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Updated on Friday, May 22 at 11:56 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Spotted Sandgrouse,©Jan Wilczur

22 May Re: Cornell eBird app [Ronald Orenstein ]
22 May Re: Cornell eBird app [Brian Sullivan ]
22 May Cornell eBird app [Ronald Orenstein ]
21 May Bicycle Birdathon in the Okanagan Valley, BC [Dick Cannings ]
19 May Hilton Pond 05/03/15 (Birds Of Spring 2015) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
19 May PBS Nature Series "The Sagebrush Sea" [Patricia Rossi ]
16 May BirdNote, last week & the week of May 17, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
16 May Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100) [jkennedy366 ]
15 May Finally some migration movement in the midwest ["R.D. Everhart" ]
15 May Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
15 May Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) [Sam Sinderson ]
15 May Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
14 May Pine Warbler behavior [Bernie Carr ]
13 May Short video clips - bird and interesting behaviors [Allison Wells ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Jerry Friedman ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Geoffrey Williamson ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Jim Royer ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Katrina Knight ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Jerry Friedman ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Katrina Knight ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Eric Jeffrey ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? []
12 May CA - Vancouver, British Columbia Trip Story [Dave DeReamus ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Ronald Orenstein ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? ["Tangren, Jerry" ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Jim ]
12 May Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? []
12 May Anyone read the Narrow Edge? [sj wexlr ]
11 May RFH: Horicon Marsh ["sandfalcon1 ." ]
11 May RFH: Michigan UP birding ["sandfalcon1 ." ]
11 May Birding Community E-bulletin - May 2015 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
11 May Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] "Artsy" Greater Yellowlegs Photo :-) ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
10 May Update on Ocosingo Rd in Chiapas [barry ]
10 May Re: An extraordinary book for birders [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
9 May Big Migration Movement in Southeast U.S. tonight ["R.D. Everhart" ]
9 May Re: An extraordinary book for birders ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
9 May "Artsy" Greater Yellowlegs Photo :-) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
9 May Re: An extraordinary book for birders [Bob Powell ]
9 May Re: An extraordinary book for birders [Ronald Orenstein ]
9 May An extraordinary book for birders [William Saur ]
9 May Hilton Pond 04/27/15 (New River Birding Festival) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
9 May Hilton Pond 04/27/15 (New River Birding Festival) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
9 May BirdNote, last week & the week of May 10, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
8 May Odd location for a dead cormorant? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
6 May Trip Report - Morocco March-April 2015 []
6 May Wild Turkey yoga (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
5 May Victoria, BC ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
5 May interesting report: Birdfeeding favours non-native species [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
4 May Posting for Phil Hansbro-- trip in Dec to Argentina? [ ]
2 May Link to next week's BirdNote shows [Ellen Blackstone ]
2 May BirdNote, last week & the week of May 3, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
1 May Interesting yard bird turkey photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
1 May will be in Las Vegas (birding!) next week [ ]
1 May New bird species discovered in a bush in Sichuan China [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
28 Apr 2015 audubon photography awards [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
28 Apr New York State Dims Lights To Help Birds [Eric Jeffrey ]
26 Apr Hilton Pond 04/01/15 (The Matriarch Passes On) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
25 Apr BirdNote, last week & the week of April 26, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
22 Apr Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine [ ]
22 Apr Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
22 Apr RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine [Ralph McKinnon ]
21 Apr Re: Red-eyed Red-bellied Woodpecker? (photo) [Eran Tomer ]
21 Apr Red-eyed Red-bellied Woodpecker? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Apr Re: Why? [Ronald Orenstein ]
21 Apr Why? [Al Schirmacher ]
21 Apr beatboxing birdsongs of New York?? WHAAAAT? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
20 Apr TR: 2 Quetzal trip-Mexico and updated info [barry ]
19 Apr Birding Community E-bulletin - April 2015 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Joseph Morlan ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Ronald Orenstein ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Dixie Burkhart ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [dmark ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Ronald Orenstein ]
18 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Patricia Burden ]

Subject: Re: Cornell eBird app
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 16:46:07 +0000
OK - I'll look forward to it.  A couple of questions:  Will it allow you to 
sae observations on your device or computer as well as uploading them to eBird, 
and will it be integrated with bird iWitness (im Malaysia) which I understand 
is merging with eBird? 

Thanks - Ron
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Brian Sullivan 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 10:48 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Cornell eBird app
   
Hi Ron

We are currently beta testing a data entry app for eBird on iOS. We had it
up in the iTunes store only briefly the other day so a few people could get
it to help test. We expect it to be available worldwide for free within a
month. Stay tuned to eBird for the latest announcements on this.

Thanks

Brian



On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:01 AM, Ronald Orenstein 
wrote:

> Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks
> most interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App Store. I
> am not sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about
> it - does anyone know?
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> --
> ===========
>
>
> *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> www.ebird.org
>
> *Photo Editor*
> Birds of North America Online
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> -------------------------------
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Cornell eBird app
From: Brian Sullivan <bls42 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 07:48:58 -0700
Hi Ron

We are currently beta testing a data entry app for eBird on iOS. We had it
up in the iTunes store only briefly the other day so a few people could get
it to help test. We expect it to be available worldwide for free within a
month. Stay tuned to eBird for the latest announcements on this.

Thanks

Brian

On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:01 AM, Ronald Orenstein 
wrote:

> Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks
> most interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App Store. I
> am not sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about
> it - does anyone know?
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> --
> ===========
>
>
> *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> www.ebird.org
>
> *Photo Editor*
> Birds of North America Online
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> -------------------------------
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Cornell eBird app
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 07:01:34 -0400
Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks most 
interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App Store. I am not 
sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about it - does 
anyone know? 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bicycle Birdathon in the Okanagan Valley, BC
From: Dick Cannings <dickcannings AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 19:51:40 -0700
Hi Birders:

We did our annual bicycle birdathon-part of the Okanagan Big Day Challenge
and the Meadowlark Nature Festival-on Sunday, May 17th.  This happens in the
south Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, one of the continent's best
places for breeding bird diversity.  It was an epic adventure as usual,
although a little damper than normal this year.  But we had some great birds
and raised some money for bird conservation.   Here's the link:

http://dickcannings.com/2015/05/21/bicycle-birdathon-2015-a-wet-willety-day/



Good birding!

Dick Cannings

Penticton, BC


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Hilton Pond 05/03/15 (Birds Of Spring 2015)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 21:22:15 -0400
Orioles and grosbeaks, gnatcatchers and warblers—we banded so many 
fascinating birds "This Week at Hilton Pond" I'm devoting the entire 
installment to their images and information about them. To view the 3-19 May 
2015 photo essay, please visit http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150503.html 
 


While there don’t forget to scroll down for an impressive lists of old birds 
recaptured at the Center during the period. 


Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: PBS Nature Series "The Sagebrush Sea"
From: Patricia Rossi <circus_cyaneus AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 19:46:01 -0500
 Greetings!


 Wednesday, May 20, at 8pm (check your local listings) on the PBS NATURE 
Series: 

The "Sagebrush Sea": The life of the greater sage-grouse, which lives on the 
"sagebrush sea" that stretches across 11 states in the American West. 

 Other featured creatures include the golden eagle, great-horned owl, 
cavity-nesting bluebirds and American kestrel. 



Patricia Rossi
Levittown, PA
circus_cyaneus AT verizon.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of May 17, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 07:44:36 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Bluethroat - What a Singer!
http://bit.ly/1H8ZWjS
* Swainson's Warbler
http://bit.ly/KauNU3
* Flickers and Buffleheads
http://bit.ly/1KcJyFb
* Birdsong, Music, and Neuroscience
http://bit.ly/1B3wz0c
* Hold the Phone
http://bit.ly/1JnIrkK
* Endangered Species Day
http://bit.ly/M7Vwj0
* Ponderosa Pine Savanna
http://bit.ly/KVngEm
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1A9A2iH
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100)
From: jkennedy366 <jkennedy366 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 07:09:53 -0500
The birds are tree swallows. I have found them exploring cliff swallow nests
in southeast texas and got pictures of it but did not make it back to the
area to see if they actually nested at that spot. A couple of years later,
tree swallows had just fledged young sitting in nearby shrubs in an area
that had no trees but did have cliff swallow nests. All they need is a hole
into a correctly sized chamber. And they easily switch to bird boxes etc
from hollow trees.

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of BIRDCHAT automatic digest
system
Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2015 12:00 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100)

There are 4 messages totalling 160 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) (3)
  2. Finally some migration movement in the midwest

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 19:35:45 -0400
From:    "B.G. Sloan" 
Subject: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look like
Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 19:59:12 -0400
From:    Sam Sinderson 
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

These look like a Tree Swallow to me.  Maybe you have a new observation.  If
I'm not mistaken, its been awhile since I've seen Cliff Swallow nest, the
nest is "closed" and has just a hole entrance, pretty much like a birdhouse.
So why not a Tree Swallow using it, especially if the site is abandoned by
Cliff Swallows?

Sam Sinderson
sinderso AT verizon.net

On 5/15/2015 7:35 PM, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old
> Cliff Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active
> in the two years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent
> birds don't look like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank
> Swallows, or some other species?
>
> Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/
>
> And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the
nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/
>
> My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
> swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 20:14:21 -0400
From:    "Spector, David (Biology)" 
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

At first glance look like Tree Swallows to me.

The Birds of North America Account lists a variety of unusual Tree Swallow
nest sites including old Cliff Swallow nests, eaves of buildings, Wood Duck
boxes, and fire hydrants.

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan [bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM]
Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 7:35 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look like
Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 22:44:10 -0500
From:    "R.D. Everhart" 
Subject: Finally some migration movement in the midwest

I have posted a radar image tonight showing an impressive movement of birds
in the Great Lakes region. I haven't seen it look this heavy in quite a
while. See the image here:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

Saturday could be a banner day in the field!


Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100)
***************************************************************

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Finally some migration movement in the midwest
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 22:44:10 -0500
I have posted a radar image tonight showing an impressive movement of
birds in the Great Lakes region. I haven't seen it look this heavy in
quite a while. See the image here:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

Saturday could be a banner day in the field!


Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 20:14:21 -0400
At first glance look like Tree Swallows to me.

The Birds of North America Account lists a variety of unusual Tree Swallow nest 
sites including old Cliff Swallow nests, eaves of buildings, Wood Duck boxes, 
and fire hydrants. 


David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan [bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 7:35 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look
like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other
species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)
From: Sam Sinderson <sinderso AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 19:59:12 -0400
These look like a Tree Swallow to me.  Maybe you have a new
observation.  If I'm not mistaken, its been awhile since I've seen Cliff
Swallow nest, the nest is "closed" and has just a hole entrance, pretty
much like a birdhouse. So why not a Tree Swallow using it, especially if
the site is abandoned by Cliff Swallows?

Sam Sinderson
sinderso AT verizon.net

On 5/15/2015 7:35 PM, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
> Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
> years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look
> like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other
> species?
>
> Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/
>
> And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/
>
> My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
> swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 19:35:45 -0400
OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look
like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other
species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Pine Warbler behavior
From: Bernie Carr <mycocarex AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 10:34:14 +0000
A few weekendss ago, I watched a male pine warbler "shake". It would shake its 
wings a little and then its body a lot and then it would sing. Someone 
suggested a mating dance? This bird flew from tree to tree doing this behavior. 
Anyone ever seen this behavior. This was about 2 weeks after the pine warblers 
were back on territory. Much more interesting watching this - than running on 
to the next FOS. 

