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Updated on Wednesday, March 4 at 12:19 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Macgillivrays Warbler,©David Sibley

3 Mar Zapata Rail rediscovered [Eran Tomer ]
3 Mar Goshawk pursuit strategies [OC ]
2 Mar Re: Moving Life List to Computer [Sam Sinderson ]
2 Mar Re: Moving Life List to Computer [Chuck & Lillian ]
2 Mar Fwd: Re: [Albertabird] Re: Moving Life List to Computer [Sandra Savage ]
2 Mar Re: Moving Life List to Computer [Mark Cranford ]
2 Mar Re: Moving Life List to Computer [Mona Bearor ]
2 Mar Moving Life List to Computer [Katharine Mills ]
2 Mar Re: Moving Life List to Computer [Arie Gilbert ]
1 Mar Moving Life List to Computer [Sandra Savage ]
1 Mar Re: Check out Mystery goo that killed hundreds of birds remains unidentified - LA ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
1 Mar Check out Mystery goo that killed hundreds of birds remains unidentified - LA ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
1 Mar Swivel-headed woodpecker (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
1 Mar Re: TR Columbia SA Feb 2015 ["Patrick C. Hodgson" ]
28 Feb TR Columbia SA Feb 2015 ["barry " ]
28 Feb TR Columbia SA Feb 2015 [barry ]
28 Feb TR Columbia SA Feb 2015 ["barry " ]
28 Feb RFI: Bird Calls/Songs for Android [Hank Pfeifer ]
28 Feb RFI Bell's Sparrow [OC ]
28 Feb BirdNote, last week & the week of March 1, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
27 Feb Re: Hearing Aids, birding and honeybees [Mike Mulligan ]
27 Feb Hearing Aids, birding and honeybees [Chuck & Lillian ]
27 Feb Re: Interesting Cardinal photo: Female or a juvenile? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
27 Feb Interesting Cardinal photo: Female or a juvenile? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Feb Odd Couple :-) (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Feb Re: Stress []
26 Feb Re: Stress ["Tangren, Gerald Vernon" ]
26 Feb Re: Stress [Marcel Gahbauer ]
26 Feb Re: Stress [Eric Jeffrey ]
26 Feb Stress [Al Schirmacher ]
25 Feb Beautiful Dozing Dove (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
25 Feb Re: Glass bird ID follow-up ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
25 Feb Re: Glass bird ID follow-up [John Arnfield ]
24 Feb Glass bird ID follow-up ["B.G. Sloan" ]
24 Feb Re: Glass bird ID [Jerry Blinn ]
24 Feb Admin: E-mail address changes [L Larson ]
24 Feb Re: RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s? [Phil Davis ]
24 Feb Re: RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s? [Andy Mabbett ]
23 Feb Glass bird ID? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
23 Feb Re: RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s? [Phil Davis ]
23 Feb RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s? [dmark ]
21 Feb Pacific Wren - Winter Wren [Katharine Mills ]
21 Feb BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 22, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
21 Feb Hilton Pond 02/01/15 (30,000 WinterFinches) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
19 Feb Very chilly-looking heron (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
19 Feb Birding on Manu Road, Peru in May [Jim Danzenbaker ]
18 Feb The many colors of a Mourning Dove (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
17 Feb Re: NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo) [Chuck Carlson ]
17 Feb Re: NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo) []
17 Feb Hoary Redpoll Question ["R.D. Everhart" ]
17 Feb Hoary Redpoll Question ["R.D. Everhart via Mnbird" ]
17 Feb NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
17 Feb FW: Venezuela 2 [Vader Willem Jan Marinus ]
16 Feb Re: Hoary Redpoll question [Jean Iron ]
16 Feb Hoary Redpoll question ["R.D. Everhart" ]
16 Feb Hoary Redpoll question ["R.D. Everhart via Mnbird" ]
14 Feb Suggestions for tours in Brazil to Iguazu falls from Sao Paolo or Rio [Rick ]
14 Feb BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 15, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Feb Nuthatch frozen in fear? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
12 Feb Re: Southern Vancouver Island []
12 Feb Southern Vancouver Island ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
10 Feb Gulls rolling down the river (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Feb Hilton Pond 01/01/15 (Nature's Shorthand) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
7 Feb BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 8, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
2 Feb Re: Fork-tailed Cardinal photos - clarification [Lynea ]
2 Feb Fork-tailed Cardinal photos - clarification ["B.G. Sloan" ]
2 Feb Fork-tailed Cardinal (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
2 Feb Hilton Pond 11/01/14 (Costa Rica-East Hummingbird Report) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
31 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 1, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
29 Jan White-throated Sparrow more like White-bearded Sparrow? :-) (Photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
28 Jan My first decent photo of a White-throated Sparrow! ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Jan Re: What type of birder? [marys1000 ]
26 Jan Clarification [Al Schirmacher ]
28 Jan Finding Gallinaceous Birds in Colorado [Rebecca ]
26 Jan Re: Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo) ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
26 Jan Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]

Subject: Zapata Rail rediscovered
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 23:25:07 -0500
Hello all,

Exciting news from BirdLife International - Cuba's critically endangered
Zapata Rail was documented reliably for the first time in c. ​40 years.
(Previous sightings evidently were not confirmed). Birdlife estimates the
global population at less than 250 individuals, and decreasing.

http://www.birdlife.org/americas/news/rare-glimpse-elusive-rail

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Goshawk pursuit strategies
From: OC <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 10:47:21 -0800
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/02/science/natures-fighter-jets-with-flapping-wings.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share 


Video from a camera on a goshawk’s head shows that the bird uses different 
pursuit strategies to catch its prey. 


Oscar Canino
SF, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Sam Sinderson <sinderso AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 16:49:21 -0500
I use AviSys, which is very versatile.  Jerry Blinn, the author, is very
good to work with if you have questions.  A great user manual.

Sam Sinderson
sinderso AT verizon.net

On 3/2/2015 10:37 AM, Katharine Mills wrote:
> I have used Bird Base from Santa Barbara Software since 1988.  It also
> does everything you want plus more.
> Kathy Mills
> Holden, MA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:28:51 -0800
Sandra:
I've been using BirdBase (for the entire world) for many years, since
before Windows was a glimmer in Bill Gates' eye, in fact. It does
everything you wished for below. There are other listing programs
that do much the same, but I haven't tried them so I can't comment
whether they are better, easier, cheaper, etc.

Right now I have over 30,000 entries for over 5,000 species. As far
as I know, your sighting comment can be as long as you want (I've
never run out of room). There are many ways I can output the data
(including to word processing, excel spreadsheet).

The only disadvantage I am aware of is this: if you bird with a
partner, and you want a complete and completely useful list for both
people, you must enter it twice. There is a "work-around" which
permits entry only once, but I don't like the results. So when my
wife and I share a trip, I do all the data entry, research (mostly
for subspecies) and notes, then email her a copy of the complete trip
list; she then does a cut-and-paste & enter for each species and has
her list finished in about 1/10th the time.

I also use the BirdArea (creates many lists for all countries & areas
{continents, faunal zones, etc.} - targets, seen anywhere, seen in
country, etc.) and Subspecies programs. The latter permits you to
enter subspecies for all your sightings. You will, however, need a
good additional reference for subspecies ranges if you get the
subspecies program. I use my old Clements Checklist (vol 6) book, but
the Cornell updates are also useful. You can use the EditData program
that comes with BirdArea, but it gets you only down to country or
state level, not sufficient localized in many areas (e.g. look as
Clements' entries for ranges of Amazonian birds).
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/updateindex/

I have no portable phone - smart or otherwise - and do my entry on my
computer at home. I've seen birders using bird list data entry
programs on their smart phone - poke, poke, beep, beep - but I don't
want to do that. Luddite.

All these programs are updated annually. Updates are not free.
http://www.birdbase.com/

Costs are as below, plus shipping & sales tax:
BirdBase & BirdArea special: 99.95  (1)
All Species Add-on: 19.95  (1)
BirdBase & BirdArea North America only special: 69.95
BirdBase world: 59.95
BirdBase North America only: 39.95
BirdArea world: 59.95
BirdArea North America only: 39.95

Update Birdbase species annually: 9.95  (2)
Update BirdArea range data annually: 9.95  (2)
Update all species annually: 9.95  (2)

(1) Programs I have
(2) Programs I purchase annually

They have other programs for mammals and butterflies, about which I
know nothing.
Contact me off-line if you have any additional questions, but I
suggest you look at the BirdBase website.
yours,
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

>Date:    Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:38:20 -0700
>From:    Sandra Savage 
>Subject: Moving Life List to Computer
>
>Hi Everyone
>I have a beautiful, hard-bound life list book.  There are, however,
>three problems with it:
>
>1 - it's hard to update splits and such;
>2 - there's only enough room to write one or two dates beside each
>species; and
>3 - it can take a long time to find which page a bird is listed on -
>there's a species index at the back but things like flycatchers have 20 pages.
>
>I would like a simple-to-use, non-expensive software program if
>there is one that does the following:
>
>1 - it needs to have Latin names as well as English
>2 - I need room to note a first sighting and then to note things
>like a first sighting of the other sex or a bird on a nest or something
>3 - I would like to be able to enter "Short-eared Owl" for instance
>and have it find the place to put that; and
>4 - I want to be able to print a list of birds seen sorted by date.
>
>Ideally, there would also be a way to add as many notes as I wanted
>to any species.
>
>I don't have iPod or blackberry or smart phone.  Right now, this
>would all be on my computer.  But, some day I might want to be able to
>co-ordinate between the computer and a device.
>
>Does anyone have suggestions as to what might be best for me?
>Thanks
>Sandra Savage
>Calgary, Alberta

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Fwd: Re: [Albertabird] Re: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Sandra Savage <savagebirder AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:11:22 -0700
Thank you to everyone who replied.

The clear favourites:

      - ebird.org to keep on-line; and

     - AviSys to keep on my computer.

I will be investigating both of these.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

Sandra Savage
Calgary, Alberta

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Mark Cranford <mark.cranford AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 11:13:00 -0500
I'm not about to leave Avisys - it's great but there is eBird  you can
enter your life list as incidental records with a date and location and
it's free

Mark Cranford
Mississauga, Ont.

mark.cranford at rogers dot com

On 02/03/2015 10:02 AM, Arie Gilbert wrote:
> Hi Sandra,
>
> The answer you seek is called Avisys. It has been around for a long time.
> it does all that you seek below, and much more.
>
> I have been using it for a VERY long time and I can answer addition
> questions if you need.
>
> I have no financial or other ties to this product other than being a
> happy user for many years.
>
> Arie Gilbert
> North Babylon, NY
>
> WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
>  WWW.qcbirdclub.org
>
>
>
>
> On 3/2/2015 12:38 AM, Sandra Savage wrote:
>> Hi Everyone
>>
>> I have a beautiful, hard-bound life list book.  There are, however,
>> three problems with it:
>>
>> 1 - it's hard to update splits and such;
>> 2 - there's only enough room to write one or two dates beside each
>> species; and
>> 3 - it can take a long time to find which page a bird is listed on -
>> there's a species index at the back but things like flycatchers have 20
>> pages.
>>
>> I would like a simple-to-use, non-expensive software program if there is
>> one that does the following:
>>
>> 1 - it needs to have Latin names as well as English
>> 2 - I need room to note a first sighting and then to note things like a
>> first sighting of the other sex or a bird on a nest or something
>> 3 - I would like to be able to enter "Short-eared Owl" for instance and
>> have it find the place to put that; and
>> 4 - I want to be able to print a list of birds seen sorted by date.
>>
>> Ideally, there would also be a way to add as many notes as I wanted to
>> any species.
>>
>> I don't have iPod or blackberry or smart phone.  Right now, this would
>> all be on my computer.  But, some day I might want to be able to
>> co-ordinate between the computer and a device.
>>
>> Does anyone have suggestions as to what might be best for me?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Sandra Savage
>> Calgary, Alberta
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>
>
>
> -----
>
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2015.0.5751 / Virus Database: 4299/9212 - Release Date: 03/02/15
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Mona Bearor <conservebirds AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:59:59 -0500
I too have been using Avisys for years and love it. I have over 25,000 
sightings in my personal file and 17,000 in our Audubon chapter data set. You 
will be amazed at how easy it is to enter sightings and later retrieve 
information. Another great thing about this product is the support you receive 
if you have a question - it is thorough and quick, and that is important as 
well know. 


