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Updated on Thursday, December 8 at 11:30 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Andean Cock of the Rock,©BirdQuest

8 Dec Snow Geese die [Lyndal York ]
8 Dec 2nd & 3rd Segments of Waterfowl/Duck/Deer Hunting [Karen Holliday ]
7 Dec NATURE on PBS is about Hummingbirds tonight. 7: PM [Jacque Brown ]
7 Dec PELICAN AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE THIS MORNING [Joseph Neal ]
7 Dec Re: ASCA Holiday Part Addendum [Kara Beach ]
7 Dec Arkansas Times: View Trumpeter Swans in Heber Springs [Barry Haas ]
7 Dec Mississippi River SP Count Circle in Lee and Phillips Co [Tara Gillanders ]
7 Dec First-glassing [Herschel Raney ]
7 Dec ASCA Holiday Part Addendum [Dan Scheiman ]
7 Dec Leucistic Crow- Fayetteville, AR [Melinda Gay ]
6 Dec Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs [Daniel Scheiman ]
6 Dec Red Slough Bird survey - Dec. 6 [David Arbour ]
6 Dec CONCERNING A BUFFLEHEAD RAFT [Joseph Neal ]
6 Dec WESTERN MEADOWLARKS AROUND MAYSVILLE [Joseph Neal ]
5 Dec woodcocks & others [Judy & Don ]
5 Dec Re: Merlin for lunch [Sandy Berger ]
5 Dec Re: Merlin for lunch [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
5 Dec Merlin for lunch [Jeffrey Short ]
5 Dec Re: Geese flying [Ellen Repar ]
4 Dec Re: Geese flying [Jonathan Perry ]
4 Dec Re: Geese flying [Gail Miller ]
4 Dec Re: Geese flying [jonathanperry24 ]
4 Dec Re: Geese flying [Jerry Davis ]
4 Dec Re: Geese flying [Jeffrey Short ]
4 Dec Re: Geese flying [jonathanperry24 ]
4 Dec A FEW DIVING DUCKS FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND THIS MORNING [Joseph Neal ]
4 Dec Re: Geese flying [Sandy Berger ]
4 Dec Dusk, too soon [Herschel Raney ]
4 Dec Geese flying [Joseph Neal ]
4 Dec Rare bird records [Lyndal York ]
4 Dec Miller County 12/04/2016 [Charles Mills ]
4 Dec ASCA Holiday Party, Dec 8 [Daniel Scheiman ]
2 Dec Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike [CK Franklin ]
2 Dec A Vulture problem [Keith Newton ]
3 Dec ON BEAVER LAKE, WATCH THE GULLS [Joseph Neal ]
2 Dec Re: A Vulture problem [Jeffrey Short ]
2 Dec Selasphorus hummingbird at Pangburn [Michael Linz ]
30 Nov Golden eagle [Michael ]
2 Dec DARK MORPH RED-TAILED HAWK NEAR PINE BLUFF [JFR ]
2 Dec Sandhill Flyover @ Two Rivers [ ]
30 Nov Fwd: Golden eagle [Michael Linz ]
1 Dec Re: Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike [Michael ]
2 Dec Plegadis ibis [Charles Mills ]
30 Nov OBSERVABLE FACTS IN A MOMENT AUDUBONESQUE (Centerton) [Joseph Neal ]
2 Dec Re: A Vulture problem [Allan Mueller ]
30 Nov Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 30 [David Arbour ]
3 Dec Red Slough Christmas Bird Count [David Arbour ]
3 Dec Sylamore CBC [Megan Foll ]
2 Dec 117th CBC - new dates set - Bayou DeView, Magnolia, Mount Magazine, Texarkana, my error on Hot Springs Village's date and Red Slough, OK ["Anderson, Leif E -FS" ]
29 Nov CBC [Alan ]
29 Nov Prairie Ridge Preserve [Dan Scheiman ]
29 Nov Re: A riveting reminder not to take common birds for granted ["Reames, Clark -FS" ]
29 Nov Re: A riveting reminder not to take common birds for granted [Allan Mueller ]
28 Nov Birding and Seed Collecting, Prairie Ridge Preserve [Dan Scheiman ]
28 Nov The Snipe Newsletter has now been posted online [Dottie Boyles ]
28 Nov Re: Wild Turkey or not [ ]
27 Nov Need to borrow boots for Two Rivers [CK Franklin ]
27 Nov Frazier Pike, Pulaski Co. [Daniel Scheiman ]
27 Nov So far across the water (Beaver Lake) [Joseph Neal ]
27 Nov Fwd: Hummingbird in Vilonia [Charles Lyon ]
27 Nov ASCA's Annual Potluck & Silent Auction [Dottie Boyles ]
26 Nov Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia [Charles Lyon ]
25 Nov game and fish volunteer request [Lyndal York ]
26 Nov Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike [Keith Hawkins ]
26 Nov Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia [Herschel Raney ]
26 Nov Red-breasted Nuthatch [Robin Buff ]
24 Nov A riveting reminder not to take common birds for granted [Janine Perlman ]
26 Nov Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia [Gail Miller ]
24 Nov Merlin [Bob Harden ]
25 Nov FOS Purple Finch [Lenore ]
26 Nov Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia [Michael Linz ]
25 Nov Sun greeters [Joseph Neal ]
25 Nov Hummingbird in Vilonia [Gail Miller ]
26 Nov Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia [Michael ]
24 Nov Inca Doves [Bob Harden ]
24 Nov Possible Red-throated loon [Michael ]

Subject: Snow Geese die
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 10:23:06 -0600
Arbirders:

I know we have more than enough snow geese, but it is sad the hear about
man made toxic traps for wildlife. The Washington Post and several other
news sources report that 10,000 snow geese landed in a lake consisting of
acid water containing toxic metals such as mercury. This was a mine pit
near Butt, Montana. After a week the geese started to die all over the area.

www.cnn.com/2016/12/07/health/*snow*-*geese*-deaths-berkeley-pit-trnd/

Lyndal York
Little Rock
Subject: 2nd & 3rd Segments of Waterfowl/Duck/Deer Hunting
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1 AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 14:39:49 +0000
If you are out birding, be aware that the second segment of waterfowl/duck 
hunting opened yesterday (Thursday).  Dates are  Dec. 8 thru Dec. 23, 2016.  
The third segment of waterfowl/duck hunting is Dec. 26, 2016 thru Jan. 29, 
2017.  Shooting hours are 30 minutes before sunrise until sunset.  If you see 
flooded fields that have duck blinds, you may not want to stop in that area.  


The second segment of Modern Gun Season for deer hunting is Dec. 26-28.

Just a heads-up as we start our Christmas Bird Counts next week.  Sign up to 
help with as many CBCs as you can.  They are great fun! 

Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little Rock
Subject: NATURE on PBS is about Hummingbirds tonight. 7: PM
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 18:41:12 -0600
Sorry for the late notice. I just got home from work and realized it’s 
Wednesday. 





Jacque Brown

Centerton, AR 72719

618-540-9409  cell

479-224-6099  house

bluebird2 AT cox.net





Subject: PELICAN AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE THIS MORNING
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 21:12:14 +0000
An American White Pelican at Lake Fayetteville this morning was not the lake's 
first December sighting, but such occurrences after typical migration periods 
are always a surprise. Neil Nodelman has observed a single pelican at Lake 
Sequoyah, also in Fayetteville, several times recently, so I was a little less 
surprised by this one. Other waterfowl: Gadwall (6), Mallard (5), Northern 
Shoveler (15), Redhead (1), Lesser Scaup (2), Bufflehead (5) and an adult 
Ring-billed Gull. To join lots of fellow pelicans, all a bird would have to 
perform is the short soar south, into the Arkansas River Valley. So why remain 
up here? One thought: maybe pelicans have exploring genes? Maybe we see some 
adaptation to climate change? Whatever the cause, on a small lake in the 
Ozarks, a big mostly white creature makes quite a showing, especially against a 
backdrop of freezing temps, gray sky, and occasional snowflakes. 

Subject: Re: ASCA Holiday Part Addendum
From: Kara Beach <islippednfell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 14:26:07 -0600
I won’t be attending but want to thank you for this.  It is much appreciated.

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Dan Scheiman 

Sent: Wednesday, December 7, 2016 11:18 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: ASCA Holiday Part Addendum

 

For those of you who are mobility impaired and coming to the Little Rock 
Audubon Center for tomorrow night's Audubon Society of Central Arkansas holiday 
party, please park on the right (north) side of the building and come in 
through the doors next to the garage. That is the handicap accessible entrance. 


 

Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR
Subject: Arkansas Times: View Trumpeter Swans in Heber Springs
From: Barry Haas <bhaas AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 12:15:50 -0600
Dear ARBIRDers,

For those interested in the trumpeter swans on Magness Lake just east of Heber 
Springs, here's a link to a sponsored (by Visit Arkansas) article on the 
Arkansas Times: 



http://www.arktimes.com/arkansas/view-trumpeter-swans-in-heber-springs/Content?oid=4734762 


Enjoy.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
Subject: Mississippi River SP Count Circle in Lee and Phillips Co
From: Tara Gillanders <tara.gillanders AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 18:15:11 +0000
Mississippi River State Park could use a few more volunteers for Our Christmas 
Bird Count Thursday Dec 15th. 


The Mississippi River State Park count circle takes in parts of North East 
Phillips County and South East Lee County. We have diverse habitats since this 
circle includes the state park which is within the St. Francis National Forest 
(the southern part of Crowley’s Ridge) and the surrounding delta. Plus the 
eastern part of our circle includes the St. Francis and Mississippi rivers. 


Email me if you would like to join us this year. 
tara.gillanders AT arkansas.gov 



Tӓra Z Gillanders
Park Interpreter, CIG
Mississippi River State Park
2955 Hwy 44
Marianna, AR  72360
(870) 295-4040
tara.gillanders AT arkansas.gov
This electronic message transmission contains information from the Arkansas 
Department of Parks and Tourism and is confidential or privileged. The 
information is intended to be for the use of the individual or entity named 
above. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure, 
copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is prohibited. 
If you have received this electronic transmission in error, please notify us by 
telephone (870-295-4040) immediately. 




Subject: First-glassing
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 11:21:54 -0600
At age 27 this past week my daughter put up her first bird feeders. And 
she has been waiting patiently for the birds to arrive. She had watched 
them come to my array of feeders after Thanksgiving. Sitting at my front 
window and looking through my wife’s binoculars. She commented “I 
wouldn’t mind having some nice binoculars.” I told her what those 
Leupold’s cost and she said “oh no, something not quite as nice.”

Yesterday, her Christmas binoculars came. After dark, the dogs alerted 
in the house, an unknown car in the drive. Nice young man, wished me 
Merry Christmas. One of the seasonal hires for the USPS I presume. And 
this morning I unpackaged them. I wanted to leave the strap assembly for 
her so I looped some rubber bands through the tight black eyelets and 
hooked them on my shoulder straps. It was time to look at the first bird 
through these things.

I could have just looked at the feeder birds out front. But I wanted 
something better for the first bird. Seemed like it should be something 
more eventful. Though we all know there is nothing wrong with a male 
cardinal or a white-throated sparrow. I walked out toward the cedars. 
Thinking I would make a hermit thrush the first-glassed-bird. Certainly 
one of my favorites in winter. I knew I would not be able to resist a 
sapsucker or a raptor.

I heard kinglets of both varieties. Chickadees heading for the yard. I 
did not lift for them. I heard flickers and crows. And I thought I would 
mark the new binoculars with a close crow if it came. I would lift for 
one that came so close I could see the ringlet feathers on the black 
nape. But one did not come.

I walked all through the cedars around by the creek and up by the 
northeast corner of the property and out onto the land just north of 
mine. No thrushes. Flights of robins were dropping into the treetops. A 
black vulture cruised over but I thought that a wrongish bird to make 
glass-first.

Finally walked out into my dried hardwood swamp and came back into my 
own land inside the bowl of the swamp. It is more open there. And the 
sky, the leaden gray type was more visible. Nothing seemed to be feeding 
on the many berries around. I lifted the glasses for some lovely 
resurrection fern.

And then I heard geese. I thought, hmm, they may be above these low 
clouds. But slowly the sound grew louder and they came out just above me 
passing over. I considered for a moment and lifted the glass to the V of 
geese. Snows and blues and at least five Ross’ geese vocalized across 
and toward the southeast.