Bernie CarrSyracuse,NY 		 	   		  
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Subject: Short video clips - bird and interesting behaviors
From: Allison Wells <awells AT NRCM.ORG>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 13:32:38 +0000
Here in Maine, migrants are flooding through, but it's also a great time to 
take a few minutes to watch "local" birds as they do interesting things this 
time of year. Below is a series of very short video clips taken around our yard 
here in Maine over the last few weeks, of birds doing interesting spring 
behaviors. We thought fellow Chatters might enjoy. 


Bald Eagle getting mobbed by crows (love that you can hear the White-throat 
singing in the beginning) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An9Y8_lUeEQ 


Male Mourning Dove courtship display:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_mBJbh1p3o

Blue Jays doing matching "bouncing" display
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pza-RkKW3-8

White-crowned Sparrow singing https://youtu.be/qgi-klQukRE

White-throated Sparrow (one of my favorite bird vocalizations - quintessential 
Maine!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSSiSQgVutA 


Also: "Maine 's Other Amazing Tide: Migrating Birds 
http://www.nrcm.org/blogs-of-nrcm/maines-other-amazing-tide-migrating-birds/ 


Hope you enjoy, and good birding!

Allison and Jeff Wells
Gardiner, Maine

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 17:21:17 -0600
On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 4:09 PM, Katrina Knight  wrote:
> At 04:02 PM 5/12/2015 Jerry Friedman wrote:
>>
>> On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight
>>  wrote:
>>
>> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>>
>> As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not
>> trespassing.
>
>
> Have you read the text of the law?

Yes, but apparently I didn't quite understand it.

> It is entitled "Trespassing
> to unlawfully collect resource data; unlawful collection of
> resource data." Its purpose is to define data collection as
> trespassing in situations where it wouldn't normally be
> considered trespassing, making the data collection illegal. They
> really are calling data collection, including photography,
> "trespassing".

I see what you're saying.  If you have the owner's permission to
enter the land, but you intend to collect resource data (as defined
in the act) and you don't have the owner's permission for that,
you're "trespassing to unlawfully collect resource data".

Jerry Friedman
Espanola, N. M.

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Geoffrey Williamson <geoffrey.williamson.21 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 17:53:36 -0500
There are two separate actions dealt with by the act.  One concerns
trespassing, the other concerns data collection.  One can be guilty of
trespassing for the purpose of collecting resource data without having
actually collected the data.   If one does in addition collect data, then
one is guilty of trespassing for the purpose of collecting resource data
while also being guilty of collecting resource data.

I have not followed this mess closely, but there is an earlier version (?)
of the act in which the trespassing clause read "A person is guilty of
trespassing to unlawfully collect resource data if he (i) Enters onto or
crosses private open land for the purpose of collecting resource data;" and
(ii) doesn't have appropriate permission.   It appears to me that the
version that made it into law had the word "private" deleted, and now reads
"... enters onto or crosses open land for the purpose of ...."    So it is
"open land" for determining whether there was trespassing.   The definition
of unlawfully collected resource data still refers to "private open land."



On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 5:09 PM, Katrina Knight  wrote:

> At 04:02 PM 5/12/2015 Jerry Friedman wrote:
>
>> On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight
>>  wrote:
>>
>> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>>
>> As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not
>> trespassing.
>>
>
> Have you read the text of the law? It is entitled "Trespassing
> to unlawfully collect resource data; unlawful collection of
> resource data." Its purpose is to define data collection as
> trespassing in situations where it wouldn't normally be
> considered trespassing, making the data collection illegal. They
> really are calling data collection, including photography,
> "trespassing".
>
> --
> Katrina Knight
> kknight AT fastmail.fm
> Reading, PA, USA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
Geoff Williamson
geoffrey.williamson.21 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Jim Royer <jrmotmot AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 15:48:26 -0700
I'm a birder in Caifornia and a criminal defense attorney. The link to the
act referred to in this discussion is at:
https://legiscan.com/WY/text/SF0012/id/1151882/Wyoming-2015-SF0012-Enrolled.pdf
.
I would recommend reviewing the actual language of this law before jumping
to conclusions.

First, it does not criminalize anything without actual "entry" into the
land. Parts (a) and (b) of this law define the two basis for violation
of it's provisions. Part (b) requires "entry" into private land, and may
very well be a valid criminal prohibition, if not contrary to some other
Wyoming statute. Under this part, a person would need to get permission to
"collect resource data" (as defined by the code) on private property. So,
for example, if you wanted to enter private land to do a bird count, you
would need permission. You would not appear to need permission to bird from
outside the property, since you have made no entry into the land.

Part (a) also requires actual entry into the land, so it would not appear
to be illegal to bird from outside the affected open land. The rest of Part
(a) is less certain. As a criminal defense attorney, I would argue that
individuals have "legal authorization to enter the land" where the land is
publically owned and accessible land (such as an open park or national
monument or BLM land.) The public also arguably has an "ownership interest"
in any publically owned lands, which would allow entry under this Part.
I don't know if Wyoming courts (or federal courts) would agree with this
logical interpretation. There are also likely problems with the
constitutionality of Part (a) (under the U.S. Constitution), such as those
cited in a prior post. Hopefully, the state or federal courts will strike
down Part (a). In the meantime, it would be prudent to get permission from
the governmental entity that manages a specific publically owned land
before doing a bird count (or gathering other "resource data"). Hopefully,
the appropriate governmental entity (such as the National Park Service in a
national park) will readily grant such permission.

(I am not licensed to practice law in Wyoming. I am licensed to practice in
California. I base the above opinions on my understanding of the laws of my
state, as well as general legal principles. For a completely
legally accurate opinion on this matter, you should ask an attorney
licensed in Wyoming (if you can find one who is so inclined).)

Jim Royer
Los Osos, CA

On Tuesday, May 12, 2015, Jerry Friedman  wrote:

> On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight  > wrote:
> > At 11:41 AM 5/12/2015 ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM  wrote:
> >>
> >> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
> >>
> >> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
> >> condition
> >> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to
> >> share that data> with the state or federal government"
> >
> >
> >
> >>  But I immediately
> >> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of
> >> this new Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
> >
> >
> > It disallows collecting resource data with a plan or intention
> > to submit it to an agency of the state or federal government.
>
> It says information "which is submitted or intended to be submitted
> to any agency of the state or federal government".  Intended by
> who?  What if you submit data to eBird or Audubon that someone
> else intends to pass on to the government?  Does it matter whether
> you know about that other person's intention?
>
> (The double passive construction isn't great style, either.)
>
> > CBC data is collected by Audubon.  Audubon is definitely not a
> > state or federal agency. Cornell University is involved as well.
> > Does Cornell count as a state agency? IIRC, they are a land
> > grant school that is privately endowed. I'm unclear on whether
> > that makes them an arm of the state or not. Does "the state" as
> > written in this law apply to all states or just the state of
> > Wyoming? If Cornell qualifies as a state agency, it would be an
> > agency of New York, not Wyoming.
>
> I was wondering about both of those things too.
>
> Data for the Breeding Bird Survey go to the U. S. Geological
> Survey, which is unquestionably a federal agency.
>
> > The law is clearly unconstitutional as written and if Wyoming
> > tried to prosecute CBC participants in Wyoming I think they'd
> > have a big battle and a lot of bad publicity on their hands.
> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>
> As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not trespassing.
>
> > Telling people
> > they can't take photographs at Yellowstone or other parks then
> > share them would put a definite damper on tourism and I'm pretty
> > sure that would upset a lot of people who make their money off
> > of tourists as well as put a dent in the state budget.
>
> I imagine the National Park Service will give blanket permission to
> photograph in parks and monuments in Wyoming, if it hasn't already.
>
> > In any case, getting permission from appropriate park officals
> > or land owners to collect CBC data would seem to take care of
> > any potential problem.
>
> It will add to the list of people you have to get permission from.  I
> happily give eBird data from state parks without doing anything but
> paying the entry fee.  Maybe people in Wyoming doing BBSs, at
> least, will have to get explicit permission.
>
> Jerry Friedman
> Espanola, N. M.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Katrina Knight <kknight AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 18:09:08 -0400
At 04:02 PM 5/12/2015 Jerry Friedman wrote:
>On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight
> wrote:
>
> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>
>As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not
>trespassing.

Have you read the text of the law? It is entitled "Trespassing
to unlawfully collect resource data; unlawful collection of
resource data." Its purpose is to define data collection as
trespassing in situations where it wouldn't normally be
considered trespassing, making the data collection illegal. They
really are calling data collection, including photography,
"trespassing".

--
Katrina Knight
kknight AT fastmail.fm
Reading, PA, USA

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 14:02:11 -0600
On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight  wrote:
> At 11:41 AM 5/12/2015 ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM wrote:
>>
>> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>>
>> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
>> condition
>> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to
>> share that data> with the state or federal government"
>
>
>
>>  But I immediately
>> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of
>> this new Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>
>
> It disallows collecting resource data with a plan or intention
> to submit it to an agency of the state or federal government.

It says information "which is submitted or intended to be submitted
to any agency of the state or federal government".  Intended by
who?  What if you submit data to eBird or Audubon that someone
else intends to pass on to the government?  Does it matter whether
you know about that other person's intention?

(The double passive construction isn't great style, either.)

> CBC data is collected by Audubon.  Audubon is definitely not a
> state or federal agency. Cornell University is involved as well.
> Does Cornell count as a state agency? IIRC, they are a land
> grant school that is privately endowed. I'm unclear on whether
> that makes them an arm of the state or not. Does "the state" as
> written in this law apply to all states or just the state of
> Wyoming? If Cornell qualifies as a state agency, it would be an
> agency of New York, not Wyoming.

I was wondering about both of those things too.

Data for the Breeding Bird Survey go to the U. S. Geological
Survey, which is unquestionably a federal agency.

> The law is clearly unconstitutional as written and if Wyoming
> tried to prosecute CBC participants in Wyoming I think they'd
> have a big battle and a lot of bad publicity on their hands.
> Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.

As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not trespassing.

> Telling people
> they can't take photographs at Yellowstone or other parks then
> share them would put a definite damper on tourism and I'm pretty
> sure that would upset a lot of people who make their money off
> of tourists as well as put a dent in the state budget.

I imagine the National Park Service will give blanket permission to
photograph in parks and monuments in Wyoming, if it hasn't already.

> In any case, getting permission from appropriate park officals
> or land owners to collect CBC data would seem to take care of
> any potential problem.

It will add to the list of people you have to get permission from.  I
happily give eBird data from state parks without doing anything but
paying the entry fee.  Maybe people in Wyoming doing BBSs, at
least, will have to get explicit permission.

Jerry Friedman
Espanola, N. M.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Katrina Knight <kknight AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 15:18:11 -0400
At 11:41 AM 5/12/2015 ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM wrote:
>A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>
>"Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
>condition
>of the environment across most of the state if you plan to
>share that data
>with the state or federal government"


>  But I immediately
>find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of
>this new
>Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?

It disallows collecting resource data with a plan or intention
to submit it to an agency of the state or federal government.
CBC data is collected by Audubon. Audubon is definitely not a
state or federal agency. Cornell University is involved as well.
Does Cornell count as a state agency? IIRC, they are a land
grant school that is privately endowed. I'm unclear on whether
that makes them an arm of the state or not. Does "the state" as
written in this law apply to all states or just the state of
Wyoming? If Cornell qualifies as a state agency, it would be an
agency of New York, not Wyoming.

