Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Arkansas Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Sunday, September 21 at 07:27 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Rufous-tailed Plantcutter,©Sophie Webb

22 Sep Franklin's Gulls and Red-headed Woodpeckers at Beaver Lake ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Sep Re: Bald knob [CK Franklin ]
21 Sep Re: hawks [Richard Baxter ]
21 Sep hawks [Don Simons ]
21 Sep BKWMA cuteness [Edie Calaway ]
21 Sep Re: Snowy Plover [Jim Dixon ]
21 Sep A Tree Full [Bill Thurman ]
21 Sep Migration count details available ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
21 Sep Cave Swallow [Charles Mills ]
21 Sep Re: Snowy Plover [Jim Dixon ]
21 Sep Bald knob Monday [Sarah Morris ]
21 Sep Re: Snowy Plover [Daniel Scheiman ]
21 Sep Snowy Plover [Kenny Nichols ]
21 Sep Bald knob [CK ]
20 Sep Peregrines at Bald Knob [CK ]
20 Sep Bald Knob NWR Shorebirds [Daniel Scheiman ]
20 Sep Report from "Hawk Ridge" in the Ozarks ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 Sep migrating Canada [Judy & Don ]
20 Sep Re: Broad-wing hawk migration is on [Nancy Felker ]
20 Sep Snowy Plover - YES [Dan Scheiman ]
20 Sep Yard birds [Lenore Gifford ]
20 Sep Re: Bald knob ["Campbell, Martin" ]
20 Sep Re: Bald Knob [swamp_fox ]
20 Sep Broad-wing hawk migration is on [Joan ]
20 Sep Plover [Herschel Raney ]
20 Sep Bald knob [CK ]
20 Sep First siskins at Maysville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 Sep Re: Bald Knob [Ryan Risher ]
20 Sep Bald Knob [Michael Linz ]
19 Sep Bald Knob NWR [Kenny Nichols ]
19 Sep cinnamon teal [Don Simons ]
19 Sep Missed a few swallow species but.... [Charles Mills ]
19 Sep Re: Boyd Point and Bald Knob [Erin Tripcony ]
19 Sep Re: Boyd Point and Bald Knob [Ryan Risher ]
19 Sep Re: Boyd Point and Bald Knob [swamp_fox ]
18 Sep Plover photographed at Bald Knob [Michael Todd ]
18 Sep Boyd Point and Bald Knob [Michael Linz ]
18 Sep Bell Again [Allan Mueller ]
18 Sep FW: CHANGE TO CALL-IN NUMBER! FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool Webinar [Jeffrey Short ]
18 Sep White-faced Ibis [Doc George ]
17 Sep Bell Slough [Allan Mueller ]
17 Sep RUDDY TURNSTONE AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
17 Sep FW: NPR Science Friday focus on birds and climate change [Jeffrey Short ]
17 Sep FW: FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool Webinar [Jeffrey Short ]
17 Sep Cave and other swallows [Charles Mills ]
17 Sep Weedy Estates ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
16 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 16 [David Arbour ]
16 Sep Faulkner Co Migration, Bell Tomorrow [Allan Mueller ]
16 Sep Cave and other swallows [Charles Mills ]
16 Sep ALL THAT VITAL UNIVERSE ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
15 Sep Re: Lesser Yellowlegs ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
15 Sep SANDERLINGS & BAIRD'S AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
15 Sep California Gull [Kenny Nichols ]
15 Sep Sabine's Gull [Kenny Nichols ]
15 Sep Ninestone field trip, Sunday October 5 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
15 Sep Say's Phoebe [Richard Baxter ]
14 Sep BKNWR [Terry Butler ]
14 Sep Re: Lesser Yellowlegs [Delos McCauley ]
14 Sep Lesser Yellowlegs ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
14 Sep ASCA Field Trip [Karen ]
14 Sep Cave Swallow [Charles Mills ]
14 Sep Bald Knob 9/14 [Ryan Risher ]
14 Sep Bob Sargent's memorial service [Janine Perlman ]
13 Sep Birds Along the Illinois River [Pruitt ]
13 Sep Yard birds this morning [Sandy Berger ]
12 Sep Sooty Tern [Sandy Berger ]
13 Sep CALLING ALL PINKS (CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
12 Sep Re: Lake Dardanelle [Ryan Risher ]
12 Sep Lake Dardanelle [Kenny Nichols ]
12 Sep Sooty [Sandy Berger ]
12 Sep Sooty Tern [Sandy Berger ]
11 Sep ASCA Meeting - Change in Presentation [Dan Scheiman ]
11 Sep 2014 Report — The State of the Birds Report 2014 [jwdavis ]
11 Sep Re: FW: NYTimes.com: Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study Says [Ellen Fennell ]
10 Sep Common Ground-Dove-No [Karen ]
10 Sep Re: NYTimes.com: Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study Says [Jack and Pam ]

Subject: Franklin's Gulls and Red-headed Woodpeckers at Beaver Lake
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 00:00:30 +0000
FRANKLINS GULLS (71) flying southwest over the Prairie Creek arm of Beaver 
Lake this morning. Also, Caspian Tern (2), small rafts of Pied-billed Grebes 
(8, 10), plus Ospreys (2), then single Ospreys near the highway 12 bridge and 
Beaver Lake Nursery Pond (total=4). 


At the Nursery Pond: Blue-winged Teal (156), Green-winged Teal (2), Wood Duck 
(2), a few distant peeps (they looked like Least Sandpipers), Semipalmated 
Plover (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Killdeer (10), Marsh Wren (1), Sora (1), 
Green Heron (2). 


Joan Reynolds pointed out a Red-headed Woodpecker that came into view on the 
south end of the nursery pond area. Then, within a few minutes, wed counted 
10-12, strung out between the nursery pond levee and the Beaver Lake shoreline. 
Two (an adult and a juvenile) woodpeckers perched briefly in a snag. While we 
had them in view, we heard them call, then we watched as an Accipiter (probably 
Sharp-shinned) chased an American Kestrel right past the snag. 


Red-headed Woodpeckers nest around Beaver, taking advantage of the abundant 
shoreline snags. But this was obviously more than a family group. Movements in 
the second half of September are consistent with other migration records in 
Arkansas. In the Birds of North America species account (no. 518), Kimberly G. 
Smith and coauthors (James Withgott and Paul Rodewald) include this 
observation: Known to follow watercourses (e.g., large rivers) south in fall 
which is what we may have seen this morning at the Nursery Pond. 
Subject: Re: Bald knob
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 17:22:53 -0500
No phalarope today. As already mentioned, the snowy plover continues and it is 
a challenge to find that wee rascal as it is the color of the drying mud. It 
continues in the same area of the field where the gravel road between the 
fields meets Huntsman, the road in front of the grain bins. 


The refuge appears to be draining pond/field #3. All the egrets were lined up 
along the channels cut into the bed of the field scooping up the fish trapped 
in the water. We saw 11 great blue herons, 25 little blue herons, and well over 
300 great egrets assembled on the wet exposed mud. The avocets continue in 
field/pond #1 along Coal Chute. 


We had a nice visit with Edie and Mitchell before they left. 

In other news we went east down Huntsman and did the short loop north back to 
Coal Chute. The hunting club just east of the refuge has cleared the field they 
use for duck hunting & looks like they will be flooding it in the near future. 
I saw large numbers of ducks on that water last year. 

