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Updated on Friday, October 31 at 07:13 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Bearded Mountaineer,©Jan Wilczur

31 Oct Birds seen at Boyd Point Waste Water Facility today [Delos McCauley ]
31 Oct Birds, Birders, State Parks and Kids [jwdavis ]
31 Oct National Audubon Society- Change Glass, Save Birds [Barry Haas ]
31 Oct Ninestone wild turkeys [Judy & Don ]
31 Oct Re: Lake Fayetteville--Spotted Towhee and Waterfowl [Kelly Chitwood ]
31 Oct shrikes and shrews ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
31 Oct Re: But consider Arkansas Audubon Society convention in Russellville FIRST [Ragupathy Kannan ]
31 Oct Prairie Falcon at Maysville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
31 Oct RTH in LR today [Carol Meyerdirk ]
30 Oct FOS Cedar Waxwings [Judy & Don ]
30 Oct BEAVER LAKE WATERFOWL FROM GLADE TO DAM ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
29 Oct towhee [Meredith Hawkins ]
29 Oct No Subject [Anna Weeks ]
29 Oct Re: But consider Arkansas Audubon Society convention in Russellville FIRST [Ann Gordon ]
29 Oct But consider Arkansas Audubon Society convention in Russellville FIRST ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
29 Oct LAKE FAYETTEVILLE WATERFOWL FIELD TRIP SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Oct It might have caused a pile-up (Centerton) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Oct FOS Specks [Ryan Risher ]
27 Oct Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS ["Elizabeth F. Shores" ]
27 Oct Purple and Swamp Milkweeds ["Donald C. Steinkraus" ]
27 Oct Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS [Mary Ann King ]
27 Oct Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS [Carol Meyerdirk ]
27 Oct Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS ["Elizabeth F. Shores" ]
26 Oct A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Oct symposium sessions on science in artistic form [Harriet Jansma ]
25 Oct Bald Knob, Treadways, and Sauls [Karen ]
25 Oct Golden Eagle [Kelly Chitwood ]
25 Oct Late report : Towhee [Jerry Schulz ]
25 Oct Great Horned Owl vs Crows -- clickable link [Doc George ]
25 Oct Great Horned Owl vs Crows [Doc George ]
24 Oct Re: Seabirding [David Starrett ]
24 Oct Re: LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers [James Morgan ]
24 Oct Re: Irruption Birds (Madison County) [Gail Miller ]
25 Oct LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers [Ragupathy Kannan ]
24 Oct 6th Annual Lake Sweep on Lake Maumelle [Dan Scheiman ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [ ]
24 Oct Late Black-and-white Warbler [Dan Scheiman ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Gail Miller ]
24 Oct Open pipes kill birds [Jeffrey Short ]
24 Oct Re: Bald Eagle in a weird spot - Another unususal spot ["Campbell, Martin" ]
24 Oct FOS Hermits! [Judy & Don ]
24 Oct Donations to avian rehabbers [Gail Miller ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Ragupathy Kannan ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [ ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Elizabeth Shores ]
24 Oct Re: the Big Day recollection by Scott Robinson [ ]
24 Oct Re: Donations to avian rehabbers [Ragupathy Kannan ]
23 Oct Donations to avian rehabbers [Barry Haas ]
23 Oct Re: Five weeks in rehab [Gail Miller ]
23 Oct Re: Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab" [Elizabeth Shores ]
23 Oct Re: IBIS ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
23 Oct Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab" [Barry Haas ]
23 Oct Re: Five weeks in rehab [Susan Hardin ]
23 Oct Re: Five weeks in rehab [Sara Caulk ]
23 Oct Five weeks in rehab [Barry Haas ]
23 Oct Bald Eagle in a weird spot [Teresa & Leif Anderson ]
23 Oct brush pile [Judy & Don ]
23 Oct Re: Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville) [Elizabeth Shores ]
23 Oct Central Arkansas/Little Rock Area Birders [Randy Robinson ]
23 Oct Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville) ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Oct IBIS [Michael Linz ]
22 Oct HERRING GULL AT LAKE SARACEN [JFR ]
22 Oct White-faced Ibis in central Arkansas [Michael ]
22 Oct Re: If it is on TV - it must be true [Ryan Risher ]
22 Oct Re: some help please [Nancy Felker ]
22 Oct If it is on TV - it must be true [Dan Bogler ]
22 Oct some help please [Charles Anderson ]
21 Oct Pelicans on Beaver Lake [Betty Brown ]
21 Oct weekend arrivals [Adam Schaffer ]
21 Oct Minneapolis Star-Tribune Editorial counterpoint: What shall our 'perspective' on birds, Vikings stadium aesthetics be? [Barry Haas ]
21 Oct Re: FOS-WC Sparrow [Carol Meyerdirk ]
21 Oct Blue-headed vireo [CK Franklin ]
21 Oct Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count Sunday December 14, 2014 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
20 Oct Birds and History [Karen ]
20 Oct Irruption Birds (Madison County) [Alyssa DeRubeis ]

Subject: Birds seen at Boyd Point Waste Water Facility today
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 18:45:04 -0500
The duck have arrived at Boyd Point.  With the use of a scope today, I was
able to identify the following:

 

Duck, Ruddy (300)

Shoveler, Northern (400)

Mallard (2)

Gadwall (200)

Wigeon, American (3)

Teal, Green-winged (200)

Redhead (4)

Scaup, Lesser (10)

Duck, Ring-necked (200)

Goldeneye, Common (2)

Merganser, Hooded (6)

Pipit, American (1)

Sandpiper, Least (4)

Killdeer (5)

Coot, American (1000)

Goose, Canada (6)

Grebe, Pied-billed (1)

Grebe, Eared (5)

Egret, Great (3)

Heron, Great Blue (1)

 

Most of the ducks were far out at the south side of the rip-rap in the
middle of the north-east pond.  At first glance, it was not obvious that the
ducks were there.  The duck and eared grebes should be increasing in numbers
from here on.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff

 

 
Subject: Birds, Birders, State Parks and Kids
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 17:16:10 -0500
After attending the National Audubon Conference on Climate Change in 
Minneapolis last July, Barbara and I went north to some of the Minnesota State 
Parks to look for birds of the boreal forests. What we found at the State Park 
visitor centers were birding kits that families could check out while they were 
visiting the Parks to be returned when they finished their hike. The kit with 
binoculars, bird list and field guide was an additional activity that connected 
kids and adults with birds, birding and the out of door experience. I am not 
sure what State Parks in other states are doing, but this seemed to be a good 
idea to get people connected with birds. I am sure there are other places with 
such application as well. I think there are people in every state that might be 
motivated to put such a project in action for the future of birds. I know we 
can think of many reasons not to do it, funding, personnel, something more to 
do etc. but instead of asking why? let us as “Why Not”"?” 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Subject: National Audubon Society- Change Glass, Save Birds
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 15:56:15 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

For those of you who would like to take some action to convince the deciders on 
the new Minneapolis football stadium to use less reflective glass that's safer 
for birds, here's an opportunity provided earlier today by the National Audubon 
Society: 


https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1717

Imagine the birds whose lives you might save are those you will see during 
migration next spring. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Ninestone wild turkeys
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:21:00 -0500
We stopped suddenly upon emerging from the woods at the entrance to a small 
field. The dogs and I saw a flock of turkeys in the grasses where they often 
graze in winter. The wild turkeys usually explode flying into the woods as soon 
as we make eye contact. But this morning they must have finally realized we are 
not a threat and simply stood looking back at us as I counted 21 blue heads. 
One was a large gobbler, 3 or 4 were younger males if wattles are an indication 
of gender, and the rest hens. This is the six acre field where we planted 
native warm season grasses for native birds a few years ago and one of the 
places here where Woodcocks dance. 


After we continued and the turkeys went on their way, both a mature and 
immature Bald Eagle flew overhead on this morning filled with a north wind and 
bluebird song. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Lake Fayetteville--Spotted Towhee and Waterfowl
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:19:21 -0500
Edie and I were discussing towhees just this week. For the past two years I've 
had one overwinter in the yard. 

It usually appears at the feeder on the coldest days, but the mew call is 
always cause to investigate the surrounding 

thickets. I've seen a handful of Spotted Towhees in Arkansas more in the past 
two years. 


Yesterday, I heard the "mew" call, although I won't get excited until I see 
him. 




Kelly Chitwood
Union County.





On Oct 31, 2014, at 9:55 AM, Pruitt wrote:

> I swung by Lake Fayetteville this morning where waterfowl is starting to 
gather. When I arrived, it was cloudy and the sun wasnt quite up, but two 
eagles already had the waterfowl in the air, circling in chaos. A raft of coots 
huddled close to shore in a giant ball, while a Coopers Hawk flew low across 
the water towards them. Over the coots, the Coop banked, scaring them half to 
death and flew off into the woods. I must have witnessed some sick joke between 
birds. I thought it was funny and I be that Coopers Hawk did too! 

> 
> Anyway, the waterfowl lineup: Ring-necked Duck, Gadwall, American Wigeon, 
Green-winged Teal, Mallard, Wood Duck, Horned Grebe, and Pied-billed Grebe. 
Another bird of note was a Spotted Towhee that I startled in a brush pile. It 
scolded me with a loud burst of quick chips and a mew and then was silent. 

> 
> ~Mitchell Pruitt
Subject: shrikes and shrews
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 15:06:47 +0000
NORTH AMERICAN LEAST SHREWS are taking a pounding from LOGGERHEAD SHRIKES in 
the former prairies from Siloam Springs to Maysville in northwest Arkansas. 
Well maybe not pounding exactly, but I keep finding shrew carcasses impaled on 
barbed wire fences. During yesterdays Maysville trip I saw 3 or 4 impaled 
shrews in two different places, with many more impaled grasshoppers on the 
fences surrounding them. 


I know this may just be too gruesome for some folks who value beautiful birds 
and furry mammals, but these are natural processes, evolution-in-action. 
Predator and prey working out their relationships. 


Ive found impaled shrews in at least 5 places around Maysville, and Ive also 
seen them at the state fish hatchery in Centerton (impaled there on razor wire 
atop the chain link fence) and near Chesney Prairie Natural Area, the only 
place where Ive managed to directly observe a shrike with a Least Shrew before 
impalation. Welcome to the shrike meat locker. 


Yesterday Id stopped to photograph an impaled shrew and was soon joined by a 
curious local resident and land owner, Mr Clyde Thomas. He has seen me on the 
roads and referred to me by the friendly sobriquet, the bird man. So what is 
bird man seeing today? We got to talking about why bird man likes traveling to 
the Maysville area? 


I told him Fayetteville used to have shrikes. Now we consider ourselves 
fortunate to find ONE on the Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count. On last years 
CBC, one was seen during the count week, but not on count day December 15, 2013 
-- and that despite efforts of 38 people armed with todays best birding gear, 
almost 80 party hours total (plus feeder observations), and almost 300 miles of 
driving, all within the 15-mile diameter of the count circle. 


These data become meaningful in contrast. In the 1960s we had fewer 
participants, fewer party hours, comparatively junky bins, but many shrikes. We 
tallied an average of 25 (range 14-36) in the 1960s, contrasted to an average 
of 1.0 (0-5) recently as Fayettevilles population went from 20,000 (1960) to 
over 70,000 (2013). Suitable shrike nesting and wintering habitat became an 
expanding University of Arkansas campus, malls, highways, apartment complexes, 
and subdivisions. 


Of course, none of this is a big deal if you think the earth is about nothing 
but people, not about people AND shrikes AND all the rest of creation. 