I smiled, a fitting bird group to be the first. When my daughter was 
four and five and six and after, I would bundle her up in cap and gloves 
and insulated coat, the puffy dwarf, and we would head to Holla Bend in 
the winter. Back then Holla Bend was more open and had more feed on the 
ground for geese. The flocks could number 40, 50, or even 80 thousand 
making broad white gabbling masses out in the stubble. We would drive up 
on the dirt roads nearest a flock. And if I got out the geese would 
immediately alert and lift away. But if I set the puffy dwarf out on the 
driver’s side, she apparently was something else to the geese. Something 
less dangerous, barely bigger than a full grown snow, being the thinking 
for them I suppose. So she could walk down the edge of the brush or corn 
towards the flock. And though they would lift their heads to look, this 
alien thing did not make them break and fly. She could go and go, stop 
and stutter step out fifty or a hundred yards. She would get virtually 
to the edge of the mass, some of them stepping slightly away. She could 
make a minor inward bulge in the feeding of the birds.

And then something would happen. Maybe just one bird would decide this 
thing is dangerous. Maybe she would snap a grass shaft or corn shuck too 
loudly. Who knows? Maybe just shortstop non-goosiness is given only so 
much leeway and then even a capped little girl is too much for the 
nerves of hunted geese. Whichever it was the flock would break, the 
white and black massive winged and feathered monster would shift and 
clamor up into the sky, the roar of the wings and the thousands of 
calling geese an astounding sudden noise, an upward tornado of 
birdiness. They would swirl and cackle back to the end of the field or 
shift across to another whole part of the refuge. And the little girl 
would always raise her arms high and straight up as they broke. Standing 
there, far enough off that I needed my own binoculars to see her face. 
The joy in those red cheeks and the wide eyes was worth the whole trip.

And then she would run all the way back to me, across clod and furrow, 
broomsedge and cocklebur: the happy face, the mittened hands as I lifted 
her over and back into the warmth of the truck.

“Let’s go find another one.”


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: ASCA Holiday Part Addendum
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 17:17:46 +0000
For those of you who are mobility impaired and coming to the Little Rock 
Audubon Center for tomorrow night's Audubon Society of Central Arkansas holiday 
party, please park on the right (north) side of the building and come in 
through the doors next to the garage. That is the handicap accessible entrance. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Leucistic Crow- Fayetteville, AR
From: Melinda Gay <msgy.272 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 10:46:16 -0600
I just sited an unusually interesting leucistic crow at the White River
Twin bridges area in Fayetteville/ Goshen area on Hwy. 45. (10:25 a.m.)

I thought I was seeing a magpie for a moment (my California background). I
stopped and heard it call. It flew before I could take its picture. I
believe it to be an American Crow from the call. It has a piebald pattern
which I haven't seen in a leucustic crow before. I did see a leucistic
corvid in Oregon year's ago but not to this extent.

It's worth checking out. Spectacular. It landed on the rail of the bridge
while I was driving by, almost causing me to stop traffic (lucky no one was
behind me.)

I am parked at the rock church west of the area typing this email. I
recommend parking in one of the fishing access areas to get a better look.

Misty Gay
Msgy.272 AT gmail.com
Subject: Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 21:23:22 -0600
Calling all Christmas Bird Counters,

There is still plenty of room on teams for the Little Rock (Saturday Dec 17)
and Lonoke (Sunday Dec 18) Christmas Bird Counts. Lonoke has only 6 people
so far, which is not even one person per traditional territory.

Both counts have a great mix of habitats and have the potential to tally
over 100 species, though Lonoke does so more consistently. Rarities found in
the recent past include Rufous Hummingbird, Long-tailed Duck, Glaucous Gull,
Says Phoebe, and the state's first Ash-throated Flycatcher!

Dan Scheiman, Compiler
Little Rock. AR


Subject: Red Slough Bird survey - Dec. 6
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 21:20:49 -0600
It was heavy overcast, cold, and windy on the bird survey today.  62 species
were found.  One Neotropic Cormorant still lingering.  All ibis are
apparently gone.  Was neat to find 5 Purple Finches and I thought I heard a
siskin again.  Here is my list for today:

 

Snow Goose - 10

Wood Duck - 18

Gadwall - 326

American Wigeon - 35

Mallard - 1332

Northern Shoveler - 111

Northern Pintail - 53

Green-winged Teal - 173

Canvasback - 10

Ring-necked Duck - 1426

Lesser Scaup - 6

Hooded Merganser - 3

Ruddy Duck - 7

Pied-billed Grebe - 10

Neotropic Cormorant - 1 imm.

Double-crested Cormorant - 19

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 4

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 31

Bald Eagle - 2 adults

Northern Harrier - 4

Red-tailed Hawk - 5

American Coot - 505

Killdeer - 4

Greater Yellowlegs - 9

Mourning Dove - 128

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 14

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 9

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 61

Fish Crow - 2

Carolina Wren - 4

House Wren - 2

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 6

Marsh Wren - 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 3

American Pipit - 12

Cedar Waxwing - 15

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 5

Savannah Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 5

Song Sparrow - 20

Swamp Sparrow - 7

White-throated Sparrow - 16

Northern Cardinal - 9

Red-winged Blackbird - 100

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Purple Finch - 5

American Goldfinch - 5

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 
Subject: CONCERNING A BUFFLEHEAD RAFT
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 22:49:05 +0000
The 151 male and female Buffleheads in a single raft observable from Mulhollan 
Blind on Lake Fayetteville this afternoon is among our highest counts* on the 
lake. Also: Ruddy Duck (21), Lesser Scaup (2), Northern Shoveler (9), 
Green-winged Teal (3), Mallard (9), and Horned Grebe (3). There was a gull of 
some sort (1). 

Some thoughts upon seeing the Bufflehead flock: For people like me who did not 
grow up in a family of duck hunters or bird watchers, the spectacle and 
inspiration of a sizeable flock of wild creatures, immaculate and penguin-like 
in their simple majesty of black and white, riding into to our lives on a cold 
north wind, seems life's spirit manifest. They've come from nowhere we created, 
pass through our universe briefly, always managing their own affairs. 

Left to us not to interfere. Left to us to utterly respect.
(*Source: The History and Bird Life of Lake Fayetteville by H. David Chapman. 
Available here: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/birdingbooks.htm) 

Subject: WESTERN MEADOWLARKS AROUND MAYSVILLE
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2016 13:28:21 +0000
Maysville centers on former Beaty Prairie, on the eastern fringes of the Great 
Plains in extreme northwestern Arkansas. Maysville has been pretty consistent 
in terms of wintering Western Meadowlarks (WEME). Sometimes they are singing. 
More often in winter, what I hear are distinct chuck calls. In this regard, 
yesterday was particularly productive. 

Northeast of Maysville, junction Austin X Wet Prairie roads, big fields where 
soybeans have been harvested, and especially closely-grazed pastures, often 
yield WEMEs. I had at least 3 there (and of course, many other meadowlarks, 
including Easterns) before driving further east on Highway 72, to huge open 
fields near location of Civil War Camp Walker, especially 72 X Graham Road. 
Fields are managed for hay, grazing, and last year, commercial plantings of 
vegetables. I heard numerous chuck calls in the big vegetable/grazing fields, 
now with numerous cows. It's not that easy to decide just how many, but easily 
in the range of 7-10 midway down Graham. Also LOTs of meadowlarks in these 
fields, including vocalizing Easterns. 

Overall, it was a relatively high number for WEMEs in my experience, though I 
have heard more, especially in terms of big flocks singing during migration. 
Chucking was broken up, at least temporarily, along Graham by a low passing 
Northern Harrier. 

Other birds of interest yesterday: Harris's Sparrows (3), single birds each 
time associated with more numerous flocks of White-crowned Sparrows. Brewer's 
Blackbird (8), including one flock of 7, and a single Rusty Blackbird. Just to 
round out the blackbirds: hundreds of Red-wings leap-frogging through a 
harvested squash field. 

One reason for yesterday's trip was to find Lapland Longspurs. Hopes rising as 
a flock of American Pipits, maybe 150-200 birds, fly low over Wet Prairie Road. 
I can hear everything well; surely in that mass must come longspur tuwes and 
rattles. But NOOO. Ditto for a flock of 50? 100 in the same area with WEMEs 
along Graham Road; again, no longspurs. 

Starting at Siloam Springs, all along highways 59, then 43, then around 
Maysville: noticeable influx of buteos. Most seemed like fairly typical eastern 
red-tails, but a few stand out, especially one along Wet Prairie. Perched atop 
a powerpole, obviously working a roadside thicket of Giant Ragweed, etc., a 
buteo I think is an immature, light-morph Harlan's (I posted images on 
facebook). 

In many years of observing and more recently trying to photograph them, I have 
never encountered one so apparently unconcerned. Driving slowly up the road, no 
matter how close I get, it doesn't fly. When I walk up to the pole: looks down 
at me, doesn't fly. Suddenly drops headlong into the brush, and then back up, 
to the next pole down. 

My impression is that "people" don't register. How far from modern society must 
it have experienced that first crack in the egg? When it first saw our world? 

Subject: woodcocks & others
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 19:01:29 -0600
During the last week of November the trees were full of Robins and Cedar 
Waxwings. Irrupting Red-breasted Nuthatches began to visit the feeders. The 
birdbath, still filled with water due to warm weather, was surrounded morning, 
noon, and evening by Bluebirds, Cedar Waxwings, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Hermit 
Thrushes, Cardinals, Goldfinches, and White-breasted Nuthatches. 


Until this year we have never seen American Woodcocks in November or December. 
However during the last two weeks in November and the first in December, we and 
friends in Carroll County have flushed numerous American Woodcocks. One evening 
two of their plump silhouettes flew over the house as I watched the sunset. 
Obviously these birds migrate south in autumn and then migrate north again in 
February and March when we see them here dancing but even today and again this 
evening my dog Gabriel flushed two. 

Is this unusual?

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Subject: Re: Merlin for lunch
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 19:33:44 +0000
And all I can say is that someone was eaten in my yard by someone else. Not
much left.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith


On Mon, Dec 5, 2016 at 1:26 PM Karen Konarski-Hart 
wrote:

>
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> And our female Coopers is back.  Just when we had what I believe was a
> hermit thrush In the yard.
>
>
> That girl is so cheeky.  Slowly lifts off from over the feeder to sit in
> the tree, beak in the air, completely ignoring my pitiful efforts to shoo
> her away.
>
>
> Hopefully she'll soon go dove-diving elsewhere  & take us off her routine
> stop. Karen Hart
>
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> Sent from my iPhone
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>
> On Dec 5, 2016, at 12:40 PM, Jeffrey Short  wrote:
>
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> A FOYard Merlin today alighted (alit?) in a Dogwood tree near our feeder.
> Ruined lunchtime for the other birds…
>
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> Jeff Short
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Subject: Re: Merlin for lunch
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 19:25:36 +0000
And our female Coopers is back. Just when we had what I believe was a hermit 
thrush In the yard. 

That girl is so cheeky. Slowly lifts off from over the feeder to sit in the 
tree, beak in the air, completely ignoring my pitiful efforts to shoo her away. 

Hopefully she'll soon go dove-diving elsewhere & take us off her routine stop. 
Karen Hart 


Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 5, 2016, at 12:40 PM, Jeffrey Short 
> wrote: 


A FOYard Merlin today alighted (alit?) in a Dogwood tree near our feeder. 
Ruined lunchtime for the other birds... 


Jeff Short
Subject: Merlin for lunch
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 12:40:26 -0600
A FOYard Merlin today alighted (alit?) in a Dogwood tree near our feeder.
Ruined lunchtime for the other birds.

 

Jeff Short
Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: Ellen Repar <blueeyes621 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2016 15:27:18 +0000
Wonderful!

