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Updated on Monday, October 20 at 10:26 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Mottled Ducks,©John Schmitt

20 Oct Union County, NC Leps []
20 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2104 [Mike Turner ]
20 Oct Archie Elledge Butterflies, Forsyth Co. [Gene Schepker ]
20 Oct The Last Tiger? [nottke1 ]
20 Oct Short Mecklenburg County list [drivesa3 AT aol.com ]
20 Oct Charleston Co., SC leps 19 Oct 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
19 Oct Migrating Monarchs [Brian Bockhahn ]
18 Oct Migrating Monarchs ["Loretta" ]
18 Oct 10/17/14 Carolina Sandhills NWR, Chesterfield County, SC [Sven Halling ]
18 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/18/2014 [Mike Turner ]
18 Oct Fwd: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
18 Oct Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
18 Oct Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species [Harry LeGrand ]
18 Oct Re: Falls lake monarchs [Brian Bockhahn ]
18 Oct Re: Falls lake monarchs [Doug Allen ]
18 Oct Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
17 Oct Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species [Jeff Pippen ]
17 Oct Falls lake monarchs [Bb ]
17 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/17/2014 [Mike Turner ]
17 Oct Chester Co., SC leps 16 Oct. 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
17 Oct Lancaster Co., SC leps 16 October 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
17 Oct Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website [Harry LeGrand ]
16 Oct Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website ["Mathis" ]
16 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/16/2014 [Mike Turner ]
16 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/13/2014 [Mike Turner ]
16 Oct A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website [Harry LeGrand ]
15 Oct Edisto Island weeked butterfly field trip pictures [Doug Allen ]
15 Oct Forsyth County, Winston-Salem Butterflies, Checkered Whites [Gene Schepker ]
13 Oct Pitt County, 13 October 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
12 Oct Re: Pickney Is NWR, SC leps 11 Nov 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
12 Oct Jasper Co., SC leps 10 Oct 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
12 Oct Pickney Is NWR, SC leps 11 Nov 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
11 Oct Report on Roxbury Park and Edisto Island field trip [Doug Allen ]
11 Oct Barred Yellow near Ace Basin NWR yesterday [Doug Allen ]
10 Oct Danaus caterpillar [Brian Bockhahn ]
10 Oct More Falls Lake monarchs and larva [Brian Bockhahn ]
10 Oct Barred Yellow just beyond Ace Basin and unid skippers [Doug Allen ]
10 Oct Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Neuse River Greenway-10/10/2014 [Harry LeGrand ]
10 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Neuse River Greenway-10/10/2014 [Mike Turner ]
10 Oct Falls Lake Monarchs [Brian Bockhahn ]
10 Oct Buncombe Co. Cove Forest ["Gail's Skyrunner" ]
9 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-10/08 and 10/09/2014 [Mike Turner ]
9 Oct 10/09/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County, NC [Sven Halling ]
9 Oct Re: 10/08/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County,NC [Harry LeGrand ]
9 Oct 10/08/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County,NC [Sven Halling ]
9 Oct PMSP Butterflies, Surry Co. 10/08/14 [Gene Schepker ]
8 Oct Re: Uwharries Randolph and Montgomery county [Harry LeGrand ]
8 Oct Uwharries Randolph and Montgomery county [Brian Bockhahn ]
08 Oct Monarch [Jules Fraytet ]
7 Oct Some Onslow County, NC, butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
7 Oct 10/7/14 Lewisville, Forsyth County, NC [Sven Halling ]
7 Oct 10/05/14 Watauga County, NC [Sven Halling ]
7 Oct Chatham & Moore Co. Butterflies [Richard Stickney ]
6 Oct Durham yard bflies 10-6-2014 [Jeff Pippen ]
6 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-10/06/2014 [Mike Turner ]
6 Oct Monarch []
6 Oct Monarch Blythewood, SC []
6 Oct Macon Co., NC leps and Posts to carolinaleps not appearing [Jeff Pippen ]
6 Oct Re: Call for butterfly photos for the Butterflies of NC website -- part 2 [Jeff Pippen ]
5 Oct Call for photos for the Butterflies of North Carolina website -- Part 3 [Harry LeGrand ]
5 Oct Call for butterfly photos for the Butterflies of NC website -- part 2 [Harry LeGrand ]
4 Oct Photos wanted for Butterflies of North Carolina website [Harry LeGrand ]
4 Oct Falls lake monarchs, a little superflight! [Bb ]
4 Oct Chatham co leps [Bb ]
4 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Mitchell Mill State Natural Area-10/04/2014 [Mike Turner ]
4 Oct Children and Butterflies ["Trish Harrill" ]
4 Oct 3 Monarchs nectaring this chilly morning [Doug Allen ]
3 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Durant Nature Park-10/03/2014 [Mike Turner ]
3 Oct Monarchs in southern Va. []
3 Oct Pitt County, 3 October 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
3 Oct Monarchs (Mecklenburg County) ["Lampel, Lenny L." ]
3 Oct 10/03/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County, NC [Sven Halling ]
3 Oct 10/02/14 Watauga County , NC [Sven Halling ]
03 Oct Monarch in Durham, NC [Toni Rexrode ]
2 Oct Falls lake monarchs and more oct 2 [Bb ]
2 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Temple Flat Rock-10/02/2014 [Mike Turner ]

Subject: Union County, NC Leps
From: drivesa3 AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 22:58:28 -0400
 I took an hour walk along a power line cut at Cane Creek Park this afternoon. 
There were sporadic asters blooming but not much else. 


Red-spotted Purple1
Eastern Tailed-blue 4
Pearl Crescent 5
American Lady 1
Common Buckeye 4
Fiery Skipper 1
Common Checkered Skipper
Clouded Skipper 3
Ocola Skipper 2

 George Andrews
 Indian Trail, NC

Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2104
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:52:02 -0400
This afternoon I walked around the place from 12:30 to 4pm. The weather was
sunny and 70F. Numbers and diversity were way down from what they have
been. Maybe nighttime temperatures that dipped into the 40's last night put
a hurting on them, or maybe it was just not a good day to be a butterflier.
Nothing of note among my 12 species. Good butterflying.

  Pipevine Swallowtail 3 caterpillars on Aristolochia tomentosa  Sleepy
Orange 1  Variegated Fritillary 1  Pearl Crescent 4  American Lady 1  Common
Buckeye 8  Monarch 3  Common Checkered-Skipper 3  Clouded Skipper 1  Fiery
Skipper 14  Sachem 1  Ocola Skipper 5
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Archie Elledge Butterflies, Forsyth Co.
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:37:39 -0400
Today from 12:30 -2:30 under sunny, windy, and cool conditions, Sven
Halling and I found the following:

Checkered White 2
Common Buckeye 5
Variegated Fritillary 1
Painted Lady 1
American Lady 1
Pearl Crescent 6
Sleepy Orange 1
Common Checkered Skipper 14
Clouded Skipper 2
Ocola Skipper 1
Least Skipper 1
Fiery Skipper 9
Sachem 2

Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling)
Subject: The Last Tiger?
From: nottke1 <nottke1 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:32:48 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
In west Forsyth County today I saw a large, very fresh, Eastern Tiger Swtl - 
first one I have seen in a month. 


Also saw;
1  Cloudless Sulphur
5  Sleepy Orange
1  American Snout
4  Checkered Skipper

Jim Nottke
Subject: Short Mecklenburg County list
From: drivesa3 AT aol.com <drivesa3@aol.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:58:41 GMT





  Spent 1 1/2 hours both Saturday and Sunday probing an impressive aster stand 
(Oldfield Ater I believe) at Colonel Fancis Beatty Park and was disappointed by 
the lack of diversity; an enjoyable day nonetheless. Here is the short list; 

SaturdayFiery Skipper 36Sachem 6Monarch 8 (I've seen them nectaring on the 
asters in the past, but just passing through southbound this day)Variegated 
Fritillary 1Common Checkered Skipper 4Ocola Skipper 2Sleepy Orange 9Eastern 
Tailed-blue 3Common Buckeye 7Pearl Crescent 1 

SundayFiery Skipper 25Sachem 5Ocola Skipper 3Common Checkered Skipper 
4Variegated Fritillary 1Sleepy Orange 6Eastern Tailed-blue 5Common Buckeye 12 

 I am very curious about the Sleepy Orange habit of staying close to a group 
of 3 pine trees (resemble Virginia Pines in needle and cone size but much 
"fuller" foliage) in the field. I've seen this all year and first thought it 
was for the shade until I realized they would perch on the ground in the sunlit 
gaps. There are small groups of deciduous trees scattered around the fields, 
but I've never seen any Sleepy Orange gravitate towards them. Any thoughts on 
this are welcome (as are clever wise-cracks!). 

 George Andrews Indian Tail, NC


Subject: Charleston Co., SC leps 19 Oct 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 08:25:56 -0400
Hi All,

Donna and I saw some butterflies while we were birding yesterday.

Patriot's Point 12:40-1:45 PM
Cloudless Sulfur 10
Gulf Fritillary 10
Common Buckeye 1
Long-tailed Skipper 2
Tropical Checkered-Skipper 1
Ocola Skipper 10

Middle St, Mt. Pleasant 2:00-2:55  PM
Cloudless Sulfur 5
Little Yellow 1
Gulf Fritillary 10
Common Buckeye 3
Viceroy 1 very fresh
Monarch 2
Long-tailed Skipper 7
Ocola Skipper 15

Ft. Moultrie, Sullivan's Island 3:10-3:50 PM
Cloudless Sulfur 5
Gulf Fritillary 1
Monarch 6

Dennis





-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Migrating Monarchs
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 06:46:19 -0400
Since it sounds like the monarchs are not visually able to locate Loretta's
nectar, I wonder if it's less about the monarchs "remembering" where the
nectar is as opposed to the blooms sending out chemical signals out to
pollinators.  Chemoreceptors role in plant and insect communication are
fascinating, I especially love the part of predators intercepting those
signals!  No wonder every parasitic wasp I see is swinging it's antenna
around madly!

Anyway, along my nectar highway I see monarchs come over the tree tops,
visually spot the nectar and drop down.  They also seem to visually spot
other monarchs and drop down, which is why my "fake" monarchs taped to
flowers seem to draw them down!

But other times I notice them just come through the trees or low bushes and
drop into the nectar as if on a "bee" line....is that where that saying
comes from!!!

Fun ramblings...

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Migrating Monarchs
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 19:54:35 -0400
Since last Saturday, October 11, we have had no less than 2 dozen Monarchs 
daily in our garden. They favor the Mexican sunflower, but also nectar on 
lantana and buddlea blooms. We live on a hilltop, but are surrounded by trees, 
so they don't get a clear vista as they fly over. They come up the road, then 
make a detour into the garden. This is several years in succession for this 
pattern. I'm wondering if they send out pheromones to attract others to come? 
Or, we also speculate if the 4th generation can find it's way to Mexico, 
couldn't they also return to the same good nectar sources? Ideas anyone? 


The sunflower patch gets shade by 4 pm each day, and it's interesting to note 
that when the sun is shining, they nectar with wings open. But when the shade 
hits, or if there is a cool stiff breeze, they nectar with wings closed. 


Loretta Lutman
Asheboro, NC
Subject: 10/17/14 Carolina Sandhills NWR, Chesterfield County, SC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:59:39 -0400 (EDT)
71 F – 75 F. Full sunny weather.  Butterflied 01:00am to 04:00pm.

Cloudless Sulphur		5
Sleepy Orange			15
Little Yellow			6
Eastern Tailed-Blue		1
Gulf Fritillary 		9
Variegated Fritillary		61
Pearl Crescent			7
American Lady			3
Painted Lady			1
Common Buckeye			84
Monarch 			6

Long-tailed Skipper		2
Common/White Checkered Skipper	3
Eufala Skipper			1
Clouded Skipper 		12
Fiery Skipper			83
Whirlabout			1
Sachem				1
Ocola	Skipper 		9			


Along the way through Montgomery and Richmond Counties we saw five Monarchs
migrating in westerly direction. 

