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Updated on Wednesday, April 23 at 07:57 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Lears Macaw,©BirdQuest

23 Apr Chapel Hill Bird Club - April meeting [Eddie Owens ]
23 Apr Re: winter Baltimores still here [Bruce Smithson ]
23 Apr Surprise at the feeder [John Register ]
23 Apr winter Baltimores still here ["John Fussell" ]
23 Apr eBird -- Warren Wilson College/Owen Park, Swannanoa, Buncombe Co, NC -- Apr 23, 2014 [James Poling ]
23 Apr Green River Cove Rd - Polk County [Marilyn Westphal ]
23 Apr USC Swainson's Thrush []
23 Apr Hilton Pond 03/27/14 (Hummingbirds Galore) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
23 Apr Re: Hummers and other FOS birds ["Liz" ]
23 Apr woodpecker ridge, falls lake [steve stevens ]
23 Apr Hummers and other FOS birds [Holly Powell ]
23 Apr Rockingham County this morning [Marty Wall ]
23 Apr Simon Thompson's email hacked [JILL ]
23 Apr Your Day was right Re: NPR's Your day - Birding [Nate Dias ]
22 Apr Re: Female hummer [Beth Garver ]
22 Apr RE: Female hummer ["Shelley Rutkin" ]
22 Apr RE: NPR's Your day - Birding []
22 Apr video: nuthatch vs Hairy woodpecker [Paul Hubert ]
22 Apr Re: NPR's Your day - Birding [William Burke ]
22 Apr Falls lake birds [Bb ]
22 Apr Birding on the radio [stu ]
22 Apr WNC Asheville-ish: cont. RN Grebes, Orange-crowned - 4/22/14 [Steve Ritt ]
22 Apr Female hummer [Edith Tatum ]
22 Apr RE: NPR's Your day - Birding []
22 Apr NPR's Your day - Birding ["KC Foggin" ]
22 Apr 18+ Loons and mystery ducks at Falls Lake north of Raleigh today [Tom Snow ]
22 Apr Yard bird 112 ["KC Foggin" ]
22 Apr Purple Gallinule Continues -- Buxton Woods Trail [J Gard ]
22 Apr Rough-Legged Hawk, Orange County , NC [David Snyder ]
22 Apr Ft. Fisher- 4/22 [Ryan Justice ]
22 Apr Parula Warblers building nest, Duke Forest, Durham [Peter Perlman ]
22 Apr Beaver Lake Sanctuary, Asheville NC - a few arrivals [Jay Wherley ]
22 Apr New yard bird--Eastern Whip-poor-will []
21 Apr Mississippi Kites, Swainson Warbler, Cattle Egrets, and a few warblers, Dorchester County, SC [Elisa Enders ]
21 Apr WNC Asheville: Orange-crowned Warbler - 4/21/14 [Steve Ritt ]
21 Apr Re: yard bird #99Oh [Philip Dickinson ]
21 Apr yard bird #99 []
21 Apr Watauga Co.- 4/21 [Ryan Justice ]
21 Apr Ref: Wilmington Rose-breasted Grosbeaks [Bruce Smithson ]
21 Apr Wayah Bald, NC [David Lenat ]
21 Apr Hummingbirds [WALTER KENT ]
21 Apr Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC ["Rubberhead" ]
21 Apr Plantation Birding Tours Coastal SC [Jerry Walls ]
21 Apr Re: Songbird Stamps []
21 Apr Rose-breasted Grosbeaks in Wilmington, NC today [Bruce Smithson ]
21 Apr Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC [Len Kopka ]
21 Apr Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC []
21 Apr Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC [Irvin Pitts ]
21 Apr Mecklenburg Audubon May Day Meeting (Thursday 5/01) [Christy Hill ]
21 Apr Vesper Sparrow, Wake Co. NC, 4/21/14 [nicholas ]
21 Apr Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC [James Watson ]
21 Apr RE: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC [Paul Glass ]
21 Apr Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC [Jeff Catlin ]
21 Apr Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC [Derek Aldrich ]
21 Apr Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC [Steve Cox ]
20 Apr FOYs at Prairie Ridge Ecostation in Raleigh today [Tom Snow ]
20 Apr Fwd: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at Gunter Rd [Paul Serridge ]
20 Apr Greensboro Arrivals [Henry Link ]
20 Apr RE: Cerulean Warbler, etc. Mecklenburg Co., NC Apr. 20 [TNT Sanders ]
20 Apr Franklin N.C. [Christine S Stoughton Root ]
20 Apr Got me a lifer today ["KC Foggin" ]
20 Apr Sandy Creek Park April 20, 2014 [Brendan Klick ]
20 Apr Saluda Watershed and beyond [Simon Harvey ]
20 Apr Cerulean Warbler, etc. Mecklenburg Co., NC Apr. 20 [Kevin Metcalf ]
20 Apr Red-breasted Nuthatch continues, Horry County, SC [Steve Thomas ]
19 Apr Edisto Nature Trail and Donnelley WMA [Craig ]
19 Apr RE: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC [Aaron Given ]
19 Apr Great-crested Flycatcher [Edith Tatum ]
19 Apr Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia SC - SWAINSON'S WARBLER [Simon Harvey ]
19 Apr Re: Red-necked Grebes--twisted logic [Brian Patteson ]
19 Apr Re: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC [Chris Hill ]
19 Apr Re: Red-necked Grebes--twisted logic [Harry LeGrand ]
19 Apr Re: Blue Grosbeak []
19 Apr Hilton Pond 03/17/14 (Home From The Tropics) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
19 Apr Re: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC [Brian Patteson ]
19 Apr Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC [David Gardner ]

Subject: Chapel Hill Bird Club - April meeting
From: Eddie Owens <banjoman_57 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:33:46 -0700 (PDT)
Date: April 28, 2014 (Monday)

Time: 7:30 p.m. (snacks at 7:15)

Location: 1712 Willow Dr., Chapel Hill, NC

Topic: Birding Ethiopia

Speakers: David and Judy Smith

Ethiopia, that populous and ancient country in the horn of Africa, might not be 
at the top of your list for African birding destinations, but it is home to 
more than 30 endemic bird species, plus several strange and beautiful endemic 
mammals. The country’s cultural history is rich and distinctive and can’t 
be ignored even on a birding trip. David and Judy Smith, our guides on this 
tour of Ethiopia, have traveled widely in search of birds, and as usual, they 
returned with lots of photos. Join them for a few bee-eaters, sunbirds, 
turacos, hornbills, and weavers, as well as wolves, monkeys, and the Giant 
Root-rat. 


Hoping you will join us for this fascinating journey!

Eddie Owens
Subject: Re: winter Baltimores still here
From: Bruce Smithson <brucesmithson AT netscape.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:48:53 -0400 (EDT)
That's good to know. I've got 5 or 6 orioles that have been here most of the 
winter and I'm down to one or two days worth of grape jelly supply. Was 
planning on getting another quart tomorrow....think I'll wait. 


Also still have 3 Ruby-throated Hummers...... My selasphorus hummer and 2 of my 
Ruby throats left here last Wed., Thurs. and Fri. 


One of my 2 Monday male Rose-breasted Grosbeaks appeared on Tuesday, but 
neither has been seen today. However, Cary Paynter who lives across Hewlett's 
Creek from me spotted a handsome male Rosebreasted Grosbeak on her morning walk 
today. 

 

Bruce Smithson
Wilmington, New Hanover County
North Carolina
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: John Fussell 
To: carolinabirds 
Sent: Wed, Apr 23, 2014 4:51 pm
Subject: winter Baltimores still here


Today, my two winter Baltimore Orioles--1 immature male, 1 female--are still 
here.  Based on past years, they'll be gone in a day or two.

My winter Ruby-throated (an adult male) left about a week ago.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC



 
Subject: Surprise at the feeder
From: John Register <jregister4 AT suddenlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:17:57 -0400
C-birders...
     I was surprised to find a male Indigo Bunting at the feeder -- a 
seed cake hanging in a wire basket. He's been there for about 20 
minutes, actively feeding.
John Register
Washington, NC
Subject: winter Baltimores still here
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:51:16 -0400
Today, my two winter Baltimore Orioles--1 immature male, 1 female--are still 
here.  Based on past years, they'll be gone in a day or two.

My winter Ruby-throated (an adult male) left about a week ago.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC

Subject: eBird -- Warren Wilson College/Owen Park, Swannanoa, Buncombe Co, NC -- Apr 23, 2014
From: James Poling <james.poling AT garrett.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:43:41 -0400
> Steve Yurkovich and I birded the Owen Park and the Warren Wilson College 
campus today. We had 43 birds. Highlights were Orchard Oriole at Owen Park, 
Northern Waterthrush on the Swannanoa River trail just beyond the first power 
lines, Other Warblers: Black and White, American Redstart, Palm, Yellow-rumped, 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Sparrows: Savannah, Field, Chipping, White-throated, 
and Song, and a Blue Grosbeak along the fence row at the Pig Pens on the farm. 
We had one species we could not ID, but we have a recording of its songmaybe 
one of the Flycatchers. WWC/Owen Park should be great for the CBC next week. 