Ellen Repar
Little Rock

On Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 9:58 PM Jonathan Perry 
wrote:

> It's viewable on YouTube. Lousy, but better'n nothin'. Long personal story
> involving my taciturn Greatest Generation dad. Made the first time I
> actually saw a Snow Goose poignant almost beyond words. Birds flow in and
> out of our lives.......or "fly"......
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Dec 4, 2016, at 8:30 PM, Gail Miller 
> wrote:
>
> I LOVED the movie “The Snow Goose”, did you know that you can NOT buy it
> on DVD, or anything else, for that matter.  I bought a very, VERY lousy
> recording of it once, off EBay, but you could not see anything at all!
> Someone must have tried recording it off the TV movie.   I do have the book
> and I will occasionally re-read it.  The movie was wonderful, I was always
> a Richard Harris fan as well.
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [
> mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU ] *On
> Behalf Of *jonathanperry24
> *Sent:* Sunday, December 04, 2016 7:31 PM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
> *Subject:* Re: Geese flying
>
>
>
> As a psychologist, I've never been drawn to or convinced by Jungian
> archetypal notions. They seem close to "magic" to me, and that wouldn't
> serve me well in my professional endeavors. Nevertheless...there is clearly
> something about wild geese aloft, calling and honking their way to
> who-knows-where, that awakens some call-and-response in many of us. Perhaps
> a few of us could collaborate on a presentation sometime, somewhere,
> celebrating wild geese and our manifold responses to their own
> announcements. Art, poetry, music, film (does anyone remember "The Snow
> Goose", by Paul Gallico, and the lovely TV movie based on it starring
> Richard Harris--1971?), maybe even dance (outside my area). What think you?
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>
> Licensed Psychologist
>
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
>
>
> On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 7:20 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:
>
> At this time of year during migration I am reminded of the Frankie Lane
> song Wild Goose. " I must go where the wild goose goes and I must know
> what the wild goose knows..." A few of you may be old enough to remember
> this one and those that are not need to look it up and listen to it.
>
> Jerry W. Davis
>
>
>
>
>  Below is a poem that my grandmother wrote while in the 1980’s—when she
> > was in her 80’s—for a class at the (then) Garland County Community
> > College.
> >
> >
> >
> > Wait for Me
> >
> >
> >
> > Wild geese fly across at night.
> >
> > Their cries awaken me
> >
> > With an urgency to follow.
> >
> >
> >
> > With the fading sound
> >
> > I settle back
> >
> > while my heart cries,
> >
> > “Wait!  Wait for me!”
> >
> >
> >
> > If the sound had lingered
> >
> > a moment longer,
> >
> > would I have moved to follow?
> >
> >
> >
> > Carrie Joyce Jamison
> >
> >
> >
> > From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> > [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of jonathanperry24
> > Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 4:27 PM
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Geese flying
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Wild Geese," by Mary Oliver
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > You do not have to be good.
> >
> >
> > You do not have to walk on your knees
> >
> >
> > for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
> >
> >
> > You only have to let the soft animal of your body
> >
> >
> > love what it loves.
> >
> >
> > Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the world goes on.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
> >
> >
> > are moving across the landscapes,
> >
> >
> > over the prairies and the deep trees,
> >
> >
> > the mountains and the rivers.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
> >
> >
> > are heading home again.
> >
> >
> > Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
> >
> >
> > the world offers itself to your imagination,
> >
> >
> > calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting -
> >
> >
> > over and over announcing your place
> >
> >
> > in the family of things.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> >
> > Licensed Psychologist
> >
> > Fayetteville, Arkansas
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:
> >
> > Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in
> > Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south
> > and flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning
> > like that. At Beaver Lake’s Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east
> > of Rogers: Common Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6),
> > Mallard (4), Ring-billed Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more
> > geese (I could see ~30, but I doubt this was the whole flock).
> >
> > Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2
> > PM at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another
> > Beaver stop – at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett
> > and Kitty Sanders there):  LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3
> > overflights, including one with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no
> > Ross’s) and another that must have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and
> > Mallard, probably (97); “probably” because they were a mile away, out
> > in the old White River channel. In several small rafts, American Coots
> > (24) that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle.
> >
> > Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they
> > fly by like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common
> > Loons. Sure enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~
> > 20 total) scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a
> > fast fly-by of probable Hooded Mergansers (~25).
> >
> > There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese,
> > arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is
> > not tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and
> > overall, not even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray
> > wintering sky made over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of
> > geese.
> >
> > That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell
> > Pruitt summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed
> > them as very rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that
> > thought, a useful reminder of how much we can still learn right in our
> own
> > back yards.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 21:57:47 -0600
It's viewable on YouTube. Lousy, but better'n nothin'. Long personal story 
involving my taciturn Greatest Generation dad. Made the first time I actually 
saw a Snow Goose poignant almost beyond words. Birds flow in and out of our 
lives.......or "fly"...... 


Sent from my iPad

> On Dec 4, 2016, at 8:30 PM, Gail Miller  wrote:
> 
> I LOVED the movie “The Snow Goose”, did you know that you can NOT buy it 
on DVD, or anything else, for that matter. I bought a very, VERY lousy 
recording of it once, off EBay, but you could not see anything at all! Someone 
must have tried recording it off the TV movie. I do have the book and I will 
occasionally re-read it. The movie was wonderful, I was always a Richard Harris 
fan as well. 

>  
> Gail Miller
> Conway
>  
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of jonathanperry24 

> Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 7:31 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Geese flying
>  
> As a psychologist, I've never been drawn to or convinced by Jungian 
archetypal notions. They seem close to "magic" to me, and that wouldn't serve 
me well in my professional endeavors. Nevertheless...there is clearly something 
about wild geese aloft, calling and honking their way to who-knows-where, that 
awakens some call-and-response in many of us. Perhaps a few of us could 
collaborate on a presentation sometime, somewhere, celebrating wild geese and 
our manifold responses to their own announcements. Art, poetry, music, film 
(does anyone remember "The Snow Goose", by Paul Gallico, and the lovely TV 
movie based on it starring Richard Harris--1971?), maybe even dance (outside my 
area). What think you? 

> 
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>  
> On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 7:20 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:
> At this time of year during migration I am reminded of the Frankie Lane
> song Wild Goose. " I must go where the wild goose goes and I must know
> what the wild goose knows..." A few of you may be old enough to remember
> this one and those that are not need to look it up and listen to it.
> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> 
> 
> 
>  Below is a poem that my grandmother wrote while in the 1980’s—when she
> > was in her 80’s—for a class at the (then) Garland County Community
> > College.
> >
> >
> >
> > Wait for Me
> >
> >
> >
> > Wild geese fly across at night.
> >
> > Their cries awaken me
> >
> > With an urgency to follow.
> >
> >
> >
> > With the fading sound
> >
> > I settle back
> >
> > while my heart cries,
> >
> > “Wait!  Wait for me!”
> >
> >
> >
> > If the sound had lingered
> >
> > a moment longer,
> >
> > would I have moved to follow?
> >
> >
> >
> > Carrie Joyce Jamison
> >
> >
> >
> > From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> > [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of jonathanperry24
> > Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 4:27 PM
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Geese flying
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Wild Geese," by Mary Oliver
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > You do not have to be good.
> >
> >
> > You do not have to walk on your knees
> >
> >
> > for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
> >
> >
> > You only have to let the soft animal of your body
> >
> >
> > love what it loves.
> >
> >
> > Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the world goes on.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
> >
> >
> > are moving across the landscapes,
> >
> >
> > over the prairies and the deep trees,
> >
> >
> > the mountains and the rivers.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
> >
> >
> > are heading home again.
> >
> >
> > Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
> >
> >
> > the world offers itself to your imagination,
> >
> >
> > calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting -
> >
> >
> > over and over announcing your place
> >
> >
> > in the family of things.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> >
> > Licensed Psychologist
> >
> > Fayetteville, Arkansas
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:
> >
> > Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in
> > Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south
> > and flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning
> > like that. At Beaver Lake’s Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east
> > of Rogers: Common Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6),
> > Mallard (4), Ring-billed Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more
> > geese (I could see ~30, but I doubt this was the whole flock).
> >
> > Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2
> > PM at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another
> > Beaver stop – at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett
> > and Kitty Sanders there):  LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3
> > overflights, including one with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no
> > Ross’s) and another that must have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and
> > Mallard, probably (97); “probably” because they were a mile away, out
> > in the old White River channel. In several small rafts, American Coots
> > (24) that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle.
> >
> > Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they
> > fly by like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common
> > Loons. Sure enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~
> > 20 total) scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a
> > fast fly-by of probable Hooded Mergansers (~25).
> >
> > There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese,
> > arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is
> > not tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and
> > overall, not even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray
> > wintering sky made over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of
> > geese.
> >
> > That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell
> > Pruitt summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed
> > them as very rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that
> > thought, a useful reminder of how much we can still learn right in our own
> > back yards.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>  
Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 20:30:12 -0600
I LOVED the movie “The Snow Goose”, did you know that you can NOT buy it on 
DVD, or anything else, for that matter. I bought a very, VERY lousy recording 
of it once, off EBay, but you could not see anything at all! Someone must have 
tried recording it off the TV movie. I do have the book and I will occasionally 
re-read it. The movie was wonderful, I was always a Richard Harris fan as well. 


 

Gail Miller

Conway

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of jonathanperry24 

Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 7:31 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Geese flying

 

As a psychologist, I've never been drawn to or convinced by Jungian archetypal 
notions. They seem close to "magic" to me, and that wouldn't serve me well in 
my professional endeavors. Nevertheless...there is clearly something about wild 
geese aloft, calling and honking their way to who-knows-where, that awakens 
some call-and-response in many of us. Perhaps a few of us could collaborate on 
a presentation sometime, somewhere, celebrating wild geese and our manifold 
responses to their own announcements. Art, poetry, music, film (does anyone 
remember "The Snow Goose", by Paul Gallico, and the lovely TV movie based on it 
starring Richard Harris--1971?), maybe even dance (outside my area). What think 
you? 





Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.

Licensed Psychologist

Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 7:20 PM, Jerry Davis  > wrote: 


At this time of year during migration I am reminded of the Frankie Lane
song Wild Goose. " I must go where the wild goose goes and I must know
what the wild goose knows..." A few of you may be old enough to remember
this one and those that are not need to look it up and listen to it.

Jerry W. Davis




 Below is a poem that my grandmother wrote while in the 1980’s—when she
> was in her 80’s—for a class at the (then) Garland County Community
> College.
>
>
>
> Wait for Me
>
>
>
> Wild geese fly across at night.
>
> Their cries awaken me
>
> With an urgency to follow.
>
>
>
> With the fading sound
>
> I settle back
>
> while my heart cries,
>
> “Wait!  Wait for me!”
>
>
>
> If the sound had lingered
>
> a moment longer,
>
> would I have moved to follow?
>
>
>
> Carrie Joyce Jamison
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  ] On 
Behalf Of jonathanperry24 

> Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 4:27 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU  
> Subject: Re: Geese flying
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Wild Geese," by Mary Oliver
>
>
>
>
> You do not have to be good.
>
>
> You do not have to walk on your knees
>
>
> for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
>
>
> You only have to let the soft animal of your body
>
>
> love what it loves.
>
>
> Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
>
>
> Meanwhile the world goes on.
>
>
> Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
>
>
> are moving across the landscapes,
>
>
> over the prairies and the deep trees,
>
>
> the mountains and the rivers.
>
>
> Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
>
>
> are heading home again.
>
>
> Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
>
>
> the world offers itself to your imagination,
>
>
> calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting -
>
>
> over and over announcing your place
>
>
> in the family of things.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>
> Licensed Psychologist
>
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
>
>
> On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM, Joseph Neal  > wrote: 

>
> Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in
> Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south
> and flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning
> like that. At Beaver Lake’s Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east
> of Rogers: Common Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6),
> Mallard (4), Ring-billed Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more
> geese (I could see ~30, but I doubt this was the whole flock).
>
> Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2
> PM at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another
> Beaver stop – at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett
> and Kitty Sanders there):  LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3
> overflights, including one with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no
> Ross’s) and another that must have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and
> Mallard, probably (97); “probably” because they were a mile away, out
> in the old White River channel. In several small rafts, American Coots
> (24) that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle.
>
> Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they
> fly by like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common
> Loons. Sure enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~
> 20 total) scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a
> fast fly-by of probable Hooded Mergansers (~25).
>
> There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese,
> arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is
> not tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and
> overall, not even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray
> wintering sky made over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of
> geese.
>
> That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell
> Pruitt summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed
> them as very rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that
> thought, a useful reminder of how much we can still learn right in our own
> back yards.
>
>
>
>
>
>

 
Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 19:31:07 -0600
As a psychologist, I've never been drawn to or convinced by Jungian
archetypal notions. They seem close to "magic" to me, and that wouldn't
serve me well in my professional endeavors. Nevertheless...there is clearly
something about wild geese aloft, calling and honking their way to
who-knows-where, that awakens some call-and-response in many of us. Perhaps
a few of us could collaborate on a presentation sometime, somewhere,
celebrating wild geese and our manifold responses to their own
announcements. Art, poetry, music, film (does anyone remember "The Snow
Goose", by Paul Gallico, and the lovely TV movie based on it starring
Richard Harris--1971?), maybe even dance (outside my area). What think you?