The long and the short of this, when Doug James and others did the Fayetteville 
CBC in the 1960s, Fayetteville was shrike country, with all that implies about 
habitat suitable for shrikes and associated species of plants and animals. 
Shrike country now is around Siloam Springs - Cherokee City (30-40 miles from 
Fayetteville) and Maysville (48 miles) 

.
Maysville is growing too, but hopefully still has good years ahead, judging 
from shrikes and shrews. 
Subject: Re: But consider Arkansas Audubon Society convention in Russellville FIRST
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 01:39:50 +0000
See the conference agenda below.  I have boldened the special talks.
 ARKANSAS 2014 FALLCONVENTION AUDUBON November 14-16, 2014 SOCIETY 
Russellville, ARAGENDAAll programs and meals will be held at the Lake Point 
Conference CenterFRIDAY, November 14, 2014Field Trips 1:00 pm Leaving from 
Conference CenterBoard Meeting 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm Conference Center Training 
Room BRegistration 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Conference CenterDinner 6:00 pm – 7:00 
pm Conference Center Dining RoomEvening Program 7:15 pm – 8:30 pm Conference 
Center Dining Room“Cerulean Warbler Responses to Fire and Ice in the Ozark 
National Forest”Guest Speaker – Dr. Chris Kellner, Professor of Wildlife 
Science, Arkansas Tech UniversityDrawing for Door Prizes, descriptions of 
Saturday’s Field TripsSATURDAY, November 15, 2014Continental Breakfast 6:00 
am LodgesField Trips 7:00 am Leaving from Conference CenterTrust Meeting 1:30 
pm – 3:30 pm Conference Center Executive Board RoomSpecial Presentations 3:45 
pm – 5:00 pm Conference Center Training Room B“Property Rights, Not 
Pipelines” by Adam LanskyDiscussion on fighting climate change and protecting 
Arkansas’ birds with Lynsy Smithson-Stanley from the National Audubon 
SocietyMix & Mingle 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Atrium Area in Hickory LodgeDinner 6:00 
pm – 7:00 pm Conference Center Dining RoomEvening Program 7:15 pm – 8:15 pm 
Conference Center Dining Room“Birds in a Changing World” Guest Speakers – 
Tom Auer, IBA Program Biologist, National Audubon Society and Lynsy 
Smithson-Stanley, Deputy Director of Climate and Strategic Initiatives, 
National Audubon Society; NAS staff will present startling new research on the 
threat of climate change to North American Birds.AAS Business Meeting 8:30 pm 
– 9:00 pmWeekend checklist, door prizes, reports from Saturday’s field 
trips, discussion of Sunday field tripsSUNDAY, November 16, 2014Continental 
Breakfast 6:30 amField trips are based on interest. Times, locations, and 
leaders will be discussed at the Business Meeting.FIELD TRIPSPlease indicate on 
your registration form which of the following field trips you would like to 
join. Sign-up sheets for Saturday’s trips will also be available at 
registration. Changes are OK at any point.FRIDAY AFTERNOON FIELD TRIPS – both 
trips will leave from the Conference Center at 1 PMF1 – Holla Bend National 
Wildlife Refuge – Driving time approximately 30 minutes. Includes 7,000 
varied acres of managed habitat along a former bend of the Arkansas River. 
Along with migrating hawks, eagles, and sparrows, most of the refuge’s 27 
species of waterfowl should be possibilities this time of year.F2 – Lake 
Dardanelle State Park – Located on the eastern shore of Lake Dardanelle in 
Russellville. The park features a short nature trail, scenic views of Mt. Nebo 
and extensive shoreline for viewing the lake’s diverse birdlife, including a 
wide variety of loons, gulls, and ducks. Spotting scopes should prove quite 
useful. We will meet a park interpreter at the visitor center which houses 
7,000 gallons of water full of Arkansas’ native aquatic denizens.SATURDAY 
FIELD TRIPSAll field trips will leave from the Conference Center at 7 AM. 
Please see field trip notifications at registration for the list of trip 
leaders and possible changes in time or meeting locations. Some trips may 
require most of the day, others only part.S1 – Holla Bend National Wildlife 
Refuge – Driving time approximately 30 minutes. We will search for 
hawks, eagles, sparrows, and some of the tens of thousands of ducks and geese 
beginning their winter stay at Holla Bend. This trip should also provide time 
to check Lake Dardanelle dam on the return trip to the conference center.S2 – 
Bona Dea Trails and Sanctuary – Bona Dea is a Corps of Engineers property 
located adjacent to Lake Dardanelle on the edge of Russellville. This popular 
recreation and birding area includes bottomland forest and wetland habitats 
and is home to a wide variety of woodland and water birds. Moderate walking on 
smooth trails.S3 – Delaware Recreation Area – Driving time approximately 35 
minutes. Home to a large number of the state’s rare gull sightings, Delaware 
Recreation Area also offers the perfect vantage to scan the lake for loons, 
grebes, ducks, and pelicans. Time permitting, we will also search some other 
areas on the southern shoreline including Shoal Creek and the Lake Dardanelle 
dam. Bring your spotting scopes if you have one.S4 – Cabin Creek Recreation 
Area/Lake Point Conference Center – Driving time approximately 20 minutes 
to Cabin Creek which provides an excellent vantage point to scan Lake 
Dardanelle’s westernmost arm. Again gulls, loons, grebes, ducks, and 
pelicans should fuel your visual and auditory appetites. Bring your spotting 
scopes if you have one. Time permitting, we will also scan more of the 
northern shoreline of Lake Dardanelle. We will then return to the conference 
center to uncover the treats we’d been ignoring outside our front doors. 

 

 On Wednesday, 29 October 2014 9:11 AM, Ann Gordon  
wrote: 

   

 Thanks, Joe, for modifying your post.  It will be a good meeting with 
wonderful field trips and Lake Point is a great facility.  Should be prime 
season for ducks and gulls around Lake Dardanelle! 


Ann


On Wed, Oct 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:

In my just-posted announcement about the NWAAS field trip to Lake Fayetteville 
on November 15, I meant to include an additional IMPORTANT fact. This field 
trip conflicts with the Fall convention of Arkansas Audubon Society, at 
Russellvile, November 14-16. I set up the Lake Fayetteville trip in early 2014 
before being aware of the conflict with the AAS meeting. I always encourage 
folks with an interest in a wider, well-established, state-wide birding 
community to get involved in AAS. I strongly encourage anyone with an interest 
in attending the AAS meeting to bypass our November 15 field trip on your way 
to Russellville. The Russellville meeting includes some really extraordinary 
field trips plus all of the equally extraordinary folks who will be attending. 
Check out the Arkansas Audubon Society web page. If you can’t go to 
Russellville, we welcome you to Lake Fayetteville. 




   
Subject: Prairie Falcon at Maysville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:21:34 +0000
Two Savannah Sparrows took off, and a Vesper Sparrow walked out of a bean field 
for a dust bath along a county road in Oklahoma, 1.5 miles southwest of 
Maysville and 0.5 miles west of State Line Road in Arkansas. Theres basically 
no traffic, so I turned the car sideways to watch the Vesper at its dust bath 
through my spotting scope. 


I heard American Crows, looked up, and theres an adult PRAIRIE FALCON! Not in 
anything like chase mode, even with a flock of Killdeer (~50) up and calling. 


Instead of immediately disappearing into the next universe  often the case -- 
this falcon came over a low tree line toward me, made shallow loops over the 
bean field, then casually flew over the car and low enough I could have been 
checking off ALL of the Peterson field marks. Of course I was stunned. 


Just then, a pickup came along with a friendly guy, Shad, who is not a bird 
watcher as such, but has often noticed me along this road. Was I was seeing 
anything good? I handed him my binoculars. The falcon now was headed east into 
Arkansas, but even then, high above us, visible black axillaries and long 
pointed wings. I gave him a copy of the AAS field list, with Prairie Falcon 
circled. 


I used to think of these birds as mid-winter visitors, but consider the 
following: Joan Reynolds and I saw one, and she photographed it, at the 
Tallgrass Prairie Preserve on September 30, 2012. I photographed one just south 
of todays sighting on October 21, 2012. 


Todays Prairie Falcon, which started out as an Oklahoman, turned into an 
Arkansas rarity as it conveniently crossed the state line near the intersection 
of State Line Road and highway 43. Not long after, a Red-headed Woodpecker did 
about the same thing. I am reminded that one thing I like about birds is they 
exhibit what seems refreshing disdain for artificial boundaries. 


The wind had been blowing all day out of the south, with the entire earth in 
motion, but seemed still during these fascinating moments. 
Subject: RTH in LR today
From: Carol Meyerdirk <dmeyerdirk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 00:16:47 +0000
Backyard surprise a RTH checking out the magic bean blossoms. 
Carol WLR 
Subject: FOS Cedar Waxwings
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:11:36 -0500
I was just out in the yard collecting brightly colored leaves for a friend who 
lives in the desert and noticed several Hermit Thrushes collecting brightly 
colored dogwood berries. In the foliage with them were Cedar Waxwings! 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: BEAVER LAKE WATERFOWL FROM GLADE TO DAM
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 01:04:41 +0000
Seeing all those Double-crested Cormorants heading south yesterday reminded me 
I hadnt been up on the north side of Beaver Lake since summer. Todays weather 
was cool and clear, and almost no wind  so no waves -- perfect for viewing the 
lakes big openings. 


FIRST STOP: Glade, or I should say its watery grave, as it was buried when the 
White River was impounded to form Beaver. You get there on the Slate Gap Road 
out of Garfield. Once there, its a straight look 2 miles across the lake to 
Rocky Branch. The ducks are usually out in the middle, in the old river channel 
(~1 mile). Such was the case today. Way out there, roughly 325 ducks, brownish 
mainly in the bright light, so I think mainly Gadwalls, Green-winged Teals, 
Mallards, Northern Shovelers, maybe a few others species. Also in the channel, 
a tight raft of American Coots (~250). Much closer, Horned Grebes (89), Eared 
Grebe (1), and Common Loon (1). The Horned Grebes mainly looked all wintery, 
but the Eared Grebe was quite dark, more like breeding season dress. 


NEXT STOPS, the two Corps of Engineers parks at Lost Bridge. A few more Horned 
Grebes, Northern Shovelers, and Pied-billed Grebes. The persimmon trees in the 
parks are groaning under weight of so much fruit. 


INDIAN CREEK AND THE DAM SITE PARKS: three or four more tight rafts of American 
Coots (total 100+), Ring-billed Gulls (5), more Horned Grebes (12+), and 
another Common Loon. 


And that was about it for todays waterfowl bidness. However, by the time I got 
to the dam it was late afternoon. East-facing slopes of the hills rising above 
were in relative dark, with the sun preparing to set in the west behind them. 
But above the hills bright sun poured into a deep blue sky. That bright light 
with a dark backdrop illuminated another migration: gobs and strings, long and 
short, of ballooning spiders. The whole sky was filled with silver strands, 
drifting south. 
Subject: towhee
From: Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 13:21:45 -0500
Saw a female Eastern Towhee yesterday feeding with cardinals underneath a
stand of beauty berries. I love their chewink!

Meredith Hawkins
west Little Rock
Subject: No Subject
From: Anna Weeks <annaw AT ARPANEL.ORG>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:14:57 -0500
"signoff ARBIRD-L"
Subject: Re: But consider Arkansas Audubon Society convention in Russellville FIRST
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:10:49 -0500
Thanks, Joe, for modifying your post.  It will be a good meeting with
wonderful field trips and Lake Point is a great facility.  Should be prime
season for ducks and gulls around Lake Dardanelle!

Ann


On Wed, Oct 29, 2014 at 9:02 AM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:

>  In my just-posted announcement about the NWAAS field trip to Lake
> Fayetteville on November 15, I meant to include an additional IMPORTANT
> fact. This field trip conflicts with the Fall convention of Arkansas
> Audubon Society, at Russellvile, November 14-16. I set up the Lake
> Fayetteville trip in early 2014 before being aware of the conflict with the
> AAS meeting. I always encourage folks with an interest in a wider,
> well-established, state-wide birding community to get involved in AAS. I
> strongly encourage anyone with an interest in attending the AAS meeting to
> bypass our November 15 field trip on your way to Russellville. The
> Russellville meeting includes some really extraordinary field trips plus
> all of the equally extraordinary folks who will be attending. Check out the
> Arkansas Audubon Society web page. If you can’t go to Russellville, we
> welcome you to Lake Fayetteville.
>
Subject: But consider Arkansas Audubon Society convention in Russellville FIRST
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:02:11 +0000
In my just-posted announcement about the NWAAS field trip to Lake Fayetteville 
on November 15, I meant to include an additional IMPORTANT fact. This field 
trip conflicts with the Fall convention of Arkansas Audubon Society, at 
Russellvile, November 14-16. I set up the Lake Fayetteville trip in early 2014 
before being aware of the conflict with the AAS meeting. I always encourage 
folks with an interest in a wider, well-established, state-wide birding 
community to get involved in AAS. I strongly encourage anyone with an interest 
in attending the AAS meeting to bypass our November 15 field trip on your way 
to Russellville. The Russellville meeting includes some really extraordinary 
field trips plus all of the equally extraordinary folks who will be attending. 
Check out the Arkansas Audubon Society web page. If you cant go to 
Russellville, we welcome you to Lake Fayetteville. 
Subject: LAKE FAYETTEVILLE WATERFOWL FIELD TRIP SATURDAY NOVEMBER 15
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 13:39:34 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society (NWAAS) will host a field trip to see the 
waterfowl migration on Saturday November 15, 2014, starting at Lake 
Fayetteville at 9 AM. Meet in the parking lot at the north end of the dam. We 
go rain, sleet, or snowthe wilder the better at this time of year. 
Mid-November is a peak time for the migration of all kinds of ducks, including 
diving ducks like Surf Scoters and Common Goldeneyes, Pied-billed and Horned 
Grebes (sometimes Eared Grebe), Common Loons, and several gull species. We 
usually see Bald Eagles. We will observe from the dam end of the lake, then 
move to the observation deck near the Environmental Study Center and elsewhere 
on the lake as needed. You do not need to be a member to participate. All ages 
and abilities (including disabilities) are welcome. Bring binoculars and 
spotting scopes if you have them. Dress warmly since good observation points 
could be exposed to cold north wind. This is usually finished by around noon. 
If theres time or interest, we may drive around to the Botanical Garden and 
walk in to see progress on the Mulhollan Waterfowl Blind. Call Joe 479-521-1858 
if you need additional information. Upcoming (so mark your calendars now): Dr 
Dan Scheiman, Bird Conservation Director of Audubon Arkansas, on impact of 
climate change on Arkansas birds: at Hobbs SP-Conservation Area Visitors Center 
Saturday Dec 6, 2 PM; and Fayetteville CBC Sunday Dec 14. 
Subject: It might have caused a pile-up (Centerton)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:27:56 +0000
A modest cool front passed through northwest Arkansas today, with a little rain 
last night and cooler temps this morning. Mike Mlodinow and I went to the state 
fish hatchery at Centerton, then a few miles east, to the big stormwater 
retention pond off Moberly Lane in Bentonville. There were tons of Savannah 
Sparrows along the road to Centerton. 


