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Updated on Thursday, October 30 at 09:25 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Keel-billed Toucan,©Jan Wilczur

30 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/30/2014 [Mike Turner ]
29 Oct Monarchs today ["Loretta" ]
29 Oct Re: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White [Harry LeGrand ]
29 Oct Re: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
29 Oct Greensboro, NC Arboretum Butterflies [Dennis Burnette ]
29 Oct Butterfly Highway Project - Charlotte, NC [Angelique Hjarding ]
28 Oct today's butterflies ["Loretta" ]
28 Oct Re: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White [Gene Schepker ]
28 Oct Mecklenburg Co., NC Leps [Kevin Metcalf ]
28 Oct Monarch [Ginger Kopka ]
28 Oct Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White [Gene Schepker ]
28 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Durant Nature Park-10/28/2014 [Mike Turner ]
28 Oct Orangeburg Co., SC leps 28 Oct 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
28 Oct Ashe/Watauga County foray [Richard Stickney ]
28 Oct Watauga county Polygonias [Brian Bockhahn ]
28 Oct dare county leps [Brian Bockhahn ]
28 Oct Dare county monarchs [Brian Bockhahn ]
28 Oct Archie Elledge Butterflies, Forsyth County NC [Gene Schepker ]
27 Oct today in the garden ["Loretta" ]
27 Oct Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Anderson Point Park-10/27/2014 [Harry LeGrand ]
27 Oct Re: possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC [Harry LeGrand ]
27 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Anderson Point Park-10/27/2014 [Mike Turner ]
27 Oct Re: possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC [Doug Allen ]
27 Oct Re: possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
27 Oct possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC [Doug Allen ]
26 Oct Mecklenburg Butterflies Sunday [Kevin Metcalf ]
26 Oct Forsyth County, Winston-Salem [Gene Schepker ]
26 Oct Re: Monarch 10/25 and 26,2014 Brunswick Beaches [Harry LeGrand ]
26 Oct Monarch 10/25 and 26,2014 Brunswick Beaches []
26 Oct James Is, SC leps Oct 25, 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
26 Oct Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/26/2014 [Mike Turner ]
26 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/26/2014 [Mike Turner ]
26 Oct Monarch ["Loretta" ]
25 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/25/2014 [Mike Turner ]
25 Oct Ft. Moultrie, SC leps 25 Oct 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
25 Oct Forsyth County Monarchs [nottke1 ]
25 Oct Pitt County, 25 October 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
25 Oct Colleton Co., SC leps 24 Oct 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
24 Oct Chemoreceptors & migration ["Loretta" ]
23 Oct Dare county monarchs [Bb ]
23 Oct SE Coastal Monarch Flight [John Ennis ]
23 Oct James Is, SC Zebra Longwing [Dennis Forsythe ]
22 Oct Monarch Caterpillars [Ginger Kopka ]
22 Oct Ft Moultrie NM, SC leps Oct. 22, 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
22 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-10/22/2014 [Mike Turner ]
22 Oct Gray Comma location [Richard Stickney ]
22 Oct Dare and washington counties nc monarch movements [Bb ]
21 Oct 10/21/14 Horizon Park, Rural Hall, Forsyth County, NC [Sven Halling ]
21 Oct Wake County, NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/21/2014 [Mike Turner ]
21 Oct Holy Cross Cemetery and Ft. Johnson Marine Lab, James Is, SC 21 Oct 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
21 Oct Pitt County, 21 October 2014 ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
20 Oct Union County, NC Leps []
20 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2104 [Mike Turner ]
20 Oct Archie Elledge Butterflies, Forsyth Co. [Gene Schepker ]
20 Oct The Last Tiger? [nottke1 ]
20 Oct Short Mecklenburg County list [drivesa3 AT aol.com ]
20 Oct Charleston Co., SC leps 19 Oct 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
19 Oct Migrating Monarchs [Brian Bockhahn ]
18 Oct Migrating Monarchs ["Loretta" ]
18 Oct 10/17/14 Carolina Sandhills NWR, Chesterfield County, SC [Sven Halling ]
18 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/18/2014 [Mike Turner ]
18 Oct Fwd: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
18 Oct Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
18 Oct Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species [Harry LeGrand ]
18 Oct Re: Falls lake monarchs [Brian Bockhahn ]
18 Oct Re: Falls lake monarchs [Doug Allen ]
18 Oct Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species ["Abdulali, Salman" ]
17 Oct Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species [Jeff Pippen ]
17 Oct Falls lake monarchs [Bb ]
17 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/17/2014 [Mike Turner ]
17 Oct Chester Co., SC leps 16 Oct. 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
17 Oct Lancaster Co., SC leps 16 October 2014 [Dennis Forsythe ]
17 Oct Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website [Harry LeGrand ]
16 Oct Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website ["Mathis" ]
16 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/16/2014 [Mike Turner ]
16 Oct Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/13/2014 [Mike Turner ]

Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/30/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:57:24 -0400
I saw 20 species today at the arboretum, a good almost-November total,
perhaps one of my last 20 species days this year. Highlights were 35 Ocola
Skippers, my highest total of 2014; a late but fresh male Black
Swallowtail; and a late-ish Red-spotted Purple. My complete list is below.
Good butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail 1 male  Cabbage White 21
 Orange Sulphur 3
 Cloudless Sulphur 1
 Sleepy Orange 6
 Red-banded Hairstreak   3
 Eastern Tailed-Blue   2
 Variegated Fritillary   1
 Pearl Crescent   1
 American Lady   8
 Painted Lady   2
 Common Buckeye   14
 Red-spotted Purple   1
 Monarch   5
 Silver-spotted Skipper   3
 Com. Check.-Skipper   18
 Clouded Skipper   2
 Fiery Skipper   35
 Sachem   2 1 each male & female  Ocola Skipper 35


-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Monarchs today
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 22:45:33 -0400
Two stragglers in the garden today.  Again, freshly eclosed.

Loretta Lutman,
Asheboro, NC
Subject: Re: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:31:59 -0400
I probably saw that info from Ron years ago -- sadly, he passed away a few
years ago -- and forgot about it. Thanks, Alex, for re-posting it, and I'll
quote this material and attribute it to Gatrelle, in the next version of
the butterflies of North Carolina. In fact, while I'm thinking about it,
I'll go ahead and copy this quote tonight and paste it into the White
Checkered-Skipper (albescens) account on the website, so that folks can
see these when they go online. I'll copy Burns' measurements, and quote
him, as well.

So, folks, if you have some photos of checkered-skippers, see what the
undersides look like, and if a male (slimmer abdomen, usually brighter blue
on the body and wing bases than on a female), take a look at the ground
color.

As I have said before, rather than tossing out everyone's checkered-skipper
sightings in NC, I have been adding them to the database/website as Common
Checkered-Skippers, for now.

Harry LeGrand


On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 10:39 PM, Gene Schepker 
wrote:

> Thanks, Alex.  Actually the title of the report was for the Checkered
> White, *Pontia protodice,* female which I considered a good find (a
> statistical prejudice)!  But this is a good argument for using the
> taxonomic names to avoid confusion.
>
> We actually saw a few Common Checkered Skippers (I guess possibly White
> Checkered Skippers) today also and I noted their sexes.  I think I know how
> to sex *P. communis *and *P. albescens *skippers if they look the same,
> but I must have missed Gatrelle's tips on how the species differ.   Usually
> If I am in the mountains, I call them Common Checkered. If on the coast of
> SC, I call them White Checkered Skippers.  In the Sandhills of SC I call
> them just Checkered Skippers!  It would be comforting to be able to know
> how to tell them apart.
>
> Thanks for the information.   I'll try to check them out more carefully in
> the future and see if I can tell the difference.  There are those who say
> that you cannot tell the Common Checkered from the White.  As a skipper
> student, I love this kind of information and I'm sure a lot of us on
> Carolinaleps find this interesting!
>
> Gene Schepker
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 7:04 PM, Alex Grkovich 
> wrote:
>
>> Of course, you all saw this post / comments from Ron Gatrelle through
>> Jeff on distinguishing males of Common and White Checkered Skippers:
>>
>> >>>The Checkered Skippers were actually pretty easy to tell apart just by
>> appearance.  Have been vouchering these for the last couple years they
>> seem
>> to be pretty "typical" here in the Carolinas.  Communis being noticeably
>> larger and much darker on the underside of the hindwings.   The markings
>> on
>> the underside of albescens looks washed out in comparison.  Also the
>> ground
>> color above in communis is darker - kind of blackish gray, while in
>> albescens it is more a brown gray.   This is all for males.<<<
>>
>> This comment also came from Charles Bordelon later on the same subject:
>>
>> >>>I'd just add that males of P. albescens also have the same basic
>> pattern as P. philetas dorsally. <<<
>>
>> I do plan to test these on Pyrgus that I hve from TX, AZ etc.
>>
>> Alex
>>
>>
>>
>>  ------------------------------
>>  *From:* Gene Schepker 
>> *To:* Carolinaleps 
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, October 28, 2014 6:54 PM
>> *Subject:* Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White
>>
>> Sven Halling and I worked the River Road in northwestern Surry Co. today
>> from 1:00 - 3:00 and found the following:
>>
>>
>> Variegated Fritillary 12
>> Pearl Crescent 22
>> Eastern Tailed Blue 2
>> Orange Sulphur 3
>> Clouded Sulphur 8
>> Orange Sulphur 3
>> Cabbage White 9
>> Checkered White 1 (female)
>> Sachem 6
>> Fiery Skipper 5
>> Ocola Skipper 3
>> Common Checkered Skipper 4
>> Silver-spotted Skipper 1
>> Clouded Skipper 1
>> Common Buckeye 3
>> American Lady 2
>> Monarch 1
>>
>> The only blossoms that we found butterflies using were Asters and
>> second-growth Ironweed. It was windy and around 80 degrees.
>>
>> Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling)
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:47:51 +0000
It would be great if we could distinguish them in the field With regards to 
size, Burns, in 


http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/41154427#page/64/mode/1up

gives the following measurements of a forewing:

albescens: 12.0 to 14.9 mm (mean: 13.72 mm)
communis: 13.2 to 15.6 mm (mean: 14.58 mm)

I doubt if this difference would be noticeable in the field.

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC



On Oct 28, 2014, at 10:39 PM, Gene Schepker wrote:

Thanks, Alex. Actually the title of the report was for the Checkered White, 
Pontia protodice, female which I considered a good find (a statistical 
prejudice)! But this is a good argument for using the taxonomic names to avoid 
confusion. 


We actually saw a few Common Checkered Skippers (I guess possibly White 
Checkered Skippers) today also and I noted their sexes. I think I know how to 
sex P. communis and P. albescens skippers if they look the same, but I must 
have missed Gatrelle's tips on how the species differ. Usually If I am in the 
mountains, I call them Common Checkered. If on the coast of SC, I call them 
White Checkered Skippers. In the Sandhills of SC I call them just Checkered 
Skippers! It would be comforting to be able to know how to tell them apart. 


