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Updated on Thursday, July 30 at 12:23 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Kittlitzs Plover,©BirdQuest

30 Jul Re: Crazy bird sighting of the week [zoe caywood ]
30 Jul Re: Crazy bird sighting of the week [Gail Miller ]
29 Jul Crazy bird sighting of the week [Charles Anderson ]
28 Jul Painted Buntings [dianemarie yates ]
28 Jul Upland Sandpiper in the Valley ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
27 Jul Joe Neal's story of Dr. Doug James... [dianemarie yates ]
27 Jul Doug at 90 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Jul Hummingbirds [Lenore ]
26 Jul Centerton Beach Today ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
26 Jul White-winged Dove [Terry Butler ]
25 Jul Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita [kjdillard ]
25 Jul Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita [Ryan Risher ]
25 Jul Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita [Karen And Jim Rowe ]
25 Jul Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita [Janine Perlman ]
25 Jul Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita [Joyce Hartmann ]
25 Jul Bird Island Lake Ouachita [Susan Adkins ]
24 Jul Re: Bird Island [jwdavis ]
24 Jul Re: Bird Island [kjdillard ]
24 Jul Re: Bird Island [kjdillard ]
24 Jul Purple Martin Roosts [dianemarie yates ]
24 Jul Re: Bird Island [jwdavis ]
24 Jul Bird Island [ ]
23 Jul Black bellied whistling ducks [Ryan Risher ]
23 Jul Dates set for 2016 Red Slough Birding Convention [David Arbour ]
23 Jul FOOT-TREMBLING BY PIPING PLOVER AT CENTERTON ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Jul THREATENED-ENDANGERED SPECIES (2) AT CENTERTON THIS MORNING ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
22 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [martha strother ]
22 Jul bird book sale in Conway ["Kimberly G. Smith" ]
22 Jul Re: feeders & flying squirrels [Mary Ann King ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Gail Miller ]
22 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Carol Meyerdirk ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Sara Caulk ]
22 Jul SHOREBIRDS AT CENTERTON TODAY AFTER WEAK COLD FRONT ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Jul Red Slough Bird Survey - July 21 [David Arbour ]
21 Jul No Subject [j s ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Joyce Hartmann ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Sally Jo Gibson ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [martha strother ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Charles Anderson ]
21 Jul Please bear with me... [dianemarie yates ]
21 Jul Fw: eBirding can be recuperative [dianemarie yates ]
21 Jul Hummer Feeder Robbers, cont'd. [dianemarie yates ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Gail Miller ]
21 Jul Sightings young Cooper's Hawk and Greater Roadrunner [Gail Miller ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Herschel Raney ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Jeffrey Short ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Sara Cain-Bartlett ]
21 Jul BIRDS [Bill Thurman ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Lynn ]
21 Jul Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Janine Perlman ]
21 Jul A Hummingbird feeder mystery [Charles Anderson ]
21 Jul Re: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY & BUTTERFLIES 2015 [Jane Steinkraus ]
21 Jul BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY & BUTTERFLIES 2015 ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
21 Jul RE Kannan's Post about Kelley Nunn (for Sandy) [dianemarie yates ]
21 Jul Kelley's Recouperation [dianemarie yates ]
20 Jul eBirding can be recuperative [Ragupathy Kannan ]
20 Jul Adventures and new birders [dianemarie yates ]
20 Jul Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info [Suzie Liles ]
20 Jul Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
20 Jul felt bird house info [Karen Konarski-Hart ]
20 Jul Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info [Nancy Felker ]
20 Jul Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info [Sally Jo Gibson ]
20 Jul Adventures and New Birders ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
19 Jul Test and West ["George R. Hoelzeman" ]
19 Jul Big Purple Martin roost at Rogers ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
19 Jul Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost [Karen Garrett ]
19 Jul Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost [Kenny Nichols ]
18 Jul Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost [Jeffrey Short ]
18 Jul Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost [Jerry Davis ]
18 Jul Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost [kjdillard ]
18 Jul Rogers Purple Martin Roost [Adam Schaffer ]
17 Jul Re: Bird ID Needed [Cheryle Sytsma ]
17 Jul Western Kingbirds in Fort Smith ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul Green Heron ON the bird blind ["Joseph C. Neal" ]
17 Jul Re: Bird ID Needed I PHOTOGraphed... [Cheryle Sytsma ]
17 Jul Re: GOLDFINCHES EATING ALGAE AT CENTERTON TODAY [Harriet Jansma ]

Subject: Re: Crazy bird sighting of the week
From: zoe caywood <zcaywood AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 12:19:07 -0500
The dominant species:  I walked out first thing this a.m. & heard the young
red-tail hawk screeching.  He flew off the carport roof with a hummingbird
in hot pursuit.  The hawk was so stressed that he was tipping his wings
back and forth.  He landed on a pine limb, really screeching now, and that
little hummer dove right into his breast.  The hawk relented and flew off,
while the hummer return to "his" flower garden.  I guess we raise them
tough in War Eagle!!

On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 8:11 AM, Gail Miller 
wrote:

> I watched something similar this week with a Yellow-breasted Chat and a
> Ruby Throated Hummingbird.  As the Chat moved from limb to limb in a tree,
> the hummer just kept tracking it.
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
> Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
> See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
> See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
>
>
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Charles Anderson
> Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 9:08 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Crazy bird sighting of the week
>
>
> Just have to report this one.
>
> Ruth and I watched a Blue Grey Gnatcatcher and a Ruby Throated Hummingbird
> "duking" it out. The blue grey had a hard time tracking the hummer and
> watching his head twist and turn trying to follow the hummer was crazy
> funny.  I guess territorial behavior applies to every critter and not just
> other hummers!
>
> Chuck Anderson
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>



-- 
Zoe Caywood 479 236 4086
Subject: Re: Crazy bird sighting of the week
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 08:11:22 -0500
I watched something similar this week with a Yellow-breasted Chat and a Ruby 
Throated Hummingbird.  As the Chat moved from limb to limb in a tree, the 
hummer just kept tracking it.



Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



-----Original Message----- 
From: Charles Anderson
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 9:08 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Crazy bird sighting of the week

Just have to report this one.

Ruth and I watched a Blue Grey Gnatcatcher and a Ruby Throated Hummingbird 
"duking" it out. The blue grey had a hard time tracking the hummer and 
watching his head twist and turn trying to follow the hummer was crazy 
funny.  I guess territorial behavior applies to every critter and not just 
other hummers!

Chuck Anderson


Sent from my iPhone 
Subject: Crazy bird sighting of the week
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 09:08:20 -0500
Just have to report this one. 

Ruth and I watched a Blue Grey Gnatcatcher and a Ruby Throated Hummingbird 
"duking" it out. The blue grey had a hard time tracking the hummer and watching 
his head twist and turn trying to follow the hummer was crazy funny. I guess 
territorial behavior applies to every critter and not just other hummers! 


Chuck Anderson 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Painted Buntings
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 22:47:58 +0000
Early in the season our male was killed hitting the kitchen window, leaving his 
“widow” to come sporadically until the past week, when she came almost 
daily to the triple tube feeder. Then a second female joined her and, as of 
yesterday, a new male. The three just showed up again this evening, making me 
have to edit my eBird home list for today--a chore I am quite willing for. We 
also have the “downiest” of new downies fledged and learning to use the 
suet feeder for the first time, as well as a new thrasher and two young towhees 
that take turns with the parents at visiting our feeders. Last week it was a 
baby Carolina Wren, fledged from the cocoa hull liner of a hanging basket. 







Dianemarie
That which you surround yourself with, there shall your heart be also.
Subject: Upland Sandpiper in the Valley
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 22:29:27 +0000
Southbound transient Upland Sandpipers start showing up in the northwest part 
of Arkansas during July, including today's phenomenal blazer. It was pleasing 
but not surprising to find one at Frog Bayou WMA this morning, in a recently 
plowed field. We expect to see them in higher numbers in August. Later, I 
looked for them at the turf farms just to the west, but didn't see any. 


Frog is "all tore up" right now - big pieces of earth-moving equipment at work. 
It looks like the place is getting a serious remake. Overall, most everything 
except the higher ground still belongs to the Arkansas River. In one spot I 
could see the river had reoccupied one of its former oxbows on River Road south 
of Dyer. Observed seven Little Blue Herons out in the resulting swamp: white 
young of the year (1), calico (2), the rest adults. 


After floods comes drying out. Terrestrial crayfish really have their claws 
full right now. As the surface dries, they burrow deeper and deeper, carrying 
fresh balls of mud up and on top of their chimneys. I saw one this morning at 
Frog more than a foot in height, with the upper two inches fresh mud from last 
night. A skyscraper and a fine one, too. 


The area south of Alma and Kibler (Thornhill Road, etc) has some pretty 
impressive mudflats, where there used to be soybeans. I did find a convenient 
mixed shorebird flock on the eastern end of Arnold Road, another one of those 
former oxbows that was still partially flooded. Around 40 shorebirds close 
enough that I could see them broke down as Killdeer (8), Spotted Sandpiper (1), 
Semipalmated Sandpiper (6), Western Sandpiper (4), Least Sandpiper (20), 
Pectoral Sandpiper (2). 


Parked there while I was watching, my car soon filled up with flies and a real 
obnoxious smell. It was then I noticed I was parked along a little bayou or 
creek full of dead and dying fish. 


The drive down into the Valley at this time of year usually includes Painted 
Buntings in the fencerows, and this morning was no different. And Bell's Vireos 
in the thickets out in the big fields. It is really a wonderful place, but to 
get here, you have to drive through, and notice, the habit of some local folks 
who drive up to any little bridge over any little creek, and there dump TVs, 
couches, mattresses, etc. 


People who feel like they have a stake in a healthy environment -- or who 
desire a quality outdoors experience -- don't do these things. Dumpers must be 
people who, for whatever reason, don't feel in ownership in these outdoor 
spaces; that is, these places belong to them. That is a big challenge for us - 
to reach them so they understand this is also their land and their future, and 
at the very least there are better places to take their old couches. 

Subject: Joe Neal's story of Dr. Doug James...
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 15:16:32 +0000
So very cool! Loved the story; must’ve been a very fun gathering. Recall a 
great lady, Dad’s bridge partner for years, who made 100. They always shared 
old stuff and talked about the birds at their feeders. Yes, I think there is a 
shared faith and an appreciation for nature that bids us all to say that amen 
to its Creator, whether in silence, as a whisper, or get-up-and-hollered! As I 
write this, a G. Roadrunner (a yard first) has climbed onto the ground feeder 
and is checking out the fixin’s. We’ve a few new tiny lizards in the garden 
and those fingertip-size toads that might interest him. I love them too but a 
roadrunner must dine! 


Dianemarie

That which you surround yourself with, there shall your heart be also.
Subject: Doug at 90
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 13:49:35 +0000
The James family and Kim Smith threw a party on Saturday, honoring Dr Doug 
James, born July 25, 1925, in Detriot. Came to UA-Fayetteville in 1953 on a 
bus, a graduate student himself then, with one suitcase in hand. Subsequently, 
he has squired something like 130 graduate other students through MSs and PhDs, 
and on to careers. Most of them already retired, me among the latter. Still has 
six current graduate students to shepherd through to their degrees. 


I couldn't decide whether to laugh or cry, so instead I put on my best Hawaiian 
shirt and went to the luncheon. His daughter Avis arranged a wonderful 
powerpoint show. Doug as baby in a stroller on sandy beaches of the Great Lakes 
not too long before he had his first binoculars: 3X opera glasses and a Chester 
Reed bird book; just 14 when the first Peterson was published. Doug, a Detroit 
Tigers fan, saw Babe Ruth play. Doug as a Cub Scout den chief, teaching birds. 
Doug in his Army uniform. Doug when he married Elizabeth Adam on this same day 
30 years ago. 


Doug the marathoner on the 4th of July, with his star spangled banner running 
shorts and flags stuck in his glasses. Doug, fighting the battle for the 
Buffalo River. 


In the middle of all of this I am reminded that nothing was foreordained July 
25, 1925. Like us all, he went from experience to experience. From Michigan to 
Illinois to Arkansas. With birds and students, all over the world. Doug and 
three Fulbright Professorships (Ghana, Nepal, Belize). Doug with his lab full 
of students from the world, just as Arkansas Senator J William Fulbright 
envisioned, a productive way for the US to peacefully influence the world. 


But even with the birthday cake, Saturday's luncheon wasn't about achievement. 
The Honoree held forth for an hour or so about graduate students, mostly 
illustrated by anecdotes, and former students, University collegues, and 
friends, responding. Raj Kannan described leeches during their hornbill nest 
searches in India. They got a can of 100% Deet. Kannan sprayed up, but Doug 
sprayed only one leg. Why is this, Dr James? Asked Kannan. Always the 
scientist, Doug responded the sprayed leg was the treatment, the unsprayed leg 
the control. 


Or the time Doug in his old canvas running shoes, AKA Jamesian field boots, had 
a rattlesnake tapping his toes. That sort of afternoon. 


Or Doug, on an overseas flight, spending nine straight hours reading Andrea 
Greene's dissertation draft. 


The 90th luncheon wasn't EXACTLY the call-and-response in a Baptist service. 
But I am reminded ... there is a certain shared faith ... something like a 
congregation I suppose ... underneath significant life purpose. No amens on 
Saturday, at least not out loud. LOTS of laughter. 

Subject: Hummingbirds
From: Lenore <elgiffor AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:10:56 -0500
I have had more Ruby-throated Hummingbirds today than I've had in a long while. 
Maybe since I moved to this house. Six of them at least. It's nice to have that 
many. 


Lenore near the Sardis community in Saline Co
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Centerton Beach Today
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 23:41:30 +0000
Hot and modestly breezy today, and relatively quiet, at least enough that it 
reminded me of walking on beaches of Horn Island, off the Mississippi Coast, 
many years ago. And a few shorebirds to go with the memories. Birds on the 
Centerton beach (actually, Craig State Fish Hatchery) today included 
Semipalmated Plover (2), [NO Piping Plover], Killdeer (36), Spotted Sandpiper 
(1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (2), Least Sandpiper (11). Continuing down the 
beach, missing of course, Man O Wars, or what moderns insist on calling 
frigatebirds. Our Ozarks versions of Man O Wars, the vultures, were soaring 
with frigatebird-like effortlessness in a blue sky in a way that would have 
pleased the artist Walter Anderson, who spent so much of life drawing and 
painting the busy like of Horn Island. Both species at the hatchery this 
morning: Black Vulture (2) and Turkey Vulture (8, and by 11 AM, rising). The 
Swamp Milkweed and related marshy prairie flowers are really starting to tune 
up. I'll bet Walter Anderson would have had to stop and draw the Swamp 
Milkweeds, visited today by old friends, Monarchs and Large Milkweed Bugs. I 
stopped with my camera. 

Subject: White-winged Dove
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 13:54:35 -0500
The White-winged Dove returned today after an absents of over a month.

 

It looks to have been doing well,

 

Terry Butler

Pangburn, AR
Subject: Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 18:46:54 -0500
    
Thank you so much!
Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Karen And Jim Rowe  
Date: 07/25/2015  5:28 PM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita 

Just spoke with Sgt. Carpenter, AGFC Enforcement Division.  Starting this 
evening, he will increase patrols around Bird Island. 


Karen Rowe, 
AGFC Wildlife Management Div.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 25, 2015, at 11:25 AM, Susan Adkins  wrote:
> 
> Hello everyone.  Just wanted to chime in on this topic.  First of all, the 
purple martins are back on the original "Bird Island."  (They had moved to a 
nearby island last year.)  Unfortunately, the cattle egret rookery is not 
present this year on Bird Island.  However, there are a few dozen herons, 
egrets and blackbirds roosting on the island.  The purple martins are present 
each night in large numbers and seem to spread across much of the island since 
they have it all to themselves.  They tend to favor the north side though.  

> 
> As far as the harassment of the birds, this is something I struggle with 
every year during the roost.  A few years back the island was designated an 
Important Bird Area and signs were placed on the island.  Of course, they were 
taken.  I'm going to talk with the Corps of Engineers and AGFC and see what 
can be done. 

> 
> At the very least, I think documenting occurrences where we witness people 
harassing the birds on the island might influence the amount of patrol done out 
there.  Maybe we can get new signs put on the island as well. 

> 
> On a good note, I want to mention that we will be doing the Bird Island Tours 
until mid-August.  You can make reservations at the number below.  I will be 
offering an Early Bird Island Tour next Friday, July 31st.  This sunrise tour 
leaves the marina at 5:30 am.  Very unique opportunity to see the birds wake 
from their roost and fly away.  The space is limited to 20 guests. 

> 
> 
> Susan Adkins
> Park Interpreter, CIG
> Lake Ouachita State Park
> 5451 Mountain Pine Rd.
> Mountain Pine, Arkansas  71956
> Ph:   501.767.9366
> Susan.Adkins AT Arkansas.gov
>  
>    
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of ARBIRD-L automatic digest 
system 

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2015 12:00 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
> 
> There are 7 messages totaling 802 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Bird Island (5)
>  2. Purple Martin Roosts
>  3. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:41:52 +0000
> From:    Tiffany & Bob Bertram
>         <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:01:11 -0500
> From:    jwdavis 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying.  Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem.  Civilian Federal employees 
are lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

> 
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them.  It is 
my opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> 
> 
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> 
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:09:28 +0000
> From:    dianemarie yates 
> Subject: Purple Martin Roosts
> 
> It’s been decades since I camped  out with a boat but it seems to me there 
is or should be a law concerning the use of an air horn for other than what it 
was intended, especially at evening. The revelers need to be stuck with a fine 
or run off the lake upon a second warning. And, yes, Audubon should get 
involved with signage and protection for martin roosts and all known shore bird 
nest sites. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Dianemarie
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:16:28 -0500
> From:    kjdillard 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> 
> 
> I took the tour last summer and had the same experience.   A large 
houseboat was parked on the island.  They had two little boys with BB guns and 
the parents totally ignored the blow horn.  I was very disappointed that these 
people could get away with these tactics.   I should have contacted the 
authorizes myself the following day. Thanks for sharing maybe someone on the 
list has some pull to get this resolved. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 

> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram 
<000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

> Date: 07/24/2015  10:41 AM  (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island 
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:30:56 -0500
> From:    kjdillard 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> 
> 
> Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.?  I'm taking friends on the tour next week.   I hope we don't 
experience this again. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 

> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: jwdavis 
> Date: 07/24/2015  12:01 PM  (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying.  Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem.  Civilian Federal employees 
are lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

>  
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them.  It is 
my opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

>  
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>  
>  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob
> Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
>  
> 
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake
> Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, someone had parked their houseboat on 
the end of the island where the purple martins usually roost.  The birds tried 
to settle in on the other end of the island, but would only use the last few 
trees - about 1/3 of the space they normally roost in.  Our park interpreter 
said he had no authority to make the boat move, but after some friendly 
cajoling from us, he got a little brave & told the man he would be reporting 
him to the park rangers, and he should move by morning. 

>  
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
>  
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:15:30 -0500
> From:    jwdavis 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> No, I am saying nothing has been done. These problems mentioned have been 
identified since as early as 1992 and they still exists due to apathy, 
indifference and those that could and should do something do not place it as a 
priority to implement a solution. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> 
> From: kjdillard
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 1:30 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.?  I'm taking friends on the tour next week.   I hope we don't 
experience this again. 

