Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Arkansas Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, September 4 at 07:02 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Southern Bald Ibis,©BirdQuest

4 Sep Re: Please speak up NOW for the birds and other wildlife on Kessler Mountain in Fayetteville [ ]
4 Sep Re: Trinidad & Tobago Tour 2016 [Ragupathy Kannan ]
4 Sep SW AR birds, 9/04/2015 [swamp_fox ]
3 Sep World Shorebird Day September 6, 2015 [jwdavis ]
4 Sep HUMMERS IN JEWELWEED PATCHES ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
3 Sep Ensley Bottoms, Maxson Wastewater Lagoons (The Pits)/Earth Complex: Red Knot [Michael Linz ]
2 Sep Buff-breasted Sandpipers [Doc George ]
1 Sep Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 1st [David Arbour ]
1 Sep Tweet by Smithsonian's NMNH on Twitter [Chuck Bartels ]
1 Sep Audubon Arkansas Bird Walk, Sept. 18 [Dan Scheiman ]
1 Sep September field trips (2) with Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
31 Aug Mid AR River Valley shorebirds ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
31 Aug Habitat Improvement Opportunities at Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission Natural Areas [Samantha Scheiman ]
31 Aug 2015 Natural Areas Conference, Nov. 3-5, 2015, Little Rock - Conservation Through Collaboration [Samantha Scheiman ]
30 Aug Re: ASCA field trip report [Jeffrey Short ]
30 Aug ASCA field trip report [Karen ]
30 Aug south by southeast [Bill Shepherd ]
30 Aug ALL THOSE FABULOUS SHOREBIRDS AT BALD KNOB ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
28 Aug Re: Baltimore Oriole [ ]
28 Aug Re: Baltimore Oriole [Michael ]
28 Aug Ini need a good photograph of a Whip-poor-will [Jim and Karen Rowe ]
28 Aug ASCA Field Trip Tomorrow-Bald Knob NRW [Karen Holliday ]
28 Aug Baltimore Oriole [jonathanperry24 ]
28 Aug Trinidad & Tobago Tour 2016 [Ragupathy Kannan ]
26 Aug Re: Adventures in Pulaski County: LR Port roost & Frazier Pike [Karen Garrett ]
26 Aug Re: Adventures in Pulaski County: LR Port roost & Frazier Pike [Jerry Butler ]
27 Aug Re: Adventures in Pulaski County: LR Port roost & Frazier Pike [Ellen Fennell ]
26 Aug Adventures in Pulaski County: LR Port roost & Frazier Pike [CK Franklin ]
26 Aug From Avisys to eBird [Daniel Scheiman ]
26 Aug Re: Democrat Gazette pic [Alyson Hoge ]
26 Aug Re: Democrat Gazette pic [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
26 Aug BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
26 Aug Re: Democrat Gazette pic [Leslie Peacock ]
26 Aug Re: Democrat Gazette pic [Ellen Fennell ]
26 Aug Re: Democrat Gazette pic [Alyson Hoge ]
26 Aug Democrat Gazette pic [Charles Anderson ]
25 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 25 [David Arbour ]
25 Aug AM. WHITE PELICANS AT LAKE SARACEN [JFR ]
25 Aug Bell [Herschel Raney ]
25 Aug Hawks over Western Hills Park [Charles Anderson ]
25 Aug Greater roadrunner [Nancy Felker ]
25 Aug Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrows [Butch Tetzlaff ]
25 Aug Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites, Drew Co. [Michael ]
25 Aug Yellow Warblers [Bill Thurman ]
25 Aug Please speak up NOW for the birds and other wildlife on Kessler Mountain in Fayetteville ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
25 Aug Shorebirds and others in W Arkansas Valley ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
24 Aug Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrows [Jacque Brown ]
24 Aug 4 Mississippi Kites in Rogers, AR, today [Joan Reynolds ]
24 Aug Tree Sparrow [Jerry Schulz ]
24 Aug Mitchell Pruitt presentation on Wednesday this week ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
23 Aug Eurasian Tree Sparrows [David Arbour ]
24 Aug Videos of Birds [Jamie Gwin ]
23 Aug North American Birds Magazine [Daniel Scheiman ]
23 Aug Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites, Drew Co. [Kenny Nichols ]
23 Aug Wood storks - yes [Betsy's Birds ]
23 Aug eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites, Drew Co. [Daniel Scheiman ]
22 Aug Wood Storks [perfectplaces ]
21 Aug spring '15 records [Lyndal York ]
21 Aug ASCA August Field Trip Aug. 29 [Karen Holliday ]
20 Aug Greater white-fronted goose [Ryan Risher ]
19 Aug Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 19 [David Arbour ]
19 Aug Centerton [Karen Garrett ]
19 Aug Adult Natural History Workshops Sept. 19-20 at Ferncliff Camp in Ferndale [Barry Haas ]
19 Aug MIGRATORY ACTIVITY AT BOYD POINT [JFR ]
19 Aug swarms of hummingbirds [Judy & Don ]
19 Aug FOS Eared Grebe at Boyd [Delos McCauley ]
19 Aug Feeder Visitors [dianemarie yates ]
18 Aug Re: scat? [zoe caywood ]
18 Aug Re: scat? [Jeffrey Short ]
18 Aug Re: scat? [Janine Perlman ]
18 Aug Re: scat? [Stacy Clanton ]
17 Aug Purple martin roost in Little Rock [CK Franklin ]
17 Aug Re: scat? [Jeffrey Short ]
17 Aug scat? [Butch Tetzlaff ]
16 Aug Re: Sighting - Male Rufous Hummingbird, Conway County [Gail Miller ]
16 Aug Sighting - Male Rufous Hummingbird, Conway County [Gail Miller ]

Subject: Re: Please speak up NOW for the birds and other wildlife on Kessler Mountain in Fayetteville
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 23:54:36 +0000
I wish I had had a chance to read this earlier!  As it is, I still did send an 
email to Fayetteville Parks and Recreation opposing bike trails.  I really 
really hope that all of you bird-lovers have done the same - or called!  I am 
greatly saddened to see the damage done at Lake Atlanta.  Let's work together 
so that Mount Kessler is spared. 

Joanie Patterson
      From: Joseph C. Neal 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Monday, August 24, 2015 8:10 PM
 Subject: Please speak up NOW for the birds and other wildlife on Kessler 
Mountain in Fayetteville 

   
 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Re: Trinidad & Tobago Tour 2016
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 22:29:20 +0000
Only three seats left in this wonderful adventure......last call......last call 
:)  



 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 10:16 PM, Ragupathy Kannan 
 wrote: 

   
Hi all, for the 3rd year in a row, I will be leading a Trinidad & Tobago nature 
tour May 30 - June 6, 2016, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society 
Trust, in which I serve as a trustee.  Last year's tour helped me raise $620 
for the trust; this year I hope to touch at least $1,000.  The trust, as you 
know, funds research and conservation projects mostly in Arkansas.   


Highlights of the Trinidad & Tobago tour include:
* Three nights in Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad, one of the most famous 
ecolodges in the world-- www.asawright.org* Manakins, Bellbirds, 
Honeycreepers, Oropendolas, Euphonias, Tanagers, Toucans.....a rainbow of 
tropical birds from a comfortable veranda (while sipping rum punch!)* About 10 
species of hummingbirds, many hovering inches from your face!* Trek to a 
riverine cave to see the strange Oilbirds 

* Boating in Caroni Swamp to witness the spectacle of Scarlet Ibis coming to 
roost en masse 

* A night walk on a remote beach to encounter massive Leatherback Sea turtles 
nesting * Three nights in Blue Waters Inn, Tobago, a delightful and luxurious 
beach-side resort (www.bluewatersinn.com) 

* Hike up Little Tobago island to see 2 species of boobies, tropic birds, and 
other pelagics* Glass bottom boating to view coral reefs* About 150-200 species 
of birds, including the Trinidad & Tobago endemic,Trinidad Motmot 

Cost excluding international airfare will be $1440, which covers comfortable 
accommodations for 7 nights, sumptuous food, local air travel between the 
islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and all tours and activities. You must be 
physically fit for easy to moderate walks in hot and humid tropical weather, 
with temperatures usually in the 80s. But since we will be there at the 
beginning of the rainy season, cooler overcast conditions and a few rain 
showers can be expected.  This will be my 8th tour of Trinidad & Tobago.  

Rough itinerary summary: 
May 30 -- check into Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC)May 31 -- early AM veranda 
birding; hike for manakins and bellbirds; PM Arippo Savannah birding and Matura 
beach for sea turtlesJune 1 -- early AM veranda; optional Blanchisseuse trip at 
your expense (or) hikes in AWNC; PM Trin city sewage ponds and Caroni Marsh 
boating                 for Scarlet Ibis spectacleJune 2 -- early AM 
veranda; Oilbirds cave hike; and then off to Tobago.  Some birding en route 
Bluewaters InnJune 3 -- AM Little Tobago Island hike for pelagics; glassbottom 
boat coral reefs viewing; PM relax at the beach or go birding, sea kayaking, 
etc.June 4 -- all day optional rain forest trip at your expense (or) relax at 
the beach or go birdingJune 5 -- AM birding hikes to mop up Tobago endemics; PM 
fly back to TrinidadJune 6 -- Back to the USA 

For detailed itinerary and other information, please contact me.  Please 
indicate your background in birding and traveling, and any health-related 
concerns. The tour is intended only for ardent nature lovers and birders, and 
for those who can stay patient and keep their sense of humor when things 
occasionally don't go as planned in the tropics.  Please also note that I am 
not a professional tour guide.  I am a college professor and tropical 
biologist passionate about showing birds to people.  I outsource the logistics 
and arrangements to the real pros (Caligo Ventures -- www.caligo.com) who have 
arranged such tours for Americans for decades.  They are based here in the 
USA.  This tour is for a maximum of 20 persons. 

Here are bird lists from last year's tour, in which several seasoned ar-birders 
participated (173 bird species in total): http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ 
checklist?subID=S23684569 (Trinidad) 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ checklist?subID=S23684940 (Tobago)

Cheers, Kannan-------------------R. Kannan, Ph.D.,Professor of 
BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort 
SmithTel: 479.788.7616ragupathy.kannan AT uafs.edu 


  
Subject: SW AR birds, 9/04/2015
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 16:24:23 -0500
I spent much of the day birding with Charlie Lyon and Jeff Trahan of 
Shreveport. Charlie will likely post a more complete list on eBird later. 
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (more interesting because of the 20 some odd 
duckling with 4 adults), Swainson’s Hawk, White-winged Dove, Inca Dove and 
Barn Owl were among the more notable species that I can remember. The big miss 
was Cave Swallow. We saw plenty of buff-rumped swallows in the air but the only 
ones I could find perched were about a dozen Northern Rough-winged. 


One observation, along Spirit Lake in Lafayette, surprised us though:

http://www.pbase.com/image/161205265 

Charles Mills
Subject: World Shorebird Day September 6, 2015
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 20:57:23 -0500


https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/

A day to count shorebirds worldwide.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
Subject: HUMMERS IN JEWELWEED PATCHES
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 4 Sep 2015 00:48:11 +0000
A year ago, in early September 2014, crowds of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds 
worked big Spotted Jewelweed patches along the shady spring runs at Van Winkle 
Historic Trail in Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area. Truly spectacular; a 
local, scaled-down version of say ... 500,000 Sandhill Cranes migrating through 
the Platte River valley of Nebraska ... OK, I know that's a bit of a stretch, 
but adjust your imagination: a shady spring run as the sunny Great Plains, tiny 
ruby-throats as elegant cranes. Now you have it. 