Hatchery personnel have continued draining ponds, so theres LOTS of shorebird 
and puddle duck habitat. We heard and saw a single Greater White-fronted Goose 
that was constantly vocalizing, maybe looking for the flock; O where o where 
have they gone? Also, Gadwall (~45), Mallard (6), Northern Shoveler (at least 
2), Green-winged Teal (~40), Ring-necked Duck (6), Ruddy Duck (1), Pied-billed 
Grebe (6), Double-crested Cormorant (3 at hatchery, 2 flocks overhead going S, 
total at least 45), American Coot (~50). There were also Great Blue Herons (4). 


For shorebirds we had mostly Killdeers (~205) and Least Sandpipers (18), but 
also Greater Yellowlegs (1), Long-billed Dowitcher (1), and Wilsons Snipe (9). 
Also, American Pipit (3), Bald Eagle (1, adult), and a Loggerhead Shrike. Swamp 
Sparrows were singing in the little cattail marsh. 


Moberly Pond is also starting to collect some winter waterfowl. In addition to 
species wed already tallied at Centerton, we added Redheads (2) and FRANKLINS 
GULLS (25-30), first coming off the pond, then just above in a low kettle, 
close enough to heavy traffic on I-49 it might have caused a pile-up if all 
those drivers were as glad as were we to see migrating gulls. 


Last nights cool front was NOT the window-rattling arctic blast signaling the 
Great North freeze-up, sending all those loons and scoters heading south. 
Rather, a warm up, warning us to prepare. 
Subject: FOS Specks
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 14:18:26 -0500
Sitting here in Pope Co. deer hunting I've had my first fall flocks of greater 
white-fronted geese flying overhead. One of my favorites of the fall. Hoping to 
have some Snows fly over tonight too. Also had my FOS white throated sparrows 
walking in has well. 


R. Risher
Russellville

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
From: "Elizabeth F. Shores" <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 10:55:25 -0500
MaryAnn, I have only succeeded in growing tropical milkweed and A. tuberosa
from seed. Please tell us if you have any of the other native milkweeds in
your inventory.



From: Mary Ann King 
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 10:36:12 -0500
To: "'Elizabeth F. Shores'" ,

Subject: RE: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS

I have been hearing of the possible problems with tropical milkweed for over
a year now.  It has concerned me so much that I dont grow it anymore.
There are other milkweeds that would grow in the shade  admittedly they are
difficult to locate for the most part  but Common milkweed (Asclepias
syriaca), Asclepias variegata, Asclepias verticillata, Asclepias
viridiflora, Asclepias sullivantii, Asclepias quadrifolia to name some.
These are all Arkansas native milkweeds.  Asclepias exaltata will also grow
in shade- it is native to Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Iowa,
WS, MI, and the rest of the eastern U.S.
 

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods Northwest of London (AR)
 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 10:01 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
 
I enjoyed Alysons article, too, but was dismayed by the information
concerning tropical milkweed, as it and A. tuberosa  are the only species I
can realistically accommodate in my dry, largely shady garden. I was
planning to raise a big crop of tropical milkweed next year, starting the
seeds indoors in February, and place pots in every tiny gap of my sunny
areas. 


From: "Joseph C. Neal"  >
Reply-To: "Joseph C. Neal"  >
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 16:53:45 +0000
To:  >
Conversation: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
Subject: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS

Three ponds at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton have been pulled down,
a lot of decent shorebird habitat and for us, a muddy inland seashore.


Not many ducks at the hatchery,  but otherwise American Coot (31), Killdeer
(123), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (1; it is instructive to
view these two species together), Least Sandpiper (14), Pectoral Sandpiper
(1), Long-billed Dowitcher (1), Wilsons Snipe (7). In addition, Bald Eagle
(2), both meadowlark species, including Western (ID by chuck notes),
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (3), American Pipit (1).


Over by the dairy farms I ran across several flocks of singing White-crowned
Sparrows, plus approximately 200 Brown-headed Cowbirds in what seemed to me
a bubble chorus. I was able to slowly ease up under a mostly leafless
persimmon tree and listen.  For a couple of minutes, no airplanes from
nearby NWA regional airport, just bubbles. I can send a short recording, MP3
audio format, if anyone is interested.


Swamp Milkweed seeds have taken flight around the hatchery grounds. I
recommend Alyson Hoges Monarchs and milkweeds in yesterdays Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette (page 1-E). What ails our Monarchs also ails birds. Im
among others urging protection of habitat that includes Swamp Milkweed,
Asclepias incarnate (subspecies incarnata) that occurs in extreme northwest
Arkansas. 



Swamp Milkweed is an indicator of former wet prairies, habitat for many
birds of wet grasslands. Education and action in behalf of Monarchs and
milkweeds, as in Hoges article, also helps birds. The hatchery, and
naturally wet ditches around the hatchery, supports a population of Swamp
Milkweed, well-attended by Monarchs in season and a place where we see the
future in Monarch caterpillars.

Subject: Purple and Swamp Milkweeds
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:53:32 +0000
My wife, Jane, and I are trying hard to increase the numbers of purple 
milkweeds, swamp milkweeds, green milkweeds, on our property. I don't know, but 
I suspect that birds utilize milkweed silk for nests and may also eat milkweed 
seeds. Do any of you more experienced birders know about this? 


Jane and I have had some success. We found that the swamp milkweeds were very 
attractive to monarchs and some of our plants were defoliated by monarch 
larvae. 


I think ALL milkweeds are incredibly lovely plants and deserve to be in flower 
beds. The purple milkweed and swamp milkweeds are special favorites. In 
addition to monarchs, milkweeds also support a very interesting fauna of other 
insects, such as beetles, aphids, true bugs, and some other Lepidoptera. 


In addition to helping monarchs, by growing these native milkweeds you are 
helping preserve and save these precious native plants. I see very few purple 
milkweeds growing anymore outside of the ones we grew from seeds a few years 
ago. We gathered seeds from a few specimens we saw along the roadside. But 
those milkweeds disappeared under the pressures of the road crews and invasive 
plants. 


I think there may be dangers in growing African or other non-native milkweeds. 
First for the monarchs. Our monarch populations evolved with our native 
milkweeds. We don't know the long-term effects of their feeding on non-native 
plants. Second, these exotic milkweeds could become invasive. 


Arkansas is truly blessed by a diverse, beautiful, and interesting set of 
native milkweed species. They deserve our protection and efforts to increase 
them. 


Don Steinkraus
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] on 
behalf of Mary Ann King [office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM] 

Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 10:36 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS

I have been hearing of the possible problems with tropical milkweed for over a 
year now. It has concerned me so much that I dont grow it anymore. There are 
other milkweeds that would grow in the shade  admittedly they are difficult to 
locate for the most part  but Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), Asclepias 
variegata, Asclepias verticillata, Asclepias viridiflora, Asclepias 
sullivantii, Asclepias quadrifolia to name some. These are all Arkansas native 
milkweeds. Asclepias exaltata will also grow in shade- it is native to 
Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Iowa, WS, MI, and the rest of the 
eastern U.S. 


MaryAnn King
In the pine woods Northwest of London (AR)

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores 

Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 10:01 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS

I enjoyed Alysons article, too, but was dismayed by the information concerning 
tropical milkweed, as it and A. tuberosa are the only species I can 
realistically accommodate in my dry, largely shady garden. I was planning to 
raise a big crop of tropical milkweed next year, starting the seeds indoors in 
February, and place pots in every tiny gap of my sunny areas. 


________________________________
From: "Joseph C. Neal" >
Reply-To: "Joseph C. Neal" >
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 16:53:45 +0000
To: >
Conversation: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
Subject: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS

Three ponds at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton have been pulled down, a 
lot of decent shorebird habitat and for us, a muddy inland seashore. 



Not many ducks at the hatchery, but otherwise American Coot (31), Killdeer 
(123), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (1; it is instructive to view 
these two species together), Least Sandpiper (14), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), 
Long-billed Dowitcher (1), Wilsons Snipe (7). In addition, Bald Eagle (2), 
both meadowlark species, including Western (ID by chuck notes), Scissor-tailed 
Flycatcher (3), American Pipit (1). 



Over by the dairy farms I ran across several flocks of singing White-crowned 
Sparrows, plus approximately 200 Brown-headed Cowbirds in what seemed to me a 
bubble chorus. I was able to slowly ease up under a mostly leafless persimmon 
tree and listen. For a couple of minutes, no airplanes from nearby NWA regional 
airport, just bubbles. I can send a short recording, MP3 audio format, if 
anyone is interested. 



Swamp Milkweed seeds have taken flight around the hatchery grounds. I recommend 
Alyson Hoges Monarchs and milkweeds in yesterdays Arkansas Democrat-Gazette 
(page 1-E). What ails our Monarchs also ails birds. Im among others urging 
protection of habitat that includes Swamp Milkweed, Asclepias incarnate 
(subspecies incarnata) that occurs in extreme northwest Arkansas. 




Swamp Milkweed is an indicator of former wet prairies, habitat for many birds 
of wet grasslands. Education and action in behalf of Monarchs and milkweeds, as 
in Hoges article, also helps birds. The hatchery, and naturally wet ditches 
around the hatchery, supports a population of Swamp Milkweed, well-attended by 
Monarchs in season and a place where we see the future in Monarch caterpillars. 
Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 10:36:12 -0500
I have been hearing of the possible problems with tropical milkweed for over
a year now.  It has concerned me so much that I don't grow it anymore.
There are other milkweeds that would grow in the shade - admittedly they are
difficult to locate for the most part - but Common milkweed (Asclepias
syriaca), Asclepias variegata, Asclepias verticillata, Asclepias
viridiflora, Asclepias sullivantii, Asclepias quadrifolia to name some.
These are all Arkansas native milkweeds.  Asclepias exaltata will also grow
in shade- it is native to Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Iowa,
WS, MI, and the rest of the eastern U.S.  
 
MaryAnn King
In the pine woods Northwest of London (AR)
 
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 10:01 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
 
I enjoyed Alyson's article, too, but was dismayed by the information
concerning tropical milkweed, as it and A. tuberosa  are the only species I
can realistically accommodate in my dry, largely shady garden. I was
planning to raise a big crop of tropical milkweed next year, starting the
seeds indoors in February, and place pots in every tiny gap of my sunny
areas. 


  _____  

From: "Joseph C. Neal" <  joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Reply-To: "Joseph C. Neal" <  joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 16:53:45 +0000
To: <  ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Conversation: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
Subject: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS

Three ponds at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton have been pulled down,
a lot of decent shorebird habitat and for us, a muddy inland seashore.


Not many ducks at the hatchery,  but otherwise American Coot (31), Killdeer
(123), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (1; it is instructive to
view these two species together), Least Sandpiper (14), Pectoral Sandpiper
(1), Long-billed Dowitcher (1), Wilson's Snipe (7). In addition, Bald Eagle
(2), both meadowlark species, including Western (ID by chuck notes),
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (3), American Pipit (1).


Over by the dairy farms I ran across several flocks of singing White-crowned
Sparrows, plus approximately 200 Brown-headed Cowbirds in what seemed to me
a bubble chorus. I was able to slowly ease up under a mostly leafless
persimmon tree and listen.  For a couple of minutes, no airplanes from
nearby NWA regional airport, just bubbles. I can send a short recording, MP3
audio format, if anyone is interested.


Swamp Milkweed seeds have taken flight around the hatchery grounds. I
recommend Alyson Hoge's Monarchs and milkweeds in yesterday's Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette (page 1-E). What ails our Monarchs also ails birds. I'm
among others urging protection of habitat that includes Swamp Milkweed,
Asclepias incarnate (subspecies incarnata) that occurs in extreme northwest
Arkansas. 



Swamp Milkweed is an indicator of former wet prairies, habitat for many
birds of wet grasslands. Education and action in behalf of Monarchs and
milkweeds, as in Hoge's article, also helps birds. The hatchery, and
naturally wet ditches around the hatchery, supports a population of Swamp
Milkweed, well-attended by Monarchs in season and a place where we see the
future in Monarch caterpillars.   
Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
From: Carol Meyerdirk <dmeyerdirk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:34:32 +0000
I have seen very few monarchs this year in and around my yard. However, near 
Lake Lavonne in Texas last weekend, we saw many monarchs on goldenrods in the 
dry lake bed. Last year we had giant yellow swallowtails on my backyard phlox 
and turk's cap. this year not one. I plan on planting more milkweed. 

Carol WLR 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Joseph C. Neal"  
To: "ARBIRD-L"  
Sent: Sunday, October 26, 2014 11:53:45 AM 
Subject: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS 



Three ponds at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton have been pulled down, a 
lot of decent shorebird habitat and for us, a muddy inland seashore. 





Not many ducks at the hatchery,   but otherwise American Coot (31), Killdeer 
(123), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (1; it is instructive to view 
these two species together), Least Sandpiper (14), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), 
Long-billed Dowitcher (1), Wilson’s Snipe (7). In addition, Bald Eagle (2), 
both meadowlark species, including Western (ID by chuck notes), Scissor-tailed 
Flycatcher (3), American Pipit (1). 





Over by the dairy farms I ran across several flocks of singing White-crowned 
Sparrows, plus approximately 200 Brown-headed Cowbirds in what seemed to me a 
bubble chorus. I was able to slowly ease up under a mostly leafless persimmon 
tree and listen.   For a couple of minutes, no airplanes from nearby NWA 
regional airport, just bubbles. I can send a short recording, MP3 audio format, 
if anyone is interested. 