Cindy F
still with lots of hummingbirds in the Heights for another few days
Little Rock




> Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 08:47:05 -0500
> Subject: Bald knob
> From: meshoppen AT hotmail.com
> To: arbird-l AT listserv.uark.edu
> 
> Headed back to the refuge to see if we can get the phalarope for Bill B
> Cindy F
> Little Rock
> 
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: hawks
From: Richard Baxter <dickbaxter100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:00:46 -0500
Don/ ar birders,

We are traveling back home from northwest Arkansas and within about 5 miles
of the Lamar exit on i-40, we saw an estimated 1200 broad-wings. I have
always read about the huge migrating flocks,  but never experienced it. Get
out right now!
On Sep 21, 2014 3:26 PM, "Don Simons"  wrote:

>  Hawk watching got off to a slow start this week but got a little
> exciting this morning. Keith Hawkins helped my count 94 broad-winged hawks,
> one Cooper’s, one red-tailed, and nine turkey vultures.
>
>
>
> We started at 9 a.m. Things were looking bleak with clouds and a strong
> wind out of the north. Then at 9:50 our first group of 13 appeared, follow
> shortly by a group of 12. For the next hour small groups of fives and
> sevens passed by. They were coming in low right up the middle of the hollow
> to catch an up draft to get over the mountain. Some came in fairly close to
> us. Things  slowed down and visibility became poorer after 11 a.m.
>
>
>
> Rain at 1 p.m. and the passage of a front might make for an interesting
> Monday morning.
>
>
>
> *Don R. Simons*, *Park Interpreter*
>
> Certified Heritage Interpreter
>
> Mount Magazine State Park
>
> 16878 HWY 309 South
>
> Paris, AR 72855
>
>
>
> don.simons AT arkansas.gov
>
> phone: 479-963-8502
>
> FAX: 479-963-1031
>
>
>
Subject: hawks
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 20:26:32 +0000
Hawk watching got off to a slow start this week but got a little exciting this 
morning. Keith Hawkins helped my count 94 broad-winged hawks, one Cooper's, one 
red-tailed, and nine turkey vultures. 


We started at 9 a.m. Things were looking bleak with clouds and a strong wind 
out of the north. Then at 9:50 our first group of 13 appeared, follow shortly 
by a group of 12. For the next hour small groups of fives and sevens passed by. 
They were coming in low right up the middle of the hollow to catch an up draft 
to get over the mountain. Some came in fairly close to us. Things slowed down 
and visibility became poorer after 11 a.m. 


Rain at 1 p.m. and the passage of a front might make for an interesting Monday 
morning. 


Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: BKWMA cuteness
From: Edie Calaway <00000066d9cc52d5-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 14:24:57 -0500
  It was nice to see the Snowy Plover, but coming into the refuge just  
after we hit the dirt road part we saw two Quail crossing the road in  
front of us. So cute and so rare to get to see them out in the open.

Leaving we had what I think was a Peregrine Falcon almost hit out  
windshield, I jumped out of the car but could not find him.

Edie Calaway
Little Rock
Subject: Re: Snowy Plover
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 12:19:25 -0500
Apparently I can't count to 3 successfully.  I meant third pond.


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 

-------- Original message --------
From: Jim Dixon
Date:09/21/2014 09:55 (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Snowy Plover
Just seen at BKNWR in second pond west of coal chute road Jim Dixon Little Rock www.JamesDixon.us Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III -------- Original message -------- From: Daniel Scheiman Date:09/21/2014 09:35 (GMT-06:00) To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: Re: Snowy Plover From the Snowy Plover account at Birds of North America Online: Legs And Feet Slate gray to black, occasionally dull yellowish or pinkish. Dan Scheiman Little Rock, AR On 9/21/14, 9:09 AM, "Kenny Nichols" wrote: more pics of the Orange-legged Snowy Plover here>>> Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols Snowy Plover IMG_2361.jpg IMG_2358.jpg IMG_2380.jpg IMG_2368.jpg IMG_2367.jpg comment | share click on thumbnails for full image View on www.pbase.com Preview by Yahoo kenny nichols cabot, ar
Subject: A Tree Full
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 10:40:55 -0600
I don't about how well all birds are doing, but I know that Scissor Tailed
Flycatchers are doing fabulously in Russellville and central Arkansas.  I
saw and heard an entire tree full of them across from the Bona Dea Trails,
chattering and flittering about. There are hundreds upon hundreds around
here.

                         Bill Thurman
Subject: Migration count details available
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:19:06 +0000
Greetings all,
The "Arkansas Birds" article is out. The migration count article would have 
taken up the entire newsletter, so we cut its size to be fair to other 
articles. 


I'd like to thank all of you that got out and counted and especially the below 
that compiled a county: 

AAS, ASU, TOS Memphis chapter, Sharon Boatright, Sarah Davis, Judith Griffith, 
Jim & Suzanne Liles, Wayne & Marty Lynch, Mike Mlodinow (2 counties for all 21 
years!!) Allan Mueller, Sheree Rogers, Bill Shepherd, Dan Scheiman, Don Simons 
and Greg Taylor. 


Thanks to eBird "eBird. 2012. eBird: An online database of bird distribution 
and abundance [web application]. eBird, Ithaca, New York. Available: 
http://www.ebird.org. (Accessed: June 30, 2014)."; 



Several of you have expressed interest in having more details about the 
migration count. 

I can email you the following attachments:
The full 2014 article: Including all 88 counts, many available only from eBird 
data. A word document (.docx) at 38k. Or as a .pdf at 191k 


The 2014 spreadsheet:
 Including raw numbers, normalized numbers, numbers by ecoregion and numbers by 
time. In excel at 1.8m or .pdf at 17.5m 


The 21 yr summary spreadsheet: In excel at 912k. or .pdf at approx 10m 


I can also send info in McIntosh or other formats.
Some items may be too large for your email so I can bring you a CD to the Fall 
AAS convention or even mail it through USPS. Whatever you want, I'll be happy 
to send it. 


Please reply off the list to me .... Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us
Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Cave Swallow
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 10:05:42 -0500
5 Cave Swallows (1adult, 1 older juvenile and 3 younger juveniles) present at 
Beard's Lake earlier this morning. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Snowy Plover
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 09:55:15 -0500
Just seen at BKNWR in second pond west of coal chute road


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.JamesDixon.us 
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S™ III 

-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Scheiman
Date:09/21/2014 09:35 (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Snowy Plover
From the Snowy Plover account at Birds of North America Online: Legs And Feet Slate gray to black, occasionally dull yellowish or pinkish. Dan Scheiman Little Rock, AR On 9/21/14, 9:09 AM, "Kenny Nichols" wrote: more pics of the Orange-legged Snowy Plover here>>> Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols Snowy Plover IMG_2361.jpg IMG_2358.jpg IMG_2380.jpg IMG_2368.jpg IMG_2367.jpg comment | share click on thumbnails for full image View on www.pbase.com Preview by Yahoo kenny nichols cabot, ar
Subject: Bald knob Monday
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 09:47:04 -0500
Does anyone plan to head to Bald Knob Monday morning? 

Sarah Morris
Jonesboro

Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S®4, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
Subject: Re: Snowy Plover
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 09:35:59 -0500
From the Snowy Plover account at Birds of North America Online:

Legs And Feet
Slate gray to black, occasionally dull yellowish or pinkish.
Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 9/21/14, 9:09 AM, "Kenny Nichols"  wrote:

more pics of the Orange-legged Snowy Plover here>>>

Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols
 Snowy Plover IMG_2361.jpg
IMG_2358.jpg IMG_2380.jpg IMG_2368.jpg IMG_2367.jpg comment |   share click
on thumbnails for full image
View on www.pbase.com 
Preview by Yahoo
 
  
 
kenny  nichols
cabot, ar

Subject: Snowy Plover
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 07:09:14 -0700
more pics of the Orange-legged Snowy Plover here>>> 

Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols

  
             
Snowy Plover by Kenny Nichols
Snowy Plover IMG_2361.jpg IMG_2358.jpg IMG_2380.jpg IMG_2368.jpg IMG_2367.jpg 
comment | share click on thumbnails for full image 

View on www.pbase.com Preview by Yahoo  
  
 
 
kenny  nichols
cabot, ar
Subject: Bald knob
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 08:47:05 -0500
Headed back to the refuge to see if we can get the phalarope for Bill B
Cindy F
Little Rock


Subject: Peregrines at Bald Knob
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 17:25:59 -0500
2 peregrine falcons were giving the shorebirds the business today. We saw both 
of them on the ground at the same time in the field along Coal Chute. Given how 
jittery the shorebirds were yesterday & today, it seems reasonable to assume 
the peregrines' presence was duly noted by the other guests at the refuge. 

Cindy F


Subject: Bald Knob NWR Shorebirds
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 16:10:08 -0500
Other notable shorebirds I saw today while searching for the Snowy Plover:

Buff-breasted Sandpiper  1
American Golden-Plover  1 immature
Black-bellied Plover  1
Sanderling  2

On the way home Dottie called to say Terry Butler relocated the Red-necked
Phalarope, which Sam and I did not see.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Report from "Hawk Ridge" in the Ozarks
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 20:24:38 +0000
Following are a few more details about todays Broad-winged Hawk migration as 
observed by Joan Reynolds and me from near the Beaver Lake dam site this 
morning. We directly counted at least 159 hawks moving over us, 10:30 to 11:20 
AM. 


