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Updated on Tuesday, September 2 at 08:27 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Turquoise Jay,©Dan Lane

2 Sep Green Comma [Doug Allen ]
2 Sep Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-09/02/2014 [Mike Turner ]
2 Sep Re: Eastern nc leps [Harry LeGrand ]
2 Sep Eastern nc leps [Bb ]
2 Sep Re: possible Roadside skipper [Harry LeGrand ]
01 Sep Fwd: Chesterfield County Three more leps [Jules Fraytet ]
01 Sep Chesterfield County [Jules Fraytet ]
31 Aug Wake Co., NC-Temple Flat Rock-08/31/2014 [Mike Turner ]
31 Aug Re: possible Roadside skipper [Jeff Pippen ]
31 Aug Re: possible Roadside skipper [Doug Allen ]
31 Aug possible Roadside skipper [Doug Allen ]
30 Aug Pitt County, 30 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
30 Aug More Green Commas on BRP [Richard Stickney ]
29 Aug RE: Transylvania County NABA Count results ["Sue" ]
29 Aug Giant swallowtail [Ginger Kopka ]
29 Aug Dukes' Skippers today ["John Fussell" ]
29 Aug Transylvania County NABA Count results [Ruth Young ]
28 Aug Re: 3 FOY: Hayhurst Scallopwing, Delaware Skipper, and Eufala Skipper [Harry LeGrand ]
28 Aug 3 FOY: Hayhurst Scallopwing, Delaware Skipper, and Eufala Skipper [Doug Allen ]
28 Aug Re: Carolina/Intricate Satyr and Common Checkered/White Checkered-Skipper [Mike Turner ]
28 Aug Re: Carolina/Intricate Satyr and Common Checkered/White Checkered-Skipper [Harry LeGrand ]
28 Aug Carolina/Intricate Satyr and Common Checkered/White Checkered-Skipper [Mike Turner ]
28 Aug Oops!! Wake Co. butterflies, JC Raulston Arboretum [Mike Turner ]
28 Aug Wild Indigo Duskywings, Common Roadside Skippers PMSP, Surry Co [Gene Schepker ]
28 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-08/28/2014 [Mike Turner ]
28 Aug Lee Co., SC leps 27 August 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
28 Aug Re: Avery county leps [Alex Netherton ]
28 Aug Reminder: Lake Phelps/Pettigrew Butterfly Count - Sunday, August 31st ["Corey, Ed" ]
28 Aug North Carolina Butterfly Website ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
27 Aug Tanglewood Monarch, Viceroys at Tanglewood [Gene Schepker ]
27 Aug Re: Petition [Paul Cherubini ]
27 Aug Berkeley County SC Walk 8/27 []
27 Aug Re: Petition ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
27 Aug Butterflies, Southwest Park, Guilford County [Dennis Burnette ]
27 Aug Petition [Ginger Kopka ]
27 Aug Re: Avery county leps [Harry LeGrand ]
27 Aug Avery county leps [Bb ]
27 Aug Papilio July 25 and August 25 []
27 Aug Mount mitchell leps [Bb ]
27 Aug Mcdowell county leps [Bb ]
27 Aug Re: Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID) ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
26 Aug Re: Monarch petition [Paul Cherubini ]
26 Aug Re: Monarch petition [Doug Allen ]
26 Aug Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID) [Doug Allen ]
26 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill Co. Park-08/26/2014 [Mike Turner ]
26 Aug Pitt County, 26 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
26 Aug Re: Monarch petition [ROBERT CAVANAUGH ]
26 Aug Monarch petition ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
25 Aug Monarch Ovipositing and Peck's Skipper [Gene Schepker ]
25 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Mitchell Mill State Natural Area-08/25/2014 [Mike Turner ]
25 Aug Southern Lake Norman NABA Count []
25 Aug Butterfly Symposium Deadline Approaching [Dennis Burnette ]
25 Aug Shallow Ford NA, Alamance Co, NC Butterflies [Dennis Burnette ]
25 Aug Dixie Plantation Butterfly Walk 8/23 []
25 Aug SCAN trip leps highlight 8/23 [Jules Fraytet ]
25 Aug Surry leps [Bb ]
24 Aug Ocola at Reynolda Village, Garden Pipevine Swallowtail [Gene Schepker ]
24 Aug A few Wake County, NC, butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
24 Aug Favorite butterfly plants [Will Cook ]
24 Aug Fwd: Dingle Pond Unit-Santee NWR, SC leps 23 Aug 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
23 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-08/23/2014 [Mike Turner ]
23 Aug Butterflying in N Durham County [Tom Krakauer ]
23 Aug Durham Bfly Count results 8/17/2014 [Jeff Pippen ]
22 Aug Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-08/22/2014 [Mike Turner ]
22 Aug Pitt County, 22 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
22 Aug Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
22 Aug RE: Johnston Co. Butterflies [Richard Stickney ]
22 Aug vacation return ["Gail Lankford" ]
21 Aug Carteret County Aug 21 [ROBERT CAVANAUGH ]
21 Aug Correction on Lake Hills walk [Gene Schepker ]
21 Aug Greenville Co., SC leps 20 Aug 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
21 Aug Spartenburg Co., SC leps 20 August 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
21 Aug Butterflies at Lake Hills, Bethania, Forsyth County [Gene Schepker ]
21 Aug Pitt County, 21 August 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
21 Aug Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies [Harry LeGrand ]
21 Aug Johnston Co. Butterflies [Richard Stickney ]

Subject: Green Comma
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 21:00:46 -0400
Jean Fontaine and I drove up to the Blue Ridge Parkway at Asheville and on
to Mount Mitchell today. Our previous June trip to the western Blue Ridge
Parkway was rewarding with lifers Aphrodite Fritillary and Early
Hairstreak, and we planned to return to the high country.

Today was beautiful blue sky mid-morning, but mostly cloudy by noon, and
Mount Mitchell was in and out of the clouds when we arrived there around
12:30.   Stopping at overlooks on the way to Mitchell, we saw some odd
Tiger Swallowtails  above 3500', about 8 in one turnoff and half a dozen in
another. They seemed to be smaller than our Piedmont Tigers in Spartanburg
and Greenville County, but the odd thing is that they all continuously
fluttered their wings while nectaring  like Pipevines do.  I've never seen
that before with Tigers. Have others seen that?  Could it be a different
subspecies?

Nothing at Craggy gardens where it was cloudy, but quite a few Pipevines ,
a couple of Great-spangled Fritillaries, a Cabbage White, several Summer
Azure and several Sachem while the sun was still breaking through on the
way to Craggy Gardens around 5200'.

We saw very little on top, 6500', but just below at the pick nick trail,
the skies started to clear and we found some more Tigers, Pipevine, some
American Ladies, and our target species, Green Comma.  Or did it find us?
 We had gotten a glimpse earlier and did some more hiking. When we returned
to near where we had glimpsed the Green Comma, it (or a second Green Comma)
landed on Jean's hand and then on my shirt! Three times we hiked and then
returned to near the original area, and three times we saw the same or
possibly additional Green commas.

We drove further down the mountain and hiked around the restaurant area and
up the trail a little. but it was cloudy again and we saw just one Snout
and a Pipevine..
It poured the next hour on our way home.

You can see the Green Comma, one of the continuously fluttering Tigers, and
some other things here-

 https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

Doug Allen  Inman, SC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-09/02/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 16:54:33 -0400
Today was very hot here in Raleigh so I only butterflied from 12:10 to
2:50. It was sunny and 95F. My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail 2  Cloudless Sulphur 1  Red-banded Hairstreak 6  Summer
Azure 3  Variegated Fritillary 1  Pearl Crescent 3  American Lady 1  Common
Buckeye 10  Red-spotted Purple 1  Carolina Satyr 2  Monarch 10  Silver-spotted
Skipper 2  Wild Indigo Duskywing 1  Clouded Skipper 5  Fiery Skipper 5
Sachem 4
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Re: Eastern nc leps
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 09:08:41 -0400
I will assume the Croatan list is all from Craven County, where the Dukes'
Skipper locations are -- not far from the Neuse River. Bo Sullivan's
collections for Intricate Satyr -- of course back several decades ago there
was no such bug as an Intricate Satyr (described early in 2014) -- were in
this area and at Island Creek area in Jones County, which is a very rich
forest with circumneutral pH soils. Of course, most Carolina Satyrs are
seen in bottomlands and swamp margins, so could be said to be in rich
soils. But, at least in NC, the specimen records for Intricate fall in the
lower Coastal Plain only. So, it is certainly possible that Brian did have
Intricate Satyrs, and maybe could be identified by photos of the spread
wing (at least if a male).

His description of the behavior of Dukes' is spot-on; they weave in-between
the tall Carex leaves and culms like a Least or a Broad-winged, but they
certain can be frisky when perching up high, or when nectaring. And, yes,
when I've gone looking for them in this area, you generally do have to get
your feet wet!

Brian told some of us he is off to Colorado now, so he might lose a bit of
chasing time for his year list. But, he'll still need a trip or two way
down east for Palatka, Dion, Yehl, Berry's, Aaron's, etc. And, a Sandhills
trip or two for Dotted, Meske's, Southern Skipperling, etc.   I can
certainly see him making 125 on his Big Year, perhaps adding a few other
things not mentioned above.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh


On Tue, Sep 2, 2014 at 8:38 AM, Bb  wrote:

> Carolinaleppers,
>
> Aug 31 pettigrew count, fairly uneventful, foy whirlabout #118!  2 N
> broken dash new for count and county. Rattlesnake posed for better photos
> though. All satys appeared carolina.
>
> Kyle and i had a great night of moths at pettigrew, highlight for me was a
> great horned owl at the lights during a 5am check, maybe eating the
> katydids, or eyeing the toads and big sphinx moths?
>
> Sep 1 quick run to croatan following john fusssels excellent directions
>
> 1 e tiger swallowtail
> 5 palamedes seallowtail
> 2 cloudless sulphur
> 3 sleepy orange
> 12 red banded hairstreak
> 2 pearl crescent
>
> 8 satyr - 1 showing field marks of carolina, the rest showed dorsal and
> ventral field marks of intricate!  Not my property so didn't collect, but i
> do plan to examine genitalia a little later in season, especially some of
> the wake and durham county ones showing intermediate field marks.
>
> 2 silver spotted skipper
> 1 horaces duskywing
> 2 clouded skipper
> 1 least skipper
> 2 fiery skipper
> 1 southern broken dash
> 1 little glassywing
> 1 sachem
> 1 carolina roadside skipper
> 2 ocola skipper
> 6 dukes skipper (foy #119! And lifer!!!). Distant open winged photos was
> all i could manage, should have brought waders!  Odd they flied like least
> skippers down in the carex grass, but above they could shift into skipper
> speed!  The swamp was 100 degrees, lost about a quart of sweat and a pint
> of blood to mosquitoes.
>
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC
Subject: Eastern nc leps
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 08:38:58 -0400
Carolinaleppers,

Aug 31 pettigrew count, fairly uneventful, foy whirlabout #118! 2 N broken dash 
new for count and county. Rattlesnake posed for better photos though. All satys 
appeared carolina. 


Kyle and i had a great night of moths at pettigrew, highlight for me was a 
great horned owl at the lights during a 5am check, maybe eating the katydids, 
or eyeing the toads and big sphinx moths? 