Swamp Milkweed seeds have taken flight around the hatchery grounds. I recommend 
Alyson Hoge’s Monarchs and milkweeds in yesterday’s Arkansas 
Democrat-Gazette (page 1-E). What ails our Monarchs also ails birds. I’m 
among others urging protection of habitat that includes Swamp Milkweed, 
Asclepias incarnate (subspecies incarnata) that occurs in extreme northwest 
Arkansas. 






Swamp Milkweed is an indicator of former wet prairies, habitat for many birds 
of wet grasslands. Education and action in behalf of Monarchs and milkweeds, as 
in Hoge’s article, also helps birds. The hatchery, and naturally wet ditches 
around the hatchery, supports a population of Swamp Milkweed, well-attended by 
Monarchs in season and a place where we see the future in Monarch caterpillars. 
    

Subject: Re: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
From: "Elizabeth F. Shores" <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 10:00:31 -0500
I enjoyed Alysons article, too, but was dismayed by the information
concerning tropical milkweed, as it and A. tuberosa  are the only species I
can realistically accommodate in my dry, largely shady garden. I was
planning to raise a big crop of tropical milkweed next year, starting the
seeds indoors in February, and place pots in every tiny gap of my sunny
areas. 



From: "Joseph C. Neal" 
Reply-To: "Joseph C. Neal" 
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 16:53:45 +0000
To: 
Conversation: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
Subject: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS

Three ponds at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton have been pulled down,
a lot of decent shorebird habitat and for us, a muddy inland seashore.


Not many ducks at the hatchery,  but otherwise American Coot (31), Killdeer
(123), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (1; it is instructive to
view these two species together), Least Sandpiper (14), Pectoral Sandpiper
(1), Long-billed Dowitcher (1), Wilsons Snipe (7). In addition, Bald Eagle
(2), both meadowlark species, including Western (ID by chuck notes),
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (3), American Pipit (1).


Over by the dairy farms I ran across several flocks of singing White-crowned
Sparrows, plus approximately 200 Brown-headed Cowbirds in what seemed to me
a bubble chorus. I was able to slowly ease up under a mostly leafless
persimmon tree and listen.  For a couple of minutes, no airplanes from
nearby NWA regional airport, just bubbles. I can send a short recording, MP3
audio format, if anyone is interested.


Swamp Milkweed seeds have taken flight around the hatchery grounds. I
recommend Alyson Hoges Monarchs and milkweeds in yesterdays Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette (page 1-E). What ails our Monarchs also ails birds. Im
among others urging protection of habitat that includes Swamp Milkweed,
Asclepias incarnate (subspecies incarnata) that occurs in extreme northwest
Arkansas. 



Swamp Milkweed is an indicator of former wet prairies, habitat for many
birds of wet grasslands. Education and action in behalf of Monarchs and
milkweeds, as in Hoges article, also helps birds. The hatchery, and
naturally wet ditches around the hatchery, supports a population of Swamp
Milkweed, well-attended by Monarchs in season and a place where we see the
future in Monarch caterpillars.

Subject: A PLACE WHERE WE SEE THE FUTURE IN MONARCH CATERPILLARS
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 16:53:45 +0000
Three ponds at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton have been pulled down, a 
lot of decent shorebird habitat and for us, a muddy inland seashore. 


Not many ducks at the hatchery, but otherwise American Coot (31), Killdeer 
(123), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (1; it is instructive to view 
these two species together), Least Sandpiper (14), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), 
Long-billed Dowitcher (1), Wilsons Snipe (7). In addition, Bald Eagle (2), 
both meadowlark species, including Western (ID by chuck notes), Scissor-tailed 
Flycatcher (3), American Pipit (1). 


Over by the dairy farms I ran across several flocks of singing White-crowned 
Sparrows, plus approximately 200 Brown-headed Cowbirds in what seemed to me a 
bubble chorus. I was able to slowly ease up under a mostly leafless persimmon 
tree and listen. For a couple of minutes, no airplanes from nearby NWA regional 
airport, just bubbles. I can send a short recording, MP3 audio format, if 
anyone is interested. 


Swamp Milkweed seeds have taken flight around the hatchery grounds. I recommend 
Alyson Hoges Monarchs and milkweeds in yesterdays Arkansas Democrat-Gazette 
(page 1-E). What ails our Monarchs also ails birds. Im among others urging 
protection of habitat that includes Swamp Milkweed, Asclepias incarnate 
(subspecies incarnata) that occurs in extreme northwest Arkansas. 


Swamp Milkweed is an indicator of former wet prairies, habitat for many birds 
of wet grasslands. Education and action in behalf of Monarchs and milkweeds, as 
in Hoges article, also helps birds. The hatchery, and naturally wet ditches 
around the hatchery, supports a population of Swamp Milkweed, well-attended by 
Monarchs in season and a place where we see the future in Monarch caterpillars. 
Subject: symposium sessions on science in artistic form
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 11:44:44 +0000
On Nov. 14-15 at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, a symposium on the 
State of the Art exhibit of contemporary art will occur. The Friday events may 
interest you, since the discussion including 5 of the artists is about "science 
in artistic form." 


The introductory statements left me with as many questions as answers, but 
these events will likely be of interest to birders. 


First, the statement about the panel discussion of the artists, which occurs on 
Fri. 14th, 2:45-4:15: 


With the dangers currently facing our planets natural ecosystems, many artists 
are examining the connections between humanity and the natural world through 
the lens of science. This panel discussion includes State of the Art artists 
who mix scientific study with artistic formfeaturing Dornith Dohertys seed 
bank study of biodiversity; Flora C. Maces three-dimensional botanical 
specimens; Monica Aissa Martinezs holistic and spiritual study of human 
anatomy; Isabella Kirklands homage to species recently revealed to science; 
and Susan Goethel Campbells merging of nature and consumerism. 


Of particular interest to me and surely to some of you, is the biographical 
information about Isabella Kirkland, of Sausolito, California. She works as a 
research associate at the California Academy of Sciences, and this has given 
her the knowledge of scientific discoveries and the motivation to depict them 
in her art: 


"Emergent" (her painting in the exhibit) depicts the uppermost layer of an 
imaginary, mid-elevation tropical rainforest, where the tallest trees rise 
above the canopy into full sun. In this airy part of the forest habitat, 200 
feet above the ground, plants and animals exist that are seen nowhere else, and 
whose entire life cycles are spent in the trees. Each creature pictured in this 
painting has been identified by scientists only in the past two decades. The 
work comments both on the vastness and enduring mystery of life on our planet, 
and on the still-undiscovered scope of what could be lost. 


After the panel, the five artists will be present beside their art in the 
galleries to talk about it with participants. 


Finally, in the evening, another artist, Matthew Moore, a farmer who lives near 
Phoenix, will speak and show his work on life cycles: 


Learn about State of the Art artist Matthew Moores passionate, grassroots 
effort to address environmental and economic sustainability issues through art. 
Moore is the most recent of four generations to farm his familys land outside 
of Phoenix, Arizona. Within five years, however, Moores family farm will be 
transformed into suburbia. The impending loss of the land has inspired Moore to 
take an active role in educating the public about issues of sustainability and 
urban sprawl in his work. His project life cycles uses time-lapse video to 
educate consumers about the produce they purchase by showing the growing 
process in the field. 

***
All events are free to everyone who registers at the Crystal Bridges web site 
(total of 300 participants, of which more than 200 places are still available). 


The Saturday events will feature NW Arkansas artists, including UA students in 
the MFA program. 




Subject: Bald Knob, Treadways, and Sauls
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:15:07 -0500
With a beautiful day predicted, a small group of Central Arkansas birders 
decided to spend Saturday checking Bald Knob NWR, Treadways, and Sauls. At Bald 
Knob, only a couple of ponds were drained. Best birds were a Stilt Sandpiper, 
40 Green-winged Teal, several Long-billed Dowitchers, a Bald Eagle, an American 
Crow and Northern Harrier in arial combat, plus herons and egrets. A Vesper 
Sparrow was a life bird for one birder. 


Next stop was Treadways. The first pond contained rafts of ducks. As we 
scanned, we were stunned to see group after group of Redheads, at least 60 
birds. A male and female Canvasback were mixed in with the hundreds of Ruddy 
Ducks, plus numerous Ringed-necked Ducks, Shovelers, Gadwalls, American Coots, 
and a couple of Northern Pintails. Shorebirds were scarce with only Yellowlegs, 
a few LB Dowitchers, and several dozen Least Sandpipers. Lots of GB Herons and 
Great Egrets with one Snowy Egret were scattered throughout the ponds. 


On to Sauls, checking ponds as we went. The few drained ponds were too dry and 
only had GB Herons and Great Egrets. The one good pond was loaded with dozens 
of male and female Northern Pintails, plus Gadwalls, Coots, Northern Shovelers, 
a few Redheads, Green-winged Teal, and some Double-crested Cormorants. There 
were also a dozen American Wigeons, plus three Belted Kingfishers, 
Yellow-rumped Warblers, Bluebirds, and one Eastern Phoebe. 


All locations had American Kestrels. The shorebirds were on the wane and ducks 
are moving in. We had a single White-fronted Goose and brief glimpses of what 
we think were Red-breasted Mergansers. The ducks and geese are coming! 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock 
Subject: Golden Eagle
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:02:15 -0500
Just south of Hot Springs, I spied a Golden Eagle, circling over Hwy. 7!!! Wow! 


Kelly Chitwood 
Subject: Late report : Towhee
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 07:33:28 -0700
I was sitting on a jury this week at the Pulaski County Courthouse and on 
Wednesday coming back from lunch, spotted a female Eastern Towhee under the 
Azaleas on the east site feeding with a small flock of WTSP. What a nice treat 
! 


 
Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas
Subject: Great Horned Owl vs Crows -- clickable link
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 06:08:02 -0700
Here's a better link for the Owl vs Crow photo.

http://www.pbase.com/docg/image/157968694


Doc George   
Subject: Great Horned Owl vs Crows
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 06:00:21 -0700
This morning about daylight I saw several crows harassing a Great Horned Owl. I 
managed to 

get a few photos before the owl had enough and took off for parts unknown.

I've got one of those photos posted at the following link for anyone interested 
in taking a look. 


http://www.pbase.com/docg/image/157968694


Doc George   
Subject: Re: Seabirding
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 20:41:58 -0500
Mitchell,
I had the good fortune to find a pelagic out of central Florida last month when 
I was down there on business. I had greater fortune in having that very same 
Steve Howell on the trip! I did not have any guide besides my iphone bird guide 
apps. But the trip leader had Howell's book. We had 2.5 hr trip in the dark out 
to the gulf stream and I sat with what I believe is the same book you are 
talking about, and read/studied it. It is big for an actual field guide, but on 
a pelagic a great tool to leave in on the table and study from or refer to. 
Lots of pictures, good use of the similar species approach. It had rarities and 
the common stuff. A lot of the photos were off the N Carolina coast. The book 
pointed to a lot of the small distinguishing traits. By the time we started 
seeing stuff, I was very confident in IDing it and a short time after hearing 
trip leaders calling stuff out I could confidentially ID pretty much everything 
we were seeing. That was my 4th pelagic, first on Atlantic Coast. 

I highly recommend that book.

Dave
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Cape Girardeau, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


> Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 08:25:44 -0500
> From: 0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Seabirding
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> 
> Hey ARBIRDERS,
> I will be doing a pelagic out of North Carolina in May and am wanting to get 
prepared for IDing seabirds. Quite an undertaking, I know, but I at least want 
to have some idea since I've never done this before. Does anyone have any 
thoughts on a field guide for these species (i.e. petrels, storm-petrels, 
etc.)? 

> 
> Here's one title I found by Steve Howell:
> 
> Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America: A Photographic 
Guide 

> 
> Thanks,
> Mitchell
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
From: James Morgan <jlmm AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:45:05 -0500
Saw 2 Scissortails in Logan County yesterday and thought it was late. 
But checked NW Arkansas seasonal distribution and it was November.
The Scissortails on our farm have left.

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville/Elkins

At 07:10 PM 10/24/2014, Ragupathy Kannan wrote:
>Four Scissortails today in our ornithology field trip to Cherokee 
>Prairie.   Class had decent looks at a nice bald eagle, lots of 
>eastern meadowlarks and a fleeting savanna sparrow, among other species.
>
>We were happy to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatchers.  They must be 
>the "LOS" birds.
Subject: Re: Irruption Birds (Madison County)
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:26:46 -0500
My sister lives in Pettigrew (Madison County). I spent 3 days and 2 nights with 
her this week; Tues. – Thurs. and I heard a lot of Red-breasted Nuthatches at 
her house. She doesn’t feed birds because of bear, but I did love hearing the 
nuthatches while my dogs and I visited her!! 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Alyssa DeRubeis 
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 7:22 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Irruption Birds (Madison County)

In accordance with Ron Pittaway's famous "Winter Finch Forecast," the Ozark 
Natural Science Center (near Huntsville) has hosted both Red-breasted 
Nuthatches and Pine Siskins over the past two weeks. I heard the former twice 
during the second week of October; the latter I heard late last week. 



And of course, there have been other recent fall arrivals: Dark-eyed Juncos, 
Yellow-rumped Warblers, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets, and 
White-throated Sparrows. 