Gene Schepker
Sven Halling (at the note pad)

Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/18/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:50:02 -0400
From 12:15 to 4pm I walked around the open areas of the park and hiked the
Creekside Trail. The weather was sunny and 75F. The highlight among my 20
species were 2 Broad-winged Skippers where they have been since 9/18;
nectaring on Pickerelweed in the retention pond at the bottom of the
parking lot, but today I got photos! They can be seen here,
https://www.flickr.com/photos/61962421 AT N05/. Nectar sources were planted
Lantana and white asters in the genus Symphyotrichum.

I wonder if the Broad-winged Skippers I have been seeing here for the last
month are the same ones, offspring of the first ones I saw (their host
plant is ~100' away from the retention pond), or totally different
individuals. Hmm. My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Cabbage White 3  Orange Sulphur 2  Cloudless Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 4  Gulf
Fritillary 1  Variegated Fritillary 3  Pearl Crescent 6  Question Mark/E.
Comma 1  American Lady 1  Common Buckeye 25  Viceroy 1  Carolina Satyr 2
Monarch 1  Common Checkered-Skipper 2  Clouded Skipper 5  Least
Skipper 3  Fiery
Skipper 15  Sachem 2  Broad-winged Skipper 2  Ocola Skipper 15
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Fwd: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 21:39:24 +0000
To add some specifics:

The paper, "Cretaceous origin and repeated tertiary diversification of the 
redefined butterflies" by Heikilla et al, located at 


http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1731/1093

classifies all butterflies into a single superfamily, Papilionoidea, consisting 
of 7 families: 


Papilionidae (swallowtails)
Hedylidae (not found in the US, considered to be moths until recently)
Hesperiidae (skippers)
Pieridae (sulphurs, whites)
Nymphalidae (brushfoots)
Riodinidae (metalmarks)
Lycaenidae (blues, hairstreaks, etc.)

Another recent paper, Kawahara AY, Breinholt JW. 2014 Phylogenomics provides 
strong evidence for relationships of butterflies and moths. Proc. R. Soc. B 
281: 20140970. 


http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.0970

finds that within the Lepidoptera, butterflies are most closely related to some 
microlepidoptera, rather than to larger moths as previously thought. 


Salman Abdulali

--------------------------------------------------

From: "Abdulali, Salman" 
Date: October 18, 2014 12:07:39 AM EDT
To: Jeff Pippen 
Cc: Carolinaleps 
Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species

Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find that 
Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of the 
butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future list may 
start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the skippers in 
the middle. 


Salman Abdulali



On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:

Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the Pelham Catalogue was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that youre not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
Snouts
Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
Longwings
Fritillaries
Admirals
Emperoros
Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, Im 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and Im retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, Ill probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 18:14:12 +0000
One point of confusion I have found is that Butterflies of America is in some 
ways two somewhat inconsistent web sites. Compare, for example 


http://butterfliesofamerica.com/L/neographium_marcellus.htm

and

http://butterfliesofamerica.com/eurytides_marcellus.htm

One species, two names.


On Oct 18, 2014, at 2:07 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:

I see that you (Jeff) list Phyciodes incognitus (Mimic Crescent) as a full 
species. But, -- fortunately for the Butterflies of North Carolina website and 
the N.C. Natural Heritage Program) -- Pelham lists it as Phyciodes cocyta 
incognitus -- a subspecies of Northern Crescent. 


It takes a long time to go thru Pelham's list! I'll do that this afternoon, and 
report back to this listserve if I see any new splits or lumps that we might 
not be aware of. 


As for common names, Pelham doesn't venture into this slippery/muddy area, but 
Jeff and the Butterflies of North Carolina website tend to use the NABA 
Checklist, except where there are some "new" species that are not in that 
checklist, such as some azures, Intricate Satyr, etc. We then tend to use the 
Butterflies of America website. 


Harry LeGrand


On Sat, Oct 18, 2014 at 12:07 AM, Abdulali, Salman 
> wrote: 

Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find that 
Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of the 
butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future list may 
start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the skippers in 
the middle. 


Salman Abdulali



On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen 
> wrote: 


Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the Pelham Catalogue was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that youre not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
 Snouts
 Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
 Longwings
 Fritillaries
 Admirals
 Emperoros
 Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
 Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, Im 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and Im retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, Ill probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/


Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 14:07:43 -0400
I see that you (Jeff) list *Phyciodes incognitus *(Mimic Crescent) as a
full species. But, --  fortunately for the Butterflies of North Carolina
website and the N.C. Natural Heritage Program) -- Pelham lists it as *Phyciodes
cocyta incognitus *-- a subspecies of Northern Crescent.

It takes a long time to go thru Pelham's list! I'll do that this afternoon,
and report back to this listserve if I see any new splits or lumps that we
might not be aware of.

As for common names, Pelham doesn't venture into this slippery/muddy area,
but Jeff and the Butterflies of North Carolina website tend to use the NABA
Checklist, except where there are some "new" species that are not in that
checklist, such as some azures, Intricate Satyr, etc. We then tend to use
the Butterflies of America website.

Harry LeGrand


On Sat, Oct 18, 2014 at 12:07 AM, Abdulali, Salman 
wrote:

> Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find
> that Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of
> the butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future
> list may start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the
> skippers in the middle.
>
> Salman Abdulali
>
>
>
> On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:
>
> Butterfliers,
>
> Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have
> significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research.  One such
> publication, known as the “Pelham Catalogue” was recently revised, and a
> new edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June
> 2014.  The author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist
> world, and his catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly
> specialists, including many scientific articles that are much more recent
> than any of your field guides!
>
> What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and
> other publications that show an arrangement that you’re not yet used to.
> For example, below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the
> brushfoot family.  I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a
> list with Monarch right after American Snout but before Variegated
> Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after Hackberry Emperor but right before
> Northern Pearly-Eye!
>
> Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
>  Snouts
>  Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
>  Longwings
>  Fritillaries
>  Admirals
>  Emperoros
>  Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
>  Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs
>
> And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the
> lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries
> (e.g. Great Spangled), and so on.
>
> Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos
> were moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs,
> etc.  Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better
> reflect our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other,
> and will promote further research and knowledge.
>
> I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my
> webpages to mostly conform to the new organization.  I say mostly because
> at this point, I’m retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and
> I’m retaining the whites before the sulphurs within the Pieridae.
> Eventually, I’ll probably change those, too!  Here are some links to help.
>
> North Carolina Butterflies
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm
>
> North American Butterflies
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm
>
> The Pelham Catalogue
> http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm
>
> Good Butterflying!
> Jeff
> --
> Jeffrey S. Pippen
> Durham, NC
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/
>
>
Subject: Re: Falls lake monarchs
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 09:01:36 -0400
Yes, as I have mentioned before they were all heading southwest.  I have
had recaptures from this stock in Greensboro and suspect they visually
follow I85 at least partway through NC.  In my little stretch of I85 over
Falls Lake there is a lot of nectar right along the service roads/power
lines and I believe that this nectar superhighway, the funneling effect of
the lake and a slight curve in 85 towards a more SW route at this point
causes the larger numbers.

About 7 years ago I found this concentration and went from tagging 30-40
per year at max, to hundreds tagged easily.  And on good days when I have
hundreds at this site, I have checked sites a couple miles south or north
and even with just as much nectar I only see a handful.

Hence my nectar superhighway with monarch concentration!

I was hoping to have more time this year to tag here, one of these years
I'd like to get out daily and see what the grand totals really are!  Oct 17
is pretty late for a superflight here, but everything has been late this
year, and I still have 4 in Chrysalids!  Though most years I run out of
tags around mid October so stop going out....

Thanks!

Brian

On Sat, Oct 18, 2014 at 8:30 AM, Doug Allen  wrote:

> Very interested in the large numbers Brian reports, especially since we
> saw very few Monarchs on the southern SC coast over the weekend. Brian, did
> those Monarchs appear to be flying southwest?
>
> Here in upstate SC, Windmill Hill, 8 miles from the NC border and 12 miles
> from the southern Appalachians, we had our highest Monarch total nectaring
> on the Lantana yesterday- at least 13 individuals. As with bird feeder
> counts, 13 is the highest number seen at one time and no doubt
> underestimates the total.  Last year we counted a total of 7 individuals
> all autumn. We have counted upwards of 40 Monarchs nectaring here on
> Windmill Hill so far this month. I have not seen any tagged Monarchs yet.
>
> We have goldenrod and a dozen other flower species in bloom, but the
> Monarchs definitely prefer the Lantana.  Unlike most other species, they
> seem to have little preference for whether the Lantana is in the sun or in
> the shade on warm days.
>
> I spent the better part of two hours yesterday watching about 10 Monarchs
> from 4 PM until after 6 PM in an effort to discern where they would fly
> after nectaring. The Monarchs seemed to be much more wary after 4 PM than
> they had been earlier in the day when I could often approach within a few
> feet. Between 5 PM and 6 PM, Monarchs, one at a time, took of in a
> southwesterly direction.  In only a single case did two take off together.
> This suggests to me that our Monarchs are probably headed for the gulf
> coast (or Texas) and not Florida. One of the butterfliers this past weekend
> at Edisto Island is from the Florida panhandle and reports impressive
> Monarch migrations there where they seen to take off across the Gulf of
> Mexico, probably for the Yucatan peninsula where they are reported.
>
> To repeat what I wrote here a couple of days ago, if the coastal migration
> at Edisto was at all representative, there are a hundred Gulf Fritillaries
> heading south to every one or two Monarchs on the coast.  My 10 minute
> count was 104 Gulf Frits and one Monarch. I was using binoculars to see
> over 100 yards inland and 100 yards offshore from the beach at Botany Bay.
> Can others tell me if that is representative of earlier and later dates in
> the season?  I think that  the Monarch migration may peak a week or two
> after the Gulf Fritillary migration?
>
>  I was amazed how many Gulf Frits were migrating (reported to be much
> fewer than two years ago when Marty and Dave saw thousands)  especially
> considering that they their northern range  extends only to piedmont NC and
> south eastern Virginia where they are rare.  I remember a few weeks ago
> Brian reporting over 100 NC species for his big year, but missing Gulf
> Fritillary at that time.
>
> The internet report of a large Monarch migration to the Bahamas where
> others report few or no Monarchs may well be Gulf Fritillaries.  Similarly,
> when I asked my friend who has a house on Fripp island to report his
> sightings two weeks ago, I think, not being a butterflier, he probably was
> reporting seeing Gulf Fritillaries and not Monarchs off shore from his
> boat. Another non-butterlier friend who lives in Mont Pleasant, next to
> Charleston, SC also reports many Monarchs which I think may be mostly Gulf
> Frits.  I am including both my friends in this email to get their reaction.
>
>
> My butterflying friend in Cozumel, Quintana Roo, has asked friends and
> also readers of her online journal, *Cozumel Insider*, to look for and
> report Monarchs which ought to be reaching there by now if that is part of
> their flyway.  She also reports the good news that " *2 biologists, just
> finished a coffee table book they worked on for over 2 years about
> Cozumel’s wildlife, flora and fauna AND…they photographed and named over 
**90 

> different butterflies right here on the island!"   *That compares to the
> 70 species I think she has recorded and the 40 I saw during my 3
> day reconnaissance of the island this past summer-
> https://sites.google.com/site/butterfliesofcozumel/
>
> Doug Allen  Inman, SC
> https://sites.google.com/site/southcarolinauplandbutterflies/
>
> On Fri, Oct 17, 2014 at 8:49 PM, Bb  wrote:
>
>> I suspected that the few days of rainy weather and the cold front would
>> cause another superflight today and it did!!!
>>
>> Tagged 129 monarchs and saw about 400 from 130pm-530pm, i should have
>> started earlier!
>>
>> Saw two that were already tagged, from some point north, cant wait to
>> find out where!
>>
>> Nectar use was mostly goldenrod and aster. Baccaharis and eupatorium had
>> just a couple, bidens was spent. There were several clusters again, at
>> goldenrod mostly, especially right before or after the lake crossings even
>> though its a narrow crossing. Didn't bother with the net on clusters, just
>> hand picked them which was a lot easier and quicker.  Most abdomens looked
>> pretty skinny, no wonder they were re-fueling!!!
>>
>> Brian Bockhahn
>> Durham NC
>
>
>


-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Falls lake monarchs
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 08:30:26 -0400
Very interested in the large numbers Brian reports, especially since we saw
very few Monarchs on the southern SC coast over the weekend. Brian, did
those Monarchs appear to be flying southwest?