Mona Bearor
South Glens Falls, NY



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Arie Gilbert 

Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 10:02 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Moving Life List to Computer

Hi Sandra,

The answer you seek is called Avisys. It has been around for a long time.
it does all that you seek below, and much more.

I have been using it for a VERY long time and I can answer addition questions 
if you need. 


I have no financial or other ties to this product other than being a happy user 
for many years. 


Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY

WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
  WWW.qcbirdclub.org




On 3/2/2015 12:38 AM, Sandra Savage wrote:
> Hi Everyone
>
> I have a beautiful, hard-bound life list book.  There are, however,
> three problems with it:
>
> 1 - it's hard to update splits and such;
> 2 - there's only enough room to write one or two dates beside each
> species; and
> 3 - it can take a long time to find which page a bird is listed on -
> there's a species index at the back but things like flycatchers have
> 20 pages.
>
> I would like a simple-to-use, non-expensive software program if there
> is one that does the following:
>
> 1 - it needs to have Latin names as well as English
> 2 - I need room to note a first sighting and then to note things like
> a first sighting of the other sex or a bird on a nest or something
> 3 - I would like to be able to enter "Short-eared Owl" for instance
> and have it find the place to put that; and
> 4 - I want to be able to print a list of birds seen sorted by date.
>
> Ideally, there would also be a way to add as many notes as I wanted to
> any species.
>
> I don't have iPod or blackberry or smart phone.  Right now, this would
> all be on my computer.  But, some day I might want to be able to
> co-ordinate between the computer and a device.
>
> Does anyone have suggestions as to what might be best for me?
>
> Thanks
>
> Sandra Savage
> Calgary, Alberta
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

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Subject: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Katharine Mills <gkmills AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:37:47 -0500
I have used Bird Base from Santa Barbara Software since 1988.  It also
does everything you want plus more.
Kathy Mills
Holden, MA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 10:02:13 -0500
Hi Sandra,

The answer you seek is called Avisys. It has been around for a long time.
it does all that you seek below, and much more.

I have been using it for a VERY long time and I can answer addition
questions if you need.

I have no financial or other ties to this product other than being a
happy user for many years.

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY

WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
  WWW.qcbirdclub.org




On 3/2/2015 12:38 AM, Sandra Savage wrote:
> Hi Everyone
>
> I have a beautiful, hard-bound life list book.  There are, however,
> three problems with it:
>
> 1 - it's hard to update splits and such;
> 2 - there's only enough room to write one or two dates beside each
> species; and
> 3 - it can take a long time to find which page a bird is listed on -
> there's a species index at the back but things like flycatchers have 20
> pages.
>
> I would like a simple-to-use, non-expensive software program if there is
> one that does the following:
>
> 1 - it needs to have Latin names as well as English
> 2 - I need room to note a first sighting and then to note things like a
> first sighting of the other sex or a bird on a nest or something
> 3 - I would like to be able to enter "Short-eared Owl" for instance and
> have it find the place to put that; and
> 4 - I want to be able to print a list of birds seen sorted by date.
>
> Ideally, there would also be a way to add as many notes as I wanted to
> any species.
>
> I don't have iPod or blackberry or smart phone.  Right now, this would
> all be on my computer.  But, some day I might want to be able to
> co-ordinate between the computer and a device.
>
> Does anyone have suggestions as to what might be best for me?
>
> Thanks
>
> Sandra Savage
> Calgary, Alberta
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

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Subject: Moving Life List to Computer
From: Sandra Savage <savagebirder AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:38:20 -0700
Hi Everyone

I have a beautiful, hard-bound life list book.  There are, however,
three problems with it:

1 - it's hard to update splits and such;
2 - there's only enough room to write one or two dates beside each
species; and
3 - it can take a long time to find which page a bird is listed on -
there's a species index at the back but things like flycatchers have 20
pages.

I would like a simple-to-use, non-expensive software program if there is
one that does the following:

1 - it needs to have Latin names as well as English
2 - I need room to note a first sighting and then to note things like a
first sighting of the other sex or a bird on a nest or something
3 - I would like to be able to enter "Short-eared Owl" for instance and
have it find the place to put that; and
4 - I want to be able to print a list of birds seen sorted by date.

Ideally, there would also be a way to add as many notes as I wanted to
any species.

I don't have iPod or blackberry or smart phone.  Right now, this would
all be on my computer.  But, some day I might want to be able to
co-ordinate between the computer and a device.

Does anyone have suggestions as to what might be best for me?

Thanks

Sandra Savage
Calgary, Alberta

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Check out Mystery goo that killed hundreds of birds remains unidentified - LA
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 23:48:27 -0500
Sorry…somehow the “l” got cut off the end of the URL.  

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-mystery-goo-20150301-story.html








Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca  
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada






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Subject: Check out Mystery goo that killed hundreds of birds remains unidentified - LA
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:00:51 -0500
http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-mystery-goo-20150301-story.htm
l





Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada





FIAT LUX !
(Genesis)


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Subject: Swivel-headed woodpecker (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 13:13:38 -0500
For some reason I'm always surprised by how far some birds can twist their
heads. This Red-bellied Woodpecker turned its head an almost-but-not-quite
180 degrees to check me out as I snapped the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16666410572/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: TR Columbia SA Feb 2015
From: "Patrick C. Hodgson" <hadu AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 09:00:34 -0500
Barry,

Thanks for sharing this.  I would like to know your number of species
totals.  I am not trying to be competitive here, just looking for a
comparison of what you can get out of guided versus non-guided trip.  I
want to know because I am giving a talk to my local bird club soon about
my trip to Colombia.  I did a 3 week guided group trip in July 2014 with
a local guiding company.  I could tell it would be quite tough to do
many of the sites on your own, so your effort is certainly not
underappreciated by me.  For your reference, I got 544 total species, of
which 61 hummingbirds. I was pretty tight on what I counted, the total
including heard only by the guides was probably closer to 600.  We went
to many of the same places, but I think the time you lost in logistics
was spent by us in other good places, e.g. Montezuma, Jardin, Paramo
Ruiz, Chingaza, etc.  Even so I felt we were always rushing from place
to place and leaving quite a few missed species behind at every stop.
Internal flights were certainly easy - the 75 minute flight from Bogota
to Santa Marta replaces an 18 hour drive.

Pat Hodgson
Toronto

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Subject: TR Columbia SA Feb 2015
From: "barry " <levineb AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:29:50 -0800
Fellow birders,
This years version of my winter getaway found me traveling in Columbia
S.A.. With a small window of three days to put the 17 day trip together
there was a fair amount of concern as to whether 
I would be able to get to the places necessary and whether my experience
would be enough so that I didn't miss a large percentage of the birds
heard or seen. Luck was with me as I
was able to use 30k miles for a quick connection roundtrip on Alaska Air
and to get Pro Avis to send a copy of the second version of the  book to
Casona Del Patio in Bogota where many birders chose to stay. 
Got it on arrival to the hotel. I was also able to get Diana Bacalar to
help out with 3 days of guiding in and around Bogota. Elkin Rodriguez, a
Birdingpal, also agreed to one day of help 
in the city. Both Elkin and Diana are great spirits to be around and we
did quite well at Sumipaz, La Florida, Montserrate, San Francisco, the
Botanical Gardens and La Vega. Did not get 
to go to Chingaza, as Diana thought we could get many of the same
species at Sumipaz.
Bogota is so choked with traffic that the independent birder will have
to have their wiles about them to get to the sites. I would recommend
not trying to drive in the city. Buses and taxis are 
a possibility. Possible to use taxis in city for La Florida (Bogota
Rail, Apolinarse Wren site), Montserrate (worth a visit for some of the
birds and a great view of the city) and the Botanical 
Gardens (nice place, but not a must). Could also hire a taxi to get to
San Francisco (hummingbird feeders), and La Vega, both about an hour and
a half away and very worthwhile.
Sumipaz possible with a taxi. All sites would depend on how well you
know the birds and their songs in S.A. Without playback many of the
sought after birds will be really difficult. 
From Bogota headed by bus to Pareira. A 6 hour trip that turned into 10
hours. It typified my experience pretty much throughout Columbia. Only
take buses if you have the extra time or 
are looking for places to save money. At the bus terminal in Pereira on
my way out of town to Manizales, I was sold a ticket for a bus that was
supposed to leave in 20 minutes The bus never even showed 
up. After asking often I was finally refunded my money about an hour
later.   Did not meet many non-cooperative people in Columbia, though
many were workers at the bus terminals. I did 
run into the taxi drivers who tried to overcharge. Pretty much like
anywhere else in the world. Flights your best bets. Reasonably priced
overall. 
Before you get to Pereira might be best to call Jimmy at Otun Quimbaya
to get a taxi to pick you up at the terminal.  The ride which is 15
kilometers is on a rough road. Loved staying at Otun. Birded on my own. 
I was the only guest and got to know Jimmy (a great character) and also
one of the other workers there. Both knowledgeable birders and fun to
hang around with. The fruiting trees in the garden 
held many good birds. Be careful of chiggers in the tall grass.
Columbian and Tropical Screech Owls seen in the garden area.The road as
you head out to the right also well worth spending time birding. 
The trails inside Otun not as important according to Jimmy and I would
agree. An Andean Solitaire being the only new bird found inside the
trails. Rode the local bus back to Pereira and that
was an interesting experience. All the local school kids ride that bus
to get to and from school. You could have Jimmy get you a taxi back to
town. Pereira didn't seem like a nice place at all.
Took a mini bus from Pereira to Manizales, the gateway to Rio Blanco.
Manizales is a beautiful place with Mobius strip like roads that climb
up the mountain to the center of town. Sort of like the 
roads in San Francisco US, but even more so. Great place to spend an
evening if the time is available. Selene at Rio Blanco gave me the
number of a taxi and off I went early the next morning. At Rio Blanco 
you cannot go alone on the road to the Antpitta feeding areas. This
ended up being a problem as the local guide (Selene's daughter) who I
had been told would take me that day, was already engaged 
with another birding group. So now I was restricted to birding around
the lodge. Again luck was on my side as the group from Newcastle invited
me to join them for the rest of the day. So nice 
to meet these lads and their guide Johnny. Saved what could have been a
wasted day. Rio Blanco is a little rough around the edges, but with the
chance of seeing 4 Antpittas in one day you pretty much must go there. 
Another minibus ride took me to Medallin (pronounced Med a jeen). Liked
it here a lot. Great metro system that takes you pretty much everywhere.
If you go on the metro,to the it is important to note that the gondolas 
to Santo Domingo don't leave until 9 in the morning. When you get to the
top the one walk that would get you into primary forest does not leave
until 11. Takes about 4-5 hours to cover the 5 kilometers you will walk. 
Only one guide is knowledgeable about birds, so aim to go on his trip.
The Botanical Gardens in town hold some nice birds as well. These are
easily visited from a metro stop.
Flew on to Cartagena. Not much birding to do around town, in that
species can easily be seen elsewhere. But it is a spectacular place to
see. It was my intention to head to Baranquilla for Isla Salamanca, but
the Carnival had just started and it was going to be a zoo. So on to the
Mecca of the trip: Santa Marta. 
No guide lined up for the 5 days in the area posed a daunting challenge.
Impossible to get up to the towers without a 4 wheel drive vehicle.
Could get to Minca, but from there who knew what would happen. 
Not really my style of birding. But,again good luck interceded. An email
I had sent to another local birdingpal was answered and now 4 out of the
5 days were covered. Great time in a very magnificent place. 
Two nights around Minca (nice Hotel Minca) and three at Palo Alto.
Another spot where I was the only person staying there. So beautiful.
Nights of many stars and incredible views all the way south to
Baranquilla. Birding was superb. 
Great guiding by the ethically minded Sebastian made for a memorable
time in a place that hopefully will not be overrun by people putting too
much pressure on the birds. What a grand way to end the trip.
Thanks for all the help from Diana, Elkin, Jimmy and especially
Sebastian who came through in a pinch. And to all of you who sent me
information about Columbia. A trip report from Dick Meijer and Peter 
Van Scheepen helped me immeasurably in forming the backbone of the trip.
Easy to say at this point that it makes great sense to get yourself a
guide and have them cover the logistics, but for an individual 
that will be very pricey. The cost of getting a vehicle, guides,
flights, food, etc. runs steep. I feel tremendously fortunate to be able
to have traveled given the constraints that were present. Due to these
constraints 
it was difficult to almost impossible to get into certain areas. I just
had to let that go. Could have easy struck out a few, or possibly many,
times during the trip.  But if anything my hopes were raised by the
goodness 
of the people I encountered. .
As usual I'll skip the list of birds. They are many excellent trip
reports that have already covered the same ground.  It is always my
intention to create a possible vehicle for helping people to try to set
up their own journey.
Let me know if I can be of any more help in that respect. 
Columbia felt very safe. Really enjoyed my time there.
All the best
 

