5:24 PM, Erin Tripcony  wrote:

> Still present at 5:23.  Sitting perfectly still for great views.  Thanks
> to Michael, Shelby and I have seen it!
>
> Erin
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jan 25, 2015, at 4:54 PM, Kenny Nichols  wrote:
> >
> > The Great Black-backed Gull continues at this moment below the dam.
> Presently, it is on the water and in the company of a first-winter Lesser
> Black-backed Gull, which makes for a nice comparison.
> >
> > Kenny Nichols
> > Dardanelle
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
Subject: Re: Gull
From: "bill ." <tvulture AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 00:01:18 -0600
I was groom at 2 of them. Sure wish i had been a birder then, chasing a first 
state bird instead! Just sayin... 


On a more serious note, how can i better keep up with changes in the official 
Arkansas bird list? I've been trying to help reconcile some state checklists 
for the author of a free cross-platform little known birding software program 
called Scythebill (which i use and love). I would at least like to keep up to 
date on any changes in the checklist and review species list for our two 
states. 

peace
-bill
enid ok




> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 08:45:51 -0600
> From: sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Gull
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> Why, oh why, do people have to get married, in the middle of the day, when a 
first state bird shows up???? Ugh!!! 

> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> Sent from my iPad
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Dardanelle Lock & Dam
From: Erin Tripcony <erintrip AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 17:24:17 -0600
Still present at 5:23. Sitting perfectly still for great views. Thanks to 
Michael, Shelby and I have seen it! 


Erin

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 25, 2015, at 4:54 PM, Kenny Nichols  wrote:
> 
> The Great Black-backed Gull continues at this moment below the dam. 
Presently, it is on the water and in the company of a first-winter Lesser 
Black-backed Gull, which makes for a nice comparison. 

> 
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Dardanelle Lock & Dam
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 16:54:31 -0600
The Great Black-backed Gull continues at this moment below the dam. Presently, 
it is on the water and in the company of a first-winter Lesser Black-backed 
Gull, which makes for a nice comparison. 


Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Passenger Pigeon talk on Tuesday night in Fayetteville
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 22:24:09 +0000
Nancy McCartney will be presenting a talk on the demise of the Passenger Pigeon 
on Tuesday evening... open to the public and visitors welcome... 


1. Highlands Chapter November meeting, Tue Jan 27, 6:30 p.m. Our Highlands 
Chapter meets regularly on the fourth Tuesday of the month from September 
through May at First United Presbyterian Church in Fayetteville. Here are 
details for our January meeting. Visitors are welcome. 


Event: Ozark Society Highlands Chapter Monthly Meeting (January) 

Date:                     Tuesday, November 27, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. social, 7:00 p.m. program/speaker, 8:00 p.m. business meeting 

Place: First United Presbyterian Church, 695 E. Calvin St., Fayetteville AR 

Speaker:              Nancy Glover McCartney, Curator, University of Arkansas
Topic:                   The Passing of the (Passenger) Pigeon

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Herring Gull at Lake Saracen
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 16:03:27 -0600
I sent a bad picture of a gull I photographed on Lake Saracen yesterday to
Kenny Nichols and he felt for sure it was a 1st winter Herring Gull.  John
Redman, Doc George and I confirmed it today when we got much closer looks at
it.  For those who are interested, it has been hanging out on the small
island on the southeast corner of the lake, near the parking lot and the
walking trail.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: saw-whet trip cancelled tonight
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 21:51:29 +0000
Mitchell and I believe it is too windy for banding tonight... will try later 
this week, maybe Wednesday night... will let everyone know... 


********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Gulls
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 14:50:09 -0600
Due to my job, I am unable to run over to Russellville this weekend. So, I
took the scope over to Toadsuck Dam to see if I could watch some gulls in
flight. And if you have not taken a scope with a good fluid head tripod and
watched gulls in flight (it takes some turning and weaving, a steady hand)
I recommend it. It is quite a bit different from binocular watching and 5
to 6 times as powerful.


Windy at the dam and as always mostly winter adult Ring-bills feeding and
crying, chasing and bobbing. I did find a first winter and early second
winter Herring Gull in the mix, flying and resting and making their own
noise. Herrings are unusually rare in my county on the river or otherwise.
Mostly I see them on shad kill days below the dam. They were a pleasure to
watch at relatively close range at any rate. I will try and check the dam
more often this next month.