But this summer's high water in Beaver Lake backed way up Van Winkle, drowning 
a lot of last Fall's robust jewelweed patches. Remaining patches are currently 
attended by a few energetic hummers, but many fewer than last Fall. I was at 
Hobbs this week and posted some pictures to facebook. Jim Arterburn saw them 
and sent me a message about hummers and jewelweed at Natural Falls State Park 
in Oklahoma, just 6 miles west of Siloam Springs, AR. For me, this is as close 
as Hobbs and most important, another chance to see fall hummers in the wilds. 


I went over to Natural Falls SP today, paid my $5 (per car) entry fee, walked 
the Dripping Springs Trail down to the spectacular, shady falls -- a 77 foot 
drop into a pool and a mass of jewelweed - and, let me testify friends, it was 
all Hummer World down there. Lush, green, tropical and right in the Ozarks! 
With big patches of Sensitive Fern! Just took all the heat out of a 90+ day and 
soothed all disappointment about this Fall's relatively few hummers at Van 
Winkle. 


Today was all about a lot of flowering jewelweed and plenty enough hummers to 
fill the imagination (4 or 5 at a time in places; 50 hummers? 100?) Also lots 
of other birds: White-eyed and Yellow-throated Vireo, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, 
Summer Tanager, Northern Cardinals, etc. 


If this is interesting to any of you, my advice is to head out without delay to 
your local jewelweed patch. The association of hummers and jewelweed is 
well-documented, another of the Great Natural Wonders, like the cranes of the 
Platte River. With more normal water levels in Beaver, the jewelweed patches 
should revive at Hobbs in time, again, for hummers as they head south next 
fall. 

Subject: Ensley Bottoms, Maxson Wastewater Lagoons (The Pits)/Earth Complex: Red Knot
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 07:32:04 -0500
While not Arkansas, it is close enough that I thought I would mention it.

Yesterday afternoon late Allan Mueller, Kathleen Mueller and I located a
juvenile Red Knot in Memphis at Ensley Bottoms (more commonly know as the
Pits).

Picture at this location:

https://picasaweb.google.com/OtaLinz/September2015BirdsAndStuff#6190140167770709266 


It was my first trip to bird "The Pits" and I see why it was one of Jeff
Wilson's favorite places.

The location in the title can be found on eBird for directions should you
be interested in going.


Michael (Conway)
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpipers
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 17:16:34 +0000
This morning there were six buff-breasted Sandpipers at Boyd Point Waste Water 
Treatment Facility near Pine Bluff. 

Doc George

Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 1st
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 19:13:38 -0500
It was partly cloudy and warm on the bird survey today.  70 species were
found.  Not many migrant passerines around today.  A flock of 12 Least Terns
and 8 Wood Storks are hanging out in the SE corner of unit 5 along with a
fair number of shorebirds and other waders.  

 

Wood Duck - 32

Mallard - 2

Blue-winged Teal - 59

Green-winged Teal - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 20

American White Pelican - 1

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 4

Least Bittern - 4 

Great Blue Heron - 14

Great Egret - 171

Snowy Egret - 404

Little-blue Heron - 54

Cattle Egret - 91

Green Heron - 10

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 2

White Ibis - 90

Wood Stork - 8

Black Vulture - 14

Turkey Vulture - 13

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Sora - 1 (walking and feeding out in the open on lilypads like a gallinule.)

Purple Gallinule - 8 (3 adults & 5 full-sized juveniles.)

Common Gallinule - 39 (also 2 broods of downy young.)

American Coot - 5

Killdeer - 7

Solitary Sandpiper - 3

Lesser Yellowlegs - 1

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 10

Western Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 141

Stilt Sandpiper - 6

Least Tern - 12 (about half of these were juveniles.)

Mourning Dove - 2

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 6

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 3

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 5 (still singing!)

Bell's Vireo - 2 (still singing!)

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1 (still singing!)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 11

Purple Martin - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 10

Cliff Swallow - 7

Barn Swallow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 13

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Gray Catbird - 2

Yellow Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 6 (one still singing!)

Black-and-White Warbler - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 11

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 10

American Goldfinch - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Blue-faced Meadowhawk 

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Black Ratsnake

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

Visit the Red Slough Photo Gallery:   
www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Tweet by Smithsonian's NMNH on Twitter
From: Chuck Bartels <cbartels AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 12:18:05 -0500
	Smithsonian's NMNH ( AT NMNH)
9/1/15, 11:06 AM
MT  AT SILibraries: #OTD 1914 Martha, the last #passengerpigeon, died. But she 
lives on  AT smithsonian s.si.edu/1VtrPfZ 


The last link will take you to a 3-D view of poor Martha. 

Chuck Bartels
Little Rock

Download the Twitter app


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Audubon Arkansas Bird Walk, Sept. 18
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 15:40:29 +0000

Join Audubon Arkansas for a morning bird walk at the Old North Shore Marina on 
Lake Maumelle on Friday September 18, 8:00-10:00. 





We'll be looking for migrants. The Ouachita Trail crosses the property so we'll 
get to hike a bit of that too. 





Location: Meet at entrance to Maumelle River WMA off of Hwy 300 (GPS: 34.907, 
-92.549). 


Traveling west on Hwy 10, turn right onto Chenal Pwky/Hwy 300 towards Pinnacle 
Mtn. 


Follow Hwy 300 for 9.4 miles until a SHARP LEFT turn. 

Continue on Hwy 300 for 3.8 miles. 

Entrance to a gravel road on left, at curve, with Maumelle River WMA sign. 



To RSVP or for more info, contact Uta Meyer at 501-244-2229, umeyer AT audubon.org 
(don't reply to me) 





PLEASE RSVP, SPACE IS LIMITED. 



Sponsored by Audubon Arkansas and Central Arkansas Water. 




Dan Scheiman 


Little Rock, AR 
Subject: September field trips (2) with Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 11:45:39 +0000
(1) HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA, Sunday September 13, 2015. Meet at 9 AM 
in the parking lot for Sinking Stream and Historic Van Winkle trails in Hobbs 
State Park-Conservation Area east of Rogers. Both share the parking on highway 
12. Spotted Jewelweed and other flowering plants native to the Ozarks are 
common in these areas and quite attractive to many bird species, including 
migrating Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. Other interesting native flowers here, 
too, include Great Blue Lobelia Both walks are easy and often birdy (each about 
0.5 miles). Historic Van Winkle Trail is accessible. As on all NWAAS field 
trips, participate as much or as little as you want. The field trip is free and 
open to the public. For more about Hobbs: 
http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/id17.html. 




(2) BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND, Saturday September 19, 2015. Meet 9 AM at Beaver 
Lake Nursery Pond on Beaver Lake, east of Rogers. Directions, pictures and more 
details about birding potentials at the nursery pond can be found on the NWAAS 
web site: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/id17.html. The nursery pond includes 150 
acres, mostly forested, with a 30 acre pond with a circle walk of about 1.0 
miles. This provides complete views of the pond, bird boxes for Tree Swallows, 
Eastern Bluebirds, and Wood Ducks, the surrounding shortleaf pine-oak 
woodlands, and Beaver Lake. The field trip will involve a leisurely stroll on 
the levee. As on all NWAAS field trips, participate as much or as little as you 
want. The field trip is free and open to the public. 

Subject: Mid AR River Valley shorebirds
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 18:59:16 +0000
Greetings all,
We went looking for shorebirds this past weekend.
The AG&FC Nursery Pond near Knoxville was full of water with no mud.

Holla Bend NWR is drawing down the old river channel to plant food for ducks. 
The old river channel boat launch is closed because of the low water, but views 
can be obtained from the dam's levee. 

Portions of the old river channel and the interior rd ponds have nice mud 
features. Not huge numbers of individuals, but pretty good with about 100 
individuals of 10 species. 1 Willet was the highlight. 

Cheers, Leif  AT  Hector
Subject: Habitat Improvement Opportunities at Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission Natural Areas
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 11:32:41 -0500
Arkansas birders,

The Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission (ANHC) is hosting several
volunteer opportunities
in September, so please consider participating to improve wildlife habitat
and discover new birding locales! Event details include the following:

   - * Tuesday, September 15, and Wednesday, September 16* - 9:30 a.m. to
   ~1:30 p.m. (schedule same for both days), fencing removal to benefit native
   plants and animals at Sweden Creek Falls Natural Area  (Madison County).
   This event coincides with the Great Arkansas Cleanup promoted by Keep
   Arkansas Beautiful.
   - * Saturday, September 19 *- 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., general cleanup (also
   part of the Great Arkansas Cleanup) at Cherokee Prairie Natural Area
   (Franklin County).

Volunteers should meet at the designated natural area and bring sturdy work
boots, a sack lunch and drink, and clothing that can get dirty and provide
protection from scratches. Drinking water, first aid kits, insect
repellent, and work equipment will be provided. If you'd like a map with
directions to any or all of these events, reply to me off-list.

Should you need other information (e.g., the event's status if inclement
weather is in the forecast), please contact the Arkansas Natural Heritage
Commission's volunteer program coordinator, Toby Von Rembow, at
toby AT arkansasheritage.org or (501) 683-4084.

Cheers,

Samantha Scheiman
Little Rock, Ark.
-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: 2015 Natural Areas Conference, Nov. 3-5, 2015, Little Rock - Conservation Through Collaboration
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 10:46:18 -0500
Arkansas birders,



The 42nd Annual Natural Areas Conference will be held at the Little Rock
Marriott November 3-5, 2015, offering educational seminars, exciting field
trips, and opportunities to connect with other nature enthusiasts from
around the country. Details and registration are available at the
conference website: http://naturalareasconference.org/ The Arkansas Natural
Heritage Commission, which I work for, and the Arkansas Field Office of The
Nature Conservancy are serving as conference hosts.



Hundreds of conservation professionals from around the nation attend this
conference. Attendees represent a variety of disciplines, including land
managers, researchers, faculty and students, land trusts, non-profit
organizations, consultants, federal and state government agencies, and
volunteers. The theme of this year’s conference is “Conservation through
Collaboration” and will provide an important avenue for networking and will
focus on the importance of partnering to accomplish conservation
objectives. Attendees can expect:



•             Thought-provoking plenary sessions featuring Dr. M. Sanjayan
and Dr. Reed Noss

•             Workshops on current issues facing our natural areas

•             Field trips to outstanding natural areas across Arkansas

•             Networking with conservation professionals from across the
county

•             Opportunities for student involvement such as student
competitions, speed networking, and a Keys to Conservation Careers Session



Several field trips will feature birding, such as a trip to view open pine
restoration at Warren Prairie Natural Area, a roadside-birding tour of
Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, and a paddling excursion through the
Big Woods of Arkansas! The full lineup of field trips and trip descriptions
can be viewed here: http://naturalareasconference.org/field-trips



I encourage you to take advantage of this golden opportunity to meet others
involved in conservation and learn more about our aptly named Natural State
through presentations and field trips! Note that early bird registration is
available until September 12, so act fast!



Good Birding,



Samantha Scheiman

Little Rock, Ark.

-- 
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold
Subject: Re: ASCA field trip report
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 20:39:02 -0500
Just a general comment about dragonflies.  The numbers are way down on the
Ouachita River and I attribute that to more high water this summer than
usual.  Anyone else seeing low numbers of dragonflies?