 
-- 
  barry Levine
  Seattle, Wa. US
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

-- 
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Subject: TR Columbia SA Feb 2015
From: barry <levineb AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:29:50 -0800
Fellow birders,
This years version of my winter getaway found me traveling in Columbia
S.A.. With a small window of three days to put the 17 day trip together
there was a fair amount of concern as to whether
I would be able to get to the places necessary and whether my experience
would be enough so that I didn't miss a large percentage of the birds
heard or seen. Luck was with me as I
was able to use 30k miles for a quick connection roundtrip on Alaska Air
and to get Pro Avis to send a copy of the second version of the  book to
Casona Del Patio in Bogota where many birders chose to stay.
Got it on arrival to the hotel. I was also able to get Diana Bacalar to
help out with 3 days of guiding in and around Bogota. Elkin Rodriguez, a
Birdingpal, also agreed to one day of help
in the city. Both Elkin and Diana are great spirits to be around and we
did quite well at Sumipaz, La Florida, Montserrate, San Francisco, the
Botanical Gardens and La Vega. Did not get
to go to Chingaza, as Diana thought we could get many of the same
species at Sumipaz.
Bogota is so choked with traffic that the independent birder will have
to have their wiles about them to get to the sites. I would recommend
not trying to drive in the city. Buses and taxis are
a possibility. Possible to use taxis in city for La Florida (Bogota
Rail, Apolinarse Wren site), Montserrate (worth a visit for some of the
birds and a great view of the city) and the Botanical
Gardens (nice place, but not a must). Could also hire a taxi to get to
San Francisco (hummingbird feeders), and La Vega, both about an hour and
a half away and very worthwhile.
Sumipaz possible with a taxi. All sites would depend on how well you
know the birds and their songs in S.A. Without playback many of the
sought after birds will be really difficult.
From Bogota headed by bus to Pareira. A 6 hour trip that turned into 10
hours. It typified my experience pretty much throughout Columbia. Only
take buses if you have the extra time or
are looking for places to save money. At the bus terminal in Pereira on
my way out of town to Manizales, I was sold a ticket for a bus that was
supposed to leave in 20 minutes The bus never even showed
up. After asking often I was finally refunded my money about an hour
later.   Did not meet many non-cooperative people in Columbia, though
many were workers at the bus terminals. I did
run into the taxi drivers who tried to overcharge. Pretty much like
anywhere else in the world. Flights your best bets. Reasonably priced
overall.
Before you get to Pereira might be best to call Jimmy at Otun Quimbaya
to get a taxi to pick you up at the terminal.  The ride which is 15
kilometers is on a rough road. Loved staying at Otun. Birded on my own.
I was the only guest and got to know Jimmy (a great character) and also
one of the other workers there. Both knowledgeable birders and fun to
hang around with. The fruiting trees in the garden
held many good birds. Be careful of chiggers in the tall grass.
Columbian and Tropical Screech Owls seen in the garden area.The road as
you head out to the right also well worth spending time birding.
The trails inside Otun not as important according to Jimmy and I would
agree. An Andean Solitaire being the only new bird found inside the
trails. Rode the local bus back to Pereira and that
was an interesting experience. All the local school kids ride that bus
to get to and from school. You could have Jimmy get you a taxi back to
town. Pereira didn't seem like a nice place at all.
Took a mini bus from Pereira to Manizales, the gateway to Rio Blanco.
Manizales is a beautiful place with Mobius strip like roads that climb
up the mountain to the center of town. Sort of like the
roads in San Francisco US, but even more so. Great place to spend an
evening if the time is available. Selene at Rio Blanco gave me the
number of a taxi and off I went early the next morning. At Rio Blanco
you cannot go alone on the road to the Antpitta feeding areas. This
ended up being a problem as the local guide (Selene's daughter) who I
had been told would take me that day, was already engaged
with another birding group. So now I was restricted to birding around
the lodge. Again luck was on my side as the group from Newcastle invited
me to join them for the rest of the day. So nice
to meet these lads and their guide Johnny. Saved what could have been a
wasted day. Rio Blanco is a little rough around the edges, but with the
chance of seeing 4 Antpittas in one day you pretty much must go there.
Another minibus ride took me to Medallin (pronounced Med a jeen). Liked
it here a lot. Great metro system that takes you pretty much everywhere.
If you go on the metro,to the it is important to note that the gondolas
to Santo Domingo don't leave until 9 in the morning. When you get to the
top the one walk that would get you into primary forest does not leave
until 11. Takes about 4-5 hours to cover the 5 kilometers you will walk.
Only one guide is knowledgeable about birds, so aim to go on his trip.
The Botanical Gardens in town hold some nice birds as well. These are
easily visited from a metro stop.
Flew on to Cartagena. Not much birding to do around town, in that
species can easily be seen elsewhere. But it is a spectacular place to
see. It was my intention to head to Baranquilla for Isla Salamanca, but
the Carnival had just started and it was going to be a zoo. So on to the
Mecca of the trip: Santa Marta.
No guide lined up for the 5 days in the area posed a daunting challenge.
Impossible to get up to the towers without a 4 wheel drive vehicle.
Could get to Minca, but from there who knew what would happen.
Not really my style of birding. But,again good luck interceded. An email
I had sent to another local birdingpal was answered and now 4 out of the
5 days were covered. Great time in a very magnificent place.
Two nights around Minca (nice Hotel Minca) and three at Palo Alto.
Another spot where I was the only person staying there. So beautiful.
Nights of many stars and incredible views all the way south to
Baranquilla. Birding was superb.
Great guiding by the ethically minded Sebastian made for a memorable
time in a place that hopefully will not be overrun by people putting too
much pressure on the birds. What a grand way to end the trip.
Thanks for all the help from Diana, Elkin, Jimmy and especially
Sebastian who came through in a pinch. And to all of you who sent me
information about Columbia. A trip report from Dick Meijer and Peter
Van Scheepen helped me immeasurably in forming the backbone of the trip.
Easy to say at this point that it makes great sense to get yourself a
guide and have them cover the logistics, but for an individual
that will be very pricey. The cost of getting a vehicle, guides,
flights, food, etc. runs steep. I feel tremendously fortunate to be able
to have traveled given the constraints that were present. Due to these
constraints
it was difficult to almost impossible to get into certain areas. I just
had to let that go. Could have easy struck out a few, or possibly many,
times during the trip.  But if anything my hopes were raised by the
goodness
of the people I encountered. .
As usual I'll skip the list of birds. They are many excellent trip
reports that have already covered the same ground.  It is always my
intention to create a possible vehicle for helping people to try to set
up their own journey.
Let me know if I can be of any more help in that respect.
Columbia felt very safe. Really enjoyed my time there.
All the best



--
  barry Levine
  Seattle, Wa. US
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