As a reminder, the Ozark Natural Science Center is open and free to the public 
on weekends when there aren't educational programs, which are most weekends. 
Simply contact them by phone or e-mail (see http://onsc.us/contact-all.php) and 
let them know when you plan to visit so the gate can be left open for you. 



Good birding!


Alyssa DeRubeis
Huntsville, Madison Co.
Subject: LOS Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 00:10:41 +0000
Four Scissortails today in our ornithology field trip to Cherokee Prairie.   
Class had decent looks at a nice bald eagle, lots of eastern meadowlarks and a 
fleeting savanna sparrow, among other species.   

We were happy to see the Scissor-tailed Flycatchers.  They must be the "LOS" 
birds.   
Subject: 6th Annual Lake Sweep on Lake Maumelle
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 21:27:14 +0000
On Saturday November 1 please join Central Arkansas Water and Audubon Arkansas 
for the 6th Annual Lake Sweep on Lake Maumelle. Help keep waterbird habitat and 
Little Rock's drinking water supply clean by picking up litter at the lake's 
public use areas. Meet at 9:30 at Jolly Roger's Marina, 11800 Maumelle Harbor 
Rd. off Highway 10. All supplies provided, along with free Starbucks coffee, 
plus pizza for lunch for all you hard-working volunteers. Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas members help every year. 


Find the event on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/732514620151435/ 
. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:15:29 +0000
Thanks Gail!Joanie
 

 On Friday, October 24, 2014 2:06 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

   

 Here is a link to Rodney's Facebook page, should anyone be interested.  He 
works tirelessly for the raptors.... and has a fulltime job to boot!!


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Raptor-Rehab-Of-Central-Arkansas/184508031575523?ref=br_tf 


Here also is a link to photos and the story of a Red-tailed Hawk that was 
injured at my work campus.  I took it to Rodney, left him a donation, he 
rehabbed it and I was able to turn it back out at work. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/redtailed_hawk_from_work


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Gail Miller
Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 8:40 AM
To: ARBirdlist
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers

I donate to Rodney Paul at Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas.  Donations to
his efforts are tax deductible now.  I'd rather maker a check out to 'RRCA'
than to 'IRS'!!  :-)

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root


   
Subject: Late Black-and-white Warbler
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:08:51 +0000
Today at the Central Arkansas Water Grass Farm I saw an apparent female 
Black-and-white Warbler that is about two weeks late, according to the state 
checklist. Also saw my FOS Lincoln's Sparrow and White-crowned Sparrow. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:06:40 -0500
Here is a link to Rodney's Facebook page, should anyone be interested.  He 
works tirelessly for the raptors.... and has a fulltime job to boot!!


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Raptor-Rehab-Of-Central-Arkansas/184508031575523?ref=br_tf 


Here also is a link to photos and the story of a Red-tailed Hawk that was 
injured at my work campus.  I took it to Rodney, left him a donation, he 
rehabbed it and I was able to turn it back out at work. 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/redtailed_hawk_from_work


Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Gail Miller
Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 8:40 AM
To: ARBirdlist
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers

I donate to Rodney Paul at Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas.  Donations to
his efforts are tax deductible now.  I'd rather maker a check out to 'RRCA'
than to 'IRS'!!  :-)

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Open pipes kill birds
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:30:12 -0500
https://ojs.lib.byu.edu/spc/index.php/wnan/article/view/32779 

 

I haven't read the paper, but apparently open PVC pipes as small as 3- 4
inches diameter used as gate posts and the like, can become a deathtrap for
some species of birds.  If you use them at your place either cap them or
stuff them with hardware cloth or metal screening.

 

Maybe this could become an item to improve sustainability at our state
properties, too.

 

Jeff Short

 

As an aside, I found a toad at the bottom of a ground-level standing pipe
next to a faucet.  Tongs wouldn't work because of the depth and pipe
diameter, but an Oreck canister  vacuum-you know the kind that will pick-up
a bowling ball-with an extension tube did.  Left a temporary hickey on the
toad's back but it hopped away with a smile.
Subject: Re: Bald Eagle in a weird spot - Another unususal spot
From: "Campbell, Martin" <campbem AT HSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 17:11:52 +0000
ARBIRDERS and Teresa,

Yesterday I drove from Arkadelphia to Little Rock on I-30, passing by Benton 
about 7:40 AM and was very surprised to observe an adult Bald Eagle swoop low 
over the interstate and then fly down the interstate in my lane. There is a 
city park with several ponds about exit 116 (Sevier road) and I suspect the 
eagle was attracted to the pond and ducks. 


I don't know how others seeing your bird on the same day affects things, but 
definitely an odd place. 


Marty
Arkadelphia - HSU

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Teresa & Leif Anderson 

Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 11:50 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bald Eagle in a weird spot

 The Native Americans often considered birds to be signs of omens whenever they 
were seen on an important day of your life. I have Cherokee and Celtic in my 
bloodlines and often will pay attention to the omens each day as I see them. 
Since today was my birthday this one I took seriously since this bird is also 
my Cherokee totem. 


 I was driving on 27 North about 11:10am this morning leaving Dover, from the 
laundry mat. I was about 3 miles south of Scottsville when I noticed this big 
white thing in a mud puddle on the side of the road up ahead. It looked like a 
big white Fan spread out there. I slowed down to look closely and it leaped 
into the air turned and gracefully flew along in front of me as a full adult 
Bald Eagle. 


 Talked about a weird spot for it to be seen. I often see one sitting along 
that stretch of road in a dead tree. But never in a mud puddle that was smaller 
than the bird. Lovely sight for such a grey depressing day. Fly High and be 
Graceful is one of the meanings that I will take note of for today. Cheers: 
Teresa of Hector, AR 
Subject: FOS Hermits!
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:13:59 -0500
Exploring the dense cedar thicket at the bottom of Walnut Hollow I heard the 
first "chup" call of a Hermit Thrush. Following the sound I found the bird 
flicking its wings and calling from low branches at the edge of a wood. There 
were several answering "zeee" notes coming from other areas as well as whistled 
flight calls. All the way home I continued to hear more calls from a flock of 
Hermits that apparently arrived during the night. 


Although the Golden-crowned Kinglets have been present for several days, I was 
also treated to the first scolding call and full song of a Ruby-crowned Kinglet 
while marveling at the surrounding Hermit Thrushes. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 08:40:22 -0500
I donate to Rodney Paul at Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas.  Donations to 
his efforts are tax deductible now.  I'd rather maker a check out to 'RRCA' 
than to 'IRS'!!  :-)

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:20:53 +0000
http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
|      |
|  |
| View on www.abcbirds.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

   

 On Friday, 24 October 2014 8:08 AM, Sharon Boatright 
<000000a09993a9c3-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

   

 One of the issues that the American Bird Conservancy is involved with is 
raising awareness of the threat of domestic cats.Sharon BoatrightBaxter County 

       From: Elizabeth Shores 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 7:40 AM
 Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
   
Where could we give to help raise awareness of the threat of domestic cats?

Sent from my iPhone


On Oct 24, 2014, at 4:11 AM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 



Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
 Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course".   

Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin.  It goes a much 
longer distance that way.  I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a 
leader in wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that 
money to rehab one sick wood duckling.  I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS 
spends that much on rehab efforts annually.   

That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters.     


 On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  wrote: 

   

 Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber.  Rather than rely 
on my own response, I asked a rehabber.  The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY 
grateful for any donation."  And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so 
rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release.  A Wood 
duckling is probably $200.  A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly 
$2/meal."  That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers 
who for the most part have no reliable outside funding.  I say for the most 
part because Joe Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society 
donates $1,000 annually to rehab efforts in their corner of the state.  My 
chapter, Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited 
donations to several rehabbers.  But in general rehabbers funding comes out of 
their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work.  Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, 
but mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no 
sugar daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good.  The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts.  Strange. 


    


   

   
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Sharon Boatright <000000a09993a9c3-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 13:07:45 +0000
One of the issues that the American Bird Conservancy is involved with is 
raising awareness of the threat of domestic cats.Sharon BoatrightBaxter County 

       From: Elizabeth Shores 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, October 24, 2014 7:40 AM
 Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
   
Where could we give to help raise awareness of the threat of domestic cats?

Sent from my iPhone


On Oct 24, 2014, at 4:11 AM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 



Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
 Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course".   

Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin.  It goes a much 
longer distance that way.  I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a 
leader in wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that 
money to rehab one sick wood duckling.  I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS 
spends that much on rehab efforts annually.   

That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters.     


 On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  wrote: 

   

 Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber.  Rather than rely 
on my own response, I asked a rehabber.  The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY 
grateful for any donation."  And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so 
rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release.  A Wood 
duckling is probably $200.  A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly 
$2/meal."  That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers 
who for the most part have no reliable outside funding.  I say for the most 
part because Joe Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society 
donates $1,000 annually to rehab efforts in their corner of the state.  My 
chapter, Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited 
donations to several rehabbers.  But in general rehabbers funding comes out of 
their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work.  Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, 
but mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no 
sugar daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good.  The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts.  Strange. 


    


  
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 12:54:19 +0000
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society donates to our local rehabber Lynn Sciumbato 
at Morning Star Wildlife Rehabilitation Center (located a few miles from the 
state fish hatchery at Centerton) to help maintain the facility, rather than to 
any particular rehab project she undertakes. She takes in all kinds of 
creatures in need of care, including mammals and turtles, and the occasional 
protected or even rare species. She is one of the single most effective 
presenters to the public of the importance of protecting all kinds of hawks, 
owls, vultures, etc. I have never seen. Plus, a master teacher, she is both 
serious and humorous in the role. She always packs the room. It has been my 
experience that if we want to draw a crowd for any kind of an Audubon-oriented 
program, ensure that Lynn and her Turkey Vulture Igor are also giving a 
presentation. People don't turn out that well for many of our Audubon 
presentation; Lynn packs the house. My only wish is that NWAAS could donate 
more to her effort. 


She is a retired ecology teacher who continues to expand the circle of 
knowledge, a great deal by any measure. Check this out: 


http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/morning-star.html

But before you hit that link, make sure you have good control over your check 
book, because I predict you will want to help out, no matter your previous 
views about wildlife rehab, especially a la Lynn Sciumbato and her Morning 
Star. 

________________________________
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 07:40:18 -0500
Where could we give to help raise awareness of the threat of domestic cats?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 24, 2014, at 4:11 AM, Ragupathy Kannan  
wrote: 

> 
> Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course". 

> 
> Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin. It goes a much longer 
distance that way. I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a leader in 
wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that money to 
rehab one sick wood duckling. I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS spends that 
much on rehab efforts annually. 

> 
> That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters. 

> 
> 
> On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> Dear ARBIRDers,
> 
> Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an 
appropriate donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber. Rather 
than rely on my own response, I asked a rehabber. The reply: "Rehabbers are 
HUGELY grateful for any donation." And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is 
so rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 

> 
> Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release. A Wood 
duckling is probably $200. A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly $2/meal." 
That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers who for the 
most part have no reliable outside funding. I say for the most part because Joe 
Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society donates $1,000 annually 
to rehab efforts in their corner of the state. My chapter, Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited donations to several rehabbers. But 
in general rehabbers funding comes out of their own pockets day in and day out. 

> 
> My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work. Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, but 
mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no sugar 
daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 

> 
> I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.
> 
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
> 
> P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good. The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts. Strange. 

> 
Subject: Re: the Big Day recollection by Scott Robinson
From: Robert Wiedenmann <0000002694b336a7-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 06:02:04 -0400
The talk by Scott Robinson (in the link sent previously) was so wonderful on 
many levels. I used to work with Scott at the Illinois Natural History Survey 
from 1994 until he moved to the Florida Museum, and had the pleasure of 
spending time with him in Panama in 2002. I never actually met Ted Parker, but 
I sort of did in 1981. I had spent the summer in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru 
with three others, and I had taken a large number of photos. In 1981, field 
guides to the areas were limited -- Meyer de Schaunsee's Birds of Venezuela, 
maybe the Birds of Colombia (which I didn't have), and little else that was 
available to us. That meant that a large number of birds we saw were not able 
to be identified to species, as they were not in books we had. I taken had a 
few photos of a small, colorful passerine, taken in wet marshy vegetation near 
the coast, south of Lima. Someone had told me about this Ted Parker fellow at 
LSU, so I mailed him the slides (remember, 1981), a description of the location 
and asked if he could ID them. I got back a very nice, helpful note, telling me 
that what I had photographed was a Many-colored Rush Tyrant. 


In addition to Scott's recollections of the magic of Ted Parker, he gave a very 
good description of just how special southeastern Peru was in the early 80s. We 
had spent 10 days at Explorer's Inn on the Tambopata River (made famous by Ted, 
and luxurious, compared to Scott's descriptions of Coca Cashu), so I could 
recall many of the same feelings that Scott related -- you could see the 
excitement in his eyes. Scott's drawings of the place they birded along the 
river provided an excellent primer on succession and its effects on avifauna -- 
forest that flooded every year, bordered by an area that flooded about every 
decade, and so on to a narrow band that flooded annually -- made it easy to 
understand why the diversity can be so great and how so many species can be 
packed into a small area. He showed a photo looking downslope, from cloud 
forest down a valley toward the river, and related that within that one view 
resided 900 species of birds -- half the species found in Peru. Realize, too, 
that their long-standing record of 332 species from 1982 was from one site, all 
on foot (or boat), at one altitude, without playback tapes. 