Thanks for the information. I'll try to check them out more carefully in the 
future and see if I can tell the difference. There are those who say that you 
cannot tell the Common Checkered from the White. As a skipper student, I love 
this kind of information and I'm sure a lot of us on Carolinaleps find this 
interesting! 


Gene Schepker



On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 7:04 PM, Alex Grkovich 
> wrote: 

Of course, you all saw this post / comments from Ron Gatrelle through Jeff on 
distinguishing males of Common and White Checkered Skippers: 


>>>The Checkered Skippers were actually pretty easy to tell apart just by
appearance.  Have been vouchering these for the last couple years they seem
to be pretty "typical" here in the Carolinas.  Communis being noticeably
larger and much darker on the underside of the hindwings.   The markings on
the underside of albescens looks washed out in comparison.  Also the ground
color above in communis is darker - kind of blackish gray, while in
albescens it is more a brown gray.   This is all for males.<<<

This comment also came from Charles Bordelon later on the same subject:

>>>I'd just add that males of P. albescens also have the same basic pattern as 
P. philetas dorsally. <<< 


I do plan to test these on Pyrgus that I hve from TX, AZ etc.

Alex



________________________________
From: Gene Schepker >
To: Carolinaleps >
Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 6:54 PM
Subject: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White

Sven Halling and I worked the River Road in northwestern Surry Co. today from 
1:00 - 3:00 and found the following: 



Variegated Fritillary 12
Pearl Crescent 22
Eastern Tailed Blue 2
Orange Sulphur 3
Clouded Sulphur 8
Orange Sulphur 3
Cabbage White 9
Checkered White 1 (female)
Sachem 6
Fiery Skipper 5
Ocola Skipper 3
Common Checkered Skipper 4
Silver-spotted Skipper 1
Clouded Skipper 1
Common Buckeye 3
American Lady 2
Monarch 1

The only blossoms that we found butterflies using were Asters and second-growth 
Ironweed. It was windy and around 80 degrees. 


Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling)



Subject: Greensboro, NC Arboretum Butterflies
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 07:59:09 -0400
Lynn and I spent an hour or so in the Greensboro (North Carolina) Arboretum
yesterday, 10/27/14. There was a lot of butterfly activity, especially for
late October. Much of it was around one butterfly bush, although there were
others in bloom nearby as well as bedding plants. I assume that our dry
weather has dried up a lot of the nectar. In addition to the butterflies,
there was a Wheelbug, Arilus cristatus, that had caught a skipper that
looked like it might have been a Sachem.
 
Here is our list for the afternoon:
 
Orange Sulphur 1
Sleepy Orange 1
Cabbage White 2
Painted lady 6
American Lady 2
Monarch 6
Fiery Skipper 2
Sachem 3
Ocola Skipper 3
Several łskipping˛ skippers that went unidentified.
 
Dennis
Subject: Butterfly Highway Project - Charlotte, NC
From: Angelique Hjarding <ahjardin AT uncc.edu>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:41:19 +0100
Hi all,

I am a PhD student at UNC Charlotte and am working on a project to increase 
participation in butterfly monitoring in underserved urban neighborhoods in 
Charlotte. The project I have created is called the Butterfly Highway and 
through this I hope to lay the groundwork for a community based monitoring and 
urban habitat restoration project. I am reaching out to this list as I am in 
need of local butterfly experts to help neighborhood residents identify 
butterflies. I will need help creating a local identification guide for 
residents to use as well as people to go on monitoring walks in the 
neighborhoods. If you are in the area and would like to be a part of the 
project or would just like to find out more please get in touch. I am currently 
at a conference in Sweden presenting on this work so email is the best way to 
contact me until I return to Charlotte on Monday. 


Thanks in advance for your interest in my project!
Angel

Angelique Hjarding | PhD Student
The Butterfly Highway Project
www.butterflyhighway.org
UNC Charlotte | Department of Geography and Earth Sciences
9201 University City Blvd |Charlotte, NC 28223
mobile: 704-718-0928
Skype: Hjarding
ahjardin AT uncc.edu
Subject: today's butterflies
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 22:51:15 -0400
Today in the garden: A Monarch in the morning, as well as 5 American Ladies, 
and one variegated Fritillary, plus the various and sundry skippers. About 6 
pm, another Monarch. All were nectaring on Mexican sunflower, except one 
American Lady. 


Loretta Lutman
Asheboro, NC
Subject: Re: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 22:39:57 -0400
Thanks, Alex.  Actually the title of the report was for the Checkered
White, *Pontia protodice,* female which I considered a good find (a
statistical prejudice)!  But this is a good argument for using the
taxonomic names to avoid confusion.

We actually saw a few Common Checkered Skippers (I guess possibly White
Checkered Skippers) today also and I noted their sexes.  I think I know how
to sex *P. communis *and *P. albescens *skippers if they look the same, but
I must have missed Gatrelle's tips on how the species differ.   Usually If
I am in the mountains, I call them Common Checkered. If on the coast of SC,
I call them White Checkered Skippers.  In the Sandhills of SC I call them
just Checkered Skippers!  It would be comforting to be able to know how to
tell them apart.

Thanks for the information.   I'll try to check them out more carefully in
the future and see if I can tell the difference.  There are those who say
that you cannot tell the Common Checkered from the White.  As a skipper
student, I love this kind of information and I'm sure a lot of us on
Carolinaleps find this interesting!

Gene Schepker




























On Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 7:04 PM, Alex Grkovich 
wrote:

> Of course, you all saw this post / comments from Ron Gatrelle through Jeff
> on distinguishing males of Common and White Checkered Skippers:
>
> >>>The Checkered Skippers were actually pretty easy to tell apart just by
> appearance.  Have been vouchering these for the last couple years they seem
> to be pretty "typical" here in the Carolinas.  Communis being noticeably
> larger and much darker on the underside of the hindwings.   The markings on
> the underside of albescens looks washed out in comparison.  Also the ground
> color above in communis is darker - kind of blackish gray, while in
> albescens it is more a brown gray.   This is all for males.<<<
>
> This comment also came from Charles Bordelon later on the same subject:
>
> >>>I'd just add that males of P. albescens also have the same basic
> pattern as P. philetas dorsally. <<<
>
> I do plan to test these on Pyrgus that I hve from TX, AZ etc.
>
> Alex
>
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>  *From:* Gene Schepker 
> *To:* Carolinaleps 
> *Sent:* Tuesday, October 28, 2014 6:54 PM
> *Subject:* Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White
>
> Sven Halling and I worked the River Road in northwestern Surry Co. today
> from 1:00 - 3:00 and found the following:
>
>
> Variegated Fritillary 12
> Pearl Crescent 22
> Eastern Tailed Blue 2
> Orange Sulphur 3
> Clouded Sulphur 8
> Orange Sulphur 3
> Cabbage White 9
> Checkered White 1 (female)
> Sachem 6
> Fiery Skipper 5
> Ocola Skipper 3
> Common Checkered Skipper 4
> Silver-spotted Skipper 1
> Clouded Skipper 1
> Common Buckeye 3
> American Lady 2
> Monarch 1
>
> The only blossoms that we found butterflies using were Asters and
> second-growth Ironweed. It was windy and around 80 degrees.
>
> Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling)
>
>
>
Subject: Mecklenburg Co., NC Leps
From: Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:22:40 -0400
Some incidental butterflies at McDowell Nature Preserve today: 

Cloudless Sulphur			3
Orange Sulphur			5
Clouded Sulphur			1
Sleepy Orange			1
Common Buckeye			15
Variegated Fritillary			3
Gulf Fritillary				1
American Lady			1
Monarch					1
Common Checkered-Skipper	3
Fiery Skipper				2
Southern Skipperling		1

Kevin Metcalf
Huntersville, NC
Subject: Monarch
From: Ginger Kopka <gkopka1 AT aol.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:10:43 -0400
Had a female Monarch nectaring on Miss Huff Lantana this evening. 
Now have 7 Monarch caterpillars to raise. (Not from this Monarch)
Ginger Kopka
Simpsonville, SC. 

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Northwestern Surry Co. Checkered White
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:54:53 -0400
Sven Halling and I worked the River Road in northwestern Surry Co. today
from 1:00 - 3:00 and found the following:


Variegated Fritillary 12
Pearl Crescent 22
Eastern Tailed Blue 2
Orange Sulphur 3
Clouded Sulphur 8
Orange Sulphur 3
Cabbage White 9
Checkered White 1 (female)
Sachem 6
Fiery Skipper 5
Ocola Skipper 3
Common Checkered Skipper 4
Silver-spotted Skipper 1
Clouded Skipper 1
Common Buckeye 3
American Lady 2
Monarch 1

The only blossoms that we found butterflies using were Asters and
second-growth Ironweed. It was windy and around 80 degrees.

Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling)
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Durant Nature Park-10/28/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:36:46 -0400
The highlights today were a Little Yellow and my first Mourning Cloak since
April. Good butterflying.

  Little Yellow 1  Sleepy Orange 2  Variegated Fritillary   1  Question
Mark/E. Comma 2  Mourning Cloak   1  American Lady   1  Red Admiral
1  Clouded
Skipper   1  Least Skipper   2  Fiery Skipper   3  Ocola Skipper 2
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Orangeburg Co., SC leps 28 Oct 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:00:27 -0400
Hi All,

I had the following butterflies along Po Chance Road of Hy 15, Orangeburg
Co., SC today.

Cabbage Butterfly 6
Cloudless Sulfur 7
Sleepy Orange 1
Little Yellow 1
Gulf Fritillary 1
Variegated Fritillary 1
Monarch 1
Long-tailed Skipper 1
White Checkered-Skipper 6

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Ashe/Watauga County foray
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:33:24 +0000
Hi all,

As Brian noted, we both went up to look for Gray Commas. I just left here too 
late and didn't get up there till 3:00 or so. I did set out some baits along NC 
194 and went up Rich Mountain Road (and found Brian's site - no luck) but I had 
to be back here last night. So, I only got to check my baits an hour or so 
after setting them this time. Next spring I will plan a two-day trip (perhaps 
with some of you all) and try again! 


Unless I see something really extraordinary, this closes the book on a year 
that was good for number of species if not individuals. I saw at least 96 of 
our species in the Carolinas and another 8 elsewhere, including seven and a 
half lifers (the half being the female Diana). Most notable misses were Striped 
Hairstreak, American Copper, Little Metalmark, Georgia Satyr, Clouded Sulphur, 
N. Broken-Dash, and Byssus Skipper. 


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
Keep up with us on Facebook, 
Twitter and at 
lifeandscience.org 
Subject: Watauga county Polygonias
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:38:05 -0400
Took yesterday Oct 27 good weather window to drag my weary butt to the
mountains to try for Gray Comma.  The only tip I had was "any gravel road
in Ashe county" so after a little research on the butterflies of NC website
I selected 1. gravel road, 2. above 4,000 feet, 3. northern hardwood/cove
forest and 4. with a east facing aspect so I could start earlier in the
warm sun.