The law is clearly unconstitutional as written and if Wyoming
tried to prosecute CBC participants in Wyoming I think they'd
have a big battle and a lot of bad publicity on their hands.
Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse. Telling people
they can't take photographs at Yellowstone or other parks then
share them would put a definite damper on tourism and I'm pretty
sure that would upset a lot of people who make their money off
of tourists as well as put a dent in the state budget.

In any case, getting permission from appropriate park officals
or land owners to collect CBC data would seem to take care of
any potential problem.

--
Katrina Knight
kknight AT fastmail.fm
Reading, PA, USA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 14:17:27 -0400
I read this a little more broadly to forbid entry onto open lands -- public or 
private -- for the purpose of collecting data. So it could place a damper on 
CBCs to the extent that it was conducted on public open lands. 

 
Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: lgardellabirds 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, May 12, 2015 1:56 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect 
CBCs? 



The exact language of the statute is
at
https://legiscan.com/WY/text/SF0012/id/1151882   It prohibits entry
onto
open lands to collect data and prohibits the collection of data
on
private open lands without

(A) An ownership interest in the real property
or, statutory,
contractual or other legal authorization to enter or access the
land to
collect resource data; or
(B) Written or verbal permission of the
owner, lessee or agent of the
owner to enter or access the land to collect the
specified resource
data.

The omission of the word "private" from the first
prohibition is
troubling, but the statute still is aimed at private land.  It
would
cover collection of CBC or BBS data but only if someone enters
private
or leased public land to get that data.  Anyone staying on the
street
and collecting data should be fine.


Larry Gardella
Montgomery,
AL


On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 11:03 AM, Tangren, Jerry wrote:

> Seeing that
the linked article was written by a lawyer involved in an
> active lawsuit, I
wouldn¹t panic; he¹s appealing to the court of
> public
> opinion.
>
> I
don¹t believe they plan on criminalizing Christmas Bird Counts.
>
> ‹Jerry

>
> On 5/12/15, 8:41 AM, "ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM"
 wrote:
>
>> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen
science" in the state.
>>
>> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather
data about the
>> condition
>> of the environment across most of the state if
you plan to share that
>> data
>> with the state or federal
government"
>>
>> Quoted from this article in Slate:
>>
>>
>>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.slate.com/articles/h
>>
>>
ealth_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_prot
>>
>>
ecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=T
>>
>>
uoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sW
>>
>>
tYgE%3D%0A&s=7494c4276613627b76248b896f2533164f965be91fedb83ca97aad4099a81
>>
a51
>>
>> This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is
to
>> curtail
>> citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But
I
>> immediately
>> find myself wondering about what happens on the
intersection of this
>> new
>> Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>>
>>
Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com
>>
>> BirdChat
Guidelines:
>>
>>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat
>>
>>
/&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=
>>
>>
b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=c6055c183f3b87479c1252
>>
5c04c038b4ca55d421f7823e1ddc59490b18d0a952
>> Archives:
>>
>>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://listserv.ksu.edu/archive
>>
>>
s/birdchat.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6EL
>>
>>
Vg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=474490ec
>>
c9ccb48d914c30c947c658e9b1f2d34046521d55699824d44b294737
>
> BirdChat
Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:
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BirdChat Guidelines:
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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 13:54:22 -0400
The exact language of the statute is at
https://legiscan.com/WY/text/SF0012/id/1151882   It prohibits entry onto
open lands to collect data and prohibits the collection of data on
private open lands without

(A) An ownership interest in the real property or, statutory,
contractual or other legal authorization to enter or access the land to
collect resource data; or
(B) Written or verbal permission of the owner, lessee or agent of the
owner to enter or access the land to collect the specified resource
data.

The omission of the word "private" from the first prohibition is
troubling, but the statute still is aimed at private land.  It would
cover collection of CBC or BBS data but only if someone enters private
or leased public land to get that data.  Anyone staying on the street
and collecting data should be fine.


Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 11:03 AM, Tangren, Jerry wrote:

> Seeing that the linked article was written by a lawyer involved in an
> active lawsuit, I wouldn¹t panic; he¹s appealing to the court of
> public
> opinion.
>
> I don¹t believe they plan on criminalizing Christmas Bird Counts.
>
> ‹Jerry 
>
> On 5/12/15, 8:41 AM, "ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM"  wrote:
>
>> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>>
>> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
>> condition
>> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to share that
>> data
>> with the state or federal government"
>>
>> Quoted from this article in Slate:
>>
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.slate.com/articles/h
>>
>> ealth_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_prot
>>
>> ecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=T
>>
>> uoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sW
>>
>> tYgE%3D%0A&s=7494c4276613627b76248b896f2533164f965be91fedb83ca97aad4099a81
>> a51
>>
>> This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is to
>> curtail
>> citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But I
>> immediately
>> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of this
>> new
>> Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>>
>> Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat
>>
>> /&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=
>>
>> b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=c6055c183f3b87479c1252
>> 5c04c038b4ca55d421f7823e1ddc59490b18d0a952
>> Archives:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://listserv.ksu.edu/archive
>>
>> s/birdchat.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6EL
>>
>> Vg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=474490ec
>> c9ccb48d914c30c947c658e9b1f2d34046521d55699824d44b294737
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: CA - Vancouver, British Columbia Trip Story
From: Dave DeReamus <becard AT RCN.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 13:51:03 -0400
I’ve posted a trip story about my trip from San Diego, CA to Vancouver, 
British Columbia from April 25th through May 1st. The story and many photos can 
be found directly under the Glossy Ibis photos at: 
http://becard.blogspot.com/2015_05_01_archive.html . Click on “Older Posts” 
once you reach the bottom to continue on to the end of the trip. 


Good birding,
Dave DeReamus
Palmer Township, PA
becard -at- rcn.com
Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com
PicasaWeb Photo Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/becard57
Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html
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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 13:00:48 -0400
Nonetheless, surely this violates the U.S. constitutional protection of freedom 
of speech? Are they going to start arresting kids for doing 
environmentally-based science fair projects in school? Unbelievable! 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On May 12, 2015, at 12:03 PM, Tangren, Jerry  wrote:
>
> Seeing that the linked article was written by a lawyer involved in an
> active lawsuit, I wouldn¹t panic; he¹s appealing to the court of public
> opinion.
>
> I don¹t believe they plan on criminalizing Christmas Bird Counts.
>
> ‹Jerry 
>
>> On 5/12/15, 8:41 AM, "ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM"  wrote:
>>
>> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>>
>> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the condition
>> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to share that data
>> with the state or federal government"
>>
>> Quoted from this article in Slate:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.slate.com/articles/h
>> ealth_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_prot
>> ecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=T
>> uoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sW
>> tYgE%3D%0A&s=7494c4276613627b76248b896f2533164f965be91fedb83ca97aad4099a81
>> a51
>>
>> This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is to curtail
>> citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But I immediately
>> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of this new
>> Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>>
>> Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines:
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat
>> /&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=
>> b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=c6055c183f3b87479c1252
>> 5c04c038b4ca55d421f7823e1ddc59490b18d0a952
>> Archives:
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://listserv.ksu.edu/archive
>> s/birdchat.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6EL
>> Vg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=474490ec
>> c9ccb48d914c30c947c658e9b1f2d34046521d55699824d44b294737
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: "Tangren, Jerry" <tangren AT WSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 16:03:13 +0000
Seeing that the linked article was written by a lawyer involved in an
active lawsuit, I wouldnt panic; hes appealing to the court of public
opinion.

I dont believe they plan on criminalizing Christmas Bird Counts.

Jerry 

On 5/12/15, 8:41 AM, "ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM"  wrote:

>A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>
>"Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the condition
>of the environment across most of the state if you plan to share that data
>with the state or federal government"
>
>Quoted from this article in Slate:
>
>https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.slate.com/articles/h
>ealth_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_prot
>ecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=T
>uoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sW
>tYgE%3D%0A&s=7494c4276613627b76248b896f2533164f965be91fedb83ca97aad4099a81
>a51
>
>This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is to curtail
>citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But I immediately
>find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of this new
>Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>
>Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com
>
>BirdChat Guidelines:
>https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat
>/&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=
>b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=c6055c183f3b87479c1252
>5c04c038b4ca55d421f7823e1ddc59490b18d0a952
>Archives:
>https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://listserv.ksu.edu/archive
>s/birdchat.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6EL
>Vg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=474490ec
>c9ccb48d914c30c947c658e9b1f2d34046521d55699824d44b294737

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 11:57:02 -0400
As it says later in the article:

"Anyone with a passing familiarity with our Constitution will recognize
that the Wyoming law is unconstitutional. It runs afoul of the supremacy
clause because it interferes with the purposes of federal environmental
statutes by making it impossible for citizens to collect the information
necessary to bring an enforcement lawsuit. The Wyoming law also violates
the First Amendment’s guarantee of free speech because it singles out
speech about natural resources for burdensome regulation and makes it a
crime to engage in a variety of expressive and artistic activities. And
finally, it specifically criminalizes public engagement with federal and
state agencies and therefore violates another right guaranteed by the First
Amendment: the right to petition the government."

Jim Moore
Washington DC area

On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 11:41 AM,  wrote:

> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>
> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the condition
> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to share that data
> with the state or federal government"
>
> Quoted from this article in Slate:
>
>
> 
http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_protecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html 

>
> This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is to curtail
> citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But I immediately
> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of this new
> Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>
> Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 09:41:50 -0600
A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.

"Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the condition
of the environment across most of the state if you plan to share that data
with the state or federal government"

Quoted from this article in Slate:


http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_protecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html 


This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is to curtail
citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But I immediately
find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of this new
Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?

Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Anyone read the Narrow Edge?
From: sj wexlr <merganser AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 11:08:18 +0000
Hi All:

 I just finished reading Deborah Cramer's book Great Waters and I see where she 
has a new book out The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic 
Journey. Has anyone read it - it sounds fantastic? 


 

Sally Wechsler

silver spring, md
 		 	   		  
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Subject: RFH: Horicon Marsh
From: "sandfalcon1 ." <sandfalcon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 May 2015 21:44:42 -0400
Greetings all,

As mentioned in my previous post, I am taking a bird road trip up
through the northern Midwest in about three weeks.  As part of that, I
plan to spend a couple of days traversing Wisconsin.  I have blocked
out the better part of a day to spend at Horicon Marsh.

Horicon Marsh is a big place!  If anyone could offer any insights on
the most efficient use of my time there, I would be most appreciative.
I am not looking for any specific species, just the best way to get
into a good variety of habitats and thus a larger list of potential
species.

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer,

Brandon Best
Lawrenceville, GA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: RFH: Michigan UP birding
From: "sandfalcon1 ." <sandfalcon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 May 2015 21:43:56 -0400
Greetings all,

In about three weeks I will make my way through the UP of Michigan as
part of a larger birding road trip.  I'm hoping the good folks of
BirdChat can help me out with any tips or insights about the following
locations-

1) I will be visiting Seney NWR.  Is my best bet to work the auto
tour?  Are there any areas I should focus on which are particularly
avian-rich?

2) I will also spend an evening and all morning at Pictured Rocks
Nat'l Lakeshore.  This is primarily to get in some good hiking and
enjoy the scenery.  That said, are there any specific areas I should
focus on for birds or for scenic cliffs?

