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Updated on Thursday, September 3 at 10:02 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Sokoke Scops Owl,©BirdQuest

3 Sep pc and silvery checkerspot ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
3 Sep Ft Fisher [John Ennis ]
02 Sep Re: Cloudless sulphurs [Bruce Grimes ]
2 Sep Pitt County, 2 September 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
2 Sep Queen at Fort Fisher ["T. Armstrong" ]
1 Sep 14,952 Cloudless Sulphurs [Derb Carter ]
1 Sep Re: Cloudless sulphurs [Harry LeGrand ]
1 Sep Re: Cloudless sulphurs ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
1 Sep Re: Cloudless sulphurs [Virginia Holman ]
1 Sep Re: Cloudless sulphurs [Virginia Holman ]
1 Sep Re: Cloudless sulphurs [Shawn Lane ]
1 Sep Cloudless sulphurs ["Virginia" ]
31 Aug Haw River State Park Bio-Blitz - September 26-27, 2015 (8am to 8am) ["Corey, Ed" ]
30 Aug Some Raulston Arboretum, NC, butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
30 Aug Butterfly a Pawpaw [nottke1 ]
29 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-08/29/2015 [Mike Turner ]
29 Aug Cumberland Co., NC butterflies-Rhodes Pond-08/29/2015 [Mike Turner ]
28 Aug Pitt County, 28 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
28 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-08/25/2015 [Mike Turner ]
28 Aug 08/27/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC ["Sven Halling" ]
27 Aug Finally a Monarch, Female Zabulon ovipositing [Gene Schepker ]
27 Aug North Buncombe 17th Aug [Doug Johnston ]
27 Aug Pettigrew Butterfly Count - September 5 (6) ["Corey, Ed" ]
26 Aug 08/26/15 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County , NC ["Sven Halling" ]
26 Aug Butterfly weekend trip to Croatan NF and Fort Macon SP, NC [Harry LeGrand ]
26 Aug North Buncombe county 26th August [Doug Johnston ]
26 Aug New Yard Butterfly, Appalachian Brown 8/25/15, Return of the Pearly-eyes [Gene Schepker ]
25 Aug 08/25/15 Bethabara Park, Forsyth County , NC ["Sven Halling" ]
25 Aug Re: Pettigrew State Park, August 18th [Harry LeGrand ]
25 Aug Pettigrew State Park, August 18th [Lori Carlson ]
25 Aug Triangle Area Butterflies [Richard Stickney ]
25 Aug Gulf Fritillary, Hillsborough, NC August 25th [Lori Carlson ]
25 Aug More Monarchs [Ginger Kopka ]
25 Aug 08/19/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC ["Sven Halling" ]
25 Aug 08/14/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC ["Sven Halling" ]
25 Aug Many Monarch Caterpillars in Jamestown, Guilford Co, NC [Dennis Burnette ]
25 Aug 08/12/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC ["Sven Halling" ]
24 Aug Forsyth Co. NABA Count Saturday 8/22/15 [Gene Schepker ]
23 Aug Pitt County, 23 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
23 Aug Carolina Sandhills NWR Chesterfield County [Jules Fraytet ]
23 Aug long-tailed skipper in Durham County [Tom Krakauer ]
23 Aug Henderson county [Gail Lankford ]
23 Aug Brasstown Creek Heritage Preserve Oconee County SC [Jules Fraytet ]
22 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-8/22/2015 [Mike Turner ]
22 Aug Pitt County, 22 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
22 Aug North Buncombe NABA count - 55 species [Gail Lankford ]
21 Aug Hayhurst's Scallopwing [Rob Van Epps ]
21 Aug Pitt County, 21 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
21 Aug August Carolina Butterfly Society Butterfly Field Trip 8/30 [Dennis Burnette ]
20 Aug Re: Durham Butterfly Count results (16 Aug 2015) [Jeff Pippen ]
20 Aug Transylvania NABA Count [Ruth Young ]
20 Aug Pitt County, 20 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
20 Aug Recent Saturniidae and Sphingidae + wasp control question [Nate Dias ]
19 Aug Re: Monday, August 17th, Hillsborough, NC in Our Garden [Harry LeGrand ]
19 Aug Monday, August 17th, Hillsborough, NC in Our Garden [Lori Carlson ]
18 Aug Hayhurst's Scallopwings ["John Fussell" ]
18 Aug Pitt County, 18 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
18 Aug Mayo River Butterfly Count [Brian Bockhahn ]
18 Aug Richland Co., SC Monarchs [Dennis Forsythe ]
17 Aug Link to Photo Album of Durham Butterfly Count [Lori Carlson ]
17 Aug Pitt County, 17 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
17 Aug Orangeburg Co., SC leps 15 Aug. 2015 [Dennis Forsythe ]
16 Aug Durham Butterfly Count results (16 Aug 2015) [Jeff Pippen ]
16 Aug Cherokee County, NC, butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
16 Aug Pitt County, 16 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
16 Aug August 15, Cataloochee Valley, GSMNP [Gail Lankford ]
16 Aug Iredell NABA Count 8/15/15 [Gene Schepker ]
16 Aug Wee Tee State Forest, Williamsburg Co., SC 15 Aug. 2015 [Dennis Forsythe ]
15 Aug Macon Co, NC butterflies [Jason Love ]
15 Aug Gaston County leps [drivesa3 AT aol.com ]
14 Aug Another "fall" Monarch and FOY Long-tailed Skipper [Doug Allen ]
13 Aug Re: First "fall" Monarch, and butterflies common again ["Loretta" ]
13 Aug Correction on Howell Woods [Richard Stickney ]
12 Aug Catawba County, 12 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
12 Aug Fwd: Davie County, 12 August 2015- date correction ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
12 Aug Davie County, 12 August 2015 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]

Subject: pc and silvery checkerspot
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 14:51:08 +0000
An observation:

Pearl Crescents have very rounded forewings.
Silvery Checkerspots have slightly concave, and not at all rounded, forewings.

This may be well-known but I don't recall seeing it anywhere. It may be useful 
for id'ing the occasional odd-looking insect such as the 3rd one on Will Cook's 
page at 


http://www.carolinanature.com/butterflies/silverycheckerspot.html

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Ft Fisher
From: John Ennis <jxennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 09:15:15 -0400
There is a small population of Queens down there...sometimes you can see 
several this time of year...also a few Giant Swallowtails... 


The others your mentioned are normal post breeding dispersal...

John Ennis 
Leland NC

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
From: Bruce Grimes <bugpix AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 02 Sep 2015 23:44:08 -0400
In the Blue Ridge area of Virginia, near Roanoke, we see at our Rocky 
Knob migration watch site occasional southward-bound migrants in the 
fall including Sleepy Orange, Cloudless Sulphur, and very rarely, Little 
Yellow.  We also see southward-bound Vanessa species including Painted 
Lady in years they are around in numbers.
I have seen large northward movements of Cloudless Sulphur in September 
when visiting Chincoteague, including over the ocean.
Bruce Grimes
Christiansburg, VA

On 9/1/2015 2:33 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:
> Salman has it right. Some species of butterflies -- especially whites and
> sulphurs -- are adapted to fly northward or eastward, especially -- to
> attempt to expand the range and colonize new areas. It might be that these
> species are "overcrowded" in the main range, and need to emigrate outward
> from there. But, at any rate, some of these species every year make the
> trek northward and eastward to spread to new areas, and then mate and lay
> eggs. Of course, very few of these eggs or later stages will survive the
> harsh "northern" winter, but a few will -- we do see a very few adult
> Cloudless Sulphurs, Little Yellows, etc., in spring.  Likewise, every few
> years, Painted Ladies have a big outbreak from the desert Southwest and
> western Mexico and move eastward and northeastward in very large numbers,
> but there is no return flight.
>
> A few of the adults may fly back to the south, but for most part, they live
> out the rest of their lives (a week or a month or two) up here.  Some
> adults can be seen on warm winter days, for example, but these most likely
> are adults just making it day by day through the early winter.  (I have
> seen claims that Cloudless Sulphurs often have a noticeable migration back
> to the south in late fall. I am not sure where that came from; I've never
> seen it!  But, I sure see lots of them flying N or NE in August and
> September (but this is a bad year for seeing a big movement.)
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 1:40 PM, Abdulali, Salman  wrote:
>
>> It seems to me like the right strategy for a species to maximize its
>> range, and well adapted to climate change.
>>
>> Salman Abdulali
>> Greenville, NC
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sep 1, 2015, at 1:14 PM, Virginia Holman wrote:
>>
>> Is there a reason for a northward autumnal migration? It seems ofd.
>>
>> On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Alex Grkovich 
>> wrote:
>> It is likely that a northward dispersion is in progress. They are already
>> being seen in south coastal Connecticut, which is a regular occurrence most
>> years during late August into September.......They should be expected soon
>> in southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island.....
>>
>> Alex
>>
>>
>>
>> From: Virginia Holman 
>> To: Shawn Lane 
>> Cc: "carolinaleps AT duke.edu" 
>> Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2015 12:48 PM
>> Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
>>
>> You may be correct, but it truly seems to this layperson's eye that they
>> are migrating north each year. The only thing I've found that indicates a
>> similar pattern is this:
>>
>>
>> http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/1980s/1983/1983-37(2)166-Gaddy.pdf
>>
>> Fascinating if it is indeed migratory behavior.
>>
>> On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Shawn Lane  wrote:
>> Hi
>>   I may be wrong but if you observe the wind direction they most likely are
>> flying into the wind. I do not think they are migrating but simply flying
>> where the lift is easier across the wing. I would be curious what other
>> replies you might get.
>> Sincerely, Shawn
>>
>> On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Virginia 
>> wrote:
>> Hello:
>> I have a newby question. My husband and I live at the coast near
>> Wilmington.
>> Each fall we observe large numbers of cloudless sulphurs migrating north
>> instead of south. I've been unable to find any explanation for this
>> behavior.
>> Can someone here point us in the right direction (so to speak)?
>> Thanks.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

---
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Subject: Pitt County, 2 September 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 20:50:41 +0000
Butterflies seen today (2015-09-02) in Pitt County:

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 5
Spicebush Swallowtail, 4

Silver-spotted Skipper, 30
Horace's Duskywing, 1 female
Ocola Skipper, 6
Fiery Skipper, 80
Sachem, 7

Cloudless Sulphur, 5
Sleepy Orange, 10

Red-banded Hairstreak, 7
Gray Hairstreak, 1
Summer Azure, 3

Variegated Fritillary, 1
Viceroy, 1
Red Admiral, 2
American Lady, 1
Common Buckeye, 3
Pearl Crescent, 5

Left unidentified: a pearly-eye, a white (cabbage?) and a dark skipper (dun?).