I will also try and see the spinning gull show at Dardanelle on Tuesday.



Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Re: Danger in Columbia
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:34:46 +0000
Lyndal means the country of Colombia, not Columbia, SC :-) 
 

 On Sunday, 25 January 2015 2:05 PM, Lyndal York  wrote: 

   

 Arbirders,

Some of you may remember Dr. Carlos Araoz who was active in ASCA some years 
ago. He emailed me recently that while on a bird watching trip to Columbia he 
and his brother were robbed on a city street(did not say which city). Carlos 
feels the county is dangerous. If you are going to Columbia you might want to 
take this advise into account. 


Lyndal York
Little Rock


   
Subject: Danger in Columbia
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 14:04:56 -0600
Arbirders,

Some of you may remember Dr. Carlos Araoz who was active in ASCA some years
ago. He emailed me recently that while on a bird watching trip to Columbia
he and his brother were robbed on a city street(did not say which city).
Carlos feels the county is dangerous. If you are going to Columbia you
might want to take this advise into account.

Lyndal York
Little Rock
Subject: Re: Sightings at Ninestone
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 18:30:21 +0000
I am reminded again -- as though needing re-reminding -- that Ninestone is 
indeed a "land trust" and its main stewards including Judith and Don, so well 
attuned to natural elements and needs there. 


Anyone who reads Judith's summary with special interest might consider visiting 
during a scheduled field trip there Sunday April 26. 

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of Judy & Don [9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2015 12:14 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Sightings at Ninestone

During the week of January 18 – 25 the bird highlights at Ninestone have been:
Wild Turkeys, a flock of 40, flushed from large gravel bar in Piney Creek, 
downstream and across into trees. 

One, possibly two young Red-headed Woodpeckers continue residence in trees out 
front, having arrived last autumn. They now scold the dogs and me as we pass or 
discuss tree issues with a Red-bellied Woodpecker. Hairy, Downy, and Pileated 
Woodpeckers are everywhere. 

Bald Eagles of all ages roost by the creek, circle, or fly across the land, 
from the west in morning and from the east in evening. Only one masked third 
year BAEA appeared on the game camera at the GOEA project site. 

Great Horned Owls seem to be nesting again this winter in the ancestral owl 
cave in the sandstone bluff. We heard the male and female courtship calls in 
November. They are so well camouflaged against the owl colored wall of stone 
behind them, and flush if I walk too close to their safety zone, alerting crows 
to their daytime movement. So although I would love to actually see one without 
alarming it, I respectfully avoid their territory at this time of year. They 
have left middens of bunny fur, plucked feathers, and pellets under specific 
trees at a distance that they use for the purpose. 

Although we’ve had only a dusting of snow all winter there were 3 female Rusty 
Blackbirds at the ground feeder one morning on bare ground. 

This is the first winter I recall the treetops at Ninestone filled with 
whistling Cedar Waxwings every morning, their pale yellow breasts facing the 
rising sun for warmth, and always complemented by the russet and sapphire of 
scattered bluebirds and robins, chortling and piping along with the waxwings. 
Individual flocks are small with up to 20 birds, but there are hundreds if all 
flocks in the treetops are taken into account. Several times I have been 
surprised by a group of waxwings bursting from the coppery leaves of an 
American Beech right beside me as I passed by. So far I have found no Bohemians 
among them. 

 Male and female Purple Finches accompany the Goldfinches and House Finches on 
hanging feeders. 

 And the Hermit Thrushes are back once again “chupping” from trees after being 
absent for a few weeks. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

Subject: Sightings at Ninestone
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 12:14:36 -0600
During the week of January 18 – 25 the bird highlights at Ninestone have been:

Wild Turkeys, a flock of 40, flushed from large gravel bar in Piney Creek, 
downstream and across into trees. 


One, possibly two young Red-headed Woodpeckers continue residence in trees out 
front, having arrived last autumn. They now scold the dogs and me as we pass or 
discuss tree issues with a Red-bellied Woodpecker. Hairy, Downy, and Pileated 
Woodpeckers are everywhere. 


Bald Eagles of all ages roost by the creek, circle, or fly across the land, 
from the west in morning and from the east in evening. Only one masked third 
year BAEA appeared on the game camera at the GOEA project site. 