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Karen
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2015 7:02 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: ASCA field trip report

Saturday, August 29, 2015 over 40 birders gathered at the Bald Knob National
Wildlife Refuge for the ASCA field trip.  Birders came from all over the
state.  The majority of birders were from many central Arkansas towns, plus
people from as far away as Pine Bluff, Atkins, Pangburn, and Fayetteville.
The temps hovered in the mid 80s, a nice change compared to the broiling
heat of past August trips to the refuge.  At our first stop, the Northwest
Arkansas contingent reported Mitchell Pruitt's very close encounter with a
Cottonmouth.  After that, the group carefully surveyed all grassy areas
before wading in.  The good news was that a few days prior to our arrival,
the new refuge manager had his crew mow several of the levees.  Much
appreciated for chigger and tick control, and allowed us better views into
the mudflats. 

The cool, wet spring put farmers way behind in planting their rice and
soybean fields.  As a result, very little shorebird habitat is currently
available because most fields are yet to be harvested.  Missing species were
Avocets, Wood Storks, Spoonbills, American and Black-bellied Plovers, and
raptors.  Shorebird and duck numbers were low, but with careful scoping we
found a fair number of the common shorebird, heron, and egret species.  We
were pleased to see a Wilson's Phalarope, two Semipalmated Plovers, Baird's
Sandpipers, a Wilson's Snipe, and 68 Black-necked Stilts.  A few
Dickcissels, Blue Grosbeaks, and Indigo Buntings still linger.  The only
warblers spotted were a family of Yellow Warblers and a Northern Parula.
Several Bell's Vireos were singing up a storm at the entrance to the refuge,
but refused to come in for closer looks.

Be sure to read Joe Neal's enthusiastic write-up of his experience of the
trip that he posted August 30 on ARBird.  He provides a great perspective
and a more comprehensive shorebird list for the trip.  A nice variety of
butterflies, dragonflies, and blooming plants kept the photographers busy.
A compilation of birds spotted by the various birders in the group netted us
a little over 70 species.  The complete list is on eBird.  A good time was
had by all!

Submitted by
Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock=
Subject: ASCA field trip report
From: Karen <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 19:01:34 -0500
Saturday, August 29, 2015 over 40 birders gathered at the Bald Knob National 
Wildlife Refuge for the ASCA field trip. Birders came from all over the state. 
The majority of birders were from many central Arkansas towns, plus people from 
as far away as Pine Bluff, Atkins, Pangburn, and Fayetteville. The temps 
hovered in the mid 80s, a nice change compared to the broiling heat of past 
August trips to the refuge. At our first stop, the Northwest Arkansas 
contingent reported Mitchell Pruitt's very close encounter with a Cottonmouth. 
After that, the group carefully surveyed all grassy areas before wading in. The 
good news was that a few days prior to our arrival, the new refuge manager had 
his crew mow several of the levees. Much appreciated for chigger and tick 
control, and allowed us better views into the mudflats. 


The cool, wet spring put farmers way behind in planting their rice and soybean 
fields. As a result, very little shorebird habitat is currently available 
because most fields are yet to be harvested. Missing species were Avocets, Wood 
Storks, Spoonbills, American and Black-bellied Plovers, and raptors. Shorebird 
and duck numbers were low, but with careful scoping we found a fair number of 
the common shorebird, heron, and egret species. We were pleased to see a 
Wilson's Phalarope, two Semipalmated Plovers, Baird's Sandpipers, a Wilson's 
Snipe, and 68 Black-necked Stilts. A few Dickcissels, Blue Grosbeaks, and 
Indigo Buntings still linger. The only warblers spotted were a family of Yellow 
Warblers and a Northern Parula. Several Bell's Vireos were singing up a storm 
at the entrance to the refuge, but refused to come in for closer looks. 


Be sure to read Joe Neal's enthusiastic write-up of his experience of the trip 
that he posted August 30 on ARBird. He provides a great perspective and a more 
comprehensive shorebird list for the trip. A nice variety of butterflies, 
dragonflies, and blooming plants kept the photographers busy. A compilation of 
birds spotted by the various birders in the group netted us a little over 70 
species. The complete list is on eBird. A good time was had by all! 


Submitted by
Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Maumelle/Little Rock
Subject: south by southeast
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 13:58:23 -0500
Yesterday Blake Kennedy and I headed back to Chicot County in search of Wood 
Storks. At 10:20 in the morning we picked up exactly where we had left the 
Mississippi levee road two weeks earlier: just a few hundred yards north of 
where U.S. Highway 82 sails over the levee en route to the state of 
Mississippi. 

 
Here and there along the levee we found standing water and groups of wading 
birds. These included Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Little Blue Heron, 
hundreds of Cattle Egrets, and, eventually, a group of seven Roseate 
Spoonbills. This time the spoonbills didn't just fly past us but were hopping 
from branch to branch of a large tree downed in a pond, giving Blake his first 
opportunity to study their bizarre beaks. 

 
But no storks.
 
After lunch in Lake Village, we returned to the same spot where we had stopped 
at 11:55 and continued northward. We hadn't gone a mile before we came upon a 
large flock of mixed egrets that also included some Wood Storks. Blake counted 
74 of the latter, including one that was foraging in the water and another 
perched atop a tall tree trunk. The same pool also sported a lively 
Black-necked Stilt. So Blake picked up two lifers right after lunch. 

 
Thinking Purple Gallinules and alligators, we turned around on the levee road 
and headed for Arkansas Post National Memorial on the far side of the Arkansas 
River. When we got there, we saw lots of gallinule habitat but no gallinules of 
any kind. No alligators either. We did, however, encounter--separately--three 
Anhingas in flight. Of even greater interest were two cormorants perched on a 
log way out in a lake. My gut told me they were Neotropic Cormorants, but--even 
with my telescope--I was unable to discern any good field marks that would have 
nailed down a species identification. And, of course, there was no other bird 
nearby with which I could have made a size comparison. So the cormorants will, 
again, have to be reported as "cormorant species." 

 
Having always high hopes, especially in southeastern Arkansas at the end of 
August, I told Blake early in the day that we should be on the alert for a 
Swallow-tailed Kite. As it turned out, we didn't see even a single Mississippi 
Kite this time and returned to Little Rock happy but totally kiteless. 

 
Bill Shepherd

Bill Shepherd
2805 Linden, Apt. 3 
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 
Stoneax63 AT hotmail.com 
(501) 375-3918
 
 
 		 	   		  
Subject: ALL THOSE FABULOUS SHOREBIRDS AT BALD KNOB
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 15:18:56 +0000
YESTERDAY presented the great opportunity to jump in Mitchell Pruitt's Toyota, 
and along with David Oakley, make the 3.5 hour dash from Fayetteville across 
the state to Bald Know NWR, and there for a meet up with intrepid Audubon 
Society of Central Arkansas lead by "bird colonel" Karen Holliday. But first, 
we three, and especially one, had high pre-adventure. 


Before dusk clouds on Coal Chute road could announce ASCA's arrival, we three 
musketeers set off down a grassy 4-wheeler track, Pruitt in lead. Things came 
to a sudden STOP when he exclaimed and simultaneously hustled backwards. Yes, 
birding friends, this trip opened with Agkistrodon piscivorus. Wise in such 
affairs, David wondered about the results if Mitchell had stepped a little 
closer to that upraised white gape. I wondered, already knowing, what kind of 
emergency care was available in Bald Knob. 


Bell's Vireos were singing down that trail, but we went no further. Neither did 
the ASCA crowd pursue Blue Grosbeaks when they heard the tale. In terms of 
cross country bird chasing, it just took the wind right out of our sails. 


I don't know how, overall, the trip went for the group. I personally saw 14 
shorebird species and heard of a few others that I didn't see. 160 acres of 
good shorebird habitat =s you won't see it all, not in a few hours anyway. My 
very rough and PERSONAL shorebird list was: Semipalmated Plover (2), Killdeer 
(WAG =s 200), Black-necked Stilt (~50), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser 
Yellowlegs (~25), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), Least 
Sandpiper (WAG =s 40), Baird's Sandpiper (FOS, 3: 2 adults, 1 buffy juvenile; 
photo of 1 adult with pecs), Pectoral Sandpiper (WAG =s 150), Stilt Sandpiper 
(~6; photo of 1), dowitcher species (I wasn't able to spend time on a study), 
Wilson's Snipe (1, FOS, seen and heard well), Wilson's Phalarope (1). 


This was a wonderful few hours of shorebirds and a good list for me personally, 
though not exceptional for Bald Knob, from eBird postings and from what I've 
heard from the regulars. I am thankful I don't live closer, because I'll bet I 
would get even LESS "done" than I do now, and that's saying something. 


Mitchell and David found some other great stuff. A couple that caught my eye, 
too: a wonderful close-up Green Treefrog perfectly at home on a large blade of 
grass. A golden and truly diminutive Least Skipper Ancyloxypha numitor on a 
fabulously pink smartweed, ignoring us and the dust on the road we brought. 


What a wonderful day to be alive on our green planet. What a great opportunity 
to share it with other seekers. Many blessings to you all. 

Subject: Re: Baltimore Oriole
From: Beverly Sullivan <000000ac6001d7f0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 23:46:59 -0400
Put some oranges out for them. The orioles love them. I cut them and stick them 
on the ends of the shepard's crooks. that my feeders hang from. 

Beverly Sullivan
Marion, Ar



-----Original Message-----
From: Michael 
To: ARBIRD-L 
Sent: Fri, Aug 28, 2015 3:06 pm
Subject: Re: Baltimore Oriole


 
I had a very nice male with his girl friend on my deck yesterday in 
Conway(Faulkner Co). Looks like they are moving around the state. 

Michael 
 
  
On Aug 28, 2015, at 1:42 PM, jonathanperry24 < jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM> 
wrote: 

  
 
 
  
   
Absolutely splendid male on our backyard bird bath, East Oaks neighborhood in 
Fayetteville. 

   
 

Subject: Re: Baltimore Oriole
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 15:05:45 -0500
I had a very nice male with his girl friend on my deck yesterday in 
Conway(Faulkner Co). Looks like they are moving around the state. 

Michael

> On Aug 28, 2015, at 1:42 PM, jonathanperry24  
wrote: 

> 
> Absolutely splendid male on our backyard bird bath, East Oaks neighborhood in 
Fayetteville. 
Subject: Ini need a good photograph of a Whip-poor-will
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 19:47:31 +0000
 AGFC is updating the Arkansas Wildlife Action Plan and needs a good quality, 
high resolution photograph of a Whip-poor-will.  The photographer's name will 
appear on the photo giving her/her credit for the image.  The photo does not 
have to have been taken in AR. Please let me know either at this email address 
or my work email Karen.Rowe AT agfc.ar.gov if you can help us out. Thank you.Karen 
Rowe 
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Tomorrow-Bald Knob NRW
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 19:22:46 +0000
Reminder that the ASCA field trip is tomorrow, Saturday, August 29.  Details 
are below.  Please fee free to contact me off-list if you have any 
questions.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorMaumelle/Little Rock 

 August 29Bald Knob National WildlifeRefugeBald Knob, ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. 
inNorth Little Rock at the Other Center parking lot on the east side of the 
lotbehind McDonald’s.  The Other Center isacross from McCain Blvd. from 
McCain Mall. Take Exit 1 West off US-67/167. We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR 
at around 8:30 a.m. for those who want tomeet us there.  We'll start out 
birding along Coal Chute Road, working our way toward the grain bins.  The 
federal refuge isalso a National Audubon Important Bird Area. We expect to see 
shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possiblyWood Storks and Roseate 
Spoonbills.  Itwill be hot so bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a 
hat.  If you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  
There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 
atBald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for driving directions and 
moreinformation about the refuge.  GPS:  35.260233, -91.571903 
Subject: Baltimore Oriole
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:42:03 -0500
Absolutely splendid male on our backyard bird bath, East Oaks neighborhood
in Fayetteville.
Subject: Trinidad & Tobago Tour 2016
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 03:13:12 +0000
Hi all, for the 3rd year in a row, I will be leading a Trinidad & Tobago nature 
tour May 30 - June 6, 2016, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society 
Trust, in which I serve as a trustee.  Last year's tour helped me raise $620 
for the trust; this year I hope to touch at least $1,000.  The trust, as you 
know, funds research and conservation projects mostly in Arkansas.   