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Queen at Fort Fisher
From: "T. Armstrong" <tarmstrong75 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 13:26:29 -0400
While hiking the Fort Fisher basin trail with my family this morning I
found a single Queen butterfly.  Low quality cell phone photo at

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/6WCC7JQtVTEUpYaMMYQbE9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 


Although primarily there for birding, I was surprised by the large numbers
of Eastern Tiger and Palamedes Swallowtails, Gulf Fritillaries, Cloudless
Sulphurs, and Salt Marsh Skippers.  Also of note were four Monarchs.

Tim Armstrong
Wilmington, NC
Subject: 14,952 Cloudless Sulphurs
From: Derb Carter <derbc AT selcnc.org>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 20:17:06 +0000
On Saturday, on Figure 8 Island near Wilmington NC, Cloudless Sulphurs heading 
north started moving by in large numbers at about 9 am. The movement went on 
for about seven hours until about 4 pm. From the corner of the deck I could 
count the number of individuals passing by from the beach to the marsh on the 
back side. I did eight random counts through the day ranging from 27 to 44 
(mean 35.6) passing by per minute. For seven steady hours that's 14,952 
Cloudless Sulphurs. Sunday had another major movement of not quite the same 
numbers. There were also good numbers of Palamedes Swallowtails, Gulf Frits and 
Sleepy Oranges drifting around and few Monarchs heading south. 


Derb Carter
Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 14:33:11 -0400
Salman has it right. Some species of butterflies -- especially whites and
sulphurs -- are adapted to fly northward or eastward, especially -- to
attempt to expand the range and colonize new areas. It might be that these
species are "overcrowded" in the main range, and need to emigrate outward
from there. But, at any rate, some of these species every year make the
trek northward and eastward to spread to new areas, and then mate and lay
eggs. Of course, very few of these eggs or later stages will survive the
harsh "northern" winter, but a few will -- we do see a very few adult
Cloudless Sulphurs, Little Yellows, etc., in spring.  Likewise, every few
years, Painted Ladies have a big outbreak from the desert Southwest and
western Mexico and move eastward and northeastward in very large numbers,
but there is no return flight.

A few of the adults may fly back to the south, but for most part, they live
out the rest of their lives (a week or a month or two) up here.  Some
adults can be seen on warm winter days, for example, but these most likely
are adults just making it day by day through the early winter.  (I have
seen claims that Cloudless Sulphurs often have a noticeable migration back
to the south in late fall. I am not sure where that came from; I've never
seen it!  But, I sure see lots of them flying N or NE in August and
September (but this is a bad year for seeing a big movement.)

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 1:40 PM, Abdulali, Salman  wrote:

> It seems to me like the right strategy for a species to maximize its
> range, and well adapted to climate change.
>
> Salman Abdulali
> Greenville, NC
>
>
>
> On Sep 1, 2015, at 1:14 PM, Virginia Holman wrote:
>
> Is there a reason for a northward autumnal migration? It seems ofd.
>
> On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Alex Grkovich 
> wrote:
> It is likely that a northward dispersion is in progress. They are already
> being seen in south coastal Connecticut, which is a regular occurrence most
> years during late August into September.......They should be expected soon
> in southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island.....
>
> Alex
>
>
>
> From: Virginia Holman 
> To: Shawn Lane 
> Cc: "carolinaleps AT duke.edu" 
> Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2015 12:48 PM
> Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
>
> You may be correct, but it truly seems to this layperson's eye that they
> are migrating north each year. The only thing I've found that indicates a
> similar pattern is this:
>
>
> http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/1980s/1983/1983-37(2)166-Gaddy.pdf
>
> Fascinating if it is indeed migratory behavior.
>
> On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Shawn Lane  wrote:
> Hi
>  I may be wrong but if you observe the wind direction they most likely are
> flying into the wind. I do not think they are migrating but simply flying
> where the lift is easier across the wing. I would be curious what other
> replies you might get.
> Sincerely, Shawn
>
> On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Virginia 
> wrote:
> Hello:
> I have a newby question. My husband and I live at the coast near
> Wilmington.
> Each fall we observe large numbers of cloudless sulphurs migrating north
> instead of south. I've been unable to find any explanation for this
> behavior.
> Can someone here point us in the right direction (so to speak)?
> Thanks.
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 17:40:34 +0000
It seems to me like the right strategy for a species to maximize its range, and 
well adapted to climate change. 


Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC



On Sep 1, 2015, at 1:14 PM, Virginia Holman wrote:

Is there a reason for a northward autumnal migration? It seems ofd.

On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Alex Grkovich  wrote:
It is likely that a northward dispersion is in progress. They are already being 
seen in south coastal Connecticut, which is a regular occurrence most years 
during late August into September.......They should be expected soon in 
southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island..... 

 
Alex
 
 

From: Virginia Holman 
To: Shawn Lane  
Cc: "carolinaleps AT duke.edu"  
Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2015 12:48 PM
Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs

You may be correct, but it truly seems to this layperson's eye that they are 
migrating north each year. The only thing I've found that indicates a similar 
pattern is this: 


http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/1980s/1983/1983-37(2)166-Gaddy.pdf

Fascinating if it is indeed migratory behavior. 

On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Shawn Lane  wrote:
Hi
 I may be wrong but if you observe the wind direction they most likely are 
flying into the wind. I do not think they are migrating but simply flying where 
the lift is easier across the wing. I would be curious what other replies you 
might get. 

Sincerely, Shawn 

On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Virginia  wrote:
Hello:
I have a newby question. My husband and I live at the coast near Wilmington.
Each fall we observe large numbers of cloudless sulphurs migrating north
instead of south. I've been unable to find any explanation for this behavior.
Can someone here point us in the right direction (so to speak)?
Thanks.



Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
From: Virginia Holman <virginiaholman1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 13:14:44 -0400
Is there a reason for a northward autumnal migration? It seems ofd.

On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Alex Grkovich 
wrote:

> It is likely that a northward dispersion is in progress. They are already
> being seen in south coastal Connecticut, which is a regular occurrence most
> years during late August into September.......They should be expected soon
> in southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island.....
>
> Alex
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Virginia Holman  >
> *To:* Shawn Lane  >
> *Cc:* "carolinaleps AT duke.edu
> " <
> carolinaleps AT duke.edu
> >
> *Sent:* Tuesday, September 1, 2015 12:48 PM
> *Subject:* Re: Cloudless sulphurs
>
> You may be correct, but it truly seems to this layperson's eye that they
> are migrating north each year. The only thing I've found that indicates a
> similar pattern is this:
>
>
> http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/1980s/1983/1983-37(2)166-Gaddy.pdf
>
> Fascinating if it is indeed migratory behavior.
>
> On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Shawn Lane  wrote:
>
> Hi
>  I may be wrong but if you observe the wind direction they most likely are
> flying into the wind. I do not think they are migrating but simply flying
> where the lift is easier across the wing. I would be curious what other
> replies you might get.
> Sincerely, Shawn
>
> On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Virginia 
> wrote:
>
> Hello:
> I have a newby question. My husband and I live at the coast near
> Wilmington.
> Each fall we observe large numbers of cloudless sulphurs migrating north
> instead of south. I've been unable to find any explanation for this
> behavior.
> Can someone here point us in the right direction (so to speak)?
> Thanks.
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
From: Virginia Holman <virginiaholman1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 12:48:04 -0400
You may be correct, but it truly seems to this layperson's eye that they
are migrating north each year. The only thing I've found that indicates a
similar pattern is this:

http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/1980s/1983/1983-37(2)166-Gaddy.pdf

Fascinating if it is indeed migratory behavior.

On Tuesday, September 1, 2015, Shawn Lane  wrote:

> Hi
>  I may be wrong but if you observe the wind direction they most likely are
> flying into the wind. I do not think they are migrating but simply flying
> where the lift is easier across the wing. I would be curious what other
> replies you might get.
> Sincerely, Shawn
>
> On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Virginia  > wrote:
>
>> Hello:
>> I have a newby question. My husband and I live at the coast near
>> Wilmington.
>> Each fall we observe large numbers of cloudless sulphurs migrating north
>> instead of south. I've been unable to find any explanation for this
>> behavior.
>> Can someone here point us in the right direction (so to speak)?
>> Thanks.
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: Cloudless sulphurs
From: Shawn Lane <shawnlane07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 12:39:20 -0400
Hi
 I may be wrong but if you observe the wind direction they most likely are
flying into the wind. I do not think they are migrating but simply flying
where the lift is easier across the wing. I would be curious what other
replies you might get.
Sincerely, Shawn

On Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 11:56 AM, Virginia  wrote:

> Hello:
> I have a newby question. My husband and I live at the coast near
> Wilmington.
> Each fall we observe large numbers of cloudless sulphurs migrating north
> instead of south. I've been unable to find any explanation for this
> behavior.
> Can someone here point us in the right direction (so to speak)?
> Thanks.
>
Subject: Cloudless sulphurs
From: "Virginia" <virginiaholman1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 11:56:17 -0400 (EDT)
Hello:
I have a newby question. My husband and I live at the coast near Wilmington.
Each fall we observe large numbers of cloudless sulphurs migrating north
instead of south. I've been unable to find any explanation for this behavior.
Can someone here point us in the right direction (so to speak)?
Thanks.
Subject: Haw River State Park Bio-Blitz - September 26-27, 2015 (8am to 8am)
From: "Corey, Ed" <ed.corey AT ncparks.gov>
Date: Mon, 31 Aug 2015 15:54:44 +0000
On September 26th, 2015, the NC Division of Parks and Recreation will be 
hosting its fourth Bio-Blitz at Haw River State Park (hereafter, HARI), in 
Guilford and Rockingham counties. Many of you have likely participated in 
bio-blitzes before, but for those who haven't, please refer to this website: 
http://wiki.laptop.org/go/BioBlitz_guide 




HARI is a small, developing park, most well-known for its meeting facilities 
(formerly the Summit Center). However, this gem just north of Greensboro 
provides good examples of various Piedmont habitats, from river floodplains, to 
oak hillsides, to pine-dominated forests and many others! Additionally, there 
are several aquatic habitats to explore, including the headwaters of the Haw 
River and a modest fishing lake. 




Our goals for this effort will be: 1) to increase our knowledge and 
understanding of flora and fauna at the park; 2) to update existing species 
records, and 3) to continue to refine the model for future bio-blitzes within 
our division. We are trying to pull experts from many different taxonomic 
groups, ranging from moths, to mammals, to myxomycota! 


If interested in participating, please let me know.

Thanks!

Ed

--------

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist
NC Division of Parks and Recreation

Yorkshire Center
Office 305
12700 Bayleaf Church Road, Raleigh, NC 27614-9633
Office: 919-841-4037 Cell: 919-208-7864 Fax: 919-870-6843

E-mail correspondence to and from this address may be subject to the North 
Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties. 