3) Ebird indicates two areas of interest to me east of Newberry-
Hulbert Bog and Forest Road 3145.  I am specifically interested in
finding Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, and perhaps Mourning and
Connecticut Warblers.  Any advice on how to approach these areas?

Many thanks in advance,
Brandon Best
Lawrenceville, GA

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Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - May 2015
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 May 2015 17:51:04 -0400
The May 2015 issues of the Birding Community 
E-bulletin is now available the web, covering 
news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for 
active and concerned birders, those dedicated to 
the joys of birding and the protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of 
superb quality birding binoculars and scopes, 
Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past 
E-bulletins on the website of the National 
Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The May 2015 edition includes the following topics:

RARITY FOCUS
   - Indiana's Black-tailed Godwit - Who would ever guess that such
a species would ever appear so far inland in the U.S.?

LOUISIANA CRANE UPDATE
   - initial nesting of a pair of four-year-old birds

NEW CANADIAN WILDLIFE HABITAT CONSERVATION STAMP
   - primarily bought by waterfowl hunters to 
validate their migratory
game bird hunting permits. Since 1985, sales of this stamp
have generated more than $50 million for Wildlife Habitat Canadas
conservation projects.

IBA NEWS: FRASER ESTUARY WESTERN SANDPIPERS
   - the Western Sandpipers also feed on a 
substance known as biofilm,
a thin layer of sugars and microbes that grows on 
the surface of mudflats

THE CALIFORNIA DROUGHT CONTINUES
   - Situation is getting worse with many impacts

SAGE-GROUSE: BI-STATE DECISION AND MORE
   - the Greater Sage-Grouse Bi-State population - the FWS is
withdrawing proposal as Threatened under the ESA

FOUR-YEAR LOSS OF GRASSLANDS: 5.7 MILLION ACRES
   - crop expansion into 5.7 million acres that had been grassland

A FIELD GUIDE TO THE FARM BILL
   - the just-released 2014 Farm Bill Field Guide, produced by
the U.S. Committee of NABCI (North American Bird
Conservation Initiative) can help make sense of it all

ACCESS MATTERS: MARYLANDS POPLAR ISLAND
   - a model of environmental restoration, where a creative
solution for dredged material is resulting in the restoration
of this once vanishing island

PROBABLY JUST ONE REDPOLL
   - an article showing that Hoary Redpolls and Common Redpolls
have no differences across much of their genomes

FUNKY NESTS, ANYONE?
   - Cornell Lab of Ornithologys Celebrate 
Urban Birds - participants
are asked to send in photos of nests in old boots, barbecue grills,
motorcycle helmets, traffic signals, rakes, old 
tires, and who-knows-what.

TIP OF THE MONTH: SPRING HOME CHECKUP
   - put window concerns on your checklist of things to consider

NEXT TIME YOU GOOGLE THINK EGRETS
   - at the corporate headquarters of Google, 
Inc. accommodations have
been made to protect their nesting egrets

- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National 
Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA) website:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 



If you wish to receive the bulletin or have any 
friends or co-workers
who want to get onto the monthly E-bulletin mailing list, have them
contact either:

Wayne R. Petersen
Director Massachusetts Important Bird Areas (IBA)
Program Mass Audubon
wpetersen-at-massaudubon.org

Paul J. Baicich
Great Birding Projects
paul.baicich-at-verizon.net

If you wish to distribute all or parts of any of the monthly Birding
Community E-bulletins, they simply request that 
you mention the source
of any material used. (Include a URL for the E-bulletin archives, if
possible.)

We never lend or sell our E-bulletin recipient list.


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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] "Artsy" Greater Yellowlegs Photo :-)
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Mon, 11 May 2015 12:03:23 -0400
Wow, Bernie-- spectacular! --(Like dropping acid and then going shorebirding.. 
. jes sayin'..) 


Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: Saturday, May 09, 2015 8:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] "Artsy" Greater Yellowlegs Photo :-)

This photo sort of has the look of an Impressionist painting. The Greater 
Yellowlegs is walking along the edge of a concrete spillway that divides a park 
pond from the Raritan River here in New Jersey. The background and foreground 
show spring colors reflected in ripples in the water. Some of the colors in the 
background are reflections of graffiti on a concrete wall on the opposite bank 
of the river: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17279973428/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Update on Ocosingo Rd in Chiapas
From: barry <levineb AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Sun, 10 May 2015 18:43:52 -0700
Chatters and tweeters,
Please note that the sources in Chiapas say it's not the Chanal Rd (as I
mentioned in an earlier post), but Km 2 of the Ocosingo Rd that is
deemed to be too dangerous for birders. This
is by the Dos Lagunas road entrance area.
All the best
--
  Barry Levine
  Seattle, Wa.
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

--
http://www.fastmail.com - Same, same, but different...

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Subject: Re: An extraordinary book for birders
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 May 2015 10:54:52 -0700
Ron and Bill

 I had a similar experience with the Reader's Digest book, Birds Their life, 
their ways, their world. As a kid this was the first inkling I had of the 
diversity of birds throughout the world. The illustrations (Ad Cameron) were 
pretty good, and very "Singeresque." This was the type of book you got for free 
if you signed up for some cheap Encyclopedia or something like that! Remember 
Encyclopedia salespeople going door to door, happened still when I was a kid. 
www.amazon.com/Birds-Their-Life-Ways-World/dp/B000QA6OK4 


Good birding
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein 

Sent: Saturday, May 09, 2015 2:47 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] An extraordinary book for birders

I remember very well when I first saw this book. My Uncle Ben and my late Aunt 
Joyce presented it to me as a get-well gift back in, I think, 1962, when I was 
recovering from an appendectomy. I was in Grade 11 at the time, but already a 
nature-lover of some years' standing (I had already read E T Gilliard's "Living 
Birds of the World"). It blew me away (and I devoured every page on my 
sickbed). This was the first time I had seen colour paintings of members of 
every (then) recognized bird family on earth. It was a remarkable achievement 
for its time, though it contains some errors of identification, and still holds 
pride of place on my shelf (not least because I later met both author and 
artist - the curmudgeonly Austin was one of ornithology's great characters). It 
was many years before anything like it in scope or artistry appeared again, 
though I have to give a nod to a quite different book of the same vintage, "The 
World of Birds" by Roger Tory Peterson and James Fis! 

 her - the two go hand in hand in my mind.) Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: William Saur 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
 Sent: Saturday, May 9, 2015 3:58 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] An extraordinary book for birders

Hello,

On a cold January night this past January I ran across an an extraordinary, now 
out-of-print book that I think every serious birder would be delighted to have 
in their library. If you are interested in reading about this book 

- BIRDS OF THE WORLD with text by Oliver Austin and illustrations by Arthur 
Singer, I posted an article entitled "A Seemingly Forgotten Book Every Serious 
Birder Would Be Delighted To Own" here: 



http://www.thepassionatebirder.com/2015/05/a-seemingly-forgotten-book-every.html 


Regards,
Bill Saur

DeForest, WI

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Subject: Big Migration Movement in Southeast U.S. tonight
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 23:03:25 -0500
   Checking the radar returns tonight it looks like the heaviest
movement is in the southeast. I tried a little experiment and put
together a video clip showing what lift-off looks like on the radar.
Anyone interested can see it at:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

  Still waiting for the big waves of birds to get to Minnesota.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: Re: An extraordinary book for birders
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 22:57:22 -0400
The little Golden Guide version is also worth having as a handy tiny reference 
to the diversity of bird families of the world. 


Several decades ago I worked at a nature center in New Jersey, when someone 
came in describing an odd pheasant-like bird in her neighborhood. On a hunch I 
took the Austin/Singer volume down and opened it to the pheasants, and the 
visitor pointed to the illustration of the Silver Pheasant as her bird. The 
next day, when another person came in to report an unfamiliar bird, I was an 
instant expert, asking right away if her bird was Singer's Silver Pheasant, 
which it was. 


David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of William Saur 
[thepassionatebirder AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Saturday, May 09, 2015 3:58 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] An extraordinary book for birders

Hello,

On a cold January night this past January I ran across an an extraordinary,
now out-of-print book that I think every serious birder would be delighted
to have in their library. If you are interested in reading about this book
- BIRDS OF THE WORLD with text by Oliver Austin and illustrations by Arthur
Singer, I posted an article entitled "A Seemingly Forgotten Book Every
Serious Birder Would Be Delighted To Own" here:


http://www.thepassionatebirder.com/2015/05/a-seemingly-forgotten-book-every.html 


Regards,
Bill Saur

DeForest, WI

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: "Artsy" Greater Yellowlegs Photo :-)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 20:44:02 -0400
This photo sort of has the look of an Impressionist painting. The Greater
Yellowlegs is walking along the edge of a concrete spillway that divides a
park pond from the Raritan River here in New Jersey. The background and
foreground show spring colors reflected in ripples in the water. Some of
the colors in the background are reflections of graffiti on a concrete wall
on the opposite bank of the river:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17279973428/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: An extraordinary book for birders
From: Bob Powell <rdp1710 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 17:50:47 -0400
I received mine as a Christmas gift in 1964 and treasured it for many
years.  It was the reference for my fledgling world list in the beginning.
Mine eventually fell apart, loved to death.

Modern day readers would find the taxonomy woefully out of date, but
Austin's biogeography would hold up well.

The same is true of Singer's illustrations.  Singer was a commercial
illustrator at that time and had no previous experience with birds.  He
went on to be the principal artist for all the "Golden Guides," beginning
with the Robbins bird guide in 1967.

"Birds of the World" can still be had on Amazon.  Used copies start at
$1.95.  New books run about $65.00, which in my humble opinion is a steal.

Austin died in 1988; Singer, in 1990.