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 7:20 PM, Jerry Davis  wrote:

> At this time of year during migration I am reminded of the Frankie Lane
> song Wild Goose. " I must go where the wild goose goes and I must know
> what the wild goose knows..." A few of you may be old enough to remember
> this one and those that are not need to look it up and listen to it.
>
> Jerry W. Davis
>
>
>
>  Below is a poem that my grandmother wrote while in the 1980’s—when she
> > was in her 80’s—for a class at the (then) Garland County Community
> > College.
> >
> >
> >
> > Wait for Me
> >
> >
> >
> > Wild geese fly across at night.
> >
> > Their cries awaken me
> >
> > With an urgency to follow.
> >
> >
> >
> > With the fading sound
> >
> > I settle back
> >
> > while my heart cries,
> >
> > “Wait!  Wait for me!”
> >
> >
> >
> > If the sound had lingered
> >
> > a moment longer,
> >
> > would I have moved to follow?
> >
> >
> >
> > Carrie Joyce Jamison
> >
> >
> >
> > From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> > [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of jonathanperry24
> > Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 4:27 PM
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Geese flying
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Wild Geese," by Mary Oliver
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > You do not have to be good.
> >
> >
> > You do not have to walk on your knees
> >
> >
> > for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
> >
> >
> > You only have to let the soft animal of your body
> >
> >
> > love what it loves.
> >
> >
> > Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the world goes on.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
> >
> >
> > are moving across the landscapes,
> >
> >
> > over the prairies and the deep trees,
> >
> >
> > the mountains and the rivers.
> >
> >
> > Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
> >
> >
> > are heading home again.
> >
> >
> > Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
> >
> >
> > the world offers itself to your imagination,
> >
> >
> > calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting -
> >
> >
> > over and over announcing your place
> >
> >
> > in the family of things.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> >
> > Licensed Psychologist
> >
> > Fayetteville, Arkansas
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:
> >
> > Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in
> > Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south
> > and flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning
> > like that. At Beaver Lake’s Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east
> > of Rogers: Common Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6),
> > Mallard (4), Ring-billed Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more
> > geese (I could see ~30, but I doubt this was the whole flock).
> >
> > Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2
> > PM at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another
> > Beaver stop – at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett
> > and Kitty Sanders there):  LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3
> > overflights, including one with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no
> > Ross’s) and another that must have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and
> > Mallard, probably (97); “probably” because they were a mile away, out
> > in the old White River channel. In several small rafts, American Coots
> > (24) that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle.
> >
> > Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they
> > fly by like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common
> > Loons. Sure enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~
> > 20 total) scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a
> > fast fly-by of probable Hooded Mergansers (~25).
> >
> > There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese,
> > arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is
> > not tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and
> > overall, not even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray
> > wintering sky made over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of
> > geese.
> >
> > That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell
> > Pruitt summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed
> > them as very rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that
> > thought, a useful reminder of how much we can still learn right in our
> own
> > back yards.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 20:20:13 -0500
At this time of year during migration I am reminded of the Frankie Lane
song Wild Goose. " I must go where the wild goose goes and I must know
what the wild goose knows..." A few of you may be old enough to remember
this one and those that are not need to look it up and listen to it.

Jerry W. Davis



 Below is a poem that my grandmother wrote while in the 1980’s—when she
> was in her 80’s—for a class at the (then) Garland County Community
> College.
>
>
>
> Wait for Me
>
>
>
> Wild geese fly across at night.
>
> Their cries awaken me
>
> With an urgency to follow.
>
>
>
> With the fading sound
>
> I settle back
>
> while my heart cries,
>
> “Wait!  Wait for me!”
>
>
>
> If the sound had lingered
>
> a moment longer,
>
> would I have moved to follow?
>
>
>
> Carrie Joyce Jamison
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of jonathanperry24
> Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 4:27 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Geese flying
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Wild Geese," by Mary Oliver
>
>
>
>
> You do not have to be good.
>
>
> You do not have to walk on your knees
>
>
> for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
>
>
> You only have to let the soft animal of your body
>
>
> love what it loves.
>
>
> Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
>
>
> Meanwhile the world goes on.
>
>
> Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
>
>
> are moving across the landscapes,
>
>
> over the prairies and the deep trees,
>
>
> the mountains and the rivers.
>
>
> Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
>
>
> are heading home again.
>
>
> Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
>
>
> the world offers itself to your imagination,
>
>
> calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting -
>
>
> over and over announcing your place
>
>
> in the family of things.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>
> Licensed Psychologist
>
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
>
>
> On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:
>
> Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in
> Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south
> and flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning
> like that. At Beaver Lake’s Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east
> of Rogers: Common Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6),
> Mallard (4), Ring-billed Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more
> geese (I could see ~30, but I doubt this was the whole flock).
>
> Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2
> PM at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another
> Beaver stop – at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett
> and Kitty Sanders there):  LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3
> overflights, including one with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no
> Ross’s) and another that must have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and
> Mallard, probably (97); “probably” because they were a mile away, out
> in the old White River channel. In several small rafts, American Coots
> (24) that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle.
>
> Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they
> fly by like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common
> Loons. Sure enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~
> 20 total) scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a
> fast fly-by of probable Hooded Mergansers (~25).
>
> There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese,
> arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is
> not tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and
> overall, not even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray
> wintering sky made over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of
> geese.
>
> That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell
> Pruitt summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed
> them as very rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that
> thought, a useful reminder of how much we can still learn right in our own
> back yards.
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 18:27:54 -0600
Below is a poem that my grandmother wrote while in the 1980’s—when she was 
in her 80’s—for a class at the (then) Garland County Community College. 


 

Wait for Me

 

Wild geese fly across at night.

Their cries awaken me

With an urgency to follow.

 

With the fading sound

I settle back

while my heart cries,

“Wait!  Wait for me!”

 

If the sound had lingered

a moment longer,

would I have moved to follow?

 

Carrie Joyce Jamison

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of jonathanperry24 

Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2016 4:27 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Geese flying

 




"Wild Geese," by Mary Oliver

 


You do not have to be good.


You do not have to walk on your knees


for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.


You only have to let the soft animal of your body


love what it loves.


Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.


Meanwhile the world goes on.


Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain


are moving across the landscapes,


over the prairies and the deep trees,


the mountains and the rivers.


Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,


are heading home again.


Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,


the world offers itself to your imagination,


calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting -


over and over announcing your place


in the family of things.









Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.

Licensed Psychologist

Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:

Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in 
Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south and 
flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning like that. 
At Beaver Lake’s Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east of Rogers: 
Common Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6), Mallard (4), 
Ring-billed Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more geese (I could see 
~30, but I doubt this was the whole flock). 


Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2 PM at 
Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another Beaver stop 
– at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett and Kitty Sanders 
there): LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3 overflights, including one 
with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no Ross’s) and another that must 
have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and Mallard, probably (97); “probably” 
because they were a mile away, out in the old White River channel. In several 
small rafts, American Coots (24) that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle. 


Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they fly by 
like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common Loons. Sure 
enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~ 20 total) 
scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a fast fly-by of 
probable Hooded Mergansers (~25). 


There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese, 
arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is not 
tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and overall, 
not even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray wintering sky 
made over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of geese. 


That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell Pruitt 
summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed them as very 
rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that thought, a useful 
reminder of how much we can still learn right in our own back yards. 


 

 
Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 16:27:15 -0600
*"Wild Geese," by Mary Oliver*

You do not have to be good.
You do not have to walk on your knees
for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
You only have to let the soft animal of your body
love what it loves.
Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
Meanwhile the world goes on.
Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
are moving across the landscapes,
over the prairies and the deep trees,
the mountains and the rivers.
Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
are heading home again.
Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
the world offers itself to your imagination,
calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting -
over and over announcing your place
in the family of things.




Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM, Joseph Neal  wrote:

> Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in
> Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south
> and flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning like
> that. At Beaver Lake’s Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east of
> Rogers: Common Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6), Mallard
> (4), Ring-billed Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more geese (I
> could see ~30, but I doubt this was the whole flock).
>
> Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2
> PM at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another
> Beaver stop – at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett and
> Kitty Sanders there):  LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3
> overflights, including one with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no
> Ross’s) and another that must have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and
> Mallard, probably (97); “probably” because they were a mile away, out in
> the old White River channel. In several small rafts, American Coots (24)
> that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle.
>
> Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they fly
> by like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common Loons.
> Sure enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~ 20
> total) scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a fast
> fly-by of probable Hooded Mergansers (~25).
>
> There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese,
> arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is
> not tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and
> overall, not even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray
> wintering sky made over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of geese.
>
> That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell
> Pruitt summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed
> them as very rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that thought, a
> useful reminder of how much we can still learn right in our own back yards.
>
>
>
Subject: A FEW DIVING DUCKS FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND THIS MORNING
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 21:22:43 +0000
A cool light rain and mostly drizzle has been making its way through northwest 
Arkansas. So now we are having the coolest temps so far - raised my hopes a 
bunch of diving ducks might be pushed south. Not. But still interesting this 
morning at Mulhollan Blind on Lake Fayetteville: Gadwall (2), Mallard (2), 
Northern Shoveler (5), Ring-necked Duck (3), Lesser Scaup (11), Pied-billed 
Grebe (5), Horned Grebe (4), Double-crested Cormorant (2), American Coot (9). 
Even in misty overcast and distance, we could see rings on bills of Ring-necked 
Ducks, blue bills of scaup. Nice and dry in the blind, too. 

Subject: Re: Geese flying
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 21:16:47 +0000
As I stepped out of the car in the church parking lot this morning, I heard
Snow Geese flying over.  They were very high, encased in clouds.  I had to
stop walking and listen some more to make sure I heard right.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith, AR


On Sun, Dec 4, 2016 at 2:56 PM Joseph Neal  wrote:

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in
> Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south
> and flying low under clouds – hard to stay in the house on a morning like
> that. At Beaver Lake’s
>
> Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east of Rogers: Common Loon (2),
> Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6), Mallard (4), Ring-billed Gull (5),
> Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more geese (I could see ~30, but I doubt this
> was the whole flock).
>
>
> Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2
> PM at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another
> Beaver stop – at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett and
> Kitty Sanders
>
> there):  LOTS more geese flying – we had at least 3 overflights,
> including one with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no Ross’s) and
> another that must have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and Mallard, probably
> (97);
>
> “probably” because they were a mile away, out in the old White River
> channel. In several small rafts, American Coots (24) that drew interest
> from an adult Bald Eagle.
>
>
>
> Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte’s (8). When they fly
> by like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren’t any Common Loons.
> Sure enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~ 20
> total) scattered, but
>
> water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a fast fly-by of probable
> Hooded Mergansers (~25).
>
>
> There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese,
> arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is
> not tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn’t see any rare birds, and
> overall, not even many
>
> common and expected birds, but we did see a gray wintering sky made over
> in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of geese.
>
>
> That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell
> Pruitt summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed
> them as very rare in Arkansas. Mitchell’s project overturns that thought, a
> useful reminder
>
> of how much we can still learn right in our own back yards.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Dusk, too soon
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 15:15:58 -0600
The Hermit Thrushes were worked up this morning as I worked in my woods. 
Weeet noises in all directions. I was not digging up earth or grubs or 
worms so they stayed out in the brush.

A beautiful sapsucker has been coming to the dead spire outside my 
window. And every day, what I think is the same Brown Creeper also comes.

Snow Geese going over every fifteen minutes or so. Somewhere inside the 
cloud cover.

Kinglets talk among themselves. And sometimes in the late afternoon the 
local pair of Pileated Woodpeckers will make the long dueling chatter 
with each other. Seemingly just to talk, just to hear that they are 
close, that in the world for now there is just him and her, telling each 
other that he and she exist, in these woods, on this day.

On December the 2^nd I heard Gray treefrogs squeaking. I am not sure 
that has ever happened before.