Great Horned Owls seem to be nesting again this winter in the ancestral owl 
cave in the sandstone bluff. We heard the male and female courtship calls in 
November. They are so well camouflaged against the owl colored wall of stone 
behind them, and flush if I walk too close to their safety zone, alerting crows 
to their daytime movement. So although I would love to actually see one without 
alarming it, I respectfully avoid their territory at this time of year. They 
have left middens of bunny fur, plucked feathers, and pellets under specific 
trees at a distance that they use for the purpose. 


Although we’ve had only a dusting of snow all winter there were 3 female Rusty 
Blackbirds at the ground feeder one morning on bare ground. 


This is the first winter I recall the treetops at Ninestone filled with 
whistling Cedar Waxwings every morning, their pale yellow breasts facing the 
rising sun for warmth, and always complemented by the russet and sapphire of 
scattered bluebirds and robins, chortling and piping along with the waxwings. 
Individual flocks are small with up to 20 birds, but there are hundreds if all 
flocks in the treetops are taken into account. Several times I have been 
surprised by a group of waxwings bursting from the coppery leaves of an 
American Beech right beside me as I passed by. So far I have found no Bohemians 
among them. 


 Male and female Purple Finches accompany the Goldfinches and House Finches on 
hanging feeders. 


 And the Hermit Thrushes are back once again “chupping” from trees after being 
absent for a few weeks. 


 

Judith

Ninestone, Carroll County

 

 
Subject: Re: Great Black-backed Gull - YES
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 11:41:33 -0600
When Jim and I left at 9:00 it was sitting on top of the dam, still in full
view.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 1/25/15, 9:56 AM, "Erin Tripcony"  wrote:

Shelby and I may head that way mid afternoon.  Keep the status updates
coming.  Particularly where precisely we need to go.  Who else will be there
mid afternoon?

Erin

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 25, 2015, at 8:11 AM, Dan Scheiman  wrote:

> Jim Dixon and I are looking at the GBBG right now on the upstream side of the
> dam, preening atop one of the concrete walls.
> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
> 
> Sent from Xfinity Connect Mobile App

Subject: RFI - NW Arkansas/NE Oklahoma Birds
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 09:03:38 -0800
Hello all,
I will be in Bentonville for work this week, but should have some extra
time to do some birding while I'm there. I've done a bit of scouting in
eBird and there are a few potential lifers or other desirable birds while
I'm in the area. A few of these seem to be more likely in NE Oklahoma. I'm
hoping to have a day to drive out there and will be posting an RFI to that
listserv when I get approved to join, but if any of you have experience in
that region I'd love to hear it as well.


American Woodcock - It looks like these are present this time of year, but
I'm a few weeks early for breeding displays? Any tips to finding them when
they're not displaying?

Northern Bobwhite - Chesney Prairie and Woolsey Wet Prairie are both
hotspots with these birds present. I assume this is a "spend some time and
hope to get lucky" species?

Eastern Screech-Owl - I don't hold out much hope for this bird. Probably
not singing this time of year and not easy to locate otherwise, but just in
case someone has a hot tip.

Le Conte's Sparrow - Looks like the same hotspots with Bobwhite sometimes
have these as well.

Smith's Longspur - Much more of a E. Oklahoma bird it would appear. I've
read some tips from the Tulsa Audobon on the Longspur species (
http://www.tulsaaudubon.org/longspurs.htm ). I may head over to Tallgrass
Prairie if I can wrangle a day free.

Lapland Longspur - Not a lifer, but a bird which I've only seen extremely
poorly. Bare wheat fields?


Thanks for any help you can provide.

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA
Subject: Re: Great Black-backed Gull - YES
From: Erin Tripcony <erintrip AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 09:56:19 -0600
Shelby and I may head that way mid afternoon. Keep the status updates coming. 
Particularly where precisely we need to go. Who else will be there mid 
afternoon? 


Erin

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 25, 2015, at 8:11 AM, Dan Scheiman  wrote:
> 
> Jim Dixon and I are looking at the GBBG right now on the upstream side of the 
dam, preening atop one of the concrete walls. 

> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
> 
> Sent from Xfinity Connect Mobile App
Subject: Re: binocular recommendation request
From: Craig Provost <craig-daleprovost AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 08:55:47 -0700
Due to a family issue with a (usually) slight hand tremor, my recommendation 
for a more moderate priced binocular is Canon Image Stabilized (IS) bins. I use 
the 10X30. This is becoming more evident with my hopefully advancing age! 

Good Birding!