--
http://www.fastmail.com - Email service worth paying for. Try it for free

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: TR Columbia SA Feb 2015
From: "barry " <levineb AT fastmail.fm>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:29:50 -0800
Fellow birders,
This years version of my winter getaway found me traveling in Columbia
S.A.. With a small window of three days to put the 17 day trip together
there was a fair amount of concern as to whether 
I would be able to get to the places necessary and whether my experience
would be enough so that I didn't miss a large percentage of the birds
heard or seen. Luck was with me as I
was able to use 30k miles for a quick connection roundtrip on Alaska Air
and to get Pro Avis to send a copy of the second version of the  book to
Casona Del Patio in Bogota where many birders chose to stay. 
Got it on arrival to the hotel. I was also able to get Diana Bacalar to
help out with 3 days of guiding in and around Bogota. Elkin Rodriguez, a
Birdingpal, also agreed to one day of help 
in the city. Both Elkin and Diana are great spirits to be around and we
did quite well at Sumipaz, La Florida, Montserrate, San Francisco, the
Botanical Gardens and La Vega. Did not get 
to go to Chingaza, as Diana thought we could get many of the same
species at Sumipaz.
Bogota is so choked with traffic that the independent birder will have
to have their wiles about them to get to the sites. I would recommend
not trying to drive in the city. Buses and taxis are 
a possibility. Possible to use taxis in city for La Florida (Bogota
Rail, Apolinarse Wren site), Montserrate (worth a visit for some of the
birds and a great view of the city) and the Botanical 
Gardens (nice place, but not a must). Could also hire a taxi to get to
San Francisco (hummingbird feeders), and La Vega, both about an hour and
a half away and very worthwhile.
Sumipaz possible with a taxi. All sites would depend on how well you
know the birds and their songs in S.A. Without playback many of the
sought after birds will be really difficult. 
>From Bogota headed by bus to Pareira. A 6 hour trip that turned into 10
hours. It typified my experience pretty much throughout Columbia. Only
take buses if you have the extra time or 
are looking for places to save money. At the bus terminal in Pereira on
my way out of town to Manizales, I was sold a ticket for a bus that was
supposed to leave in 20 minutes The bus never even showed 
up. After asking often I was finally refunded my money about an hour
later.   Did not meet many non-cooperative people in Columbia, though
many were workers at the bus terminals. I did 
run into the taxi drivers who tried to overcharge. Pretty much like
anywhere else in the world. Flights your best bets. Reasonably priced
overall. 
Before you get to Pereira might be best to call Jimmy at Otun Quimbaya
to get a taxi to pick you up at the terminal.  The ride which is 15
kilometers is on a rough road. Loved staying at Otun. Birded on my own. 
I was the only guest and got to know Jimmy (a great character) and also
one of the other workers there. Both knowledgeable birders and fun to
hang around with. The fruiting trees in the garden 
held many good birds. Be careful of chiggers in the tall grass.
Columbian and Tropical Screech Owls seen in the garden area.The road as
you head out to the right also well worth spending time birding. 
The trails inside Otun not as important according to Jimmy and I would
agree. An Andean Solitaire being the only new bird found inside the
trails. Rode the local bus back to Pereira and that
was an interesting experience. All the local school kids ride that bus
to get to and from school. You could have Jimmy get you a taxi back to
town. Pereira didn't seem like a nice place at all.
Took a mini bus from Pereira to Manizales, the gateway to Rio Blanco.
Manizales is a beautiful place with Mobius strip like roads that climb
up the mountain to the center of town. Sort of like the 
roads in San Francisco US, but even more so. Great place to spend an
evening if the time is available. Selene at Rio Blanco gave me the
number of a taxi and off I went early the next morning. At Rio Blanco 
you cannot go alone on the road to the Antpitta feeding areas. This
ended up being a problem as the local guide (Selene's daughter) who I
had been told would take me that day, was already engaged 
with another birding group. So now I was restricted to birding around
the lodge. Again luck was on my side as the group from Newcastle invited
me to join them for the rest of the day. So nice 
to meet these lads and their guide Johnny. Saved what could have been a
wasted day. Rio Blanco is a little rough around the edges, but with the
chance of seeing 4 Antpittas in one day you pretty much must go there. 
Another minibus ride took me to Medallin (pronounced Med a jeen). Liked
it here a lot. Great metro system that takes you pretty much everywhere.
If you go on the metro,to the it is important to note that the gondolas 
to Santo Domingo don't leave until 9 in the morning. When you get to the
top the one walk that would get you into primary forest does not leave
until 11. Takes about 4-5 hours to cover the 5 kilometers you will walk. 
Only one guide is knowledgeable about birds, so aim to go on his trip.
The Botanical Gardens in town hold some nice birds as well. These are
easily visited from a metro stop.
Flew on to Cartagena. Not much birding to do around town, in that
species can easily be seen elsewhere. But it is a spectacular place to
see. It was my intention to head to Baranquilla for Isla Salamanca, but
the Carnival had just started and it was going to be a zoo. So on to the
Mecca of the trip: Santa Marta. 
No guide lined up for the 5 days in the area posed a daunting challenge.
Impossible to get up to the towers without a 4 wheel drive vehicle.
Could get to Minca, but from there who knew what would happen. 
Not really my style of birding. But,again good luck interceded. An email
I had sent to another local birdingpal was answered and now 4 out of the
5 days were covered. Great time in a very magnificent place. 
Two nights around Minca (nice Hotel Minca) and three at Palo Alto.
Another spot where I was the only person staying there. So beautiful.
Nights of many stars and incredible views all the way south to
Baranquilla. Birding was superb. 
Great guiding by the ethically minded Sebastian made for a memorable
time in a place that hopefully will not be overrun by people putting too
much pressure on the birds. What a grand way to end the trip.
Thanks for all the help from Diana, Elkin, Jimmy and especially
Sebastian who came through in a pinch. And to all of you who sent me
information about Columbia. A trip report from Dick Meijer and Peter 
Van Scheepen helped me immeasurably in forming the backbone of the trip.
Easy to say at this point that it makes great sense to get yourself a
guide and have them cover the logistics, but for an individual 
that will be very pricey. The cost of getting a vehicle, guides,
flights, food, etc. runs steep. I feel tremendously fortunate to be able
to have traveled given the constraints that were present. Due to these
constraints 
it was difficult to almost impossible to get into certain areas. I just
had to let that go. Could have easy struck out a few, or possibly many,
times during the trip.  But if anything my hopes were raised by the
goodness 
of the people I encountered. .
As usual I'll skip the list of birds. They are many excellent trip
reports that have already covered the same ground.  It is always my
intention to create a possible vehicle for helping people to try to set
up their own journey.
Let me know if I can be of any more help in that respect. 
Columbia felt very safe. Really enjoyed my time there.
All the best
 

 
-- 
  barry Levine
  Seattle, Wa. US
  levineb AT fastmail.fm

-- 
http://www.fastmail.com - Email service worth paying for. Try it for free

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters AT u.washington.edu
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Subject: RFI: Bird Calls/Songs for Android
From: Hank Pfeifer <hcpfeifer AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 18:06:05 -0500
A friend is looking for an app for birdsongs on an Android. I would
appreciate any information or tips.



Thanks,



Hank Pfeifer

Harbor Springs, MI


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI Bell's Sparrow
From: OC <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 10:22:49 -0800
All,

We're hoping to hear/see Bell's Sparrow around San Bernardino, CA today or 
tomorrow. Any ideas of reliable places to search? 


Thanks for suggestions!

Oscar Canino
oscarboy AT gmail.com
SF, CA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of March 1, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 07:17:43 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the new video with Clemson's Dr. Drew Lanham,
"Rules for the Black Birdwatcher" -
http://youtu.be/4thb2zGuOnU
_____________________

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Snowy Owls Are Here - With Gerrit Vyn of Cornell
http://bit.ly/1o2NBr6
* Bird Tracks in the Snow - A story without words
http://bit.ly/17EXtmN
* Wood Storks and Climate Change
http://bit.ly/1E1gUCz
* February - Summer in Argentina
http://bit.ly/1EyrnWV
* Flocking and Foraging, Safety in Numbers
http://bit.ly/1DjZnSi
* Ravens' Love Song
http://bit.ly/1BoJei2
* Regal Great Blue Heron
http://bit.ly/1vI3oCw
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1E1hksP
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Hearing Aids, birding and honeybees
From: Mike Mulligan <potoo AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:40:29 -0700
I've worn hearing aids for 7 or 8 years, Chuck, and have never noticed their
attracting bees. However once in Central America I swung around and my scope
accidently struck a low bee nest. I can tell you that stings on the ears can
be extremely painful!

Mike Mulligan
Calgary, Alberta

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Chuck & Lillian" 
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 11:44 AM
To: 
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Hearing Aids, birding and honeybees

> Birders:
>
> A year or two ago I wrote a longish comment about birding with
> hearing aids and received a number of appreciative comments and queries.
>
> I have two additions, and a request:
> 1. When I bird I always wear a hat with a 2-3" brim which sits just
> over the ears. Because it is close to the aid sound pickup, it seems
> to reflect sound back to the unit. At higher volumes, this causes a
> high pitched tinny feedback, especially when I'm using "birding
> mode". So I either take the hat off, turn down the volume or change the
> mode.
>
> 2. Honeybees seem to not like my hearing aids (mini-behind-the-ear).
> I have been attacked 3 times and stung twice. I think they can hear
> some high frequency output which humans can't hear, as they make a
> bee-line (pun intended) to my ears, at which point I start flailing
> at them to keep from being stung there (which I think would be
> especially painful.) Bees other than honeybee don't seem to care,
> except perhaps for big black bumblebees, perhaps because they are far
> less territorially defensive.
>
> Question: Has anyone ever heard of this or experienced a similar problem?
>
> Chuck Almdale
> North Hills, Ca.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hearing Aids, birding and honeybees
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:44:34 -0800
Birders:

A year or two ago I wrote a longish comment about birding with
hearing aids and received a number of appreciative comments and queries.

I have two additions, and a request:
1. When I bird I always wear a hat with a 2-3" brim which sits just
over the ears. Because it is close to the aid sound pickup, it seems
to reflect sound back to the unit. At higher volumes, this causes a
high pitched tinny feedback, especially when I'm using "birding
mode". So I either take the hat off, turn down the volume or change the mode.

2. Honeybees seem to not like my hearing aids (mini-behind-the-ear).
I have been attacked 3 times and stung twice. I think they can hear
some high frequency output which humans can't hear, as they make a
bee-line (pun intended) to my ears, at which point I start flailing
at them to keep from being stung there (which I think would be
especially painful.) Bees other than honeybee don't seem to care,
except perhaps for big black bumblebees, perhaps because they are far
less territorially defensive.

Question: Has anyone ever heard of this or experienced a similar problem?

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Interesting Cardinal photo: Female or a juvenile?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:58:43 -0500
Adult female. Young would have black or dark beak and a grayer-shade of 
brown/tan. 



Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: February-27-15 2:30 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Interesting Cardinal photo: Female or a juvenile?

Is this a female Northern Cardinal, or a juvenile? I'm leaning towards adult 
female: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16018800784/

Thanks in advance!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Interesting Cardinal photo: Female or a juvenile?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:29:42 -0500
Is this a female Northern Cardinal, or a juvenile? I'm leaning towards
adult female:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16018800784/

Thanks in advance!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Odd Couple :-) (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:38:39 -0500
Male Red-bellied Woodpecker and female Northern Cardinal:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16453485778/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: Stress
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:53:15 -0500
Al,

Have you read "Why Birds Sing?", by David Rothenberg? In one chapter an 
experiment to discover how the neurons in a bird's brain (6 Starlings) respond 
to specific pure tones and whistles, "necessitated" freezing, then slicing 
their brains into layers 50 microns thin, in order to see this relationship. A 
lot of nasty things are done in the name of science. Whose to judge what falls 
within the realm of justifiable research? 


All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario

birding AT aol.com
www.birdsongidentification.com


-----Original Message-----
From: Al Schirmacher 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 8:03 am
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Stress


An ignorant photographer or rookie birder stresses a bird, and he/she is
denounced.

Out of scientific curiosity, an ornithologist withdraws a male
from feeding a female, inadvertently causing nest failure, publishes such
nationally, and I've seen no criticism (of course, I may have missed it, but I
do subscribe to a significant number of Facebook sites and listservs).

What
am I missing?

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS
(formerly Madison, WI)


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



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Subject: Re: Stress
From: "Tangren, Gerald Vernon" <tangren AT WSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 16:27:17 +0000
This thread does remind me of a study a few decades back when a researcher
put additional young into the next of a polygynous species; I think it was
a Bobolink. The researcher was able to document the male spent more time
helping his mate than he would have otherwise. The results shed a lot of
light on the trade-offs polygynous males may make in their behavior to
produce an optimal number of offspring.

Jerry 

>

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Subject: Re: Stress
From: Marcel Gahbauer <marcel AT MIGRATIONRESEARCH.ORG>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:34:20 +0000
I believe Eric has summarized the situation very well. I would just add that 
while I'm not familiar with the study that prompted the question, academic 
research on wildlife generally requires pre-approval of an Animal Care 
Committee - and all of the ones I've dealt with (at both institutional and 
provincial levels) have been rigorous with respect to ethical considerations, 
and demanding exploration of alternatives that would reduce potential effects 
on individuals or populations being studies. Like in any group, some will bend 
or break the rules - but on the whole, researchers are likely to take 
implications of their work into much greater consideration than others 
(including, admittedly, a selfish aspect, in that any negative consequences of 
their activities could bias the results of their studies). 