Subject: Some Raulston Arboretum, NC, butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 16:42:40 -0400
This afternoon I went back to Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, after having
been there 8 days ago. Where did the orange butterflies go?! I saw nary an
American Lady, Monarch, Pearl Crescent, or Variegated Fritillary this time
-- and no white butterflies either (i.e., Cabbage White).  Thankfully, I
saw 4-5 species today that I missed last weekend. Here is my list from 2 -
3:15 pm, under very warm but overcast skies:

Pipevine Swallowtail  1
Black Swallowtail  2
E. Tiger Swallowtail 25
Cloudless Sulphur  4
Sleepy Orange 25
Gray Hairstreak   5 possibly my record count there
Red-banded Hairstreak  1
Common Buckeye  4
Red-spotted Purple  1
Silver-spotted Skipper  35
Hoarce's Duskywing  3
Wild Indigo Duskywing  1
Common Checkered-Skipper  3
Fiery Skipper  50
Sachem  45
Southern Broken-dash  1
Ocola Skipper 6

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh
Subject: Butterfly a Pawpaw
From: nottke1 <nottke1 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2015 12:00:20 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
It is pawpaw season here in Forsyth County.
If you have an over-ripe, damaged, or excess pawpaw fruit, butterfly it, lay it 
skin side down on a plate and place it on a deck railing or outside table. 

It will soon attract any Red-spotted Purple, Viceroy, Hackberry Emperor, Tawny 
Emperor, Questionmark or Eastern Comma butterflies in the area. 

And it tends NOT to attract raccoons, possums, ants, flies, or wasps. And it 
will last a week. 

Why go through all the trouble of going out looking for butterflies, when you 
can attract them to you? 

I have frozen a few to use next year before the pawpaws get ripe.

Jim Nottke
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-08/29/2015
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 20:04:44 -0400
After visiting Cumberland Co. earlier this afternoon I stopped by Lake
Raleigh from 4-5:15pm. I walked about 1.5 miles along the greenway and
below the dam. The highlight among my 17 species was 1 Dion Skipper. Good
butterflying.

E. Tiger Swallowtail 2 incl. 1 black form female
Spicebush Swallowtail 1
Cloudless Sulphur 1
Sleepy Orange 3
Gray Hairstreak   2
Red-banded Hairstreak   3
Eastern Tailed-Blue   6
Summer Azure   1
Pearl Crescent   2
Common Buckeye   4
Red-spotted Purple   2
Silver-spotted Skipper   2
Least Skipper   1
Fiery Skipper   2
Sachem   4
Zabulon Skipper   1
Dion Skipper   1

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Cumberland Co., NC butterflies-Rhodes Pond-08/29/2015
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 20:00:04 -0400
Today, from noon until 3pm, I walked around the sedge/grass-infested lake
bed and ditches at the drained Rhodes Pond. I saw 15 species, an excellent
total when you consider I visited here in May 2015, under near perfect
butterflying conditions, and saw only 1 butterfly the whole day. Today the
highlights were 9 Dion Skippers. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

E. Tiger Swallowtail 5
Spicebush Swallowtail 2
Palamedes Swallowtail 2
Cloudless Sulphur 2
Sleepy Orange 10
Pearl Crescent   3
Question Mark   3
Red Admiral   5
Common Buckeye   6
Red-spotted Purple   2
Viceroy   2
Silver-spotted Skipper   8
Least Skipper   10
Fiery Skipper   25
Dion Skipper   9

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 28 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 20:37:17 +0000
Butterflies seen today (2015-08-28) in Pitt County:

Black Swallowtail, 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 40
Spicebush Swallowtail, 2

Silver-spotted Skipper, 25
Horace's Duskywing, 3
Common Checkered-Skipper, 1
Ocola Skipper, 6
Fiery Skipper, 65
Sachem, 3
Whirlabout, 1 male
Dun Skipper, 1

Cloudless Sulphur, 4
Sleepy Orange, 13

Great Purple Hairstreak, 5, Boyd Lee Park (4) and Pitt Count Arboretum (1)
Red-banded Hairstreak, 12
Gray Hairstreak, 1
Summer Azure, 1

Red-spotted Purple, 1
American Lady, 1, first in a while
Common Buckeye, 4
Pearl Crescent, 3

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-08/25/2015
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 15:00:11 -0400
From 1:30 to 2:15 this afternoon I walked around PRE under sunny skies and
temps about 87F. Among my 19 species were 3 Gulf Fritillarys, my first seen
since May. My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

Pipevine Swallowtail  2 caterpillar on Aristilochia tomentosa
Black Swallowtail  1  caterpillar on Foeniculum vulgare
E. Tiger Swallowtail  3
Sleepy Orange  5
Cloudless Sulphur  2
Gray Hairstreak  1
Red-banded Hairstreak  2
Summer Azure  1
Gulf Fritillary  3
Variegated Fritillary  2
Pearl Crescent  2
Red Admiral  1
Common Buckeye  5
Monarch  4
Silver-spotted Skipper 1
Common Checkered-Skipper  1
Fiery Skipper  2
Sachem  6
Ocola Skipper 3

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: 08/27/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC
From: "Sven Halling" <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 09:07:05 -0400 (EDT)
While working in the garden I was surrounded by the following butterflies:

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail		1
Orange Sulphur			        1
Sleepy Orange			       3
Variegated Fritillary			1
Common Buckeye			1
Hackberry Emperor			1

Silver-spotted Skipper		2
Sachem				                4



Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Finally a Monarch, Female Zabulon ovipositing
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 20:48:57 -0400
We had the first Monarch since early in the season and she just nectared
and flew up into some pine needles to spend the night.  I watched her
nectar mostly on Tropical Milkweed but saw no sign of egg laying. For the
last two days we have been getting Northern Pearly-eyes on the wood edges
of our property.  I had 3 yesterday, two today.

Todays numbers:

Monarch 1
Northern Pearly-eye 2
Question Mark 1 (fresh)
Red-spotted Purple 3
Great Spangled Fritillary 1
Common Buckeye 4
Sleepy Orange 4
Cloudless Sulphur 1
Pearl Crescent 5
Silvery Checkerspot 1
Clouded Skipper 2
Zabulon Skipper 7
Fiery Skipper 1
Sachems 20
Dun Skipper 1
Little Glassywing 1
Cabbage White 3

Gene Schepker
Subject: North Buncombe 17th Aug
From: Doug Johnston <wellsteadwest AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 15:31:47 -0400
A Gorgeous Gulf frit just sailed into my yard aiming for some zinnias. Add to 
that a Southern broken-dash on buddleia this morning (kindly confirmed by 
Harry) and the great week for butterflies in Buncombe goes on. I am now waiting 
for the Giant swallowtails to appear as they did a couple of times a few years 
ago. 

Always something

Doug
Subject: Pettigrew Butterfly Count - September 5 (6)
From: "Corey, Ed" <ed.corey AT ncparks.gov>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 18:57:35 +0000
Folks,

We will be holding our annual butterfly count at Pettigrew State Park (and 
surrounding areas; Creswell, NC) on Saturday, September 5th, with September 6th 
as a rain date. We would love to have you join us to cover the available 
habitats, so let me know if you'd be interested in participating. 


Thanks!

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC
Ed.Corey AT ncparks.gov
Subject: 08/26/15 Dinkins Bottoms, Yadkin County , NC
From: "Sven Halling" <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 23:06:04 -0400 (EDT)
Partly sunny weather. Walked 3 hours(03:00pm-06:00pm). The fields I found in
10/08/2014 were all planted with soybeans and had mostly sleepy oranges.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail		    2
Cloudless Sulphur			    4
Sleepy Orange			          91
Gray Hairstreak			            3
Eastern Tailed-Blue			   28
Summer Azure			           10
American Snout			             1
Silvery Checkerspot			    13
Pearl Crescent			            19
Question Mark			              1
Eastern Comma			              2
Red Admiral				              1
Common Buckeye			      5
Red-spotted Purple			     21
Viceroy 				                      5
Hackberry Emperor			      2
Tawny Emperor			              3
Northern Pearly-Eye		              1
Appalachian Brown			      1
Carolina Satyr			            38

Silver-spotted Skipper		    27
Hayhurst’s Scallopwing		      1
Common Sootywing			      1
Clouded Skipper			              2
Least Skipper			              2
Crossline				              1
Sachem				                    36
Delaware Skipper 			       1
Zabulon				                     38
Lace-winged Roadside-skipper	3
Ocola Skipper			                1



Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Butterfly weekend trip to Croatan NF and Fort Macon SP, NC
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 19:45:44 -0400
 This past weekend 5 enthusiastic lepsters (Rick Cheicante, Matt Orsie,
Barry Marts, Mike Smith and Tom Pendleton) from WV, MD and VA went on a
field trip to SE North Carolina spending time in various locations within
Croatan National Forest with a side trip to Fort Macon State Park. The
weather could not have been better with low humidity, light breezes and
plentiful sunshine. For Barry, Mike and I this was our second trip of the
year to SE NC, the first being in early May. Our primary targets were
Roadside Skippers and any other rare / regional specialties that have been
found in that area. 42 species were seen with the best butterfly being a
Berry's Skipper which posed nicely for photos and played tag team with a
Delaware Skipper which made for a nice comparison. Three Cane specialists
were seen in decent numbers (Lace-winged Roadside-Skipper (13), Carolina
Roadside-Skipper (37), Reversed Roadside-Skipper (6)). Other notables for
us were Giant Swallowtails at Fort Macon SP, Little Metalmark, Gulf
Fritillary, Georgia Satyr, Zarucco Duskywing, Whirlabout, Byssus Skipper
and Twin-spot Skipper.

8-22/23  Croatan NF and Fort Macon SP, NC
To the left are the total numbers for the trip; to the right, the first
column is for Croatan (Craven), the second column is for Croatan
(Carteret), and the third is for Fort Macon (Carteret):
2   Giant Swallowtail   (0, 0, 2)
7   Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (6, 1, 0)
1   Spicebush Swallowtail (0, 1, 0)
46  Palamedes Swallowtail (14, 32, 0)
135 Cloudless Sulphur (67, 18, 50)
38  Sleepy Orange (23, 10, 5)
7   Gray Hairstreak (4, 0, 3)
9   Red-banded Hairstreak (8, 0, 1)
2   Eastern Tailed-Blue (2, 0, 0)
3   Summer Azure (3, 0, 0)
4   Little Metalmark (0, 4, 0)
1   Gulf Fritillary (0, 0, 1)
9   Pearl Crescent (4, 3, 2)
12  Common Buckeye (10, 2, 0)
3   Red-spotted Purple (1, 2, 0)
42  Carolina Satyr (12, 30, 0)
12  Georgia Satyr (12, 0, 0)
2   Common Wood-Nymph (2, 0, 0)
1   Monarch (1, 0, 0)
2   Silver-spotted Skipper (1, 1, 0)
1   Southern Cloudywing (1, 0, 0)
1   Hayhurst's Scallopwing (0, 0, 1)
3   Horace's Duskywing (3, 0, 0)
2   Zarucco Duskywing (0, 2, 0)
1   Swarthy Skipper (0, 1, 0)
4   Clouded Skipper ((0, 3, 1)
3   Least Skipper (3, 0, 0)
16  Fiery Skipper (8, 0, 8)
8   Tawny-edged Skipper (0, 8, 0)
1   Whirlabout (1, 0, 0)
22  Southern Broken-Dash (4, 3, 15)
1   Little Glassywing (1, 0, 0)
1   Delaware Skipper (1, 0, 0)
6   Byssus Skipper (1, 5, 0)
1   Berry's Skipper (1, 0, 0)
3   Dun Skipper (1, 1, 1)
13  Lace-winged Roadside-Skipper (13, 0, 0)
37  Carolina Roadside-Skipper (37, 0, 0)
6   Reversed Roadside-Skipper (6, 0, 0)
28  Twin-spot Skipper (28, 0, 0)
1   Salt Marsh Skipper (0, 0, 1)
16  Ocola Skipper (0, 0, 16)

Some photos are posted on my blog at: http://wvbirder.org/wvleps

Matt Orsie - Summit Point, WV
Subject: North Buncombe county 26th August
From: Doug Johnston <wellsteadwest AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 17:32:29 -0400
Weather today, clear, light north wind, 81F

These past two days after the cold front have been great for butterflies around 
my local patch. For some reason, today produced a number of singles, best of 
which was probably my FOY Painted lady. 