I selected a gravel road near snake mountain in Watauga with hopes to work
it and also snake mountain, but the latter now sports a gate.  I placed out
six brown bananas along the gravel road from my freezer, my wife will have
to wait on the banana bread as butterflies have priority this year!

I arrived at 10am and after seeing a couple pierids down low, around 1130
am under warm sunny skies I was driving the gravel road past the gap and
saw a Polygonia flying out of a tree on the road edge.  I thought it was a
falling leaf at first, it's flight was ridiculously slow, like a Zebra
Longwing or like it was on puppet stings!!!  It danced out into the road as
I went from 5 to 0 mph.  It came down in front of the hood of my vehicle
and I could see a brightish orange dorsal surface, bright like a Deleware
Skipper almost!!!!  It flew back and forth over the hood and then right
over the windshield and I could see a blackish ventral surface!!!!!!!  I
backed up to follow it and then just got out of the car in a hurry to give
chase with a butterfly net, but as I about strangled myself with my seat
belt getting out I lost sight and could not relocate it.  I had one banana
left so put it right there and would continue to check it and all roadside
bait for the rest of the day.4200-4400 feet.

I made a quick run into ashe county and Elk knob state park but not much
doing there, so returned to my bait.  All day the flies loved the bait, but
only had one eastern comma at the bait.

Cell service did not allow Richard Stickney and I to meet up, but he set up
more bait last night and is working the area today, hope he gets a photo!

Meager list, 10am - 4pm Watauga county

1 clouded sulphur
3 cabbage white
1 cloudless sulphur
1 pearl crescent
1 eastern comma
1 gray comma
3 polygonia sp


-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: dare county leps
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:17:27 -0400
From week of Oct 20-25, Dare county, nc

1 clouded sulphur
3 cabbage white
12 cloudless sulphur
1 little yellow (jockeys ridge sp)
3 sleepy orange
1 gray hairstreak
1 variegated fritillary
1 eastern comma
10 american lady
4 painted lady
3 red admiral
25 common buckeye
1000 monarch
1 zaruccos duskywing (worn jockeys ridge)
1 fiery skipper
1 sachem
8 ocola skipper
13 salt marsh skipper

Alas, no Aarons for the big year, hoped they were running late....

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Dare county monarchs
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:12:26 -0400
As expcected Fri 10/24 and Sat 10/25 under warm sunny skies we tagged about
25 each day exhausting my supply of tags each day.  The daily total of
monarchs each day was about 300.  On 10/24 we had two recoveries of
monarchs tagged on 10/23.  On 10/25 we had one recovery of a monarch tagged
on 10/24.  As I noted before there were many skinny abdomens so a lot of
nectaring going on!  By Saturday abdomens were looking bigger.

So tagged a total of 92 at the coast last week, most I've tagged out there
because of the earlier timing of the birding festival this year.  If it's
early again next year I'll make more of an effort to tag more and hopefully
get a few recoveries from points north.

Hope SC gets a few of these...

BB

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Archie Elledge Butterflies, Forsyth County NC
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 07:54:27 -0400
Sven Halling and I found these at AE from 1:15 - 3:00 yesterday, the 27th:

Fiery Skipper 4
Sachem 14
Least Skipper 3
Silver-spotted Skipper 1
Common Checkered Skipper 1
Clouded Skipper 1
Common Buckeye 6
Cabbage White 4
Clouded Sulphur 1
Orange Sulphur 4
Pearl Crescent 11
Monarch 6

Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling) under sunny, warm conditions,
Subject: today in the garden
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:42:18 -0400
This afternoon, we saw a Pipevine swallowtail, and a female Monarch, a bit 
larger than the one that came through yesterday. Both butterflies appeared 
freshly eclosed. 


Loretta Lutman
Asheboro, NC
Subject: Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Anderson Point Park-10/27/2014
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:47:31 -0400
That tiny little planting of nectar plants inside the traffic circle
yielded the Wake County butterfly count its first ever Great Spangled
Fritillary, which I even managed to photograph with my iPhone this past
August.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh

On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 7:02 PM, Mike Turner  wrote:

> From 11:45 to 3:45 today I visited the park, mostly hoping to scour the
> plantings in the traffic circle for my first Long-tailed Skipper of the
> year, but no luck. I did see a Gulf Fritillary among my 15 species, the
> second adult I have seen this year. The weather was sunny and 75F. My
> complete list is below. Good butterflying.
>
>    Sleepy Orange 3  Eastern Tailed-Blue 4  Gulf Fritillary 1  Variegated
> Fritillary 4  Pearl Crescent 13  American Lady 13  Painted Lady 3  Common
> Buckeye 15  Monarch 3  Common Checkered-Skipper 6  Clouded Skipper 1  Least
> Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 18  Sachem 1  Ocola Skipper 6
>
> --
> Mike Turner
> Raleigh, NC
>
Subject: Re: possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:43:25 -0400
I agree with Salman -- very worn male Sachem. The lantana hints at Sachem
to start with!

Harry LeGrand

On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 5:36 PM, Doug Allen  wrote:

> Thanks Salman,  Think you're right.  Do others agree?
>
> Jeff Pippen has many pics of male Sachems showing lots of variation
> including two that look a little like it, especially Durham, 20 Aug.. There
> are also other internet pics that show Peck's  ventral yellow blotches
> merged.  For me, the lack of white eye ring and very dark, lower ventral
> rear wing made me question Sachem.  Plus, its been seen in the adjoining nC
> county to north.
>
> Doug
>
> On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 5:06 PM, Abdulali, Salman 
> wrote:
>
>>  I would guess an extremely worn male Sachem.
>>
>>  Salman
>>
>>  On Oct 27, 2014, at 4:59 PM, Doug Allen wrote:
>>
>> Will someone confirm this please?I was going through last years's UNIDs
>> and came across this skipper that looks like a male Peck's despite the
>> merged yellow.  If so, it which would be a Spartanburg County record and
>> 2nd recorded for SC.
>>
>>  Also- a pretty cool photo of a female Orange Sulphur in flight
>>
>>  https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/
>>
>>  We have had no Monarchs here now for almost a week, but the coastal
>> Monarch migration I'm reading about on carolinaleps is impressive.
>>
>>  Here on hill seeing lots of Sachem and Fiery's today, a couple Ocola,
>> several Am. Ladys, and a frssh Pipevine Swallowtail.  There are still quite
>> a few Sleepy Orange ans a few Orange and Cloudless Sulphur in nearby fields.
>>
>>  Doug Allen Inman, SC
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Anderson Point Park-10/27/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:02:09 -0400
From 11:45 to 3:45 today I visited the park, mostly hoping to scour the
plantings in the traffic circle for my first Long-tailed Skipper of the
year, but no luck. I did see a Gulf Fritillary among my 15 species, the
second adult I have seen this year. The weather was sunny and 75F. My
complete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Sleepy Orange 3  Eastern Tailed-Blue 4  Gulf Fritillary 1  Variegated
Fritillary 4  Pearl Crescent 13  American Lady 13  Painted Lady 3  Common
Buckeye 15  Monarch 3  Common Checkered-Skipper 6  Clouded Skipper 1  Least
Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 18  Sachem 1  Ocola Skipper 6

-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Re: possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:36:19 -0400
Thanks Salman,  Think you're right.  Do others agree?

Jeff Pippen has many pics of male Sachems showing lots of variation
including two that look a little like it, especially Durham, 20 Aug.. There
are also other internet pics that show Peck's  ventral yellow blotches
merged.  For me, the lack of white eye ring and very dark, lower ventral
rear wing made me question Sachem.  Plus, its been seen in the adjoining nC
county to north.

Doug

On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 5:06 PM, Abdulali, Salman  wrote:

>  I would guess an extremely worn male Sachem.
>
>  Salman
>
>  On Oct 27, 2014, at 4:59 PM, Doug Allen wrote:
>
> Will someone confirm this please?I was going through last years's UNIDs
> and came across this skipper that looks like a male Peck's despite the
> merged yellow.  If so, it which would be a Spartanburg County record and
> 2nd recorded for SC.
>
>  Also- a pretty cool photo of a female Orange Sulphur in flight
>
>  https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/
>
>  We have had no Monarchs here now for almost a week, but the coastal
> Monarch migration I'm reading about on carolinaleps is impressive.
>
>  Here on hill seeing lots of Sachem and Fiery's today, a couple Ocola,
> several Am. Ladys, and a frssh Pipevine Swallowtail.  There are still quite
> a few Sleepy Orange ans a few Orange and Cloudless Sulphur in nearby fields.
>
>  Doug Allen Inman, SC
>
>
>
>
Subject: Re: possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 21:06:22 +0000
I would guess an extremely worn male Sachem.

Salman

On Oct 27, 2014, at 4:59 PM, Doug Allen wrote:

Will someone confirm this please?I was going through last years's UNIDs and 
came across this skipper that looks like a male Peck's despite the merged 
yellow. If so, it which would be a Spartanburg County record and 2nd recorded 
for SC. 


Also- a pretty cool photo of a female Orange Sulphur in flight

https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

We have had no Monarchs here now for almost a week, but the coastal Monarch 
migration I'm reading about on carolinaleps is impressive. 


Here on hill seeing lots of Sachem and Fiery's today, a couple Ocola, several 
Am. Ladys, and a frssh Pipevine Swallowtail. There are still quite a few Sleepy 
Orange ans a few Orange and Cloudless Sulphur in nearby fields. 


Doug Allen Inman, SC


Subject: possible male Peck's Skipper in Piedmont, SC
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:59:30 -0400
Will someone confirm this please?I was going through last years's UNIDs and
came across this skipper that looks like a male Peck's despite the merged
yellow.  If so, it which would be a Spartanburg County record and 2nd
recorded for SC.

Also- a pretty cool photo of a female Orange Sulphur in flight

https://www.flickr.com/photos/carolinabutterflies/

We have had no Monarchs here now for almost a week, but the coastal Monarch
migration I'm reading about on carolinaleps is impressive.

Here on hill seeing lots of Sachem and Fiery's today, a couple Ocola,
several Am. Ladys, and a frssh Pipevine Swallowtail.  There are still quite
a few Sleepy Orange ans a few Orange and Cloudless Sulphur in nearby fields.

Doug Allen Inman, SC
Subject: Mecklenburg Butterflies Sunday
From: Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 23:08:54 -0400
While birding, also noted a few species of butterflies out in northern 
Mecklenburg County today. 


Cloudless Sulphur
Sleepy Orange
Eastern Tailed-Blue
American Lady
Common Buckeye
Mourning Cloak
Gulf Fritillary (fresh, perfect)
Monarch
Common Checkered-Skipper
Fiery Skipper
Sachem
Ocola Skipper

Kevin Metcalf
Huntersville, NC

Subject: Forsyth County, Winston-Salem
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 22:23:23 -0400
Saturday and Sunday with warm temperatures brought nice visitors as the
season winds down.  In our yard while gardening:

*Saturday*
Red Admiral 1
Painted Lady 1
Silver-spotted Skipper 1
Common Checkered Skipper 1
Red Banded Hairstreak 1
Sachem 3
Clouded Skipper 3
Ocola Skipper 1
Cloudless Sulphur 1

*Sunday*
Painted Lady 1
American Lady 1
Cloudless Sulphur 1
Eastern Comma 1 (very fresh)
Cabbage White 1
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Common Checkered Skipper 1
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Clouded Skipper 1
Sachem 2
Ocola Skipper 1

Gene Schepker
Subject: Re: Monarch 10/25 and 26,2014 Brunswick Beaches
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:18:29 -0400
Yes -- Great Purple Hairstreak (called Great Blue Hairsteak by some folks).