Sep 1 quick run to croatan following john fusssels excellent directions

1 e tiger swallowtail
5 palamedes seallowtail
2 cloudless sulphur
3 sleepy orange
12 red banded hairstreak
2 pearl crescent

8 satyr - 1 showing field marks of carolina, the rest showed dorsal and ventral 
field marks of intricate! Not my property so didn't collect, but i do plan to 
examine genitalia a little later in season, especially some of the wake and 
durham county ones showing intermediate field marks. 


2 silver spotted skipper
1 horaces duskywing
2 clouded skipper
1 least skipper
2 fiery skipper
1 southern broken dash
1 little glassywing
1 sachem
1 carolina roadside skipper
2 ocola skipper 
6 dukes skipper (foy #119! And lifer!!!). Distant open winged photos was all i 
could manage, should have brought waders! Odd they flied like least skippers 
down in the carex grass, but above they could shift into skipper speed! The 
swamp was 100 degrees, lost about a quart of sweat and a pint of blood to 
mosquitoes. 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Re: possible Roadside skipper
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 08:14:59 -0400
I didn't look at it before, but now that I've seen the responses -- Jeff
Pippen is correct. It is a duskywing, and I feel 95% that it is a male
Horace's. I think I can see a small white spot inside the "wrist" area.

It isn't a bad shot at all, other than being from below.

Harry LeGrand


On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 12:02 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:

> Hi Doug,
>
> Actually, it looks like a duskywing of some flavor.
>
> Cheers,
> Jeff
> --
> Jeffrey S. Pippen
> Durham, NC
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/
>
> On Aug 31, 2014, at 8:22 AM, Doug Allen  wrote:
>
> About the possible Roadside Skipper.
>
> Thanks for emails.  A couple of you think it's a Clouded Skipper which is
> fairly common here so that makes it a good possibility. I did some more
> searching and find a hint of a fourth spot on some Clouded Skippers, but
> the spot alignment looks wrong, more rounded in the Clouded, isn't it? .
>  The wing margin is like the Clouded, but this small dark gray skipper
> didn't look like my ordinary Clouded Skippers which have a richer brownish
> color.  I'm really not familiar with any of the Roadside Skippers and my
> photo's not all that good.
>
> Doug
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 9:35 AM, Doug Allen  wrote:
>
>> On Friday I got a glimpse and just one photo of a very small dark gray
>> skipper which I think might be a Common Roadside Skipper, but the wing
>> border doesn't look right.
>>
>>  It's the only skipper I can find with four spots in that configuration,
>> but possibly  the top spot is from the rear wing.  Don't think so, but I
>> can't rule that out.  What do you think?
>>
>> first picture-
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/
>>
>> Doug
>>  Inman, SC
>>
>
>
>
Subject: Fwd: Chesterfield County Three more leps
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 09:10:15 -0400
One each:

Zarucco Duskwing
Silver Spotted Skipper
Eastern Tailed Blue


-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: 	Chesterfield County
Date: 	Mon, 01 Sep 2014 08:01:01 -0400
From: 	Jules Fraytet 
To: 	carolinaleps AT duke.edu



Sightings at Mcbee WMA, SandHills SF and Carolina Sandhills NWR 8/31

Cloudless Sulphur   20
Clouded Sulphur  2
Little Yellow  12
Buckeye 6
Sleepy Orange 8
Variegated Fritillary  8
Pipevine ST  1
Palameades ST  2

Eastern Tiger ST 1  very fresh, near sunset after a brief thundershower
near Oxpen Lakes

and happy to see an abundance of bumblebees and other pollinators on
Lepedeza bicolor and composites.

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte


Subject: Chesterfield County
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 08:01:01 -0400
Sightings at Mcbee WMA, SandHills SF and Carolina Sandhills NWR 8/31

Cloudless Sulphur   20
Clouded Sulphur  2
Little Yellow  12
Buckeye 6
Sleepy Orange 8
Variegated Fritillary  8
Pipevine ST  1
Palameades ST  2

Eastern Tiger ST 1  very fresh, near sunset after a brief thundershower 
near Oxpen Lakes

and happy to see an abundance of bumblebees and other pollinators on 
Lepedeza bicolor and composites.

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte
Subject: Wake Co., NC-Temple Flat Rock-08/31/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:04:01 -0400
I walked around the field and explored the flat rock area.The weather was
sunny and 91F. Most of the nectaring was on goldenrod and lespedeza.
Notable sightings among my 21 species were my FOY Crossline and Swarthy
Skippers, and my second 2014 sightings of Little Yellow and Hoary Edge. My
list is below. Good butterflying.

  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2, incl 1 blk female  Cloudless Sulphur 2  Little
Yellow 1  Sleepy Orange 2  Gray Hairstreak 2  Red-banded Hairstreak 1  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 7  Summer Azure 3  Pearl Crescent 2  Common Buckeye 10  Tawny
Emperor 2  Carolina Satyr 10  Common Wood-Nymph 2  Silver-spotted
Skipper 1  Hoary
Edge 1  Horace's Duskywing 1  Common Checkered-Skipper 2  Swarthy Skipper
FOY 1  Fiery Skipper 2  Crossline Skipper FOY 5  Sachem 3
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Re: possible Roadside skipper
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:02:57 -0600
Hi Doug,

Actually, it looks like a duskywing of some flavor.

Cheers,
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

On Aug 31, 2014, at 8:22 AM, Doug Allen  wrote:

> About the possible Roadside Skipper. 
> 
> Thanks for emails. A couple of you think it's a Clouded Skipper which is 
fairly common here so that makes it a good possibility. I did some more 
searching and find a hint of a fourth spot on some Clouded Skippers, but the 
spot alignment looks wrong, more rounded in the Clouded, isn't it? . The wing 
margin is like the Clouded, but this small dark gray skipper didn't look like 
my ordinary Clouded Skippers which have a richer brownish color. I'm really not 
familiar with any of the Roadside Skippers and my photo's not all that good. 

> 
> Doug
> 
> 
> On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 9:35 AM, Doug Allen  wrote:
> On Friday I got a glimpse and just one photo of a very small dark gray 
skipper which I think might be a Common Roadside Skipper, but the wing border 
doesn't look right. 

> 
> It's the only skipper I can find with four spots in that configuration, but 
possibly the top spot is from the rear wing. Don't think so, but I can't rule 
that out. What do you think? 

> 
> first picture-
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/
> 
> Doug
>  Inman, SC
> 
Subject: Re: possible Roadside skipper
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:22:26 -0400
About the possible Roadside Skipper.

Thanks for emails.  A couple of you think it's a Clouded Skipper which is
fairly common here so that makes it a good possibility. I did some more
searching and find a hint of a fourth spot on some Clouded Skippers, but
the spot alignment looks wrong, more rounded in the Clouded, isn't it? .
 The wing margin is like the Clouded, but this small dark gray skipper
didn't look like my ordinary Clouded Skippers which have a richer brownish
color.  I'm really not familiar with any of the Roadside Skippers and my
photo's not all that good.

Doug


On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 9:35 AM, Doug Allen  wrote:

> On Friday I got a glimpse and just one photo of a very small dark gray
> skipper which I think might be a Common Roadside Skipper, but the wing
> border doesn't look right.
>
>  It's the only skipper I can find with four spots in that configuration,
> but possibly  the top spot is from the rear wing.  Don't think so, but I
> can't rule that out.  What do you think?
>
> first picture-
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/
>
> Doug
>  Inman, SC
>
Subject: possible Roadside skipper
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:35:48 -0400
On Friday I got a glimpse and just one photo of a very small dark gray
skipper which I think might be a Common Roadside Skipper, but the wing
border doesn't look right.

 It's the only skipper I can find with four spots in that configuration,
but possibly  the top spot is from the rear wing.  Don't think so, but I
can't rule that out.  What do you think?

first picture-

https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

Doug
 Inman, SC
Subject: Pitt County, 30 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 23:44:22 +0000
I went to the Pitt County Arboretum, VOA site C, River Park North, and Boyd Lee 
Park today, and found 30 species, by far the best showing this year. Here is my 
list (Pitt County, 2014-08-30): 


Black Swallowtail, 2, Pitt County Arboretum
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 7
Palamedes Swallowtail, 1, VOA site C
Spicebush Swallowtail, 2

Sleepy Orange, 10
Cloudless Sulphur, 3

HARVESTER, 1, River Park North
Great Purple Hairstreak, 2
Red-banded Hairstreak, 5, Pitt County Arboretum
Gray Hairstreak, 1, VOA site C
Summer Azure, 1, Boyd Lee Park
Eastern Tailed-Blue, 2, River Park North

American Snout, 1, River Park North
Monarch, 1, River Park North
Variegated Fritillary, 5, River Park North
Viceroy, 2, Pitt County Arboretum
Red-spotted Purple, 1, River Park North
Common Buckeye, 13
Pearl Crescent, 1, River Park North
Carolina Satyr, 1, River Park North
Common Wood-Nymph, 2, VOA site C, first August record for Pitt

Silver-spotted Skipper, 20
Horace's Duskywing, 2, River Park North
Checkered-Skipper, 1, VOA site C
Ocola Skipper, 7
Fiery Skipper, 45
Whirlabout, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Dun Skipper, 2, River Park North
Dion Skipper, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Sachem, 1, Pitt County Arboretum

I count 39 species recorded from Pitt in August of this year - slightly better 
than 2013 (38 species), but well below 2012 (46 species). 


Salman Abdulali
Greenville NC
Subject: More Green Commas on BRP
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 22:33:27 +0000
Hi all,

I had a wonderful time with all of you on Mt. Mitchell, and I continued on down 
toward Asheville and got some other good ones. At Walker Knob overlook about 5 
miles south of Mitchell, 

I had an Eastern Comma right away, then two more Greens! Not much else, though, 
as butterflies were still scarce in general. Later I went to the NC Arboretum 
(the wooded part below the main gardens), hoping for Lady Diana to finally show 
herself after several years of eluding me. Finally, she did! Just one, but she 
was beautiful! 


The next day I went back up to Walker Knob and had two more Green Commas 
(perhaps the same ones) along with several Pipevine Swallowtails and a couple 
of Eastern Tigers. I got some very nice photos - take a look! 


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
Keep up with us on Facebook, 
Twitter and at 
lifeandscience.org 
Subject: RE: Transylvania County NABA Count results
From: "Sue" <spinashe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 14:29:10 -0400
Hi All,
Hi Everyone,

I've attached photos of a beautiful orchid and moth caterpillar taken on our
Transylvania count on Tuesday.

Sue
Subject: Giant swallowtail
From: Ginger Kopka <gkopka1 AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:05:19 -0400
Finally had a Giant Swallowtail lay eggs on my Rue plants in Simpsonville, SC. 
Ginger Kopka

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Dukes' Skippers today
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:56:10 -0400
Today, after a bit of searching, I found 4 Dukes' Skippers near Flanners 
Beach (U.S. Forest Service recreation area), Neuse River, Craven County.

They seem to be less common this year than in past years.