Despite that I know winter is looming like a fight I dread. Like a pill 
I need to swallow when I would just rather listen to the robins settle 
in the cedar trees. Oh, December, your darks fall hard and early.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR
Subject: Geese flying
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 20:56:12 +0000
Before daylight yesterday, I heard Snow Geese flying over my house in 
Fayetteville. On a cloudy night, with rain coming in, geese heading south and 
flying low under clouds - hard to stay in the house on a morning like that. At 
Beaver Lake's Prairie Creek boat ramp, on highway 12 east of Rogers: Common 
Loon (2), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (6), Mallard (4), Ring-billed 
Gull (5), Bald Eagle (1 immature). Plus more geese (I could see ~30, but I 
doubt this was the whole flock). 

Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society had its winter meeting scheduled for 2 PM at 
Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, so that left time for another Beaver stop - 
at Corp of Engineers Rocky Branch Park (met Barry Bennett and Kitty Sanders 
there): LOTS more geese flying - we had at least 3 overflights, including one 
with ~300 Snows (mostly white, some blues, no Ross's) and another that must 
have been 400. In addition: Gadwall and Mallard, probably (97); "probably" 
because they were a mile away, out in the old White River channel. In several 
small rafts, American Coots (24) that drew interest from an adult Bald Eagle. 

Of gulls, fly-bys from Ring-billed (7) and Bonaparte's (8). When they fly by 
like that on Beaver, it usually means there aren't any Common Loons. Sure 
enough, we saw 0. There were small groups of Horned Grebes (~ 20 total) 
scattered, but water so choppy we missed many. Also missed, a fast fly-by of 
probable Hooded Mergansers (~25). 

There is very little in nature that impresses like a sky full of geese, 
arranging and rearranging as they transect Earth, a reminder that all is not 
tamed for sake of Homo sapiens. We didn't see any rare birds, and overall, not 
even many common and expected birds, but we did see a gray wintering sky made 
over in a timeless fashion by flights and calls of geese. 

That got us ready for the NWAAS meeting and the presentation by Mitchell Pruitt 
summarizing his research on Northern Saw-whet Owls. We once viewed them as very 
rare in Arkansas. Mitchell's project overturns that thought, a useful reminder 
of how much we can still learn right in our own back yards. 

Subject: Rare bird records
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 14:18:35 -0600
Arbirders:  It is time to submit your records of rare and out of season
birds for the fall period of August through November to the Bird  Records
Committee. Just go to www.arbirds.org/rbreports.html and enter your data.
If you have several records, you can enter them in an Excel file and email
the file to arbirds0 AT gmail.com .

The latest edition of the AAS Field List is now available for download  on
the arbirds.org website.

Lyndal York
Curator Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Miller County 12/04/2016
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 10:53:57 -0600
A short outing through eastern Miller County netted at least 24 Sandhill 
Cranes, 1 Barn Owl and 1 Merlin. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: ASCA Holiday Party, Dec 8
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 09:20:22 -0600
Join Audubon Society of Central Arkansas on Thursday, December 8, from 6:00
 9:00 p.m., at the Little Rock Audubon Center for our annual holiday
potluck and silent auction. You dont have to be a dues-paying member to
share in the fun with your fellow birders.
 
If you are bringing an item for the auction please be there by 6:00 p.m. in
order to get the item(s) labeled and in place. Items can be purchased or
handmade.
 
Dinner begins at 6:30. Bring a dish to share. ASCA will provide the drinks.
Plates, cups, and eating utensils will be furnished by Audubon Arkansas.
 
In addition to all the fun, well conduct one important point of business 
elect officers and board members for the upcoming year. So exercise your
right to vote!
 
The Little Rock Audubon Center is located on the southeast side of Little
Rock at 4500 Springer Blvd. Take I-440 to exit 1, Springer Blvd.  Go south
(left) on Springer Blvd. Cross the railroad tracks, then look for the center
and Audubon Arkansas sign on the right.
 
Also a reminder to signup with me for the Little Rock (Dec 17) and Lonoke
(Dec 18) Christmas Bird Counts. ASCA sponsors these counts.
 
For more information, go to our website at ascabird.org.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 00:22:06 +0000
At 4 pm 4 cranes were present at the first levee crossing going south on 
Frazier Pike. Karen H saw 1 Inca Dove at the corner of Frazier Pike & Harper 
Rd. It flew before Bill B. or I could get binocs on it. We also had at least 
one Rusty Blackbird further south on Frazier past the levee. 

Cindy F
Little Rock


Subject: A Vulture problem
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 09:23:37 -0600
I have a friend who lives atop a bluff with decks that have become a favorite 
resting destination for Vultures, which would be ok, except for the deposits 
they leave. We were talking about finding a way to deter them. One suggestion 
was to install little stanchions with small wire strung between them above the 
deck rail. Not wanting to do harm to the birds, are there any guidelines or 
other suggestions for this problem? 
Subject: ON BEAVER LAKE, WATCH THE GULLS
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 00:43:12 +0000
Scouting a sector of Fayetteville CBC was on the agenda this morning (Jacque 
Brown, Jonathan Perry, Rick Jones, and me). It was a warming, low wind day, 
perfect for big lakes. So after the scout, we hit a few spots on the north side 
of Beaver: Glade (on Slate Gap Road) and the adjoining Corp of Engineer parks 
at Lost Bridge South and North. 

Horned Grebes (30) at Glade looked like they were floating on glass. Too far 
out, about 75 ducks that seemed mostly Mallards and Gadwalls. We could see all 
the way across to Rocky Branch (2 miles). At Lost Bridge South Park: Common 
Loons (3) closely attended by Bonaparte's Gulls (17). A similar situation at 
Lost Bridge North Park: Common Loons (5) attended by Bonaparte's Gulls (~45), 
plus a single male Hooded Merganser. We could see Beaver Lake dam site area 
easily from Lost Bridge North today. 

A person might get the idea gulls are harassing loons, but what I think this is 
fish. They both seek schools of abundant fish, like shad. I'm not sure who 
finds them, but the loons look into the water, dive, and disappear. The gulls 
wait and get excited and seem to start fishing themselves when loons reappear. 

Maybe loons stir up fish and make them vulnerable to gulls. We didn't see any 
Common Goldeneyes today, but when they are present, these divers also come with 
gulls. Whatever is actually happening, at Beaver the best way to find a loon, 
even one very far out, is to watch gulls. 

Subject: Re: A Vulture problem
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 18:39:16 -0600
There was a product called "Nixalite" that are strips with sharp prongs to
keep the birds away from roosting spots. They are available through Walmart,
Sam's Club and Sears. If there are young children prone to climbing on the
rails, that may not be a good solution. The spikes also tend to collect
debris (e.g., leaves) over time.

There are also some non-toxic "fogs" that seems to work on pigeons and other
birds.

Vulture effigies (i.e., fake, dead vultures) are effective for short periods
of time, depending on the attractivenss of the site.  I would think effigies
would be somewhat off-putting to some individuals, though probably not as
bad as the "deposits".  

If you have a laser pointer--green seems to work best--shine the light
around the deck or railing  when you see the vultures loitering.  Don't
shine the light into their eyes.  I don't know if the lasers will work on
vultures but it seems to do a great job on Canada Geese, blackbirds, gulls,
etc.  If the ambient lighting is bright, the vultures may not respond, dusk
or night is optimum for the lasers.

Any substantial problem may require a USFWS depredation permit. Thurman
Booth works for USDA, and could help with some ideas. 

Jeff Short



-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Keith Newton
Sent: Friday, December 02, 2016 9:24 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: A Vulture problem

I have a friend who lives atop a bluff with decks that have become a
favorite resting destination for Vultures, which would be ok, except for the
deposits they leave. We were talking about finding a way to deter them. One
suggestion was to install little stanchions with small wire strung between
them above the deck rail. Not wanting to do harm to the birds, are there any
guidelines or other suggestions for this problem? =
Subject: Selasphorus hummingbird at Pangburn
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 23:11:39 -0600
I went to Pangburn, AR in White County to look at another Selasphorus
hummingbird.
It would not expose it's tail for a picture but I did take a few shots with
it's tail closed.  It is most likely a Rufous female but it was easy to let
my imagination say that bill is decurved and that back is green.  Link to
pictures below:

https://goo.gl/Cwzhwd

While I was in the area I ran over to the "Swan ponds" at Heber Springs.
At the west pond there were 18, east pond had 8 and 0 on Magness.  The
numbers are still way down from what is normally seen there.  The
Ring-necked Ducks are starting to show up...38 of them.
The link above does contain a couple of duck shots from Heber as well.

Michael(Conway)
Subject: Golden eagle
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 12:54:01 -0600
Golden Eagle on Howell Rd in the New Hope Bottoms.  
This was about an hour ago(11:40am 11/30/2016). Howell is just before you get 
to Dardanelle off highway 247. 


Kestrels and Merlin also seen....

Michael Linz (Conway)
Subject: DARK MORPH RED-TAILED HAWK NEAR PINE BLUFF
From: JFR <johnfredman AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 17:23:29 -0600
This morning I photographed my first dark morph Red-tailed Hawk. It was perched 
in the top of a large Cypress along Black Bayou, as it courses near Hwy 31 just 
north of the junction with Hwy 79. In this area just north of Ark. River I have 
seen 2 Krider's, but never a dark morph. I have always been envious when 
reading Joe Neal's descriptions of his frequent sightings of dark morph 
Red-tails. My hawk posed for a long time and then, unprovoked, took flight. I 
was able to get shots of both the up and down strokes of it's wings, which 
showed the dark red tail. The all chocolate brown body with rufous overtones 
makes for a magnificent bird! 

John Redman
Subject: Sandhill Flyover @ Two Rivers
From: Ragan Sutterfield <000001798b796cbe-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 18:27:19 +0000
I had an hour to bird this morning at Two Rivers on the west end.  Just as I 
was heading back through the large field toward the marshy area near the 
bathrooms I saw a Sandhill Crane flying over the field heading east back toward 
the river.   


 On Friday, December 2, 2016 12:00 AM, ARBIRD-L automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

 

 There are 3 messages totaling 86 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Lake Dardanelle
  2. Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike (2)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 2 Dec 2016 00:13:56 +0000
From:    Kenny Nichols 
Subject: Lake Dardanelle

For the last few weeks the lake has been covered with waterbirds -primarily 
ducks, gulls, pelicans and cormorants. One adult Lesser Black-backed Gull that 
has been present for several weeks has been joined by another -also an adult. 
They are best seen from Delaware Rec Area. Late this afternoon, I had a Western 
Grebe in addition to the two black-backed gulls. 


Kenny NicholsDardanelle, AR

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 2 Dec 2016 00:22:06 +0000
From:    CK Franklin 
Subject: Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike

At 4 pm 4 cranes were present at the first levee crossing going south on 
Frazier Pike. Karen H saw 1 Inca Dove at the corner of Frazier Pike & Harper 
Rd. It flew before Bill B. or I could get binocs on it. We also had at least 
one Rusty Blackbird further south on Frazier past the levee. 

Cindy F
Little Rock


------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 1 Dec 2016 18:50:57 -0600
From:    Michael 
Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike

Patty and I missed the cranes at 2:00 today but there was an even dozen Inca 
Doves in the drive of the red house at the corner(driveway is on Frazier Pike). 


Michael

> On Dec 1, 2016, at 6:22 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:
> 
> At 4 pm 4 cranes were present at the first levee crossing going south on 
Frazier Pike. Karen H saw 1 Inca Dove at the corner of Frazier Pike & Harper 
Rd. It flew before Bill B. or I could get binocs on it. We also had at least 
one Rusty Blackbird further south on Frazier past the levee. 

> Cindy F
> Little Rock
> 
> 

------------------------------

End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 30 Nov 2016 to 1 Dec 2016 (#2016-338)
**************************************************************

   
Subject: Fwd: Golden eagle
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 20:57:08 -0600
Not so golden eagle....
I got home and checked the pictures on this bird and it was NOT a Golden
Eagle.
Sorry for the false alarm.

Picture link below...
https://goo.gl/9tB3k1

Michael Linz(redfaced in Conway)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michael 
Date: Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 12:54 PM
Subject: Golden eagle
To: ARBIRD-L AT listserv.uark.edu


Golden Eagle on Howell Rd in the New Hope Bottoms.
This was about an hour ago(11:40am 11/30/2016).  Howell is just before you
get to Dardanelle off highway 247.

Kestrels and Merlin also seen....