One species missing from this list is Red spotted purple. I saw three today, 
but couldn’t figure out how to edit eButterfly to correct the omission. 

Other leps seen in the past few days include Silvery checkerspot and Clouded 
skipper 


Doug

List copied from eButterfly submission

Species
4 Silver-spotted Skipper <>10 Least Skipper <>20 Sachem Skipper <>1 Zabulon 
Skipper <>1 Dun Skipper <>1 Black Swallowtail <>4 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail <>6 
Cabbage White <>5 Clouded Sulphur <>3 Orange Sulphur <>1 Cloudless Sulphur <>1 
Little Yellow <>1 Sleepy Orange <>1 Red-banded Hairstreak <>2 Gray Hairstreak 
<>7 Eastern Tailed-Blue <>2 Summer Azure <>1 Variegated Fritillary <>5 Great 
Spangled Fritillary <>1 Meadow Fritillary <>9 Pearl Crescent <>1 Question Mark 
<>1 Eastern Comma <>1 American Lady <>1 Painted Lady <>1 Red Admiral <>2 Common 
Buckeye <>1 Viceroy <>7 Northern Pearly-Eye <>2 Monarch <>1 Gemmed Satyr <>3 
Carolina Satyr <> 
Subject: New Yard Butterfly, Appalachian Brown 8/25/15, Return of the Pearly-eyes
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 08:30:27 -0400
While trying to catch up with the yard work, I was called up to the deck
behind the house by Lois to see an Appalachian Brown (probably a good 1/4
mile from an ephemeral swamp on Salem Creek where I usually find them)  It
was sunning while waiting for the party.  The Red-spotted Purples were
dining on our figs which are splitting from the recent rains (at exactly
the wrong time of the year for the figs).  A lot of insects and Brown
Threshers joined in on sharing the fruit.

After a bulldozer destroyed almost all the Native Cane,  a stoned road
replaced a wet dirt road on nearby Salem Creek.  When a lot of trees, many
of them  dead, were removed and the sterilization program intact, the
Northern and Creole Pearly-eye populations disappeared for over two years.
Last week I found a few Northern Pearly-eyes had returned on 8/20/15.
Yesteday I saw one Northern Pearly-eye on a nearby Oak tree at dusk.

In the garden and yard"

Sachem  14
Southern Broken-dash 1
Little Glassywing 2
Ocola Skipper 1
Crossline Skipper 1
Question Mark 1 (worn and frayed)
Spicebush Swallowtail 1 female
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail  5
Pearl Crescent 3
Common Buckeye 5
Sleepy Orange 1 (ovipositing on Sicklepod)
Cloudless Sulphur 1
Eastern Tailed-blue 1
Gray Hairstreak caterpillar (brought inside on yellow greenbean).
Common Sootywing 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 2
Zabulon Skipper
Common Checkered Skipper
Carolina Satyr 3
American Lady 1 (fresh)
American Snout 1
Northern Pearly-eye (near the yard)

Hot, sunny, and humid.  Mostly late afternoon.

Gene Schepker
Subject: 08/25/15 Bethabara Park, Forsyth County , NC
From: "Sven Halling" <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 22:28:36 -0400 (EDT)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail                         10

Cloudless Sulphur                                        3

Sleepy Orange                                             15

Eastern Tailed-Blue                                    19

Summer Azure                                               4

Great Spangled Fritillary                              2

Silvery Checkerspot                                      1

Pearl Crescent                                             25

Red Admiral                                                   1

Common Buckeye                                       13

Red-spotted Purple                                       3

Carolina Satyr                                                2



Silver-spotted Skipper                                  4

Tawny-edged Skipper                                  6

Southern Broken-dash                                 1

Northern Broken-dash                                  1

Sachem                                                          37

Delaware Skipper                                          8

Zabulon                                                            6





Gene Schepker

Sven Halling (at the note pad)



Sven Halling

Lewisville, NC
Subject: Re: Pettigrew State Park, August 18th
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 19:01:35 -0400
Lori:

I think the anglewing is an Eastern Comma. I only see three black spots on
rear of the FW from below instead of four. However, I'd rather not enter
that into the database, as the angle is rather poor, it is quite worn, and
Comma is scarce in the area.

The mystery skipper close up on the blade of grass is a fresh male Dion
Skipper, which is fairly common in the area. Glad you got the male
Zabulons, as we often seem to have trouble with this one -- maybe the
butterfly counts don't quite hit them in the flight periods. I think the
smaller photo earlier in the photo album is the same species (Dion), but
maybe not. It isn't a Least, but I wasn't sure that I could rule out a
female Delaware.

The bluish dragonflies all are Great Blue Skimmers -- males except maybe a
few photos of probable females. I didn't see a Blue Dasher photo.

Thanks for the list; we don't get that many NC Coastal Plain lists
submitted other than from Salman from Pitt County.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Tue, Aug 25, 2015 at 3:36 PM, Lori Carlson 
wrote:

> Hello,
> A week ago we took a trip out to Pettigrew State Park as Jeff Pippen
> commented to us that would be the place to go see some Zebra Swallowtails.
> Our visit surpassed our expectations in what we saw! It was our first time
> seeing a Palamedes Swallowtail, and we survived without a cell phone and
> flush toilets. Our day was 85F with overcast skies. We had all parts of the
> park to ourselves encountering other people only twice. We practiced our
> counting skills and identification. I posted the photos on Flickr:
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskiNk8vR
> Only two skippers had us a bit confused and we decided based on its size
> it one could be a Least Skipper, and our best guess for the other was a
> Dion.
> Take care,
> Lori
>
> Our counts:
> 49 Zebra Swallowtails
> 41 Eastern Tiger Swallowtails
> 9 Sleepy Orange
> 21 Summer Azure
> 3 Pearl Crescent
> 10 Red Admiral
> 16 Red Spotted Purple
> 10 Carolina Satyr
> 3 Silver-Spotted Skipper
> 2 Least Skipper (uncertain on ID)
> 1 Little Glassywing
> 7 Zabulon Skipper
> 1 Dion Skipper (maybe)
> 7 Palamedes Swallowtail
> 1 Comma or Question Mark
>
Subject: Pettigrew State Park, August 18th
From: Lori Carlson <lori.m.carlson AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 15:36:46 -0400
Hello,
A week ago we took a trip out to Pettigrew State Park as Jeff Pippen 
commented to us that would be the place to go see some Zebra 
Swallowtails. Our visit surpassed our expectations in what we saw! It 
was our first time seeing a Palamedes Swallowtail, and we survived 
without a cell phone and flush toilets. Our day was 85F with overcast 
skies. We had all parts of the park to ourselves encountering other 
people only twice. We practiced our counting skills and identification. 
I posted the photos on Flickr: https://flic.kr/s/aHskiNk8vR
Only two skippers had us a bit confused and we decided based on its size 
it one could be a Least Skipper, and our best guess for the other was a 
Dion.
Take care,
Lori

Our counts:
49 Zebra Swallowtails
41 Eastern Tiger Swallowtails
9 Sleepy Orange
21 Summer Azure
3 Pearl Crescent
10 Red Admiral
16 Red Spotted Purple
10 Carolina Satyr
3 Silver-Spotted Skipper
2 Least Skipper (uncertain on ID)
1 Little Glassywing
7 Zabulon Skipper
1 Dion Skipper (maybe)
7 Palamedes Swallowtail
1 Comma or Question Mark
Subject: Triangle Area Butterflies
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 19:35:12 +0000
Hi all,

Just a few notes from this past week, as I stayed close to home for a change.

We've had a Gulf Fritillary hanging around the Museum grounds for 10 days now, 
joined by another this week. 


The Common Sootywing we recorded from our grounds on last Sunday's count was 
the first ever seen here and our 73rd species! 


Saw my FOY Long-tailed Skipper, a worn one, on grounds last week.

Sleepy Oranges are becoming abundant all over Durham County, and we have 
caterpillars all over our Cassias. 


At the powerline cut off NC 751 in Duke Forest, I saw a Hayhurst's Scallopwing 
on Sunday, then another (or the same one again) yesterday. 


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
Keep up with us on Facebook, 
Twitter and at 
lifeandscience.org 
Subject: Gulf Fritillary, Hillsborough, NC August 25th
From: Lori Carlson <lori.m.carlson AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 14:01:05 -0400
Hello All,
I'm still quite in disbelief that we have a Gulf Fritillary visiting in 
our garden today! I happened to get a few photos of it and I'll share 
the best: https://flic.kr/p/xwcNim
It's been enjoying the lantana and gaillardia. We have passiflora vine 
in our yard. I'm not sure if this one is female, but it would be nice to 
find some caterpillars later!

Take care,
Lori
Subject: More Monarchs
From: Ginger Kopka <gkopka1 AT aol.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 09:08:12 -0400
Here in Simpsonville, SC, we just finish raising Monarchs. We have almost 40 
Chrysalides. 

Now we found 213 more eggs from 2 Monarchs. We are locating people in the area 
who grow milkweed to spread out the Monarchs to raise them. 

It is surprising how many conscientious gardeners do grow milkweed. 
Ginger Kopka

 
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: 08/19/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC
From: "Sven Halling" <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 08:49:27 -0400 (EDT)
While weeding the front yard 1 Common Sootywing visited our flower bed.


Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: 08/14/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC
From: "Sven Halling" <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 08:45:33 -0400 (EDT)

While enjoying the backyard following species flew by:

Cloudless Sulphur		1
Mourning Cloak		1


Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Many Monarch Caterpillars in Jamestown, Guilford Co, NC
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 08:20:26 -0400
All,

I have been carrying on a conversation with Marie Poteat in Jamestown,
Guilford County, NC, for more than a week now. She has about eight or nine
species of milkweeds planted in various places on her farm property
(including a couple of midwestern species shes trying out). Within the last
few days she has seen Monarchs flying around almost every day, once as many
as three separate adult Monarchs.