I also made a couple of brief searches at Fishers Landing (another Forest 
Service access point a mile or so upriver), at sites where I've seen Dukes' 
in the past, but was unsuccessful.  At one of the sites, I see that the 
Carex hyalinolepis (assumed larval foodplant of the skipper) is being 
invaded by Phragmites and alligator weed.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

Subject: Transylvania County NABA Count results
From: Ruth Young <reyoung1227 AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:36:49 -0400
Six participants located 36 species of butterflies during the Transylvania NABA 
count on Wednesday, August, 27, 2014. The morning was cool, about 60 degrees, 
ending at about 80 degrees by the afternoon. There was full sunshine all day. 
Here are the results: 


Pipevine Swallowtail    24
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail   31
Spicebush Swallowtail  2
Cabbage White  8
Clouded Sulphur  55
Orange Sulphur   25
Cloudless Sulphur  8
Little Yellow 1
Gray Hairstreak 2
Eastern Tailed-Blue  39
Summer Azure  31
Variegated Fritillary  35
Diana Fritillary  7 ( one male, six females)
Great Spangled Fritillary  3
Meadow Fritillary  14
Pearl Crescent  8
Eastern Comma 1 (One Polygonia  as well)
American Lady 1
Red Admiral 1
Common Buckeye 6
Red-spotted Purple 25
Viceroy 2
Northern Pearly-Eye 1
Carolina Saytr 1
Common Wood-Nymph 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 104
Horace's Duskywing 2
Wild Indigo Duskywing 8
Clouded Skipper 3
Least Skipper 9
Fiery Skipper 1
Tawny-edged Skipper 1
Sachem 14
Zabuon Skipper 2
Dun Skipper 1
Lace-winged Roadside-Skipper 1

Many thanks to Nancy Cowal, Doug Johnston, Janie Owens, Sue Perry, and Vin 
Stanton for their participation! 


Subject: Re: 3 FOY: Hayhurst Scallopwing, Delaware Skipper, and Eufala Skipper
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:39:38 -0400
Your duskywing is a Zarucco, and the broken-dash is a Southern.

Harry LeGrand


On Thu, Aug 28, 2014 at 9:05 PM, Doug Allen  wrote:

> All three are rare to uncommon here on Windmill Hill near mountains.
>  Other butterflies similar to last report except there were over half a
> dozen Variegated Frits flying today, first time seen in a while.
>
> Pictures of above-    https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/
>
> Doug Allen
> Windmill Hill, Spartanburg County, SC
>
Subject: 3 FOY: Hayhurst Scallopwing, Delaware Skipper, and Eufala Skipper
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:05:27 -0400
All three are rare to uncommon here on Windmill Hill near mountains.  Other
butterflies similar to last report except there were over half a dozen
Variegated Frits flying today, first time seen in a while.

Pictures of above-    https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

Doug Allen
Windmill Hill, Spartanburg County, SC
Subject: Re: Carolina/Intricate Satyr and Common Checkered/White Checkered-Skipper
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:58:12 -0400
Thanks Harry. After reading Harry's comment about intricata only being
recorded in NC from the Coastal Plain, I thought I had him dead to rights!
But I just now re-checked the paper that I THOUGHT had a photo record of
intricata from Durant Nature Park in Wake Co., NC, and I see that the photo
was actually labeled as "Hermeuptychia sp.". Sorry for the temporary
confusion. Another case of Harry being right and me being wrong! Thanks for
your comments, Harry.

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC


On Thu, Aug 28, 2014 at 7:46 PM, Harry LeGrand  wrote:

> I am certainly not going to throw out good data, and thus I enter all of
> these two reports -- still as Carolina Satyr and Common Checkered-Skipper.
> Sure, a tiny few of these could well be the rare members of the pair. I am
> aware of confirmed records of Intricate Satyr only from 3 counties in the
> lower Coastal Plain -- none anywhere near Wake County of the Piedmont. And
> although most checkered-skippers in SC are White C-S, such has not been the
> case in NC, as far as we know.
>
> The only data I tend to not include are those to group only, where the
> members are both or all possible. Thus, I don't enter "Polygonia species",
> or "duskywing species", or "pearly-eye species", etc.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Aug 28, 2014 at 7:04 PM, Mike Turner 
> wrote:
>
>> I was just wondering how Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard record the above
>> two pairs of taxa in their Butterflies of NC/Approximation databases, and
>> how NABA Butterfly Count compilers do so for their respective counts,
>> especially in the Triangle area. I know both satyrs are recorded from Wake
>> Co. and CAN be told apart in the field, but I rarely think I am able to do
>> so, thus I report these as Carolina/Intricate Satyr. When I do this how do
>> you put them in your databases? And when others on the listserve report
>> Carolina Satyr do you mean that you actually ID'd these as Carolina Satyr
>> or is it sometimes implied that it could be either species?
>>
>> I have the same question about the two Checkered-Skippers, but I realize
>> WCC has not been documented away from the coast and one western Piedmont
>> location.
>>
>> I thought their answers may answer questions others on here may have so I
>> posted this query to the listserve. Thanks.
>>
>> --
>> Mike Turner
>> Raleigh, NC
>>
>
>


-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Re: Carolina/Intricate Satyr and Common Checkered/White Checkered-Skipper
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:46:22 -0400
I am certainly not going to throw out good data, and thus I enter all of
these two reports -- still as Carolina Satyr and Common Checkered-Skipper.
Sure, a tiny few of these could well be the rare members of the pair. I am
aware of confirmed records of Intricate Satyr only from 3 counties in the
lower Coastal Plain -- none anywhere near Wake County of the Piedmont. And
although most checkered-skippers in SC are White C-S, such has not been the
case in NC, as far as we know.

The only data I tend to not include are those to group only, where the
members are both or all possible. Thus, I don't enter "Polygonia species",
or "duskywing species", or "pearly-eye species", etc.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh




On Thu, Aug 28, 2014 at 7:04 PM, Mike Turner  wrote:

> I was just wondering how Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard record the above two
> pairs of taxa in their Butterflies of NC/Approximation databases, and how
> NABA Butterfly Count compilers do so for their respective counts,
> especially in the Triangle area. I know both satyrs are recorded from Wake
> Co. and CAN be told apart in the field, but I rarely think I am able to do
> so, thus I report these as Carolina/Intricate Satyr. When I do this how do
> you put them in your databases? And when others on the listserve report
> Carolina Satyr do you mean that you actually ID'd these as Carolina Satyr
> or is it sometimes implied that it could be either species?
>
> I have the same question about the two Checkered-Skippers, but I realize
> WCC has not been documented away from the coast and one western Piedmont
> location.
>
> I thought their answers may answer questions others on here may have so I
> posted this query to the listserve. Thanks.
>
> --
> Mike Turner
> Raleigh, NC
>
Subject: Carolina/Intricate Satyr and Common Checkered/White Checkered-Skipper
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:04:16 -0400
I was just wondering how Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard record the above two
pairs of taxa in their Butterflies of NC/Approximation databases, and how
NABA Butterfly Count compilers do so for their respective counts,
especially in the Triangle area. I know both satyrs are recorded from Wake
Co. and CAN be told apart in the field, but I rarely think I am able to do
so, thus I report these as Carolina/Intricate Satyr. When I do this how do
you put them in your databases? And when others on the listserve report
Carolina Satyr do you mean that you actually ID'd these as Carolina Satyr
or is it sometimes implied that it could be either species?

I have the same question about the two Checkered-Skippers, but I realize
WCC has not been documented away from the coast and one western Piedmont
location.

I thought their answers may answer questions others on here may have so I
posted this query to the listserve. Thanks.

-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Oops!! Wake Co. butterflies, JC Raulston Arboretum
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:42:30 -0400
I didn't mean to post my sightings scientific names. I cut and pasted the
wrong column. Here is the same list's common names. Sorry.

  Black Swallowtail 1  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2 (incl. 1 black
female)  Cabbage
White 8  Orange Sulphur 1  Cloudless Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 8  Gray
Hairstreak 1  Summer Azure 1  Pearl Crescent 1  Painted Lady 2  Common
Buckeye 23  Monarch 1  Silver-spotted Skipper 16  Horace's Duskywing 2  Wild
Indigo Duskywing 1  Common Checkered-Skipper 3  Fiery Skipper 45
Sachem 15  Ocola
Skipper 1

-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Wild Indigo Duskywings, Common Roadside Skippers PMSP, Surry Co
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:40:43 -0400
Sven Halling and I cased the Little Pinnacle today in preparation for the
Surry County NABA Count Sept. 7th. There is a good chance that most of
these species could still be around for the NABA count and a lot of them
will not be common down below any more this year. Around the parking lot,
down the pipeline cut between the picnic tables, and up on Little Pinnacle
we found:


*Wild Indigo Duskywing 2*

*Common Roadside Skipper 3*

*Horace's Duskywing 4*

*Hoary Edge 6*
Silver-spotted Skipper 11
Sachem 16
Little Glassywing 2
Southern Broken-dash 3
Gemmed Satyr 3
Common Wood Nymph 6
American Lady 7
Great Spangled Fritillary 5
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 3
Black Swallowtail 1
Red-spotted Purple 12
Gray Hairstreak 2
Common Buckeye 1
Summer Azure 8
Easten Tailed Blue 7

It was very hot (even up on the mountain with a little breeze at times).

Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling)
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-08/28/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:39:42 -0400
I walked around the arboretum from 1-3:45pm under sunny skies and temps
about 92F. The highlight among my 19 species were two Painted Ladies, my
FOY. My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

 Papilio polyxenes (1)  Papilio glaucus (2, incl. 1 black female)  Pieris
rapae (8)  Colias eurytheme (1)  Phoebis sennae (1)  Abaeis nicippe
(8)  Strymon
melinus (1)  Celastrina neglecta (1)  Phyciodes tharos (1)  Vanessa cardui
(2)  Junonia coenia (23)  Danaus plexippus (1)  Epargyreus clarus (16)  Erynnis
horatius (2)  Erynnis baptisiae (1)  Pyrgus communis (3)  Hylephila phyleus
(45)  Atalopedes campestris (15)  Panoquina ocola (1)
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Lee Co., SC leps 27 August 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 07:05:19 -0400
Hi All,

Brian Scholtens and I spent about an hour on rural roads in Lee Co., SC and
had the following:


Cloudless Sulfur 15
Sleepy Orange 10
Gulf Fritillary 1
Variegated Fritillary 5
Silver-spotted Skipper 2
Horace's Duskywing 1
checkered-skipper sp 1 male
Clouded Skipper 1

Dennis
Fiery Skipper 8
-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Avery county leps
From: Alex Netherton <blueridgediscovery AT charter.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 02:02:53 -0400
Harry. I have lived in Asheville all my life and never have I seen a Green 
Comma or a Copper.  Where and when do I need to go? 

Thanks!!!


Alex

-------- Original message --------
From: Harry LeGrand  
Date:08/27/2014  2:01 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: Bb  
Cc: carolinaleps  
Subject: Re: Avery county leps 

Congrats on getting three montane target butterflies -- the "easy" three -- 
Green Comma, Diana Fritillary, and American Copper. Glad Gail's and my 
locations still panned out. For Gray Comma -- you are on your own to hike some 
high elevation trails or gravel roads!  You still can rack up on some Coastal 
Plain wetland skippers in the next month, and a few are gimmes, like Palatka. 
But for things like Dusky Roadside-Skippers, luck and persistence will need to 
be part of the game plan. For things like Dukes', Berry's, and Aaron's (and 
Yehl?), they aren't too hard with proper planning and persistence. Dukes' is 
peaking about now, so .... 

 
Harry LeGrand


On Wed, Aug 27, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Bb  wrote:
Tue 8/26 went home via blue ridge parkway, checked several overlooks the day 
before, but concentrated on gails suggestion to try for american copper around 
entrance to linville falls, she was right!!!  The field nw of intersection 
across road had more sun and nectar.  