Harry LeGrand

On Sun, Oct 26, 2014 at 9:08 PM,  wrote:

> Saturday and Sunday October 25 and 26 at Brunswick county beaches. Saturday
> winds light from the west, NW at 5 to 8 knots, sunny and mild, Sunday winds
> from the south steady at 10 knots sunny and mild.
>  Count for both days.
>  Monarchs 100+
>  Buckeye 200+
>  Gulf Frit. 12
>  A.Painted Lady 25
>  Cloudless Sulphur 50+
>  Lots of Misc Skippers
>  Red Admiral 2
>  1 Very Large Hairstreak Dark Blue on the Dorsal and some irredescent
> spotting
> on the ventral with a orange abdomin.
>
>  I have not looked this butterfly up but perhaps some of you will
> recognize the
> description.
>  All were feeding on Golden Rod.
>  I physically caught 100+ Monarchs and inspected for tags but found none. I
> found perhaps 15 Monarchs that were broken the other were in good shape and
> some looked freshly hatched. I wish I had gotten some tags from someone as
> I
> have never tagged any Monarch. There were at least 100 that sailed thru the
> golden rod and never landed I did not see any tags on those either but
> some I
> could not get close enough to to see. I honestly did not expect to find so
> many
> as it has been more than 20 years since I have tried to find any but luck
> was
> with me.
>  Thanks.
>  Shawn Lane
>
Subject: Monarch 10/25 and 26,2014 Brunswick Beaches
From: <shawnlane07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 21:08:44 -0400 (EDT)
Saturday and Sunday October 25 and 26 at Brunswick county beaches. Saturday
winds light from the west, NW at 5 to 8 knots, sunny and mild, Sunday winds
from the south steady at 10 knots sunny and mild.
 Count for both days.
 Monarchs 100+
 Buckeye 200+
 Gulf Frit. 12
 A.Painted Lady 25
 Cloudless Sulphur 50+
 Lots of Misc Skippers
 Red Admiral 2
 1 Very Large Hairstreak Dark Blue on the Dorsal and some irredescent spotting
on the ventral with a orange abdomin.

 I have not looked this butterfly up but perhaps some of you will recognize the
description.
 All were feeding on Golden Rod.
 I physically caught 100+ Monarchs and inspected for tags but found none. I
found perhaps 15 Monarchs that were broken the other were in good shape and
some looked freshly hatched. I wish I had gotten some tags from someone as I
have never tagged any Monarch. There were at least 100 that sailed thru the
golden rod and never landed I did not see any tags on those either but some I
could not get close enough to to see. I honestly did not expect to find so many
as it has been more than 20 years since I have tried to find any but luck was
with me.
 Thanks.
 Shawn Lane
Subject: James Is, SC leps Oct 25, 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:27:37 -0400
Hi All,

I had a Red Admiral on the dirt road in our Eastwood Neighborhood on James
Is, Charleston Co., SC.  around 4 PM this evening.

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/26/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 18:34:33 -0400
Oops. Add 4 Ocola Skippers to this list. Mike Turner

On Sun, Oct 26, 2014 at 6:33 PM, Mike Turner  wrote:

> I walked the Creekside and Millpond Trails and explored the open areas.
> The weather was sunny and about 75F. The best butterfly of the day was a
> Clouded Sulphur. I didn't get to see this individual perched like the one I
> saw 10/10 in southeastern Wake Co., but it did flutter leisurely at my feet
> and nearby so that I could see it was pale lemon-yellow above and below
> with no orange (eliminating Sleepy Orange and Orange Sulphur) and had sharp
> black wind edges (eliminating a small pale Cloudless Sulphur). My complete
> list is below. Good butterflying.
>
>    Cabbage White 2  Clouded Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 2  Eastern
> Tailed-Blue 1 Variegated Fritillary 2 Pearl Crescent 5 Question Mark 1 
American 

> Lady 1  Common Buckeye 4  Monarch 1  Least Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 9
> Mike Turner
> Raleigh, NC
>



-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/26/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 18:33:44 -0400
I walked the Creekside and Millpond Trails and explored the open areas. The
weather was sunny and about 75F. The best butterfly of the day was a
Clouded Sulphur. I didn't get to see this individual perched like the one I
saw 10/10 in southeastern Wake Co., but it did flutter leisurely at my feet
and nearby so that I could see it was pale lemon-yellow above and below
with no orange (eliminating Sleepy Orange and Orange Sulphur) and had sharp
black wind edges (eliminating a small pale Cloudless Sulphur). My complete
list is below. Good butterflying.

  Cabbage White 2  Clouded Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 2  Eastern
Tailed-Blue 1  Variegated
Fritillary 2  Pearl Crescent 5  Question Mark 1  American Lady 1  Common
Buckeye 4  Monarch 1  Least Skipper 2  Fiery Skipper 9
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Monarch
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2014 18:23:26 -0400
Today, a single Monarch came into the garden, nectaring on Mexican sunflower. 
It was a small female, and very fresh looking. She didn't tarry, and wasn't 
here long 


Loretta Lutman,
Asheboro, NC.
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/25/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:47:03 -0400
From 12-4:30pm this afternoon I walked around the arboretum looking for
butterflies. The weather was sunny and about 75F. The highlights among my
18 species were an arboretum-rare Red Admiral and an Eastern Comma, the
first anglewing I have ever seen here. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Cabbage White 15  Orange Sulphur 2  Cloudless Sulphur 15  Sleepy
Orange 8  Red-banded
Hairstreak 4  Eastern Tailed-Blue 2  Pearl Crescent 5  Eastern Comma 1
 American
Lady 10  Painted Lady 3  Red Admiral 1  Common Buckeye 13  Monarch 4
Silver-spotted
Skipper 2  Common Checkered-Skipper 15  Clouded Skipper 3  Fiery
Skipper 45  Ocola
Skipper 24
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Ft. Moultrie, SC leps 25 Oct 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:44:25 -0400
Hi All,

Donna and I spent from 1:45 until 2:30 PM today at Fr. Moultrie NM,
Sullivan's Is, SC.  It was 72 f, light west wind and clear.  We walked
about 1/3 of the front of the fort.  We had:

Black Swallowtail 1 very fresh
Orange Sulfur 1
Cloudless Sulfur 40+
Little Yellow 4
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Ceraunus Blue 4
Gulf Fritillary 25+
American Lady 1
Common Buckeye 30+
Phaon Crescent 4
Monarch 120+
Long-tailed Skipper 8
checkered-skipper sp. 1 could not tell if Tropical or White as it flew too
far away
Clouded Skipper 1
Fiery Skipper 4
Eufala Skipper 1
Ocola Skipper 4

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Forsyth County Monarchs
From: nottke1 <nottke1 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:05:30 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
Had 21 Monarchs go through the yard today between 3:00 and 4:15. A few stopped 
to nectar on Fall asters, but most just flew through heading SSW. 


Also had Common Checkered Skippers, Cloudless Sulphurs, and one Sleepy Orange.

Jim Nottke
Subject: Pitt County, 25 October 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:17:32 +0000
Butterflies seen today, 2014-10-25, in Pitt County:

Common Checkered-Skipper, 1
Ocola Skipper, 20
Fiery Skipper, 20

Sleepy Orange, 5
Cloudless Sulphur, 2
Cabbage White, 2

Monarch, 1
Gulf Fritillary, 1, Pitt County Arboretum
Variegated Fritillary, 2
American Lady, 5
Painted Lady, 5
Eastern Comma, 1, River Park North, FOY #56 and new late date for Pitt
Common Buckeye, 5
Pearl Crescent, 2

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Colleton Co., SC leps 24 Oct 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 08:51:15 -0400
Hi All,

I spent a couple hours mid-day yesterday at Bear Is WMA and when the
temperatures gotr above 70 f, I had a couple of butterflies.

Cloudless SUlfur 10
Little Yellow 1
Gulf Fritillary 8
Common Buckeye 5

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Chemoreceptors & migration
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 18:09:26 -0400

In reference to Brian Bochahn's reply of Sunday Oct, 19, about monarchs 
'remembering' where nectaring sites are:

In 2006, and again in 2012,  when we had a mass migration, enough to make 
the entire patch of Mexican sunflowers appear to be in motion, there were 
several avenues in which they came down into the garden.  Some came up the 
road and through a pass, some came farther up the road and came in from the 
southwest side of the garden.  Others flew over, and dropped into the 
garden, while others continued to fly over.  But flying in the same 'stream' 
as the  Monarchs, were also dragon flies and hummingbirds.

Loretta Lutman,
Asheboro, NC

Just returned from trip, thus late reply. 
Subject: Dare county monarchs
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 22:15:46 -0400
Todays trip to pelican island near oregon inlet nc, was wrought with strong 
winds and 58 degree temps. But the sun and abundance of seaside goldenrod on 
the leeward aide of the island provided big numbers of monarchs, easy catches 
too, we ended up tagging 42 exhausting the supply of tags i rationed for the 
day! Several participants on this wings over water birding festival trip were 
able to catch one or more monarchs. I don't facebook but they did post some 
pics and always we get a lot of good pr on this trip, even tagging a few back 
at the docks as several commercial fisherman watched in awe! 


Back on the mainland i tagged a quick 5 at jockeys ridge state park. most 
flying west here. a little yellow and a dusywing here along with more common 
ones. 


Next year ill have to buy more tags, could have easily tripled my numbers, 
actually a three or four hundred a day would be possible as long as its sunny 
and clear!!!! 


Another trip tomorrow and one sat morning, with only 50 tags left we can only 
do that much damage!! 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: SE Coastal Monarch Flight
From: John Ennis <jxennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 18:24:20 -0400
I arrived at Federal Point, Ft Fisher this morning a little after sunrise...it 
was 48 degrees and a little windy...I quickly found that 100+ Monarchs had 
camped out last night in the area's cedars and wax myrtles...there were at 
least 20 more over the road that passed me on my way back to the 
aquarium...120+ is a conservative estimate... 


My next stop was Ft Caswell where I observed single Monarchs floating over the 
huge lawn area while I searched for birds...dozens more Monarchs but many may 
have been counted on the other side of the inlet...amazing sight especially 
with good numbers of buckeyes and Gulf Frits. 


Total observation time was about 3 hours...would love to hear how many Monarchs 
others had at other coastal locations and time periods... 


Photo posted to Carolina Leps Facebook page...