> 
>> From: james poling 
>> Subject: eBird -- Warren Wilson College/Owen Park -- Apr 23, 2014
>> Date: April 23, 2014 at 12:45:32 PM EDT
>> To: James Poling , Steve Yurkovich 
 

>> 
>> jpoling
>> Apr 23, 2014
>> Warren Wilson College/Owen Park
>> Traveling
>> 1 miles
>> 150 Minutes
>> Observers: 2
>> All birds reported? Yes
>> Comments: W Steve Yurkovich
>> X Canada Goose
>> X Mallard
>> X Green Heron
>> X Turkey Vulture
>> X Mourning Dove
>> X Ruby-throated Hummingbird
>> X Belted Kingfisher
>> X Red-bellied Woodpecker
>> X Downy Woodpecker
>> X Northern Flicker
>> X Pileated Woodpecker
>> X Eastern Phoebe
>> X Blue Jay
>> X American Crow
>> X Northern Rough-winged Swallow
>> X Tree Swallow
>> X Barn Swallow
>> X Carolina Chickadee
>> X Tufted Titmouse
>> X Carolina Wren
>> X Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
>> X Eastern Bluebird
>> X American Robin
>> X Brown Thrasher
>> X European Starling
>> X Yellow-rumped Warbler
>> X Palm Warbler
>> X Black-and-white Warbler
>> X American Redstart
>> X Northern Waterthrush
>> X warbler sp.
>> X Eastern Towhee
>> X Chipping Sparrow
>> X Field Sparrow
>> X Savannah Sparrow
>> X Song Sparrow
>> X White-throated Sparrow
>> X Northern Cardinal
>> X Blue Grosbeak
>> X Red-winged Blackbird
>> X Orchard Oriole
>> X House Finch
>> X American Goldfinch
>> X Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
>> 
>> 
> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> James Poling, Black Mountain, NC, Buncombe County
>> 
> 
Subject: Green River Cove Rd - Polk County
From: Marilyn Westphal <mjwestph AT ret.unca.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:38:46 -0400
Another lovely day along Green River Cove Rd. as well as a few minutes at
the Green River bridge at Lake Adger for Mark and I, Emily Travis and Beth
Holley.  Only FOY for me was Rose-breasted Grosbeak, but lots of good stuff
including 4 species of vireo (Red-eyed, Blue-headed, White-eyed, and
Yellow-throated) and 16 species of warbler as well as 3 Scarlet Tanagers
and 2 female Common Mergansers feeding along the river that are from the
small breeding colony on Lake Adger. Warblers included:
Ovenbird - 1
Wormeating - 9
La Waterthrush - 7
Black-and-white - 5
Swainson's - 4
Kentucky - 1
Hooded - 16
American Redstart - 7
Northern Parula - 3
Palm - 1
Pine - 1
Yellow-rumped - 2
Yellow-throated - 6
Prairie - 4
Black-throated Green - 9
Common Yellowthroat - 1

FYI, for those of you attending the CBC meeting here in May, this is the
half-day trip that is labeled "Hungry River."  This is all Green River
Gamelands and the Hungry River is a tributary of the Green River.  It's
mighty fine birding.
Marilyn


-- 
Marilyn Westphal
Hendersonville, NC
Subject: USC Swainson's Thrush
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:19:40 -0400
I noticed a thrush with a buffy breast disappear into a magnolia tree yesterday 
on the USC campus. I checked out the same area this afternnon--a small lawn 
behind McKissick Museum and the thrush was in plain view, hopping up to catch 
gnats--it's a Swainson's Thrush, a little ahead of schedule. 


John Grego
Columbia SC
Subject: Hilton Pond 03/27/14 (Hummingbirds Galore)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 15:18:07 -0400
This year my first Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont 
Natural History tied a record for earliest spring arrival on 27 March, and I've 
banded an unprecedented number of early spring ruby-throats in the month since 
then. My analysis of this phenomenon is the subject of my latest "This Week at 
Hilton Pond" photo essay for 27 Mar-21 Apr 2014. To access the installment, 
please see 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140327.html

While there, don't forget to scroll down for lists of all birds banded and 
recaptured during the period; the returns are especially interesting, with a 
couple of very old American Goldfinches re-appearing in our traps. I also 
include numerous nature notes and an acknowledgement for recent supporters of 
our education, research, and conservation initiatives. 


Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL


P.S. Please "Like" our new Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
for timely updates on nature topics. Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond. 


========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: Re: Hummers and other FOS birds
From: "Liz" <lizbirder AT centurylink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:26:15 -0400
We had 3 male Blue Grosbeak and one female at Weyerhaeuser’s Environ. Ed. 
Ctr., Cool Springs, at Askin, NC, yesterday. The three males were on the ground 
and then a female joined them .... perhaps she picked her mate, because once 
she appeared they all flew away, very exciting. The males were on the ground 
for about 10 minutes before she appeared. 


Cheers,
Liz Lathrop
Oriental, NC

From: Holly Powell 
Sent: Wednesday, April 23, 2014 12:59 PM
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu 
Subject: Hummers and other FOS birds

Spotted FOS adult male Ruby-throated hummer on 29 March which was a couple of 
days earlier than normal. Saw the first female yesterday. 


Although we've had Gray catbirds before, they never seemed to hang around for 
long or at least they weren't very visible. We've had one frequenting our deck 
regularly since 28 Feb--seems to like the homemade suet. That is one 
classy-looking bird! 


Have been hearing Great crested flycatchers since 14 April and FOS adult male 
Orchard oriole appeared the same day. 


The bluebirds finished laying their first clutch of 5 eggs on 19 April.

No Summer tanagers, Blue grosbeaks or Indigo or Painted buntings yet.

Holly Powell 
Hummingbird Hideaway
Adams Creek, Intracoastal Waterway
15 miles north of Beaufort, NC

Subject: woodpecker ridge, falls lake
From: steve stevens <stevevonsteve AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 13:47:19 -0400
yesterday i went to woodpecker ridge at falls lake across from the
hiway50 boat ramp. the area itself was really beautiful, so much of it
is burnt that it creates an interesting climate. some of the birds i
saw, including the common ones, were:

yellow throated warbler
eastern kingbird
blue grey gnatcatcher
orchard oriole
prothonotary warbler
red winged black bird
purple martin
red bellied wood pecker
red headed wood pecker
downy wood pecker
belted kingfisher
mourning dove
blue jay
tufted titmouse
eastern towee
chipping sparrow
brown headed nuthatch
carolina chickadee
carolina wren
double crested cormorant
osprey
great blue heron
northern cardinal

the orchard oriole and red headed WP were new ones for me, embarassingly
enough. i also saw many swallows that i couldn't positively ID. the
osprey were chasing around the herons at one point, which was an
interesting aerial display. im new to the durham area, so it's exciting
to find interesting spots nearby.
Subject: Hummers and other FOS birds
From: Holly Powell <hpowell48 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 12:59:44 -0400
Spotted FOS adult male Ruby-throated hummer on 29 March which was a couple
of days earlier than normal.  Saw the first female yesterday.

Although we've had Gray catbirds before, they never seemed to hang around
for long or at least they weren't very visible.  We've had one frequenting
our deck regularly since 28 Feb--seems to like the homemade suet.  That is
one classy-looking bird!

Have been hearing Great crested flycatchers since 14 April and FOS adult
male Orchard oriole appeared the same day.

The bluebirds finished laying their first clutch of 5 eggs on 19 April.

No Summer tanagers, Blue grosbeaks or Indigo or Painted buntings yet.

*Holly Powell*
*Hummingbird Hideaway*
*Adams Creek, Intracoastal Waterway*
*15 miles north of Beaufort, NC*
Subject: Rockingham County this morning
From: Marty Wall <mwbirdmail AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 11:47:50 -0400
Hi All,

Despite mostly leafless trees along the Northern Tier birds are starting to
show up in here in Rockingham County.  First of year Rockingham County
birds today:

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (saw one in Guilford last week)
Kentucky Warbler
Hooded Warbler (saw one in Guilford last week)
Scarlet Tanager
Orchard Oriole
Purple Finch (Same place I had a flock of 15 this time last year; what a
difference a year makes!)


Old Anglin Loop
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18041167

Deshazo Road tract Mayo River State Park
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18041200

Good birding,
Marty Wall
Eden, NC
Subject: Simon Thompson's email hacked
From: JILL <jm3567 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 08:50:32 -0400
Called to let him know of the odd email sent to Carolina birds. He is working 
on a "fix". Since that message went to the entire list, he agreed to my posting 
that he was hacked.  

Jill M.
Durham NC

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S®III
Subject: Your Day was right Re: NPR's Your day - Birding
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2014 07:44:44 -0400
One thing to keep in mind:  by providing super-abundant food to nest
predators / parasites like Blue Jays, Grackles, cowbirds etc, you cause
their population to become artificially high.  And you attract them to your
yard in higher numbers.  This leads to increased predation on smaller
nesting birds and other critters.  Just the other day I rescued a small
Glass Lizard from a Boat-tailed Grackle that was attacking it.