Highlights of the Trinidad & Tobago tour include:
* Three nights in Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad, one of the most famous 
ecolodges in the world-- www.asawright.org* Manakins, Bellbirds, 
Honeycreepers, Oropendolas, Euphonias, Tanagers, Toucans.....a rainbow of 
tropical birds from a comfortable veranda (while sipping rum punch!)* About 10 
species of hummingbirds, many hovering inches from your face!* Trek to a 
riverine cave to see the strange Oilbirds 

* Boating in Caroni Swamp to witness the spectacle of Scarlet Ibis coming to 
roost en masse 

* A night walk on a remote beach to encounter massive Leatherback Sea turtles 
nesting * Three nights in Blue Waters Inn, Tobago, a delightful and luxurious 
beach-side resort (www.bluewatersinn.com) 

* Hike up Little Tobago island to see 2 species of boobies, tropic birds, and 
other pelagics* Glass bottom boating to view coral reefs* About 150-200 species 
of birds, including the Trinidad & Tobago endemic,Trinidad Motmot 

Cost excluding international airfare will be $1440, which covers comfortable 
accommodations for 7 nights, sumptuous food, local air travel between the 
islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and all tours and activities. You must be 
physically fit for easy to moderate walks in hot and humid tropical weather, 
with temperatures usually in the 80s. But since we will be there at the 
beginning of the rainy season, cooler overcast conditions and a few rain 
showers can be expected.  This will be my 8th tour of Trinidad & Tobago.  

Rough itinerary summary: 
May 30 -- check into Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC)May 31 -- early AM veranda 
birding; hike for manakins and bellbirds; PM Arippo Savannah birding and Matura 
beach for sea turtlesJune 1 -- early AM veranda; optional Blanchisseuse trip at 
your expense (or) hikes in AWNC; PM Trin city sewage ponds and Caroni Marsh 
boating                 for Scarlet Ibis spectacleJune 2 -- early AM 
veranda; Oilbirds cave hike; and then off to Tobago.  Some birding en route 
Bluewaters InnJune 3 -- AM Little Tobago Island hike for pelagics; glassbottom 
boat coral reefs viewing; PM relax at the beach or go birding, sea kayaking, 
etc.June 4 -- all day optional rain forest trip at your expense (or) relax at 
the beach or go birdingJune 5 -- AM birding hikes to mop up Tobago endemics; PM 
fly back to TrinidadJune 6 -- Back to the USA 

For detailed itinerary and other information, please contact me.  Please 
indicate your background in birding and traveling, and any health-related 
concerns. The tour is intended only for ardent nature lovers and birders, and 
for those who can stay patient and keep their sense of humor when things 
occasionally don't go as planned in the tropics.  Please also note that I am 
not a professional tour guide.  I am a college professor and tropical 
biologist passionate about showing birds to people.  I outsource the logistics 
and arrangements to the real pros (Caligo Ventures -- www.caligo.com) who have 
arranged such tours for Americans for decades.  They are based here in the 
USA.  This tour is for a maximum of 20 persons. 

Here are bird lists from last year's tour, in which several seasoned ar-birders 
participated (173 bird species in 
total): http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23684569 (Trinidad) 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23684940 (Tobago)

Cheers, Kannan-------------------R. Kannan, Ph.D.,Professor of 
BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort 
SmithTel: 479.788.7616ragupathy.kannan AT uafs.edu 
Subject: Re: Adventures in Pulaski County: LR Port roost & Frazier Pike
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 23:54:38 -0500
I was confronted by a cattle farmer one day last week, wanting to know what
I was doing.  (I had heard a gunshot from his place a little earlier.)
 Anyway, I finally convinced him that I meant no harm and that I was merely
birdwatching, in the opposite direction of his buildings, by the way.  He
said that cattle farming is his business, and that he had to keep an eye on
things.  Evidently he thought that I was going to load one of his cows into
the back of my Honda.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Wed, Aug 26, 2015 at 10:28 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:

> All,
>
> I was out at the port in Little Rock tonight to see if any martins were
> still around. A few were.  A surprisingly large number of Cliff Swallows
> were present. When I left about 7P, I estimate there were approximately
> 7,000 birds present with more arriving by the minute.  Many were on the
> same high voltage tower where the martins gathered a few days ago.
> Approximately 1500-2000 birds collected on the lower lines just past the
> scrap metal pile on the side away from the port complex.  I took 2 random
> slices of birds, counted 50, and noted how many Purple Martins were
> present.  For the record 9/100.  Cliff Swallows are more twitchy than the
> martins.  Any sudden movement sent then swirling off the lines overhead.
> They quickly returned to the lines if I held still.  I took photos, of
> course.
>
> It was harder to tell what all the birds were on the high voltage lines. 
Those 

> nearest to me appeared to also be predominately Cliffs.
>
> I frittered away an hour or so driving my CBC count area that happens to
> include the port area.  I am happy to report there are no snowy owls
> present in the area.  Also nary a raptor today.  Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
> were on the move.  Multiple flocks of 10 or less individuals were common.
> There is work going on in the fields across from Wellspun.  Looks like
> another building/plant will be going up on that site.
>
> Any time it rains, there is a small pool of water in the dug out area
> south of the road out to Terry Lock & Dam off Frazier Pike.  I always stop
> for a look because you never know what might be lurking.  Besides the
> omnipresent Killdeer, the muddy pond held 3 Snowy Egrets, 6 Least
> Sandpipers, and 2 birds one step up from the Least that had to be
> Sanderlings although they were not as active as expected.  The little guys
> were quiet, just back from the water and, of course, hiding behind little
> twigs of vegetation to increase the thrill of making a positive ID.  They
> held their ground as a large red farm tractor passed nearby.
>
> My prolonged squinting through the scope at the two mystery birds was
> apparently conducted in a highly suspicious manner.  Besides the
> aforementioned red tractor buzzing the shore birds, a large Cat tractor
> pulling a super sized bushhog was heading in my general direction.  I
> thought he was further off the road than he was & I didn't start taking
> down my scope as soon as I should have.  By the time I realized he was
> heading straight for me,  the tractor was closing fast in a deliberate sort
> of way, & the bush hog was still turning.  I hustled to get my stuff in the
> car since it seemed the guy was intent on bush hogging the side of the road
> all the way to the tree line whether I moved or not.
>
> "What are you doing there?"  he growled as he threw the cab door open.
>
> Me, eyeing the chains hanging from the leading edge of the now quiet bush
> hog a few feet away.  "Looking at your birds down there in the water."
>
> "Birds?  There are birds down there? I thought you were taking pictures of
> my property."
>
> "Bird pictures.  I am trying to decide what a couple of them are."
>
> "You know people get shot out here. You heard about the two people who got
> shot the other day?"
>
> No idea which two people he was referring to.  Why quibble? "Yeah, it was
> just terrible what happened. Well, you know, I'm just standing out here in
> the open.  I guess if someone wants to shoot me, they'll have to do it
> while I'm standing in plain view."
>
> "I didn't mean shoot you.  I meant people out here will rob you.  I'd not
> go over to the dam if I were you.  It's dangerous over there."
>
> "Yeah, it's pretty isolated.  I was going to turn around here in a
> minute.  I've got to go back over by the port to look at some birds."
>
> "You don't have to leave. Look as long as you want. I just came over here
> to see what you were doing."
>
> "Hey, I appreciate you checking on me. I grew up on a farm in another
> state.  I know how it is."
>
> By that time the big red tractor pulled around the other tractor and me
> and turned into the pond area a few feet down the road.  No doubt intent on
> making the area safe from marauding birdwatchers from town.
>
> God, I just love rural harassment.
>
> Cindy
> Bird terrorist
> Little Rock
>
>
Subject: Re: Adventures in Pulaski County: LR Port roost & Frazier Pike
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 23:18:05 -0500
        I visited the Port after Cindy left and believe there were more
birds there at 7,45  I agree that the cliff swallows were more numerous on
the tower and martins were out numbering them on the power lines. Six spans
of the wires were pretty loaded and more on the ground than usual.

      Since those martins are so easily counted while on the power lines,
much more so than than when in trees, I think a valid and reliable
statistical study could be conducted of purple martins' arrival and
departure schedules at such gathering sites.  This would help us beat back
the borders of our ignorance about one of our most beloved birds. If one of
our State's  bird scientists would help design such a study and do a review
of the literature between now and next year on the chance that they would
return to the same area next year, I would gladly do the bulk of the data
collection in July, August and September and assist with writing a report
to be submitted to an appropriate scientific journal.  Any takers?

Peace and Birds   Jerry Butler

On Wed, Aug 26, 2015 at 10:28 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:

> All,
>
> I was out at the port in Little Rock tonight to see if any martins were
> still around. A few were.  A surprisingly large number of Cliff Swallows
> were present. When I left about 7P, I estimate there were approximately
> 7,000 birds present with more arriving by the minute.  Many were on the
> same high voltage tower where the martins gathered a few days ago.
> Approximately 1500-2000 birds collected on the lower lines just past the
> scrap metal pile on the side away from the port complex.  I took 2 random
> slices of birds, counted 50, and noted how many Purple Martins were
> present.  For the record 9/100.  Cliff Swallows are more twitchy than the
> martins.  Any sudden movement sent then swirling off the lines overhead.
> They quickly returned to the lines if I held still.  I took photos, of
> course.
>
> It was harder to tell what all the birds were on the high voltage lines. 
Those 