I got to visit her yesterday, 8/24, and we found an almost uncountable
number of caterpillars of different instars on 6 Milkweed species including
Aclepias curisavica, A. exaltata, A. incarnata, A. syriaca, A. tuberosa, and
A. verticillata. We would find only one or two on some plants, then on
others it seemed like there would be one or more on almost every stem. Marie
had counted 2 caterpillars on one plant a couple of days earlier. A
conservative estimate yesterday would be a total of 50 caterpillars! During
the two hours we spent looking, we saw one adult female Monarch on several
separate occasions, so it was impossible to tell if it was the same one each
time or different ones.

Marie has documented this explosion of Monarchs with her cell phone
camera.

Dennis
-- 
Dennis E. Burnette
7 Brownstone Lane
Greensboro, NC 27410
(336) 299-4342
deburnette AT triad.rr.com


Subject: 08/12/15 Lewisville, Forsyth County , NC
From: "Sven Halling" <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 08:20:07 -0400 (EDT)
While working in the yard I saw the following species:

Sleepy Orange		3
Eastern Tailed-Blue		2
Pearl Crescent		1
Common Buckeye		1
Horace’s Duskywing	1
Sachem			7


Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Forsyth Co. NABA Count Saturday 8/22/15
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2015 18:00:18 -0400
For our annual count preliminary numbers, we now have 49 species and 607
butterflies.  I've been through all of my images but will send a couple off
to Harry L for confirmation. But I don't think the numbers will change much
more.  We apparently missed a couple that were around (folks sent me
photos from Reynolda Village on Sunday of a Juniper Hairstreak and a
Long-tailed Skipper which we missed).  We also found no Anglewings  which
doesn't surprise me.  They have been scarce since  early summer. One short
power-line cut which is mowed once a year in Bethabara, provided some of my
favorites,  Swarthy, Crossline, Tawny-edged, Dun, and Delaware Skippers
mixed in with a lot of Sachem.

We covered mostly western (Tanglewood), northwestern Pfafftown, Bethabara,
and Bethania areas.  We didn't have enough personnel to cover Tanglewood
and parts of Walnut Bottom Bethania Saturday.  A couple of our butterfliers
were missing on vacation.  Maybe next year!

At any rate, these are very good numbers for here for any time of the year,
especially in a poor butterfly season.  Thanks to all who
participated, even  a couple of pop-in helpers contributed to the cause.

Good Count,
Gene S
Subject: Pitt County, 23 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 22:20:03 +0000
Butterflies seen today (2015-08-23) in Pitt County:

Black Swallowtail, 3
Spicebush Swallowtail, 5
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 2

Silver-spotted Skipper, 40
Horace's Duskywing, 4
Common Checkered-Skipper, 1
Least Skipper, 2
Ocola Skipper, 20
Fiery Skipper, 50
Sachem 2
Dun Skipper, 15, River Park North

Cloudless Sulphur, 1
Sleepy Orange, 20

Great Purple Hairstreak, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Red-banded Hairstreak, 5
Gray Hairstreak, 1
Eastern Tailed-Blue, 1

American Snout, 3
Monarch, 1
Variegated Fritillary, 9
Red-spotted Purple, 3
Tawny Emperor, 1, River Park North
Eastern Comma, 1
Common Buckeye, 6
Red Admiral, 2
Pearl Crescent, 10
Carolina Satyr, 1, River Park North, first in several months

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Carolina Sandhills NWR Chesterfield County
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 17:53:33 -0400
4 hours driving and hiking through refuge, Partly cloudy to cloudy with 
spots of full sun.

5 Spicebush Swallowtail
25 Sleepy Orange
Both species above feeding on  Button weed/Poor Joe(Diodia teres) and 
Rattlebox (Crotalaria spectablis)

5 Cloudless Sulphur
1 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
1 Palameades Swallowtail
4 Common Buckeye
1 Southern Cloudywing on Button bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) at 
Oxpen lake
At least a dozen Sulphurs that I could not get a good ID due to rapid 
flights.

1 Zarucco Duskywing  seen at Mcbee Lake picnic shelter that has a fire 
place and open grill with burned wood in it.  Seems to like that shelter 
around
the rocks and bricks that the fireplace it is made of.   Remember seeing 
a Zarucco in the same place in 1996 on my first visit to the refuge and 
subsequent visits.  Maybe there are some legumes nearby that serves as 
it host plant.

Notice refuge is replacing all their old red gates with bright yellow 
ones and closing off a road in the Oxpen area that was usually open to 
the north of the lakes and meadows. Will probably open in the hunting 
season as they do with other areas.

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte, NC
Subject: long-tailed skipper in Durham County
From: Tom Krakauer <thkrakauer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 12:47:06 -0400
Lynn Richardson and I returned today to Quail Roost from 10-12 to re-run the 
Durham B'fly territory of last weekend. On Hill Forest Road in the first 
wetlands we saw a very fresh long-tailed skipper (Urbanus proteus). Unusual bug 
in Durham, and not seen on the count last week. 


We were surprised to see a nice collection of swallowtails nectoring one of the 
quail roost fields. I estimate that there were about 10 pipevine swallowtails, 
6 Eastern Tigers, and several black ST. The Pipevine and Blacks were drop dead 
beautiful and very fresh. 


Several very fresh red admirals.

We were thrilled to see a solitary sandpiper at the exact same spot where it 
was seen last Sunday. 


Tom Krakauer
Bahama, NC

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Henderson county
From: Gail Lankford <whocooksforyou64 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 10:00:52 -0400
Word came to me that Simon Thompson had 6 Appalachian Browns at Jackson
Park on warbler trail last Wednesday, Aug. 19.
Gail Lankford
Subject: Brasstown Creek Heritage Preserve Oconee County SC
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 07:08:44 -0400
On SCAN trip 8/22/2015 along the SC/GA border next to the Tugaloo River 
and Brasstown Creek.  Sunny and in low 90's.

6 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
2 Cloudless Sulphur
8 Carolina Satyr
1 Spicebush Swallowtail
1 Red Spotted Purple
3 Azure
1 Hackberry Emperor very fresh and drying out its wings while sitting on 
some dog scat.
1 Lace-winged Roadside-Skipper
1 Red banded Hairstreak

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte,NC




Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-8/22/2015
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 20:28:35 -0400
Today I visited Lake Raleigh to paddle around and look for butterflies and
odes. The weather was sunny and ~87F. I walked ~2 miles and paddled ~ 1.5
miles. There was nothing exciting among my 24 species but I did see 5
Monarchs. Popular nectar sources were E. Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias
incarnata var. pulchra), Late Eupatorium (Eupatorium serotinum), Waterpod
(Hydrolea quadrivalvis), and Heartleaf Pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata
var. cordata). My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

E. Tiger Swallowtail 10 incl. 2 black form females
Spicebush Swallowtail 2
Cloudless Sulphur 5
Sleepy Orange 8
Red-banded Hairstreak   1
E. Tailed-Blue   8
Pearl Crescent   3
Question Mark   2
E. Comma   1
Red Admiral   2
Common Buckeye   7
Viceroy   4
N. Pearly-eye   3
Appalachian Brown   3
Carolina Satyr   3
Monarch   5
Silver-spotted Skipper   10
Horace's Duskywing   1
Least Skipper   5
Fiery Skipper   4
Little Glassywing   2
Sachem   5
Zabulon Skipper   3
Ocola Skipper 3
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 22 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 21:47:10 +0000
Butterflies seen today (2015-08-22) in Pitt County. It was sunny and windy.

Palamedes Swallowtail, 1, VOA site C, first of year for Pitt
Spicebush Swallowtail, 2
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 1

Silver-spotted Skipper, 10, most were fresh
Horace's Duskywing, 1
Ocola Skipper, 3
Fiery Skipper, 20
Sachem 1
Dion Skipper, 1 on Lantana, Pitt County Arboretum

Cloudless Sulphur, 4
Sleepy Orange, 30

Red-banded Hairstreak, 2
Eastern Tailed-Blue, 1

American Snout, 1
Pearl Crescent, 5
Common Buckeye, 7
Red Admiral, 1

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: North Buncombe NABA count - 55 species
From: Gail Lankford <whocooksforyou64 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 13:17:58 -0400
Count held Thursday, August 20, more than  two weeks later than previous
counts. Weather was great; mix of  sunny, partly cloudy, cloudy, five
minute sprinkles. High in low 80s.

This ties our 2012 high count of 55. We had three BFs new to count (Sleepy
Orange, Zarucco DW, Tawny Emperor), and missed two (Silvery Checkerspot and
Hayhurst Scallopwing)  that we had on all previous counts.  Sachem, SSS,
ETB,  and Pearl Crescent numbers were high counts. Our total individual
count was highest ever at 2626.

We had 9 participants, six walking Sandy Mush gamelands and 3 driving other
areas. Big thank you to Doug Johnson, Joe Tomcho, Vin Stanton, Simon
Thompson, Nancy Cowal, Janie Owens, Ruth Young, and Sue Perry.
Compiler - Gail Lankford

 Pipevine ST - 3
 Black ST - 9
 Tiger ST - 46
> Spicebush ST - 13
> Cabbage White - 23
> Clouded Sulphur - 7
> Orange Sulphur - 19
> Cloudless Sulphur - 33
> Sleepy Orange - 1
> Little Yellow - 5
> Am. Copper - 1
> White M HS - 1
> Gray HS - 10
> Red Banded HS - 3
> ETB - 208
> Summer Azure - 9
> Gulf Fritillary - 1
> Variegated Frit - 25
> Great spangled Frit - 20
> Meadow Frit - 4
> Pearl Crescent - 426
> Question Mark - 5
> E. Comma - 2
> Am. Lady - 4
> Red Admiral - 10
> C. Buckeye - 65
> Red-spotted Purple - 16
> Viceroy - 7
> Hackberry Emperor - 2
> Tawny Emperor - 6
> No. Pearly-eye - 40
> Gemmed Satyr - 9
> Carolina Satyr - 14
> C. Wood-nymph - 4
> Monarch - 3
> SSS - 382
> Hoary-edge - 9
> So. Cloudywing - 1
> No. Cloudywing - 2
> Horace DW -- 3
> Wild Indigo DW - 27
> Zarucco DW - 1
> Common Checkered Skipper - 3
> Common Sootywing -- 1
> Swarthy Skipper - 14
> Clouded Skipper - 4
> Least Skipper - 20
> Fiery Skipper - 5
> Peck's Skipper - 3
> Tawny-edged Skipper - 5
> Crossline Skipper - 14
> Little Glassywing - 3
> Sachem - 1127
> Zabulon Skipper - 22
> Dun Skipper - 26
Subject: Hayhurst's Scallopwing
From: Rob Van Epps <rwvanepps AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2015 20:04:07 -0400
I had a Hayhurst's Scallopwing in my yard in Davidson, NC this evening. I've 
only seen this species a few times and it was a first for the yard. Very fresh. 
Got a nice photo. 


