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Updated on Tuesday, August 26 at 11:15 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-winged Snowfinch

27 Aug Re: Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID) ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
26 Aug Re: Monarch petition [Paul Cherubini ]
26 Aug Re: Monarch petition [Doug Allen ]
26 Aug Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID) [Doug Allen ]
26 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill Co. Park-08/26/2014 [Mike Turner ]
26 Aug Pitt County, 26 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
26 Aug Re: Monarch petition [ROBERT CAVANAUGH ]
26 Aug Monarch petition ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
25 Aug Monarch Ovipositing and Peck's Skipper [Gene Schepker ]
25 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Mitchell Mill State Natural Area-08/25/2014 [Mike Turner ]
25 Aug Southern Lake Norman NABA Count []
25 Aug Butterfly Symposium Deadline Approaching [Dennis Burnette ]
25 Aug Shallow Ford NA, Alamance Co, NC Butterflies [Dennis Burnette ]
25 Aug Dixie Plantation Butterfly Walk 8/23 []
25 Aug SCAN trip leps highlight 8/23 [Jules Fraytet ]
25 Aug Surry leps [Bb ]
24 Aug Ocola at Reynolda Village, Garden Pipevine Swallowtail [Gene Schepker ]
24 Aug A few Wake County, NC, butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
24 Aug Favorite butterfly plants [Will Cook ]
24 Aug Fwd: Dingle Pond Unit-Santee NWR, SC leps 23 Aug 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
23 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-08/23/2014 [Mike Turner ]
23 Aug Butterflying in N Durham County [Tom Krakauer ]
23 Aug Durham Bfly Count results 8/17/2014 [Jeff Pippen ]
22 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-08/22/2014 [Mike Turner ]
22 Aug Pitt County, 22 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
22 Aug Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
22 Aug RE: Johnston Co. Butterflies [Richard Stickney ]
22 Aug vacation return ["Gail Lankford" ]
21 Aug Carteret County Aug 21 [ROBERT CAVANAUGH ]
21 Aug Correction on Lake Hills walk [Gene Schepker ]
21 Aug Greenville Co., SC leps 20 Aug 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
21 Aug Spartenburg Co., SC leps 20 August 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
21 Aug Butterflies at Lake Hills, Bethania, Forsyth County [Gene Schepker ]
21 Aug Pitt County, 21 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
21 Aug Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
21 Aug Johnston Co. Butterflies [Richard Stickney ]
21 Aug Re: Currituck Co., NC butterflies, 8-20-2014 (Creole Pearly-Eye!) ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
21 Aug Re: Currituck Co., NC butterflies, 8-20-2014 (Creole Pearly-Eye!) [Harry LeGrand ]
21 Aug Southern Lake Norman Butterfly Count []
20 Aug PMSP Butterflies, Surry County [Gene Schepker ]
20 Aug Currituck Co., NC butterflies, 8-20-2014 (Creole Pearly-Eye!) [Jeff Pippen ]
20 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Umstead S.P.-08/20/2014 [Mike Turner ]
19 Aug 8/19 Berkeley County SC Butterfly Walk []
19 Aug Iredell County NABA Count 8/16/14 [Gene Schepker ]
18 Aug FOY Painted Lady, Ocola Skipper, and Common Sootywing [Doug Allen ]
18 Aug Fwd: Wake County butterfly count results [Harry LeGrand ]
18 Aug Carolina Butterfly Society 2014 Butterfly Symposium Sat, Sept 13 [Dennis Burnette ]
17 Aug Harbison SF, SC []
17 Aug Re: Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) seed pods available [ROBERT CAVANAUGH ]
17 Aug James Is, SC leps 17 AUg. 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
17 Aug Folly Beach, SC leps 17 AUg 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
17 Aug Sleepy Oranges super-abundant ["John Fussell" ]
16 Aug Re: Not interested in running the Croatan NF count this year [ROBERT CAVANAUGH ]
16 Aug Pitt County, 16 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
16 Aug Buncombe county 16th August [Doug Johnston ]
16 Aug Not interested in running the Croatan NF count this year [Harry LeGrand ]
16 Aug Umstead, wake county leps [Brian Bockhahn ]
16 Aug Brunswick county leps [Brian Bockhahn ]
16 Aug CBS Shallow Ford Natural Area Butterfly Field Trip [Dennis Burnette ]
15 Aug Clemson Botanical Garden [TNT Sanders ]
15 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Durant Nature Park and North Wake Landfill District Park-08/15/2014 [Mike Turner ]
15 Aug Pitt County, 15 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
15 Aug Things picking up here [Ginger Kopka ]
15 Aug Chesterfield Co., SC leps 14 Aug. 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
15 Aug Lee Co., SC leps 14 Aug. 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
15 Aug Durham Butterfly Count this Sunday! [Jeff Pippen ]
14 Aug Sightings 2 counties SC [Jules Fraytet ]
14 Aug Re: Wake County butterfly count -- Aug. 15 (Friday) [Mike Turner ]
13 Aug Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Bond Park-08/13/2014 [Mike Turner ]
13 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Bond Park-08/13/2014 [Mike Turner ]
13 Aug Pitt County, 13 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
12 Aug New NC Entomological Group [David Campbell ]
12 Aug Re: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens [Paul Cherubini ]
12 Aug Fwd: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
12 Aug Re: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens [Paul Cherubini ]
12 Aug Re: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens ["Abdulali, Salman" ]

Subject: Re: Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID)
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 03:48:45 +0000
The 5th photo looks like a Carolina Satyr - I don't see any blue in it.

Salman Abdulali

On Aug 26, 2014, at 8:41 PM, "Doug Allen" 
> wrote: 


On the 21st I saw my first Hairsreaks since April!. Stlli no Zebra Swallowtail 
or Red Admiral this year, but numbers of most species approaching normal. 


The first 3 pictures on mt Flickr site are A Broken Dash. Is it possible to 
separate Southern and Northern? I've never counted Northern here. The 4th 
picture is a Duskywing, maybe just another male Horace's. I've never been able 
to count Wild Indigo here. The 5th picture is a blue gray lep that was sunning 
within some open foliage, maybe a month? 


Help with the UNIDs please

See     https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/     for pics.

8/21  both Blue Wall, Greenville County, and Inman, Spartanburg County

2 Pipevine Swallowtail
15 Tiger Swallowtail
1 Black Swallowtail
1 Cloudless Sulphur
5 Gray Hairstreak
2 Summer Azure
2 Eastern-tailed Blue
1 Great-spangled Frit
5 Pearl Crescent
1 Question Mark
6 Am. Lady
1 Painted Lady
3 C. Buckeye
6 Red-spotted Purple
3 Appalachian Brown  FOY
5 Carolina Satyr
16 Silver-spotted Skipper
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Southern Cloudywing
2 Horace's Duskywing
1 C. Checkered Skipper
3 C. Sootywing
15+ Fiery Skipper
12+ Sachem
1 Zebulon Skipper
1 Ocola Skipper

8/26  Windmill Hill gardens  Spartanburg County

3 Pipevine Swallowtail
15+ Tiger Swallowtail
1 cabbage White
2 Sleepy Orange
2 Pearl Crescent
12+ Am. Painted Lady
4 C. Buckeye
1 Red-spotted Purple
1 Monarch   ***********************
20+  Silver-spotted Skipper  most common butterfly this summer
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Horace's Duskywing
1 UNID Duskywing
2 C. Sootywing
15+  Fiery Skipper
20+ Sachem
1 UNID Broken-Dash
3 Zebulon Skipper

Doug Inman, SC



Subject: Re: Monarch petition
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:10:57 -0700
On Aug 26, 2014, at 7:12 PM, Doug Allen wrote:

>  "Climate change models predict that annual mean maximum
> temperature is expected to increase across the continental
> United States, with mean predicted increases ranging from
> 3.6˚F to 9.0˚F (Alder and Hostetler 2013)."  page 101 of petition  
> The above is not only an extreme, but an absurd claim since
> no time frame or CO2 emissions frame of reference is given. 

Likewise, in this one minute excerpt of a lecture Dr. Chip Taylor 
presented 2 years ago, 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEZ4UvqOXJ8
it was suggested that mean winter temperatures on the mountains 
where the monarchs overwinter in Mexico could rise 2 degrees 
Celsius by 2030, (about 3.6 degrees F) making those mountains 
too warm for the monarchs to successfully overwinter.

Is a large 3.6 degree F rise in mean winter temperatures at the 
10,500 foot elevation zone in central Mexico in just 18 years 
realistically plausible? 

Paul Cherubini



Subject: Re: Monarch petition
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 22:12:27 -0400
Habitat degradation is always an important consideration.  So I am on board
with that one in its many forms..  I am not very knowledgeable about many
of the petition claims, but somewhat suspicious because I am knowledgeable
about one of them.

In the petition, many dozens of scientific papers are referenced which
would require hours to read.   There usually are opposing scientific views
and papers, for most any topic, which would require additional hours to
find and to read.  I'm familiar enough with one "threat", global
warming/climate change, to know that the papers referenced to support that
threat are mostly extreme and outmoded views, such as the following-

 "Climate change models predict that annual mean maximum temperature is
expected to increase across the continental United States, with mean
predicted increases ranging from 3.6˚F to 9.0˚F (Alder and Hostetler
2013)."  page 101 of petition

The above is not only an extreme, but an absurd claim since no time frame
or CO2 emissions frame of reference is given. The IPCC (2013) estimates
climate sensitivity to be in the range of 1.5 degrees to 4.5 Celsius for a
doubling of CO2.  We are half way to a double from the pre-industrial 280
ppm of CO2 and will reach the double before the end of this century.
 Global temperatures have so far risen about 0.8 degrees C.   Assuming that
warming was and is mostly the GHG effect, we might expect a similar
additional 0.8 degrees warming towards the end of the century when CO2
reaches 560 ppm, a double.  Its more complex than that, very politicized,
and everything about climate science is poorly understood by the
journalists and talking heads who pontificate about it.  I 'm in the
process of updating a paper which explains climate sensitivity. The concept
climate sensitivity is a key to understanding how much warming we'll have
and why the predictions are all over the map.  If interested, go to-
  http://climatesensitivity.blogspot.com/

Doug Allen


On Tue, Aug 26, 2014 at 4:50 PM, ROBERT CAVANAUGH 
wrote:

> I believe this is an absurd petition.  This is putting the horse before
> the cart.  Monarch decline is a byproduct of foodplant decimation due to
> extensive spraying of herbicides.  It is the food plant which should be
> placed on the threatened species list.
>
> Bob
>
>
>   On Tuesday, August 26, 2014 2:28 PM, "Abdulali, Salman" <
> ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu> wrote:
>
>
>
> http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/files/monarch-esa-petition-final_61585.pdf
>
>
>
Subject: Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID)
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:40:48 -0400
On the 21st I saw my first Hairsreaks since April!.  Stlli no Zebra
Swallowtail or Red Admiral this year, but numbers of most species
approaching normal.

The first 3 pictures on mt Flickr site are A Broken Dash.  Is it possible
to separate Southern and Northern?  I've never counted Northern here.  The
4th picture is a Duskywing, maybe just another male Horace's.  I've never
been able to count Wild Indigo here.  The 5th picture is a blue gray lep
that was sunning within some open foliage, maybe a month?

Help with the UNIDs please

See     https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/     for pics.

8/21  both Blue Wall, Greenville County, and Inman, Spartanburg County

2 Pipevine Swallowtail
15 Tiger Swallowtail
1 Black Swallowtail
1 Cloudless Sulphur
5 Gray Hairstreak
2 Summer Azure
2 Eastern-tailed Blue
1 Great-spangled Frit
5 Pearl Crescent
1 Question Mark
6 Am. Lady
1 Painted Lady
3 C. Buckeye
6 Red-spotted Purple
3 Appalachian Brown  FOY
5 Carolina Satyr
16 Silver-spotted Skipper
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Southern Cloudywing
2 Horace's Duskywing
1 C. Checkered Skipper
3 C. Sootywing
15+ Fiery Skipper
12+ Sachem
1 Zebulon Skipper
1 Ocola Skipper

8/26  Windmill Hill gardens  Spartanburg County

3 Pipevine Swallowtail
15+ Tiger Swallowtail
1 cabbage White
2 Sleepy Orange
2 Pearl Crescent
12+ Am. Painted Lady
4 C. Buckeye
1 Red-spotted Purple
1 Monarch   ***********************
20+  Silver-spotted Skipper  most common butterfly this summer
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Horace's Duskywing
1 UNID Duskywing
2 C. Sootywing
15+  Fiery Skipper
20+ Sachem
1 UNID Broken-Dash
3 Zebulon Skipper

Doug Inman, SC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill Co. Park-08/26/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 19:22:24 -0400
I walked the Creekside and Mill Pond trails and explored the open area. I
saw 24 species, a nice total this year. Weather was partly cloudy and 84F.
My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail 1  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2  Cabbage White 1  Sleepy
Orange 2  Eastern Tailed-Blue 4  Variegated Fritillary 5  Pearl
Crescent 5  Question
Mark 1  Red Admiral 1  Common Buckeye 4  Red-spotted Purple 2  Viceroy
1  Pearly-eye
sp. 4  Northern Pearly-eye 2  Creole Pearly-eye 2  Appalachian Brown 1
 Carolina/Intricate
Satyr 25  Monarch 2  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Horace's Duskywing 1  Least
Skipper 15  Fiery Skipper 2  Sachem 2  Zabulon Skipper 2  Ocola Skipper 7
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 26 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 23:10:58 +0000
I went to Boyd Lee Park late today (after 5:30 pm, 2014-08-26, Pitt County), 
and saw the following: 


Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 2
GREAT PURPLE HAIRSTREAK, 1, FOY #50 for Pitt County
Red-banded Hairstreak, 1
Summer Azure, 2
Red-spotted Purple, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 2

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Re: Monarch petition
From: ROBERT CAVANAUGH <papilio28570 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 13:50:20 -0700
I believe this is an absurd petition. This is putting the horse before the 
cart. Monarch decline is a byproduct of foodplant decimation due to extensive 
spraying of herbicides. It is the food plant which should be placed on the 
threatened species list. 