> 
> Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: jwdavis 
> Date: 07/24/2015 12:01 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island 
> 
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying.  Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem.  Civilian Federal employees 
are lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

> 
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them.  It is 
my opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> 
> 
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> 
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:02:57 -0500
> From:    Sandy Berger 
> Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 
> Karen McGee just called me and asked me to report that she had a very 
bedraggled adult male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at her feeder this afternoon. 

> 
> Very early migrant.  Karen lives in Central City.
> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
> ***************************************************************
Subject: Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 18:35:22 -0500
Joyce,

That's a sweet idea with the rocks. Signs can be such a catch 22 & it's 
frustrating. More often than not, people see them as a threat rather than an 
opportunity to learn. Plus, signs often "attract" negative attention and an 
increase in disturbance to what it is you are trying to help. Sometimes, no 
signs are the best policy as they don't make people aware of something to look 
for and they passively go about their business. I've dealt with both approaches 
in endangered species management and I've seen the pros and cons to both from 
people being actually interested in what's going on behind the fencing and 
signage to watching people plow through it and everything in between. 
Fortunately, many species have evolved to be somewhat accustomed to 
anthropogenic disturbance, which is only likely to increase...or they move into 
other areas where disturbance is reduced. Sadly, new areas also result in new 
pros and cons for species... 


Ryan
Pope Co

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 25, 2015, at 14:52, Joyce Hartmann  wrote:
> 
> Bird Island sounds like a great place to visit...just a note about signs...in 
a few public places that we've tried to provide ID signs for trees, , we've 
noticed vandalism and theft of interesting signs, so we experimented with using 
rocks. I painted 64 very large VERY heavy native sandstone slabs with signs 
that identify trees on hiking trails at South Fork Nature Center in 
Choctaw...so far (knock on wood) no thefts. They are large enough to paint the 
common name, scientific name, with drawings of the leaf, fruit, and 
twig...about 2' square or larger. Maybe a few of those strategically placed, 
saying something like "Respect the birds", or "Pleae don't disturb the 
birds"...or "Bird roost...shhhhhhhh"...might work...Nice and natural looking, 
too....I used burnt umber Patio Outdoor paint...it does require maintenance, 
and acrylic sealer...Joyce Hartmann, Van Buren County 

> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Susan Adkins 

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2015 11:25 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island Lake Ouachita
> 
> Hello everyone. Just wanted to chime in on this topic. First of all, the 
purple martins are back on the original "Bird Island." (They had moved to a 
nearby island last year.) Unfortunately, the cattle egret rookery is not 
present this year on Bird Island. However, there are a few dozen herons, egrets 
and blackbirds roosting on the island. The purple martins are present each 
night in large numbers and seem to spread across much of the island since they 
have it all to themselves. They tend to favor the north side though. 

> 
> As far as the harassment of the birds, this is something I struggle with 
every year during the roost. A few years back the island was designated an 
Important Bird Area and signs were placed on the island. Of course, they were 
taken. I'm going to talk with the Corps of Engineers and AGFC and see what can 
be done. 

> 
> At the very least, I think documenting occurrences where we witness people 
harassing the birds on the island might influence the amount of patrol done out 
there. Maybe we can get new signs put on the island as well. 

> 
> On a good note, I want to mention that we will be doing the Bird Island Tours 
until mid-August. You can make reservations at the number below. I will be 
offering an Early Bird Island Tour next Friday, July 31st. This sunrise tour 
leaves the marina at 5:30 am. Very unique opportunity to see the birds wake 
from their roost and fly away. The space is limited to 20 guests. 

> 
> 
> Susan Adkins
> Park Interpreter, CIG
> Lake Ouachita�State Park
> 5451 Mountain Pine Rd.
> Mountain Pine, Arkansas� 71956
> Ph:�� 501.767.9366
> Susan.Adkins AT Arkansas.gov
> �
> �� 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of ARBIRD-L automatic digest 
system 

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2015 12:00 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
> 
> There are 7 messages totaling 802 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Bird Island (5)
>  2. Purple Martin Roosts
>  3. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:41:52 +0000
> From:    Tiffany & Bob Bertram
>         <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.� Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.� The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.� Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.� Our interpreter said they've been missing for the 
last couple of years.� I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do 
with that as well.� He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and 
it's difficult to control such a large area.� Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??� Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:01:11 -0500
> From:    jwdavis 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

> 
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> 
> 
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> 
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:09:28 +0000
> From:    dianemarie yates 
> Subject: Purple Martin Roosts
> 
> It�s been decades since I camped out with a boat but it seems to me there 
is or should be a law concerning the use of an air horn for other than what it 
was intended, especially at evening. The revelers need to be stuck with a fine 
or run off the lake upon a second warning. And, yes, Audubon should get 
involved with signage and protection for martin roosts and all known shore bird 
nest sites. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Dianemarie
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:16:28 -0500
> From:    kjdillard 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> 
> 
> I took the tour last summer and had the same experience. � A large 
houseboat was parked on the island. �They had two little boys with BB guns 
and the parents totally ignored the blow horn. �I was very disappointed that 
these people could get away with these tactics. � I should have contacted the 
authorizes myself the following day. Thanks for sharing maybe someone on the 
list has some pull to get this resolved. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon� 

> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram 
<000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

> Date: 07/24/2015  10:41 AM  (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island 
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.� Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.� The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.� Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.� Our interpreter said they've been missing for the 
last couple of years.� I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do 
with that as well.� He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and 
it's difficult to control such a large area.� Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??� Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:30:56 -0500
> From:    kjdillard 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> 
> 
> Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? �I'm taking friends on the tour next week. � I hope we don't 
experience this again. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon� 

> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: jwdavis 
> Date: 07/24/2015  12:01 PM  (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying.� Budget cuts 
from all agencies have probably been a major problem.� Civilian Federal 
employees are lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 
million more people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and 
implementing these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see 
that they are implemented. 

> �
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them.� It is 
my opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

> �
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> �
> �
> 
> 
> �
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob
> Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
> �
> 
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake
> Ouachita last night.� Unfortunately, someone had parked their houseboat on 
the end of the island where the purple martins usually roost.� The birds 
tried to settle in on the other end of the island, but would only use the last 
few trees - about 1/3 of the space they normally roost in.� Our park 
interpreter said he had no authority to make the boat move, but after some 
friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & told the man he would be 
reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move by morning. 

> �
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.� Our interpreter said they've been missing for the 
last couple of years.� I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do 
with that as well.� He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and 
it's difficult to control such a large area.� Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??� Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> �
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:15:30 -0500
> From:    jwdavis 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> No, I am saying nothing has been done. These problems mentioned have been 
identified since as early as 1992 and they still exists due to apathy, 
indifference and those that could and should do something do not place it as a 
priority to implement a solution. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> 
> From: kjdillard
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 1:30 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? I'm taking friends on the tour next week. I hope we don't experience 
this again. 

> 
> Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: jwdavis 
> Date: 07/24/2015 12:01 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island 
> 
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

> 
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> 
> 
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> 
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:02:57 -0500
> From:    Sandy Berger 
> Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 
> Karen McGee just called me and asked me to report that she had a very 
bedraggled adult male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at her feeder this afternoon. 

> 
> Very early migrant.  Karen lives in Central City.
> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
> ***************************************************************
Subject: Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <rollingrfarm AT ROCKETMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 17:28:02 -0500
Just spoke with Sgt. Carpenter, AGFC Enforcement Division. Starting this 
evening, he will increase patrols around Bird Island. 


Karen Rowe, 
AGFC Wildlife Management Div.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 25, 2015, at 11:25 AM, Susan Adkins  wrote:
> 
> Hello everyone. Just wanted to chime in on this topic. First of all, the 
purple martins are back on the original "Bird Island." (They had moved to a 
nearby island last year.) Unfortunately, the cattle egret rookery is not 
present this year on Bird Island. However, there are a few dozen herons, egrets 
and blackbirds roosting on the island. The purple martins are present each 
night in large numbers and seem to spread across much of the island since they 
have it all to themselves. They tend to favor the north side though. 

> 
> As far as the harassment of the birds, this is something I struggle with 
every year during the roost. A few years back the island was designated an 
Important Bird Area and signs were placed on the island. Of course, they were 
taken. I'm going to talk with the Corps of Engineers and AGFC and see what can 
be done. 

> 
> At the very least, I think documenting occurrences where we witness people 
harassing the birds on the island might influence the amount of patrol done out 
there. Maybe we can get new signs put on the island as well. 

> 
> On a good note, I want to mention that we will be doing the Bird Island Tours 
until mid-August. You can make reservations at the number below. I will be 
offering an Early Bird Island Tour next Friday, July 31st. This sunrise tour 
leaves the marina at 5:30 am. Very unique opportunity to see the birds wake 
from their roost and fly away. The space is limited to 20 guests. 

> 
> 
> Susan Adkins
> Park Interpreter, CIG
> Lake Ouachita State Park
> 5451 Mountain Pine Rd.
> Mountain Pine, Arkansas  71956
> Ph:   501.767.9366
> Susan.Adkins AT Arkansas.gov
>  
>    
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of ARBIRD-L automatic digest 
system 

> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2015 12:00 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
> 
> There are 7 messages totaling 802 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. Bird Island (5)
>  2. Purple Martin Roosts
>  3. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:41:52 +0000
> From:    Tiffany & Bob Bertram
>         <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:01:11 -0500
> From:    jwdavis 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

> 
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> 
> 
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> 
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:09:28 +0000
> From:    dianemarie yates 
> Subject: Purple Martin Roosts
> 
> It’s been decades since I camped out with a boat but it seems to me there 
is or should be a law concerning the use of an air horn for other than what it 
was intended, especially at evening. The revelers need to be stuck with a fine 
or run off the lake upon a second warning. And, yes, Audubon should get 
involved with signage and protection for martin roosts and all known shore bird 
nest sites. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Dianemarie
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:16:28 -0500
> From:    kjdillard 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> 
> 
> I took the tour last summer and had the same experience. A large houseboat 
was parked on the island. They had two little boys with BB guns and the parents 
totally ignored the blow horn. I was very disappointed that these people could 
get away with these tactics. I should have contacted the authorizes myself the 
following day. Thanks for sharing maybe someone on the list has some pull to 
get this resolved. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 

> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram 
<000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 

> Date: 07/24/2015  10:41 AM  (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island 
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:30:56 -0500
> From:    kjdillard 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> 
> 
> Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? I'm taking friends on the tour next week. I hope we don't experience 
this again. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 

> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: jwdavis 
> Date: 07/24/2015  12:01 PM  (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

>  
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

>  
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>  
>  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob
> Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
>  
> 
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake
> Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, someone had parked their houseboat on the 
end of the island where the purple martins usually roost. The birds tried to 
settle in on the other end of the island, but would only use the last few trees 
- about 1/3 of the space they normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he 
had no authority to make the boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from 
us, he got a little brave & told the man he would be reporting him to the park 
rangers, and he should move by morning. 

>  
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
>  
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:15:30 -0500
> From:    jwdavis 
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> No, I am saying nothing has been done. These problems mentioned have been 
identified since as early as 1992 and they still exists due to apathy, 
indifference and those that could and should do something do not place it as a 
priority to implement a solution. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> 
> From: kjdillard
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 1:30 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island
> 
> Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? I'm taking friends on the tour next week. I hope we don't experience 
this again. 

> 
> Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 
> 
> 
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
> 
> 
> -------- Original message --------
> From: jwdavis 
> Date: 07/24/2015 12:01 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: Bird Island 
> 
> 
> I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

> 
> During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

> 
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
> 
> 
> 
> From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Bird Island
> 
> We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

> 
> We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:02:57 -0500
> From:    Sandy Berger 
> Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 
> Karen McGee just called me and asked me to report that she had a very 
bedraggled adult male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at her feeder this afternoon. 

> 
> Very early migrant.  Karen lives in Central City.
> 
> Sandy B.
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
> ***************************************************************
Subject: Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 16:52:18 -0500
I wonder if signs of any kind aren't incitement for 
low-lives---particularly in locations where there's no enforcement.

Janine

On 7/25/2015 2:52 PM, Joyce Hartmann wrote:
> Bird Island sounds like a great place to visit...just a note about signs...in 
a few public places that we've tried to provide ID signs for trees, , we've 
noticed vandalism and theft of interesting signs, so we experimented with using 
rocks. I painted 64 very large VERY heavy native sandstone slabs with signs 
that identify trees on hiking trails at South Fork Nature Center in 
Choctaw...so far (knock on wood) no thefts. They are large enough to paint the 
common name, scientific name, with drawings of the leaf, fruit, and 
twig...about 2' square or larger. Maybe a few of those strategically placed, 
saying something like "Respect the birds", or "Pleae don't disturb the 
birds"...or "Bird roost...shhhhhhhh"...might work...Nice and natural looking, 
too....I used burnt umber Patio Outdoor paint...it does require maintenance, 
and acrylic sealer...Joyce Hartmann, Van Buren County 

>
>
Subject: Re: Bird Island Lake Ouachita
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 14:52:37 -0500
Bird Island sounds like a great place to visit...just a note about signs...in a 
few public places that we've tried to provide ID signs for trees, , we've 
noticed vandalism and theft of interesting signs, so we experimented with using 
rocks. I painted 64 very large VERY heavy native sandstone slabs with signs 
that identify trees on hiking trails at South Fork Nature Center in 
Choctaw...so far (knock on wood) no thefts. They are large enough to paint the 
common name, scientific name, with drawings of the leaf, fruit, and 
twig...about 2' square or larger. Maybe a few of those strategically placed, 
saying something like "Respect the birds", or "Pleae don't disturb the 
birds"...or "Bird roost...shhhhhhhh"...might work...Nice and natural looking, 
too....I used burnt umber Patio Outdoor paint...it does require maintenance, 
and acrylic sealer...Joyce Hartmann, Van Buren County 


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Susan Adkins 

Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2015 11:25 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island Lake Ouachita

Hello everyone. Just wanted to chime in on this topic. First of all, the purple 
martins are back on the original "Bird Island." (They had moved to a nearby 
island last year.) Unfortunately, the cattle egret rookery is not present this 
year on Bird Island. However, there are a few dozen herons, egrets and 
blackbirds roosting on the island. The purple martins are present each night in 
large numbers and seem to spread across much of the island since they have it 
all to themselves. They tend to favor the north side though. 


As far as the harassment of the birds, this is something I struggle with every 
year during the roost. A few years back the island was designated an Important 
Bird Area and signs were placed on the island. Of course, they were taken. I'm 
going to talk with the Corps of Engineers and AGFC and see what can be done. 


At the very least, I think documenting occurrences where we witness people 
harassing the birds on the island might influence the amount of patrol done out 
there. Maybe we can get new signs put on the island as well. 


On a good note, I want to mention that we will be doing the Bird Island Tours 
until mid-August. You can make reservations at the number below. I will be 
offering an Early Bird Island Tour next Friday, July 31st. This sunrise tour 
leaves the marina at 5:30 am. Very unique opportunity to see the birds wake 
from their roost and fly away. The space is limited to 20 guests. 



Susan Adkins
Park Interpreter, CIG
Lake Ouachita�State Park
5451 Mountain Pine Rd.
Mountain Pine, Arkansas� 71956
Ph:�� 501.767.9366
Susan.Adkins AT Arkansas.gov
�
�� 

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of ARBIRD-L automatic digest system 

Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2015 12:00 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)

There are 7 messages totaling 802 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Bird Island (5)
  2. Purple Martin Roosts
  3. Rose-breasted Grosbeak

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:41:52 +0000
From:    Tiffany & Bob Bertram
         <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.� Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.� The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.� Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.� Our interpreter said they've been missing for the 
last couple of years.� I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do 
with that as well.� He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and 
it's difficult to control such a large area.� Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??� Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:01:11 -0500
From:    jwdavis 
Subject: Re: Bird Island

I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 


During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR



From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 


We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:09:28 +0000
From:    dianemarie yates 
Subject: Purple Martin Roosts

It�s been decades since I camped out with a boat but it seems to me there is 
or should be a law concerning the use of an air horn for other than what it was 
intended, especially at evening. The revelers need to be stuck with a fine or 
run off the lake upon a second warning. And, yes, Audubon should get involved 
with signage and protection for martin roosts and all known shore bird nest 
sites. 







Dianemarie

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:16:28 -0500
From:    kjdillard 
Subject: Re: Bird Island


    
I took the tour last summer and had the same experience. � A large houseboat 
was parked on the island. �They had two little boys with BB guns and the 
parents totally ignored the blow horn. �I was very disappointed that these 
people could get away with these tactics. � I should have contacted the 
authorizes myself the following day. Thanks for sharing maybe someone on the 
list has some pull to get this resolved. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon� 



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: 07/24/2015  10:41 AM  (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island 

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.� Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.� The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.� Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.� Our interpreter said they've been missing for the 
last couple of years.� I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do 
with that as well.� He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and 
it's difficult to control such a large area.� Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??� Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 




------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:30:56 -0500
From:    kjdillard 
Subject: Re: Bird Island


    
Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? �I'm taking friends on the tour next week. � I hope we don't 
experience this again. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon� 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: jwdavis 
Date: 07/24/2015  12:01 PM  (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Island 




I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying.� Budget cuts 
from all agencies have probably been a major problem.� Civilian Federal 
employees are lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 
million more people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and 
implementing these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see 
that they are implemented. 

�
During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them.� It is 
my opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

�
Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
�
�


�

From: Tiffany & Bob
Bertram
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island
�


We took the Bird Island tour on Lake
Ouachita last night.� Unfortunately, someone had parked their houseboat on 
the end of the island where the purple martins usually roost.� The birds 
tried to settle in on the other end of the island, but would only use the last 
few trees - about 1/3 of the space they normally roost in.� Our park 
interpreter said he had no authority to make the boat move, but after some 
friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & told the man he would be 
reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move by morning. 

�
We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.� Our interpreter said they've been missing for the 
last couple of years.� I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do 
with that as well.� He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and 
it's difficult to control such a large area.� Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??� Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


�

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:15:30 -0500
From:    jwdavis 
Subject: Re: Bird Island

No, I am saying nothing has been done. These problems mentioned have been 
identified since as early as 1992 and they still exists due to apathy, 
indifference and those that could and should do something do not place it as a 
priority to implement a solution. 


Jerry W. Davis

From: kjdillard
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 1:30 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Island

Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? I'm taking friends on the tour next week. I hope we don't experience 
this again. 


Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: jwdavis 
Date: 07/24/2015 12:01 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Island 


I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 


During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR



From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 


We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:02:57 -0500
From:    Sandy Berger 
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Karen McGee just called me and asked me to report that she had a very 
bedraggled adult male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at her feeder this afternoon. 


Very early migrant.  Karen lives in Central City.

Sandy B.


Sent from my iPad

------------------------------

End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
***************************************************************
Subject: Bird Island Lake Ouachita
From: Susan Adkins <susan.adkins AT ARKANSAS.GOV>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 16:25:12 +0000
Hello everyone. Just wanted to chime in on this topic. First of all, the purple 
martins are back on the original "Bird Island." (They had moved to a nearby 
island last year.) Unfortunately, the cattle egret rookery is not present this 
year on Bird Island. However, there are a few dozen herons, egrets and 
blackbirds roosting on the island. The purple martins are present each night in 
large numbers and seem to spread across much of the island since they have it 
all to themselves. They tend to favor the north side though. 