Cheers,

Bob


On Sat, May 9, 2015 at 3:58 PM, William Saur 
wrote:

> Hello,
>
> On a cold January night this past January I ran across an an extraordinary,
> now out-of-print book that I think every serious birder would be delighted
> to have in their library. If you are interested in reading about this book
> - BIRDS OF THE WORLD with text by Oliver Austin and illustrations by Arthur
> Singer, I posted an article entitled "A Seemingly Forgotten Book Every
> Serious Birder Would Be Delighted To Own" here:
>
>
> 
http://www.thepassionatebirder.com/2015/05/a-seemingly-forgotten-book-every.html 

>
> Regards,
> Bill Saur
>
> DeForest, WI
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
Robert D Powell
Congress Farm Research Institute
Wilmington, OH, USA
rdp1710 AT gmail.com

Nulla dies sine aves

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Subject: Re: An extraordinary book for birders
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 21:46:52 +0000
I remember very well when I first saw this book.  My Uncle Ben and my late 
Aunt Joyce presented it to me as a get-well gift back in, I think, 1962, when I 
was recovering from an appendectomy.  I was in Grade 11 at the time, but 
already a nature-lover of some years' standing (I had already read E T 
Gilliard's "Living Birds of the World").  It blew me away (and I devoured 
every page on my sickbed).  This was the first time I had seen colour 
paintings of members of every (then) recognized bird family on earth.  It was 
a remarkable achievement for its time, though it contains some errors of 
identification, and still holds pride of place on my shelf (not least because I 
later met both author and artist - the curmudgeonly Austin was one of 
ornithology's great characters).  It was many years before anything like it in 
scope or artistry appeared again, though I have to give a nod to a quite 
different book of the same vintage, "The World of Birds" by Roger Tory Peterson 
and James Fisher - the two go hand in hand in my mind.) Ronald Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: William Saur 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Saturday, May 9, 2015 3:58 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] An extraordinary book for birders
   
Hello,

On a cold January night this past January I ran across an an extraordinary,
now out-of-print book that I think every serious birder would be delighted
to have in their library. If you are interested in reading about this book
- BIRDS OF THE WORLD with text by Oliver Austin and illustrations by Arthur
Singer, I posted an article entitled "A Seemingly Forgotten Book Every
Serious Birder Would Be Delighted To Own" here:


http://www.thepassionatebirder.com/2015/05/a-seemingly-forgotten-book-every.html 


Regards,
Bill Saur

DeForest, WI

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: An extraordinary book for birders
From: William Saur <thepassionatebirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 14:58:39 -0500
Hello,

On a cold January night this past January I ran across an an extraordinary,
now out-of-print book that I think every serious birder would be delighted
to have in their library. If you are interested in reading about this book
- BIRDS OF THE WORLD with text by Oliver Austin and illustrations by Arthur
Singer, I posted an article entitled "A Seemingly Forgotten Book Every
Serious Birder Would Be Delighted To Own" here:


http://www.thepassionatebirder.com/2015/05/a-seemingly-forgotten-book-every.html 


Regards,
Bill Saur

DeForest, WI

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Subject: Hilton Pond 04/27/15 (New River Birding Festival)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 13:29:15 -0400
I was away from my home base in South Carolina the last week in April, acting 
as a guide, bird bander, and lecturer at the annual New River Birding & Nature 
Festival in Fayette County WV. Folks from across the country attend this 
one-of-a-kind event, so I’m pleased to devote the current installment of 
“This Week at Hilton Pond” to birds, amphibians, spring flora, wetlands, 
and other natural phenomenon I observed while in the Mountain State. To view 
the latest photo essay for 27 Apr-2 May 2015, please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150427.html 


Happy Nature Watching, no matter where you are!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============


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Subject: Hilton Pond 04/27/15 (New River Birding Festival)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 13:28:12 -0400
I was away from my home base in South Carolina the last week in April, acting 
as a guide, bird bander, and lecturer at the annual New River Birding & Nature 
Festival in Fayette County WV. Folks from across the country attend this 
one-of-a-kind event, so I’m pleased to devote the current installment of 
“This Week at Hilton Pond” to birds, amphibians, spring flora, wetlands, 
and other natural phenomenon I observed while in the Mountain State. To view 
the latest photo essay for 27 Apr-2 May 2015, please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150427.html 


Happy Nature Watching, no matter where you are!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of May 10, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 May 2015 08:05:11 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Great Tits Learn Via Social Networks
http://bit.ly/1DXVcvf
* American Robins Are Exceptional Singers
http://bit.ly/1KTdK5Y
* Birds' Sense of Taste
http://bit.ly/1bFSbsP
* The Diminutive Downy Woodpecker
http://bit.ly/1Elmxcg
* Voices and Vocabularies - Songs Long and Short
http://bit.ly/1P84X5K
* Oxpeckers and Mutualism
http://bit.ly/1AMKFTG
* Boreal Birds Need Half
http://bit.ly/1GVrwAU
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1ElxmuM
--------------------------
Just in time for Mother's Day, a BirdNote Q&A about avian motherhood,
with AWayToGarden: http://bit.ly/1EqQyGP
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Odd location for a dead cormorant? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 May 2015 08:45:54 -0400
Yesterday I took some photos of what looked to the naked eye like it
*might* be an Osprey. When I got home and cropped them, I was surprised to
see that it was a dead cormorant hanging in a tree with its head wedged in
the fork of a tree branch. The dead bird was 40 feet above ground, near the
top of the tree. Made me wonder if this was an unfortunate freak accident
while the cormorant was landing in the tree, or if a predator had cached
the bird there. (Cormorants roost here during the day, and there are Bald
Eagles in the area).

Interestingly, I received some photos today from a Pennsylvania birder that
are strikingly similar to mine.

Here's one of my photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16788391563/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Trip Report - Morocco March-April 2015
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 22:32:35 -0400
Oued Souss:

Andrea and I wanted a bird guide in Morocco, and we found one on Birding 
Pals, Mohamed Bargache. We arranged for him to meet us at our hotel in 
Agadir from which we went to Oued Souss the afternoon we arrived, Oued 
Massa the next day, then the semi-desert near Guelmim and finally up in 
the Atlas Mountains near Imlil and the Toubkag National Park.  For some 
of the photos from the trip, go to 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/132996029 AT N08/sets/ and select the Morocco 
album.

Mohamed lives in Massa, and he knows the specialty birds of Souss-Massa 
National Park extremely well and is very good at finding them.

In our one late afternoon at Oued Souss, we saw Barbary Partridge, Med 
Gull, Slender-billed Gull, the African form of Eurasian Magpie and both 
Sardinian and Subalpine Warbler.  Unfortunately, the light was not good 
for photos.  See the checklist for this afternoon’s birding at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22682700

Oued Massa:

Oued Massa was even better than Oued Souss. Each of the sites we visited 
a Souss was great!

In the morning, we took a wonderful long walk from the parking lot to 
the beach.  A group of Audouin’s Gulls lingered on the flats of the 
delta near the ocean.  Along the path itself, some of the highlights 
were the northern form of Black-crowned Tchagra, Moussier's Redstarts 
and more Barbary’s Partridges.  A bird I initially identified as a 
very-out-of-range Dusky Warbler also escaped my lens - but I decided I 
could not make a definite ID.

We went to some flooded fields where there were good numbers of Marbled 
Duck and Eurasian Spoonbill as well as a variety of shorebirds and 
herons.  A stop at a stream failed to yield the expected Brown-throated 
Martins but did bring us better views of the Marbled Ducks, an 
Isabelline Wheatear and a Cirl Bunting.  Later on, another larger stream 
also did not have any of the martins, but we did see and hear a Western 
Olivaceous Warbler and a number of other warblers.

Our main target at Oued Massa was the Northern Bald Ibis.  Mohammed kept 
assuring us we would get to see them, and he was right.  He spotted some 
ibis flying and figured out where we could see more and then figured out 
where we were likely to see some down on the ground.  We ended up 
walking around right next to a group of more than 30.

Our last stop was for Eurasian Stone Curlews, and they were right where 
Mohammed expected them to be.  See the following checklists from the 
sites visited during the day:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22663497

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22663497

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22663396

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22662952

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22663325

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22663159

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22662871

Semi-desert:

On our third day with Mohamed, Andrea and I rode almost four hours down 
the coast and then inland to Guelmim to see some semi-desert birds. We 
saw a great variety of larks (including Greater and Lesser Short-toed, 
Thekla and Crested, Temmick’s and Desert Wheatear), but our favorite 
bird here was the beautiful Cream-colored Courser.  We heard Fulvous 
Chatterer but could not locate it. We heard several Scrub Warblers but 
only had rather poor looks of them. Some other birds included Little 
Ringed Plover, Rock and Tree Pipit and White Wagtail.  The ebird 
checklists:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22683337

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22682997

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22682857

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22682626

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22683916


Toubkal:

On our fourth and last full day with bird guide Mohamed Bargache, we 
left from Agadir, headed past the old city walls at Taroudant and up to 
the high pass over the Atlas Mountains. Mist and heavy fog obscured the 
views all the way up to the highest point, but once we reached the Tizi 
n'Test pass the skies were clear and there were beautiful views in every 
direction. I prevailed on Mohamed to stop not too long after crossing 
the pass. We got out for the view, and I noticed a path and followed it. 
Before too long, we were hearing warbler chips. After a bit of 
scrambling, Andrea and I got to see a pair of Tristram's Warblers moving 
about in the low vegetation. From there we drove on until we reached the 
National Park Toubkal and started making more stops looking for birds. 
We saw our only Black Wheatear from the moving car but saw little on our 
first stops. When we reached kilometer marker 9 (which the bird finding 
guide recommends for Tristram's) we had a productive walk. After hearing 
a clock sound and tracking it down for my first-ever Common Cuckoo, I 
heard a woodpecker that I figured was Levaillant's. It was, and we were 
able to track it down. After that success, we drove up to Imlil to be 
greeted by vistas of flowering almond trees with backdrops of 
snow-covered mountaintops. Another Levaillant's Woodpecker and several 
more birds in such a wonderful setting. I got a much better photo of a 
Great Spotted Woodpecker than of the Levaillant's. Imlil was serene and 
wonderful, but we left after one night to head back to Marrakech from 
which we flew to Sevilla the next day.  The checklists:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22719530

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22722750

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22722621

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22722691

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22722561

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL

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Subject: Wild Turkey yoga (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 May 2015 10:15:16 -0400
This turkey was going through all kinds of contortions yesterday afternoon.
Photo taken from my deck:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17197076810/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Victoria, BC
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2015 15:07:02 -0400
I just returned recently from a trip to Victoria, BC.Here is the trip report 
for anyone who might be 
interested.http://www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.ca/2015/05/trip-report-victoria-british-columbia.html 


David M. GascoigneWaterloo, ONblog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com 

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Subject: interesting report: Birdfeeding favours non-native species
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 May 2015 09:09:39 +0100
hello everyone,

an interesting paper was just published today in PNAS. this study reports
that following the traditional birdfeeding practices (bits of bread and a
handful of seed) in urban areas does affect populations of wild birds in
cities by favouring introduced species (which are either omnivores or
granivores) over native species (which are more specialised in their food
preferences):

http://gu.com/p/484hc/stw

hopefully, this study will be the first of many that investigate the
ecological effects of birdfeeding!

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Posting for Phil Hansbro-- trip in Dec to Argentina?
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 13:05:32 +0000
Hi all

I am posting the for Phil Hansbro in Australia. Any interest please contact him 
directly on Philip dot Hansbro at newcastle.edu.au 


"We are planning a 17 day trip to Argentina over Christmas/new year 2015/16. We 
are looking for another 2 keen birders to participate in this intensive trip. 
This would make 7 of us. This is a custom designed itinerary where we will be 
going for all the major targets in Argentina such as Hooded Grebe, Lesser Rhea, 
Chubut Steamer Duck, White-bellied Seedsnipe, Magellanic Plover, South Am 
Painted-Snipe, Rufous-tailed Plantcutter, etc, etc, and will try and see as 
many other targets as possible in the areas. Costs will be reasonable and on a 
cost and room share basis. 


Please contact me for further information and if interested. Please feel free 
to pass on to other people. 


Thanks very much
Phil"

Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD

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Subject: Link to next week's BirdNote shows
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 14:37:04 -0700
Sorry, the original was incorrect.

Here's the right one.
http://bit.ly/1AuGxYf

Thanks and have a good weekend, everyone.