Bob  



On Tuesday, August 26, 2014 2:28 PM, "Abdulali, Salman"  
wrote: 

 


http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/files/monarch-esa-petition-final_61585.pdf
Subject: Monarch petition
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:28:31 +0000
http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/files/monarch-esa-petition-final_61585.pdf
Subject: Monarch Ovipositing and Peck's Skipper
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:38:26 -0400
Our garden was jumping with yellow skippers today and we had our first yard
Peck's Skipper, our 70th yard species. We have been seeing the Peck's for a
few days but I finally got a photo today. Most of the day was spent
following the Monarch around to collect eggs.  We brought in 29 eggs.

Monarch ovipositing 1 (we had a female early in the season who laid 4 eggs
which did not hatch out)
Red-spotted Purple 1
Common Buckeye 1
Pearl Crescent 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2
Pipevine Swallowtail 1 (male only)
Spicebush Female 1 (back for her third day, ovipositing)
Sleepy Orange 1 (ovipositing)
Cabbage White 3
Carolina Satyr 1
Summer Azure 1
Red-banded Hairsteak 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 3
Clouded Skipper 1
Little Glassywing 2
Zabulon Skipper 4 (1 female)
Fiery Skipper 2 (males)
Southern Broken-dash 4
Delaware Skipper 2 (male and female)
Peck's Skipper 2 (saw the dorsal of male and female)*
Sachem 7

I was with Richard Stickney when he found a Peck's (a montane species) at
Archie Elledge about a mile down the creek from here 5-6 years ago.  But
the Peck's was a good find in the garden down here in the Piedmont.


Gene S
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Mitchell Mill State Natural Area-08/25/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:50:01 -0400
Today I spent from noon until 6:15pm walking around the area looking for
leps and odes. The weather was mostly cloudy and 82F. My complete list is
below. Good butterflying.

  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 1  Sleepy Orange 1  Gray Hairstreak 1  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 2  Summer Azure 1  Pearl Crescent 7  Common Buckeye 1  Red-spotted
Purple 1  Hackberry Emperor 2  Appalachian Brown 1  Carolina/Intricate Satyr
20  Monarch 1  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Least Skipper 5  Little Glassywing
4  Zabulon Skipper 1  Ocola Skipper 2
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Southern Lake Norman NABA Count
From: piephofft AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 17:58:10 -0400 (EDT)


The Southern Lake Norman NABA Butterfly Count was held Sunday August 17, 2014 
after being postponed from the previous week. Temperatures were hot but 
humidity could have been much worse. Seventeen participants in six parties 
identified 57 species and 1238 individuals, spending 33.5 party hours in the 
field. Rob Van Epp's group spent the most hours in the field and appropriately 
tallied the most species (44). Thanks to all who participated. 

Rob Van Epps, Christine Lisiewski, Jeff Lemons, Lenny Lampel, Ethan Lampel, 
Robert Gilson, Laura Domingo, Thanh Huynh, Taylor Piephoff, Steve Tracy, Chris 
Talkington, Jan Fowler, Phil Fowler, Gene Schepker, Kevin Metcalf, Tom Sanders, 
Tammy Sanders. 

 
 







Pipevine  Swallowtail
12

Zebra  Swallowtail
4

Black  Swallowtail
4

Eastern  Tiger Swallowtail
81

Spicebush  Swallowtail
33

Cabbage  White
12

Orange  Sulphur    
10

Cloudless  Sulphur
9

Little  Yellow
1

Sleepy  Orange
24

Red-banded  Hairstreak
1

Gray  Hairstreak
7

Summer  Azure
26

Eastern  Tailed-Blue
69

American  Snout
12

Gulf  Fritillary
2

Variegated  Fritillary
30

Great  Spangled Fritillary
4

Pearl  Crescent
22

Question  Mark     
3

Eastern  Comma     
2

Painted  Lady
4

American  Lady
1

Red  Admiral
6

Common  Buckeye
133

Red-spotted  Purple
23

Viceroy
5

Hackberry  Emperor
8

Tawny  Emperor
2

Northern  Pearly-Eye
7

Creole  Pearly-Eye
4

Appalachian  Brown
13

Gemmed  Satyr
1

Carolina  Satyr
200

Common  Wood-Nymph
4

Monarch
20

Silver-spotted  Skipper
112

Hoary  Edge
8

Southern  Cloudywing
3

Northern  Cloudywing
2

Horace’s  Duskywing
8

Wild  Indigo Duskywing
2

Common  Checkered-Skipper
9

Common  Sootywing
10

Swarthy  Skipper
4

Clouded  Skipper
22

Least  Skipper
40

Southern  Skipperling
1

Fiery  Skipper
39

Tawny-edged  Skipper
2

Crossline  Skipper
1

Little  Glassywing
21

Sachem
62

Delaware  Skipper
25

Zabulon  Skipper
45

Dun  Skipper
4

Ocola  Skipper
19


1238


 
Taylor Piephoff 
Matthews, NC 
PiephoffT AT aol.com

Subject: Butterfly Symposium Deadline Approaching
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:55:48 -0400
The deadline for ordering lunches for the Carolina Butterfly Society
Butterfly Symposium is fast approaching. Although you can register for the
symposium itself right up until the day of the event, Saturday, Sept. 13, if
you want to order lunch you need to do it now. The deadline is this coming
Friday, August 29. Go to the Carolina Butterfly Society website  www.carolinabutterflysociety.org/>, download the registration
form, indicate your preference of the meat or vegetarian choice, and send it
to the address on the form along with the fees indicated.


-----

Carolina Butterfly Society
2014 BUTTERFLY SYMPOSIUM
Stedman Education Building, North Carolina Zoological Park
4401 Zoo Pkwy, Asheboro, NC, 27205
 
Butterflies, native plants that attract butterflies, updates on the decline
in Monarch butterflies  all this and more are planned for our annual
Carolina Butterfly Society Butterfly Symposium. Mark your calendar now and
plan to join us on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014. The registration fee is $12 per
person. The optional lunch cost is $12.50 per person and must be received by
August 29. For the registration form, go to the Carolina Butterfly Society
website  www.carolinabutterflysociety.org/>
 
Last year our annual Butterfly Symposium was held in South Carolina, so we
have rotated it to North Carolina this year. Were delighted that we found a
date when the popular Stedman Education Building just outside the gate of
the NC Zoological Park in Asheboro, NC, was available. While our activities
wont take us into the zoo itself, participants who come for the weekend
should plan a visit to this wonderful zoo at times when we arent engaged in
Butterfly Symposium activities.
 
We have a full agenda beginning at 10 am and running through 4 pm. We plan
to have a presentation on native plants that are good nectar sources for
adult butterflies and other pollinators as well as plants that are used as
food for the butterfly caterpillars. Well have a special presentation on
the milkweed species in our region, the only group of plants that Monarchs
can use as caterpillar host plants. Well hear from an experienced gardener
about designing and maintaining a home garden specifically for butterflies
and other pollinators. One of our presenters, who is involved with the
Monarch Watch program, will give us some insight on whats been happening
with that iconic species.
 
In addition to these great presentations, we are arranging to have some
handouts that participants can take home with them. We also will distribute
milkweed seeds of several different species to folks who want to try them in
their own gardens and landscaping.
 
Lots of people will be coming from some distance away, so we have made it
easy to make this a whole weekend of butterflies! On the Friday before the
Symposium, Sept. 12, we will have a butterfly walk at 2:00 pm to Purgatory
Mountain near the NC Zoo in Randolph Co. On Sept. 14, the Sunday following
the Symposium, we will have a field trip to the scenic Pisgah Covered Bridge
and portions of the Uwharrie National Forest in Montgomery and Randolph
Counties starting at 9:00 am. We expect to have lots of photo opportunities
for the photographers in the group.
 
Registration fee: $12 per person. (Meal cost separate.) Send your check to
CBS, PO Box 18771, Greensboro, NC 27419. If you plan to purchase a catered
lunch (see below), please add the cost per person to your registration
check. You may register up to the day of the Symposium, but your lunch
payment must be received by August 29.
 
Meals: You may bring your own food and drinks for lunch on the day of the
symposium. If you prefer, you may purchase a catered lunch. We are required
to use the NC Zoos contract caterer; the cost is $12.50. The meat selection
is a roast turkey breast sandwich with Gruyere cheese and honey mustard on
whole wheat bread. The vegetarian selection is fresh mozzarella, tomato,
basil, and olive oil on ciabatta. In addition, we will have fresh fruit,
chips, cookies, and soft drinks for everyone who orders a catered lunch. If
you intend to buy the catered lunch, please add the lunch cost for each
person in your party to your registration check. Your lunch payment must be
received by August 29. If you bring your own lunch, youll have to provide
your own drinks and snacks. Breakfasts and dinners are on your own. For the
field trips, please bring plenty of water to drink.
 
Zoo admission: We will be outside the zoo gate in the Stedman Education
Building. Zoo admission is not included in your registration. This is a
wonderful zoo, and we encourage folks to enjoy it when they arent involved
in Symposium activities. Currently, regular admission for all visitors is
$12 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $8 for children 12 and under. You will
pay this at the gate.
 
Lodging: Were aware that some folks like to make their hotel reservations
well in advance, so one of our committee members has been lining up
accommodations. Asheboro has several national chain hotels that you can find
on line. In addition, we have reserved a block of rooms at one hotel that
has a full breakfast and other nice amenities, and we have a couple of other
suggestions below. [NOTE: These prices were confirmed last spring but may
have changed. Tell the desk clerk youre attending the CBS Butterfly
Symposium and ask for the current rate.]
 
Hampton Inn, E. Dixie Dr.  336-625-9000. A block of King rooms  AT  $95, Double
rooms  AT  $105 (2 queen beds) has been reserved for Friday and Saturday night,
Sept 12 & 13th. Non-smoking, Indoor heated pool, excellent breakfast
included. Reservation cut off date - August 22. All reservations honored at
block room rate, even if they exceed blocked number. For those who wish to
have a longer vacation in the area, extended days Sept 11th and14th are
included in block room rate if mentioned at time of reservation.
Reservations may be made at these rates immediately.
 
Other hotels (No block reservations): Fairfield Inn and Suites, 336-626-9197
(shares Hampton Inn entrance) King rooms $93, Double $99 (2 double beds).
Non-smoking, indoor heated pool, breakfast included. Reservation cut off
date - August 22.  Also have extended days of Sept 11th & 14th.
 
Comfort Inn, 825 W. Dixie Dr. 336-626-4414.  King $71.10, Double $79 (2
Queen beds), free hot breakfast, seasonal outdoor pool, pet-friendly hotel.
 
This is the last notice that well be able to send out to the whole
membership before the Butterfly Symposium. If you have questions, you may
contact Don Allemann  or Dennis Burnette Dennis Burnette
.
 
Dont miss this great Butterfly Symposium on Sept. 13, 2014, and we hope
youll also join us for the field trips on Friday afternoon, Sept. 12, and
Sunday morning, Sept. 14. Lets make it a Butterfly Weekend!
http://www.carolinabutterflysociety.org/
Subject: Shallow Ford NA, Alamance Co, NC Butterflies
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:29:46 -0400
8/23/14 Report Shallow Ford NA
 
Nine of us participated in the Carolina Butterfly Society field trip to
Shallow Ford Natural Area in northern Alamance County, NC, on Saturday, Aug.
23, 2014. This was a joint trip with the Triad Chapter of the NC Native
Plant Society. In addition to exploring part of the park, we also visited
the private residence of one of the participants who kindly provided lunch
for the group. 
 
The morning was overcast, the wind calm, and it was warm and humid. Judging
by the wet roads several places in the vicinity, there were showers that
popped up all around us. However, we didnt have any rain during our walk
from 9:30 to 12:15.
 
We werent expecting to see a lot of butterflies due to the cloudy weather
and the low number of butterflies that have occurred throughout eastern
North Carolina all summer, so we werent surprised at the low count. We
slowly walked along a trail that traversed dense woodlands before coming out
into a large meadow. The woodland trail proved to be excellent for
mushrooms; there were at least a dozen species, many quite colorful.
 
We found that much of the meadow had been mowed within the last two weeks,
so there were few nectar sources. However, we spotted a fresh looking female
Monarch busily laying eggs on the 10 to 12 Common Milkweed that had
resprouted. We also saw an azure species flying by and a perched Pearl
Crescent. We reentered the woods and continued along a creek back to the
parking lot where we saw a male Zabulon Skipper on Silphium. At the nearby
private residence we saw a Carolina Satyr and the best butterfly of the day,
a Little Yellow.
 