Michael Linz (Conway)
Subject: Re: Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 1 Dec 2016 18:50:57 -0600
Patty and I missed the cranes at 2:00 today but there was an even dozen Inca 
Doves in the drive of the red house at the corner(driveway is on Frazier Pike). 


Michael

> On Dec 1, 2016, at 6:22 PM, CK Franklin  wrote:
> 
> At 4 pm 4 cranes were present at the first levee crossing going south on 
Frazier Pike. Karen H saw 1 Inca Dove at the corner of Frazier Pike & Harper 
Rd. It flew before Bill B. or I could get binocs on it. We also had at least 
one Rusty Blackbird further south on Frazier past the levee. 

> Cindy F
> Little Rock
> 
> 
Subject: Plegadis ibis
From: Charles Mills <swamp_fox AT MAC.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 19:17:25 -0600
While on a brief photo outing east of Texarkana this morning, a flock of 20 
Plegadis ibis flew overhead about a mile north of the intersection of Hwy 82 
and Miller County 27. I've not been able to critically examine all 3 images I 
was able to obtain but, from what I have seen, I suspect at least 1-2 of them 
may have been White-faced. Whatever their identity, it's pretty late in the 
year to see such a number of Plegadis ibis. 


Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: OBSERVABLE FACTS IN A MOMENT AUDUBONESQUE (Centerton)
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 20:44:34 +0000
North on I-49, on my way this morning to Craig State Fish Hatchery in 
Centerton, I was listening to a radio discussion, essence of which seems in our 
politico stratosphere, facts are not what they used to be. This is one reason, 
among too many to go into here, why I like visiting drained fish ponds at 
Centerton -- and birding in general, especially shorebirds -- and also why I 
love botany. 

Count all you want, from left to right, or right to left, and it won't make any 
difference to 25 Killdeer on a mudflat. A Sawtooth Sunflower is a Sawtooth 
Sunflower, no matter who you voted for. 

At Centerton there were so many birdfacts in the first big drained pond I never 
got anywhere else. Hatchery personnel were dozing out an adjoining pond and the 
birds had gotten used to noise and movement; paid no attention to me. A Rusty 
Blackbird walking the flat was all bold rust red with animated gold for eyes. 
Snipe were so close I could hear them growling at each other over little wet 
dimples in algae-covered flats. Pipits landed next to my car and kept bobbing. 

The best bird in the past 100 years may have been over at the next pond. I 
didn't make it. 

So here are just the bare facts: Killdeer (~30), Least Sandpiper (23), Dunlin 
(2), Wilson's Snipe (~25), American Pipit (12+), Rusty Blackbird (3). In good 
light and close up, there is no bird more extraordinary than a Wilson's Snipe. 
This fact and the truth of it are only obscured - and might serve as subject 
for a panel discussion -- if the bird itself is so far away the truth can't be 
discerned. 

A Dunlin and a Least Sandpiper foraging alongside one another, close to my car, 
with the sun to my back, provided grand comparison of relative body size, bill 
length, and leg color. Observable facts in a moment Audubonesque. 

A Dunlin and a Least Sandpiper for sure know one from the other. And that's a 
fact you can take to the next election or post to ebird. 

Subject: Re: A Vulture problem
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 11:01:18 -0600
Contact Thurman Booth, contact information below, for help with these kind
of problems.


Thurman W. Booth, Arkansas
Wildlife Services State Director
1020 Lantrip Road
Sherwood, AR 72120
Phone: (501) 835-2318
FAX: (501) 835-2350
Toll-Free Number: 1-866-4USDAWS
1-866-487-3297
thurman.w.booth AT aphis.usda.gov
www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife-damage

Allan Mueller

On Fri, Dec 2, 2016 at 9:23 AM, Keith Newton 
wrote:

> I have a friend who lives atop a bluff with decks that have become a
> favorite resting destination for Vultures, which would be ok, except for
> the deposits they leave. We were talking about finding a way to deter them.
> One suggestion was to install little stanchions with small wire strung
> between them above the deck rail. Not wanting to do harm to the birds, are
> there any guidelines or other suggestions for this problem?




-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 30
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 20:32:07 -0600
The day started off cold and cloudy with a light wind and turned sunny,
windy, and a little warmer by afternoon.   74 species were found.
Passerines were hard to come by in the wind today.  The White Ibis' found
today were a new late date for Red Slough.   One Neotropic Cormorant is
still lingering.   Here is my list for today:

 

Canada Goose - 40

Wood Duck - 56

Gadwall - 1030

American Wigeon - 14

Mallard - 439

Northern Shoveler - 114

Northern Pintail - 125

Green-winged Teal - 136

Ring-necked Duck - 1012

Bufflehead - 1 male

Hooded Merganser - 7

Ruddy Duck - 5

Pied-billed Grebe - 16

Neotropic Cormorant - 1 imm.

Double-crested Cormorant - 40

Great-blue Heron - 8

Great Egret - 12

White Ibis - 10

Black Vulture - 15

Turkey Vulture - 105

Bald Eagle - 1 adult

Northern Harrier - 4

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 9

Virginia Rail - 3

American Coot - 428

Killdeer - 10

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Bonaparte's Gull - 3

Ring-billed Gull - 1

Rock Pigeon - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 7

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 16

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 300

Fish Crow - 5

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 1

House Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 3

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 2

Eastern Bluebird - 10

American Robin - 22

American Pipit - 19

Cedar Waxwing - 6

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 6

Pine Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 7

Fox Sparrow - 9

Song Sparrow - 11

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 6

White-throated Sparrow - 17

White-crowned Sparrow - 10

Dark-eyed Junco - 5

Northern Cardinal - 10

Red-winged Blackbird - 145

Rusty Blackbird - 2

Common Grackle - 57

Purple Finch - 1

American Goldfinch - 9

 

 

Odonates:

 

Variegated Meadowhawk

Wandering Glider

 

 

Herps:

 

Red-eared Slider

Missouri River Cooter

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: Red Slough Christmas Bird Count
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 20:44:15 -0600
We are starting back up the Red Slough Christmas Bird Count this year.  The
date will be Thursday December 22.  We have a new compiler, Leif Anderson,
who works for the forest service in Arkansas and runs several CBC's in
Arkansas.  I am the co-compiler.  We could really use some help getting this
count off to a good start.  If you are interested in helping with the count
please contact me off-list.  Thanks!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: Sylamore CBC
From: Megan Foll <auntm13 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 09:59:46 -0600
Hello all,

I thought I'd add this email address as a way to contact me if you want to
participate in the Sylamore CBC.  So now you can use either mnfoll AT fs.fed.us
or auntm13 AT gmail.com.

Hope to see some of you soon!
Megan Foll
Subject: 117th CBC - new dates set - Bayou DeView, Magnolia, Mount Magazine, Texarkana, my error on Hot Springs Village's date and Red Slough, OK
From: "Anderson, Leif E -FS" <leanderson AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 21:25:31 +0000

Greetings all,
It's getting close to the coolest (figuratively & literally) birding of the 
year. 


The Christmas Bird Counts are held around the Americas from 12/14 through 1/5. 
Counts have been done for 117 years - the oldest citizen science bird database 
in the hemisphere. 




If you've seen Audubon's Climate Change Report, then you know that the CBC & 
BBS supplied the data that made the report possible. Here is your chance to 
help the science, building toward future planned reports! 


Any birding skill level is fine.
Any length of time is welcome.
Just contact a compiler for details and join in the fun.
It's FREE for all, though donations to Audubon are always appreciated.

You're welcome to contact me for general information - Leanderson "at" 
fs.fed.us or leave a message at 479-284-3150 ext 3151. If you're looking for 
life birds, contact me and I can tell you which counts would give you the best 
chance of seeing them. 

"at" =  AT   in the list below.



I messed-up and listed Hot Springs Village as the 15th. But it's the 14th. 
Sorry. 


Dec 14th Wens:

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER EAST (near Buffalo Point on Hwy 14); Jack Stewart; 
jampack1 "at" mac.com; Sponsored by Buffalo National River Partners. 


HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE; Chris Cash; c52cash "at" sbcglobal.net Sponsored by Hot 
Springs Village Audubon 


JONESBORO;    Virginie Rolland;   vrolland "at" astate.edu



15th Thurs:
MISSISSIPPI RIVER SP (near Marianna); Tara Gillanders; tara.gillanders "at" 
arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mississippi River SP 




16th Fri:

BAYOU DeVIEW (near Brinkley);  Steve Osborne;  jsteveosborne "at" gmail.com

MAGNOLIA/ LAKE COLUMBIA; Darrell & Debbie Chatelain; darrell1951 "at" 
suddenlink.net 


TEXARKANA (northern Miller co); Don Kyle; rondokyle "at" windstream.net Meeting 
7am at Rondo Methodist Church at jct of Hwy 237 & E 19th st. 




17th Sat:

ARKADELPHIA;  Evelyn & Glenn Good;   theoldcrow "at" sbcglobal.net

CROOKED CREEK (near Harrison);  Alan Gregory;  quattro "at" windstream.net

FORT SMITH; Bill Beall; billtoka "at" mynewroads.com (Bill has been compiling 
for 66 years!!) 


LITTLE ROCK; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon 
Society of Central AR 


VILLAGE CREEK SP; Heather Runyan; heather.runyon "at" arkansas.gov 870-238-9406 
Sponsored by Village Creek SP. 




18th Sun:

CONWAY; Allan Mueller; akcmueller "at" gmail.com Co-compiler Michael Linz 
mplinz "at" gmail.com 


FAYETTEVILLE; Joe Neal; joeneal "at" uark.edu; Co-compiler Mike Mlodinow mamlod 
"at" hotmail.com Sponsored by NorthWest AR Audubon. 


HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; Shelley Todd; shelley_todd "at" nps.gov 501-620-6751 
Sponsored by Hot Springs NP 


LONOKE; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society 
of Central AR 




19st Mon:
MOUNTAIN HOME;   Tom Krohn;   dreamer "at" Yellville.net



21st Wens:

SYLAMORE RANGER DISTRICT; (near Mountain View); Megan Foll; mnfoll "at" 
fs.fed.us Sponsored by US Forest Service. 




22nd Thurs:

RED SLOUGH, OK; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Co-compiler David 
Arbour arbour "at" Windstream.net 




29th Thurs:

LAKE GEORGIA PACIFIC/ FELSENTHAL NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us 
Sponsored by Felsenthal NWR and the Friends of Felsenthal NWR. 


PINE BLUFF; Rob Doster; rdoster "at" Hotmail.com Sponsored by Three Rivers 
Audubon Society 




30th Fri:

WAPANOCCA NWR; Dick Preston; dickpreston "at" rittermail.com Co-compiler of TN 
side Van Harris shelbyforester1223 "at" bigriver.net Sponsored by TN 
Ornithological Society 




31th Sat:

MOUNT MAGAZINE; Don Simons; don.simons "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mount 
Magazine SP 




Jan 1st Sun:

LAKE DARANELLE;    Kenny Nichols;   kingbird "at"  ymail.com



3rd Tues:

NORTH FORK of the ILLINOIS BAYOU (near Hector); Sarah Davis; sadavis "at" 
fs.fed.us; Contact Leif Anderson after 12/18; Sponsored by US Forest Service. 




4th Wens:

HOLLA BEND NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Holla 
Bend NWR & the Friends of Holla Bend NWR. 




5th Thurs:

WHITE RIVER NWR;   (Near St. Charles)    Than Boves;   tboves "at" astate.edu



Dates not set yet:

BIG LAKE NWR;   Al Reams;  corgiboy47 "at" outlook.com



I'll do occasional remailings as other count dates are set.

cheers, Leif  AT  Hector






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: CBC
From: Alan <quattro AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 19:22:49 -0600
The Crooked creek Christmas bird count will be Sat. Dec. 17. Anyone is
welcome to join us.  We have lost several of our regular counters for this
year so, we need all the help we can get. We are having a tally rally at
Leonardo's pizza at 5 pm, and Stepahnie Barr is sponsoring a mini-cbc for
people who want to dip their toes in the water without getting too wet. It
is set for 8am at Lake Harrison. There might be pastry and coffee.  I will
be serving as compiler again this year so anyone interested or who has any
questions can contact me, Alan gregory at Quattro AT windstream.net. 

If anyone is interested in the Buffalo River CBC on Dec 14  contact Jack
Stewart or me and we can carpool from Harrison.