Rob Van Epps
Davidson, NC


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Pitt County, 21 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2015 21:00:24 +0000
Butterflies seen today (2015-08-21) in Pitt County:

Black Swallowtail, 3
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 37
Spicebush Swallowtail, 2

Silver-spotted Skipper, 6
Horace's Duskywing, 4
Common Checkered-Skipper, 1, Boyd Lee Park, first in several weeks
Ocola Skipper, 1
Fiery Skipper, 40
Sachem, 1
Dun Skipper, 1

Cloudless Sulphur, 2
Sleepy Orange, 12

Gray Hairstreak, 1
Summer Azure, 6

Variegated Fritillary, 2
Red-spotted Purple, 1
Common Buckeye, 3
Pearl Crescent, 2
Southern Pearly-eye, 1, Boyd Lee Park, first in several weeks

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: August Carolina Butterfly Society Butterfly Field Trip 8/30
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2015 09:00:17 -0400
August Butterfly Field Trip 8/30:
 
As announced in earlier Carolina Butterfly Society activity calendars, we
have tentatively set aside Sunday, Aug. 30, from 2:00-5:00 for a field trip
to the Museum of Life & Science in Durham. Participation requires an RSVP 
see our note below.
 
We will look for butterflies on the museum grounds and around the lake.
Imagine walking along a forest path with dinosaurs looking over your
shoulder as you spot butterflies in the sunny spots! The lake may have
butterflies around the edges as well as dragonflies and other interesting
critters.
 
If it gets too hot, those who wish to may visit the butterfly house to see
butterflies up close and personal. There are many other interesting indoor
exhibits not related to butterflies that we can see in the main museum
building. Water, restrooms and snacks are available on the grounds.
 
There is an entrance fee to the museum of $14.50 for adults with a $2.50
discount for adults age 65+. Children are welcome as always. The entrance
fee is $10 for kids from 3 to 12.
 
Note: Because there is an entrance fee, those of us on the field trips
committee dont know whether folks will be interested in this trip.
Consequently, we are requiring that people let us know if they will be
participating. Let us know by Monday, August 24, if you plan to participate.
That will give us time to make any arrangements we need to make.

Dennis Burnette, Guilford County, 
Bud Webster, Wake County, 
Subject: Re: Durham Butterfly Count results (16 Aug 2015)
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 18:08:37 -0400
Butterfliers,

Due to poor proofreading on my part, Will Cook’s invaluable participation in 
the Durham Butterfly Count this past Sunday went unacknowledged in my results 
email so I wanted to correct that! 


Additionally, I’ve posted pics of a somewhat intermediate yellow morph/dark 
morph Eastern Tiger Swallowtail that I found on the count. It could be re-named 
a dusky tiger swallowtail, based on appearance! Scroll about half way down the 
page to the 16 Aug 2015 pics to see: 


http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/easterntigerswallowtail.htm 
 


Good Butterflying,
Jeff
ps. Next year’s count is tentatively scheduled for Sunday 20 Aug 2016. Mark 
yer calendars! 

--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

> On Aug 16, 2015, at 9:37 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:
> 
> Butterfliers,
> 
> Despite laments that the 2015 butterfly season in the eastern half of North 
Carolina has been poor, we enjoyed a very good 17th annual Durham Butterfly 
Count today (Sun 16 Aug 2015), with a total of 54 species (average 56) and 4155 
individuals (average 3755). Near perfect weather helped our cause with mostly 
clear to partly cloudy skies and highs reaching into the low 90s. Eleven 
counters in six parties spent the day in fields and forests around Durham, NC 
searching for butterflies. Most of the species' tallies today were a little 
above or a little below average with a few record highs set: Silvery 
Checkerspot, Tawny-edged Skipper, Delaware Skipper, and Ocola Skipper. The only 
record low was a complete lack of ladies, as this was the first time we've ever 
missed American Lady, and it was only the second time we've missed Gemmed 
Satyr. "Best" butterfly of the day was a Gulf Fritillary found by Richard 
Stickney, only the second ever for the Durham Count. Jeff Pippen's party 
tallied the most individuals with 1558 thanks in big part to gangbuster numbers 
of Silver-spotted Skippers and Sachems in the Duke Gardens. Brian Bockhahn's 
and Randy Emmitt's parties tied for the highest diversity with 41 species. 

> 
> Many thanks to all participants who helped with the Count this year: Brian 
Bockhahn, Lori Carlson, Randy Emmitt, John Jarvis, Ashley and Marshall 
Johnson-Prentice, Tom Krakauer, Meg Millard, Jeffrey Pippen, Lynn Richardson, 
and Richard Stickney. 

> 
> Here’s our list!
> 
> 5	Pipevine Swallowtail
> 1	Zebra Swallowtail
> 8	Black Swallowtail
> 300	Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
> 14	Spicebush Swallowtail
> 3	Cabbage White
> 13	Orange Sulphur
> 154	Cloudless Sulphur
> 263	Sleepy Orange
> 1	Juniper Hairstreak
> 12	Gray Hairstreak
> 3	Red-banded Hairstreak
> 188	Eastern Tailed-Blue
> 34	Summer Azure
> 13	American Snout
> 1	Gulf Fritillary
> 31	Variegated Fritillary
> 11	Great Spangled Fritillary
> 132	Silvery Checkerspot
> 235	Pearl Crescent
> 4	Question Mark
> 1	Eastern Comma
> 9	Red Admiral
> 354	Common Buckeye
> 30	Red-spotted Purple
> 7	Viceroy
> 5	Hackberry Emperor
> 6	Tawny Emperor
> 6	Northern Pearly-eye
> 150	Carolina Satyr
> 4	Common Wood-Nymph
> 30	Monarch
> 443	Silver-spotted Skipper
> 5	Hoary Edge
> 14	Horace's Duskywing
> 1	Zarucco Duskywing
> 1	Wild Indigo Duskywing
> 13	Com. Checkered-Skipper
> 4	Common Sootywing
> 67	Swarthy Skipper
> 21	Clouded Skipper
> 35	Least Skipper
> 210	Fiery Skipper
> 11	Tawny-edged Skipper
> 33	Crossline Skipper
> 56	Southern Broken-Dash
> 4	Northern Broken-Dash
> 74	Little Glassywing
> 1003	Sachem
> 15	Delaware Skipper
> 41	Zabulon Skipper
> 3	Dion Skipper
> 16	Dun Skipper
> 57	Ocola Skipper
> 
> For past results, see:
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/durhamcount.htm 
 

> 
> Good Butterflying,
> Jeff
> --
> Jeffrey S. Pippen
> Durham, NC
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/ 
Subject: Transylvania NABA Count
From: Ruth Young <reyoung1227 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 17:59:40 -0400
 The Transylvania NABA count was held on Thursday, August 13, 2015. We counted 
a total of 48 species, as listed below. I'll be submitting the higher number of 
Wild Indigo Duskywings when I complete my report to NABA. We had some 
questionable individuals and after photographs were submitted to Harry LeGrand, 
they were identified as Wild Indigos, not Zarucco duskywings. 

 Many thanks to-Doug Johnston, Gene Schepker, Sven Halling, Gail Lankford, 
Nancy Cowal, Janie Owens, Sue Perry, Roger Wellington, and Salman Abdulali for 
the great job you did! Ruth Young 



Pipevine swallowtail  27
Black swallowtail 6
E. Tiger swallowtail 165
Spicebush swallowtail 20
Cabbage white 9
Clouded sulphur 25
Orange sulphur 18
Cloudless sulphur 11
Sleepy orange 3
Harvester 3
Gray hairstreak 6
Red banded hairstreak 7
Eastern tailed blue 81
Summer azure 206
Gulf fritillary 2
Variegated fritillary 58
Diana fritillary 7
Great spangled fritillary 2
Aphrodite fritillary 1
Meadow fritillary 92
Silvery checkerspot 2
Pearl crescent 83
Question mark 2
Eastern comma 3
Red admiral 5
Common buckeye 65
Red spotted purple 6
Viceroy 4
Northern pearly eye 2
Carolina satyr 2
Monarch 10
Silver spotted skipper 308
Long tailed skipper 3
Horace's duskywing 18
Wild Indigo duskywing 18 (28?)
Common checkered skipper 1
Swarthy Skipper 1
Least skipper 23
Fiery skipper 12
Peck's skipper 43
Tawny edged skipper 2
Crossline skipper 30
Little glassywing 2
Sachem 33
Zabulon skipper 10
Dun skipper 3
Lace winged roadside skipper 1
Ocola skipper 4
Subject: Pitt County, 20 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 20:39:00 +0000
Butterflies seen today (2015-08-20) at the Pitt County Arboretum:

Black Swallowtail, 1
Spicebush Swallowtail, 1

Silver-spotted Skipper, 2
Horace's Duskywing, 1
Ocola Skipper, 2
Fiery Skipper, 10
Sachem, 1
Whirlabout, 1, new brood

Sleepy Orange, 5

Red-banded Hairstreak, 2

American Snout, 1
Monarch, 1 female on Lantana
Red-spotted Purple, 1
Variegated Fritillary, 1
Red Admiral, 1
Common Buckeye, 5
Pearl Crescent, 4

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Recent Saturniidae and Sphingidae + wasp control question
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 13:36:30 -0400
Yesterday I enjoyed a Pink-striped Oakworm Moth perched on the back of
a building by a wooded area in North Charleston and today a Mournful
Sphinx has been perched on the same wall all day.

West of the Ashley in Charleston, the Spinx Moths are flying and
nectaring at Ginger Lilies, Turk's-cap Hibiscus, Golden Dewdrop and
others.  Once the Ageratum starts blooming, they will be attracting
Sphingidae as well.

So far I've seen Pink-spotted Hawkmoth, Tersa Sphinx and Mournful Sphinx.

Unfortunately the Hornworms on the tomatoes at Rancho Dias have all
been killed by wasps. The wasp overpopulation in the neighborhood is
getting extreme and has resulted in a noticeable lack of everything
from leps to Garden Spiders.

* Question:  does anyone on the list know any eco-friendly wasp
control methods?   Beyond busting up all the dirt dauber nests and
paper wasp nests one can find?  Because that does not seem to be
putting a dent in them...

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
Subject: Re: Monday, August 17th, Hillsborough, NC in Our Garden
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 20:33:53 -0400
Lori:

You've got them almost all right. I don't see a Wild Indigo; your duskywing
photos look like a female Horace's. The white spots are too large, there is
a white spot inside the pale wrist patch, and the black pattern also is too
bold and blotchy for Wild Indigo.

Not many folks have a Common Sootywing visiting their garden!