John Ennis
Leland, NC
Sent from my iPad
Subject: James Is, SC Zebra Longwing
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:53:30 -0400
Hi All,

This afternoon I had a Zebra Longwing flying around Plantation Pharmacy,
James Is, SC.  This is the 1st one I have seen in Charleston Co. this year.

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Monarch Caterpillars
From: Ginger Kopka <gkopka1 AT aol.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:16:35 -0400
Today, in my Simpsonville, SC garden, I found two second instar Monarch 
caterpillars. Big surprise for me. Checked the other 12 Tropical Milkweed 
plants, but only found these two on a potted plant. 

Ginger Kopka

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Ft Moultrie NM, SC leps Oct. 22, 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 19:34:54 -0400
Hi All,

Donna and I spent from 1-3 PM today with Matt Campbells Biology Class at
Ft. Moultrie NM, Sullivans Is, SC.  It was clear with temps of 63 f and 10
mph NNW winds.  We had the following most in the front of the fort agong
the water.:

dark swallowtail sp. (Palamedes ?)
Cloudless Sulfur 10
Little Yellow 1
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Ceraunus Blue 2
Gulf Fritillary 25
Painted Lady 1
Common Buckeye 15
Phaon Crescent 3
Monarch   100+      along the shore they were passing at the rate of 15/min
Long-tailed Skipper 3
Tropical Checkered-Skipper 1 male
Fiery Skipper 2

Dennis


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Lake Raleigh-10/22/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:57:43 -0400
From 12:30-4pm I paddled around the lake and walked along the greenway. The
weather was partly cloudy, windy, and 65F. Wee list below.

  Sleepy Orange 2  Red-banded Hairstreak 1  Variegated Fritillary 2  Pearl
Crescent 4  American Lady 1  Common Buckeye 5  Monarch 2  Common
Checkered-Skipper 3  Clouded Skipper 1  Fiery Skipper 28  Sachem 2  Ocola
Skipper 7
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Gray Comma location
From: Richard Stickney <RichardS AT ncmls.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:47:22 +0000
Hi all,

I'm thinking about going up to Ashe County this weekend and wanted to get in 
touch with David Campbell, who trapped some Gray Commas last year. What I had 
in mind was for someone to set traps one evening and for me to come up the next 
day. Can anyone help? 


Richard Stickney
NC Museum of Life & Science
www.flickr.com/photos/rstickney

---
Keep up with us on Facebook, 
Twitter and at 
lifeandscience.org 
Subject: Dare and washington counties nc monarch movements
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:10:30 -0400
Mon oct 21 saw a couple hundred monarchs passing through eastern nc. Didn't 
have a lot of time to tag but... 


Around lake phelps they were flying sw. Around alligator river nwr and on 
roanoke island they flew west. From whalebone junction south they were all 
heading south along the banks as i have seen then in past at this time of year. 
I did see some crossing the sound too, but most heading west from roanoke 
island were concentrated on goldenrod along the manns harbor bridge and along 
64bypass bridge, all heading west. 


I doubt its as neat and tidy as southbound coastal monarchs make a turn on 64 
west to go to mexico, or stay south and head to florida or offshore (didnt see 
many over ocean). Or maybe just cross back to the mainland further south and 
head to mexico?? Or maybe I'm just looking at this from a human point of view 
because these are the routes I'm following. Surely its just a broad swath of 
movement, but nectar surely is a concentrator! 


I tagged 25 on mon and just 1 during a trip yesterday. Rain and wind but 
clearing up again later this week and i hope for some more movement. And hoping 
for some recoveries!!!! 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: 10/21/14 Horizon Park, Rural Hall, Forsyth County, NC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 21:59:23 -0400 (EDT)
Partly sunny weather, 70 F and	windy conditions. (02:00 – 04:15pm). All
observed butterflies were seen on open fields. The best field was mowed while I
was surveying for butterflies. All Asters visited by the butterflies in that
field are now chopped off.

Orange Sulphur			2
Eastern Tailed-Blue		1
Pearl Crescent			2
Common Buckeye			25

Common Checkered-Skipper	6
Fiery Skipper			3
Sachem				5

Mint-Loving Pyrausta		1
Swordsman Dart			1

Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Wake County, NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/21/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 18:30:49 -0400
I was here from 12:30 to 4pm. The weather was sunny until 3pm and mostly
cloudy afterwards with a temperature of ~75F. Highlights among my 22
species were 1 each adult Black & E. Tiger Swallowtail (black female), a
Red Admiral (hard to find here), and a Viceroy (my first sighting here this
year). My complete list is below.

  Black Swallowtail 2 1 ad. & 1 caterpillar on Parsley  Eastern Tiger
Swallowtail 1 black female  Cabbage White 17
 Orange Sulphur 2
 Cloudless Sulphur 12
 Sleepy Orange 10
 Red-banded Hairstreak 1
 Eastern Tailed-Blue 1
 Variegated Fritillary 1
 Pearl Crescent 4
 American Lady 12
 Painted Lady 3
 Red Admiral 1
 Common Buckeye 6
 Viceroy 1
 Monarch 5
 Silver-spotted Skipper 3
 Common Checkered-Skipper 15
 Clouded Skipper 4
 Fiery Skipper 46
 Sachem 2
 Ocola Skipper 22

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Holy Cross Cemetery and Ft. Johnson Marine Lab, James Is, SC 21 Oct 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:09:16 -0400
Hi All,

A brief visit to Holy Cross Cemetery and Ft. Johnson Marine Lab, James Is.,
SC today produced  the following butterflies almost all of which were on
Lantana:

Cloudless Sulfur 5
Little Yellow 1
Gulf Fritillary 7
Painted Lady 3
Common Buckey 3
Monarch 4
Long-tailed Skipper 10
Fiery Skipper 15
Salt MArsh Skipper 1
Ocola Skipper 25


Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Pitt County, 21 October 2014
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 19:59:30 +0000
Some butterflies seen in Pitt County today, 2014-10-21:

Sleepy Orange, 4
Cloudless Sulphur, 2
Monarch, 20
American Lady, 4
Painted Lady, 7
Common Buckeye, 5
Pearl Crescent, 1
Silver-spotted Skipper, 1
Brazilian Skipper, 1 adult, Pitt County Arboretum
Ocola Skipper, 15
Clouded Skipper, 1
Fiery Skipper, 15

Salman Abdulali
Greenville, NC
Subject: Union County, NC Leps
From: drivesa3 AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 22:58:28 -0400
 I took an hour walk along a power line cut at Cane Creek Park this afternoon. 
There were sporadic asters blooming but not much else. 


Red-spotted Purple1
Eastern Tailed-blue 4
Pearl Crescent 5
American Lady 1
Common Buckeye 4
Fiery Skipper 1
Common Checkered Skipper
Clouded Skipper 3
Ocola Skipper 2

 George Andrews
 Indian Trail, NC

Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2104
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:52:02 -0400
This afternoon I walked around the place from 12:30 to 4pm. The weather was
sunny and 70F. Numbers and diversity were way down from what they have
been. Maybe nighttime temperatures that dipped into the 40's last night put
a hurting on them, or maybe it was just not a good day to be a butterflier.
Nothing of note among my 12 species. Good butterflying.

  Pipevine Swallowtail 3 caterpillars on Aristolochia tomentosa  Sleepy
Orange 1  Variegated Fritillary 1  Pearl Crescent 4  American Lady 1  Common
Buckeye 8  Monarch 3  Common Checkered-Skipper 3  Clouded Skipper 1  Fiery
Skipper 14  Sachem 1  Ocola Skipper 5
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Archie Elledge Butterflies, Forsyth Co.
From: Gene Schepker <geneschepker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:37:39 -0400
Today from 12:30 -2:30 under sunny, windy, and cool conditions, Sven
Halling and I found the following:

Checkered White 2
Common Buckeye 5
Variegated Fritillary 1
Painted Lady 1
American Lady 1
Pearl Crescent 6
Sleepy Orange 1
Common Checkered Skipper 14
Clouded Skipper 2
Ocola Skipper 1
Least Skipper 1
Fiery Skipper 9
Sachem 2

Gene Schepker (and Sven Halling)
Subject: The Last Tiger?
From: nottke1 <nottke1 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:32:48 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
In west Forsyth County today I saw a large, very fresh, Eastern Tiger Swtl - 
first one I have seen in a month. 


Also saw;
1  Cloudless Sulphur
5  Sleepy Orange
1  American Snout
4  Checkered Skipper

Jim Nottke
Subject: Short Mecklenburg County list
From: drivesa3 AT aol.com <drivesa3@aol.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:58:41 GMT





  Spent 1 1/2 hours both Saturday and Sunday probing an impressive aster stand 
(Oldfield Ater I believe) at Colonel Fancis Beatty Park and was disappointed by 
the lack of diversity; an enjoyable day nonetheless. Here is the short list; 

SaturdayFiery Skipper 36Sachem 6Monarch 8 (I've seen them nectaring on the 
asters in the past, but just passing through southbound this day)Variegated 
Fritillary 1Common Checkered Skipper 4Ocola Skipper 2Sleepy Orange 9Eastern 
Tailed-blue 3Common Buckeye 7Pearl Crescent 1 

SundayFiery Skipper 25Sachem 5Ocola Skipper 3Common Checkered Skipper 
4Variegated Fritillary 1Sleepy Orange 6Eastern Tailed-blue 5Common Buckeye 12 

 I am very curious about the Sleepy Orange habit of staying close to a group 
of 3 pine trees (resemble Virginia Pines in needle and cone size but much 
"fuller" foliage) in the field. I've seen this all year and first thought it 
was for the shade until I realized they would perch on the ground in the sunlit 
gaps. There are small groups of deciduous trees scattered around the fields, 
but I've never seen any Sleepy Orange gravitate towards them. Any thoughts on 
this are welcome (as are clever wise-cracks!). 

 George Andrews Indian Tail, NC


Subject: Charleston Co., SC leps 19 Oct 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 08:25:56 -0400
Hi All,

Donna and I saw some butterflies while we were birding yesterday.

Patriot's Point 12:40-1:45 PM
Cloudless Sulfur 10
Gulf Fritillary 10
Common Buckeye 1
Long-tailed Skipper 2
Tropical Checkered-Skipper 1
Ocola Skipper 10

Middle St, Mt. Pleasant 2:00-2:55  PM
Cloudless Sulfur 5
Little Yellow 1
Gulf Fritillary 10
Common Buckeye 3
Viceroy 1 very fresh
Monarch 2
Long-tailed Skipper 7
Ocola Skipper 15

Ft. Moultrie, Sullivan's Island 3:10-3:50 PM
Cloudless Sulfur 5
Gulf Fritillary 1
Monarch 6

Dennis





-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Migrating Monarchs
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 06:46:19 -0400
Since it sounds like the monarchs are not visually able to locate Loretta's
nectar, I wonder if it's less about the monarchs "remembering" where the
nectar is as opposed to the blooms sending out chemical signals out to
pollinators.  Chemoreceptors role in plant and insect communication are
fascinating, I especially love the part of predators intercepting those
signals!  No wonder every parasitic wasp I see is swinging it's antenna
around madly!