Alan Gregory

 



---
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Subject: Prairie Ridge Preserve
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 22:06:38 +0000
Five birders and two of my Audubon Arkansas coworkers joined me this morning at 
Prairie Ridge Preserve, Clark Co. Highlights include Le Conte's Sparrows (a 
lifer for one birder), a cooperative Sedge Wren, two territorial Brown-headed 
Nuthatches, and two Loggerhead Shrikes. The complete checklist is in eBird 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32785101 


After birding we collected bags and bags of Rattlesnake Master seed heads for 
using in Audubon's NATIVE Project. 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: Re: A riveting reminder not to take common birds for granted
From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames AT FS.FED.US>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 17:17:43 +0000
Interesting info.. Although not a bird commonly found in this area, I forwarded 
it out to our district bios as a good study on genetics.… 


[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
creames AT fs.fed.us

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
[USDA Logo][Forest Service 
Twitter][USDA 
Facebook] 


Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Jack and Pam 

Sent: Monday, November 28, 2016 7:01 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A riveting reminder not to take common birds for granted

Janine,
Thank you so much for posting this fascinating article on the White-throated 
Sparrow. 


Jack

On Thursday, November 24, 2016 12:22 PM, Janine Perlman 
> wrote: 



http://www.nature.com/news/the-sparrow-with-four-sexes-1.21018?WT.ec_id=NEWS-20161124&spMailingID=52842448&spUserID=MTc2NjQ3ODY5NgS2&spJobID=1047205062&spReportId=MTA0NzIwNTA2MgS2 






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 
Subject: Re: A riveting reminder not to take common birds for granted
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 11:06:08 -0600
Jack,

What a great story, all the way around.  Thanks for posting it.

Allan

On Mon, Nov 28, 2016 at 9:01 PM, Jack and Pam <
00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request AT listserv.uark.edu> wrote:

> Janine,
> Thank you so much for posting this fascinating article on the
> White-throated Sparrow.
>
> Jack
>
>
> On Thursday, November 24, 2016 12:22 PM, Janine Perlman <
> jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET> wrote:
>
>
> http://www.nature.com/news/the-sparrow-with-four-sexes-1.
> 21018?WT.ec_id=NEWS-20161124&spMailingID=52842448&spUserID=
> MTc2NjQ3ODY5NgS2&spJobID=1047205062&spReportId=MTA0NzIwNTA2MgS2
>
>
>


-- 
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"
Subject: Birding and Seed Collecting, Prairie Ridge Preserve
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 21:58:17 +0000
Birding and seed collecting at Prairie Ridge Preserve outside Arkadelphia is 
still on for tomorrow. Should be a beautiful day. Details are here 
http://ar.audubon.org/events/birding-and-native-seed-collection-prairie-ridge-preserve 
. If you want to carpool or caravan from Little Rock please contact Uta Meyer 
umeyer AT audubon.org . 


Dan Scheiman 
Little Rock, AR 
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter has now been posted online
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 10:44:52 -0600
The latest issue of The Snipe has now been posted to the ASCA website.
For the latest information on the December Potluck and Silent Auction,
upcoming programs, field trips, and other news visit:
http://wp.ascabird.org/?p=1703 [1]

Thanks
Dottie
Little
Rock


Links:
------
[1] http://wp.ascabird.org/?p=1703
Subject: Re: Wild Turkey or not
From: "POPHAM, JAMES T GS-11 USAF AMC 19 CES/CEIEC" <james.popham AT US.AF.MIL>
Date: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 14:05:16 +0000
It's not a domestic, i.e., usually white turkey raised for food. It's the 
original genetic strain. 


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Glenn 

Sent: Friday, November 25, 2016 10:19 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Wild Turkey or not

I get a little confused about what is considered a wild bird. Take for example 
the Wild Turkey. Wild Turkey is a species of turkey, but it doesn't necessarily 
mean it's wild. I have taken photos of Wild Turkeys, only to be told they are 
always hanging around in that person's yard so they aren't wild. So what makes 
a bird wild and reportable in places like eBird? A turkey could hang around a 
person's back yard in the country and be wild. Or, maybe that person raised 
those turkeys making them domestic Wild Turkeys. Either way, they are the same 
bird. If someone always feeds their hummingbirds to a point where they will 
come sit on their finger, is it still a wild bird? What criteria does a birder 
use to determine what is a reportable wild bird? 



Glenn Wyatt
Cabot, AR

Subject: Need to borrow boots for Two Rivers
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 21:48:03 +0000
Folks in LR, an out of state birder will be stopping in LR Tuesday & would like 
to see the Le Conte Sparrows at Two Rivers. I told her I would try to borrow a 
pr of size 9 rubber boots for that walk. Does anyone in town have a pair I can 
pick up tomorrow & returnon Wednesday? 

Cindy


Subject: Frazier Pike, Pulaski Co.
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 14:16:37 -0500
I birded along Thibault Rd. and Frazier Pike this morning. Struck out on
Merlin, Sandhill Crane, and Inca Dove. I even walked a stretch of Frazier
Pike from Harper Rd. south and talked to a homeowner by that intersection
who saw the doves in his yard yesterday. I drove Harper Rd. all the way to
Sweet Home just to see what it is like.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Subject: So far across the water (Beaver Lake)
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 10:49:30 +0000
Yesterday, northwest Arkansas was socked-in by dense, freezing fog. My roof 
looked like snow. Trees dripping like rain. So the idea of a trip up to Lake 
Few Loons (Beaver) didn't seem promising. Even if the season's greatest rarity 
was present, I couldn't see it. I had another cup of coffee. Stopped, shopped, 
and stalled. 

Finally, around 10, a modest thinning. At 10:30 actual rays. At 11, what 
started as freezing fog was bold sunshine. That moment was celebrated at Rocky 
Branch on Lake Few Loons by an adult Bald Eagle, majestic as a Christmas 
calendar, perched in a snag overlooking the marina. 

On the walk down to the shoreline: Red-headed Woodpeckers (3), Cedar Waxwings, 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1), Yellow-rumped Warblers (2), Eastern Bluebirds flying 
over and calling, and a flock of Dark-eyed Juncos (~20) working the shoreline 
grasses. Out on the lake: Canada Goose (13), a low number of Gadwalls (3) and 
Mallards (~10), Red-breasted Merganser (3), Common Loon (1), another adult Bald 
Eagle, Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (~81). Staggering, because so late 
in the season: a single swallow that seemed more like Barn than Tree, but so 
far across the water I never could decide what it was. 

On the way back, at Prairie Creek ramp on highway 12, lots of boats being 
launched in the sunny mid-50s, plus: Red-breasted Merganser (2), Common Loon 
(2), Bald Eagle (1, adult), and Ring-billed Gulls (4) loafing on a gravel bar 
that has emerged in low water. 

So, once again, Beaver continues as Lake Few Loons, but these few are 
appreciated! We can always travel to Lake Many Loons (Tenkiller) as needed. 

Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society is holding its annual winter meeting at 
Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area visitors center on Saturday, December 3, 
starting at 2 PM. Headliner is Mitchell Pruitt and Northern Saw-whet Owl 
research. I just checked the 10-day forecast; December 3 looks good for a 
return to Rocky Branch, so I'll plan to be in the Rocky Branch marina parking 
lot by 9 AM for anyone interested. We'll quit in plenty of time for lunch and 
Mitchell. 

Subject: Fwd: Hummingbird in Vilonia
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 00:53:29 -0600
AR-birders,
I have forwarded a reply from Nancy Newfield, who despite her humility, really 
is an expert on the subject, and has written a couple of books on hummingbirds. 

Charlie Lyon 

Sent from my iPhone. C Lyon 

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Nancy Newfield 
> Date: November 27, 2016 at 12:37:20 AM CST
> To: Charles Lyon 
> Subject: RE: Fwd: Hummingbird in Vilonia
> 
> Charlie,
> 
> I do not consider myself an expert on Broad-taileds, having only banded a few 
hundred in Louisiana, Texas, and Arizona, but I have banded a few thousand 
Rufous in Louisiana alone. 

> 
> I took a look at the new images and still see a female Rufous / Allen's. One 
of the clinchers for me is the rusty-colored undertail 

> coverts. No Broad-tailed should be colored so brightly. Broad-tailed should 
be cream-colored. 

> 
> I'll be back home tomorrow evening and will rereview all the images Tuesday 
and let you know if I have any additional thoughts. Am ccing to Steve C because 
he also queried me about the same bird. 

> 
> Nan 
> 
> 
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S® 5 mini, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Charles Lyon 
> Date: 11/26/2016 23:07 (GMT+00:00) 
> To: Nancy L Newfield  
> Subject: Fwd: Hummingbird in Vilonia 
> 
> Nancy,
> Your thoughts. Looks like a Rufous to me...some of AR people think 
Broad-tailed. 

> Charlie
> 
> Sent from my iPhone. C Lyon 
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: Herschel Raney 
>> Date: November 26, 2016 at 3:45:54 PM CST
>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>> Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
>> Reply-To: Herschel Raney 
>> 
>> From Michael's very fine shots I am willing to put 50 bucks on a fall female 
Broad-tailed. One more spread tailed shot should do it. 

>> Herschel Raney
>> 
>> Conway AR
>> 
>>> On 11/26/2016 1:08 PM, Michael Linz wrote:
>>> I'm thinking that we will only know for sure what the bird is if she can 
get a bander out to catch the bird. The property owner is trying to do this. 

>>> 
>>> Below is a link to a few pictures I took this morning....
>>> Lighting was bad and I never got a good tail shot but have out of town 
guest and had to come home.... 

>>> 
>>> https://goo.gl/K3Wvha
>>> 
>>> Michael (Conway)
>>> 
>>>> On Sat, Nov 26, 2016 at 9:43 AM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

>>>> You could definitely hear it fly up to the feeder
>>>> 
>>>>  
>>>> 
>>>> Gail Miller
>>>> 
>>>>  
>>>> 
>>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Michael 

>>>> Sent: Saturday, November 26, 2016 9:42 AM
>>>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>>>> Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
>>>> 
>>>>  
>>>> 
>>>> Bird is still present. Gail's tail picture had me leaning toward 
broad-tail. In the field I am hearing the wing trill of a rufous. 

>>>> 
>>>> So I think it is a rufous.
>>>> 
>>>>  
>>>> 
>>>> Michael Linz (Conway or at least close to there)
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> On Nov 25, 2016, at 6:28 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

>>>> 
>>>> I got a text from friends yesterday about a hummingbird at their house in 
Vilonia. I went out today to get photos, as it was dark by time I got home from 
Thanksgiving with family yesterday. The Vilonia folks had a male Rufous 
Hummingbird back in November 2013 that I also was able to photograph. Not 
positive on the ID of the one today, I’ve sent the photos to several folks. 
ID suggestions are welcome. I included the not-so-good tail shot to try to help 
with ID. 

>>>> 
>>>>  
>>>> 
>>>> http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/hummingbird_id
>>>> 
>>>>  
>>>> 
>>>> Gail Miller
>>>> 
>>>> Conway, AR (Faulkner Co.)
>>>> 
>>> 
>> 
Subject: ASCA's Annual Potluck & Silent Auction
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles AT ARISTOTLE.NET>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 00:27:50 -0600
ASCA's Annual Potluck & Silent Auction

Please join the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) on Thursday,
December 8, from 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., at the Little Rock Audubon Center for our
annual holiday potluck and silent auction. The  Center is located at 4500
Springer Blvd., just minutes from downtown. Take I-440 to exit 1, Springer
Blvd. Go south (left) on Springer Blvd. Cross the railroad tracks, then look
for the center and Audubon Arkansas sign on the right.

This fun-filled event is a great opportunity to enjoy wonderful food, spread
some holiday cheer, and exchange stories with fellow birders.

If you are bringing an item for the auction please be there by 6:00 p.m. in
order to get the item(s) labeled and in place. We'll begin accepting bids at
6:15 and sit down for dinner at 6:30. Items can be purchased or handmade.

ASCA will provide the drinks. Plates, cups, and eating utensils will be
furnished by Audubon Arkansas. Bring your favorite dish and join us on
December 8 for a fun-filled evening and a chance to visit with fellow
birders from around the state.

In addition to all the fun, we'll conduct one important point of business -
election of Officers and Board Members for the upcoming year.