> nearest to me appeared to also be predominately Cliffs.
>
> I frittered away an hour or so driving my CBC count area that happens to
> include the port area.  I am happy to report there are no snowy owls
> present in the area.  Also nary a raptor today.  Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
> were on the move.  Multiple flocks of 10 or less individuals were common.
> There is work going on in the fields across from Wellspun.  Looks like
> another building/plant will be going up on that site.
>
> Any time it rains, there is a small pool of water in the dug out area
> south of the road out to Terry Lock & Dam off Frazier Pike.  I always stop
> for a look because you never know what might be lurking.  Besides the
> omnipresent Killdeer, the muddy pond held 3 Snowy Egrets, 6 Least
> Sandpipers, and 2 birds one step up from the Least that had to be
> Sanderlings although they were not as active as expected.  The little guys
> were quiet, just back from the water and, of course, hiding behind little
> twigs of vegetation to increase the thrill of making a positive ID.  They
> held their ground as a large red farm tractor passed nearby.
>
> My prolonged squinting through the scope at the two mystery birds was
> apparently conducted in a highly suspicious manner.  Besides the
> aforementioned red tractor buzzing the shore birds, a large Cat tractor
> pulling a super sized bushhog was heading in my general direction.  I
> thought he was further off the road than he was & I didn't start taking
> down my scope as soon as I should have.  By the time I realized he was
> heading straight for me,  the tractor was closing fast in a deliberate sort
> of way, & the bush hog was still turning.  I hustled to get my stuff in the
> car since it seemed the guy was intent on bush hogging the side of the road
> all the way to the tree line whether I moved or not.
>
> "What are you doing there?"  he growled as he threw the cab door open.
>
> Me, eyeing the chains hanging from the leading edge of the now quiet bush
> hog a few feet away.  "Looking at your birds down there in the water."
>
> "Birds?  There are birds down there? I thought you were taking pictures of
> my property."
>
> "Bird pictures.  I am trying to decide what a couple of them are."
>
> "You know people get shot out here. You heard about the two people who got
> shot the other day?"
>
> No idea which two people he was referring to.  Why quibble? "Yeah, it was
> just terrible what happened. Well, you know, I'm just standing out here in
> the open.  I guess if someone wants to shoot me, they'll have to do it
> while I'm standing in plain view."
>
> "I didn't mean shoot you.  I meant people out here will rob you.  I'd not
> go over to the dam if I were you.  It's dangerous over there."
>
> "Yeah, it's pretty isolated.  I was going to turn around here in a
> minute.  I've got to go back over by the port to look at some birds."
>
> "You don't have to leave. Look as long as you want. I just came over here
> to see what you were doing."
>
> "Hey, I appreciate you checking on me. I grew up on a farm in another
> state.  I know how it is."
>
> By that time the big red tractor pulled around the other tractor and me
> and turned into the pond area a few feet down the road.  No doubt intent on
> making the area safe from marauding birdwatchers from town.
>
> God, I just love rural harassment.
>
> Cindy
> Bird terrorist
> Little Rock
>
>
Subject: Re: Adventures in Pulaski County: LR Port roost & Frazier Pike
From: Ellen Fennell <f.ellen AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 04:07:28 +0000




Subject: Adventures in Pulaski County:  LR Port roost & Frazier Pike
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 22:28:13 -0500
All,

I was out at the port in Little Rock tonight to see if any martins were still 
around. A few were. A surprisingly large number of Cliff Swallows were present. 
When I left about 7P, I estimate there were approximately 7,000 birds present 
with more arriving by the minute. Many were on the same high voltage tower 
where the martins gathered a few days ago. Approximately 1500-2000 birds 
collected on the lower lines just past the scrap metal pile on the side away 
from the port complex. I took 2 random slices of birds, counted 50, and noted 
how many Purple Martins were present. For the record 9/100. Cliff Swallows are 
more twitchy than the martins. Any sudden movement sent then swirling off the 
lines overhead. They quickly returned to the lines if I held still. I took 
photos, of course. 

It was harder to tell what all the birds were on the high voltage lines. Those 
nearest to me appeared to also be predominately Cliffs. 


I frittered away an hour or so driving my CBC count area that happens to 
include the port area. I am happy to report there are no snowy owls present in 
the area. Also nary a raptor today. Scissor-tailed Flycatchers were on the 
move. Multiple flocks of 10 or less individuals were common. There is work 
going on in the fields across from Wellspun. Looks like another building/plant 
will be going up on that site. 


Any time it rains, there is a small pool of water in the dug out area south of 
the road out to Terry Lock & Dam off Frazier Pike. I always stop for a look 
because you never know what might be lurking. Besides the omnipresent Killdeer, 
the muddy pond held 3 Snowy Egrets, 6 Least Sandpipers, and 2 birds one step up 
from the Least that had to be Sanderlings although they were not as active as 
expected. The little guys were quiet, just back from the water and, of course, 
hiding behind little twigs of vegetation to increase the thrill of making a 
positive ID. They held their ground as a large red farm tractor passed nearby. 


My prolonged squinting through the scope at the two mystery birds was 
apparently conducted in a highly suspicious manner. Besides the aforementioned 
red tractor buzzing the shore birds, a large Cat tractor pulling a super sized 
bushhog was heading in my general direction. I thought he was further off the 
road than he was & I didn't start taking down my scope as soon as I should 
have. By the time I realized he was heading straight for me, the tractor was 
closing fast in a deliberate sort of way, & the bush hog was still turning. I 
hustled to get my stuff in the car since it seemed the guy was intent on bush 
hogging the side of the road all the way to the tree line whether I moved or 
not. 


"What are you doing there?"  he growled as he threw the cab door open. 

Me, eyeing the chains hanging from the leading edge of the now quiet bush hog a 
few feet away. "Looking at your birds down there in the water." 


"Birds? There are birds down there? I thought you were taking pictures of my 
property." 


"Bird pictures.  I am trying to decide what a couple of them are."

"You know people get shot out here. You heard about the two people who got shot 
the other day?" 


No idea which two people he was referring to. Why quibble? "Yeah, it was just 
terrible what happened. Well, you know, I'm just standing out here in the open. 
I guess if someone wants to shoot me, they'll have to do it while I'm standing 
in plain view." 


"I didn't mean shoot you. I meant people out here will rob you. I'd not go over 
to the dam if I were you. It's dangerous over there." 


"Yeah, it's pretty isolated. I was going to turn around here in a minute. I've 
got to go back over by the port to look at some birds." 


"You don't have to leave. Look as long as you want. I just came over here to 
see what you were doing." 


"Hey, I appreciate you checking on me. I grew up on a farm in another state. I 
know how it is." 


By that time the big red tractor pulled around the other tractor and me and 
turned into the pond area a few feet down the road. No doubt intent on making 
the area safe from marauding birdwatchers from town. 


God, I just love rural harassment.

Cindy
Bird terrorist
Little Rock

 		 	   		  
Subject: From Avisys to eBird
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 22:23:31 -0500
The Avisys list-keeping program is no longer being supported. Users are
encouraged to move their records to eBird. See eBirds article
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/avisystoebird/ for a how-to and help.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 17:20:51 -0500
So, just to be sure, am I safe in putting a correction in tomorrow's paper 
saying they were Mississippi kites? 


Alyson Hoge
(Primary editor of corrections at the ADG)



> On Aug 26, 2015, at 4:17 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart  
wrote: 

> 
> Those kohl ringed Egyptian eyes are always a give-away (even if you can’t 
see the red eye-ball) They always look so exotic. Karen Hart 

>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Leslie Peacock 

> Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 2:49 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
>  
> And it was feeding its young an insect. Sounds kite-like!
>  
>  
> On Wed, Aug 26, 2015 at 12:53 PM, Ellen Fennell  wrote:
> Looks like a mature Mississippi Kite on the left, immature on the right.
> 
> 
> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
> -----Original Message-----
> 
> From: alycat14 AT ME.COM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Cc: 
> Sent: 2015-08-26 12:38:34 GMT
> Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
> 
> I'm glad you asked, because I didn't think hawk. 
> 
> My uneducated guess is Mississippi kite. 
> 
> Alyson Hoge
> 
> 
> 
> > On Aug 26, 2015, at 11:26 AM, Charles Anderson wrote:
> > 
> > Anybody I'd the birds in today's paper, 10B? Ospreys?
> > 
> > Chuck Anderson
> > 
> > 
> > Sent from my iPhone
> 
> 
>  
> --
> Leslie Peacock
> Managing Editor
> Arkansas Times
> 501-492-3981
Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 21:17:34 +0000
Those kohl ringed Egyptian eyes are always a give-away (even if you can’t see 
the red eye-ball) They always look so exotic. Karen Hart 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Leslie Peacock 

Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 2:49 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic

And it was feeding its young an insect. Sounds kite-like!


On Wed, Aug 26, 2015 at 12:53 PM, Ellen Fennell 
> wrote: 

Looks like a mature Mississippi Kite on the left, immature on the right.


Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
-----Original Message-----

From: alycat14 AT ME.COM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Cc:
Sent: 2015-08-26 12:38:34 GMT
Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic

I'm glad you asked, because I didn't think hawk.

My uneducated guess is Mississippi kite.

Alyson Hoge


> On Aug 26, 2015, at 11:26 AM, Charles Anderson wrote:
>
> Anybody I'd the birds in today's paper, 10B? Ospreys?
>
> Chuck Anderson
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone



--
Leslie Peacock
Managing Editor
Arkansas Times
501-492-3981
Subject: BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 15:11:14 -0500
This morning I observed and photographed a pair of Buff-breasted Sandpipers at 
Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. It was a unique 
experience in that I first observed them foraging in the grass alongside the 
levee road. I stopped my vehicle and opened the door to get a clear shot. The 
Sandpipers, which had been moving away, suddenly reversed course and moved 
together until they were right by my door. Talk about not disturbing wildlife 
to get close-up photos. 

John Redman
Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock AT ARKTIMES.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 14:48:36 -0500
And it was feeding its young an insect. Sounds kite-like!


On Wed, Aug 26, 2015 at 12:53 PM, Ellen Fennell  wrote:

> Looks like a mature Mississippi Kite on the left, immature on the right.
>
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
> -----Original Message-----
>
> From: alycat14 AT ME.COM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Cc:
> Sent: 2015-08-26 12:38:34 GMT
> Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
>
> I'm glad you asked, because I didn't think hawk.
>
> My uneducated guess is Mississippi kite.
>
> Alyson Hoge
>
>
>
> > On Aug 26, 2015, at 11:26 AM, Charles Anderson wrote:
> >
> > Anybody I'd the birds in today's paper, 10B? Ospreys?
> >
> > Chuck Anderson
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>



-- 
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*
Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
From: Ellen Fennell <f.ellen AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 17:53:45 +0000




Subject: Re: Democrat Gazette pic
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14 AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 12:38:20 -0500
I'm glad you asked, because I didn't think hawk. 

My uneducated guess is Mississippi kite. 

Alyson Hoge



> On Aug 26, 2015, at 11:26 AM, Charles Anderson  wrote:
> 
> Anybody I'd the birds in today's paper, 10B? Ospreys?
> 
> Chuck Anderson
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Democrat Gazette pic
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 11:26:38 -0500
Anybody I'd the birds in today's paper, 10B? Ospreys?

Chuck Anderson


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 25
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 19:12:42 -0500
It was mostly overcast with a strong east wind on the survey today.  73
species were found.  Migrants were moving but the overcast sky and winds
made observation difficult.  The southeast corner of unit 5 is the hotspot
for shorebirds right now.  The north levee of Bittern Lake has lots of
Empids feeding on Rough-leaved dogwood berries.  I had 3 flyover blackbirds
of which one was giving a call I didn't recognize.  I got my glasses on the
calling bird and it turned out to be an immature male Yellow-headed
Blackbird.  I quickly tried to get on the other two birds it was flying with
but they were flying away from me by then and I wasn't able to I.D. them but
believe they were probably female Yellow-headed Blackbirds as they were
slightly smaller than the male.  The 3 of them kept flying south until they
were out of sight.  This was my earliest fall migration record for this
species.  Here is my list for today:

 

Wood Duck - 70

Mallard - 11

Blue-winged Teal - 93

Pied-billed Grebe - 22

American White Pelican - 1

Anhinga - 7

Least Bittern - 2 

Great Blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 89

Snowy Egret - 164

Little-blue Heron - 37

Tricolored Heron - 1 juv.

Cattle Egret - 200

Green Heron - 14

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 13

White Ibis - 63

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 17

Mississippi Kite - 2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Purple Gallinule - 5

Common Gallinule - 7

American Coot - 7

Semipalmated Plover - 1 

Killdeer - 3

Spotted Sandpiper - 3

Solitary Sandpiper - 3

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Lesser Yellowlegs - 7

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 6

Western Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 95

Pectoral Sandpiper - 2

Mourning Dove - 12

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 4

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Least Flycatcher - 8

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 5

Bell's Vireo - 4 (still singing!)