Ellen Blackstone
for BirdNote

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of May 3, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 07:25:07 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* The Eagle Trains the Man
http://bit.ly/1DREvD4
* Burrowing Belted Kingfisher
http://bit.ly/1I1mdUJ
* Ruby-throated Hummingbird
http://bit.ly/1GQeGcB
* Seabirds Drink Salt Water
http://bit.ly/Y3nXmW
* Double-crested Cormorant
http://bit.ly/1JZbl8v
* Great Horned Owlets Venture Out
http://bit.ly/1GOJ1p0
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1I1mwPp
--------------------------
Join BirdNote & Earthbound Expeditions on a trip to Chile and Argentina,
November 2015. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1HBCMGx
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Interesting yard bird turkey photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 15:31:07 -0400
Not sure if I've seen a hen turkey spread its tail feathers before. Female
Wild Turkey preening her feathers in my yard. I love the different color
highlights in all the fluffed out feathers:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17323309202/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: will be in Las Vegas (birding!) next week
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 15:12:56 +0000
Hi all,

Last autumn I got some excellent suggestions for places to go birding in Clark 
Co, Nevada in spring as my husband and I had planned a May trip to Las Vegas, 
prompted by two free night in a L.V. hotel... (I should emphasize the trip is 
for birding although we might take in a show...). 


Anyway, we will arrive on May 5 quite early and leave in late afternoon May 8. 
If any Nevada birders are on this list, if you hear of something out of the 
ordinary, could you text or phone me at 240-460-1679? 


We are planning visits to Desert NWR - Corn Creek, Mt. Charleston, Red Rocks, 
Henderson and some sites in the more urban area of LV. Targets are desert and 
Western species we haven't seen for some time, hopefully some migrants as 
well... 


Thanks,
Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD

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Subject: New bird species discovered in a bush in Sichuan China
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2015 10:17:32 +0100
Hello everyone,

I've been deeply involved this week with writing a long-form story about
the newly described Sichuan bush warbler, which was discovered by a
Swedish-Chinese team of scientists. The story about how this came about is
particularly interesting. After reading the story, I think you might agree:

http://gu.com/p/47j8m/stw

Since it is a holiday weekend in the UK/EU, it falls upon your capable
shoulders to share this story widely amongst your friends and using social
media so my rather substantial writing efforts are rewarded by readers --
lots of readers!

many thanks, everyone. i hope you enjoy the story.

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: 2015 audubon photography awards
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Apr 2015 14:14:19 +0100
hi everyone,

if you love birds, photography and, well, birds, then you will love this
link to the 2015 Audubon Society's photography awards:

http://bit.ly/1Gsjz66

breathtaking!

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: New York State Dims Lights To Help Birds
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Apr 2015 09:02:33 -0400
My apologies if this has been posted before and I missed it.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-32491715

Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA

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Subject: Hilton Pond 04/01/15 (The Matriarch Passes On)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 14:21:15 -0400
On the afternoon of 15 April 2015 at 90 years of age, the matriarch of the 
Hilton Family breathed her final breath and joined the ranks of my ancestors. 
Because of her supportive influence on my becoming an educator-naturalist, I am 
exercising my editorial prerogative in devoting the 1-26 April 2015 installment 
of "This Week at Hilton Pond" to my mother, Jackie Hilton. Along with some 
nature photos I include three documents: Her published obituary, remarks made 
at her funeral by my niece Lizzy Saunders, and the eulogy I delivered on behalf 
of my four siblings and our extended Hilton clan. I would be honored for you to 
read and accept these tributes to a life well-lived. The posting is at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150401.html 
 


While there, please scroll down and review my tally of birds banded during the 
period, as well as some phenological notes and images of interest. There’s 
also a list of recaptures, including several rather elderly birds that have 
been hanging at Hilton Pond for quite a while. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of April 26, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 07:31:08 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Watch the latest BirdNote video, Behind the Binoculars, with Drew
Lanham: http://bit.ly/1FGSOuf
--------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* American Woodcock, Timberdoodle
http://bit.ly/1HzHG8E
* House Sparrow - An Introduction
http://bit.ly/1dcj2hv
* Suburbs, Juncos, And Evolution
Based on John Marzluff's "Subirdia"
http://bit.ly/1JDFJ8k
* Celebrate the Earth
http://bit.ly/1bCqbHw
* Shakespeare's Birthday
http://bit.ly/1lGQ9s9
* Voices and Vocabularies - Cardinals' Duet
http://bit.ly/1zWPtFJ
* Hummingbird Migration Myths
http://bit.ly/1GrJzkK
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1EqamOQ
--------------------------
Join BirdNote & Earthbound Expeditions on a trip to Chile and Argentina,
November 2015. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1HBCMGx
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 20:10:53 +0000
You could also take the ferry from Boothbay Harbor to Monhegan -- at that time 
of year the island can be a major migrant trap. However you may not get out far 
enough to see a lot of pelagic species -- it varies on wind etc. Not sure on 
spring schedule, there are three ferries but I believe the one from Port Clyde 
starts May 1. 


Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD




----- Original Message -----

From: "Gregg Gorton" 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 3:27:47 PM
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine

There is a company that runs whale-watching excursions out of Boothbay Harbor, 
Maine, and I have had Pom Jaeger, Greater and Manx Shearwater, and Wilson's 
Storm-petrel, but of course the time of year is key. I went on a couple of 
those trips in late August.. Once I went with Boothbay Whale Watch and once 
with Cap'n Fish's Whale Watch. No appreciable difference in the experience... 
You can check Pierson et al's Birds of Maine, and/or past eBird data for what 
to expect at that time in that area.... 


Good luck,

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ralph McKinnon 

Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 3:10 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine

All,

I'm planning a trip to Maine around May 9-11 (these dates can't be moved to 
later ones) and would love to see puffins, razorbills, guillemots, etc. One 
place I've looked into is Mantinicus Excursions, but it's either booked for 
that period or would charge $700 for the trip to M. Rock and back. 


Another alternative may be to head further north to Eastern Egg Rock, but it 
looks like the season for heading to EER begins mid-May. 


Are others aware of ways to get on a boat, perhaps via whale watching trips, 
where it's possible to see some of the more common pelagic species off the 
coast of ME? 


Thanks for any and all ideas,

Ralph McKinnon
SF, CA
mckinnon.ralph1953 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 15:27:47 -0400
There is a company that runs whale-watching excursions out of Boothbay Harbor, 
Maine, and I have had Pom Jaeger, Greater and Manx Shearwater, and Wilson's 
Storm-petrel, but of course the time of year is key. I went on a couple of 
those trips in late August.. Once I went with Boothbay Whale Watch and once 
with Cap'n Fish's Whale Watch. No appreciable difference in the experience... 
You can check Pierson et al's Birds of Maine, and/or past eBird data for what 
to expect at that time in that area.... 


Good luck,

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ralph McKinnon 

Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2015 3:10 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine

All,

I'm planning a trip to Maine around May 9-11 (these dates can't be moved to 
later ones) and would love to see puffins, razorbills, guillemots, etc. One 
place I've looked into is Mantinicus Excursions, but it's either booked for 
that period or would charge $700 for the trip to M. Rock and back. 


Another alternative may be to head further north to Eastern Egg Rock, but it 
looks like the season for heading to EER begins mid-May. 


Are others aware of ways to get on a boat, perhaps via whale watching trips, 
where it's possible to see some of the more common pelagic species off the 
coast of ME? 


Thanks for any and all ideas,

Ralph McKinnon
SF, CA
mckinnon.ralph1953 AT gmail.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: RFI: Finding Puffins in Maine
From: Ralph McKinnon <mckinnon.ralph1953 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 12:09:40 -0700
All,

I'm planning a trip to Maine around May 9-11 (these dates can't be moved to
later ones) and would love to see puffins, razorbills, guillemots, etc. One
place I've looked into is Mantinicus Excursions, but it's either booked for
that period or would charge $700 for the trip to M. Rock and back.

Another alternative may be to head further north to Eastern Egg Rock, but
it looks like the season for heading to EER begins mid-May.

Are others aware of ways to get on a boat, perhaps via whale watching
trips, where it's possible to see some of the more common pelagic species
off the coast of ME?

Thanks for any and all ideas,

Ralph McKinnon
SF, CA
mckinnon.ralph1953 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Red-eyed Red-bellied Woodpecker? (photo)
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 20:09:22 -0400
Bernie,

Red-bellied Woodpecker iris color is always red. But it's a dark red, and
this is a forest-dwelling bird that isn't usually seen in intense, direct
sunlight, so the eye frequently appears dark. In strong light, as in your
photo, the red iris is obvious.

It should also be noted that this species displays a great deal of
individual variation. The amount of of reddish tinge on the underside, the
intensity of red-brown, pollen-like tinge in the lores and under the eyes,
and the saturation / intensity of black on the upperside all vary
tremendously from bird to bird. Presumably this is due to both normal
genetic variation and the amount of carotenoid pigments in the diet.  Such
pigments are present not only in plants but also in invertebrates that feed
on them.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA



On Tue, Apr 21, 2015 at 6:46 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> I was going through some photos today and came up with this Red-bellied
> Woodpecker that appears to have red irises and dark pupils. All of my field
> guides (and photos I've looked at online) seem to show this species with
> dark irises and pupils. At first I thought it might be akin to the "redeye"
> phenomenon in photos of humans, but I'm pretty sure the "redeye" thing has
> to do with light being reflected back through the pupils, and doesn't deal
> with the irises...
>
> Here's the photo. Is this unusual?
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16974125478/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Red-eyed Red-bellied Woodpecker? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 18:46:05 -0400
I was going through some photos today and came up with this Red-bellied
Woodpecker that appears to have red irises and dark pupils. All of my field
guides (and photos I've looked at online) seem to show this species with
dark irises and pupils. At first I thought it might be akin to the "redeye"
phenomenon in photos of humans, but I'm pretty sure the "redeye" thing has
to do with light being reflected back through the pupils, and doesn't deal
with the irises...

Here's the photo. Is this unusual?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16974125478/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: Why?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 21:15:26 +0000
Pope didn't mean ignore nature: with Pope, you have to read the context to see 
what he meant.  the full quote is: 

Know then thyself, presume not God to scan
The proper study of Mankind is Man. Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Al Schirmacher 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2015 3:30 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Why?
   
Facebook post, man escapes rotten day by birding.


I empathize.  But,
being an unconscious contemplative, the following bubbled up later:


Why?


Why does birding renew? 
What does birding “work”, at least most of the time?


We could talk about fresh air, exercise, visual and audio
stimulation, return to nature, companionship and a variety of other reasons,
but I want to focus on one:


It lifts us out of ourselves.


I’m not sure that Alexander Pope had it right when he
wrote:  “The proper study of mankind is man.”  Such self-focus over a
lengthy period of time – often brought on by problems, frustrations, fatigue,
defeat – imprisons our spirits.  



We need out.


Birds are out.


Their songs, their colors, their behavior, their interaction gradually –
sometimes suddenly - pull us away from the preoccupation with self that
squeezes our spirits, freeing us to explore outside the shells of our bodies,
minds and hearts.


They cause us to consider.


They cause us to appreciate.


They cause us to enjoy.


They even may cause us to worship.


Eventually we are ready to reenter our bodies, rejoin the fray, until
the next time of need.
Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS


                         
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Subject: Why?
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 14:30:12 -0500
Facebook post, man escapes rotten day by birding.


I empathize.  But,
being an unconscious contemplative, the following bubbled up later:


Why?


Why does birding renew? 
What does birding work, at least most of the time?


We could talk about fresh air, exercise, visual and audio
stimulation, return to nature, companionship and a variety of other reasons,
but I want to focus on one:


It lifts us out of ourselves.


Im not sure that Alexander Pope had it right when he
wrote:  The proper study of mankind is man.  Such self-focus over a
lengthy period of time  often brought on by problems, frustrations, fatigue,
defeat  imprisons our spirits.  



We need out.


Birds are out.


Their songs, their colors, their behavior, their interaction gradually 
sometimes suddenly - pull us away from the preoccupation with self that
squeezes our spirits, freeing us to explore outside the shells of our bodies,
minds and hearts.


They cause us to consider.


They cause us to appreciate.


They cause us to enjoy.


They even may cause us to worship.


Eventually we are ready to reenter our bodies, rejoin the fray, until
the next time of need.
Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS


 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: beatboxing birdsongs of New York?? WHAAAAT?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 13:03:16 +0200
hello everyone,

I have been following the work of ben mirin, a professional beatboxer who
is an avid birdwatcher. for the past 2 years, he has been exploring how to
merge his two passions into one, and has come up with beatboxing birdsongs.
it's really fun and fascinating, and as birders, you'll love watching these
videos and hearing how all these sounds work together to make our passion
into something that many people can appreciate:

http://gu.com/p/47y93/stw

tschüss,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: TR: 2 Quetzal trip-Mexico and updated info
From: barry <levineb AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2015 10:10:01 -0700
Chatters Tweeters, Birding-aus,
April rolled in like a lion as Kate and I ventured south for a trip to
the Copper Canyon and El Triunfo.  Snow, stifling heat and everything in
between were experienced during a 2 1/2 week trip visiting our neighbors
to the south.
The mostly all of the hoped for birds, including Resplendent Quetzal,
Cabanis or Azure-rumped Tanager, Hummingbirds and Guans, were seen at El
Triunfo. A great place to see birds and experience life. Lucky to be in
a great group of people. 2 ( Henry and Laura) from a mile or so away
from my home in Seattle. 2 others (Jay and Steve) from Southern
California. Laughed more than I have in awhile, plus we all seemed to
benefit from the skills of each other. Add a fabulous guide in Amy
McAndrews and we were guaranteed to be very successful.
The other part of the trip was to the Copper Canyon in Chihuahua. Kate
and I did some birding and enjoyed some hiking. Very beautiful place. We
lucked into Eared Quetzals the day before our birthdays (yup, the same
birthday). Lots of other birds seen around Batopilus, Creel, Divisidero.
Did not go to the west toward El Fuerte and Los Mochis so don't know
much about the birding there.
Just some updates for those of you going to either of these areas that
might be of help.
The Sumidero in Tuxtla has closed some of the trails off to hikers.
Especially the trail at the last mirador which can hold some nice birds.
I walked around the areas with trail closed signs and found a way in,
but I have been told by a guide in the area that they were asked to
leave that same trail by a guard recently. Did see a freshly plumaged
Azure-hooded Jay up there. I did find a couple of other trails and
turnoffs along the way. They are pretty obvious, usually with little
space to park a vehicle. A couple of dirt roads would also be possible
to walk down. Hard to stop at other places along the winding road.
Supposedly can get into El Sumidero earlier than the posted opening time
with a reassurance that you will pay on the way out. I didn't try that
so don't know if that works.
I was told by 2 locals that the Chanal Road site listed in Howell's Bird
Finding Guide is no longer safe to bird. Also a couple I met said that
they were stopped along the road into the ruins at Tonina by a group of
Zapatista's carrying rifles and had to pay a fee to continue on.
Great information prior and during the trip was provided by Kraig
Kemper, who spends part of the year in San Cristobal, and a good friend
of his, Francesca Albini who does some guiding.
In the Copper Canyon area, we headed down from Creel to Batopilus at the
bottom of the canyon. Batopilus is great place to hike and experience
the bottom of the canyon, but is a trip done for the sightseeing rather
than birding. The best areas to bird are closer to Creel and Divisidero.
 If you do decide to head to Batopilus, the road has been worked on
extensively. If you are lucky and the weather has been kind you can
reach Batopilus in about 3 1/2 hours. Better than the old 5 or more hour
trip. When we were there you could have very very carefully reached the
bottom of the canyon in a sedan, but I would not recommend that. A note
of caution if you are looking for a 4 wheel drive vehicle. Renting one
in the city of Chihuahua was impossible for us. Also of note, the Tree
Amigos in Creel no longer rents out vehicles. Ivan, the owner, is a
great resource though and can give you updated information about the
birds. Well worth talking to him. He does set up tours if you are
looking for that.
We rode buses into and out of Batopilus and that worked out fine for us.
Stayed at Hotel Minas and liked it quite a bit.
Mexico felt very safe and was as beautiful as always. Such a great
country to go to and experience the culture and the wildlife. If you
have any questions about some of the logistics of the travel feel free
to ask.
All the best

  Barry Levine
  Seattle, Wa.
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

--
http://www.fastmail.com - Choose from over 50 domains or use your own

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Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - April 2015
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 14:28:32 -0400
The April 2015 issues of the Birding Community E-bulletin is now
available the web, covering news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for active and
concerned birders, those dedicated to the joys of birding and the
protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of superb quality birding
binoculars and scopes, Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past E-bulletins on the
website of the National Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The April 2015 edition includes the following topics:

RARITY FOCUS
   - mystery Shrike at Manchester Beach State Park in Mendocino
County, California

SAN JOSE ADOPTING BIRD-SAFE BUILDING GUIDELINES
   - fourth city in CA to enact bird-safe building standards which
address the bird-collisions issue

CRANE NEWS: LOUISIANA RELEASES
   - releases of Whooping Cranes in Louisiana continue

IBA NEWS: COVERING THE BOREAL ZONE
   - the conservation benchmarks necessary to ensure that the boreal
forest continues to be an important North American bird nursery

BLACKPOLL WARBLER PROOF
   - warblers leave the northeastern US and Canada and make landfall
somewhere in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Greater Antilles

ACCESS MATTERS: FLORIDA FLAMINGOS
   - in western Palm Beach County, Florida, for almost a decade

CLASSIC BIRDS OF AMERICA ONLINE
   - available for free download and online navigation into all their
details

TIP OF THE MONTH: REMINDER FOR TAXES
   - many states have a non-game, endangered/threatened, or related
wildlife check-off feature connected to the state annual tax returns


- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National Wildlife Refuge
Association (NWRA) website:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 



If you wish to receive the bulletin or have any friends or co-workers

who want to get onto the monthly E-bulletin mailing list, have them
contact either:

Wayne R. Petersen
Director Massachusetts Important Bird Areas (IBA)
Program Mass Audubon
wpetersen-at-massaudubon.org

Paul J. Baicich
Great Birding Projects
paul.baicich-at-verizon.net

If you wish to distribute all or parts of any of the monthly Birding
Community E-bulletins, they simply request that you mention the
source
of any material used. (Include a URL for the E-bulletin archives, if
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We never lend or sell our E-bulletin recipient list.


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Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 11:12:03 -0400
Exactly so, which makes it all so much fun.

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph Morlan
Sent: April-19-15 10:37 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?

In my neighborhood on the California coast, Swainson's Thrushes first
arrived about a week ago; but are almost undetected.  They just give soft
calls for a couple of weeks before the first males start singing.

Before answering the question why birds sing when not on territory, I think
we need to also answer the question why some species of birds do not
normally sing until well after they arrive on territory.  Whatever the
presumed advantages of one strategy may be, the opposite strategy also needs
an explanation.

This type of question reminds me of other similar questions, like "Why do
geese fly in a 'V' formation."  The answer usually involves some fluid
mechanics or slipstream explanation in which there is an energy efficiency
in such a formation.  But this leaves us with the question of why some
species of geese (e.g. Brant) tend to fly in straight lines if other
formations are so much more efficient.

On Sun, 19 Apr 2015 13:32:34 +0000, Ronald Orenstein
 wrote:

>I have heard Swainson's Thrushes singing on their wintering grounds in
Costa Rica (April 18, 1971 - I checked my notes), whether or not they do so
on passage.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

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Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 07:36:46 -0700
In my neighborhood on the California coast, Swainson's Thrushes first
arrived about a week ago; but are almost undetected.  They just give soft
calls for a couple of weeks before the first males start singing.

Before answering the question why birds sing when not on territory, I think
we need to also answer the question why some species of birds do not
normally sing until well after they arrive on territory.  Whatever the
presumed advantages of one strategy may be, the opposite strategy also
needs an explanation.

This type of question reminds me of other similar questions, like "Why do
geese fly in a 'V' formation."  The answer usually involves some fluid
mechanics or slipstream explanation in which there is an energy efficiency
in such a formation.  But this leaves us with the question of why some
species of geese (e.g. Brant) tend to fly in straight lines if other
formations are so much more efficient.

On Sun, 19 Apr 2015 13:32:34 +0000, Ronald Orenstein
 wrote:

>I have heard Swainson's Thrushes singing on their wintering grounds in Costa 
Rica (April 18, 1971 - I checked my notes), whether or not they do so on 
passage. 

--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 13:32:34 +0000
I have heard Swainson's Thrushes singing on their wintering grounds in Costa 
Rica (April 18, 1971 - I checked my notes), whether or not they do so on 
passage. 

Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: dmark 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2015 9:00 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
   
Another clue is that not all passerines are singing as they migrate.
Catharus
thrushes do not sing (or very seldom sing) at migration spots in the
Buffalo (NY)
area (latitude 43). Neither do Empidonax flycatchers other than Least.
Migrating New World Warblers (Parulidae) are mostly singing here, but
not as they
cross the Texas coast. Etc.