Marcel Gahbauer
Ottawa ON

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Subject: Re: Stress
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:51:43 -0500
Al

Without suggesting that ends necessarily justify the means, I do think there is 
some balancing that goes on. I don't suppose the ornithologist is doing this 
for no good reason -- if so he is no different than the photographer/rookie. 
More likely, he/she is doing so to learn something about birds, perhaps for the 
ultimate benefit of conservation. 


This does not mean ornithologists are free from controversy. Certainly there is 
a divergence of opinion about the taking of specimens. And an ornithologist who 
did what you suggest to a rare/threatened bird would be subject to criticism 
unless there was a substantial benefit involved. 


Also, there are a heck of a lot more birders/photographers than ornithologists. 
If birders/photographers do not follow an appropriate code of ethics the result 
could be quite significant. While I might think that sometimes the 
denunciations are a bit over the top, especially when applied to fledgling 
birders who should be taught rather than chastised, it is important to maintain 
some reasonable rules. It is sort of like the difference between 100 people 
touching Stonehenge and millions. 


I assume that there is some written or unwritten code of conduct among 
ornithologists, and I would hope that they make efforts to police themselves. 


Best regards,

Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA


-----Original Message-----
From: Al Schirmacher 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Feb 26, 2015 8:03 am
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Stress


An ignorant photographer or rookie birder stresses a bird, and he/she is
denounced.

Out of scientific curiosity, an ornithologist withdraws a male
from feeding a female, inadvertently causing nest failure, publishes such
nationally, and I've seen no criticism (of course, I may have missed it, but I
do subscribe to a significant number of Facebook sites and listservs).

What
am I missing?

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS
(formerly Madison, WI)


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Stress
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 06:59:58 -0600
An ignorant photographer or rookie birder stresses a bird, and he/she is 
denounced. 


Out of scientific curiosity, an ornithologist withdraws a male from feeding a 
female, inadvertently causing nest failure, publishes such nationally, and I've 
seen no criticism (of course, I may have missed it, but I do subscribe to a 
significant number of Facebook sites and listservs). 


What am I missing?

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS
(formerly Madison, WI)
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Beautiful Dozing Dove (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:45:42 -0500
This Mourning Dove was napping in the warm-ish afternoon New Jersey
sunlight today. Feathers are puffed up to keep in the warmth. Love the blue
eyelids closed in sleep! And I'd never noticed the blue-ish belly feathers
before:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16645926201/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Glass bird ID follow-up
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 08:09:22 -0500
I've been following this thread and if I may:

I don't think I'd try too hard to assign an actual species to what is a very 
decorative (and very lovely, IMHO) piece. Artists who are not of an 
ornithological bent often, in my experience, artistically distort a basic bird 
shape, based on faulty memory, or perhaps various images of various species, to 
create something that is only vaguely like any given species, and in this case 
it could as well be a Great Tit or Barn Swallow as an Eastern Bluebird. 


And in naming such objects, often it is a matter of picking a name that fits 
the art...it's a bird, it's blue, ergo, bluebird. 


Or it may simply be a name that is familiar or picked out from some 
source....not only the classic Vera Lynn song (which stirs me, a post WWII 
boomer who grew up in the aftermath of the conflict and its effect on my family 
here in Canada, to this day) but remember that hit from several decades ago, 
"In an English Country Garden" where an obviously American lyricist employed 
the names of several North American bird species, such as a Bobolink, that 
would never be found in an English country, or probably any other, garden. 


Even when the species the artist intends to portray is known, artists who work 
impressionistically, or in response to culturally established styles, often 
create images that, outside of context, are not possible to identify as to 
species. Inuit art often features the Snowy Owl, but if one did not know who 
created the art or from where, one would only guess that it is an owl. (See 
http://canadianart.ca/news/2013/01/08/kenojuak-ashevak/ for one of the most 
iconic images in all Canadian art...but how on earth would you know what kind 
of owl it was if you didn't know its origin). 


The features that distinguish one bird species from another are, well, 
specific. Thus, without the right beak shape, tail length, wing extension, or 
indeed, anything at all that is species-specific, without knowing what the 
artist intended to be, you'll never be able to tell the species. 


That in no way detracts from its value or its attractiveness. In fact, I have 
seen variants of this form often...and sometimes I have seen china figurines of 
similar shape, but coloured in ways that did give a clue to species, and 
obviously the artist was looking at that species, probably a photo or painting, 
when deciding, if not with great accuracy, what colours to use. Cartoonists 
sometimes do that, as well (Mutts, Calvin and Hobbs, a few others actually show 
cartoonish images that can be identified as to species, while still done in the 
style of the cartoon). 


Even artists who try to do more "realistic" birds sometimes get asked by 
non-birders how we decide what colour to use...as if the questioner was not 
aware that colour and pattern are species specific, or told something like, 
"That would look nicer if you made the white part yellow". Nobody asks a 
portraitist how she or he decided on eye colour or skin colour of the 
subject. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of John Arnfield 

Sent: February-25-15 4:37 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Glass bird ID follow-up

There is a slant on this that may have been overlooked as a result of the 
discussion being North America-based. The term "bluebird" was used colloquially 
in my youth (I am 70) in Britain to denote the Barn Swallow. Here are two links 
that illustrate this usage, one for Bluebird Toffees and one for Bluebird 
Coaches. 


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Bird_Toffee (look at the tin shown)

http://www.thebluebirdcoach.com/ (look at the logo on the front and back of the 
coach) 


The classic wartime Vera Lynn song ("There'll be bluebirds over / the White 
Cliffs of Dover /" etc) is also popularly interpreted to be referring the Barn 
Swallows, even though the song was, I believe, written by an American. (We do 
not have Bluebirds in Europe.) 


That being said, the glass figurine does not really look like a swallow either, 
although it does look more like a swallow than a bluebird (especially the head, 
beak and wings), albeit a short, squashed up version. (I cannot see from the 
photograph whether the tail is forked.) 


Nevertheless (and especially if the name was attached to the figurine after it 
was originally conceived), this discussion might all be wasted effort - the 
bird depicted might be just a generic, schematic creature. 


Incidentally, I have not heard the term "bluebird" used to refer to a swallow 
since the late 1950s here in the UK so I think it is no longer used in this 
way. I suspect that it might have been the Vera Lynn song that was responsible, 
in fact, likening the springtime return of the Barn Swallow from Africa to the 
dawning of a better time after WWII in Europe. 


Just another slant on the discussion - probably not helpful but fun!

John


On 25/02/2015 01:35, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> Many people have told me that the glass figurine in my photo is the
> classic "Bluebird of Happiness" figurine. Turns out this particular
> piece was done by the original creator (Leo Ward) in 1990 (signed and
> dated on the bottom). Not worth a fortune, but it's good to know the 
background... 

>
> Knowing the background of this piece doesn't really answer my initial
> question, though. While the figurine is blue and bird-shaped, it
> doesn't look like a bluebird. And from what I've read, Leo Ward didn't
> think of it as a bluebird when he created it (a salesman suggested the
> "Bluebird of Happiness" name after the fact). I still think it looks
> like a Chickadee or Tit. Here's a black and white photo of my figurine:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16639574275/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

--
===============================================
John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Glass bird ID follow-up
From: John Arnfield <arnfield.2 AT OSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 09:37:06 +0000
There is a slant on this that may have been overlooked as a result of
the discussion being North America-based.  The term "bluebird" was used
colloquially in my youth (I am 70) in Britain to denote the Barn
Swallow.  Here are two links that illustrate this usage, one for
Bluebird Toffees and one for Bluebird Coaches.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Bird_Toffee (look at the tin shown)

http://www.thebluebirdcoach.com/ (look at the logo on the front and back
of the coach)

The classic wartime Vera Lynn song ("There'll be bluebirds over / the
White Cliffs of Dover /" etc) is also popularly interpreted to be
referring the Barn Swallows, even though the song was, I believe,
written by an American.  (We do not have Bluebirds in Europe.)

That being said, the glass figurine does not really look like a swallow
either, although it does look more like a swallow than a bluebird
(especially the head, beak and wings), albeit a short, squashed up
version.  (I cannot see from the photograph whether the tail is forked.)

Nevertheless (and especially if the name was attached to the figurine
after it was originally conceived), this discussion might all be wasted
effort - the bird depicted might be just a generic, schematic creature.

Incidentally, I have not heard the term "bluebird" used to refer to a
swallow since the late 1950s here in the UK so I think it is no longer
used in this way.  I suspect that it might have been the Vera Lynn song
that was responsible, in fact, likening the springtime return of the
Barn Swallow from Africa to the dawning of a better time after WWII in
Europe.

Just another slant on the discussion - probably not helpful but fun!

John


On 25/02/2015 01:35, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> Many people have told me that the glass figurine in my photo is the classic
> "Bluebird of Happiness" figurine. Turns out this particular piece was done
> by the original creator (Leo Ward) in 1990 (signed and dated on the
> bottom). Not worth a fortune, but it's good to know the background...
>
> Knowing the background of this piece doesn't really answer my initial
> question, though. While the figurine is blue and bird-shaped, it doesn't
> look like a bluebird. And from what I've read, Leo Ward didn't think of it
> as a bluebird when he created it (a salesman suggested the "Bluebird of
> Happiness" name after the fact). I still think it looks like a Chickadee or
> Tit. Here's a black and white photo of my figurine:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16639574275/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

--
===============================================
John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Glass bird ID follow-up
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 20:35:40 -0500
Many people have told me that the glass figurine in my photo is the classic
"Bluebird of Happiness" figurine. Turns out this particular piece was done
by the original creator (Leo Ward) in 1990 (signed and dated on the
bottom). Not worth a fortune, but it's good to know the background...

Knowing the background of this piece doesn't really answer my initial
question, though. While the figurine is blue and bird-shaped, it doesn't
look like a bluebird. And from what I've read, Leo Ward didn't think of it
as a bluebird when he created it (a salesman suggested the "Bluebird of
Happiness" name after the fact). I still think it looks like a Chickadee or
Tit. Here's a black and white photo of my figurine:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16639574275/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Glass bird ID
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 13:55:51 -0700
That is the classic "Bluebird of Happiness," so named by the
manufacturer and merchant.

We buy them by the half-dozen, and hand them out as "Thank You"
presents, house warmers, etc. . . .

Jerry


>I've had this blue glass bird figurine for ages and have never given much
>thought to what species it might be, until today.

Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

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Subject: Admin: E-mail address changes
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 15:18:27 -0500
Geoff, Phil, and everyone:

A reminder --for a simple address change, you never have to wait -- just ask. 
We'll even make the change for you. Be sure to include both old and new 
addresses. Just shoot an email to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 
 and let us know. Use this address 
for any questions about your subscription, one or the other of us (Chuck, Dave, 
or I) will take care of it. 


best, 

Laurie Larson
Birdchat co-listowner


> On Feb 24, 2015, at 1:57 PM, Phil Davis  wrote:
> 
> Hi Chatters:
> 
> FYI ... From Geoff Williamson ... Thanks, Geoff!
> 
> Phil
> 
>> Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 18:52:34 -0600
>> Subject: Re: Rejected posting to BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> From: Geoffrey Williamson 
>> To: pdavis AT ix.netcom.com, dmark AT buffalo.edu
>> 
>> Hi David and Phil:
>> 
>> My post in reply was just rejected (I've changed emails recently and
>> so am in the two week waiting period for posting), but here it is.
>> 
>> I suggested to take a look at
>> 
>> http://darwiniana.org/zoo/AOUmenu.htm
>> 
>> This may have some of what you are looking for. It is at the
>> checklist level, rather than supplement level, though.
>> 
>> Best,
>> Geoff Williamson
>> --
>> Geoff Williamson
>> geoffrey.williamson.21 AT gmail.com
> 
> ===================================================
> Phil Davis, Secretary
> MD/DC Records Committee
> 2549 Vale Court
> Davidsonville, Maryland  21035     USA
> 301-261-0184
> mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
> 
> MD/DCRC Web site:  http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html
> ===================================================
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


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Subject: Re: RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s?
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 13:57:22 -0500
Hi Chatters:

FYI ... From Geoff Williamson ... Thanks, Geoff!