To me, the best part of the interview or presentation was the very gracious 
compliment that Scott paid to the LSU ornithologists, stating strongly that 
their lasting legacy was that all of the areas the long line of LSU researchers 
had explored had become protected land, either government or private reserves, 
and those set-aside lands not only helped protect the habitats and the species 
contained, but also benefited the local economies and the people living in 
those remote and poor places. And that is the key -- if we want biodiversity to 
be maintained, it is critical to make it economically beneficial for the 
locals. We can talk of species richness, maintaining genetic diversity, 
corridors connecting important bird areas, but the locals still need to feed 
themselves and their children. Often locals are able to be trained to be 
guards, guides, or otherwise benefiting the reserve and its visitors, the 
ecotourists, us. By his praise, Scott captured very nicely the non-linear 
connection between the magical diversity of the tropics, exploring new areas, 
discovering new species, creating a network of reserves, and integrating and 
benefiting local communities -- the abstract concept of conservation writ 
large, but carried out in a series of local examples, often on a small scale, 
but very real and vitally important. 


Thanks for sharing the link to the video. If you didn't look at it when the 
link was sent out, you might do so. Maybe it was because of the connections I 
had to the players and the place, but Scott Robinson's recollection was the 
best 32 minutes I spent that day. 


 

 Rob Wiedenmann
Fayetteville

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ragupathy Kannan 
To: ARBIRD-L 
Sent: Fri, Oct 17, 2014 12:30 pm
Subject: Re: new big day world record today!



LSU just issued this press release. 
http://www.lsu.edu/ur/ocur/lsunews/MediaCenter/News/2014/10/item73041.html 

  
Also, Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world record 1982 Birding 
Big Day in Peru 



What seems very impressive is that the 1982 record was apparently done with 
little or no song playbacks. 




 


 




 

 

 

 

 



Scott Robinson recounts his and Ted Parker's world recor...








View on www.youtube.com

Preview by Yahoo







 



  
 



 
 
 
 On Friday, 17 October 2014 12:13 PM, Carol Joan Patterson 
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

  
  

 


I am truly impressed - and envious! Makes me want to go back to Peru! There are 
so many places to visit there! 

Joanie

 




 
 
 
 On Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:41 PM, Sara Caulk 
<0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

  
  

 

Our daughter sent the Advocate article this morning with the subject "And y'all 
call yourselves Birders?" My response was in part, "We go birding with 
Birders"... Big difference in the two! A BIG high five to the LSU team. What an 
accomplishment. 

Sara

On Oct 16, 2014 2:51 PM, Ragupathy Kannan  wrote:





They did it! Today, a team of LSU ornithologists broke the world big day record 
by tallying 354 species in 24 hrs in Peru! 



The previous record was held by the legendary Ted Parker and Scott Robinson, 
who chalked up 332 species between 330am and 8pm one day in 1982. 



See their exuberant twitter post at 
https://twitter.com/LSUBigDay/status/522243110232162304/photo/1 



See the article that appeared just before this feat: 
http://theadvocate.com/features/10427084-123/big-day-in-peru-lsu 



To put this in perspective, the Big YEAR record for all of the entire continent 
of North America is a little over 700 species. But today's Big DAY record 
gathered about half that many species, all within a few square miles. 



Wow!


Kannan
 





  
 
  
 




  
 
  
 
Subject: Re: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 09:11:00 +0000
Personally, I would only rehab endangered or threatened bird species. 
 Students bring me baby blue jays or mockingbirds all the time, and I politely 
tell them to "put it where it was and let nature take its course".   

Money spent on rehabbing is best channeled toward protecting habitats and 
controlling free-ranging domestic cats and other vermin.  It goes a much 
longer distance that way.  I would rather give $200 to Ducks Unlimited, a 
leader in wetland conservation (www.ducks.org/conservation) than spend that 
money to rehab one sick wood duckling.  I am a little surprised to hear NWAAS 
spends that much on rehab efforts annually.   

That said, I admire the good intentions and efforts of rehabbers and their 
supporters.     


 On Thursday, 23 October 2014 10:26 PM, Barry Haas  wrote: 

   

 Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber.  Rather than rely 
on my own response, I asked a rehabber.  The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY 
grateful for any donation."  And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so 
rare and precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release.  A Wood 
duckling is probably $200.  A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly 
$2/meal."  That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers 
who for the most part have no reliable outside funding.  I say for the most 
part because Joe Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society 
donates $1,000 annually to rehab efforts in their corner of the state.  My 
chapter, Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited 
donations to several rehabbers.  But in general rehabbers funding comes out of 
their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work.  Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, 
but mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no 
sugar daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good.  The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts.  Strange. 


   
Subject: Donations to avian rehabbers
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 22:25:42 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Based on my post earlier today, I was queried off line regarding an appropriate 
donation amount if one took an injured bird to a rehabber. Rather than rely on 
my own response, I asked a rehabber. The reply: "Rehabbers are HUGELY grateful 
for any donation." And: "Any donation, no matter how small, is so rare and 
precious that we rehabbers are stunned into near incoherence." 


Additional useful information provided by the rehabber is the following: "One 
young songbird nestling, properly fed, costs about $25 to release. A Wood 
duckling is probably $200. A GHOW [great horned owl] costs roughly $2/meal." 
That should give you an idea of the expense incurred by rehabbers who for the 
most part have no reliable outside funding. I say for the most part because Joe 
Neal reminded me the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society donates $1,000 annually 
to rehab efforts in their corner of the state. My chapter, Audubon Society of 
Central Arkansas, has also sent unsolicited donations to several rehabbers. But 
in general rehabbers funding comes out of their own pockets day in and day out. 


My original response to the question regarding an appropriate donation amount 
was: "I doubt you'll ever offend a rehabber by making a donation of any amount 
to support their work. Part of the equation is what you can afford to give, but 
mainly it's a way of letting the rehabber know you understand there's no sugar 
daddy picking up the tab for their expenses." 


I like my friendly rehabber's response better than my own.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Earlier today I watched a pair of hairy woodpeckers going at it pretty 
good. The male was relentlessly attempting to peck the female, following her 
from branch to branch in his efforts. Strange. 

Subject: Re: Five weeks in rehab
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:48:33 -0500
Thanks for your concern for the owl Barry.  I help transport injured raptors 
to Rodney Paul.  I am retired now, so if I am not out of town, which is 
pretty rare (just got back from three days at my sister's), I am available 
in central Arkansas for transport to Rodney.  I keep gloves and several 
sizes of carriers to assist with transports.

My land line is still listed in the phone book in my name; 501-329-2590 and 
my cell number/text is 501-450-2535



Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Barry Haas
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 12:20 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Five weeks in rehab

Dear ARBIRDers,

No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl.  One 
Saturday evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl 
was standing near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock.  I 
headed that way with a cat carrier, towel and gloves.  When I arrived, there 
was a great horned owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of 
the pavement.  Cars whizzed by in both westbound lanes.  The owl never 
flinched as cars whizzed by within feet.  Our conjecture was the owl had 
flown into a vehicle and suffered a glancing blow to the head.

Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap 
the towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier.  Just after I 
cradled the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 
10 years off my life.

Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife.  The 
vet told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to 
meet us at her clinic.  We did just that about noon that Sunday.  The vet 
examined the bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones.  She kept it 
overnight and x-rayed it the following day.  No broken bones.

Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl.  We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of 
our carrier and into a larger one of theirs.

Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition 
and progress.  Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point 
we were ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day 
since the saga began.  We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back 
to the same place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement 
community on Chenal Parkway.

That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird.  That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right.  The 
release took place about one-half hour before dusk.  Susan and Helen both 
had cameras at the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier. 
Once I had that off I got out of the way as quickly as possible.  The owl 
first hopped out of the now topless carrier then turned around and flew over 
Susan and Helen's heads and over the duplex.  This all happened in the blink 
of an eye, so quality pictures of the release were not to be had.

We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees 
in every direction.  As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over 
our heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away.  I think the owl 
was trying to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life."

And that, in my mind, is all we could do.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S.  Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier 
as we picked it up for release last Saturday.= 
Subject: Re: Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab"
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:48:30 -0500
Barry Haas, you are a good guy.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 23, 2014, at 3:45 PM, Barry Haas  wrote:
> 
> Dear ARBIRDers,
> 
> One important thing I forgot to mention in my original great horned owl rehab 
post. When we dropped the owl off at rehabber Rodney Paul's house, we 
voluntarily gave them a check made payable Raptor Rehab to more than cover the 
cost of taking care of the owl until we could hopefully release it. When we 
picked the owl up last Saturday, we asked Rodney's wife Melissa if our original 
donation covered the cost of caring for the owl. She declined to accept 
anything else. 

> 
> Avian rehabbers invest their own time and often considerable personal funds 
to help our feathered friends get well. Eleven- that's the number of federally 
licensed migratory bird rehabbers in Arkansas per the Ark. Game & Fish 
Commission website. There used to be more avian rehabbers years ago, but I 
suspect rehabbing is an expensive endeavor- meeting federal and possibly state 
guidelines in addition to the cost of caring for the birds. 

> 
> Don't know what to get for that family member or friend who has everything? 
How about making a donation to a rehabber so they can keep donating their time 
and talents to heal more birds? 

> 
> For the list of avian rehabbers use this link:
> 
> http://www.agfc.com/species/Pages/SpeciesWildlifeRehabilitation.aspx
> 
> and then click on the link to the left of the bald eagle.
> 
> Hope some on this list will send a check to a rehabber, and thank them for 
the work they do. 

> 
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
Subject: Re: IBIS
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:00 -0500
Michael/ARBIRD-
    Thanks for sharing the ibis photo.  Plegadis ID remains a complicated
ID challenge, especially in fall.  The bird that you photographed is an
immature by plumage (e.g., note lack of reddish feathering around the
shoulder area), and immatures are almost impossible to ID to species in the
fall because White-faced can have grayish facial skin, dark brown eyes, and
even a pale line between the eye and bill.  On your bird I can almost
imagine some reddish tones in the iris and maybe a pinkish tone to the pale
loral streak, which would suggest White-faced.  But, again, you almost have
to call immatures as "Plegadis sp."  At some point by late winter or spring
the immatures start to acquire more adult-like eye and face colors and are
somewhat safer to ID to species.

    The other problem is that there is considerable hybridization going on
between the two species.  Hybrids (individuals with intermediate plumage,
eye color, face color, or leg color) have been reported "anecdotally" with
increasing frequency.  But, where the complex is being studied more
intensively (e.g., OK and southwest LA), hybridization is rampant as
determined through DNA analysis and through intermediate appearance.  This
is being documented with adults in breeding plumage.  Relatively
"Glossy-like" hybrids are the easiest to pick out because, at a distance,
they appear like the much scarcer Glossy Ibis.  Hybrids at the White-faced
end of the spectrum are more difficult because they don't stand-out among
the more abundant pure White-faced. Anyway, getting back to the AR bird,
again, ID of fall immatures has not been refined, and the possibility of
hybrids will further complicate the situation.

Sincerely,

Steve Cardiff

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 11:31 PM, Michael Linz  wrote:

> I posted a listing earlier from the field for a White-faced Ibis.  When I
> got home and looked at the pictures it looks more like a Glossy Ibis to me.
>
> What do others think?
>
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/October2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6073248180369577154 

>
> Thanks
> Michael
>
Subject: Postscript to "Five weeks in rehab"
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:45:05 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

One important thing I forgot to mention in my original great horned owl rehab 
post. When we dropped the owl off at rehabber Rodney Paul's house, we 
voluntarily gave them a check made payable Raptor Rehab to more than cover the 
cost of taking care of the owl until we could hopefully release it. When we 
picked the owl up last Saturday, we asked Rodney's wife Melissa if our original 
donation covered the cost of caring for the owl. She declined to accept 
anything else. 


Avian rehabbers invest their own time and often considerable personal funds to 
help our feathered friends get well. Eleven- that's the number of federally 
licensed migratory bird rehabbers in Arkansas per the Ark. Game & Fish 
Commission website. There used to be more avian rehabbers years ago, but I 
suspect rehabbing is an expensive endeavor- meeting federal and possibly state 
guidelines in addition to the cost of caring for the birds. 


Don't know what to get for that family member or friend who has everything? How 
about making a donation to a rehabber so they can keep donating their time and 
talents to heal more birds? 


For the list of avian rehabbers use this link:

http://www.agfc.com/species/Pages/SpeciesWildlifeRehabilitation.aspx

and then click on the link to the left of the bald eagle.

Hope some on this list will send a check to a rehabber, and thank them for the 
work they do. 


From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: Five weeks in rehab
From: Susan Hardin <whizcats AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:17:39 -0500
p.s. Rodney has a Facebook page and will have a number of photos posted there. 
I just sent the final ones to him last night. The photos were taken by Melissa 
Paul and me over the five weeks, and it's a startling change. 


I thought the bird was near death when we got it to their house in El Paso, and 
Melissa Paul was also doubting that it would make it. Great job by the 
rehabbers, and the huge flight pen that ASCA helped to support many years ago 
was certainly a good investment. 


On Sat., that bird flew beautifully, and we hope that Helen has once again 
heard a GHOW at Parkway Village! 