Here is our list:
 
Little Yellow 1
Azure sp. 1
Pearl Crescent 1
Carolina Satyr 1
Zabulon Skipper 1
-- 
Dennis E. Burnette
7 Brownstone Lane
Greensboro, NC 27410
(336) 299-4342
deburnette AT triad.rr.com

Subject: Dixie Plantation Butterfly Walk 8/23
From: <aszwarc AT berkeleycountysc.gov>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 08:19:47 -0400 (EDT)
It seems the Lowcountry CBS had a successful butterfly walk this past Saturday,
August 23. Dixie Plantation is located in Hollywood, SC, and has gardens,
wooded paths, and is located against salt marsh. We walked between 9 and 11:30
AM, and the weather was sunny and got up to 94*F while walking.

17 observers saw the following:

13 Cloudless Sulphur
1 Common Buckeye
6 Gulf Fritillaries
7 Horace's Dusky Wing
2 Carolina Satyr
2 Red Banded Hairstreaks
5 Sleepy Orange
1 Gray Hairstreak
2 Wild Indigo 
1 Least Skipper
2 Black Swallowtail (Female)
1 Silver Spotted Skipper
1 Red Spotted Purple
1 Hackberry Emperor
1 Tiger Swallowtail
Subject: SCAN trip leps highlight 8/23
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 08:01:40 -0400
While not in the Carolinas, I wanted to mention that we saw at least two 
Lace Winged Roadside-Skippers on Elephantopus tomentosus on a private 
conservation easement in McDuffy County GA, south of Augusta.

There was not many other species or abundance(of what I saw,others may 
may have seen additional species) besides Sleepy Orange, Cloudless 
Sulphurs and Azures.

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte
Subject: Surry leps
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 06:49:41 -0400
Count rained out, but paul scharf and jesse anderson stayed to sweep net and 
bug out. Rain stopped but sun barely poked out a bit. Moth list from overnight 
near 100 sp, lots of northern specialties. 


2 e tiger sw
1 black sw
1 spicebush sw
1 sleepy orange
12 summer azure
2 e tailed blue
2 harvester
1 gr spangled fritillary
1 american snout
2 no pearly eye
2 so pearly eye (FOY #114)
12 carolina satyr, several caught, nothing close to intricata field marks
3 gemmed satyr
1 common wood nymph
8 deleware skipper
7 zabulon sk
1 least sk
1 so broken dash
6 lace winged roadside skipper

Hope the count can be rescheduled. 

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Ocola at Reynolda Village, Garden Pipevine Swallowtail
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:27:13 -0400
On the way home from the rain-out on the Surry NABA Count at PMSP this
morning. I stopped in at Reynolda Village for an hour of skipper hunting in
the  flower boxes of mostly Lantanas.  From  AT 11:00 to !2:00 I found:

Ocola 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 5
Sachem 14
Fiery Skipper 1
Southern Broken-dash 3
Northern Broken-dash 1 (male)
Little Glassywing 2

Sachems and Southern Broken-dash were doing a lot of courting maneuvers!

In our garden this afternoon at various times we had:

Sachem 4
Silver-spotted Skipper 2
Southern Broken-dash 2
Delaware Skipper 1
Clouded Skipper 1 (male)
Fiery Skipper 1 (male)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2
Pipevine Swallowtail 1 (male)
Spicebush Swallowtail (ovipositing)
Pearl Crescent 2
Common Buckeye 1
Little Glassywing 2
Cabbage White 2
C Satyr 1
Summer Azure 1

The Spicebush Swallowtails have been making up for lost time in our
garden.  We have found several caterpillars and eggs in the last few days
on Sassafras and Spicebush.

We will try to re-schedule the Surry Count within the next two weeks if we
can find an opening.

Gene Schepker
Subject: A few Wake County, NC, butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:39:51 -0400
This afternoon (Aug. 24) I went to the Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh from
about 2:15 - 3:15. I was there on the count on Aug. 15. It wasn't hopping
with true butterflies today; in fact, they were very scarce -- FIVE species
only.  I did find one species we missed completely on the butterfly count.
Here is the meager list -- probably the worst I have ever seen here for
late August:

Black Swallowtail  1 female
Cabbage White  3
Sleepy Orange  2   surprised not to see Cloudless Sulphur
Summer Azure  1 female
Common Buckeye  8
Silver-spotted Skipper  30
Horace's Duskywing  7
WILD INDIGO DUSKYWING  2   resident here, but usually missed; was found on
the count
COMMON SOOTYWING  1  missed on the count, but not unusual here
Fiery Skipper  45
Sachem  20
Ocola Skipper  2

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh
Subject: Favorite butterfly plants
From: Will Cook <cwcook AT duke.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:54:10 -0400
Butterfliers,

In preparation for a talk I'm scheduled to present at the CBS Butterfly 
Symposium at the NC Zoo (9/13/14), I thought it would be fun to ask 
butterfly gardeners what their favorite butterfly plants are. You can 
interpret the question loosely, for example it can be a favorite because 
it attracts many butterflies, is easy to grow, or is particularly 
ornamental. If you're not sure whether a certain plant is native or 
exotic, just list it anyway and I can figure it out.

What are your favorite three (in order of preference):

butterfly nectar plants (native or exotic)?
1.
2.
3.

native butterfly nectar plants?
1.
2.
3.

exotic butterfly nectar plants?
1.
2.
3.

butterfly host plants?
1.
2.
3.

I'll send out a compilation of answers after the symposium.

Thanks!

Will


-- 
Will Cook - Durham, NC
http://www.carolinanature.com
Subject: Fwd: Dingle Pond Unit-Santee NWR, SC leps 23 Aug 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 07:41:38 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Dennis Forsythe 
Date: Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 7:40 AM
Subject: Dingle Pond Unit-Santee NWR, SC leps 23 Aug 2014
To: "Ponce, Azucena" , "Epstein, Marc" <
marc_epstein AT fws.gov>, Jackie , Billy McCord <
bmccord AT bellsouth.net>, Donna Forsythe , Frances
Egleston , Linda Hyman , "
pittsjam AT windstream.net" , Barbara Dengler <
zippitytzuda AT comcast.net>


Hi All,

Donna and I spent from 1345 until 1515 hrs, 23 Aug. 2014 looking for
butterflies at the Dingle Pond Unit, Santee NWR, Colleton Co., SC.  It over
95 degrees, with a NW wind and scattered clouds with light rain at the end.
 We walked from the parking lot to the boardwalk and back (ca 0.8 mi).  We
had:

E. Tiger Swallowtail 1
Spicebush Swallowtail 3
Cloudless Sulfur 1
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Summer Azure 1
Red-spotted Purple 4
Creole Pearly-eye 1
Gemmed Satyr 2
Pearly-eye sp. 1
SIlver-spotted Skipper 1


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com



-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-08/23/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 21:31:27 -0400
Today I paddled around the lake and walked around below the dam and the
floodplain above the lake. The weather was partly cloudy and 88F, with
brief rain for about 10 minutes. The highlight among my 18 species was a
lone Little Yellow, my first of the year. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2  Cabbage White 1  Little Yellow 1  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 3  Variegated Fritillary 1  Eastern Comma 1  Red Admiral 1
 Red-spotted
Purple 2  Viceroy 1  Northern Pearly-eye 1  Carolina/Intricate Satyr 8
Monarch 1  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Least Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 4  Little
Glassywing 1  Sachem 2  Ocola Skipper 1
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Butterflying in N Durham County
From: Tom Krakauer <thkrakauer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 17:14:43 -0400
I returned to the territory that Salman and I covered on the Durham County 
yesterday with my friend Lynn Richardson. We were at Quail Roost and N Hill 
Forest for about 2 hrs from 10-12:00 

We got 23. species including one not seen on Durham Count--juniper 
hairstreak AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT , and 3 that we missed on the count in the Quail Roost 
territory AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT - Cabbage White, Great-spangled Fritillary , and American Lady. 
Everything looked very fresh. Nice group of Cloudless Sulphurs 


Eastern Tiger St.       1
Spice bush ST.          2
Cabbage White.       1 AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
Orange Sulphur.       3
Cloudless Sulphur.   12
Sleepy Orange.         2
Juniper Hairstreak.   1  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
ETB.                          8
Variegated Frit.          3
Great-spangled Frit.  2 AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
American Lady.          1 AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
Common Buckeye.    100
Red-spotted Purple.   2
Monarch.                    4
Carolina Satyr.            5
Clouded skipper.       1
Zebulon Skipper.        1
Least Skipper.            3
Little Glassywing.       3
Sachem.                    5
Cross line Skipper.     2
Southern Broken dash.  1
Ocola Skipper.            5

I should mention that there was a Great Egret at Quail Roost


Tom Krakauer
Bahama, NC


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Durham Bfly Count results 8/17/2014
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 14:08:24 -0400
Butterfliers,

As has been widely reported across the southeastern US, butterfly numbers are 
dramatically reduced in 2014 in many areas. Results of the 15th Annual NABA 
Durham Butterfly Count support that trend. Although wet/dewy vegetation and 
cloudy conditions made for a slow start to the 2014 Durham Count, nine 
butterfliers persisted and cumulatively tallied 54 species (average=56) 
composed of 1433 individuals, drastically below our average number of 3726 
individuals! Late spring hard freezes seem to be the prevailing theory for 
depressed numbers in our area. 


Brian Bockhahn's party found the most species of the day (41) including a Great 
Purple Hairstreak (only the second time for this count). Amazingly, two parties 
(Bockhahn and Stickney) found a single Harvester each, only the second time for 
that species on this count. Jeff Pippen's party found the most individuals 
(454) and only the second ever Long-tailed Skipper. While we had no terrible 
"misses", we also set no record-high counts for any species, and we had too 
many record or near record low species' counts to mention. Our avearge # of 
individuals per party hour was 49 (an all time low). This count averages 120 
individual butterflies seen per party hour. While it's a bummer to not see as 
many butterflies as usual, it's great to have some real data that support the 
various casual and anecdotal observations that "butterfly numbers seem down 
this year." Fortunately, insects lay hundreds to thousands of eggs per pair, 
hence they have a strong capacity to rebound after setbacks by such factors as 
unusually rough weather. I expect numbers to bounce back up for most species in 
the next couple of seasons. 


Many thanks to all participants who helped with the Count this year: Brian 
Bockhahn, Randy Emmitt, Owen McConnel, Tom Krakauer, Salman Abdulali, Harry 
LeGrand, Jeffrey Pippen, Kelly Mieszkalski, and Richard Stickney. 


Here are our results for the Durham Butterfly Count, 17 Aug 2014:

4	Pipevine Swallowtail
13	Black Swallowtail
24	Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
33	Spicebush Swallowtail
12	Cabbage White
2	Orange Sulphur
85	Cloudless Sulphur
48	Sleepy Orange
2	Harvester
1	Great Purple Hairstreak
17	Gray Hairstreak
107	Eastern Tailed-Blue
62	Summer Azure
1	American Snout
9	Variegated Fritillary
1	Great Spangled Fritillary
99	Pearl Crescent
3	Question Mark
4	Eastern Comma
5	American Lady
5	Painted Lady
15	Red Admiral
66	Common Buckeye
21	Red-spotted Purple
3	Viceroy
12	Hackberry Emperor
4	Tawny Emperor
10	Northern Pearly-eye
1	Appalachian Brown
1	Gemmed Satyr
77	Carolina Satyr
9	Common Wood-Nymph
20	Monarch
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/monarch.htm

225	Silver-spotted Skipper
1	Long-tailed Skipper
11	Hoary Edge
2	Southern Cloudywing
18	Horace's Duskywing
1	Zarucco Duskywing
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/zaruccoduskywing.htm

1	Wild Indigo Duskywing
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/wildindigoduskywing.htm

3	Com. Checkered-Skipper
17	Swarthy Skipper
41	Clouded Skipper
5	Least Skipper
80	Fiery Skipper
5	Crossline Skipper
20	Southern Broken-Dash
1	Northern Broken-Dash
41	Little Glassywing
102	Sachem
4	Delaware Skipper
50	Zabulon Skipper
5	Dun Skipper
24	Ocola Skipper

For more info about the Durham Count, including data from all years, go here:
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/durhamcount.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-08/22/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 19:16:03 -0400
Today I walked around looking for butterflies and odes under partly cloudy
skies and temps about 93F. I saw 28 species today, by far my highest one
day total of 2014. Highlights were 5 Red-banded Hairstreaks (before today I
had seen only one all year!), 1 Southern Broken-dash (my third sighting
this year), 10 Monarchs (there could have 2-3x as many, they were all over
and hard to count), 1 Cloudless Sulphur (my third this year), 1 Wild Indigo
Duskywing (FOY), and 1 E. Comma (my first anglewing sighting since 6/23).
There were a lot of nectar sources, almost all of which were in the fenced
in garden, but a large patch of Brazilian Vervain (Verbena brasiliensis)
was very popular, especially with Monarchs. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Pipevine Swallowtail 1  Black Swallowtail 2  Eastern Tiger
Swallowtail 2  Cloudless
Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 2  Gray Hairstreak 2  Red-banded Hairstreak 5  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 3  Summer Azure 1  Variegated Fritillary 6  Pearl Crescent
9  Eastern
Comma 1  Red Admiral 1  Common Buckeye 10  Red-spotted Purple 1
Viceroy 1  Carolina/Intricate
Satyr 1  Monarch 10  Silver-spotted Skipper 4  Horace's Duskywing 2  Wild
Indigo Duskywing 1  Clouded Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 11  Southern
Broken-dash 1  Little Glassywing 3  Sachem 8  Zabulon Skipper 1  Ocola
Skipper 1
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 22 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 21:56:45 +0000
A few butterflies seen with minimal effort today (Pitt County, 2014-08-22):

Black Swallowtail, 1
Red-banded Hairstreak, 3
Monarch, 1
Red Admiral, 1
Common Buckeye, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 1
Horace's Duskywing, 1
HAYHURST'S SCALLOPWING, 1, PItt County Arboretum, a new location, FOY #49 for 
Pitt 

Ocola Skipper, 2
Fiery Skipper, 10
Whirlabout, 1

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:56:14 -0400
I recall seeing a lot of Symplocos [sweetleaf] years ago, on a spring
visit, to Cliffs of the Neuse State Park. So, I returned in June to see if
I could find a King's Hairstreak. There were so many Pondhawks there that I
don't recall seeing any butterflies. (I did see several elfins nectaring on
the sweetleaf in April, before the Pondhawks are common.) Howell Woods is
also bad in summer, as are a lot of places in the western and central
Coastal Plain; Pondhawks just eat up everything, including themselves, from
about May into August. Great Blue Skimmers are also abundant now, as are
several other dragonflies, though these other guys don't seem to take as
many butterflies as do Pondhawks.