As far as the harassment of the birds, this is something I struggle with every 
year during the roost. A few years back the island was designated an Important 
Bird Area and signs were placed on the island. Of course, they were taken. I'm 
going to talk with the Corps of Engineers and AGFC and see what can be done. 


At the very least, I think documenting occurrences where we witness people 
harassing the birds on the island might influence the amount of patrol done out 
there. Maybe we can get new signs put on the island as well. 


On a good note, I want to mention that we will be doing the Bird Island Tours 
until mid-August. You can make reservations at the number below. I will be 
offering an Early Bird Island Tour next Friday, July 31st. This sunrise tour 
leaves the marina at 5:30 am. Very unique opportunity to see the birds wake 
from their roost and fly away. The space is limited to 20 guests. 



Susan Adkins
Park Interpreter, CIG
Lake Ouachita State Park
5451 Mountain Pine Rd.
Mountain Pine, Arkansas  71956
Ph:   501.767.9366
Susan.Adkins AT Arkansas.gov
 
   

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of ARBIRD-L automatic digest system 

Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2015 12:00 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)

There are 7 messages totaling 802 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Bird Island (5)
  2. Purple Martin Roosts
  3. Rose-breasted Grosbeak

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:41:52 +0000
From:    Tiffany & Bob Bertram
         <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:01:11 -0500
From:    jwdavis 
Subject: Re: Bird Island

I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 


During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR



From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 


We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:09:28 +0000
From:    dianemarie yates 
Subject: Purple Martin Roosts

It’s been decades since I camped out with a boat but it seems to me there is 
or should be a law concerning the use of an air horn for other than what it was 
intended, especially at evening. The revelers need to be stuck with a fine or 
run off the lake upon a second warning. And, yes, Audubon should get involved 
with signage and protection for martin roosts and all known shore bird nest 
sites. 







Dianemarie

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:16:28 -0500
From:    kjdillard 
Subject: Re: Bird Island


    
I took the tour last summer and had the same experience.   A large houseboat 
was parked on the island.  They had two little boys with BB guns and the 
parents totally ignored the blow horn.  I was very disappointed that these 
people could get away with these tactics.   I should have contacted the 
authorizes myself the following day. Thanks for sharing maybe someone on the 
list has some pull to get this resolved. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon  



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: 07/24/2015  10:41 AM  (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island 

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 




------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:30:56 -0500
From:    kjdillard 
Subject: Re: Bird Island


    
Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.?  I'm taking friends on the tour next week.   I hope we don't 
experience this again. Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon  


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: jwdavis 
Date: 07/24/2015  12:01 PM  (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Island 




I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying.  Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem.  Civilian Federal employees 
are lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 

 
During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them.  It is 
my opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 

 
Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 
 


 

From: Tiffany & Bob
Bertram
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island
 


We took the Bird Island tour on Lake
Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, someone had parked their houseboat on the 
end of the island where the purple martins usually roost.  The birds tried to 
settle in on the other end of the island, but would only use the last few trees 
- about 1/3 of the space they normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he 
had no authority to make the boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from 
us, he got a little brave & told the man he would be reporting him to the park 
rangers, and he should move by morning. 

 
We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


 

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:15:30 -0500
From:    jwdavis 
Subject: Re: Bird Island

No, I am saying nothing has been done. These problems mentioned have been 
identified since as early as 1992 and they still exists due to apathy, 
indifference and those that could and should do something do not place it as a 
priority to implement a solution. 


Jerry W. Davis

From: kjdillard
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 1:30 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Island

Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? I'm taking friends on the tour next week. I hope we don't experience 
this again. 


Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: jwdavis 
Date: 07/24/2015 12:01 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Bird Island 


I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 


During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR



From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 


We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 


------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 24 Jul 2015 18:02:57 -0500
From:    Sandy Berger 
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Karen McGee just called me and asked me to report that she had a very 
bedraggled adult male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at her feeder this afternoon. 


Very early migrant.  Karen lives in Central City.

Sandy B.


Sent from my iPad

------------------------------

End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 23 Jul 2015 to 24 Jul 2015 (#2015-212)
***************************************************************
Subject: Re: Bird Island
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 14:15:30 -0500
No, I am saying nothing has been done. These problems mentioned have been 
identified since as early as 1992 and they still exists due to apathy, 
indifference and those that could and should do something do not place it as a 
priority to implement a solution. 


Jerry W. Davis

From: kjdillard 
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 1:30 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Bird Island

Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.? I'm taking friends on the tour next week. I hope we don't experience 
this again. 


Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: jwdavis  
Date: 07/24/2015 12:01 PM (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Bird Island 


I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 


During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR



From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram 
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 


We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

Subject: Re: Bird Island
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:30:56 -0500
    
Jerry are you saying that nothing can be done to resolve this on going 
problem.?  I'm taking friends on the tour next week.   I hope we don't 
experience this again.  

Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: jwdavis  
Date: 07/24/2015  12:01 PM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: Bird Island 




I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the 
birds changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 

regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement 

Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying.  Budget cuts from all 
agencies have probably been a major problem.  Civilian Federal employees 
are lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 

implemented. 
 
During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not 

have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them.  It is 
my opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 
 
Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 
 


 

From: Tiffany & Bob 
Bertram 
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Bird Island
 


We took the Bird Island tour on Lake 
Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, someone had parked their houseboat on 
the end of the island where the purple martins usually roost.  The birds 
tried to settle in on the other end of the island, but would only use the last 
few trees - about 1/3 of the space they normally roost in.  Our park 
interpreter said he had no authority to make the boat move, but after some 
friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & told the man he would be 
reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move by morning.
 
We also noticed that the white ibis were 
conspicuously absent since the last time we took the tour.  Our interpreter 
said they've been missing for the last couple of years.  I'm wondering if 
human interaction has something to do with that as well.  He stated there 
are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's difficult to control such a 
large 

area.  Maybe there are a few civilian birders with boats who could keep an 
eye out for the island during roosting season??  Seems like another case of 
humans ruining a good thing!

 
Subject: Re: Bird Island
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 13:16:28 -0500
    
I took the tour last summer and had the same experience.   A large houseboat 
was parked on the island.  They had two little boys with BB guns and the 
parents totally ignored the blow horn.  I was very disappointed that these 
people could get away with these tactics.   I should have contacted the 
authorizes myself the following day.  

Thanks for sharing maybe someone on the list has some pull to get this 
resolved.  

Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
Date: 07/24/2015  10:41 AM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Bird Island 

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

Subject: Purple Martin Roosts
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:09:28 +0000
It’s been decades since I camped out with a boat but it seems to me there is 
or should be a law concerning the use of an air horn for other than what it was 
intended, especially at evening. The revelers need to be stuck with a fine or 
run off the lake upon a second warning. And, yes, Audubon should get involved 
with signage and protection for martin roosts and all known shore bird nest 
sites. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Re: Bird Island
From: jwdavis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:01:11 -0500
I have not been on the Ouachita State Park Purple Martin tour since the birds 
changed location. The Corps of Engineers are the ones that are suppose to 
regulate and enforce protection of these birds. Thus far they have not been 
motivated to do that or sign, or put out buoys, provide protective rip rap to 
keep boat wave action from continuing to erode the islands nor plant 
replacement Bald Cypress to replace the ones that are dying. Budget cuts from 
all agencies have probably been a major problem. Civilian Federal employees are 
lower than they have been since 1946 and the US has added 200 million more 
people. However, from my perspective, protecting the birds and implementing 
these items have not been a priority of birders or Audubon to see that they are 
implemented. 


During the times that I have visited Bird Island, drunk boaters loaded with 
party revelers were blaring their air horns to see the birds fly from their 
roosts after they had settled in for the night. The Ouachita State Park does 
not have authority to deal with such problems and the CE ignores them. It is my 
opinion that these types of actions are in violation of provisions of the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act and should be prevented. 


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR



From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram 
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2015 10:41 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Bird Island

We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night. Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost. The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in. Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 


We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour. Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years. I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well. He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area. Maybe there are a few civilian birders 
with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting season?? 
Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

Subject: Bird Island
From: Tiffany & Bob Bertram <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:41:52 +0000
We took the Bird Island tour on Lake Ouachita last night.  Unfortunately, 
someone had parked their houseboat on the end of the island where the purple 
martins usually roost.  The birds tried to settle in on the other end of the 
island, but would only use the last few trees - about 1/3 of the space they 
normally roost in.  Our park interpreter said he had no authority to make the 
boat move, but after some friendly cajoling from us, he got a little brave & 
told the man he would be reporting him to the park rangers, and he should move 
by morning. 

We also noticed that the white ibis were conspicuously absent since the last 
time we took the tour.  Our interpreter said they've been missing for the last 
couple of years.  I'm wondering if human interaction has something to do with 
that as well.  He stated there are very few patrol boats on the lake and it's 
difficult to control such a large area.  Maybe there are a few civilian 
birders with boats who could keep an eye out for the island during roosting 
season??  Seems like another case of humans ruining a good thing! 

Subject: Black bellied whistling ducks
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 20:06:09 -0500
Holla Bend tonight, saw at least two. Early gadwall too.

Ryan 
Pope Co

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Dates set for 2016 Red Slough Birding Convention
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 17:34:04 -0500
The dates for the 2016 Red Slough Birding Convention will be May 7 - 10.
Hope you can make it!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR
Subject: FOOT-TREMBLING BY PIPING PLOVER AT CENTERTON
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 21:17:38 +0000
The PIPING PLOVER that Mike Mlodinow and I observed at Craig state fish 
hatchery in Centerton yesterday was still present this morning. It was steadily 
feeding in the soft mud employing a technique often called foot-trembling: it 
extends one foot and vibrates it on the wet mud, presumably to bring aquatic 
invertebrates up from just below the surface. It was alternating feet as it 
moved along the soft mud. We've seen Semipalmated Plovers doing this at the 
hatchery, too. 


Overall shorebird numbers were lower today as the weak cool front moves out. 
Besides Piping Plover and Killdeer (~20), I saw Semipalmated Plover (1), 
Solitary Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), 
Least Sandpiper (12), and Pectoral Sandpiper (1). 


Two Great Blue Herons briefly engaged in a stylistic bills-up display, like 
they were posing for Audubon or something. It was a moderate version of the 
"upright and spread wing" display described in the Online Birds of North 
America account. One of the birds was an adult and showed off its black 
shoulder patch. 


I saw David Oakley up there this morning. The hatchery was built in a mesic 
Tallgrass Prairie with artesian springs. We investigated interesting plants 
typical of this habitat. One large Swamp Milkweed is now blooming and several 
others are on the way. On one plant, a fantastic orange and black Swamp 
Milkweed Leaf Beetle (Labidomera clavicollis) - looks like a huge lady beetle. 
Pale violet Monkey Flowers were their yellow ears were also in bloom. 

Subject: THREATENED-ENDANGERED SPECIES (2) AT CENTERTON THIS MORNING
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 18:35:24 +0000
The weak cold front and generally unsettled weather -- including almost two 
inches of rain in northwest Arkansas last night - was probably reflected in 
some interesting birding at Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton. Mike 
Mlodinow and I got up there around 8. As you might expect in stormy weather, 
the shorebird species mix was different from yesterday, and interesting, too. 


To begin with, we had a LEAST TERN, presumably an Inland Least Tern, a 
Federally-listed Endangered Species. We see them with some regularity at the 
hatchery, though always in low numbers. After a couple of hours of checking and 
then rechecking the two best shorebird flats, we spotted a PIPING PLOVER. 
Depending upon this bird's origins, it is either a Federally-threatened species 
(Great Plains breeding population) or an Endangered species (Great Lakes 
population); my bet is Great Plains, though this is just a hunch. While this is 
a rarity for us, we do see them on occasion. 


Besides them, we also had Killdeer (~20), Semipalmated Plover (3), Lesser 
Yellowlegs (1), Solitary Sandpiper (2), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), Western 
Sandpiper (1), Least Sandpiper (33), Pectoral Sandpiper (2). 


The presence of these rare species underscores why public lands like this are 
important for the ultimate recovery of many species of migratory birds, 
including these rare ones. The hatchery's chief business and source of public 
support and funding involves fish production and distribution, but there is 
significant room for other wildlife values, including bird conservation, as 
well illustrated today. 
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: martha strother <000000ad14e4acd0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 16:36:19 +0000
Possums can definitely be found in trees, as recently demonstrated in my 
backyard at 1:30 a.m. when my dog, who had asked to go out, treed one and 
announced the fact to all within a 3-block radius.   

      From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 7:20 PM
 Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
   
We have both raccoons and 'possums, but while we see the raccoons almost daily 
during family rearin' season, we rarely see the 'possums. Our feeder had no 
damage either, which is unusual for raccoons.. our suet feeder and the can with 
the spring-loaded lid holding the sunflower seeds bear battle scars of proof... 
but I hadn't seen a 'possum in a tree, so they didn't make the suspect list. 
Additionally a raccoon would have snapped the small branches in this holly 
which was young and tender. It remained a mystery until my 'possum discovery. 
By the way, in the meantime I discovered that GROUNDhogs are not true to their 
name, and that they are very agile and daring tree climbers going out on the 
flimsiest branches to munch on the tender young leaves.Let us know who the 
culprit is, Chuck, when you find out.Sara 


On Jul 21, 2015 3:15 PM, Charles Anderson  wrote:

Raccoons, huh? 
Thanks for all the input. We haven't seen any raccoons around our place, but we 
do have the occasional possum. The curious thing is that there is no damage to 
the feeders at all. Just no juice left. 

I'll update if I find the culprit with its whatever in the juice.
Thanks!
Chuck
On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 


My guess too would be Raccoons.   Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



 From: Charles Anderson Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AMTo: 
ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery I have a 
mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills in Little 
Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, it is 
empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. 
 We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders 
like this before. 

 Any ideas? Chuck Anderson




  
Subject: bird book sale in Conway
From: "Kimberly G. Smith" <kgsmith AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 15:06:36 +0000
This is going to be an estate sale this weekend at the home of Martha and Art 
Johnson (see below)… 

Apparently there are a lot of bird books…

The family has offered to let birders come to the pre-sale on Thursday 
evening… 


Contact Mike Marion (email below) if you have any questions…

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
********************************

Begin forwarded message:

From: Mike Manion >
Date: July 21, 2015 at 2:38:41 PM MDT
Re:  Johnson Estate Sale



They are having an estate sale at the Johnson's house (53 Meadowbrook, Conway) 
this weekend. When we were going through and organizing everything, we of 
course found many, many bird books that Martha had. I thought that maybe some 
of the local birders might want to have a chance to look through those books 
before the sale officially begins.The estate sale folks are going to have a 
pre-sale Thursday night from 5:00-8:00 for friends and family. So, if you know 
of any birders who would like to attend, can you please forward this to them. 




They are welcome to browse and buy anything, but I thought the bird books might 
be of interest to them and I'm sure Martha would be happy with them going to 
people who would really appreciate them. 




Thanks,

 Mike
Subject: Re: feeders & flying squirrels
From: Mary Ann King <office AT PINERIDGEGARDENS.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 07:10:36 -0500
When I just want to watch the flying squirrels, I leave the porch light on over 
our 2nd story deck & they ‘fly’ in to a pine tree next to the deck and run 
over the railings to the feeders that I try to keep hulled sunflower chips in. 


 

‘MaryAnn’ King

In the pine woods northwest of London

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of j s 

Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 5:53 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: 

 

 

 

Sent from Windows Mail

 My vote is for flying squirrels. Quietly walk outside every now and then for 
an hour or two after dark and listen for squeaks. If you hear them, use a 
flashlight to see the feeder. Hurry! Flying squirrels are fast although they 
may stop and squeak at you again. 

Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 19:51:06 -0500
I have a friend here in Conway who says the raccoons drain his hummingbird 
feeders at night, though I’ve never seen it here. My bird feeding station is 
just outside my kitchen window. If I leave feed out over night; which I try NOT 
to do, I can shine a flashlight on the feeder station (from inside the kitchen) 
and the raccoons will be there eating. I also have flying squirrels, but I 
don’t see them as often. 


Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Charles Anderson 
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 3:15 PM
To: Gail Miller 
Cc: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery

Raccoons, huh?  

Thanks for all the input. We haven't seen any raccoons around our place, but we 
do have the occasional possum. The curious thing is that there is no damage to 
the feeders at all. Just no juice left. 


I'll update if I find the culprit with its whatever in the juice.

Thanks!

Chuck

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 


  My guess too would be Raccoons.  

  Gail Miller 
  Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
  See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
  See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





  From: Charles Anderson 
  Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AM
  To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
  Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery

 I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills in 
Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, it 
is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. 


 We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders 
like this before. 



  Any ideas?

  Chuck Anderson
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Carol Meyerdirk <dmeyerdirk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 00:34:57 +0000
Years ago, we had that same problem. We finally solved it when one night, we 
saw a fox up in an oak tree on the limb where the feeder was located. I didn't 
even know they would eat nectar much less get up in a tree. I looked it up and 
they have been known to do that. 

Carol M 

----- Original Message -----

From: "martha strother" <000000ad14e4acd0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
To: "ARBIRD-L"  
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 3:54:56 PM 
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery 

I'd be tempted to find some kind of night-vision gadget and stake it out . . 
.  



From: Charles Anderson  
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 3:15 PM 
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery 

Raccoons, huh?  

Thanks for all the input. We haven't seen any raccoons around our place, but we 
do have the occasional possum. The curious thing is that there is no damage to 
the feeders at all. Just no juice left. 


I'll update if I find the culprit with its whatever in the juice. 

Thanks! 

Chuck 



On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Gail Miller < gail.miller AT conwaycorp.net > 
wrote: 




My guess too would be Raccoons.  
  
Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR 
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent 
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root 



  
From: Charles Anderson 
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AM 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery 
  
I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills in 
Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, it 
is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. 

  
We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders 
like this before. 

  
Any ideas? 
  
Chuck Anderson 






Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 19:20:50 -0500




Subject: SHOREBIRDS AT CENTERTON TODAY AFTER WEAK COLD FRONT
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 00:20:25 +0000
The weak cold front that pushed down into northwest Arkansas last night brought 
with it a few more shorebird migrants at Craig State Fish Hatchery in 
Centerton. With overcast sky, cooler temps (mid-80s), and a very, very slight 
rain, it was quite a pleasure to sit in the car and watch the mudflats. Besides 
Killdeer (~20), migrants included Spotted Sandpiper (2), Semipalmated Sandpiper 
(3), Western Sandpiper (1), Least Sandpiper (28+), Stilt Sandpiper (5), 
Wilson's Phalarope (1). American Goldfinches continue to work the algae 
patches, harvesting long strands and the occasional large gob. Swamp Milkweed 
that grows naturally around the hatchery is starting to bloom. When it gets 
going good, it's a great place to see all kinds of pollinators, especially 
Monarchs. 

Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 21
From: David Arbour <arbour AT WINDSTREAM.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:09:06 -0500
It was mostly cloudy and warm on the bird survey today.  71 species were
found.  I started at 6:02 a.m. so I could get done before it got too hot but
fortunately the clouds kept things a lot cooler than they were yesterday.  I
played a Screech-Owl call first thing and had two answer back from some
woods along Mudline road.  I found a new location with a calling Eastern
Towhee which makes 5 locations this year now.  Here is my list for today:

 

Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3

Wood Duck - 38

Ring-necked Duck - 2 males

Pied-billed Grebe - 10

American White Pelican - 45

Neotropic Cormorant - 2 (1 on nest in Anhinga rookery.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 

Anhinga - 11 adults and fledged young.  (also 1 nest with young still.)