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

American Crow - 12

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 3

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 7

Cliff Swallow - 1

Cave Swallow - 2 (Otter Lake)

Barn Swallow - 11

Carolina Chickadee - 8

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 2

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal - 11

Blue Grosbeak - 5

Indigo Bunting - 34

Painted Bunting - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 11

Eastern Meadowlark - 4

Yellow-headed Blackbird - 1

Orchard Oriole - 1

American Goldfinch - 1

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser 

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

Visit the Red Slough Photo Gallery:   
www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma 

 

 

 
Subject: AM. WHITE PELICANS AT LAKE SARACEN
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 15:26:16 -0500
This morning I observed 40-50 Am. White Pelicans foraging and resting on Lake 
Saracen in Pine Bluff. This is an early arrival date. 

John Redman
Subject: Bell
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 13:15:33 -0500
Walked into Bell for the first time since the butterfly count. Cool day 
even in the late morning. Chickadees on the move. Several with graduated 
tails like some cuckoo in the tropics. Molting Gnatcatchers and titmice. 
Red-eyed Vireos without red eyes singing off-timed phrasing and buzzy 
notes. You can actually tell the youngsters from the newly minted ones 
before you raise the binoculars.

Cicadas overtopping any and all bird noise. Scissor-grinder, Lyric, 
Robinson's and Hieroglyphic Cicadas all still working the still air.

The local Thryothorus bubbling here and there, also looking rather 
molty. How many wrens can a wren pair make in one summer? They outdid 
themselves out front this year at my house.

Tanagers flash and are eating berries. I see one quick bird among them 
that looks like a Blue-winged Warbler but it is gone. They don't have 
far to move. They are often here early but hard to see.

The Green Dragon fruits are leaning and falling along the trail. Red 
clusters on the leaf litter like small pomegranates. I rake a few seeds 
in my pocket for home.

Toads are thriving, quick lizards still slipping off in the leaves.

Back on the porch the hummers thrum and chase. I see two go down in a 
tangle that proves something. The mighty mites zing each other like it 
is the most important thing on the globe. If they weighed five pounds we 
would all be doing their bidding.

September is almost upon us like a weight off our shoulders. Feels like 
I could jump a few feet higher if I tried.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR
www.hr-rna.com/RNA
Subject: Hawks over Western Hills Park
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 12:49:11 -0500
Ruth and I watched lots of Hawks in Western Hills Park this morning. Red 
shouldered and red tailed. We saw two flying one above the other that weren't 
the usual suspects. 


Larger birds. Wide wings. Very light colored. No belly band or tail stripes. 
Black wing tips. Very pale creamy looking translucent tail feathers. Black 
spots scattered on the undersides of the wings. White spot at the base of the 
tail on the back (just a quick look). We did not get a good look at the back 
because the were circling above us. Unfortunately I didn't have my camera. 


They were probably juvenile red tails, but they looked very light to us. Our 
Sibley shows variations that look close, especially the Krider's, but that's 
probably just wistful/delusional thinking. If anyone is out that way and sees 
them, we'd appreciate some help or confirmation on the id. 


Also saw yellow billed cuckoos, blue grey gnatcatchers, blue grosbeaks, 
Mississippi kites, some really quick little yellowish warblers with very 
distinct eye ring (only detail we could catch), and all the usual late summer 
denizens. 


Sitting in the yard now watching red headed adult and juvenile woodpeckers 
mauling the bird feeder. 


Chuck Anderson. 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Greater roadrunner
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 11:57:46 -0500
When out for my morning run (11am) on mud creek trail in Fayetteville I saw a 
roadrunner land on the trail. He saw me coming and went back towards the creek. 
This was right behind the new roller building being built behind arvest. I am 
on the trail at least 3 times a week and have never seen one there before. 

Nancy

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrows
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 10:06:29 -0500
The thing I find fascinating about Eurasian Tree Sparrows is that they have
tended to move north of their origin rather than span out in all directions.
I've never subscribed to the "barge hypothesis" because barges presumably
also go south of St. Louis and very few records are south.  Furthermore, I
used to see these little guys in my backyard in Minier, IL all the time
which was about 40 miles away from any navigable waterway.

 

Personally, I believe something seems to have changed in these little guys
fairly recently.  Whether it is a tendency toward increased post-juvenile
dispersal or what is anyone's guess. But I hope someone will put aside the
negative bias of being an "introduced species" and notice that this is a
wonderful opportunity to learn about range expansion in real time.

 

Butch

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Jacque Brown
Sent: Monday, August 24, 2015 6:59 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrows

 

I lived in Alton Ill for 6 years, I was nearly always able to find some E
Tree Sparrows at any time of the year. I went up for Mothers day to visit
the in-laws this year and found a nest hole in Grafton right by the
warehouse used as a flea market. I parked right next to a vine covered tree
and was checking out the birds in a large shrub across the street when a
male flew to the tree and went in the hole. 

 

The house next door usually had food out but all feeders were empty. I have
photos of a nice male with wee critters for the nestlings. Jacque Brown,
Centerton

 

 

On Aug 23, 2015, at 11:09 PM, David Arbour  wrote:

 

 

Arkansas is long overdue for a Eurasian Tree sparrow record in my opinion.
When I lived in Iowa, the E. Tree Sparrows were traveling up and down the
Mississippi River on grain barges and populating the towns along the river.
Take a look at the ebird map for them, they are getting close.  Someone
should check any port towns in northeast Arkansas for them.  Just a thought.

 

David

 
Subject: Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites, Drew Co.
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 10:04:02 -0500
Randy Robinson and I were able to relocate a single swallow-tail kite at Gee's 
Landing in Drew county. It was flying very high but easily identifiable. We did 
hear the fledging or locate the nest. 


Michael(Conway)

> On Aug 23, 2015, at 3:22 PM, Kenny Nichols  wrote:
> 
> Dan, she also reported seeing one at the same location, in late May of this 
year. 

> 
> Kenny
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 23, 2015, at 1:57 PM, Daniel Scheiman  wrote:
>> 
>> Kay Craig Malan posted this to the Arkansas Rare and Unusual Bird Reports 
Facebook page today along with a photo of a single adult Swallow-tailed Kite: 

>> 
>> "I observed as an adult pair flew over and around the Gee's Landing access 
of the Saline River (Drew Co) I also could hear the young but was unable to 
observe them. I know and older gentleman who has traveled the river bottoms all 
his life who told me that he has seen where they nested in this area. So, 
they've probably been here for awhile but no official report made.” 

>> 
>> She also submitted 2 STKIs to eBird at this location 33.436546, -91.991566.
>> 
>> Confirmation of nesting, and especially of successfully fledged young is 
highly desirable. 

>> 
>> Dan Scheiman
>> Little Rock, AR
>> 
Subject: Yellow Warblers
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 07:34:45 -0500
Saw a small group of Yellow Warblers in the dense growth of bushes, weeds
and small trees near Rock Creek in western Little Rock yesterday in the
late morning.

                               Bill Thurman
Subject: Please speak up NOW for the birds and other wildlife on Kessler Mountain in Fayetteville
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 01:10:21 +0000
Some folks in the birding community in northwest Arkansas, myself included, are 
concerned that overly-intense mountain bike trail development in our urban 
parks have negative impacts on numerous species of plants and animals - 
including birds -- because of the increased level of disturbance associated 
with these heavily-used trails. In my view, some of these areas just need to be 
left without development. 


The City of Fayetteville is preparing an overall master plan for Kessler 
Mountain to guide existing trails management and future trail development for 
the 390-acre addition to the 230-acre Regional Park in Southwest Fayetteville. 
The 390-acre addition is a mature, upland forest rich in numerous nesting bird 
species. We refer to this as the Kessler Preserve. 


The City of Fayetteville encourages all interested persons or groups to attend 
a public listening session to be held at 5:30 pm, Monday, August 31, 2015, in 
Room 326 of Fayetteville City Hall located at 113 W. Mountain Street. The 
purpose of this meeting is to seek public comment and feedback. 


I am certainly not at all against trails or mountain bikes, especially in light 
of the fact that I have ridden bikes all my life. However, there are some areas 
that should be left to explore on your own, and with respect for wild creatures 
being the number 1 priority, not a fast ride through the woods. Kessler is not 
the place for a bunch more miles of mountain bike trails. 


If you are unable to attend the meeting, you may phone Fayetteville Parks and 
Recreation at 479-444-3471. Written comments may be submitted to Fayetteville 
Parks and Recreation, 113 West Mountain, Fayetteville, AR 72701 or 
parks_and_recreation AT fayetteville-ar.gov. 


Advocates for expansion of mountain bike trails will likely speak in a unified 
voice on this. If the birding/environmental community doesn't speak up, I 
foresee an outcome unfavorable to protecting the many nesting birds currently 
associated with the upland hardwood forests on Kessler. 


There is no need to write to me or make a comment about this on ARBIRD. Use the 
process outlined above to make your comments. 

Subject: Shorebirds and others in W Arkansas Valley
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 00:24:29 +0000
Rain in the past few days have refreshed shorebird habitats in the western area 
of the Arkansas River Valley. Especially productive, the big cut-off Arkansas 
River oxbow south of Kibler between Thornhill and East Arnold Roads in the east 
and West-Ark Sod in the west. I also checked Arkansas River at Frog Bayou WMA 
(Dyer Bay) and the Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility. 


Shorebirds today: Semipalmated Plover (2), Killdeer (102), Lesser Yellowlegs 
(~10), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (8), Semipalmated Sandpiper 
(1), Least Sandpiper (13), Pectoral Sandpiper (48), and BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER 
(~153). Most (~132) Buff-breasts were in the part of the oxbow visible from 
Thornkill Road, but down in the grass and hard to see until they flew. The rest 
(21) were easy to see from Crawford Road on the south edge of West-Ark Sod. 


At Dyer Bay there was a flock of Blue-winged Teal (~60), Plegadis ibises (9), 
and Forster's Terns (8). Many of today's Snowy Egrets were at Alma Wastewater, 
white plumage contrasting incongruously with greenish bubbling wastewater 
ponds. Lots of food there, which is the attraction. 

Just past the ponds, a huge Yellow Garden Spider seemed to have hung its orb 
from the clouds - and netted some sizeable prey for its effort. Across the 
road, in the King ranch pasture, Cattle Egrets (~200), including several 
preening atop resting cows. Black-bellied Whistling Ducks (2) in a farm pond 
there. 


I didn't see Upland Sandpipers at the sod farm today, but powerlines were 
really sagging under weight of Cliff Swallows (~1,200), other swallow species, 
and Purple Martins. 


Also interesting today: Swamp Milkweed. The Arkansas Valley is as far south as 
this plant goes. I found patches of 25+ plants on Sharp Chapel Road and at the 
Alma Wastewater plant. Monarchs busy at the flowers in both places. 

Subject: Re: Eurasian Tree Sparrows
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 18:58:37 -0500
I lived in Alton Ill for 6 years, I was nearly always able to find some E Tree 
Sparrows at any time of the year. I went up for Mothers day to visit the 
in-laws this year and found a nest hole in Grafton right by the warehouse used 
as a flea market. I parked right next to a vine covered tree and was checking 
out the birds in a large shrub across the street when a male flew to the tree 
and went in the hole. 