We were on the Dam Site Road (907) when Joan picked up several Broad-wings 
flying over us at 10:30. We moved up the road a short distance where a big 
powerline crosses, providing broad views north and south. A modest breeze was 
coming out of the west. Birds flew over in 1s and 2s and small flocks (20). 
They first appeared in the north and northeast, then over us, moving west and 
southwest over the lake and out of sight. 


We observed from 1400 feet elevation. The lake is at about 1100 elevation. The 
300-foot difference contributed to kettling, no doubt a result of declivity 
soaring, a result of west wind pushed against the slopes with a resulting 
column of rising air. Maybe this ridgetop powerline opening is our own local 
version of Hawk Mountain. 


Besides Broad-winged Hawks, we also saw one Red-tailed Hawk, one Osprey, and 
many Turkey and Black Vultures. Ospreys are certainly now migrating through 
northwest Arkansas. 


Todays observations are consistent with others over the years in Arkansas, in 
which the last week or so of September consistently marks significant 
Broad-winged movements. 


Finally, we werent out mostly birding, but rather to visit a glade along the 
road into the Beaver Lake North park. No birds to report there, but a lot of 
interesting glade plants. 
Subject: migrating Canada
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 15:23:34 -0500
While crossing the creek this morning some movement in the mint and bidens and 
a raspy call alerted me to a small bird as it flew to vegetation along the 
bank. The complete white eye ring plus a grayish upper body with bright yellow 
below and a faint necklace led me to suspect it was a migrating Canada Warbler. 
She disappeared into a heavily fruit laden vitis where I did see white under 
the tail. Field guides indicate a first year female. I rarely see Canada 
Warblers, let alone during fall migration, so this was very exciting! 


Only a couple of RT Hummingbirds visit the feeders morning through evening for 
the past three days following the rain and islands of jewel weed in the creek 
are equally quiet for most of the day now. The fluffed-up hummer who was parked 
on one of the three feeders most all the time from dawn until dusk for a month 
seemed to be recovering enough to depart with the others. 


Yesterday while standing on the big overflow at the falls, Don saw a huge 
kettle of hawks overhead, numbering 50 to 75 individuals. He had just returned 
from a long run so did not have his binoculars but was able to determine that 
some of the lower birds looked like Broad-winged Hawks. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Broad-wing hawk migration is on
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 14:24:16 -0500
Thanks for the heads up. I took my bins on the dog walk at the end of ventris 
road on beaver lake saw at least 75 go over. 

Nancy
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2014, at 11:03 AM, Joan  wrote:
> 
> 
> From beaver lake dam site be Hawks streaming south. 140 and counting. Plus an 
osprey. 

> 
> --Joan
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Sep 20, 2014, at 8:03 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:
>> 
>> Southwest of Maysville, county roads with big stands of flowering Sawtooth 
Sunflower, many plants now at least 10 feet in height. Lots of birds in and 
around: Indigo Buntings and Blue Grosbeaks, now not so indigo or blue, but 
rather rich browns. American Goldfinches and my first Pine Siskins of the 
season testing ripeness of the seedheads, including native thistles. Along a 
barbed wire fence near the corner of Tucker Road and highway 102, Loggerhead 
Shrike-hung: small snake (1), small frog (4), beetle (1), several grasshoppers. 
In the same area, Swamp Milkweeds have made pods, and these are covered with 
brilliant orange and black Milkweed Bugs. It may require a few weeks for 
widespread ripening of seeds on the Sawtooth Sunflowers. Then it should be even 
more interesting. 
Subject: Snowy Plover - YES
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 19:19:43 +0000




Subject: Yard birds
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 13:02:55 -0500
I have a male Ruby-throated Hummingbird.  I also have seen several
White-breasted Nuthatches and a Brown-headed Nuthatch.  I also saw a bird
earlier this morning just long enough to think it was something I haven't
seen before.  Impression was Olive green body and on the crown of the head
it was striped.  I don't know what the color was between the stripes or what
the side of the face looked like.  About 2 weeks ago the same thing happened
but it was a different bird.  No matter how much I wished it/they would come
back they haven't cooperated.  

Have a great day.

Lenore
Saline County
Subject: Re: Bald knob
From: "Campbell, Martin" <campbem AT HSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 17:23:32 +0000
Could someone please repost the link to the interesting plover. I lost the link 
somewhere. 


Thanks,
Marty

________________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of CK [meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Saturday, September 20, 2014 10:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bald knob

Hunters were shooting around pond 3 per Kenny Nations before Bill & I got here. 
Also a peregrine falcon has been cruising the ponds. The plover is still here & 
the debate continues. The plover's bill looks longer than a piping's. Here with 
Joanie Patterson who isn't convinced it is a piping. 18 avocets remain. 

Cindy F
Subject: Re: Bald Knob
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 11:21:45 -0500
Im not convinced the bird in the most recent photos is the same one in the 
first series. Perhaps distance, light angle and other factors perhaps are 
making examination of the images even more problematic. I dont know. I just 
get the impression that 2 different birds are involved. And, Ive been 
comparing the photos on a high end, 27 inch color-calibrated monitor. 


Sorting out juvie Cave Swallows is so much simpler.well, almost always any 
way. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

On Sep 20, 2014, at 6:23 AM, Michael Linz  wrote:

> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/Sep2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6061002661786059346 

Subject: Broad-wing hawk migration is on
From: Joan <joanreynolds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 11:03:46 -0500
From beaver lake dam site be Hawks streaming south. 140 and counting. Plus an 
osprey. 


--Joan
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2014, at 8:03 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:
> 
> Southwest of Maysville, county roads with big stands of flowering Sawtooth 
Sunflower, many plants now at least 10 feet in height. Lots of birds in and 
around: Indigo Buntings and Blue Grosbeaks, now not so indigo or blue, but 
rather rich browns. American Goldfinches and my first Pine Siskins of the 
season testing ripeness of the seedheads, including native thistles. Along a 
barbed wire fence near the corner of Tucker Road and highway 102, Loggerhead 
Shrike-hung: small snake (1), small frog (4), beetle (1), several grasshoppers. 
In the same area, Swamp Milkweeds have made pods, and these are covered with 
brilliant orange and black Milkweed Bugs. It may require a few weeks for 
widespread ripening of seeds on the Sawtooth Sunflowers. Then it should be even 
more interesting. 
Subject: Plover
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 10:19:33 -0500
I am out of town. And I don't know what birds are left at Bald knob now,
this morning, but the bird in Michael's picture from several days ago now
is a Snowy.
Subject: Bald knob
From: CK <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 10:08:29 -0500
Hunters were shooting around pond 3 per Kenny Nations before Bill & I got here. 
Also a peregrine falcon has been cruising the ponds. The plover is still here & 
the debate continues. The plover's bill looks longer than a piping's. Here with 
Joanie Patterson who isn't convinced it is a piping. 18 avocets remain. 

Cindy F

Subject: First siskins at Maysville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 13:03:40 +0000
Southwest of Maysville, county roads with big stands of flowering Sawtooth 
Sunflower, many plants now at least 10 feet in height. Lots of birds in and 
around: Indigo Buntings and Blue Grosbeaks, now not so indigo or blue, but 
rather rich browns. American Goldfinches and my first Pine Siskins of the 
season testing ripeness of the seedheads, including native thistles. Along a 
barbed wire fence near the corner of Tucker Road and highway 102, Loggerhead 
Shrike-hung: small snake (1), small frog (4), beetle (1), several grasshoppers. 
In the same area, Swamp Milkweeds have made pods, and these are covered with 
brilliant orange and black Milkweed Bugs. It may require a few weeks for 
widespread ripening of seeds on the Sawtooth Sunflowers. Then it should be even 
more interesting. 
Subject: Re: Bald Knob
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 07:40:50 -0500
That is snowy plover all day.

Notice long thin black bill, long legs, more compressed body versus a PIPL.

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2014, at 6:23, Michael Linz  wrote:
> 
> I have posted a few more pictures from Bald Knob.
> 
> The first few are from the plover on the first day I saw it. What I was 
calling orange legs look more fleshy when I put it up on the big screen. I am 
leaning toward Snowy with some of the other guys now. 

> 
> I did not get good pictures yesterday and it was sleeping when I was there. I 
can't wait to see LaDonna's to see if the birds look the same in hers on the 
computer. 