Least Bittern - 2

Great Blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 166

Snowy Egret - 48

Little-blue Heron - 12

Cattle Egret - 3

Green Heron - 10

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 8

White Ibis - 11

Turkey Vulture - 18

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 12 adults (also 3 broods seen.)

Common Gallinule - 20 adults (also 2 broods seen.)

American Coot - 7

Killdeer - 4

Spotted Sandpiper - 8

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3

Western Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 74

Least Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 10

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 8

Eastern Screech-Owl - 2

Chimney Swift - 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Willow Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 7

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 8

Bell's Vireo - 1

American Crow - 11

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 16

Cliff Swallow - 3

Barn Swallow - 31

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 13

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Black-and-White Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 15

Yellow-breasted Chat - 3

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2 singing (1 at new location.)

Northern Cardinal - 11

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 33

Common Grackle - 56

Orchard Oriole - 3

 

 

Odonates:

 

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

Herps:

 

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog

 

 

Good birding!

 

David Arbour

De Queen, AR

 

 

 

 

 

 
Subject: No Subject
From: j s <sweeney_2 AT MSN.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 22:52:35 +0000



Sent from Windows Mail

 My vote is for flying squirrels. Quietly walk outside every now and then for 
an hour or two after dark and listen for squeaks. If you hear them, use a 
flashlight to see the feeder. Hurry! Flying squirrels are fast although they 
may stop and squeak at you again. 
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Joyce Hartmann <hart AT ARTELCO.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 17:32:59 -0500
We have had raccoons visit our feeders but they do tear things up. . flying 
squirrels also come to our feeders and  might more likely be your culprit 
'cause they would probably just lick and sip, more likely. ..will be 
interesting to read your findings.  Joyce Hartmann, Van Buren County 





Sent from Samsung tablet

-------- Original message --------
From: Charles Anderson  
Date: 07/21/2015  3:15 PM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery 
 
Raccoons, huh? 

Thanks for all the input. We haven't seen any raccoons around our place, but we 
do have the occasional possum. The curious thing is that there is no damage to 
the feeders at all. Just no juice left. 


I'll update if I find the culprit with its whatever in the juice.

Thanks!

Chuck

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 

My guess too would be Raccoons. 
 
Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



 
From: Charles Anderson
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
 
I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills in 
Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, it 
is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. 

 
We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders 
like this before. 

 
Any ideas?
 
Chuck Anderson
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 16:05:06 -0500
I have a field camera set up pointed at my small pond. The only varmint caught 
recently other than birds and squirrels is a black cat. This afternoon I 
stopped by Home Depot and bought a floating fountain. I just plunked it in the 
pond and plugged it in to the electric outlet and it began to spray. 
Immediately a brown thrasher came to investigate and the ever present Blue Jays 
took a shower. Life is good 😊. 

Sally Jo Gibson,
Harrison,AR

Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: martha strother
Sent: ‎7/‎21/‎2015 3:55 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery

I'd be tempted to find some kind of night-vision gadget and stake it out . . .
      From: Charles Anderson 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
 Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 3:15 PM
 Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery

Raccoons, huh?
Thanks for all the input. We haven't seen any raccoons around our place, but we 
do have the occasional possum. The curious thing is that there is no damage to 
the feeders at all. Just no juice left. 

I'll update if I find the culprit with its whatever in the juice.
Thanks!
Chuck


On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 


My guess too would be Raccoons.   Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



 From: Charles Anderson Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AMTo: 
ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery I have a 
mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills in Little 
Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, it is 
empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. We 
do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders like 
this before. 

 Any ideas? Chuck Anderson



Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: martha strother <000000ad14e4acd0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 20:54:56 +0000
I'd be tempted to find some kind of night-vision gadget and stake it out . . 
.  

      From: Charles Anderson 
 To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 3:15 PM
 Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
   
Raccoons, huh? 
Thanks for all the input. We haven't seen any raccoons around our place, but we 
do have the occasional possum. The curious thing is that there is no damage to 
the feeders at all. Just no juice left. 

I'll update if I find the culprit with its whatever in the juice.
Thanks!
Chuck


On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Gail Miller  
wrote: 


My guess too would be Raccoons.   Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root



 From: Charles Anderson Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AMTo: 
ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery I have a 
mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills in Little 
Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, it is 
empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. 
 We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders 
like this before. 

 Any ideas? Chuck Anderson



  
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 15:15:37 -0500
Raccoons, huh?

Thanks for all the input. We haven't seen any raccoons around our place,
but we do have the occasional possum. The curious thing is that there is no
damage to the feeders at all. Just no juice left.

I'll update if I find the culprit with its whatever in the juice.

Thanks!

Chuck

On Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Gail Miller 
wrote:

>   My guess too would be Raccoons.
>
> Gail Miller
> Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
> See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
> See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
>
>
>
>
>  *From:* Charles Anderson 
> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AM
> *To:* ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> *Subject:* A Hummingbird feeder mystery
>
>  I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western
> Hills in Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by
> morning, it is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the
> same thing is happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a
> nice shady spot.
>
> We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied
> feeders like this before.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Chuck Anderson
>
Subject: Please bear with me...
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 19:52:31 +0000
if posts are repeating or coming up untimely. Not intended. Thanks.






Dianemarie
Subject: Fw: eBirding can be recuperative
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 19:46:15 +0000






Dianemarie

Money can only buy happiness when you already have the things it can't.






From: dianemarie yates
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎July‎ ‎20‎, ‎2015 ‎7‎:‎01‎ ‎PM
To: dianemarie yates





Right-on, Kelley! While my recuperation wasn’t nearly the challenge this 
lady’s was, I did have hip replacement, knee replacement, shoulder spur 
removal and two carpel tunnel surgeries in 14 months. In each case I was back 
on the trail (two with a walker, then quad-cane) the day after hospital 
release. My list tablet was on its tape around my neck and pen was in my 
pocket. I didn’t want to let eBird down! Now, you’d hardly guess there’s 
all that metal in me and after Kluie (dog) and I both beat tick fever we’re 
back on top of our game. We eBird every day. 







Dianemarie


That which you surround yourself with, there also shall your heart be.



From: dianemarie yates
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎July‎ ‎20‎, ‎2015 ‎6‎:‎48‎ ‎PM
To: Ragupathy Kannan
















From: Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎July‎ ‎20‎, ‎2015 ‎6‎:‎33‎ ‎PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU






The response to my appeal for as many checklists from Arkansas as possible for 
eBird's Global Big Day in May was lukewarm at best :) 





But perhaps the following article on the recuperative effects of eBirding will 
help more Arkansan birders to get into eBird. Recuperative or not, eBird has 
made me a better birder and ornithologist. --Kannan 


-------------------------





Kelley Nunn June 2, 2015  Recovery Big Year







The neurologist I saw back in August 2014 who misdiagnosed me with cerebellar 
atrophy wasn't on point with his diagnosis, but did give me some resounding 
advice on how to cope with chronic illness. As he was measuring my muscle 
strength, balance, and tremor, he told me a story about a violinist he had seen 
in concert who became so entranced in her music that she would sway and move 
with her instrument as though the rest of her world had just disappeared in the 
feeling of it all. After the concert, someone asked the woman what she felt 
while playing and she answered, “Bliss." His advice to me was to find my 
"violin:” something that was so all-encompassing that it could make the 
“What’s wrong with me? Will I ever get better?” thoughts about my medical 
condition disappear. Lucky for me, I already had. Birding is my violin. 


Back when I was bed-ridden, there wasn't much birding I could do. On days when 
I could tolerate the visual stimulation of sitting in a car, friends and family 
members would drive me to nearby birding locations: the Brandywine Wetlands to 
look for interesting shorebirds; Wilson Road to see the Bobolinks/Eastern 
Meadowlarks and search through the swallows hoping for a Cliff or Bank Swallow; 
and Longwood Abbondi property, to check again for an vagrant heron, egret, or 
swallow. As you can imagine, driving to the same three locations over and over 
with the same goal every time became rather tiresome. But, there was something 
that revitalized my goals every month and gave me a renewed purpose-- eBird's 
"eBirder of the Month" challenge. 


Every month since the beginning of 2014, Cornell Lab of Ornithology's eBird has 
posted details for a monthly birding challenge. The requirement to complete the 
challenge is simple, and those who are successful are entered into a drawing to 
win a pair of Zeiss Conquest HD 8x42 (!!!) binoculars. For example, the June 
2015 challenge is to submit 20 checklists containing at least one breeding 
code. Back in April 2015, you qualified if you submitted 20 checklists 
containing a species of diurnal raptor (coinciding with spring raptor 
migration). As you can see, the challenge is usually pertinent to what the 
birds are doing. What was my motivation for completing the monthly challenges? 
Well, 1) anyone who knows me can attest that I love a good challenge. 
Otherwise, 2) the monthly challenges provided much-needed structure, goals, and 
motivation. And, 3) while I have yet to win one of the Zeiss binoculars, the 
optimism and hope I would feel every month while waiting for the “You’ve 
won!” email and imagining myself retiring my beaten and battered Nikon 
Monarchs did more good for me than the eBird team could have ever imagined. 



 





 Hawk Watch Kelley 
HAWK WATCH KELLEY - OCTOBER 2013





 


 Yard Birding (in the rain) for eBird 
YARD BIRDING (IN THE RAIN) FOR EBIRD'S "EBIRDER OF THE MONTH" CHALLENGE - 
OCTOBER 2014 







So, when I was bed-ridden, I would formulate the birding I did almost entirely 
around the eBirder of the month challenge. One month, the challenge was to 
submit at least 20 checklists from a single patch. For those few weeks, I would 
ask whoever was driving me to head for the Route 82 farmlands, which was one of 
my patches. At that time, it was physically hard for me to tolerate the visual 
stimulation of the landscape moving as we drove around, but my determination to 
meet my goal of completing the monthly challenge would get me through the half 
hour/forty-five minutes in the car. Last October, the challenge was to submit 
stationary checklists of duration greater than one hour. Just a year earlier in 
October 2013, I would stand atop the hill at the Ashland Hawk Watch and count 
raptors for hours while scanning the skies, but in October 2014, moving my eyes 
around for more than 5, 10, or 20 minutes was sometimes enough to put me flat 
in bed for hours or days. That month, I probably submitted over twenty 1-hour 
stationary checklists (sometimes I even went over an hour). It felt SO GOOD to 
submit them, and to accomplish something. 


Through completing these challenges and submitting all these checklists, I 
began to feel that every checklist I submitted was like earning a merit 
badge— as though I was proving to myself that on that day, I had accomplished 
something. I absolutely love eBirding and eBird; I use their data resources 
religiously and owe so many of my positive birding experiences to their species 
maps and alerts. Without eBird’s challenges, I wouldn’t have had a purpose 
to get “sick me” sitting up in a chair, or out in the yard, or to sit 
through those car rides every single day. So, I’d like to say thank you eBird 
and thank you Zeiss for coming up with this truly brilliant idea. I can’t 
tell you how much I appreciate it. 


When it comes to my 2015 Recovery Big Year, I can’t help but think how much 
good could be done in introducing individuals who are struggling to cope with 
chronic illnesses to birding. If you know someone who’s not-so-healthy, 
introduce them to the monthly eBird challenges! And please, if you’re out 
birding, submit your checklists to eBird! 
Subject: Hummer Feeder Robbers, cont'd.
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:51:15 +0000
The commonest culprit in wooded Arkansas yards is the raccoon. They’ve been 
dangling from the rims of my feeders for years, tipping them sideways to let 
the juices flow while they slurp. I try to remember to take the feeders in 
every night or risk breakage as well as lost nectar. I’ve sacrificed some 
pretty nice ones to forgetfulness, and get mad enough to consider the shotgun. 
Then I remember my youth, when working in a national park I had no bird feeders 
of any kind, and only semi-pet coons who came every evening to my tent cabin to 
sit up on their haunches like spoiled pups, asking for left over hotdogs and 
cereal. Everything I do now favors the birds, and I sometimes wonder if life 
wasn’t simpler when my appreciation of wildlife was less selective. 







Dianemarie

“That which you surround yourself with, there shall your heart be also.”
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 13:25:46 -0500
My guess too would be Raccoons.  

Gail Miller 
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root





From: Charles Anderson 
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:44 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery

I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills in 
Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, it 
is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. 


We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders 
like this before. 



Any ideas?

Chuck Anderson
Subject: Sightings young Cooper's Hawk and Greater Roadrunner
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 13:24:40 -0500
Excitement around my place continues to be sightings of the young Cooper's
Hawks and the Greater Roadrunner.  A couple of days ago I walked into the
kitchen and saw a young Cooper's chasing the Roadrunner up the pasture hill.
Roadrunners are quite comical when they are being pursued ... stopping and
spreading its wings before starting off running again.  Just a bit ago I was
was heading out the back door to walk the dogs when the Roadrunner rose,
very awkwardly from the back yard.  I've read that they are not great flyers
and it almost resembled a heron-type bird (especially the feet) as it lifted
off and flew over the deck of my workshop.  I found this photo online that
resembles its flight.
http://www.birdforum.net/opus/Image:Gtr_Roadrunner_flying.jpg  Yesterday, I
saw a squirrel running across the pasture with one of the young Cooper's
Hawks after it.  My observations lead me to believe that the young Cooper's
spend a lot of time whistling, which I think is begging parents for food ..
but makes it easy for me to know where they are though .. and they spend a
lot of practice time trying to catch food.

So, so far, four sightings of the Roadrunner here at home.

Gail Miller
Conway - Faulkner Co. - AR
See my recent photos at http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root&view=recent
See my photography at: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/root
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney AT CONWAYCORP.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 13:20:52 -0500
Essentially all the 14 bats or so that we have in Arkansas are 
predominantly insectivores. You have to push towards the deserts to find 
the nectivores. Or in the tropics. Hummingbird feeders in the tropics 
are frequently night visited though I am not sure they could empty a 
full feeder overnight even there.

Watch this one after the night light is on:

http://www.ornithos.com.br/live-cams/live-cam-5/

If we lived down there I think we would definitely keep the feeders out 
for these animals. A friend in Brazil with a cam also has several 
species of Fruit Bats that come for his bananas at night and they are 
even more impressive and animated on cameras than the high speed nectivores.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR

On 7/21/2015 12:35 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
> Gee, I'd set up a dedicated feeder if it would attract bats.
>
> The flying squirrel premise is a good one. They are out this time of year 
munching on June bugs among other things. 

>
> Jeff Short
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

> Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:52 AM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
>
> Here are some interesting possibilities:
> 
http://www.the-scoop-on-wild-birds-and-feeders.com/what-is-drinking-my-hummingbird-nectar-at-night.html 

>
> On 7/21/2015 10:44 AM, Charles Anderson wrote:
>> I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western
>> Hills in Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening,
>> and by morning, it is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors
>> says the same thing is happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the
>> eaves in a nice shady spot.
>>
>> We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied
>> feeders like this before.
>>
>> Any ideas?
>>
>> Chuck Anderson
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 12:35:07 -0500
Gee, I'd set up a dedicated feeder if it would attract bats.

The flying squirrel premise is a good one. They are out this time of year 
munching on June bugs among other things. 


Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery

Here are some interesting possibilities: 

http://www.the-scoop-on-wild-birds-and-feeders.com/what-is-drinking-my-hummingbird-nectar-at-night.html 


On 7/21/2015 10:44 AM, Charles Anderson wrote:
> I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western 
> Hills in Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, 
> and by morning, it is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors 
> says the same thing is happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the 
> eaves in a nice shady spot.
>
> We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied 
> feeders like this before.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Chuck Anderson
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Sara Cain-Bartlett <saracnbrtltt9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:00:34 -0500
I have found all the guards chewed off and the feeder empty. I hate all the 
hassle but I have to take down all feeders at dark (7-10) and put them back out 
before dawn. I've fed hummers for now over 30 years in Arkansas and this has 
been a problem but more now than before. My ongoing frustration is bees. I 
understood during the drought that the bees were coming for liquid. I called 
the UALR expert on bees and he said someone near me has a hive and they don't 
provide water. Well, even with all the rain this year, bees are swarming my 
feeders and sometimes covering the feeder. When that happens I have to take 
down all the feeders for a few days. It is NOT easy to feed hummingbirds! 


Sara Cain-Bartlett, LCSW
Fayetteville, Arkansas 
HOME:  479-521-3125
OFFICE:  479-521-4406
Cell:  479-466-0611

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Janine Perlman 

Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:52 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery

Here are some interesting possibilities: 

http://www.the-scoop-on-wild-birds-and-feeders.com/what-is-drinking-my-hummingbird-nectar-at-night.html 


On 7/21/2015 10:44 AM, Charles Anderson wrote:
> I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western 
> Hills in Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, 
> and by morning, it is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors 
> says the same thing is happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the 
> eaves in a nice shady spot.
>
> We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied 
> feeders like this before.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Chuck Anderson
Subject: BIRDS
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 10:58:23 -0500
Kindness is as kindness does.

A bird still alive is worth 100 on your dinner plates.

BFDOSOR  Bird Found Dead On Side Of Road

The bird in the sky is worth more than the one in the oil slick.

The early bird often ends up as one of the others' breakfast.

The shrike that impales its future meals on the long thorn is more
considerate than the human prison guards who routinely torture their
victims, often innocent ones.

The oceans are more important than your swimming pools.

Maniraptors and Coelurosaurs gave rise to what became the modern birds
according to some interpretations of the fossil record.

Little Jenny Wren fell sick,
      Upon a time;
In came Robin Redbreast
       And brought her cake and wine.
"Eat well of my cake, Jenny,
       Drink well of my wine."
"Thank you, Robin, kindly,
You shall be mine."

Jenny she got well,
      And stood upon her feet,
And told Robin plainly
      She loved him not a bit.
Robin being angry,
      Hopped upon a twig,
Saying, "Out upon you! Fie upon you!
      Bold-faced jig!"

I have talked with a fair amount of people around this state, and I believe
I've been acquitted of witchcraft, devil worship, drug promotion and date
rape advocacy.

If anyone wants to "talk" to me from now on, they can do it Off List.

An automatic answer is no guarantee.

My work is done here.


  WT
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Lynn <lynn.nowell33 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 10:58:13 -0500
Raccoon! ( I bet) 
I have one destroying feeders ( seed and nectar) at night! 
Pooping on my deck!!
I saw him one night raiding seeds off my porch , have to lock the doggie door 
at night now. 


Lynn
Lonoke county


> On Jul 21, 2015, at 10:44 AM, Charles Anderson  wrote:
> 
> I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills 
in Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by morning, 
it is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the same thing is 
happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a nice shady spot. 

> 
> We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied feeders 
like this before. 

> 
> Any ideas?
> 
> Chuck Anderson
Subject: Re: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf AT SWBELL.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 10:52:05 -0500
Here are some interesting possibilities: 

http://www.the-scoop-on-wild-birds-and-feeders.com/what-is-drinking-my-hummingbird-nectar-at-night.html 


On 7/21/2015 10:44 AM, Charles Anderson wrote:
> I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western 
> Hills in Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, 
> and by morning, it is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors 
> says the same thing is happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the 
> eaves in a nice shady spot.
>
> We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied 
> feeders like this before.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Chuck Anderson
Subject: A Hummingbird feeder mystery
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson AT UALR.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 10:44:40 -0500
I have a mystery that I would love some help solving. Here in Western Hills
in Little Rock, we fill our hummingbird feeder in the evening, and by
morning, it is empty. It doesn't leak, and one of our neighbors says the
same thing is happening to his feeder. It's hanging under the eaves in a
nice shady spot.