Craig Provost,
Salt Lake City
(Very far West of Little Rock)

On Jan 24, 2015, at 11:21, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 


> For all you avid birders, what is your favorite make and model binoculars? 
And, which do you prefer, and why - Zeiss or Swarovsky? 

> Thanks - Joanie
Subject: TOSO
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 15:11:07 +0000
Townsend's Solitaires are still here. In the past they have lingered into 
March. However, the forest service plans to do a prescribed burn west of Brown 
Springs where one pair has set up a feeding territory. This might cause them to 
relocate. So if you want to see a solitare this year, now is the time to come 
up to Mount Magazine. Without enough notice and no wind, I might be available 
to assist. Not tomorrow though, I plan to add GBBG to my state list. 

Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: GBBG still here
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 14:45:52 +0000




Subject: old binoculars donation
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 14:38:56 +0000
Hi all, when I was a Fulbright Scholar in a remote institution in India in 
2007-08, I started a nature club.  The club is still alive.  From time to 
time, I donate old binoculars and field guides to keep them going.  The 
university is at the base of the Himalayas in a species-rich region.  Many of 
my students have graduated and left the university and some are active birders. 
  

If you have a pair of binocs you'd like to throw away, please do so in my 
direction.  I am scheduled to go to India Feb 21st, so any donation by then 
will be welcome.  The students cherish them.  Even old ones with scratches 
are ok as long as you can see something through them :) 

Kannan  
Subject: Great Black-backed Gull - YES
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 14:10:50 +0000




Subject: GBBG
From: David Oakley <mainoak AT OAKLEYCOMPANY.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 07:33:45 -0600
Were there any sightings yesterday?

————— 


David Oakley
479/422-6588
mainoak AT oakleycompany.com


“We’ll raise up our glasses against evil forces singing whiskey for my men, 
beer for my horses" 

Subject: The great saw-whet owl hunt
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 07:27:51 +0000
We had a nice group tonight, but no saw-whets... Sara from KUAF was there and 
there will be a piece on Ozarks at Large later this week... 


We will be going out to the Ozark Natural Science Center again tonight 
(Sunday), leaving Fayetteville around 7 and getting to the center around 8... 
we left the nets up, so we should be good to go right around 8... 


We will also be going out some nights this week and we keep you posted...

Best, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
University Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Re: The next 67 species MINUS 1
From: Nick Anich <000000bf373d24cc-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 04:39:26 +0000
I checked my archived email and see that I also apparently made this guess two 
years ago to the day before the gull was found. What do I win? 

Now if I could only more successfully apply this predictive power to my own 
birding... 

Nick AnichAshland, Wisconsin
P.S. Next for me was Reddish Egret (Dick Baxter, Desha County, mid-August)

Subject: The next 67 species MINUS 1
Date: Fri Jan 23 2015 8:07 am
From: leanderson AT fs.fed.us Greetings all,

A while ago several folks made predictions on what the next species would be to 
the state checklist. 




The top 2 were:

Crested Caracara with 157 points, three 1st place votes and 10 voters for the 
species. 


Greater Black-backed Gull with 139 points, five 1st place votes and 8 voters 
for the species. 


One of the voters not only predicted the 1st state record, but also predicted 
where and who would find it! Great prediction Nick Anich. The other 1st place 
predictors were Dick Baxter, Mitchell Pruitt, Kenny Nichols and Bill Shepherd. 


Congratulations to Kenny Nichols for finding the Greater Black-backed Gull. 
(Potential first state record, pending records committee review.) 




If you want to see just how big this bird is come visit the Lake Dardanelle COE 
lock-n-dam, where last evening a Goldilocks moment occurred (a tiny 
Ring-billed, a med Herring and the giant Greater Black-backed in the same scope 
view. (and a kicker of Lesser Black-backed, nearby.) 




The top five are now:

Crested Caracara, Shiny Cowbird, Reddish Egret, Golden-crowned Sparrow and 
Harris Hawk. 




cheers, Leif  AT  Hector- See more at: Birding News | #birdingnews via  AT aba

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Birding News | #birdingnews via  AT abaGreetings all, A while ago several folks 
made predictions on what the next species would be to the state checklist. The 
top 2 were: | 

|  |
| View on birding.aba.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

Subject: Re: binocular recommendation request
From: Jack Stewart <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 06:44:56 +0300
 The new line of Zeiss binoculars are astonishingly clear and bright even at 
the edges of the field. Personally I like the balance and feel of the Zeiss in 
my hands over the Swarovsky. For Christmas my wife, Pam, received the Zeiss 
Conquest HD 8X32. She is very happy with them after a month here in Panama 
birding every day. The close focus is amazing. I can focus on my shoe with 
them. This will be handy if a butterfly or robber fly ever lands there. 


