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Updated on Tuesday, September 2 at 03:16 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Macgillivrays Warbler,©David Sibley

2 Sep Re: Good birding at Hefner Gap this morning [Marcus Simpson ]
2 Sep Good birding at Hefner Gap this morning [william haddad ]
2 Sep Marbled Godwit Still Present at Kerr Scott Dam Wilkes Co. [Dwayne Martin ]
2 Sep Re: Hooper Lane- September 2, 2014 [Harry LeGrand ]
2 Sep NC: Gray Kingbird @ Pea Island via eBird [Nate Swick ]
2 Sep Hooper Lane- September 2, 2014 [Simon Thompson ]
2 Sep Re: Henderson Cty., N. C. BLACK TERNFolks, [John Scavetto ]
1 Sep Sparrows, etc. in Southeast NC? [richardscott w ]
1 Sep Re: Am Turf Farm- Washington NC [Brian Pendergraft ]
1 Sep re: Red Wolf [Jacob Socolar ]
1 Sep Henderson Cty., N. C. BLACK TERNFolks, ["Wayne K. Forsythe" ]
1 Sep Re: Red Wolf needs help [Bill Guion ]
1 Sep Fwd: Marbled Godwit - W Kerr Scott Reservoir, Wilkesboro, NC [Dwayne Martin ]
1 Sep Re: Yellow-Headed Blackbird: Henderson Co, NC [Len Kopka ]
1 Sep Re: Yellow-Headed Blackbird: Henderson Co, NC [Jan Fowler ]
1 Sep Nighthawks []
1 Sep Mackay Island NWR [Ryan Justice ]
1 Sep Re: Red Wolf needs help ["R. Bruce Richardson" ]
1 Sep Re: Red Wolf needs help ["R. Bruce Richardson" ]
1 Sep Re: Red Wolf needs help [David Campbell ]
1 Sep Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina [David Anderson ]
30 Aug Red Wolf needs help [Derb Carter ]
31 Aug Red Wolf needs help [Derb Carter ]
1 Sep Am Turf Farm- Washington NC [Ryan Justice ]
1 Sep Yellow-Headed Blackbird: Henderson Co, NC ["Keith E. Camburn" ]
1 Sep Great Morning in Yard...So Far! [Brian Pendergraft ]
31 Aug RE: 2 Dead Sora @ Bear Island WMA SC [JILL ]
1 Sep Re: Common Nighthawks ["GRIGGS, JERRY" ]
31 Aug American Turf Farm birds today (Aug. 31) [Harry LeGrand ]
31 Aug 2 Dead Sora @ Bear Island WMA SC []
31 Aug Re: Jackson Park Henderson County [Mike Judd ]
31 Aug Veery at Congaree National Park []
31 Aug Pea Island, No Lark Sparrow, but... ["Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans" ]
31 Aug Jackson Park Henderson County []
31 Aug American Golden-Plovers and Buff-breasted Sandpiper in Carteret County, NC ["John Fussell" ]
31 Aug Rufous in Black Mountain, NC [stu ]
31 Aug Bobolinks and Northern Harrier at Schenck Forest, Wake County, NC [John Finnegan ]
31 Aug Orangeburg Sod Farm early Aug. 30 [Nate Dias ]
30 Aug Orangeburg - Baird's, Upland Sandpipers ["Jeff Click" ]
30 Aug Re: Common Nighthawks [Ryan Justice ]
30 Aug Hummers in Black Mountain, NC [stu ]
30 Aug Common Nighthawks [Ryan Justice ]
30 Aug Chapel Hill Bird Club Bird Walks Resume [Robert Rybczynski ]
30 Aug RE: Black-chinned Hummingbird-photo not definitive []
30 Aug Black-chinned Hummingbird [Ryan Justice ]
30 Aug Great Day in the Mountains [Marilyn Westphal ]
30 Aug Fwd: eBird Report - Cape Romain NWR--Bulls Island, Aug 29, 2014 [David McLean ]
30 Aug Mississippi Kite - Got lucky [KC Foggin ]
30 Aug Mid-Morning Surprises- Outer Banks [Jim Gould ]
30 Aug Olive-sided Flycatcher NOT relocated [Marty Wall ]
30 Aug Deadliest Swarms []
29 Aug Re: Hawk migration is ON [Jesse Pope ]
29 Aug Henderson County Northern Bobwhite []
29 Aug Migrants at Lake Crabtree Park, NC [Robert Rybczynski ]
29 Aug Hawk migration is ON []
29 Aug Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher? Rockingham County [Marty Wall ]
29 Aug Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher? Rockingham County [Harry LeGrand ]
29 Aug Olive-sided Flycatcher? Rockingham County [Marty Wall ]
29 Aug Redheaded Woodpecker - Durham [Peter Perlman ]
29 Aug Roanoke Island migrants this a.m. [Jeff Lewis ]
29 Aug Lark sparrows still present on Pea Island [Jeff Lewis ]
28 Aug Hilton Pond 08/16/14 (Late August Walkabout) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
29 Aug Bob Sargent (hummingbirds) [Rob G. ]
28 Aug Fwd: Night hawks in black mountain, NC [James Poling ]
28 Aug Migrants in the I'On rookery (Mt Pleasant, SC) [Jack Rogers ]
28 Aug shorebirds at Rachel Carson Reserve today ["John Fussell" ]
28 Aug Contact for Richard Brown? [Rob Bierregaard ]
28 Aug Blue Ridge Parkway-Ridge Junction [Marilyn Westphal ]
28 Aug Ruby-throated Hummingbird No. 5,000 ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
28 Aug Piedmont Tennessee Warbler [Dwayne Martin ]
28 Aug Migrants on Outer Banks this AM [Audrey ]
28 Aug Egyptian Goose (no sighting information) ["Shultz, Steven" ]
28 Aug American Turf in Roper, NC [Jamie Adams ]
27 Aug Good birds on the Tanawha Trail/Blue Ridge Parkway [Elizabeth Faison ]
27 Aug Migrant passerines and NW tonight [Jeff Lewis ]
27 Aug Wood stork [Eamon Freiburger ]

Subject: Re: Good birding at Hefner Gap this morning
From: Marcus Simpson <mbsmjw63 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 15:49:22 -0400
Bill,

Thanks for the report from Hefner Gap; looks like things are getting busy
there as well. Marilyn and I were at Ridge Junction this morning and found
Dwayne Martin and a student already on the scene. Fairly good morning with
most of yesterday's warbler species, although no Wilson's seen, unless
Dwayne had them after we left. Also had a good look at a Golden-winged.
Some Red Crossbills there and also later on Bald Knob Ridge. Marilyn may be
doing a more detailed summary later.

Mark


On Tue, Sep 2, 2014 at 3:17 PM, william haddad  wrote:

> Hefner Gap on the Blue Ridge Parkway had many birds this morning between
> 7:45 and 9 am.  I saw 26 species.
>
> Warblers seen were Hooded, Black-throated Green, Blackburnian,
> Black-throated Blue, Chestnut-sided, Black and White, and American
> Redstart. The Greens were by far the most numerous and very active. One
> chased a bird that was probably a Cape May Warbler, not allowing me a
> decent look. Another Black-throated Green went up after some Chimney Swifts
> that were circling lower over the feeding migrants. A first for me but,
> then again, you always see something different when afield.
>
> Other birds seen were Wood Pewees, a male Baltimore Oriole,  Scarlet
> Tanagers, the Chimney Swifts which were probably feeding on the same gnats
> as some of the migrant flocks, Cardinals, Goldfinches, a Raven,
> Hummingbirds, Blue-headed Vireos, at least 10 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks,
> Towhees, Red-eyed Vireos, C.Chickadees, Tufted Titmice, Waxwings, Downy
> Woodpeckers, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Crows and Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.
>
> After the action slowed at 9, I went to the Orchard, which yielded 5
> different species: Indigo Buntings, Song Sparrows, Mourning Doves,
> White-breasted Nuthatches and a nice Brown Thrasher, in a half hour of
> birding.
>
> Yesterday I birded Mt Mitchell, where there was a different mix of birds.
> There was a good group of birders there and it was more enjoyable to bird
> with them than alone as I was at Hefner today. Not to mention the great
> pancakes they shared! Thanks. At Mitchell I saw more Baltimore Orioles than
> I have ever put my binocs on in one morning - 11. More were seen by the
> group as a whole. At Hefner I only saw one Oriole today but had many
> Grosbeaks. There were a good number of Cape Mays at Mitchell but I saw a
> Redstart at Hefner which I didn't see at Mitchell. Of course, more eyes at
> Hefner would have yielded more birds and probably more species.
>
> Wondering if anyone birded Mitchell today? Maybe the mix would not have
> been so different. Were the Wilson's Warblers, which I missed, still
> present?
>
> Bill Haddad
> Spruce Pine, N.C.
>
Subject: Good birding at Hefner Gap this morning
From: william haddad <photobill9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 15:17:12 -0400
Hefner Gap on the Blue Ridge Parkway had many birds this morning between
7:45 and 9 am.  I saw 26 species.

Warblers seen were Hooded, Black-throated Green, Blackburnian,
Black-throated Blue, Chestnut-sided, Black and White, and American
Redstart. The Greens were by far the most numerous and very active. One
chased a bird that was probably a Cape May Warbler, not allowing me a
decent look. Another Black-throated Green went up after some Chimney Swifts
that were circling lower over the feeding migrants. A first for me but,
then again, you always see something different when afield.

Other birds seen were Wood Pewees, a male Baltimore Oriole,  Scarlet
Tanagers, the Chimney Swifts which were probably feeding on the same gnats
as some of the migrant flocks, Cardinals, Goldfinches, a Raven,
Hummingbirds, Blue-headed Vireos, at least 10 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks,
Towhees, Red-eyed Vireos, C.Chickadees, Tufted Titmice, Waxwings, Downy
Woodpeckers, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Crows and Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.

After the action slowed at 9, I went to the Orchard, which yielded 5
different species: Indigo Buntings, Song Sparrows, Mourning Doves,
White-breasted Nuthatches and a nice Brown Thrasher, in a half hour of
birding.

Yesterday I birded Mt Mitchell, where there was a different mix of birds.
There was a good group of birders there and it was more enjoyable to bird
with them than alone as I was at Hefner today. Not to mention the great
pancakes they shared! Thanks. At Mitchell I saw more Baltimore Orioles than
I have ever put my binocs on in one morning - 11. More were seen by the
group as a whole. At Hefner I only saw one Oriole today but had many
Grosbeaks. There were a good number of Cape Mays at Mitchell but I saw a
Redstart at Hefner which I didn't see at Mitchell. Of course, more eyes at
Hefner would have yielded more birds and probably more species.