We do have some Downys that poach our juice, but we've never emptied
feeders like this before.

Any ideas?

Chuck Anderson
Subject: Re: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY & BUTTERFLIES 2015
From: Jane Steinkraus <janesteinkraus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 07:58:33 -0500
This year, by Golly, we're coming.
Joe, our patch of swamp milkweed is turning into a robust swath of
milkweed.  Yesterday, while squishing milkweed aphids, I counted 5 monarch
larvae, a couple of them nearly ready to pupate.  This isn't much, but
there wouldn't have been any on this site before we got milkweeds started,
so it feels like a small triumph.
Happy birding,
Jane

On Mon, Jul 20, 2015 at 8:30 PM, Joseph C. Neal  wrote:

>  Mark your calendars, birding friends, for y’ll are hereby invited to an
> INFORMAL*  birding-natural history “conference,” Bison, Birds, Botany &
> Butterflies (BBBB) centered at The Nature Conservancy’s Tallgrass Prairie
> Preserve in northeastern Oklahoma, Thursday-Friday-Saturday, *September
> 25-26, 2015* (maybe even starting September 24). We will informally* –
> and I do mean informally* -- and with little fanfare and no fund raising --
> observe and enjoy free-ranging bison, typical birds of the Flinthills
> prairies and associated crosstimbers woodlands, and the remarkably diverse
> native flora there. We will also check out all the other stuff, like
> fossils, Eastern Collared-Lizards, Ornate Box Turtles, and anything else
> encountered. This is also peak time for the southward migration of Monarch
> Butterflies, and if previous years serve as guide, we should see a lot of
> them, too.
>
>
>
> These dates coincide with another BBB: Bikes, Blues & Barbecue, the rally
> of 400,000 folks that turns Fayetteville into a ROARING, RUMBLING, NON-STOP
> chaotic national playground for those who have a special interest in
> motorcycles and riding back-and-forth on College Avenue or riding
> low-flying helicopters over otherwise private neighborhoods. Noise and
> congestion has become so extreme Fayetteville is uninhabitable UNLESS you
> are deaf, or live a long ways out of town in a special out of the way gated
> community, or are actually making a lot of money off the rally.
>
>
>
> I’ll planning to spend a couple of nights at the La Quinta motel in
> Bartlesville. I couldn’t get a room at the Super 8. On both Friday and
> Saturday, I will be at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve headquarters area at
> noon, to meet up with anyone interested.
>
>
>
> If you are interested, there are no “fees,” no “registration,” 
nothing 

> whatsoever official about this BBBB. You don’t need to contact me. However,
> I will be glad to provide information to anyone interested. We can meet up
> over there where the grass is tall, where the lizards are big and colorful,
> where the bison are crossing the road or head butting out in the fields, or
> maybe an interesting hawk never seen before in this universe is gliding
> over the grass, or some rare Flinthills flower like Eryngiumn has opened
> just for us, poor refugees from The World’s Greatest Motorcycle Rally,
> Ever.
>
>
>
Subject: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY & BUTTERFLIES 2015
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 01:30:15 +0000
Mark your calendars, birding friends, for y'll are hereby invited to an 
INFORMAL* birding-natural history "conference," Bison, Birds, Botany & 
Butterflies (BBBB) centered at The Nature Conservancy's Tallgrass Prairie 
Preserve in northeastern Oklahoma, Thursday-Friday-Saturday, September 25-26, 
2015 (maybe even starting September 24). We will informally* - and I do mean 
informally* -- and with little fanfare and no fund raising -- observe and enjoy 
free-ranging bison, typical birds of the Flinthills prairies and associated 
crosstimbers woodlands, and the remarkably diverse native flora there. We will 
also check out all the other stuff, like fossils, Eastern Collared-Lizards, 
Ornate Box Turtles, and anything else encountered. This is also peak time for 
the southward migration of Monarch Butterflies, and if previous years serve as 
guide, we should see a lot of them, too. 




These dates coincide with another BBB: Bikes, Blues & Barbecue, the rally of 
400,000 folks that turns Fayetteville into a ROARING, RUMBLING, NON-STOP 
chaotic national playground for those who have a special interest in 
motorcycles and riding back-and-forth on College Avenue or riding low-flying 
helicopters over otherwise private neighborhoods. Noise and congestion has 
become so extreme Fayetteville is uninhabitable UNLESS you are deaf, or live a 
long ways out of town in a special out of the way gated community, or are 
actually making a lot of money off the rally. 




I'll planning to spend a couple of nights at the La Quinta motel in 
Bartlesville. I couldn't get a room at the Super 8. On both Friday and 
Saturday, I will be at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve headquarters area at 
noon, to meet up with anyone interested. 




If you are interested, there are no "fees," no "registration," nothing 
whatsoever official about this BBBB. You don't need to contact me. However, I 
will be glad to provide information to anyone interested. We can meet up over 
there where the grass is tall, where the lizards are big and colorful, where 
the bison are crossing the road or head butting out in the fields, or maybe an 
interesting hawk never seen before in this universe is gliding over the grass, 
or some rare Flinthills flower like Eryngiumn has opened just for us, poor 
refugees from The World's Greatest Motorcycle Rally, Ever. 

Subject: RE Kannan's Post about Kelley Nunn (for Sandy)
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 00:12:11 +0000
See his tag of her “Recovery Big Year” following his summary of our eBird 
Global Big Day. 







Dianemarie
Subject: Kelley's Recouperation
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 00:02:31 +0000
Right-on, Kelley! After hip- and knee-replacement, then shoulder spur removal 
and two carpel tunnels in 14 months I faced none such a challenge as Kelley’s 
but still couldn’t let eBird down. So the day of hospital release (2nd day 
after knee surgery) I was back on the trail with wolf-dog Kluie, list tablet 
and pen in hand and Kluie tied to the walker at first. We eBird every day. 







Dianemarie
That which you surround yourself with, there also shall your heart be.
Subject: eBirding can be recuperative
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 23:32:14 +0000
The response to my appeal for as many checklists from Arkansas as possible for 
eBird's Global Big Day in May was lukewarm at best :)   

But perhaps the following article on the recuperative effects of eBirding will 
help more Arkansan birders to get into eBird.  Recuperative or not, eBird has 
made me a better birder and ornithologist.  --Kannan------------------------- 

Kelley Nunn June 2, 2015  Recovery Big YearThe neurologist I saw back in 
August 2014 who misdiagnosed me with cerebellar atrophy wasn't on point with 
his diagnosis, but did give me some resounding advice on how to cope with 
chronic illness. As he was measuring my muscle strength, balance, and tremor, 
he told me a story about a violinist he had seen in concert who became so 
entranced in her music that she would sway and move with her instrument as 
though the rest of her world had just disappeared in the feeling of it all. 
After the concert, someone asked the woman what she felt while playing and she 
answered, “Bliss." His advice to me was to find my "violin:” something that 
was so all-encompassing that it could make the “What’s wrong with me? Will 
I ever get better?” thoughts about my medical condition disappear. Lucky for 
me, I already had. Birding is my violin. Back when I was bed-ridden, there 
wasn't much birding I could do. On days when I could tolerate the visual 
stimulation of sitting in a car, friends and family members would drive me to 
nearby birding locations: the Brandywine Wetlands to look for interesting 
shorebirds; Wilson Road to see the Bobolinks/Eastern Meadowlarks and search 
through the swallows hoping for a Cliff or Bank Swallow; and Longwood Abbondi 
property, to check again for an vagrant heron, egret, or swallow. As you can 
imagine, driving to the same three locations over and over with the same goal 
every time became rather tiresome. But, there was something that revitalized my 
goals every month and gave me a renewed purpose-- eBird's "eBirder of the 
Month" challenge. Every month since the beginning of 2014, Cornell Lab of 
Ornithology's eBird has posted details for a monthly birding challenge. The 
requirement to complete the challenge is simple, and those who are successful 
are entered into a drawing to win a pair of Zeiss Conquest HD 8x42 (!!!) 
binoculars. For example, the June 2015 challenge is to submit 20 checklists 
containing at least one breeding code. Back in April 2015, you qualified if 
you submitted 20 checklists containing a species of diurnal raptor (coinciding 
with spring raptor migration). As you can see, the challenge is usually 
pertinent to what the birds are doing. What was my motivation for completing 
the monthly challenges? Well, 1) anyone who knows me can attest that I love a 
good challenge. Otherwise, 2) the monthly challenges provided much-needed 
structure, goals, and motivation. And, 3) while I have yet to win one of the 
Zeiss binoculars, the optimism and hope I would feel every month while waiting 
for the “You’ve won!” email and imagining myself retiring my beaten and 
battered Nikon Monarchs did more good for me than the eBird team could have 
ever imagined. HAWK WATCH KELLEY - OCTOBER 2013 YARD BIRDING (IN THE RAIN) 
FOR EBIRD'S "EBIRDER OF THE MONTH" CHALLENGE - OCTOBER 2014So, when I was 
bed-ridden, I would formulate the birding I did almost entirely around the 
eBirder of the month challenge. One month, the challenge was to submit at least 
20 checklists from a single patch. For those few weeks, I would ask whoever was 
driving me to head for the Route 82 farmlands, which was one of my patches. At 
that time, it was physically hard for me to tolerate the visual stimulation of 
the landscape moving as we drove around, but my determination to meet my goal 
of completing the monthly challenge would get me through the half 
hour/forty-five minutes in the car. Last October, the challenge was to submit 
stationary checklists of duration greater than one hour. Just a year earlier 
in October 2013, I would stand atop the hill at the Ashland Hawk Watch and 
count raptors for hours while scanning the skies, but in October 2014, moving 
my eyes around for more than 5, 10, or 20 minutes was sometimes enough to put 
me flat in bed for hours or days. That month, I probably submitted over twenty 
1-hour stationary checklists (sometimes I even went over an hour). It felt SO 
GOOD to submit them, and to accomplish something.Through completing these 
challenges and submitting all these checklists, I began to feel that every 
checklist I submitted was like earning a merit badge— as though I was proving 
to myself that on that day, I had accomplished something. I absolutely love 
eBirding and eBird; I use their data resources religiously and owe so many of 
my positive birding experiences to their species maps and alerts. Without 
eBird’s challenges, I wouldn’t have had a purpose to get “sick me” 
sitting up in a chair, or out in the yard, or to sit through those car rides 
every single day. So, I’d like to say thank you eBird and thank you Zeiss for 
coming up with this truly brilliant idea. I can’t tell you how much I 
appreciate it.When it comes to my 2015 Recovery Big Year, I can’t help but 
think how much good could be done in introducing individuals who are struggling 
to cope with chronic illnesses to birding. If you know someone who’s 
not-so-healthy, introduce them to the monthly eBird challenges! And please, if 
you’re out birding, submit your checklists to eBird! 
Subject: Adventures and new birders
From: dianemarie yates <maribird AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 22:24:20 +0000
Thanks, George, for your fun travelogue. My husband, Joe, says it reminded him 
of the trips he took with his family as a child to Mono Lake and up the Pacific 
Coast. I too am taken back to those family vacations, zipped up next to my 
little brother in sleeping bags in the back of the family station wagon, 
watching out the window at the road winding through ochre and gold deserts, 
live oak and chaparral, on up through forests of multi-greens and the redwoods 
with their tips scratching heaven, then down to the coast with its emerald foam 
and gull-strewn beaches where we collected shells I still have today. Your kids 
are on a journey that will only grow more verdant with years. May they all grow 
to love birds and wildlife and wrap themselves, mind, body and soul in God’s 
gorgeous creation. For one of them it’s lizards. For me it was frogs. Thanks 
again! 







Dianemarie

Money can only buy happiness when you already have the things it can't.
Subject: Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info
From: Suzie Liles <suzie.liles AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 16:42:40 -0500
Those little guides Game and Fish produce are wonderful giveaways for the
younger set.  Also, for the big folk who just started looking in their back
yard.

Suzie Liles
Marion County

On Mon, Jul 20, 2015 at 3:10 PM, Nancy Felker 
wrote:

> Thank you for that great idea of having books ready to give away.
> Education is the key to future environmentally minded people. When I grew
> up my mother was a huge reader and we had  the golden book guides on birds,
> insects, reptiles, wildflowers and trees. We were taught if we did not know
> what something was to look it up. That taught us to appreciate nature. I
> have people in my life who ask me what things are, now I will have a plan
> of action-- give them a book. Thanks!
> Nancy
> Fayetteville
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jul 20, 2015, at 12:31 PM, Sally Jo Gibson 
> wrote:
> >
> >    Thanks for this account of your remarkable educational vacation with
> your kids.  (I visited Mono Lake last year) Too old to do much on bird
> education these days, but I do keep a few National Geographic "Birds of
> North America" on hand to distribute to people who I think might become
> birders.  This past spring a neighbor had a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks
> nesting on their property, then later a pair of Mourning Doves nested and
> fledged two babies (with their approval) on their deck.  That resulted in
> having to discard a moderately expensive deck chair cushion.  They were
> given a new book.  I noticed it on their couch when I visited last week, so
> they are using it.
> >    Saturday I had a workman come to clean off my roof and clean out the
> gutters.  He brought his 5th and 6th grade grandsons with him.  They all
> know I watch and keep daily records of birds I see in the yard.  They also
> were able to see the acorn shaped bird house where Carolina Wrens had just
> fledged the day before.  The 6th grader commented that his favorite bird
> was the Peregrine Falcon.  Aha!  Another opportunity to gift a bird book.
> Having only that one book left, I'll have to place an order so when the
> boys come back with their grandfather to power wash my house, I'll have a
> new book for the 5th grader.  The grandfather, who is the age of my
> children, happens to be the person who built my solarium.  We've become
> good friends.  He is a person of whom it has been said, "A workman is
> worthy of his hire."
> >    Several birders and other friends who have seen photos of the
> Carolina Wrens nesting in the Acorn shaped felt bird house have asked where
> I bought it.  Here is a link to an online site where these can be
> purchased. However, if you put felt bird houses into your browser, they can
> be found at more than one site.
> >    Sally Jo Gibson
> >    Harrison, AR
> > http://www.bluebirdlanding.com/Wild-Woolies-Felt-Birdhouses.html
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman
> > Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 12:04 PM
> > To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> > Subject: Adventures and New Birders
> >
> > In my previous post (which was mostly a test) I made oblique reference
> to how the kids enjoyed their encounters with various birds on our western
> excursion.  Since that has caused consternation for some, I thought I'd
> share the broader experience with the group.  Why?  Well, this is not a
> simple travelogue.  It demonstrates how something as seemingly innocuous as
> a drive to pick up a machine can be turned into a learning experience and
> encourage a new generation of bird/nature enthusiasts and raise
> consciousness about conservation issues.
> >
> > So, let's begin.
> >
> > The goal of the trip was to pick up a machine in San Francisco and
> something else in Wyoming.  But, with the kids along I decided that this
> was not going to be a drive out and back.  These two have grown up
> appreciating the natural world around us and as we started out we created a
> list of State and National parks we hoped to visit.  The kids also
> generated a list of wildlife they hoped to see, including a variety of
> birds.  We succeeded on both points.  Plus, I scored several life birds.
> >
> > First day out we had some trailer problems which necessitated an
> extended stay in Amarillo.  This did not offer much promise until I
> remembered Palo Duro Canyon.  So, while the trailer was in repair we drove
> down to the Canyon and spent a few hours driving and hiking this remarkable
> (and surprising) geological wonder.  Roadrunners were very much in evidence
> along with Western Meadowlarks and Kingbirds.  The youngest (11) was quite
> excited to spot a variety of lizards which the Roadrunners were hunting.
> Attempting to distinguish between Eastern and Western Meadowlarks was
> essentially futile (even for me) but we did have some discussion about the
> differences between our Eastern Kingbirds and those we were not seeing at
> Palo Duro.  They now know how to spot the occasional accidental Western
> Kingbird when they help with the various Arkansas bird counts.
> >
> > After Palo Duro we made our way to the Painted Desert and Petrified
> Forest.  By now we were spotting Common Ravens much to everyone's
> excitement.  We had a fair bit of discussion about the crow species we were
> seeing but decided they must be regular crows.  Still, the kids did point
> out some slight differences in call and behavior from the Arkansas versions
> - but they were definitely common crows.  More lizards, which the youngest
> again identified correctly as a result of watching Wild Kratts on AETN.
> Flitting among the logs in Petrified Forest we spotted Horned Larks and a
> couple other birds we had trouble identifying.
> > Sparrows of some sort, so we spent some time going over bird anatomy and
> field marks.  They were much more prepared for the next stop.
> >
> > Which was Meteor Crater where we saw Ravens...so no bird excitement
> there.  The youngest found a lizard guide book at the gift shop, however,
> that was/is well above her reading level.  Her enthusiasm for the reptiles
> as a result of her experiences earlier on the trip made her insist on
> purchasing it (not cheap).  The rest of the trip she was looking up lizards
> we might see in the habitats we were visiting, book marking the pages,
> memorizing field marks and dramatically advancing her reading skills.  Her
> new enthusiasm for field guides drew her to my Sibley's "Guide to Bird Life
> and Behavior" - she is becoming quite the budding naturalist!
> >
> > Overnighting in Flagstaff introduced us to Mountain Cottontails.  I
> didn't know there were three species of Cottontail, but apparently there
> are.  More Ravens.
> >
> > The next day was our tour of Grand Canyon.  We went up through Cameron
> and in the East gate (vastly less crowded).  The oldest spotted a bird
> which she had not previously seen.  Driving as I was, I missed it but based
> on her precise description of field marks we determined it was a Magpie.
> The youngest had also done a 5th grade report on the California Condor so
> was quite hopeful that we might see them around the Canyon.
> > Although that didn't happen, she did know exactly what to look for and
> where.  Plenty of Turkey Vultures, however, but no Condors.
> >
> > Skipping ahead a few days we found ourselves at Mono Lake in
> California.  A volunteer with the park service explained a lot of
> interesting things about the lake, its formation and importance for nesting
> gulls and migrating shorebirds.  We spent a good hour or so wandering the
> lake shore, photographing and identifying the various gulls (mostly
> Herring) and getting our feet caked with the weird mud on the lake.
> Climate change issues were also very much in evidence as the lake level is
> down significantly due to the ongoing drought. The consequences of predator
> access to nesting areas on the lake made a significant impression on the
> kids.
> >
> > Of course, many other things on the trip brought up conservation
> issues.  Discussions about wind fields (which have multiplied
> significantly), solar power (which we saw near Barstow) and hydro-electric
> power (two plants on the Columbia River) and the endless trains of coal and
> a few coal fired power plants made for great conversation about energy
> sources, environmental impacts and things we could do to shrink our carbon
> footprint.  Hasn't kept them from holding the fridge door open, but they
> are thinking about it more.
> >
> > Lake Tahoe introduced us to Mountain Chickadees, Sugar Pines, more gulls
> and Ravens, Acorn Woodpeckers and Stellar's Jays.  Both were also looking
> for Scrub Jays (didn't see any).  But, it was pretty cool to see Dark-eyed
> Juncos on their breeding grounds - and to see the unique Oregon variety of
> junco.  I was less enthused with the dead crawfish they found in the lake
> and wanted to take with us.  My olfactory organs were grateful that they
> decided to abandon it.
> >
> > A few days later we were in the Redwoods of the Humbolt area and along
> the Oregon coast.  Weather patterns and ocean currents were the topics of
> conversation along with the various Elk and Mule deer herds we
> encountered.  Both spotted cowbirds accompanying the elk which was
> interesting since until now they've only seen them at feeders or with
> cows.  We hoped to see shorebirds in Oregon but only found evidence of
> their probing in the sand.  We did, however, see nesting islands white with
> droppings.
> >
> > And ducks and geese.  True, these probably won't be in Arkansas this
> fall, but it was fun to talk about migration patterns.  We were hoping to
> see some western hummingbird species as well, but were frustrated in that
> objective.  On the other hand, when we got home the youngest decided she
> needed a hummingbird feeder and has been quite diligent maintaining it
> since.  Mostly female ruby throats so far, but I digress...
> >
> > We finally did see Scrub Jays in Oregon, Western subspecies of Red
> Tailed Hawks and, at one point, I think we saw a Ferruginous Hawk. None of
> us could be sure.  Clearly we need to hone our hawk identification skills.
> >
> > Sadly, all good things must come to an end and after gazing with
> amazement on the nesting activity at Garden of the Gods we made our way
> across the plains back to Arkansas.  We did, however, pass Cheyenne Bottoms
> in Kansas which is an important shorebird area if I remember correctly.  We
> may need to go back up there some time.
> >
> > So - the two week journey came to an end with everyone gaining greater
> appreciation for the natural wonders of the world and stories to tell about
> birds, reptiles, mammals and machines.  The oldest wants to write and the
> youngest wants to be a naturalist with the park service.  And they both
> appreciate the local environment much more (although they have declared
> they want to move to the Pacific Northwest).
> >
> > So I'd say it was a very beneficial experience for all.
> >
> > George (n. Conway Co. encouraging a new generation of birders and
> > conservationists)
>
Subject: Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 16:27:11 -0500
Yes! That is a brilliant idea about the books. I also anticipate owning a felt 
wren house very soon. 