Harry LeGrand

On Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 8:22 PM, Lori Carlson 
wrote:

> Hello,
> A survey of our garden on Monday, August 17th. We are practicing our
> skipper and duskywing identification! I hope we're improving. We counted 21
> species with the majority being Sachems. I uploaded some of the better
> photos I took with an attempt at identification. If you see any that need
> correcting I think you can leave a comment. Link:
> https://flic.kr/s/aHskf7YdZp
>
> Take care,
> Lori and John
>
> Butterflies by the numbers:
>
>    - Pipevine Swallowtail - 1
>    - Black Swallowtail - 5
>    - Eastern Tiger Swallowtail - 21
>    - Cloudless Sulfur - 1
>    - Sleepy Orange - 4
>    - Gray Hairsteak - 2
>    - Eastern Tailed-Blue -1
>    - Pearl Crescent - 4
>    - Common Buckeye - 10
>    - Carolina Satyr - 1
>    - Monarch -1
>    - Silver-spotted Skipper - 3
>    - Horace's Duskywing - 1
>    - Wild Indigo Duskywing - 1
>    - Common Checkered-Skipper - 2
>    - Common Sootywing - 1
>    - Swarthy Skipper - 5
>    - Fiery Skipper - 6
>    - Southern Broken-Dash - 1
>    - Sachem 100 +
>    - Ocola Skipper - 3
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Monday, August 17th, Hillsborough, NC in Our Garden
From: Lori Carlson <lori.m.carlson AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 20:22:15 -0400
Hello,
A survey of our garden on Monday, August 17th. We are practicing our 
skipper and duskywing identification! I hope we're improving. We counted 
21 species with the majority being Sachems. I uploaded some of the 
better photos I took with an attempt at identification. If you see any 
that need correcting I think you can leave a comment. Link:
https://flic.kr/s/aHskf7YdZp

Take care,
Lori and John

Butterflies by the numbers:

  * Pipevine Swallowtail - 1
  * Black Swallowtail - 5
  * Eastern Tiger Swallowtail - 21
  * Cloudless Sulfur - 1
  * Sleepy Orange - 4
  * Gray Hairsteak - 2
  * Eastern Tailed-Blue -1
  * Pearl Crescent - 4
  * Common Buckeye - 10
  * Carolina Satyr - 1
  * Monarch -1
  * Silver-spotted Skipper - 3
  * Horace's Duskywing - 1
  * Wild Indigo Duskywing - 1
  * Common Checkered-Skipper - 2
  * Common Sootywing - 1
  * Swarthy Skipper - 5
  * Fiery Skipper - 6
  * Southern Broken-Dash - 1
  * Sachem 100 +
  * Ocola Skipper - 3





Subject: Hayhurst's Scallopwings
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 19:52:22 -0400
This morning I did a shorebird survey at the Rachel Carson Reserve, off 
Beaufort NC.

I took a short break from shorebirds to search for Crystal Skippers (in an 
area where they're regular) but didn't see any.

As usual at this time of year, I saw a few (at least 4) Hayhurst's 
Scallopwings at the site where I leave my kayak.  This is an area where the 
shrub thicket merges with marsh, and it's shady.  I assume the larval 
foodplant is Atriplex, which is common at the site.

In Beaufort, a Giant Swallowtail was floating around over Rich and Susan 
Boyd's garden.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Pitt County, 18 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 20:12:35 +0000
A few butterflies seen on a wet, cloudy day (Pitt County, 2015-08-18)

Pipevine Swallowtail, 1, ECU Campus, first of year for Pitt
Black Swallowtail, 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 4
Horace's Duskywing, 3
Fiery Skipper, 15
Least Skipper, 1
Ocola Skipper, 3
Cloudless Sulphur, 1
Pearl Crescent, 1
Common Buckeye, 1

Salman Abdulali
Greenville NC
Subject: Mayo River Butterfly Count
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 09:59:45 -0400
Results from our party of 6 that covered Mayo Mountain, the river and cedar
mountain.  Thanks to Charles Cameron, Gene Schepker, Sven Halling, Kelly
King and Jennifer Fenwick for helping out.

44 sp from 9am-6pm.

5 Pipevine Swallowtail
103 E Tiger swallowtail
4 Spicebush swallowtail

1 Clouded sulphur
1 Orange sulphur
4 Cloudless sulphur
5 Sleepy orange

7 Gray Hairstreak
64 E tailed blue
17 Summer azure

1 American snout
1 Variegated fritillary
23 Great spangled fritillary
31 silvery checkerspot
39 pearl crescent
1 eastern comma
1 American lady
19 common buckeye
26 red-spotted purple
1 hackberry emperor
2 tawny emperor
3 northern pearly eye
79 Carolina satyr
1 common wood-nymph
1 monarch

44 silver spotted skipper
2 hoary edge
2 horaces duskywing
2 common checkered skipper
4 swarthy skipper
10 clouded skipper
9 least skipper
4 fiery skipper
7 peck's skipper
9 tawny-edged skipper
23 crossline skipper
7 southern broken dash
8 northern broken dash
8 little glassywing
434 sachem
51 delaware skipper
14 zabulon skipper
2 dun skipper
2 ocola skipper
-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Richland Co., SC Monarchs
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 08:53:12 -0400
Hi All,

Yesterday II spent some time at the Hy 601 Bridge at Bates Landing and
vicinity looking w/o success for the Roseate Spoonbill which had been
reported but I did seen some butterflies .

Cloudless Sulfur 7
Sleepy Orange 6
Red-spotted Purple 1
Viceroy 1
Hackberry Emperor 6
MONARCH 2
Horace's Duskywing 1
Clouded Skipper 1
Fiery Skipper 1
Dun Skipper 2

Dennis




-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Link to Photo Album of Durham Butterfly Count
From: Lori Carlson <lori.m.carlson AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 19:10:38 -0400
It was the first time for my husband (John Jarvis) and I to count 
butterflies and we survived the day! It was an exciting adventure and we 
are already thinking ahead to next year. For years I've been using 
Jeff's website to identify the butterflies in our garden. I never 
thought he'd personally help us learn to ID skippers and duskywings. 
We're both thankful and grateful for such an amazing experience!

I thought I barely took any photos but managed to capture some worth 
sharing with you. I haven't captioned them at all but figure most of you 
already know them.
Link: https://goo.gl/photos/pQ52EdXM4WYz6MdFA

We were so inspired that we took a count of our yard today and I'll 
share the results shortly.

~ Lori
Subject: Pitt County, 17 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 22:44:37 +0000
Butterflies seen in Pitt County today (2015-08-17):

Black Swallowtail, 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 35
Spicebush Swallowtail, 1

Silver-spotted Skipper, 7
Horace's Duskywing, 5
Ocola Skipper, 2
Fiery Skipper, 20
Dun Skipper, 1, Boyd Lee Park

Cloudless Sulphur, 1
Sleepy Orange, 12

Great Purple Hairstreak, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Red-banded Hairstreak, 1
Summer Azure, 5
Eastern Tailed-Blue, 1

Viceroy, 1
Common Buckeye, 3
Pearl Crescent, 2

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Orangeburg Co., SC leps 15 Aug. 2015
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 08:34:20 -0400
Hi All,

Donna and I spent 2 hours yesterday afternoon at the Indian Bluff Co. Park,
Orangeburg Co., SC. We had the following butterflies:

E. Tiger Swallowtail 1
Cloudless Sulfur 2
Sleepy Orange 3
Red Admiral 2
Red-spotted Purple 7
Hackberry Emperor 1
unid. nymphalids 1

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Durham Butterfly Count results (16 Aug 2015)
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 21:37:33 -0400
Butterfliers,

Despite laments that the 2015 butterfly season in the eastern half of North 
Carolina has been poor, we enjoyed a very good 17th annual Durham Butterfly 
Count today (Sun 16 Aug 2015), with a total of 54 species (average 56) and 4155 
individuals (average 3755). Near perfect weather helped our cause with mostly 
clear to partly cloudy skies and highs reaching into the low 90s. Eleven 
counters in six parties spent the day in fields and forests around Durham, NC 
searching for butterflies. Most of the species' tallies today were a little 
above or a little below average with a few record highs set: Silvery 
Checkerspot, Tawny-edged Skipper, Delaware Skipper, and Ocola Skipper. The only 
record low was a complete lack of ladies, as this was the first time we've ever 
missed American Lady, and it was only the second time we've missed Gemmed 
Satyr. "Best" butterfly of the day was a Gulf Fritillary found by Richard 
Stickney, only the second ever for the Durham Count. Jeff Pippen's party 
tallied the most individuals with 1558 thanks in big part to gangbuster numbers 
of Silver-spotted Skippers and Sachems in the Duke Gardens. Brian Bockhahn's 
and Randy Emmitt's parties tied for the highest diversity with 41 species. 


Many thanks to all participants who helped with the Count this year: Brian 
Bockhahn, Lori Carlson, Randy Emmitt, John Jarvis, Ashley and Marshall 
Johnson-Prentice, Tom Krakauer, Meg Millard, Jeffrey Pippen, Lynn Richardson, 
and Richard Stickney. 


Here’s our list!

5	Pipevine Swallowtail
1	Zebra Swallowtail
8	Black Swallowtail
300	Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
14	Spicebush Swallowtail
3	Cabbage White
13	Orange Sulphur
154	Cloudless Sulphur
263	Sleepy Orange
1	Juniper Hairstreak
12	Gray Hairstreak
3	Red-banded Hairstreak
188	Eastern Tailed-Blue
34	Summer Azure
13	American Snout
1	Gulf Fritillary
31	Variegated Fritillary
11	Great Spangled Fritillary
132	Silvery Checkerspot
235	Pearl Crescent
4	Question Mark
1	Eastern Comma
9	Red Admiral
354	Common Buckeye
30	Red-spotted Purple
7	Viceroy
5	Hackberry Emperor
6	Tawny Emperor
6	Northern Pearly-eye
150	Carolina Satyr
4	Common Wood-Nymph
30	Monarch
443	Silver-spotted Skipper
5	Hoary Edge
14	Horace's Duskywing
1	Zarucco Duskywing
1	Wild Indigo Duskywing
13	Com. Checkered-Skipper
4	Common Sootywing
67	Swarthy Skipper
21	Clouded Skipper
35	Least Skipper
210	Fiery Skipper
11	Tawny-edged Skipper
33	Crossline Skipper
56	Southern Broken-Dash
4	Northern Broken-Dash
74	Little Glassywing
1003	Sachem
15	Delaware Skipper
41	Zabulon Skipper
3	Dion Skipper
16	Dun Skipper
57	Ocola Skipper

For past results, see:
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/durhamcount.htm 
 