So by providing over-abundant artificial food sources (particularly during
nesting season), you can end up negatively affecting your area's small
birds, lizards, snakes, etc.  The late Rich Stallcup of the Point Reyes
Bird Observatory was adamant that people should not feed Jays too much due
to nest predation issues.

For this reason, I believe the responsible thing to do is to reduce the
amount of seeds offered in nesting season, and to only use cage-protected
feeders to keep larger birds like Blue Jays and Grackles from getting the
seeds.

And I think using a suet basket within a cage is advisable year-round to
avoid feeding Jays, Starlings, Grackles, Squirrels, etc.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Tuesday, April 22, 2014, KC Foggin  wrote:

>   Anyone listen to the birding segment of Your Day today at noon?  I was
> a bit surprised to hear them apparently repeat their suggestion as to cut
> back on the seed feeders during nesting time.  Suet is okay but they
> suggested going down to one or two seed feeders.  I don’t know about the
> rest of you but it seems to me that the birds need it more during this time
> of year.  I understand where they are coming from about the birds feeding
> their young “natural” proteins i.e. bugs but I had never heard before 
about 

> cutting back on the seed feeders and was wondering just how many of you do
> that.
>
>
> K.C.
>
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
>
> www.birdforum.net
>
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Female hummer
From: Beth Garver <bethgarver AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 22:51:06 -0400
I had my first male that I got to see this morning before 7am. Beautiful!

Beth Garver
Stokesdale, NC

"The earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof."  Psalm of David

> On Apr 22, 2014, at 9:34 PM, "Shelley Rutkin"  
wrote: 

> 
> I also saw my first female Ruby-throat of the year this afternoon at my 
feeder. My first male was on April 11. 

>  
> Shelley Rutkin
> Winston-Salem, NC
>  
> From: edith.tatum AT gmail.com [mailto:edith.tatum AT gmail.com] On Behalf Of Edith 
Tatum 

> Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 7:17 PM
> To: Carolinabirds
> Subject: Female hummer
>  
> 
> I saw my first female Ruby-Throated Hummingbird a few minutes ago. My first 
male arrived on April 5th a day later that its earliest arrival on April 4th. 

> Edith
> 
> Edith Tatum
> Durham, NC
> sent from my XOOM
Subject: RE: Female hummer
From: "Shelley Rutkin" <shelleyr AT windstream.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 21:34:08 -0400
I also saw my first female Ruby-throat of the year this afternoon at my feeder. 
My first male was on April 11. 

 
Shelley Rutkin
Winston-Salem, NC
 
From: edith.tatum AT gmail.com [mailto:edith.tatum AT gmail.com] On Behalf Of Edith 
Tatum 

Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 7:17 PM
To: Carolinabirds
Subject: Female hummer
 

I saw my first female Ruby-Throated Hummingbird a few minutes ago. My first 
male arrived on April 5th a day later that its earliest arrival on April 4th. 

Edith
Edith Tatum
Durham, NC
sent from my XOOM
Subject: RE: NPR's Your day - Birding
From: <raleighgardener AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:44:38 -0400 (EDT)
I feed year-round - seeds, peanuts, grape jelly, peanut butter, suet,
sunflower, mealworms, cracked corn, you-name-it.  

I feed in protected areas due to the neighborhood cats. I've been feeding the
birds here for 20 years and it seems that each year I have more and more birds
visiting --- and staying.

I'll continue to feed a variety of foods all year.  At least here, the birds
have a better chance of making it back to the nest instead of lying at Miss
Kitty's doorstep. Its tough being a bird these days, why make it any harder? 
 
Rene Wilbur
Raleigh, NC
Subject: video: nuthatch vs Hairy woodpecker
From: Paul Hubert <paulhubert123 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:25:56 -0400
While sitting on my back porch, I saw a Hairy Woodpecker land on my peanut
suet feeder. I started videotaping it, hoping it would sing (it didn't). A
few seconds later a White-breasted nuthatch landed and tried to intimidate
the woodpecker with an elaborate posturing routine. The video is a little
over a minute long and has some superfluous noise in the background (dogs
licking empty bowls, etc). It is here: http://youtu.be/FMKY4oUopho

Paul Hubert

Raleigh, N.C.
Subject: Re: NPR's Your day - Birding
From: William Burke <lewisburkej AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:56:15 -0700 (PDT)
I heard the tail-end  of the comments.  Drew Lanham was suggesting to switch 
to suet because there was plenty of natural  food around.   

Lewis Burke, Columbia, SC

________________________________
 From: "scompton1251 AT charter.net" 
To: KC Foggin  
Cc: CarolinaBirds  
Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 6:54 PM
Subject: RE: NPR's Your day - Birding
 


KC,

I have listened to those Clemson guys from time to time. They mean well but 
they sometimes don't seem to be all that well informed. I've never heard of 
cuting back on feeding during nest time. Has anyone else? 


Steve Compton
Greenville,SC 


On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 5:41 PM, KC Foggin wrote:

 Anyone listen to the birding segment of Your Day today at noon?  I was  a 
bit surprised to hear them apparently repeat their suggestion as to cut back  
on the seed feeders during nesting time.  Suet is okay but they suggested  
going down to one or two seed feeders.  I don’t know about the rest of you  
but it seems to me that the birds need it more during this time of year.  I  
understand where they are coming from about the birds feeding their young  
“natural” proteins i.e. bugs but I had never heard before about cutting 
back on  the seed feeders and was wondering just how many of you do that. 

  
  
K.C. 

K.C.  Foggin 
Socastee 
Myrtle Beach  SC 

www.birdforum.net 

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20 
Subject: Falls lake birds
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:54:35 -0400
During falls lake spring count, wake county, nc, sandling beach. 

4 white winged scoter
1 red necked grebe
3 horned grebe in breeding plumage
7 ruddy duck
2 red breasted merganser
42 common loon, breeding plumage, calling, all in one flock that increased in 
numbers all day. 


1 Great black backed gull
17 bonapartes
2 herring
500 ring billed
1 caspian tern

Most of the landbird migrants here, nothing too out of the ordinary but did 
hear a strange pre dawn song that was like a blue winged warbler but very soft, 
hope the audio recording is discernible. 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Birding on the radio
From: stu <sgibeau AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:21:52 -0400
The other day I was listening to the Red Sox on WEEI streaming thru the 
internet. This is a New England sports talk radio station. Between innings they 
advertised a birding event in Maine. Not Carolina but pretty good if it makes 
it out to Red Sox nation. No comment Wayne! 


I did see a FOY Louisiana Waterthrush & White Eyed Vireo at the Black Mountain, 
NC Rec park this afternoon. 


Stu Gibeau
Subject: WNC Asheville-ish: cont. RN Grebes, Orange-crowned - 4/22/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:19:42 -0400
Three Red-necked Grebes continued at Lake Julian today. Three Blue-winged Teal 
linger, and two Spotted Sandpipers have recently arrived. 


I was hoping for more with the weather, but Hooper Lane had only four Lesser 
Yellowlegs, and five swallow species (no Cliffs). 


Bill Rhodes had the continuing Orange-crowned Warbler at Hominy Creek Park.

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC
Subject: Female hummer
From: Edith Tatum <ektatum AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 19:17:24 -0400
I saw my first female Ruby-Throated Hummingbird a few minutes ago.  My
first male arrived on April 5th a day later that its earliest arrival on
April 4th.
Edith

Edith Tatum
Durham, NC
sent from my XOOM
Subject: RE: NPR's Your day - Birding
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:54:43 -0400 (EDT)
KC,

I have listened to those Clemson guys from time to time. They mean well 
but they sometimes don't seem to be all that well informed. I've never 
heard of cuting back on feeding during nest time. Has anyone else?

Steve Compton
Greenville,SC

On Tue, Apr 22, 2014 at 5:41 PM, KC Foggin wrote:

  Anyone listen to the birding segment of Your Day today at noon?  I was 
a bit surprised to hear them apparently repeat their suggestion as to 
cut back  on the seed feeders during nesting time.  Suet is okay but 
they suggested  going down to one or two seed feeders.  I don’t know 
about the rest of you  but it seems to me that the birds need it more 
during this time of year.  I  understand where they are coming from 
about the birds feeding their young  “natural” proteins i.e. bugs but I 
had never heard before about cutting back on  the seed feeders and was 
wondering just how many of you do that.


K.C.

K.C.  Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach  SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20
Subject: NPR's Your day - Birding
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:41:16 -0400
Anyone listen to the birding segment of Your Day today at noon? I was a bit 
surprised to hear them apparently repeat their suggestion as to cut back on the 
seed feeders during nesting time. Suet is okay but they suggested going down to 
one or two seed feeders. I don’t know about the rest of you but it seems to 
me that the birds need it more during this time of year. I understand where 
they are coming from about the birds feeding their young “natural” proteins 
i.e. bugs but I had never heard before about cutting back on the seed feeders 
and was wondering just how many of you do that. 



K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Subject: 18+ Loons and mystery ducks at Falls Lake north of Raleigh today
From: Tom Snow <tsnow6065 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 16:15:27 -0400
I had an opportunity to stop by the Sandling Beach area of Falls Lake north
of Raleigh around lunch today.  Glad it's open for the season.  I saw 2
groups of loons which I assume were Common Loons totaling 18 birds (7 &
11.)  Almost all looked to have totally black heads.  They were almost out
of reach of my camera and then zooming the digital display but these were
loons not cormorants.  There was another group but it was too far away and
I can't confirm what they were.  Very few people and very few boats so it
was nice and quiet and I could listen to them call.

I also saw 2 ducks and I have no idea what they were.  They were very close
to shore but made no wing or vocal sounds and I happened to look up and get
a glimpse before they disappeared behind trees.  They were large like
Mallards (but not Mallards,) greyish brown, could have possibly had some
white on their heads, and seemed noticeably fat.  In fact the first things
I thought was "Man those are some fat ducks!"  Female American Wigeons?  I
guess I'll never know.

Tom Snow
Raleigh
Subject: Yard bird 112
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 15:40:45 -0400
It’s been a great April for me and the yard birds 

Prothonotary Warbler

http://upload.pbase.com/image/155332907



K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Subject: Purple Gallinule Continues -- Buxton Woods Trail
From: J Gard <garj25 AT ymail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 11:29:57 -0700 (PDT)
Purple Gallinule continues at the Buxton Woods trail today. Was able to get 
some photos which are located here: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/92405216 AT N02/

General coordinates of both sightings have been 35.25392, -75.53249 which are 
located about a quarter mile down the trail (stay right) in the grassy marsh. 
Both sightings have been early morning on sunny, calm days. 


Jason
Subject: Rough-Legged Hawk, Orange County , NC
From: David Snyder <david.j.snyder AT duke.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:14:52 +0000
While sitting in a blind, found a solitary Rough-Legged Hawk circling low over 
a grassy field. Off of Schley Road near Hurdle Mills. 


Dave Snyder
Orange County, NC
Subject: Ft. Fisher- 4/22
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 12:54:49 -0400
Slow birding today. Best birds were Merlin and my FOY Sandwich Terns.

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Parula Warblers building nest, Duke Forest, Durham
From: Peter Perlman <pperlman AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 12:20:10 -0400
Birded at Duke Forest Korstian area off Mt. Sinai Rd. in Durham on Sunday.
Highlight was was a pair of Parula Warblers working on a nest in a  broken
off snag hanging in a tree right beside the west side of the Wooden Bridge.
Wonderful view as they build their soft lichen covered hanging bag. Also
great looks at Prarie Warbler.

Peter Perlman
Chapel Hill
Subject: Beaver Lake Sanctuary, Asheville NC - a few arrivals
From: Jay Wherley <brevardjay-birding AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 09:02:17 -0700 (PDT)
After seeing not much activity yesterday morning, was happy to
pick out a few new arrivals this morning at Beaver Lake including
an American Redstart (adult male) and a Prairie Warbler in a
small flock with a Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher and some Yellow-rumped Warblers.

eBird list:

18 species total

3 Chimney Swift
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 American Crow
2 Tree Swallow
2 Carolina Chickadee
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
2 Carolina Wren
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1 American Robin
1 American Redstart
2 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Prairie Warbler
1 Eastern Towhee
2 Song Sparrow
2 Swamp Sparrow
3 Northern Cardinal
6 Red-winged Blackbird


Jay Wherley
Asheville NC
Subject: New yard bird--Eastern Whip-poor-will
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 9:59:58 -0400
At 5:30 this morning, I heard an Eastern Whip-poor-will calling through our 
bedroom window. It's nice when the pre-dawn birds come to you rather than vice 
versa. 


John Grego
Columbia, SC
Subject: Mississippi Kites, Swainson Warbler, Cattle Egrets, and a few warblers, Dorchester County, SC
From: Elisa Enders <elisaenders AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 22:34:04 -0400
Apologies for the late posting. Nick Flanders and I checked several spots 
around Dorchester County, SC yesterday (Sunday). 

 
Along Dorchester Road, near the intersection with Murray Blvd, we saw at least 
10 Cattle Egrets in a cattle field. Shortly after that, we saw a pair of 
Mississippi Kites (one must have been starting its second year...it had barring 
on the tail) over a field along Old Beech Hill Road, west of Highway 17A. 

 
We heard a distant Swainson's Warbler in the Edisto River WMA, on the east side 
of the Edisto River. Several Hooded Warblers and a Worm-eating Warbler were 
nearby as well. 

 
At Givhans Ferry State Park, we found a male Scarlet Tanager, along with Summer 
Tanagers, Black-and-White Warbler, and Worm-eating Warbler. A Spotted 
Sandpiper, Barn Swallows, and Tree Swallows were seen along the river. We were 
hoping for other swallow species and Kentucky Warbler (heard one in the area 
last year), but had no such luck. 

 
Northern Parulas, Yellow-throated Warblers, and Yellow-rumped Warblers were the 
more common warblers found during our day. 


Elisa Enders
(temporarily in N. Charleston, SC)

Portsmouth, VA


 		 	   		  
Subject: WNC Asheville: Orange-crowned Warbler - 4/21/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 18:43:10 -0700
One Orange-crowned Warbler was just downstream from the parking lot for
Hominy Creek Park at 7 pm this evening. It might still be there tomorrow.
Walking downstream from the parking lot, there is a raised, concrete,
stormwater manhole on the left with a small "Chessie" tag on it, and the
bird was in the dense privets behind this.

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC
Subject: Re: yard bird #99Oh
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 20:39:23 -0400
I have never had a House Sparrow in my yard during my 16.5 years in
Winston-Salem, although my yard list is close to 100 species. I have to
travel about 1.5 miles to McDonalds and Lowes Foods to see them. Oh well.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

From:  
Date:  Monday, April 21, 2014 7:53 PM
To:  Carolinabirds 
Subject:  yard bird #99

Can.t believe that after 7 plus years here got first house sparrow on millet
feeded

Jack and Pat Eckstine
Hanahan, SC

Subject: yard bird #99
From: jackpateck AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 23:53:23 +0000 (UTC)
Can.t believe that after 7 plus years here got first house sparrow on millet 
feeded 


Jack and Pat Eckstine 
Hanahan, SC 
Subject: Watauga Co.- 4/21
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:19:29 -0400
Had an enjoyable day in the mountains today, finishing with 56 species. Here 
are some notables: 


Note- numbers are very conservative

Wood Duck- 2
Bufflehead- 8
Wild Turkey- 1
Osprey- 1
Broad-winged Hawk- 4
Wilson's Snipe- 1
Hairy Woodpecker- 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee- 1
Least Flycatcher- 2
Yellow-throated Vireo- 1
Blue-headed Vireo- 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher- 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet- 14
Black-and-white Warbler- 3
Hooded Warbler- 3
Northern Parula- 4
Black-throated Blue Warbler- 2
Palm Warbler- 1
Black-throated Green Warbler- 2
Swamp Sparrow- 1
Rusty Blackbird- 1

Ryan Justice

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ref: Wilmington Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
From: Bruce Smithson <brucesmithson AT netscape.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:11:43 -0400 (EDT)

Some folks couldn't open the link to the Grosbeak pictures I sent a bit 
earlier......you can try again now ( I failed to open the site to the public - 
a wonderful new feature (not) of Google +) and the album should open. 


 
If you have deleted that posting, here's the url again: 
https://picasaweb.google.com/108682023475248921354/RoseBreastedGrosbeaksInMyBackyard?authkey=Gv1sRgCNyG9pLB_uXKeg 


Bruce Smithson
Wilmington, New Hanover County
North Carolina


Subject: Wayah Bald, NC
From: David Lenat <Lenatbks AT mindspring.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 18:14:05 -0400
Has anyone birded this area recently?  I was wondering if it is a 
location for Black-capped Chickadee.  The Bald is an important site for 
rare aquatic insects.
    Dave Lenat, Raleigh
Subject: Hummingbirds
From: WALTER KENT <tneklw AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 18:09:19 -0400 (EDT)
Walter Kent - Caldwell County, NC

I have a pair (male and female) of ruby throated hummingbirds in the yard. 
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: "Rubberhead" <rubberhead AT comporium.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 18:07:20 -0400
They are very common in Charlotte/Fort Mill/Rock Hill area in the spring. 
It's not that far to Greenville.  They don't seem to key on water as much as 
they do in the winter.

Also, Fish Crows are, in my opinion, responsible for most of the bad 
reputation of crows as nest raiders.  If you ever see a quiet fish crow in 
the spring - he's up to no good...

Stephen Thomas
Fort Mill SC


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steve Cox" 
To: "Carolina Birds Birds" 
Sent: Monday, April 21, 2014 8:50 AM
Subject: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC


Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically  in 
Greenville county?  Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like fish 
crows calling.  I used to think that what I heard was fledgling American 
crows. When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not so sure.

Thanks in advance,



Steve Cox
Fountain Inn, S C



Sent from my iPad


Subject: Plantation Birding Tours Coastal SC
From: Jerry Walls <jwalls443 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:54:15 -0400
Spring is finally arriving after a strong winter for SC!  There are two
plantation birding tours scheduled in coastal South Carolina this weekend.
First is on 4-26-14 to two plantations in Plantersville (between Georgetown
& Conway) from 8:30 am to 11:30 am. Habitat varies from pinewoods,
deciduous bottomland forest, open fields, old rice impoundments, Pee Dee
River. Warblers, orioles, tanagers, vireos, waders, raptors (inc.
swallow-tailed kites), rails and more will be possible.
Contact me off-list for additional information if you are interested.  An
optional addition to this trip is a visit to a wildlife sanctuary in the
area housing 170 animals including wolves, dozens of exotic birds, a
great-horned owl and many others. Space is limited for both options.
On 4-27, a visit to an old plantation in Francis Marion National Forest
(between McClellanville and Mt. Pleasant, SC) will take place from 9 am to
noon. This trip will involve a walk through several varied habitats from
fresh water ecosystems to views of the intracoastal waterway. As a result
numerous species of birds are possible including songbirds (including
painted buntings), raptors (inc. swallow-tailed kites), waders and more.
To register (space is limited), call 843-568-3222.
Good spring birding to all....a special time of year!
Jerry Walls
Georgetown County, SC
Subject: Re: Songbird Stamps
From: ladybug.gang AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:06:47 -0400
Just bought a set - beautiful

Ladybug
Hyco Lake,NC
Sent from my NOOK

Jared Barnes  wrote:

>Birding friends, 
>
> 
>
>You may want to pick up a sheet of these stamps:
>
> 
>
>http://uspsstamps.com/stamps/songbirds
>
> 
>
>Cheers,
>
>Jared Barnes
>
>Raleigh, NC
>
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeaks in Wilmington, NC today
From: Bruce Smithson <brucesmithson AT netscape.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:00:54 -0400 (EDT)
Spotted a nice adult male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at my backyard platform feeder 
this morning while cooking my breakfast. Got some photos. Finished cooking 
breakfast, and when I sat down to eat it, I glanced at the feeder and there was 
a second Red-breasted Grosbeak at the feeder with the original. Went to my gym 
exercise routine and returned at noon and watched for the birds for an hour or 
so and didn't see them...figured they were just passing through....then 2 hours 
later I looked out and they were back again. 


Here's a link to some photos: 
https://plus.google.com/photos/108682023475248921354/albums/6004845940271460913 


Been living here for 37 years and this is the first time I've ever seen this 
species in New Hanover County, NC. 



Bruce Smithson
Wilmington, New Hanover County
North Carolina
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: Len Kopka <lenkopka AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 14:55:40 -0400
I have them each spring. And, I've had them for the past week or so in the 
wooded area behind my home in Simpsonville, SC. Seems they're gone in the 
summer - or at least they do not vocalize. 


Len Kopka

On Apr 21, 2014, at 2:08 PM, scompton1251 AT charter.net wrote:

Steve,

Here in suburban Greenville, SC Fish Crows are vocal and common all Spring and 
Summer. I live .5 miles upslope from Cleveland Park and the Reedy River. 


Steve Compton
In present home since 2007


> On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 1:51 PM, Irvin Pitts wrote:
> 
> Steve,
> I've seen Spring time fish crows in Spartanburg County since about the early 
1980's and Post and Gauthreaux (1989) report nesting in the Clemson area at 
about 1984. This crow undoubtedly breeds at a number of piedmont sites though 
the full extent of its distribution has probably not been documented. They do 
nest here in my Lexington County neighborhood, though thats obviously a good 
bit east of your location. 

> 
> Irvin Pitts
> Lexington, SC
> 
> ---- Steve Cox  wrote:
>> Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically in 
Greenville county? Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like fish 
crows calling. I used to think that what I heard was fledgling American crows. 
When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not so sure. 

>> 
>> Thanks in advance,
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Steve Cox
>> Fountain Inn, S C
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: scompton1251 AT charter.net
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 14:08:54 -0400 (EDT)
Steve,

Here in suburban Greenville, SC Fish Crows are vocal and common all 
Spring and Summer. I live .5 miles upslope from Cleveland Park and the 
Reedy River.

Steve Compton
In present home since 2007


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 1:51 PM, Irvin Pitts wrote:

> Steve,
> I've seen Spring time fish crows in Spartanburg County since about the 
> early 1980's and Post and Gauthreaux (1989) report nesting in the 
> Clemson area at about 1984. This crow undoubtedly breeds at a number 
> of piedmont sites though the full extent of its distribution has 
> probably not been documented. They do nest here in my Lexington County 
> neighborhood, though thats obviously a good bit east of your location.
>
> Irvin Pitts
> Lexington, SC
>
> ---- Steve Cox  wrote:
>> Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, 
>> specifically  in Greenville county?  Each year in June and July, I 
>> hear what sounds like fish crows calling.  I used to think that what 
>> I heard was fledgling American crows. When I discussed this with 
>> another fellow birder, I am not so sure.
>>
>> Thanks in advance,
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Cox
>> Fountain Inn, S C
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: Irvin Pitts <pittsjam AT windstream.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:51:37 -0500
Steve,
I've seen Spring time fish crows in Spartanburg County since about the early 
1980's and Post and Gauthreaux (1989) report nesting in the Clemson area at 
about 1984. This crow undoubtedly breeds at a number of piedmont sites though 
the full extent of its distribution has probably not been documented. They do 
nest here in my Lexington County neighborhood, though thats obviously a good 
bit east of your location. 


Irvin Pitts
Lexington, SC

---- Steve Cox  wrote: 
> Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically in 
Greenville county? Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like fish 
crows calling. I used to think that what I heard was fledgling American crows. 
When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not so sure. 

> 
> Thanks in advance,
> 
> 
> 
> Steve Cox
> Fountain Inn, S C
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
Subject: Mecklenburg Audubon May Day Meeting (Thursday 5/01)
From: Christy Hill <chill2k5 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 13:19:38 -0400 (EDT)
MAS presents – The Threads That Weave the Carolina Thread Trail
Speaker –Andy Kane, Land Stewardship Associate
When  - Thur, May 1st at 7:30 PM (Refreshments begin around 7:15 pm)
Where - Tyvola Rd Senior Center, 2225 Tyvola Rd, Charlotte, NC 28210
More info - http://meckbirds.org

The Carolina Thread Trail (The Thread) is an exciting project that’s creating
a regional network of greenways, trails and blueways that reaches 15 counties,
2 states and 2.3 million people. There are 140 miles of The Thread open to the
public which means miles and miles of tremendous birding opportunities! Join
Mecklenburg Audubon for our May Day presentation as Andy Kane, Land Stewardship
Associate with the Catawba Lands Conservancy and the Carolina Thread Trail
highlights the unique bird habitats that encompass this landmark project. Andy
will share current trail initiatives, growth strategies and the present trail
system as well as plans for future trails. Come learn how The Thread weaves
together communities and natural areas to provide places for the exploration of
nature, culture, science and history.

Andy recently completed 24 years with the YMCA of Greater Charlotte where he
served as VP/Executive of Camp Thunderbird. During his tenure, he and his wife
Florence established the Environmental Education Center which since 1986 has
provided a residential outdoor learning center for over 200,000 students from
the Carolinas. In addition, Andy supervised the construction and start up of
YMCA Camp Harrison/ Herring Ridge in the NC mountains. Previously, while in
Alabama, he was employed by the Auburn Extension Service as a
Horticulture/Forestry Agent in Chambers County. He has a BS in Agriculture from
the University of Tennessee and an MS in Forestry from Stephen F. Austin State
University. Currently, he is employed by the Catawba Lands Conservancy where he
serves as a Land Stewardship Associate. The Catawba Lands Conservancy protects
13,500 acres of forest and farm land in the Piedmont of North Carolina. He and
Florence have two sons, Charles and Ryan.

Be sure to peruse our merchandise table for an array of products. Proceeds
benefit our conservation projects. Brown-headed Nuthatch boxes will still be
available at the meeting for $15 each. Sample some Bird Friendly Birds & Beans
coffee during the meeting then purchase a bag to take home or share at the
office. Pre-orders will also be placed for pick-up at next month’s meeting.
Help the birds by drinking great tasting Bird Friendly coffee!
  
JOIN US. IT'S FREE, SO BRING A FRIEND. PLEASE FORWARD TO OTHERS YOU THINK MAY
BE INTERESTED

Christy Hill
MAS Publicity
Charlotte, NC
Subject: Vesper Sparrow, Wake Co. NC, 4/21/14
From: nicholas <flicknanders AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 10:54:15 -0400
Hey all, accompanied Chris Moorman, Nathan Howell, and some beginning birders 
from NC State Univ. on a walk at Schenck Forest in Wake Co. this morning. A 
Vesper Sparrow perched up in a large oak for a while for decent views; this was 
just off the gravel entrance road off Reedy Creek Rd. at the eastern edge of 
the property. A bunch of Palm Warblers singing in the same area was nice for me 
as I don't hear their song much. Best, 

 
Nick Flanders
Raleigh, NC 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: James Watson <jcraigw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 09:52:52 -0400
The South Carolina Breeding Bird Atlas shows them as possible and probable
breeders in the upstate.

http://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/bbatlas/bba.html

Craig Watson
Mt. Pleasant, SC
On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:36 AM, Paul Glass  wrote:

>   I'm not sure about SC, but in VA they don't always stay near water.  A
> pair has nested in my suburban neighborhood for the last several years, and
> this year they chose a large pine in my backyard.  I'm a couple miles from
> the Dan River and 15+ miles from the nearest large lake.
>
>
>
> Paul Glass
>
> South Boston, VA
>
>
>
>
>  ------------------------------
>
> *From:* Derek Aldrich [mailto:derekaldrich AT gmail.com]
> *Sent:* Monday, April 21, 2014 8:56 AM
> *To:* Steve Cox
> *Cc:* Carolina Birds Birds
> *Subject:* Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
>
>
>
> I live "near" lake Robinson and get them every spring. More so in
> March/April but then sporadically into the summer. So, they could breed
> around the larger lakes. ebird also puts them year round at Lake Conestee.
> So, I imagine they do.
>
>
>
> Derek Aldrich
>
> Taylors, SC
>
>
>
> On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 8:50 AM, Steve Cox  wrote:
>
> Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically  in
> Greenville county?  Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like
> fish crows calling.  I used to think that what I heard was fledgling
> American crows. When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not
> so sure.
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
>
>
> Steve Cox
> Fountain Inn, S C
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
>



-- 

Fair winds and following seas..........
Subject: RE: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: Paul Glass <pag AT gcrcompany.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 09:36:05 -0400
I'm not sure about SC, but in VA they don't always stay near water.  A pair
has nested in my suburban neighborhood for the last several years, and this
year they chose a large pine in my backyard.  I'm a couple miles from the
Dan River and 15+ miles from the nearest large lake.

 

Paul Glass

South Boston, VA

 

 

  _____  

From: Derek Aldrich [mailto:derekaldrich AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Monday, April 21, 2014 8:56 AM
To: Steve Cox
Cc: Carolina Birds Birds
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC

 

I live "near" lake Robinson and get them every spring. More so in
March/April but then sporadically into the summer. So, they could breed
around the larger lakes. ebird also puts them year round at Lake Conestee.
So, I imagine they do. 

 

Derek Aldrich

Taylors, SC

 

On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 8:50 AM, Steve Cox  > wrote:

Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically  in
Greenville county?  Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like fish
crows calling.  I used to think that what I heard was fledgling American
crows. When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not so sure.

Thanks in advance,



Steve Cox
Fountain Inn, S C



Sent from my iPad

 
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: Jeff Catlin <shieffcat AT charter.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 09:34:43 -0400
Fish Crows are in Greenville County all summer. I have seen nesting 
activity at Furman University.

Jeff Catlin
Marietta, SC/Tuxedo, NC

On 4/21/2014 8:50 AM, Steve Cox wrote:
> Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically in 
Greenville county? Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like fish 
crows calling. I used to think that what I heard was fledgling American crows. 
When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not so sure. 

>
> Thanks in advance,
>
>
>
> Steve Cox
> Fountain Inn, S C
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
Subject: Re: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: Derek Aldrich <derekaldrich AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 08:55:38 -0400
I live "near" lake Robinson and get them every spring. More so in
March/April but then sporadically into the summer. So, they could breed
around the larger lakes. ebird also puts them year round at Lake Conestee.
So, I imagine they do.

Derek Aldrich
Taylors, SC


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 8:50 AM, Steve Cox  wrote:

> Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically  in
> Greenville county?  Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like
> fish crows calling.  I used to think that what I heard was fledgling
> American crows. When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not
> so sure.
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
>
>
> Steve Cox
> Fountain Inn, S C
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
Subject: Question About Fish Crows Breeding in Greenville, SC
From: Steve Cox <srcox AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 08:50:00 -0400
Does anyone know if fish crows nest in the upstate of SC, specifically in 
Greenville county? Each year in June and July, I hear what sounds like fish 
crows calling. I used to think that what I heard was fledgling American crows. 
When I discussed this with another fellow birder, I am not so sure. 


Thanks in advance,



Steve Cox
Fountain Inn, S C



Sent from my iPad
Subject: FOYs at Prairie Ridge Ecostation in Raleigh today
From: Tom Snow <tsnow6065 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 22:21:39 -0400
My wife and I visited Prairie Ridge Ecostation in Raleigh this afternoon. First 
of years being 5+ Purple Martins(1 female,) 1 Eastern Kingbird, and 1 male 
Orchard Oriole. 


Tom Snow
Raleigh
Subject: Fwd: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at Gunter Rd
From: Paul Serridge <paulserridge AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 18:18:13 -0600
A Scissor-tailed Flycatcher is back at the farm on Gunter Rd near Piedmont,
Greenville County, SC.
See the e-mail below from GCBC member, Barry Phillips.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Barry Phillips" 
Date: Apr 20, 2014 7:52 PM
Subject: [gcbirdclub] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at Gunter Rd
To: "gcbirdclub AT yahoogroups.com" 
Cc:



I made a pass down Gunter Rd tonight around 6:30 pm and am pleased to
report the return of the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  There are a couple of
pics linked below.  These are not of great quality as the bird was a fair
distance away but it's rather unmistakable.  The bird was sitting on the
fence about 30 yards up the driveway where the farm gate is.  It flew out a
few times but returned to roughly the same spot several times during the
few minutes I was there.  In the other few minutes there was a Savannah
Sparrow, Eastern Bluebirds, Mourning Doves, and an excellent view of a
Killdeer which may have been nesting as it let me approach within about 15
ft or so.  That's as close as I ventured as I didn't want to disturb the
bird.

Earlier this afternoon, Stacy and I were at Conestee to try and view the
Prothonotary Warbler in the area as described by Yves Limpalair.
 (EXCELLENT directions by the way!)  We were not disappointed.  The bird
did not go into the nest or perch atop the post but did stay in the general
area during the hour or so we were there.  It was very easy to follow by
it's call.  A few pics of the Prothonotary - all by Stacy - below as well.

Barry Phillips
Simpsonville

https://www.dropbox.com/s/tvtbi63yzwh0g8o/scissor-tailed%20flycatcher-020.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ry4qthdteproefp/scissor-tailed%20flycatcher-012.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/0kjez2fl5jpsnrr/killdeer-028.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3hkkgacxd03bvb4/Prothonotary%20Warbler-2.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1unpdlfho3oyz1a/Prothonotary%20Warbler-042.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3gjt465h289cxcm/prothonotary%20warbler-103.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/37cq9rj2x9flt14/prothonotary%20warbler-083.jpg

https://www.dropbox.com/s/b9r9iomgb0r5lnl/prothonotary%20warbler-069.jpg


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Subject: Greensboro Arrivals
From: Henry Link <linkh AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 20:12:58 -0400
Scott DePue, Marty Wall, Elizabeth Link and I birded Hamilton Lakes Park this 
morning. The bird of the day was an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, possibly the same 
one I saw there on Wednesday. 

Other migrants today included:

White-eyed Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo.
Red-eyed Vireo
SWAINSON"S THRUSH - my earliest spring record for Greensboro
Wood Thrush
Gray Catbird
Northern Parula
Black-throated Green Warbler
Ovenbird
Hooded Warbler
Common Yellowthroat

FOY birds here over the last week have included:

Ovenbird - April 13
Prairie Warbler - April 13
House Wren - April 14
Great-crested Flycatcher - April 14 (Scott Depue)
Red-eyed Vireo - April 15
Wood Thrush - April 15
Black-and-white Warbler - April 15
Worm-eating Warbler - April 15
ORANGE_CROWNED WARBLER - April 16
Cape May Warbler - April 17 (Scott Depue)
American Redstart - April 18

Henry Link
Greensboro, NC




Subject: RE: Cerulean Warbler, etc. Mecklenburg Co., NC Apr. 20
From: TNT Sanders <tsanders1993 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 19:53:33 -0400
Tammy and I spent some time looking for the heard Cerulean at Cowan's Ford with 
Kevin this morning, it looks like we parted ways too soon and missed seeing the 
bird. 

More migrants to add to Kevin's list include:
Cape May WarblerProthonotary WarblerOvenbirdEastern KingbirdGreat Crested 
FlycatcherWood Thrush 

Tom SandersCharlotte, NC

> From: skermetcalf AT earthlink.net
> Subject: Cerulean Warbler, etc. Mecklenburg Co., NC Apr. 20
> Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 11:47:52 -0400
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> 
> Highlights from the Rural Hill-Cowans Ford area along Neck Rd. this morning 
included a male CERULEAN WARBLER singing (eventually seen) near the road at 
Cowans Ford around 8:30 am. A follow up attempt to re-find it around 10:30 was 
not successful. It was high in some oak trees on the south side of the road 
past the large transmission tower right-of-way. 

> 
> Other migrants/birds of note: 
> 
> Wood Duck (with ducklings)
> Bald Eagle
> Barn Swallow
> Cliff Swallow
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow
> Tree Swallow
> Red-eyed Vireo
> White-eyed Vireo
> Black-and-white Warbler
> Common Yellowthroat
> Palm Warbler
> Pine Warbler
> Prairie Warbler (at least 3)
> Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Grasshopper Sparrow (Rural Hill)
> Orchard Oriole
> Summer Tanager
> Indigo Bunting
> 
> Kevin Metcalf
> Huntersville, NC
 		 	   		  
Subject: Franklin N.C.
From: Christine S Stoughton Root <cssjar AT aol.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 19:52:08 -0400
Hi All
I will be heading out to Franklin NC before the CBC meeting. I will have up to 
two days there to bird can anyone advise the best areas there to hit. Thanks! 


Cheers
Christine Stoughton-Root

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Got me a lifer today
From: "KC Foggin" <KCFoggin AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 19:31:39 -0400
2 Eastern Kingbirds at Market Commons. Now I say Market Commons as Ritch Lilly 
and I decided to call the whole area between the bypass & Kings Hwy along 
Farrow Pkwy, Market Commons. The Kingbirds were seen off Airpark Drive. Hard to 
believe I never saw them before but that’s where I got my first Eastern 
Meadowlark as well 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/155309297


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20

Subject: Sandy Creek Park April 20, 2014
From: Brendan Klick <brendan.klick AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 17:19:14 -0400
Today at Sandy Creek Park in Durham I had the following warbler
species: Worm-eating,
Prothonotary, Black-and-white Warbler, Palm Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler,
Northern Waterthrush, American Redstart, and Common Yellowthroat.

Also, a flyover Merlin, a flyover Pileated Woodpecker, a Green Heron and 30
Cedar Waxwings.

Brendan Klick
Durham, NC
Subject: Saluda Watershed and beyond
From: Simon Harvey <harveyssc AT charter.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 15:33:18 -0400
On a 62 mile bike ride through Greenville County SC and Polk/Henderson Counties 
in NC i had 15 species of warbler including FOY Prairies, Chestnut-sided, 
Redstart and KENTUCKY. 

The Kentucky was singing in good habitat along Skyuka Rd in Polk County. Also 
had a couple of SWAINSON'S singing on the SC side of the watershed. 


Most birds were heard but did see 7 different Broad-winged Hawks including one 
vocalizing while soaring low over Silver Creek Rd in Polk County. 


Good birding!

Simon C. Harvey
Simpsonville, SC
Subject: Cerulean Warbler, etc. Mecklenburg Co., NC Apr. 20
From: Kevin Metcalf <skermetcalf AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 11:47:52 -0400
Highlights from the Rural Hill-Cowans Ford area along Neck Rd. this morning 
included a male CERULEAN WARBLER singing (eventually seen) near the road at 
Cowans Ford around 8:30 am. A follow up attempt to re-find it around 10:30 was 
not successful. It was high in some oak trees on the south side of the road 
past the large transmission tower right-of-way. 


Other migrants/birds of note: 

Wood Duck (with ducklings)
Bald Eagle
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Tree Swallow
Red-eyed Vireo
White-eyed Vireo
Black-and-white Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler (at least 3)
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Grasshopper Sparrow (Rural Hill)
Orchard Oriole
Summer Tanager
Indigo Bunting

Kevin Metcalf
Huntersville, NC
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch continues, Horry County, SC
From: Steve Thomas <stype AT sccoast.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 09:38:44 -0400
On the afternoon of Friday, April 18, my wife and I clearly and 
repeatedly heard a Red-breasted Nuthatch in the trees in our yard, 
though we didn't get a look at it.  It seems reasonable to me that it is 
the female individual that's been here since November 20. We're 
surprised that we hearing it at this time of the year.

Steve

-- 
Stephen Thomas
Aynor, SC
Subject: Edisto Nature Trail and Donnelley WMA
From: Craig <jcraigw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 23:08:14 -0400
My daughter Shelley and I birded the Edisto Nature Trail until about noon today 
and then moved on down to Donnelley. For the day from both sites we had a total 
of 95 species. 


At the Edisto Nature Trail we had 12 species of warbler including Blue-winged, 
Swainson's, Hooded, Kentucky, Worm-eating, Prothonotary, and Yellow-throated. 
Other good birds were Acadian Flycatcher, Broad-winged Hawk, and Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak (breeding plumage male). At times there were so many birds flitting in 
the canopy it was difficult to identify them all. A major area of activity was 
at the beginning of the Pon Pon trail, and the "theater" area near the parking 
lot. We had met Andy Harrison there later in the morning and we all three had 
looks at the Rose-breasted Grosbeak. 


Later, Andy, Shelley and I went to Donnelley WMA. We had two Purple Gallinules, 
one in the impoundment behind the office and one at the Savage Backwater 
impoundment. There were also numerous Green Herons there and Acadian 
Flycatcher. In the fields near the Check Station there were at least a dozen 
Eastern Kingbirds perched on the ground feeding along with Barn and Tree 
Swallows and Eastern Bluebirds. There were also about 20 Greater and Lesser 
Yellowlegs in the field recently flooded by the rain on Friday. 


Craig Watson
Mt. Pleasant, SC

Sent from my iPad
Subject: RE: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC
From: Aaron Given <amgiven AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 20:57:28 -0400
On April 11th, there were at least 1000 black scoters off of Kiawah Island, SC. 
Many in much closer to shore than we usually see during the winter. 
Additionally, there were still several hundred off of Kiawah late last week. 
Black scoters don't breed until their 2nd or 3rd year, so I suspect that they 
may be younger birds that are in no hurry to leave just yet. We usually get a 
big "bump" in scoters in early spring/late winter with some lingering into late 
spring. 


Aaron Given
Kiawah Island, SC

> Subject: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC
> From: davidgardner14 AT gmail.com
> Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 13:12:17 -0400
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> 
> Walked the beach today about 1 hr before high tide. Saw 15 Black Scoters 
scattered along the shoreline actively foraging just out from the breakers 
(20ft from shore). Best views I have ever had. 

> In addition to those 15, I saw multiple small groups of scoters flying toward 
the ocean from up the estuary. The total number that I saw today was 66. 

> 
> Are the numbers of black scoters seen recently in Chas area related to the 
invasion of White-winged Scoters and Red-necked Grebes earlier this year, or is 
it within normal parameters? Ebird sure doesn't think they should be here. 

> Any thoughts.
> David
> 
> St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center,
> Seabrook Island, SC
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
 		 	   		  
Subject: Great-crested Flycatcher
From: Edith Tatum <ektatum AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 18:06:44 -0400
I had my first GC Flycatcher of the spring in my yard this morning.  I hope
it continues to nest in my deplapidated old bird house.

Edith Tatum
Durham, NC
sent from my XOOM
Subject: Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia SC - SWAINSON'S WARBLER
From: Simon Harvey <harveyssc AT charter.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 16:35:56 -0400
In light rain from 10am saw some good migrants including 14 species of warbler 
and a 

BROAD-WINGED HAWK eating prey.

Warblers encountered:-

NORTHERN PARULA
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER
BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER
BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER
PALM WARBLER
PINE WARBLER
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER
CAPE MAY WARBLER
BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER
SWAINSON'S WARBLER
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
OVENBIRD
WORM-EATING WARBLER
HOODED WARBLER

Simon C Harvey
Simpsonville, SC
Subject: Re: Red-necked Grebes--twisted logic
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1 AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 15:18:18 -0400
Harry,

I think Bob knows about the March flight, and that is reflected in the list of 
recipients of his screed. I also think the long tenure of the grebes here is 
Dixie this spring might be due to the fact that they were quite stressed when 
they arrived. After cheating death on their normal wintering grounds, it has 
taken them a while to regain their strength. 


Brian Patteson

On Apr 19, 2014, at 3:00 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:

> Bob:
> 
> You are the one who is wrong here! Congrats to Sandra Keller for apparently 
getting this right all along. 

> 
> You are apparently not aware of the huge fallout of Red-necked Grebes all 
across North Carolina starting in early March, right about when the last bit of 
the Great Lakes were freezing over. And, not long after, reports came out from 
the Great Lakes of lots of dead waterfowl, including some Red-necked Grebes. 
And, instead of immediately heading out when the weather warmed, these inland 
NC grebes stayed put on our reservoirs for several weeks, and a few are still 
here now. 

> 
> In addition, you don't get large numbers of Red-necked Grebes wintering on 
salt water -- the Bay of Fundy, Chesapeake Bay, or wherever -- displacing 
INLAND in early March, and remaining for weeks at a time. Our Red-necked Grebes 
in INLAND North Carolina came to us from other inland lakes, north of us, and 
we assume that generally means the Great Lakes. It clearly appears that they 
were frozen out of their winter abode, and were lingering here before returning 
either back to the Great Lakes, or to the northwest to their nesting lakes and 
ponds (we likely won't know that part of the story). As I've stated to a few 
folks, and I'll state it here -- our inland Red-necked Grebes probably NEVER 
saw salt or brackish water this winter, if they ever have. (Yes, we do get 
coastal birds that migrate over inland NC -- such as Common Loons and Horned 
Grebes -- drop down on our reservoirs in March or April, in some numbers -- but 
they quickly disappear on the first night when flight conditions are good; such 
birds would certainly have been in active migration mode. The remarkable 
numbers of Red-necked Grebes did not do that, nor did the good numbers of 
White-winged Scoters and Long-tailed Ducks that also appeared on reservoirs 
this winter -- they also certainly were wintering on the Great Lakes, as well, 
and they often stayed a few weeks on our lakes.) 

> 
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh, NC
> 
> 
> On Sat, Apr 19, 2014 at 2:15 PM, bob augustine  
wrote: 

> Sandra Keller is a frequent contributor to NJ Birds. In 2003 she did some 
research on the origin of Red-necked Grebes. On March 10 one of her 
correspondents wrote,"Some evidence suggests that as many as a few thousand 
overwinter on the Great Lakes", citing BNA, 1999. Then I recently found a piece 
entitled Ohio Birds and Biodiversity posted on the Internet by Jim McCormac of 
the Ohio DNR. It included the exact wording of the BNA account. 

> 
> "Some winter on the Great Lakes. However, distribution and size of winter 
population poorly known. In severe winters, irruptions of Red-necked Grebes 
into inland and coastal areas south and east of the Great Lakes following 
freeze-up of the Great Lakes suggest that numbers of wintering Red-necked 
Grebes may range from hundreds to a few thousand individuals." 

> 
> In other words, since over 1,000 RNGs have shown up displaced to the 
Mid-Atlantic states and it is said that they came from the Great Lakes, that is 
the evidence that numbers on the Great Lakes may range to a few thousand 
individuals. 

> It simply should not have been said that they came from the Great Lakes. A 
little research shows they aren't there. The research shows they are in the Bay 
of Fundy (Root, 1980). Someone, who should have known better, started this 
myth. The issue was brought up 2003 on BirdChat for all to see. 

> 
> Feel free to share this e-mail.
> 
> Bob Augustine
> augustinebob8 AT gmail.com
> Rockville, MD
> 19 Apr. 2014
> 
> p.s. There are still 4 RNGs near here on the Potomac at this date.
> 
Subject: Re: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC
From: Chris Hill <chill AT coastal.edu>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 15:01:02 -0400
I saw a single lingering White-winged Scoter in Little River inlet and another 
in Murrells inlet this week. I figured they were in poor health and got left 
behind, though I never got out to the jetties at either inlet, so maybe there 
were still flocks on the ocean. 


************************************************************************
Christopher E. Hill
Biology Department
Coastal Carolina University
Conway, SC 29528-1954
843-349-2567
chill AT coastal.edu
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm




Subject: Re: Red-necked Grebes--twisted logic
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 15:00:46 -0400
Bob:

You are the one who is wrong here! Congrats to Sandra Keller for apparently
getting this right all along.

You are apparently not aware of the huge fallout of Red-necked Grebes all
across North Carolina starting in early March, right about when the last
bit of the Great Lakes were freezing over. And, not long after, reports
came out from the Great Lakes of lots of dead waterfowl, including some
Red-necked Grebes.  And, instead of immediately heading out when the
weather warmed, these inland NC grebes stayed put on our reservoirs for
several weeks, and a few are still here now.

In addition, you don't get large numbers of Red-necked Grebes wintering on
salt water -- the Bay of Fundy, Chesapeake Bay, or wherever -- displacing
INLAND in early March, and remaining for weeks at a time. Our Red-necked
Grebes in INLAND North Carolina came to us from other inland lakes, north
of us, and we assume that generally means the Great Lakes. It clearly
appears that they were frozen out of their winter abode, and were lingering
here before returning either back to the Great Lakes, or to the northwest
to their nesting lakes and ponds (we likely won't know that part of the
story). As I've stated to a few folks, and I'll state it here -- our inland
Red-necked Grebes probably NEVER saw salt or brackish water this winter, if
they ever have.  (Yes, we do get coastal birds that migrate over inland NC
-- such as Common Loons and Horned Grebes -- drop down on our reservoirs in
March or April, in some numbers -- but they quickly disappear on the first
night when flight conditions are good; such birds would certainly have been
in active migration mode. The remarkable numbers of Red-necked Grebes did
not do that, nor did the good numbers of White-winged Scoters and
Long-tailed Ducks that also appeared on reservoirs this winter -- they also
certainly were wintering on the Great Lakes, as well, and they often stayed
a few weeks on our lakes.)

Harry LeGrand
Raleigh, NC


On Sat, Apr 19, 2014 at 2:15 PM, bob augustine wrote:

> Sandra Keller is a frequent contributor to NJ Birds. In 2003 she did some
> research on the origin of Red-necked Grebes. On March 10 one of her
> correspondents wrote,"Some evidence suggests that as many as a few thousand
> overwinter on the Great Lakes", citing BNA, 1999. Then I recently found a
> piece entitled Ohio Birds and Biodiversity posted on the Internet by Jim
> McCormac of the Ohio DNR. It included the exact wording of the BNA account.
>
>  "Some winter on the Great Lakes. However, distribution and size of winter
> population poorly known. In severe winters, irruptions of Red-necked Grebes
> into inland and coastal areas south and east of the Great Lakes following
> freeze-up of the Great Lakes suggest that numbers of wintering Red-necked
> Grebes may range from hundreds to a few thousand individuals."
>
> In other words, since over 1,000 RNGs have shown up displaced to the
> Mid-Atlantic states and it is said that they came from the Great Lakes,
> that is the evidence that numbers on the Great Lakes may range to a few
> thousand individuals.
> It simply should not have been said that they came from the Great Lakes. A
> little research shows they aren't there. The research shows they are in the
> Bay of Fundy (Root, 1980). Someone, who should have known better, started
> this myth. The issue was brought up 2003 on BirdChat for all to see.
>
> Feel free to share this e-mail.
>
> Bob Augustine
> augustinebob8 AT gmail.com
> Rockville, MD
> 19 Apr. 2014
>
> p.s. There are still 4 RNGs near here on the Potomac at this date.
>
Subject: Re: Blue Grosbeak
From: jackpateck AT comcast.net
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 18:49:30 +0000 (UTC)
We hadn't seen the male or female grosbeak for two or three days - then this 
morning both were on the millet feeder. 


----- Original Message -----

From: "KC Foggin"  
To: "CarolinaBirds"  
Sent: Friday, April 18, 2014 8:12:57 AM 
Subject: Blue Grosbeak 

Had a male Blue Grosbeak at the suet feeder this a.m. 
K.C. 

K.C. Foggin 
Socastee 
Myrtle Beach SC 

www.birdforum.net 

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages&page=20 


Subject: Hilton Pond 03/17/14 (Home From The Tropics)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 14:32:21 -0400
For those of you not out and about watching spring birds today--its chilly and 
rainy here--I offer the 17-26 March 2014 installment of "This Week at Hilton 
Pond" as I try to get caught up after my late winter hummingbird banding trips 
to the Neotropics. The latest photo essay is a day-by-day summary of bird 
banding and other nature observations during the period. It's at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140317.html 

While there, please don't forget to scroll down for a rather interesting tally 
of banded birds returning from previous years. There are also miscellaneous 
nature notes and acknowledgment of recent contributors who support education, 
research, and conservation activities of Hilton Pond Center. 


Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL

P.S. Please "Like" our new Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
for timely updates on nature topics. Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond. 


========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: Re: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1 AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 13:26:39 -0400
That seems like a bit late for that many scoters, but it's been a long, hard 
winter, probably the hardest that the fledgling eBird has yet encountered. 
While it can be a useful tool, I think eBird has a lot to learn yet, and it's a 
lot better as a short term reference. 


Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

On Apr 19, 2014, at 1:12 PM, David Gardner wrote:

> Walked the beach today about 1 hr before high tide. Saw 15 Black Scoters 
scattered along the shoreline actively foraging just out from the breakers 
(20ft from shore). Best views I have ever had. 

> In addition to those 15, I saw multiple small groups of scoters flying toward 
the ocean from up the estuary. The total number that I saw today was 66. 

> 
> Are the numbers of black scoters seen recently in Chas area related to the 
invasion of White-winged Scoters and Red-necked Grebes earlier this year, or is 
it within normal parameters? Ebird sure doesn't think they should be here. 

> Any thoughts.
> David
> 
> St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center,
> Seabrook Island, SC
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Continuing large numbers of Black Scoters, Seabrook, SC
From: David Gardner <davidgardner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2014 13:12:17 -0400
Walked the beach today about 1 hr before high tide. Saw 15 Black Scoters 
scattered along the shoreline actively foraging just out from the breakers 
(20ft from shore). Best views I have ever had. 

In addition to those 15, I saw multiple small groups of scoters flying toward 
the ocean from up the estuary. The total number that I saw today was 66. 


Are the numbers of black scoters seen recently in Chas area related to the 
invasion of White-winged Scoters and Red-necked Grebes earlier this year, or is 
it within normal parameters? Ebird sure doesn't think they should be here. 

Any thoughts.
David

St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center,
Seabrook Island, SC

Sent from my iPhone