Wondering if anyone birded Mitchell today? Maybe the mix would not have
been so different. Were the Wilson's Warblers, which I missed, still
present?

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, N.C.
Subject: Marbled Godwit Still Present at Kerr Scott Dam Wilkes Co.
From: Dwayne Martin <redxbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 14:13:25 -0400
The Marbled Godwit is still being seen at the Kerr Scott Dam near
Wilkesboro, NC. We are here right now looking at it. Great bird!! Thanks to
Isaac Kerns for getting the word out.

-- 
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
redxbill AT gmail.com

http://naturalsciences.org/research-collections/research-specialties/birds/nc-hummingbirds 


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
St. Stephens Park - Hickory, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
http://www.ncbirdingtrail.org/TrailGuide/Guide_CatawbaValley.pdf
Subject: Re: Hooper Lane- September 2, 2014
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 13:22:32 -0400
I looked at the photo of the blackbird very hard, trying to see if the tall
grass really is Phragmites, as someone said. I'm not convinced it is, and
certainly hope it isn't. That is a weed we definitely don't need any
farther inland than about the middle of the Coastal Plain -- where it seems
to be now, invading inward in ditches alongside major highways, for
example. I'm hoping it is just Johnson grass (Sorghum halpense) or an
Echinochloa of some kind.

Harry LeGrand


On Tue, Sep 2, 2014 at 10:40 AM, Simon Thompson  wrote:

> Just stopped by Hooper Lane in Henderson County to see if Wayne and
> Simon's Yellow-headed Blackbird was still around. I did not see the
> blackbird, but did not hang around too long as there was a lot of work
> going on in the fields.
> However, the fields had plenty of puddles and several shorebirds- which
> was nice.
> Highlights included the following:
>
> Lesser Yellowlegs (1)
> Semipalmated Plover (1)
> Buff-breasted Sandpiper (1)
> Least Sandpiper (6)
> Western Sandpiper (1 juv.)
> Pectoral Sandpiper (3)
> Sora (1)
> Bobolink (1)
> Savannah Sparrrow (2)
> Barn and Tree Swallows
>
> Will probably try again this week.
> Simon
>
> Simon RB Thompson
> Ventures Birding Tours
> Asheville, North Carolina
>
> Check out the full 2014 Calendar of birding tours on:www.birdventures.com
> Also "like" us on Facebook at
> https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ventures-Birding-Tours/207237043263?ref=hl
>
>
Subject: NC: Gray Kingbird @ Pea Island via eBird
From: Nate Swick <nswick AT aba.org>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 10:56:18 -0400
Got a report to eBird, along with a photo, of a Gray Kingbird at the Old
Coast Guard Station at Pea Island found yesterday if anyone wants to check
it out.

Photo here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/114635069 AT N03/15110958231/

NateSwick
Greensboro, NC

-- 
Editor, ABA Blog
American Birding Association
blog.aba.org
Subject: Hooper Lane- September 2, 2014
From: Simon Thompson <simonrbt AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 10:40:15 -0400
Just stopped by Hooper Lane in Henderson County to see if Wayne and Simon's
Yellow-headed Blackbird was still around. I did not see the blackbird, but
did not hang around too long as there was a lot of work going on in the
fields.
However, the fields had plenty of puddles and several shorebirds- which was
nice.
Highlights included the following:

Lesser Yellowlegs (1)
Semipalmated Plover (1)
Buff-breasted Sandpiper (1)
Least Sandpiper (6)
Western Sandpiper (1 juv.)
Pectoral Sandpiper (3)
Sora (1)
Bobolink (1)
Savannah Sparrrow (2)
Barn and Tree Swallows

Will probably try again this week.
Simon

Simon RB Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, North Carolina

Check out the full 2014 Calendar of birding tours on:www.birdventures.com
Also "like" us on Facebook at
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ventures-Birding-Tours/207237043263?ref=hl
Subject: Re: Henderson Cty., N. C. BLACK TERNFolks,
From: John Scavetto <johnscavetto AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 06:43:10 -0400
Nice! :)

John Scavetto
P.O.Box 77171
Charlotte, NC 28271
Cell  704-989-6763
Home. 980-207-2674
On Sep 1, 2014 6:34 PM, "Wayne K. Forsythe"  wrote:

>  Folks,
>         At about 4:45 PM, after a very brief shower in the Mills River
> area of Henderson Cty., I had 1 BLACK TERN feeding at the pond in the front
> of the H20 plant in Mills River.  I watched the bird for about 10 minutes
> and got a few less then spectacular shots with my point and shoot camera.
> I then went to Hooper Lane and at 5:45 PM, I again had the YELLOW-HEADED
> BLACKBIRD that Simon Harvey and I had this AM in the heavy reids at the
> exact same location we had the bird at early this AM.  The pictures are
> posted on the CBC website.
> Wayne
>  Wayne K. Forsythe
> 16 Colonial Way
> Hendersonville, N. C. 28791
> wforsytheATmorrisbb.net
>
Subject: Sparrows, etc. in Southeast NC?
From: richardscott w <richardscottw AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:51:13 -0400
I'll be visiting Wilmington and the Brunswick County beaches in a few
days, and as I was looking at page 476 in my Nat'l Geo Field Guide I
wondered if there are any possible sites that folks could recommend
for those sparrows (Saltmarsh, Seaside, LeConte's and Nelson's)? Also
Sedge Wren?

I was thinking in particular of the Fort Fisher locality. I would
appreciate hearing from anyone who could direct me to specific sites.

Also would be interested in Upland Sandpiper and Buff-breasted Sandpiper.

I will be checking ebird while we're there.

Thanks in advance.

-Scott Walker
-New Cumberland PA
Subject: Re: Am Turf Farm- Washington NC
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:53:55 -0400
I also visited this afternoon and I think Ryan had the numbers about
right.  Of the 4 Goldens I saw I had one nice bird with still a lot of
golden brown.

I counted 14 Uppies one time with an incredible 9 within 100 yards of one
another!  I've never seen this many at once in NC.  Simply incredible.

I had 2 Buff - breasted Sandpipers.  Great afternoon after a decent morning
in the yard. Worn out though....

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC
On Sep 1, 2014 10:35 AM, "Brian Pendergraft" 
wrote:

> Ok. Thanks!
>
> BP
> On Sep 1, 2014 10:29 AM, "Ryan Justice"  wrote:
>
>> I don't think you should have much of a problem. All birds were down the
>> middle road on both sides. Golden plovers were on each side and gave great
>> comparisons with Black bellied.
>>
>> Ryan
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Sep 1, 2014, at 10:21 AM, Brian Pendergraft 
>> wrote:
>>
>> Ryan
>>
>> After I pick up a friend at the airport shortly I'm heading down there.
>> Keep them there please??
>>
>> Brian Pendergraft
>> On Sep 1, 2014 9:49 AM, "Ryan Justice"  wrote:
>>
>>> Only birded an hour this morning at the turf farm due to plans to get to
>>> Mackay Island. Birding was still excellent and we only went half way up the
>>> middle road!
>>>
>>> Upland Sp- 12+
>>> Buff-breasted Sp- 1/2
>>> Pectoral Sp- 40
>>> Least Sp- 5
>>> Wilson's Snipe- 2
>>> Am Golden Plover- AT LEAST 3
>>> BB Plover- 10
>>>
>>> Ryan Justice
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
Subject: re: Red Wolf
From: Jacob Socolar <jacob.socolar AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:23:49 -0400
Hi all,
It's nice to be able to take a survey, but please heed Derb's advice.  The
most impactful thing to do is to send in an originally worded comment,
which Derb kindly informs us can be sent to redwolfreview at fws.gov

Make it abundantly clear (perhaps in the subject line) that the message is
in support of the recovery program.

Cheers from Iquitos, Peru
Jacob
Subject: Henderson Cty., N. C. BLACK TERNFolks,
From: "Wayne K. Forsythe" <wforsythe AT morrisbb.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:35:00 -0400
Folks,
 At about 4:45 PM, after a very brief shower in the Mills River area of 
Henderson Cty., I had 1 BLACK TERN feeding at the pond in the front of the H20 
plant in Mills River. I watched the bird for about 10 minutes and got a few 
less then spectacular shots with my point and shoot camera. I then went to 
Hooper Lane and at 5:45 PM, I again had the YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD that Simon 
Harvey and I had this AM in the heavy reids at the exact same location we had 
the bird at early this AM. The pictures are posted on the CBC website. 

Wayne
 Wayne K. Forsythe
16 Colonial Way
Hendersonville, N. C. 28791
wforsytheATmorrisbb.net
Subject: Re: Red Wolf needs help
From: Bill Guion <bguion AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:13:03 -0400
On Aug 30, 2014, at 2:06 PM, Derb Carter  wrote:

snip

> http://jgassett.com/red-wolf-restoration-recovery-program
> 

Derb,

I get an error trying to access the link above.

> Derb Carter
> 
> 


     -----===== Bill =====-----
-- 

The first rule of holes: If you are in one, stop digging.
Subject: Fwd: Marbled Godwit - W Kerr Scott Reservoir, Wilkesboro, NC
From: Dwayne Martin <redxbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:01:33 -0400
Forwarding this for Isaac Kerns.


Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
redxbill AT gmail.com

http://naturalsciences.org/research-collections/research-specialties/birds/nc-hummingbirds 


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
St. Stephens Park - Hickory, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
http://www.ncbirdingtrail.org/TrailGuide/Guide_CatawbaValley.pdf


*From:* Isaac Kerns 
*Date:* September 1, 2014 at 4:34:59 PM EDT
*To:* carolinabirds AT duke.edu
*Subject:* *Marbled Godwit - W Kerr Scott Reservoir, Wilkesboro, NC*

There is a cooperative Marbled Godwit feeding in the grass and rocks along
the dam at W. Kerr Scott Reservoir in Wilkes County, NC. The lake is full
of boaters and personal watercraft, but so far it hasn't been scared off.
I've got photos I'll send into the CBC photo gallery.

Present when I arrived were 2 Common, 3 Forester's, and 3 Black Terns, but
they have all flown west and out of site as of the time of this message.

Isaac Kerns
Wilkesboro, NC
Subject: Re: Yellow-Headed Blackbird: Henderson Co, NC
From: Len Kopka <lenkopka AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:52:49 -0400
I looked around noon - nothing but hot sun and about 50 killdeer.