20 pipevine swallowtail
15 eastern tiger swallowtail
1 clouded sulphur
2 cloudless sulphur
7 e tailed blue
2 summer azure
1 american copper (foy #117)
7 great spangled fritillary
1 aphrodite fritillary
1 pearl. CRescent
1 american lady
2 common wood nymph
10 silver spotted skipper
1 horaces duskywing
1 least skipper
15 pecks skipper

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Reminder: Lake Phelps/Pettigrew Butterfly Count - Sunday, August 31st
From: "Corey, Ed" <ed.corey AT ncparks.gov>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 02:29:17 +0000
Folks,

Just a reminder for those interested that we'll be holding our Lake 
Phelps/Pettigrew Butterfly Count on Sunday, August 31st. We plan to meet at 9am 
at the park office, to then split up to cover the various areas in the circle. 
If you would like to join us, please let me know by Friday. If you've already 
committed, no need to remind me. 


Thanks!

Ed

--------

Ed Corey
Inventory Biologist
NC Division of Parks and Recreation

Yorkshire Center
Office 305
12700 Bayleaf Church Road, Raleigh, NC 27614-9633
Office: 919-841-4037 Cell: 919-208-7864 Fax: 919-870-6843

Note that my email address has changed to 
Ed.Corey AT ncparks.gov. Please update in your contact 
lists. 


E-mail correspondence to and from this address may be subject to the North 
Carolina Public Records Law and may be disclosed to third parties. 

Subject: North Carolina Butterfly Website
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:29:14 +0000
The photo at the bottom of this page is stunning!

http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/a/accounts.php?acctID=27
Subject: Tanglewood Monarch, Viceroys at Tanglewood
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 19:44:15 -0400
Sven Halling, Wayne Petel, and I went to Tanglewood in western Forsyth Co.
From 1:30 -4:00 we found the following butterflies:

Sachem 100+
Fiery Skipper 2
Zabulon 5
Common/White Checkered Skipper 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 5
Delaware Skipper 2
Tawny-edged Skipper 1
Summer Azure 12
Pearl Crescent 5
Sleepy Orange 1
Cloudless Sulphur 2
Orange Sulphur 1
Hackberry 5
Tawny Emperor 4
American Snout 2
Red Admiral 1
Red-spotted Purple 2
Eastern Comma 1
Common Buckeye 6
Northern Pearly-eye 4
Creole Pearly-eye 5
Appalachian Brown 1
Viceroy 2
American Lady 1
Monarch 1
Viceroy 11
Carolina Satyr 100+

It was very hot and sunny. Who would have guessed that we would have 11
Viceroys to 1 Monarch this year?
Gene Schepker
Subject: Re: Petition
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 14:37:39 -0700
The petition says: permits "will not apply to the collection of 
wild members of the species and rearing of fewer than ten 
monarchs per year by any individual, household, or 
educational entity."  

So only ten wild adult monarchs, caterpillars or eggs
could be collected per year per elementary school.

And if teachers cannot find wild adult monarchs, caterpillars 
or eggs the petition says they cannot order them from
commercial suppliers. 

And if a wild female monarch lays 50 eggs on milkweeds 
in a home or school garden, the homeowner / teacher 
would only be allowed to bring 10 of them indoors to be 
raised which in turn means the other 40 would likely end
up getting killed by monarch egg and caterpillar predators or
tachinid fly / chalcid wasp parasites.

Paul Cherubini



Subject: Berkeley County SC Walk 8/27
From: <aszwarc AT berkeleycountysc.gov>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:41:25 -0400 (EDT)
This afternoon, August 27, 4 observers (D. Williams, A. Szwarc, L. Vaughn, M.
Horry) saw the following at Cypress Gardens in Berkeley County SC:

16 Palamedes Swallowtails
15 Cloudless Sulphurs
10 Carolina/Intricate Satyrs
5 Silver Spotted Skippers
2 Black Swallowtails
2 Azure spp
2 Gulf Fritillaries
2 Pearl Crescents
2 Least Skipper
1 Red Spotted Purple
1 Twin Spot Skipper
1 Appalachian Brown
1 Sleepy Orange
1 Checkered Skipper spp
1 Whirlabout
1 Common Buckeye
1 Red Banded Hairstreak
1 Gray Hairstreak

We were out from about 2-4 PM in 89*F, with sunny skies. A great day for
butterflies!
Subject: Re: Petition
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 20:36:01 +0000
I will break a resolution I had made to not get involved in arguments over 
this, to say that this is simply not true. All of these issues are addressed 
within the petition. 


Salman Abdulali

On Aug 27, 2014, at 3:07 PM, Ginger Kopka wrote:

Edith Smith, owner of Shady Oaks butterfly farm, said if the petition is signed 
and the Monarch is declared endangered, it would mean that no one could touch a 
Monarch, caterpillar or egg again. Schools would not be able to raise them in 
their classroom. We would not be able to raise them. 

Ginger Kopka
Simpsonville, SC
Subject: Butterflies, Southwest Park, Guilford County
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:18:26 -0400
I was in Southwest Park in Guilford County, NC this morning, 8/27/14,
working on an Audubon project. As I was driving out, I noticed some
butterflies on a row of butterfly bushes. I paused long enough to see a very
ragged Spicebush Swallowtail, an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, two Great
Spangled Fritillaries, and about 6 Sachems. Its likely that there were
other butterflies, but I was on my way to another appointment so didnt
linger long. Outside the park I saw a Cloudless Sulphur along the roadside.
-- 
Dennis Burnette
Greensboro, NC
Guilford County
deburnette AT triad.rr.com
Subject: Petition
From: Ginger Kopka <gkopka1 AT aol.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:07:48 -0400
Edith Smith, owner of Shady Oaks butterfly farm, said if the petition is signed 
and the Monarch is declared endangered, it would mean that no one could touch a 
Monarch, caterpillar or egg again. Schools would not be able to raise them in 
their classroom. We would not be able to raise them. 

Ginger Kopka
Simpsonville, SC

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Avery county leps
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 14:01:29 -0400
Congrats on getting three montane target butterflies -- the "easy" three --
Green Comma, Diana Fritillary, and American Copper. Glad Gail's and my
locations still panned out. For Gray Comma -- you are on your own to hike
some high elevation trails or gravel roads!  You still can rack up on some
Coastal Plain wetland skippers in the next month, and a few are gimmes,
like Palatka. But for things like Dusky Roadside-Skippers, luck and
persistence will need to be part of the game plan. For things like Dukes',
Berry's, and Aaron's (and Yehl?), they aren't too hard with proper planning
and persistence. Dukes' is peaking about now, so ....

Harry LeGrand


On Wed, Aug 27, 2014 at 11:27 AM, Bb  wrote:

> Tue 8/26 went home via blue ridge parkway, checked several overlooks the
> day before, but concentrated on gails suggestion to try for american copper
> around entrance to linville falls, she was right!!!  The field nw of
> intersection across road had more sun and nectar.
>
> 20 pipevine swallowtail
> 15 eastern tiger swallowtail
> 1 clouded sulphur
> 2 cloudless sulphur
> 7 e tailed blue
> 2 summer azure
> 1 american copper (foy #117)
> 7 great spangled fritillary
> 1 aphrodite fritillary
> 1 pearl. CRescent
> 1 american lady
> 2 common wood nymph
> 10 silver spotted skipper
> 1 horaces duskywing
> 1 least skipper
> 15 pecks skipper
>
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC
>
Subject: Avery county leps
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 11:27:41 -0400
Tue 8/26 went home via blue ridge parkway, checked several overlooks the day 
before, but concentrated on gails suggestion to try for american copper around 
entrance to linville falls, she was right!!! The field nw of intersection 
across road had more sun and nectar. 


20 pipevine swallowtail
15 eastern tiger swallowtail
1 clouded sulphur
2 cloudless sulphur
7 e tailed blue
2 summer azure
1 american copper (foy #117)
7 great spangled fritillary
1 aphrodite fritillary
1 pearl. CRescent
1 american lady
2 common wood nymph
10 silver spotted skipper
1 horaces duskywing
1 least skipper
15 pecks skipper

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Papilio July 25 and August 25
From: <shawnlane07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:31:04 -0400 (EDT)
 I went for a drive around July 25 on the Blue Ridge Parkway with the wife. I
started at the Virginia line and went south almost to Asheville.  The Pipevine,
Battus philenor was in swarm. I picked up several perfect specimens from the
road that were hit by cars gave them a good inspection and tossed them to the
weeds so not to waste a good meal for some other insect. I stopped counting at
200 after only 3 hrs. I saw only  5 or 6 P troilus and P glaucus. I hope I
spelled those right. There was also an abundance of Speyeria cybele. Did not
count but they were every where. Several Monarchs were flying as well and the
Milk weed was in bloom. It was a beautiful drive and the first time for my wife
to see the Mountains. A small shower a couple times but light and warm but cool
for the mountains that time of year.
 We went back and took the same route again near August 25 and to my surprise
the Pipevines were hard to see but they were out and flying with speed where in
July they were lazing on the Milk weeds. The good news is The Tiger S.T. were
flocking every where. I stopped counting again after 2 to 3 hours at over 200.
I would say 95% were broken badly and worn. I saw many more females than males
and the dark females were as abundant as well as lots of P. troilus. 
 The milk weeds were finished and a tall flower was the choice for the buffet.
I dont know the name of the plant but it is very common down into the
foothills. I took some photos at a few stops I made to get a closer look at
some of the overlook. Sever more Monachs and tons of Fritillary again. Also
lots of Red spot Purple and Wood nymphs with the yellow on the forewing. They
refused to be still for a photo. Just thought I would share. Good day to all !
Subject: Mount mitchell leps
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:20:29 -0400
Tue 8/26 about 15 famous and infamous nc butterfly enthusiasts embarked on the 
commissary trail at mount mitchell to search for the rare and elusive green 
comma. After seeing one that did not cooperate for photos i was a little 
worried, but the sun and warm temps opened the flood gates! We had them 
perching on us, flowers, ground, dung, everything but the rotten bananas that i 
so grossly squeezed out of their skins onto some rocks as bait along the trail 
the previous night. They even landed on us while we were back at the office 
eating lunch! 


Previous high count for green comma someone said was 12. Checked as many as 
possible for a gray but no luck. Our count total for green comma was very 
accurate with that many eyes, if anything maybe slightly conservative. With 8 
reported a week ago and 5 reported in early aug, i wonder if next week will be 
higher or lower!?! Surely this was the peak, i cant imagine more numbers than 
this! Maybe someone can beat our record... 


Thanks to all who came out for this glorious day!

50 pipevine swallowtail
22 eastern tiger swallowtail
2 clouded sulphur
2 orange sulphur
1 cloudless sulphur
4 e tailed blue
2 summer azure
8 great spangled fritillary
1 aphrodite fritillary worn
62 green comma, yes sixty-two!!!! (foy #116)
2 american lady
2 painted lady
6 red admiral
1 common buckeye
2 common wood nymph
11 silver spotted skipper
2 horaces duskywing
1 wild indigo duskywing
1 sachem

With so many folks i may have left something off, so let me know of any 
additions to this list so i can enter the data. 



Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Mcdowell county leps
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 09:57:27 -0400
On the way to mt mitchell mon 8/25 we took harrys advice and drove curtis creek 
road from i40 to the parkway hoping for diana frit. Once the road turned gravel 
nectar was less so we returned to the lower section of joe pye weed to search 
again. 


14 pipevine swallowtail
3 e tiger swallowtail
2 clouded sulphur
1 orange sulphur
1 gray hairstreak
4 summer azure
1 great spangled fritillary
1 Diana fritillary female (foy# 115)
2 pearl crescent
12 red spotted purple
9 silver spotted skipper
4 horaces duskywing
2 wild indigo duskywing
1 zabulon skipper

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Re: Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID)
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 03:48:45 +0000
The 5th photo looks like a Carolina Satyr - I don't see any blue in it.

Salman Abdulali

On Aug 26, 2014, at 8:41 PM, "Doug Allen" 
> wrote: 


On the 21st I saw my first Hairsreaks since April!. Stlli no Zebra Swallowtail 
or Red Admiral this year, but numbers of most species approaching normal. 


The first 3 pictures on mt Flickr site are A Broken Dash. Is it possible to 
separate Southern and Northern? I've never counted Northern here. The 4th 
picture is a Duskywing, maybe just another male Horace's. I've never been able 
to count Wild Indigo here. The 5th picture is a blue gray lep that was sunning 
within some open foliage, maybe a month? 


Help with the UNIDs please

See     https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/     for pics.

8/21  both Blue Wall, Greenville County, and Inman, Spartanburg County

2 Pipevine Swallowtail
15 Tiger Swallowtail
1 Black Swallowtail
1 Cloudless Sulphur
5 Gray Hairstreak
2 Summer Azure
2 Eastern-tailed Blue
1 Great-spangled Frit
5 Pearl Crescent
1 Question Mark
6 Am. Lady
1 Painted Lady
3 C. Buckeye
6 Red-spotted Purple
3 Appalachian Brown  FOY
5 Carolina Satyr
16 Silver-spotted Skipper
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Southern Cloudywing
2 Horace's Duskywing
1 C. Checkered Skipper
3 C. Sootywing
15+ Fiery Skipper
12+ Sachem
1 Zebulon Skipper
1 Ocola Skipper

8/26  Windmill Hill gardens  Spartanburg County

3 Pipevine Swallowtail
15+ Tiger Swallowtail
1 cabbage White
2 Sleepy Orange
2 Pearl Crescent
12+ Am. Painted Lady
4 C. Buckeye
1 Red-spotted Purple
1 Monarch   ***********************
20+  Silver-spotted Skipper  most common butterfly this summer
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Horace's Duskywing
1 UNID Duskywing
2 C. Sootywing
15+  Fiery Skipper
20+ Sachem
1 UNID Broken-Dash
3 Zebulon Skipper

Doug Inman, SC



Subject: Re: Monarch petition
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:10:57 -0700
On Aug 26, 2014, at 7:12 PM, Doug Allen wrote:

>  "Climate change models predict that annual mean maximum
> temperature is expected to increase across the continental
> United States, with mean predicted increases ranging from
> 3.6˚F to 9.0˚F (Alder and Hostetler 2013)."  page 101 of petition  
> The above is not only an extreme, but an absurd claim since
> no time frame or CO2 emissions frame of reference is given. 

Likewise, in this one minute excerpt of a lecture Dr. Chip Taylor 
presented 2 years ago, 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEZ4UvqOXJ8
it was suggested that mean winter temperatures on the mountains 
where the monarchs overwinter in Mexico could rise 2 degrees 
Celsius by 2030, (about 3.6 degrees F) making those mountains 
too warm for the monarchs to successfully overwinter.

Is a large 3.6 degree F rise in mean winter temperatures at the 
10,500 foot elevation zone in central Mexico in just 18 years 
realistically plausible? 

Paul Cherubini



Subject: Re: Monarch petition
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 22:12:27 -0400
Habitat degradation is always an important consideration.  So I am on board
with that one in its many forms..  I am not very knowledgeable about many
of the petition claims, but somewhat suspicious because I am knowledgeable
about one of them.

In the petition, many dozens of scientific papers are referenced which
would require hours to read.   There usually are opposing scientific views
and papers, for most any topic, which would require additional hours to
find and to read.  I'm familiar enough with one "threat", global
warming/climate change, to know that the papers referenced to support that
threat are mostly extreme and outmoded views, such as the following-

 "Climate change models predict that annual mean maximum temperature is
expected to increase across the continental United States, with mean
predicted increases ranging from 3.6˚F to 9.0˚F (Alder and Hostetler
2013)."  page 101 of petition

The above is not only an extreme, but an absurd claim since no time frame
or CO2 emissions frame of reference is given. The IPCC (2013) estimates
climate sensitivity to be in the range of 1.5 degrees to 4.5 Celsius for a
doubling of CO2.  We are half way to a double from the pre-industrial 280
ppm of CO2 and will reach the double before the end of this century.
 Global temperatures have so far risen about 0.8 degrees C.   Assuming that
warming was and is mostly the GHG effect, we might expect a similar
additional 0.8 degrees warming towards the end of the century when CO2
reaches 560 ppm, a double.  Its more complex than that, very politicized,
and everything about climate science is poorly understood by the
journalists and talking heads who pontificate about it.  I 'm in the
process of updating a paper which explains climate sensitivity. The concept
climate sensitivity is a key to understanding how much warming we'll have
and why the predictions are all over the map.  If interested, go to-
  http://climatesensitivity.blogspot.com/

Doug Allen


On Tue, Aug 26, 2014 at 4:50 PM, ROBERT CAVANAUGH 
wrote:

> I believe this is an absurd petition.  This is putting the horse before
> the cart.  Monarch decline is a byproduct of foodplant decimation due to
> extensive spraying of herbicides.  It is the food plant which should be
> placed on the threatened species list.
>
> Bob
>
>
>   On Tuesday, August 26, 2014 2:28 PM, "Abdulali, Salman" <
> ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu> wrote:
>
>
>
> http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/files/monarch-esa-petition-final_61585.pdf
>
>
>
Subject: Hairstreaks finally, FOY Broken Dash (UNID), Duskywing (UNID)
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:40:48 -0400
On the 21st I saw my first Hairsreaks since April!.  Stlli no Zebra
Swallowtail or Red Admiral this year, but numbers of most species
approaching normal.

The first 3 pictures on mt Flickr site are A Broken Dash.  Is it possible
to separate Southern and Northern?  I've never counted Northern here.  The
4th picture is a Duskywing, maybe just another male Horace's.  I've never
been able to count Wild Indigo here.  The 5th picture is a blue gray lep
that was sunning within some open foliage, maybe a month?

Help with the UNIDs please

See     https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/     for pics.

8/21  both Blue Wall, Greenville County, and Inman, Spartanburg County

2 Pipevine Swallowtail
15 Tiger Swallowtail
1 Black Swallowtail
1 Cloudless Sulphur
5 Gray Hairstreak
2 Summer Azure
2 Eastern-tailed Blue
1 Great-spangled Frit
5 Pearl Crescent
1 Question Mark
6 Am. Lady
1 Painted Lady
3 C. Buckeye
6 Red-spotted Purple
3 Appalachian Brown  FOY
5 Carolina Satyr
16 Silver-spotted Skipper
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Southern Cloudywing
2 Horace's Duskywing
1 C. Checkered Skipper
3 C. Sootywing
15+ Fiery Skipper
12+ Sachem
1 Zebulon Skipper
1 Ocola Skipper

8/26  Windmill Hill gardens  Spartanburg County

3 Pipevine Swallowtail
15+ Tiger Swallowtail
1 cabbage White
2 Sleepy Orange
2 Pearl Crescent
12+ Am. Painted Lady
4 C. Buckeye
1 Red-spotted Purple
1 Monarch   ***********************
20+  Silver-spotted Skipper  most common butterfly this summer
2 Hoary Skipper
1 Horace's Duskywing
1 UNID Duskywing
2 C. Sootywing
15+  Fiery Skipper
20+ Sachem
1 UNID Broken-Dash
3 Zebulon Skipper

Doug Inman, SC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill Co. Park-08/26/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 19:22:24 -0400
I walked the Creekside and Mill Pond trails and explored the open area. I
saw 24 species, a nice total this year. Weather was partly cloudy and 84F.
My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail 1  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2  Cabbage White 1  Sleepy
Orange 2  Eastern Tailed-Blue 4  Variegated Fritillary 5  Pearl
Crescent 5  Question
Mark 1  Red Admiral 1  Common Buckeye 4  Red-spotted Purple 2  Viceroy
1  Pearly-eye
sp. 4  Northern Pearly-eye 2  Creole Pearly-eye 2  Appalachian Brown 1
 Carolina/Intricate
Satyr 25  Monarch 2  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Horace's Duskywing 1  Least
Skipper 15  Fiery Skipper 2  Sachem 2  Zabulon Skipper 2  Ocola Skipper 7
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 26 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 23:10:58 +0000
I went to Boyd Lee Park late today (after 5:30 pm, 2014-08-26, Pitt County), 
and saw the following: 


Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 2
GREAT PURPLE HAIRSTREAK, 1, FOY #50 for Pitt County
Red-banded Hairstreak, 1
Summer Azure, 2
Red-spotted Purple, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 2

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Re: Monarch petition
From: ROBERT CAVANAUGH <papilio28570 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 13:50:20 -0700
I believe this is an absurd petition. This is putting the horse before the 
cart. Monarch decline is a byproduct of foodplant decimation due to extensive 
spraying of herbicides. It is the food plant which should be placed on the 
threatened species list. 


Bob  



On Tuesday, August 26, 2014 2:28 PM, "Abdulali, Salman"  
wrote: 

 


http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/files/monarch-esa-petition-final_61585.pdf
Subject: Monarch petition
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:28:31 +0000
http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/files/monarch-esa-petition-final_61585.pdf
Subject: Monarch Ovipositing and Peck's Skipper
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:38:26 -0400
Our garden was jumping with yellow skippers today and we had our first yard
Peck's Skipper, our 70th yard species. We have been seeing the Peck's for a
few days but I finally got a photo today. Most of the day was spent
following the Monarch around to collect eggs.  We brought in 29 eggs.

Monarch ovipositing 1 (we had a female early in the season who laid 4 eggs
which did not hatch out)
Red-spotted Purple 1
Common Buckeye 1
Pearl Crescent 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2
Pipevine Swallowtail 1 (male only)
Spicebush Female 1 (back for her third day, ovipositing)
Sleepy Orange 1 (ovipositing)
Cabbage White 3
Carolina Satyr 1
Summer Azure 1
Red-banded Hairsteak 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 3
Clouded Skipper 1
Little Glassywing 2
Zabulon Skipper 4 (1 female)
Fiery Skipper 2 (males)
Southern Broken-dash 4
Delaware Skipper 2 (male and female)
Peck's Skipper 2 (saw the dorsal of male and female)*
Sachem 7

I was with Richard Stickney when he found a Peck's (a montane species) at
Archie Elledge about a mile down the creek from here 5-6 years ago.  But
the Peck's was a good find in the garden down here in the Piedmont.


Gene S
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Mitchell Mill State Natural Area-08/25/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 19:50:01 -0400
Today I spent from noon until 6:15pm walking around the area looking for
leps and odes. The weather was mostly cloudy and 82F. My complete list is
below. Good butterflying.