Phil

>Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 18:52:34 -0600
>Subject: Re: Rejected posting to BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>From: Geoffrey Williamson 
>To: pdavis AT ix.netcom.com, dmark AT buffalo.edu
>
>Hi David and Phil:
>
>My post in reply was just rejected (I've changed emails recently and
>so am in the two week waiting period for posting), but here it is.
>
>I suggested to take a look at
>
>http://darwiniana.org/zoo/AOUmenu.htm
>
>This may have some of what you are looking for. It is at the
>checklist level, rather than supplement level, though.
>
>Best,
>Geoff Williamson
>--
>Geoff Williamson
>geoffrey.williamson.21 AT gmail.com

===================================================
Phil Davis, Secretary
MD/DC Records Committee
2549 Vale Court
Davidsonville, Maryland  21035     USA
301-261-0184
mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com

MD/DCRC Web site:  http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html
===================================================

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Subject: Re: RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s?
From: Andy Mabbett <andy AT PIGSONTHEWING.ORG.UK>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 08:56:41 +0000
That would make a good Wikipedia article, if you feel inclined. Otherwise,
please make your final document available so that someone else may start
one.
On Feb 24, 2015 12:10 AM, "Phil Davis"  wrote:

> Hey David:
>
> Funny, just this afternoon, I was looking at the same thing for some
> research for the MD/DC Records Committee.
>
> I will privately email you a work in progress, based on Denis
> LePage's Avibase web site ...
>
>         http://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/avibase.jsp?lang=EN&pg=home
>
> I have just identified the splits and lumps, so far, but not the
> years or AOU Supplements that made them effective. I was going to
> manually dig up that data.
>
> Perhaps someone already has a more mature product than what I am preparing
> ...
>
> Phil
>
>
>
> At 18:03 02/23/2015, dmark wrote:
>
>> Hello!
>>
>> Can anyone direct me to a good source of information on the DATES
>> (years) for all the lumps and splits of North American (ABA-area)
>> species since the 1960s?
>>
>> After searching using Google, and not finding anything, I have
>> started compiling such a list. I have found years for 37 of the
>> taxonomic changes but am still looking for dates for the other 62.
>>
>> Any suggestions?
>>
>
> ===================================================
> Phil Davis, Secretary
> MD/DC Records Committee
> 2549 Vale Court
> Davidsonville, Maryland  21035     USA
> 301-261-0184
> mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
>
> MD/DCRC Web site:  http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html
> ===================================================
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Glass bird ID?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 20:27:27 -0500
I've had this blue glass bird figurine for ages and have never given much
thought to what species it might be, until today. The sun was shining
through the window in such a way that it back lit the figurine and
highlighted features I hadn't noticed before. I'd previously thought it was
supposed to be some sort of generic "bluebird", but now I'm thinking that
it is supposed to be some sort of Chickadee or Tit species:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16007218184/

Thanks in advance!!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s?
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:10:22 -0500
Hey David:

Funny, just this afternoon, I was looking at the same thing for some
research for the MD/DC Records Committee.

I will privately email you a work in progress, based on Denis
LePage's Avibase web site ...

         http://avibase.bsc-eoc.org/avibase.jsp?lang=EN&pg=home

I have just identified the splits and lumps, so far, but not the
years or AOU Supplements that made them effective. I was going to
manually dig up that data.

Perhaps someone already has a more mature product than what I am preparing ...

Phil



At 18:03 02/23/2015, dmark wrote:
>Hello!
>
>Can anyone direct me to a good source of information on the DATES
>(years) for all the lumps and splits of North American (ABA-area)
>species since the 1960s?
>
>After searching using Google, and not finding anything, I have
>started compiling such a list. I have found years for 37 of the
>taxonomic changes but am still looking for dates for the other 62.
>
>Any suggestions?

===================================================
Phil Davis, Secretary
MD/DC Records Committee
2549 Vale Court
Davidsonville, Maryland  21035     USA
301-261-0184
mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com

MD/DCRC Web site:  http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html
===================================================

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Subject: RFI: Bird lumps and splits since 1960s?
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 18:03:57 -0500
Hello!

Can anyone direct me to a good source of information on the DATES
(years)
for all the lumps and splits of North American (ABA-area) species since
the 1960s?

After searching using Google, and not finding anything, I have started
compiling such a list. I have found years for 37 of the taxonomic
changes
but am still looking for dates for the other 62.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance,

David Mark
dmark AT buffalo.edu
Amherst, NY

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Subject: Pacific Wren - Winter Wren
From: Katharine Mills <gkmills AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 19:59:21 -0500
Hi Chatters,
   So it seems like I am  way behind in updates on splits. I am going
through my 6th edition of National Geographic and it appears that
Pacific Wren has been split from winter wren.  Is this correct? If so
the "winter wrens" that I saw in Washington state and Alaska are Pacific
Wren. Looking for a confirmation on this.
Thanks!
Kathy Mills
Holden, MA

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 22, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 08:32:53 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the latest blog, Parrots and Falcons, Long-lost Cousins, by
Kim Bostwick. http://bit.ly/1Av7QUi
-----------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Beak Meets Seed
http://bit.ly/1AtCAoy
* Bald Eagle, National Symbol
http://bit.ly/1w7vVSt
* Hope for the Alala - The Hawaiian Crow
http://bit.ly/1vQWJRl
* Interview with Gerrit Vyn
http://bit.ly/1AZsvBH
* Where Are All the Queen Birds?
http://bit.ly/1zud8g4
* American Kestrel
http://bit.ly/Vnm3BT
* BirdNote at Ten Years
http://bit.ly/1JwqbHK
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/18aly5R
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Hilton Pond 02/01/15 (30,000 WinterFinches)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 07:45:16 -0500
In commemoration of banding our 30,000th "winter finch" at the Center, I 
devoted my 1-14 February 2015 installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond" to 
images, identification tips, and trends appropriate to four species that show 
up at feeders when the weather gets cold. To view the latest photo essay, 
please visit 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150201.html 
 


While there, don’t forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded and 
recaptured during the period, along with miscellaneous nature notes from the 
first half of February. 


Happy (Midwinter) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================



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Subject: Very chilly-looking heron (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 15:08:03 -0500
This Great Blue Heron managed to find pretty much the only wade-able open
water in Johnson Park in Piscataway, NJ. Spillway from a park pond.
Everything else was pretty much frozen solid, including the nearby Raritan
River:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16396068710/

Temps are getting below zero tonight, with wind chills of 20 below, so I
imagine even these small rivulets of open water will freeze up...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Birding on Manu Road, Peru in May
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 11:41:20 -0800
BirdChat community,

Three of us are heading down to Peru from May 21-31 (11 days) for
some intensive birding with an emphasis on seeing many of the endemic birds
along the Manu Road    We are looking for one other traveler.  If
interested, please contact Phil Hansbro (contact information below)

From Phil:

I am planning on 11 days in Peru between 21-31st May going down the Manu
road. This is a good length of time to do it properly. If anyone is
interested in coming along on a cost share basis? 4 people would be good.
We will do it as cheap as we can, have a great guide, etc. Please contact
me offline if you are interested. Philip dot Hansbro at newcastle dot edu
dot au

Will be a great trip.

Thanks
Phil

--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com

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Subject: The many colors of a Mourning Dove (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 15:29:36 -0500
If you are like me, you look out the window and see Mourning Doves and
think "gray birds". But there is really more to them color-wise. Black,
white, yellow, light blue, dark blue, brown, buff, ochre, etc.

Here's a photo I took the other day through my living room window:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16387289529/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo)
From: Chuck Carlson <chuckcmt AT NEMONT.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 19:30:59 -0700
Bernie

Several years ago I decided on a binomial name for those grocery sack Snowy
Owls. The genus is Bubo (as in Snowy Owl) and the species name is baggins.
Thus (Bubo baggins)  :-)

Chuck Carlson
Ft. Peck, MT

-----Original Message-----
From: B.G. Sloan
Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2015 1:18 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo)

After several months this winter mistaking white plastic grocery store bags
for Snowy Owls I finally thought I'd found one today. Looked realistic from
a distance. Size and shape and color looked good. Two "eyes" and what
looked like a bill. Wasn't until I looked at photos later that realized it
was a tree root covered by freshly fallen snow.  :-)  Check out the center
of this photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15940524954/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo)
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 15:35:43 -0500
Looks pretty good Bernie. Are you giving it a checkmark?
 
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
 
birding AT aol.com
www.birdsongidentification.com
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: B.G. Sloan 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, Feb 17, 2015 3:20 pm
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo)


After several months this winter mistaking white plastic grocery store bags
for Snowy Owls I finally thought I'd found one today. Looked realistic from
a distance. Size and shape and color looked good. Two "eyes" and what
looked like a bill. Wasn't until I looked at photos later that realized it
was a tree root covered by freshly fallen snow.  :-)  Check out the center
of this photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15940524954/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Hoary Redpoll Question
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 14:22:05 -0600
   Thanks to everyone who responded to my question about the redpolls
I saw at Sax-Zim this weekend. The consensus was yes on Hoary and I
learned a ton about ID. You guys are the best!

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Hoary Redpoll Question
From: "R.D. Everhart via Mnbird" <mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 14:22:05 -0600
   Thanks to everyone who responded to my question about the redpolls
I saw at Sax-Zim this weekend. The consensus was yes on Hoary and I
learned a ton about ID. You guys are the best!

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN



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Subject: NOT a Snowy Owl :-) (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 15:18:19 -0500
After several months this winter mistaking white plastic grocery store bags
for Snowy Owls I finally thought I'd found one today. Looked realistic from
a distance. Size and shape and color looked good. Two "eyes" and what
looked like a bill. Wasn't until I looked at photos later that realized it
was a tree root covered by freshly fallen snow.  :-)  Check out the center
of this photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15940524954/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: FW: Venezuela 2
From: Vader Willem Jan Marinus <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 10:43:13 +0000
Dear all

 Here is a short report on my latest birding tour. This time it was a VENT-tour 
to Venezuela, billed as 'an easy and relaxed tour' and led by the Venezuelan 
David Ascanio. This was a short tour, only a little more than a week, with 
basically only two places, Casa Maria in 2 nights and Hato Piero in 4, in 
addition we spent the first and last night in two different hotels in Caracas, 
and as almost always when there is jet lag involved, I arrived one day early in 
Caracas. The group consisted of 8 people, all exept me Americans, plus leader 
David Ascanio, and his 'samboer', young Desiree Starke. 


 David Ascanio, the guide (48 this week) was altogether excellent, both as a 
bird guide, as well as as guide to understand his country, which he clearly 
loved dearly and which is in considerable trouble nowadays. He told very openly 
and in detail about that; he disagreed with the present government (Maduro is a 
follower of the late Chavez, but without his charisma),but also thought that 
the present opposition had little to commend them. Chavez is still present in 
lots of billboards (hardly any of Madura), and everything is 'Bolivarian', from 
the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela' to the 'Bolivarian' police and buses. 
There are surprisingly many well-armed soldiers along the roads (usually two at 
a time), but not all that many checkpoints and our bus was in addition waved 
through at most of them. Venezuela has 26 million inhabitants, of which far 
more than half live in the five largest cities (all near the coast) and 7 
million in Caracas alone. That city is considered very dangerous and 
crime-ridden, but we noticed that only indirectly: when we the first day walked 
from the hotel to a nearby park (with macaws) David collected all ur field 
glasses in his backpack until we were in the park proper. Caracas is also a 
place where the traffic is almost constantly gridlocked, while the drivers try 
to get on every which way, never mind rules or traffic lights. The reason for 
the vast amount of cars on the road (with hordes of light motorcycles weaving 
among all the cars) is that petrol is almost free: David told me that he could 
drive a whole year for a few dollars, and when I was with a guy who filled his 
tank, I saw he paid the equivalent of 4 or 5 cents for a whole tank! The 
government had decided 17 years ago to make the petrol cheap, in order to help 
the poor, and since then the price had remained constant, even though there had 
been heavy inflation of the bolivar, now ca 100 to a dollar. We traveled in a 
roomy bus, about 3 hours to Casa Maria, another 4 hours to Hato Piero and ca 8 
hrs back from there to Caracas. 



 I arrived in Caracas in the late afternoon, and was brought to a hotel in 
between many skyscrapers, a room on the 13th floor. When I looked out of the 
window, I was surprised to see many large macaws on a neighbouring roof. These 
were Blue-and-yellow Macaws, which I had first seen a few months ago in the 
Pantanal in Brazil. Here it turns out that they have been introduced. But the 
next morning, from the roof restaurant, we also saw some smaller macaws, 
Chestnut-fronted, fly over and these are indigenous and also life birds for me. 
David had offered an extra tour to me, and Richard and Regina, and this was up 
the steep sides of the Coastal cordillera, to about 2500m a.s.l.; these 
hillsides are entirely forested and constitute El Avila NP. The area turned out 
quite birdy and we had a fruitful day. As usual here tanagers were much to the 
fore, as were N. American migrant warblers. there were thrushes and vireos, 
various tyrants, among them the Venezuelan Tyrant, and as more spectacular 
elements an antpitta, a fruiteater, and the colourful and impressive 
Chestnut-capped Brush Finch, all birds we did not see later on the trip, when 
we never were at the same height. 




 That day the rest of the group arrived, and the next morning our roomy bus 
brought us to our next destination, Casa Maria, again in the Coastal 
Cordillera, but at 1500m. Here it was often foggy or even drizzly, and less hot 
that elsewhere in Venezuela. This turned out to be an extremely hospitable 
'home away from home'. The owners, Germans Norbert and Gaby, with their adopted 
Yanomame Indian daughter, had made the place into a veritable little paradise 
(Norbert is very big on reforestation, among his many other passions). There 
were small chalets several places on the grounds (but I had a room high up in 
the main building), and there were various pets: Three frisky but friendly 
dogs, several Peacocks, a magnificent Yellow-knobbed Curassow, who whistled his 
'falling-bomb' whistle all day (poor guy must have been lonely), and also a 
parrot. Also the wild chachalacas were so tame that they ate bananas from 
Norbert's hand. Gaby delighted in cooking and trying out new things (the hosts 
ate with us), and she i.a. had also concocted new jams from the local fruits. 
In the garden there was a.o. a gauze contraption with a very strong light 
inside, built to attract insects (Norbert is primarily an entomologist), but 
which also attracted birds in the early morning, feeding on these insects. Here 
we saw several woodcreepers and tanagers, as well as various flycatchers. Walks 
through the forest, here and a few hundred meters higher up, yielded many more 
birds, i.a. an impressive Ornate Hawk Eagle high up in the air, the brilliant 
jacamars, and the funny Groove-billed Toucanets, in addition to various foliage 
gleaners, spinetails and tyrannulets. At the house banana feeders attracted 
colourful tanagers and euphonias, as well as the raucous chachalacas. A very 
special occasion one day was the observation of a 'rolling front' of army ants 
(animals that figured often in my boys' books, but which I had never seen so 
well). David demonstrated courageouly that by standing stock still the ants 
would just move around him, while all around spiders and insects tried in panic 
to flee, in many cases only to be gobbled up by the attending birds 
(woodcreepers, antbirds, Grey-headed Tanager). 




 We were two nights at Casa Maria (including one evening a show of Norbert's 
most impressive 3D macrophotographs), but then reluctantly had to leave and 
drive into the llanos to our final and 4 nights destinaion, Hato Piero. This 
is an enormous cattle ranch, started by a rich man, who wanted to keep it as 
much as possible in its original state (he earned his large amounts of money 
elesewhere), but which a few years after his death has been taken over by the 
government, in Venezuela a somewhat uncertain status. The area must be explored 
by vehicle, because jaguars and pumas do not make it advisable to go there on 
foot, and we did practically all of our birding from an open safari vehicle, 
usually with 3-4 hrs bouts both morning and afternoon, on two days till after 
dark. This is primarily a cattle ranch (Brahma cattle), so there are large 
amounts of grassland, but there is also much dry forest, and narrow fringes of 
woodland along the dirt roads connecting the patches of forest. Parts of all 
this is seasonally flooded in the wet, but now it was extra dry (El Nio year!) 
and there were only smaller and larger lagoons left. When these were in the 
forest, they invariably had numbers of the most peculiar Hoatzins, quite 
prehistoric-looking large lumbering birds. There also always were various 
herons and ibises, Grey-necked Wood Rails, and my particular favourite (and a 
main reason for coming on this trip), the super stylish Sun Bittern. This bird 
turned out to be quite common here (we saw at least ten in the end), but I am 
very happy to be able to report that I found the first one myself! This one 
even threatened a nearby dove with stretching out its sunburst-patterned wings 
suddenly (the dove flew away); the Sun Bitterns invariably walked on the banks 
of the lagoons and streamlets, but never in the water. Another constant feature 
of the lagoons were the large and dozy capybaras; one time we heard them bark 
shrilly in alarm---a sign a jaguar was nearby, said David---, and they all 
retreated to the middle of the lagoon, with only the heads sticking out. 




A large lagoon in more open grassland was framed by hundreds of Black-bellied 
Whistling Ducks (perusal of the flocks unearthed a few White-faced Whistling 
Ducks); here there were also Stilts and even two colourful Large-billed Terns, 
as well as a number of shorebirds and a pair of the queer Horned Screamers, one 
of my many life birds this trip. When we had our picnic dinner here at dusk, 
flocks of radiant Scarlet Ibises flew past, no doubt on their way to a roost, 
accompanied by a single White Ibis and a Roseate Spoonbill (There were many 
species of ibises her, with as the most impressive to me Green Ibises along a 
forest lagoon, glistening green in the sunlight). When dark fell, nightjars and 
nighthawks came out, and we also heard a Great Horned Owl hoot. 




 The facilities at Hato Piero were quite adequate, but with nothing of the 
special care we got at Casa Maria. The rooms had AC, but of an antiquated and 
very loud variety (Fortunately this is one of the few occasions where my 
hearing problems are of help). I had a large rooms with two beds, heavy 
mattresses on stone sockets. One night my bed was invaded by minuscule, but 
somewhat aggressive ants. I moved to the other bed, but was woken up a few 
hours later by being stung repeatedly---the ants had found me also there. In 
the end I took one of the mattresses and put it on the ground in the opposite 
corner, and amazingly , the ants stayed away for the rest of the night. They 
were somehow eradicated the next day by the hosts. 




As I said, we were generally not to come down from the vehicle. One day David 
asked us to come down, in order to try to find the diminutive, but cozy 
White-throated Spadebill. But no sooner had we found our places around him, or 
we heard an ominous growling, the Jaguar! David herded us as quickly as 
possible back onto the vehicle, and nobody got eaten. 




After 4 nights here we returned to Caracas, an 8 hrs drive, and ended the tour 
at still another hotel in town. Many people left for the airport in the 
morning, but Barb, Mary Ellen and me had our flights in the afternoon, and 
David decided to take us birding for a last fling in the vicinity of the 
Ecological Gardens (built around the former house of William Phelps, the grand 
old man of Venezuelan ornithology). While we walked around there---and saw 
still another Brush Finch, the Ochre-breasted--, David happened to meet his old 
friend and mentor Leo, who, it turned out, had access to these gardens (which 
were closed until later in the day). This was a great stroke of luck, as this 
way we got to see a.o. some impressive and heavily visited hummingbird feeders 
and a beautifully reconstructed cloud forest. Later that day I was brought to 
the airport, where I was at first suspected of being one of those Dutch drug 
smugglers, before Desiree succeeded in convincing the Guardia of my innocence 
But it all ended well, and even my suitcase arrived in Odijk with only half a 
day delay. 


 Wim Vader, Troms Museum, 9037 Troms, Norway 


                                                               wim.vader AT uit.no





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Subject: Re: Hoary Redpoll question
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 19:21:33 -0500
The redpoll on the right in the second and third photos is almost certainly
a Hoary by its overall whiteness, almost unmarked undertail coverts, very
lightly marked sides, and the bill appears more obtuse (stubby) in the
second photo than on most Commons. The bird in the top photo and on the left
in the second and third photos may be a Hoary, but we hesitate to call it
one because the photos are slightly overexposed and fewer characters are
visible. Hoaries should be identified on a suite of characters - the more
characters the greater the certainty. Please see link for more information
on identifying Common and Hoary Redpolls and their subspecies.
http://jeaniron.ca/2015/redpollsRP.htm

Ron Pittaway and Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of R.D. Everhart
Sent: Monday, February 16, 2015 4:28 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Hoary Redpoll question

Hey folks -

   I was up in northern Minnesota yesterday and saw what I believe is a
Hoary Redpoll and I'm looking for some input. I have posted the best three
shots that I think will be of use. If anyone has a good feel for this
species please feel free to give an opinion. Of the hundreds of redpolls we
saw yesterday I only saw 2 that I think fit Hoary.

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


  Thanks for the help.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Hoary Redpoll question
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 15:28:15 -0600
Hey folks -

   I was up in northern Minnesota yesterday and saw what I believe is
a Hoary Redpoll and I'm looking for some input. I have posted the
best three shots that I think will be of use. If anyone has a good
feel for this species please feel free to give an opinion. Of the
hundreds of redpolls we saw yesterday I only saw 2 that I think fit
Hoary.

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


  Thanks for the help.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: Hoary Redpoll question
From: "R.D. Everhart via Mnbird" <mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 15:28:15 -0600
Hey folks -

   I was up in northern Minnesota yesterday and saw what I believe is
a Hoary Redpoll and I'm looking for some input. I have posted the
best three shots that I think will be of use. If anyone has a good
feel for this species please feel free to give an opinion. Of the
hundreds of redpolls we saw yesterday I only saw 2 that I think fit
Hoary.

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


  Thanks for the help.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN



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Subject: Suggestions for tours in Brazil to Iguazu falls from Sao Paolo or Rio
From: Rick <rickbking AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2015 13:53:14 -0500
My girlfriend and I will be in Brazil 3/29-4/12. We want to take a 4-5
trip to Iguazu falls, staying in a lodge in the area where we can do
some birding. I'd like a tour with more or less easy birding, because
she's not really a birder but wants to see some nice birds. (For that
matter, I'm way out of practice and will need something easy myself.)