Here in upstate SC, Windmill Hill, 8 miles from the NC border and 12 miles
from the southern Appalachians, we had our highest Monarch total nectaring
on the Lantana yesterday- at least 13 individuals. As with bird feeder
counts, 13 is the highest number seen at one time and no doubt
underestimates the total.  Last year we counted a total of 7 individuals
all autumn. We have counted upwards of 40 Monarchs nectaring here on
Windmill Hill so far this month. I have not seen any tagged Monarchs yet.

We have goldenrod and a dozen other flower species in bloom, but the
Monarchs definitely prefer the Lantana.  Unlike most other species, they
seem to have little preference for whether the Lantana is in the sun or in
the shade on warm days.

I spent the better part of two hours yesterday watching about 10 Monarchs
from 4 PM until after 6 PM in an effort to discern where they would fly
after nectaring. The Monarchs seemed to be much more wary after 4 PM than
they had been earlier in the day when I could often approach within a few
feet. Between 5 PM and 6 PM, Monarchs, one at a time, took of in a
southwesterly direction.  In only a single case did two take off together.
This suggests to me that our Monarchs are probably headed for the gulf
coast (or Texas) and not Florida. One of the butterfliers this past weekend
at Edisto Island is from the Florida panhandle and reports impressive
Monarch migrations there where they seen to take off across the Gulf of
Mexico, probably for the Yucatan peninsula where they are reported.

To repeat what I wrote here a couple of days ago, if the coastal migration
at Edisto was at all representative, there are a hundred Gulf Fritillaries
heading south to every one or two Monarchs on the coast.  My 10 minute
count was 104 Gulf Frits and one Monarch. I was using binoculars to see
over 100 yards inland and 100 yards offshore from the beach at Botany Bay.
Can others tell me if that is representative of earlier and later dates in
the season?  I think that  the Monarch migration may peak a week or two
after the Gulf Fritillary migration?

 I was amazed how many Gulf Frits were migrating (reported to be much fewer
than two years ago when Marty and Dave saw thousands)  especially
considering that they their northern range  extends only to piedmont NC and
south eastern Virginia where they are rare.  I remember a few weeks ago
Brian reporting over 100 NC species for his big year, but missing Gulf
Fritillary at that time.

The internet report of a large Monarch migration to the Bahamas where
others report few or no Monarchs may well be Gulf Fritillaries.  Similarly,
when I asked my friend who has a house on Fripp island to report his
sightings two weeks ago, I think, not being a butterflier, he probably was
reporting seeing Gulf Fritillaries and not Monarchs off shore from his
boat. Another non-butterlier friend who lives in Mont Pleasant, next to
Charleston, SC also reports many Monarchs which I think may be mostly Gulf
Frits.  I am including both my friends in this email to get their reaction.


My butterflying friend in Cozumel, Quintana Roo, has asked friends and also
readers of her online journal, *Cozumel Insider*, to look for and report
Monarchs which ought to be reaching there by now if that is part of their
flyway.  She also reports the good news that " *2 biologists, just finished
a coffee table book they worked on for over 2 years about Cozumel’s
wildlife, flora and fauna AND…they photographed and named over **90
different butterflies right here on the island!"   *That compares to the 70
species I think she has recorded and the 40 I saw during my 3
day reconnaissance of the island this past summer-
https://sites.google.com/site/butterfliesofcozumel/

Doug Allen  Inman, SC
https://sites.google.com/site/southcarolinauplandbutterflies/

On Fri, Oct 17, 2014 at 8:49 PM, Bb  wrote:

> I suspected that the few days of rainy weather and the cold front would
> cause another superflight today and it did!!!
>
> Tagged 129 monarchs and saw about 400 from 130pm-530pm, i should have
> started earlier!
>
> Saw two that were already tagged, from some point north, cant wait to find
> out where!
>
> Nectar use was mostly goldenrod and aster. Baccaharis and eupatorium had
> just a couple, bidens was spent. There were several clusters again, at
> goldenrod mostly, especially right before or after the lake crossings even
> though its a narrow crossing. Didn't bother with the net on clusters, just
> hand picked them which was a lot easier and quicker.  Most abdomens looked
> pretty skinny, no wonder they were re-fueling!!!
>
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC
Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 04:07:39 +0000
Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find that 
Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of the 
butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future list may 
start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the skippers in 
the middle. 


Salman Abdulali



On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:

Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the Pelham Catalogue was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that youre not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
 Snouts
 Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
 Longwings
 Fritillaries
 Admirals
 Emperoros
 Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
 Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, Im 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and Im retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, Ill probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 23:52:00 -0400
Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the Pelham Catalogue was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that youre not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
  Snouts
  Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
  Longwings
  Fritillaries
  Admirals
  Emperoros
  Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
  Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, Im 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and Im retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, Ill probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Falls lake monarchs
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 20:49:05 -0400
I suspected that the few days of rainy weather and the cold front would cause 
another superflight today and it did!!! 


Tagged 129 monarchs and saw about 400 from 130pm-530pm, i should have started 
earlier! 


Saw two that were already tagged, from some point north, cant wait to find out 
where! 


Nectar use was mostly goldenrod and aster. Baccaharis and eupatorium had just a 
couple, bidens was spent. There were several clusters again, at goldenrod 
mostly, especially right before or after the lake crossings even though its a 
narrow crossing. Didn't bother with the net on clusters, just hand picked them 
which was a lot easier and quicker. Most abdomens looked pretty skinny, no 
wonder they were re-fueling!!! 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/17/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 19:21:16 -0400
From noon to 4pm I walked around the arboretum under sunny skies and temps
about 70F. Highlights among my 24 species were 1 black female E. Tiger
Swallowtail (my first ETS since 9/3), 1 Southern Skipperling!, my first
adult Gulf Fritillary of the year, and a Red Admiral (the first I have ever
seen here). The skipperling zipped in and landed on the lawn ~10' in front
of me, sat there for just enough time to get my binoculars on it, then
zipped away before I could get a photo. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail
2 caterpillars on Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
1 black form female  Cabbage White 15
 Orange Sulphur 2
 Cloudless Sulphur 18
 Little Yellow 1
 Sleepy Orange 10
 Red-banded Hairstreak 3
 Eastern Tailed-Blue 4
 Gulf Fritillary 1
 Variegated Fritillary 2
 Pearl Crescent 4
 American Lady 4
 Painted Lady 3
 Red Admiral 1
 Common Buckeye 18
 Monarch 25
 Silver-spotted Skipper 3
 Common Checkered-Skipper 39
 Clouded Skipper 6
 Southern Skipperling 1
 Fiery Skipper 67
 Sachem 5
 Ocola Skipper 30

-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Chester Co., SC leps 16 Oct. 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:13:20 -0400
Hi All,

I looked for butterflies mainly around General Lane near Richburg, Chester
Co., SC yesterday. This is a real estate development with alot of blazing
star and goldenrods.  I had:

Little Yellow 2
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Eastern Tailed-Blue 1
Gulf Fritillary 1
Varegated Fritillary 2
Pearl Crescent 1
American Lady 1
Common Buckeye 11
Monarch 15
white/common Checkered-Skipper 1 male which I missed!
Clouded Skipper 4
Fiery Skipper 2

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Lancaster Co., SC leps 16 October 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:02:34 -0400
Hi All,

Had the following leps in Lancaster Co., SC yesterday:

Andrew Jackson State Park
Eastern Tailed-Blue  1
Pearl Crescent 4
Common Buckeye 4
Painted Lady 2
Clouded Skipper 2
Fiery Skipper 5
Ocola Skipper 4 county record

Hyy 9 Boat Landing
Pearl Crescent 2
Clouded Skiper 1
Zebulon Skipper 1

Regards,

Dennis

PS Brian can you forward this to whom ever replaced V. Carter?


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 08:42:07 -0400
Partly. It is an atlas for rare species, not all species. Check it out at:

http://www.vararespecies.org/

Harry LeGrand


On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 11:44 PM, Mathis  wrote:

>   Is there a comparable website/butterfly project for Virginia?
>
> Cecelia Mathis
> Sparta, NC
>
>  *From:* Harry LeGrand 
> *Sent:* Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:06 PM
> *To:* carolinaleps AT duke.edu
> *Subject:* A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North
> Carolina website
>
>  Fellow butterfliers;
>
> Tom Howard and I got a huge response to our request for photos to fill in
> holes on the *Butterflies of North Carolina *website. So huge, in fact,
> that Tom got swamped, and it took him quite a few days to get most
> uploaded. And, three of you, Jeff Pippen, Will Cook, and Richard Stickney,
> offered us the opportunity to hand-pick some of the photos on their
> websites, which was helpful in filling in even additional "holes", such as
> a dorsal photo of a male Hobomok Skipper.
>
> Tom cranked out a listing of people whose photographs have been uploaded
> onto the website at some point in 2014 (not necessarily after the request).
> Many or most of the names were of those who did indeed submit photos after
> the request.
>
> So -- we wish to thank all of you, alphabetically by number of photos:
>
> *50 or more photos in 2014 *
> Will Cook
> Sven Halling
> Jeff Pippen
>
> *20 - 49 photos*
> Salman Abdulali
> Richard Stickney
>
> *10 -19 photos*
> Doug Allen
> Bruce Grimes
> Tom Sanders
> Paul Scharf
> Chris Talkington
>
> *1-9 photos*
> Lee Amos
> Betty Anderson
> Jamie Anderson
> Parker Backstrom
> Nancy Baldwin
> Mac Basnight/Mary Doll
> Allen Belden
> Madge Birk
> Brian Bockhahn
> Jason Brown
> Dennis Burnette
> Paula Tohline Calhoun
> Derb Carter
> Bob Cavanaugh
> Ricky Davis
> John Dole
> Keith Endres
> John Ennis
> Marty Fancy
> Carl Ganser
> Lane Garner
> Shay Garriock
> Steve Hall
> Paul Hart
> Scott Hartley
> Doug Johnston
> Mark Jones
> Ginger Kopka
> Joe Lafferty
> Jeff Lewis
> Owen McConnell
> Joe Mickey
> Randy Newman
> Lori Owenby
> Mike Papay
> Jim Parnell
> Jim Petranka
> Irvin Pitts
> Stephanie Puckett
> Debbie Roos
> Gene Schepker
> Bruce Smithson
> Frank Spilker
> Lois Stacey
> Vin Stanton
> Tom Stock
> Bud Webster
> Ted Wilcox
> Floyd Williams
>
> We also wish to remind folks of the numerous photographic contributions to
> the website by many of you prior to 2014, with special thanks to Ted
> Wilcox, Jeff Pippen, and Roger Rittmaster -- each of whom must have well
> over 100 photos on the site.
>
> Feel free to roam the site:
> http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/
>
> and see what holes still need to be filled! We still lack a photo, from
> anybody anywhere, of a Gorgone Checkerspot!
>
> Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard
>
Subject: Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website
From: "Mathis" <weer AT skybest.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 23:44:48 -0400
Is there a comparable website/butterfly project for Virginia?

Cecelia Mathis
Sparta, NC

From: Harry LeGrand 
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:06 PM
To: carolinaleps AT duke.edu 
Subject: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina 
website 


Fellow butterfliers;

Tom Howard and I got a huge response to our request for photos to fill in holes 
on the Butterflies of North Carolina website. So huge, in fact, that Tom got 
swamped, and it took him quite a few days to get most uploaded. And, three of 
you, Jeff Pippen, Will Cook, and Richard Stickney, offered us the opportunity 
to hand-pick some of the photos on their websites, which was helpful in filling 
in even additional "holes", such as a dorsal photo of a male Hobomok Skipper. 


Tom cranked out a listing of people whose photographs have been uploaded onto 
the website at some point in 2014 (not necessarily after the request). Many or 
most of the names were of those who did indeed submit photos after the request. 