Thanks for his information!

George (n. Conway co. Hoping for new adventures soon)

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Nancy Felker  wrote:

>Thank you for that great idea of having books ready to give away. Education is 
the key to future environmentally minded people. When I grew up my mother was a 
huge reader and we had the golden book guides on birds, insects, reptiles, 
wildflowers and trees. We were taught if we did not know what something was to 
look it up. That taught us to appreciate nature. I have people in my life who 
ask me what things are, now I will have a plan of action-- give them a book. 
Thanks! 

>Nancy
>Fayetteville 
>Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 20, 2015, at 12:31 PM, Sally Jo Gibson  wrote:
>> 
>> Thanks for this account of your remarkable educational vacation with your 
kids. (I visited Mono Lake last year) Too old to do much on bird education 
these days, but I do keep a few National Geographic "Birds of North America" on 
hand to distribute to people who I think might become birders. This past spring 
a neighbor had a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks nesting on their property, then 
later a pair of Mourning Doves nested and fledged two babies (with their 
approval) on their deck. That resulted in having to discard a moderately 
expensive deck chair cushion. They were given a new book. I noticed it on their 
couch when I visited last week, so they are using it. 

>> Saturday I had a workman come to clean off my roof and clean out the 
gutters. He brought his 5th and 6th grade grandsons with him. They all know I 
watch and keep daily records of birds I see in the yard. They also were able to 
see the acorn shaped bird house where Carolina Wrens had just fledged the day 
before. The 6th grader commented that his favorite bird was the Peregrine 
Falcon. Aha! Another opportunity to gift a bird book. Having only that one book 
left, I'll have to place an order so when the boys come back with their 
grandfather to power wash my house, I'll have a new book for the 5th grader. 
The grandfather, who is the age of my children, happens to be the person who 
built my solarium. We've become good friends. He is a person of whom it has 
been said, "A workman is worthy of his hire." 

>> Several birders and other friends who have seen photos of the Carolina Wrens 
nesting in the Acorn shaped felt bird house have asked where I bought it. Here 
is a link to an online site where these can be purchased. However, if you put 
felt bird houses into your browser, they can be found at more than one site. 

>>    Sally Jo Gibson
>>    Harrison, AR
>> http://www.bluebirdlanding.com/Wild-Woolies-Felt-Birdhouses.html
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

>> Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 12:04 PM
>> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
>> Subject: Adventures and New Birders
>> 
>> In my previous post (which was mostly a test) I made oblique reference to 
how the kids enjoyed their encounters with various birds on our western 
excursion. Since that has caused consternation for some, I thought I'd share 
the broader experience with the group. Why? Well, this is not a simple 
travelogue. It demonstrates how something as seemingly innocuous as a drive to 
pick up a machine can be turned into a learning experience and encourage a new 
generation of bird/nature enthusiasts and raise consciousness about 
conservation issues. 

>> 
>> So, let's begin.
>> 
>> The goal of the trip was to pick up a machine in San Francisco and something 
else in Wyoming. But, with the kids along I decided that this was not going to 
be a drive out and back. These two have grown up appreciating the natural world 
around us and as we started out we created a list of State and National parks 
we hoped to visit. The kids also generated a list of wildlife they hoped to 
see, including a variety of birds. We succeeded on both points. Plus, I scored 
several life birds. 

>> 
>> First day out we had some trailer problems which necessitated an extended 
stay in Amarillo. This did not offer much promise until I remembered Palo Duro 
Canyon. So, while the trailer was in repair we drove down to the Canyon and 
spent a few hours driving and hiking this remarkable (and surprising) 
geological wonder. Roadrunners were very much in evidence along with Western 
Meadowlarks and Kingbirds. The youngest (11) was quite excited to spot a 
variety of lizards which the Roadrunners were hunting. Attempting to 
distinguish between Eastern and Western Meadowlarks was essentially futile 
(even for me) but we did have some discussion about the differences between our 
Eastern Kingbirds and those we were not seeing at Palo Duro. They now know how 
to spot the occasional accidental Western Kingbird when they help with the 
various Arkansas bird counts. 

>> 
>> After Palo Duro we made our way to the Painted Desert and Petrified Forest. 
By now we were spotting Common Ravens much to everyone's excitement. We had a 
fair bit of discussion about the crow species we were seeing but decided they 
must be regular crows. Still, the kids did point out some slight differences in 
call and behavior from the Arkansas versions - but they were definitely common 
crows. More lizards, which the youngest again identified correctly as a result 
of watching Wild Kratts on AETN. Flitting among the logs in Petrified Forest we 
spotted Horned Larks and a couple other birds we had trouble identifying. 

>> Sparrows of some sort, so we spent some time going over bird anatomy and 
field marks. They were much more prepared for the next stop. 

>> 
>> Which was Meteor Crater where we saw Ravens...so no bird excitement there. 
The youngest found a lizard guide book at the gift shop, however, that was/is 
well above her reading level. Her enthusiasm for the reptiles as a result of 
her experiences earlier on the trip made her insist on purchasing it (not 
cheap). The rest of the trip she was looking up lizards we might see in the 
habitats we were visiting, book marking the pages, memorizing field marks and 
dramatically advancing her reading skills. Her new enthusiasm for field guides 
drew her to my Sibley's "Guide to Bird Life and Behavior" - she is becoming 
quite the budding naturalist! 

>> 
>> Overnighting in Flagstaff introduced us to Mountain Cottontails. I didn't 
know there were three species of Cottontail, but apparently there are. More 
Ravens. 

>> 
>> The next day was our tour of Grand Canyon. We went up through Cameron and in 
the East gate (vastly less crowded). The oldest spotted a bird which she had 
not previously seen. Driving as I was, I missed it but based on her precise 
description of field marks we determined it was a Magpie. The youngest had also 
done a 5th grade report on the California Condor so was quite hopeful that we 
might see them around the Canyon. 

>> Although that didn't happen, she did know exactly what to look for and 
where. Plenty of Turkey Vultures, however, but no Condors. 

>> 
>> Skipping ahead a few days we found ourselves at Mono Lake in California. A 
volunteer with the park service explained a lot of interesting things about the 
lake, its formation and importance for nesting gulls and migrating shorebirds. 
We spent a good hour or so wandering the lake shore, photographing and 
identifying the various gulls (mostly Herring) and getting our feet caked with 
the weird mud on the lake. Climate change issues were also very much in 
evidence as the lake level is down significantly due to the ongoing drought. 
The consequences of predator access to nesting areas on the lake made a 
significant impression on the kids. 

>> 
>> Of course, many other things on the trip brought up conservation issues. 
Discussions about wind fields (which have multiplied significantly), solar 
power (which we saw near Barstow) and hydro-electric power (two plants on the 
Columbia River) and the endless trains of coal and a few coal fired power 
plants made for great conversation about energy sources, environmental impacts 
and things we could do to shrink our carbon footprint. Hasn't kept them from 
holding the fridge door open, but they are thinking about it more. 

>> 
>> Lake Tahoe introduced us to Mountain Chickadees, Sugar Pines, more gulls and 
Ravens, Acorn Woodpeckers and Stellar's Jays. Both were also looking for Scrub 
Jays (didn't see any). But, it was pretty cool to see Dark-eyed Juncos on their 
breeding grounds - and to see the unique Oregon variety of junco. I was less 
enthused with the dead crawfish they found in the lake and wanted to take with 
us. My olfactory organs were grateful that they decided to abandon it. 

>> 
>> A few days later we were in the Redwoods of the Humbolt area and along the 
Oregon coast. Weather patterns and ocean currents were the topics of 
conversation along with the various Elk and Mule deer herds we encountered. 
Both spotted cowbirds accompanying the elk which was interesting since until 
now they've only seen them at feeders or with cows. We hoped to see shorebirds 
in Oregon but only found evidence of their probing in the sand. We did, 
however, see nesting islands white with droppings. 

>> 
>> And ducks and geese. True, these probably won't be in Arkansas this fall, 
but it was fun to talk about migration patterns. We were hoping to see some 
western hummingbird species as well, but were frustrated in that objective. On 
the other hand, when we got home the youngest decided she needed a hummingbird 
feeder and has been quite diligent maintaining it since. Mostly female ruby 
throats so far, but I digress... 

>> 
>> We finally did see Scrub Jays in Oregon, Western subspecies of Red Tailed 
Hawks and, at one point, I think we saw a Ferruginous Hawk. None of us could be 
sure. Clearly we need to hone our hawk identification skills. 

>> 
>> Sadly, all good things must come to an end and after gazing with amazement 
on the nesting activity at Garden of the Gods we made our way across the plains 
back to Arkansas. We did, however, pass Cheyenne Bottoms in Kansas which is an 
important shorebird area if I remember correctly. We may need to go back up 
there some time. 

>> 
>> So - the two week journey came to an end with everyone gaining greater 
appreciation for the natural wonders of the world and stories to tell about 
birds, reptiles, mammals and machines. The oldest wants to write and the 
youngest wants to be a naturalist with the park service. And they both 
appreciate the local environment much more (although they have declared they 
want to move to the Pacific Northwest). 

>> 
>> So I'd say it was a very beneficial experience for all.
>> 
>> George (n. Conway Co. encouraging a new generation of birders and
>> conservationists)
Subject: felt bird house info
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen AT KONARSKICLINIC.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 20:50:32 +0000
They had felt bird houses shaped like squirrels and barns on the drastically 
reduced pile of Little Rock & NLR Cracker Barrels Karen Hart 


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of Nancy Felker 

Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 3:11 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info

Thank you for that great idea of having books ready to give away. Education is 
the key to future environmentally minded people. When I grew up my mother was a 
huge reader and we had the golden book guides on birds, insects, reptiles, 
wildflowers and trees. We were taught if we did not know what something was to 
look it up. That taught us to appreciate nature. I have people in my life who 
ask me what things are, now I will have a plan of action-- give them a book. 
Thanks! 

Nancy
Fayetteville 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 20, 2015, at 12:31 PM, Sally Jo Gibson  wrote:
> 
> Thanks for this account of your remarkable educational vacation with your 
kids. (I visited Mono Lake last year) Too old to do much on bird education 
these days, but I do keep a few National Geographic "Birds of North America" on 
hand to distribute to people who I think might become birders. This past spring 
a neighbor had a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks nesting on their property, then 
later a pair of Mourning Doves nested and fledged two babies (with their 
approval) on their deck. That resulted in having to discard a moderately 
expensive deck chair cushion. They were given a new book. I noticed it on their 
couch when I visited last week, so they are using it. 

> Saturday I had a workman come to clean off my roof and clean out the gutters. 
He brought his 5th and 6th grade grandsons with him. They all know I watch and 
keep daily records of birds I see in the yard. They also were able to see the 
acorn shaped bird house where Carolina Wrens had just fledged the day before. 
The 6th grader commented that his favorite bird was the Peregrine Falcon. Aha! 
Another opportunity to gift a bird book. Having only that one book left, I'll 
have to place an order so when the boys come back with their grandfather to 
power wash my house, I'll have a new book for the 5th grader. The grandfather, 
who is the age of my children, happens to be the person who built my solarium. 
We've become good friends. He is a person of whom it has been said, "A workman 
is worthy of his hire." 

> Several birders and other friends who have seen photos of the Carolina Wrens 
nesting in the Acorn shaped felt bird house have asked where I bought it. Here 
is a link to an online site where these can be purchased. However, if you put 
felt bird houses into your browser, they can be found at more than one site. 

>    Sally Jo Gibson
>    Harrison, AR
> http://www.bluebirdlanding.com/Wild-Woolies-Felt-Birdhouses.html
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

> Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 12:04 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Adventures and New Birders
> 
> In my previous post (which was mostly a test) I made oblique reference to how 
the kids enjoyed their encounters with various birds on our western excursion. 
Since that has caused consternation for some, I thought I'd share the broader 
experience with the group. Why? Well, this is not a simple travelogue. It 
demonstrates how something as seemingly innocuous as a drive to pick up a 
machine can be turned into a learning experience and encourage a new generation 
of bird/nature enthusiasts and raise consciousness about conservation issues. 

> 
> So, let's begin.
> 
> The goal of the trip was to pick up a machine in San Francisco and something 
else in Wyoming. But, with the kids along I decided that this was not going to 
be a drive out and back. These two have grown up appreciating the natural world 
around us and as we started out we created a list of State and National parks 
we hoped to visit. The kids also generated a list of wildlife they hoped to 
see, including a variety of birds. We succeeded on both points. Plus, I scored 
several life birds. 

> 
> First day out we had some trailer problems which necessitated an extended 
stay in Amarillo. This did not offer much promise until I remembered Palo Duro 
Canyon. So, while the trailer was in repair we drove down to the Canyon and 
spent a few hours driving and hiking this remarkable (and surprising) 
geological wonder. Roadrunners were very much in evidence along with Western 
Meadowlarks and Kingbirds. The youngest (11) was quite excited to spot a 
variety of lizards which the Roadrunners were hunting. Attempting to 
distinguish between Eastern and Western Meadowlarks was essentially futile 
(even for me) but we did have some discussion about the differences between our 
Eastern Kingbirds and those we were not seeing at Palo Duro. They now know how 
to spot the occasional accidental Western Kingbird when they help with the 
various Arkansas bird counts. 

> 
> After Palo Duro we made our way to the Painted Desert and Petrified Forest. 
By now we were spotting Common Ravens much to everyone's excitement. We had a 
fair bit of discussion about the crow species we were seeing but decided they 
must be regular crows. Still, the kids did point out some slight differences in 
call and behavior from the Arkansas versions - but they were definitely common 
crows. More lizards, which the youngest again identified correctly as a result 
of watching Wild Kratts on AETN. Flitting among the logs in Petrified Forest we 
spotted Horned Larks and a couple other birds we had trouble identifying. 

> Sparrows of some sort, so we spent some time going over bird anatomy and 
field marks. They were much more prepared for the next stop. 

> 
> Which was Meteor Crater where we saw Ravens...so no bird excitement there. 
The youngest found a lizard guide book at the gift shop, however, that was/is 
well above her reading level. Her enthusiasm for the reptiles as a result of 
her experiences earlier on the trip made her insist on purchasing it (not 
cheap). The rest of the trip she was looking up lizards we might see in the 
habitats we were visiting, book marking the pages, memorizing field marks and 
dramatically advancing her reading skills. Her new enthusiasm for field guides 
drew her to my Sibley's "Guide to Bird Life and Behavior" - she is becoming 
quite the budding naturalist! 

> 
> Overnighting in Flagstaff introduced us to Mountain Cottontails. I didn't 
know there were three species of Cottontail, but apparently there are. More 
Ravens. 

> 
> The next day was our tour of Grand Canyon. We went up through Cameron and in 
the East gate (vastly less crowded). The oldest spotted a bird which she had 
not previously seen. Driving as I was, I missed it but based on her precise 
description of field marks we determined it was a Magpie. The youngest had also 
done a 5th grade report on the California Condor so was quite hopeful that we 
might see them around the Canyon. 

> Although that didn't happen, she did know exactly what to look for and where. 
Plenty of Turkey Vultures, however, but no Condors. 

> 
> Skipping ahead a few days we found ourselves at Mono Lake in California. A 
volunteer with the park service explained a lot of interesting things about the 
lake, its formation and importance for nesting gulls and migrating shorebirds. 
We spent a good hour or so wandering the lake shore, photographing and 
identifying the various gulls (mostly Herring) and getting our feet caked with 
the weird mud on the lake. Climate change issues were also very much in 
evidence as the lake level is down significantly due to the ongoing drought. 
The consequences of predator access to nesting areas on the lake made a 
significant impression on the kids. 

> 
> Of course, many other things on the trip brought up conservation issues. 
Discussions about wind fields (which have multiplied significantly), solar 
power (which we saw near Barstow) and hydro-electric power (two plants on the 
Columbia River) and the endless trains of coal and a few coal fired power 
plants made for great conversation about energy sources, environmental impacts 
and things we could do to shrink our carbon footprint. Hasn't kept them from 
holding the fridge door open, but they are thinking about it more. 

> 
> Lake Tahoe introduced us to Mountain Chickadees, Sugar Pines, more gulls and 
Ravens, Acorn Woodpeckers and Stellar's Jays. Both were also looking for Scrub 
Jays (didn't see any). But, it was pretty cool to see Dark-eyed Juncos on their 
breeding grounds - and to see the unique Oregon variety of junco. I was less 
enthused with the dead crawfish they found in the lake and wanted to take with 
us. My olfactory organs were grateful that they decided to abandon it. 

> 
> A few days later we were in the Redwoods of the Humbolt area and along the 
Oregon coast. Weather patterns and ocean currents were the topics of 
conversation along with the various Elk and Mule deer herds we encountered. 
Both spotted cowbirds accompanying the elk which was interesting since until 
now they've only seen them at feeders or with cows. We hoped to see shorebirds 
in Oregon but only found evidence of their probing in the sand. We did, 
however, see nesting islands white with droppings. 

> 
> And ducks and geese. True, these probably won't be in Arkansas this fall, but 
it was fun to talk about migration patterns. We were hoping to see some western 
hummingbird species as well, but were frustrated in that objective. On the 
other hand, when we got home the youngest decided she needed a hummingbird 
feeder and has been quite diligent maintaining it since. Mostly female ruby 
throats so far, but I digress... 