The house next door usually had food out but all feeders were empty. I have 
photos of a nice male with wee critters for the nestlings. Jacque Brown, 
Centerton 



> On Aug 23, 2015, at 11:09 PM, David Arbour  wrote:
> 
>  
> Arkansas is long overdue for a Eurasian Tree sparrow record in my opinion. 
When I lived in Iowa, the E. Tree Sparrows were traveling up and down the 
Mississippi River on grain barges and populating the towns along the river. 
Take a look at the ebird map for them, they are getting close. Someone should 
check any port towns in northeast Arkansas for them. Just a thought. 

>  
> David
Subject: 4 Mississippi Kites in Rogers, AR, today
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 12:21:11 -0500
There were 4 Mississippi Kites circling high and low a near Olive Street
and 28th this morning.  They were very vocal, too.

--Joan
Subject: Tree Sparrow
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757 AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 14:29:27 +0000
Aaah, the little Tree Sparrow. I remember when I was a lad in St.Louis. About 
16 I was in '56, when I discovered a nest of strange looking birds in the 
hollow of an old maple at the end of our little cul de' sac in University City. 
A sparrow with a spot on its cheek. I was already in love with birds after 
being fascinated by the singing canaries my German grandmother raised in their 
basement. She would bring up her favorite males and let them have singing 
contests throughout the rooms in their little home. It was wonderful. So, after 
my discovery, I ran home, found my much used Peterson Guide and learned that 
their were two small colonies. One in St.Louis and one in East St.Louis. They 
were scattered and somewhat rare. How special it was that I had found a nesting 
pair. I remember watching two more clutches hatch. That winter we moved to 
Washington Missouri and no more Tree Sparrows. I still have that old Peterson 
Guide. Fond memories ! Jerry Schulz 

Little Rock, Arkansas
Subject: Mitchell Pruitt presentation on Wednesday this week
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 13:58:30 +0000
Mitchell has been selected as the first Student Scholar Showcase speaker, 
sponsored by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of 
Arkansas. The presentation is from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 26, at the 
Global Campus, 2 E. Center St. in Fayetteville. His talk will be about his 
past, present and future... here is the University announcement: 
http://news.uark.edu/articles/32047/u-of-a-student-known-as-extreme-birder-to-give-illustrated-presentation?utm_source=Newswire&utm_medium=email2015-08-18&utm_campaign=u-of-a-student-known-as-extreme-birder-to-give-illustrated-presentation 


The talk is free and open to the public.

Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************
Subject: Eurasian Tree Sparrows
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 23:09:25 -0500
 

Arkansas is long overdue for a Eurasian Tree sparrow record in my opinion.
When I lived in Iowa, the E. Tree Sparrows were traveling up and down the
Mississippi River on grain barges and populating the towns along the river.
Take a look at the ebird map for them, they are getting close.  Someone
should check any port towns in northeast Arkansas for them.  Just a thought.

 

David
Subject: Videos of Birds
From: Jamie Gwin <aarongwin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 03:21:59 +0000
  
After a long wait and a lot of help from my son and daughter I have finely been 
able to find a man who was ale to connect my 13 year old camcorder to my older 
computer. My intentions are to have a nature type face book page with some bird 
videos and photographs. I now have photographs and two videos of Arkansas 
migrants birds on my face book page 

  
I post no political message or get involved in any political discussions 
there . 

  
I have photographs birds from Barrow, Alaska, the 9 most northern city in the 
world, south almost to the Equator and west to the International Date Line and 
East to some Dutch Islands  off the coast of South America.. Later I will 
post some birds that some of you may have never seen.  I plan to add a couple 
of videos each month.  When someone reports seeing a Long-tailed Duck this 
winter I will then post some video on one.  If discussion get on Snowy Owl I 
will then post video on one.  In case someone gets chased by a Grizzy Bear 
while birding  I was  lucky enough to get  video on one instead of becoming 
bear poop.  For a while the outcome was doubtful as we stood 70 yards apart 
staring at each other face to face.  

One of my videos is listed as Shore Bird Performance.  If anyone can figure 
out what these two shorebird are doing I would appreciate hearing from you. It 
may be some type of mating performance but if so no one scored at that time. 

 My daughter has posted a few photographs of our 50th wedding cerebration but 
you can skip thru them quickly. 

I will be glad to accept people to my face book page but not the 90 friends 
with each person. 

  
The ancient one 
Aaron Gwin 
  
----- Original Message -----

From: "perfectplaces"  
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Saturday, August 22, 2015 9:05:41 PM 
Subject: Wood Storks 



Rhonda and I observed over 100 Wood Storks approximately ½ mile south of the 
Lake Chico pumping plant on the Mississippi river levee road.  Saw Tricolored 
Heron and several spoonbills also.  Alice Sidney Fish Farm produced Avocet, 
Stilts, and a mix of sandpipers and dowitchers.  Not an Ibis to be found all 
day.  Danny Townsend 

Subject: North American Birds Magazine
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 17:55:56 -0500
With Steve Cardiffs retirement from writing the Arkansas/Louisiana column
for North American Birds after the Summer 2013 issue, none of our states
records were being published in subsequent issues. I was ready to drop my
subscription. So it was with surprise and relief to see our region return to
the latest issue, Spring 2014. Not only does LA have a new compiler, but Im
delighted to see that our very own Kenny Nichols had been keeping up with
the records all this time. Either that or he took on the surely long and
tedious task to compile and write up FOUR seasons in one quarter. Not only
are the Spring 2014 records for both states in the latest issue, but NAB
published just the AR records for the two seasons in between AND our Fall
2012 records, which didnt make it into that issue. So nice to see that AR
is caught up and no rare bird records have gone unpublished after all.
Thanks, Kenny!

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites, Drew Co.
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 15:22:45 -0500
Dan, she also reported seeing one at the same location, in late May of this 
year. 


Kenny

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 23, 2015, at 1:57 PM, Daniel Scheiman  wrote:
> 
> Kay Craig Malan posted this to the Arkansas Rare and Unusual Bird Reports 
Facebook page today along with a photo of a single adult Swallow-tailed Kite: 

> 
> "I observed as an adult pair flew over and around the Gee's Landing access of 
the Saline River (Drew Co) I also could hear the young but was unable to 
observe them. I know and older gentleman who has traveled the river bottoms all 
his life who told me that he has seen where they nested in this area. So, 
they've probably been here for awhile but no official report made.” 

> 
> She also submitted 2 STKIs to eBird at this location 33.436546, -91.991566.
> 
> Confirmation of nesting, and especially of successfully fledged young is 
highly desirable. 

> 
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
> 
Subject: Wood storks - yes
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 13:58:55 -0500
Moved to 3.5 - 4 miles south of pumping plant.  Just north of marker 1800.


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites, Drew Co.
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 13:57:53 -0500
Kay Craig Malan posted this to the Arkansas Rare and Unusual Bird Reports
Facebook page today along with a photo of a single adult Swallow-tailed
Kite:

"I observed as an adult pair flew over and around the Gee's Landing access
of the Saline River (Drew Co) I also could hear the young but was unable to
observe them. I know and older gentleman who has traveled the river bottoms
all his life who told me that he has seen where they nested in this area.
So, they've probably been here for awhile but no official report made.

She also submitted 2 STKIs to eBird at this location 33.436546, -91.991566.

Confirmation of nesting, and especially of successfully fledged young is
highly desirable. 

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR


Subject: Wood Storks
From: perfectplaces <perfectplaces AT HUGHES.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 21:05:41 -0500
Rhonda and I observed over 100 Wood Storks approximately  mile south of the
Lake Chico pumping plant on the Mississippi river levee road.  Saw
Tricolored Heron and several spoonbills also.  Alice Sidney Fish Farm
produced Avocet, Stilts, and a mix of sandpipers and dowitchers.  Not an
Ibis to be found all day.  Danny Townsend
Subject: spring '15 records
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2015 15:29:53 -0500
The vetted records for rare and out of season birds discovered during  the
spring 2015 season have been added to the online database. The database can
be searched at www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html .

Lyndal York
Curator - Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: ASCA August Field Trip Aug. 29
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2015 19:55:42 +0000
The August field trip of the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas is next 
Saturday, August 29th.  Please see details below.  Everyone is invited.  You 
don't have to be an ASCA member to participate.  Shorebirds are starting to 
migrant through, so hopefully we'll have a good group of birds by next 
weekend.  Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have any 
questions.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorMaumelle/Little Rock 

 August 29Bald Knob National WildlifeRefugeBald Knob, ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. 
inNorth Little Rock at the Other Center parking lot on the east side of the 
lotbehind McDonald’s.  The Other Center isacross from McCain Blvd. from 
McCain Mall. Take Exit 1 West off US-67/167. We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR 
at around 8:30 a.m. for those who want tomeet us there.  The federal refuge 
isalso a National Audubon Important Bird Area. We expect to see shorebirds, 
herons, night-herons, egrets, and possiblyWood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills.  
Itwill be very hot so bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If 
you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  There is 
no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atBald Knob 
Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for driving directions and 
moreinformation about the refuge.  GPS:  35.260233, -91.571903  
Subject: Greater white-fronted goose
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 12:27:53 -0500
I just observed one on Lake Dardenelle seen easily from Lakefront Drive in 
Russellville. Adult bird. A very, very early migrant. 


Ryan 
Pope Co

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 19
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 20:37:28 -0500
It was mostly cloudy and windy with a thunderstorm on the bird survey today.
64 species were found.  Large numbers of waders are congregating to feed in
the drying up wetlands (units 5, 27B, 40, & 44).  Shorebirds were present
also.  Almost no birds were singing today.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 34

Mallard - 5

Blue-winged Teal - 16

Ring-necked Duck - 1 male

Pied-billed Grebe - 34

American White Pelican - 1

Anhinga - 6

Least Bittern - 2 adults (also one young in nest.)

Great Blue Heron - 34

Great Egret - 197

Snowy Egret - 327

Little-blue Heron - 70

Green Heron - 20

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 24

White Ibis - 146

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 9

Mississippi Kite - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 4

Common Gallinule - 23 (also a couple broods of smallish young.)

American Coot - 9 

Killdeer - 6

Spotted Sandpiper - 5

Solitary Sandpiper - 10

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Lesser Yellowlegs - 4

Upland Sandpiper - 1

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 22

Western Sandpiper - 4

Least Sandpiper - 37

Baird's Sandpiper - 1

Pectoral Sandpiper - 4

Least Tern - 6

Mourning Dove - 10

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 5

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 4

Bell's Vireo - 1

American Crow - 5

Tree Swallow - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 3

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 5

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Yellow Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 9

Indigo Bunting - 70

Painted Bunting - 4 juv.

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 47

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

River Cruiser species

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Spot-winged Glider

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

 

Herps:

 

American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

Visit the Red Slough Photo Gallery:   
www.pbase.com/red_slough_wma 

 

 
Subject: Centerton
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:15:13 -0500
The storms of last night did blow some birds into the area of the State
Fish Hatchery in Centerton.  I ran into Joanie Patterson and Donald there.
Between the 3 of us, we saw 4 Black Terns, and 6 Forster's Terns, all in
various stages of molt, Green and Great Blue Herons, and a Great Egret.  In
the sandpiper department, we saw Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Stilt
Sandpipers, Semi-palmated, Least, Solitary, Spotted, and Pectoral
Sandpipers.  (seems like I missed something).  There were 4 Black-bellied
Plovers, still in breeding plumage, one Semi-palmated Plover, and several
Killdeer.  On SW Anglin Rd, there was a field below and along side a pond
with many Killdeer, Solitary, Stilt, and Pectoral Sandpipers, with a few
hard to see peeps, and 3 Upland Sandpipers, seen by Joanie and Donald.  (I
spent two fairly long periods of time there in an attempt to see the
Uplands, but whiffed.)