Hope to see you there.
Dottie Boyles
Little Rock

Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 23:39:23 -0600
Herschel/ARBIRD,
I'm not asking for your money, but some of my LA birding friends would like to 
get into the betting action if I decline. The bird in question looks to be most 
likely a female Rufous Hummingbird, but certainly a Rufous/Allen's Selasphorus, 
and not a Broad-tailed. The consensus is the tail is not only too short for 
Broad-tailed but the rectrices are too narrow to be Broad-tailed( hence why it 
is called Broad-tailed). What I can see of the tail looks better for Rufous 
than Allen's to me. Banding would be ideal to completely rule out Allen's, but 
I think it's probably Rufous. We do have at least one Allen's record for north 
LA, which Steve Cardiff let me know of. My LA birding friends (probably all of 
which have Rufous Hummingbirds at their feeders right now) and financial 
backers include Steve Cardiff, Van Remsen, Paul Conover, and Donna Dittmann. I 
hope this helps. 

Charlie Lyon


Sent from my iPhone. C Lyon 

> On Nov 26, 2016, at 3:45 PM, Herschel Raney  
wrote: 

> 
> From Michael's very fine shots I am willing to put 50 bucks on a fall female 
Broad-tailed. One more spread tailed shot should do it. 

> Herschel Raney
> 
> Conway AR
> 
>> On 11/26/2016 1:08 PM, Michael Linz wrote:
>> I'm thinking that we will only know for sure what the bird is if she can get 
a bander out to catch the bird. The property owner is trying to do this. 

>> 
>> Below is a link to a few pictures I took this morning....
>> Lighting was bad and I never got a good tail shot but have out of town guest 
and had to come home.... 

>> 
>> https://goo.gl/K3Wvha
>> 
>> Michael (Conway)
>> 
>>> On Sat, Nov 26, 2016 at 9:43 AM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

>>> You could definitely hear it fly up to the feeder
>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> Gail Miller
>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Michael 

>>> Sent: Saturday, November 26, 2016 9:42 AM
>>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>>> Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> Bird is still present. Gail's tail picture had me leaning toward 
broad-tail. In the field I am hearing the wing trill of a rufous. 

>>> 
>>> So I think it is a rufous.
>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> Michael Linz (Conway or at least close to there)
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Nov 25, 2016, at 6:28 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

>>> 
>>> I got a text from friends yesterday about a hummingbird at their house in 
Vilonia. I went out today to get photos, as it was dark by time I got home from 
Thanksgiving with family yesterday. The Vilonia folks had a male Rufous 
Hummingbird back in November 2013 that I also was able to photograph. Not 
positive on the ID of the one today, Ive sent the photos to several folks. ID 
suggestions are welcome. I included the not-so-good tail shot to try to help 
with ID. 

>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/hummingbird_id
>>> 
>>>  
>>> 
>>> Gail Miller
>>> 
>>> Conway, AR (Faulkner Co.)
>>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: game and fish volunteer request
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2016 11:56:06 -0600
Arbirders,

I know skunks don't fly or sing, but the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
has requested that birders be made aware of the opportunity to  contribute
to the census of the spotted skunk. If you have a game camera and a gps
unit, check out the details here:   http://survey.agfc.com/index.
php?r=survey/index&sid=531838&lang=en .

Lyndal York
Webmaster, Arkansas Audubon Society
Subject: Sandhill Cranes Frazier Pike
From: Keith Hawkins <kdrjnest AT IGLOU.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 17:05:13 -0600
Five Sandhill Cranes observed on Frazier Pike at 4:20 p.m. today.  We
stopped where Frazier Pike crosses the levy the second time heading south.
Parked near a black mailbox marked 9712. Looked northwest to the second
field, approximately  mile. Occasional distant gunfire noted by the birds. 

 

Keith Hawkins

Perry County &

The Heights. 
Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 15:45:54 -0600
 From Michael's very fine shots I am willing to put 50 bucks on a fall 
female Broad-tailed. One more spread tailed shot should do it.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR


On 11/26/2016 1:08 PM, Michael Linz wrote:
> I'm thinking that we will only know for sure what the bird is if she 
> can get a bander out to catch the bird.  The property owner is trying 
> to do this.
>
> Below is a link to a few pictures I took this morning....
> Lighting was bad and I never got a good tail shot but have out of town 
> guest and had to come home....
>
> https://goo.gl/K3Wvha
>
> Michael (Conway)
>
> On Sat, Nov 26, 2016 at 9:43 AM, Gail Miller 
> > wrote:
>
>     You could definitely hear it fly up to the feeder
>
>     Gail Miller
>
>     *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
>     [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>     ] *On Behalf Of *Michael
>     *Sent:* Saturday, November 26, 2016 9:42 AM
>     *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
>     *Subject:* Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
>
>     Bird is still present.  Gail's tail picture had me leaning toward
>     broad-tail.  In the field I am hearing the wing trill of a rufous.
>
>     So I think it is a rufous.
>
>     Michael Linz (Conway or at least close to there)
>
>
>     On Nov 25, 2016, at 6:28 PM, Gail Miller
>     >
>     wrote:
>
>         I got a text from friends yesterday about a hummingbird at
>         their house in Vilonia.  I went out today to get photos, as it
>         was dark by time I got home from Thanksgiving with family
>         yesterday.   The Vilonia folks had a male Rufous Hummingbird
>         back in November 2013 that I also was able to photograph.  Not
>         positive on the ID of the one today, I’ve sent the photos to
>         several folks.  ID suggestions are welcome.  I included the
>         not-so-good tail shot to try to help with ID.
>
>         http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/hummingbird_id
>         
>
>         Gail Miller
>
>         Conway, AR (Faulkner Co.)
>
>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 13:27:46 -0600
2 red-breasted nuthatches at my feeding station - eating peanuts, black oil 
sunflower seeds, and suet with peanuts embedded. So excited. 



Robin Buff
just west of Fayetteville
Subject: A riveting reminder not to take common birds for granted
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 12:22:30 -0600
http://www.nature.com/news/the-sparrow-with-four-sexes-1.21018?WT.ec_id=NEWS-20161124&spMailingID=52842448&spUserID=MTc2NjQ3ODY5NgS2&spJobID=1047205062&spReportId=MTA0NzIwNTA2MgS2 

Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 09:43:40 -0600
You could definitely hear it fly up to the feeder

 

Gail Miller

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Michael 

Sent: Saturday, November 26, 2016 9:42 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia

 

Bird is still present. Gail's tail picture had me leaning toward broad-tail. In 
the field I am hearing the wing trill of a rufous. 


So I think it is a rufous.

 

Michael Linz (Conway or at least close to there)


On Nov 25, 2016, at 6:28 PM, Gail Miller  > wrote: 


I got a text from friends yesterday about a hummingbird at their house in 
Vilonia. I went out today to get photos, as it was dark by time I got home from 
Thanksgiving with family yesterday. The Vilonia folks had a male Rufous 
Hummingbird back in November 2013 that I also was able to photograph. Not 
positive on the ID of the one today, I’ve sent the photos to several folks. 
ID suggestions are welcome. I included the not-so-good tail shot to try to help 
with ID. 


 

http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/hummingbird_id 

 

Gail Miller

Conway, AR (Faulkner Co.)
Subject: Merlin
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 09:54:34 -0600
It appears the Merlin is back around Thibault road area of the LR Port It and a 
Kestral were seemingly competing for best perch on the poles around the curve 
that I refer to as the Merlin Tree 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: FOS Purple Finch
From: Lenore <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2016 09:17:25 -0600
Had my first pair of Purple Finches this morning. 

I also tried for the Sandhills Cranes out on Frazier Pike and didn't find them 
yesterday. I did see Eurasian Collared-Doves which I haven't seen before. I 
also saw the Merlin. 


Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
From: Michael Linz <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 13:08:17 -0600
I'm thinking that we will only know for sure what the bird is if she can
get a bander out to catch the bird.  The property owner is trying to do
this.

Below is a link to a few pictures I took this morning....
Lighting was bad and I never got a good tail shot but have out of town
guest and had to come home....

https://goo.gl/K3Wvha

Michael (Conway)

On Sat, Nov 26, 2016 at 9:43 AM, Gail Miller 
wrote:

> You could definitely hear it fly up to the feeder
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.
> UARK.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Michael
> *Sent:* Saturday, November 26, 2016 9:42 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
>
>
>
> Bird is still present.  Gail's tail picture had me leaning toward
> broad-tail.  In the field I am hearing the wing trill of a rufous.
>
> So I think it is a rufous.
>
>
>
> Michael Linz (Conway or at least close to there)
>
>
> On Nov 25, 2016, at 6:28 PM, Gail Miller 
> wrote:
>
> I got a text from friends yesterday about a hummingbird at their house in
> Vilonia.  I went out today to get photos, as it was dark by time I got home
> from Thanksgiving with family yesterday.   The Vilonia folks had a male
> Rufous Hummingbird back in November 2013 that I also was able to
> photograph.  Not positive on the ID of the one today, I’ve sent the photos
> to several folks.  ID suggestions are welcome.  I included the not-so-good
> tail shot to try to help with ID.
>
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/hummingbird_id
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway, AR (Faulkner Co.)
>
>
Subject: Sun greeters
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2016 18:42:41 +0000
On a visit to Lake Fayetteville's Mulhollan Blind this morning - and let me say 
one of the most spectacular late fall mornings since First of Creation - 
sparkling sunshine, temps rising from freezing to shorts, no wind. First up, 
one of four Double-crested Cormorants performing the Sun Greeting Ceremony, or 
at least projecting those white chest feathers of youth, and so majestic, 
holding aloft sun-ray gathering black wings. From such beginnings a person may 
legitimately expect everyday miracles. So in addition to Sun Greeter: Wood Duck 
(male), Mallard (3 - what morning sun does with animated green feathers), 
Gadwall (38), Pied-billed Grebe (3), Horned Grebe (2), Great Blue Heron (1), 
and a young Ring-billed Gull in the pale plumage of winter. But just so we 
don't take this for granted, as it flew away, a fine black band on white tail. 
Stepping out on the porch, bare sycamore limbs framing a blue sky, with white 
cloud wisps, and seeming among branches, but in truth in a far away land, a 
near spectral Black Vulture turning and rising in solar thermals. 

Subject: Hummingbird in Vilonia
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2016 18:28:59 -0600
I got a text from friends yesterday about a hummingbird at their house in
Vilonia.  I went out today to get photos, as it was dark by time I got home
from Thanksgiving with family yesterday.   The Vilonia folks had a male
Rufous Hummingbird back in November 2013 that I also was able to photograph.
Not positive on the ID of the one today, I've sent the photos to several
folks.  ID suggestions are welcome.  I included the not-so-good tail shot to
try to help with ID. 

 

http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/hummingbird_id 

 

Gail Miller

Conway, AR (Faulkner Co.)
Subject: Re: Hummingbird in Vilonia
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 09:41:45 -0600
Bird is still present. Gail's tail picture had me leaning toward broad-tail. In 
the field I am hearing the wing trill of a rufous. 

So I think it is a rufous.

Michael Linz (Conway or at least close to there)

> On Nov 25, 2016, at 6:28 PM, Gail Miller  wrote:
> 
> I got a text from friends yesterday about a hummingbird at their house in 
Vilonia. I went out today to get photos, as it was dark by time I got home from 
Thanksgiving with family yesterday. The Vilonia folks had a male Rufous 
Hummingbird back in November 2013 that I also was able to photograph. Not 
positive on the ID of the one today, I’ve sent the photos to several folks. 
ID suggestions are welcome. I included the not-so-good tail shot to try to help 
with ID. 

>  
> http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/hummingbird_id
>  
> Gail Miller
> Conway, AR (Faulkner Co.)
Subject: Inca Doves
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 20:15:06 -0600
Birding out Frazier Pike area today close to LR Airport.   Started with the
Merlin, and then went out to Harper Road.   Seems like everyone saw the
Inca doves there last fall and spring but I struck out on probably 15 to 20
trips.   Today I drove by the area and Behold there was a pair in a
driveway right beside the road.  They were very happy to pose for some
great photos.    No Sandhill cranes today, but plenty of other birds
including Vesper Sparrows,Orange Crowned Warbler and both Kinglets
Subject: Possible Red-throated loon
From: Michael <mplinz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 15:30:52 -0600
Beaverfork Lake in Faulkner County...
Small loon observed with large common loon. Observed from the point with the 
red bench near the boat slips. The loons are a long ways out. Throat is dark 
with hints of red. 


This is my first red-throated loon from Faulkner county.

Happy Thanksgiving 🦃 
Michael Linz