Harry LeGrand


On Fri, Aug 22, 2014 at 1:43 PM, Richard Stickney 
wrote:

>  I neglected to mention that I also had 2 Lace-winged Roadside-skippers.
> And Harry’s right about the dragonflies! Between the Pondhawks and Great
> Blue Skimmers, it’s a wonder any skippers survive. All but a couple of my
> butterflies were seen along wooded roads/paths or in the forest, where
> fewer dragonflies go.
>
>
>
> *From:* Richard Stickney
> *Sent:* Thursday, August 21, 2014 11:41 AM
> *To:* 'carolinaleps AT duke.edu'
> *Subject:* Johnston Co. Butterflies
>
>
>
> Hi all,
>
>
>
> I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a
> couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina
> Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition:
>
> Sleepy Orange – 2
>
> Variegated Fritillary – 3
>
> Pearl Crescent – 1
>
> Buckeye – 1
>
> Red-spotted Purple – 4
>
> Southern Pearly-eye – a dozen or so, plentiful in “caney” woods
>
> Creole Pearly-eye – 4
>
> Carolina/Intricate Satyr – 6
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper – 1
>
> Flyby Duskywing – 1 didn’t sit still for ID
>
>
>
>
>
> Richard Stickney
>
> NC Museum of Life & Science
>
> www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney
>
>
>
Subject: RE: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:43:20 +0000
I neglected to mention that I also had 2 Lace-winged Roadside-skippers. And 
Harry's right about the dragonflies! Between the Pondhawks and Great Blue 
Skimmers, it's a wonder any skippers survive. All but a couple of my 
butterflies were seen along wooded roads/paths or in the forest, where fewer 
dragonflies go. 


From: Richard Stickney
Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2014 11:41 AM
To: 'carolinaleps AT duke.edu'
Subject: Johnston Co. Butterflies

Hi all,

I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a 
couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina 
Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition: 

Sleepy Orange - 2
Variegated Fritillary - 3
Pearl Crescent - 1
Buckeye - 1
Red-spotted Purple - 4
Southern Pearly-eye - a dozen or so, plentiful in "caney" woods
Creole Pearly-eye - 4
Carolina/Intricate Satyr - 6
Silver-spotted Skipper - 1
Flyby Duskywing - 1 didn't sit still for ID


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney
Subject: vacation return
From: "Gail Lankford" <whocooksforyou AT skyrunner.net>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:57:07 -0400
set carolinaleps digest 
Subject: Carteret County Aug 21
From: ROBERT CAVANAUGH <papilio28570 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 23:52:54 -0700
A few interesting sightings lately.

Today a female Monarch was found my milkweed and spent about two hours laying 
eggs and feeding. A fresh looking male was seen yesterday patrolling the yard 
repeatedly most of the day. Today's female was somewhat faded indicating some 
age. 


 

A Longtail Skipper made its first appearance in my back yard along with a 
Brazilian Skipper which is the second one seen this year. First one was over a 
month ago and today's bug was very fresh. 



Yesterday, I was standing in the shade of my Bradford Pear tree in my back yard 
and noticed a female Great Purple Hairstreak laying eggs. The tree is 40 to 50 
feet tall with a two foot wide trunk. Over the years mistletoe became resident 
among the limbs. I have seen an occasional GP Hairstreak in springtime while 
the tree is in bloom. This is the first time I ever saw this species 
ovipositing. 


Also yesterday, finally saw a Tiger Swallowtail flying across the yard and 
spotted another that had been hit by a car on Hyway 24 - Hibbs Road 
intersection. 


A male Holly Azure was seen flying along the rear border where a grove of 
American Holly grows. 


Bob
Subject: Correction on Lake Hills walk
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:41:49 -0400
Make that a Calico Pennant instead of a Haloween Pennant on today's walk.

Gene Schepker
Subject: Greenville Co., SC leps 20 Aug 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:10:30 -0400
Hi All,

I searched  for butterflies at Camp Greenville YMCA and the Caesars Head
State Park areas of Greenville Co, SC 20 August from 1000-1330 hrs.  I had
the following:

Pipevine Swallowtail 6
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 9
Cabbage White 1
Cloudless Sulfur 1
Sleepy Orange 1
Summer Azure 6
Eastern tailed-Blue 1 very worn
Great Spangled Fritillary 1
Pearl Crescent 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 18
Zebulon Skipper 1 male

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Spartenburg Co., SC leps 20 August 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:48:16 -0400
Hi All,

I spent an hour in the late afternoon yesterday along Hacker Creek just
inside the Spartenburg Co. line from Union County.

I had the following:
E. Tiger Swallowtail 1
Sleepy Orange 2
Summer Azure 2
Pearl Crescent 1
Silver -spotted Skipper 1
Zabulon Skipper 1 male
Lace-wing Roadside-Skipper 1

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Butterflies at Lake Hills, Bethania, Forsyth County
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:45:25 -0400
Shelley Rutkin, Cynthia Donaldson, and I went to Lake Hills a private
wetland restoration area in Bethania to check out the butterflies.  There
is a large field which was a little over-mowed and we bordered a small lake
and a trail on one side of the wetlands.  Under hot and sunny conditions
from 11:45 - 1:30 we found:

Sachem 14
Silver-spotted Skipper 10
Variegated Fritillary 3
Summer Azure 6
Eastern Tailed-blue 3
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 9 (several black form)
Zabulon Skipper 3
Least Skipper 3
Common Buckeye 6
Pearl Crescent 3
Northern Broken-dash
Cloudless Sulphur 2
Little Glassywing 3
Dun (skipper) 2
Fiery Skipper 1
Viceroy 1
American Lady

Odonates included Haloween Pennant, Widow Skimmer, and Common White-tail,
and several others!  Gene Schepker

 Gene Schepker
Subject: Pitt County, 21 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 22:41:26 +0000
Here are the butterflies seen today in the Greenville area (Pitt County, 
2014-08-21). Despite excellent weather I could only count 20 species. 


Black Swallowtail, 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 3
Spicebush Swallowtail, 1
Sleepy Orange, 12
Red-banded Hairstreak, 5
Summer Azure, 10
Eastern Tailed-Blue, 1
Monarch, 2
Variegated Fritillary, 4
Red-spotted Purple, 1
Common Buckeye, 2
Painted Lady, 1
Red Admiral, 1
Pearl Crescent, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 2
Horace's Duskywing, 7
Ocola Skipper, 5
Fiery Skipper, 25
Dun Skipper, 1
Sachem, 1

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:46:24 -0400
Howell Woods has so many Eastern Pondhawks all summer that they, sadly,
keep the skipper numbers way down. It has such great potential for skippers
during the year, but -- I guess there's no good way to control those flying
vacuum cleaners. I have always had rather disappointing results for small
butterfly species there -- guess the pearly-eyes are large enough to avoid
being eaten.

Harry LeGrand


On Thu, Aug 21, 2014 at 11:41 AM, Richard Stickney 
wrote:

>  Hi all,
>
>
>
> I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a
> couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina
> Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition:
>
> Sleepy Orange – 2
>
> Variegated Fritillary – 3
>
> Pearl Crescent – 1
>
> Buckeye – 1
>
> Red-spotted Purple – 4
>
> Southern Pearly-eye – a dozen or so, plentiful in “caney” woods
>
> Creole Pearly-eye – 4
>
> Carolina/Intricate Satyr – 6
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper – 1
>
> Flyby Duskywing – 1 didn’t sit still for ID
>
>
>
>
>
> Richard Stickney
>
> NC Museum of Life & Science
>
> www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney
>
>
>  ---
> Keep up with us on Facebook ,
> Twitter  and at lifeandscience.org
>
Subject: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 15:41:23 +0000
Hi all,

I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a 
couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina 
Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition: 

Sleepy Orange - 2
Variegated Fritillary - 3
Pearl Crescent - 1
Buckeye - 1
Red-spotted Purple - 4
Southern Pearly-eye - a dozen or so, plentiful in "caney" woods
Creole Pearly-eye - 4
Carolina/Intricate Satyr - 6
Silver-spotted Skipper - 1
Flyby Duskywing - 1 didn't sit still for ID


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
Keep up with us on Facebook, 
Twitter and at 
lifeandscience.org 
Subject: Re: Currituck Co., NC butterflies, 8-20-2014 (Creole Pearly-Eye!)
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:51:33 +0000
I have seen several Creoles, but no Southerns this year in Pitt County.

Salman Abdulali
Greenville NC

On Aug 21, 2014, at 8:45 AM, "Harry LeGrand" 
> wrote: 


Nice list for a part of the state from where we seldom get reports. Interesting 
that you didn't see any Southern Pearly-eyes. Usually one sees several 
Southerns for every Creole in that part of the state. 


Harry LeGrand


On Wed, Aug 20, 2014 at 10:33 PM, Jeff Pippen 
> wrote: 

Butterfliers,

I did some butterflying today in northern mainland Currituck Co., NC along the 
Virginia state line south of Chesapeake. Weather was mostly sunny with temps in 
80s, and the habitat included bottomland forest with lots of cane, wet ditches, 
ag field edges, and mixed forest edges. Skipper numbers were definitely below 
par, but a Creole Pearly-Eye made the day! According to the Notes of the 
Butterflies of North Carolina by LeGrand and Howard, its the first documented 
record in the last 30 plus years. 


Heres the list:

Zebra Swallowtail (E. marcellus), 2
Black Swallowtail (P. polyxenes), 3
Spicebush Swllowtail (P. troilus), 2
Palamedes Swallowtail (P. palamedes), 2
Cabbage White (P. rapae), 2
Orange Sulphur (C. eurytheme), 1
Cloudless Sulphur (P. sennae), 4
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/cloudlesssulphur.htm

Sleepy Orange (E. nicippe), 9
Gray Hairstreak (S. melinus), 2
Summer Azure (C. neglecta), 3
Pearl Crescent (P. tharos), 6
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/pearlcrescent.htm

Red Admiral (V. atalanta), 7
Common Buckeye (J. coenia), 13
Red-spotted Purple (L. arthemis astyanax), 1
CREOLE PEARLY-EYE (E. creola), 1
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/creolepearlyeye.htm

Carolina Satyr (H. sosybius), 3
Common Wood-Nymph (C. pegala), 2
Monarch (Danaus plexippus), 2
Common Checkered-Skipper (P. communis), 2
Zabulon Skipper (P. zabulon), 2
Ocola Skipper (P. ocola), 1

Good Butterflying,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

Subject: Re: Currituck Co., NC butterflies, 8-20-2014 (Creole Pearly-Eye!)
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 08:45:34 -0400
Nice list for a part of the state from where we seldom get reports.
Interesting that you didn't see any Southern Pearly-eyes.  Usually one sees
several Southerns for every Creole in that part of the state.

Harry LeGrand


On Wed, Aug 20, 2014 at 10:33 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:

> Butterfliers,
>
> I did some butterflying today in northern mainland Currituck Co., NC along
> the Virginia state line south of Chesapeake.  Weather was mostly sunny with
> temps in 80s, and the habitat included bottomland forest with lots of cane,
> wet ditches, ag field edges, and mixed forest edges.  Skipper numbers were
> definitely below par, but a Creole Pearly-Eye made the day!  According to
> the Notes of the Butterflies of North Carolina by LeGrand and Howard, it’s
> the first documented record in the last 30 plus years.
>
> Here’s the list:
>
> Zebra Swallowtail (E. marcellus), 2
> Black Swallowtail (P. polyxenes), 3
> Spicebush Swllowtail (P. troilus), 2
> Palamedes Swallowtail (P. palamedes), 2
> Cabbage White (P. rapae), 2
> Orange Sulphur (C. eurytheme), 1
> Cloudless Sulphur (P. sennae), 4
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/cloudlesssulphur.htm
>
> Sleepy Orange (E. nicippe), 9
> Gray Hairstreak (S. melinus), 2
> Summer Azure (C. neglecta), 3
> Pearl Crescent (P. tharos), 6
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/pearlcrescent.htm
>
> Red Admiral (V. atalanta), 7
> Common Buckeye (J. coenia), 13
> Red-spotted Purple (L. arthemis astyanax), 1
> CREOLE PEARLY-EYE (E. creola), 1
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/creolepearlyeye.htm
>
> Carolina Satyr (H. sosybius), 3
> Common Wood-Nymph (C. pegala), 2
> Monarch (Danaus plexippus), 2
> Common Checkered-Skipper (P. communis), 2
> Zabulon Skipper (P. zabulon), 2
> Ocola Skipper (P. ocola), 1
>
> Good Butterflying,
> Jeff
> --
> Jeffrey S. Pippen
> Durham, NC
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/
>
>
Subject: Southern Lake Norman Butterfly Count
From: piephofft AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 07:30:11 -0400 (EDT)
Sixteen counters in six parties participated in the Southern Lake Norman 
Butterfly Count on Sunday August 17.Thanks to participant's efforts and 
favorable weather, 57 species were tallied. Final numbers to follow. 

 

 
Taylor Piephoff 
Matthews, NC 
PiephoffT AT aol.com
Subject: PMSP Butterflies, Surry County
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 22:40:08 -0400
I went to Pilot Mountain State Park today from 1:30 - 3:30 and found:

Common Roadside Skipper 2 (males by activity, fighting for hilltopping
rights)
Hoary Edge 5
Gemmed Satyr 3
Spicebush Swallowtail 3
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 5
Silver-spotted Skipper 3
Summer Azure 5
Eastern Tailed-blue 1
Horace's Duskywing 3
Common Wood Nymph 1
Great Spangled Fritillary 1
Red-spotted Purple 6
American Lady 3
Cabbage White 1

Weather was warm but breezy at times. All but two of the Eastern Tigers
were found around the parking area, picnic ground, and near the summit.

Don't forget the Surry NABA Count which will begin at the summit parking
lot on Pilot Mountain State Park at 8:45 this Sunday, the 24th.

Gene Schepker
Subject: Currituck Co., NC butterflies, 8-20-2014 (Creole Pearly-Eye!)
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 22:33:03 -0400
Butterfliers,

I did some butterflying today in northern mainland Currituck Co., NC along the 
Virginia state line south of Chesapeake. Weather was mostly sunny with temps in 
80s, and the habitat included bottomland forest with lots of cane, wet ditches, 
ag field edges, and mixed forest edges. Skipper numbers were definitely below 
par, but a Creole Pearly-Eye made the day! According to the Notes of the 
Butterflies of North Carolina by LeGrand and Howard, its the first documented 
record in the last 30 plus years. 


Heres the list:

Zebra Swallowtail (E. marcellus), 2
Black Swallowtail (P. polyxenes), 3
Spicebush Swllowtail (P. troilus), 2
Palamedes Swallowtail (P. palamedes), 2
Cabbage White (P. rapae), 2
Orange Sulphur (C. eurytheme), 1
Cloudless Sulphur (P. sennae), 4
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/cloudlesssulphur.htm

Sleepy Orange (E. nicippe), 9
Gray Hairstreak (S. melinus), 2
Summer Azure (C. neglecta), 3
Pearl Crescent (P. tharos), 6
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/pearlcrescent.htm

Red Admiral (V. atalanta), 7
Common Buckeye (J. coenia), 13
Red-spotted Purple (L. arthemis astyanax), 1
CREOLE PEARLY-EYE (E. creola), 1
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/creolepearlyeye.htm

Carolina Satyr (H. sosybius), 3
Common Wood-Nymph (C. pegala), 2
Monarch (Danaus plexippus), 2
Common Checkered-Skipper (P. communis), 2
Zabulon Skipper (P. zabulon), 2
Ocola Skipper (P. ocola), 1

Good Butterflying,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Umstead S.P.-08/20/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 19:30:49 -0400
Today I walked the powerline ROW east of Big Lake and explored the
floodplain of Sycamore Creek above the lake and the area immediately below
the dam. It was nice seeing a Monarch among my ten species. A lot of nectar
but the butterflies I saw were not partaking. The weather was sunny and
88F. Good butterflying.

  "black" swallowtail 2  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 5  Sleepy Orange 1
Red-spotted
Purple 1  Appalachian Brown 1  Carolina/Intricate Satyr 12  Common
Wood-Nymph 4  Monarch 1  Least Skipper 7  Ocola Skipper 1
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: 8/19 Berkeley County SC Butterfly Walk
From: <aszwarc AT berkeleycountysc.gov>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 15:39:21 -0400 (EDT)
Today two observers (A. Szwarc, M. Horry)saw the following butterflies at
Cypress Gardens in Berkeley County, SC.

8 Cloudless Sulphurs

2 Silver Spotted Skippers

4 Gulf Fritillaries 

3 Buckeyes

1 Red Banded Hairstreak

3 Palamedes Swallowtails

1 Carolina/Intricate Satyr

1 Common Checkered Skipper

1 Sleepy Orange 

1 Unidentified Hairstreak (may have been Gray Hairstreak)

We were out from 2-3 pm on a swamp trail and service road. The temperature was
approximately 91*F. It was partly cloudy. 
Subject: Iredell County NABA Count 8/16/14
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 14:46:44 -0400
Seven of us went to Statesville and surveyed mostly Allison Woods and
finished the day at the Greenway.  We had 30 species and 320 butterflies on
a hot day under mostly sunny conditions. In light of a trying butterfly
year and sparse nectaring plants in the fields, it was a good effort and
fairly good results. Several common butterflies were glaringly missing
though.  The best finds were probably a Lace-winged Roadside Skipper and
Harvester, a "lifer" for several in the group."  Everyone had a good chance
to photograph the very accommodating Harvester including some National
Guard members working in the park and one of the Allisons, the owners of
the site.

Black Swallowtail  1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 15
Cabbage White 1
Clouded Sulphur 2
Sleepy Orange 7
Harvester 1
Gray Hairstreak 2
Eastern Tailed-blue 7
Summer Azure 22
American Snout 1
Pearl Crescent 2
Question Mark 1
Eastern Comma 1
Common Buckeye 110
Red-spotted Purple 19
Hackberry Emperor 5
Northern Pearly-eye 34
Carolina Satyr 43
Appalachian Brown 1
Silver Spotted Skipper 1
Common Checkered/White Skipper 4
Clouded Skipper 2
Least Skipper 1
Tawny-edged Skipper 1
Crossline skipper 2
Northern Broken-dash 1
Little Glassywing 6
Sachem 5
Zabulon Skipper 21
Lace-winged Roadside Skipper 1

30 species, 320 butterflies

Compiler, Gene Schepker
Subject: FOY Painted Lady, Ocola Skipper, and Common Sootywing
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 21:37:38 -0400
After spending most of the last 2/1/2 weeks in Mexico and Maine I got a
look at our local butterfly gardens and a nearby weedy, overgrown area.
 Our local gardens are finally almost back to normal with many Tiger
Swallowwtails and a few Black, Spicebush and Pipevine.  Still no Hairsteaks
going on 4 months!   Last year I saw as many as 12 Red-banded on one hike.
   Not much activity in the weedy fields, but the Painted Lady was good to
see after last year's absence.

8/17  Windmill Hill gardens Inman, SC

2 Pipevine S.
1 Black S.
1 Spicebush s.
12 Tiger S. inc several dark females
1 Orange Sulphur
2 Great Spangled Frit
10 Am. Lady
1 Buckeye
1 Red-spotted Purple
9 Silver-spotted Skipper
2 Hoary Skipper
15+ Fiery Skipper
15+ Sachem
1 Dun Skipper
1 Ocola Skipper

8/18 hour hike along and through weedy and overgrown fields
1 Tiger Swallowtail
1 Black Swallowtail
1 Pipevine Swallowtail
no yellows/sulphurs in prime territory!
3 Am. Lady
1 Painted lady
1 Buckeye
1 Common Sootywing
1 Sachem

I've uploaded a few Maine butterflies and many Mexican butterflies to my
Flickr site-
https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

Doug Allen  Inman, SC
Subject: Fwd: Wake County butterfly count results
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:36:32 -0400
Here are the totals for the Wake County butterfly count, held last Friday
(August 15). John Connors sent it to participants only, in an Excel file. I
copied the two relevant columns. Note that I haven't gone thru and removed
excess lines of species not seen.

We did manage 55 species, a very good total, considering the struggle to
find butterflies this year. Several were new to the count, which started in
1995 -- Brazilian Skipper and Great Spangled Fritillary, both seen by me.
Neither is new for the county, and the Fritillary probably should have been
gotten earlier, but we lie a tad southeast of the edge of the range. I did
manage a photo of the Fritillary, but the Brazilian was not about to let me
get close for an iPhone photo! Note a few other goodies, such as Great
Purple Hairstreak, Harvester, Byssus Skipper, etc.  And, note the absence
of anglewings -- not a surprise this year.

Harry LeGrand

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Harry LeGrand 
Date: Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 2:28 PM
Subject: Wake County butterfly count results
To: Harry LeGrand 


                                                                        2014
au15  Species   *Paplionidae- Swallowtails*  Pipevine Sw.- Battus
philenor3 Zebra
Sw. - Eurytides marcellus  Black Sw. -Papilio polyxenes6 Giant Sw. -
Papilio cresphontes  E. Tiger Sw. - Papilio glaucus19 Spicebush Sw.-
Papilio troilus6 Palamedes Sw. - P. palamedes  *Pieridae- Whites & Sulphurs*
  Checkered W.-Pontia protodice  Cabbage Wh. -Pieris rapae19 Clouded Sul.
-Colias philodice1 Orange Sulp.- Colias eurytheme16 So. Dogface - Colias
cesonia  Cloudless Sul- Phoebis sennae4 Little Yellow- Eureme lisa3 Sleepy
Orange- Eurema nicippe23 *Lycaenidae- Harvesters*  Harvester - Feniseca
tarquinius1 *Lycaenidae- Hairstreaks*  Gr. Purple Hrstk- Atlides halesus1 Coral
Hrstk- Satyrium titus  Edwards' Hrstk- S. edwardsii  Banded Hrstk - S.
calanus  Striped Hrstk - S liparops  Southern Hrstk - S. favonius  E. Pine
Elfin - C. niphon  Juniper Hrstk - C. gryneus  White-M Hrstk-Parrhasius
m-album  Gray Hrstk - Strymon melinus 11  Red-bd Hrstk-Calycopis
cecrops 2  *Lycaenidae-
Blues*    E Tailed Blue- Everes comyntas 37  Spring Azure- Celastrina ladon
   Summer Azure- C. neglecta 23  *Libytheidae-Snouts*    A Snout-
Libytheana carinenta 1  *Nymphalidae- Brushfoots*    Gulf Fritillary-
Agraulis vanillae    Zebra- Heliconius charitonius    Variegated
Frit-Euptoieta claudia 18  GrSpangled Frit-Speyeria cybele 1
SilveryCheckersp-Chlosyne
nycteis    Pearl Crescent-Phyciodes tharos 36  QMark- Polygonia
interrogationis    E Comma- P. comma    Mourning Cloak-Nymphalis antiopa    A.
Lady- Vanessa virginiensis 2  Painted Lady- V. cardui 2  Red Admiral- V.
atalanta 2  C. Buckeye- Junonia coenia 69  Red-sp.Purple-Limenitis arthemis
17  Viceroy- L. archippus 9  Hackberry E.-Asterocampa celtis8 Tawny
Emperor- A. clyton  *Nymphalidae- Satyrs*   So.Pearly-eye- Enodia portlandia
  No. Pearly-eye- E. anthedon6  Creole P.-eye- E. creola3 App.Brown-Satyrodes
appalachia  1  Gemmed Satyr-Cyllopsis gemma 1  Car.Satyr-Hermeuptychia
sosybius 32  Little Wood Satyr-Megisto cymelo    C. Wood-Nymph-Cercyonis
pegala 1  *Nymphalidae-Milkweed Butterflies*    Monarch-- Danaus plexippus
11  *Hesperiidae- Spreadwing Skippers*    Silver-spot Sk.-Epargyreus clarus
93  Long-tail Skip- Urbanus proteus    Hoary Edge- Achalarus lyciades 2
SoCloudywing 3  NoCloudywing- T. pylades    Confused
Cloudywing-T.confusis    Hayhurst
Scallop-Staphylus hayhurstii    Juvenal's Duskywing-Erynnis juvenalis
  Horace's
Duskywing- E. horatius 17  Mottled Duskywing- E. martialis    Zarucco
Duskywing- E. zarucco    Wild Indigo Duskyw- E. baptisiae 3  C.Checkered
Skip-Pyrgus communis 8  C. Sootywing- Phollisora catullus    *Hesperiidae-
Grass Skippers*    Swarthy Skip- Nastra Iherminier 10  Clouded Skip- Lerema
accius 19  Least Skip-Ancycloxypha numitor 57  So.Skipperling-Copaeodes
minimus    Fiery Skip-Hylephila phyleus 164  Tawny-edgeSkip-Polites
themistocles    Crossline Skip- P. origenes    Long Dash- P. mystic
Whirlabout-
P. vibex    So.Broken-Dash-Wallengrenia otho 2  No. Broken-Dash- W. egeremet
1  Little Glassywing-Pompeius verna 21  Sachem- Atalopedes campestris
141  Zabulon
Skip- Poanes zabulon 88  Dun Skip- Euphyes vestris 6
Lace-wingRdside-Amblyscirtes
aesculapius 2  C. Roadside Skip-A. carolina    Com. Roadside- A.
vialis    Eufala
Skip- Lerodea eufala    Ocola Skip- Panoquina ocola 29  *Other
Species*    Delaware
Skip Anatrytone logan    Yehl Skip- *Poanes yehl*    Dion Skipper Euphyes
dion 1  Braod-wing Skip-*Poanes viator*    Byssus Skipper 1  Brazilian
Skipper 1  *Total Species Obseved* 55  *Total numbers* 1064  *Date* au 15
*Weather*    temp 65-87  % sun 75  precip 0  *# Observers* 15  Party miles
18  Party Hours 30  *Sites Surveyed*    Art Museum garden    Schenck x  Umstead
Powerline x  Umstead-Ebenezer bottom x  Pullen    Buckeye Greenway x  Durant
Nature Park x  Falls dam/Neuse River x  Blue Jay Pt.    NCSU Arboretum
x  Prairie
Ridge x  Horseshoe Farm x  Neuse-Anderson Pt x  Durant Rd Landfill Pk x
Subject: Carolina Butterfly Society 2014 Butterfly Symposium Sat, Sept 13
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 12:03:37 -0400
Carolina butterfliers,