Anyway, along my nectar highway I see monarchs come over the tree tops,
visually spot the nectar and drop down.  They also seem to visually spot
other monarchs and drop down, which is why my "fake" monarchs taped to
flowers seem to draw them down!

But other times I notice them just come through the trees or low bushes and
drop into the nectar as if on a "bee" line....is that where that saying
comes from!!!

Fun ramblings...

-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Migrating Monarchs
From: "Loretta" <butterflies_bg AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 19:54:35 -0400
Since last Saturday, October 11, we have had no less than 2 dozen Monarchs 
daily in our garden. They favor the Mexican sunflower, but also nectar on 
lantana and buddlea blooms. We live on a hilltop, but are surrounded by trees, 
so they don't get a clear vista as they fly over. They come up the road, then 
make a detour into the garden. This is several years in succession for this 
pattern. I'm wondering if they send out pheromones to attract others to come? 
Or, we also speculate if the 4th generation can find it's way to Mexico, 
couldn't they also return to the same good nectar sources? Ideas anyone? 


The sunflower patch gets shade by 4 pm each day, and it's interesting to note 
that when the sun is shining, they nectar with wings open. But when the shade 
hits, or if there is a cool stiff breeze, they nectar with wings closed. 


Loretta Lutman
Asheboro, NC
Subject: 10/17/14 Carolina Sandhills NWR, Chesterfield County, SC
From: Sven Halling <shalling AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:59:39 -0400 (EDT)
71 F – 75 F. Full sunny weather.  Butterflied 01:00am to 04:00pm.

Cloudless Sulphur		5
Sleepy Orange			15
Little Yellow			6
Eastern Tailed-Blue		1
Gulf Fritillary 		9
Variegated Fritillary		61
Pearl Crescent			7
American Lady			3
Painted Lady			1
Common Buckeye			84
Monarch 			6

Long-tailed Skipper		2
Common/White Checkered Skipper	3
Eufala Skipper			1
Clouded Skipper 		12
Fiery Skipper			83
Whirlabout			1
Sachem				1
Ocola	Skipper 		9			


Along the way through Montgomery and Richmond Counties we saw five Monarchs
migrating in westerly direction. 

Gene Schepker
Sven Halling (at the note pad)

Sven Halling
Lewisville, NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Yates Mill County Park-10/18/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 17:50:02 -0400
From 12:15 to 4pm I walked around the open areas of the park and hiked the
Creekside Trail. The weather was sunny and 75F. The highlight among my 20
species were 2 Broad-winged Skippers where they have been since 9/18;
nectaring on Pickerelweed in the retention pond at the bottom of the
parking lot, but today I got photos! They can be seen here,
https://www.flickr.com/photos/61962421 AT N05/. Nectar sources were planted
Lantana and white asters in the genus Symphyotrichum.

I wonder if the Broad-winged Skippers I have been seeing here for the last
month are the same ones, offspring of the first ones I saw (their host
plant is ~100' away from the retention pond), or totally different
individuals. Hmm. My complete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Cabbage White 3  Orange Sulphur 2  Cloudless Sulphur 1  Sleepy Orange 4  Gulf
Fritillary 1  Variegated Fritillary 3  Pearl Crescent 6  Question Mark/E.
Comma 1  American Lady 1  Common Buckeye 25  Viceroy 1  Carolina Satyr 2
Monarch 1  Common Checkered-Skipper 2  Clouded Skipper 5  Least
Skipper 3  Fiery
Skipper 15  Sachem 2  Broad-winged Skipper 2  Ocola Skipper 15
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Fwd: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 21:39:24 +0000
To add some specifics:

The paper, "Cretaceous origin and repeated tertiary diversification of the 
redefined butterflies" by Heikilla et al, located at 


http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1731/1093

classifies all butterflies into a single superfamily, Papilionoidea, consisting 
of 7 families: 


Papilionidae (swallowtails)
Hedylidae (not found in the US, considered to be moths until recently)
Hesperiidae (skippers)
Pieridae (sulphurs, whites)
Nymphalidae (brushfoots)
Riodinidae (metalmarks)
Lycaenidae (blues, hairstreaks, etc.)

Another recent paper, Kawahara AY, Breinholt JW. 2014 Phylogenomics provides 
strong evidence for relationships of butterflies and moths. Proc. R. Soc. B 
281: 20140970. 


http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.0970

finds that within the Lepidoptera, butterflies are most closely related to some 
microlepidoptera, rather than to larger moths as previously thought. 


Salman Abdulali

--------------------------------------------------

From: "Abdulali, Salman" 
Date: October 18, 2014 12:07:39 AM EDT
To: Jeff Pippen 
Cc: Carolinaleps 
Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species

Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find that 
Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of the 
butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future list may 
start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the skippers in 
the middle. 


Salman Abdulali



On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:

Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the “Pelham Catalogue” was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that you’re not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
Snouts
Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
Longwings
Fritillaries
Admirals
Emperoros
Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, I’m 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and I’m retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, I’ll probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/

Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 18:14:12 +0000
One point of confusion I have found is that Butterflies of America is in some 
ways two somewhat inconsistent web sites. Compare, for example 


http://butterfliesofamerica.com/L/neographium_marcellus.htm

and

http://butterfliesofamerica.com/eurytides_marcellus.htm

One species, two names.


On Oct 18, 2014, at 2:07 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:

I see that you (Jeff) list Phyciodes incognitus (Mimic Crescent) as a full 
species. But, -- fortunately for the Butterflies of North Carolina website and 
the N.C. Natural Heritage Program) -- Pelham lists it as Phyciodes cocyta 
incognitus -- a subspecies of Northern Crescent. 


It takes a long time to go thru Pelham's list! I'll do that this afternoon, and 
report back to this listserve if I see any new splits or lumps that we might 
not be aware of. 


As for common names, Pelham doesn't venture into this slippery/muddy area, but 
Jeff and the Butterflies of North Carolina website tend to use the NABA 
Checklist, except where there are some "new" species that are not in that 
checklist, such as some azures, Intricate Satyr, etc. We then tend to use the 
Butterflies of America website. 


Harry LeGrand


On Sat, Oct 18, 2014 at 12:07 AM, Abdulali, Salman 
> wrote: 

Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find that 
Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of the 
butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future list may 
start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the skippers in 
the middle. 


Salman Abdulali



On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen 
> wrote: 


Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the “Pelham Catalogue” was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that you’re not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
 Snouts
 Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
 Longwings
 Fritillaries
 Admirals
 Emperoros
 Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
 Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, I’m 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and I’m retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, I’ll probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/


Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 14:07:43 -0400
I see that you (Jeff) list *Phyciodes incognitus *(Mimic Crescent) as a
full species. But, --  fortunately for the Butterflies of North Carolina
website and the N.C. Natural Heritage Program) -- Pelham lists it as *Phyciodes
cocyta incognitus *-- a subspecies of Northern Crescent.

It takes a long time to go thru Pelham's list! I'll do that this afternoon,
and report back to this listserve if I see any new splits or lumps that we
might not be aware of.

As for common names, Pelham doesn't venture into this slippery/muddy area,
but Jeff and the Butterflies of North Carolina website tend to use the NABA
Checklist, except where there are some "new" species that are not in that
checklist, such as some azures, Intricate Satyr, etc. We then tend to use
the Butterflies of America website.

Harry LeGrand


On Sat, Oct 18, 2014 at 12:07 AM, Abdulali, Salman 
wrote:

> Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find
> that Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of
> the butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future
> list may start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the
> skippers in the middle.
>
> Salman Abdulali
>
>
>
> On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:
>
> Butterfliers,
>
> Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have
> significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research.  One such
> publication, known as the “Pelham Catalogue” was recently revised, and a
> new edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June
> 2014.  The author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist
> world, and his catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly
> specialists, including many scientific articles that are much more recent
> than any of your field guides!
>
> What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and
> other publications that show an arrangement that you’re not yet used to.
> For example, below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the
> brushfoot family.  I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a
> list with Monarch right after American Snout but before Variegated
> Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after Hackberry Emperor but right before
> Northern Pearly-Eye!
>
> Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
>  Snouts
>  Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
>  Longwings
>  Fritillaries
>  Admirals
>  Emperoros
>  Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
>  Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs
>
> And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the
> lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries
> (e.g. Great Spangled), and so on.
>
> Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos
> were moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs,
> etc.  Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better
> reflect our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other,
> and will promote further research and knowledge.
>
> I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my
> webpages to mostly conform to the new organization.  I say mostly because
> at this point, I’m retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and
> I’m retaining the whites before the sulphurs within the Pieridae.
> Eventually, I’ll probably change those, too!  Here are some links to help.
>
> North Carolina Butterflies
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm
>
> North American Butterflies
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm
>
> The Pelham Catalogue
> http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm
>
> Good Butterflying!
> Jeff
> --
> Jeffrey S. Pippen
> Durham, NC
> http://www.jeffpippen.com/
>
>
Subject: Re: Falls lake monarchs
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 09:01:36 -0400
Yes, as I have mentioned before they were all heading southwest.  I have
had recaptures from this stock in Greensboro and suspect they visually
follow I85 at least partway through NC.  In my little stretch of I85 over
Falls Lake there is a lot of nectar right along the service roads/power
lines and I believe that this nectar superhighway, the funneling effect of
the lake and a slight curve in 85 towards a more SW route at this point
causes the larger numbers.

About 7 years ago I found this concentration and went from tagging 30-40
per year at max, to hundreds tagged easily.  And on good days when I have
hundreds at this site, I have checked sites a couple miles south or north
and even with just as much nectar I only see a handful.

Hence my nectar superhighway with monarch concentration!

I was hoping to have more time this year to tag here, one of these years
I'd like to get out daily and see what the grand totals really are!  Oct 17
is pretty late for a superflight here, but everything has been late this
year, and I still have 4 in Chrysalids!  Though most years I run out of
tags around mid October so stop going out....

Thanks!