  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 1  Sleepy Orange 1  Gray Hairstreak 1  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 2  Summer Azure 1  Pearl Crescent 7  Common Buckeye 1  Red-spotted
Purple 1  Hackberry Emperor 2  Appalachian Brown 1  Carolina/Intricate Satyr
20  Monarch 1  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Least Skipper 5  Little Glassywing
4  Zabulon Skipper 1  Ocola Skipper 2
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Southern Lake Norman NABA Count
From: piephofft AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 17:58:10 -0400 (EDT)


The Southern Lake Norman NABA Butterfly Count was held Sunday August 17, 2014 
after being postponed from the previous week. Temperatures were hot but 
humidity could have been much worse. Seventeen participants in six parties 
identified 57 species and 1238 individuals, spending 33.5 party hours in the 
field. Rob Van Epp's group spent the most hours in the field and appropriately 
tallied the most species (44). Thanks to all who participated. 

Rob Van Epps, Christine Lisiewski, Jeff Lemons, Lenny Lampel, Ethan Lampel, 
Robert Gilson, Laura Domingo, Thanh Huynh, Taylor Piephoff, Steve Tracy, Chris 
Talkington, Jan Fowler, Phil Fowler, Gene Schepker, Kevin Metcalf, Tom Sanders, 
Tammy Sanders. 

 
 







Pipevine  Swallowtail
12

Zebra  Swallowtail
4

Black  Swallowtail
4

Eastern  Tiger Swallowtail
81

Spicebush  Swallowtail
33

Cabbage  White
12

Orange  Sulphur    
10

Cloudless  Sulphur
9

Little  Yellow
1

Sleepy  Orange
24

Red-banded  Hairstreak
1

Gray  Hairstreak
7

Summer  Azure
26

Eastern  Tailed-Blue
69

American  Snout
12

Gulf  Fritillary
2

Variegated  Fritillary
30

Great  Spangled Fritillary
4

Pearl  Crescent
22

Question  Mark     
3

Eastern  Comma     
2

Painted  Lady
4

American  Lady
1

Red  Admiral
6

Common  Buckeye
133

Red-spotted  Purple
23

Viceroy
5

Hackberry  Emperor
8

Tawny  Emperor
2

Northern  Pearly-Eye
7

Creole  Pearly-Eye
4

Appalachian  Brown
13

Gemmed  Satyr
1

Carolina  Satyr
200

Common  Wood-Nymph
4

Monarch
20

Silver-spotted  Skipper
112

Hoary  Edge
8

Southern  Cloudywing
3

Northern  Cloudywing
2

Horace’s  Duskywing
8

Wild  Indigo Duskywing
2

Common  Checkered-Skipper
9

Common  Sootywing
10

Swarthy  Skipper
4

Clouded  Skipper
22

Least  Skipper
40

Southern  Skipperling
1

Fiery  Skipper
39

Tawny-edged  Skipper
2

Crossline  Skipper
1

Little  Glassywing
21

Sachem
62

Delaware  Skipper
25

Zabulon  Skipper
45

Dun  Skipper
4

Ocola  Skipper
19


1238


 
Taylor Piephoff 
Matthews, NC 
PiephoffT AT aol.com

Subject: Butterfly Symposium Deadline Approaching
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:55:48 -0400
The deadline for ordering lunches for the Carolina Butterfly Society
Butterfly Symposium is fast approaching. Although you can register for the
symposium itself right up until the day of the event, Saturday, Sept. 13, if
you want to order lunch you need to do it now. The deadline is this coming
Friday, August 29. Go to the Carolina Butterfly Society website  www.carolinabutterflysociety.org/>, download the registration
form, indicate your preference of the meat or vegetarian choice, and send it
to the address on the form along with the fees indicated.


-----

Carolina Butterfly Society
2014 BUTTERFLY SYMPOSIUM
Stedman Education Building, North Carolina Zoological Park
4401 Zoo Pkwy, Asheboro, NC, 27205
 
Butterflies, native plants that attract butterflies, updates on the decline
in Monarch butterflies  all this and more are planned for our annual
Carolina Butterfly Society Butterfly Symposium. Mark your calendar now and
plan to join us on Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014. The registration fee is $12 per
person. The optional lunch cost is $12.50 per person and must be received by
August 29. For the registration form, go to the Carolina Butterfly Society
website  www.carolinabutterflysociety.org/>
 
Last year our annual Butterfly Symposium was held in South Carolina, so we
have rotated it to North Carolina this year. Were delighted that we found a
date when the popular Stedman Education Building just outside the gate of
the NC Zoological Park in Asheboro, NC, was available. While our activities
wont take us into the zoo itself, participants who come for the weekend
should plan a visit to this wonderful zoo at times when we arent engaged in
Butterfly Symposium activities.
 
We have a full agenda beginning at 10 am and running through 4 pm. We plan
to have a presentation on native plants that are good nectar sources for
adult butterflies and other pollinators as well as plants that are used as
food for the butterfly caterpillars. Well have a special presentation on
the milkweed species in our region, the only group of plants that Monarchs
can use as caterpillar host plants. Well hear from an experienced gardener
about designing and maintaining a home garden specifically for butterflies
and other pollinators. One of our presenters, who is involved with the
Monarch Watch program, will give us some insight on whats been happening
with that iconic species.
 
In addition to these great presentations, we are arranging to have some
handouts that participants can take home with them. We also will distribute
milkweed seeds of several different species to folks who want to try them in
their own gardens and landscaping.
 
Lots of people will be coming from some distance away, so we have made it
easy to make this a whole weekend of butterflies! On the Friday before the
Symposium, Sept. 12, we will have a butterfly walk at 2:00 pm to Purgatory
Mountain near the NC Zoo in Randolph Co. On Sept. 14, the Sunday following
the Symposium, we will have a field trip to the scenic Pisgah Covered Bridge
and portions of the Uwharrie National Forest in Montgomery and Randolph
Counties starting at 9:00 am. We expect to have lots of photo opportunities
for the photographers in the group.
 
Registration fee: $12 per person. (Meal cost separate.) Send your check to
CBS, PO Box 18771, Greensboro, NC 27419. If you plan to purchase a catered
lunch (see below), please add the cost per person to your registration
check. You may register up to the day of the Symposium, but your lunch
payment must be received by August 29.
 
Meals: You may bring your own food and drinks for lunch on the day of the
symposium. If you prefer, you may purchase a catered lunch. We are required
to use the NC Zoos contract caterer; the cost is $12.50. The meat selection
is a roast turkey breast sandwich with Gruyere cheese and honey mustard on
whole wheat bread. The vegetarian selection is fresh mozzarella, tomato,
basil, and olive oil on ciabatta. In addition, we will have fresh fruit,
chips, cookies, and soft drinks for everyone who orders a catered lunch. If
you intend to buy the catered lunch, please add the lunch cost for each
person in your party to your registration check. Your lunch payment must be
received by August 29. If you bring your own lunch, youll have to provide
your own drinks and snacks. Breakfasts and dinners are on your own. For the
field trips, please bring plenty of water to drink.
 
Zoo admission: We will be outside the zoo gate in the Stedman Education
Building. Zoo admission is not included in your registration. This is a
wonderful zoo, and we encourage folks to enjoy it when they arent involved
in Symposium activities. Currently, regular admission for all visitors is
$12 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $8 for children 12 and under. You will
pay this at the gate.
 
Lodging: Were aware that some folks like to make their hotel reservations
well in advance, so one of our committee members has been lining up
accommodations. Asheboro has several national chain hotels that you can find
on line. In addition, we have reserved a block of rooms at one hotel that
has a full breakfast and other nice amenities, and we have a couple of other
suggestions below. [NOTE: These prices were confirmed last spring but may
have changed. Tell the desk clerk youre attending the CBS Butterfly
Symposium and ask for the current rate.]
 
Hampton Inn, E. Dixie Dr.  336-625-9000. A block of King rooms  AT  $95, Double
rooms  AT  $105 (2 queen beds) has been reserved for Friday and Saturday night,
Sept 12 & 13th. Non-smoking, Indoor heated pool, excellent breakfast
included. Reservation cut off date - August 22. All reservations honored at
block room rate, even if they exceed blocked number. For those who wish to
have a longer vacation in the area, extended days Sept 11th and14th are
included in block room rate if mentioned at time of reservation.
Reservations may be made at these rates immediately.
 
Other hotels (No block reservations): Fairfield Inn and Suites, 336-626-9197
(shares Hampton Inn entrance) King rooms $93, Double $99 (2 double beds).
Non-smoking, indoor heated pool, breakfast included. Reservation cut off
date - August 22.  Also have extended days of Sept 11th & 14th.
 
Comfort Inn, 825 W. Dixie Dr. 336-626-4414.  King $71.10, Double $79 (2
Queen beds), free hot breakfast, seasonal outdoor pool, pet-friendly hotel.
 
This is the last notice that well be able to send out to the whole
membership before the Butterfly Symposium. If you have questions, you may
contact Don Allemann  or Dennis Burnette Dennis Burnette
.
 
Dont miss this great Butterfly Symposium on Sept. 13, 2014, and we hope
youll also join us for the field trips on Friday afternoon, Sept. 12, and
Sunday morning, Sept. 14. Lets make it a Butterfly Weekend!
http://www.carolinabutterflysociety.org/
Subject: Shallow Ford NA, Alamance Co, NC Butterflies
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:29:46 -0400
8/23/14 Report Shallow Ford NA
 
Nine of us participated in the Carolina Butterfly Society field trip to
Shallow Ford Natural Area in northern Alamance County, NC, on Saturday, Aug.
23, 2014. This was a joint trip with the Triad Chapter of the NC Native
Plant Society. In addition to exploring part of the park, we also visited
the private residence of one of the participants who kindly provided lunch
for the group. 
 
The morning was overcast, the wind calm, and it was warm and humid. Judging
by the wet roads several places in the vicinity, there were showers that
popped up all around us. However, we didnt have any rain during our walk
from 9:30 to 12:15.
 
We werent expecting to see a lot of butterflies due to the cloudy weather
and the low number of butterflies that have occurred throughout eastern
North Carolina all summer, so we werent surprised at the low count. We
slowly walked along a trail that traversed dense woodlands before coming out
into a large meadow. The woodland trail proved to be excellent for
mushrooms; there were at least a dozen species, many quite colorful.
 
We found that much of the meadow had been mowed within the last two weeks,
so there were few nectar sources. However, we spotted a fresh looking female
Monarch busily laying eggs on the 10 to 12 Common Milkweed that had
resprouted. We also saw an azure species flying by and a perched Pearl
Crescent. We reentered the woods and continued along a creek back to the
parking lot where we saw a male Zabulon Skipper on Silphium. At the nearby
private residence we saw a Carolina Satyr and the best butterfly of the day,
a Little Yellow.
 
Here is our list:
 
Little Yellow 1
Azure sp. 1
Pearl Crescent 1
Carolina Satyr 1
Zabulon Skipper 1
-- 
Dennis E. Burnette
7 Brownstone Lane
Greensboro, NC 27410
(336) 299-4342
deburnette AT triad.rr.com

Subject: Dixie Plantation Butterfly Walk 8/23
From: <aszwarc AT berkeleycountysc.gov>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 08:19:47 -0400 (EDT)
It seems the Lowcountry CBS had a successful butterfly walk this past Saturday,
August 23. Dixie Plantation is located in Hollywood, SC, and has gardens,
wooded paths, and is located against salt marsh. We walked between 9 and 11:30
AM, and the weather was sunny and got up to 94*F while walking.