> 
> I know several others are going this weekend and I wish you luck in finding 
the plover. It will be interesting to see what everyone thinks. 

> 
> Terry pointed out the Red-neck Phalarope for me as soon as I got there 
yesterday. This made for the 3rd life bird for me this week. 

> 
> All of the pictures from yesterday were made over 100 yards. So not as sharp 
and crisp as some of the other. I was playing with a new lens and a lot of the 
people there (including me) were asking how good of pictures it would take. The 
phalarope pictures were from about 350 yards. It shows what our bird looks like 
if you are making a trip over. 

> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/Sep2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6061002661786059346 

> 
> Michael(Conway)
Subject: Bald Knob
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 06:23:04 -0500
I have posted a few more pictures from Bald Knob.

The first few are from the plover on the first day I saw it.  What I was
calling orange legs look more fleshy when I put it up on the big screen.  I
am leaning toward Snowy with some of the other guys now.

I did not get good pictures yesterday and it was sleeping when I was
there.  I can't wait to see LaDonna's to see if the birds look the same in
hers on the computer.

I know several others are going this weekend and I wish you luck in finding
the plover.  It will be interesting to see what everyone thinks.

Terry pointed out the Red-neck Phalarope for me as soon as I got there
yesterday.  This made for the 3rd life bird for me this week.

All of the pictures from yesterday were made over 100 yards.  So not as
sharp and crisp as some of the other.  I was playing with a new lens and a
lot of the people there (including me) were asking how good of pictures it
would take.  The phalarope pictures were from about 350 yards.  It shows
what our bird looks like if you are making a trip over.


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/Sep2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6061002661786059346 


Michael(Conway)
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:22:01 -0500
In the west impoundment there is a PIPING PLOVER and at least 2 Sanderlings. In 
the east impoundment there are several avocets and a juvenile RED-NECKED 
PHALAROPE. I believe the Piping is the same bird that Michael Linz photographed 
yesterday. The orange legs (though a bit muddy) are clearly evident. LaDonna 
took some photos that I'll post later. 


Kenny Nichols
Cabot

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: cinnamon teal
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 16:00:19 +0000
A hunter sent me a photo of some teal killed on Millwood Lake on September 
13th. One had reddish neck, head, and body like nonbreeding adult male cinnamon 
teal in the Sibley guide. He said two had more reddish color on their tails. 




So be on watch for cinnamon teal.




Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

don.simons AT arkansas.gov
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031
Subject: Missed a few swallow species but....
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:20:25 -0500
....I did get some really nice comparative looks at juvie Cave vs juvie Cliff 
Swallows at Beard's Lake. Now headed to Beard's Bluff. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Boyd Point and Bald Knob
From: Erin Tripcony <erintrip AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 08:38:16 -0400
Karen- remember the bird we saw at bald knob that we kept trying to make a 
piping plover but it just didn't fit? Could this have been a snowy?? 


Erin and Shelby 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 19, 2014, at 9:18 AM, "Pruitt" 
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> The bill looks right for a Snowy (it's just too needly for a Piping). As does 
the darker cheek and darker shoulder patch. The little bit of orange on the 
muddy legs worries me a bit, but if it were a Piping, I think the orange would 
show through the mud a lot better than that. 

> 
> Not to mention that MOST Piping Plovers tend to migrate earlier, while many 
of the interior Snowy Plovers straggle off their warmer breeding grounds. And 
it is getting late. 

> 
> ~Mitchell Pruitt
> In Fayetteville now, but Bald Knob later.
> 
> 
>> On Sep 18, 2014, at 10:58 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:
>> 
>> I visited Boyd point today and was able to find the Ruddy Turnstone with 
help from John Redman. 

>> 
>> On the way home I made a side trip to Bald Knob. I was finally able to 
locate the Piping Plover. 

>> 
>> Here are a few pictures from both locations:
>> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/Sep2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6060621717960614946 

>> 
>> Michael(Conway)
> 
Subject: Re: Boyd Point and Bald Knob
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 07:36:09 -0500
Are you freaking kidding me!!!!! That's a snowy plover!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 18, 2014, at 22:58, Michael Linz  wrote:
> 
> I visited Boyd point today and was able to find the Ruddy Turnstone with help 
from John Redman. 

> 
> On the way home I made a side trip to Bald Knob. I was finally able to locate 
the Piping Plover. 

> 
> Here are a few pictures from both locations:
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/Sep2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6060621717960614946 

> 
> Michael(Conway)
Subject: Re: Boyd Point and Bald Knob
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 07:35:40 -0500
I find myself in the same school of thought as Michael Todd. I think the 
Piping Plover photographed at Bald Knob is instead a Snowy Plover based on 
bill shape, leg color and the shoulder mark being darker than the rest of the 
upperparts. 


Michael and I might indeed be wrong but, in this case, I dont think so.

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503


On Sep 18, 2014, at 10:58 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:

> I visited Boyd point today and was able to find the Ruddy Turnstone with help 
from John Redman. 

> 
> On the way home I made a side trip to Bald Knob. I was finally able to locate 
the Piping Plover. 

> 
> Here are a few pictures from both locations:
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/Sep2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6060621717960614946 

> 
> Michael(Conway)
Subject: Plover photographed at Bald Knob
From: Michael Todd <birder1 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:55:22 -0700
I just looked at the link to the great photos Michael posted from today. I'm 
sure others will be looking soon as well, but just wanted to say that the pale 
plover photographed appears to be a Snowy to me. I'm assuming AR has very 
records of Snowy so thought I might be able to get the ball rolling a little 
quicker. If I misinterpreted this, and this bird wasn't the Piping that was 
mentioned, my apologies. 


Good Birding!!

Mike Todd
McKenzie, TN
birder1 AT bellsouth.net
www.pbase.com/mctodd
Subject: Boyd Point and Bald Knob
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 22:58:12 -0500
I visited Boyd point today and was able to find the Ruddy Turnstone with
help from John Redman.

On the way home I made a side trip to Bald Knob.  I was finally able to
locate the Piping Plover.

Here are a few pictures from both locations:

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/Sep2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6060621717960614946 


Michael(Conway)
Subject: Bell Again
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 21:44:23 -0500
Another good day at Bell Slough.  About 9:00 met Justin Brand, who was also
chasing fall migrants.  Neither of us had seen much at Bell south so we
decided to move to Bell across the Lake Conway dam.  At about 10:30 things
started to pick up, It was 10:00 yesterday when I started to see birds.
They may be extending their night migration into the morning, then coming
down for day time rest and food at Bell.  Most of the birds below seem
across the dam.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Willow Flycatcher - a lifer for Justin
Least Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher

Gray Catbird

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

White-eyed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo

Wood Thrush

Nashville Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Northern Parula
Black-and white Warbler
American Redstart
Common Yellowthroat

Summer Tanager

​Indigo Bunting​


-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
​​

Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: FW: CHANGE TO CALL-IN NUMBER! FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool Webinar
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:11:19 -0500
New call-in number for Monday's webinar

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2014 3:12 PM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: CHANGE TO CALL-IN NUMBER! FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool
Webinar

The meeting dial-in and webex information has changed to allow for recording
capabilities. Here's the new info. Looking forward to talking with you next
week!