Brian

On Sat, Oct 18, 2014 at 8:30 AM, Doug Allen  wrote:

> Very interested in the large numbers Brian reports, especially since we
> saw very few Monarchs on the southern SC coast over the weekend. Brian, did
> those Monarchs appear to be flying southwest?
>
> Here in upstate SC, Windmill Hill, 8 miles from the NC border and 12 miles
> from the southern Appalachians, we had our highest Monarch total nectaring
> on the Lantana yesterday- at least 13 individuals. As with bird feeder
> counts, 13 is the highest number seen at one time and no doubt
> underestimates the total.  Last year we counted a total of 7 individuals
> all autumn. We have counted upwards of 40 Monarchs nectaring here on
> Windmill Hill so far this month. I have not seen any tagged Monarchs yet.
>
> We have goldenrod and a dozen other flower species in bloom, but the
> Monarchs definitely prefer the Lantana.  Unlike most other species, they
> seem to have little preference for whether the Lantana is in the sun or in
> the shade on warm days.
>
> I spent the better part of two hours yesterday watching about 10 Monarchs
> from 4 PM until after 6 PM in an effort to discern where they would fly
> after nectaring. The Monarchs seemed to be much more wary after 4 PM than
> they had been earlier in the day when I could often approach within a few
> feet. Between 5 PM and 6 PM, Monarchs, one at a time, took of in a
> southwesterly direction.  In only a single case did two take off together.
> This suggests to me that our Monarchs are probably headed for the gulf
> coast (or Texas) and not Florida. One of the butterfliers this past weekend
> at Edisto Island is from the Florida panhandle and reports impressive
> Monarch migrations there where they seen to take off across the Gulf of
> Mexico, probably for the Yucatan peninsula where they are reported.
>
> To repeat what I wrote here a couple of days ago, if the coastal migration
> at Edisto was at all representative, there are a hundred Gulf Fritillaries
> heading south to every one or two Monarchs on the coast.  My 10 minute
> count was 104 Gulf Frits and one Monarch. I was using binoculars to see
> over 100 yards inland and 100 yards offshore from the beach at Botany Bay.
> Can others tell me if that is representative of earlier and later dates in
> the season?  I think that  the Monarch migration may peak a week or two
> after the Gulf Fritillary migration?
>
>  I was amazed how many Gulf Frits were migrating (reported to be much
> fewer than two years ago when Marty and Dave saw thousands)  especially
> considering that they their northern range  extends only to piedmont NC and
> south eastern Virginia where they are rare.  I remember a few weeks ago
> Brian reporting over 100 NC species for his big year, but missing Gulf
> Fritillary at that time.
>
> The internet report of a large Monarch migration to the Bahamas where
> others report few or no Monarchs may well be Gulf Fritillaries.  Similarly,
> when I asked my friend who has a house on Fripp island to report his
> sightings two weeks ago, I think, not being a butterflier, he probably was
> reporting seeing Gulf Fritillaries and not Monarchs off shore from his
> boat. Another non-butterlier friend who lives in Mont Pleasant, next to
> Charleston, SC also reports many Monarchs which I think may be mostly Gulf
> Frits.  I am including both my friends in this email to get their reaction.
>
>
> My butterflying friend in Cozumel, Quintana Roo, has asked friends and
> also readers of her online journal, *Cozumel Insider*, to look for and
> report Monarchs which ought to be reaching there by now if that is part of
> their flyway.  She also reports the good news that " *2 biologists, just
> finished a coffee table book they worked on for over 2 years about
> Cozumel’s wildlife, flora and fauna AND…they photographed and named over 
**90 

> different butterflies right here on the island!"   *That compares to the
> 70 species I think she has recorded and the 40 I saw during my 3
> day reconnaissance of the island this past summer-
> https://sites.google.com/site/butterfliesofcozumel/
>
> Doug Allen  Inman, SC
> https://sites.google.com/site/southcarolinauplandbutterflies/
>
> On Fri, Oct 17, 2014 at 8:49 PM, Bb  wrote:
>
>> I suspected that the few days of rainy weather and the cold front would
>> cause another superflight today and it did!!!
>>
>> Tagged 129 monarchs and saw about 400 from 130pm-530pm, i should have
>> started earlier!
>>
>> Saw two that were already tagged, from some point north, cant wait to
>> find out where!
>>
>> Nectar use was mostly goldenrod and aster. Baccaharis and eupatorium had
>> just a couple, bidens was spent. There were several clusters again, at
>> goldenrod mostly, especially right before or after the lake crossings even
>> though its a narrow crossing. Didn't bother with the net on clusters, just
>> hand picked them which was a lot easier and quicker.  Most abdomens looked
>> pretty skinny, no wonder they were re-fueling!!!
>>
>> Brian Bockhahn
>> Durham NC
>
>
>


-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Falls lake monarchs
From: Doug Allen <dougk4ly AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 08:30:26 -0400
Very interested in the large numbers Brian reports, especially since we saw
very few Monarchs on the southern SC coast over the weekend. Brian, did
those Monarchs appear to be flying southwest?

Here in upstate SC, Windmill Hill, 8 miles from the NC border and 12 miles
from the southern Appalachians, we had our highest Monarch total nectaring
on the Lantana yesterday- at least 13 individuals. As with bird feeder
counts, 13 is the highest number seen at one time and no doubt
underestimates the total.  Last year we counted a total of 7 individuals
all autumn. We have counted upwards of 40 Monarchs nectaring here on
Windmill Hill so far this month. I have not seen any tagged Monarchs yet.

We have goldenrod and a dozen other flower species in bloom, but the
Monarchs definitely prefer the Lantana.  Unlike most other species, they
seem to have little preference for whether the Lantana is in the sun or in
the shade on warm days.

I spent the better part of two hours yesterday watching about 10 Monarchs
from 4 PM until after 6 PM in an effort to discern where they would fly
after nectaring. The Monarchs seemed to be much more wary after 4 PM than
they had been earlier in the day when I could often approach within a few
feet. Between 5 PM and 6 PM, Monarchs, one at a time, took of in a
southwesterly direction.  In only a single case did two take off together.
This suggests to me that our Monarchs are probably headed for the gulf
coast (or Texas) and not Florida. One of the butterfliers this past weekend
at Edisto Island is from the Florida panhandle and reports impressive
Monarch migrations there where they seen to take off across the Gulf of
Mexico, probably for the Yucatan peninsula where they are reported.

To repeat what I wrote here a couple of days ago, if the coastal migration
at Edisto was at all representative, there are a hundred Gulf Fritillaries
heading south to every one or two Monarchs on the coast.  My 10 minute
count was 104 Gulf Frits and one Monarch. I was using binoculars to see
over 100 yards inland and 100 yards offshore from the beach at Botany Bay.
Can others tell me if that is representative of earlier and later dates in
the season?  I think that  the Monarch migration may peak a week or two
after the Gulf Fritillary migration?

 I was amazed how many Gulf Frits were migrating (reported to be much fewer
than two years ago when Marty and Dave saw thousands)  especially
considering that they their northern range  extends only to piedmont NC and
south eastern Virginia where they are rare.  I remember a few weeks ago
Brian reporting over 100 NC species for his big year, but missing Gulf
Fritillary at that time.

The internet report of a large Monarch migration to the Bahamas where
others report few or no Monarchs may well be Gulf Fritillaries.  Similarly,
when I asked my friend who has a house on Fripp island to report his
sightings two weeks ago, I think, not being a butterflier, he probably was
reporting seeing Gulf Fritillaries and not Monarchs off shore from his
boat. Another non-butterlier friend who lives in Mont Pleasant, next to
Charleston, SC also reports many Monarchs which I think may be mostly Gulf
Frits.  I am including both my friends in this email to get their reaction.


My butterflying friend in Cozumel, Quintana Roo, has asked friends and also
readers of her online journal, *Cozumel Insider*, to look for and report
Monarchs which ought to be reaching there by now if that is part of their
flyway.  She also reports the good news that " *2 biologists, just finished
a coffee table book they worked on for over 2 years about Cozumel’s
wildlife, flora and fauna AND…they photographed and named over **90
different butterflies right here on the island!"   *That compares to the 70
species I think she has recorded and the 40 I saw during my 3
day reconnaissance of the island this past summer-
https://sites.google.com/site/butterfliesofcozumel/

Doug Allen  Inman, SC
https://sites.google.com/site/southcarolinauplandbutterflies/

On Fri, Oct 17, 2014 at 8:49 PM, Bb  wrote:

> I suspected that the few days of rainy weather and the cold front would
> cause another superflight today and it did!!!
>
> Tagged 129 monarchs and saw about 400 from 130pm-530pm, i should have
> started earlier!
>
> Saw two that were already tagged, from some point north, cant wait to find
> out where!
>
> Nectar use was mostly goldenrod and aster. Baccaharis and eupatorium had
> just a couple, bidens was spent. There were several clusters again, at
> goldenrod mostly, especially right before or after the lake crossings even
> though its a narrow crossing. Didn't bother with the net on clusters, just
> hand picked them which was a lot easier and quicker.  Most abdomens looked
> pretty skinny, no wonder they were re-fueling!!!
>
> Brian Bockhahn
> Durham NC
Subject: Re: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: "Abdulali, Salman" <ABDULALIS AT ecu.edu>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 04:07:39 +0000
Even more radical changes are likely to come soon. The latest studies find that 
Swallowtails were the first family to branch off in the evolution of the 
butterflies, followed by the skippers, and then the rest. So, a future list may 
start with the swallowtails, and end with the satyrs, putting the skippers in 
the middle. 


Salman Abdulali



On Oct 17, 2014, at 11:52 PM, Jeff Pippen  wrote:

Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the “Pelham Catalogue” was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that you’re not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
 Snouts
 Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
 Longwings
 Fritillaries
 Admirals
 Emperoros
 Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
 Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, I’m 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and I’m retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, I’ll probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Taxonomic arrangement of butterfly species
From: Jeff Pippen <jeffpippen9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 23:52:00 -0400
Butterfliers,

Some of the latest publications on North American butterflies have 
significantly re-ordered our species, based on new research. One such 
publication, known as the “Pelham Catalogue” was recently revised, and a new 
edition was published on the Butterflies of America website in June 2014. The 
author is Jonathon Pelham, highly regarded in the Lepidopterist world, and his 
catalogue synthesizes hundreds of publications by butterfly specialists, 
including many scientific articles that are much more recent than any of your 
field guides! 


What this means is that you will likely begin seeing butterfly lists and other 
publications that show an arrangement that you’re not yet used to. For example, 
below is the latest treatment of the subfamilies within the brushfoot family. 
I, for one, will have trouble thinking about writing a list with Monarch right 
after American Snout but before Variegated Fritillary, and Pearl Crescent after 
Hackberry Emperor but right before Northern Pearly-Eye! 


Brushfoots (Nymphalidae)
  Snouts
  Milkweed Butterflies (e.g. Monarch)
  Longwings
  Fritillaries
  Admirals
  Emperoros
  Ladies, Anglewings, Buckeyes, Checkerspots, Crescents
  Pearly-Eyes, Browns, Satyrs, Wood-Nymphs

And within each subfamily, there are many rearrangements, like placing the 
lesser fritillaries (e.g. Meadow Fritillary) before the great fritillaries 
(e.g. Great Spangled), and so on. 


Birders will be familiar with these types of changes, like when the vireos were 
moved away from the warblers, and more recently, moving the longspurs, etc. 
Change is often hard to deal with, but hopefully these changes better reflect 
our current understanding of butterfly relationships to each other, and will 
promote further research and knowledge. 


I spent the last couple of days rearranging the species lists on my webpages to 
mostly conform to the new organization. I say mostly because at this point, I’m 
retaining the skippers AFTER the true butterflies, and I’m retaining the whites 
before the sulphurs within the Pieridae. Eventually, I’ll probably change 
those, too! Here are some links to help. 


North Carolina Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies/nc-butterflies.htm

North American Butterflies
http://www.jeffpippen.com/butterflies.htm

The Pelham Catalogue
http://www.butterfliesofamerica.com/US-Can-Cat.htm

Good Butterflying!
Jeff
--
Jeffrey S. Pippen
Durham, NC
http://www.jeffpippen.com/
Subject: Falls lake monarchs
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 20:49:05 -0400
I suspected that the few days of rainy weather and the cold front would cause 
another superflight today and it did!!! 


