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Updated on Tuesday, July 29 at 10:14 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black-throated Blue Warbler,©Douglas Pratt

30 Jul notes on a nesting MS Kite in Wilmington ["dmcooper2 AT juno.com" ]
29 Jul Re: Broad-winged Hawks [Dwayne Martin ]
29 Jul Hilton Pond 07/01/14 (Midsummer Harvest) ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
29 Jul RE: Broad-winged Hawks []
29 Jul Broad-winged Hawks [TBT ]
29 Jul shorebirds at Rachel Carson Reserve NC today ["John Fussell" ]
29 Jul next guided birding walk - this Saturday (8/2) at Francis Beidler Forest ["Johnson, Matthew" ]
29 Jul Re: Juvenile White Ibis : Rosman, NC [Steve Ritt ]
28 Jul Juvenile White Ibis : Rosman, NC [Claire Herzog ]
28 Jul Re: Ft fisher spit [Ryan Justice ]
28 Jul Ft fisher spit [Ryan Justice ]
28 Jul Kites, Kites, Kites in SC []
28 Jul Trindade Petrel off Hatteras July 25; Space on Aug. 2 [Brian Patteson ]
28 Jul Great Egrets Near Hillsborough NC [Carol Chelette ]
27 Jul 30 Years With Hummingbirds ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
27 Jul Upland Sandpipers, ILM ["Steve Shultz" ]
27 Jul Re: Kentucky Warbler and Red-breasted Nuthatch: 17 Acre Woods, Durham NC [Peter Perlman ]
27 Jul Oakland Turf Farm Saturday [John Ennis ]
27 Jul North River Farms and Cedar Island (NC) this morning ["John Fussell" ]
27 Jul Black-Bellied Whistling Duck, Carteret County, South River [Marilyn Bjork Shuping ]
27 Jul Kentucky Warbler and Red-breasted Nuthatch: 17 Acre Woods, Durham NC [Robert Rowan Meehan ]
26 Jul Harris Lake- Wake Co NC [Ryan Justice ]
26 Jul Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia, SC []
26 Jul Orangeburg SC Sod Farm [Pamela Ford ]
26 Jul Drones and bird life []
26 Jul Redstart_RoxburyPark_CharlestonCoSC [Cherrie Sneed ]
25 Jul Oakland Glossy Ibis + Others [John Ennis ]
25 Jul Re: Drones and bird life [Bill Guion ]
25 Jul Drones and bird life [KC Foggin ]
25 Jul Re: South Bladen County, NC Horned Larks ["dmcooper2 AT juno.com" ]
25 Jul WNC Green River: juvenile Common Mergs, local shorebirds - 7/24/14 [Steve Ritt ]
24 Jul Re: South Bladen County, NC Horned Larks [Clyde Sorenson ]
25 Jul South Bladen County, NC Horned Larks [James Abbott ]
24 Jul RE: They're back! ["Randy Dunson" ]
24 Jul They're back! ["John Fussell" ]
23 Jul RE: David S. Lee - in memoriam [Rob G. ]
23 Jul Mid-altitude mountain birds and wildflowers this morning [william haddad ]
23 Jul David S. Lee - in memoriam [Will Cook ]
23 Jul Black Scoters/Sea Ducks in the Carolinas /Southeast [James Watson ]
22 Jul Re: Fish kill at Huntington Beach State Park, SC [Nate Dias ]
22 Jul Sightings at Huntington Beach SP and Blog []
22 Jul Short-billed Dowitchers in Forsyth County ["Shelley Rutkin" ]
22 Jul Fish kill at Huntington Beach State Park, SC ["JerryK" ]
22 Jul White-winged Dove, Manns Harbor yesterday ["R. Bruce Richardson" ]
21 Jul WNC Mills River: cont./new? Western Sand, SB Dow - 7/21/14 [Steve Ritt ]
21 Jul Final reminder for Birder Travel Decisions Survey! [Ginger Deason ]
20 Jul Gull-billed Terns at Davis Impoundment today ["John Fussell" ]
20 Jul Red-breasted Nuthatch - Durham [Daniel Kaplan ]
20 Jul Fw: Upcoming birding events at Chimney Rock State Park ["Steve Shultz" ]
20 Jul Upland Sandpiper- American Turf Farm [Brian Pendergraft ]
20 Jul Shorebirds after the rain, Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC [Simon Thompson ]
19 Jul Oakland Turf Farm this Morning [John Ennis ]
19 Jul Re: Botany Bay WMA, Charleston County, South Carolina [Cherrie Sneed ]
19 Jul Re: Botany Bay WMA, Charleston County, South Carolina [Pamela Ford ]
19 Jul Allendale, SC Kite Fields [Peter Stangel ]
19 Jul Upland Sandpiper at Wilmington Airport ["dmcooper2 AT juno.com" ]
19 Jul Re: Shrub/bush/tree question [Will Cook ]
19 Jul Shrub/bush/tree question [KC Foggin ]
19 Jul nice morning at brickhouse road ["Young, Bruce" ]
19 Jul Re: Frigatebird in Carteret County [Daniel Kaplan ]
18 Jul Re: WNC Mills River: SB Dowitcher, Western, Stilt Sands, etc. - 7/18/14 [Steve Ritt ]
18 Jul CBC announces Blue Ridge Parkway bonus trip ["Steve Shultz" ]
18 Jul WNC Mills River: SB Dowitcher, Western, Stilt Sands, etc. - 7/18/14 [Steve Ritt ]
18 Jul Frigatebird in Carteret County [Chandra Biggerstaff ]
18 Jul Re: RoseatteSpoonbills_RantowlesCreek@Hwy17_CharlestonCoSC [Cherrie Sneed ]
18 Jul Brickhouse Road Waterfowl Impoundment [David Anderson ]
18 Jul FW: eBird Report - 28560 New Bern, Jul 18, 2014 ["Olwen jarvis" ]
18 Jul Re: WNC Mills River: cont. Savannah, Bobolink, Gr. Egret - 7/17/14 [Bill Rhodes ]
17 Jul WNC Mills River: cont. Savannah, Bobolink, Gr. Egret - 7/17/14 [Steve Ritt ]
17 Jul Hatteras Pelagic Photos [Jeff Lemons ]
17 Jul Re: RoseatteSpoonbills_RantowlesCreek@Hwy17_CharlestonCoSC [JILL MIDGETT ]
17 Jul RoseatteSpoonbills_RantowlesCreek@Hwy17_CharlestonCoSC [Cherrie Sneed ]
17 Jul Possible American Kestrel nesting site--University of South Carolina []
17 Jul Reddish Egret at North Topsail Beach, NC ["gilbert grant" ]
17 Jul Botany Bay WMA, Charleston County, South Carolina [James Watson ]
17 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Gunter Rd. Piedmont, SC, Jul 17, 2014 [Paul Serridge ]

Subject: notes on a nesting MS Kite in Wilmington
From: "dmcooper2 AT juno.com" <dmcooper2@juno.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 02:46:05 GMT
On 29 June 2014 I found and photographed an adult Mississippi Kite on a nest in 
my residential neighborhood (photo posted on Carolina Bird Club website). The 
nest was in a large sweetgum tree in the backyard of a home located in the 
upper Bradley Creek drainage basin about 3 miles from the ocean. The nest was 
estimated at a height of 70 feet and about 10-15 feet from the top of the tree. 
Based on the date the chick left the nest, it is unlikely the adult was 
incubating at the time of discovery. 


No more than a single chick was observed during the season, and it moved out of 
the nest onto a lower branch about 6 feet away on 19 July. On 20 July the 
juvenile was observed in a tree about 60 feet from the nest, and it was also 
seen later in the day taking food from an adult in the nest. Blue Jays harassed 
the juvenile almost daily during the first days out of the nest. The juvenile 
was fed regularly by the adults for about seven days after leaving the nest and 
infrequently after. Even though the juvenile was observed soaring and being fed 
away from the nest, it returned to the nest as late as 26 July. The adults and 
young continue to roost in the nest tree or adjacent trees. 


Since 2010 the birds have returned to this area around the third week of April 
and departed in the first or second week in August. Upon arrival (last year and 
this year) two adults were seen with two apparent first year birds that I 
presume may have been young from previous years. One of the sub-adult birds 
disappeared about a month after arrival, and other one stayed in the vicinity 
of the nesting adults throughout this season, but never appeared to contribute 
to nesting duties. The birds appeared to spend most of the nesting season well 
within a mile of the nest. Seven MS kites were observed circling the area on 21 
July, but lighting and distance did not allow for distinguishing adults from 
sub-adults. Some of these birds were certainly moving through the area and not 
seen in following days. An abundance of cicadas this year provided a continuous 
source of food for the young and entertaining observations as the adults 
frequently swooped low into backyards to pursue them. 


Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC
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Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawks
From: Dwayne Martin <redxbill AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 21:01:00 -0400
Though not technically in the mountains, for several years we have had 2
pair that nest inside Riverbend Park in northern Catawba County.  One pair
has nested near the office for at least 10 years now. The other pair nest
in the back side of the park.

On Tuesday, July 29, 2014,  wrote:

> Neat finding a family in ENC They're scattered though out the state but in
> small numbers (except the mountains where they're far more common).
> Case-in-point, I saw one soaring over Hwy 158 near between Littleton and
> Roanoke Rapids on July 4. Still, it's rather rare to see them in NC (away
> from the mountains or during migration).
>
> Mike Tove
> Cary, NC
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: TBT [mailto:cssjar AT aol.com ]
> Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:25 PM
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu 
> Subject: Broad-winged Hawks
>
> Yesterday 8:30 am I located a family of Broad-winged Hawks just outside of
> Oriental N C off SR55 on Straight Rd going north pass Bent Tree  apx .2 of
> a
> mile on the west side 1adult and 2 juvies. Very active and vocal.
>
> Christine Stoughton-Root
> !DSPAM:53d82d7b190541277615477!
>
>
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4716 / Virus Database: 3986/7945 - Release Date: 07/29/14
>
>

-- 
Dwayne
*************
Dwayne Martin
Hickory, NC
redxbill AT gmail.com

http://naturalsciences.org/research-collections/research-specialties/birds/nc-hummingbirds 


Catawba County Park Ranger
Riverbend Park - Conover, NC
St. Stephens Park - Hickory, NC
jdmartin AT catawbacountync.gov
http://www.catawbacountync.gov/depts/parks/
http://www.weatherlink.com/user/riverbendpark
http://www.ncbirdingtrail.org/TrailGuide/Guide_CatawbaValley.pdf
Subject: Hilton Pond 07/01/14 (Midsummer Harvest)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 20:36:18 -0400
Some plants wait until autumn to yield fruit, but many roadside species already 
have ripened seeds that are capable of propagation. "This Week at Hilton Pond" 
we took a stroll to see just what was in this "hot weather harvest." 


To view what we found, please see the photo essay for 1-15 Jul 2014 
athttp://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140701.html . Don't forget to scroll down 
for a list of all birds banded or recaptured during the period--plus some 
miscellaneous nature notes. 


Happy (Midsummer) Nature Watching!

BILL

P.S. Please "Like" our new Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
for timely updates on nature topics. Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond. 


========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: RE: Broad-winged Hawks
From: <mtove AT deltaforce.net>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 19:46:58 -0400
Neat finding a family in ENC They're scattered though out the state but in
small numbers (except the mountains where they're far more common).
Case-in-point, I saw one soaring over Hwy 158 near between Littleton and
Roanoke Rapids on July 4. Still, it's rather rare to see them in NC (away
from the mountains or during migration).

Mike Tove
Cary, NC

-----Original Message-----
From: TBT [mailto:cssjar AT aol.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:25 PM
To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
Subject: Broad-winged Hawks

Yesterday 8:30 am I located a family of Broad-winged Hawks just outside of
Oriental N C off SR55 on Straight Rd going north pass Bent Tree  apx .2 of a
mile on the west side 1adult and 2 juvies. Very active and vocal. 

Christine Stoughton-Root
!DSPAM:53d82d7b190541277615477!




-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4716 / Virus Database: 3986/7945 - Release Date: 07/29/14
Subject: Broad-winged Hawks
From: TBT <cssjar AT aol.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 19:25:21 -0400
Yesterday 8:30 am I located a family of Broad-winged Hawks just outside of 
Oriental N C off SR55 on Straight Rd going north pass Bent Tree apx .2 of a 
mile on the west side 1adult and 2 juvies. Very active and vocal. 


Christine Stoughton-Root
Subject: shorebirds at Rachel Carson Reserve NC today
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 17:09:58 -0400
Today, I did a shorebird survey at Bird Shoal (Rachel Carson Reserve), S of 
Beaufort, NC.

I observed 18 species.  Some highlights were 3 Piping Plovers, 60 Wilson's 
Plovers, and 104 Whimbrels.  Spotted Sandpipers were common on the dunes and 
borders of the flats--I counted 28.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: next guided birding walk - this Saturday (8/2) at Francis Beidler Forest
From: "Johnson, Matthew" <mgjohnson AT audubon.org>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 17:17:25 +0000
Hi All,

Our next "early bird" walk at the Audubon Center at Francis Beidler Forest 
(Dorchester County, SC) will take place this Saturday, August 2nd. There have 
been lots of young birds around lately, as well as a few early migrants. We'll 
spend our time looking for these birds, plus discussing other wildlife and 
plantlife at our walk this Saturday. 


As usual, the trip runs from 7-10 a.m. and costs $10/person. Anyone interested 
should call the visitor's center in advance to sign up (843-462-2150). For 
questions, please feel free to contact me off-list. 


Good birding,

Matt


Matt Johnson
Education Manager
Audubon Center at Francis Beidler Forest
336 Sanctuary Road
Harleyville, SC 29448
(843) 462-2150
http://beidlerforest.audubon.org
Subject: Re: Juvenile White Ibis : Rosman, NC
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 10:05:32 -0400
Kelly Hughes just called to report that this bird is still present as of 9:30 
am 7/29/14. However, the fields are being mowed. The bird has flown away and 
returned a few times. 


Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2014, at 9:01 PM, Claire Herzog  wrote:
> 
> This morning I saw a juvenile White Ibis at the Sport's Fields in Rosman NC. 
The fields are located on Old Rosman Hwy. close to downtown Rosman. The 
Transylvania Co. Bird List suggests that this bird is extremely rare here and 
Sibley lists it as a rare bird as well. 

> 
> I have pictures if anyone is interested.
> 
> Claire Herzog
> Transylvania Co.
Subject: Juvenile White Ibis : Rosman, NC
From: Claire Herzog <ceherzog AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:01:40 -0400
This morning I saw a juvenile White Ibis at the Sport's Fields in Rosman
NC. The fields are located on Old Rosman Hwy. close to downtown Rosman. The
Transylvania Co. Bird List suggests that this bird is extremely rare here
and Sibley lists it as a rare bird as well.

I have pictures if anyone is interested.

Claire Herzog
Transylvania Co.
Subject: Re: Ft fisher spit
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:13:22 -0400
Also a Yellow crowned NH.

Ryan Justice 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2014, at 1:11 PM, Ryan Justice  wrote:
> 
> Only made it to crossover 2 today due to deep sand. Got stuck once. Still 
good birding. 

> 
> Lots of Whimbrel, Am. Oystercatcher, Western Sandpiper, a Least Sandpiper, 
Semi Plover, Wilson's Plover, SB Dowitcher, Willet, Sanderling, 3 Red Knot, 4 
avocet. I think I had a Stilt Sandpiper but lost it amidst the dowitchers. 

> 
> Common, Royal, Least, Sandwich, and good numbers of Black Terns plus 
skimmers. 

> 
> Great looks at a Nighthawk at crossover 2.
> 
> A collared dove in CB
> 
> A pair of Painted Buntings at Carolina Beach SP
> 
> Ryan Justice 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Ft fisher spit
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:11:57 -0400
Only made it to crossover 2 today due to deep sand. Got stuck once. Still good 
birding. 


Lots of Whimbrel, Am. Oystercatcher, Western Sandpiper, a Least Sandpiper, Semi 
Plover, Wilson's Plover, SB Dowitcher, Willet, Sanderling, 3 Red Knot, 4 
avocet. I think I had a Stilt Sandpiper but lost it amidst the dowitchers. 


Common, Royal, Least, Sandwich, and good numbers of Black Terns plus skimmers.

Great looks at a Nighthawk at crossover 2.

A collared dove in CB

A pair of Painted Buntings at Carolina Beach SP

Ryan Justice 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Kites, Kites, Kites in SC
From: amaspirit AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 10:47:18 -0400 (EDT)
 From previous visits I directed my friend to the hay fields at Millet along 
Hwy 125 northwest of Allendale yesterday. We were later getting there and the 
kites (Mississippi and Swallow-tail) were back from the road. We tried Millet 
Rd a bit, the moved up 125 to park and watch them closer. Estimate about half 
and half for the two species. 


Next, although it was noon, we went down to the Revolutionary Rd area southeast 
of Allendale toward Barton. Over the field next to the prison were MS kites but 
no STKI. Back on Barton Rd we parked between the field with large pond (where 
we had Wood Stork, Great Egret, Anhinga, and Cattle Egrets) and watched kites 
work field across from pond. Again there was a mix but mostly MS this time. 


On return home, we left Allendale on 278 to hwy 3. To TWO surprises. First, we 
had MS Kites working a field just this side of Blackville. Saw no STKI there. 
Then, we slowed for a field where we've had lots of Eastern Meadowlarks 
previously. It's a large farm on the south side of 125 only about 3-5 miles 
before the Lexington County boundary line. YES, that close to my home! Well, we 
found two Meadowlarks and a power line holding at least 20 MS Kites!!! There is 
a dead end dirt road there that we've driven before. Parked on it and watched 
as at least 2 STKIs appeared. This was after 2 pm. 


So, not only were kites much closer to me in Lexington, they were working the 
fields much later than the noon when the ones in Allendale had been known to 
stop. To say the least this was an awesome Kite trip! 


 
We spotted juvenile and adult MS. Some of the MS Kites seemed a bit battered 
but the STKIs were in all their glory. 



Patricia Voelker
Lexington, SC
Subject: Trindade Petrel off Hatteras July 25; Space on Aug. 2
From: Brian Patteson <patteson1 AT embarqmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 08:59:36 -0400
We just ran two pelagic trips off Hatteras (Friday and Saturday) and they went 
well. The rarest bird we saw was a light morph Trindade Petrel that came right 
to the boat on Friday. We also saw good numbers of Black-capped Petrels- over 
60 the first day and a few more the next day. Band-rumped Storm-Petrels made a 
good showing each day and we had good looks at Leach's on Saturday. 
Non-tubenoses were scarce with single Red-necked Phalaropes each day and a few 
Bridled Terns seen on Saturday. We saw three species of shearwaters: Cory's, 
Great, and Audubon's. There were a few hundred Wilson's Storm-Petrels on Friday 
and only about 100 on Saturday. We will post a trip report in a day or two on 
our blog when we get all the photos collected, but there is already a photo of 
the Trindade Petrel on our Twitter page: https://twitter.com/Seabirding 


Looking at the weather for this week, we should have an unusually long spell of 
northeasterly winds (into Friday) veering to the east by Saturday. That could 
be a good set-up for some hit or miss species, such as Trindade Petrel, Great 
Shearwater (scarce lately w/ the southwesterly flow) and Leach's Storm-Petrel. 
Of course, part of what makes these trips exciting is not knowing what else 
might show up. There is a long list of possibilities when you throw in the 
other gadfly petrels, rare storm-petrels, tropicbirds, boobies, and jaegers and 
skuas. Saturday, August 2 is the only trip we have coming up on the 
Stormy-Petrel II this weekend and we have space for more participants. This 
trip and our trips on August 8, 9, and 10 are the only trips scheduled for the 
"big boat" until September. We also have a few trips on our smaller boat in 
August, but these are filling fast. As of today, there is only one space on 
August 3, 15, and 16 and a few spaces on August 17. So if you want to get out 
this summer.... 


All of the trips and pertinent info is on our website- www.seabirding.com/ I 
hope that some of you can take advantage of this unique opportunity to observe 
these pelagic seabirds and other seldom seen marine life. I'll be offshore 
running some fishing trips this week, but I can be usually reached in the 
evenings between 7 and 9PM at (252) 986-1363 to answer questions and take 
reservations. 


Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC
Subject: Great Egrets Near Hillsborough NC
From: Carol Chelette <cncbrdr AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 08:01:56 -0400
We saw 5 great egrets while fishing on a private lake near Hillsborough on
Saturday morning. Luckily, they flew in and landed in a couple of trees
before fog absolutely blanketed the area. We couldn't even see land in any
direction for about an hour. Prior to the fog, fish were breaking and birds
were singing. When the fog cover happened, all went completely quiet.
Later, with the sun becoming visible and a light wind blowing, the fog
cleared and the action resumed. My husband even caught an 8-pound
largemouth bass!
Carol Chelette
Durham, NC
Subject: 30 Years With Hummingbirds
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <hilton AT hiltonpond.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:20:15 -0400
Another big celebration today at Hilton Pond Center:

Exactly 30 years ago (27 Jul 1984) I received authorization from the federal 
Bird Banding Lab to begin working with hummingbirds. At 3 p.m. that afternoon I 
pulled the string on my homemade trap baited with sugar water and caught my 
very first hummer--a recently fledged male Ruby-throated Hummingbird that 
received band X37373. 


In three decades since I've banded 4,920 RTHU at the Center, with more than 12% 
of them returning in at least one later year. I've learned a lot about about 
hummer longevity, site fidelity, population dynamics, and migration, and I've 
derived quite a bit of personal and professional pleasure from these tiny balls 
of fluff. 


Among other things, my interest in ruby-throats has introduced me to a 
cherished assemblage of students, hummingbird enthusiasts, and fellow 
banders--including those who have been with me on Operation RubyThroat 
expeditions to five Central American countries where I've banded 1,113 hummers. 
I am grateful for all those friends here and abroad and for the hummingbirds 
that have taught me much about the natural world of which we all are part. At 
67, I doubt I'll have another 30 years working with ruby-throats, but I'm not 
about to quit just yet! 


Happy Hummingbirding!

BILL

P.S. Please "Like" our new Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
for timely updates on nature topics. Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond. 


========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Subject: Upland Sandpipers, ILM
From: "Steve Shultz" <sshultz AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:13:53 -0400
Had 3 Upland Sandpipers from the observation area at Wilmington NCs airport 
(ILM) yesterday afternoon. All three were in tallish grass in the direction of 
the rotating red radar off to the right from the observation area (opposite 
side of the airport from the terminals). 


Steve Shultz
Apex, NC
Subject: Re: Kentucky Warbler and Red-breasted Nuthatch: 17 Acre Woods, Durham NC
From: Peter Perlman <pperlman AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 16:47:38 -0400
He's still in that area near the first bench on that trail. Lifer! Thanks 
Robert. 


Peter Perlman

> On Jul 27, 2014, at 2:07 PM, Robert Rowan Meehan  
wrote: 

> 
> Hey all,
> 
> Headed down to the 17 Acre Woods between the rains to see if I could drum up 
the continuing Red-breasted Nuthatch. Heard him calling several times from 
multiple stands of pines around the bridge, but could never locate him visually 
(I blame the weather). However, along the first nature trail you come across 
travelling from Albany St, I found a beautiful male Kentucky Warbler! It's only 
the second Kentucky I've seen in this county. A good combo for these parts, and 
a great way to spend a rainy day! 

> 
> Robert Meehan
> Durham, NC
Subject: Oakland Turf Farm Saturday
From: John Ennis <jxennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:06:35 -0400
I returned to see if the fields around this area were still wet...yes...looks 
like they had had another frog-strangler in the 20 hours I had been gone... 


The ibises were still hanging out...the adult Glossy was still present plus I 
think I photographed a juvenile Glossy but still need to check it on the 
computer... 


Several new species had flown in...Solitary Sandpiper, Spotted Sandpiper, and 
about 20 Pectoral Sandpipers... 


Had several great behavioral photos which I'll post later to 
Facebook...including a bee harassing a Red-spotted Purple, an Argiope Spider 
weaving a new orb, and several White Ibises (adults and juveniles) lying flat 
out on the grass, wings spread, sunning themselves... 


Wonderful day!

John Ennis
Leland, NC
Sent from my iPad
Subject: North River Farms and Cedar Island (NC) this morning
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 16:29:28 -0400
Several of us birded North River Farms and Cedar Island this morning.

Highlights were 3 Upland Sandpipers and about 25 Horned Larks at North River 
Farms.

At the corner of Davis Impoundment that can be seen from US 70 S of Davis 
community, we saw about 130 Gull-billed Terns.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Black-Bellied Whistling Duck, Carteret County, South River
From: Marilyn Bjork Shuping <mbshuping650 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 15:00:14 -0400
My husband and I observed this Whistling Duck early on July 21st. My photos are 
blurry but we could see him well with our binoculars. After perching on a dead 
snag in the pond for approximately an hour, it flew south. 


Sorry for the late post.  Company and internet issues.

Marilyn Bjork Shuping
Beaufort, NC
Subject: Kentucky Warbler and Red-breasted Nuthatch: 17 Acre Woods, Durham NC
From: Robert Rowan Meehan <kkquartz AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 14:07:13 -0400
Hey all,
Headed down to the 17 Acre Woods between the rains to see if I could drum up 
the continuing Red-breasted Nuthatch. Heard him calling several times from 
multiple stands of pines around the bridge, but could never locate him visually 
(I blame the weather). However, along the first nature trail you come across 
travelling from Albany St, I found a beautiful male Kentucky Warbler! It's only 
the second Kentucky I've seen in this county. A good combo for these parts, and 
a great way to spend a rainy day! 


Robert Meehan
Durham, NC 		 	   		  
Subject: Harris Lake- Wake Co NC
From: Ryan Justice <blackburnian151 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:05:55 -0400
Had two Eastern Whip-poor-wills calling and eventually flying across the dirt 
road past the boat ramp. 


Chats and bobwhites were also present.

Ryan Justice 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia, SC
From: amaspirit AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 20:02:08 -0400 (EDT)
 We didn't see many species today but it was an eventful morning in other ways. 
My first view of a Green Heron in the wetlands pond this summer. It gave great 
views while hunting. We saw it catch and lose a crayfish. The muskrat provided 
lots of fun looks as diversion. 


 

Patricia Voelker
Lexington, SC

 

 


Sent: Sat, Jul 26, 2014 3:58 pm
Subject: eBird Report - Saluda Shoals Park, Jul 26, 2014


Saluda Shoals Park, Lexington, US-SC
Jul 26, 2014 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Birded from parking lot to wetlands, across to Aerie area, then 
back across bridge and out Greenway to end of Eagle Trail.  Cut through to 
meadow and returned to parking lot.  Great views of fishing Green Heron in 
wetlands pond, fun views of Muskrat in two places of river, close up of Red 
Shouldered Hawk and Ruby throat Hummingbird, among others. Two novice birders, 

Julia and Leland, joined Barbara and Milt, Earleen, Judy and I for fun morning.
23 species

Mallard  2
Green Heron  1
Black Vulture  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  2
Mourning Dove  6
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  2
Red-eyed Vireo  1
American Crow  2
Carolina Chickadee  2
Tufted Titmouse  4
Brown-headed Nuthatch  1
Carolina Wren  8
Eastern Bluebird  3
Northern Mockingbird  2
Chipping Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  4
American Goldfinch  4

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19227973 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 
Subject: Orangeburg SC Sod Farm
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 19:12:53 -0400
Made a quick trip to the Sod Farm today. There were 8 Pectoral Sandpipers seen 
in the fields to the right at the intersection of Super Sod Blvd and Centpede 
Rd. 200 plus Killdeer, Least Sandpipers, Eastern Meadow Larks and Horned Larks 
have returned. 

Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Drones and bird life
From: <grayro AT appstate.edu>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 14:51:37 -0400 (EDT)
Hi K.C.

There is an interesting article on the use of drones in field research in the
latest issue of Audubon magazine (July-August, p 58).  I can certainly see the
value of using drones in field research but I too am worried by the prospect of
commercial drones invading our towns and countryside and their potential for
disturbing bird life.  I know that Amazon is actively exploring the possibility
of using drones to deliver packages.  Someone needs to take this up as a
research project so that we have some actual data on the degree of disturbance
before commercial drones become legal.

Richard Gray
Subject: Redstart_RoxburyPark_CharlestonCoSC
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:14:35 -0400
Greetings,

This morning Ken Carman and I spotted our first of season female Redstart
at Roxbury Park.  This is a new park for Meggett, SC.
http://www.roxburypark.org

There were so many baby vireos and warbler babies.  One fascinating this we
saw was a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher feeding a baby Cowbird.  Poor little
mother.  …not baby Gnatcatchers to feed either.

Cherrie

-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Oakland Glossy Ibis + Others
From: John Ennis <jxennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:38:46 -0400
Oakland Turf Farms and the Elwell's Ferry area needed rain...and they got
it!!!

The fields are soaked so some good shorebirds may show up soon. Today I had
one SB Dowitcher and a double-handful of Least Sandpipers...plus a
beautiful adult Glossy Ibis. The Glossy was among 86 White Ibis, containing
a smattering of three age groups...adult, hatch-year juveniles, and
second-summer sub-adults.

Will post 1 or 2 Glossy Ibis pix to CBC Photo Gallery by tomorrow.

No Horned Larks; however, the young have fledged (even by last Sunday when
I photographed several of them). They will be very hard to find now since
that is such a large area. Just pure luck I found them when I did.
-- 
John Ennis
Leland, NC
Subject: Re: Drones and bird life
From: Bill Guion <bguion AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:54:53 -0400
On Jul 25, 2014, at 1:49 PM, KC Foggin  wrote:

> I know the UK has used drones to keep watch on vulnerable species of birds 
but does the idea of delivery drones mixed with our flying bird life bother 
anyone else or am I just getting old and ornery? ;) 


Why are those two possibilities mutually exclusive? 

> 
> K.C.
> 
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
> 
> www.birdforum.net
> 
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages


     -----===== Bill =====-----
-- 

How many roads must a man travel down before he admits he is lost?
Subject: Drones and bird life
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 13:49:28 -0400
I know the UK has used drones to keep watch on vulnerable species of birds
but does the idea of delivery drones mixed with our flying bird life bother
anyone else or am I just getting old and ornery? ;)

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: Re: South Bladen County, NC Horned Larks
From: "dmcooper2 AT juno.com" <dmcooper2@juno.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:01:41 GMT
Glad to see confirmation of nesting documented along Elwell Ferry Road, as 
Horned Larks have been present some summers at this site since the late 1990s. 
Horned Larks have also been present on about half of the Montague Breeding Bird 
Surveys (Pender County) since 1994, with up to three singing birds near the 
high school in 2001, about 5 miles north (in latitude) of the Bladen County 
site. Would not be surprised if they have nesting at the Wilmington Airport, as 
they have been present there off-and-on since at least 1988 and there has been 
one singing bird at that airport this year (through last week). 


Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC

---------- Original Message ----------
From: James Abbott 
To: "carolinabirds AT duke.edu" 
Subject: South Bladen County, NC Horned Larks
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 00:01:04 +0000


Regarding this spring/summer's postings about the Horned Larks from Oakland 
Plantation, I would like to clarify the original source of the observation. 


 On March 15th, during the first 2014 survey of my Swallow-tailed Kite graduate 
research project, I and fellow biologist Carson Wood observed a pair of Horned 
Lark on Elwell Ferry Road, Bladen County, NC. We observed the male vocalizing 
and the female exhibiting nest constructing behavior. Several subsequent 
surveys through March and April confirmed the breeding activity of this pair, 
as well as the observation of two additional pairs of Horned Lark on March 22nd 
and again on April 4th. Early June surveys brought the observation of juvenile 
Horned Lark with the original pair. To our knowledge this is the southern-most 
confirmed breeding site in North Carolina. 


 Our reasoning behind not posting this information until now is the fact that 
the species is considered uncommon in the state and we did not wish to attract 
the attention of numerous birders to the privately owned site. Others have made 
postings regarding sightings at the aforementioned location; we contacted 
several of them requesting they not share the sitings until we had a a better 
grasp of what the property owner's opinion was going to be towards the birds. 
Thankfully the owner is willing to take a laisseze-faire approach to the birds 
presence on the site. 


 The deeper message of this email revolves around the public posting of species 
of particular conservation concern. With the growing popularity of birding fast 
approaching a competitive sport, as evidenced by numerous accounts this year of 
birds being disturbed in and around nesting, foraging, and resting areas, we 
felt it would be safer for the larks if they were not advertised and 
potentially exposed to human activity; and the risk of unintended disturbance. 

 -- 
James Abbott
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group (501 c3)
P.O. Box 10008 Hampstead, NC 28443
757-320-9191
jabbott AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org 

This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 

____________________________________________________________
The #1 Worst Carb Ever?
Click to Learn #1 Carb that Kills Your Blood Sugar (Don't Eat 
This!) 

http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/53d24776dd1c47763edest02duc
Subject: WNC Green River: juvenile Common Mergs, local shorebirds - 7/24/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 00:13:17 -0400
Well, they made at least ten this year. Ten juvenile Common Mergansers were
along the Green River, about halfway between Lake Adger and Bradley Falls.
They kept getting spooked downstream by the river rats.

There was an article posted in the Tryon Daily Bulletin today, saying that
there was a 5-foot drawdown at Lake Adger that left exposed sedimentation
(with a photo). I checked it out, only to find the lake completely full.
Who knows, perhaps the article was referencing a 2013 drawdown. Eh.

In local shorebird news today...
Hooper Lane:
Pectoral Sandpiper - 2
Solitary Sandpiper - 2 (evening)
Least Sandpiper - 15 (at least, but only 5 at midday)
Semipalmated Plover - 1

Pisgah Forest:
Solitary Sandpiper - 4
Least Sandpiper - 5

Columbus:
Pectoral Sandpiper - 8
Solitary Sandpiper - 4
Least Sandpiper -2
Spotted Sandpiper - 1

The Great Egret and four Grasshopper Sparrows continue at Van Wingerden.

A Western Sandpiper and Short-billed Dowitcher were in Pisgah Forest on
7/22/24, and it seems likely that these were the same birds that were at
Hooper Lane earlier this week.

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC
Subject: Re: South Bladen County, NC Horned Larks
From: Clyde Sorenson <sorenson AT ncsu.edu>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:00:57 -0400
Horned Larks can be reliably seen, all spring and summer, at the Upper
Coastal Plain Research Station between Rocky Mount and Tarboro on 64. This
also a very reliable spot for grasshopper sparrows and meadowlarks. And
there is a heron rookery in the swamp at the south end of the property.

Clyde Sorenson
Clayton and Raleigh, NC


On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 8:01 PM, James Abbott  wrote:

>  Regarding this spring/summer's postings about the Horned Larks from
> Oakland Plantation, I would like to clarify the original source of the
> observation.
>
>
>  On March 15th, during the first 2014 survey of my Swallow-tailed Kite
> graduate research project, I and fellow biologist Carson Wood observed a
> pair of Horned Lark on Elwell Ferry Road, Bladen County, NC. We observed
> the male vocalizing and the female exhibiting nest constructing behavior.
> Several subsequent surveys through March and April confirmed the breeding
> activity of this pair, as well as the observation of two additional pairs
> of Horned Lark on March 22nd and again on April 4th. Early June surveys
> brought the observation of juvenile Horned Lark with the original pair. To
> our knowledge this is the southern-most confirmed breeding site in North
> Carolina.
>
>
> Our reasoning behind not posting this information until now is the fact
> that the species is considered uncommon in the state and we did not wish to
> attract the attention of numerous birders to the privately owned site.
> Others have made postings regarding sightings at the aforementioned
> location; we contacted several of them requesting they not share the
> sitings until we had a a better grasp of what the property owner's opinion
> was going to be towards the birds. Thankfully the owner is willing to take
> a laisseze-faire approach to the birds presence on the site.
>
>
> The deeper message of this email revolves around the public posting of
> species of particular conservation concern. With the growing popularity of
> *birding* fast approaching a competitive sport, as evidenced by numerous
> accounts this year of birds being disturbed in and around nesting,
> foraging, and resting areas, we felt it would be safer for the larks if
> they were not advertised and potentially exposed to human activity; and the
> risk of unintended disturbance.
>
>  --
>  *James Abbott*
> *Biologist*
> *Coastal Plain Conservation Group (501 c3)*
> *P.O. Box 10008 *
> *Hampstead, NC 28443*
> *757-320-9191 <757-320-9191>*
> *jabbott AT coastalplaincg.org *
> *www.coastalplaincg.org *
>
>
>  This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and
> intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are
> addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the
> sender immediately.
>
Subject: South Bladen County, NC Horned Larks
From: James Abbott <jaa3469 AT alum.uncw.edu>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 00:01:04 +0000
Regarding this spring/summer's postings about the Horned Larks from Oakland 
Plantation, I would like to clarify the original source of the observation. 


 On March 15th, during the first 2014 survey of my Swallow-tailed Kite graduate 
research project, I and fellow biologist Carson Wood observed a pair of Horned 
Lark on Elwell Ferry Road, Bladen County, NC. We observed the male vocalizing 
and the female exhibiting nest constructing behavior. Several subsequent 
surveys through March and April confirmed the breeding activity of this pair, 
as well as the observation of two additional pairs of Horned Lark on March 22nd 
and again on April 4th. Early June surveys brought the observation of juvenile 
Horned Lark with the original pair. To our knowledge this is the southern-most 
confirmed breeding site in North Carolina. 


Our reasoning behind not posting this information until now is the fact that 
the species is considered uncommon in the state and we did not wish to attract 
the attention of numerous birders to the privately owned site. Others have made 
postings regarding sightings at the aforementioned location; we contacted 
several of them requesting they not share the sitings until we had a a better 
grasp of what the property owner's opinion was going to be towards the birds. 
Thankfully the owner is willing to take a laisseze-faire approach to the birds 
presence on the site. 


The deeper message of this email revolves around the public posting of species 
of particular conservation concern. With the growing popularity of birding fast 
approaching a competitive sport, as evidenced by numerous accounts this year of 
birds being disturbed in and around nesting, foraging, and resting areas, we 
felt it would be safer for the larks if they were not advertised and 
potentially exposed to human activity; and the risk of unintended disturbance. 


--
James Abbott
Biologist
Coastal Plain Conservation Group (501 c3)
P.O. Box 10008
Hampstead, NC 28443
757-320-9191
jabbott AT coastalplaincg.org
www.coastalplaincg.org


[https://1b36397c-a-298c1fa2-s-sites.googlegroups.com/a/coastalplaincg.org/cpcg/home/CPCG%20Logo%20II.png?attachauth=ANoY7cqBXTX1nsimLRytwc1nkY3VapgL7FgWvEczWMTer4LRnO0wNBSycxbghhvnfZ00ZdnPaoHcVs3dKshcGzOpXip90LmPKaCVvKIHeV-bTvjL6JpaNEliltVXa3LiKCOnpsSuW4u7mRRceggmm-5RXw5kGhTl1LQ9si0ohHX-LUqGn11nUSEk93WJRUvPEshze9lLBUnqbaCx1mN_WcfNY4SAd9c4iQ%3D%3D&attredirects=0] 

This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the sender immediately. 
Subject: RE: They're back!
From: "Randy Dunson" <trdunson AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:16:18 -0400
Non-stop activity here throughout spring & summer.

Regards,

Randy Dunson
Hillsborough, NC (just west of...; +36 1' 1.38", -79 7' 50.84")


-----Original Message-----
From: John Fussell [mailto:jfuss AT clis.com] 
Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2014 3:14 PM
To: carolinabirds
Subject: They're back!

I just heard a hummer around the trumpet-vine (in the top of a red cedar) in
the front yard.

This is the first hummer I've noticed in my yard since the overwintering
adult male left in April.

This is a late arrival date for my yard--usually they return about early
July.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: They're back!
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:14:02 -0400
I just heard a hummer around the trumpet-vine (in the top of a red cedar) in 
the front yard.

This is the first hummer I've noticed in my yard since the overwintering 
adult male left in April.

This is a late arrival date for my yard--usually they return about early 
July.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: RE: David S. Lee - in memoriam
From: Rob G. <thrush AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 23:15:27 +0000
I can't help but add that he also had a claimed female Ivory-billed Woodpecker 
sighting in central Florida back in 1967, when several similar reports were 
emanating from Fla. 


-- Rob Gluck..... Carrboro, NC........
   



> Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:55:52 -0400
> From: cwcook AT duke.edu
> To: carolinabirds AT duke.edu
> Subject: David S. Lee - in memoriam
> 
> I just learned that Dave Lee, former Curator of Birds at the NC Museum 
> of Natural Sciences, passed away last Saturday, 7/19/14. He also served 
> as General Field Notes editor for The Chat. I only met him once, but 
> heard his name many times over the years; he was almost a legendary 
> figure in the NC bird world for years, notorious for collecting as many 
> seabirds as possible to add to the museum's collection. He was also 
> well-known for his turtle and tortoise conservation work.
> 
> Googling, I found that Will Mackin and John Gerwin wrote some lengthy 
> rememberances of him, which are well worth reading:
> 
> http://ornithologyexchange.org/forums/topic/17071-david-s-lee/
> 
> 
> -- 
> Will Cook - Durham, NC
> http://www.carolinanature.com/
 		 	   		  
Subject: Mid-altitude mountain birds and wildflowers this morning
From: william haddad <photobill9 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 19:12:05 -0400
Drove from Spruce Pine to Crabtree Meadows this a.m. with enroute stops at
Hefner Gap and the Orchard at Altapass .

Birds Seen:
1. Black-throated Green Warblers - saw these at all three places.
2.Worm-eating Warbler
3. Black and White Warblers - including a group of very young juveniles
4. Red-eyed Vireo
5. Blue-headed Vireo
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Downy Woodpecker
8  Dark-eyed Junco
9. R.T. Hummingbirds
10. Gray Catbird
11. E.Towhees
12. Amer. Goldfinch
13.Chipping Sparrow
14. Song Sparrow
15. House Wren
16. Tufted Titmouse
17. Carolina Wren
18. No. Cardinal
19. Barn Swallow
20. Indigo Bunting
21. Carolina Chickadee
22. Amer. Crow
23. E. Bluebird
24. E. Phoebe
25. Mourning Dove
26. Wild Turkey

Birds heard, but not seen, included Hooded Warbler, Field Sparrow, Wood
Pewee and Piliated Woodpecker,

Wildflowers in bloom seen included Oxe-eye Daisy, Rattlesnake Plantain,
Carolina Lily, Rosebay Rhodo., Bee Balm, Primrose, Black-eyed Susan,
Coreopsis, Flowering Raspberry, Spiderwort, Red Clover, Phlox, Bladder
Champion, Tall Bellflower, Horse Nettle, Morning Glory, Sourwood, Staghorn
Sumac, Mullien, Black Cohash, Bindweed, Common Milkweed, Joe-pye-weed,
Turk's Cap Lily, Thimbleweed, Day flower, Heal-all, Dandelion, Spiraea,
Hipericum, Sensitive Flower, Trumpet Creeper, Indian Pipe, Flowering
Spurge, Bouncing Bet, Daisy Fleabane, Wild Bergamot, Fire Pink, Mountain
Mint., Wild Columbine, and Tickseed,

Undoubtedly, proceeding toward Mt. Mitchell and higher altitudes would have
produced more species of wildflowers - and birds. However, this was to be a
mid-elevation field trip. The weather cooperated, making for a wonderful
morning.

Bill Haddad
Spruce Pine, NC.
Subject: David S. Lee - in memoriam
From: Will Cook <cwcook AT duke.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:55:52 -0400
I just learned that Dave Lee, former Curator of Birds at the NC Museum 
of Natural Sciences, passed away last Saturday, 7/19/14. He also served 
as General Field Notes editor for The Chat. I only met him once, but 
heard his name many times over the years; he was almost a legendary 
figure in the NC bird world for years, notorious for collecting as many 
seabirds as possible to add to the museum's collection. He was also 
well-known for his turtle and tortoise conservation work.

Googling, I found that Will Mackin and John Gerwin wrote some lengthy 
rememberances of him, which are well worth reading:

http://ornithologyexchange.org/forums/topic/17071-david-s-lee/


-- 
Will Cook - Durham, NC
http://www.carolinanature.com/
Subject: Black Scoters/Sea Ducks in the Carolinas /Southeast
From: James Watson <jcraigw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:32:25 -0400
Please see this link to upcoming aerial surveys for sea ducks from North
Carolina south to Georgia.  I posted to this listserv earlier to be on the
watch out for Black Scoters and other sea ducks in the southeast, and this
is another request to continue that great reporting, either on eBird or
through this listserv.

Here is the link to eBird requesting information on Black Scoters and other
sea ducks in the southeast:

http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/seaduck201407/

If you have any questions, you can call or e-mail me, and thank you for
your assistance.

Craig Watson
South Atlantic Coordinator
Atlantic Coast Joint Venture
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Division of Migratory Birds (Region 5)
176 Croghan Spur Rd., Suite 200
Charleston, SC 29407
(843)727-4707, ext. 304
Mobile: (843)693-0905
Fax: (843)727-4218

craig_watson AT fws.gov
http://acjv.org
www.facebook.com/AtlanticCoastJointVenture


-- 

Happy Birding!
Subject: Re: Fish kill at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
From: Nate Dias <offshorebirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 20:25:34 -0400
When impoundments get a lot of rain in a short time, they often experience
"turnover" in their stratified layers.  This can cause fish kills due to
low oxygen - regular occurrence in such impoundments.  That might be what
happened at Mullet Pond.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Tue, Jul 22, 2014 at 11:48 AM, JerryK >
wrote:
> Visited the park this morning to see hundreds of Egrets, many Osprey and
> Gulls and Terns.
> It would appear that there was a fish kill in Mallard Pond.  This seems to
> be a yearly
> summer event, although others are saying the rangers were drawing down the
> lake yesterday.
>
> It doesn’t appear that the lake went down to any degree.
>
> And no, I have not contacted anyone at the park.
>
> Jerry Kerschner
> Pawleys Island, SC
Subject: Sightings at Huntington Beach SP and Blog
From: <eal-jr AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:55:48 -0400 (EDT)
Hello Carolina Birders,

I birded Huntington Beach SP the morning of July 22nd. The Mullet pond was
filled with Great Egrets, Wood Storks, and many other waders. the pond was
alive with lots of feeding activity due to a large amount of fish, definitely a
beautiful sight with all the activity. Other sightings were of a Clapper Rail
feeding at board walk.

Here is my BLOG post on the trip and remebering your field marks:
http://cacklesofayb.blogspot.com/

Enjoy!
-Edward Landi
Subject: Short-billed Dowitchers in Forsyth County
From: "Shelley Rutkin" <shelleyr AT windstream.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:38:24 -0400
Yesterday I found two Short-billed Dowitchers at Archie Elledge Treatment
Plant in Winston-Salem.  This is a rare bird for Forsyth County with the
last sighting in 2008.  Several of us looked again this morning and could
not find the birds.  Here is a link to my poor photo.  I was photographing
moths the previous night and forgot to take the camera out of macro mode!
Hopefully, I will remember next time.  There was no doubt as to the
identify, though, as the birds softly called "tu-tu-tu" a few times.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/shelleyr/14524445920/

Shelley Rutkin
Winston-Salem

Subject: Fish kill at Huntington Beach State Park, SC
From: "JerryK" <bogey AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:48:28 -0400
Visited the park this morning to see hundreds of Egrets, many Osprey and Gulls 
and Terns. 

It would appear that there was a fish kill in Mallard Pond. This seems to be a 
yearly 

summer event, although others are saying the rangers were drawing down the lake 
yesterday. 


It doesn’t appear that the lake went down to any degree.

And no, I have not contacted anyone at the park.

Jerry Kerschner
Pawleys Island, SC
Subject: White-winged Dove, Manns Harbor yesterday
From: "R. Bruce Richardson" <rbrucegrp AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:10:00 -0400
I apologize for the late posting. I had hoped to see the bird again, as it may 
just have been passing through. Early afternoon yesterday there was a 
White-winged Dove perched in the open above my feeders off my deck. It was 
only about 12-15 feet off the deck in full view. I called my wife to come and 
see it (life bird for her) and she got it. Then I ran for the camera, but was 
too late. It flew off (giving lovely views of the white wing patches) toward 
and behind my neighbors house. 


I am continuing to watch for it today and will post if I see it again. We live 
near the end of Croatan Way, a cul-de-sac in Manns Harbor. 


Cheers,
R. Bruce Richardson
Manns Harbor
Subject: WNC Mills River: cont./new? Western Sand, SB Dow - 7/21/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:43:37 -0400
I stopped by Hooper Lane from 5:30-7:30 pm this evening and had the
following in the front field with the dirt mounds and weeds:
Western Sandpiper - 1
Least Sandpiper - 70
Solitary Sandpiper - 2
Semipalmated Plover - 2

All birds were still adults. Most in full, but worn, breeding plumage.
Well, aside from all the juvenile Killdeer, which are a hoot. Also had two
continuing Bobolink. No Savannah Sparrows or Yellow-crowned NH. Be sure to
be safe, and pull completely off of the road, not blocking any gates.

Interesting that earlier Vin Stanton had:
Short-billed Dowitcher - 1
Least Sandpiper - 15
Semipalmated Plover - 2

Wayne Forsythe also had a few Semipalmated Sandpipers today. Soo, again,
things move around and pass through here in all sorts of ways. Who knows
where they go. Interesting to watch the changes as bicyclists and Cooper's
Hawks flush certain things off, and others come in.

A private farm in Pisgah Forest had about 15 Least Sandpipers.

Beaver Lake had a Louisiana Waterthrush at the spillway, and Simon Thompson
had a Spotted Sandpiper nearby as well.

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC
Subject: Final reminder for Birder Travel Decisions Survey!
From: Ginger Deason <ggdeason AT ncsu.edu>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:06:02 -0400
Dear Carolina Birder,



It’s *Loon*-ey not to participate in the Birder Travel Decisions Survey!
From *Heron* out you only have one week before the survey closes! It’s your
*Tern* to help with this important study.



This is the last reminder email that the Birder Travel Decisions Survey
 is awaiting your
response. *The survey closes on July 28th!*



Please click here 
and complete it now.



It will only take about 15 – 20 minutes of your time, and your voluntary
participation in this study will help to assist local businesses better
serve birders as clientele.



All answers are confidential and you could receive a North Carolina Birding
Trail guidebook by completing the survey!



If you have any questions about this survey, please feel free to contact me
(ggdeason AT ncsu.edu) or Dr. Erin Seekamp (erin_seekamp AT ncsu.edu).



Thank you so much for your valuable input!



Sincerely,

Ginger Deason, Doctoral Research Assistant

Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management

College of Natural Resources

North Carolina State University

-- 
PhD Student/Research Assistant
Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism
College of Natural Resources
North Carolina State University


Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and
the last fish has been caught, will we realize that we cannot eat money.
~ 19th century Cree saying

Hasta que el último árbol sea cortado, el último río sea contaminado y el
último pescado sea atrapado; solo entonces nos daremos cuenta que el dinero
no se puede comer.
~ profecia Indios Cree
Subject: Gull-billed Terns at Davis Impoundment today
From: "John Fussell" <jfuss AT clis.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 17:23:21 -0400
Today we counted at least 58 Gull-billed Terns (and at least 8 juveniles) at 
Davis Impoundment (Carteret County. NC).  These birds were near the S end of 
the impoundment, where it can be overlooked (marginally) from US 70.

This location is a traditional aggregation site for post-breeding 
Gull-billed Terns.  In that only a small fraction of the impoundments can be 
seen from the highway, there could easily be far more Gull-billeds than the 
58 we saw.

John Fussell
Morehead City, NC 
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch - Durham
From: Daniel Kaplan <danmaxkaplan AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 17:17:54 -0400
In the seasonal oddity department, the summering RBNU persists in 17 Acre Wood, 
near the nature trail south of the bridge this morning. 


Dan Kaplan 
back home in Durham

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Fw: Upcoming birding events at Chimney Rock State Park
From: "Steve Shultz" <sshultz AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 14:51:39 -0400
Forwarding an FYI on upcoming events at Chimney Rock State Park...

Steve Shultz
Apex, NC

From: Shannon Tucker 
Sent: Thursday, July 17, 2014 2:43 PM
To: newsletter AT carolinabirdclub.org ; webeditor AT carolinabirdclub.org 
Subject: Upcoming birding events at Chimney Rock State Park

Good afternoon,

 

I’m writing to let you know about upcoming birding events with at Chimney 
Rock at Chimney Rock State Park; details are below. We’d love it if you could 
include these on your events calendar or newsletter or pass the word along in 
another way to members of the Carolina Bird Club. And of course, if there’s 
someone else I should be contacting about this, please let me know. 


 

Many thanks for any help you can provide in spreading the word!

 

Best regards,

Shannon 

 

Shannon Quinn-Tucker

Public Relations & Promotions Manager

Chimney Rock Management, LLC

Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park

 

o: 828.625.9611 ext *814

m: 828.243.2019  f: 828.625.9610

PO Box 39, Chimney Rock, NC 28720

chimneyrockpark.com

Facebook: Chimney Rock Park

Twitter:  AT ChimneyRockPark

 

Naturalist Niche Series: Simon Says Bird Walk 

 

Date/Time: Saturday, July 26; 8:30-10:30am

Description: During the summer, dozens of species of warblers breed in Chimney 
Rock. Join world-traveled expert Simon Thompson to see and hear these feathered 
friends, including Worm-eating, Swainson's, Black-and-white, Hooded and 
Yellow-throated Warblers. The summer-resident Scarlet Tanagers and Wood 
Thrushes will likely be singing and establishing their territories. Limited to 
15; advance registration required. 


Cost: $22 Adult (includes Park admission), $10 Annual Passholder, $12 Youth 
(ages 5-15), $5 Grady’s Kids Club Member 


 

Link to Event: 
http://chimneyrockpark.com/events/year_view.php?monthYear=2014&category=32 


 

 

6th Annual Flock to the Rock

 

Date/Time: Saturday-Sunday, September 20-21; 8:30am-2pm Sat.; Simon’s Early 
Bird walk 7:30am Sunday 

Description: The region’s premier fall migration birding event is held at 
Chimney Rock, an official site on the NC Birding Trail. Features live Birds of 
Prey programs (a Red-tailed Hawk and Great Horned Owl), bird walks led by local 
experts, workshops like bird photography and hummingbirds, plus family nature 
walks. Event coincides with the annual hawk migration. Chimney Rock is home to 
130+ species year-round, including warblers, vireos, tanagers, woodpeckers, 
thrushes, owls and birds of prey, like the Peregrine Falcon. For an event 
schedule, visit chimneyrockpark.com. 


Cost: Included with Park admission; the “Early Bird” walk is extra

 

Link to Event: 
http://chimneyrockpark.com/events/month_view.php?&monthYear=2014&month=09#E394 


 

Naturalist Niche Series: Simon Says Bird Walk

 

Date/Time: Saturdays, November 8; 8:30-10:30am

Description: Now is the perfect time to start preparing for winter birding. 
Grab your binoculars and field guide to join world-traveled birding expert 
Simon Thompson for an early look at which of our feathered friends are staying 
around for winter. Limited to 15; advance registration required. 


Cost: $22 Adult (includes Park admission), $10 Annual Passholder

 

Link to Event: 
http://chimneyrockpark.com/events/year_view.php?monthYear=2014&category=32 


 

 
Subject: Upland Sandpiper- American Turf Farm
From: Brian Pendergraft <bkpendergraft AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:59:13 -0400
Woke up this morning and made a last minute decision to go to the Sod Farm
and was rewarded with an Uppie. My first one of the season.

Brian Pendergraft
Falls Lake NC
Subject: Shorebirds after the rain, Hooper Lane, Henderson County, NC
From: Simon Thompson <simonrbt AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:37:40 -0400
Folks
A good number of shorebirds have come into the flooded fields along Hooper
Lane in Mill's River. Steve Ritt reported good numbers on July 18, so we
returned on July 19 to see what else had come in during the rain showers.
What was surprising was that several birds had already left- despite the
ongoing bad weather.
The birds are relatively easy to see from Hooper Lane immediately after you
turn off from Jeffress Road- the field has dead weeds and large amounts of
standing water.

Highlights included:
Stilt Sandpiper (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (9). Semipalmated Sandpiper (2),
Semipalmated Plover (5), Least Sandpiper (10+), Pectoral Sandpiper (1)
Most of the swallows seem to have left, but an Immature Yellow-crowned
Night-Heron was flushed from adjacent to the river heading towards Highway
191

Simon RB Thompson
Ventures Birding Tours
Asheville, North Carolina

Check out the full 2014 Calendar of birding tours on:www.birdventures.com
Steve Ritt is leading 2 upcoming tours- Arizona in August and California in
September- information on the website.

Also "like" us on Facebook at
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ventures-Birding-Tours/207237043263?ref=hl
Subject: Oakland Turf Farm this Morning
From: John Ennis <jxennis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 23:21:02 -0400
Went out looking for butterflies and early migrating birds this
morning...found 4 Horned Larks at Oakland Turf Farm...

I believe the Horned Larks were a family unit made up of 2 adults and 2
juveniles...probably they nested locally...will post pix tomorrow if they
turn out OK...

Also saw about 20 Least Sandpipers...

---
John Ennis
Leland, NC
Subject: Re: Botany Bay WMA, Charleston County, South Carolina
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 22:24:31 -0400
Congratulations Pam!  You earned that egret.  They have been more scarce in
the past year.  I hope I get a chance to see it or another in the area.


On Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 7:53 PM, Pamela Ford  wrote:

> I made a return trip to Botany today in search of the Reddish Egret
> discovered by Matt Johnson. I got lucky after a couple of hours of birding
> at the mouth of the inlet, it magically appeared! I saw it 2 hours after
> low tide. It was performing its "clown act" canopy feeding. I got some
> photos.
> Pam Ford
> Charleston
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 17, 2014, at 11:20 AM, James Watson  wrote:
>
> Yesterday, Pam Ford and I drove down to Botany Bay WMA on Edisto Island in
> search of a Reddish Egret that had been reported there on Monday at the
> inlet at low tide.  Since the area is closed on Tuesday we decided to go
> after work on Wednesday.  We did not find the egret, but we did find some
> good birds.  We had 91 Red Knot, 8 Whimbrel, 3 Least Sandpipers, 2
> Semipalmated Sandpipers, one Ruddy Turnstone, three Wilson's Plovers, 14
> Willets, 5 American Oystercatchers, and one Short-billed Dowitcher.  All of
> these shorebirds were essentially on the front beach just a short distance
> from where the trail empties out onto the beach, except for the Whimbrels,
> they were in the marsh grass behind the beach and in the tidal creeks (pics
> on eBird list). We also had one immature Great Black-backed Gull, lots of
> Black Skimmers, and the entire area had a ton of activity.  You could
> easily see Deveaux Bank to the north and nearing dusk, hundreds of birds
> were heading in that direction.  You can look at the eBird list here if you
> are interested.
>
> Some other good birds were Eastern Kingbirds, Indigo Bunting, Painted
> Bunting, Eastern Wild Turkey, it was a very fun trip.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19123021
>
>
> Craig Watson
> Mt. Pleasant, SC
>
> --
>
> Happy Birding!
>
>


-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Re: Botany Bay WMA, Charleston County, South Carolina
From: Pamela Ford <jford6 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 19:53:22 -0400
I made a return trip to Botany today in search of the Reddish Egret discovered 
by Matt Johnson. I got lucky after a couple of hours of birding at the mouth of 
the inlet, it magically appeared! I saw it 2 hours after low tide. It was 
performing its "clown act" canopy feeding. I got some photos. 

Pam Ford
Charleston

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 17, 2014, at 11:20 AM, James Watson  wrote:

> Yesterday, Pam Ford and I drove down to Botany Bay WMA on Edisto Island in 
search of a Reddish Egret that had been reported there on Monday at the inlet 
at low tide. Since the area is closed on Tuesday we decided to go after work on 
Wednesday. We did not find the egret, but we did find some good birds. We had 
91 Red Knot, 8 Whimbrel, 3 Least Sandpipers, 2 Semipalmated Sandpipers, one 
Ruddy Turnstone, three Wilson's Plovers, 14 Willets, 5 American Oystercatchers, 
and one Short-billed Dowitcher. All of these shorebirds were essentially on the 
front beach just a short distance from where the trail empties out onto the 
beach, except for the Whimbrels, they were in the marsh grass behind the beach 
and in the tidal creeks (pics on eBird list). We also had one immature Great 
Black-backed Gull, lots of Black Skimmers, and the entire area had a ton of 
activity. You could easily see Deveaux Bank to the north and nearing dusk, 
hundreds of birds were heading in that direction. You can look at the eBird 
list here if you are interested. 

>  
> Some other good birds were Eastern Kingbirds, Indigo Bunting, Painted 
Bunting, Eastern Wild Turkey, it was a very fun trip. 

>  
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19123021
>  
>  
> Craig Watson
> Mt. Pleasant, SC
> 
> -- 
> Happy Birding!
Subject: Allendale, SC Kite Fields
From: Peter Stangel <peter AT usendowment.org>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 18:43:57 +0000
The kite action is heating up near Allendale. On a trip this morning sponsored 
by Aiken's Birds & Butterflies nature Shop, we had great views in Allendale and 
Millet. 


We arrived in Allendale at about 10. At the hayfields on the west side of the 
road near the intersection of Revolutionary Trail and Barton Road, the kites 
were already flying. Over the course of the next hour we had a dozen or so 
Swallow-tails and about 5 Mississippi's in view simultaneously. 


Millet was even better. Over the big hayfields NW of the intersection of Hwy. 
125 and Millett Road, we had about 40 Swallow-tails and 7-8 Mississippis in 
view simultaneously. The highlight was a great view through the scope of 23 
Swallow-tails sitting shoulder-to-shoulder in what's left of the big pine snag 
next to Hwy. 125. 


It's a spectacle not to be missed!


Peter Stangel, Aiken, SC


Subject: Upland Sandpiper at Wilmington Airport
From: "dmcooper2 AT juno.com" <dmcooper2@juno.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 17:02:20 GMT
One Upland Sandpiper was present at the Wilmington Airport around 11am this 
morning. I saw it from the observation area near the end of Control Tower Dr. 
Also present was a continuing Horned Lark that's been present/singing for at 
least the past three weeks. A scope is helpful to appreciate. 


Sam Cooper
Wilmington, NC
____________________________________________________________
The #1 Worst Carb Ever?
Click to Learn #1 Carb that Kills Your Blood Sugar (Don't Eat 
This!) 

http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/53caa4c7ca04f24c703fcst01duc
Subject: Re: Shrub/bush/tree question
From: Will Cook <cwcook AT duke.edu>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 11:25:03 -0400
In general I think it's good for all birders to know the common trees so 
that, when birding, you can tell people exactly which tree a bird of 
interest is flitting about in.

Looks like this Red-winged Blackbird is perched on a Pondcypress 
(Taxodium ascendens). My page on it:
http://www.carolinanature.com/trees/taas.html

Will


On 7/19/2014 11:13 AM, KC Foggin wrote:
> Sort of related to bird life but please answer me off the listserv.
>
> I'd like to know what shrubbery this Blackbird is perched on.  Found in
> a swampy, flat grassland area near the Myr Bch airport. Surrounded by
> Cattails.  The birds love to perch on them.  Thank you.
>
> http://www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/image/156631623
>
> K.C.
>
> K.C. Foggin
> Socastee
> Myrtle Beach SC
>
> www.birdforum.net 
>
> www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
> 

-- 
Will Cook - Durham, NC
http://www.carolinanature.com
Subject: Shrub/bush/tree question
From: KC Foggin <kcfoggin AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 11:13:48 -0400
Sort of related to bird life but please answer me off the listserv.

I'd like to know what shrubbery this Blackbird is perched on.  Found in a
swampy, flat grassland area near the Myr Bch airport. Surrounded by
Cattails.  The birds love to perch on them.  Thank you.

http://www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/image/156631623

K.C.

K.C. Foggin
Socastee
Myrtle Beach SC

www.birdforum.net

www.pbase.com/kcfoggin/nikon_d50_pages
Subject: nice morning at brickhouse road
From: "Young, Bruce" <Bruce.Young AT edtsi.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 10:43:04 -0400
Went for a binocular-free walk at brickhouse road this morning and saw lots of 
critters. The goldfinches are out in force as are indigo buntings. Had two 
different Yellow-breasted Chats perched on wires and one downy woodpecker who 
tried to land on a wire several times before realizing his feet and tail don't 
really work that way and abandoned the attempt. 

The highlight was a striped skunk foraging alongside the trail, an odd sight 
even for an early cloudy morning. He only had white on his head and neck, no 
stripes, but i guess that's just natural variation. 

Bruce Young
byoung715 AT yahoo.com
durham, nc
Subject: Re: Frigatebird in Carteret County
From: Daniel Kaplan <danmaxkaplan AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 08:59:09 -0400
The bird that passed northeastward by Topsail Beach 5 days before that I called 
immature was rather an adult or near adult female (i emailed in haste to get 
word out before reviewing) Wonder if it's the same bird hanging around the 
region ? 


Dan Kaplan
Durham usually

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 18, 2014, at 9:47 PM, Chandra Biggerstaff  
wrote: 

> 
> 
> This afternoon while driving along Hwy 70 in Williston NC, I was surprised to 
see a Frigatebird soaring over the road. The bird appeared to to be have white 
underneath, but I can't say with certainty whether it was an immature bird or 
an adult female. 

> 
> Chandra Biggerstaff
> Greenville, NC
> Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: WNC Mills River: SB Dowitcher, Western, Stilt Sands, etc. - 7/18/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 23:14:43 -0400
I'm going to reduce that SB Dowitcher all the way back to a Dowitcher sp..
I thought the call and shape were good for SB, but I'm now questioning my
poor photos.

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC


On Fri, Jul 18, 2014 at 10:06 PM, Steve Ritt  wrote:

> Luke Cannon and I started off with good intentions to make it up to the
> spruce-fir zone this morning, but only got as far as Lake Junaluska, which
> had an Osprey and a very lonely, continuing DC Cormorant. The rain chased
> us back east, and I continued on to Lake Julian, which had another Osprey
> and three Spotted Sandpipers. I wondered if I'd been missing these all
> summer, or if they'd just come in.
>
> A private farm in the Mills River Valley may have then answered my
> question by showing the first real push of "fall" migrants we've had up
> here so far. It was a very nice change:
> Short-billed Dowitcher (griseus) - 1
> Stilt Sandpiper - 8
> Western Sandpiper - 4
> Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3
> Least Sandpiper - 8
> Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
> Greater Yellowlegs - 4
> Killdeer - a brazilian
>
> The Great Egret continued at Van Wingerden.
>
> Hoping for more tomorrow. Wish I could be more specific, but figured folks
> would like to know anyways, and write if you'd like more info. Looks like a
> great time to just get out to any flooded fields nearby!
>
> Steve Ritt
> Asheville, NC
>
>
Subject: CBC announces Blue Ridge Parkway bonus trip
From: "Steve Shultz" <sshultz AT nc.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 22:05:46 -0400
Carolina Bird Club Blue Ridge Parkway Bonus Field Trip
September 13-14, 2014

Join us as we seek out and enjoy roving flocks of fall migrants on the 
beautiful Blue Ridge Parkway.

Are you a fan of warblers? Then this trip is for you. Mid to late 
September is the peak of fall migration for warblers in the Carolinas. This 
is the time when a variety of warblers abandon their breeding season 
stratification and join together with vireos, tanagers, cuckoos, grosbeaks 
and more to feast on the little buggy things that power their southward 
migration. These flocks frequently follow the crests of the Appalachian 
ranges, and we hope to encounter a variety of species as we travel the 
scenic Parkway. While not as common in the lowlands, up here on the Blue 
Ridge, Tennessee, Cape May, and Bay-breasted Warblers often take center 
stage, with many others playing supporting roles.

Sound like fun? Act quickly as space on this Bonus Trip is limited to 10 
participants. This smaller group makes individualized interaction with the 
trip leaders easier and allows us to help you with identifying any of those 
“confusing fall warblers”.

Logistics:
This trip visits the Blue Ridge Parkway in northern North Carolina and 
southern Virginia on September 13 and 14th. We will depart from Sparta, NC 
at 7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday with a full day of birding on Saturday and a 
half day on Sunday. Registration cost is $25. You must be a member of the 
Carolina Bird Club to attend, but you may join at the same time as you 
register if you are currently not a member. Participants are responsible for 
lodging, meals, and transportation. All levels of birding experience are 
welcome.

Parking alongside the Parkway can be limited, so we will endeavour to 
combine into as few vehicles as possible.

Environmental hazards are few, and annoying insects are not usually 
problematic, but bring a rain jacket and sweater in case of showers or cool 
weather.

To Register:
Contact Steve Shultz for a reserved slot and a registration form. If your 
plans should change after registration, refunds are available through 
August 29th. After August 29th refunds are available if we can fill 
your slot.
Subject: WNC Mills River: SB Dowitcher, Western, Stilt Sands, etc. - 7/18/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 22:06:41 -0400
Luke Cannon and I started off with good intentions to make it up to the
spruce-fir zone this morning, but only got as far as Lake Junaluska, which
had an Osprey and a very lonely, continuing DC Cormorant. The rain chased
us back east, and I continued on to Lake Julian, which had another Osprey
and three Spotted Sandpipers. I wondered if I'd been missing these all
summer, or if they'd just come in.

A private farm in the Mills River Valley may have then answered my question
by showing the first real push of "fall" migrants we've had up here so far.
It was a very nice change:
Short-billed Dowitcher (griseus) - 1
Stilt Sandpiper - 8
Western Sandpiper - 4
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 3
Least Sandpiper - 8
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1
Greater Yellowlegs - 4
Killdeer - a brazilian

The Great Egret continued at Van Wingerden.

Hoping for more tomorrow. Wish I could be more specific, but figured folks
would like to know anyways, and write if you'd like more info. Looks like a
great time to just get out to any flooded fields nearby!

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC
Subject: Frigatebird in Carteret County
From: Chandra Biggerstaff <cjbiggerstaff AT me.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 21:47:46 -0400
This afternoon while driving along Hwy 70 in Williston NC, I was surprised to 
see a Frigatebird soaring over the road. The bird appeared to to be have white 
underneath, but I can't say with certainty whether it was an immature bird or 
an adult female. 


Chandra Biggerstaff
Greenville, NC
Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: RoseatteSpoonbills_RantowlesCreek@Hwy17_CharlestonCoSC
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:15:40 -0400
Today at low tide there were 2 Roseatte Spoonbills foraging in the shallows
and two were in the trees at the Waldon Rd. bridge.  It could pay off to
check by at any time of day since low tide didn't mean they all were out
feeding and out of sight.

Cherrie


On Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 5:57 PM, Cherrie Sneed  wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> At 4:45 PM there were 7 Roseatte Spoonbills at the Waldon Rd. Brdige off
> Hwy 17S. at Rantowles Creek.  It was high tide.  I've seen them 2 other
> times recently at high tide there, They may be roosting there tonight.  The
> spoonbills were on both sides of the creek.  Here is a weak photo of one
> group.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/63304395 AT N02/14656560406/
>
> Also present was 1 Woodstork, 1 Yellow-crowned Night Heron, 1 Belted
> Kingfisher, 1 Tri-colored Heron, and a dozen Snowy Egrets.  Painted
> Buntings were also singing near the creek.
>
> Cherrie
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> *Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
> Meggett, SC
> St. Paul's Parish
> Southern Coastal Charleston County
>                        &
> Robbinsville, NC
> Snowbird Mountains
> Graham County
>



-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Brickhouse Road Waterfowl Impoundment
From: David Anderson <d47anders AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:59:27 -0400
A perfect morning for birding, unseasonable. Clear, cool (61° at 6:45 AM, 74° 
by 10 AM), low humidity. Less busy than a month ago but still great fun. 
PILEATED WOODPECKERS were the stars, three flying over in succession. Found two 
different NORTHERN PARULAS, so beautiful in the sun. Glad to have so many 
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS around. And a nice sighting of the ORCHARD ORIOLE. The 
sunflowers are in full bloom covering the adjoining field. 

David Anderson 
Durham, NC 

Brickhouse Road Waterfowl Impoundment
July 18, 2014

Fish crow 3
Mourning dove 5
Chipping sparrow 3
Northern cardinal 35
Yellow-billed cuckoo 4
Red-eyed vireo 4
Tufted titmouse 25
Carolina wren 20
Common grackle 12
Acadian flycatcher 3
Carolina chickadee 10
American goldfinch 9
Northern parula 2
Red-bellied woodpecker 18
Downy woodpecker 2
Blue-gray gnatcatcher 28
White-eyed vireo 7
Pileated woodpecker 5
Indigo bunting 24
Orchard oriole 1
Brown-headed cowbird 1
Summer tanager 3
Great blue heron 2
Common yellowthroat 3
Yellow-breasted chat 1
Eastern kingbird 1
Turkey vulture 2 
Barn swallow 2
Ruby-throated hummingbird 5
American crow 4
Eastern bluebird 3


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: FW: eBird Report - 28560 New Bern, Jul 18, 2014
From: "Olwen jarvis" <Olwen AT suddenlink.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:37:19 -0400
The count was done by six people including a visitor from Texas and a new 
birder. 


-----Original Message-----
From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org [mailto:do-not-reply AT ebird.org] 
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 12:30 PM
To: olwen AT suddenlink.net
Subject: eBird Report - 28560 New Bern, Jul 18, 2014

28560 New Bern, Craven, US-NC
Jul 18, 2014 5:45 AM - 9:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
9.0 mile(s)
43 species

Canada Goose  53
Double-crested Cormorant  2
Green Heron  3
Black Vulture  4
Osprey  9
Killdeer  3
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Laughing Gull  9
Least Tern  13
Forster's Tern  1
Royal Tern  1
Mourning Dove  27
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  5
Red-bellied Woodpecker  7
Downy Woodpecker  3
Northern Flicker  3
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  3
Blue Jay  13
American Crow  3
Fish Crow  24
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  3
Purple Martin  76
Barn Swallow  3
Carolina Chickadee  10
Tufted Titmouse  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown-headed Nuthatch  12
Carolina Wren  14
Eastern Bluebird  28
American Robin  6
Gray Catbird  6
Brown Thrasher  6
Northern Mockingbird  25
European Starling  4
Chipping Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  16
Indigo Bunting  1
Common Grackle  9
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
House Finch  15
House Sparrow  26

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19134424 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: WNC Mills River: cont. Savannah, Bobolink, Gr. Egret - 7/17/14
From: Bill Rhodes <ashevillein AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 09:50:48 -0400
Was there in the PM, hardly any swallows... Savanah was hiding from the
horde of guys bailing hay. Great Egret standing proud.


On Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 11:21 PM, Steve Ritt  wrote:

> A group of local and visiting birders birded Hooper Lane this morning. The
> Savannah Sparrow and at least one Bobolink continue. Swallow numbers were
> low this morning, but there was still good diversity with about a handful
> of Banks. They mowed the fields at Mills River Park, but there was still
> one Grasshopper Sparrow.
>
> The Great Egret continued at the Van Wingerden Pond, and there are still
> multiple Grashopper Sparrows in the meadow behind it.
>
> Lake Julian had an Osprey, and Double-crested Cormorant numbers have
> increased (roughly 25 from usual 15). Broad-winged Hawks seem to be more
> visible and moving about recently.
>
> Steve Ritt
> Asheville, NC
>
Subject: WNC Mills River: cont. Savannah, Bobolink, Gr. Egret - 7/17/14
From: Steve Ritt <stevenmritt AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 23:21:18 -0400
A group of local and visiting birders birded Hooper Lane this morning. The
Savannah Sparrow and at least one Bobolink continue. Swallow numbers were
low this morning, but there was still good diversity with about a handful
of Banks. They mowed the fields at Mills River Park, but there was still
one Grasshopper Sparrow.

The Great Egret continued at the Van Wingerden Pond, and there are still
multiple Grashopper Sparrows in the meadow behind it.

Lake Julian had an Osprey, and Double-crested Cormorant numbers have
increased (roughly 25 from usual 15). Broad-winged Hawks seem to be more
visible and moving about recently.

Steve Ritt
Asheville, NC
Subject: Hatteras Pelagic Photos
From: Jeff Lemons <birdsalot AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 22:42:22 -0400
Here are some photos from the spring Hatteras pelagic trips with Brian
Patteson and Kate Sutherland on the Stormy Petrel II.
Each link is to a different gallery.  Use the arrow keys on the keyboard to
advance photos.

http://bit.ly/1yzjpbg

http://bit.ly/1ngWhfk

http://bit.ly/1ngW7EB

http://bit.ly/1rviPbi

http://bit.ly/1qMllst

http://bit.ly/1qMlb4x

I was fortunate to be on board for seven pelagic trips over a four week
period during May and June.  One thing is for sure about pelagic
seabirding, every day is different.  There are different winds, different
seas, different birds and different marine life every day.  No two trip
lists were the same.  The best way to see the most pelagic species is to go
on as many trips as you can.  Unless you can go on every trip, you are
going to miss something.  I missed the day they had Bermuda Petrel,
European Storm Petrel, and Fea's Petrel and didn't see them on any of the
other trips, but I had many great days with many highlights.These included
a run on Trindade Petrel on 3 out of 4 trips with one three bird day
including a light morph Trindade Petrel.  There were a couple of days when
we had six species of shearwater including Scopoli's and Borealis Cory's
Shearwater, Sooty, Manx, Audubon's and Great Shearwater.  There were Arctic
Terns on several trips that gave good looks, a few Bridled Terns and we had
a Common Tern land on the front railing.  Leach's and Band-rumped Storm
Petrels were present on most trips, but showed better on some days than
others.  Several of the days, Black-capped Petrels were around the boat
almost all day, but on a few of the calm days we almost missed them
altogether.

The best day for me came on the last day of the Spring Blitz.  We had
calmer seas and Brian ran further out into the Gulf Stream than other
mornings before slowing down.  We were almost 42 miles from the inlet at
9:00am when a Pair of Tropicbirds came in to check out the boat.  There was
a juvenile Red-billed and an adult White-tailed traveling together.  They
made several passes around the boat for at least ten minutes giving
excellent looks.  There is nothing like a Tropicbird at sea and it's always
a cause for celebration.  Having both species together was a first for all
on board including Brian Patteson and Steve Howell.  After the Tropicbirds
departed the fun didn't quit.  We had Jaegers around the boat most of the
day including a group of three Long-tailed Jaegers harassing a Pomarine
Jaeger.  We had a couple of Arctic Terns and a sweep on all the expected
Shearwaters.

I also missed South Polar Skua and Parasitic Jaeger that were seen on other
trips during May.  I had one day cancelled due to weather.

I'm looking forward to some additional trips in late July and August in
hopes that a mega-rarity will show again this year.  The boat is due for a
Swinhoe's or Black-bellied Storm Petrel or maybe another Cape Verde
Shearwater.  You never know what might show up on any given pelagic trip.
 There are currently spaces available on all the upcoming trips, but some
trips in August are filling up.

Good Birding,
Jeff Lemons
Charlotte, NC
Subject: Re: RoseatteSpoonbills_RantowlesCreek@Hwy17_CharlestonCoSC
From: JILL MIDGETT <jm3567 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 20:57:00 -0400
Just an FYI in case you drive along Waldon Road, Rantowles Creek,  to find
Spoonbills or other birds, you might be greeted by homeowners as I was on
July 4 and again this evening.  Once I introduced myself and they saw the
binoculars and camera, they were friendly and we enjoyed our chats.  On my
first visit out there the gentleman I spoke with was so glad to know it was
Barn Swallows he had been watching every evening.  The young guy I spoke
with tonight told me that the dolphin love it when he plays music on his
boat and he sees Spoonbills every summer.

They are happy as long as they know we are watching birds, and they will
verify what we're doing on their street.

Cherrie thank you so much, saw one on the creek up Waldon Rd, and 2 across
Hwy 17 feeding in the creek.

The only thing better than seeing Roseate Spoonbills is only having to
drive 5 miles to see them. Amazing.

Jill Midgett
Charleston, SC


On Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 5:57 PM, Cherrie Sneed  wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> At 4:45 PM there were 7 Roseatte Spoonbills at the Waldon Rd. Brdige off
> Hwy 17S. at Rantowles Creek.  It was high tide.  I've seen them 2 other
> times recently at high tide there, They may be roosting there tonight.  The
> spoonbills were on both sides of the creek.  Here is a weak photo of one
> group.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/63304395 AT N02/14656560406/
>
> Also present was 1 Woodstork, 1 Yellow-crowned Night Heron, 1 Belted
> Kingfisher, 1 Tri-colored Heron, and a dozen Snowy Egrets.  Painted
> Buntings were also singing near the creek.
>
> Cherrie
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> *Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
> Meggett, SC
> St. Paul's Parish
> Southern Coastal Charleston County
>                        &
> Robbinsville, NC
> Snowbird Mountains
> Graham County
>
Subject: RoseatteSpoonbills_RantowlesCreek@Hwy17_CharlestonCoSC
From: Cherrie Sneed <sneedcb AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 17:57:43 -0400
Greetings,

At 4:45 PM there were 7 Roseatte Spoonbills at the Waldon Rd. Brdige off
Hwy 17S. at Rantowles Creek.  It was high tide.  I've seen them 2 other
times recently at high tide there, They may be roosting there tonight.  The
spoonbills were on both sides of the creek.  Here is a weak photo of one
group.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/63304395 AT N02/14656560406/

Also present was 1 Woodstork, 1 Yellow-crowned Night Heron, 1 Belted
Kingfisher, 1 Tri-colored Heron, and a dozen Snowy Egrets.  Painted
Buntings were also singing near the creek.

Cherrie



-- 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
*Cherrie & Dan Sneed*
Meggett, SC
St. Paul's Parish
Southern Coastal Charleston County
                       &
Robbinsville, NC
Snowbird Mountains
Graham County
Subject: Possible American Kestrel nesting site--University of South Carolina
From: <jrgrego AT sc.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:00:49 -0400
I often see kestrels during the summer on the USC campus in and around McMaster 
College. Today I was strolling around McMaster College looking at their 
installation art and noticed a male kestrel fly toward the building and perch 
on one of the Italianate brackets under the eaves. The bracket was broken at 
the top and it looked as though there might be room for a nest. The kestrel 
circled over to another bracket on the opposite side of the entrance and 
disappeared completely from view--I think the second spot, to the left of 
McMaster's entrance, may be the nesting site. 


John Grego
Columbia SC
Subject: Reddish Egret at North Topsail Beach, NC
From: "gilbert grant" <gilbert_grant AT usa.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:50 -0400
This morning I found an immature, dark morph Reddish Egret feeding in the
mudflat area of North Topsail Beach, Onslow County, NC near New River Inlet. I
did not relocate the spoonbill that I last reported on 4 July from here.

Gilbert S. Grant
Sneads Ferry, NC
Subject: Botany Bay WMA, Charleston County, South Carolina
From: James Watson <jcraigw1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 11:20:16 -0400
Yesterday, Pam Ford and I drove down to Botany Bay WMA on Edisto Island in
search of a Reddish Egret that had been reported there on Monday at the
inlet at low tide.  Since the area is closed on Tuesday we decided to go
after work on Wednesday.  We did not find the egret, but we did find some
good birds.  We had 91 Red Knot, 8 Whimbrel, 3 Least Sandpipers, 2
Semipalmated Sandpipers, one Ruddy Turnstone, three Wilson's Plovers, 14
Willets, 5 American Oystercatchers, and one Short-billed Dowitcher.  All of
these shorebirds were essentially on the front beach just a short distance
from where the trail empties out onto the beach, except for the Whimbrels,
they were in the marsh grass behind the beach and in the tidal creeks (pics
on eBird list). We also had one immature Great Black-backed Gull, lots of
Black Skimmers, and the entire area had a ton of activity.  You could
easily see Deveaux Bank to the north and nearing dusk, hundreds of birds
were heading in that direction.  You can look at the eBird list here if you
are interested.

Some other good birds were Eastern Kingbirds, Indigo Bunting, Painted
Bunting, Eastern Wild Turkey, it was a very fun trip.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19123021


Craig Watson
Mt. Pleasant, SC

-- 

Happy Birding!
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Gunter Rd. Piedmont, SC, Jul 17, 2014
From: Paul Serridge <paulserridge AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 09:12:33 -0400
I found the adult female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher and 1 of her recently
fledged young at Gunter Rd early this morning. (4 young had successfully
fledged.)
The tail of the young bird was about 1/3 the length of that of the adult
female and already distinctly split into two.
After 2 or 3 minutes both birds flew across the cow pasture and I did not
see them again.

e-Bird report follows.

Paul Serridge
Greenville, SC


Gunter Rd. Piedmont, SC, Greenville, US-SC
Jul 17, 2014 6:30 AM - 7:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.3 mile(s)
16 species

Mourning Dove  2
Chimney Swift  2
Eastern Kingbird  3     1 adult feeding 2 young perched on telephone lines
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  2     Female and young perched on telephone
wires near pole holding old nest.
American Crow  6
Northern Mockingbird  2
European Starling  8
Eastern Towhee  1
Chipping Sparrow  1
Field Sparrow  5
Grasshopper Sparrow  1
Blue Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  1
Eastern Meadowlark  1
Brown-headed Cowbird  9
American Goldfinch  3

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19124963

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)