Karen Garrett
Rogers
Subject: Adult Natural History Workshops Sept. 19-20 at Ferncliff Camp in Ferndale
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 14:25:58 -0500
Dear ARBIRDers,

Attached are the Adult Natural History Workshops flyer and registration form 
for this year's 3 separate workshops taking place the weekend of September 
19-20 at Ferncliff Camp & Conference Center in Ferndale. We are offering 
"Landscaping with Native Plants for Birds and other Wildlife" by Pam Stewart 
for a second time. We are also offering two new workshops this year, "Aquatic 
Biology" and "Reptiles and Amphibians in Arkansas". The Aquatic Biology 
workshop instructor will be Robin Buff, retired A.P science teacher at 
Fayetteville High School and current director of our Audubon youth ecology 
camps. The Reptiles and Amphibians workshop instructor will be Kory Roberts who 
is a teacher, longtime herps instructor at our youth ecology camp and webmaster 
of Herps of Arkansas. 


We still have some openings in all 3 workshops.

1) If you would like to attend one of our workshops, please let me know by 
e-mail which workshop. 


2) Then complete your registration form, and send it along with your payment. 
Checks should be made payable "Arkansas Audubon Society". 


Friday night lodgings are available if who prefer to arrive at Ferncliff Camp 
Friday evening instead of having a long drive early Saturday morning. Price 
details can be found near the top of the flyer's page 2 under Workshop Cost 
Option 1. 


Please share this with e-mail anyone you think might be interested in 
attending. 


Sincerely,
Barry Haas
Adult Workshop Treasurer
Subject: MIGRATORY ACTIVITY AT BOYD POINT
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 14:11:21 -0500
This morning, Doc George and I enjoyed a morning of observation and photography 
of migratory birds at Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. 
In addition to the numerous Least and Semi-palmated Sandpipers, the notable 
birds were: 2 Baird's Sandpipers, 1 Sanderling in residual of breeding plumage, 
6 Western Sandpipers, 1 adult Semi-palmated Plover, 20 Black Terns and 5 Least 
Terns. In addition, there was flock of 50 Blue-winged Teal 

John Redman
Subject: swarms of hummingbirds
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 10:27:46 -0500
During this welcome series of thunderstorms that have lasted several hours, 
gifting us with much needed rain, the hummingbirds are visiting the feeders in 
numbers I've never before witnessed. All eight portals on all three feeders are 
occupied. At least a dozen more hummers hover, waiting their turns, while 
others emerge from foliage to arc around the gardens, and a few sit quietly on 
branches. With this many hummingbirds I keep hoping to see a rufous! 


Meanwhile fledgling cardinals beg for sunflower seeds and many other species 
are testing the barely ripe elderberries. 



Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: FOS Eared Grebe at Boyd
From: Delos McCauley <edelos AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 00:26:20 -0500
I spotted the first arrival Eared Grebe at the Boyd Point Waste Water
Facility today.  We usually get around 30 or 35 Eared Grebes that come and
spend the winter with us.  So others are probably on their way.

 

Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff
Subject: Feeder Visitors
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 02:05:20 +0000
A yearling black bear visited our peanut/fruit feeder this evening before dark. 
My photos failed. Joe fired the shotgun to scare it back over the fence, but we 
know it’ll be back. Instead of 4 hummer feeders and a suet cage to bring in 
at night to avoid the coons, 2 nut feeders came in with it and the triple-tube 
finch feeder and triple hopper must spend the night in the shed. I felt bad 
cutting the hummers off early but such is life in the country. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: scat?
From: zoe caywood <zcaywood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:52:59 -0500
Squirrel ---  They like your place!

On Mon, Aug 17, 2015 at 8:21 AM, Butch Tetzlaff  wrote:

> My wife and I are relatively new to NWA.  We found these “pellets” in our
> tray feeder the other day.  It hangs from a shepherd’s hook about 6 feet
> off the ground and is near a wood fence about the same height.  There was
> no damage to the feeder or marks on the fence.
>
>
>
> We’re assuming scat.  Does anyone know what the animal might be?
>
>
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
>
> Bentonville, AR
>
>
>
>
>



-- 
Zoe Caywood 479 236 4086
Subject: Re: scat?
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:39:04 -0500
Comparing with the quarter which is a little less than an inch across (24.2 
mm), I’d guess it was a small raccoon with a strong anal sphincter (note the 
attenuated ends). Larger raccoons do leave a sizable, disturbingly human-like 
turd similar to bears and hogs. 


 

The far left piece which is broken apart seems to have a lot of plant fiber in 
it. I didn’t see any hair but the resolution is poor when magnified. If some 
pieces could be dissolved in water or teased apart, there may be some 
identifiable pieces of invertebrates or seeds that had been eaten. 


 

I’d say put them in the compost and invest in a crittercam.

 

Cheers and scat-singin’ at the new moon,

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Carol Joan Patterson 

Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2015 3:32 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: scat?

 

Size is important.  How big are they?

 

  _____  

From: Jeffrey Short 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Monday, August 17, 2015 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: scat?

 

I’d venture raccoon. Did you tease any apart to see what goodies the critter 
had been eating? 


 

Jeff Short

 

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Butch Tetzlaff 

Sent: Monday, August 17, 2015 8:21 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: scat?

 

My wife and I are relatively new to NWA. We found these “pellets” in our 
tray feeder the other day. It hangs from a shepherd’s hook about 6 feet off 
the ground and is near a wood fence about the same height. There was no damage 
to the feeder or marks on the fence. 


 

We’re assuming scat.  Does anyone know what the animal might be?

 

Butch Tetzlaff    

Bentonville, AR

 

 

 
Subject: Re: scat?
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 15:30:52 -0500
I've encountered for-sure raccoon scat on a number of occasions 
(sometimes in the presence of the depositor), and I agree with you, 
Stacy---though in my experience it was more like bear---if not as 
voluminous.

Good luck with those students!

Janine

On 8/18/2015 2:42 PM, Stacy Clanton wrote:
> On a couple of occasions, I've seen, on or near a bird feeder, scat which I 
assumed to be raccoon-produced. "Assumed," because while I didn't actually see 
the depositor of the scat, I knew that raccoons were frequent visitors to our 
yard, especially attracted to the seed cake on nights I forgot to take it in. 

>
> The scat I saw on those occasions didn't look at all like the picture Butch 
sent. In fact, it looked very much like human feces. 

>
> But then, maybe Southwest Arkansas raccoons have different products than 
those in NWA. Or maybe I had just been visited by a disgruntled student! 

>
> Stacy Clanton
>
> From: "ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU" 
> on behalf of 
Jeffrey Short > 

> Reply-To: Jeffrey Short >
> Date: Monday, August 17, 2015 9:31 AM
> To: "ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU" 
> 

> Subject: Re: scat?
>
> Id venture raccoon. Did you tease any apart to see what goodies the critter 
had been eating? 

>
> Jeff Short
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Butch Tetzlaff 

> Sent: Monday, August 17, 2015 8:21 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: scat?
>
> My wife and I are relatively new to NWA. We found these pellets in our tray 
feeder the other day. It hangs from a shepherds hook about 6 feet off the 
ground and is near a wood fence about the same height. There was no damage to 
the feeder or marks on the fence. 

>
> Were assuming scat.  Does anyone know what the animal might be?
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville, AR
>
Subject: Re: scat?
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton AT SAUMAG.EDU>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 19:42:51 +0000
On a couple of occasions, I've seen, on or near a bird feeder, scat which I 
assumed to be raccoon-produced. "Assumed," because while I didn't actually see 
the depositor of the scat, I knew that raccoons were frequent visitors to our 
yard, especially attracted to the seed cake on nights I forgot to take it in. 


The scat I saw on those occasions didn't look at all like the picture Butch 
sent. In fact, it looked very much like human feces. 


But then, maybe Southwest Arkansas raccoons have different products than those 
in NWA. Or maybe I had just been visited by a disgruntled student! 


Stacy Clanton

From: "ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU" 
> on behalf of 
Jeffrey Short > 

Reply-To: Jeffrey Short >
Date: Monday, August 17, 2015 9:31 AM
To: "ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU" 
> 

Subject: Re: scat?

Id venture raccoon. Did you tease any apart to see what goodies the critter 
had been eating? 


Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Butch Tetzlaff 

Sent: Monday, August 17, 2015 8:21 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: scat?

My wife and I are relatively new to NWA. We found these pellets in our tray 
feeder the other day. It hangs from a shepherds hook about 6 feet off the 
ground and is near a wood fence about the same height. There was no damage to 
the feeder or marks on the fence. 


Were assuming scat.  Does anyone know what the animal might be?

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR
Subject: Purple martin roost in Little Rock
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 11:02:23 -0500
All, 

Jerry Butler wrote an article that appears in today's Democrat Gazette about 
the purple martins here in Little Rock. 

Cindy


 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: scat?
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 09:31:46 -0500
I'd venture raccoon.  Did you tease any apart to see what goodies the
critter had been eating?

 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Butch Tetzlaff
Sent: Monday, August 17, 2015 8:21 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: scat?

 

My wife and I are relatively new to NWA.  We found these "pellets" in our
tray feeder the other day.  It hangs from a shepherd's hook about 6 feet off
the ground and is near a wood fence about the same height.  There was no
damage to the feeder or marks on the fence.

 

We're assuming scat.  Does anyone know what the animal might be?

 

Butch Tetzlaff    

Bentonville, AR

 

 
Subject: scat?
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 08:21:10 -0500
My wife and I are relatively new to NWA.  We found these "pellets" in our
tray feeder the other day.  It hangs from a shepherd's hook about 6 feet off
the ground and is near a wood fence about the same height.  There was no
damage to the feeder or marks on the fence.

 

We're assuming scat.  Does anyone know what the animal might be?

 

Butch Tetzlaff    

Bentonville, AR

 

 
Subject: Re: Sighting - Male Rufous Hummingbird, Conway County
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 19:38:09 -0500
PBase finally had a rare compliance with my upload :-)

Here is the link to 5 photos from today: 
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/rufous_hummingbird



Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Gail Miller
Sent: Sunday, August 16, 2015 7:25 PM
To: ARBirdlist
Subject: Sighting - Male Rufous Hummingbird, Conway County

I received a call today from a friend who lives North of Morrilton, near
Hattieville.  She has a male Rufous at her house and I was able to go and
photograph it this afternoon.  It is private property, behind a locked gate,
sorry.  She said it is her first Rufous sighting in over 40 years on the
property.  I've been having a LOT of problems uploading photos to PBase
lately, so I can not provide a link to the photos yet.  When I get them
posted on PBase, I will share the link.  For now, I have them on my Facebook
Page.  https://www.facebook.com/gail.miller.73932

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Sighting - Male Rufous Hummingbird, Conway County
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 19:25:04 -0500
I received a call today from a friend who lives North of Morrilton, near 
Hattieville.  She has a male Rufous at her house and I was able to go and 
photograph it this afternoon.  It is private property, behind a locked gate, 
sorry.  She said it is her first Rufous sighting in over 40 years on the 
property.  I've been having a LOT of problems uploading photos to PBase 
lately, so I can not provide a link to the photos yet.  When I get them 
posted on PBase, I will share the link.  For now, I have them on my Facebook 
Page.  https://www.facebook.com/gail.miller.73932

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root