Tagged 129 monarchs and saw about 400 from 130pm-530pm, i should have started 
earlier! 


Saw two that were already tagged, from some point north, cant wait to find out 
where! 


Nectar use was mostly goldenrod and aster. Baccaharis and eupatorium had just a 
couple, bidens was spent. There were several clusters again, at goldenrod 
mostly, especially right before or after the lake crossings even though its a 
narrow crossing. Didn't bother with the net on clusters, just hand picked them 
which was a lot easier and quicker. Most abdomens looked pretty skinny, no 
wonder they were re-fueling!!! 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/17/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 19:21:16 -0400
From noon to 4pm I walked around the arboretum under sunny skies and temps
about 70F. Highlights among my 24 species were 1 black female E. Tiger
Swallowtail (my first ETS since 9/3), 1 Southern Skipperling!, my first
adult Gulf Fritillary of the year, and a Red Admiral (the first I have ever
seen here). The skipperling zipped in and landed on the lawn ~10' in front
of me, sat there for just enough time to get my binoculars on it, then
zipped away before I could get a photo. My complete list is below. Good
butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail
2 caterpillars on Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)  Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
1 black form female  Cabbage White 15
 Orange Sulphur 2
 Cloudless Sulphur 18
 Little Yellow 1
 Sleepy Orange 10
 Red-banded Hairstreak 3
 Eastern Tailed-Blue 4
 Gulf Fritillary 1
 Variegated Fritillary 2
 Pearl Crescent 4
 American Lady 4
 Painted Lady 3
 Red Admiral 1
 Common Buckeye 18
 Monarch 25
 Silver-spotted Skipper 3
 Common Checkered-Skipper 39
 Clouded Skipper 6
 Southern Skipperling 1
 Fiery Skipper 67
 Sachem 5
 Ocola Skipper 30

-- 
Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Chester Co., SC leps 16 Oct. 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:13:20 -0400
Hi All,

I looked for butterflies mainly around General Lane near Richburg, Chester
Co., SC yesterday. This is a real estate development with alot of blazing
star and goldenrods.  I had:

Little Yellow 2
Red-banded Hairstreak 1
Eastern Tailed-Blue 1
Gulf Fritillary 1
Varegated Fritillary 2
Pearl Crescent 1
American Lady 1
Common Buckeye 11
Monarch 15
white/common Checkered-Skipper 1 male which I missed!
Clouded Skipper 4
Fiery Skipper 2

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Lancaster Co., SC leps 16 October 2014
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:02:34 -0400
Hi All,

Had the following leps in Lancaster Co., SC yesterday:

Andrew Jackson State Park
Eastern Tailed-Blue  1
Pearl Crescent 4
Common Buckeye 4
Painted Lady 2
Clouded Skipper 2
Fiery Skipper 5
Ocola Skipper 4 county record

Hyy 9 Boat Landing
Pearl Crescent 2
Clouded Skiper 1
Zebulon Skipper 1

Regards,

Dennis

PS Brian can you forward this to whom ever replaced V. Carter?


-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2014 08:42:07 -0400
Partly. It is an atlas for rare species, not all species. Check it out at:

http://www.vararespecies.org/

Harry LeGrand


On Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 11:44 PM, Mathis  wrote:

>   Is there a comparable website/butterfly project for Virginia?
>
> Cecelia Mathis
> Sparta, NC
>
>  *From:* Harry LeGrand 
> *Sent:* Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:06 PM
> *To:* carolinaleps AT duke.edu
> *Subject:* A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North
> Carolina website
>
>  Fellow butterfliers;
>
> Tom Howard and I got a huge response to our request for photos to fill in
> holes on the *Butterflies of North Carolina *website. So huge, in fact,
> that Tom got swamped, and it took him quite a few days to get most
> uploaded. And, three of you, Jeff Pippen, Will Cook, and Richard Stickney,
> offered us the opportunity to hand-pick some of the photos on their
> websites, which was helpful in filling in even additional "holes", such as
> a dorsal photo of a male Hobomok Skipper.
>
> Tom cranked out a listing of people whose photographs have been uploaded
> onto the website at some point in 2014 (not necessarily after the request).
> Many or most of the names were of those who did indeed submit photos after
> the request.
>
> So -- we wish to thank all of you, alphabetically by number of photos:
>
> *50 or more photos in 2014 *
> Will Cook
> Sven Halling
> Jeff Pippen
>
> *20 - 49 photos*
> Salman Abdulali
> Richard Stickney
>
> *10 -19 photos*
> Doug Allen
> Bruce Grimes
> Tom Sanders
> Paul Scharf
> Chris Talkington
>
> *1-9 photos*
> Lee Amos
> Betty Anderson
> Jamie Anderson
> Parker Backstrom
> Nancy Baldwin
> Mac Basnight/Mary Doll
> Allen Belden
> Madge Birk
> Brian Bockhahn
> Jason Brown
> Dennis Burnette
> Paula Tohline Calhoun
> Derb Carter
> Bob Cavanaugh
> Ricky Davis
> John Dole
> Keith Endres
> John Ennis
> Marty Fancy
> Carl Ganser
> Lane Garner
> Shay Garriock
> Steve Hall
> Paul Hart
> Scott Hartley
> Doug Johnston
> Mark Jones
> Ginger Kopka
> Joe Lafferty
> Jeff Lewis
> Owen McConnell
> Joe Mickey
> Randy Newman
> Lori Owenby
> Mike Papay
> Jim Parnell
> Jim Petranka
> Irvin Pitts
> Stephanie Puckett
> Debbie Roos
> Gene Schepker
> Bruce Smithson
> Frank Spilker
> Lois Stacey
> Vin Stanton
> Tom Stock
> Bud Webster
> Ted Wilcox
> Floyd Williams
>
> We also wish to remind folks of the numerous photographic contributions to
> the website by many of you prior to 2014, with special thanks to Ted
> Wilcox, Jeff Pippen, and Roger Rittmaster -- each of whom must have well
> over 100 photos on the site.
>
> Feel free to roam the site:
> http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/
>
> and see what holes still need to be filled! We still lack a photo, from
> anybody anywhere, of a Gorgone Checkerspot!
>
> Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard
>
Subject: Re: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina website
From: "Mathis" <weer AT skybest.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 23:44:48 -0400
Is there a comparable website/butterfly project for Virginia?

Cecelia Mathis
Sparta, NC

From: Harry LeGrand 
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 8:06 PM
To: carolinaleps AT duke.edu 
Subject: A "thank you" for photographs for the Butterflies of North Carolina 
website 


Fellow butterfliers;

Tom Howard and I got a huge response to our request for photos to fill in holes 
on the Butterflies of North Carolina website. So huge, in fact, that Tom got 
swamped, and it took him quite a few days to get most uploaded. And, three of 
you, Jeff Pippen, Will Cook, and Richard Stickney, offered us the opportunity 
to hand-pick some of the photos on their websites, which was helpful in filling 
in even additional "holes", such as a dorsal photo of a male Hobomok Skipper. 


Tom cranked out a listing of people whose photographs have been uploaded onto 
the website at some point in 2014 (not necessarily after the request). Many or 
most of the names were of those who did indeed submit photos after the request. 


So -- we wish to thank all of you, alphabetically by number of photos:

50 or more photos in 2014 
Will Cook
Sven Halling
Jeff Pippen

20 - 49 photos
Salman Abdulali
Richard Stickney

10 -19 photos
Doug Allen
Bruce Grimes
Tom Sanders
Paul Scharf
Chris Talkington

1-9 photos
Lee Amos
Betty Anderson
Jamie Anderson
Parker Backstrom
Nancy Baldwin
Mac Basnight/Mary Doll
Allen Belden
Madge Birk
Brian Bockhahn
Jason Brown
Dennis Burnette
Paula Tohline Calhoun
Derb Carter
Bob Cavanaugh
Ricky Davis
John Dole
Keith Endres
John Ennis
Marty Fancy
Carl Ganser
Lane Garner
Shay Garriock
Steve Hall
Paul Hart
Scott Hartley
Doug Johnston
Mark Jones
Ginger Kopka
Joe Lafferty
Jeff Lewis
Owen McConnell
Joe Mickey
Randy Newman
Lori Owenby
Mike Papay
Jim Parnell
Jim Petranka
Irvin Pitts
Stephanie Puckett
Debbie Roos
Gene Schepker
Bruce Smithson
Frank Spilker
Lois Stacey
Vin Stanton
Tom Stock
Bud Webster
Ted Wilcox
Floyd Williams

We also wish to remind folks of the numerous photographic contributions to the 
website by many of you prior to 2014, with special thanks to Ted Wilcox, Jeff 
Pippen, and Roger Rittmaster -- each of whom must have well over 100 photos on 
the site. 


Feel free to roam the site:
http://www.dpr.ncparks.gov/nbnc/

and see what holes still need to be filled! We still lack a photo, from anybody 
anywhere, of a Gorgone Checkerspot! 


Harry LeGrand and Tom Howard
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/16/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:32:15 -0400
Today I spent ~2.5 hours at the ecostation under partly cloudy skies and
temps ~70F. No real highlights among my 13 species, but I photographed a
Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar on Aristolochia tomentosa, Wooly Pipevine.
My conplete list is below. Good butterflying.

  Pipevine Swallowtail 2 2 caterpillars on Aristolochia tomentosa  Cabbage
White 2
 Sleepy Orange 3
 Eastern Tailed-Blue 2
 Pearl Crescent 5
 Common Buckeye 15
 Monarch 5
 Common Checkered-Skipper 5
 Clouded Skipper 6
 Least Skipper 1
 Fiery Skipper 41
 Sachem 1
 Ocola Skipper 12

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Wake Co., NC butterflies-J.C. Raulston Arboretum-10/13/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 20:27:07 -0400
On Monday, 10/13/14, I spent the day at J.C. Raulston Arboretum. The
weather was partly cloudy and about 80F. The highlights among my 2 species
were 48 Monarchs (my highest one-day count this year), and 4 Wild Indigo
Duskywings. Pics of the duskywings and other butterflies/caterpillars can
be seen here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/61962421 AT N05/. My complete ist
is below. Good butterflying.

  Black Swallowtail 1 1 ad.female ovipositing on Petroselinum crispum; 3
cats on same  Spicebush Swallowtail 1
 Cabbage White 7
 Orange Sulphur 3
 Cloudless Sulphur 8
 Sleepy Orange 7
 Gray Hairstreak 1
 Eastern Tailed-Blue 3
 Variegated Fritillary 1
 Pearl Crescent 4
 American Lady 2
 Painted Lady 2
 Common Buckeye 10
 Monarch 48
 Silver-spotted Skipper 2
 Wild Indigo Duskywing 4
 Common Checkered-Skipper 40
 Clouded Skipper 6
 Fiery Skipper 55
 Sachem 3
 Ocola Skipper 15

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC