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Updated on Wednesday, October 22 at 11:13 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Western Tanager,©Barry Kent Mackay

22 Oct Re: Mike Tove's terrible faux pas ["Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans" ]
22 Oct Mike Tove's terrible faux pas [Harry LeGrand ]
22 Oct Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets? [Brian Patteson ]
22 Oct Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets? ["Barbara Brooks" ]
22 Oct Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets? ["Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans" ]
22 Oct Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots [Lois Stacey ]
22 Oct Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots [Pamela Ford ]
22 Oct Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots [Derek Aldrich ]
22 Oct Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots [Bradley Dalton ]
22 Oct Hummingbirds in Costa Rica: An Opportunity ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
22 Oct Wings over water big day [Bb ]
22 Oct Help document bird window collisions [Scott Winton ]
22 Oct Re: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds [Helmut Mueller ]
22 Oct Sparrows @ Franklin co, N.C. [Paul Hubert ]
21 Oct Fwd: Piping Plover Sullivan's Island SC [Pamela Ford ]
21 Oct Wake Co., NC-American Bittern-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2014 []
21 Oct RE: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets? []
21 Oct Union County Anhinga [drivesa3 AT aol.com ]
21 Oct Re: Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet 10/18 [Scott Jackson-Ricketts ]
21 Oct Re: Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet 10/18 [Philip Dickinson ]
21 Oct Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet 10/18 [Nate Dias ]
21 Oct Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets? [Nate Dias ]
21 Oct Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets? [Carson Wood ]
21 Oct Sora and Orange-crowned Warbler at Price Park [Henry Link ]
21 Oct re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets? [Scott Winton ]
21 Oct Piping Plover Sullivan's Island SC [Pamela Ford ]
21 Oct Nashville Warbler at Conestee, Greenville, SC [Paul Serridge ]
21 Oct Lincoln's Sparrows continue at Brookshire Park Boone [Badger ]
21 Oct Re: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds ["John Fussell" ]
21 Oct Reddish Egrets observed at Mattamuseet NWR []
21 Oct North River Farms and Cape Lookout, NC on Sunday ["John Fussell" ]
20 Oct Union County, NC, Anhinga []
20 Oct RE: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC [Jamie Adams ]
20 Oct Wake Co., NC-American Bittern-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2014 [Mike Turner ]
20 Oct Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC [Philip Dickinson ]
20 Oct Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC [Brian Patteson ]
20 Oct Butter-butts [KC Foggin ]
20 Oct Meck Audubon November Meeting (Thursday 11/06): Conserving Breeding Habitat for Grassland Birds in a Changing Agricultural Landscape [Christy Hill ]
20 Oct Bio blitz for St. Christopher, Seabrook Isl. 4/25/15 [David Gardner ]
20 Oct Ft Fisher NC [Ryan Justice ]
20 Oct Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC [Carson Wood ]
20 Oct Birds Out, Birds In [John Connors ]
20 Oct Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC [Carson Wood ]
20 Oct sapsuckers return ["Olwen jarvis" ]
20 Oct correction on the Peanut feeder for warblers [Linda Ward ]
20 Oct Re: Siskins and Vultures at Grandfather Mountain [Dwayne Martin ]
20 Oct Siskins and Vultures at Grandfather Mountain [Jesse Pope ]
20 Oct Warblers and peanut butter feeders, NC [Linda Ward ]
20 Oct New Hotspot [Dennis Forsythe ]
20 Oct Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Mattamuskeet, NC [Jamie Adams ]
20 Oct Re: Bodie Island lighthouse pond, Dare Cty, NC [TBT ]
19 Oct Re: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds [Bruce Smithson ]
19 Oct A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds [Scott Winton ]
19 Oct Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, SC [Ann Truesdale ]
19 Oct Am White Pelicans - Wrightsville Beach NC [KD Edwards ]
19 Oct Black Tern, Currituck Sound, NC and other birds [Elisa Enders ]
19 Oct swallow flock Saturday 18 October, Outer Banks [Stephen Johnson ]
19 Oct No Subject []
19 Oct Re: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder [Dwayne Martin ]
19 Oct Re: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder [KC Foggin ]
19 Oct Sapsuckers [KC Foggin ]
19 Oct RE: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder [Brian Pendergraft ]
19 Oct RE: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder [Judy Halleron ]
19 Oct Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder [Brian Pendergraft ]
19 Oct Hermit Thrush [Brian Pendergraft ]
19 Oct Congaree Bluffs Hawk Watch October 19 []
19 Oct Rockingham County, NC/Mayo River fall bird count results [Brian Bockhahn ]
19 Oct 2nd attempt to unsubscribe [david ]
19 Oct WNC Warren Wilson: Orange-crowned W, Marsh Wren, Lincoln's S (again) - 10/18/14 [Steve Ritt ]
18 Oct Bodie Island lighthouse pond, Dare Cty, NC [Audrey ]
18 Oct RFI on Northern CA birding [David Gardner ]
18 Oct RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_Chas.Co [Cherrie Sneed ]
18 Oct Hermie's back [KC Foggin ]
18 Oct Stumpy Point, NC...any birders? [Linda Ward ]
18 Oct Accipiters aplenty in eastern carolina [Alan Meijer ]
18 Oct Henderson Cty.N. C. Lake Osceola ["Wayne K. Forsythe" ]

Subject: Re: Mike Tove's terrible faux pas
From: "Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans" <vanwilkins AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:45:50 -0400
Harry,
Thanks for the helpful clarification.  Hopefully, we can all be more
careful going forward.
Elizabeth

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 11:13 PM, Harry LeGrand 
wrote:

> Several of us are extremely upset that Mr. Tove presumably forgot to whom
> he was sending messages, and inadvertently ended up sending a bunch of
> personal messages to carolinabirds that he was not entitled to send.
>
> All of us send emails about birds and other subjects (politics, etc.) to
> our friends. But, when such "private" e-mails become public on a full
> listserve, then issues may arise, feelings get hurt, and others get very
> embarrassed. Obviously several of us in this string are very upset and now
> have been called hurtful names by some folks on this listserve. I am very
> sorry about this, but please note again that these were personal emails
> that were not sent to this listserve by me and several others.
>
> Mr. Tove called me just now from Duluth, MN, and we explained what had
> happened. He told me that he had assumed that these personal emails had
> already been sent to carolinabirds, or at least as they were not expressly
> stated not to be sent to the listserve, it was OK for him to forward them
> on to all of you readers. That was a huge mistaken assumption on his part.
>
> He wanted me to say that he apologizes for this error, and that when he
> returns to NC on Monday will be able to further comment on this.
>
> Harry LeGrand
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Mike Tove's terrible faux pas
From: Harry LeGrand <hlegrandjr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 23:13:53 -0400
Several of us are extremely upset that Mr. Tove presumably forgot to whom
he was sending messages, and inadvertently ended up sending a bunch of
personal messages to carolinabirds that he was not entitled to send.

All of us send emails about birds and other subjects (politics, etc.) to
our friends. But, when such "private" e-mails become public on a full
listserve, then issues may arise, feelings get hurt, and others get very
embarrassed. Obviously several of us in this string are very upset and now
have been called hurtful names by some folks on this listserve. I am very
sorry about this, but please note again that these were personal emails
that were not sent to this listserve by me and several others.

Mr. Tove called me just now from Duluth, MN, and we explained what had
happened. He told me that he had assumed that these personal emails had
already been sent to carolinabirds, or at least as they were not expressly
stated not to be sent to the listserve, it was OK for him to forward them
on to all of you readers. That was a huge mistaken assumption on his part.

He wanted me to say that he apologizes for this error, and that when he
returns to NC on Monday will be able to further comment on this.

Harry LeGrand
Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1 AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:21:05 -0400
How about anyone who wants to comment on this, reply to THIS MESSAGE, w/o 
repeatedly copying the PRIVATE comments that were forwarded to the LISTSERVE by 
Mike Tove. Fair enough? 


Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC



On Oct 22, 2014, at 8:09 PM, Barbara Brooks wrote:

> I concur
>  
> barb brooks
> NE Orange Co. NC
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans
> To: mtove AT deltaforce.net
> Cc: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> Sent: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 7:36 PM
> Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
> 
> At the risk of annoying the sender, Mike Tove, and maybe others, I need to 
object to the blatant takedowns of birders posting unsubstantiated, or even 
incorrect, sightings to Carolina Birds. What was obviously and deliberately a 
private (though snarky) exchange among experts HAD to be re-posted to the 
entire listserve? For the sole purpose of humiliation, or so it seems, of a 
birder who in good faith dared to put something out there that was possibly (oh 
no!) inaccurate. This is what gives "elite birders" a bad name, and keeps too 
many of us in the "relative novice" category...yes, such comments are 
intimidating and discouraging, and the folks being disparaged are likely just 
as smart as you are, if less expert at bird identification. Gentle correction 
and skepticism are helpful and necessary (as in the initial responses), but we 
should all be appalled when disrespect and humiliation are used to put fellow 
enthusiastic birders "in their place". 

> 
> Furthermore, email rule number one : Never intentionally re-post a private 
conversation to a public listserve.... 

> 
> Respectfully,
> 
> Elizabeth Wilkins
> Yorktown, VA 
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
From: "Barbara Brooks" <brooksba1 AT frontier.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 20:09:57 -0400
I concur

barb brooks
NE Orange Co. NC
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans 
  To: mtove AT deltaforce.net 
  Cc: carolinabirds AT duke.edu 
  Sent: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 7:36 PM
  Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?


 At the risk of annoying the sender, Mike Tove, and maybe others, I need to 
object to the blatant takedowns of birders posting unsubstantiated, or even 
incorrect, sightings to Carolina Birds. What was obviously and deliberately a 
private (though snarky) exchange among experts HAD to be re-posted to the 
entire listserve? For the sole purpose of humiliation, or so it seems, of a 
birder who in good faith dared to put something out there that was possibly (oh 
no!) inaccurate. This is what gives "elite birders" a bad name, and keeps too 
many of us in the "relative novice" category...yes, such comments are 
intimidating and discouraging, and the folks being disparaged are likely just 
as smart as you are, if less expert at bird identification. Gentle correction 
and skepticism are helpful and necessary (as in the initial responses), but we 
should all be appalled when disrespect and humiliation are used to put fellow 
enthusiastic birders "in their place". 



 Furthermore, email rule number one : Never intentionally re-post a private 
conversation to a public listserve.... 



  Respectfully,


  Elizabeth Wilkins
  Yorktown, VA 


  On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 9:34 PM,  wrote:

 I agree with all this cautious commentary. Maybe there were multiple Reddish 
Egrets but if so, the documentation really needs to be far better than is 
presently available. However, I confess I’ve seen them that way before. Oh 
wait. That was south Florida. Never mind. 




    Mike Tove

    Cary, NC



    From: Brian Patteson [mailto:patteson1 AT embarqmail.com] 
    Sent: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 7:38 PM
    To: Harry LeGrand
    Cc: Nate Dias; Scott Winton; Mike Tove
    Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?



    Harry,



 Yeah, only THREE! LMAO. I'm afraid there are many people out there who do not 
"get it" as well. Like the guy who said maybe he saw them at Pea Island. Makes 
you feel like all that work on the status and distribution of NC birds was 
worth it, I suppose. 




    Brian







    On Oct 21, 2014, at 7:00 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:





 I almost fell off my chair when, right after Scott questioned the report of 
"several" Reddish Egrets, Carson came back on and said, and I copy: "to clarify 
for everyone there were only three birds seen, not seven." 




 He still doesn't get that the species is very rare there, especially this late 
in the season He still thinks that three Reddish Egrets there is not a big 
deal, for after all, he or they saw Little Blues as well. This guy is still a 
relative novice, and I'm glad each of you has saved Mike Tove and me from 
having to do the same on the listserve. Mike and I have questioned a lot of 
folks over the years, and this was certainly something that I said "highly 
unlikely". I questioned Steve Patterson about the reported Wilson's Plover way 
inland recently near Clemson, I think. I don't know what became of all that. 




 With WOW starting any day now, I expect a bunch of birders will be combing the 
refuge daily now. We shall see if any Reddish Egrets are really there. I doubt 
it. 




    Harry





 On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 3:08 PM, Nate Dias  wrote: 




    I agree with Scott in being a little hesitant to accept multiple
    Reddish Egrets showing up at Mattamuskeet out of the blue.
    Particularly without any details covering plumage, eye color, bill
    characteristics, etc.

    This is because I have never seen a Reddish Egret in fresh water -
    always salt or brackish water, including all the times I have seen
    them in (coastal brackish) impoundments.

    Reddish Egrets are on occasion seen in pure fresh water in Florida and
    along the Gulf Coast, but it is by no means a common occurrence.

    So without photos or other documentation, or a report from a
    walks-on-water witness like John Fussell, or any details at all, who
    can blame someone for being skeptical?

    Carson - if you had provided a few details that led you to that
    conclusion, it might have cut down on the accusatory emails...

    Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC


 On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 1:20 PM, Scott Winton  wrote: 

    > I have to jump on the jerky skeptical bandwagon on this one...
    >
    > 1) In the original post there was no mention of Little Blue Herons, which
 > are common in the impoundments. Little Blues superficially resemble Reddish 

    > Egrets with their reddish necks and pale blue bodies.  They've definitely
    > made me look twice before and I've had other people call me saying they
 > found a Reddish Egret at Mattamuskeet only to later realize it was a Little 

    > Blue.  It's an easy mistake to make.
    >
 > 2) the wording of "...several reddish egrets..." suggests that the observer 

    > didn't give this observation a whole lot of critical thought and is
    > unfamiliar with their rarity in this part of the state.  One or a few
 > Reddish Egrets is always worth a mention anywhere in NC, but "several" would 

    > imply 5+ which would be a possible high count for NC. They also have a
    > preference for tidal habitats over impoundments.
    >
    > Of course birds can do strange things...but if 7 Reddish Egrets really
    > showed up at Mattamuskeet all at once, that's something that ought to be
    > pretty carefully documented rather than casually reported and accepted.
    > --
    > Scott Winton - Durham, NC
    > http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
    >





    !DSPAM:5446ee5c190541734587522! 

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    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
From: "Elizabeth Wilkins/vanMontfrans" <vanwilkins AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 19:36:43 -0400
At the risk of annoying the sender, Mike Tove, and maybe others, I need to
object to the blatant takedowns of birders posting unsubstantiated, or even
incorrect, sightings to Carolina Birds.  What was obviously and
deliberately a private (though snarky) exchange among experts *HAD* to be
re-posted to the entire listserve?  For the sole purpose of humiliation, or
so it seems, of a birder who in good faith dared to put something out there
that was possibly (oh no!) inaccurate.  This is what gives "elite birders"
a bad name, and keeps too many of us in the "relative novice"
category...yes, such comments are intimidating and discouraging, and the
folks being disparaged are likely just as smart as you are, if less expert
at bird identification.  Gentle correction and skepticism are helpful and
necessary (as in the initial responses), but we should all be appalled when
disrespect and humiliation are used to put fellow enthusiastic birders "in
their place".

Furthermore, email rule number one : Never intentionally re-post a private
conversation to a public listserve....

Respectfully,

Elizabeth Wilkins
Yorktown, VA

On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 9:34 PM,  wrote:

> I agree with all this cautious commentary. Maybe there were multiple
> Reddish Egrets but if so, the documentation really needs to be far better
> than is presently available. However, I confess I’ve seen them that way
> before. Oh wait. That was south Florida. Never mind.
>
>
>
> Mike Tove
>
> Cary, NC
>
>
>
> *From:* Brian Patteson [mailto:patteson1 AT embarqmail.com]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, October 21, 2014 7:38 PM
> *To:* Harry LeGrand
> *Cc:* Nate Dias; Scott Winton; Mike Tove
> *Subject:* Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
>
>
>
> Harry,
>
>
>
> Yeah, only THREE!  LMAO. I'm afraid there are many people out there who do
> not "get it" as well.  Like the guy who said maybe he saw them at Pea
> Island.  Makes you feel like all that work on the status and distribution
> of NC birds was worth it, I suppose.
>
>
>
> Brian
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 21, 2014, at 7:00 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:
>
>
>
> I almost fell off my chair when, right after Scott questioned the report
> of "several" Reddish Egrets, Carson came back on and said, and I copy:  "to
> clarify for everyone there were only *three* birds seen, not seven."
>
>
>
> He still doesn't get that the species is very rare there, especially this
> late in the season He still thinks that three Reddish Egrets there is not a
> big deal, for after all, he or they saw Little Blues as well.   This guy is
> still a relative novice, and I'm glad each of you has saved Mike Tove and
> me from having to do the same on the listserve. Mike and I have questioned
> a lot of folks over the years, and this was certainly something that I said
> "highly unlikely". I questioned Steve Patterson about the reported Wilson's
> Plover way inland recently near Clemson, I think.  I don't know what became
> of all that.
>
>
>
> With WOW starting any day now, I expect a bunch of birders will be combing
> the refuge daily now. We shall see if any Reddish Egrets are really there.
> I doubt it.
>
>
>
> Harry
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 3:08 PM, Nate Dias 
> wrote:
>
> I agree with Scott in being a little hesitant to accept multiple
> Reddish Egrets showing up at Mattamuskeet out of the blue.
> Particularly without any details covering plumage, eye color, bill
> characteristics, etc.
>
> This is because I have never seen a Reddish Egret in fresh water -
> always salt or brackish water, including all the times I have seen
> them in (coastal brackish) impoundments.
>
> Reddish Egrets are on occasion seen in pure fresh water in Florida and
> along the Gulf Coast, but it is by no means a common occurrence.
>
> So without photos or other documentation, or a report from a
> walks-on-water witness like John Fussell, or any details at all, who
> can blame someone for being skeptical?
>
> Carson - if you had provided a few details that led you to that
> conclusion, it might have cut down on the accusatory emails...
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
>
> On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 1:20 PM, Scott Winton 
> wrote:
> > I have to jump on the jerky skeptical bandwagon on this one...
> >
> > 1) In the original post there was no mention of Little Blue Herons, which
> > are common in the impoundments.  Little Blues superficially resemble
> Reddish
> > Egrets with their reddish necks and pale blue bodies.  They've definitely
> > made me look twice before and I've had other people call me saying they
> > found a Reddish Egret at Mattamuskeet only to later realize it was a
> Little
> > Blue.  It's an easy mistake to make.
> >
> > 2) the wording of "...several reddish egrets..." suggests that the
> observer
> > didn't give this observation a whole lot of critical thought and is
> > unfamiliar with their rarity in this part of the state.  One or a few
> > Reddish Egrets is always worth a mention anywhere in NC, but "several"
> would
> > imply 5+ which would be a possible high count for NC. They also have a
> > preference for tidal habitats over impoundments.
> >
> > Of course birds can do strange things...but if 7 Reddish Egrets really
> > showed up at Mattamuskeet all at once, that's something that ought to be
> > pretty carefully documented rather than casually reported and accepted.
> > --
> > Scott Winton - Durham, NC
> > http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
> >
>
>
>
>
>
> !DSPAM:5446ee5c190541734587522!
>
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4040/8429 - Release Date: 10/21/14
>
Subject: Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots
From: Lois Stacey <croakie AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:28:56 -0400
I merge mine once or twice a year but recently found that it appears that 
capitalization counts. Several of the hot spots I have in my phone are spelled 
correctly but are not capitalized and when I uploaded they formed their own 
point. I have changed them to match exactly now. 


Lois Stacey
North Augusta, SC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 22, 2014, at 5:56 PM, Derek Aldrich  wrote:
> 
> Also, Please feel free to suggest a location as a hotspot if it is not 
already one. 

> 
> Derek
> 
>> On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 5:08 PM, Bradley Dalton  
wrote: 

>> Merging personal sighting with a hotspot is something that everyone using 
ebird should take a look at, especially if they've been using it for more than 
a couple of years. It is a very easy process and would be very beneficial to 
all birders who use the site. If one does not merge their own location with the 
hotspot (likely of the same name), their sightings are effectively unnoticed 
unless a person is searching by species instead of location. I took a look at 
mine about a year ago and noticed there were nearly a dozen new hotspots where 
I had a personal location. It is an easy process. Just type "merge" in the 
search box and it will show you what to do. If you want to check if you have 
any spots that need merging, just go to submit an observation and 'find it on a 
map.' Enter the state and then zoom in. It helps to open two windows. 

>> 
>> Brad Dalton
>> Greenville, SC
>> 
>>> On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 7:54 AM, Dennis Forsythe 
 wrote: 

>>> Hi All,
>>> 
>>> Derek Aldrich has just created a new hotspot:
>>> 
>>>  Name:  Hy 17 below spoil site
>>>    State/Province:  US-SC
>>>    County:  US-SC-Jasper
>>>    Latitude:  32.121
>>>    Longitude:  -81.065
>>> 
>>> This is the spot on Speedway Blvd ( Hy 17) below the spoil site were you 
can look over the marsh. Currently there are a number or Roseate Spoonbills 
there. In the past you could see shorebirds like Avocets and Stilt Sandpipers. 
If you have any checklist for this site pelase move them to the new hotspot. 

>>> 
>>> Thanks,
>>> 
>>> Dennis
>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
>>> South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
>>> Emeritus Professor of Biology
>>> The Citadel
>>> 171 Moultrie St,
>>> Charleston, SC 29409
>>> 843.795.3996-home
>>> 843.953.7264-fax
>>> 843.708.1605-cell
>>> dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
> 
Subject: Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 18:19:14 -0400
Brad has an excellent point. I too have made the mistake of not picking HOT 
SPOT for list location, my first sighting of the Scissor-tail Flycatcher in 
Greenville SC. I accidentally dropped the pin 10 miles from actual location. 
This data could be lost and also causes much grief for someone who relies on a 
map to chase a bird. 

Another point, if you use the BIRDLOG APP on your smartphone and don't pick a 
Hot Spot, do to Internet connection, you want to go back and change location to 
the Hot Spot. It benefits everyone, especially if retrieving info for early or 
late sightings or last reported, from previous years. 

Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone

Bird On!


> On Oct 22, 2014, at 5:56 PM, Derek Aldrich  wrote:
> 
> Also, Please feel free to suggest a location as a hotspot if it is not 
already one. 

> 
> Derek
> 
>> On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 5:08 PM, Bradley Dalton  
wrote: 

>> Merging personal sighting with a hotspot is something that everyone using 
ebird should take a look at, especially if they've been using it for more than 
a couple of years. It is a very easy process and would be very beneficial to 
all birders who use the site. If one does not merge their own location with the 
hotspot (likely of the same name), their sightings are effectively unnoticed 
unless a person is searching by species instead of location. I took a look at 
mine about a year ago and noticed there were nearly a dozen new hotspots where 
I had a personal location. It is an easy process. Just type "merge" in the 
search box and it will show you what to do. If you want to check if you have 
any spots that need merging, just go to submit an observation and 'find it on a 
map.' Enter the state and then zoom in. It helps to open two windows. 

>> 
>> Brad Dalton
>> Greenville, SC
>> 
>>> On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 7:54 AM, Dennis Forsythe 
 wrote: 

>>> Hi All,
>>> 
>>> Derek Aldrich has just created a new hotspot:
>>> 
>>>  Name:  Hy 17 below spoil site
>>>    State/Province:  US-SC
>>>    County:  US-SC-Jasper
>>>    Latitude:  32.121
>>>    Longitude:  -81.065
>>> 
>>> This is the spot on Speedway Blvd ( Hy 17) below the spoil site were you 
can look over the marsh. Currently there are a number or Roseate Spoonbills 
there. In the past you could see shorebirds like Avocets and Stilt Sandpipers. 
If you have any checklist for this site pelase move them to the new hotspot. 

>>> 
>>> Thanks,
>>> 
>>> Dennis
>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
>>> South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
>>> Emeritus Professor of Biology
>>> The Citadel
>>> 171 Moultrie St,
>>> Charleston, SC 29409
>>> 843.795.3996-home
>>> 843.953.7264-fax
>>> 843.708.1605-cell
>>> dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
> 
Subject: Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots
From: Derek Aldrich <derekaldrich AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:56:14 -0400
Also, Please feel free to suggest a location as a hotspot if it is not
already one.

Derek

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 5:08 PM, Bradley Dalton 
wrote:

> Merging personal sighting with a hotspot is something that everyone using
> ebird should take a look at, especially if they've been using it for more
> than a couple of years.  It is a very easy process and would be very
> beneficial to all birders who use the site.  If one does not merge their
> own location with the hotspot (likely of the same name), their sightings
> are effectively unnoticed unless a person is searching by species instead
> of location.  I took a look at mine about a year ago and noticed there were
> nearly a dozen new hotspots where I had a personal location.  It is an easy
> process. Just type "merge" in the search box and it will show you what to
> do.  If you want to check if you have any spots that need merging, just go
> to submit an observation and 'find it on a map.'  Enter the state and then
> zoom in. It helps to open two windows.
>
> Brad Dalton
> Greenville, SC
>
> On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 7:54 AM, Dennis Forsythe <
> dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> Derek Aldrich has just created a new hotspot:
>>
>>  Name:  Hy 17 below spoil site
>>    State/Province:  US-SC
>>    County:  US-SC-Jasper
>>    Latitude:  32.121
>>    Longitude:  -81.065
>>
>> This is the spot on Speedway Blvd ( Hy 17) below the spoil site were you
>> can look over the marsh.  Currently there are a number or Roseate
>> Spoonbills there.  In the past you could see shorebirds like Avocets and
>> Stilt Sandpipers.  If you have any checklist for this site pelase move them
>> to the new hotspot.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Dennis
>>
>> --
>> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
>> South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
>> Emeritus Professor of Biology
>> The Citadel
>> 171 Moultrie St,
>> Charleston, SC 29409
>> 843.795.3996-home
>> 843.953.7264-fax
>> 843.708.1605-cell
>> dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: New Hotspot; Merging Hotspots
From: Bradley Dalton <bradley.dalt AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:08:02 -0400
Merging personal sighting with a hotspot is something that everyone using
ebird should take a look at, especially if they've been using it for more
than a couple of years.  It is a very easy process and would be very
beneficial to all birders who use the site.  If one does not merge their
own location with the hotspot (likely of the same name), their sightings
are effectively unnoticed unless a person is searching by species instead
of location.  I took a look at mine about a year ago and noticed there were
nearly a dozen new hotspots where I had a personal location.  It is an easy
process. Just type "merge" in the search box and it will show you what to
do.  If you want to check if you have any spots that need merging, just go
to submit an observation and 'find it on a map.'  Enter the state and then
zoom in. It helps to open two windows.

Brad Dalton
Greenville, SC

On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 7:54 AM, Dennis Forsythe 
wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> Derek Aldrich has just created a new hotspot:
>
>  Name:  Hy 17 below spoil site
>    State/Province:  US-SC
>    County:  US-SC-Jasper
>    Latitude:  32.121
>    Longitude:  -81.065
>
> This is the spot on Speedway Blvd ( Hy 17) below the spoil site were you
> can look over the marsh.  Currently there are a number or Roseate
> Spoonbills there.  In the past you could see shorebirds like Avocets and
> Stilt Sandpipers.  If you have any checklist for this site pelase move them
> to the new hotspot.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Dennis
>
> --
> Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
> South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
> Emeritus Professor of Biology
> The Citadel
> 171 Moultrie St,
> Charleston, SC 29409
> 843.795.3996-home
> 843.953.7264-fax
> 843.708.1605-cell
> dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
>
Subject: Hummingbirds in Costa Rica: An Opportunity
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:12:47 -0400
There may be a few Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (RTHU) lingering in the Carolina 
Piedmont this week, but by now nearly all of our Carolina hummers have flown 
south—except, of course, for those hardy individuals that seem determined to 
overwinter on the Outer Banks. 


If you think you’ll need a “hummingbird fix” before these little birds 
return next spring, consider joining me on my 25th Operation RubyThroat 
expedition to the Neotropics—this one in Guanacaste Province on the Pacific 
Coast of Coast Rica. The nine-day trip (24 Jan-1 Feb 2015) includes lots of 
opportunities for in-hand looks at numerous hummingbird species—plus other 
resident and migrant birds we encounter while banding and observing RTHU. And 
there’s plenty of time for discovering and photographing other aspects of the 
tropical dry forest, from butterflies to orchids to howler monkeys. 


For info about the upcoming trip please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/CostaRica(west)AnnounceMain15.html 
 . No field 
experience necessary. Deposit deadline is 15 November. 


Happy (Neotropical) Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============
Subject: Wings over water big day
From: Bb <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:00:10 -0400
Yesterday audrey and i led 6 die hard attendees on the 15 hr big day from lake 
phelps to pea island. We ended up with 115 species, shorebird areas that were 
kind the day before were unkind on count day! 20 species could have been added 
from 9/20 scouting. 


Highlights were barn owl, magnolia warbler, lesser scaup, am white pelican, fos 
tundra swan, 7 piping plover, surf and black scoter. 


Did not find the eurasian wigeon but afternoon winds moved the ducks far. Also 
did no see the am golden plover reported from the new inlet, lighting is tough 
out there! 


Red wolf, coyote, raccoon, deer, squirrel and a big dead nutria were neat too. 
As was hundreds of migrating monarchs, see carolinaleps for that post! 


Brian Bockhahn
Durham NC
Subject: Help document bird window collisions
From: Scott Winton <scott.winton AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 12:26:19 -0400
We've just finished intensive fall surveys on Duke University's campus and
while not all the data has been processed yet, there has been an
interesting diversity among the casualties:

Swainson's Thrush
Hermit Thrush
Veery
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Magnolia Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Chesnut-sided Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Swamp Sparrow

...are all birds that generally take a bit of birding effort to find around
Durham, yet have turned up at our feet on campus dead over the past several
weeks.  The first step in addressing this kind of problem is by gathering
good information.  All birders can help by reporting any window collision
victims to the citizen science database inaturalist.org.

See more details from Natalia Ocampo-Penuela:

*Bird-window collisions are a big problem all over the world. In the US
alone, an estimated 1 billion birds die annually. Reporting this collisions
helps us quantify this threat to move forward in preventing this
collisions. If you find a bird that hit a window, please take some time to
report it. And help us spread the word. Here's how:*

* If you have a smart phone, download the iNaturalist app so you can report
the bird-window collision easily, add a picture, and create a geotag for
the place you found the bird, at the bottom of your observation submission,
under projects choose "Bird-window collisions". If you don't know the ID of
this bird, turn on the "Need ID help" button. *

* If you don't have a smartphone, go to the iNaturalist webpage
www.inaturalist.org

 

and add your observation. Upload a picture and specify the place you found
the bird. Once you've added the observation, it gives you an option to "add
to project", choose "Bird-window collisions". If you don't know the ID of
this bird, turn on the "Need ID help" button. *

* Thank you for contributing to the science that will help us prevent these
collisions in the future!*


-- 
Scott Winton - Durham, NC
http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
Subject: Re: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds
From: Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller AT att.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 11:18:47 -0400
May your marriage last longer than ours (55 years).

Helmut & Nancy Mueller
409 Moonridge Road
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
919-942-4937
hmueller AT live.unc.edu

On Oct 19, 2014, at 11:03 PM, Bruce Smithson wrote:

> Congratulations Elisa and Nick!!   Wish you a long and loving  
> marriage filled with birdsong and a fledgling or two.
>
> Bruce Smithson
> Wilmington, New Hanover County
> North Carolina
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Scott Winton 
> To: carolinabirds 
> Sent: Sun, Oct 19, 2014 10:12 pm
> Subject: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds
>
> I'm happy to report the successful Union of two preeminent NC  
> birders, Nick Flanders and Elisa Enders, who were joined in holy  
> matrimony on the edge of Great Dismal Swamp in southern Va. on  
> Saturday!
>
> The newly weds joined Mark K., Natalia Ocampo-Penuela and I for some  
> birding in Mackay Island NWR and some other far northeastern NC  
> areas today.
>
> Scott Winton - Durham, NC
> http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
>

Subject: Sparrows @ Franklin co, N.C.
From: Paul Hubert <paulhubert123 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 06:21:32 -0400
Yesterday at work I saw and heard the first sparrows of the season- a
handfull of Song Sparrows and White-throats.  As usual, the White-throats
were singing snippets of their
"Maids, maids, maids, put on your tea kettle, ettle, ettle".  They seem to
do this for he first few weeks after arriving before hushing for the Winter.
The exact locaton of this event was the power line right-of-way on state
road 1138.
Also saw the first Hermit Thrush of the season last week in the back yard.
Paul Hubert
Raleigh, N.C.
Subject: Fwd: Piping Plover Sullivan's Island SC
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 23:08:57 -0400

> From: jford6 AT comcast.net
> Date: October 21, 2014 at 7:19:23 PM EDT
> To: Pamela Ford , CarolinaBirds 
> Subject: Re: Piping Plover Sullivan's Island SC
> 
> I need to apologize for bashing dog owners. I was unaware of October leash 
law hours on Sullivan's, dogs are allowed off leash until 12 noon, this was 
time I was there. 

> Pam Ford
> Charleston
> 
> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
> 
> 
> ------ Original Message ------
> 
> From: Pamela Ford
> To: CarolinaBirds
> Sent: October 21, 2014 at 12:48 PM
> Subject: Piping Plover Sullivan's Island SC
> 
> Saw 3 Piping Plovers today on Sullivan's Island at Station 29. One juvenile, 
another one banded and flagged, green band orange flag on left leg and a 
returning Plover reported by John Cox last winter. The third bird, green band 
left leg was also crippled, right lower leg turned under. I had photographed 
this bird last year and remember it well. Unfortunately did not have my camera 
with me. 

> If we could just get dog owners to obey leash law, we all might enjoy beach 
birding more! 

> Pam Ford
> Charleston SC 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> Bird On!
> 
Subject: Wake Co., NC-American Bittern-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2014
From: <ed.corey AT ncparks.gov>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 22:41:19 -0400 (EDT)
Very cool!  Wonder if A) this is the same one from last year and B) if it will
hang out all winter again?

Ed Corey
Raleigh, NC
Subject: RE: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
From: <mtove AT deltaforce.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 21:34:58 -0400
I agree with all this cautious commentary. Maybe there were multiple Reddish
Egrets but if so, the documentation really needs to be far better than is
presently available. However, I confess I've seen them that way before. Oh
wait. That was south Florida. Never mind.

 

Mike Tove

Cary, NC

 

From: Brian Patteson [mailto:patteson1 AT embarqmail.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 7:38 PM
To: Harry LeGrand
Cc: Nate Dias; Scott Winton; Mike Tove
Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?

 

Harry,

 

Yeah, only THREE!  LMAO. I'm afraid there are many people out there who do
not "get it" as well.  Like the guy who said maybe he saw them at Pea
Island.  Makes you feel like all that work on the status and distribution of
NC birds was worth it, I suppose.

 

Brian

 

 

 

On Oct 21, 2014, at 7:00 PM, Harry LeGrand wrote:





I almost fell off my chair when, right after Scott questioned the report of
"several" Reddish Egrets, Carson came back on and said, and I copy:  "to
clarify for everyone there were only three birds seen, not seven."

 

He still doesn't get that the species is very rare there, especially this
late in the season He still thinks that three Reddish Egrets there is not a
big deal, for after all, he or they saw Little Blues as well.   This guy is
still a relative novice, and I'm glad each of you has saved Mike Tove and me
from having to do the same on the listserve. Mike and I have questioned a
lot of folks over the years, and this was certainly something that I said
"highly unlikely". I questioned Steve Patterson about the reported Wilson's
Plover way inland recently near Clemson, I think.  I don't know what became
of all that.

 

With WOW starting any day now, I expect a bunch of birders will be combing
the refuge daily now. We shall see if any Reddish Egrets are really there. I
doubt it.

 

Harry

 

 

On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 3:08 PM, Nate Dias  wrote:



I agree with Scott in being a little hesitant to accept multiple
Reddish Egrets showing up at Mattamuskeet out of the blue.
Particularly without any details covering plumage, eye color, bill
characteristics, etc.

This is because I have never seen a Reddish Egret in fresh water -
always salt or brackish water, including all the times I have seen
them in (coastal brackish) impoundments.

Reddish Egrets are on occasion seen in pure fresh water in Florida and
along the Gulf Coast, but it is by no means a common occurrence.

So without photos or other documentation, or a report from a
walks-on-water witness like John Fussell, or any details at all, who
can blame someone for being skeptical?

Carson - if you had provided a few details that led you to that
conclusion, it might have cut down on the accusatory emails...

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC


On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 1:20 PM, Scott Winton 
wrote:
> I have to jump on the jerky skeptical bandwagon on this one...
>
> 1) In the original post there was no mention of Little Blue Herons, which
> are common in the impoundments.  Little Blues superficially resemble
Reddish
> Egrets with their reddish necks and pale blue bodies.  They've definitely
> made me look twice before and I've had other people call me saying they
> found a Reddish Egret at Mattamuskeet only to later realize it was a
Little
> Blue.  It's an easy mistake to make.
>
> 2) the wording of "...several reddish egrets..." suggests that the
observer
> didn't give this observation a whole lot of critical thought and is
> unfamiliar with their rarity in this part of the state.  One or a few
> Reddish Egrets is always worth a mention anywhere in NC, but "several"
would
> imply 5+ which would be a possible high count for NC. They also have a
> preference for tidal habitats over impoundments.
>
> Of course birds can do strange things...but if 7 Reddish Egrets really
> showed up at Mattamuskeet all at once, that's something that ought to be
> pretty carefully documented rather than casually reported and accepted.
> --
> Scott Winton - Durham, NC
> http://birdaholic.blogspot.com  
>

 

 

!DSPAM:5446ee5c190541734587522! 

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Subject: Union County Anhinga
From: drivesa3 AT aol.com <drivesa3@aol.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 22:47:24 GMT





     Forgot to mention that I was at Cane Creek Park lake.
George AndrewsIndian Tail, NC


Subject: Re: Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet 10/18
From: Scott Jackson-Ricketts <scottjr AT ls.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 18:39:33 -0400
Amen.  Inspiring photos!

Scott J-R

On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 6:34 PM, Philip Dickinson 
wrote:

> Very cool. Nate, thanks for sharing the wonderful photos.
>
> Phil Dickinson
> Winston-Salem
>
> From: Nate Dias 
> Date: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 6:02 PM
> To: Carolinabirds 
> Subject: Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet
> 10/18
>
> Sorry for the belated report, but I felt it worth mentioning.
>
> This past Saturday I met Marilyn Blizard and Pam Cohen for a birding and
> nature walk on west Kiawah Island down to Captain Sam's Inlet.  Pam is a
> professional photographer and biologist and Marilyn is a staunch defender
> of Kiawah's wildlife, particularly Diamondback Terrapins.
>
> Throughout the morning, we had multiple Merlins in sight almost
> constantly.  The most we had in view at once was three but based on plumage
> differences I think there were at least 5 Merlin present.
>
> Other birding highlights were two Reddish Egrets (immatures), White
> Pelicans, Piping Plovers, Clapper Rails chasing each other around a
> mudflat, a couple of hundred Black Skimmers, three Bald Eagles, Lesser
> Black-backed Gulls, several common shorebird species, and common terns and
> gulls.
>
> We also had the pleasure of running into Ed and Aija Konrad.  Though Aija
> was out on the point at the time, Ed was with us when we saw several
> sessions of strand feeding by Bottlenose Dolphins.  One of them surprised
> us and exploded right at our feet - too close to capture with even a small
> zoom lens!
>
> Words cannot describe the electric feeling of excitement one gets when
> watching this event close at hand.
>
> A few photos are on my Flickr page:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2
>
> If anyone is interested in visiting Captain Sam's Inlet early before
> Beachwalker Park is open - or wants to avoid paying the entrance fee, shoot
> me an email and I will describe how you can park nearby for free and walk
> to the beach.
>
> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>
Subject: Re: Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet 10/18
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 18:34:01 -0400
Very cool. Nate, thanks for sharing the wonderful photos.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

From:  Nate Dias 
Date:  Tuesday, October 21, 2014 6:02 PM
To:  Carolinabirds 
Subject:  Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet
10/18

Sorry for the belated report, but I felt it worth mentioning.

This past Saturday I met Marilyn Blizard and Pam Cohen for a birding and
nature walk on west Kiawah Island down to Captain Sam's Inlet.  Pam is a
professional photographer and biologist and Marilyn is a staunch defender of
Kiawah's wildlife, particularly Diamondback Terrapins.

Throughout the morning, we had multiple Merlins in sight almost constantly.
The most we had in view at once was three but based on plumage differences I
think there were at least 5 Merlin present.

Other birding highlights were two Reddish Egrets (immatures), White
Pelicans, Piping Plovers, Clapper Rails chasing each other around a mudflat,
a couple of hundred Black Skimmers, three Bald Eagles, Lesser Black-backed
Gulls, several common shorebird species, and common terns and gulls.

We also had the pleasure of running into Ed and Aija Konrad.  Though Aija
was out on the point at the time, Ed was with us when we saw several
sessions of strand feeding by Bottlenose Dolphins.  One of them surprised us
and exploded right at our feet - too close to capture with even a small zoom
lens!

Words cannot describe the electric feeling of excitement one gets when
watching this event close at hand.

A few photos are on my Flickr page:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

If anyone is interested in visiting Captain Sam's Inlet early before
Beachwalker Park is open - or wants to avoid paying the entrance fee, shoot
me an email and I will describe how you can park nearby for free and walk to
the beach. 

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

Subject: Great birding and marine mammal watching at Captain Sam's Inlet 10/18
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 18:02:18 -0400
Sorry for the belated report, but I felt it worth mentioning.

This past Saturday I met Marilyn Blizard and Pam Cohen for a birding and
nature walk on west Kiawah Island down to Captain Sam's Inlet.  Pam is a
professional photographer and biologist and Marilyn is a staunch defender
of Kiawah's wildlife, particularly Diamondback Terrapins.

Throughout the morning, we had multiple Merlins in sight almost
constantly.  The most we had in view at once was three but based on plumage
differences I think there were at least 5 Merlin present.

Other birding highlights were two Reddish Egrets (immatures), White
Pelicans, Piping Plovers, Clapper Rails chasing each other around a
mudflat, a couple of hundred Black Skimmers, three Bald Eagles, Lesser
Black-backed Gulls, several common shorebird species, and common terns and
gulls.

We also had the pleasure of running into Ed and Aija Konrad.  Though Aija
was out on the point at the time, Ed was with us when we saw several
sessions of strand feeding by Bottlenose Dolphins.  One of them surprised
us and exploded right at our feet - too close to capture with even a small
zoom lens!

Words cannot describe the electric feeling of excitement one gets when
watching this event close at hand.

A few photos are on my Flickr page:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2

If anyone is interested in visiting Captain Sam's Inlet early before
Beachwalker Park is open - or wants to avoid paying the entrance fee, shoot
me an email and I will describe how you can park nearby for free and walk
to the beach.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:08:16 -0400
I agree with Scott in being a little hesitant to accept multiple
Reddish Egrets showing up at Mattamuskeet out of the blue.
Particularly without any details covering plumage, eye color, bill
characteristics, etc.

This is because I have never seen a Reddish Egret in fresh water -
always salt or brackish water, including all the times I have seen
them in (coastal brackish) impoundments.

Reddish Egrets are on occasion seen in pure fresh water in Florida and
along the Gulf Coast, but it is by no means a common occurrence.

So without photos or other documentation, or a report from a
walks-on-water witness like John Fussell, or any details at all, who
can blame someone for being skeptical?

Carson - if you had provided a few details that led you to that
conclusion, it might have cut down on the accusatory emails...

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 1:20 PM, Scott Winton  wrote:
> I have to jump on the jerky skeptical bandwagon on this one...
>
> 1) In the original post there was no mention of Little Blue Herons, which
> are common in the impoundments.  Little Blues superficially resemble Reddish
> Egrets with their reddish necks and pale blue bodies.  They've definitely
> made me look twice before and I've had other people call me saying they
> found a Reddish Egret at Mattamuskeet only to later realize it was a Little
> Blue.  It's an easy mistake to make.
>
> 2) the wording of "...several reddish egrets..." suggests that the observer
> didn't give this observation a whole lot of critical thought and is
> unfamiliar with their rarity in this part of the state.  One or a few
> Reddish Egrets is always worth a mention anywhere in NC, but "several" would
> imply 5+ which would be a possible high count for NC. They also have a
> preference for tidal habitats over impoundments.
>
> Of course birds can do strange things...but if 7 Reddish Egrets really
> showed up at Mattamuskeet all at once, that's something that ought to be
> pretty carefully documented rather than casually reported and accepted.
> --
> Scott Winton - Durham, NC
> http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
>
Subject: Re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
From: Carson Wood <cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:36:58 -0400
To clarify for everyone I did not fully edit my email before sending. I have 
been dealing with numerous accusatory emails regarding my observation; to 
clarify for everyone there were only three birds seen, not seven. 


There were plenty of Little Blues there at Mattamuskeet that day.

Carson Wood
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group
PO Box 1008
Hampstead, NC 28443
910-859-9425
cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org


This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 



> On Oct 21, 2014, at 13:20, Scott Winton  wrote:
> 
> I have to jump on the jerky skeptical bandwagon on this one...
> 
> 1) In the original post there was no mention of Little Blue Herons, which are 
common in the impoundments. Little Blues superficially resemble Reddish Egrets 
with their reddish necks and pale blue bodies. They've definitely made me look 
twice before and I've had other people call me saying they found a Reddish 
Egret at Mattamuskeet only to later realize it was a Little Blue. It's an easy 
mistake to make. 

> 
> 2) the wording of "...several reddish egrets..." suggests that the observer 
didn't give this observation a whole lot of critical thought and is unfamiliar 
with their rarity in this part of the state. One or a few Reddish Egrets is 
always worth a mention anywhere in NC, but "several" would imply 5+ which would 
be a possible high count for NC. They also have a preference for tidal habitats 
over impoundments. 

> 
> Of course birds can do strange things...but if 7 Reddish Egrets really showed 
up at Mattamuskeet all at once, that's something that ought to be pretty 
carefully documented rather than casually reported and accepted. 

> -- 
> Scott Winton - Durham, NC
> http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
> 
Subject: Sora and Orange-crowned Warbler at Price Park
From: Henry Link <linkh AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:28:48 -0400
This morning Ann Walter-Fromson, Jean Murdick, Sue Cole and I found an 
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER on the Highwwoods Trail across Hobbs Road from Price 
Park in Greensboro. It was working the brushy hillside up from the trail about 
100 yards south of the big stairs and just south of the field of drainage 
rocks. In the park we found a SORA at the upper end of the marshy depression up 
the hill from the intersection of Price Park Road and the library entrance. 


Henry Link
Greensboro NC
Subject: re: Mattamuskeet reddish egrets?
From: Scott Winton <scott.winton AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:20:16 -0400
I have to jump on the jerky skeptical bandwagon on this one...

1) In the original post there was no mention of Little Blue Herons, which
are common in the impoundments.  Little Blues superficially resemble
Reddish Egrets with their reddish necks and pale blue bodies.  They've
definitely made me look twice before and I've had other people call me
saying they found a Reddish Egret at Mattamuskeet only to later realize it
was a Little Blue.  It's an easy mistake to make.

2) the wording of "...several reddish egrets..." suggests that the observer
didn't give this observation a whole lot of critical thought and is
unfamiliar with their rarity in this part of the state.  One or a few
Reddish Egrets is always worth a mention anywhere in NC, but "several"
would imply 5+ which would be a possible high count for NC. They also have
a preference for tidal habitats over impoundments.

Of course birds can do strange things...but if 7 Reddish Egrets really
showed up at Mattamuskeet all at once, that's something that ought to be
pretty carefully documented rather than casually reported and accepted.
-- 
Scott Winton - Durham, NC
http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
Subject: Piping Plover Sullivan's Island SC
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:47:28 -0400
Saw 3 Piping Plovers today on Sullivan's Island at Station 29. One juvenile, 
another one banded and flagged, green band orange flag on left leg and a 
returning Plover reported by John Cox last winter. The third bird, green band 
left leg was also crippled, right lower leg turned under. I had photographed 
this bird last year and remember it well. Unfortunately did not have my camera 
with me. 

If we could just get dog owners to obey leash law, we all might enjoy beach 
birding more! 

Pam Ford
Charleston SC 

Sent from my iPhone

Bird On!
Subject: Nashville Warbler at Conestee, Greenville, SC
From: Paul Serridge <paulserridge AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 12:35:22 -0400
Jane Kramer and I had excellent close looks at a Nashville Warbler foraging
in low shrubbery in the native plants lot near the ball fields at Lake
Conestee Park this morning.
Other birds of note:
A first-of-season female Blue-winged Teal near the West Bay obs. deck.
Two Double-crested Cormorants on the lake at the East Bay.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC
Subject: Lincoln's Sparrows continue at Brookshire Park Boone
From: Badger <badgerboy AT wilkes.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:50:20 -0400
Had two there this morning about 8 AM, behind the 2nd (last)  
professional-type soccer field.  Swamp sparrows also still present,  
two at this same location, and another by the last small soccer  
field, at the little gravel parking lot.

Guy McGrane
Deep Gap, NC
Subject: Re: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:49:56 -0400
Congratulations to Elisa and Nick!

(This reminds me of when two birders--forget their names--got married [by Rich 
Boyd] on the Pamlico County Christmas Bird Count, back in the 1980's.) 


John Fussell
Morehead City, NC


  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Scott Winton 
  To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu 
  Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2014 10:11 PM
  Subject: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds


 I'm happy to report the successful Union of two preeminent NC birders, Nick 
Flanders and Elisa Enders, who were joined in holy matrimony on the edge of 
Great Dismal Swamp in southern Va. on Saturday! 



 The newly weds joined Mark K., Natalia Ocampo-Penuela and I for some birding 
in Mackay Island NWR and some other far northeastern NC areas today. High winds 
kept the rails silent at Mackay, but we saw Virginia, Sora and King all fly out 
of the marsh at dusk at Back Bay NWR (Va.) on Saturday. Maybe this is a normal 
occurrence with rails during fall migration, but I had never seen them all just 
emerge from a marsh like this before! 



 Best birds today were a late Black Tern following behind the ferry to 
Currituck and a Gray-cheeked Thrush at Merchant's Millpond SP. 



 Yesterday we picked a Cave Swallow out from the Trees at Back Bay NWR, so keep 
an eye out! 



  -- 
  Scott Winton - Durham, NC
  http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
Subject: Reddish Egrets observed at Mattamuseet NWR
From: <susan AT ncaves.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 07:44:14 -0700
All,

Although Caron Wood's report of multiple Reddish Egrets at Mattamuskeet
is unprecedented, I find it believable.  The habitat is certainly
appropriate.  The Mattamuskeet area is a popular destination but I
personally believe is underbirded--even in winter.  As many of you know,
"odd" waders (Great White Herons, White-faced Ibis) have been showing up
there in recent years. 
 
Now I suspect more of us will be looking a lot more closely at each
white bird we see at the refuge...

Susan Campbell
Whispering Pines, NC
Subject: North River Farms and Cape Lookout, NC on Sunday
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 09:10:41 -0400
On Sunday, several of us checked North River Farms and Cape Lookout.

We went into North River Farms first thing in the morning, for about an 
hour.  Birds there included an American Bittern standing in the middle of 
the road for several minutes, 4 White-crowned Sparrows, and my 
first-of-season Orange-crowned Warbler.

We were hoping for another migrant fallout (like the one we had two weeks 
ago) at Cape Lookout.  The ferry (which doesn't leave until 0915 this time 
of year) made a couple of side trips on the way out, and we didn't get to 
start birding until about 1000.  Plus, variety wasn't quite what we hoped 
for, with the dreaded shift to most warblers being Yellow-rumpeds and Palms.

Still, we had a fun time out there.  Warbler species, in addition to the 
Yellow-rumpeds, Palms, and Yellowthroats, were American Redstart, Cape May, 
Northern Parula, Magnolia, Black-throated Blue, and Black-throated Green. 
The Black-throated Green put on a nice extended show for us, very low and 
close and in nice light, as we sat eating lunch on a cottage porch.  Other 
migrants included 15 Yellow-billed Cuckoos and 2 Swainson's Thrushes.

As expected, there were many "winter birds" as well, including 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (about 30), Eastern Phoebe (only about 50 this 
week), Blue-headed Vireo, House Wren (15), Brown Creeper, Golden-crowned 
Kinglet, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Cedar Waxwing.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Union County, NC, Anhinga
From: drivesa3 AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 22:26:12 -0400
 Kayaking on this windy afternoon, I passed a cove that held the usual 4 
immature Double-crested Cormorants and also, 4 Anhingas! I would love to say 
that they were there when I left, but after a couple of not-so-good pics taken 
on the choppy main lake, I tried to sneak into the cove on some calmer water 
for a better pic. I did get a better pic, but it was of one airborne as they 
bugged out! 

 Pics here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95580865 AT N07/15564416646/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95580865 AT N07/14967362194/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95580865 AT N07/15588948002/

 I also saw a "water dance" (who makes up these names?!) of 7 Pied-billed 
Grebes, the largest group I've seen on the lake. 


 George Andrews
 Indian Trail, NC
Subject: RE: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 22:54:05 +0000
Maybe Carson mixed his notes with Pea Island?

Shun and I did not see any Reddish at Mattamuskeet and we scanned the 
impoundments right after you guys left. Tons of other egrets including Cattle, 
Great, Snowy, Little Blue (White and Blue morphs) a couple Tricolor and a 
couple Great Blues. That being said it's a pretty big place and there has been 
a lot of Reddish in the coastal marshes lately. It's possible 3 were traveling 
together after the rude cold snap and stopped for a snack. 


We did get the Tundra Swans and they even flew right over us hooting as they do 
which is always impressive. 


Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC


From: Philip Dickinson [mailto:pdickins AT triad.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 6:33 PM
To: Brian Patteson; Carson Wood
Cc: CBC
Subject: Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC

I just did an ebird check for all Mattamuskeet ebird hotspots. The only 
previous Reddish Egret reported at the lake on ebird was on 12/9/07. So, I must 
agree with Brian. 


Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

From: Brian Patteson 
> 

Date: Monday, October 20, 2014 6:26 PM
To: Carson Wood >
Cc: Carolinabirds >
Subject: Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC

"Several" Reddish Egrets sounds pretty strong for Mattamuskeet.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

On Oct 20, 2014, at 10:51 AM, Carson Wood wrote:


Correction we were at New Field between North and South Pond, thanks to Kent 
Fiala for clarifying. 

Carson Wood
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group
PO Box 1008
Hampstead, NC 28443
910-859-9425
cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org




This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 



On Oct 20, 2014, at 9:35, Carson Wood 
> wrote: 

Hi All,

Spent a very windy morning on Pea Is. yesterday enjoying the great duck weather 
with James Abbott. We re-sighted the EURASIAN WIGEON on the north side of South 
Pond from the third observation platform looking south at approximately 0800. 
He was mixed with AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN PINTAIL, and AMERICAN BLACK DUCK. 
Along with them were 5 AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN and 11 AMERICAN AVOCET. We 
estimated that between the two ponds there were approximately 15000 mixed duck 
species! Along the edge of the North Pond James sighted a GOLDEN-CROWNED 
KINGLET. 


We then proceeded to Lake Mattamuskeet NWR where along the way we counted 40 
AMERICAN KESTREL perched on power lines. Upon arriving at Mattamuskeet we 
stopped at the refuge entrance and scopped the marshy area there. There were 
several REDDISH EGRETS and the best spotting was 3 early TUNDRA SWAN that we 
told Jamie Adams about. A second year BALD EAGLE and 3 NORTHERN HARRIERS were 
it for raptors. 


Looks like it may be a good duck year at Lake Mattamuskeet.

Happy Birding!

Carson Wood
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group
PO Box 1008
Hampstead, NC 28443
910-859-9425
cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org




This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 



********************** IMPORTANT--PLEASE READ ************************ This 
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contain PROPRIETARY or LEGALLY PRIVILEGED information. If you are not the 
intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, disclosure, copying, 
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Subject: Wake Co., NC-American Bittern-Prairie Ridge Ecostation-10/20/2014
From: Mike Turner <wmike.turner AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:46:39 -0400
Today I flushed an American Bittern from the edge of the small pond and
watched it fly toward the large pond. About an hour later I found it
"hiding" among the cattails at the edge of the large pond. Pics can be seen
here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/61962421 AT N05/. Good birding.

Mike Turner
Raleigh, NC
Subject: Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC
From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins AT triad.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:33:29 -0400
I just did an ebird check for all Mattamuskeet ebird hotspots. The only
previous Reddish Egret reported at the lake on ebird was on 12/9/07. So, I
must agree with Brian.

Phil Dickinson
Winston-Salem

From:  Brian Patteson 
Date:  Monday, October 20, 2014 6:26 PM
To:  Carson Wood 
Cc:  Carolinabirds 
Subject:  Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC

"Several" Reddish Egrets sounds pretty strong for Mattamuskeet.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

On Oct 20, 2014, at 10:51 AM, Carson Wood wrote:

> Correction we were at New Field between North and South Pond, thanks to Kent
> Fiala for clarifying.
> 
> Carson Wood
> Biologist
> Coastal Plain Conservation Group
> PO Box 1008 
> Hampstead, NC 28443 
> 910-859-9425 
> cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org 
> www.coastalplaincg.org 
> 
> 
> This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended
> solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If
> you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately.
> 
> 
> On Oct 20, 2014, at 9:35, Carson Wood  wrote:
> 
>> Hi All,
>> 
>> Spent a very windy morning on Pea Is. yesterday enjoying the great duck
>> weather with James Abbott. We re-sighted the EURASIAN WIGEON on the north
>> side of South Pond from the third observation platform looking south at
>> approximately 0800. He was mixed with AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN PINTAIL, and
>> AMERICAN BLACK DUCK. Along with them were 5 AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN and 11
>> AMERICAN AVOCET. We estimated that between the two ponds there were
>> approximately 15000 mixed duck species! Along the edge of the North Pond
>> James sighted a GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET.
>> 
>> We then proceeded to Lake Mattamuskeet NWR where along the way we counted 40
>> AMERICAN KESTREL perched on power lines. Upon arriving at Mattamuskeet we
>> stopped at the refuge entrance and scopped the marshy area there. There were
>> several REDDISH EGRETS and the best spotting was 3 early TUNDRA SWAN that we
>> told Jamie Adams about. A second year BALD EAGLE and 3 NORTHERN HARRIERS 
were 

>> it for raptors. 
>> 
>> Looks like it may be a good duck year at Lake Mattamuskeet.
>> 
>> Happy Birding!
>> 
>> Carson Wood
>> Biologist
>> Coastal Plain Conservation Group
>> PO Box 1008 
>> Hampstead, NC 28443 
>> 910-859-9425 
>> cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org 
>> www.coastalplaincg.org 
>> 
>> 
>> This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended
>> solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. 
If 

>> you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately.
>> 


Subject: Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1 AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:26:46 -0400
"Several" Reddish Egrets sounds pretty strong for Mattamuskeet.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras

On Oct 20, 2014, at 10:51 AM, Carson Wood wrote:

> Correction we were at New Field between North and South Pond, thanks to Kent 
Fiala for clarifying. 

> 
> Carson Wood
> Biologist
> Coastal Plain Conservation Group
> PO Box 1008
> Hampstead, NC 28443
> 910-859-9425
> cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
> www.coastalplaincg.org
> 
> 
> This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 

> 
> 
> On Oct 20, 2014, at 9:35, Carson Wood  wrote:
> 
>> Hi All,
>> 
>> Spent a very windy morning on Pea Is. yesterday enjoying the great duck 
weather with James Abbott. We re-sighted the EURASIAN WIGEON on the north side 
of South Pond from the third observation platform looking south at 
approximately 0800. He was mixed with AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN PINTAIL, and 
AMERICAN BLACK DUCK. Along with them were 5 AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN and 11 
AMERICAN AVOCET. We estimated that between the two ponds there were 
approximately 15000 mixed duck species! Along the edge of the North Pond James 
sighted a GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET. 

>> 
>> We then proceeded to Lake Mattamuskeet NWR where along the way we counted 40 
AMERICAN KESTREL perched on power lines. Upon arriving at Mattamuskeet we 
stopped at the refuge entrance and scopped the marshy area there. There were 
several REDDISH EGRETS and the best spotting was 3 early TUNDRA SWAN that we 
told Jamie Adams about. A second year BALD EAGLE and 3 NORTHERN HARRIERS were 
it for raptors. 

>> 
>> Looks like it may be a good duck year at Lake Mattamuskeet.
>> 
>> Happy Birding!
>> 
>> Carson Wood
>> Biologist
>> Coastal Plain Conservation Group
>> PO Box 1008
>> Hampstead, NC 28443
>> 910-859-9425
>> cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
>> www.coastalplaincg.org
>> 
>> 
>> This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 

>> 
Subject: Butter-butts
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:20:16 -0400
First Yellow-rumped Warbler arrived today.


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Meck Audubon November Meeting (Thursday 11/06): Conserving Breeding Habitat for Grassland Birds in a Changing Agricultural Landscape
From: Christy Hill <chill2k5 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:10:42 -0400 (EDT)
MAS presents – Conserving Breeding Habitat for Grassland Birds in a Changing
Agricultural Landscape
When  - Thurs, Nov 6th at 7:30 PM (Refreshments begin around 7:15 pm)
Where - Tyvola Rd Senior Center, 2225 Tyvola Rd, Charlotte, NC 28210
More info - http://meckbirds.org

Grassland birds are declining at staggering rates across the United States. At
the November MAS meeting, Jessie Birckhead, Conservation Coordinator for the NC
Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, will address challenges facing grassland
birds in agricultural landscapes in her presentation "Conserving Breeding
Habitat for Grassland Birds in a Changing Agricultural Landscape". She will
share stories of projects working to accommodate breeding grassland bird
habitat in North Carolina and beyond. 

Jessie Birckhead is Conservation Coordinator with the NC Chapter of The Nature
Conservancy based in Durham, NC.  She earned her B.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife
Management from North Carolina State University, and her M.S. in Wildlife
Science from the University of Tennessee, where her thesis research focused on
integrating grassland bird habitat into beef cattle management practices. She
has worked as an environmental educator with the North Carolina Museum of
Natural Sciences and as a lobbyist for the Tennessee Wildlife Federation. In
her spare time she enjoys birding, hiking, and hunting with her husband and
their border collie. 

Visit our merch tables for a nice selection of club and birding merchandise
including Brown-headed Nuthatch boxes ($15 each) and new 2015 MAS Calendars
($20 each). Be sure to sample some Birds & Beans Bird Friendly® coffee during
the meeting then purchase a bag for yourself or a friend. Pre-orders will also
be placed for pick-up at the next month’s meeting. Feel free to contact Jan
Fowler at janmfowler AT gmail.com or Bill Duston at bduston AT carolina.rr.com if you
have any questions about Birds & Beans and fulfilling your Bird Friendly®
coffee needs. Help the birds by drinking great tasting Bird Friendly® coffee! 


Look forward to seeing you Thursday November 6th at 7:30pm at the Tyvola Road
Senior Center, 2225 Tyvola Road, Charlotte, NC 28210. If you know of others you
think may be interested, please let them know.

Christy Hill
MAS Publicity
Charlotte, NC
Subject: Bio blitz for St. Christopher, Seabrook Isl. 4/25/15
From: David Gardner <davidgardner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:40:32 -0400
Hi folks,
Here is the first invitation to St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center's 
annual Bioblitz. 

It will be held on the Saturday after Earth Day: 4/25/2015.
Please mark your calendars.
This will be a community wide event for folks to visit and learn about local 
biodiversity while observing and helping teams of herpetologists, birders, 
entomologists, botanists, mycologists etc... In finding as many species as 
possible within the given time frame (midnight till 5pm). 

St. Christopher is partnering with the Seabrook Island wildlife committee and 
POA to produce a fun and enjoyable experience for all ages and expertise. 

Please let me know if you would be interested. And please pass this email on to 
any of your contacts that could provide valuable expertise. 

Thank you in advance, and I hope to see many of you there.
Happy Birding,
David

David Gardner
Director of Environmental Education
St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center
2810 Seabrook Island Road
Seabrook Island, SC 29455
843-737-2729

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ft Fisher NC
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 12:57:24 -0400
Great morning at Ft fisher. 
I had a flyover Common Loon at Federal Point. Seaside and Saltmarsh/Nelson's 
sparrows were present. Clapper Rails were seen and heard. About 150 shorebirds 
present on the rocks. Mostly Willets, oystercatchers, godwits, Semi Plovers, 
with a Least sandpiper and some turnstones in there. 


Basin trail was good today. Merlin and Peregrine Falcon were patrolling the 
area. More Seasides and a harrier too. Good looks at Marsh, House, and a Sedge 
Wren. Best bird was a Nashville Warbler in the yellow flowers at the end of the 
trail. 


Clay-colored Sparrow was at the aquarium parking lot. Great looks. 

A Caspian Tern flew over at Coquina Rocks. 

Flickers, blue jays, yellow rumps, palms, and Yellow-billed Cuckoos were out in 
force. 


Ryan Justice
Raleigh

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC
From: Carson Wood <cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:51:32 -0400
Correction we were at New Field between North and South Pond, thanks to Kent 
Fiala for clarifying. 


Carson Wood
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group
PO Box 1008
Hampstead, NC 28443
910-859-9425
cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org


This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 



> On Oct 20, 2014, at 9:35, Carson Wood  wrote:
> 
> Hi All,
> 
> Spent a very windy morning on Pea Is. yesterday enjoying the great duck 
weather with James Abbott. We re-sighted the EURASIAN WIGEON on the north side 
of South Pond from the third observation platform looking south at 
approximately 0800. He was mixed with AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN PINTAIL, and 
AMERICAN BLACK DUCK. Along with them were 5 AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN and 11 
AMERICAN AVOCET. We estimated that between the two ponds there were 
approximately 15000 mixed duck species! Along the edge of the North Pond James 
sighted a GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET. 

> 
> We then proceeded to Lake Mattamuskeet NWR where along the way we counted 40 
AMERICAN KESTREL perched on power lines. Upon arriving at Mattamuskeet we 
stopped at the refuge entrance and scopped the marshy area there. There were 
several REDDISH EGRETS and the best spotting was 3 early TUNDRA SWAN that we 
told Jamie Adams about. A second year BALD EAGLE and 3 NORTHERN HARRIERS were 
it for raptors. 

> 
> Looks like it may be a good duck year at Lake Mattamuskeet.
> 
> Happy Birding!
> 
> Carson Wood
> Biologist
> Coastal Plain Conservation Group
> PO Box 1008
> Hampstead, NC 28443
> 910-859-9425
> cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
> www.coastalplaincg.org
> 
> 
> This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 

> 
Subject: Birds Out, Birds In
From: John Connors <jconnorsbird AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:45:08 -0400
Small flocks of roosting Chimney Swifts persisted in the downtown Raleigh
through last Friday, October 17 and then, with the passage of the cold
front, they have gone. Safe travels...
In their place White-throated Sparrows arrived on what was a chilly Sunday
morning, October 19. I grabbed a cup of hot coffee and ventured
outside...there were a number of them chirping from the various bushy edges
of my yard. Welcome back.
This morning as I opened the lid to the metal trash can where I store my
bird seed, I heard a number of them start chirping. I don't think I
startled them...I think some of them remember the dinner bell from last
year. A half hour later more than a dozen were feeding on the seed
scattered on the lawn.  JC
Subject: Pea Is. and Lake Mattamuskeet NWR, NC
From: Carson Wood <cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:35:27 -0400
Hi All,

Spent a very windy morning on Pea Is. yesterday enjoying the great duck weather 
with James Abbott. We re-sighted the EURASIAN WIGEON on the north side of South 
Pond from the third observation platform looking south at approximately 0800. 
He was mixed with AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN PINTAIL, and AMERICAN BLACK DUCK. 
Along with them were 5 AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN and 11 AMERICAN AVOCET. We 
estimated that between the two ponds there were approximately 15000 mixed duck 
species! Along the edge of the North Pond James sighted a GOLDEN-CROWNED 
KINGLET. 


We then proceeded to Lake Mattamuskeet NWR where along the way we counted 40 
AMERICAN KESTREL perched on power lines. Upon arriving at Mattamuskeet we 
stopped at the refuge entrance and scopped the marshy area there. There were 
several REDDISH EGRETS and the best spotting was 3 early TUNDRA SWAN that we 
told Jamie Adams about. A second year BALD EAGLE and 3 NORTHERN HARRIERS were 
it for raptors. 


Looks like it may be a good duck year at Lake Mattamuskeet.

Happy Birding!

Carson Wood
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group
PO Box 1008
Hampstead, NC 28443
910-859-9425
cdwood AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org


This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 

Subject: sapsuckers return
From: "Olwen jarvis" <Olwen AT suddenlink.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:29:12 -0400
We counted four sapsuckers, two Pine warblers and two Yellow-rumped warblers
during our ecount on Friday. Total species count 37

 

Mrs. Olwen Jarvis.

New Bern, 

Craven county, NC

 
Subject: correction on the Peanut feeder for warblers
From: Linda Ward <tankapoet2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 05:52:38 -0700
Sorry, I typed  "peanut" instead of peanut butter feeder....but now that I
recall, we actually did have a pine warbler come to a peanut feeder...the
type you put split peanuts in wire mesh.

Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC
Subject: Re: Siskins and Vultures at Grandfather Mountain
From: Dwayne Martin <redxbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 08:18:29 -0400
Some folks in Tennessee are already reporting Pine Siskins, so they might
be making their move toward us already.

Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
redxbill AT gmail.com

http://naturalsciences.org/research-collections/research-specialties/birds/nc-hummingbirds 


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
St. Stephens Park - Hickory, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
http://www.ncbirdingtrail.org/TrailGuide/Guide_CatawbaValley.pdf

On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 8:15 AM, Jesse Pope 
wrote:

> Sorry for the late posting but I wanted to pass along a weekend update
> from Grandfather. A few folks on our naturalist and ranger staff got to see
> a few little kettles of Turkey Vultures pass through on Friday/Saturday. We
> were busy in the park with lots of leaf peepers so observations were
> casual.  The largest kettle was about 32 birds. A few other 5-7 vulture
> kettles also passed through. Yesterday I got to see the largest flock of
> pine siskins I've seen in a while. They were flying around the top shop
> visitor center area and roughly 75 birds. They were really working the red
> spruce just behind and below the building for a couple hours. I didn't see
> what direction they were headed when they left the area but maybe they will
> find the feeders at the nature museum and stick around a while. I wonder if
> it is a sign of things to come?? It's a little early for large flocks of
> siskins! Not much else to report up here. Things have slowed down
> considerably in regards to migrants activity but we are keeping our eyes
> open for the rarities that could show up this time of year. We should hit
> the turkey vulture peak migration in the coming weeks. If you haven't
> observed vultures kettling like broad wings in the mountains before, it's
> as cool as the hawk migration in my book! The numbers are lower but
> seemingly less coordinated birds trying to form tight kettles while
> battling November winds is always entertaining to me!! The birds almost
> appear to sparkle as the white underwings contrast with the dark birds
> around them. Pretty cool indeed.
>
> Jesse Pope
>
> Newland, NC
> (C) 828-898-3012
> (W) 828-733-3224
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Siskins and Vultures at Grandfather Mountain
From: Jesse Pope <highcountrybirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 08:15:04 -0400
Sorry for the late posting but I wanted to pass along a weekend update from 
Grandfather. A few folks on our naturalist and ranger staff got to see a few 
little kettles of Turkey Vultures pass through on Friday/Saturday. We were busy 
in the park with lots of leaf peepers so observations were casual. The largest 
kettle was about 32 birds. A few other 5-7 vulture kettles also passed through. 
Yesterday I got to see the largest flock of pine siskins I've seen in a while. 
They were flying around the top shop visitor center area and roughly 75 birds. 
They were really working the red spruce just behind and below the building for 
a couple hours. I didn't see what direction they were headed when they left the 
area but maybe they will find the feeders at the nature museum and stick around 
a while. I wonder if it is a sign of things to come?? It's a little early for 
large flocks of siskins! Not much else to report up here. Things have slowed 
down considerably in regards to migrants activity but we are keeping our eyes 
open for the rarities that could show up this time of year. We should hit the 
turkey vulture peak migration in the coming weeks. If you haven't observed 
vultures kettling like broad wings in the mountains before, it's as cool as the 
hawk migration in my book! The numbers are lower but seemingly less coordinated 
birds trying to form tight kettles while battling November winds is always 
entertaining to me!! The birds almost appear to sparkle as the white underwings 
contrast with the dark birds around them. Pretty cool indeed. 


Jesse Pope 

Newland, NC
(C) 828-898-3012
(W) 828-733-3224
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Warblers and peanut butter feeders, NC
From: Linda Ward <tankapoet2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 05:06:37 -0700
We've had three warbler species come to our peanut feeder (which we mix
with corn meal): yellow-throated, yellow-rumped and pine warbler. The pine
most often.

Our first of season sapsucker was sighted here in Coinjock a few days ago.

Linda Ward and Skip Hancock
Coinjock, NC
Subject: New Hotspot
From: Dennis Forsythe <dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 07:54:15 -0400
Hi All,

Derek Aldrich has just created a new hotspot:

 Name:  Hy 17 below spoil site
   State/Province:  US-SC
   County:  US-SC-Jasper
   Latitude:  32.121
   Longitude:  -81.065

This is the spot on Speedway Blvd ( Hy 17) below the spoil site were you
can look over the marsh.  Currently there are a number or Roseate
Spoonbills there.  In the past you could see shorebirds like Avocets and
Stilt Sandpipers.  If you have any checklist for this site pelase move them
to the new hotspot.

Thanks,

Dennis

-- 
Dennis M. Forsythe PhD
South Carolina Ebird Reviewer
Emeritus Professor of Biology
The Citadel
171 Moultrie St,
Charleston, SC 29409
843.795.3996-home
843.953.7264-fax
843.708.1605-cell
dennis.forsythe AT gmail.com
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Mattamuskeet, NC
From: Jamie Adams <Jamie.Adams AT quintiles.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 11:48:12 +0000
Shun Endo and I had a good day birding Pea Island and Mattamuskeet yesterday. 
The only really notable bird was a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher which was 
extremely obliging and allowed many close photos. This bird was on a wire about 
2-3 miles east on 264 from the main entrance to Mattamuskeet. I would have 
posted real time but cell service stinks there. 


Pea Island had thousands of ducks in the middle impoundment and despite other 
reports of Eurasian Wigeons we dipped because we lost patience with the wind 
and sun glare. However multiple credible sources confirmed seeing at least one 
in the morning. 


There were three Tundra Swans in the big impoundment at Mattamuskeet. The water 
is still low in the main impoundment but things are starting to liven up. 
Clouds of Tree Swallows and Yellow-rumps and made things interesting in the 
air. Shun had a Lincoln's sparrow and we had Sora calling in the inner 
impoundments. 


On Lake Mattamuskeet we saw more American Wigeon congregated than I have seen 
before. 


We had about 70 or so species on the day.

Altogether a great day to be alive.

Jamie Adams
Wilmington, NC


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Subject: Re: Bodie Island lighthouse pond, Dare Cty, NC
From: TBT <cssjar AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 07:15:06 -0400
Heard Virginia Rails off platform around 11:45 or so yesterday
See you Tuesday 
Cheers
Christine Stoughton-Root

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 18, 2014, at 9:38 PM, Audrey  wrote:
> 
> Hey Birders,
> 
> I got to run out to Bodie Island late afternoon today but all was quiet. 
Total of 4 N. sHOVELERS, 8 A. BLACK DUCKS, 1 N. PINTAIL and many PIED-BILLED 
GREBES seen from the tower behind the lighthouse. Lots of MARSH WRENS too but 
no Sedge or rails heard. Water level high. 

> 
> NW Winds tonight so hoping for a morning of migrants on north Pea Island, 
stay tuned!! 

> 
> See some of u at WOW this coming week!!
> 
> Audrey Whitlock
> Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL
> 
> Sent from iPhone
> 
Subject: Re: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds
From: Bruce Smithson <brucesmithson AT netscape.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 23:03:55 -0400
Congratulations Elisa and Nick!! Wish you a long and loving marriage filled 
with birdsong and a fledgling or two. 

 
Bruce Smithson
Wilmington, New Hanover County
North Carolina
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Scott Winton 
To: carolinabirds 
Sent: Sun, Oct 19, 2014 10:12 pm
Subject: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds



I'm happy to report the successful Union of two preeminent NC birders, Nick 
Flanders and Elisa Enders, who were joined in holy matrimony on the edge of 
Great Dismal Swamp in southern Va. on Saturday! 



The newly weds joined Mark K., Natalia Ocampo-Penuela and I for some birding in 
Mackay Island NWR and some other far northeastern NC areas today. 


Scott Winton - Durham, NC
http://birdaholic.blogspot.com



Subject: A birder marriage and far northeastern NC birds
From: Scott Winton <scott.winton AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:11:47 -0400
I'm happy to report the successful Union of two preeminent NC birders, Nick
Flanders and Elisa Enders, who were joined in holy matrimony on the edge of
Great Dismal Swamp in southern Va. on Saturday!

The newly weds joined Mark K., Natalia Ocampo-Penuela and I for some
birding in Mackay Island NWR and some other far northeastern NC areas
today.  High winds kept the rails silent at Mackay, but we saw Virginia,
Sora and King all fly out of the marsh at dusk at Back Bay NWR (Va.) on
Saturday.  Maybe this is a normal occurrence with rails during fall
migration, but I had never seen them all just emerge from a marsh like this
before!

Best birds today were a late Black Tern following behind the ferry to
Currituck and a Gray-cheeked Thrush at Merchant's Millpond SP.

Yesterday we picked a Cave Swallow out from the Trees at Back Bay NWR, so
keep an eye out!

-- 
Scott Winton - Durham, NC
http://birdaholic.blogspot.com
Subject: Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, SC
From: Ann Truesdale <anntrue AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:10:30 -0400
Winter is on the way -- or at least it is if we believe an influx of 
Yellow-rumped Warblers is any indication. We also saw several migrating 
hawks, plus a "discussion" between the local nesting pair of Bald Eagles 
with an intruder eagle in their territory. Is there a better way to 
spend a lovely October morning than seeing what is new in the local 
avian population?

-- 
Ann Truesdale
anntrue AT mindspring.com
Meggett, Charleston Co., SC


Magnolia Gardens, Charleston, US-SC
Oct 19, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Sunday morning bird walk with Perry Nugent.
52 species (+1 other taxa)

Wood Duck  8
Blue-winged Teal  130
Pied-billed Grebe  8
Anhinga  3
Great Blue Heron  1
Great Egret  3
Snowy Egret  1
Green Heron  1
White Ibis  5
Black Vulture  3
Turkey Vulture  25
Osprey  1
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
Cooper's Hawk  1
Bald Eagle  3
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  3
Sora  15     heard, river impoundments
Common Gallinule  4
American Coot  6     river impoundments
Ring-billed Gull  2
Mourning Dove  1
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  15
Downy Woodpecker  6
Northern Flicker  4
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  8
White-eyed Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  8
American Crow  10
Fish Crow  15
crow sp.  30
Tree Swallow  4
Carolina Chickadee  50
Tufted Titmouse  20
Carolina Wren  40
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Eastern Bluebird  4
Gray Catbird  8
Northern Mockingbird  6
Black-and-white Warbler  3
Common Yellowthroat  6
American Redstart  4
Northern Parula  1
Pine Warbler  6
Yellow-rumped Warbler  75  Many in the edge of the swamp garden closest 
to the slave cabins and a few scattered elsewhere.
Northern Cardinal  30
Blue Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  40
Common Grackle  10

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20282232

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Subject: Am White Pelicans - Wrightsville Beach NC
From: KD Edwards <sparverius AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 21:42:49 -0400
May be old news these days but new for me at this location... I spotted 30 
American White Pelicans kettling over the north end of Wrightsville Beach in 
New Hanover County, NC before heading south along the beach around 4:30 on 
Sunday afternoon (19 Oct). 


Dean Edwards
Knoxville, TN

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Black Tern, Currituck Sound, NC and other birds
From: Elisa Enders <elisaenders AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 21:29:15 -0400
Today, Nick Flanders and I birded with Natalia Ocampo-Peuela, Scott Winton, 
and Mark Kosiewski in northeastern North Carolina. While riding the ferry from 
Knotts Island to Currituck (Currituck County), a 1st year/winter-plumaged Black 
Tern was observed following the ferry vessel, at the back of a gull and tern 
flock (about 30 Laughing Gulls, up to 3 Forster's Terns, up to 5 Ring-billed 
Gulls, and a flyby Great Black-backed Gull). This is a fairly late date for 
this fall migrant (the Black Tern). 

 
On the Knotts Island causeway, at the Charles Kuralt Trail overlook, a large 
flock of Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal was seen. Also 3 Northern Pintail 
and American Black Ducks were observed. 

 
Earlier in the morning, Nick and I saw, along the causeway road, Wood Ducks and 
6 flyby American Wigeon. Soras and Virginia Rails (2 each) were heard. 

 
Later in the afternoon, a Gray-cheeked Thrush was observed feeding in 
Beautyberry, near the boat ramp at Merchants Millpond State Park (Gates 
County). 


Elisa Flanders
Portsmouth, VA

 
 		 	   		  
Subject: swallow flock Saturday 18 October, Outer Banks
From: Stephen Johnson <stevejohnson2 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 20:11:27 -0400
Sorry for the late report here, but just for the record -- --

Saturday afternoon around 4-5 PM we had a fairly tight flock of at least 50 
swallows fly south over the dunes at Salvo, NC. They were most likely Tree 
Swallow, but hard to ID without binocs as they passed quickly southward. It 
definitely looked like a migration flight, no stopping for foraging sallies, 
etc. 


The only alternate ID here would be Bank or Northern Rough-Wing - they were 
mostly white underneath, and no dark heads like Barn or Cliff. 


This morning I came home to Virginia after 7.5 wonderful days in Dare County 
(and two forays into Tyrrell). One of the best highlights for me was about 8-10 
total Peregrine Falcon sightings. The other was the very friendly and 
knowledgable group of birders on the weekly Friday bird walk at Pea Island, led 
by Neal, Peggy, and one other expert and friendly birder. Thanks, folks!! 


Steve Johnson
(back on the nest at Fairfax, Virginia)
Subject: No Subject
From: gidrkline AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 19:37:58 -0400
Sat,19 Oct 2014--noon from Jeff Kline Gidrkline AT aol.com Subject: White Winged 
Dove, Botany Bay preserve, Edisto Island, SC 


Charleston Audubon all had a very good look at a White Winged Dove flying to 
and fro to a telephone wire, next to parking lot of the barrier Island walkway 
to the beach boneyard --- Bird showed white on wings coming and going to the 
wire, white lateral stripe when perched---black cheek patch prominent- tail 
wider than mourning dove- loner---Jeff Kline Charleston,SC 
Subject: Re: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
From: Dwayne Martin <redxbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 18:01:43 -0400
I've seen them eating grape jelly from a feeder before.

Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
redxbill AT gmail.com

http://naturalsciences.org/research-collections/research-specialties/birds/nc-hummingbirds 


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
St. Stephens Park - Hickory, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
http://www.ncbirdingtrail.org/TrailGuide/Guide_CatawbaValley.pdf

On Sun, Oct 19, 2014 at 5:17 PM, Brian Pendergraft 
wrote:

> Has anybody ever seen a Black - throated Blue Warbler visiting this
> feeder?  Currently looking at a female nibbling away.  Hanky and all.
>
> Never seen it.
>
Subject: Re: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:58:35 -0400
You'd be surprised at the birds that hit the peanut butter.  I coat a
couple of pine cones and hang them from thin branches (so the raccoons
can't get to them.)  I wind up coating them each day because all the peanut
butter gets lapped up.

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages

On Sun, Oct 19, 2014 at 5:46 PM, Brian Pendergraft 
wrote:

> So this knucklehead warbler has been back 4 times to the peanut butter.
> Wow.
>
> Ok. You won't see another email about it.  Dang exciting though.
>
> Brian Pendergraft
> Falls Lake NC
> On Oct 19, 2014 5:31 PM, "Judy Halleron"  wrote:
>
>> No, not at a peanut feeder.  But I have watched a female Black-throated
>> Blue drink at a hummingbird feeder.  She would land one one side, tipping
>> it slightly and drink the sweet stuff.  She (or a friend) came back
>> numerous times over a day or two so it wasn't an accident.  Birds are
>> amazing!
>>
>> Judy Halleron
>> Marble, NC
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>> Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:17:41 -0400
>> Subject: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
>> From: bkpendergraft AT gmail.com
>> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
>>
>> Has anybody ever seen a Black - throated Blue Warbler visiting this
>> feeder?  Currently looking at a female nibbling away.  Hanky and all.
>>
>> Never seen it.
>>
>
Subject: Sapsuckers
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:55:20 -0400
And the Sapsuckers have arrived today ;)  I knew they were here this a.m.
because no bird pounds the tree trunks and vines like these guys do.
Finally got a look at two.  Well the back of one and a profile of another.
Usually they arrive with an immature but no sign of that yet.


K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: RE: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:46:34 -0400
So this knucklehead warbler has been back 4 times to the peanut butter.
Wow.

Ok. You won't see another email about it.  Dang exciting though.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC
On Oct 19, 2014 5:31 PM, "Judy Halleron"  wrote:

> No, not at a peanut feeder.  But I have watched a female Black-throated
> Blue drink at a hummingbird feeder.  She would land one one side, tipping
> it slightly and drink the sweet stuff.  She (or a friend) came back
> numerous times over a day or two so it wasn't an accident.  Birds are
> amazing!
>
> Judy Halleron
> Marble, NC
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:17:41 -0400
> Subject: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
> From: bkpendergraft AT gmail.com
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
>
> Has anybody ever seen a Black - throated Blue Warbler visiting this
> feeder?  Currently looking at a female nibbling away.  Hanky and all.
>
> Never seen it.
>
Subject: RE: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
From: Judy Halleron <geojudyh AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:31:13 -0400
No, not at a peanut feeder. But I have watched a female Black-throated Blue 
drink at a hummingbird feeder. She would land one one side, tipping it slightly 
and drink the sweet stuff. She (or a friend) came back numerous times over a 
day or two so it wasn't an accident. Birds are amazing! 


Judy Halleron 
Marble, NC
 

 
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:17:41 -0400
Subject: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
From: bkpendergraft AT gmail.com
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu

Has anybody ever seen a Black - throated Blue Warbler visiting this feeder? 
Currently looking at a female nibbling away. Hanky and all. 

Never seen it. 		 	   		  
Subject: Surprise visit to Peanut Butter Feeder
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 17:17:41 -0400
Has anybody ever seen a Black - throated Blue Warbler visiting this
feeder?  Currently looking at a female nibbling away.  Hanky and all.

Never seen it.
Subject: Hermit Thrush
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 16:54:13 -0400
Right on time here in my yard.  Good to see it again.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC
Subject: Congaree Bluffs Hawk Watch October 19
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 15:57:05 -0400
I was at Congaree Bluffs Heritage Preserve in Calhoun County for a hawk watch 
today with a student from my USC Honors College service course. I wanted a 
second try at finding accipiters after the poor weather for last week's Big 
Sit. In two hours, we saw 5 SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, 5 COOPER'S HAWK, 4 RED-TAILED 
HAWK, an OSPREY and several BLACK VULTURE and TURKEY VULTURE that seemed to be 
on the move. With high winds and no clouds, most raptors were soaring high in a 
featureless sky. 


John Grego
Columbia, SC
Subject: Rockingham County, NC/Mayo River fall bird count results
From: Brian Bockhahn <birdranger248 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 08:36:34 -0400
Been a very busy fall, so I'm late getting the count compiled!!!  Let me
know if you would like full results in excel.

The SECOND Rockingham County Fall Migration Bird Count was held on
September 12, 2014 with cloudy skies, light winds and temps 68-80 degrees.  8
observers in four parties tallied 75 species and 1740 total individuals
(2013 had 70 sp and 728 individuals).  10 count week birds were also
tallied owing to the vagrancy of fall migration!



Highlights include two separate Green Heron, en early kettle of 38
Broad-winged Hawks seen from Ceddar Mountain, two parties finding Acadian
Flycatcher, a Least Flycatcher and two parties reporting Common Raven.
Nocturnal
flight calls included just 15 Swainson’s Thrush, 25 Veery and 4
Gray-cheeked.  Of the 10 warbler species the days highlight was a single
Prothonotary and a single Palm (five more warblers were seen during count
week including Bay-breasted and a late Chat).  Week highlight was a count
week Yellow-bellied Flycatcher!



MISSES:  misses include both Sharp-shinned and Coopers Hawk, Northern
Harrier, House Finch and House Sparrow!



Many thanks to everyone who volunteered to count!


-- 
Brian Bockhahn
birdranger248 AT gmail.com
Subject: 2nd attempt to unsubscribe
From: david <birchbark1 AT frontier.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 06:10:25 -0400
  I tried this:

"To unsubscribe, send a message to sympa AT duke.edu with this text in the 
body of the message:

     unsubscribe carolinabirds

More info: http://www.carolinanature.com/birds/cbirds.html"

They still keep on coming
Thanks
Subject: WNC Warren Wilson: Orange-crowned W, Marsh Wren, Lincoln's S (again) - 10/18/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 07:51:02 +0200
The Black Mountain Monthly Bird Walk had four Lincoln's and two
White-crowned Sparrows near the Warren Wilson College Pig Farm this
morning. Another bird with black and white stripes on the mantle will be
searched for tomorrow. Another Lincoln's was at the NE corner of Owen
Ponds. Thanks to James Poling for organizing the walk.

I continued on to find a very pale Orange-crowned Warbler and a Marsh Wren
along the hedgerow that runs from the lotus pond (below the WWC barn) to
the river. Three more Lincoln's and a Grasshopper Sparrow were here or
nearby. Also a Wilson's Snipe and two House Wrens. Savannah (6) and Swamp
Sparrows (6) and Palm Warblers (4) decreased. Yellow-rumped Warblers
increased (14).

Birds have turned over, and/or moved around and left over the past two
days. Different locations for all birds since. Windy, sunny conditions were
difficult.

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC
Subject: Bodie Island lighthouse pond, Dare Cty, NC
From: Audrey <ajw AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 21:38:26 -0400
Hey Birders,

I got to run out to Bodie Island late afternoon today but all was quiet. Total 
of 4 N. sHOVELERS, 8 A. BLACK DUCKS, 1 N. PINTAIL and many PIED-BILLED GREBES 
seen from the tower behind the lighthouse. Lots of MARSH WRENS too but no Sedge 
or rails heard. Water level high. 


NW Winds tonight so hoping for a morning of migrants on north Pea Island, stay 
tuned!! 


See some of u at WOW this coming week!!

Audrey Whitlock
Nags Head NC & Merritt Island FL

Sent from iPhone
Subject: RFI on Northern CA birding
From: David Gardner <davidgardner14 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 20:53:56 -0400
Hi folks,
Sorry that this isn't specifically Carolina birding but I am sure that many of 
you have experience birding where I will be next weekend. 

I am heading to Fort Bragg, CA. Can you please suggest a few key spots that 
won't be too far out of the way around Fort Bragg and on the way back to SFO? 

Also, what is the carolinabirds equivalent email list for Northern California?
Thank you for your time and advice in advance.
Happy Birding,
David

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RoxburyPark_MeggettSC_Chas.Co
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 18:54:20 -0400
Greetings,

A nice morning walk at Roxbury Park this morning with Ken Carman offered 48
species including a late Wood Thrush, a Blue-headed Vireo, a Black-throated
Blue Warbler, a couple of Redstarts, a good many Common Yellowthroats, a
lot of Palm Warblers, a pair of singing House Wrens, and three
Yellow-Rumped Warblers.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20265970

Cherrie

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Hermie's back
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 18:23:43 -0400
My Hermit Thrush came back today a few weeks earlier than last year but
pretty much on time comparing to the preceding years.

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Stumpy Point, NC...any birders?
From: Linda Ward <tankapoet2 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 12:46:03 -0700
Hey birders,

If anyone lives in Stumpy Point, NC, or knows a birder who does, please
contact me directly.

Thanks,
Linda Ward
Coinjock, NC
Subject: Accipiters aplenty in eastern carolina
From: Alan Meijer <alan.meijer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 15:25:29 -0400
I've probably seen a dozen accipiters over the last 3 days, soaring (well,
flap-flap-gliding) overhead. 4 female Coopers just yesterday alone, while
driving to and from Goldsboro, NC.

A. Meijer
Beaufort Co., NC
adm2792(ya hoo)
Subject: Henderson Cty.N. C. Lake Osceola
From: "Wayne K. Forsythe" <wforsythe AT morrisbb.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 13:26:46 -0400
Folks,
 At about 10:55 AM, I received a call from Ron Selvey advising me that he just 
had an Anhinga over Lake Osceola. He watched the bird for a while before it 
drifted off to the south east. Ron and I had 1 at Mills River Park on Oct. 21, 
2012. 

Wayne
 Wayne K. Forsythe
16 Colonial Way
Hendersonville, N. C. 28791
wforsytheATmorrisbb.net