> 
> We finally did see Scrub Jays in Oregon, Western subspecies of Red Tailed 
Hawks and, at one point, I think we saw a Ferruginous Hawk. None of us could be 
sure. Clearly we need to hone our hawk identification skills. 

> 
> Sadly, all good things must come to an end and after gazing with amazement on 
the nesting activity at Garden of the Gods we made our way across the plains 
back to Arkansas. We did, however, pass Cheyenne Bottoms in Kansas which is an 
important shorebird area if I remember correctly. We may need to go back up 
there some time. 

> 
> So - the two week journey came to an end with everyone gaining greater 
appreciation for the natural wonders of the world and stories to tell about 
birds, reptiles, mammals and machines. The oldest wants to write and the 
youngest wants to be a naturalist with the park service. And they both 
appreciate the local environment much more (although they have declared they 
want to move to the Pacific Northwest). 

> 
> So I'd say it was a very beneficial experience for all.
> 
> George (n. Conway Co. encouraging a new generation of birders and
> conservationists)
Subject: Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 15:10:59 -0500
Thank you for that great idea of having books ready to give away. Education is 
the key to future environmentally minded people. When I grew up my mother was a 
huge reader and we had the golden book guides on birds, insects, reptiles, 
wildflowers and trees. We were taught if we did not know what something was to 
look it up. That taught us to appreciate nature. I have people in my life who 
ask me what things are, now I will have a plan of action-- give them a book. 
Thanks! 

Nancy
Fayetteville 
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 20, 2015, at 12:31 PM, Sally Jo Gibson  wrote:
> 
> Thanks for this account of your remarkable educational vacation with your 
kids. (I visited Mono Lake last year) Too old to do much on bird education 
these days, but I do keep a few National Geographic "Birds of North America" on 
hand to distribute to people who I think might become birders. This past spring 
a neighbor had a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks nesting on their property, then 
later a pair of Mourning Doves nested and fledged two babies (with their 
approval) on their deck. That resulted in having to discard a moderately 
expensive deck chair cushion. They were given a new book. I noticed it on their 
couch when I visited last week, so they are using it. 

> Saturday I had a workman come to clean off my roof and clean out the gutters. 
He brought his 5th and 6th grade grandsons with him. They all know I watch and 
keep daily records of birds I see in the yard. They also were able to see the 
acorn shaped bird house where Carolina Wrens had just fledged the day before. 
The 6th grader commented that his favorite bird was the Peregrine Falcon. Aha! 
Another opportunity to gift a bird book. Having only that one book left, I'll 
have to place an order so when the boys come back with their grandfather to 
power wash my house, I'll have a new book for the 5th grader. The grandfather, 
who is the age of my children, happens to be the person who built my solarium. 
We've become good friends. He is a person of whom it has been said, "A workman 
is worthy of his hire." 

> Several birders and other friends who have seen photos of the Carolina Wrens 
nesting in the Acorn shaped felt bird house have asked where I bought it. Here 
is a link to an online site where these can be purchased. However, if you put 
felt bird houses into your browser, they can be found at more than one site. 

>    Sally Jo Gibson
>    Harrison, AR
> http://www.bluebirdlanding.com/Wild-Woolies-Felt-Birdhouses.html
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List 
[mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

> Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 12:04 PM
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Adventures and New Birders
> 
> In my previous post (which was mostly a test) I made oblique reference to how 
the kids enjoyed their encounters with various birds on our western excursion. 
Since that has caused consternation for some, I thought I'd share the broader 
experience with the group. Why? Well, this is not a simple travelogue. It 
demonstrates how something as seemingly innocuous as a drive to pick up a 
machine can be turned into a learning experience and encourage a new generation 
of bird/nature enthusiasts and raise consciousness about conservation issues. 

> 
> So, let's begin.
> 
> The goal of the trip was to pick up a machine in San Francisco and something 
else in Wyoming. But, with the kids along I decided that this was not going to 
be a drive out and back. These two have grown up appreciating the natural world 
around us and as we started out we created a list of State and National parks 
we hoped to visit. The kids also generated a list of wildlife they hoped to 
see, including a variety of birds. We succeeded on both points. Plus, I scored 
several life birds. 

> 
> First day out we had some trailer problems which necessitated an extended 
stay in Amarillo. This did not offer much promise until I remembered Palo Duro 
Canyon. So, while the trailer was in repair we drove down to the Canyon and 
spent a few hours driving and hiking this remarkable (and surprising) 
geological wonder. Roadrunners were very much in evidence along with Western 
Meadowlarks and Kingbirds. The youngest (11) was quite excited to spot a 
variety of lizards which the Roadrunners were hunting. Attempting to 
distinguish between Eastern and Western Meadowlarks was essentially futile 
(even for me) but we did have some discussion about the differences between our 
Eastern Kingbirds and those we were not seeing at Palo Duro. They now know how 
to spot the occasional accidental Western Kingbird when they help with the 
various Arkansas bird counts. 

> 
> After Palo Duro we made our way to the Painted Desert and Petrified Forest. 
By now we were spotting Common Ravens much to everyone's excitement. We had a 
fair bit of discussion about the crow species we were seeing but decided they 
must be regular crows. Still, the kids did point out some slight differences in 
call and behavior from the Arkansas versions - but they were definitely common 
crows. More lizards, which the youngest again identified correctly as a result 
of watching Wild Kratts on AETN. Flitting among the logs in Petrified Forest we 
spotted Horned Larks and a couple other birds we had trouble identifying. 

> Sparrows of some sort, so we spent some time going over bird anatomy and 
field marks. They were much more prepared for the next stop. 

> 
> Which was Meteor Crater where we saw Ravens...so no bird excitement there. 
The youngest found a lizard guide book at the gift shop, however, that was/is 
well above her reading level. Her enthusiasm for the reptiles as a result of 
her experiences earlier on the trip made her insist on purchasing it (not 
cheap). The rest of the trip she was looking up lizards we might see in the 
habitats we were visiting, book marking the pages, memorizing field marks and 
dramatically advancing her reading skills. Her new enthusiasm for field guides 
drew her to my Sibley's "Guide to Bird Life and Behavior" - she is becoming 
quite the budding naturalist! 

> 
> Overnighting in Flagstaff introduced us to Mountain Cottontails. I didn't 
know there were three species of Cottontail, but apparently there are. More 
Ravens. 

> 
> The next day was our tour of Grand Canyon. We went up through Cameron and in 
the East gate (vastly less crowded). The oldest spotted a bird which she had 
not previously seen. Driving as I was, I missed it but based on her precise 
description of field marks we determined it was a Magpie. The youngest had also 
done a 5th grade report on the California Condor so was quite hopeful that we 
might see them around the Canyon. 

> Although that didn't happen, she did know exactly what to look for and where. 
Plenty of Turkey Vultures, however, but no Condors. 

> 
> Skipping ahead a few days we found ourselves at Mono Lake in California. A 
volunteer with the park service explained a lot of interesting things about the 
lake, its formation and importance for nesting gulls and migrating shorebirds. 
We spent a good hour or so wandering the lake shore, photographing and 
identifying the various gulls (mostly Herring) and getting our feet caked with 
the weird mud on the lake. Climate change issues were also very much in 
evidence as the lake level is down significantly due to the ongoing drought. 
The consequences of predator access to nesting areas on the lake made a 
significant impression on the kids. 

> 
> Of course, many other things on the trip brought up conservation issues. 
Discussions about wind fields (which have multiplied significantly), solar 
power (which we saw near Barstow) and hydro-electric power (two plants on the 
Columbia River) and the endless trains of coal and a few coal fired power 
plants made for great conversation about energy sources, environmental impacts 
and things we could do to shrink our carbon footprint. Hasn't kept them from 
holding the fridge door open, but they are thinking about it more. 

> 
> Lake Tahoe introduced us to Mountain Chickadees, Sugar Pines, more gulls and 
Ravens, Acorn Woodpeckers and Stellar's Jays. Both were also looking for Scrub 
Jays (didn't see any). But, it was pretty cool to see Dark-eyed Juncos on their 
breeding grounds - and to see the unique Oregon variety of junco. I was less 
enthused with the dead crawfish they found in the lake and wanted to take with 
us. My olfactory organs were grateful that they decided to abandon it. 

> 
> A few days later we were in the Redwoods of the Humbolt area and along the 
Oregon coast. Weather patterns and ocean currents were the topics of 
conversation along with the various Elk and Mule deer herds we encountered. 
Both spotted cowbirds accompanying the elk which was interesting since until 
now they've only seen them at feeders or with cows. We hoped to see shorebirds 
in Oregon but only found evidence of their probing in the sand. We did, 
however, see nesting islands white with droppings. 

> 
> And ducks and geese. True, these probably won't be in Arkansas this fall, but 
it was fun to talk about migration patterns. We were hoping to see some western 
hummingbird species as well, but were frustrated in that objective. On the 
other hand, when we got home the youngest decided she needed a hummingbird 
feeder and has been quite diligent maintaining it since. Mostly female ruby 
throats so far, but I digress... 

> 
> We finally did see Scrub Jays in Oregon, Western subspecies of Red Tailed 
Hawks and, at one point, I think we saw a Ferruginous Hawk. None of us could be 
sure. Clearly we need to hone our hawk identification skills. 

> 
> Sadly, all good things must come to an end and after gazing with amazement on 
the nesting activity at Garden of the Gods we made our way across the plains 
back to Arkansas. We did, however, pass Cheyenne Bottoms in Kansas which is an 
important shorebird area if I remember correctly. We may need to go back up 
there some time. 

> 
> So - the two week journey came to an end with everyone gaining greater 
appreciation for the natural wonders of the world and stories to tell about 
birds, reptiles, mammals and machines. The oldest wants to write and the 
youngest wants to be a naturalist with the park service. And they both 
appreciate the local environment much more (although they have declared they 
want to move to the Pacific Northwest). 

> 
> So I'd say it was a very beneficial experience for all.
> 
> George (n. Conway Co. encouraging a new generation of birders and
> conservationists)
Subject: Re: Adventures and New Birders reply - plus felt bird house info
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 12:31:23 -0500
 Thanks for this account of your remarkable educational vacation with your 
kids. (I visited Mono Lake last year) Too old to do much on bird education 
these days, but I do keep a few National Geographic "Birds of North America" on 
hand to distribute to people who I think might become birders. This past spring 
a neighbor had a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks nesting on their property, then 
later a pair of Mourning Doves nested and fledged two babies (with their 
approval) on their deck. That resulted in having to discard a moderately 
expensive deck chair cushion. They were given a new book. I noticed it on their 
couch when I visited last week, so they are using it. 

 Saturday I had a workman come to clean off my roof and clean out the gutters. 
He brought his 5th and 6th grade grandsons with him. They all know I watch and 
keep daily records of birds I see in the yard. They also were able to see the 
acorn shaped bird house where Carolina Wrens had just fledged the day before. 
The 6th grader commented that his favorite bird was the Peregrine Falcon. Aha! 
Another opportunity to gift a bird book. Having only that one book left, I'll 
have to place an order so when the boys come back with their grandfather to 
power wash my house, I'll have a new book for the 5th grader. The grandfather, 
who is the age of my children, happens to be the person who built my solarium. 
We've become good friends. He is a person of whom it has been said, "A workman 
is worthy of his hire." 

 Several birders and other friends who have seen photos of the Carolina Wrens 
nesting in the Acorn shaped felt bird house have asked where I bought it. Here 
is a link to an online site where these can be purchased. However, if you put 
felt bird houses into your browser, they can be found at more than one site. 

	Sally Jo Gibson
	Harrison, AR
http://www.bluebirdlanding.com/Wild-Woolies-Felt-Birdhouses.html


  

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman 

Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 12:04 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Adventures and New Birders

In my previous post (which was mostly a test) I made oblique reference to how 
the kids enjoyed their encounters with various birds on our western excursion. 
Since that has caused consternation for some, I thought I'd share the broader 
experience with the group. Why? Well, this is not a simple travelogue. It 
demonstrates how something as seemingly innocuous as a drive to pick up a 
machine can be turned into a learning experience and encourage a new generation 
of bird/nature enthusiasts and raise consciousness about conservation issues. 


So, let's begin.

The goal of the trip was to pick up a machine in San Francisco and something 
else in Wyoming. But, with the kids along I decided that this was not going to 
be a drive out and back. These two have grown up appreciating the natural world 
around us and as we started out we created a list of State and National parks 
we hoped to visit. The kids also generated a list of wildlife they hoped to 
see, including a variety of birds. We succeeded on both points. Plus, I scored 
several life birds. 


First day out we had some trailer problems which necessitated an extended stay 
in Amarillo. This did not offer much promise until I remembered Palo Duro 
Canyon. So, while the trailer was in repair we drove down to the Canyon and 
spent a few hours driving and hiking this remarkable (and surprising) 
geological wonder. Roadrunners were very much in evidence along with Western 
Meadowlarks and Kingbirds. The youngest (11) was quite excited to spot a 
variety of lizards which the Roadrunners were hunting. Attempting to 
distinguish between Eastern and Western Meadowlarks was essentially futile 
(even for me) but we did have some discussion about the differences between our 
Eastern Kingbirds and those we were not seeing at Palo Duro. They now know how 
to spot the occasional accidental Western Kingbird when they help with the 
various Arkansas bird counts. 


After Palo Duro we made our way to the Painted Desert and Petrified Forest. By 
now we were spotting Common Ravens much to everyone's excitement. We had a fair 
bit of discussion about the crow species we were seeing but decided they must 
be regular crows. Still, the kids did point out some slight differences in call 
and behavior from the Arkansas versions - but they were definitely common 
crows. More lizards, which the youngest again identified correctly as a result 
of watching Wild Kratts on AETN. Flitting among the logs in Petrified Forest we 
spotted Horned Larks and a couple other birds we had trouble identifying. 

Sparrows of some sort, so we spent some time going over bird anatomy and field 
marks. They were much more prepared for the next stop. 


Which was Meteor Crater where we saw Ravens...so no bird excitement there. The 
youngest found a lizard guide book at the gift shop, however, that was/is well 
above her reading level. Her enthusiasm for the reptiles as a result of her 
experiences earlier on the trip made her insist on purchasing it (not cheap). 
The rest of the trip she was looking up lizards we might see in the habitats we 
were visiting, book marking the pages, memorizing field marks and dramatically 
advancing her reading skills. Her new enthusiasm for field guides drew her to 
my Sibley's "Guide to Bird Life and Behavior" - she is becoming quite the 
budding naturalist! 


Overnighting in Flagstaff introduced us to Mountain Cottontails. I didn't know 
there were three species of Cottontail, but apparently there are. More Ravens. 


The next day was our tour of Grand Canyon. We went up through Cameron and in 
the East gate (vastly less crowded). The oldest spotted a bird which she had 
not previously seen. Driving as I was, I missed it but based on her precise 
description of field marks we determined it was a Magpie. The youngest had also 
done a 5th grade report on the California Condor so was quite hopeful that we 
might see them around the Canyon. 

Although that didn't happen, she did know exactly what to look for and where. 
Plenty of Turkey Vultures, however, but no Condors. 


Skipping ahead a few days we found ourselves at Mono Lake in California. A 
volunteer with the park service explained a lot of interesting things about the 
lake, its formation and importance for nesting gulls and migrating shorebirds. 
We spent a good hour or so wandering the lake shore, photographing and 
identifying the various gulls (mostly Herring) and getting our feet caked with 
the weird mud on the lake. Climate change issues were also very much in 
evidence as the lake level is down significantly due to the ongoing drought. 
The consequences of predator access to nesting areas on the lake made a 
significant impression on the kids. 


Of course, many other things on the trip brought up conservation issues. 
Discussions about wind fields (which have multiplied significantly), solar 
power (which we saw near Barstow) and hydro-electric power (two plants on the 
Columbia River) and the endless trains of coal and a few coal fired power 
plants made for great conversation about energy sources, environmental impacts 
and things we could do to shrink our carbon footprint. Hasn't kept them from 
holding the fridge door open, but they are thinking about it more. 


Lake Tahoe introduced us to Mountain Chickadees, Sugar Pines, more gulls and 
Ravens, Acorn Woodpeckers and Stellar's Jays. Both were also looking for Scrub 
Jays (didn't see any). But, it was pretty cool to see Dark-eyed Juncos on their 
breeding grounds - and to see the unique Oregon variety of junco. I was less 
enthused with the dead crawfish they found in the lake and wanted to take with 
us. My olfactory organs were grateful that they decided to abandon it. 


A few days later we were in the Redwoods of the Humbolt area and along the 
Oregon coast. Weather patterns and ocean currents were the topics of 
conversation along with the various Elk and Mule deer herds we encountered. 
Both spotted cowbirds accompanying the elk which was interesting since until 
now they've only seen them at feeders or with cows. We hoped to see shorebirds 
in Oregon but only found evidence of their probing in the sand. We did, 
however, see nesting islands white with droppings. 


And ducks and geese. True, these probably won't be in Arkansas this fall, but 
it was fun to talk about migration patterns. We were hoping to see some western 
hummingbird species as well, but were frustrated in that objective. On the 
other hand, when we got home the youngest decided she needed a hummingbird 
feeder and has been quite diligent maintaining it since. Mostly female ruby 
throats so far, but I digress... 


We finally did see Scrub Jays in Oregon, Western subspecies of Red Tailed Hawks 
and, at one point, I think we saw a Ferruginous Hawk. None of us could be sure. 
Clearly we need to hone our hawk identification skills. 


Sadly, all good things must come to an end and after gazing with amazement on 
the nesting activity at Garden of the Gods we made our way across the plains 
back to Arkansas. We did, however, pass Cheyenne Bottoms in Kansas which is an 
important shorebird area if I remember correctly. We may need to go back up 
there some time. 


So - the two week journey came to an end with everyone gaining greater 
appreciation for the natural wonders of the world and stories to tell about 
birds, reptiles, mammals and machines. The oldest wants to write and the 
youngest wants to be a naturalist with the park service. And they both 
appreciate the local environment much more (although they have declared they 
want to move to the Pacific Northwest). 


So I'd say it was a very beneficial experience for all.

George (n. Conway Co. encouraging a new generation of birders and
conservationists)
Subject: Adventures and New Birders
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 12:04:21 -0500
In my previous post (which was mostly a test) I made oblique reference 
to how the kids enjoyed their encounters with various birds on our 
western excursion.  Since that has caused consternation for some, I 
thought I'd share the broader experience with the group.  Why?  Well, 
this is not a simple travelogue.  It demonstrates how something as 
seemingly innocuous as a drive to pick up a machine can be turned into a 
learning experience and encourage a new generation of bird/nature 
enthusiasts and raise consciousness about conservation issues.

So, let's begin.

The goal of the trip was to pick up a machine in San Francisco and 
something else in Wyoming.  But, with the kids along I decided that this 
was not going to be a drive out and back.  These two have grown up 
appreciating the natural world around us and as we started out we 
created a list of State and National parks we hoped to visit.  The kids 
also generated a list of wildlife they hoped to see, including a variety 
of birds.  We succeeded on both points.  Plus, I scored several life birds.