Jack

Sent from myMail for iOS
>
>Saturday, January 24, 2015, 1:21 PM -0500 from Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>: 

>For all you avid birders, what is your favorite make and model binoculars?  
And, which do you prefer, and why - Zeiss or Swarovsky? 

>Thanks - Joanie
Subject: Re: Life
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:35:08 -0600
I am envious!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 24, 2015, at 7:24 PM, Bill Thurman  
wrote: 

> 
> It's not often that a person gets the opportunity to have a near perfect day.
> Great people, great birds, an air of excitement, great fun and the 
satisfaction that persistence pays off. 

> Thanks to people like Karen Holladay and many more, we got to see the Greater 
Black-backed and Lesser Black-backed Gulls as well as a roadrunner or two. 

> And very many more birds than just these. The first two aforementioned birds 
are life birds for me. Ive now got 10 more to go to hit 200 species in North 
America. 

> I've never seen so many birders in one weekend in my entire life. It was like 
a January outdoor Birders Convention. I made some new friends and met a lot of 
new people too. I enjoyed meeting Sarah, Emily and Summer from usual I learned 
a lot from others. There was plenty of action, chasing the gulls and changing 
plans, but it turned out great for me at the Dardanelle dam and Holla Bend. 

> As I said, a near perfect day for me.
> I really enjoyed having dinner with Rhonda and Danny Townsend, a great couple 
of people and birders. The perfect ending to a near perfect day. 
Subject: Re: Life
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:30:08 -0600
An amendment to my last email.
"Sarah, Emily and Summer from college ornithology classes".
AND
"As usual, I learned a lot from others."        OK
On Jan 24, 2015 7:24 PM, "Bill Thurman" 
wrote:

> It's not often that a person gets the opportunity to have a near perfect
> day.
> Great people, great birds, an air of excitement, great fun and the
> satisfaction that persistence pays off.
>        Thanks to people like Karen Holladay and many more, we got to see
> the Greater Black-backed and Lesser Black-backed Gulls as well as a
> roadrunner or two.
> And very many more birds than just these. The first two aforementioned
> birds are life birds for me. Ive now got 10 more to go to hit 200 species
> in North America.
>        I've never seen so many birders in one weekend in my entire life.
> It was like a January outdoor Birders Convention. I made some new friends
> and met a lot of new people too. I enjoyed meeting Sarah, Emily and Summer
> from  usual I learned a lot from others. There was plenty of action,
> chasing the gulls and changing plans, but it turned out great for me at the
> Dardanelle dam and Holla Bend.
> As I said, a near perfect day for me.
>        I really enjoyed having dinner with Rhonda and Danny Townsend, a
> great couple of people and birders. The perfect ending to a near perfect
> day.
>
Subject: Life
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:24:13 -0600
It's not often that a person gets the opportunity to have a near perfect
day.
Great people, great birds, an air of excitement, great fun and the
satisfaction that persistence pays off.
       Thanks to people like Karen Holladay and many more, we got to see
the Greater Black-backed and Lesser Black-backed Gulls as well as a
roadrunner or two.
And very many more birds than just these. The first two aforementioned
birds are life birds for me. Ive now got 10 more to go to hit 200 species
in North America.
       I've never seen so many birders in one weekend in my entire life. It
was like a January outdoor Birders Convention. I made some new friends and
met a lot of new people too. I enjoyed meeting Sarah, Emily and Summer
from  usual I learned a lot from others. There was plenty of action,
chasing the gulls and changing plans, but it turned out great for me at the
Dardanelle dam and Holla Bend.
As I said, a near perfect day for me.
       I really enjoyed having dinner with Rhonda and Danny Townsend, a
great couple of people and birders. The perfect ending to a near perfect
day.
Subject: Re: binocular recommendation request
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 23:31:46 +0000
I highly recommend an excellent comparative review of models, pricing, quality, 
powers that was published in Living Bird last year. We put a link to this 
article on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society website, here: 


http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/id8.html

There's some other good stuff too about buying binoculars.