Len Kopka
Simpsonville, SC

On Sep 1, 2014, at 4:37 PM, Jan Fowler  wrote:

We looked for the bird for three hours this afternoon, but were unable to 
locate it. Two other birders were also unsuccessful. 


Phil & Jan Fowler
Concord, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2014, at 9:47 AM, "Keith E. Camburn"  
wrote: 

> 
> Folks: Wayne Forsythe just called and he and Simon Harvey have a young male 
Yellow-headed Blackbird (9:30 a.m., Monday, 9/1/2014) at the Super Sod Farm on 
Hooper Lane, Henderson County, North Carolina. Coming from Jefferies Road park 
at the first bridge and walk down the main road to the 2nd ditch on your right. 
The bird is in the Phragmites along the ditch. 

> 
> Keith Camburn on behalf of Wayne Forsythe 
> 
> Keith E. Camburn
> 4435 Huntington Drive
> Gastonia, NC 28056-8276
> (H) 704 824-0626
> 
Subject: Re: Yellow-Headed Blackbird: Henderson Co, NC
From: Jan Fowler <janmfowler AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:37:15 -0400
We looked for the bird for three hours this afternoon, but were unable to 
locate it. Two other birders were also unsuccessful. 


Phil & Jan Fowler
Concord, NC
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2014, at 9:47 AM, "Keith E. Camburn"  
wrote: 

> 
> Folks: Wayne Forsythe just called and he and Simon Harvey have a young male 
Yellow-headed Blackbird (9:30 a.m., Monday, 9/1/2014) at the Super Sod Farm on 
Hooper Lane, Henderson County, North Carolina. Coming from Jefferies Road park 
at the first bridge and walk down the main road to the 2nd ditch on your right. 
The bird is in the Phragmites along the ditch. 

> 
> Keith Camburn on behalf of Wayne Forsythe 
> 
> Keith E. Camburn
> 4435 Huntington Drive
> Gastonia, NC 28056-8276
> (H) 704 824-0626
> 
Subject: Nighthawks
From: jcox3222 AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 03:02:20 +0000 (UTC)




Subject: Mackay Island NWR 
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 13:29:11 -0400
Mackay is packed with shorebirds.

Pectoral, Least, Spotted, Semi sands, Lesser Yellowlegs, dowitchers, Semi 
Plovers. 


Best birds were a White-rumped Sp and two Hudsonian Godwits.

2 Glossy Ibis and a Bank Swallow also present.

Ryan Justice 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Red Wolf needs help
From: "R. Bruce Richardson" <rbrucegrp AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 12:03:32 -0400
I am CC-ing the VA list serve as there is so much cross-over in our lists and 
interests. I just completed the survey and it took probably less than 3 
minutes. 

I hope every one will spare 3 minutes of their time to take the survey in the 
link David posted below. 


Thank you all,
R. Bruce Richardson
Manns Harbor, NC

On Sep 1, 2014, at 11:39 AM, David Campbell  wrote:

> I'm getting a slightly different address for the survey:
> http://jgassett.polldaddy.com/s/red-wolf-restoration-recovery-program
> 
> 
> On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 10:32 AM, Derb Carter  wrote:
> > This is not specifically about birds, but if you are like me while birding 
in the red wolf recovery area in eastern North Carolina you are always alert to 
the rare chance of seeing an endangered wolf in the wild. I have been lucky 
about 6-7 times, including seeing one of the first two in 1986 after it had 
been extinct in the wild for many years. 

> >
> > The good news is after restrictions on coyote hunting in the area, 
particularly the elimination of night hunting, no wolves have been killed by 
gunshot. The biggest threat to the continued existence of the red wolf in the 
wild now might be the US Fish & Wildlife Service. The Service has initiated a 
60 day "review" to decide whether to terminate the red wolf reintroduction 
program, which it previously has described as one of the most successful 
endangered species reintroduction programs ever. This has all been initiated 
from FWS leadership in Washington, cutting out the dedicated biologists in FWS 
many of whom have devoted substantial parts of their careers to recovering the 
red wolf. 

> >
> > Instead FWS has hired an outside contractor with the Wildlife Management 
Institute to coordinate the review. He is available to work on this because 
last year he resigned as head of the Kentucky fish and game agency, pleading 
guilty to numerous ethics law violations. It is our state wildlife agency that 
is behind this. Yes, that is the agency that asks you to check the box on your 
tax form every year to send them money for nongame and endangered wildlife. 

> >
> > What can you do? The agencies have made it difficult for,the public to 
participate in this so called review, but here is how you can. 

> >
> > Send an email to redwolfreview at fws.gov with your comments to the Fish 
and Wildlife Service. This is probably the most important thing you can do. 
They have allowed only two weeks for the public to comment and all comments 
must be submitted by September 12. 

> >
> > Two public hearings are scheduled, the first in Swanquarter at 7 pm on 
September 10 and the second in Colombia at 7 on September 11. The notice says 
members of the public speaking will be asked questions by other members of the 
public. If you attend, do not be intimidated by this tactic and say what you 
want to say and respectfully decline to take questions, as is your right. 

> >
> > My first legal job was as a lawyer in Washington representing the Fish & 
Wildlife Service. In over 30 years of doing this work I have never been so 
disappointed in the leadership of the Service and the way they are handling 
this. 

> >
> > Derb Carter
> >
> >
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Dr. David Campbell
> Assistant Professor, Geology
> Department of Natural Sciences
> Box 7270
> Gardner-Webb University
> Boiling Springs NC 28017
Subject: Re: Red Wolf needs help
From: "R. Bruce Richardson" <rbrucegrp AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 12:03:32 -0400
I am CC-ing the VA list serve as there is so much cross-over in our lists and 
interests. I just completed the survey and it took probably less than 3 
minutes. 

I hope every one will spare 3 minutes of their time to take the survey in the 
link David posted below. 


Thank you all,
R. Bruce Richardson
Manns Harbor, NC

On Sep 1, 2014, at 11:39 AM, David Campbell  wrote:

> I'm getting a slightly different address for the survey:
> http://jgassett.polldaddy.com/s/red-wolf-restoration-recovery-program
> 
> 
> On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 10:32 AM, Derb Carter  wrote:
> > This is not specifically about birds, but if you are like me while birding 
in the red wolf recovery area in eastern North Carolina you are always alert to 
the rare chance of seeing an endangered wolf in the wild. I have been lucky 
about 6-7 times, including seeing one of the first two in 1986 after it had 
been extinct in the wild for many years. 

> >
> > The good news is after restrictions on coyote hunting in the area, 
particularly the elimination of night hunting, no wolves have been killed by 
gunshot. The biggest threat to the continued existence of the red wolf in the 
wild now might be the US Fish & Wildlife Service. The Service has initiated a 
60 day "review" to decide whether to terminate the red wolf reintroduction 
program, which it previously has described as one of the most successful 
endangered species reintroduction programs ever. This has all been initiated 
from FWS leadership in Washington, cutting out the dedicated biologists in FWS 
many of whom have devoted substantial parts of their careers to recovering the 
red wolf. 

> >
> > Instead FWS has hired an outside contractor with the Wildlife Management 
Institute to coordinate the review. He is available to work on this because 
last year he resigned as head of the Kentucky fish and game agency, pleading 
guilty to numerous ethics law violations. It is our state wildlife agency that 
is behind this. Yes, that is the agency that asks you to check the box on your 
tax form every year to send them money for nongame and endangered wildlife. 

> >
> > What can you do? The agencies have made it difficult for,the public to 
participate in this so called review, but here is how you can. 

> >
> > Send an email to redwolfreview at fws.gov with your comments to the Fish 
and Wildlife Service. This is probably the most important thing you can do. 
They have allowed only two weeks for the public to comment and all comments 
must be submitted by September 12. 

> >
> > Two public hearings are scheduled, the first in Swanquarter at 7 pm on 
September 10 and the second in Colombia at 7 on September 11. The notice says 
members of the public speaking will be asked questions by other members of the 
public. If you attend, do not be intimidated by this tactic and say what you 
want to say and respectfully decline to take questions, as is your right. 

> >
> > My first legal job was as a lawyer in Washington representing the Fish & 
Wildlife Service. In over 30 years of doing this work I have never been so 
disappointed in the leadership of the Service and the way they are handling 
this. 

> >
> > Derb Carter
> >
> >
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Dr. David Campbell
> Assistant Professor, Geology
> Department of Natural Sciences
> Box 7270
> Gardner-Webb University
> Boiling Springs NC 28017

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Subject: Re: Red Wolf needs help
From: David Campbell <pleuronaia AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 11:39:01 -0400
I'm getting a slightly different address for the survey:
http://jgassett.polldaddy.com/s/red-wolf-restoration-recovery-program


On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 10:32 AM, Derb Carter  wrote:

> > This is not specifically about birds, but if you are like me while
> birding in the red wolf recovery area in eastern North Carolina you are
> always alert to the rare chance of seeing an endangered wolf in the wild.
> I have been lucky about 6-7 times, including seeing one of the first two in
> 1986 after it had been extinct in the wild for many years.
> >
> > The good news is after restrictions on coyote hunting in the area,
> particularly the elimination of night hunting, no wolves have been killed
> by gunshot.  The biggest threat to the continued existence of the red wolf
> in the wild now might be the US Fish & Wildlife Service.  The Service has
> initiated a 60 day "review" to decide whether to terminate the red wolf
> reintroduction program, which it previously has described as one of the
> most successful endangered species reintroduction programs ever.  This has
> all been initiated from FWS leadership in Washington, cutting out the
> dedicated biologists in FWS many of whom have devoted substantial parts of
> their careers to recovering the red wolf.
> >
> > Instead FWS has hired an outside contractor with the Wildlife Management
> Institute to coordinate the review.  He is available to work on this
> because last year he resigned as head of the Kentucky fish and game agency,
> pleading guilty to numerous ethics law violations.  It is our state
> wildlife agency that is behind this.  Yes, that is the agency that asks you
> to check the box on your tax form every year to send them money for nongame
> and endangered wildlife.
> >
> > What can you do?  The agencies have made it difficult for,the public to
> participate in this so called review, but here is how you can.
> >
> > Send an email to redwolfreview at fws.gov with your comments to the
> Fish and Wildlife Service.  This is probably the most important thing you
> can do.  They have allowed only two weeks for the public to comment and all
> comments must be submitted by September 12.
> >
> > Two public hearings are scheduled, the first in Swanquarter at 7 pm on
> September 10 and the second in Colombia at 7 on September 11.  The notice
> says members of the public speaking will be asked questions by other
> members of the public.  If you attend, do not be intimidated by this tactic
> and say what you want to say and respectfully decline to take questions, as
> is your right.
> >
> > My first legal job was as a lawyer in Washington representing the Fish &
> Wildlife Service.  In over 30 years of doing this work I have never been so
> disappointed in the leadership of the Service and the way they are handling
> this.
> >
> > Derb Carter
> >
> >
>



-- 
Dr. David Campbell
Assistant Professor, Geology
Department of Natural Sciences
Box 7270
Gardner-Webb University
Boiling Springs NC 28017
Subject: Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 11:04:14 -0400
A very fun morning at Sandy Creek. The mist at sunrise made way for bright sun. 
Stayed fairly cool and the mosquitoes were not too thick. (Thanks for clearing 
the levee trail!) The WOOD DUCKS are back. Three of them - seemed a female and 
two of this year's young, but hard to be sure. Migrants are there, a SOLITARY 
SANDPIPER, two AMERICAN REDSTARTS, and a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH. A good many 
NORTHERN FLICKERS there now. Nice to find two BELTED KINGFISHERS early. And a 
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH made a brief appearance. Wonderful little park. 