Susan Hardin
Also in the "deep woods"


> On Oct 23, 2014, at 12:20, Barry Haas  wrote:
> 
> Dear ARBIRDers,
> 
> No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl. One 
Saturday evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl was 
standing near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock. I headed 
that way with a cat carrier, towel and gloves. When I arrived, there was a 
great horned owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of the 
pavement. Cars whizzed by in both westbound lanes. The owl never flinched as 
cars whizzed by within feet. Our conjecture was the owl had flown into a 
vehicle and suffered a glancing blow to the head. 

> 
> Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap the 
towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier. Just after I cradled 
the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 10 years 
off my life. 

> 
> Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife. The 
vet told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to meet 
us at her clinic. We did just that about noon that Sunday. The vet examined the 
bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones. She kept it overnight and 
x-rayed it the following day. No broken bones. 

> 
> Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl. We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of our 
carrier and into a larger one of theirs. 

> 
> Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition 
and progress. Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point we 
were ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day since 
the saga began. We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back to the same 
place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement community on Chenal 
Parkway. 

> 
> That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird. That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right. The release 
took place about one-half hour before dusk. Susan and Helen both had cameras at 
the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier. Once I had that off 
I got out of the way as quickly as possible. The owl first hopped out of the 
now topless carrier then turned around and flew over Susan and Helen's heads 
and over the duplex. This all happened in the blink of an eye, so quality 
pictures of the release were not to be had. 

> 
> We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees 
in every direction. As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over our 
heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away. I think the owl was trying 
to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life." 

> 
> And that, in my mind, is all we could do.
> 
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
> 
> P.S. Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier 
as we picked it up for release last Saturday. 

Subject: Re: Five weeks in rehab
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:37:40 -0500
Thanks, Barry (and Susan) A happy ending to a great story.

Sara
Fayetteville

On Oct 23, 2014 12:20 PM, Barry Haas  wrote:
>
> Dear ARBIRDers, 
>
> No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl.  One 
Saturday evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl was 
standing near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock.  I headed 
that way with a cat carrier, towel and gloves.  When I arrived, there was a 
great horned owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of the 
pavement.  Cars whizzed by in both westbound lanes.  The owl never flinched 
as cars whizzed by within feet.  Our conjecture was the owl had flown into a 
vehicle and suffered a glancing blow to the head. 

>
> Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap the 
towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier.  Just after I cradled 
the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 10 years 
off my life. 

>
> Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife.  The 
vet told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to meet 
us at her clinic.  We did just that about noon that Sunday.  The vet examined 
the bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones.  She kept it overnight 
and x-rayed it the following day.  No broken bones. 

>
> Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl.  We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of our 
carrier and into a larger one of theirs. 

>
> Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition 
and progress.  Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point 
we were ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day 
since the saga began.  We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back to 
the same place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement community on 
Chenal Parkway. 

>
> That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird.  That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right.  The release 
took place about one-half hour before dusk.  Susan and Helen both had cameras 
at the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier.  Once I had 
that off I got out of the way as quickly as possible.  The owl first hopped 
out of the now topless carrier then turned around and flew over Susan and 
Helen's heads and over the duplex.  This all happened in the blink of an eye, 
so quality pictures of the release were not to be had. 

>
> We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees 
in every direction.  As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over 
our heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away.  I think the owl was 
trying to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life." 

>
> And that, in my mind, is all we could do. 
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, 
> Barry Haas 
>
> P.S.  Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier 
as we picked it up for release last Saturday. 
Subject: Five weeks in rehab
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:20:27 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

No, not me (five weeks in rehab, that is), but a great horned owl. One Saturday 
evening last month my wife Susan called to tell me an injured owl was standing 
near the edge of busy Chenal Parkway in west Little Rock. I headed that way 
with a cat carrier, towel and gloves. When I arrived, there was a great horned 
owl standing upright just a foot or two from the edge of the pavement. Cars 
whizzed by in both westbound lanes. The owl never flinched as cars whizzed by 
within feet. Our conjecture was the owl had flown into a vehicle and suffered a 
glancing blow to the head. 


Because the owl was upright and had its head tucked back, almost looking 
straight up with eyes closed, I was able to approach it from behind, wrap the 
towel around it and gently get it into the cat carrier. Just after I cradled 
the owl, a car slammed on its brakes and the screeching scared about 10 years 
off my life. 


Susan had already called a local vet who works on a range of wildlife. The vet 
told us if the owl was alive the next morning she would be willing to meet us 
at her clinic. We did just that about noon that Sunday. The vet examined the 
bird and didn't detect any obvious broken bones. She kept it overnight and 
x-rayed it the following day. No broken bones. 


Meanwhile, rehabber Rodney Paul had agreed to take the owl. We headed that 
Monday afternoon to El Paso where Rodney's wife Melissa got the owl out of our 
carrier and into a larger one of theirs. 


Days turned into weeks as Susan got frequent reports on the owl's condition and 
progress. Slowly, but surely, the owl's condition improved to the point we were 
ready to pick it up for release last Saturday, five weeks to the day since the 
saga began. We (Susan, Helen Parker and I) brought the owl back to the same 
place its journey had started- Parkway Village retirement community on Chenal 
Parkway. 


That Saturday afternoon Helen, who lives at Parkway Village, and Susan had 
considered the best spot to release the bird. That turned out to be behind 
Helen's duplex with some open area ahead and woods to the right. The release 
took place about one-half hour before dusk. Susan and Helen both had cameras at 
the ready while I detached the top half of the cat carrier. Once I had that off 
I got out of the way as quickly as possible. The owl first hopped out of the 
now topless carrier then turned around and flew over Susan and Helen's heads 
and over the duplex. This all happened in the blink of an eye, so quality 
pictures of the release were not to be had. 


We went out front looking for the owl, but couldn't spot it in all the trees in 
every direction. As we all three stood there, the owl suddenly flew over our 
heads and landed in a pine tree about 100 feet away. I think the owl was trying 
to tell us: "Thank you for giving me one more shot at life." 


And that, in my mind, is all we could do.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Susan did get some good pix of the owl when it was outside the carrier as 
we picked it up for release last Saturday. 
Subject: Bald Eagle in a weird spot
From: Teresa & Leif Anderson <ladytstarlight AT CENTURYTEL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:49:39 -0400
 The Native Americans often considered birds to be signs of omens whenever they 
were seen on an important day of your life. I have Cherokee and Celtic in my 
bloodlines and often will pay attention to the omens each day as I see them. 
Since today was my birthday this one I took seriously since this bird is also 
my Cherokee totem. 


 I was driving on 27 North about 11:10am this morning leaving Dover, from the 
laundry mat. I was about 3 miles south of Scottsville when I noticed this big 
white thing in a mud puddle on the side of the road up ahead. It looked like a 
big white Fan spread out there. I slowed down to look closely and it leaped 
into the air turned and gracefully flew along in front of me as a full adult 
Bald Eagle. 


 Talked about a weird spot for it to be seen. I often see one sitting along 
that stretch of road in a dead tree. But never in a mud puddle that was smaller 
than the bird. Lovely sight for such a grey depressing day. Fly High and be 
Graceful is one of the meanings that I will take note of for today. Cheers: 
Teresa of Hector, AR 

Subject: brush pile
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:35:46 -0500
This morning in the misty pre-drizzle, a Wild Turkey hen clucks in the woods, 
the trees are beginning to glow with color, late wildflower seeds ripen on the 
plants, and 'possum grape vines, prickly pears, persimmon trees and pokeweeds 
are covered with fruit. The largest brush pile in the glade that is bracketed 
by two huge magenta stemmed pokes, shelters numerous birds who flit out to look 
at the dogs and I as we circle around to watch them. 

Sparrows include: White-throated, White-crowned mature and immature, dozens of 
Field Sparrows, Lincolns, and a Fox Sparrow that sang when we walked away. 
Other birds hidden in the tangled sancuary: Juncos, Titmice, Chickadees, 
Yellow-rumped Warblers, Cardinals, and of course numerous Carolina Wrens. In 
the trees and the sky are numerous Flickers, a pair of Pileated Woodpeckers, 
one seasonally appropriate Turkey Vulture atop a dead oak, and scolding Blue 
Jays. 


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville)
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 08:03:53 -0500
Thank you for this beautiful report.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 23, 2014, at 6:49 AM, "Joseph C. Neal"  wrote:
> 
> Unbroken Tallgrass Prairie around contemporary Maysville is long gone in 
terms of glory days, but native birds and plants carry on old ways and habits 
of former Beaty Prairie. Yesterday, for example, FRANKLIN’S GULLS (~150-200) 
were kettling on a modest south breeze. Technically, it’s called declivity 
soaring: warm updrafts form as the breeze flows against bluffs above Spavinaw 
River valley in the immediate south. These prairie nesting gulls exploit such 
opportunities along their entire transcontinental journey as they head for 
winter in eastern South America. I’ll bet my bottom dollar prairie gulls 
riding thermals long predates even old Maysville. 

> 
> 
> And ditto that for VESPER SPARROWS, only they are on the bare or open ground, 
not thermals, and yesterday, well-distributed along unpaved roads. I saw 19 
Vespers birds in 5 spots, missed other sparrows suddenly flushing away before I 
could get bins on them -- probably more Vespers. They nest all north of us 
where there is bare ground with scattered trees and shrubs. Crop fields, fields 
with short grass, former prairies, and back in the day, ground formed of bison 
wallows and wandering herds. 

> 
> 
> Plants and their bird visitors also remember days of Sawtooth skyscrapers 
that dominated whole wet prairies like former Beaty. Modest patches of these 
elegant sunflowers remain. AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES and PINE SISKINS know them 
well. Yesterday, goldfinches (~30) and siskins (~10) hung by claws on seed 
heads 3/4-inch wide -- right-side up, sideways, upside down -- picking tiny 
seeds with their perfect conical bill tool. Ancient stuff, from long before an 
Arkansas. 

> 
> 
> I felt something akin this upon seeing elegant flowers twisting along the 
stalk of LADIES’-TRESSES ORCHIDS where a tiny patch of prairie hangs on the 
highway 72 right-of-way. Cars and trucks on their way Maysville to Gravette, 
and I'm on my knees in the roadside ditch, not praying exactly, but trying for 
a good look at small white flowers. There’s a story here, deep in the bulb, 
about the origins of orchids and did they know Greater Prairie-Chickens? 

> 
> 
> And the Gayfeathers have gone to seed, their tall wands so purple in July, 
now golden seed fluff. In these seeds a kind of keeping faith, with the past 
and with the future. 

> 
> 
> Still in the thrall, I turn down Tucker Road, last of the day. More Vesper 
Sparrows and then something truly spectacular: afternoon light caught in silky 
fluff of Swamp Milkweed seeds popping out of their pods and rising in the south 
breeze. Talk about the future beckoning! And then, of course, the present, 
where for a time we live. 

> 
> 
> Hundreds of milkweed plants and Sawtooth skyscrapers thrived in this swampy 
corner. Later, the field was mowed and apparently herbicided in favor of fescue 
and a clean fencerow. Maybe his momma didn’t teach him prairie? Maybe never 
saw milkweed seeds rising in late fall sun or golden siskins plucking seeds 
from the sky? 

> 
> 
> When the last herbicide is dumped on the last weed, they all return and 
reclaim. 
Subject: Central Arkansas/Little Rock Area Birders
From: Randy Robinson <critterkeepr AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 07:46:37 -0500
Is anyone or would anyone like to go birding this Saturday, October 25, in the 
Little Rock, Pulaski County area? Please contact me. Thank you, Randy 

Subject: Sawtooth skyscrapers (Maysville)
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:49:17 +0000
Unbroken Tallgrass Prairie around contemporary Maysville is long gone in terms 
of glory days, but native birds and plants carry on old ways and habits of 
former Beaty Prairie. Yesterday, for example, FRANKLINS GULLS (~150-200) were 
kettling on a modest south breeze. Technically, its called declivity soaring: 
warm updrafts form as the breeze flows against bluffs above Spavinaw River 
valley in the immediate south. These prairie nesting gulls exploit such 
opportunities along their entire transcontinental journey as they head for 
winter in eastern South America. Ill bet my bottom dollar prairie gulls riding 
thermals long predates even old Maysville. 


And ditto that for VESPER SPARROWS, only they are on the bare or open ground, 
not thermals, and yesterday, well-distributed along unpaved roads. I saw 19 
Vespers birds in 5 spots, missed other sparrows suddenly flushing away before I 
could get bins on them -- probably more Vespers. They nest all north of us 
where there is bare ground with scattered trees and shrubs. Crop fields, fields 
with short grass, former prairies, and back in the day, ground formed of bison 
wallows and wandering herds. 


Plants and their bird visitors also remember days of Sawtooth skyscrapers that 
dominated whole wet prairies like former Beaty. Modest patches of these elegant 
sunflowers remain. AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES and PINE SISKINS know them well. 
Yesterday, goldfinches (~30) and siskins (~10) hung by claws on seed heads 
3/4-inch wide -- right-side up, sideways, upside down -- picking tiny seeds 
with their perfect conical bill tool. Ancient stuff, from long before an 
Arkansas. 


I felt something akin this upon seeing elegant flowers twisting along the stalk 
of LADIES-TRESSES ORCHIDS where a tiny patch of prairie hangs on the highway 
72 right-of-way. Cars and trucks on their way Maysville to Gravette, and I'm on 
my knees in the roadside ditch, not praying exactly, but trying for a good look 
at small white flowers. Theres a story here, deep in the bulb, about the 
origins of orchids and did they know Greater Prairie-Chickens? 