Does anyone have any suggestions for tour companies, guides, etc.? Can
it be done independently with a car?

Thanks for any help!

Rick King
Southfield MI

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 15, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2015 07:24:55 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Here Come the Barred Owls
http://bit.ly/1KWtqUn
* Jacana - Lily-trotter
http://bit.ly/1zetB7Q
* Connecting Habitat to Life Cycle
http://bit.ly/15tpJTK
* Storks and Babies
http://bit.ly/1vKEcvA
* Chickadee Line-up
http://bit.ly/14haNrz
* Annual Great Backyard Bird Count
http://bit.ly/1yBS4D4
* Red-crowned Cranes Dance on Hokkaido --
Great show for Valentine's Day!
http://bit.ly/1D8JeEb
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1743N6U
--------------------------
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Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Nuthatch frozen in fear? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 17:28:03 -0500
There's been a Sharp-shinned Hawk checking out the neighborhood bird
feeders this week. Today the woods got dead quiet, and this White-breasted
Nuthatch froze in this exact same position for a full 15 minutes. I've
never seen a Nuthatch sit so very still for so very long. I'm thinking it
was trying to avoid detection:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16325852568/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: Southern Vancouver Island
From: mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 09:27:28 -0800
Hi David, I am in Victoria now. I return home tomorrow and will send some 
comments. 


Cheers

Barry

Barry Kent MacKay
Victoria. BC

Barry Kent MacKay

> On Feb 12, 2015, at 7:30 AM, David M. Gascoigne  
wrote: 

>
> There is a good possibility that I will be in Victoria for seven or eight 
days during the first part of April. I will have a rental car so I will be free 
to travel, although for the most part I will be based in Victoria. One day 
trips would be ideal but I am not averse to staying a night somewhere else (on 
the west coast for example). If anyone has birding tips they care to share for 
this area I would very much appreciate hearing from them. 

>
> David M. GascoigneWaterloo, ONblog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Southern Vancouver Island
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2015 10:25:23 -0500
There is a good possibility that I will be in Victoria for seven or eight days 
during the first part of April. I will have a rental car so I will be free to 
travel, although for the most part I will be based in Victoria. One day trips 
would be ideal but I am not averse to staying a night somewhere else (on the 
west coast for example). If anyone has birding tips they care to share for this 
area I would very much appreciate hearing from them. 


David M. GascoigneWaterloo, ONblog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com 

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Gulls rolling down the river (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015 18:24:11 -0500
The other day I saw maybe six dozen gulls loafing on a narrow ice floe that
was drifting downstream on the Raritan River in Middlesex County, NJ. The
birds seemed content to just sit there and take in the scenery as it passed:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16476567721/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Hilton Pond 01/01/15 (Nature's Shorthand)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 19:16:14 -0500
The first month of this year is over so I've just posted an "abbreviated" 
installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond"--not because it's short but because 
it includes a bunch of nature-related shorthand. To see what I mean, please 
visit the photo essay for 1-31 Jan 2015 at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150101.html 


While there, don’t forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded 
during the period, along with miscellaneous nature notes and a list of January 
donors. 


Happy (Midwinter) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 8, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 7 Feb 2015 09:56:16 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Crow Funeral - With Tony Angell
http://bit.ly/1ADNpHp
* Why I Fish
http://bit.ly/16sIwTZ
* Conserving Wetlands for Black Rails
http://bit.ly/LXYKdY
* Falcons, Parrots, And the Tree of Life
http://bit.ly/1DKJmX3
* If It Weren't for Birds
http://bit.ly/1DOQhig
* American Coots
http://bit.ly/1CD2tWr
* Mating for Life?
http://bit.ly/1zY7h8b
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1KqsCbV
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Fork-tailed Cardinal photos - clarification
From: Lynea <canyonwren AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 19:41:13 -0600
Hi Bernie,

It appears to be a Northern Cardinal that had lost its center tail feathers.
As can be seen in the photos, those feathers are coming back in.  In a short
time, all the rectrices will be the same length again.

Good birding!

Lynea



Lynea Hinchman
Michigan City, Indiana
Heart of the Indiana Dunes
canyonwrenATcomcastDOTnet



http://www.flickr.com/photos/canyon_wren/

”Spread love everywhere you go: first of all in your own home. Give love to
your children, to your wife or husband, to a next door neighbor . . . Let no
one ever come to you without leaving better and happier. Be the living
expression of God’s kindness; kindness in your face, kindness in your eyes,
kindness in your smile, kindness in your warm greeting.” —Mother Teresa
-----Original Message-----
From: B.G. Sloan
Sent: Monday, February 02, 2015 6:38 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Fork-tailed Cardinal photos - clarification

I think I need to clarify something about my "Fork-tailed Cardinal" post.
It wasn't the lack of central tail feathers that caught my attention. It
was that the outer tail feathers were always out of position in a spread
out inverted "V" shape. I watched other Cardinals today and they would
occasionally flick their outer feathers into that position for a split
second. My bird had its outer feathers spread the whole time, as best
exemplified by this photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16242005508/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Fork-tailed Cardinal photos - clarification
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 19:38:03 -0500
I think I need to clarify something about my "Fork-tailed Cardinal" post.
It wasn't the lack of central tail feathers that caught my attention. It
was that the outer tail feathers were always out of position in a spread
out inverted "V" shape. I watched other Cardinals today and they would
occasionally flick their outer feathers into that position for a split
second. My bird had its outer feathers spread the whole time, as best
exemplified by this photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16242005508/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Fork-tailed Cardinal (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 15:06:26 -0500
There's been an interesting Cardinal hanging around the yard today. Its
longer outer tail feathers are spread out in an apparently permanent(?)
V-shape. Every time I see the bird the tail is forked, even in flight. This
tail feather arrangement doesn't seem to interfere with flight (i.e., it
flies like a normal Cardinal).

This first photo shows a frontal view...and also brightened an otherwise
gray wintry day!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16242005328/

The next photo shows a dorsal view where the forked tail is very obvious,
contrasted against the snow:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16242005508/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 11/01/14 (Costa Rica-East Hummingbird Report)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 10:19:13 -0500
It's taken me so long to put together the photos, text, and data summarizing 
Operation RubyThroat's November 2014 highly successful hummingbird banding trip 
to Ujarrás on the Caribbean slope of Costa Rica, I just can't wait any longer! 
It's now on-line and includes many images of tropical birds (resident and 
migrant), plants, people, and landscapes—including an erupting volcano. 


It’s posted as the better-late-than-never installment of “This Week at 
Hilton Pond” for 1 November 2014 at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek141101.html 
 . There are lots of images, so 
it may take a while to download. 


Happy (Neotropical) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 1, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 07:53:24 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Short-eared Owl, The Daytime Owl
http://bit.ly/1JWRXKj
* What Happens When Birds Get Wet?
http://bit.ly/1BERqGy
* The Oilbird's Life in Darkness
http://bit.ly/1Hy6Jt6
* Why Do Chickadees Come and Go?
http://bit.ly/142xUpG
* The Myth of the Kiwi
http://bit.ly/1hODvWf
* Donald Duck - The Duck in the Sailor Suit
http://bit.ly/1dv08Oi
* Reddish Egret, Lagoon Dancer
http://bit.ly/WI794x
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/18DgrLt
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: White-throated Sparrow more like White-bearded Sparrow? :-) (Photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:28:37 -0500
I've been shooting photos of birds through my living room window today. I
like this photo of a White-throated Sparrow. Except that I think the white
"throat" looks more like a white "beard" in this photo. Maybe that's
because I have a white beard.  :-)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15778233453/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: My first decent photo of a White-throated Sparrow!
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:28:10 -0500
I've been a birder for years and years, but only really got into
photography in the past five years. I've taken photos of lots of
interesting birds, but for some reason one of my photo-nemesis birds is
quite common: White-throated Sparrow. I managed to get a decent photo today:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15768468884/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: What type of birder?
From: marys1000 <marys1000 AT WOH.RR.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 10:27:50 -0500
Fun question;
I discovered that what kind of "birder" I was changed as I learned more
about it.

Less to almost no chasing as I connect more with all the oil spill etc.
reporting.
Never a lister, I switched from self identifying as a birder to a bird
watcher
Am wondering how to learn more about habitat and how to save, improve it
with native plants.
What hasn't changed.   I too relish the local birder thing. Walking the
same patches, getting to know it, what to expect amd when, enjoying the
unexpected, feeling that connection.  Wanting to help wildlife for its
own sake, more than just view it.

Marie Schatz, Fairborn OH

On 1/21/2015 10:13 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
> Ever discovered you're more than one kind of birder?
>
> Large part of me is a local birder, enjoying my patch a walk at a time, 
content to see & hear whatever is out there. 

>
> Small part of me is a chaser, and I want everything rare the target 
destination has to offer, preferably right away:) 

>
> Significant part of me is an appreciator, relishing whatever happens, writing 
poetry about it when inspired. 

>
> Another significant part of me is a lister, enjoying numerical growth towards 
a goal. 

>
> But, despite appreciating others' scientific efforts within ornithology, only 
a very small part is a scientist. Which is not to depreciate scientists. I'm 
just not one. 

>
> You?
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
> formerly Madison, WI
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Clarification
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:25:07 -0600
Could someone clarify for me the changes in what American birds are now 
listable? 


For example, I have Whooping Cranes at Horicon Marsh in Wisconsin - certainly 
from the Necedah flock - do they now count? 


Another example might be European Goldfinches that nest in the Midwest.

Many thanks.

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS
(find that town on your maps!)
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Finding Gallinaceous Birds in Colorado
From: Rebecca <kostenrebecca AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 13:14:58 -0700
Hello birders,

 

It is almost that
time of year again, grouse lekking season. 
Many birders visit Colorado each year
to see the many gallinaceous birds in Colorado.

 

The Colorado Birding
Society's has a webpage that lists the many opportunities to see these birds. 
Some trips are free, some are commercial 

sites and there are directions to search for the gallinaceous birds on your
own.  As a note, the commercial sites
have limited birder spaces and fill up rapidly.

 

The Colorado Birding
Society's has no financial interest in any trips. We are providing the 
information for your 

interest.

 

See the "Grouse Information" Link
on their website at:

http://coloradobirdingsociety.net16.net

 

Good birding, Enjoy Colorado!

 

Rebecca Kosten,
Vice-President, Colorado
Birding Society

Denver, Colorado

Contact CoBus/Report
Interesting Birds: 303-324-7994

Subscribe to
"cobirders" by sending blank email to:

cobirders-subscribe AT yahoogroups.com

Read
"cobirders" at:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cobirders/messages

 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo)
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:52:28 -0500
Good luck to hi, and you and yours through the coming storm.  It's a nasty one.


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
je suis charlie



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: January-26-15 6:29 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day 
(photo) 


The snow had started picking up in advance of our forecasted "historic"
blizzard here in Jersey. Looked out the living room window and managed to snap 
a photo of this Red-bellied Woodpecker brightening up an otherwise very gray 
and snowy day... 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16190174289/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:28:57 -0500
The snow had started picking up in advance of our forecasted "historic"
blizzard here in Jersey. Looked out the living room window and managed to
snap a photo of this Red-bellied Woodpecker brightening up an otherwise
very gray and snowy day...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16190174289/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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