David Anderson 
Durham, NC 

Sandy Creek, Durham, North Carolina
September 1, 2014

Carolina wren 19
Belted kingfisher 2
Green heron 2
Mallard 1 
Northern waterthrush 1
American crow 7
Red-shouldered hawk 1
Mourning dove 3
Northern cardinal 23
Gray catbird 4
Red-bellied woodpecker 12
White-breasted nuthatch 3
Pileated woodpecker 3
Northern flicker 7
Tufted titmouse 6
Blue jay 5
Solitary sandpiper 1
Carolina chickadee 15
Brown-headed nuthatch 1
Northern mockingbird 1
Song sparrow 1
House finch 11
Blue-gray gnatcatcher 2
Eastern bluebird 5
Ruby-throated hummingbird 10
Wood duck 3
American goldfinch 3
Downy woodpecker 4
Fish crow 3
Eastern phoebe 1
American redstart 1
Yellow-billed cuckoo 1
Great-crested flycatcher 1







Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Red Wolf needs help
From: Derb Carter <derbc AT selcnc.org>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 18:06:20 +0000
This is not specifically about birds, but if you are like me while birding in 
the red wolf recovery area in eastern North Carolina you are always alert to 
the rare chance of seeing an endangered wolf in the wild. I have been lucky 
about 6-7 times, including seeing one of the first two in 1986 after it had 
been extinct in the wild for many years. 


The good news is after restrictions on coyote hunting in the area, particularly 
the elimination of night hunting, no wolves have been killed by gunshot. The 
biggest threat to the continued existence of the red wolf in the wild now might 
be the US Fish & Wildlife Service. The Service has initiated a 60 day "review" 
to decide whether to terminate the red wolf reintroduction program, which it 
previously has described as one of the most successful endangered species 
reintroduction programs ever. This has all been initiated from FWS leadership 
in Washington, cutting out the dedicated biologists in FWS many of whom have 
devoted substantial parts of their careers to recovering the red wolf. 


Instead FWS has hired an outside contractor with the Wildlife Management 
Institute to coordinate the review. He is available to work on this because 
last year he resigned as head of the Kentucky fish and game agency, pleading 
guilty to numerous ethics law violations. It is our state wildlife agency that 
is behind this. Yes, that is the agency that asks you to check the box on your 
tax form every year to send them money for nongame and endangered wildlife. 


What can you do? The agencies have made it difficult for,the public to 
participate in this so called review, but here is how you can. First, take the 
"survey" at the link below. Do not fall for trick question to "rank the 
threats" posed by red wolves which requires you to agree any of these things 
are threats. Tell them in a following comment it is an inappropriate question. 


http://jgassett.com/red-wolf-restoration-recovery-program

Send an email to redwolfreview AT fws.gov with your comments to the Fish and 
Wildlife Service. This is probably the most important thing you can do. They 
have allowed only two weeks for the public to comment and all comments must be 
submitted by September 12. 


Two public hearings are scheduled, the first in Swanquarter at 7 pm on 
September 10 and the second in Colombia at 7 on September 11. The notice says 
members of the public speaking will be asked questions by other members of the 
public. If you attend, do not be intimidated by this tactic and say what you 
want to say and respectfully decline to take questions, as is your right. 


My first legal job was as a lawyer in Washington representing the Fish & 
Wildlife Service. In over 30 years of doing this work I have never been so 
disappointed in the leadership of the Service and the way they are handling 
this. 


Derb Carter

Subject: Red Wolf needs help
From: Derb Carter <derbc AT selcnc.org>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 14:32:25 +0000
> This is not specifically about birds, but if you are like me while birding in 
the red wolf recovery area in eastern North Carolina you are always alert to 
the rare chance of seeing an endangered wolf in the wild. I have been lucky 
about 6-7 times, including seeing one of the first two in 1986 after it had 
been extinct in the wild for many years. 

> 
> The good news is after restrictions on coyote hunting in the area, 
particularly the elimination of night hunting, no wolves have been killed by 
gunshot. The biggest threat to the continued existence of the red wolf in the 
wild now might be the US Fish & Wildlife Service. The Service has initiated a 
60 day "review" to decide whether to terminate the red wolf reintroduction 
program, which it previously has described as one of the most successful 
endangered species reintroduction programs ever. This has all been initiated 
from FWS leadership in Washington, cutting out the dedicated biologists in FWS 
many of whom have devoted substantial parts of their careers to recovering the 
red wolf. 

> 
> Instead FWS has hired an outside contractor with the Wildlife Management 
Institute to coordinate the review. He is available to work on this because 
last year he resigned as head of the Kentucky fish and game agency, pleading 
guilty to numerous ethics law violations. It is our state wildlife agency that 
is behind this. Yes, that is the agency that asks you to check the box on your 
tax form every year to send them money for nongame and endangered wildlife. 

> 
> What can you do? The agencies have made it difficult for,the public to 
participate in this so called review, but here is how you can. 

> 
> Send an email to redwolfreview at fws.gov with your comments to the Fish and 
Wildlife Service. This is probably the most important thing you can do. They 
have allowed only two weeks for the public to comment and all comments must be 
submitted by September 12. 

> 
> Two public hearings are scheduled, the first in Swanquarter at 7 pm on 
September 10 and the second in Colombia at 7 on September 11. The notice says 
members of the public speaking will be asked questions by other members of the 
public. If you attend, do not be intimidated by this tactic and say what you 
want to say and respectfully decline to take questions, as is your right. 

> 
> My first legal job was as a lawyer in Washington representing the Fish & 
Wildlife Service. In over 30 years of doing this work I have never been so 
disappointed in the leadership of the Service and the way they are handling 
this. 

> 
> Derb Carter
> 
> 
Subject: Am Turf Farm- Washington NC
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 09:49:30 -0400
Only birded an hour this morning at the turf farm due to plans to get to Mackay 
Island. Birding was still excellent and we only went half way up the middle 
road! 


Upland Sp- 12+
Buff-breasted Sp- 1/2
Pectoral Sp- 40
Least Sp- 5
Wilson's Snipe- 2
Am Golden Plover- AT LEAST 3
BB Plover- 10

Ryan Justice 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Yellow-Headed Blackbird: Henderson Co, NC
From: "Keith E. Camburn" <kcamburn AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 06:47:13 -0700
Folks: Wayne Forsythe just called and he and Simon Harvey have a young male 
Yellow-headed Blackbird (9:30 a.m., Monday, 9/1/2014) at the Super Sod Farm on 
Hooper Lane, Henderson County, North Carolina. Coming from Jefferies Road park 
at the first bridge and walk down the main road to the 2nd ditch on your right. 
The bird is in the Phragmites along the ditch. 


Keith Camburn on behalf of Wayne Forsythe 

Keith E. Camburn
4435 Huntington Drive
Gastonia, NC 28056-8276
(H) 704 824-0626
Subject: Great Morning in Yard...So Far!
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 08:27:10 -0400
31 species including....

CHESTNUT - SIDED WARBLER
AMERICAN REDSTART
BLUE-WINGED WARBLER
BALTIMORE ORIOLE X4

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC
Subject: RE: 2 Dead Sora @ Bear Island WMA SC
From: JILL <jm3567 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 23:18:25 -0400
I too was at Bear Island at 5:30 this evening.  Surprised to see the dramatic 
change from the numbers of birds seen after Pam's report a couple of weeks 
back.  


I came across and met Jeff Click and as we talked about Sora, one came out of 
the water/grass and crossed the road in front of us.  Not an unusual bird but 
we were surprised to see it strolling across the road. 


Please allow me to share a wonderful thing about a couple of birders out there 
today.  Not long after I left Bear Island around 7:30 I was hit by a car 
driving way too fast.  A couple from Columbia who had seen me/my car out 
there, had also talked with Jeff, saw the two car wreck and came to my 
rescue.  


Thankfully no one was injured but the Highway Patrol could not arrive on scene 
for over an hour.  


They offered me kindness, ice for the knot on my forehead, mosquito repellent, 
and then drove me home on their way back to Columbia. We talked about birds & 
photography, a great way to come out of a very frightening situation. 


The point? We birders can be "out in the middle of no where" and be of 
tremendous help to others who need it.  I'm so very grateful to be alive, 
unharmed and cared for by strangers with binoculars and hearts for people in 
need as well as the birds. 


Good birding, be careful out there! 
Jill Midgett
Chas. SC

Sent on a Boost Samsung Galaxy S® III

-------- Original message --------
From: jford6 AT comcast.net
Date:08/31/2014 5:30 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: carolina bird list serve
Subject: 2 Dead Sora AT Bear Island WMA SC
Today Cathy and Carl Miller and myself found 2 Sora's flat on Titi Road, less than 30 feet apart about a quarter mile from check station. It appears they were run over. They were still soft and moveable. Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/82113160 AT N07/14910585777/in/photostream/ Later, Cathy got me on a living Sora in flight crossing impoundment on Pecan Trees Rd. I have never seen a dead Sora, and unfortunately enjoyed the juvenile bird's plumage. This must be how Audubon felt! Pam Ford Charleston SC
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawks
From: "GRIGGS, JERRY" <griggs AT math.sc.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 02:50:33 +0000
Ryan Justice reported 8 Common Nighthawks in Chapel Hill last night, Aug. 30.

I spotted 136 here in Cedar Mountain, NC, last night between 6 and 7 pm. They 
were drifting silently in loose groups, generally heading eastward in our 
valley, from Brevard towards Caesar's Head. I suspect there were many more, 
since I had limited visibility of the sky much of the time. 


I was tied up tonight until 6:45pm, but I still spotted another 68 of them. 
Curiously, they were mostly heading in the opposite direction, westward! 
Perhaps the weather affects their route, since last night we had storms 
approaching from the west (behind them), while tonight seems calmer. 


Jerry Griggs,   j AT sc.edu
Subject: American Turf Farm birds today (Aug. 31)
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 20:19:24 -0400
This afternoon a fairly large group of folks -- Ed Corey, Floyd and Signa
Williams, Nick Flanders, Elisa Enders, Audrey Whitlock, Lee Adams, and I
birded the turf farm area west of Creswell in Washington Co., NC. Most of
us had just finished the ever-exciting (snicker) Pettigrew State Park
butterfly count, and this was a convenient and close-by stop-over on the
way home. Here are the rough totals:

Killdeer  75-100 or more
Semipalmated Plover  about 3
Am. Golden-Plover  3
Black-bellied Plover   about 8
Upland Sandpiper  8+
Pectoral Sandpiper  30+
Least Sandpiper  3-5
Buff-breasted Sandpiper  1

So -- we got 3 of the 4 "grass-pipers" - Golden, Upland, and Buff-breasted,
but no Baird's.  Some Laughing Gulls were also present -- no big deal.

There were hundreds of Bobolinks in the farm fields north of Lake Phelps
today, as noted by Ed and me, among others.

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh
Subject: 2 Dead Sora @ Bear Island WMA SC
From: jford6 AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 21:30:36 +0000 (UTC)
Today Cathy and Carl Miller and myself found 2 Sora's flat on Titi Road, less 
than 30 feet apart about a quarter mile from check station. 

It appears they were run over. They were still soft and moveable. 
Photo: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/82113160 AT N07/14910585777/in/photostream/ 
Later, Cathy got me on a living Sora in flight crossing impoundment on Pecan 
Trees Rd. 

I have never seen a dead Sora, and unfortunately enjoyed the juvenile bird's 
plumage. This must be how Audubon felt! 

Pam Ford 
Charleston SC 
Subject: Re: Jackson Park Henderson County
From: Mike Judd <ebwilderae AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 15:58:50 -0400
Richard Jackson, Jerry Griggs and I were also there this morning where it
started out too cool but eventually warmed up by 10:30 or so.  Warblers
seen were a couple yellow-throated and several redstarts.  Nice looks at a
yellow-billed cuckoo on the power line trail, red-eyed vireo, lots of
robins and even more hummingbirds and an abundance of Carolina Wren.

Mike Judd
Brevard, NC


On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 3:36 PM,  wrote:

> All-
>
> Birded with Ron Selvey today. Of interest to me follows:
>
> 1 Northern Parula
> 1 Canada Warbler
>
> Ernie Hollingsworth
> erniehollingsworth AT gmail.com
>



-- 
"You show me a 50-foot wall and I'll show you a 51-foot ladder at the
border"  former DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano

These ill-conceived border walls are highly detrimental to jaguar, ocelot
and other wildlife which have historic ranges not prescribed by human
invented borders.  Me
Subject: Veery at Congaree National Park
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 15:54:29 -0400
During a non-birding trip to Congaree National Park, I heard a Veery make its 
call note near the Visitor Center, then later saw a Veery along the Weston Lake 
Loop Trail and heard it make a call note as well. I did stumble across a couple 
Wild Turkey and a couple Louisiana Waterthrush as well. 


John Grego
Columbia SC
Subject: Pea Island, No Lark Sparrow, but...
From: "Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans" <vanwilkins AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 15:39:46 -0400
Jacques and I were out at the Old Coast Guard Station this morning, hoping
to see the Lark Sparrow and Bobolink flocks, and didn't, but we were
pleased to see and photograph a Northern Waterthrush.  The only other
warblers seen were an American Redstart and a Common Yellowthroat.
 Also, at the Cape Point campground on Friday we saw several White-rumped
Sandpipers feeding along with Pectorals, dowitchers, plovers, and many
peeps.
Happy birding trails,

Elizabeth Wilkins
Frisco, NC, and Yorktown, VA
Hatteras Island rent-by-owner cottage:
www.loonslanding.info
pw: loonrise
Subject: Jackson Park Henderson County
From: <fadedletter AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 15:36:59 -0400 (EDT)
All-

Birded with Ron Selvey today. Of interest to me follows:

1 Northern Parula
1 Canada Warbler

Ernie Hollingsworth
erniehollingsworth AT gmail.com
Subject: American Golden-Plovers and Buff-breasted Sandpiper in Carteret County, NC
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 14:47:40 -0400
This morning, we (Jack Fennell, Chandra Biggerstaff, and I) saw 1 
Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the Cedar Island ferry terminal (in the horse 
pasture) and 8 American Golden-Plovers (with Black-bellieds) at North River 
Farms (in a recently harvested soybean field).

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC
Subject: Rufous in Black Mountain, NC
From: stu <sgibeau AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:09:02 -0400
Just got a great look at the adult male Rufous. He landed on a branch just 5 
feet from me. I'll have to set my motion camera up by the feeder again. 


Stu-Man-Fu
Subject: Bobolinks and Northern Harrier at Schenck Forest, Wake County, NC
From: John Finnegan <jtfinnegan AT outlook.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 11:35:36 -0400


A large flock of about 150 Bobolinks and a lone female North Harrier were in 
pasture east of the Schenck Forest access road near its intersection with Reedy 
Creek Road this morning (8/31). The harrier flushed the Bobolinks a few times, 
giving us a pretty good idea of the size of the flock. The complete eBird 
checklist can be found here: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19621590 


John Finnegan
Raleigh


 		 	   		  
Subject: Orangeburg Sod Farm early Aug. 30
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:13:28 -0400
I too birded the Orangeburg Sod Farm yesterday.  I arrived at 7:30am
though, before the rocketry club got going.  FYI they start around 10-10:30
so if you start early you can get in a couple of hours at the main unit
before they start their anti-wildlife operations.

Highlights at the main unit were 1 Baird's and 2 White-rumped Sandpipers,
two Upland Sandpipers, a handful of Pectoral Sandpipers, a couple of dozen
Least sandpipers, three Common Ground-Doves, Loggerhead Shrike, Eastern
Kingbirds and Horned Larks.  Killdeer were plentiful.  Also had singing
Field Sparrows and a calling Northern Bobwhite.

Over at the fields along Dynasty Drive, it was mostly Killdeer with some
distant peeps.

Over at the Riley farm unit there were 2 Buff-breasted Sandpipers
associating with Killdeer, two Lesser Yellowlegs and a dozen or so Least
Sandpipers.  They were hanging out in a depression between two ridges on
the right side of the main road in just before you reach the pump house.
 Calling Bobwhite at Riley too.

Foster road fields were suffering from soybean creep and Bookhardt farm was
dry and had mostly Killdeer and Starlings but a few Pecs.

Old Elloree (fields on the right near the work building) had lots of
Killdeeer and Least SP with a few scattered Pecs.  Also at least 4
Semipalmated Plovers.

Biggest bunch of shorebirds all day was the field behind the Pioneer
Equipment Co. - ridiculous number of Killdeer, 50+ Least Sandpipers, 30+
Pectorals, Solitary Sandpiper, 2-3 Semipalmated Sandpiper.  It had the most
puddles of anywhere
I visited.

I saw shorebirds and swallows taking advantage of the sprinklers in 3
locations - they run in the am so another reason to get there early.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Saturday, August 30, 2014, Jeff Click > wrote:

>  All,
>
> Took a quick pass through the Orangeburg area this afternoon.  I wasn’t
> able to do much in the typical part of the Supersod farm, since the
> rocketry club was launching out there, so I headed for the back, along Bethel
> Forest Road.  In the field behind the corn fields, I found a Baird’s
> Sandpiper among gobs of Killdeer and a few Pectoral Sandpipers.  In the
> same area were three Upland Sandpipers.  Also around were a Solitary
> Sandpiper, some Least Sandpipers, and a Northern Harrier.
>
> The birds could be seen from the marker on this Google map:
> 
*https://www.google.com/maps/place/33%C2%B026%2711.4%22N+80%C2%B043%2741.8%22W/ AT 33.4365085,-80.728269,2525m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0* 

> 
 

>
> Jeff Click
> Easley, SC
>
Subject: Orangeburg - Baird's, Upland Sandpipers
From: "Jeff Click" <clickbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 23:28:42 -0400
All,

Took a quick pass through the Orangeburg area this afternoon.  I wasn't able
to do much in the typical part of the Supersod farm, since the rocketry club
was launching out there, so I headed for the back, along Bethel Forest Road.
In the field behind the corn fields, I found a Baird's Sandpiper among gobs
of Killdeer and a few Pectoral Sandpipers.  In the same area were three
Upland Sandpipers.  Also around were a Solitary Sandpiper, some Least
Sandpipers, and a Northern Harrier.

The birds could be seen from the marker on this Google map:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/33%C2%B026%2711.4%22N+80%C2%B043%2741.8%22
W/ AT 33.4365085,-80.728269,2525m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0

Jeff Click
Easley, SC
Subject: Re: Common Nighthawks
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:41:09 -0400
And now 5 more.

Ryan Justice 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 30, 2014, at 7:22 PM, Ryan Justice  wrote:
> 
> Just had 3 fly over Kenan Stadium in Chapel Hill.
> 
> Ryan Justice 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Hummers in Black Mountain, NC
From: stu <sgibeau AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:32:45 -0400
Have quite a few coming thru the yard today. Thought I saw a full male Rufous 
come thru. Seems way early, will keep an eye out though. I usually don't get 
them till late September or early October. 


Stu Gibeau
Subject: Common Nighthawks
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:22:36 -0400
Just had 3 fly over Kenan Stadium in Chapel Hill.

Ryan Justice 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club Bird Walks Resume
From: Robert Rybczynski <rob.rybczy AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:13:30 -0400
 The Chapel Hill Bird Club Saturday bird walks resume next Sat., Sept 6. As 
usual, we will meet at Glen Lennox parking lot on the north side of 54 just 
east of the intersection with 15-501 in Chapel Hill. This Saturdays trip will 
be to nearby Mason Farm. The schedule for the rest of the year, which includes 
Mike Toves hawk watching trip, is posted at the Chapel Hill Bird Club web 
site. I will post Saturday destinations to Carolinabirds and to the CHBC 
Facebook page before Saturday, when known ahead of time. As in the past, some 
trip destinations will be decided on Saturday morning, depending on weather, 
attendees preferences, and whats around. 


 As some of you know, I am the new field trip chairman for the club. As such, I 
would like to receive suggestions for new birding destinations for the Saturday 
trips, both in the Triangle area and also somewhat farther afield. I would like 
especially to hear whether or not longer day trips would be of interest i.e. 
trips to destinations closer than the mountains or coast but which would still 
require one or two hours of travel. And if you live and bird in a no too 
distant non-Triangle areas, e.g. Greensboro, Rocky Mount, Winston-Salem, Id be 
glad to hear your suggestions too. 


Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary, NC
Subject: RE: Black-chinned Hummingbird-photo not definitive
From: <susan AT ncaves.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 15:08:59 -0700
All--

Although it is not at all impossible, I see nothing definitive in the
distant head shot of the adult male hummer labelled as a Black-chinned
on the CBC website.

Hopefully we will learn more soon from the person who captured the
image...

Susan Campbell
Whispering Pines, NC


Subject: Black-chinned Hummingbird
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 17:43:17 -0400
Does anybody have anymore info on the alleged Black-chinned Hummingbird in 
Durham? 


Ryan Justice 
  

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Great Day in the Mountains
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph AT ret.unca.edu>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 17:20:47 -0400
Mark, myself, Simon Thompson, Tom Bush, and Rick Pyeritz birded Ridge
Junction (BRP mile 355) this morning, mostly at the lower end of NC 128
going up to Mt Mitchell SP, and migration is definitely heating up.  We had
some really nice birds including 3 Wilson's Warblers with great views of
them, a Cerulean, a Golden-winged and 10 other warbler species (list below)
with lots of many of those.  There were also quite a few warblers passing
high overhead.

Then Mark and I went up to Bald Knob Ridge to do some plot analysis then
decided to come back via Curtis Creek Rd down to Parker Padgett Rd at I-40
exit 75 where the Mississippi Kites have been reported this month.  Boy
howdy were they there, 14 of them at least, and with the Mississippi
Kites flying low overhead was a SWALLOW-TAILED KITE.  Mark got some photos
of the ST Kite and I'll post them to the Carolina Bird Club website
photogallery.

Mt Mitchell/Ridge Junction list:
Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1
Broad-winged Hawk -1
Common Nighthawk - 6 - seen by Simon and Rick on the way up
Chimney Swift - 4
RT Hummingbird - 10 (crossing over the ridge one at a time)
Downy Woodpecker - 1
Hairy Woodpecker - 2
Blue-headed Vireo - 10
Red-eyed Vireo - 6
Blue Jay - 3
Common Raven - 1
Carolina Chickadee - 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch - 3
Winter Wren - 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 5
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 7
Veery - 1
Cedar Waxwing - 35
Ovenbird -1
Golden-winged Warbler - 1
Black-and-white Warbler - 6
Tennessee Warbler - 20 (numbers picking up daily)
Hooded Warbler - 1
Cape May Warbler - 9
Cerulean Warbler - 1
Magnolia Warbler - 5
Blackburnian Warbler - 10
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 14
Black-throated Blue Warbler - 13
Black-throated Green Warbler - 25
Wilson's Warbler - 3
Dark-eyed Junco - 11
Scarlet Tanager - 1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 1
Baltimore Oriole - 2
American Goldfinch - 7

Mark and I also had some Crossbills on Bald Knob Ridge.
A really beautiful and fun day.  It's nice to have all those eyes at Ridge
Junction.  There's so much going on it can often be hard to catch it all.
Best suggestion for birding Ridge Junction is to pick days that are
relatively calm and clear at high elevation.  Note that it can be very
foggy in the valleys and clear as a bell up high in fall.  Rule of thumb is
that if the forecast is for cloudy conditions it may be foggy up high, but
if the forecast is for valley fog don't worry about it.  You'll drive up
above it.  Also, go early.  Best birding is from sunrise to about 9 or 10am.
Marilyn



-- 
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Cape Romain NWR--Bulls Island, Aug 29, 2014
From: David McLean <dcmclean AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:37:18 -0400
Sat 30 Aug 2014


All,


   Bob Seigler joined me yesterday for the ongoing Bulls Island
waterfowl/shorebird survey. I was pleased to see Coastal Expeditions' owner
and captain Chris Crolley for our ride out to Bulls on their brand new
Carolina Skiff. Certified by the Coast Guard for 20 passengers, this new
boat has twin 115 hp motors and is stable and fast; it will serve CEX for
smaller charters, beach drops, and smaller regular ferry service like we
had yesterday morning. CEX's Captain Gates Roll ferried us off the island.
Many thanks to both Chris and Gates. Nice new ride!


   Bob and I tallied 47 target species for the survey proper, 61 species
overall on the whole day's outing. Our eBird checklist for the day is
appended, below, FYI. Species of note include Black-bellied Whistling Duck,
Blue-winged Teal, Reddish Egret, Roseate Spoonbill, Cooper's Hawk, Piping
Plover (no apparent leg bands or flags), Red Knot (no apparent leg bands or
flags), Western Sandpiper, Bonaparte's Gull (very unexpected), Caspian
Tern, and Common Tern. Avian misses include Least Bittern, Gull-billed
Tern, and Red-winged Blackbird (I probably looked right through and/or over
them). We also tallied very few woodland species, even considering that we
were driving rather than walking the roads.


   Non-avian sightings included multiple sightings of bottle-nosed dolphins
(including an up-close view of some "impact feeding" behavior where the
dolphin uses its tail to slap the shallow water and, thus, their prey
fish), American alligators keeping cool in the water, butterflies, and
dragonflies. We missed seeing any fox squirrels.


   There's been a VERY BIG change to Upper Summerhouse Pond (USP) since my
last visit there on Thursday 14 Aug 2014. The dike separating USP from the
extensive salt marsh along the extreme SW corner of the impoundment has
been breached. The trunk (water control structure) is completely exposed
and the earthen dike is completely washed away around both sides and top of
the trunk leaving a 15 m break in the dike. Upper Summerhouse Pond is now
completely tidal! We saw it at about an hour and a half before the
afternoon low tide and the water was fast draining out leaving extensively
exposed mudflats and vegetation in USP.


   This same USP dike was breached during Hurricane Hugo (21 Sept 1989),
though I believe that this new breach around the trunk is 40 m or so from
the Hugo breach site. I've studied some of my photos from Dec 1989 but am
unable to confirm the precise location of that breach. I suspect that the
USF&WS will bring in a private contractor to make repairs, but with their
very tight budget such a fix may not come soon. In the meantime it will be
interesting to follow the birds using USP. Yesterday USP had an American
White Pelican, 15 Roseate Spoonbills (PINK!), both species of yellowlegs,
the only Black-necked Stilts for the day, and the typical egret, heron,
cormorant, and ibis species.


   I am cross-posting this email to Carolinabirds for the upcoming (26 and
27 Sept 2014) Carolina Bird Club meeting in Charleston and the trips then
to Bulls Island.


   Looking ahead at the tidal calendar suggests the following dates for our
next survey:


Thurs 11 Sept 2014 high tide forecast 6.4 ft at 10:05 AM

Fri 12 Sept 2014 high tide forecast 6.2 ft at 10:57 AM

Sat 13 Sept 2014 high tide forecast 6.0 ft at 11:50 AM


Stay tuned for further plans.


Regards,


David McLean

Charleston, SC


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Sat, Aug 30, 2014 at 2:59 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Cape Romain NWR--Bulls Island, Aug 29, 2014
To: dcmclean AT gmail.com


Cape Romain NWR--Bulls Island, Charleston, US-SC
Aug 29, 2014 8:50 AM - 4:50 PM
Protocol: Traveling
16.1 mile(s)
Comments:     Conducting the ongoing Bulls Island waterfowl/shorebird
survey. Effort: 4.15 mi (one way) and 1 hr by ferry plus 9.9 mi and 2 hr by
truck plus 2.9 mi and 5 hr by foot. Weather: clear, sunny, warm, and very
humid; temps 74 F to 88 F; AM winds very light from NE gradually picking up
to 5 mph to 10 mph from the ENE. High tide was forecast to be 5.2 ft at
10:44 AM. The salt marsh dike at Upper Summerhouse Pond was breeched right
at the trunk sometime in the last 2 weeks. This has turned Upper
Summerhouse Pond into a tidal basin.  
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.6.3 61 species Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 1 Wood Duck 3 Mottled Duck 7 Blue-winged Teal 16 Pied-billed Grebe 1 Wood Stork 7 Double-crested Cormorant 8 Anhinga 4 American White Pelican 13 Brown Pelican 130 Many on sand bar off North Beach and many more beachfront at Jack's Creek. Great Blue Heron 3 Great Egret 22 Snowy Egret 29 Little Blue Heron 2 Tricolored Heron 14 Reddish Egret 2 Green Heron 1 Black-crowned Night-Heron 1 White Ibis 7 Glossy Ibis 1 Roseate Spoonbill 15 Accurate count from Upper Summerhouse Pond. Turkey Vulture 8 Osprey 2 Cooper's Hawk 1 Red-shouldered Hawk 1 Common Gallinule 53 Includes many juveniles. American Coot 2 Clearly distinguished dark rail with white bill. Seen adjacent to Common Gallinules. Black-necked Stilt 5 American Oystercatcher 15 Grey Plover 45 Wilson's Plover 3 Semipalmated Plover 142 A reasonably accurate estimate. Piping Plover 1 No apparent leg bands or flags. Spotted Sandpiper 1 Greater Yellowlegs 1 Willet 55 Many seen on a private boardwalk to dock on Intra Coastal Waterway Lesser Yellowlegs 5 Whimbrel 1 Marbled Godwit 8 Ruddy Turnstone 24 Beachfront at Jack's Creek. Red Knot 29 Medium sized shorebird; straight, medium length bill; still with rusty red plumage on belly. Sanderling 70 Scurrying beachfront. Semipalmated Sandpiper 24 Western Sandpiper 3 Short-billed Dowitcher 50 Bonaparte's Gull 1 Small, pale gull; blocky tail, dark spot behind eye. Unexpected. Laughing Gull 71 Least Tern 2 Caspian Tern 14 Excellent scope views of resting birds seen in large, mixed flocks along with several other tern species. Black Tern 203 Most seen to be molting out of their dark breeding plumage. Common Tern 52 Excellent scope views of most. Dark carpel spot; dark primaries folded above tail. Forster's Tern 477 Most resting in the saltwater marsh oceanfront at Jack's Creek. Royal Tern 77 Sandwich Tern 3 Black Skimmer 11 Mourning Dove 1 Tree Swallow 1 Barn Swallow 14 Northern Mockingbird 1 Northern Cardinal 1 Boat-tailed Grackle 5 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19611202 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) -- David C. McLean, Jr. DCMcLean AT gmail DOT com
Subject: Mississippi Kite - Got lucky
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 14:40:00 -0400
Where I've usually seen them in groups of 3 or more this week, yesterday,
there was just this one Mississippi Kite and I managed a viewable image ;)

Where I've usually seen them in groups of 3 or more this week, yesterday,
there was just this one Mississippi Kite and I managed a viewable image ;)

http://upload.pbase.com/image/157191398


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Mid-Morning Surprises- Outer Banks
From: Jim Gould <jgouldoz AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:48:34 -0400
Good Morning Everyone,

This morning I awoke to black-and-white warblers, brown headed nuthatches,
one orchard oriole and some american redstarts in the tall pines in my tiny
backyard.  That was a pleasant surprise and I particularly enjoyed the
activity when a brave ruby-throated hummingbird swooped in to challenge the
redstarts for a few insects.

The excitement of the morning only lasted 15 min or so, until the birds all
flew south.  I figured my birding was over, but a chance encounter with a
pair of black-throated blue warblers in Southern Shores changed
everything.  A life bird for me!... I was able to observe the male and
female for 30 minutes as they hawked insects from the edges of a greenbriar
entanglement. At times, they were no more than 5ft away. But as I observed
the warblers, more and more birds appeared. American redstarts, 1 northern
Parula,  red-eyed videos, common yellow-throats, 1 catbird and a pair of
cardinals were all in the mix.  They even stayed around as the property
owner began to weedwhack 30 yds away.

It amazed me what a 40'x40' entanglement could provide.  Certainly an
unexpected Fall gift!

Jim Gould
Kill Devil Hills,  NC

I'll share pictures this afternoon on the carolina bird club webpage.
Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher NOT relocated
From: Marty Wall <mwbirdmail AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:04:28 -0400
After three hours of scanning every perch and tree top in the area I could
not relocate the Olive-sided Flycatcher seen yesterday in Eden, NC.  I was
joined by David Williams for an enjoyable morning of birding even though we
didn't find the flycatcher.  Best birds of the morning: male Baltimore
Oriole (there has been one here since at least May), a first-year
Broad-wing Hawk, and a Yellow-throated Warbler (breeds along the river).

Marty Wall
Eden, NC
Subject: Deadliest Swarms
From: <jamie.cameron AT ncparks.gov>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:09:59 -0400 (EDT)
If you are an aerial insect that is.
Yesterday afternoon on the drive home to Black Mountain, I saw 14 Mississippi
kites flocking over I-40 at the Parker Padgett site between exits 76 and 75
(McDowell). At home in Black Mountain (Buncombe), my wife called me out to the
back porch to glimpse a swarm of around 50 nighthawks at great height. We noted
another 15 or so flying much lower over the neighborhood before darkness fell.

Jamie Cameron
Black Mountain, NC
Subject: Re: Hawk migration is ON
From: Jesse Pope <highcountrybirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:45:38 -0400
We have already been spending an hour or two here and there at the Grandfather 
count. We start officially on Monday but we will probably spend 3-4 hrs per day 
this weekend at the site. On Wednesday we had two very early red-tail migrants 
flying with a purpose southwest and later in the day one observer had good 
looks. Pretty unusual since we don't normally start them until mid-September 
with any regularity. The same day we had an adult red-shouldered hawk which 
isn't a bird we see on Grandfather during the breeding season. It too was 
flying southwest with intention. Another strange note so far is the past two 
days we have had an American Kestrel hanging out around Linville Peak, another 
bird we don't see there during the summer. It's acting like it's been here all 
along though! It perches along the road and is getting mobbed by ravens and 
blue jays on a regular basis. We haven't put him on the count yet since he 
isn't acting at all like a migrant but interesting behavior for sure. It will 
be interesting to see if this cool summer and beginning to fall will affect the 
timing of migration. Obviously we have some early initial evidence it might. 


I'll keep my out for those Goshawks!! I've still never seen one for certain in 
NC. I have a story similar to others of the split second encounter at the Black 
Rock parking lot on grandfather a few winters ago that fit the description but 
not something I felt good enough about to count with any confidence. 


Jesse Pope 

Newland, NC
(C) 828-898-3012
(W) 828-733-3224
Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2014, at 3:49 PM,  wrote:
> 
> For those who like the fall because of the annual migration of hawks, it’s 
definitely ON. 

>  
> In my normal daily work commutes, I’ve seen two Sharpies in two days where 
I normally never see them. Hawk Mountain has already recorded 2 Northern 
Goshawks(!) which in August is really unusual. 

>  
> The official count at Kiptopeke, VA starts on Monday and I assume NC’s and 
SC’s traditional hawk-watches will start then or soon. 

>  
> For those who haven’t heard, on Monday Sept 22, I’m doing a talk for the 
Chapel Hill Bird Club on hawk migration and identification and then on Oct 3-5, 
hosting a hawk-watch field trip to Kiptopeke, VA. This trip is a follow-up 
excursion to the talk but there is no requirement or prerequisite to attend – 
and there is no fee (other than Chesapeake Bridge Tunnel toll and entrance for 
Kiptopeke State Park). I expect great and multiple views of at least 10 raptor 
species. 

>  
> If anyone wants more details on the trip (or the talk). Contact me directly.
>  
> Mike Tove
> Cary, NC
>  
Subject: Henderson County Northern Bobwhite
From: <fadedletter AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:20:53 -0400 (EDT)
All-

Northern Bobwhite heard on Crest Road in Henderson County on the evening of
8/28 and the morning of 8/29.

Ernie Hollingsworth
erniehollingsworth AT gmail.com
Subject: Migrants at Lake Crabtree Park, NC
From: Robert Rybczynski <rob.rybczy AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:39:34 -0400
I birded Lake Crabtree Co. Pk. (Wake Co., NC) for a couple of hours this 
morning. I had one area of considerable bird activity, around one of the small 
parking lots. Birds were high and back-lit but I was able to identify a 
Baltimore Oriole and N. Parula, along with Gnatcatchers and Red-eyed Vireos 
which may have been local breeders. There were probably other migrants in this 
flock - I certainly very briefly glimpsed more birds in silhouette than I could 
identify. I also had a Northern Waterthrush, closely seen at eye level. 


The coolest thing I saw was a young Great Crested Flycatcher bathing 20 feet up 
a bald cypress tree, by fluttering into water-droplet laden cypress needles! I 
watched this activity for at least 3 minutes and it was continuing, even as I 
walked away. 


Good birding!
Bob Rybczynski
Cary NC


Subject: Hawk migration is ON
From: <mtove AT deltaforce.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:49:42 -0400
For those who like the fall because of the annual migration of hawks, it's
definitely ON.

 

In my normal daily work commutes, I've seen two Sharpies in two days where I
normally never see them. Hawk Mountain has already recorded 2 Northern
Goshawks(!) which in August is really unusual. 

 

The official count at Kiptopeke, VA starts on Monday and I assume NC's and
SC's  traditional hawk-watches will start then or soon.

 

For those who haven't heard, on Monday Sept 22, I'm doing a talk for the
Chapel Hill Bird Club on hawk migration and identification and then on Oct
3-5, hosting a hawk-watch field trip to Kiptopeke, VA. This trip is a
follow-up excursion to the talk but there is no requirement or prerequisite
to attend - and there is no fee (other than Chesapeake Bridge Tunnel toll
and entrance for Kiptopeke State Park). I expect great and multiple views of
at least 10 raptor species.

 

If anyone wants more details on the trip (or the talk). Contact me directly.

 

Mike Tove

Cary, NC

 
Subject: Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher? Rockingham County
From: Marty Wall <mwbirdmail AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:25:32 -0400
Thanks everybody!  I first saw it, it was in the top of a tree along the
creek on the golf course.  It moved around a lot due to golfers on the
course.  I plan to be out before the course opens tomorrow and try and
relocate it.  I have an ancient cell phone, so no texting, but if anyone is
planning to look for it, you can call me at 336-587-1872 for an update in
the morning.

eBird report with map
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19605556

Marty Wall
Eden, NC


On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 3:02 PM, Harry LeGrand  wrote:

> That's an Olive-sided Flycatcher, all right. It is most unusual to see one
> NOT perched up fairly high on an exposed bare branch, so that it can see
> 360 degrees. Maybe no trees in the area had such high and exposed twigs or
> branches. But, the bull head, short tail -- giving a top-heavy look, and of
> course the dark breast sides with cream all the way down the underparts is
> spot on.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
>
> On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 2:14 PM, Marty Wall  wrote:
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> While birding a spot along the Dan River in Eden this morning I think I
>> saw an Olive-sided Flycatcher.  I have never seen one before, so I'm a
>> little hesitant to make the call.  I did not hear the bird.  I have
>> uploaded three photos to my Flickr page if you care to look and offer an
>> opinion.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Marty Wall
>> Eden, NC
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/54116357 AT N08/
>>
>>
>>
>
Subject: Re: Olive-sided Flycatcher? Rockingham County
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:02:04 -0400
That's an Olive-sided Flycatcher, all right. It is most unusual to see one
NOT perched up fairly high on an exposed bare branch, so that it can see
360 degrees. Maybe no trees in the area had such high and exposed twigs or
branches. But, the bull head, short tail -- giving a top-heavy look, and of
course the dark breast sides with cream all the way down the underparts is
spot on.

Harry LeGrand


On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 2:14 PM, Marty Wall  wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> While birding a spot along the Dan River in Eden this morning I think I
> saw an Olive-sided Flycatcher.  I have never seen one before, so I'm a
> little hesitant to make the call.  I did not hear the bird.  I have
> uploaded three photos to my Flickr page if you care to look and offer an
> opinion.
>
> Thanks,
> Marty Wall
> Eden, NC
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/54116357 AT N08/
>
>
>
Subject: Olive-sided Flycatcher? Rockingham County
From: Marty Wall <mwbirdmail AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 14:14:16 -0400
Hi All,

While birding a spot along the Dan River in Eden this morning I think I saw
an Olive-sided Flycatcher.  I have never seen one before, so I'm a little
hesitant to make the call.  I did not hear the bird.  I have uploaded three
photos to my Flickr page if you care to look and offer an opinion.

Thanks,
Marty Wall
Eden, NC

https://www.flickr.com/photos/54116357 AT N08/
Subject: Redheaded Woodpecker - Durham
From: Peter Perlman <pperlman AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:22:31 -0400
Hi All, 
Was on 751 heading west away from Duke, got curious about the fields with 
scattered pines on the north side pulled off the road .3 miles south of 
Constitution. Heard a redhead doing the "castanet" call and easily spotted the 
bird on a snag in one of the dead trees there. 