>
>To enable this webinar to be recorded and archived, the URL and dial-in 
>info have changed. Please follow steps outlined below to join.
>
>To join the online meeting:
>-------------------------------------------------------
>1. Go to
>https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=m7172d2d0cd1edbb8b0523bc
>cf4
>3ba124
>2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
>3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: Mcs1105 4. 
>Click "Join."
>
>To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link:
>https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mfa99ce984deca63e9154a99
>526
>b4f2e4
>
>-------------------------------------------------------
>To join the teleconference only:
>-------------------------------------------------------
>Provide your phone number when you join the meeting to receive a call 
>back.
>
>Alternatively, you can call:
>Call-in toll-free number (Verizon): 1-866-873-6303  (US) Call-in number 
>(Verizon): 1-866-873-6303  (US) Show global numbers:
>https://clicktojoin.verizonbusiness.com/wbbcClick2Join/servlet/WBBCClic
>k2J
>oin?TollNumCC=1&TollNum=866-873-6303&TollFreeNumCC=1&TollFreeNum=866-87
>3-6 
>303&ParticipantCode=57861708&customHeader=mymeetings&dialInNumbers=true
>Attendee access code: 578 617 08
>
>-------------------------------------------------------
>For assistance
>-------------------------------------------------------
>1. Go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/mc
>2. On the left navigation bar, click "Support."
>
>You can also contact Meghan at:
>meghan_sadlowski AT fws.gov
>1-703-358-2218
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Shepard, Alicia
>Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 4:32 PM
>To: 'david.f.labranche.civ AT mail.mil'; 'Catherwood_Leslie AT bah.com'; 
>'michael.v.khalamayzer.civ AT mail.mil'; 'jay.m.rubinoff.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'john.p.mire.mil AT mail.mil'; 'cheryl.huckerby AT navy.mil'; 
>'michael.a.shaw114.ctr AT mail.mil'; 'alisa.r.dickson.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'mark.potter AT dla.mil'; 'joseph.hautzenroder AT navy.mil'; 
>'richard.g.white24.civ AT mail.mil'; 'jeffrey.a.gardner2 AT navy.mil'; 
>'kathleen.a.mclaughlin8.civ AT mail.mil';
>'Patricia.Collins AT pentagon.af.mil'; 'oswaldo.a.cuevas.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'steven.w.sekscienski.civ AT mail.mil'; 'robert.shirley.2 AT us.af.mil'; 
>'pancoska_diane AT bah.com'; 'lorri.a.schwartz.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'golla_derrick AT bah.com'; 'chris.petersen AT navy.mil'; 
>'david.b.guldenzopf.civ AT mail.mil'; 'edmund.d.miller.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'steven.p.stadelman.civ AT mail.mil'; 'george.e.gay3.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'john.c.pierson AT navy.mil'; 'brian.r.moyer1.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'sue.goodfellow AT usmc.mil'; 'arbel_shani AT bah.com'; 
>'julie.jeter AT us.af.mil'; 'james.g.vanness.civ AT mail.mil'; Patton, Cara; 
>'ryan.orndorff AT usmc.mil'; 'kevin.porteck AT us.af.mil'; 
>'mary.k.ebert AT navy.mil'; 'patricia.collins AT us.af.mil'; 
>'laura.muhs AT navy.mil'; 'amy.h.caramanica.ctr AT mail.mil'; 
>'tamara.conkle AT navy.mil'; 'robert.lovich AT navy.mil'; 
>'andrew.j.sarcinella.civ AT mail.mil'; 'Stephen.p.coppins.ctr AT mail.mil'; 
>'tmccall AT ag.tamu.edu'; 'John.A.Hall AT usace.army.mil'; 
>'michelle.a.volkema.ctr AT mail.mil'; 'Caligiuri, Kenneth J CIV USAF 
>AF-A4-7 (US)'; 'eric.r.beckley.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'Darryl.a.forest.mil AT mail.mil'; 'paul.jurena.1 AT us.af.mil'; 
>'william.b.miller54.civ AT mail.mil';
>'frederick.c.engle.civ AT mail.mil'; 'Patton, Elsa R CIV OSD OUSD ATL 
>(US)'; 'michelle.j.brown30.ctr AT mail.mil'; 
>'anthony.j.bethas.civ AT mail.mil'; 'melina.k.tye.civ AT mail.mil'; 
>'joseph.cecchini AT navy.mil'; 'Kelly.Merrifield AT colostate.edu';
'Richard.A.Fischer AT usace.army.mil'
>Cc: 'Boice, L P CIV (US)'; 'Dalsimer, Allyn A (Alison) CTR (US)'; 
>'Clark, Stephanie (clarkst AT ctc.com)'
>Subject: FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool Webinar
>
>All,
>
>On Monday, September 22, at 10 AM (ET), Meghan Sadlowski (FWS) will 
>demonstrate the new bird Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool. She will 
>describe when and how to use the tool, and how the data can benefit 
>both the FWS and DoD.
>
Subject: White-faced Ibis
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 04:37:41 -0700
Yesterday my wife and I made another trip to the Alice-Sydney Fish Farm near 
Lake Village. 

There were several huge flocks of Short-billed Dowitchers and one flock of 
approximately 60 

to 80 white-faced Ibis. I have six photos from that trip posted on my Pbase 
page for anyone interested. 


http://www.pbase.com/docg/sept_2014

Doc George
Subject: Bell Slough
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 16:24:07 -0500
Had a good morning at Bell Slough today.

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - feeding in the tree canopy.  Tried to make them
Black-billed, but it did not work.

Empidonax sp. - ??

Gray Catbird

Yellow-throated Vireo - at least 5
White-eyed Vireo

Golden-winged Warbler
Northern Parula
Prairie Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
American Redstart
Black-and-white Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
​Common Yellowthroat

Almost all of these birds were in two flocks at the boardwalk at the
entrance.  Nothing there when I walked in, but at about 10 AM on the way
out, birds+.

Will be going back in the morning.​

-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: RUDDY TURNSTONE AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:26:01 -0500
This morning, I observed and photographed a very approachable juvenile Ruddy 
Turnstone at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. It was 
foraging in the riprap at the base of the levees. I will be glad to share 
images, when downloaded. 

John Redman
Subject: FW: NPR Science Friday focus on birds and climate change
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:28:58 -0500
FYLE-for your listening/learning enjoyment

 

From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS
Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 7:57 PM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: NPR Science Friday focus on birds and climate change

 

For those who didn't get to hear NPR's Science Friday show on 9/12 with Ken
Rosenberg (Cornell Lab of Ornithology) and Gary Langham (Audubon) about
State of the Birds and the Audubon Climate Change report, you can listen to
it online at this link  ...

 

http://sciencefriday.com/segment/09/12/2014/can-conservation-efforts-save-th
e-birds.html

 

 
Subject: FW: FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool Webinar
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:01:58 -0500
In regards to Joe Neal's recent posts regarding avian deaths on a
powerline-the USFWS has a new tool that will be discussed next Monday.  See
you at the webinar.

 

Jeff Short

 

From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS
Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 7:48 PM
To: DODPIF-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool Webinar

 

FYI- an upcoming webinar to demonstrate how DoD can participate in a new
tool from USFWS for avian injury and mortality reporting.  Please consider
participating, and passing along to others that might be interested.

 

 

 

Subject: FWS Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool Webinar

 

All,

 

On Monday, September 22, at 10 AM (ET), Meghan Sadlowski (FWS) will

demonstrate the new bird Injury and Mortality Reporting Tool. She will

describe when and how to use the tool, and how the data can benefit both

the FWS and DoD.

 

Please forward this notice to others who may be interested!

 

WebEx (no passcode required):

http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=441059575
 &p=&t=c

Phone: 877-927-1586

Participant Passcode (phone): 74599801

 

Regards,

 

Alicia J. Shepard

DoD NR Program Support

HydroGeoLogic, Inc.

 

 
Subject: Cave and other swallows
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 08:26:26 -0500
All AR swallows again lined up on the telephone wires across Beard's Lake. Only 
1Cave so far though. Millwood is socked in by a dense fog so I'll have to make 
a return trip later in the day to look for a Sabine's Gull or perhaps a jaeger. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Weedy Estates
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:46:15 +0000
"Weedy Estates" is the title for a collection of short essays that my friend 
artist Richard Stauffacher has added to my other writings hosted on his 
website, etchings.org. Here's the link: http://etchings.org/ 


When you get there, I encourage you to check out the other stuff, especially 
Richard's work. He grew up in Africa and long ago made northwest Arkansas his 
home. His work expresses both including wonderful Ozarks natural history. You 
will then see a link that reads "Joe Neal: essays and books." That's one way to 
reach Weedy Estates. Of course, everybody has to find their own individual 
path. 


 In continuation of a discussion from my book Birdside Baptist (2010), the jest 
of the matter in Weedy Estates was poetically summarized long ago: "Lay not up 
for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt..." 
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 16
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:57:06 -0500
Chuck McGowen (OK) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 66
species.  It was partly cloudy and quite warm.  A lot of migrants were
moving through and a walk around the backside of Pintail Lake was very
productive for them.  Here is our list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 41

Blue-winged Teal - 206

Northern Pintail - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 14

Double-crested Cormorant - 2

Anhinga - 2

Least Bittern - 1

Great Blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 32

Snowy Egret - 18

Little Blue Heron - 8

Green Heron - 12

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 7

White Ibis - 24

Wood Stork - 7

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 14

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 6 (3 adults and 3 imm.)

Common Gallinule - 33 adults and immatures (also 3 downy young.)