Carolina Butterfly Society
2014 BUTTERFLY SYMPOSIUM
Stedman Education Building, North Carolina Zoological Park
4401 Zoo Pkwy, Asheboro, NC, 27205
 
Butterflies, native plants that attract butterflies, updates on the decline
in Monarch butterflies  all this and more are planned for our annual
Carolina Butterfly Society Butterfly Symposium. Mark your calendar now and
plan to join us on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014. The registration fee is $12 per
person. The optional lunch cost is $12.50 per person and must be received by
August 29. For the registration form, go to the Carolina Butterfly Society
website 
 
Last year our annual Butterfly Symposium was held in South Carolina, so we
have rotated it to North Carolina this year. Were delighted that we found a
date when the popular Stedman Education Building just outside the gate of
the NC Zoological Park in Asheboro, NC, was available. While our activities
wont take us into the zoo itself, participants who come for the weekend
should plan a visit to this wonderful zoo at times when we arent engaged in
Butterfly Symposium activities.
 
We have a full agenda beginning at 10 am and running through 4 pm. We plan
to have a presentation on native plants that are good nectar sources for
adult butterflies and other pollinators as well as plants that are used as
food for the butterfly caterpillars. Well have a special presentation on
the milkweed species in our region, the only group of plants that Monarchs
can use as caterpillar host plants. Well hear from an experienced gardener
about designing and maintaining a home garden specifically for butterflies
and other pollinators. One of our presenters, who is involved with the
Monarch Watch program, will give us some insight on whats been happening
with that iconic species.
 
In addition to these great presentations, we are arranging to have some
handouts that participants can take home with them. We also will distribute
milkweed seeds of several different species to folks who want to try them in
their own gardens and landscaping.
 
Lots of people will be coming from some distance away, so we have made it
easy to make this a whole weekend of butterflies! On the Friday before the
Symposium, Sept. 12, we will have a butterfly walk at 2:00 pm to Purgatory
Mountain near the NC Zoo in Randolph Co. On Sept. 14, the Sunday following
the Symposium, we will have a field trip to the scenic Pisgah Covered Bridge
and portions of the Uwharrie National Forest in Montgomery and Randolph
Counties starting at 9:00 am. We expect to have lots of photo opportunities
for the photographers in the group.
 
Registration fee: $12 per person. (Meal cost separate.) Send your check to
CBS, PO Box 18771, Greensboro, NC 27419. If you plan to purchase a catered
lunch (see below), please add the cost per person to your registration
check. You may register up to the day of the Symposium, but your lunch
payment must be received by August 29.
 
Meals: You may bring your own food and drinks for lunch on the day of the
symposium. If you prefer, you may purchase a catered lunch. We are required
to use the NC Zoos contract caterer; the cost is $12.50. The meat selection
is a roast turkey breast sandwich with Gruyere cheese and honey mustard on
whole wheat bread. The vegetarian selection is fresh mozzarella, tomato,
basil, and olive oil on ciabatta. In addition, we will have fresh fruit,
chips, cookies, and soft drinks for everyone who orders a catered lunch. If
you intend to buy the catered lunch, please add the lunch cost for each
person in your party to your registration check. Your lunch payment must be
received by August 29. If you bring your own lunch, youll have to provide
your own drinks and snacks. Breakfasts and dinners are on your own. For the
field trips, please bring plenty of water to drink.
 
Zoo admission: We will be outside the zoo gate in the Stedman Education
Building. Zoo admission is not included in your registration. This is a
wonderful zoo, and we encourage folks to enjoy it when they arent involved
in Symposium activities. Currently, regular admission for all visitors is
$12 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $8 for children 12 and under. You will
pay this at the gate.
 
Lodging: Were aware that some folks like to make their hotel reservations
well in advance, so one of our committee members has been lining up
accommodations. Asheboro has several national chain hotels that you can find
on line. In addition, we have reserved a block of rooms at one hotel that
has a full breakfast and other nice amenities, and we have a couple of other
suggestions below. [NOTE: These prices were confirmed last spring but may
have changed. Tell the desk clerk youre attending the CBS Butterfly
Symposium and ask for the current rate.]
 
Hampton Inn, E. Dixie Dr.  336-625-9000. A block of King rooms  AT  $95, Double
rooms  AT  $105 (2 queen beds) has been reserved for Friday and Saturday night,
Sept 12 & 13th. Non-smoking, Indoor heated pool, excellent breakfast
included. Reservation cut off date - August 22. All reservations honored at
block room rate, even if they exceed blocked number. For those who wish to
have a longer vacation in the area, extended days Sept 11th and14th are
included in block room rate if mentioned at time of reservation.
Reservations may be made at these rates immediately.
 
Other hotels (No block reservations): Fairfield Inn and Suites, 336-626-9197
(shares Hampton Inn entrance) King rooms $93, Double $99 (2 double beds).
Non-smoking, indoor heated pool, breakfast included. Reservation cut off
date - August 22.  Also have extended days of Sept 11th & 14th.
 
Comfort Inn, 825 W. Dixie Dr. 336-626-4414.  King $71.10, Double $79 (2
Queen beds), free hot breakfast, seasonal outdoor pool, pet-friendly hotel.
 
If you have questions, you may contact Don Allemann  or
Dennis Burnette Dennis Burnette .
 
Dont miss this great Butterfly Symposium on Sept. 13, 2014, and we hope
youll also join us for the field trips on Friday afternoon, Sept. 12, and
Sunday morning, Sept. 14. Lets make it a Butterfly Weekend!

-- 
Dennis Burnette
Greensboro, NC
Guilford County
deburnette AT triad.rr.com


Subject: Harbison SF, SC
From: <kastners AT aol.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 22:28:05 +0000
Dave and I walked Harbison SF in Richland County on Friday, 8/15 from around 
1:30 - 4:00. We observed the following: 



Sleepy Orange  15

Spicebush Swallowtail   2

Horace’s Duskywing   3

Gray Hairstreak   2

Cloudless Sulphur   1

Red-spotted Purple   10

Hackberry Emperor   1

Carolina Satyr   5

Clouded Skipper   1  (very fresh)

Fiery Skipper   2

Byssus Skipper   1

Little Glassywing   2

Dun Skipper   1


Marty Kastner








Sent from Windows Mail
Subject: Re: Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) seed pods available
From: ROBERT CAVANAUGH <papilio28570 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:57:26 -0700
Hello everyone,

Seed pods are being shipped Monday morning and everyone should have them around 
mid-week. Everyone is getting 4 pods. More are still available if anyone 
wants some. 


The pods are ripe and some are beginning to open. Open all pods and pull the 
cluster of seeds and silk out. The seeds are easily separated from the silk. 
Allow then to dry an additional day or two before planting or hold them over 
until spring. 


More will be available next year of course.

Is anyone interested in sickle pod seeds? Cloudless Sulphurs and Sleepy Orange 
utilize this plant. It grows quite tall, 4 to 6 feet, and is best for the back 
of the garden or open field situation. Best to simply broadcast the seeds 
before spring and allow them to come up naturally. Once started, they reseed 
themselves every year. 

Senna obtusifolia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Google

 
       
Google
Search the world's information, including webpages, images, videos and more. 
Google has many special features to help you find exactly what you're looking 
for. 

View on www.google.com Preview by Yahoo  
 

 
       
Senna obtusifolia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Senna obtusifolia (Chinese Senna or sicklepod) is a legume in the genus Senna, 
sometimes separated in the monotypic genus Diallobus. It grows wild in North, 
Central... 

View on en.wikipedia.org Preview by Yahoo  
 

Good luck,
Bob




On , ROBERT CAVANAUGH  wrote:
 


Thank you for the offer. but I have it covered. I'll be shipping pods out 
Monday morning. You should have them Wednesday. 



Best regards,
Bob



On Sunday, August 17, 2014 7:23 PM, Susan Ellermann  
wrote: 

 


Hello Bob,
Can I send you an SASE to send the pod/s?

Susan Ellermann
5844 Prescott Ct.
Charlotte, NC 28269


On Monday, August 4, 2014 5:49 PM, Susan Ellermann  
wrote: 

 


Oh, that's great. I've been reseeding mine for four years at my townhome and 
the dumb landscapers lopped them off this year. 


Susan Ellermann
5844 Prescott Ct.
Charlotte, NC 28269


On Monday, August 4, 2014 3:57 PM, ROBERT CAVANAUGH  
wrote: 

 


I have scores of seed pods nearing maturity. Anyone wanting a pod of fresh 
seeds please email me with your snail-mail address. 


Bob
Subject: James Is, SC leps 17 AUg. 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:03:26 -0400
Hi All,

After Folly Beach, we drove through the Holy Cross Cemetery off Ft. Johnson
Rd on James Is, S. C.  We had the following butterflies mostly in blooming
lantana:

Cloudless Sulfur 7
Sleepy Orange 1
Gulf Fritillary 10
Common Buckeye 2
Horace's Duskywing 2
Zarucco Duskywing 8
Tropical Checkered-Skipper 1
Fiery Skipper 6
Sachem 1 male
Ocola Skipper 1

Dennis



-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Folly Beach, SC leps 17 AUg 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 16:58:08 -0400
Hi All,

Donna and I drove 2 mi and spent 45 minutes looking for butterflies on
Folly Beach, SC.  From Folly Rd we went E on E. Hudson to 5th st and W on E
Erie.  This is basically the area we covered on butterfly walks for the CBS
symposium.

We had :
Cloudless Sulfur 35
Sleepy Orange 1
Gulf Fritillary 45

No other butterflies.

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Sleepy Oranges super-abundant
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 14:25:56 -0400
This morning Sleepy Oranges were super-abundant at North River Farms 
Restoration Area in Carteret County.

This was within a several hundred acre area that has been fallow for a year. 
I did five sweeps (with binoculars--at five different stops on a road) where 
I counted at least a hundred during each sweep.

Obviously thousands were present.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

Subject: Re: Not interested in running the Croatan NF count this year
From: ROBERT CAVANAUGH <papilio28570 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 21:56:31 -0700
I drove down Millis Road Tuesday this week stopping at the savannah for about 
half an hour. It was still pretty wet in the area so I didn't get in to where 
the Georgia Satyrs fly. 


6 Palamedes Swallowtail
1 Spicebush Swallowtail
1 Black Swallowtail female
2 Red Spotted Purple
1 Buckeye
2 Little metalmark
3 Sleepy Orange

This week in the general Carteret County area I am seeing several Cloudless 
Sulphur each day now and also at least one Gulf Frit. Spotted two Monarchs on 
the wing in separate incidents. Red Banded Hairstreak is common and easily 
found on the blooms of Hercules Club (Aralia spinosa) along roadside woodland 
borders. 


Sleepy Orange seems to be the most common species right now in my usual 
haunts. Palamedes numbers are still way down from normal. Still no Tiger 
Swallowtails seen since one in the spring.With all the rain and lush growth of 
grasses this season, the grass skippers seem to be having a banner second 
brood. 



Bob 



On Saturday, August 16, 2014 3:36 PM, Harry LeGrand  
wrote: 

 


Although I have interest from a group of 3 folks from the Triangle, I do not 
plan on going down to run the Croatan National Forest count in 2014. Reason -- 
not worth the time and effort, based on comments from Bob Cavanaugh and Dennis 
Forsythe about the pitiful number of butterflies near the coast in 2014, owing 
to the severe freezes, snow, ice, etc, in February and March. I plan to save 
my car and energy for the Pettigrew State Park count over the Labor Day 
weekend; this count likely won't be a lot of fun, either, but we still need to 
see what species are around down there at the beginning of September. I've run 
the Croatan count for about 12-13 years, with a few gaps due to drought. So -- 
we know what is down there normally in late August. 


Now, if folks DO WANT TO DO THE CROATAN COUNT, please go ahead! Just because 
the compiler isn't interested, doesn't mean that others can't do it, etc. So -- 
if you do want to try the count, or at least go down there in the next weekend 
or two to simply look for things like Little Metalmark, Georgia Satyr, Dukes' 
Skipper, etc., let me know, and I can give you pointers, a count map, etc. 


I just did the Wake County count yesterday, and will do the Durham County count 
tomorrow. Though we might still hit 50 species on the Wake count -- John 
Connors has 1-2 lists yet to come in, the numbers are awful for the true 
butterflies. As I remarked to him, I think I probably have seen more Tiger 
Swallowtails on a few counts -- at Wake or Durham -- than I saw of the combined 
numbers of all true butterflies yesterday! At least, the skippers were not too 
badly down in numbers; maybe they can recover numbers more quickly by the 
second broods than can swallowtails,sulphurs, brushfoots , etc.We did turn up 
a few excellent finds yesterday. Stay tuned! 


Harry LeGrand
Subject: Pitt County, 16 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 22:02:16 +0000
I made a very brief stop at the Pitt County Arboretum late today. It was sunny 
and windy, and I saw the following (Pitt County, 2014-08-16): 


PIPEVINE SWALLOWTAIL, 1, FOY # 48 for Pitt
Black Swallowtail, 1
Red Admiral, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 2
Fiery Skipper, 10
Sachem, 1 male
Whirlabout, 1 female
Ocola Skipper, 2

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Buncombe county 16th August
From: Doug Johnston <wellsteadwest AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 17:30:12 -0400
I spent a few hours in and around the Sandy Mush Game Lands this morning. Of 
note were a single Southern broken dash, 4 Little yellows, a couple of Coppers 
and a good number of N pearly eye. See forward from eButterfly below. 

Not many swallowtails compared to previous years, but my yard makes up for that 
with sometimes 12 E tiger ST on the same Buddleia bush. 

Also seen this week in Buncombe, but not on the eButterfly checklist were

Clouded sulphur - 2
Orange sulphur - 5
Meadow fritillary - 1
Red admiral - 1
Lace winged roadside skipper - seen in a couple of locations.

Doug

Begin forwarded message:

> From: eButterfly Team 
> Subject: Your eButterfly checklist 28332
> Date: August 16, 2014 at 5:15:42 PM EDT
> To: wellsteadwest AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> Thank you for submitting at eButterfly, dougjohnston
> Location
> 
> Sandy Mush Game Lands,35.719619, -82.667141, North Carolina
> Checklist
> 
> Date
> 2014-08-16  
> Checklist Type
> Traveling Survey  
> Distance Traveled
> 5000  
> Start Time
> 10:00  
> End Time
> 13:30  
> Institution Code
>  
> Observer
> DOUG JOHNSTON
> Species
> 
> EB-101780 Common Least Skipper
> 1
> EB-101781 Dun Skipper
> 1
> EB-101783 Sachem Skipper
> 3
> EB-101786 Wild Indigo Duskywing
> 1
> EB-101790 Gray Hairstreak
> 5
> EB-101791 Red-banded Hairstreak
> 2
> EB-101792 Summer Azure
> 2
> EB-101793 American Lady
> 1
> EB-101794 Carolina Satyr
> 8
> EB-101795 Common Buckeye
> 1
> EB-101798 Great Spangled Fritillary
> 1
> EB-101799 Hackberry Emperor
> 1
> EB-101801 Pearl Crescent
> 38
> EB-101802 Red Spotted Purple
> 2
> EB-101803 Silvery Checkerspot
> 4
> EB-101804 Variegated Fritillary
> 1
> EB-101805 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
> 5
> EB-101806 Pipevine Swallowtail
> 2
> EB-101807 Spicebush Swallowtail
> 3
> EB-101808 Cabbage White
> 6
> EB-101809 Cloudless Sulphur
> 1
> EB-101810 Little Yellow
> 4
> EB-101782 Peck's Skipper
> 1
> EB-101787 Zabulon Skipper
> 3
> EB-101784 Silver-spotted Skipper
> 26
> EB-101797 Gemmed Satyr
> 1
> EB-101788 American Copper
> 2
> EB-101796 Common Wood-Nymph
> 4
> EB-101800 Northern Pearly-Eye
> 21
> EB-101785 Southern Broken-Dash
> 1
> EB-101789 Eastern Tailed-Blue
> 42
> e-butterfly.org 2014
Subject: Not interested in running the Croatan NF count this year
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 15:36:19 -0400
Although I have interest from a group of 3 folks from the Triangle, I do
not plan on going down to run the Croatan National Forest count in 2014.
Reason -- not worth the time and effort, based on comments from Bob
Cavanaugh and Dennis Forsythe about the pitiful number of butterflies near
the coast in 2014, owing to the severe freezes, snow, ice, etc, in February
and March.  I plan to save my car and energy for the Pettigrew State Park
count over the Labor Day weekend; this count likely won't be a lot of fun,
either, but we still need to see what species are around down there at the
beginning of September. I've run the Croatan count for about 12-13 years,
with a few gaps due to drought. So -- we know what is down there normally
in late August.

Now, if folks DO WANT TO DO THE CROATAN COUNT, please go ahead! Just
because the compiler isn't interested, doesn't mean that others can't do
it, etc. So -- if you do want to try the count, or at least go down there
in the next weekend or two to simply look for things like Little Metalmark,
Georgia Satyr, Dukes' Skipper, etc., let me know, and I can give you
pointers, a count map, etc.

I just did the Wake County count yesterday, and will do the Durham County
count tomorrow. Though we might still hit 50 species on the Wake count --
John Connors has 1-2 lists yet to come in, the numbers are awful for the
true butterflies. As I remarked to him, I think I probably have seen more
Tiger Swallowtails on a few counts -- at Wake or Durham -- than I saw of
the combined numbers of all true butterflies yesterday! At least, the
skippers were not too badly down in numbers; maybe they can recover numbers
more quickly by the second broods than can swallowtails, sulphurs,
brushfoots , etc. We did turn up a few excellent finds yesterday. Stay
tuned!

Harry LeGrand
Subject: Umstead, wake county leps
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:11:28 -0400
Had 7 folks with me yesterday at Umstead.  Tallied a meager 23 species,
really low numbers, very little nectar.  The power line had been sprayed a
few months ago, so the infamous death march was pretty uneventful.  Nectar:
swamp milkweed, butterfly weed, butterfly pea, lesbedeza.

1 black swallowtail
2 e tiger swallowtail
1 orange sulphur
3 little yellow
3 sleepy orange
1 harvester
1 e tailed blue
7 summer azure
6 pearl crescent
1 red admiral
4 common buckeye
8 red-spotted purple
2 Carolina satyr
1 common wood nymph
1 silver-spotted skipper
2 southern cloudywing
8 swarthy skipper
5 clouded skipper
20 least skipper
2 little glassywing
2 zabulon skipper
1 dun skipper (FOY #111)
2 ocola skipper

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Brunswick county leps
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 13:32:08 -0400
Spent Aug 14 around Brunswick county, starting at 830 on a rail line off
421 searching fruitlessly for rare skipper.  Also checked Brunswick nature
park, Brunswick town and Green Swamp preserve.  Not much nectar and even
fewer butterflies, though I did lose a couple hours mid day with a dead
battery and waiting for AAA.

2 e tiger swallowtail
18 Palamedes swallowtail
10 Cloudless sulphur
4 sleepy orange
1 red-banded hairstreak
1 e tailed blue
7 summer azure
4 pearl crescent
1 red admiral
2 common buckeye
5 red-spotted purple
1 viceroy
1 creole pearly eye (FOY #110)
2 Carolina/intricate satyr
1 gemmed satyr
3 southern cloudywing
1 northern cloudywing
1 zarrucos duskywing
1 horaces duskywing
3 clouded skipper
1 tawny-edged skipper
2 byssus skipper (FOY #108)
3 broad-winged skipper (FOY #109)

Past week I've been at the wake and durham parts of falls lake and haw
river.  Added Little Glassywing #105, little yellow #106 and eufala skipper
#107.
-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: CBS Shallow Ford Natural Area Butterfly Field Trip
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 11:25:19 -0400
Butterfliers,

Wow, theres a lot going on with various outdoor groups this month! In
addition to all the butterfly counts that you have been alerted to, this is
a reminder that we have a regular field trip scheduled for next Saturday,
August. 23. We will meet at 9:30 at Shallow Ford Natural Area, 1955
Gerringer Mill Road, Burlington, NC 27217, 336-270-5124,
http://www.alamance-nc.com/recreation/parks/shallow-ford-natural-area/. This
will be a combined wildflower and butterfly field trip with members of the
Triad Chapters of the Carolina Butterfly Society and the NC Native Plant
Society. We will meet in the parking area of the park, which is located
along the Haw River in northern Alamance County.

Dennis
-- 
Dennis E. Burnette
7 Brownstone Lane
Greensboro, NC 27410
(336) 299-4342
deburnette AT triad.rr.com
Subject: Clemson Botanical Garden
From: TNT Sanders <tsanders1993 AT msn.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 20:01:23 -0400
We stopped by the Clemson Botanical Garden this afternoon for a couple of hours 
and had the following: 

Pipevine Swallowtail - 1Eastern Tiger Swallowtail - 6Cabbage White - 2Orange 
Sulphur - 1Sleepy Orange - 1Summer Azure - 1Gulf Fritillary - 3Variegated 
Fritillary - 1American Lady - 1Common Buckeye - 1Red-spotted Purple - 
1Silver-spotted Skipper - 35Hoary Edge - 1Horace's Duskywing - 4Fiery Skipper - 
30Little Glassywing - 1Sachem -3Ocola Skipper - 1 

Tom and Tammy SandersCharlotte, NC
 		 	   		  
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Durant Nature Park and North Wake Landfill District Park-08/15/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 19:33:02 -0400
Today, for the NABA Wake County Butterfly Count, I covered the two above
areas; Durant from 9:35am to 1:35pm, and NWLDP from 2pm to 5:30pm. I saw 22
species today, which is my highest one day total this year, but I had to
work hard for each one. There were no real highlights, but I did see my
first Clouded Skippers of the year. Popular nectar sources were
Butterfly-bush at Durant, and Verbena and Sneezeweed at NWLDP. Below are my
lists for each place. Good butterflying.

   Durant Nature Park

NWLDP
 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 5
Black Swallowtail 2  Spicebush Swallowtail 2
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2  Sleepy Orange 3
Sleepy Orange 10  Gray Hairstreak 3
Gray Hairstreak 2  Eastern Tailed-Blue 5
Eastern Tailed-Blue 22  Summer Azure 5
Summer Azure 1  Variegated Fritillary 1
Pearl Crescent 2  Red-spotted Purple 5
Common Buckeye 8  Appalachian Brown 1
Viceroy 1  Carolina/Intricata Satyr 17
Fiery Skipper 1  Silver-spotted Skipper 4


 Horace's Duskywing 2


 Clouded Skipper 2


 Least Skipper 24


 Little Glassywing 2


 Zabulon Skipper 20


 Ocola Skipper 1




Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 15 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 22:33:30 +0000
Butterflies seen today in the Greenville area (Pitt County, 2014-08-15):

Palamedes Swallowtail, 1, Pitt County Arboretum, seen after a long time
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 1, Boyd Lee Park
Spicebush Swallowtail, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Sleepy Orange, 6
Cabbage White, 1
VICEROY, 1, Pitt County Arboretum (FOY # 47 for Pitt)
Variegated Fritillary, 6
Gray Hairstreak, 1, River Park North
Red-banded Hairstreak, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Summer Azure, 15, Boyd Lee Park
Red Admiral, 1
American Lady, 1
Common Buckeye, 1
Pearl Crescent, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 2
Ocola Skipper, 12
Fiery Skipper, 40
Sachem, 1

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Things picking up here
From: Ginger Kopka <gkopka1 AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 12:17:43 -0400
Simpsonville, SC, more butterflies in the last couple of days. Just had 
Hackberry Emperor land on my hand, Spicebush laying eggs all over my Spicebush 
Tree, American Ladies, Tiger Swallowtails, Horace Duskywing, Fiery Skippers, 
etc. these are just regular butterflies, but were not seen until now--August! 

Ginger Kopka

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Chesterfield Co., SC leps 14 Aug. 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 11:59:46 -0400
Hi All,

I spent from 1100 to 1215 hrs 14 Aug. 2014 at the Carolina Sandhills NWR,
Chesterfield Co., SC.  In general there were far fewer butterflies than 2
weeks ago.  I had:

Spicebush Swallowtail 3
Palamedes Swallowtail 1
Clouded Sulfur 1  a butterfly I rarely see because I live on the coast.
Cloudless Sulfur 1
Little Yellow 1
Sleepy Orange 2
Common Buckeye 6
Red-spotted Purple 1
Silver-spotted Skipper
Northern Cloudywing 1 worn
Confused Cloudywing very worn
duskywing sp.

Regards,

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Lee Co., SC leps 14 Aug. 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 08:24:23 -0400
Hi All,

I spent about 1/2 hours in Lee Co., SC near S Lynchburg but saw very few
butterflies along the roadside.  Many fewer than I saw 2 weeks ago.