So -- we wish to thank all of you, alphabetically by number of photos:

50 or more photos in 2014 
Will Cook
Sven Halling
Jeff Pippen

20 - 49 photos
Salman Abdulali
Richard Stickney

10 -19 photos
Doug Allen
Bruce Grimes
Tom Sanders
Paul Scharf
Chris Talkington

1-9 photos
Lee Amos
Betty Anderson
Jamie Anderson
Parker Backstrom
Nancy Baldwin
Mac Basnight/Mary Doll
Allen Belden
Madge Birk
Brian Bockhahn
Jason Brown
Dennis Burnette
Paula Tohline Calhoun
Derb Carter
Bob Cavanaugh
Ricky Davis
John Dole
Keith Endres
John Ennis
Marty Fancy
Carl Ganser
Lane Garner
Shay Garriock
Steve Hall
Paul Hart
Scott Hartley
Doug Johnston
Mark Jones
Ginger Kopka
Joe Lafferty
Jeff Lewis
Owen McConnell
Joe Mickey
Randy Newman
Lori Owenby
Mike Papay
Jim Parnell
Jim Petranka
Irvin Pitts
Stephanie Puckett
Debbie Roos
Gene Schepker
Bruce Smithson
Frank Spilker
Lois Stacey
Vin Stanton
Tom Stock
Bud Webster
Ted Wilcox
Floyd Williams

We also wish to remind folks of the numerous photographic contributions to the 
website by many of you prior to 2014, with special thanks to Ted Wilcox, Jeff 
Pippen, and Roger Rittmaster -- each of whom must have well over 100 photos on 
the site. 


Feel free to roam the site:
http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/

and see what holes still need to be filled! We still lack a photo, from anybody 
anywhere, of a Gorgone Checkerspot! 


Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/16/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:32:15 -0400
Today I spent ~2.5 hours at the ecostation under partly cloudy skies and
temps ~70F. No real highlights among my 13 species, but I photographed a
Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar on Aristolochia tomentosa, Wooly Pipevine.
My conplete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Pipevine Swallowtail 2 2 caterpillars on Aristolochia tomentosa  Cabbage
White 2
 Sleepy Orange 3
 Eastern Tailed-Blue 2
 Pearl Crescent 5
 Common Buckeye 15
 Monarch 5
 Common Checkered-Skipper 5
 Clouded Skipper 6
 Least Skipper 1
 Fiery Skipper 41
 Sachem 1
 Ocola Skipper 12

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/13/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:27:07 -0400
On Monday, 10/13/14, I spent the day at J.C. Raulston Arboretum. The
weather was partly cloudy and about 80F. The highlights among my 2 species
were 48 Monarchs (my highest one-day count this year), and 4 Wild Indigo
Duskywings. Pics of the duskywings and other butterflies/caterpillars can
be seen here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/61962421 AT N05/. My complete ist
is below. Good butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail 1 1 ad.female ovipositing on Petroselinum crispum; 3
cats on same  Spicebush Swallowtail 1
 Cabbage White 7
 Orange Sulphur 3
 Cloudless Sulphur 8
 Sleepy Orange 7
 Gray Hairstreak 1
 Eastern Tailed-Blue 3
 Variegated Fritillary 1
 Pearl Crescent 4
 American Lady 2
 Painted Lady 2
 Common Buckeye 10
 Monarch 48
 Silver-spotted Skipper 2
 Wild Indigo Duskywing 4
 Common Checkered-Skipper 40
 Clouded Skipper 6
 Fiery Skipper 55
 Sachem 3
 Ocola Skipper 15

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:06:06 -0400
Fellow butterfliers;

Tom Howard and I got a huge response to our request for photos to fill in
holes on the *Butterflies of North Carolina *website. So huge, in fact,
that Tom got swamped, and it took him quite a few days to get most
uploaded. And, three of you, Jeff Pippen, Will Cook, and Richard Stickney,
offered us the opportunity to hand-pick some of the photos on their
websites, which was helpful in filling in even additional "holes", such as
a dorsal photo of a male Hobomok Skipper.

Tom cranked out a listing of people whose photographs have been uploaded
onto the website at some point in 2014 (not necessarily after the request).
Many or most of the names were of those who did indeed submit photos after
the request.

So -- we wish to thank all of you, alphabetically by number of photos:

*50 or more photos in 2014 *
Will Cook
Sven Halling
Jeff Pippen

*20 - 49 photos*
Salman Abdulali
Richard Stickney

*10 -19 photos*
Doug Allen
Bruce Grimes
Tom Sanders
Paul Scharf
Chris Talkington

*1-9 photos*
Lee Amos
Betty Anderson
Jamie Anderson
Parker Backstrom
Nancy Baldwin
Mac Basnight/Mary Doll
Allen Belden
Madge Birk
Brian Bockhahn
Jason Brown
Dennis Burnette
Paula Tohline Calhoun
Derb Carter
Bob Cavanaugh
Ricky Davis
John Dole
Keith Endres
John Ennis
Marty Fancy
Carl Ganser
Lane Garner
Shay Garriock
Steve Hall
Paul Hart
Scott Hartley
Doug Johnston
Mark Jones
Ginger Kopka
Joe Lafferty
Jeff Lewis
Owen McConnell
Joe Mickey
Randy Newman
Lori Owenby
Mike Papay
Jim Parnell
Jim Petranka
Irvin Pitts
Stephanie Puckett
Debbie Roos
Gene Schepker
Bruce Smithson
Frank Spilker
Lois Stacey
Vin Stanton
Tom Stock
Bud Webster
Ted Wilcox
Floyd Williams

We also wish to remind folks of the numerous photographic contributions to
the website by many of you prior to 2014, with special thanks to Ted
Wilcox, Jeff Pippen, and Roger Rittmaster -- each of whom must have well
over 100 photos on the site.

Feel free to roam the site:
http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/

and see what holes still need to be filled! We still lack a photo, from
anybody anywhere, of a Gorgone Checkerspot!

Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard
Subject: Edisto Island weeked butterfly field trip pictures
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 19:49:03 -0400
Thank you Marty and Dave for organizing a great trip.  Was good to meet so
many, and I mean many, some 32  on Saturday and almost as many Sunday-
possibly a record, at least a SC record, for a butterfly field trip?

I was surprised how few Monarchs were seen migrating. In a 10 minute count
on Botany Bay Beach I counted one Monarch and 104 Gulf Fritillaries!  This
makes me wonder about my friends report the weekend before of seeing many
Monarchs migrating 1/2 mile off shore at Fripp Island which is just south
of Edisto Island.  My friend is not a butterflier.  It also makes me wonder
about the earlier report I cited (found on the internet) about the
tremendous Monarch migration to the Bahamas.  My other report from a friend
in southern Belize about the Monarch "invasion" several years ago is no
doubt correct as he is good at moths and butterflies.

I previously uploaded photographs of the Barred Yellow, a SC new one for
me, and the Salt Marsh Skipper, a lifer for me. This evening I uploaded an
additional 13 species including the Brazilian Skipper which was another
lifer for me.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

Doug Allen  Inman, SC
Subject: Forsyth County, Winston-Salem Butterflies, Checkered Whites
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2014 17:49:47 -0400
In my yard today from 1:00 - 2:30:

Red-banded Hairstreak 1
American Lady 1
Monarch 4 (3 may be my releases yesterday and today)
Red-spotted Purple 1
Sleepy Orange 1
Fiery Skipper 2
Sachem 1
Clouded Skipper 1
Common Buckeye 1
Cabbage White 1

I went to Archie Elledge Water Treatment Plant from 3:00 - 4:00 looking
for exotica and found it!

*Checkered White* 2 (male and female)
Red Admiral 1
Monarch 5 (skirting the water pools heading west)
Common Buckeye 4
Pearl Crescent 3
Common Checkered Skipper 2
Fiery Skipper 4

Temperature low to mid 70s, mostly sunny.

Gene Schepker
Subject: Pitt County, 13 October 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 19:56:01 +0000
Butterflies seen today, 2014-10-13, in PItt County, in a mix of sun and clouds:

Cloudless Sulphur, 2
Sleepy Orange, 5
Cabbage White, 2
Red-banded Hairstreak, 1
Monarch, 1
Viceroy, 1
Common Buckeye, 1
American Lady, 1
Painted Lady, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 1
Horace's Duskywing, 1, Boyd Lee Park, new late date for PItt (previous: 9/30)
Common Checkered-Skipper, 2
Brazilian Skipper, Pitt County Arboretum, 1 caterpillar but no adults
Fiery Skipper, 15
Ocola Skipper, 8

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Re: Pickney Is NWR, SC leps 11 Nov 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 09:08:30 -0400
Forgot 4 Painted Ladies

On Sun, Oct 12, 2014 at 7:38 AM, Dennis Forsythe 
wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> Yesterday I led butterfly trips for National Widlife Refuge Day at Pickney
> Is NWR, Beaufort Co., SC.
> The weather was nice and we looked from 10Am until 2PM.  We had :
>
> Cloudless Sulfur 50 +
> Little Yellow 1
> Gray Hairstreak 1 very worn
> Gulf Fritillary 60+
> Zebra Longwing 3
> Common Buckeye 1
> Monarch 4  some one said they saw a tagged Monarch the previous day
> Long-tailed Skipper 20
> Fiery Skipper 1 very worn
> Whirlabout Skipper 1
> Ocola Skipper 3
>
> Dennis
>
>
>
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
>



-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Jasper Co., SC leps 10 Oct 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 08:53:54 -0400
Hi All,

Had some butterflies mainly at the Savannah NWR on the 10th.

Palamedes Swallowtail 2
Cloudless SUlfur 30+
Gulf Fritillary 10+
Zebra Longwing 6
Common Buckeye 1
Long-tailed Skipper 4
Swarthy Skipper 1 worn on 11 Oct at Tillman Sandridge HP.
Fiery Skipper 1
Palatka Skipper 1
Ocola Skipper 2

Dennis



-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Pickney Is NWR, SC leps 11 Nov 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2014 07:38:41 -0400
Hi All,

Yesterday I led butterfly trips for National Widlife Refuge Day at Pickney
Is NWR, Beaufort Co., SC.
The weather was nice and we looked from 10Am until 2PM.  We had :

Cloudless Sulfur 50 +
Little Yellow 1
Gray Hairstreak 1 very worn
Gulf Fritillary 60+
Zebra Longwing 3
Common Buckeye 1
Monarch 4  some one said they saw a tagged Monarch the previous day
Long-tailed Skipper 20
Fiery Skipper 1 very worn
Whirlabout Skipper 1
Ocola Skipper 3

Dennis



-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Report on Roxbury Park and Edisto Island field trip
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 22:46:42 -0400
We had 32 butterfliers on the field trip this morning at beautiful new
Edisto Island Roxbury Park.  Marty and Dave will report the list later, but
I just uploaded photographs of 8 species seen at Roxbury Park and nearby
Ace Basin NWR, one a lifer for me and another from the day before, a new SC
butterfly for me.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

Doug Allen
Subject: Barred Yellow near Ace Basin NWR yesterday
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 05:37:42 -0400
I  put the Barred Yellow photo on Flickr since the there are problems with
the Google posting-
https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/
Subject: Danaus caterpillar
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 21:31:23 -0400
Forgot to query, but on Sep 30th I collected what I thought was a small 5th
instar Monarch larva off Milkweed in Durham county, but then it molted and
what was two small black bumps on it's thorax turned into one larger bump
and one short tentacle like a Queen larva has!  I was hoping it would molt
again and show the red spots that a Queen older instar has, but instead it
just pupated.  The Chrysalis itself looks like a better match for Monarch
than Queen.

Has anyone seen a monarch larva with thoracic tentacles/filaments?  I have
photos.  A hybrid???  I'll be waiting for it to emerge to see what the
result is!

Oh and if anyone had never seen the origin of the monarchs scientific name,
this is really cool:
http://www.naturenorth.com/summer/monarch/monarchF2.html

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: More Falls Lake monarchs and larva
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 21:22:08 -0400
Spent today around Kerr Lake and didn't find any monarchs and little
nectar, it started raining even, so I returned to my usual haunts at Falls
Lake, this time on the Durham county side of the lake.

38 tagged (27 male, 11 female)
150 seen

I missed a lot, the heat and mosquitoes were brutal and nearly all were on
baccharis, some too high even for my extra long net!  The other side of the
lake is more conducive to netting, though the fire ants are worse.

In a patch of milkweed I did find three 5th instar larva, latest I've
found!  Nearly all my other local larva emerged a few days ago, so these
may not make the journey!