David
dmark AT buffalo.edu
Amherst, NY


On 04/19/2015 8:40 am, Barry K. MacKay wrote:
> As usual, I agree with Dr. Orenstein.  In thinking about such things I
> often ask myself what would be the selective advantage of such
> activity?
> For the sake of discussion, let's assume a migratory bird in which only
> the
> male normally sings.  Would there be a greater likelihood of a male
> singing
> before reaching the final nesting territory passing his genes on to the
> next
> generation?  If yes, assuming (as I think is valid) that the
> propensity to
> sing before reaching nesting territory is a heritable trait, it would
> be
> selected for.
>
> In other words, birds doing this would have something of an advantage
> in
> reproducing.
>
> This in no way precludes Ron's explanation that the song centre is now
> growing, as migration is underway, which, as we know of
> hormone-influenced
> changes in north-south migratory birds generally, is probably linked to
> external seasonal influences, such as photoperiodism (lengthening or
> shortening of daylight hours).  I also agree with Ron's first e-mail on
> the
> subject, that in a sense, the male has no choice, although it could be
> argued that since singing before the song serves the function of mate
> and
> territory selection, comes at a metabolic cost to the bird.  He is
> exposing
> himself and using up energy in a way that does not help him achieve
> what we
> know to be the primary goals of song (in our typical migratory songbird
> species), of establishing territory and challenging other males and
> attracting a lady.
>
> In other words, birds that don't sing may be more likely, by virtue of
> not
> drawing attention to themselves, and not using up energy needed for
> possibly
> arduous (we can, I think, assume) long flights when eating isn't
> possible,
> and thus more likely to pass on the
> non-pre-nesting-ground-arrival-singing
> trait than those who sing early.
>
> So if that's the disadvantage, what is the counter-advantage?
>
> I'm just theorizing all this, of course, but I suspect that part of it
> is,
> indeed, a honing of skill, or the reestablishment of neural pathways in
> the
> song centre involved in the storage of song repertoire, as Ron says.
> Those
> that do so, have an edge, in the same way a golfer or kid playing
> baseball
> in the spring, has an edge by practicing the sport in the early spring,
> to
> hone skills that have dulled over the winter season, since the activity
> was
> last performed, or a musician might go back to a tune she or he has not
> played for a year or so, and rehearse several times prior to
> performance in
> public, where it matters.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein
> Sent: April-19-15 6:40 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
>
> Songs, as opposed to calls, are much more likely to be challenges to
> other
> (usually) males than attempts to attract birds other than mates.  I
> have
> never heard of songs used to "call in" other birds, though some birds
> have
> assembly and flocking calls that they do use for this purpose.
>
> One point to remember is that song in songbirds is specifically
> controlled
> by a song centre in the brain, and in migratory species at least the
> song
> centre actually grows and shrinks over the course of the year as the
> birds
> become more or less active singers. I have not seen a study (though
> there
> may certainly be one - I don't keep up with all the latest literature)
> linking growth of the song centre to increasing song on spring
> migration,
> but it may be that early song activity is somehow linked to the
> reestablishment of neural pathways in the song centre involved the
> storage
> of song repertoire.
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>> On Apr 18, 2015, at 11:23 PM, Patricia Burden 
> wrote:
>>
>> When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
>> are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
>> practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
>> love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
>> perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
>> others of their species to come migrate with them.
>> Pat Burden
>> Melvin & Yale, MI
>>
>>
>>> On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan 
>>> wrote:
>>> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
>>> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it
>>> to a certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated
>>> Sparrows. Over the past couple of weeks they have been singing their
>>> plaintive songs insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed
>>> here, except sometimes in the mountains in the northern part of the
>>> state. Today a couple of them were dueling quite often, trading songs
>>> back and forth. Always makes me think...if they are not establishing
>>> breeding territories, or defending them, why do they do it?
>>>
>>> Bernie Sloan
>>> Highland Park, NJ
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Dixie Burkhart <dixieburk AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 09:27:03 -0400
Bird song is a fascinating and extremely complex subject, and I am no expert by 
any stretch. However, according to my reading on the topic, species that sing 
seasonally begin to sing when hormone levels rise in response to an increase in 
day length. That's why chickadees, for instance, start singing in early 
February, long before they are actually nesting. The juncos that winter in my 
yard begin to sing before they leave. In the fall, on the other hand, singing 
in migration is much more unusual. Hope this helps. 


Dixie Burkhart
Arlington Township, Van Buren County,
Michigan

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 18, 2015, at 11:23 PM, Patricia Burden  wrote:
>
> When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
> are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
> practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
> love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
> perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
> others of their species to come migrate with them.
> Pat Burden
> Melvin & Yale, MI
>
>
>> On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
>> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
>> certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
>> the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
>> insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
>> the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
>> were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
>> think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
>> them, why do they do it?
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park, NJ
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 09:00:29 -0400
Another clue is that not all passerines are singing as they migrate.
Catharus
thrushes do not sing (or very seldom sing) at migration spots in the
Buffalo (NY)
area (latitude 43). Neither do Empidonax flycatchers other than Least.
Migrating New World Warblers (Parulidae) are mostly singing here, but
not as they
cross the Texas coast. Etc.

David
dmark AT buffalo.edu
Amherst, NY


On 04/19/2015 8:40 am, Barry K. MacKay wrote:
> As usual, I agree with Dr. Orenstein.   In thinking about such things I
> often ask myself what would be the selective advantage of such
> activity?
> For the sake of discussion, let's assume a migratory bird in which only
> the
> male normally sings.   Would there be a greater likelihood of a male
> singing
> before reaching the final nesting territory passing his genes on to the
> next
> generation?   If yes, assuming (as I think is valid) that the
> propensity to
> sing before reaching nesting territory is a heritable trait, it would
> be
> selected for.
>
> In other words, birds doing this would have something of an advantage
> in
> reproducing.
>
> This in no way precludes Ron's explanation that the song centre is now
> growing, as migration is underway, which, as we know of
> hormone-influenced
> changes in north-south migratory birds generally, is probably linked to
> external seasonal influences, such as photoperiodism (lengthening or
> shortening of daylight hours).  I also agree with Ron's first e-mail on
> the
> subject, that in a sense, the male has no choice, although it could be
> argued that since singing before the song serves the function of mate
> and
> territory selection, comes at a metabolic cost to the bird.  He is
> exposing
> himself and using up energy in a way that does not help him achieve
> what we
> know to be the primary goals of song (in our typical migratory songbird
> species), of establishing territory and challenging other males and
> attracting a lady.
>
> In other words, birds that don't sing may be more likely, by virtue of
> not
> drawing attention to themselves, and not using up energy needed for
> possibly
> arduous (we can, I think, assume) long flights when eating isn't
> possible,
> and thus more likely to pass on the
> non-pre-nesting-ground-arrival-singing
> trait than those who sing early.
>
> So if that's the disadvantage, what is the counter-advantage?
>
> I'm just theorizing all this, of course, but I suspect that part of it
> is,
> indeed, a honing of skill, or the reestablishment of neural pathways in
> the
> song centre involved in the storage of song repertoire, as Ron says.
> Those
> that do so, have an edge, in the same way a golfer or kid playing
> baseball
> in the spring, has an edge by practicing the sport in the early spring,
> to
> hone skills that have dulled over the winter season, since the activity
> was
> last performed, or a musician might go back to a tune she or he has not
> played for a year or so, and rehearse several times prior to
> performance in
> public, where it matters.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein
> Sent: April-19-15 6:40 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
>
> Songs, as opposed to calls, are much more likely to be challenges to
> other
> (usually) males than attempts to attract birds other than mates.  I
> have
> never heard of songs used to "call in" other birds, though some birds
> have
> assembly and flocking calls that they do use for this purpose.
>
> One point to remember is that song in songbirds is specifically
> controlled
> by a song centre in the brain, and in migratory species at least the
> song
> centre actually grows and shrinks over the course of the year as the
> birds
> become more or less active singers. I have not seen a study (though
> there
> may certainly be one - I don't keep up with all the latest literature)
> linking growth of the song centre to increasing song on spring
> migration,
> but it may be that early song activity is somehow linked to the
> reestablishment of neural pathways in the song centre involved the
> storage
> of song repertoire.
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>> On Apr 18, 2015, at 11:23 PM, Patricia Burden 
> wrote:
>>
>> When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
>> are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
>> practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
>> love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
>> perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
>> others of their species to come migrate with them.
>> Pat Burden
>> Melvin & Yale, MI
>>
>>
>>> On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan 
>>> wrote:
>>> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
>>> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it
>>> to a certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated
>>> Sparrows. Over the past couple of weeks they have been singing their
>>> plaintive songs insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed
>>> here, except sometimes in the mountains in the northern part of the
>>> state. Today a couple of them were dueling quite often, trading songs
>>> back and forth. Always makes me think...if they are not establishing
>>> breeding territories, or defending them, why do they do it?
>>>
>>> Bernie Sloan
>>> Highland Park, NJ
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 08:40:09 -0400
As usual, I agree with Dr. Orenstein.   In thinking about such things I
often ask myself what would be the selective advantage of such activity?
For the sake of discussion, let's assume a migratory bird in which only the
male normally sings.   Would there be a greater likelihood of a male singing
before reaching the final nesting territory passing his genes on to the next
generation?   If yes, assuming (as I think is valid) that the propensity to
sing before reaching nesting territory is a heritable trait, it would be
selected for.

In other words, birds doing this would have something of an advantage in
reproducing.

This in no way precludes Ron's explanation that the song centre is now
growing, as migration is underway, which, as we know of hormone-influenced
changes in north-south migratory birds generally, is probably linked to
external seasonal influences, such as photoperiodism (lengthening or
shortening of daylight hours).  I also agree with Ron's first e-mail on the
subject, that in a sense, the male has no choice, although it could be
argued that since singing before the song serves the function of mate and
territory selection, comes at a metabolic cost to the bird.  He is exposing
himself and using up energy in a way that does not help him achieve what we
know to be the primary goals of song (in our typical migratory songbird
species), of establishing territory and challenging other males and
attracting a lady.

In other words, birds that don't sing may be more likely, by virtue of not
drawing attention to themselves, and not using up energy needed for possibly
arduous (we can, I think, assume) long flights when eating isn't possible,
and thus more likely to pass on the non-pre-nesting-ground-arrival-singing
trait than those who sing early.

So if that's the disadvantage, what is the counter-advantage?

I'm just theorizing all this, of course, but I suspect that part of it is,
indeed, a honing of skill, or the reestablishment of neural pathways in the
song centre involved in the storage of song repertoire, as Ron says.   Those
that do so, have an edge, in the same way a golfer or kid playing baseball
in the spring, has an edge by practicing the sport in the early spring, to
hone skills that have dulled over the winter season, since the activity was
last performed, or a musician might go back to a tune she or he has not
played for a year or so, and rehearse several times prior to performance in
public, where it matters.

Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein
Sent: April-19-15 6:40 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?

Songs, as opposed to calls, are much more likely to be challenges to other
(usually) males than attempts to attract birds other than mates.  I have
never heard of songs used to "call in" other birds, though some birds have
assembly and flocking calls that they do use for this purpose.

One point to remember is that song in songbirds is specifically controlled
by a song centre in the brain, and in migratory species at least the song
centre actually grows and shrinks over the course of the year as the birds
become more or less active singers. I have not seen a study (though there
may certainly be one - I don't keep up with all the latest literature)
linking growth of the song centre to increasing song on spring migration,
but it may be that early song activity is somehow linked to the
reestablishment of neural pathways in the song centre involved the storage
of song repertoire.

Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Apr 18, 2015, at 11:23 PM, Patricia Burden 
wrote:
>
> When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
> are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
> practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
> love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
> perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
> others of their species to come migrate with them.
> Pat Burden
> Melvin & Yale, MI
>
>
>> On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
>> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it
>> to a certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated
>> Sparrows. Over the past couple of weeks they have been singing their
>> plaintive songs insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed
>> here, except sometimes in the mountains in the northern part of the
>> state. Today a couple of them were dueling quite often, trading songs
>> back and forth. Always makes me think...if they are not establishing
>> breeding territories, or defending them, why do they do it?
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park, NJ
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 06:40:22 -0400
Songs, as opposed to calls, are much more likely to be challenges to other 
(usually) males than attempts to attract birds other than mates. I have never 
heard of songs used to "call in" other birds, though some birds have assembly 
and flocking calls that they do use for this purpose. 


One point to remember is that song in songbirds is specifically controlled by a 
song centre in the brain, and in migratory species at least the song centre 
actually grows and shrinks over the course of the year as the birds become more 
or less active singers. I have not seen a study (though there may certainly be 
one - I don't keep up with all the latest literature) linking growth of the 
song centre to increasing song on spring migration, but it may be that early 
song activity is somehow linked to the reestablishment of neural pathways in 
the song centre involved the storage of song repertoire. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Apr 18, 2015, at 11:23 PM, Patricia Burden  wrote:
>
> When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
> are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
> practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
> love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
> perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
> others of their species to come migrate with them.
> Pat Burden
> Melvin & Yale, MI
>
>
>> On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
>> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
>> certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
>> the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
>> insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
>> the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
>> were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
>> think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
>> them, why do they do it?
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park, NJ
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 23:23:41 -0400
When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
others of their species to come migrate with them.
Pat Burden
Melvin & Yale, MI


On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
> certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
> the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
> insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
> the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
> were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
> think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
> them, why do they do it?
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html