Killdeer - 2

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Lesser Yellowlegs - 4

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Long-billed Dowitcher - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Black Tern - 7

Mourning Dove - 6

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-headed Woodpecker - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 5

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Olive-sided Flycatcher - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 1

Least Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 5

White-eyed Vireo - 11

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 8

Fish Crow - 1

Tree Swallow - 11

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5

Cliff Swallow - 7

Barn Swallow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Gray Catbird - 3

Brown Thrasher - 5

Cedar Waxwing - 1 (early!)

Northern Parula - 1

Yellow Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 2

Northern Cardinal - 14

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 8

Dickcissel - 2

Red-winged Blackbird - 148

Baltimore Oriole - 3

 

 

Odonates:

 

Blue-fronted Dancer

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Great-blue Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

"red" Saddlebags species

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Faulkner Co Migration, Bell Tomorrow
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:08:06 -0500
Had a nice litte movement through my yard today.

Eastern Wood-Pewee
Olive-sided Flycatcher
White-eyed Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Black-throated Green Warbler
Tennessee Warbler

Kathleen and I will be at Bell's Slough in the morning if you want to join
us.

-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Cave and other swallows
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 08:56:39 -0500
First stop this morning at Beard's Lake Campground at Millwood Lake yielded all 
of the swallows on the Arkansas list perched on the telephone lines crossing 
Beard's Lake. That would include 4 Cave Swallows. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: ALL THAT VITAL UNIVERSE
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 13:45:00 +0000
HOODED WARBLERS, YELLOW-THROATED VIREOS, AND TUFTED TITMICE are singing on the 
forested slopes of Whitney Mountain on the north side of Beaver Lake. After a 
rainy night, a drenched and bedraggled-looking Broad-winged Hawk hunkers down 
on a powerline alongside highway 127. Three miles northeast lies Devils 
Eyebrow Natural Area Misty. A fog fills the valley between us. 


These northeast-facing mountain slopes are good places to hear and see Cerulean 
Warblers, but I havent found them today. However, there are pawpaws on the 
trees and red berries on dogwoods. In a dense bunch of blooming native 
thistles, all purple even on a cloudy day, Joan Reynolds has spotted a large 
moth vigorously working the flowers. 


Along the highway, perky trumpets of yellow jewelweed whose leaves are covered 
by shiny beads of last nights rain and this mornings mist. The well-named 
Wreath Goldenrod (Solidago caesia) has spread across lower slopes taking 
advantage of sunlight in the highway right-of-way. 


From highway 127, Slate Gap Road courses Whitney Mountains south face, down 
toward Beaver Lake. The community of Glade was here, but now buried under the 
lake. The cove formed over vanished Glade is attractive to winter waterfowl, 
especially Horned Grebes. After some scanning and spotting, it is obvious 
waterfowl business isnt yet open. Nevertheless, Slate Gap Road provides access 
to a series of glades. In one spot, thriving in the sparse, arid shale, the 
curious plant Spanish Needles, now all light pinks and dark pinks of full 
blooms. I hear Blue-gray Gnatcatchers back in the cedars. 


Im pretty sure Ive been down this road 250 times. This includes years of 
puzzling over and enjoying waterfowl on Beaver Lake and more recently, Whitney 
Mountain, both northeast moist forested slopes and arid cedar glades on the 
south. But I have never seen a large moth with stripes black and white on one 
part of its body, and stripes brown and white on another, and when hovering 
full throttle at a fully blooming thistle, wings flashing red and black and 
white. It is in full command of all that vital universe, described at least in 
part by wild thistle, White-lined Sphinx moth (Hyles lineata), and human 
observers. I can say this much: I couldnt take my eyes off the drama. 


I am reminded of life-enabling fascination so well documented by the 19th 
Century French entomologist, J. Henri Fabre, who owned the whole universe in 
his back yard in the village of Serignan. There he watched a beetle with dung 
ball,  to see whether he was rolling that pellet of dung in which ancient 
Egypt beheld an image of the world. 
Subject: Re: Lesser Yellowlegs
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:51:08 -0500
Many thanks to Delos and everyone who confirmed the Lesser Yellowlegs 
ID.  This counts as a life bird for me, so I'm delighted.

George (n. Conway Co. doesn't see many shorebirds in the hills-n-woods)

On 9/14/2014 10:08 PM, Delos McCauley wrote:
> George, I photographed a lesser yellowlegs at Boyd Point last week.
> Delos McCauley
> Pine Bluff
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Sep 14, 2014, at 9:43 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman"  
wrote: 

>>
>> Saturday afternoon I took the family up to Cowie Winecellar for their annual 
Fall festival. No wine for the kids but some really unique vintages with the 
grand prize being a cherry wine that was like liquid cherry pie . . . but 
perhaps I digress. 

>>
>> On the way back the kids wanted to stop at the Lake Dardanelle State Park 
visitor center which, of course, was closed. So we walked the jetty then around 
about in other areas of the park. As we wandered past the swimming beach (such 
as it is) a shorebird I've never seen flew up. White tail, larger than a 
sandpiper, smaller than a Whimbrel, bobbing like one of those old tippy birds, 
conspicuous yellow-orange legs and a double note call that was pretty 
distinctive and straight black bill. It hung around the sand in the swimming 
area the entire time we were there (about an hour). 

>>
>> The closest thing I can match it to is a Lesser Yellowlegs. Would this be 
the right time of year for them to be migrating through? 

>>
>> -- 
>> George R. Hoelzeman
>> North Conway County

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: SANDERLINGS & BAIRD'S AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:03:25 -0500
This morning, I observed and photographed a group of 3 juvenile Sanderlings and 
2 juvenile Baird's Sandpipers at Boyd point Wastewater Treatment Facility in 
Pine Bluff. The small "flock" stayed together as they foraged in the grass on 
the levees. 
Subject: California Gull
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:19:47 -0500
Forgot to mention that LaDonna and I photographed an immature yesterday out on 
the lake. It was near the state park in Russellville hard to see without 
getting on a boat. 


Kenny

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sabine's Gull
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:17:46 -0500
I am currently watching a juvenile Sabine's Gull, from my deck on Lake 
Dardanelle. It could probably be seen from Delaware Rec Area, but anyone 
wanting to try is welcome to come by. I may or may not be here. 


Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ninestone field trip, Sunday October 5
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:54:44 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will gather with members, friends, and 
anyone else interested, for a field trip to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll 
County on Sunday, October 5, 2014. Meet at Ninestone at 9 AM. If you arrive 
later, you can bird around until you run into us. 

There is a lot more information about Ninestone on the NWAAS web site at: 
http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/id17.html including directions and more description 
of Ninestone. 


Everyone is welcome. You do not need to be a member to participate. Folks new 
to birding will find this a fun place to get started. We look at everything  
the landscape, flowers and trees, frogs, insects, snakes, plus birds, of 
course. Those with mobility impairments will find Ninestone a comfortable spot 
to look at birds, plants, waterfalls without need for long hikes or actually 
any hiking. 


Ninestone is in southern Carroll County. The awesome natural beauty and habitat 
diversity makes it a fine place to see & hear birds, plants, springs, and 
natural rock formations typical of the Ozarks. It features a variety of 
forested habitats including Piney Creek, Ozark bluffs, grassy fields, and the 
waterfall with its spring run. Glades and warm-season native grasses are being 
restored and well experience that, too. It is a great opportunity to see a 
variety of migrant and resident land birds typical of the western Ozarks. 


We also have a fun pot-luck style lunch, so bring some stuff to share. We can 
try a carpool from Fayetteville if anyone is interested. Please call me at 
479-521-1858 if interested. 
Subject: Say's Phoebe
From: Richard Baxter <dickbaxter100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 07:23:59 -0500
I had a Say's Phoebe yesterday morning in Desha County. No photos. This is
the 5th I have found in Arkansas.  Also, 9 spoonbills and a flyover
plegadis ibis.

-Dick Baxter
Subject: BKNWR
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 22:24:05 -0500
I saw 8 to 10 Sanderling's at BKNWR today.  No Roseate Spoonbills.  Still
about 20 American Avocets present.  Only a few Semipalmated Sandpipers,
Black-necked Stilts and Stilt Sandpipers present.