17 observers saw the following:

13 Cloudless Sulphur
1 Common Buckeye
6 Gulf Fritillaries
7 Horace's Dusky Wing
2 Carolina Satyr
2 Red Banded Hairstreaks
5 Sleepy Orange
1 Gray Hairstreak
2 Wild Indigo 
1 Least Skipper
2 Black Swallowtail (Female)
1 Silver Spotted Skipper
1 Red Spotted Purple
1 Hackberry Emperor
1 Tiger Swallowtail
Subject: SCAN trip leps highlight 8/23
From: Jules Fraytet <jlfray AT ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 08:01:40 -0400
While not in the Carolinas, I wanted to mention that we saw at least two 
Lace Winged Roadside-Skippers on Elephantopus tomentosus on a private 
conservation easement in McDuffy County GA, south of Augusta.

There was not many other species or abundance(of what I saw,others may 
may have seen additional species) besides Sleepy Orange, Cloudless 
Sulphurs and Azures.

Jules Fraytet
Charlotte
Subject: Surry leps
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 06:49:41 -0400
Count rained out, but paul scharf and jesse anderson stayed to sweep net and 
bug out. Rain stopped but sun barely poked out a bit. Moth list from overnight 
near 100 sp, lots of northern specialties. 


2 e tiger sw
1 black sw
1 spicebush sw
1 sleepy orange
12 summer azure
2 e tailed blue
2 harvester
1 gr spangled fritillary
1 american snout
2 no pearly eye
2 so pearly eye (FOY #114)
12 carolina satyr, several caught, nothing close to intricata field marks
3 gemmed satyr
1 common wood nymph
8 deleware skipper
7 zabulon sk
1 least sk
1 so broken dash
6 lace winged roadside skipper

Hope the count can be rescheduled. 

Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Ocola at Reynolda Village, Garden Pipevine Swallowtail
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 21:27:13 -0400
On the way home from the rain-out on the Surry NABA Count at PMSP this
morning. I stopped in at Reynolda Village for an hour of skipper hunting in
the  flower boxes of mostly Lantanas.  From  AT 11:00 to !2:00 I found:

Ocola 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 5
Sachem 14
Fiery Skipper 1
Southern Broken-dash 3
Northern Broken-dash 1 (male)
Little Glassywing 2

Sachems and Southern Broken-dash were doing a lot of courting maneuvers!

In our garden this afternoon at various times we had:

Sachem 4
Silver-spotted Skipper 2
Southern Broken-dash 2
Delaware Skipper 1
Clouded Skipper 1 (male)
Fiery Skipper 1 (male)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2
Pipevine Swallowtail 1 (male)
Spicebush Swallowtail (ovipositing)
Pearl Crescent 2
Common Buckeye 1
Little Glassywing 2
Cabbage White 2
C Satyr 1
Summer Azure 1

The Spicebush Swallowtails have been making up for lost time in our
garden.  We have found several caterpillars and eggs in the last few days
on Sassafras and Spicebush.

We will try to re-schedule the Surry Count within the next two weeks if we
can find an opening.

Gene Schepker
Subject: A few Wake County, NC, butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:39:51 -0400
This afternoon (Aug. 24) I went to the Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh from
about 2:15 - 3:15. I was there on the count on Aug. 15. It wasn't hopping
with true butterflies today; in fact, they were very scarce -- FIVE species
only.  I did find one species we missed completely on the butterfly count.
Here is the meager list -- probably the worst I have ever seen here for
late August:

Black Swallowtail  1 female
Cabbage White  3
Sleepy Orange  2   surprised not to see Cloudless Sulphur
Summer Azure  1 female
Common Buckeye  8
Silver-spotted Skipper  30
Horace's Duskywing  7
WILD INDIGO DUSKYWING  2   resident here, but usually missed; was found on
the count
COMMON SOOTYWING  1  missed on the count, but not unusual here
Fiery Skipper  45
Sachem  20
Ocola Skipper  2

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh
Subject: Favorite butterfly plants
From: Will Cook <cwcook AT duke.edu>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 12:54:10 -0400
Butterfliers,

In preparation for a talk I'm scheduled to present at the CBS Butterfly 
Symposium at the NC Zoo (9/13/14), I thought it would be fun to ask 
butterfly gardeners what their favorite butterfly plants are. You can 
interpret the question loosely, for example it can be a favorite because 
it attracts many butterflies, is easy to grow, or is particularly 
ornamental. If you're not sure whether a certain plant is native or 
exotic, just list it anyway and I can figure it out.

What are your favorite three (in order of preference):

butterfly nectar plants (native or exotic)?
1.
2.
3.

native butterfly nectar plants?
1.
2.
3.

exotic butterfly nectar plants?
1.
2.
3.

butterfly host plants?
1.
2.
3.

I'll send out a compilation of answers after the symposium.

Thanks!

Will


-- 
Will Cook - Durham, NC
http://www.carolinanature.com
Subject: Fwd: Dingle Pond Unit-Santee NWR, SC leps 23 Aug 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 07:41:38 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Dennis Forsythe 
Date: Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 7:40 AM
Subject: Dingle Pond Unit-Santee NWR, SC leps 23 Aug 2014
To: "Ponce, Azucena" , "Epstein, Marc" <
marc_epstein AT fws.gov>, Jackie , Billy McCord <
bmccord AT bellsouth.net>, Donna Forsythe , Frances
Egleston , Linda Hyman , "
pittsjam AT windstream.net" , Barbara Dengler <
zippitytzuda AT comcast.net>


Hi All,

Donna and I spent from 1345 until 1515 hrs, 23 Aug. 2014 looking for
butterflies at the Dingle Pond Unit, Santee NWR, Colleton Co., SC.  It over
95 degrees, with a NW wind and scattered clouds with light rain at the end.
 We walked from the parking lot to the boardwalk and back (ca 0.8 mi).  We
had:

E. Tiger Swallowtail 1
Spicebush Swallowtail 3
Cloudless Sulfur 1
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Summer Azure 1
Red-spotted Purple 4
Creole Pearly-eye 1
Gemmed Satyr 2
Pearly-eye sp. 1
SIlver-spotted Skipper 1


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com



-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-08/23/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 21:31:27 -0400
Today I paddled around the lake and walked around below the dam and the
floodplain above the lake. The weather was partly cloudy and 88F, with
brief rain for about 10 minutes. The highlight among my 18 species was a
lone Little Yellow, my first of the year. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2  Cabbage White 1  Little Yellow 1  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 3  Variegated Fritillary 1  Eastern Comma 1  Red Admiral 1
 Red-spotted
Purple 2  Viceroy 1  Northern Pearly-eye 1  Carolina/Intricate Satyr 8
Monarch 1  Silver-spotted Skipper 1  Least Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 4  Little
Glassywing 1  Sachem 2  Ocola Skipper 1
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Butterflying in N Durham County
From: Tom Krakauer <thkrakauer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 17:14:43 -0400
I returned to the territory that Salman and I covered on the Durham County 
yesterday with my friend Lynn Richardson. We were at Quail Roost and N Hill 
Forest for about 2 hrs from 10-12:00 

We got 23. species including one not seen on Durham Count--juniper 
hairstreak AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT , and 3 that we missed on the count in the Quail Roost 
territory AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT - Cabbage White, Great-spangled Fritillary , and American Lady. 
Everything looked very fresh. Nice group of Cloudless Sulphurs 


Eastern Tiger St.       1
Spice bush ST.          2
Cabbage White.       1 AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
Orange Sulphur.       3
Cloudless Sulphur.   12
Sleepy Orange.         2
Juniper Hairstreak.   1  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
ETB.                          8
Variegated Frit.          3
Great-spangled Frit.  2 AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
American Lady.          1 AT  AT  AT  AT  AT  AT 
Common Buckeye.    100
Red-spotted Purple.   2
Monarch.                    4
Carolina Satyr.            5
Clouded skipper.       1
Zebulon Skipper.        1
Least Skipper.            3
Little Glassywing.       3
Sachem.                    5
Cross line Skipper.     2
Southern Broken dash.  1
Ocola Skipper.            5

I should mention that there was a Great Egret at Quail Roost


Tom Krakauer
Bahama, NC


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Durham Bfly Count results 8/17/2014
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 14:08:24 -0400
Butterfliers,

As has been widely reported across the southeastern US, butterfly numbers are 
dramatically reduced in 2014 in many areas. Results of the 15th Annual NABA 
Durham Butterfly Count support that trend. Although wet/dewy vegetation and 
cloudy conditions made for a slow start to the 2014 Durham Count, nine 
butterfliers persisted and cumulatively tallied 54 species (average=56) 
composed of 1433 individuals, drastically below our average number of 3726 
individuals! Late spring hard freezes seem to be the prevailing theory for 
depressed numbers in our area. 


Brian Bockhahn's party found the most species of the day (41) including a Great 
Purple Hairstreak (only the second time for this count). Amazingly, two parties 
(Bockhahn and Stickney) found a single Harvester each, only the second time for 
that species on this count. Jeff Pippen's party found the most individuals 
(454) and only the second ever Long-tailed Skipper. While we had no terrible 
"misses", we also set no record-high counts for any species, and we had too 
many record or near record low species' counts to mention. Our avearge # of 
individuals per party hour was 49 (an all time low). This count averages 120 
individual butterflies seen per party hour. While it's a bummer to not see as 
many butterflies as usual, it's great to have some real data that support the 
various casual and anecdotal observations that "butterfly numbers seem down 
this year." Fortunately, insects lay hundreds to thousands of eggs per pair, 
hence they have a strong capacity to rebound after setbacks by such factors as 
unusually rough weather. I expect numbers to bounce back up for most species in 
the next couple of seasons. 


Many thanks to all participants who helped with the Count this year: Brian 
Bockhahn, Randy Emmitt, Owen McConnel, Tom Krakauer, Salman Abdulali, Harry 
LeGrand, Jeffrey Pippen, Kelly Mieszkalski, and Richard Stickney. 