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of John Walko [walko AT BELLSOUTH.NET] 

Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2015 3:31 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: binocular recommendation request

I've owned a pair of Audubon Equinox Hp 10X42 bin's about 7 years ago, they are 
made by Vortex. They are Phase corrected and waterproof. Best yet is that 
Vortex stands by their Bino's and have fixed for free twice now my Bino's, 
(after turbulent episodes in the woods, mtns and my grandkids hands). Highly 
recommend anything from Vortex. 

On Jan 24, 2015, at 12:39 PM, Sally Jo Gibson wrote:

I’ve had a pair of Zeiss (10X40B) for years.  Never used Swarovsky.

However, Barry Haas introduced me to Vortex Diamondback (10X42 waterproof) that 
I like as well as the Zeiss and they cost only in the neighborhood of $200 when 
I bought them a few years back. 


Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Carol Joan Patterson 

Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2015 12:22 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: binocular recommendation request

For all you avid birders, what is your favorite make and model binoculars? And, 
which do you prefer, and why - Zeiss or Swarovsky? 

Thanks - Joanie

John "Jay" Walko
Collierville, TN
www.pbase.com/jwalko



Subject: Re: binocular recommendation request
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 16:48:45 -0600
Dear ARBIRDers,

On the recommendation of Joe Neal some years ago we purchased Audubon Equinox 
HP 8 x 42 binoculars from Eagle Optics for the Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg 
Ecology Camp. It's my understanding the Audubon brand is no longer available, 
but similar models are under a different name. 


Joe recommended 8-power for the Ecology Camp youth who are 11- and 12-year 
olds. As I recall, Joe's reasoning was the 8-power bins have a wider field of 
view and given the camp youth's likely inexperience with good binoculars they 
would have a better chance of spotting birds with the wider field of view. 


The binoculars came with a lifetime warranty, and like John Walko we have had 
to return for repair a number of the pairs we got. Eleven and 12-year old youth 
can be hard on binoculars, as can we adults. The Ecology Camp pays the cost of 
postage to Eagle Optics, and they pay the cost of postage back to us. 


Given how impressed I was with the 8 x 42's (reasonably lightweight, excellent 
optics for the price/good value, close focus to 3' or 4'), I bought a pair of 
10 x 42's for our own use. My older eyes appreciate the extra magnification. 


The Audubon Equinox HP 10 x 42's compare favorably to another pair that cost me 
roughly 3 times as much. Any difference is very slight. 


If you are in the market for new binoculars, I highly recommend you call Eagle 
Optics and ask for one of their binocular birding experts. Be specific about 
how much you are willing to spend and how you will use them . Keep in mind at 
some point you have to spend a lot more money for only marginal improvement in 
the optics. And you'll want close focus if when the birding is slow, you'd like 
to look at close by butterflies, flowers, etc, under magnification. Their 
binocular experts can recommend some good bins that will match your budget and 
specific needs. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. It doesn't matter to me where someone buys new binoculars, but given my 
good experiences with Eagle Optics I can recommend them with a clear 
conscience. In addition they gave the Halberg Ecology Camp a deep discount on 
the 28 pairs of Audubon Equinox HP 8 x 42's we got from them, and I'm still 
appreciate of their support for non-profit endeavors like our Ecology Camp. 
Subject: Re: binocular recommendation request
From: John Walko <walko AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 15:31:04 -0600
I've owned a pair of Audubon Equinox Hp 10X42 bin's about 7 years ago, they are 
made by Vortex. They are Phase corrected and waterproof. Best yet is that 
Vortex stands by their Bino's and have fixed for free twice now my Bino's, 
(after turbulent episodes in the woods, mtns and my grandkids hands). Highly 
recommend anything from Vortex. 

On Jan 24, 2015, at 12:39 PM, Sally Jo Gibson wrote:

> I’ve had a pair of Zeiss (10X40B) for years.  Never used Swarovsky.
>  
> However, Barry Haas introduced me to Vortex Diamondback (10X42 waterproof) 
that I like as well as the Zeiss and they cost only in the neighborhood of $200 
when I bought them a few years back. 

>  
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR  
>  
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Carol Joan Patterson 

> Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2015 12:22 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: binocular recommendation request
>  
> For all you avid birders, what is your favorite make and model binoculars? 
And, which do you prefer, and why - Zeiss or Swarovsky? 

> Thanks - Joanie

John "Jay" Walko
Collierville, TN
www.pbase.com/jwalko