And the Gayfeathers have gone to seed, their tall wands so purple in July, now 
golden seed fluff. In these seeds a kind of keeping faith, with the past and 
with the future. 


Still in the thrall, I turn down Tucker Road, last of the day. More Vesper 
Sparrows and then something truly spectacular: afternoon light caught in silky 
fluff of Swamp Milkweed seeds popping out of their pods and rising in the south 
breeze. Talk about the future beckoning! And then, of course, the present, 
where for a time we live. 


Hundreds of milkweed plants and Sawtooth skyscrapers thrived in this swampy 
corner. Later, the field was mowed and apparently herbicided in favor of fescue 
and a clean fencerow. Maybe his momma didnt teach him prairie? Maybe never saw 
milkweed seeds rising in late fall sun or golden siskins plucking seeds from 
the sky? 


When the last herbicide is dumped on the last weed, they all return and 
reclaim. 
Subject: IBIS
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:31:26 -0500
I posted a listing earlier from the field for a White-faced Ibis.  When I
got home and looked at the pictures it looks more like a Glossy Ibis to me.

What do others think?


https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/October2014BirdsAndStuff#slideshow/6073248180369577154 


Thanks
Michael
Subject: HERRING GULL AT LAKE SARACEN
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:38:05 -0500
This morning Delos McCauley and I observed, and I photographed, a 1st winter 
Herring Gull, as it flew near the parking lot at Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff. 
The ID was confirmed by Kenny Nichols. 

John  Redman
Subject: White-faced Ibis in central Arkansas
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:51:04 -0500
I saw a white-faced ibis in a puddle of water south of morrilton on highway 9 . 
Cross over Arkansas river about a quarter mile past hoyts implement store. East 
side of road near irrigation device (oversized sprinkler). 


Feeding and seems to be ok with hanging around.
Subject: Re: If it is on TV - it must be true
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:45:22 -0500
If it makes you feel any better Dan, I was watching a documentary about the 
Philippines I believe the other night and for some reason an eastern wood pewee 
was incessantly singing in the background. Had to laugh.... 


Ryan 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 22, 2014, at 14:56, Dan Bogler  wrote:
> 
> On only rare occasions do I post on this forum. Mostly just read and learn 
from all the good birders we have in Arkansas 

> 
> But I just had to share this
> 
> Last night I was watching TV on the HLN Channel featuring Nancy Grace and 
they were looking at a crime scene and mentioned that there were "buzzards" 
circling above. Well, technically there are no buzzards in North America. Only 
vultures. And there is a difference as the buzzards are an Old World species 

> 
> I realize that the words buzzard and vulture are often used interchangeably 
so I wrote that little comment off as no big deal. A free pass. 

> 
> Well, I then changed to The National Geographic channel about some mountain 
man named Mick or something like that who lives in the Olympic Peninsula 
Rainforest. An all knowing sort of guy that is in tune with the wilderness that 
he calls home. Pretty interesting stuff. 

> 
> That is until he went fishing and caught this beautiful "steelhead salmon"
> 
> Now there are Steelhead (which is a sea run trout). And there are Salmon.
> 
> But there are no "Steelhead Salmon"
> 
> And I thought gee wiz - there were probably several dozen people that worked 
on this show and edited before it went on the air. And nobody caught that ? 

> 
> Remember, this is on the National Geographic channel
> 
> So I said to myself "I am sort of glad that we now have an Ebola Czar. I 
guess we sort of needed that. But what this country really needs is some sort 
of bi-partisan Taxonomic Czar 

> 
> Otherwise our kids will grow up thinking all kites have a string attached to 
them 

> 
> And I nominate my good friend Jerry Davis     
> 
> Dan Bogler
> Hot Springs
Subject: Re: some help please
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 15:09:34 -0500
I second that thank you! I too appreciate when you tell what you are seeing. I 
have learned so much from this site. When you list a bird I do not know I look 
it up and listen to its song. I still say "what was that" and "who was that" 
too much and my husband is getting tired of hearing it. :-) 

Nancy in Fayetteville 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 22, 2014, at 10:12 AM, Charles Anderson  wrote:
> 
> I know it's hard to identify anything from somebody else's description, but I 
heard a bird late yesterday afternoon out in the woods around my home--too dark 
to see it--that I can't remember hearing before. 

> 
> It was a very distinctive two or three chips with a long whee, sort of like 
one of those slider whistles we had as kids: 

> 
> chip, chip, wheeeee
> 
> It's probably something common as dirt, but I just don't remember the call 
and have no idea how to look for it. Any suggestions? 

> 
> Chuck Anderson 
> 
> Seeing a lot of yellow rumps, pine warblers, eastern bluebirds, northern 
flickers, eastern phoebes, pileated and other woodpeckers, sparrows, a brown 
headed nuthatch or two, one junco, and lots of TQTI (too quick to identify) 
birds out in Western Hills Park in Little Rock, especially late in the day, 
about an hour before sunset. 

> 
> BTW, I love it when you guys post what you are seeing these days, even the 
pretty common stuff, because that helps Ruth and me to know what we might be 
looking for, and often we'll identify something we've puzzled over--like the 
Nashville Warblers that passed through a week or two ago. So thanks! 

Subject: If it is on TV - it must be true
From: Dan Bogler <danbogler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:56:53 -0500
On only rare occasions do I post on this forum. Mostly just read and learn
from all the good birders we have in Arkansas

But I just had to share this

Last night I was watching TV on the HLN Channel featuring Nancy Grace and
they were looking at a crime scene and mentioned that there were "buzzards"
circling above. Well, technically there are no buzzards in North America.
Only vultures. And there is a difference as the buzzards are an Old World
species

I realize that the words buzzard and vulture are often used interchangeably
so I wrote that little comment off as no big deal. A free pass.

Well, I then changed to The National Geographic channel about some mountain
man named Mick or something like that who lives in the Olympic Peninsula
Rainforest. An all knowing sort of guy that is in tune with the wilderness
that he calls home. Pretty interesting stuff.

That is until he went fishing and caught this beautiful "steelhead salmon"

Now there are Steelhead (which is a sea run trout). And there are Salmon.

But there are no "Steelhead Salmon"

And I thought gee wiz - there were probably several dozen people that
worked on this show and edited before it went on the air. And nobody caught
that ?

Remember, this is on the National Geographic channel

So I said to myself "I am sort of glad that we now have an Ebola Czar. I
guess we sort of needed that. But what this country really needs is some
sort of bi-partisan Taxonomic Czar

Otherwise our kids will grow up thinking all kites have a string attached
to them

And I nominate my good friend Jerry Davis

Dan Bogler
Hot Springs
Subject: some help please
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:12:38 -0500
I know it's hard to identify anything from somebody else's description, but
I heard a bird late yesterday afternoon out in the woods around my
home--too dark to see it--that I can't remember hearing before.

It was a very distinctive two or three chips with a long whee, sort of like
one of those slider whistles we had as kids:

chip, chip, wheeeee

It's probably something common as dirt, but I just don't remember the call
and have no idea how to look for it.  Any suggestions?

Chuck Anderson

Seeing a lot of yellow rumps, pine warblers, eastern bluebirds, northern
flickers, eastern phoebes, pileated and other woodpeckers, sparrows, a
brown headed nuthatch or two, one junco, and lots of TQTI (too quick to
identify) birds out in Western Hills Park in Little Rock, especially late
in the day, about an hour before sunset.

BTW, I love it when you guys post what you are seeing these days, even the
pretty common stuff, because that helps Ruth and me to know what we might
be looking for, and often we'll identify something we've puzzled over--like
the Nashville Warblers that passed through a week or two ago. So thanks!
Subject: Pelicans on Beaver Lake
From: Betty Brown <bbrown1941 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 17:04:00 -0400
We were out driving around the Lost Bridge camping area a couple of hours ago 
and as we started to enter the Lost Bridge Camping area a group of about 20 
pelicans flew over us. We love seeing pelicans and each year travel to Grove OK 
area to watch the beautiful birds. Having lived in the Bella Vista/Bentonville 
area for 7 years we have driven around Beaver Lake parks birding and never seen 
any pelicans before, so maybe this was a fluke. We have also never seen any 
mention of Pelicans in the ARBIRD emails. Does anybody have any idea where we 
can watch Pelicans on Beaver Lake? 


Thanks,

Betty and Jerry Brown
Subject: weekend arrivals
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:37:18 -0700
New-to-recent arrivals at the house this weekend included brown creepers, 
white-throated sparrows, huge flocks of robins, Dark-eyed Juncos, 
Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Yellow-rumped Warblers, 
Orange-crowned Warbler, Fox Sparrow, and Winter Wren. Soon-to-be-departeds 
included Nashville Warblers, House Wrens, and a wonderful Blue-headed Vireo. 
All could be at your houses today. Enjoy, 


Adam Schaffer
Bentonville
Subject: Minneapolis Star-Tribune Editorial counterpoint: What shall our 'perspective' on birds, Vikings stadium aesthetics be?
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:47:27 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Those of you following the effort to get bird-safe glass installed in the new 
Minneapolis football stadium will want to read this editorial counterpoint (the 
Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial link was posted on ARBIRD four days ago). 


When I first starting reading it, I thought the newspaper had reconsidered its 
editorial position. Then I realized it was submitted by two individuals 
identified as follows at the end of the article: "Lisa Venable is co-founder of 
Minnesota Citizens for the Protection of Migratory Birds. Jerry Bahls is 
president of the Audubon Chapter-Minneapolis. 


Here's the link to the editorial counterpoint:

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/279846202.html

The editorial counterpoint includes the link below to the Javits Center in New 
York that includes the following as part of Phase II: "removal of every pane of 
glass in the main building and replacing all 8,000 of them with new, low-e 
glass leading to a higher-performing curtain wall of flat, transparent, 
bird-safe fritted glass in 5-by-10 foot modules which uses less metal and gives 
the space a more open feel": 


http://tinyurl.com/Javits-glass

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Re: FOS-WC Sparrow
From: Carol Meyerdirk <dmeyerdirk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:01:35 +0000
FOS White crowned sparrows - 3 showed up in our backyard yesterday. Nice to see 
them. 

Carol WLR 

----- Original Message -----

From: "birdiehaynes AT yahoo.com" 
<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

To: "ARBIRD-L"  
Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:18:37 PM 
Subject: FOS-WC Sparrow 



Just saw my FOS White-crowned Sparrow while walking to LR Zoo. 
Donna Haynes 
West Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android 
Subject: Blue-headed vireo
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:39:38 -0500
Hi all.

A very smartly dressed Blue-headed vireo was foraging in the oak trees in my 
yard this morning. I am also seeing Ruby-throated hummingbirds, albeit now down 
to 1-2 per day. More than the usual amount of robins were busy in the trees 
this morning. Had several ruby-crowned kinglets yesterday but did not see them 
today. 


Cindy
Watching the wildlife on the ridge overlooking the Arkansas River in the 
Heights 

Little Rock



 		 	   		  
Subject: Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count Sunday December 14, 2014
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 14:27:26 +0000
Fayetteville CBC will be on Sunday December 14, 2014. It is open to anyone with 
an interest in birds. Our local count dates to 1961. We hold the count on 
Sunday because that is the day with fewest traffic conflicts. If you have been 
on the Fayetteville CBC previously, please contact your party leader about 
joining this years count. If you havent participated, come on out for this 
fun way to learn more about local birds. Data are used to help analyze trends 
in bird populations across the continent. 
Subject: Birds and History
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 20:39:19 -0500
Sunday, I was driving into Little Rock to tour the replicas of Christopher 
Columbus' original voyage vessels the Pinta and Nina, which were moored on the 
bank of the Arkansas River. Coming down Pike Ave. in North Little Rock, I 
spotted a pair of adult Bald Eagles soaring near the river. They were circling, 
dipping, and diving. It looked to be a slow, mating dance against the bright 
blue, cloudless fall sky. 


At the river, walking to the replicas along the river's edge, I spotted a very 
nervous Swamp Sparrow flying between the water's edge and a grouping of 
vegetation higher up on bank. The poor thing kept getting disturbed by all the 
people walking to the ships. I'm sure he will be very glad when the vessels 
leave and things quiet down. 


For anyone interested in history, this Wednesday the Pinta and Nina will be at 
the Lake Dardanelle State Park sailing back and forth across the lake from the 
State Park. They are being filmed by the History Channel for a special program 
about Columbus' voyage. The public is welcome to come to the park and watch the 
boats sailing with their rigging fully deployed. The crew will be in period 
dress. 

Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: Irruption Birds (Madison County)
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 19:22:38 -0500
In accordance with Ron Pittaway's famous "Winter Finch Forecast," the Ozark
Natural Science Center (near Huntsville) has hosted both Red-breasted
Nuthatches and Pine Siskins over the past two weeks. I heard the former
twice during the second week of October; the latter I heard late last week.

And of course, there have been other recent fall arrivals: Dark-eyed
Juncos, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglets,
and White-throated Sparrows.

As a reminder, the Ozark Natural Science Center is open and free to the
public on weekends when there aren't educational programs, which are most
weekends. Simply contact them by phone or e-mail (see
http://onsc.us/contact-all.php) and let them know when you plan to visit so
the gate can be left open for you.

Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Huntsville, Madison Co.