Here are our results for the Durham Butterfly Count, 17 Aug 2014:

4	Pipevine Swallowtail
13	Black Swallowtail
24	Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
33	Spicebush Swallowtail
12	Cabbage White
2	Orange Sulphur
85	Cloudless Sulphur
48	Sleepy Orange
2	Harvester
1	Great Purple Hairstreak
17	Gray Hairstreak
107	Eastern Tailed-Blue
62	Summer Azure
1	American Snout
9	Variegated Fritillary
1	Great Spangled Fritillary
99	Pearl Crescent
3	Question Mark
4	Eastern Comma
5	American Lady
5	Painted Lady
15	Red Admiral
66	Common Buckeye
21	Red-spotted Purple
3	Viceroy
12	Hackberry Emperor
4	Tawny Emperor
10	Northern Pearly-eye
1	Appalachian Brown
1	Gemmed Satyr
77	Carolina Satyr
9	Common Wood-Nymph
20	Monarch
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/monarch.htm

225	Silver-spotted Skipper
1	Long-tailed Skipper
11	Hoary Edge
2	Southern Cloudywing
18	Horace's Duskywing
1	Zarucco Duskywing
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/zaruccoduskywing.htm

1	Wild Indigo Duskywing
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/wildindigoduskywing.htm

3	Com. Checkered-Skipper
17	Swarthy Skipper
41	Clouded Skipper
5	Least Skipper
80	Fiery Skipper
5	Crossline Skipper
20	Southern Broken-Dash
1	Northern Broken-Dash
41	Little Glassywing
102	Sachem
4	Delaware Skipper
50	Zabulon Skipper
5	Dun Skipper
24	Ocola Skipper

For more info about the Durham Count, including data from all years, go here:
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/durhamcount.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-08/22/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 19:16:03 -0400
Today I walked around looking for butterflies and odes under partly cloudy
skies and temps about 93F. I saw 28 species today, by far my highest one
day total of 2014. Highlights were 5 Red-banded Hairstreaks (before today I
had seen only one all year!), 1 Southern Broken-dash (my third sighting
this year), 10 Monarchs (there could have 2-3x as many, they were all over
and hard to count), 1 Cloudless Sulphur (my third this year), 1 Wild Indigo
Duskywing (FOY), and 1 E. Comma (my first anglewing sighting since 6/23).
There were a lot of nectar sources, almost all of which were in the fenced
in garden, but a large patch of Brazilian Vervain (Verbena brasiliensis)
was very popular, especially with Monarchs. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Pipevine Swallowtail 1  Black Swallowtail 2  Eastern Tiger
Swallowtail 2  Cloudless
Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 2  Gray Hairstreak 2  Red-banded Hairstreak 5  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 3  Summer Azure 1  Variegated Fritillary 6  Pearl Crescent
9  Eastern
Comma 1  Red Admiral 1  Common Buckeye 10  Red-spotted Purple 1
Viceroy 1  Carolina/Intricate
Satyr 1  Monarch 10  Silver-spotted Skipper 4  Horace's Duskywing 2  Wild
Indigo Duskywing 1  Clouded Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 11  Southern
Broken-dash 1  Little Glassywing 3  Sachem 8  Zabulon Skipper 1  Ocola
Skipper 1
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Pitt County, 22 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 21:56:45 +0000
A few butterflies seen with minimal effort today (Pitt County, 2014-08-22):

Black Swallowtail, 1
Red-banded Hairstreak, 3
Monarch, 1
Red Admiral, 1
Common Buckeye, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 1
Horace's Duskywing, 1
HAYHURST'S SCALLOPWING, 1, PItt County Arboretum, a new location, FOY #49 for 
Pitt 

Ocola Skipper, 2
Fiery Skipper, 10
Whirlabout, 1

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:56:14 -0400
I recall seeing a lot of Symplocos [sweetleaf] years ago, on a spring
visit, to Cliffs of the Neuse State Park. So, I returned in June to see if
I could find a King's Hairstreak. There were so many Pondhawks there that I
don't recall seeing any butterflies. (I did see several elfins nectaring on
the sweetleaf in April, before the Pondhawks are common.) Howell Woods is
also bad in summer, as are a lot of places in the western and central
Coastal Plain; Pondhawks just eat up everything, including themselves, from
about May into August. Great Blue Skimmers are also abundant now, as are
several other dragonflies, though these other guys don't seem to take as
many butterflies as do Pondhawks.

Harry LeGrand


On Fri, Aug 22, 2014 at 1:43 PM, Richard Stickney 
wrote:

>  I neglected to mention that I also had 2 Lace-winged Roadside-skippers.
> And Harry’s right about the dragonflies! Between the Pondhawks and Great
> Blue Skimmers, it’s a wonder any skippers survive. All but a couple of my
> butterflies were seen along wooded roads/paths or in the forest, where
> fewer dragonflies go.
>
>
>
> *From:* Richard Stickney
> *Sent:* Thursday, August 21, 2014 11:41 AM
> *To:* 'carolinaleps AT duke.edu'
> *Subject:* Johnston Co. Butterflies
>
>
>
> Hi all,
>
>
>
> I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a
> couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina
> Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition:
>
> Sleepy Orange – 2
>
> Variegated Fritillary – 3
>
> Pearl Crescent – 1
>
> Buckeye – 1
>
> Red-spotted Purple – 4
>
> Southern Pearly-eye – a dozen or so, plentiful in “caney” woods
>
> Creole Pearly-eye – 4
>
> Carolina/Intricate Satyr – 6
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper – 1
>
> Flyby Duskywing – 1 didn’t sit still for ID
>
>
>
>
>
> Richard Stickney
>
> NC Museum of Life & Science
>
> www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney
>
>
>
Subject: RE: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:43:20 +0000
I neglected to mention that I also had 2 Lace-winged Roadside-skippers. And 
Harry's right about the dragonflies! Between the Pondhawks and Great Blue 
Skimmers, it's a wonder any skippers survive. All but a couple of my 
butterflies were seen along wooded roads/paths or in the forest, where fewer 
dragonflies go. 


From: Richard Stickney
Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2014 11:41 AM
To: 'carolinaleps AT duke.edu'
Subject: Johnston Co. Butterflies

Hi all,

I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a 
couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina 
Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition: 

Sleepy Orange - 2
Variegated Fritillary - 3
Pearl Crescent - 1
Buckeye - 1
Red-spotted Purple - 4
Southern Pearly-eye - a dozen or so, plentiful in "caney" woods
Creole Pearly-eye - 4
Carolina/Intricate Satyr - 6
Silver-spotted Skipper - 1
Flyby Duskywing - 1 didn't sit still for ID


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney
Subject: vacation return
From: "Gail Lankford" <whocooksforyou AT skyrunner.net>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 11:57:07 -0400
set carolinaleps digest 
Subject: Carteret County Aug 21
From: ROBERT CAVANAUGH <papilio28570 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 23:52:54 -0700
A few interesting sightings lately.

Today a female Monarch was found my milkweed and spent about two hours laying 
eggs and feeding. A fresh looking male was seen yesterday patrolling the yard 
repeatedly most of the day. Today's female was somewhat faded indicating some 
age. 


 

A Longtail Skipper made its first appearance in my back yard along with a 
Brazilian Skipper which is the second one seen this year. First one was over a 
month ago and today's bug was very fresh. 



Yesterday, I was standing in the shade of my Bradford Pear tree in my back yard 
and noticed a female Great Purple Hairstreak laying eggs. The tree is 40 to 50 
feet tall with a two foot wide trunk. Over the years mistletoe became resident 
among the limbs. I have seen an occasional GP Hairstreak in springtime while 
the tree is in bloom. This is the first time I ever saw this species 
ovipositing. 


Also yesterday, finally saw a Tiger Swallowtail flying across the yard and 
spotted another that had been hit by a car on Hyway 24 - Hibbs Road 
intersection. 


A male Holly Azure was seen flying along the rear border where a grove of 
American Holly grows. 


Bob
Subject: Correction on Lake Hills walk
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:41:49 -0400
Make that a Calico Pennant instead of a Haloween Pennant on today's walk.

Gene Schepker
Subject: Greenville Co., SC leps 20 Aug 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 21:10:30 -0400
Hi All,

I searched  for butterflies at Camp Greenville YMCA and the Caesars Head
State Park areas of Greenville Co, SC 20 August from 1000-1330 hrs.  I had
the following:

Pipevine Swallowtail 6
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 9
Cabbage White 1
Cloudless Sulfur 1
Sleepy Orange 1
Summer Azure 6
Eastern tailed-Blue 1 very worn
Great Spangled Fritillary 1
Pearl Crescent 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 18
Zebulon Skipper 1 male

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Spartenburg Co., SC leps 20 August 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:48:16 -0400
Hi All,

I spent an hour in the late afternoon yesterday along Hacker Creek just
inside the Spartenburg Co. line from Union County.

I had the following:
E. Tiger Swallowtail 1
Sleepy Orange 2
Summer Azure 2
Pearl Crescent 1
Silver -spotted Skipper 1
Zabulon Skipper 1 male
Lace-wing Roadside-Skipper 1

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Butterflies at Lake Hills, Bethania, Forsyth County
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:45:25 -0400
Shelley Rutkin, Cynthia Donaldson, and I went to Lake Hills a private
wetland restoration area in Bethania to check out the butterflies.  There
is a large field which was a little over-mowed and we bordered a small lake
and a trail on one side of the wetlands.  Under hot and sunny conditions
from 11:45 - 1:30 we found:

Sachem 14
Silver-spotted Skipper 10
Variegated Fritillary 3
Summer Azure 6
Eastern Tailed-blue 3
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 9 (several black form)
Zabulon Skipper 3
Least Skipper 3
Common Buckeye 6
Pearl Crescent 3
Northern Broken-dash
Cloudless Sulphur 2
Little Glassywing 3
Dun (skipper) 2
Fiery Skipper 1
Viceroy 1
American Lady

Odonates included Haloween Pennant, Widow Skimmer, and Common White-tail,
and several others!  Gene Schepker

 Gene Schepker
Subject: Pitt County, 21 August 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 22:41:26 +0000
Here are the butterflies seen today in the Greenville area (Pitt County, 
2014-08-21). Despite excellent weather I could only count 20 species. 


Black Swallowtail, 1
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, 3
Spicebush Swallowtail, 1
Sleepy Orange, 12
Red-banded Hairstreak, 5
Summer Azure, 10
Eastern Tailed-Blue, 1
Monarch, 2
Variegated Fritillary, 4
Red-spotted Purple, 1
Common Buckeye, 2
Painted Lady, 1
Red Admiral, 1
Pearl Crescent, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 2
Horace's Duskywing, 7
Ocola Skipper, 5
Fiery Skipper, 25
Dun Skipper, 1
Sachem, 1

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Re: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 12:46:24 -0400
Howell Woods has so many Eastern Pondhawks all summer that they, sadly,
keep the skipper numbers way down. It has such great potential for skippers
during the year, but -- I guess there's no good way to control those flying
vacuum cleaners. I have always had rather disappointing results for small
butterfly species there -- guess the pearly-eyes are large enough to avoid
being eaten.

Harry LeGrand


On Thu, Aug 21, 2014 at 11:41 AM, Richard Stickney 
wrote:

>  Hi all,
>
>
>
> I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a
> couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina
> Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition:
>
> Sleepy Orange – 2
>
> Variegated Fritillary – 3
>
> Pearl Crescent – 1
>
> Buckeye – 1
>
> Red-spotted Purple – 4
>
> Southern Pearly-eye – a dozen or so, plentiful in “caney” woods
>
> Creole Pearly-eye – 4
>
> Carolina/Intricate Satyr – 6
>
> Silver-spotted Skipper – 1
>
> Flyby Duskywing – 1 didn’t sit still for ID
>
>
>
>
>
> Richard Stickney
>
> NC Museum of Life & Science
>
> www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney
>
>
>  ---
> Keep up with us on Facebook ,
> Twitter  and at lifeandscience.org
>
Subject: Johnston Co. Butterflies
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 15:41:23 +0000
Hi all,

I paid a visit to Howell Woods in Johnston County earlier this week for a 
couple of hours. This is the best location near the Triangle for Carolina 
Roadside-skippers, and I found 5. In addition: 

Sleepy Orange - 2
Variegated Fritillary - 3
Pearl Crescent - 1
Buckeye - 1
Red-spotted Purple - 4
Southern Pearly-eye - a dozen or so, plentiful in "caney" woods
Creole Pearly-eye - 4
Carolina/Intricate Satyr - 6
Silver-spotted Skipper - 1
Flyby Duskywing - 1 didn't sit still for ID


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
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