Cloudless Sulfur
Sleepy Orange
Gulf Fritillary
Common Buckeye

No skippers-I was looking for checkered-skippers w/o success

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Durham Butterfly Count this Sunday!
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 00:50:36 -0600
Butterfliers,

Just a reminder that this Sunday is the Durham Count. Let me know if youre 
interested in joining us! 


Good Butterflying,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jeff Pippen 
> Subject: Durham Butterfly Count 17 Aug 2014
> Date: August 3, 2014 at 10:29:41 PM MDT
> To: carolinaleps AT duke.edu
> 
> Butterfliers,
> 
>  
> 
> Pack your binoculars -- Sunday August 17th is the 2014 Durham Butterfly 
Count, part of the North American Butterfly Association (NABA) butterfly 
monitoring program. We routinely see between 50-60 species, vying for the 
highest species diversity of any count in the Carolinas. The Durham count 
circle harbors many excellent butterflying locations, so we can use all the 
eyes we can get! Beginners welcome (see below). 

> 
>  
> 
> We will meet in the NC Museum of Life and Science parking lot on Murray Ave 
in Durham at 8:45a.m., Sunday 17 August. We'll divide into groups where 
beginners will be teamed up with experienced leaders, who will already know 
their coverage areas, and we will depart the parking lot by 9am. Butterflying 
may involve slowly driving/walking down dirt roads, hiking powerlines, 
searching fields, wetlands, etc. Weather permitting, we'll survey butterflies 
until late afternoon and then reconvene at 4:45pm at the Museum for a 
compilation of sightings. 

> 
>  
> 
> Fast food restaurants may or may not be available, depending on your coverage 
area, so I encourage participants to pack their own snacks, a lunch, and LOTS 
of beverages as it's usually pretty toasty outside this time of year. And I 
always recommend hiking boots, long pants, a hat, sunscreen and binoculars. 
Note that there is a $3 per person fee to participate (levied by and forwarded 
to NABA for printing/compiling costs). 

> 
>  
> 
> If you need directions to the museum, check out their website at 
http://www.ncmls.org/. Click on "Visit" and then "Get maps and driving 
directions". 

> 
>  
> 
> Please contact me if you plan to participate, so that I can coordinate groups 
for the count. 

> 
>  
> 
> To get more information, see past results, and view a few photos, check out 
the Durham Butterfly Count Website: 

> 
>  
> 
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/durhamcount.htm
> 
>  
> 
> Looking forward to seeing you there, and good butterflying!
> 
>  
> 
> Jeff 
> 
> --
> Jeffrey S. Pippen
> Durham, NC
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/
> 
Subject: Sightings 2 counties SC
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:26:36 -0400
En route to Charlotte fm Charleston on I 26 and I 77

Cloudless Sulphur  2 and Eastern Tiger ST  1  Orangeburg cty

Cloudless Sulphur  1 York cty

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte
Subject: Re: Wake County butterfly count -- Aug. 15 (Friday)
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 12:47:56 -0400
Hey Harry. I plan on participating in tomorrow's Wake Co. butterfly count.
If you have no objections I'll cover Bond Park in Cary, but I won't meet at
the arboretum, I'll just go straight to Bond Park at about 11am. Thanks.
Mike Turner


On Mon, Aug 11, 2014 at 12:09 PM, Harry LeGrand 
wrote:

> The Wake County Butterfly Count is scheduled for Friday, August 15. For
> those who can make it, we will plan to meet at the NCSU Arboretum at 9 am
> and peruse those gardens until about 10:30 and then disperse. For those
> leading groups elsewhere, don't feel you have to start at the Arboretum,
> but feel welcome to join us.
>
>
> Let me know if you'll be able to help.
>
> Thanks,
>
> John Connors 
>
>
>



-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Bond Park-08/13/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 20:06:59 -0400
Oops. That Spring Azure should be an Eastern Tailed-Blue. Mike Turner


On Wed, Aug 13, 2014 at 8:03 PM, Mike Turner  wrote:

> This afternoon from noon until 4pm I walked around the open field and some
> of the ball fields looking for butterflies. The weather was really nice;
> sunny, 85F, and little humidity. Just about all the butterflies seen today
> were nectaring on plantings of Salvia. My complete list is below. Good
> butterflying.
>
>    Cabbage White 2  Sleepy Orange 2  Spring Azure 1  Summer Azure 1  Red
> Admiral 1  Common Buckeye 4  Red-spotted Purple 1  Silver-spotted Skipper
> 3  Horace's Duskywing 2  Fiery Skipper 29  Sachem 3  Zabulon Skipper 1  Dun
> Skipper 1
> Mike Turner
> Raleigh, NC
>



-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Bond Park-08/13/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 20:03:03 -0400
This afternoon from noon until 4pm I walked around the open field and some
of the ball fields looking for butterflies. The weather was really nice;
sunny, 85F, and little humidity. Just about all the butterflies seen today
were nectaring on plantings of Salvia. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Cabbage White 2  Sleepy Orange 2  Spring Azure 1  Summer Azure 1  Red
Admiral 1  Common Buckeye 4  Red-spotted Purple 1  Silver-spotted
Skipper 3  Horace's
Duskywing 2  Fiery Skipper 29  Sachem 3  Zabulon Skipper 1  Dun Skipper 1
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 13 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 22:19:23 +0000
Today's big surprise was a Brazilian Skipper - the only previous sightings in 
Pitt County were in 2012. I don't understand why, but this is turning out to be 
an excellent year for migrants. The full list for today follows (Pitt County, 
2014-08-13): 


Black Swallowtail, 2
Spicebush Swallowtail, 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 3
Cloudless Sulphur, 1, Boyd Lee Park
Sleepy Orange, 12
Cabbage White, 1
Gray Hairstreak, 3
Summer Azure, 3
Variegated Fritillary, 6
American Lady, 1
Red Admiral, 1
Common Buckeye, 9
Pearl Crescent, 2

Silver-spotted Skipper, 1
Horace's Duskywing, 3
Fiery Skipper, 50
Sachem, 1
BRAZILIAN SKIPPER, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Ocola Skipper, 2
Zabulon Skipper, 1 female, Pitt County Arboretum

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: New NC Entomological Group
From: David Campbell <david.campbell.d AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 22:58:42 -0400
Dear friends,

It is with great pleasure that I am able to announce the formation of a new 
insect study group for NC: The North Carolina Field Entomologists' Association 
(NCFEA). This new organization will be primarily concerned with 
non-Lepidopteran groups, with a particular focus on Coleoptera, Diptera, 
Hymenoptera, and other orders as well. Special emphasis will be placed upon the 
documentation of species occurring within North Carolina, using photography and 
the collection of voucher specimens. 


An informational session will be held at 2pm on September 6 at Riverbend Park 
in Catawba County. All are welcome and encouraged to attend. 


Directions to Riverbend Park may be found at:

http://www.catawbacountync.gov/parks/riverbend.asp

Please forward any enquiries to david.campbell.d AT gmail.com

Many thanks,
David Campbell


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 13:25:58 -0700
The PhD Scientists in the Cited paper wrote:

>> Thus, even if eastern and western monarch butterflies are genetically
>> similar across their full genome, cross-continental shipments of monarchs 
may 

>> result in the unwanted transfer of virulent parasites (Brower et al. 1995).

But the tag-recapture results of Joe Billings, a self-educated 
naturalist from Vail, Arizona, shows the monarchs routinely move
themselves and their parasites cross-continentally:
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/a/img822/2453/g6k8.jpg

This is a good example of how citizen scientists can potentially
make landmark contributions to science.  And notice the other
major contribution Joe made - he showed some fall migrant
monarchs in Arizona fly NORTHWEST (to the central Calif.
coast overwintering sites) in the FALL!
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/a/img822/2453/g6k8.jpg

So that's another new citizen science contribution that flies in the 
face of what the PhD's have been tell us; e.g. that fall migrant 
monarchs use magnetic and sun compasses to maintain a southerly 
course to the overwintering sites:
http://phys.org/news/2014-06-monarch-butterfly-magnetic-sun-compasses.html

Paul Cherubini
Subject: Fwd: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 19:57:42 +0000
I also looked up the second paper cited in the email below. It is titled

Lack of genetic differentiation between monarch butterflies with divergent 
migration destinations 


and is located at

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2012.05613.x/full

(might require a subscription).

This paper concludes:

> Until such differential selection is better understood, our results do not 
warrant a relaxation of the current regulations to restrict the 
human-facilitated movements of eastern and western monarchs (Brower et al. 
1995). In addition, previous work has shown that western butterflies are 
subject to more virulent protozoan parasites than eastern butterflies (De Roode 
et al. 2008; De Roode & Altizer 2010). Thus, even if eastern and western 
monarch butterflies are genetically similar across their full genome, 
cross-continental shipments of monarchs may result in the unwanted transfer of 
virulent parasites (Brower et al. 1995). 



I am not a professional biologist and do not have the expertise to evaluate the 
arguments, but it is clear from these two articles that the scientists who have 
demonstrated the lack of genetic divergence between populations are concerned 
about human-assisted transfer of monarchs. 


Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC



Begin forwarded message:

From: "Abdulali, Salman" 
Date: August 12, 2014 2:30:02 PM EDT
To: carolinaleps 
Subject: Re: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens

The paper by Brower & Jeansonne may be found at

http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/docs/Brower-Jeansonne_2004.pdf

While finding little genetic divergence, it warns AGAINST transferring monarchs 
between geographical regions: 


> In addition, migratory and nonmigratory populations of D. plexippus plexippus 
within North America exhibit different loads of and susceptibilities to the 
protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (Altizer et al. 2000). Thus, the 
arguments presented in Brower et al. (1995, 1996) regarding the dangers of 
transferring monarchs among populations are still relevant, and the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture's rules (USDA Web page) prohibiting transfer of 
monarchs across the North American continental divide still seem prudent. 
Indeed, the apparent genetic homogeneity of monarchs may make them particularly 
susceptible to pandemic infection by pathogens or parasites. 


Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC


On Aug 12, 2014, at 1:47 PM, Paul Cherubini wrote:

On Aug 12, 2014, at 7:08 AM, Bitzer, Royce J [ENT] wrote:

> If theyre rearing larvae from butterflies taken from their
> own local population, there should be few if any concerns
> regarding genetic mixing of different Monarch populations.  

The genetic mixing concern is not scientifically supportable,
nor is the "mixed up monarchs unable to find their way
to the overwintering sites in Mexico" concern.

Two recent papers (Brower & Jeansonne 2004 Ann. Ent. Soc. 
Am. 97: 519, Lyons et al. 2012.  Mol. Ecol.  21:  3433) have 
found that the eastern and western USA monarch populations 
are genetically indistinct.  So if no divergence has occurred 
between these two somewhat isolated populations (which do 
have a little gene flow between them), it is not scientifically 
supported to assume that subpopulations exist within the
eastern and western populations.

Paul Cherubini



Subject: Re: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 11:50:04 -0700
On Aug 12, 2014, at 11:30 AM, Abdulali, Salman wrote:

> The paper by Brower & Jeansonne may be found at
> http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/docs/Brower-Jeansonne_2004.pdf
> While finding little genetic divergence, it warns AGAINST
> transferring monarchs between geographical regions:

The monarchs move themselves between geographical
regions far more effectively than humans could ever hope
to do.

Example: Joe Billings in Arizona, tagged over 5,000
fall migrant monarchs between 2006-2013 and about
20 of them were recaptured at the overwintering sites
in both central Mexico and the California coast:
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/a/img822/2453/g6k8.jpg

So that means, for example, that at the overwintering
sites in central Mexico, a monarch born in Maine
has the opportunity to mate with a monarch born in 
Arizona.

Paul Cherubini

Subject: Re: Butterfly releases at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 18:30:02 +0000
The paper by Brower & Jeansonne may be found at

http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/docs/Brower-Jeansonne_2004.pdf

While finding little genetic divergence, it warns AGAINST transferring monarchs 
between geographical regions: 


> In addition, migratory and nonmigratory populations of D. plexippus plexippus 
within North America exhibit different loads of and susceptibilities to the 
protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (Altizer et al. 2000). Thus, the 
arguments presented in Brower et al. (1995, 1996) regarding the dangers of 
transferring monarchs among populations are still relevant, and the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture's rules (USDA Web page) prohibiting transfer of 
monarchs across the North American continental divide still seem prudent. 
Indeed, the apparent genetic homogeneity of monarchs may make them particularly 
susceptible to pandemic infection by pathogens or parasites. 


Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC


On Aug 12, 2014, at 1:47 PM, Paul Cherubini wrote:

On Aug 12, 2014, at 7:08 AM, Bitzer, Royce J [ENT] wrote:

> If theyre rearing larvae from butterflies taken from their
> own local population, there should be few if any concerns
> regarding genetic mixing of different Monarch populations.  

The genetic mixing concern is not scientifically supportable,
nor is the "mixed up monarchs unable to find their way
to the overwintering sites in Mexico" concern.

Two recent papers (Brower & Jeansonne 2004 Ann. Ent. Soc. 
Am. 97: 519, Lyons et al. 2012.  Mol. Ecol.  21:  3433) have 
found that the eastern and western USA monarch populations 
are genetically indistinct.  So if no divergence has occurred 
between these two somewhat isolated populations (which do 
have a little gene flow between them), it is not scientifically 
supported to assume that subpopulations exist within the
eastern and western populations.

Paul Cherubini