First day out we had some trailer problems which necessitated an 
extended stay in Amarillo.  This did not offer much promise until I 
remembered Palo Duro Canyon.  So, while the trailer was in repair we 
drove down to the Canyon and spent a few hours driving and hiking this 
remarkable (and surprising) geological wonder.  Roadrunners were very 
much in evidence along with Western Meadowlarks and Kingbirds.  The 
youngest (11) was quite excited to spot a variety of lizards which the 
Roadrunners were hunting.  Attempting to distinguish between Eastern and 
Western Meadowlarks was essentially futile (even for me) but we did have 
some discussion about the differences between our Eastern Kingbirds and 
those we were not seeing at Palo Duro.  They now know how to spot the 
occasional accidental Western Kingbird when they help with the various 
Arkansas bird counts.

After Palo Duro we made our way to the Painted Desert and Petrified 
Forest.  By now we were spotting Common Ravens much to everyone's 
excitement.  We had a fair bit of discussion about the crow species we 
were seeing but decided they must be regular crows.  Still, the kids did 
point out some slight differences in call and behavior from the Arkansas 
versions - but they were definitely common crows.  More lizards, which 
the youngest again identified correctly as a result of watching Wild 
Kratts on AETN.  Flitting among the logs in Petrified Forest we spotted 
Horned Larks and a couple other birds we had trouble identifying.  
Sparrows of some sort, so we spent some time going over bird anatomy and 
field marks.  They were much more prepared for the next stop.

Which was Meteor Crater where we saw Ravens...so no bird excitement 
there.  The youngest found a lizard guide book at the gift shop, 
however, that was/is well above her reading level.  Her enthusiasm for 
the reptiles as a result of her experiences earlier on the trip made her 
insist on purchasing it (not cheap).  The rest of the trip she was 
looking up lizards we might see in the habitats we were visiting, book 
marking the pages, memorizing field marks and dramatically advancing her 
reading skills.  Her new enthusiasm for field guides drew her to my 
Sibley's "Guide to Bird Life and Behavior" - she is becoming quite the 
budding naturalist!

Overnighting in Flagstaff introduced us to Mountain Cottontails.  I 
didn't know there were three species of Cottontail, but apparently there 
are.  More Ravens.

The next day was our tour of Grand Canyon.  We went up through Cameron 
and in the East gate (vastly less crowded).  The oldest spotted a bird 
which she had not previously seen.  Driving as I was, I missed it but 
based on her precise description of field marks we determined it was a 
Magpie.  The youngest had also done a 5th grade report on the California 
Condor so was quite hopeful that we might see them around the Canyon.  
Although that didn't happen, she did know exactly what to look for and 
where.  Plenty of Turkey Vultures, however, but no Condors.

Skipping ahead a few days we found ourselves at Mono Lake in 
California.  A volunteer with the park service explained a lot of 
interesting things about the lake, its formation and importance for 
nesting gulls and migrating shorebirds.  We spent a good hour or so 
wandering the lake shore, photographing and identifying the various 
gulls (mostly Herring) and getting our feet caked with the weird mud on 
the lake.  Climate change issues were also very much in evidence as the 
lake level is down significantly due to the ongoing drought. The 
consequences of predator access to nesting areas on the lake made a 
significant impression on the kids.

Of course, many other things on the trip brought up conservation 
issues.  Discussions about wind fields (which have multiplied 
significantly), solar power (which we saw near Barstow) and 
hydro-electric power (two plants on the Columbia River) and the endless 
trains of coal and a few coal fired power plants made for great 
conversation about energy sources, environmental impacts and things we 
could do to shrink our carbon footprint.  Hasn't kept them from holding 
the fridge door open, but they are thinking about it more.

Lake Tahoe introduced us to Mountain Chickadees, Sugar Pines, more gulls 
and Ravens, Acorn Woodpeckers and Stellar's Jays.  Both were also 
looking for Scrub Jays (didn't see any).  But, it was pretty cool to see 
Dark-eyed Juncos on their breeding grounds - and to see the unique 
Oregon variety of junco.  I was less enthused with the dead crawfish 
they found in the lake and wanted to take with us.  My olfactory organs 
were grateful that they decided to abandon it.

A few days later we were in the Redwoods of the Humbolt area and along 
the Oregon coast.  Weather patterns and ocean currents were the topics 
of conversation along with the various Elk and Mule deer herds we 
encountered.  Both spotted cowbirds accompanying the elk which was 
interesting since until now they've only seen them at feeders or with 
cows.  We hoped to see shorebirds in Oregon but only found evidence of 
their probing in the sand.  We did, however, see nesting islands white 
with droppings.

And ducks and geese.  True, these probably won't be in Arkansas this 
fall, but it was fun to talk about migration patterns.  We were hoping 
to see some western hummingbird species as well, but were frustrated in 
that objective.  On the other hand, when we got home the youngest 
decided she needed a hummingbird feeder and has been quite diligent 
maintaining it since.  Mostly female ruby throats so far, but I digress...

We finally did see Scrub Jays in Oregon, Western subspecies of Red 
Tailed Hawks and, at one point, I think we saw a Ferruginous Hawk. None 
of us could be sure.  Clearly we need to hone our hawk identification 
skills.

Sadly, all good things must come to an end and after gazing with 
amazement on the nesting activity at Garden of the Gods we made our way 
across the plains back to Arkansas.  We did, however, pass Cheyenne 
Bottoms in Kansas which is an important shorebird area if I remember 
correctly.  We may need to go back up there some time.

So - the two week journey came to an end with everyone gaining greater 
appreciation for the natural wonders of the world and stories to tell 
about birds, reptiles, mammals and machines.  The oldest wants to write 
and the youngest wants to be a naturalist with the park service.  And 
they both appreciate the local environment much more (although they have 
declared they want to move to the Pacific Northwest).

So I'd say it was a very beneficial experience for all.

George (n. Conway Co. encouraging a new generation of birders and 
conservationists)
Subject: Test and West
From: "George R. Hoelzeman" <vogel AT GRHSTUDIOS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 16:26:28 -0500
Partly this is a test to see if my new e-mail program is working.

But I also just got back from a two week road trip out west with the 
kids.  They were quite excited to see everything from Magpies to Ravens.

George
Subject: Big Purple Martin roost at Rogers
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 13:06:25 +0000
Arkansas Audubon Society's VP Adam Schaffer observed thousands of Purple 
Martins while bike riding on the Rogers Greenway July 17. The approximate 
location of his observations were powerlines in the vicinity of the west end of 
Easy Street, north end of 37th Street. There is an attractive neighborhood park 
at this intersection. Joan Reynolds and I went there last night. We picked up 
our first martins about 7:45, but not more than a hundred by 8:11. Then Joan 
looked east of this area and saw a mass. Starlings or martins? We walked about 
a half-mile east along the Greenway and there, immediately north of the 
Greenway, by 8:25 approximately 4,000 martins were in the air and on wires; by 
8:40, 5,000+. As it darkened martins had congregated in a Chimney Swift-like 
swirl, and dropping straight into a thicket of small trees, again very much 
like swifts dropping into a chimney. Just when most of the birds were down in 
the thicket, a Cooper's Hawk attacked and out came most martins, returning to 
swirl mode. Then soon, the Cooper's again, now flying away, its throat with a 
martin-sized bulge. 


Almost all the martins were back in the thicket by 8:48. By then, the whole 
place, which is a remnant former mesic Tallgrass Prairie, was covered with 
energetic lightning bugs. Looking east as we walked back (west) in the early 
darkness, what an amazing evening sky: a sliver of Moon, with Venus gleaming 
above and to the right and a little further right, a not-so-brilliant but still 
awesome Jupiter. 


Finally, and VERY unfortunately, non-native and highly invasive Bradford 
(Callery) Pears have been planted along the Rogers Greenway. Some of these 
plantings are from past years, when not many people knew about problems, but 
sadly, plantings are ongoing; there are recent new plantings and trees loaded 
with fruit where we walked to find the martins. There is already a lot of 
unfortunate, ecologically indefensible, spread of this invasive tree. The field 
where the martins are roosting appears to be a solid Callery Pear thicket. 
Maybe the martins don't care, but those who value the mesic Tallgrass Prairie 
heritage of the Rogers area should, in my opinion. Callery Pears don't belong 
in this habitat, and they crowd out and eliminate native trees, shrubs, and 
flowers that do belong here, and could do as well, or better, in providing 
roost thickets for migrating Purple Martins. 

Subject: Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost
From: Karen Garrett <karen.garrett AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 04:15:02 -0500
Since I live just over a block away, I decided to check out the Purple Marin 
roost, but I had a little trouble finding the right spot. It is actually at the 
eastern end of Easy Street, or at least it was Saturday night. I didn't find 
the martins until almost 8:30 pm. At that time, there were approximately 50 on 
the cell phone tower SE of Sam's Club - Bentonville. There is a park just to 
the south of the cell tower, and there is a parking area at the north end of N 
37th St, and on the east end of W Easy St. Here is a link to the exact spot, 
complete with coordinates. I will try it again on Sunday evening. By 8:40, the 
birds were gone from the cell tower, but there were several small groups 
involved in some aerial sparring, or something. 
https://www.google.com/maps?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=36.3494037,-94.1698909&ll=36.3494037,-94.1698909 


---- Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> wrote: 

=============
While biking last evening around 8:00-8:30, I saw what must have been a large 
Purple Martin roost on telephone wires along the Rogers Greenway (separate from 
the Razorback Greenway) b/t the north end of 37th St. and the west end of Easy 
St.  My estimate is that there were a lot of them.  Ha!  Thousand(s) maybe? 
 Maybe someone will want to take binoculars out there and take a longer look. 
 It was quite the sight.  Even some average folks were taking notice. 

Adam Schaffer
Subject: Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost
From: Kenny Nichols <kingbird AT YMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 02:49:04 +0000
Here,  Sand Martin is known as Bank Swallow -same species.
 kenny nichols
cabot, ar 


 On Saturday, July 18, 2015 6:26 PM, Jeffrey Short  
wrote: 

   
 

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Martins would be the closest comparison.  Europe also has Sand Martins and 
Crag Martins in the south.  Jeff Short  From: The Birds of Arkansas 
Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of kjdillard 

Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 10:57 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost  Thanks for the post.  It reminded me 
of the boat tours on Lake Q to what they call Bird Island.   I called and 
tours continue till mid August. Plan to take our German friends while they are 
here visiting later this month.  Does anyone know, are there Purple Martin's 
in Germany?  Great evening out with the birds.  Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon 
WLR     Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone 


-------- Original message --------
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
Date: 07/18/2015 6:05 AM (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Rogers Purple Martin Roost While biking last evening around 8:00-8:30, 
I saw what must have been a large Purple Martin roost on telephone wires along 
the Rogers Greenway (separate from the Razorback Greenway) b/t the north end of 
37th St. and the west end of Easy St.  My estimate is that there were a lot of 
them.  Ha!  Thousand(s) maybe?  Maybe someone will want to take binoculars 
out there and take a longer look.  It was quite the sight.  Even some average 
folks were taking notice.  Adam Schaffer 


 
  
Subject: Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 18:26:54 -0500
House Martins would be the closest comparison. Europe also has Sand Martins and 
Crag Martins in the south. 


 

Jeff Short

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU] 
On Behalf Of kjdillard 

Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 10:57 AM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost

 

Thanks for the post. It reminded me of the boat tours on Lake Q to what they 
call Bird Island. I called and tours continue till mid August. Plan to take our 
German friends while they are here visiting later this month. Does anyone know, 
are there Purple Martin's in Germany? 


 

Great evening out with the birds.

 

Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
Date: 07/18/2015 6:05 AM (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Rogers Purple Martin Roost 

While biking last evening around 8:00-8:30, I saw what must have been a large 
Purple Martin roost on telephone wires along the Rogers Greenway (separate from 
the Razorback Greenway) b/t the north end of 37th St. and the west end of Easy 
St. My estimate is that there were a lot of them. Ha! Thousand(s) maybe? Maybe 
someone will want to take binoculars out there and take a longer look. It was 
quite the sight. Even some average folks were taking notice. 


 

Adam Schaffer
Subject: Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis AT CABLELYNX.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 14:10:19 -0400
Check with the Lake Ouachita State Park about the tours. The birds moved
from bird Island a couple of years ago and now roost in a different place.
The experiences that you had in the past will be different now.


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs




> Thanks for the post.  It reminded me of the boat tours on Lake Q to what
> they call Bird Island.   I called and tours continue till mid August.
> Plan to take our German friends while they are here visiting later this
> month.  Does anyone know, are there Purple Martin's in Germany?
> Great evening out with the birds.
> Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR 
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
> Date: 07/18/2015  6:05 AM  (GMT-06:00)
> To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
> Subject: Rogers Purple Martin Roost
>
> While biking last evening around 8:00-8:30, I saw what must have been a
> large Purple Martin roost on telephone wires along the Rogers Greenway
> (separate from the Razorback Greenway) b/t the north end of 37th St. and
> the west end of Easy St.  My estimate is that there were a lot of them.
>  Ha!  Thousand(s) maybe?  Maybe someone will want to take binoculars
> out there and take a longer look.  It was quite the sight.  Even some
> average folks were taking notice.
> Adam Schaffer
Subject: Re: Rogers Purple Martin Roost
From: kjdillard <kjdillard AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 10:56:46 -0500
    
Thanks for the post.  It reminded me of the boat tours on Lake Q to what they 
call Bird Island.   I called and tours continue till mid August. Plan to take 
our German friends while they are here visiting later this month.  Does anyone 
know, are there Purple Martin's in Germany? 

Great evening out with the birds.
Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU> 
Date: 07/18/2015  6:05 AM  (GMT-06:00) 
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU 
Subject: Rogers Purple Martin Roost 

While biking last evening around 8:00-8:30, I saw what must have been a large 
Purple Martin roost on telephone wires along the Rogers Greenway (separate from 
the Razorback Greenway) b/t the north end of 37th St. and the west end of Easy 
St.  My estimate is that there were a lot of them.  Ha!  Thousand(s) maybe? 
 Maybe someone will want to take binoculars out there and take a longer look. 
 It was quite the sight.  Even some average folks were taking notice. 

Adam Schaffer
Subject: Rogers Purple Martin Roost
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 11:05:55 +0000
While biking last evening around 8:00-8:30, I saw what must have been a large 
Purple Martin roost on telephone wires along the Rogers Greenway (separate from 
the Razorback Greenway) b/t the north end of 37th St. and the west end of Easy 
St.  My estimate is that there were a lot of them.  Ha!  Thousand(s) maybe? 
 Maybe someone will want to take binoculars out there and take a longer look. 
 It was quite the sight.  Even some average folks were taking notice. 

Adam Schaffer
Subject: Re: Bird ID Needed
From: Cheryle Sytsma <shalom AT CYBERBACK.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 20:55:23 -0500
Well, I really appreciate everyone's input.
I have 5-6 different bird suggestions.  I consider everyone
who replied to be very knowledgeable about identification.
So...I hope to perhaps see the bird again and be able to gain some
further photos.  This has certainly been a learning experience...

Thanks everyone!

cheryle

> I photographed a bird... possibly young or just molting.
> I can email you pics if you would like to try to identify...
>
> thanks
>
> cheryle sytsma
> vilonia


Subject: Western Kingbirds in Fort Smith
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 22:09:19 +0000
I received the following message from veteran birder Bill Beall, who has 
tracked Western Kingbirds at Fort Smith during the nesting season for years. 
These sites have mostly been power substations that have been undergoing a lot 
of recent changes. He gave me permission to share these results from the survey 
by he and his wife Toka: 


Toka and I recently did a survey of former weki nest sites to determine the 
effect of removing the old substations with numerous possible nesting sites and 
replacement with downsized sleek modern stations in Fort Smith. I consider the 
old substations as anchor sites for most "colonies". We visited 7 sites that 
have been modernized that previously supported at least one nesting pair. Two 
were razed completely and not replaced. There were no birds at either location. 
Five were modernized, including the 10-15 acre station on Texas road. It 
usually supported 2-3 pair. We could find no birds there or at two other of the 
new structures. There were still birds at two but we could not locate the nests 
in the short time we had. I don't think the nests were within the new 
structures as there are few places for the birds to locate their nests. 

In all, we still found 46 adult birds and 4 fledglings at what I consider 31 
active locations (territories) in Fort Smith. Again, because of our limited 
time we did locate nests at every location. 

Subject: Green Heron ON the bird blind
From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 19:38:50 +0000
At Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton today, Mike Mlodinow and I walked 
some of the upper ponds. The middle pond was drained, and had some shorebirds. 
We got separated. At one point and I noticed he was pointing north. I figured 
he'd spotted a soaring Swainson's Hawk, but as I got closer I saw what all that 
pointing was about: a Green Heron (1 of 3 today) perched ON the bird blind's 
green metal roof. After many years of visiting Centerton, it was a first for 
us. With its streaked neck, it was a juvenile, and of course would have to be, 
since proper herons chase frogs on pond edges, while we stand up IN the blind 
to watch. 

Subject: Re: Bird ID Needed I PHOTOGraphed...
From: Cheryle Sytsma <shalom AT CYBERBACK.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 14:02:25 -0500

> I photographed a bird... possibly young or just molting.
> I can email you pics if you would like to try to identify...
>
> thanks
>
> cheryle sytsma
> vilonia
Subject: Re: GOLDFINCHES EATING ALGAE AT CENTERTON TODAY
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma AT UARK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 18:57:58 +0000
xantho = yellow; phyll = leaf

It is found in most leaves, young ones in particular.


Even though my sunflower patch drowned in the May and June rains (they were 
planted in the wettest part of our garden), we have goldfinches feeding on 
other crops. It is really nice to sit in the shade and watch them dive. I will 
try to grow a late sunflower crop and see if they stay around for fall feeding. 
(The chosen patch is still drying out, but we have early crops to harvest on 
other areas.) 



Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List  on 
behalf of Joseph C. Neal 

Sent: Friday, July 17, 2015 1:39 PM
To: ARBIRD-L AT LISTSERV.UARK.EDU
Subject: GOLDFINCHES EATING ALGAE AT CENTERTON TODAY

AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES (8) were gathered around a very shallow pool at Craig 
State Fish Hatchery today. As Mike Mlodinow and I watched, they removed and 
consumed algae strands of various lengths. 


Besides goldfinches, we also tallied shorebirds, including Killdeer (15), 
Spotted Sandpiper (2), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1), and 
Least Sandpiper (10; many of these in breeding plumage). A Green Heron perched 
like majesty atop the enclosed bird blind. We also spotted a Lark Sparrow as we 
were leaving the hatchery. 


Researchers who've looked into algae-eating explain as follows: The yellow that 
makes a goldfinch is a pigment (AKA, xanthophyll, a type of carotenoid) derived 
from algae. Like chlorophyll, another light-gathering plant molecule, 
carotenoids are located inside cells where they gather and store sun energy and 
turn it into food for the algae. When goldfinches consume the algae they obtain 
xanthophylls and this in turn feeds that bold yellow. 


Just for fun I checked to see when and where else I'd photographed this habit. 
I came up with Lake Atalanta in Rogers, August 14, 2012; Eagle Watch Nature 
Trail east of Gentry, September 17, 2014; January 2, 2013, at Crystal Lake east 
of Decatur. I've also seen them other times eating algae, when I did not obtain 
photographs. 


The Crystal Lake record is of particular interest, since it's in the middle of 
winter. Algae grow there in a spring flow, which emerges at around 55 degrees, 
no matter what season. The goldfinches know where to look for it, obviously.