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: Lesser Yellowlegs
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 22:08:20 -0500
George, I photographed a lesser yellowlegs at Boyd Point last week.
Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 14, 2014, at 9:43 PM, "George R. Hoelzeman"  
wrote: 

> 
> Saturday afternoon I took the family up to Cowie Winecellar for their annual 
Fall festival. No wine for the kids but some really unique vintages with the 
grand prize being a cherry wine that was like liquid cherry pie . . . but 
perhaps I digress. 

> 
> On the way back the kids wanted to stop at the Lake Dardanelle State Park 
visitor center which, of course, was closed. So we walked the jetty then around 
about in other areas of the park. As we wandered past the swimming beach (such 
as it is) a shorebird I've never seen flew up. White tail, larger than a 
sandpiper, smaller than a Whimbrel, bobbing like one of those old tippy birds, 
conspicuous yellow-orange legs and a double note call that was pretty 
distinctive and straight black bill. It hung around the sand in the swimming 
area the entire time we were there (about an hour). 

> 
> The closest thing I can match it to is a Lesser Yellowlegs. Would this be the 
right time of year for them to be migrating through? 

> 
> -- 
> George R. Hoelzeman
> North Conway County
Subject: Lesser Yellowlegs
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:43:01 -0500
Saturday afternoon I took the family up to Cowie Winecellar for their 
annual Fall festival.  No wine for the kids but some really unique 
vintages with the grand prize being a cherry wine that was like liquid 
cherry pie . . . but perhaps I digress.

On the way back the kids wanted to stop at the Lake Dardanelle State 
Park visitor center which, of course, was closed.  So we walked the 
jetty then around about in other areas of the park.  As we wandered past 
the swimming beach (such as it is) a shorebird I've never seen flew up.  
White tail, larger than a sandpiper, smaller than a Whimbrel, bobbing 
like one of those old tippy birds, conspicuous yellow-orange legs and a 
double note call that was pretty distinctive and straight black bill.  
It hung around the sand in the swimming area the entire time we were 
there (about an hour).

The closest thing I can match it to is a Lesser Yellowlegs.  Would this 
be the right time of year for them to be migrating through?

-- 
George R. Hoelzeman
North Conway County
Subject: ASCA Field Trip
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 14:37:50 -0500
>> Cold and slow sums up the ASCA field trip, Saturday Sept. 13 at the Bell 
Slough WMA. We arrived at the main entrance at 7:30 a.m. 36 birders gathered in 
the parking lot hoping to see those confusing fall warblers. We had birders 
from all over central Arkansas, plus a birder from Norway, and a new young 
birder and his mom. With the temp hovering at 57 degrees and a stiff wind, 
birds were non-existent. We couldn't even rustle up a Blue Jay until much later 
in the morning. We dodged the dove hunters and birded along the edge of the 
waterfowl resting area. This is first time in years that area has been mowed 
and plowed, which meant bare fields containing several Killdeer, a couple of 
Lesser Yellowlegs, and three Great Egrets. In the trees and grass around the 
edge of the fields, we had a Yellow Warbler, American Goldfinches, Indigo 
Buntings, and a pair of Gray Catbirds. 

>> 
>> We walked the WMA trails hoping the morning would warm up and the birds 
would start moving. It didn't warm up, and the birds still weren't moving. 
Finally, after most people had left, we found two small mixed feeding flocks, 
which included a probable Canada Warbler, a Blue-winged Warbler, a Warbling 
Vireo, a Wilson's Warbler, American Redstarts, a Common Yellowthroat, a couple 
of Black-and-white Warblers, and a Yellow-throated Vireo. 

>> 
>> I still hadn't found Rob Weiss a confirmed life bird, which I've managed to 
produce at least one for him on every field trip he's gone on these last 7 
years. I couldn't let him move back to Wisconsin without finding one last bird. 
So we headed to the spillway entrance into Bell Slough. Rob needed a 
Prothonotary Warbler for a life bird and that area is pretty reliable for 
Prothonotary's. Fingers crossed, we walked into the back area. At the sluice 
gate, a bird flew into the top of the tallest tree that had dead branches 
sticking up at the very top. Bingo! Olive-sided Flycatcher and life bird for 
Rob! We then walked a little further in. Bingo! Prothonotary Warbler! Happy 
life bird dance! A Wilson's Warbler also popped up, giving Justin Brand his 
first really good look at a Wilson's. Since it was 2:30 p.m., we called it a 
day. Back at the cars, high-fives all around and lots of goodbye hugs and well 
wishes to Rob for his new life in Wisconsin. We ended the day with 
approximately 50 species. 

>> Karen Holliday
>> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
>> Maumelle/Little Rock
>> 
Subject: Cave Swallow
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 13:42:42 -0500
2 juvenile Cave Swallows were among the swallows perched on the telephone lines 
across Beard's Lake at Beard's Lake Campground, Millwood Lake, this morning. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bald Knob 9/14
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 11:06:11 -0500
Hey all,
I'm headed to the refuge for a few hours this afternoon and maybe to Lonoke to 
check out some minnow farms. Feel free to join! I plan on being at refuge 
around 1-2. Truck with jersey plates, that's me. I'll be in the area til about 
6 


Ryan

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Bob Sargent's memorial service
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 10:37:49 -0500
Bob's memorial service will be on October 25, 2014 at the Trussville 
Civic Center, 5381 Trussville-Clay Rd, Trussville, AL 35173, from 2-5 PM.

Anyone wishing to say a few words about Bob is welcome to speak. Please 
just let Martha know so you can be put on the schedule.
You will recognize the email address; it's RubyThroat AT aol.com.

Thanks,
Janine
Subject: Birds Along the Illinois River
From: Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 21:43:03 -0500
This morning I had the chance to float about 6.5 miles on the Illinois River 
from Chamber Springs to Fisher Ford. It started off COLD for September 13; a 
brisk 47 degrees greeted us at the water at 8:00am. The birds didn't get the 
memo though. The cold and clouds didn't seem to slow anything down; starting 
with an Osprey and ending with a Yellow-billed Cuckoo. In between there were 
several pleasant surprises. Northern Waterthrushes, Solitary and Spotted 
Sandpipers, Wood Ducks, and Blue-winged Teal to name some. The big highlight, 
however, were the Cedar Waxwings in trees along the river nearly every mile all 
day. Most of the flocks were under 20 birds and probably eating some sort of 
grape high up in the trees, but one flock consisted of at least 150 birds. 
Pretty incredible for mid-September! The most interesting part was yet to 
comeone of the last flocks of waxwings I saw (about 25 birds) was flycatching 
over the river! 


That wasn't the whole trip either. All along the way were HUNDREDS of Cardinal 
Flowers (Lobelia cardinalis), a lucky few sporting their own Ruby-throated 
Hummingbird. Birds abounded along the way (a total of 35 species for the day), 
and butterflies a little bit later. 


Despite the bad rap the Illinois gets, it was a really enjoyable float and I 
would encourage anyone who gets the chance to do it! Things didn't seem so 
great as I left in the cold this morning, but it turned out to be a spectacular 
day. 


~Mitchell Pruitt
Subject: Yard birds this morning
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 09:56:04 -0500
Bald Eagle and Inca Doves. As I'm staring at the Bald Eagle circling over the 
house I notice movement at the end of our walkway. There were two Inca Doves 
picking around in the yard debris left from the storm. Why I love birding, one 
may ask. Nuff said. 


Sandy B.
Fort Smith

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Sooty Tern
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 22:27:11 -0500
The Crawford County Sooty Tern was seen and photographed June 17, 2014 at 6:33 
p.m. Just west of Mulberry, AR. Clear skies. RIck Carson was the observer. I'll 
be getting the report in to the records committee tomorrow. 


Sandy B.



Sent from my iPad
Subject: CALLING ALL PINKS (CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 00:05:47 +0000
WIND FROM THE NORTH today, gateway to fall. Not the big waterfowl migration 
north wind, but rather the north wind when the land still looks green and the 
cicadas chorus dies down. At Chesney today, 4 pink petals and 8 gold stamens on 
the late flowers of Meadow Beauty (Rhexia virginica). Then down in the dense 
Big Bluestem Grass, merry pink trumpets of Slender False Foxglove (Agalinis 
tenuifolia). While Im taking all of that in, up flush 50-100 Red-winged 
Blackbirds, then one (and perhaps four more) rich yellow Bobolinks in flight up 
and over me, calling pink pink, an unintended, but interesting, complex of 
pinks. A flock (25? more?) of American Goldfinches call in the grass, mostly 
unseen, from ripe sunflower seed heads. Indigo Buntings, 8 or 10, or perhaps 
more, almost all brown, with just bits of blue. One Sedge Wren, scolding as I 
walk a mowed path through bluestem grass and Ashy Sunflowers. On my way out, a 
tallish upright stalk of a plant, with a few creamy white flowers of many 
petals, tip of each with a few teeth. This proves to be Prenanthes aspera, 
Prairie Rattlesnake-root, a tracked species, according to Chesney Land 
Steward Joe Woolbright. Last birds for the day: a Loggerhead Shrike along the 
fencerow and Northern Bobwhites (13) just as I reach my car. 
Subject: Re: Lake Dardanelle
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 18:06:36 -0500
At Delaware Rec area?

Ryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 12, 2014, at 17:46, Kenny Nichols  wrote:
> 
> Just had an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull out on the lake. Excluding a bird 
seen on Lake DeGray, during Hurricane Isaac 1 Sep 2012, this would be the 
earliest sighting by almost a month. 

> 
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Lake Dardanelle
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:46:45 -0500
Just had an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull out on the lake. Excluding a bird 
seen on Lake DeGray, during Hurricane Isaac 1 Sep 2012, this would be the 
earliest sighting by almost a month. 


Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sooty
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:40:27 -0500
A friend of mine that lives east of Frog Bayou WMA in Crawford County had a 
juvenile Sooty Tern at his house a few months ago. He sent me the picture 
yesterday. I sent the picture to Kenny, David, and Charles to verify. What a 
great record. Rick is not a birder in the sense that we are. But, he is very 
observant and knew this was something different. Alas, it's still a life bird 
for me. 


Sandy B.
FS, AR

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Sooty Tern
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:33:42 -0500
In order not to blow up anyone's email, here's the bird in an attachment from 
Kenny. I'm so computer illiterate. 


Sandy

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Kenny Nichols 
> Date: September 12, 2014 at 12:17:35 PM CDT
> To: Sandy Berger 
> Subject: Re: Sooty?
> 
> Sandy,
> 
> I uploaded to my pbase site but, for some reason, it seems a little fuzzy. 
> 
> Link here:   http://www.pbase.com/kennynichols/sooty_tern
> 
> Share this with others if you want. 
> 
> Kenny
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Sep 12, 2014, at 10:18 AM, Sandy Berger  wrote:
>> 
>> Question. I want to share this on the listserve. Can I attach it and it'll 
show as an attachment? Or will it show as a photo? Don't want to blow up 
anyone's email. 

>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>>> On Sep 12, 2014, at 8:43 AM, Kenny Nichols  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Holy cow! Amazing. Glad he got a shot. 
>>> 
>>> KN
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> 
>>>> On Sep 12, 2014, at 8:14 AM, Sandy Berger  wrote:
>>>> 
>>>> It was taken here. Just east of Frog Bayou WMA. My friend lives there. He 
was walking his property with his dog and saw the bird. His dog saw it too and 
chased the bird off. Thankfully Rick had the presence of mind to take a shot. 
Rick told me about it months ago but kept forgetting to send me the pic. I'll 
get the info and submit it to the records committee. 

>>>> 
>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>> 
>>>>> On Sep 12, 2014, at 6:48 AM, Kenny Nichols  wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>> That'd be my guess. Not taken here, I suppose?
>>>>> 
>>>>> Kenny
>>>>> 
>>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Sep 11, 2014, at 10:49 PM, Sandy Berger  wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Sent from my iPad
Subject: ASCA Meeting - Change in Presentation
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:41:30 +0000
Stephen Robertson is sick and so had to cancel his talk for Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas tonight. Instead Karen Holliday will show photos from one of 
her awesome overseas trips and/or I will show photos from my recent trip to 
Alaska. In any case, you will be entertained and there will be business of the 
society to conduct. 


Remember, tonight at 7 we meet at the Little Rock Audubon Center, 4500 
Springer, south of Exit 1 of I-440. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: 2014 Report — The State of the Birds Report 2014
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 11:55:13 -0500
Also note the side links, Habitat, Watch List, Common Birds in Steep Decline 
and narratives by habitat type. 

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/
Subject: Re: FW: NYTimes.com: Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study Says
From: Ellen Fennell <f.ellen AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 16:14:05 +0000
Thanks, Harriet. National Audubon knocked it out of the ball park on this one.

Ellen Fennell
Little Rock, AR

----- Original Message -----From: Harriet Jansma To: 
ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDUSent: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 18:40:07 -0000 (UTC)Subject: 
FW: NYTimes.com: Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird 
Species, Study Says 


A couple of weeks ago, I tried sending another bird article directly from the 
NYTimes to our list, but it never arrived in my mailbox. So this time I have 
sent the link to this article to myself to forward to all of you. Its source is 
one that you know about and have had exchanges about (the National Audubon 
Society report on the effects of climate change on bird territories, issued on 
Monday, Sept. 8); but I thought you would be interested in seeing how it was 
covered in the Times. 


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

From: emailthis AT ms3.lga2.nytimes.com [emailthis AT ms3.lga2.nytimes.com]Sent: 
Wednesday, September 10, 2014 1:04 PMTo: Harriet JansmaSubject: NYTimes.com: 
Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study 
Says 













 


Sent by hjansma AT uark.edu:










Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study 
Says 

By FELICITY BARRINGER
The National Audubon Society foresees danger for more than half of the 650 
species of birds in North America. 








Or, copy and paste this URL into your browser: http://nyti.ms/1qz2X9c 


To get unlimited access to all New York Times articles, subscribe today. See 
Subscription Options. 







To ensure delivery to your inbox, please add nytdirect AT nytimes.com to your 
address book. 



Advertisement







Copyright 2014|The New York Times Company|NYTimes.com 620 Eighth Avenue New 
York, NY 10018 




 



Subject: Common Ground-Dove-No
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:43:38 -0500
There was a report submitted to eBird this morning that a Common Ground-Dove 
had been seen at the Kroger in Maumelle. I live just up the hill, so it has 
been easy to try to relocate it. I checked around 9:30am this morning and again 
around 4:30pm this afternoon. Found several Killdeer and a few MODOs, but no 
Common Ground-Dove. The only odd-looking dove was a juvenile MODO this morning 
and juvie MODO this afternoon. I've put out a lot of extra seed below my 
feeders just in case the little guy lands in my backyard and needs a snack. 


When we were spending a week on the island of Nevis in the Caribbean, 
Ground-Doves were everywhere. They were so small and tame, you didn't notice 
them so you had to be careful not to accidentally step on them because they 
were always under-foot. They are such cute little birds and I would love to get 
one as a state bird, so I'll check Kroger again tomorrow. 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Re: NYTimes.com: Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study Says
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 13:12:14 -0700
Thanks Harriet. Something critical that most of the media reports left out was 
the appeal from Audubon asking people who care to sign the pledge. 

Link provided below

 http://climate.audubon.org/article/its-time-act

Jack
Newton County


On Wednesday, September 10, 2014 1:40 PM, Harriet Jansma  
wrote: 

 


 
A couple of weeks ago, I tried sending another bird article directly from the 
NYTimes to our list, but it never arrived in my mailbox. So this time I have 
sent the link to this article to myself to forward to all of you. Its source is 
one that you know about and have had exchanges about (the National Audubon 
Society report on the effects of climate change on bird territories, issued on 
Monday, Sept. 8); but I thought you would be interested in seeing how it was 
covered in the Times. 

Harriet Jansma
Fayetteville


________________________________
 
From: emailthis AT ms3.lga2.nytimes.com [emailthis AT ms3.lga2.nytimes.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2014 1:04 PM
To: Harriet Jansma
Subject: NYTimes.com: Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s 
Bird Species, Study Says 



 
  
Sent by hjansma AT uark.edu:  
 Climate Change Will Disrupt Half of North America’s Bird Species, Study Says 

By FELICITY BARRINGER
The National Audubon Society foresees danger for more than half of the 650 
species of birds in North America. 

Or, copy and paste this URL into your browser: http://nyti.ms/1qz2X9c  
To get unlimited access to all New York Times articles, subscribe today. See 
Subscription Options. 

To ensure delivery to your inbox, please add nytdirect AT nytimes.com to your 
address book. 

Advertisement   
Copyright 2014 | The New York Times Company | NYTimes.com 620 Eighth Avenue New 
York, NY 10018