Good Butterflying,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Cherokee County, NC, butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 20:37:33 -0400
For the past few days, several of us have been working in western Cherokee
County, NC, looking at a handful of US Forest Service tracts that they are
burning and managing for shortleaf pine. The tracts are too forested to
have any butterflies inside them, but Steve Hall and I did walk a lot of
roadsides -- some USFS roads, and some dirt public roads. Though we had 30
species, nothing was really unusual, though according to the Butterflies of
North Carolina website, four of these are firsts for the county. Here is
what I had, on the following dates:  August 13, 14, 15 --

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail  35-10-40
Black Swallowtail  (Steve only)
Spicebush Swallowtail  12-3-20
Cloudless Sulphur  2-0-5
Sleepy Orange  1-0-2
Little Yellow  4-0-3   rare for me to see more Little Yellows than Sleepy
Oranges
Red-banded Hairstreak  2-0-0
Eastern Tailed-Blue  14-2-12
Summer Azure  8-1-5
American Snout  1-1-0
Great Spangled Fritillary  2-0-2
Diana Fritillary  2-1-0   Steve had a few males; I only saw 2 females
Pearl Crescent  4-0-0
Common Buckeye  6-0-1
Red-spotted Purple  5-0-2
Northern Pearly-eye  (Steve only)   new county record
Gemmed Satyr  0-0-1    new county record
Carolina Satyr  0-1-0     Where are they?    Way down in 2015
Silver-spotted Skipper  10-1-25
Hoary Edge  2-0-1
Northern Cloudywing  0-0-1
Southern Cloudywing  1-0-0
Horace's Duskywing  1-0-5
Clouded Skipper  0-0-2
Crossline Skipper  0-0-4
Zabulon Skipper  1-0-4
Northern Broken-dash  1-0-0    new county record
Southern Broken-dash  0-0-1  new county record; few records in s. mts.
Little Glassywing  1-0-2
Dun Skipper  0-0-1

The land is quite acidic, and thus we weren't in Pipevine Swallowtail
country. But, the elevations are below 2,000 feet, so Gemmed Satyr, Hoary
Edge, the cloudywings, Southern B-dash, etc., are not unexpected in such
low and dry/acidic places.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh
Subject: Pitt County, 16 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 22:18:33 +0000
Butterflies seen today, 2015-08-16, at the Pitt County Arboretum:

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 1
Spicebush Swallowtail, 1

Silver-spotted Skipper, 3
Horace's Duskywing, 1
Ocola Skipper, 3
Fiery Skipper, 15
LITTLE GLASSYWING, 1, first in 3 years
Sachem, 1 female

Sleepy Orange, 4

Red-banded Hairstreak, 1
Gray Hairstreak, 1

Red-spotted Purple, 1
Common Buckeye, 1
Pearl Crescent, 2

Salman Abdulali
Greenville NC
Subject: August 15, Cataloochee Valley, GSMNP
From: Gail Lankford <whocooksforyou64 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 18:15:46 -0400
Eight members of Carolina Field Birders did a butterfly trip on this very
cloudy day. Only had 27 species.

Pipevine Swallowtail (ST) - many
Black ST - 2
E. Tiger ST - many
Spicebush St - many
Cabbage White - 1
Orange Sulphur - 1
Clouded Sulphur - 1
Cloudless Sulphur - 1
Summer Azure - many
Eastern Tailed Blue - many
American Copper - 9
Variegated Fritillary - 4
Diana Frit - 3
Great-spangled Frit - few
Meadow Frit - few
Pearl Crescent - few
Buckeye - few
Monarch - 2
Common Wood Nymph - several
Silver-spotted Skipper - many
Horace DW - 3
Clouded Skipper - 1
Least Skipper - few
Peck's Skipper - 1
Crossline Skipper - 1
Sachem - many
Fiery Skipper - few

Gail Lankford
Subject: Iredell NABA Count 8/15/15
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 09:15:28 -0400
The Iredell Count yielded 40 species without many surprises  Outside of
Eastern Tigers, there were only two other Swallowtails, a single Pipevine,
and a Spicebush.  Like in the other local counts in August this year, the
skippers carried the day and larger butterflies where at a premium.  The
best find was an Eufala Skipper by Charles Cameron.  There were well over
200 Sachem in one large field of Bermuda Grass, and the main blossoms were
Bicolor Lespedeza and the dreaded Kudzu vine along field edges.

We are still editing photos before finalizing the Iredell Count.

For anyone with time and energy, the Mayo River/Rockingham Count
Monday/August 17th could still use some help this year.  If anyone can join
us, contact Brian Bockhahn  at !

Gene Schepker
Subject: Wee Tee State Forest, Williamsburg Co., SC 15 Aug. 2015
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Aug 2015 08:10:15 -0400
Hi All,

Donna and I spent the afternoon at Wee Tee State Forest, Williamsburg Co.,
SC.  The biggest find were Tawny Emperors which for the first time in my
memory were as numerous at the Hackberry Emperors.  We had:

E. Tiger Swallowtail 1
Cloudless Sulfur 6
Little Yellow 1
Sleepy Orange 15
American Snout 2
Gulf Fritillary 4
Question Mark 4
Red Admiral 6
Common Buckeye 6
Pearl Crescent 5
Red-spotted Purple 15
Viceroy 1
Hackberry Emperor 12
Tawny Emperor 12 county record
Silver-spotted Skipper 1
Northern Cloudywing 1
Horace's Duskywing 3
Zarucco Duskywing 3
Tropical Checkered-Skipper 4
Clouded Skipper 2
Crossline Skipper 1 county record
Byssus Skipper 4
Zabulon Skipper 1 female
Dun Skipper 4
Ocola Skipper 4

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Macon Co, NC butterflies
From: Jason Love <jasonplove AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 14:02:28 -0400
Folks,
Here are a couple of leps that I saw during a botanical survey on some
property along the Little Tennessee River in south Macon County earlier
this summer (June 8th, 2015):

Southern Cloudywing (male)
Lace-winged Roadside Skipper

On Thursday, August 13th, I led a butterfly walk on the Franklin Greenway
for about 1.5 hours, from the Black Bear Shelter to Suli Marsh.  Not a
whole lot to report, despite the good weather and abundant nectar sources.
We did find an Ocola Skipper, which is only the second time I've seen this
species in the county:

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail   3
Pipevine Swallowtail   4
Gulf Fritillary     2
Monarch   1
Cabbage White    1
Silver-spotted Skipper    2
Ocola Skipper    1

Cheers,
Jason Love
Otto, NC
Subject: Gaston County leps
From: drivesa3 AT aol.com <drivesa3@aol.com>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 02:18:44 GMT





  I hiked to King's Pinnacle (Crowder's Mtn . SP) this afternoon and saw... 
nothing! That's a first. So,I went by the lake afterwards and found some 
Eutrochium blooming with lots of bug activity. Appalachian Browns and Carolina 
Satyrs were found along the Lake Trail and the shoreline vegetation had Least 
Skippers. Here's the list: 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail   6Spicebush Swallowtail         4Red Admiral   
                        1Appalachian Brown             
 5Carolina Satyr                       4Least Skipper         
               5Ocola Skipper                       
 1  George Andrews Indian Trail, NC 


Sent from my LG G3, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

Subject: Another "fall" Monarch and FOY Long-tailed Skipper
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Aug 2015 10:32:03 -0400
That's the second Monarch this week which makes me hopeful about the fall
migration.  I plan to be in Cuba in November to witness any Monarch
migration there.

Here's the list from the gardens on Windmill Hill yesterday, August 13,
 which is pretty typical of most recent days-

1 Pipevine S.
10 E. Tiger S.
8 Spicebush S.
1 Cabbage White
1 Clouded or Orange Sulphur
1 Sleepy Orange
1 Summer Azure
3 Gulf Frit
2 Variegated Frit
1 Great-spangled Frit
3 Pearl Crescent
5 Am Lady
2 C. Buckeye
2 Red-spotted Purple
1 Monarch
20+ Silver-spotted Skipper
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Long-tailed skipper   FOY
2 Southern Cloudywing
2 Common Sootywing
6 Clouded Skipper
20+ Fiery Skipper
6 Little Glassywing
15 Sachem
2 Ocola Skipper

Great recovery from a month ago!

Doug Allen
Windmill Hill,  Inman
 Spartanburg County, SC
https://sites.google.com/site/southcarolinauplandbutterflies/
Subject: Re: First "fall" Monarch, and butterflies common again
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Aug 2015 12:26:13 -0400
Referencing Doug Allen's number or Tiger swallowtails in the Aug. 12 report. 
I've had very few butterflies until one week ago. The garden is now full of 
Tiger swallowtails, so much so that it looks like a bouquet of exploding yellow 
wings when I walk by, counting no less than 14 on Abelia chinensis. A total of 
24 Tigers alone favored the phlox, Mexican sunflower and the A. chinensis. 
There were also a M & F spicebush, a Red-spotted Purple, one Buckeye, and too 
many Silver Spotted Skippers to count, plus several Hummingbird Clearwing 
moths. 


No Monarchs to date.
  
Loretta Lutman
Asheboro, NC
Subject: Correction on Howell Woods
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Thu, 13 Aug 2015 14:35:54 +0000
Hi all,

Upon further review of that Northern Pearly-eye, it's a Southern after all. It 
looks like one antenna was damaged or had a shadow on it, but the other is all 
orange. So, Harry, you can wipe that dot back off Johnston County. 


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
Keep up with us on Facebook, 
Twitter and at 
lifeandscience.org 
Subject: Catawba County, 12 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 23:44:33 +0000
At the Catawba County rest area on I 40 west, 2015-08-12:

Silver-spotted Skipper, 2
HOARY EDGE, 1
Sachem, 2
Little Glassywing, 1

Salman Abdulali 
Greenville NC
Subject: Fwd: Davie County, 12 August 2015- date correction
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 23:39:41 +0000
The date should of course be 2015-08-12, and not in the future.

I stopped at the Davie County Rest Area on I-40 West today. The Buddleija were 
hopping with butterflies including the following (Davie County, 2015-08-12): 


Sleepy Orange, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 1
Common Sootywing, 1
Sachem, 10
Fiery Skipper, 1, fills in an open dot on the county map
Ocola Skipper, 2, NEW COUNTY RECORD
Zabulon Skipper, 2
Gray Hairstreak, 1
Great Spangled Fritillary, 2
Common Buckeye, 3

There were also a couple of other grass skippers.

Salman Abdulali
Greenville NC
Subject: Davie County, 12 August 2015
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 23:34:46 +0000
I stopped at the Davie County Rest Area on I-40 West today. The Buddleija were 
hopping with butterflies including the following (Davie County, 2016-08-12): 


Sleepy Orange, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 1
Common Sootywing, 1
Sachem, 10
Fiery Skipper, 1, fills in an open dot on the county map
Ocola Skipper, 2, NEW COUNTY RECORD
Zabulon Skipper, 2
Gray Hairstreak, 1
Great Spangled Fritillary, 2
Common Buckeye, 3

There were also a couple of other grass skippers.

Salman Abdulali
Greenville NC