Happy birding and happy Holliday!

Peter Perlman
Chapel Hill
Subject: Roanoke Island migrants this a.m.
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:28:06 -0400
Audrey and I birded the north end of Roanoke Island this morning for an
hour and a half and had a nice flurry of activity. Redstarts were
everywhere, also 5 or 6 Prairies, a Prothonotary, YBChat, Black-and-white,
and Yellow Warbler. Also had one White-eyed and several Red-eyed Vireos and
a couple of Gnatcatchers. Several Eastern Kingbirds flew over along with a
single Cedar waxwing. Heard a couple of Baltimore Orioles, too.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC
Subject: Lark sparrows still present on Pea Island
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 07:52:54 -0400
The two Lark Sparrows were still present yesterday at the north end of Pea
Island. They feed in the small lawn at the south end of the parking lot and
regularly fly up into the nearby snag. At least one has been present now
for 9 days.
Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC
Subject: Hilton Pond 08/16/14 (Late August Walkabout)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 22:19:54 -0400
"This Week at Hilton Pond" I'm responding to folks who think we only write 
about hummingbirds by taking a "Late August Walkabout" around Center property. 
The photo essay for 16-31 Aug 2014 includes info about native wildflowers, 
pignuts, a couple of reptiles, pollinating butterflies, and predator-prey 
relationships, so everyone should find something to help satisfy their nature 
fixes. (P.S. There might even be a sentence or two about a very special 
hummingbird.) To view the latest installment, please see 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140816.html

While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded and 
recaptured during the period, plus some miscellaneous nature notes. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: Bob Sargent (hummingbirds)
From: Rob G. <thrush AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 01:00:01 +0000
This isn't Carolina news, but we have so many hummingbird lovers up here, 
several of whom are directly or indirectly familiar with the Sargents and their 
wonderful work, that I think this news from Lanny Chambers (on the humnet 
listserv) is worth passing along, for anyone who may wish to send some 
well-wishes: 


http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=757034&MLID=HUM&MLNM=Humnet

-- Rob Gluck.....  Carrboro, NC........
   

 		 	   		  
Subject: Fwd: Night hawks in black mountain, NC
From: James Poling <james.poling AT garrett.edu>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 20:49:32 -0400
> 50+ Night Hawks over Lake Tomahawk right now. 
> 
> James Poling, Black Mountain, NC, Buncombe County
Subject: Migrants in the I'On rookery (Mt Pleasant, SC)
From: Jack Rogers <jack AT 4rogers.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:08:22 -0400
Birded the rookery for about an hour today, migrants are picking up!  1
adult male Redstart in full plumage, at least 10 females/young males.  1
Black and white warbler.  At least 35 Wood Ducks in the main pond, highest
count I've ever had in the rookery for Woodies.  Also heading up to
Cashiers, NC for the Labor Day weekend, will hopefully be birding parts of
the Blue Ridge Parkway.
Good birding!
-- 
Jack Rogers
Mt Pleasant, SC
My Flickr page 
Subject: shorebirds at Rachel Carson Reserve today
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 17:21:53 -0400
This morning I censused shorebirds at the Rachel Carson Reserve, S of 
Beaufort, NC.

It was very productive morning, with 21 species.  Highlights were 1 Upland 
Sandpiper, 1 American Golden-Plover, 63 Wilson's Plovers, 7 Piping Plovers, 
3 American Avocets, and 1 Stilt Sandpiper (scarce at this tidal site).

The Upland Sandpiper was in an area of low dunes--it was the only one I've 
seen at the site, other than 1 on 23 April 1972.

One of the Piping Plovers was one of the birds banded in Atlantic Canada 
this year.

Migrant landbirds included a Merlin and a few Bobolinks overhead.

An Ipomoea imperati (rare this far north) added to the fun.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Contact for Richard Brown?
From: Rob Bierregaard <rbierreg AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:33:34 -0400
Any recent sightings/email address? I'm trying to dig up some information on 
the Osprey hacking project that CRC carried out in the early 80s, and thus 
would like to get in touch with Richard. 


Any leads much appreciated,

Thanks,

Rob


Rob Bierregaard
421 Cotswold Ln
Wynnewood, PA 19096
rbierreg AT gmail.com
http://www.ospreytrax.com/
704 516 4615 (c)


Subject: Blue Ridge Parkway-Ridge Junction
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph AT ret.unca.edu>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:56:50 -0400
Yes, as Dwayne mentioned, Tennessee Warblers have started coming through,
although not in big numbers yet.  Mark and I were up at Ridge Junction this
morning from about 7:15 to 9am along with Simon Thompson and Rick Pyeritz
and had a nice morning.  There wasn't much movement over the ridge, but
there were some nice birds feeding along the lower end of 128, the road
that goes up to Mt Mitchell.

There were some of the usual warblers (several each) like Black-throated
Green, Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian and Chestnut-sided, but also a few
Tennessees, a Cape May, a Black-and-white, and a Nashville.  Other birds
included Yellow-throated, Blue-headed, and Red-eyed Vireo, a couple of
Baltimore Orioles, lots of Cedar Waxwings, a few hummingbirds, a few
flyover Red Crossbills, and the usual other birds that inhabit that area
like Red-breasted Nuthatch, Winter Wren and Juncos.

It was a beautiful morning.  Looks like this nice weather should continue
for a few more days, so hopefully more stuff will be coming through.
Marilyn

-- 
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird No. 5,000
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:34:49 -0400
Another big celebration today (28 Aug 2014) at Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont 
Natural History: This morning I applied band #H81031 to a hatch-year female 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird, making her forever famous as the 5,000th of her 
species banded here at the Center since 1984. I'm hopeful all you hummingbird 
enthusiasts share in my excitement at reaching this milestone and in wishing 
her safe travels to the Neotropics--and back again next spring. :-) 


Happy Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============
Subject: Piedmont Tennessee Warbler
From: Dwayne Martin <redxbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 12:41:28 -0400
The Tennessee Warbler train must be up and running in the mountains now, as
I had my first one of fall in the Piedmont this morning at Rocky Face Mtn
Park in NE Alexander Co.  This is my first true out-of-state breeding
warbler I've seen this fall. Also had a nice Yellow-throated Warbler this
morning.

-- 
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
redxbill AT gmail.com

http://naturalsciences.org/research-collections/research-specialties/birds/nc-hummingbirds 


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
St. Stephens Park - Hickory, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
http://www.ncbirdingtrail.org/TrailGuide/Guide_CatawbaValley.pdf
Subject: Migrants on Outer Banks this AM
From: Audrey <ajw AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 11:55:21 -0400
Finally got a night of WNW winds on the Outer Banks of NC. Headed to our 
migrant trap on the north end of Pea Island with Jeff Lewis, we were not 
disappointed. 

100 Baltimore Orioles
80 Eastern Kingbirds
40 Bobolinks
15 Cedar Waxwings
Low #s of warblers but had Redstart, Yellow, Prairie, C. yellowthroat and 1 
Blackburnian and 1 or 2 RE Vireo 

And a continuing Lark Sparrow
Also a few Osprey flying south--seemed to be migrants

Audrey Whitlock
Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL

Sent from iPhone
Subject: Egyptian Goose (no sighting information)
From: "Shultz, Steven" <Steven.Shultz AT Fmr.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 11:22:38 -0400
Just saw that the ABA Checklist Committee very recently added the Egyptian 
Goose Alopochen aegyptiaca as a "countable" established exotic based on 
populations in southeast Florida. For twitchers this means that Egyptian Goose 
sightings in the SE coastal counties of Florida are "countable" on your ABA 
lists. Egyptian Goose occurs in other areas of the ABA area as well, but these 
are not considered established. We do have sightings of Egyptian Goose in the 
Carolinas; I had one spend a day in my suburban neighborhood before flying on 
to parts unknown. It has been presumed that most of these sightings are of 
escaped birds, but with established populations to our south and east, it may 
be beneficial to note these Carolina sightings in eBird in order to establish 
some baseline information on occurrence. 


Travelers to Europe may be quite familiar with this species, as it is well 
established as an introduced species in countries including the UK and the 
Netherlands, often occurring in urban parks. 



http://blog.aba.org/2014/08/aba-checklist-committee-adds-egyptian-goose-to-aba-checklist.html 


Steve Shultz
Apex, NC
Subject: American Turf in Roper, NC
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 09:54:00 -0400
American Golden Plover in West field.

I have counted 23 Upland Sandpipers , they are everywhere including short 
grass. 


Horned Lark, Harrier a nice Bank Swallow mixed in with Tree and Barn perched in 
tall grass next to one of fields! 


Jamie Adams
Wilmington , NC


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Subject: Good birds on the Tanawha Trail/Blue Ridge Parkway
From: Elizabeth Faison <eliza.faison AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 17:18:27 -0400
Went hiking with the dog on the Tanawha at Holloway Mt. Rd on Tuesday and 
collected a good number of birds, including a male Blackburnian in good colour, 
black and whites, black throated blue, black throated greens, some irritating 
flycatchers that would not sing, and a Wilson's warbler ( a lifer for me). 
Nice! 

Elizabeth FaisonBlowing Rock, NC 		 	   		  
Subject: Migrant passerines and NW tonight
From: Jeff Lewis <jlewisbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:33:18 -0400
Had an early Swainson's Thrush, two Ovenbirds and a Redstart in my Manteo,
NC yard today.

Winds are predicted to be NW tonight, so look out tomorrow morning! Of
course, this early in the year, most of the time the predicted NW winds
here on the Outer Banks end up being NE instead - I don't know why this is.
Do any of you meteorologists out there know why this is?

Jeff Lewis
Manteo, NC
Subject: Wood stork
From: Eamon Freiburger <eamonotoole100 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 12:46:55 -0400
Hi all, 

 I kayaked part of the intercostal waterway near Surf City this morning. I had 
2 WOOD STORKS flush out from the marsh! They had black all along the edges of 
the wings, had a black curved bill, and appeared to have a black bald head. I 
had 2 WHITE IBIS flyover later that were smaller & had black only on the tips 
of the wings. 


 The Wood Storks are a special bird for me since they are my 300th bird & I was 
born in North Carolina (and unfortunately had to move). Good to be back here 
again. 


Eamon Freiburger
Poughkeepsie, New York 

PS: Thanks for the Bachman's Sparrow id help!


Sent from my iPhone