I only bought 200 tags this year and today depleted that.  Taggers from the
north are sending me some leftovers they had, I'll probably get out a
couple more times and then later this month I'll be tagging at the outer
banks.

Last year with more effort I only tagged 83.  So for my neck of the woods,
or neck of the migration route, I guess it's safe to say the numbers are
rebounding!!!!

Caught accidently a long-tailed skipper with a monarch, and more wasps than
I'd like showed up in the net swings.

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Barred Yellow just beyond Ace Basin and unid skippers
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 21:04:30 -0400
One, probably two Barred Yellows were nectaring along the road beyond the
entrance to Ace Basin not far from Roxbury Park where Marty and Dave
Kastner are leading a butterflying field trip tomorrow morning.

I started the day at Sandhills NWR, but it clouded over and started raining
by 10AM so I headed south and spent a short time in the vicinity of Roxbury
Park and Ace Basin which was closed because of hunting today.

There were dozens of Cloudless Sulphurs flying south today, some Sleepy
Orange, too, but only one Monarch seen.

I've uploaded 5 butterflies I photographed today

Barred Yellow-  near Ace Basin  hope it's still there tomorrow!
Wild Indigo Duskywing, I think-  near Ace Basin
Ocola Skipper,  common both locations
possible male and female Yehl Skippers at Sandhills NWR  I've never seen
Yehl, and they're similar looking to several other skippers so not sure

Doug Allen
Walterboro, SC

https://plus.google.com/photos/114446304105523815248/albums/6068734215417175761
Subject: Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Neuse River Greenway-10/10/2014
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 19:39:46 -0400
Nice to get some scarce open-country butterflies, especially so late in the
year. Clouded Sulphurs have crashed in Wake County over the past 20 years
and are nearly gone now. There used to be a few at NC State U fields both
in the Reedy Creek Road area and in the Mid-Pines/Lake Wheeler Road areas.
They are practically extirpated there now -- and ditto for Checkered White,
which maybe I'm surprised you didn't see. They are nearing extirpation
also, though these two species do move around a lot and can appear in odd
places. And, hostplants are still out there along road or field margins,
etc.

As for southern skippers: I saw 4 Whirlabouts on a long walk I made a
decade ago to and from where I parked on Hilltop-Needmore Road well south
of Raleigh. FOUR is clearly a resident population there, but the species is
not a resident in the Raleigh area. So, in the s.e. portion of the county
there could well be a resident population also. I also have seen Southern
Skipperlings a few times south of Raleigh in the county, and I suspect
there are some resident pockets in the s.e. quarter of the county. Both of
these skippers I have seen about twice at the Raulston Arboretum, where
they are certainly strays.  Eufala Skipper also likely has a few small
resident populations in southern Wake. I recall seeing both Eufala and
Southern Skipperling along a portion of Mid-Pines Road over a several-year
period.

I think the most shocking find of the day -- other than the total of SIX
skipperlings, was a Common Sootywing well into October; now that is VERY
late. The previous late date for NC was Sept. 28!

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Fri, Oct 10, 2014 at 6:53 PM, Mike Turner  wrote:

> Today I walked the greenway from the parking area on Auburn-Knightdale Rd.
> to trail mile marker 25 on Old Baucom Rd.,
>  ~6.4 miles out and back. The weather was sunny and 80F. I haven't visited
> large, open fields/agricultural areas often this year, so I saw a lot of
> species I haven't seen much this year; Clouded (FOY), Orange, and Cloudless
> Sulphurs, Sleepy Oranges, and Cabbage White. Also of note were 6 Southern
> Skipperlings (FOY and only my second Wake Co. sighting ever), Common
> Sootywing, many Common Checkered-Skippers, and Eufala Skipper. I also had a
> fly-by Brazilian Skipper.
>
> I got a glimpse of what I believe was a female Whirlabout, but just seeing
> it for a few seconds, and not from above, and it being worn, and being a
> first county record for me, I decided not to count it. But a few miles from
> the Johnston County border would be a good place for it. All the notable
> butterflies listed above were seen along the spray fields between the trail
> crossing at Brownfield Rd. and trail mile marker 25. The fields themselves
> have little to no nectar sources or food plants for these open field
> species, but there is a narrow buffer of infrequently mowed areas next to
> the trail where a white aster, Symphyotrichum pilsoum, grows, and these
> asters were where all the nectaring activity was. My complete list is
> below. Good butterflying.
>
>    Cabbage White 1  Clouded Sulphur 1  Orange Sulphur 10  Cloudless
> Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 15  Eastern Tailed-Blue 5  Variegated Fritillary
> 6 Pearl Crescent 8 Common Buckeye 15 Carolina Satyr 3 Monarch 3 
Silver-spotted 

> Skipper 1  Common Checkered-Skipper 27  Common Sootywing 1  Least Skipper
> 3 Southern Skipperling 6 Fiery Skipper 30 Sachem 2 Eufala Skipper 1 Brazilian 

> Skipper 1  Ocola Skipper 2
> --
> Mike Turner
> Raleigh, NC
>
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Neuse River Greenway-10/10/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 18:53:34 -0400
Today I walked the greenway from the parking area on Auburn-Knightdale Rd.
to trail mile marker 25 on Old Baucom Rd.,
 ~6.4 miles out and back. The weather was sunny and 80F. I haven't visited
large, open fields/agricultural areas often this year, so I saw a lot of
species I haven't seen much this year; Clouded (FOY), Orange, and Cloudless
Sulphurs, Sleepy Oranges, and Cabbage White. Also of note were 6 Southern
Skipperlings (FOY and only my second Wake Co. sighting ever), Common
Sootywing, many Common Checkered-Skippers, and Eufala Skipper. I also had a
fly-by Brazilian Skipper.

I got a glimpse of what I believe was a female Whirlabout, but just seeing
it for a few seconds, and not from above, and it being worn, and being a
first county record for me, I decided not to count it. But a few miles from
the Johnston County border would be a good place for it. All the notable
butterflies listed above were seen along the spray fields between the trail
crossing at Brownfield Rd. and trail mile marker 25. The fields themselves
have little to no nectar sources or food plants for these open field
species, but there is a narrow buffer of infrequently mowed areas next to
the trail where a white aster, Symphyotrichum pilsoum, grows, and these
asters were where all the nectaring activity was. My complete list is
below. Good butterflying.

  Cabbage White 1  Clouded Sulphur 1  Orange Sulphur 10  Cloudless
Sulphur 1  Sleepy
Orange 15  Eastern Tailed-Blue 5  Variegated Fritillary 6  Pearl
Crescent 8  Common
Buckeye 15  Carolina Satyr 3  Monarch 3  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Common
Checkered-Skipper 27  Common Sootywing 1  Least Skipper 3  Southern
Skipperling 6  Fiery Skipper 30  Sachem 2  Eufala Skipper 1  Brazilian
Skipper 1  Ocola Skipper 2
-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Falls Lake Monarchs
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 11:23:47 -0400
yesterday Oct 9 tagged another 45 monarchs, could have quadrupled that if I
wasn't so busy trying to get HD video footage of them for our NC State
Parks 100th anniversary video that will be in 2016.

In the lower wake county portions of the lake I saw one every 30 minutes or
so.

In the granville/durham county portions near I85 and the nectar
superhighway, I saw one about every 2 minutes.  Also saw several clusters
of 20-30 monarchs especially towards evening.  Netting them would scare
them all off, so for the big groups I just start picking them by hand one
by one, get more that way.

Nectar use has changed over almost completely to Baccharis, which is
typcial for this time of year.  Male blooms preferred, the "yellow" as
opposed to white.

31 of the 45 were males, and most of what I was viewing but not catching
were predominately males.

I only bought 200 tags this year thinking I would not have much luck, and
now I only have a few left!  One of these years I'll have time to hit them
really hard and get a 1,000 or more tags.


-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Buncombe Co. Cove Forest
From: "Gail's Skyrunner" <whocooksforyou AT skyrunner.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 10:27:53 -0400
Bill and Sue Perry, Janie Owens, Ruth Young, and I went up Coleman Boundary Rd 
looking for Gray Comma with no success. All we had, besides a nice group of 
migrating birds were: 


Cloudless Sulphur – 1
Pearl Crescent  - 3
Red Spotted Purple – 3
Eastern Comma - 15+ very fresh
Clouded Skipper – 1

Gail Lankford
Weaverville
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-10/08 and 10/09/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 20:42:23 -0400
Yesterday, 10/08/14, I visited Durant Nature Park from 10:30 to 3pm. Today
I walked the Neuse River Greenway from Poole Rd. to Anderson Point Park and
back again, from 2-4:30pm. My lists from both days are below. Good
buterflying.

Durant Nature Park-10/08/14
 Abaeis nicippe (2)  Junonia coenia (1)  Danaus plexippus (1)  Ancyloxypha
numitor (5)  Hylephila phyleus (7)  Panoquina ocola (2)
Neuse River Greenway-10/09/14
 Phoebis sennae (1)  Abaeis nicippe (1)  Cupido comyntas (2)  Phyciodes
tharos (7)  Vanessa atalanta (1)  Limenitis arthemis astyanax (1)
Hermeuptychia
sosybius (2)  Danaus plexippus (1)  Ancyloxypha numitor (2)
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: 10/09/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County, NC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 17:43:16 -0400 (EDT)
Gene Schepker and I returned to those flower rich fields I reported from
yesterday. Full sunny weather, 77 F but less windy than yesterday. (12:00
am-02:00 pm). We didn’t have as my time as I had spent on Wednesday so we let
Pearl Crescents, buckeyes and silver-spotted go unaccounted. To todays list I
just add the new species and notice a few species where we saw more today(+2
means that we saw two more than I reported yesterday). Overall we saw a lot of
butterflies and a lot of them were well worn. 

Cloudless Sulphur		+4
Little Yellow			+2
Red-spotted Purple		 1
Carolina Satyr			+1

Horace’s Duskywing		 1
Fiery Skipper			+4

Gene Schepker
Sven Halling (at the note pad)

Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Re: 10/08/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County,NC
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 12:48:26 -0400
Wow! Down here, in the Triangle, and elsewhere to the east, we can only
dream of such numbers of butterflies at this time of year -- in 2014! Heck,
this would have been a great total for us way back in late August, at our
peak.

Harry LeGrand

On Thu, Oct 9, 2014 at 11:11 AM, Sven Halling  wrote:

>
> Full sunny weather, 72-79 F and windy. I found three not mowed fields with
> lots
> of ironweed and asters beyond where I usually go. (11:30 am-5 pm).
>
> Eastern Tiger Swallowtail       1
> Cabbage White                   2
> Orange Sulphur                  3
> Cloudless Sulphur               5
> Little Yellow                   1
> Sleepy Orange                   19
> Eastern Tailed-Blue             8
> Variegated Fritillary           5
> Great Spangled Fritillary       12
> Pearl Crescent                  69
> Anglewing sp.                   1
> American Lady                   3
> Painted Lady                    1
> Common Buckeye                  58
> Carolina Satyr                  1
> Monarch                         2
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper          54
> Common Checkered-Sk             15
> Clouded Skipper                 2
> Fiery Skipper                   9
> Crossline Skipper               1
> Sachem                          18
> Dun Skipper                     7
> Ocola Skipper                   11
>
> Ailanthus webworm               1
> Yellow-collared Scape Moth      1
> Swordsman Dart                  3
>
> Sven Halling
> Lewisville, NC
>
Subject: 10/08/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County,NC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 11:11:32 -0400 (EDT)
Full sunny weather, 72-79 F and windy. I found three not mowed fields with lots
of ironweed and asters beyond where I usually go. (11:30 am-5 pm). 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail	1
Cabbage White			2
Orange Sulphur			3
Cloudless Sulphur		5
Little Yellow			1
Sleepy Orange			19
Eastern Tailed-Blue		8
Variegated Fritillary		5
Great Spangled Fritillary	12
Pearl Crescent			69
Anglewing sp.			1
American Lady			3
Painted Lady			1
Common Buckeye			58
Carolina Satyr			1
Monarch 			2

Silver-spotted Skipper		54
Common Checkered-Sk		15
Clouded Skipper 		2
Fiery Skipper			9
Crossline Skipper		1
Sachem				18
Dun Skipper			7
Ocola Skipper			11

Ailanthus webworm		1
Yellow-collared Scape Moth	1
Swordsman Dart			3

Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: PMSP Butterflies, Surry Co. 10/08/14
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 09:53:38 -0400
I went up to Pilot Mountain and saw  4 American Ladies, 3 Red-spotted
Purples, 1 Common Buckeye, and 2 Gemmed Satyrs,and 2 Monarchs.  It was
windy and Sunny from 3 - 4 PM.

Forsyth Co. 10/08/14

I had in my garden in Winston-Salem from 1 - 2:00 PM:
 Common Checkered Skipper 1
Sachem 2
Fiery Skipper 1
Clouded Skipper 2 (hooked-up, worn male, and very fresh female, silver
frosting)
Monarch 3
American Lady 1
Common Buckeye 1

Gene Schepker
Subject: Re: Uwharries Randolph and Montgomery county
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 20:52:46 -0400
 I looked at a photo of a top-side of a female skipper you sent me, and it
looked good enough, but a bunch of other female skippers, including Fiery,
look pretty close. Typically, I can at least see -- briefly, the under
hindwing of a Leonard's, especially when the skipper lands at a new
perch. Of course, Fiery females are common all summer and fall, so you
should have a lot of experience with them, even if just from the top. And,
from the top, the hindwing of a Fiery has an orange arrow shape -- the
orange chevron plus a long orange bar. Female Hesperia skippers only show
an orange or yellow chevron, plus maybe a spot, on the hindwing from the
top. The dorsal forewing of a Fiery usually isn't overly dark brown away
from the pale spots; there usually is a moderate amount of light orange, or
buffy brown. Female Leonard's is typically rather deep or dark brown, other
than the pale spots.  Also, Leonard's should be noticeably larger than a
Fiery Skipper -- about the size of a female Sachem. I can't judge size on a
single photo, but in the field, it should be noticeable, at least if you
see some Fieries nearby.

Looks like the Leonard's Skipper had a very poor flight this year, and
early as well.

Harry LeGrand

On Wed, Oct 8, 2014 at 8:24 PM, Brian Bockhahn 
wrote:

> Had to wait for the sun this morning, but spent the day at the Uwharries
> in Randolph and Montgomery counties searching for Leonards skipper....and
> finally got one!!! Lifer!  It was a female (there may have been two) and
> try as I might I could only manage dorsal views and photos, bummer and
> head-achy, but it counts!!!  I will have to go back through photos, but I
> had a few suspicious ones in Chatham county that I just lumped with the
> other common Hesperias.
>
> First Randolph, second Montgomery
> 1100am - 430pm
> Aster grandifloria, bidens, goldenrod, liatris, ne aster
>
> 5,6 cloudless sulphur
> 20, 15 sleepy orange
> 1,1 clouded sulphur
> 15,10 little yellow
> 1,0 red banded hairstreak
> 1,0 gray hairstreak
> 5,7 e tailed blue
> 2, 0  Variegated Fritillary
> 3,5 pearl crescent
> 5,3 common buckeye
> 6, 6 american lady
> 0, 1 painted lady
> 3,3 red spotted purple
> 0, 1 Viceroy
> 0, 2 Carolina Satyr
> 0, 1 Common Wood-nypmh
> 4,0 monarch (2 caught and tagged)
> 1, 0 Long-tailed skipper
> 0, 1 Horaces Duskywing
> 2, 4 common checkered skipper
> 5, 9 clouded skipper
> 7, 5 fiery skipper
> 1, 0 sachem
> 1, 0 LEONARD'S SKIPPER (FOY, lifer and #137 on big year!)
> 1, 0 tawny edged skipper
> 2, 2 crossline skipper
> 1,0 Little glassywing
> 2,0 dun skipper
> 5,3 ocola skipper
>
> I need to look at weather, a little doubtful on a trip to try for Gray
> Comma, but I do have rotten bananas in fridge ready to go.  Later this
> month I'll be in Dare county for a week, quite late for Aarons but you
> never know!  I think 137 may be my end total but will keep trying.  137 is
> also my NC state list now, very cool!
>
> --
> Brian Bockhahn
> birdranger248 AT gmail.com
>
>
Subject: Uwharries Randolph and Montgomery county
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 20:24:42 -0400
Had to wait for the sun this morning, but spent the day at the Uwharries in
Randolph and Montgomery counties searching for Leonards skipper....and
finally got one!!! Lifer!  It was a female (there may have been two) and
try as I might I could only manage dorsal views and photos, bummer and
head-achy, but it counts!!!  I will have to go back through photos, but I
had a few suspicious ones in Chatham county that I just lumped with the
other common Hesperias.

First Randolph, second Montgomery
1100am - 430pm
Aster grandifloria, bidens, goldenrod, liatris, ne aster

5,6 cloudless sulphur
20, 15 sleepy orange
1,1 clouded sulphur
15,10 little yellow
1,0 red banded hairstreak
1,0 gray hairstreak
5,7 e tailed blue
2, 0  Variegated Fritillary
3,5 pearl crescent
5,3 common buckeye
6, 6 american lady
0, 1 painted lady
3,3 red spotted purple
0, 1 Viceroy
0, 2 Carolina Satyr
0, 1 Common Wood-nypmh
4,0 monarch (2 caught and tagged)
1, 0 Long-tailed skipper
0, 1 Horaces Duskywing
2, 4 common checkered skipper
5, 9 clouded skipper
7, 5 fiery skipper
1, 0 sachem
1, 0 LEONARD'S SKIPPER (FOY, lifer and #137 on big year!)
1, 0 tawny edged skipper
2, 2 crossline skipper
1,0 Little glassywing
2,0 dun skipper
5,3 ocola skipper

I need to look at weather, a little doubtful on a trip to try for Gray
Comma, but I do have rotten bananas in fridge ready to go.  Later this
month I'll be in Dare county for a week, quite late for Aarons but you
never know!  I think 137 may be my end total but will keep trying.  137 is
also my NC state list now, very cool!

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Monarch
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 08 Oct 2014 07:28:28 -0400
One Monarch flying across city street next to I-85 at Burlington,NC 10/7

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte, NC
Subject: Some Onslow County, NC, butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 20:34:26 -0400
Today (Oct. 7) I got the opportunity to do some field work at Camp Lejeune,
mostly looking at natural communities and rare plants. Habitats were mainly
coastal fringe maritime forest (ravaged by hurricanes, sadly), sandy
roadsides, and beach dunes. Most plants in bloom were yellow-flowered --
Heterotheca subaxillaris was abundant on the dunes, and various goldenrods
mainly on the mainland. As I expected, skipper diversity was very low,
despite the abundance of nectar. Here is the list, on a warm but cloudy day:

Cloudless Sulphur  18
Sleepy Orange  2
Little Yellow  3
Gulf Fritillary  3
Variegated Fritillary  2
Common Buckeye  25   the dominant species on the dunes
Monarch  2
Long-tailed Skipper  1
Fiery Skipper  1
Ocola Skipper  15  nearly all on the dunes, and most quite fresh

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh
Subject: 10/7/14 Lewisville, Forsyth County, NC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 16:44:36 -0400 (EDT)
Visitor in our front yard  today:

Red Admiral			1	

Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: 10/05/14 Watauga County, NC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 16:37:37 -0400 (EDT)
Blue Ridge Parkway at Linn Cove Viaduct. 48 F. Sunny weather.

Cabbage White		1 
Clouded Sulphur 	1


Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Chatham & Moore Co. Butterflies
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 18:37:13 +0000
Hi all,

Yesterday I made a trip down to Weymouth Woods and stopped in Chatham County 
along Christian Chapel Road. I forgot to mention that I did see a Leonard's 
Skipper in Chatham on 9/21, but neither Brian nor I have seen any since on 
repeated visits. 


Chatham County:
Orange Sulphur - 1
Cloudless Sulphur - 1
Little Yellow - 2
Sleepy Orange - 5
E. Tailed Blue - 2
Variegated Fritillary - 2
Pearl Crescent - 3
Buckeye - 5
Monarch - 1
Swarthy Skipper - 1
Clouded Skipper - 2
Fiery Skipper - 10 or so

Weymouth Woods, late afternoon with abundant Carphephorus in bloom:
Cloudless Sulphur - 1
ETB - 3
Variegated Fritillary - 2
American Lady - 1
Painted Lady - 7
Monarch - at least 20
Clouded Skipper - 3
Fiery Skipper - 8
Ocola Skipper - 9

Once again, very low numbers and no unusual skippers. At least I knew not to 
expect too much. 


On a brighter note, the Museum's butterfly bushes were FULL of butterflies this 
morning. Several Painted Ladies, even more American Ladies, two Red Admirals, 
lots of Fiery and Ocola Skippers, and about half a dozen Monarchs, along with a 
worn Black Swallowtail. 









Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
Keep up with us on Facebook, 
Twitter and at 
lifeandscience.org 
Subject: Durham yard bflies 10-6-2014
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 23:45:48 -0400
Butterfliers,

Enjoyed a few bflies on the Lantana and Buddleja in the yard today, Durham, NC 
6 Oct 2014. 


Cabbage White (P. rapae), 1
Eastern Tailed-Blue (C. comyntas), 2
Great Spangled Fritillary (A. cybele), 1
	http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/greatspangledfrit.htm (7th row)
Pearl Crescent (P. tharos), 1
American Lady (V. virginiensis), 3
	http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/americanlady.htm (7th row)
Painted Lady (V. cardui), 1
Monarch (D. plexippus), 1
	http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/monarch.htm (7th row)
Fiery Skipper (H. phyleus), 10
Sachem (A. campestris), 3

Good Butterflying!
Jeff

--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-10/06/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 19:03:04 -0400
Today I paddled around the lake shore and walked about 3/4 mile on the
greenway. The weather was sunny and 70F. No highlights among my 12 species.
Popular nectar sources were Goldenrod, a couple of species of white asters,
and Monarchs on Groundsel-trees. Good butterflying.

  Sleepy Orange 1  Eastern Tailed-Blue 6  Pearl Crescent 4  American
Lady 1  Common
Buckeye 2  Viceroy 2  Carolina Satyr 1  Monarch 5  Clouded Skipper 2  Least
Skipper 9  Fiery Skipper 19  Ocola Skipper 5
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Monarch
From: rwellington4 AT charter.net
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 18:45:48 -0400 (EDT)
I had 3 Monarchs on my butterfly bush in the Berea area of Greenville 
Co, Sc this past Saturday.

Roger
Subject: Monarch Blythewood, SC
From: KASTNERS AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 17:17:14 -0400
We had a Monarch on the butterfly bush this afternoon.  It was a  slightly 
worn female.  We usually don't get Monarchs since we are not on  the flight 
path.
 
Marty
 
Marty &  Dave Kastner
Blythewood, SC
Richland  County
Subject: Macon Co., NC leps and Posts to carolinaleps not appearing
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 11:42:22 -0400
Butterfliers,

Below I’m forwarding a post from long-time CarolinaLeps member Jason Love. 
Because Yahoo.com changed is policies and settings recently, folks with Yahoo 
emails have been having trouble with some list serves including CarolinaBirds 
and CarolinaLeps. We had to change the settings on the list affecting yahoo 
subscribers because their email addresses were bouncing. Hopefully everything 
will get straightened out, but in the meantime if you try to post a message and 
it doesn’t go through, you can forward it to me, and I’ll post it for you. 


Cheers,
Jeff, CarolinaLeps owner
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jason Love 
> Subject: Post to carolinaleps not appearing
> Date: October 6, 2014 at 9:00:16 AM EDT
> To: "carolinaleps-request AT duke.edu" 
> Reply-To: Jason Love 
> 
> Hello,
> My name is Jason Love. I subscribe to carolinaleps and have been receiving 
the posts, but I've sent my own post twice and neither one seems to make it 
though, though I haven't received a bounced message saying otherwise. Any ideas 
what is going on? Thanks for any light you can shed on why it may not be going 
through. 

> Jason
> 
> Here is the post that I sent October 1st and again on October 4th with the 
subject line "Macon County, NC butterflies" 

> 
> Last week we had our 5th annual "Migration Celebration" event for Macon 
County 6th grade students the the Land Trust for the Little Tennessee's 
Tessentee Bottomland Preserve. As part of this event, we have students catch, 
tag, and release Monarchs as part of the MonarchWatch citizen science project. 
We also have the students catch, id (I do all the IDs), and release other 
butterflies/odes that they encountered. 

> 
> I realized that I did not send last year's (2013) results, so I've include 
these data as well. 

> 
> Here are 2013 data, with the first column October 1, second column October 2, 
third column October 3, and 4th column October 4. 19 species - nothing too 
exciting 

> 
> Pipevine Swallowtail            1    2    2    2
> Cabbage White                     0    0    1    0
> Orange Sulphur                    1    0    0    1
> Cloudless Sulphur                0    2    0    0
> Eastern-tailed Blue              3    0    0    1
> Great Spangled Fritillary     0    3    0    0
> Pearl Crescent                    12    8    8    9
> Common Buckeye                1    0    0    0
> Red-spotted Purple             1    0    1    0
> Viceroy                                   0    0    1    0
> Southern Pearly-eye            1    0    0    0
> Northern Pearly-eye            1    3    2    0
> Carolina Satyr                        0    0    1    0
> Monarch                                 1    1    1    0   (all tagged)
> Least Skipper                         0    0    1    0
> Fiery Skipper                          1    0    0    0
> Sachem                                   0    1    0    1
> Clouded Skipper                    4    0    4    1
> Zabulon Skipper                    4    0    1    0
> 
> 
> Here are the 2014 data, with the first column September 22nd, then Sept. 23, 
Sept. 24, and last column September 25. 

> We found 26 species, including a county record (Ocola Skipper).
> 
> Pipevine Swallowtail                3    2    1    1
> Eastern Tiger Swallowtail        0    1    0    0
> Cabbage White                          0    0    2    1    
> Clouded Sulphur                        2    0    0    1
> Orange Sulphur                          0    0    0    1
> Little Yellow                                0    0    2    0
> Cloudless Sulphur                      1    0    0    0
> Eastern-tailed Blue                    0    3    3    3
> Red-banded Hairstreak             0    0    0    1    (fresh)
> Gray Hairstreak                           0    0    0    1    (fresh)
> Gulf Fritillary                                0    0    1    0
> Great Spangled Fritillary            6    3    3    2
> Meadow Fritillary                        0    1    1    1
> Pearl Crescent                            12   13   15  12
> Common Buckeye                        0    0    1    0
> Red-spotted Purple                     0    0    1    0
> Southern Pearly-eye                   2    0    3    2
> Northern Pearly-eye                   1    1    3    1
> Carolina Satyr                               1    0    0    0
> Monarch 0 3 2 4 (5 tagged, the others were a swing and a miss) 

> Silver-spotted Skipper                 0    0    1    0
> Least Skipper                                 0    0    0    2
> Fiery Skipper                                  0    0    1    0
> Sachem                                           3    1    2    1
> Clouded Skipper                            7    3    1    5
> Ocola Skipper 1 0 0 0 (county record) 

> 
> Cheers,
> Jason
>  
> ​
> *********************************************
> Jason P. Love
> Coweeta LTER Site Manager
>  
> Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources
> University of Georgia
>  
> Coweeta Hydrologic Lab
> 3160 Coweeta Lab Rd
> Otto, NC 28763
> 828.524.2128 x113 (office)
> 828.369.6768 (fax)
>  
> https://coweeta.uga.edu
> *********************************************
Subject: Re: Call for butterfly photos for the Butterflies of NC website -- part 2
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 00:27:01 -0400
Do yall want hi-res originals, or do will the pics on my website suffice?

Back in NC now!

Cheers,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

On Oct 5, 2014, at 2:34 PM, Harry LeGrand  wrote:

> Here are more species on the Butterflies of North Carolina website where we 
could use additional photos on the species accounts. This is the first half of 
the true butterflies; I'll send the last half later today. For stray species, 
we could use even rather poor photos if taken in NC -- mainly for documentation 
purposes, though we don't expect any (or many) such photos are available. For 
these strays, we certainly can use good photos from out of state. 

> Zebra Swallowtail -- 2 photos, but need dorsal view
> Spicebush Swallowtail -- 2, but need dorsal female photo
> Checkered White -- 2, need photos of males, especially dorsal
> West Virginia White -- only one photo online
> Great Southern White  [stray]-- only one photo, and that from TX
> Olympia Marble -- 2 photos, but can use a dorsal photo
> Orange Sulphur -- 2 photos, can use a few more
> Southern Dogface [stray] -- only one photo, from TX
> Large Orange Sulphur [stray] -- only one photo, from TX
> Orange-barred Sulphur [stray] -- only one photo, from TX
> Barred Yellow [stray] -- only one photo, from FL
> Little Yellow -- only one photo; need more!
> American Copper -- only one photo; ventral photo needed
> Striped Hairstreak -- only one photo
> Oak Hairstreak -- only one photo, and that from the Piedmont; need 1-2 from 
the s.e. coastal areas 

> Eastern Pine Elfin -- only one photo
> Red-banded Hairstreak -- only one photo!
> Early Hairstreak -- 3 photos, but all somewhat worn (good for documentation 
for this rare species); any fresh ones, showing greenish underparts welcome 

> 
> Again, attach photos in an e-mail to Tom Howard (tom.howard AT ncparks.gov) and 
to me (harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov); or you can simply hit Reply to this email and 
attach photos (to me). 

> By the way, already four of you have submitted photos of skippers, so that is 
a great start! 

> Harry LeGrand 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Call for photos for the Butterflies of North Carolina website -- Part 3
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Oct 2014 20:45:29 -0400
Here are more species on the *Butterflies of North Carolina *website where
we could use additional photos on the species accounts. This is the second
half of the true butterflies.

Ceraunus Blue [stray] -- one photo only, from FL

Spring Azure (Celastrina ladon} -- one photo only; need date and
location for additional photos

Holly Azure (C. idella) -- only one photo; need date and location also

Appalachian Azure -- only one photo; need date and location also for any
additional photos

Dusky Azure -- one photo, thankfully top side of a male; others needed

Little Metalmark -- 3 photos, but we don't have one yet of the underside

American Snout --could use a fresher photo of the dorsal side (though they
usually perch with wings closed)

Aphrodite Fritillary -- only one photo, from below; could use a dorsal
photo; also the last photo in Great Spangled Fritillary shows both species
together on a thistle; Tom -- please label the photo as such

Gorgone Checkerspot -- no photos; could use photos from anywhere, basically

Texan Crescent [stray] -- no photos; can use photos from an eastern state
(SC to FL)

Phaon Crescent -- can use another dorsal photo

Pearl Crescent -- just 2 photos; can use more for diversity, dorsal and
ventral

Tawny Crescent -- can use a dorsal photo of a male

Compton Tortoiseshell -- can use an out of state photo or two

Milbert's Tortoiseshell -- can use an out of state photo of the underside;
Tom -- you should make Wake County red -- historical; record far more than
20 years ago

American Lady -- only one photo!! What happened? Need ventral photo,
especially

White Peacock [stray] -- only one photo, from FL; can use any NC photos or
another 1-2 from out of state, such as a ventral photo

Goatweed Leafwing [stray] -- could use any out of state photos, especially
from SC to FL

Northern Pearly-eye -- only one photo; need a few more

Appalachian Brown -- also only one photo; need 1-2 more

Intricate Satyr -- no photos, but practically impossible to ID; might want
to post photos of specimens (from any state)

Georgia Satyr -- just one photo; could use 1-2 more

Helicta Satyr -- just one photo; could use 1-2 others

Mitchell's Satyr -- only one photo; don't expect any others to come in, but
need to ask anyway

Soldier [stray] -- one photo; could use a dorsal photo from an eastern
state, such as FL

please send photos (preferably as JPG attachments) to either:
Tom Howard  --  tom.howard AT ncparks.gov
or to me -- harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov

Or hit Reply to me, with attachments.

Thanks. Several additional folks have sent us photos of skippers or true
butterflies, and Tom is getting most of them online already.

Harry LeGrand
Subject: Call for butterfly photos for the Butterflies of NC website -- part 2
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Oct 2014 14:34:35 -0400
 Here are more species on the *Butterflies of North Carolina *website where
we could use additional photos on the species accounts. This is the first
half of the true butterflies; I'll send the last half later today. For
stray species, we could use even rather poor photos if taken in NC --
mainly for documentation purposes, though we don't expect any (or many)
such photos are available.  For these strays, we certainly can use good
photos from out of state.
Zebra Swallowtail -- 2 photos, but need dorsal view
Spicebush Swallowtail -- 2, but need dorsal female photo
Checkered White -- 2, need photos of males, especially dorsal
West Virginia White -- only one photo online
Great Southern White  [stray]-- only one photo, and that from TX
Olympia Marble -- 2 photos, but can use a dorsal photo
Orange Sulphur -- 2 photos, can use a few more
Southern Dogface [stray] -- only one photo, from TX
Large Orange Sulphur [stray] -- only one photo, from TX
Orange-barred Sulphur [stray] -- only one photo, from TX
Barred Yellow [stray] -- only one photo, from FL
Little Yellow -- only one photo; need more!
American Copper -- only one photo; ventral photo needed
Striped Hairstreak -- only one photo
Oak Hairstreak -- only one photo, and that from the Piedmont; need 1-2 from
the s.e. coastal areas
Eastern Pine Elfin -- only one photo
Red-banded Hairstreak -- only one photo!
Early Hairstreak -- 3 photos, but all somewhat worn (good for documentation
for this rare species); any fresh ones, showing greenish underparts welcome

Again, attach photos in an e-mail to Tom Howard (tom.howard AT ncparks.gov) and
to me (harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov); or you can simply hit Reply to this email
and attach photos (to me).
By the way, already four of you have submitted photos of skippers, so that
is a great start!
Harry LeGrand
Subject: Photos wanted for Butterflies of North Carolina website
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 20:19:10 -0400
Unlike with the *Odonates of North Carolina *website, people cannot upload
photos to the *Butterflies of North Carolina *website. They have to be sent
to the website administrator, Tom Howard, who uploads them.  As the website
often has just one or two photos for many species, I decided to review the
species one by one. I decided to start with the skippers. Below are species
for which we could use more photos online, as often we have just one photo
of the species taken in NC. Some we could use a dorsal (topside) photo, or
maybe a photo of a female. but, for most, we just would like to have a few
more, to show variation in field marks or colors, etc.

Dorantes Longtail (a stray, with one NC photo)
Golden Banded-Skipper    just one NC photo
Southern Cloudywing -- only one photo on the site for such a numerous
species
Northern Cloudywing -- only one photo on the site; another numerous species
Dreamy Duskywing -- only one photo on the site
Sleepy Duskywing  -- just 2 photos on the site
Juvenal's Duskywing -- only 2 photos for this very common species
Zarucco Duskywing - only 2 photos
Common Checkered-Skipper  -- only 2 photos for this common species
Common Sootywing -- just a single photo on the site
Swarthy Skipper  -- only 2 photos on the site
Leonard's Skipper -- only one photo on the site
Indian Skipper -- only one photo on the site
Tawny-edged Skipper -- only 2 photos
Long Dash -- only one photo
Southern Broken-dash -- only 2 photos
Northern Broken-dash  -- only 2 photos
Little Glassywing -- only 1 photo for this numerous species
Sachem -- a dorsal view of a female is desired
Rare Skipper -- only one photo
Hobomok Skipper -- only 2 photos
Aaron's Skipper -- only one photo
Broad-winged Skipper --- only one photo
Palatka Skipper -- only one photo, and a bad angle at that
Two-spotted Skipper -- only 2 photos
Dun Skipper -- only 2 photos for this widespread skipper
Dusted Skipper -- only 2 photos
Pepper and Salt Skipper -- only 2 photos
Reversed Roadside-Skipper  -- only 2 photos
Dusky Roadside-Skipper  -- only one photo
Salt Marsh Skipper -- only 2 photos
Cofaqui Giant-Skipper -- probably only skipper on the NC list with no photos


So, if you would like to help out, and have your photos online on the
*Butterflies
of North Carolina* website:
http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/

please send photos (preferably as JPG attachments) to either:
Tom Howard  --  tom.howard AT ncparks.gov
or to me -- harry.legrand AT ncdenr.gov

or to both of us. The name of the photographer is listed next to each photo
on the website. Also, we would like at a minimum the county where the photo
was taken; a date is also helpful, and a location within the county is
helpful, but not essential. But, we do want the photos to be taken in NC,
except maybe for a very rare species such as Cofaqui Giant-Skipper or a
very rare stray, such as Funereal Duskywing.

Feel free to peruse the website species accounts and see for yourself the
species where you might be able to help out with supplying photos.

I'll draft a list of true butterflies tomorrow.

Good butterflying!

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh
Subject: Falls lake monarchs, a little superflight!
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 20:02:33 -0400
Had about 19 folks with me this afternoon for a tagging field trip, started 
slow at 1pm with just a few monarchs, then It warmed up and the numbers grew! 
We tagged about 60 and missed at least thrice that many. One 12 year old girl 
caught a total of 14, and both her and i each had a "double" (2 in one net 
swing). Every participant that stuck around past the first hike ended up 
catching at least a few, even the real young ens! Though i think the parents 
had just as much fun as the kids!!! 


Nectar use was about 40% each goldenrod and tickseed sunflower, then 10% 
baccharis. There were several clusters, especially at the lakes edge before 
crossing, about a dozen backed up there! I even had one attracted to a cluster 
of paper monarchs i attached to a tall cluster of goldenrod. Flight was very 
directly southwest, right along i85 and the power line we were hiking. 


Kudos to the bulk of the group that finished the rugged 4 mile hike, we got 
back around 430 and could have kept going there were so many monarchs! Kids 
caught almost everything else too, three lined flower moth, chinese mantids 
etc. 


One family said it was an adventure of a lifetime!  

Going out again tomorrow most likely!

2 cabbage white
2 cloudless sulphur
5 sleepy orange
1 clouded sulphur
5 little yellow
3 red banded hairstreak
4 gray hairstreak
2 e tailed blue
7 pearl crescent
45 common buckeye
12 american lady
2 painted lady
2 viceroy
250 monarch
1 common wood nymph
1 common checkered skipper
5 clouded skipper
8 fiery skipper
3 sachem
15 ocola skipper

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Chatham co leps
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 19:42:28 -0400
Made a quick run to chatham county friday 10/3 from 11am to 2pm. Still lots of 
liatris and aster grandiflora in bloom but struck out on leonards skipper 
again. If i miss it 5 more times it will join yellow rail as a nemesis! (kyle 
paul and i ate going to Louisiana later this month for that little bird) 


Open winged fiery and closed winged female skippers got me excited but alas no. 


2 cabbage white
3 cloudless sulphur
4 sleepy orange
1 clouded sulphur
1 orange sulphur
3 little yellow
2 red banded hairstreak
3 gray hairstreak
4 e tailed blue
5 pearl crescent
30 common buckeye
8 american lady
1 red spotted purple
1 monarch caught and tagged
2 common checkered skipper
4 clouded skipper
10 fiery skipper
5 sachem
1 tawny edged skipper
3 crossline skipper
9 ocola skipper


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Mitchell Mill State Natural Area-10/04/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 19:35:36 -0400
Not much to report today, just 6 species, under sunny skies and temps ~70F.
Good butterflying.

  Sleepy Orange 4  Pearl Crescent 10  Common Buckeye 1  Carolina Satyr 2  Least
Skipper 6  Fiery Skipper 4

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Children and Butterflies
From: "Trish Harrill" <trish.harrill AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 14:18:12 -0400
Hello,

I am new to the list and located in Raleigh, NC. My neighborhood garden club
is sponsoring a junior garden club (ages 6-12) and we are planting a
butterfly garden as an activity with the children. I was wondering if anyone
has any ideas of a project we could do with them regarding migration
patterns of the different butterflies, namely the monarchs. Any other
information with painted lady butterflies would be great also. If anyone who
is very knowledgeable about butterflies and lives in the triangle area would
be willing to come speak to the children when we plant the garden, that
would be wonderful. Please contact me off the loop and we can discuss
details. My email is trish.harrill AT nc.rr.com.

 

Thanks very much in advance. I look forward to seeing different ideas and
suggestions.

 

Trish Harrill
Subject: 3 Monarchs nectaring this chilly morning
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 10:10:51 -0400
We have at least 3 Monarchs here at 56 degrees F at 10 AM after the passage
of autumns's first cold front last night with temperatures predicted to dip
to 40 degrees tonight.

Only other butterfly seen is a single Red-spotted Purple basking in the sun.

I have not been able to determine the direction that migating Monarchs take
when leaving our hill, whether southwest to Texas or south to Florida.

I received this interesting info yesterday from a contact in southern
Belize-






*Dear DougYes we do see Monarch's in Southern Belize, they are one of our
most common butterflies and there is plenty of Milkweed for them although
with development happening there is less Milkweed than there used to be.I
think it was in 2003 or 2004 that we had a huge migration of butterflies
coming in from the sea and heading inland (coming from the East and heading
West) for about 2 weeks and then another 2 week where the butterflies
appeared to be going the other way but did not, as far as I remember, go
out to sea and there were fewer individuals. There did not seem to be a
time gap between the Westerly movement and the Easterly movement.*
*I can try and be more exact with the date if that will help.*

I asked for more info about the date as there was reported a large influx
of Monarchs into the Bahamas in 2005,  and also asked if there was any
evidence of an annual migration there.  Any Monarchs migrating from western
Cuba could easily be blown south to Belize with strong northerly winds.

Doug Allen  Windmill Hill  Spartanburg County, SC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Durant Nature Park-10/03/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 19:03:10 -0400
From noon to 4:45 this afternoon I walked ~3 miles under sunny to partly
cloudy skies and temps ~80F. I saw 15 species but nothing of note. The only
nectaring was on the plantings of Butterfly-bush. Good butterflying.

  Cabbage White 1  Cloudless Sulphur 2  Sleepy Orange 5  Gray
Hairstreak 1  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 10  Variegated Fritillary 1  American Lady 1  Common
Buckeye 2  Carolina
Satyr 1  Monarch 1  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Clouded Skipper 1  Least
Skipper 30  Fiery Skipper 4  Ocola Skipper 7
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Monarchs in southern Va.
From: hughwyatt AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 22:07:02 +0000 (UTC)
Today, Fri., under cloudy skies with some spitting rain, I saw 6 monarchs on 
Buddleia in 2 different locations, all feeding like there was no tomorrow and 
paying no attention to us. Guess they'll pull out for NC in the AM. None were 
tagged and there were 3 male and 3 female. This is the most I have seen in any 
one month this year. For those who track such things, they'll probably enter 
the Old North State through either Caswell or Rockingham county. 

From Danville, good watching. 
Subject: Pitt County, 3 October 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 20:04:46 +0000
Butterflies seen today, 2014-10-03, in Pitt County:

Orange Sulphur, 1, ECU campus
Sleepy Orange, 5, Pitt County Arboretum
Cloudless Sulphur, 2, Pitt County Arboretum
Red-banded Hairstreak, 2, Pitt County Arboretum
Monarch, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Painted Lady, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Red Admiral, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Long-tailed Skipper, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Silver-spotted Skipper, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Ocola Skipper, 10
Fiery Skipper, 20

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Monarchs (Mecklenburg County)
From: "Lampel, Lenny L." <Lenny.Lampel AT mecklenburgcountync.gov>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 19:25:37 +0000
Yesterday, I had six monarchs in the McDowell Prairie section of McDowell 
Nature Preserve (southwest corner of Mecklenburg County). There were numerous 
Common Buckeyes and Cloudless Sulphurs as well. So far, this is the most 
monarchs I've seen this year in the Charlotte area. 


Lenny Lampel
Natural Resources Coordinator
Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation
Conservation Science Office
9001 Plaza Road Extension
Charlotte, NC 28215
Office: 704-432-1390
Mobile: 980-722-2095
Fax: 704-432-1420

Lenny.Lampel AT MecklenburgCountyNC.gov 

Subject: 10/03/14 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County, NC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 15:08:30 -0400 (EDT)
Partly sunny weather, 72 F and windy. Walked 2 hours(10:30am-12:30pm). 

Cloudless Sulphur	2
Sleepy Orange		16
Eastern Tailed-Blue	3
Pearl Crescent		23
Question Mark		1
Common Buckeye		1
Carolina Satyr		3

Silver-spotted Skipper	1

Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: 10/02/14 Watauga County , NC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 2014 09:55:02 -0400 (EDT)
Elk Knob State Park

Mostly sunny weather, started at 63 F and ended at this location at 72 F, windy
conditions. (10:30am-01:15pm). 

Cabbage White			2
Clouded Sulphur 		3
Cloudless Sulphur		2
Great Spangled Fritillary	2
Meadow Fritillary		1

Common Checkered-Skipper	1
Least Skipper			1
Pecks Skipper			3

Rich Mountain road

Dark Swallowtail, fly by	1
Cabbage White			1
Clouded Sulphur 		2
Sleepy Orange			1 
Great Spangled Fritillary	2
Pearl Crescent			4
Painted Lady			1

Peck’s Skipper			1

Julian Price Memorial Park

Partly cloudy. 67 F. (03:30 – 04:15 pm)

Eastern Tailed-Blue		1
Great Spangled Fritillary	1
Pearl Crescent			1
Monarch 			1

Least Skipper			2

Spotted Beet Webworm		1

Blue Ridge Parkway from Linn Cove Viaduct north to US 421.

Linn Cove Viaduct

Monarch 			1

View Wilson Creek Valley Overlook(MP 302.0)

Cabbage White			2
Clouded Sulphur 		1
Pearl Crescent			1
Painted Lady			1
Common Wood-Nymph		1
Monarch 			1

Pilot Ridge Overlook

Eastern Tailed-Blue		1
Painted Lady			1
Monarch 			4

Bamboo Gap – meadow harvested and had few flowers.

Red-spotted Purple		1

View of Osborne Mountain Overlook

Eastern Tailed-Blue		1


Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Monarch in Durham, NC
From: Toni Rexrode <tonirexx AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 03 Oct 2014 08:00:11 -0400
Yesterday I saw a Monarch traversing the length of the downtown American 
Tobacco Campus South Parking garage in Durham, North Carolina. It was traveling 
west to east, although I don't know if that means much since he/she did have to 
navigate his way around the parking garage. I'm pretty sure it was migrating, 
as we were on the fifth level and it was clearly moving with purpose in an 
intended direction. 


It was a pretty sight amidst all that concrete.  

Toni Rexrode
Durham, NC
Subject: Falls lake monarchs and more oct 2
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 21:20:35 -0400
Weather forecast not holding true, sunny keeps turning bleak and dreary! Had 16 
park rangers and teachers attend a monarch workshop at falls lake. We managed 
only 7 monarchs on tickseed sunflower, after i got another 8 off goldenrod. The 
nectar turnover as the sunflower wilts was apparent quickly, though the 
monarchs always see it earlier than me. Some aster ignored, baccharus not in 
bloom yet. 


Hopefully this weekends front will open the flood gates, or maybe today was as 
good as it will get...yikes! 


1 spicebush sw
1 cabbage white
2 cloudless sulphu
1 sleepy orange
1 clouded sulphur
4 little yellow
3 red banded hairstreak
5 gray hairstreak
8 e tailed blue
6 pearl crescent
25 common buckeye
10 american lady
10 painted lady
2 viceroy
15 monarch
1 common wood nymph
1 common checkered skipper
13 clouded skipper
10 fiery skipper
3 sachem
1 little glassywing
12 ocola skipper

Still a bunch of common/soybean loopers, ailanthus webworm moths and a couple 
gorgeous spotted beet webworm moths! 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Temple Flat Rock-10/02/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 17:24:56 -0400
From noon to 2:45 this afternoon I walked around the preserve under sunny
to partly cloudy skies and temps about 80F. I saw only 12 species today
with no species of note. The only nectar was Goldenrod but there was very
little nectaring activity. My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Cabbage White 1  Cloudless Sulphur 2  Little Yellow 3  Sleepy Orange
6  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 15  Variegated Fritillary 1  Pearl Crescent 5  Common
Buckeye 15  Red-spotted
Purple 1  Carolina Satyr 5  Common Checkered-Skipper 1  Fiery Skipper 1
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC