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Updated on Sunday, April 19 at 05:44 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Sabines Gull,©Jan Wilczur

19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Ronald Orenstein ]
18 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Patricia Burden ]
19 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? ["Tangren, Jerry" ]
18 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Sandra Savage ]
18 Apr Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? [Ronald Orenstein ]
18 Apr Why do birds sing when NOT on territory? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 Apr BirdNote, last week & the week of April 19, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
17 Apr Sparrow ID? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
17 Apr Bird book for north polar regions [Linda Jones ]
17 Apr My first-of-year Wild Turkey! (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
15 Apr Re: New species? [Eran Tomer ]
15 Apr Re: New species? [Jules Levin ]
15 Apr Re: New species? [Doug Hardy ]
15 Apr Re: New species? [Dick Cannings ]
15 Apr Re: New species? []
15 Apr Re: New species: Downeast birdline, Jan. 18, 1996 [Peter Wilkinson ]
15 Apr Re: New Species? []
15 Apr Re: New Species? []
15 Apr Re: New species? []
15 Apr Re: New species? [Ronald Orenstein ]
15 Apr Re: New species? [Manley Olson ]
15 Apr New species: Downeast birdline, Jan. 18, 1996 [L Larson ]
14 Apr Re: New species? [ ]
14 Apr Blue Jay love (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
14 Apr Re: New species? [John Walters ]
14 Apr Re: New species? []
14 Apr Re: New species? [Eric Jeffrey ]
14 Apr Re: New species? [Ronald Orenstein ]
14 Apr Re: New species? [Les Eastman ]
14 Apr Re: New species? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
14 Apr Re: New species? [Ronald Orenstein ]
14 Apr Re: Bird call ID question ["B.G. Sloan" ]
14 Apr Re: New species? [Sandra Savage ]
14 Apr Re: New species? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
14 Apr New species? [Al Schirmacher ]
13 Apr Hilton Pond 03/22/15 (Early Hummingbird) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
13 Apr Bird call ID question ["B.G. Sloan" ]
12 Apr Re: Experiment: online book club to read ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY REVISTED [Richard Carlson ]
12 Apr Re: Keas in New Zealand [ ]
12 Apr an actual link to the Drew Lanham video [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Apr Keas in New Zealand ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
12 Apr Experiment: online book club to read ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY REVISTED [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
11 Apr Re: Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next? [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
11 Apr Re: Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
11 Apr Sleeping hummingbird "snores" [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
11 Apr BirdNote, last week & the week of April 12, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
11 Apr Re: Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next? [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
11 Apr Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next? [Richard Carlson ]
10 Apr Duck Stamps --- a GOOD deal! [Jerry Blinn ]
9 Apr Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN [Ronald Orenstein ]
9 Apr Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN []
9 Apr Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN []
9 Apr Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN [Ronald Orenstein ]
9 Apr Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN [Richard Carlson ]
9 Apr Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN []
9 Apr Re: ivory Gulls, Polar Bears etc. [William Leigh ]
8 Apr Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN [Richard Carlson ]
7 Apr Re: Art fakes and ornithology [Paul Rakow ]
7 Apr Advice on red spruce forest visit ["Tangren, Jerry" ]
7 Apr Hilton Pond 03/01/15 (Pine Siskin Invasion) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
6 Apr Re: Art fakes and ornithology [Ronald Orenstein ]
6 Apr Re: Art fakes and ornithology [Richard Carlson ]
6 Apr Art fakes and ornithology [Ronald Orenstein ]
5 Apr RFI: NYC birding [sj wexlr ]
4 Apr BirdNote, last week & the week of April 5, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
2 Apr Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Minutes of today's meeting ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
1 Apr Re: Minutes of today's meeting [MM ]
1 Apr Minutes of today's meeting ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
30 Mar Article on the Importance of the Boreal Forest for Birds [Joyanne Hamilton ]
31 Mar Birding humor (cartoon) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
28 Mar BirdNote, last week & the week of March 29, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
29 Mar Photos and a question ["R.D. Everhart" ]
1 Apr Canadian forests state (was Importance of the Boreal Forest for Birds) [Eran Tomer ]
7 Mar Myanmar Jerdon's Babbler rediscovered (last seen in 1941) [Phil Davis ]
7 Mar a lovely video to start off your weekend right! [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
5 Mar Re: Zapata Rail rediscovered [Dana Fox ]

Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 06:40:22 -0400
Songs, as opposed to calls, are much more likely to be challenges to other 
(usually) males than attempts to attract birds other than mates. I have never 
heard of songs used to "call in" other birds, though some birds have assembly 
and flocking calls that they do use for this purpose. 


One point to remember is that song in songbirds is specifically controlled by a 
song centre in the brain, and in migratory species at least the song centre 
actually grows and shrinks over the course of the year as the birds become more 
or less active singers. I have not seen a study (though there may certainly be 
one - I don't keep up with all the latest literature) linking growth of the 
song centre to increasing song on spring migration, but it may be that early 
song activity is somehow linked to the reestablishment of neural pathways in 
the song centre involved the storage of song repertoire. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Apr 18, 2015, at 11:23 PM, Patricia Burden  wrote:
>
> When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
> are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
> practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
> love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
> perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
> others of their species to come migrate with them.
> Pat Burden
> Melvin & Yale, MI
>
>
>> On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
>> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
>> certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
>> the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
>> insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
>> the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
>> were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
>> think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
>> them, why do they do it?
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park, NJ
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 23:23:41 -0400
When I visit my mother on eastern Long Island over Christmas, there
are always White-throated Sparrows singing.  I think some of it is
practice - getting their song down - to a masterpiece a female will
love.  I think there are a lot of birds that sing while migrating,
perhaps calling to other birds "food" "food!" Or trying to locate
others of their species to come migrate with them.
Pat Burden
Melvin & Yale, MI


On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 7:21 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
> certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
> the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
> insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
> the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
> were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
> think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
> them, why do they do it?
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: "Tangren, Jerry" <tangren AT WSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 02:45:04 +0000
I wouldn't say non-adaptive; it may be quite adaptive as it allows the bird to 
get the song right before they reach the breeding territories. 


--Jerry 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 18, 2015, at 4:46 PM, Ronald Orenstein  
wrote: 

>
> There are a number of possibilities, but here are a few suggestions off the 
top of my head: 

> 1.  Non-adaptive response to rises in hormone levels (ie they can't help it).
> 2. Some birds form pairs en route north, so song may have a role there.
> 3. Some migrants do establish and defend temporary territories at migratory 
stopover points, possibly to secure the best feeding areas for refueling. 

> See 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=https://www.bio.umass.edu/oeb/students/outreach/bird-migration&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=Lw6gYMaw0%2FzZn6VzxzaNajr94zekVjscI9NSqirFz8g%3D%0A&s=a69fd61a41763aa1d0d39120ef2d939097ad8a87f12c1d4beae54834d5b993d3 
for some ongoing research on the subject. 

>  Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>      From: B.G. Sloan 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2015 7:21 PM
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
>
> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
> certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
> the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
> insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
> the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
> were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
> think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
> them, why do they do it?
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=Lw6gYMaw0%2FzZn6VzxzaNajr94zekVjscI9NSqirFz8g%3D%0A&s=b1a108351cff2d01e8dbb7b0c97557597be9315ae050d0207a0d8f6e14bc5d69 

> Archives: 
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>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: 
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Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Sandra Savage <savagebirder AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 18:49:01 -0600
I wondered if it were to practice - the same way young mountain sheep
will charge each other and such - getting reading for when it's important.

Sandra Savage
Calgary, Alberta

On 4/18/2015 5:21 PM, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
> singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
> certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
> the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
> insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
> the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
> were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
> think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
> them, why do they do it?
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 23:36:17 +0000
There are a number of possibilities, but here are a few suggestions off the top 
of my head: 

1.  Non-adaptive response to rises in hormone levels (ie they can't help it).
2. Some birds form pairs en route north, so song may have a role there.
3. Some migrants do establish and defend temporary territories at migratory 
stopover points, possibly to secure the best feeding areas for refueling. 

See https://www.bio.umass.edu/oeb/students/outreach/bird-migration for some 
ongoing research on the subject. 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: B.G. Sloan 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2015 7:21 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
   
Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
them, why do they do it?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Why do birds sing when NOT on territory?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 19:21:44 -0400
Every spring I find myself wondering why winter resident birds start
singing before they head north to their breeding ranges. Juncos do it to a
certain extent, but I am mostly thinking of White-throated Sparrows. Over
the past couple of weeks they have been singing their plaintive songs
insistently here in central NJ. They don't breed here, except sometimes in
the mountains in the northern part of the state. Today a couple of them
were dueling quite often, trading songs back and forth. Always makes me
think...if they are not establishing breeding territories, or defending
them, why do they do it?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of April 19, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 08:54:21 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Meet the Birds of the Boreal! http://bit.ly/1CWucx1 BirdNote is proud to
support the "Boreal Birds Need Half" project of the Boreal Birds Initiative.
--------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Raptor Breeding - Why So Early?
http://bit.ly/1b7Wrl1
* Boreal Forest - North America's Bird Nursery
http://bit.ly/1IpJCgO
* How Humans Affect Competition Among Birds
With John Marzluff, Based on "Subirdia"
http://bit.ly/1Hjl0aT
* High Island - Migration on the Gulf
Fallout! http://bit.ly/174lxKu
* American Robin, Valiant Challenger
http://bit.ly/1yDAIMo
* Not Just Any Nectar Will Do
http://bit.ly/1ADkEXS
* People Improving the Lives of Birds
http://bit.ly/1HEjLn7
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1O0xqtX
--------------------------
Watch the latest BirdNote video, Behind the Binoculars, with Drew
Lanham: http://bit.ly/1FGSOuf
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
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Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Sparrow ID? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 20:43:14 -0400
I'm assuming this is some sort of tan variation of a White-throated
Sparrow, but I thought I would double check with you all, just in case it's
something else:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17182014641/

Thanks in advance!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Bird book for north polar regions
From: Linda Jones <ljonesbird AT AOL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 19:47:30 -0400
Dear Bird Chatters:


A friend plans to tour the polar regions above Norway and Russia this summer. I 
will let her describe the itinerary: 

"We fly to Kirkenes, Norway, cruise the White Sea. We visit Arkhangelsk, 
Russia, the Solovetsky Islands. Next is cruising the Barents Sea for one day, 
next day visit Murmansk, Russia. Next is Honningsvag and North Cape, Norway. 
Finally leave Norway from Tromso and fly to Oslo." If anyone knows of useful 
books for information, i.d., etc. of the birds there, please let me know. 



Thanks,
Linda Jones
Porter Ranch, California


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Subject: My first-of-year Wild Turkey! (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2015 10:21:13 -0400
I haven't seen a Wild Turkey in my yard in five months. This morning I
happened to look out the window and saw a turkey under a feeder! Not the
world's best photo. Poor lighting, and I only had a chance to take one
before the turkey got spooked by a passerby. But, hey, it's my first turkey
in five months. I'm psyched!!! Here's the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17176078972/

It's kinda odd. In the fall I had up to a dozen turkeys (two separate
flocks) in my yard on an almost daily basis. Then one day they went away,
never to return until this bird showed up this AM. I even managed to
squeeze nine turkeys into this one photo last Thanksgiving Day:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15708145617/

I often wonder why they "disappeared"?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: New species?
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 19:40:46 -0400
​All right, I can no longer resist jumping in... From Atlanta, Georgia,
where the local newspaper once reported an Unbilled Seagull.

Three surefire ways to make fun of bird names:

1. Replace the species name with Mini-chicken (as all birds are, of
course). Examples:

Princess Mini-chicken
Spectacled Mini-chicken
Celestial Mini-chicken
Oven Mini-chicken
Hairy Mini-chicken
Shining Mini-chicken
Apricot Mini-chicken
Scarfed Mini-chicken
Zigzag Mini-chicken
Paradise Mini-chicken
Elegant Mini-chicken
Royal Mini-chicken
Lovely Mini-chicken

2. More politically, write bird names using pseudo-British spelling.
Examples:

Spotted Sandpipre
California Condour
Rasorbill
Clapper Reil
Green-throated Mountain-Gemme
Downy Wordpecker ("or" as in "Worcester")

3. Switch around first letters, first syllables or adjectives etc. (I tend
to do this compulsively). It's an enormous list but here are some examples
with North American birds, ommitting vulgar possibilities that sometimes
emerge:

Headbuffle
Gross-breasted Rosebeak
Hawk-tailed Zone
Jinyon Pay
Furfle Pinch
Ring Kail
Kinged Ringfisher
Huff-bellied Bummingbird
Gaughing Lull
Crown Breeper (or Beeper)
Eteller's Sider
Vulkey Torture
[cough] Porned Huffin
Pufted Tuffin
Nut Clark-cracker
Sox Fparrow
Sipping Chparrow
Cat Graybird
Clack-billed Buckoo
Prairie Greater-Chicken
Golden Barrow's-eye
Said's Bandpiper
Acadian Catchflier
Cissdickel
Linkbobo
Kississippee Mite
Torster's Fern
Vassin's Cireo
Wila Goodpecker
Wairy Hoodpecker
Nut-headed Whitehatch
Glue-Bray Gnatcatcher
Yellow Commonthroat
Cross Redbill
Fassin's Cinch

And finally, pertinent excerts from a long April 1st birding FAQ I sent to
the state birding list last year:

Q: Why are Evening Grosbeaks so rare in Georgia ?
A: Because the state is full of Morning Doves.

Q: In that case, why are Mourning Warblers so rare here ?
A: They bypass the state since the many Laughing Gulls so callously hurt
their feelings. The doves don’t care, they stand for peace.

Q: But I’d really like to find a Mourning Warbler for my state list. Any
advice ?
A: Easy - wait for spring, find a Blackpoll Warbler and say, “Have you
heard the news ? The Canadian Woolly Adelgid just wiped out the entire
boreal forest !”.

Q: Fish Crows don’t subsist off fish, and don’t look like fish, and don’t
sound like fish. How did they get their name ?
A: Good question, I can’t FICR it out either.

Q: All the Bald Eagles I’ve ever seen were immatures but I’d like to see an
adult. How do I find one ?
A: You’re out of luck. There are old eagles, there are Bald Eagles, but
there are no old Bald Eagles.

Q: Why do Swallow-tailed Kites fly in circles so frequently ?
A: They do have to grab their tails before they can swallow them.


If only birds knew how much fun we have at their expense...

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Re: New species?
From: Jules Levin <ameliede AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 12:20:18 -0700
Finally feel compelled to throw in the most common local gull in Los
Angeles:  The Dumpster Gull--very aggressive by the way. Eliminating
plastic bags in favor of paper here in California was actually promoted
by the Dumpster Gull union.
Jules Levin

On 4/15/2015 7:38 AM, Manley Olson wrote:
> Every birder should have a copy of one of the many versions of A Field
> Guide To Little- Known & Seldom-Seen Birds Of North America by Ben Sill
> et.al.  For example ,in addition to Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, it
> includes 5 other yellowlegs such as the Middle Yellowlegs and the
> Greatest Yellowlegs.
> Along that same line see Jim Morin's Field Guide To Birds. My copy has a
> 1985 publication date so it is probably out of print. It has unusual
> illustrations of common species, inspired by to what appear to a
> non-birder to be unusual names.Examples include Ovenbird, Nuthatch,
> Sandwich Tern, Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher.
> Enjoy
> Manley Olson
> Minneapolis MN
>
>
>  4/14/2015 6:27 PM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E
> wrote:
>> Or the One-winged Tern (can only fly in circles) -- this from a Rare
>> Bird Alert which *meant* to announce a WHITE-winged Tern...
>>
>> Gail Mackiernan
>> Silver Spring, MD
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: "John Walters" 
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 7:05:01 PM
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>>
>> Gotta watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.
>>
>> John Walters
>> Bonita, CA
>> johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: Doug Hardy <doug.hardy AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 13:43:27 -0400
A fun book for children along these lines is "Roadrunners and Sandwich
Terns" (Suzanne Samson, ISBN 1-57098-129-9). All real species drawn to
play on their names (picture sandpipers with bagpipes, Laughing Gulls,
etc). Very clever, and engaging for very young birders.

Doug Hardy
Norwich Vermont


On 4/15/2015 11:12 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
> Was he the fellow that once drew a Bananaquit as a disgusted-looking little 
bird tossing a banana over its shoulder? 

>   Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>        From: Manley Olson 
>   To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>   Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 10:38 AM
>   Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>
> Every birder should have a copy of one of the many versions of A Field
> Guide To Little- Known & Seldom-Seen Birds Of North America by Ben Sill
> et.al.  For example ,in addition to Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, it
> includes 5 other yellowlegs such as the Middle Yellowlegs and the
> Greatest Yellowlegs.
> Along that same line see Jim Morin's Field Guide To Birds. My copy has a
> 1985 publication date so it is probably out of print. It has unusual
> illustrations of common species, inspired by to what appear to a
> non-birder to be unusual names.Examples include Ovenbird, Nuthatch,
> Sandwich Tern, Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher.
> Enjoy
> Manley Olson
> Minneapolis MN
>
>
>    4/14/2015 6:27 PM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E
> wrote:
>> Or the One-winged Tern (can only fly in circles) -- this from a Rare Bird 
Alert which *meant* to announce a WHITE-winged Tern... 

>>
>> Gail Mackiernan
>> Silver Spring, MD
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: "John Walters" 
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 7:05:01 PM
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>>
>> Gotta watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.
>>
>> John Walters
>> Bonita, CA
>> johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: Dick Cannings <dickcannings AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 09:47:38 -0700
Hi all:

I've seen two interesting species on local checklists:
Glue-winged Teal (presumably a nonmigratory species)
Varied Thrust

Dick Cannings
Penticton, BC


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher
Sent: April 14, 2015 6:53 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] New species?

Reported Birds That
Give Me The Giggles:


(For some, results of spellcheck.  For others, lack thereof.)



Swansons Hawks  probably taste like chicken




Show Goose  vagrant from Las Vegas




Surf Scooter  endemic to Hawaii?




Mergs  on ramp masters of eight lane highways




Ruffled Grouse  very formal, closely related to full plumage Ruff




Pie Billed Grebe  coconut crme?




Great Regret  sequel to Great Expectations




Sharpie  rendered down for ink?




Roughleg  too busy to shave




Spotted Sandpiper  yes, but which one did you see?




Foresters Tern  favorite of rangers




Morning Dove  enemy of sleeping in




Mockingjay  proof that movies influence American culture heavily




English Sparrow  top hat, tails, elegant cousin of our hated weaver finch




Blackpole, Redpole  best seen in migration near maypoles




Junko  found near landfills and second hand thrift stores




Scarlet Tanger  easily discovered in outlet malls




Redwing  experts feel rare U.S. vagrant, but actually very common in
wetlands




And last, but not least, Seagulls  gulls are simply too complex to identify
well.  So, we divide them into three categories:
Seagulls, Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.  Understand there is also a
movement to lump them into Whitegulls and Notwhitegulls.
Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 11:45:34 -0400
If he did, it's not in the books he published in 1988 and 1990.

Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com


-----Original Message-----
From: Ronald Orenstein 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Wed, Apr 15, 2015 11:17 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?


Was he the fellow that once drew a Bananaquit as a disgusted-looking little 
bird 

tossing a banana over its shoulder?
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek
Court
Mississauga, ON L5L
3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

From: Manley Olson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU

Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 10:38 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New
species?

Every birder should have a copy of one of the many versions of A
Field
Guide To Little- Known & Seldom-Seen Birds Of North America by Ben
Sill
et.al.  For example ,in addition to Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs,
it
includes 5 other yellowlegs such as the Middle Yellowlegs and the
Greatest
Yellowlegs.
Along that same line see Jim Morin's Field Guide To Birds. My copy
has a
1985 publication date so it is probably out of print. It has
unusual
illustrations of common species, inspired by to what appear to
a
non-birder to be unusual names.Examples include Ovenbird, Nuthatch,
Sandwich
Tern, Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher.
Enjoy
Manley Olson
Minneapolis MN



4/14/2015 6:27 PM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E
wrote:
>
Or the One-winged Tern (can only fly in circles) -- this from a Rare Bird Alert
which *meant* to announce a WHITE-winged Tern...
>
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver
Spring, MD
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: "John Walters"

> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Sent: Tuesday,
April 14, 2015 7:05:01 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>
> Gotta
watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.
>
> John
Walters
> Bonita, CA
> johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species: Downeast birdline, Jan. 18, 1996
From: Peter Wilkinson <pjw42 AT WAITROSE.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 17:52:33 +0100
Love it!

We could do with some White-winged Scotsmen over here just now and I
guess Bohemian Waxworks aren't going to be terribly mobile!

Peter
Herts, England

On Wed, 2015-04-15 at 10:48 -0400, L Larson wrote:
> From the archives.... There was a Downeast Maine Birdline for a while, and 
compiler Ann Bacon once ran it through her spell-checker for fun. As a result, 
this classic "new species" post made the rounds back in the day. I thought it 
might be amusing to revive it. 

>
> Laurie  Larson, Princeton NJ
>
>
> -=-=-=-
>
>
> You have reached the Downeast Bismol at 244-4116. This message was recorded 
on Thursday, January 18. If you would like to leave a message without listening 
to the tape, please call 244-9945 with your sightings. After the recorded 
message, the caller will be given the opportunity to share sightings and other 
observations. 

>
> HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: BARROW'S GOLDBERG at Belfast and on MID; ROUGH-LEGGED 
HAWKS on MID; RUDDY DUCKS in Stockton Springs; and ICELAND and GLASGOW GULLS at 
Cambodian Island, NUB. 

>
> ON MOUNT DESERT ISLAND, a male and a female BARROW'S GOLDBERG were found in 
Somali Sound near Northeast Harbor on 01/12. The birds were viewed from a spot 
on Manchester Or. which is about 1/8 of a mile from the spot where Manchester 
splits off of Sargent Or.... Also of note on 01/10 in the waters at the Bar 
Island Bar in Bar Harbor were at least 2 female GREATER SCALA with orange tags 
on their bills (which seemed to be attached at the nostril). 

>
> 4 immature BALD EAGLES were at the Bar Island Bar on 01/12. Approximately 
1,500 seabeds were in the waters there on 01/14 including c. 900 COMMON EIDERS 
and c. 300 GREATER SCALA as well as smaller numbers of BULGARIANS, OLDSMOBILES, 
WHITE-WINGED SCOTSMEN, COMMON GOLDBERG and a few COMMON LOONS. 2 ROUGH-LEGGED 
HAWKS were spotted over Burnt Porcupine Island, and a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK was 
over the end of Bridge St. on the same day. Although the lakes and ponds on MID 
are frozen solid, various BALD EAGLES have been frequenting them in order to 
obtain handouts from ice fishermen. 

>
> Other sightings include 1 BOHEMIAN WAXWORK along Sargent Or. near the 
Northeast Harbor Golf Club on 01/12 as well as small numbers of BLACK 
GUILLOTINES and HORNED GREENBERG at Sealab, a RED-TAILED HAWK in the skies over 
Manchester, and a ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK over Town Hill on 01/14. 

>
> TO THE NORTH AND WEST, sightings include 20 BARROW'S GOLDBERG near the 
footbridge (at the end of Pierce St.) in Belfast as well as 25 RUDDY DUCKS and 
12 GREATER SCALA at Cape Jelling in Stockton Springs on 01/13. BARRED OWLS were 
reported this week at feeder areas in Orono and Old Town. 2 TUFTED TITMICE, 6 
DARK-EYED BUNCOS, and 4 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS frequented an Orrington feeder 
this week. 

>
> TO THE EAST, sightings include 12 BOHEMIAN WAXWORKS near the MacGregor 
Savings Bank in MacGregor on 01/11, 1 SNOW BUNTING and 1 COMMON REDSTONE at the 
NAVAJO Base in Cutler on 01/13, and 30 BOHEMIAN WAXWORKS in a tree next to 
Barnard's Nursing Home in Calcutta on 01/15. 

>
> TO THE FAR EAST, a report from Cambodia Island, NUB includes 10 ICELAND GULLS 
and 1 GLENDA GULL at Wilson's Beach, 4 ICELAND GULLS 1/4 me. to the north of 
there (on the way to East Quoddy Head), and 5 ICELAND GULLS and 1 GLENDA GULL 
at East Quoddy Head 01/16. 5-6 BLACK-LEGGED KITTIES and 12 BLACK GUILLOTINES 
were also at the Breakwater at Wilson's Beach. 12-24 BLACK GUILLOTINES and a 
couple of hundred OLDSMOBILES were observed flying out of Head Harlem Passage 
later that afternoon. 

>
> The Bismol tape will be updated on Thursday January 25. If you would like to 
leave a report, you may leave a message at the end of this tape, call me 
directly at 244-9945, or mail your sightings to: Ann Bacon at P. O. Box 19--- 
St. Desert, Me. 04660. Either way, please state your name, phone number and 
specific information. If you wish to leave a message, please wait for the beep 
tone, and thank you for calling the Downeast Bismol. 

>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New Species?
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 13:03:25 -0400
If he did, it's not in the books he published in 1988 and 1990.

Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com


-----Original Message-----
 From: Ronald Orenstein 
 To: BIRDCHAT 
 Sent: Wed, Apr 15, 2015 11:17 am
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?


Was he the fellow that once drew a Bananaquit as a disgusted-looking little 
bird 

tossing a banana over its shoulder?
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek
Court
Mississauga, ON L5L
3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New Species?
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 13:03:04 -0400
Also in Sill, if we must, don't forget the Auger-Billed Clamsucker, and the 
Four-Toed Snorkel Bill (I think it should be changed to one word, but who am I 
to question such an authority). Spellcheck highlighted Clamsucker", but I guess 
it hasn't been updated recently. 


All the best in "Birding",
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com


-----Original Message-----
 From: Manley Olson 
 To: BIRDCHAT 
 Sent: Wed, Apr 15, 2015 11:03 am
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?


Every birder should have a copy of one of the many versions of A Field
Guide To
Little- Known & Seldom-Seen Birds Of North America by Ben Sill
et.al.  For
example ,in addition to Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, it
includes 5 other
yellowlegs such as the Middle Yellowlegs and the
Greatest Yellowlegs.
Along
that same line see Jim Morin's Field Guide To Birds. My copy has a
1985
publication date so it is probably out of print. It has unusual
illustrations
of common species, inspired by to what appear to a
non-birder to be unusual
names.Examples include Ovenbird, Nuthatch,
Sandwich Tern, Scissor-Tailed
Flycatcher.
Enjoy
Manley Olson
Minneapolis MN



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 11:38:53 -0400
Also in Sill, if we must, don't forget the Auger-Billed Clamsucker, and the 
Four-Toed Snorkel Bill (I think it should be changed to one word, but who am I 
to question such an authority). Spellcheck highlighted Clamsucker", but I guess 
it hasn't been updated recently. 


All the best in "Birding",
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com


-----Original Message-----
From: Manley Olson 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Wed, Apr 15, 2015 11:03 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?


Every birder should have a copy of one of the many versions of A Field
Guide To
Little- Known & Seldom-Seen Birds Of North America by Ben Sill
et.al.  For
example ,in addition to Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, it
includes 5 other
yellowlegs such as the Middle Yellowlegs and the
Greatest Yellowlegs.
Along
that same line see Jim Morin's Field Guide To Birds. My copy has a
1985
publication date so it is probably out of print. It has unusual
illustrations
of common species, inspired by to what appear to a
non-birder to be unusual
names.Examples include Ovenbird, Nuthatch,
Sandwich Tern, Scissor-Tailed
Flycatcher.
Enjoy
Manley Olson
Minneapolis MN


  4/14/2015 6:27 PM, Gail
B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E
wrote:
> Or the One-winged Tern
(can only fly in circles) -- this from a Rare Bird Alert which *meant* to
announce a WHITE-winged Tern...
>
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, MD
>
>
----- Original Message -----
>
> From: "John Walters"

> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Sent: Tuesday,
April 14, 2015 7:05:01 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>
> Gotta
watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.
>
> John
Walters
> Bonita, CA
> johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 15:12:12 +0000
Was he the fellow that once drew a Bananaquit as a disgusted-looking little 
bird tossing a banana over its shoulder? 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Manley Olson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 10:38 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
   
Every birder should have a copy of one of the many versions of A Field
Guide To Little- Known & Seldom-Seen Birds Of North America by Ben Sill
et.al.  For example ,in addition to Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, it
includes 5 other yellowlegs such as the Middle Yellowlegs and the
Greatest Yellowlegs.
Along that same line see Jim Morin's Field Guide To Birds. My copy has a
1985 publication date so it is probably out of print. It has unusual
illustrations of common species, inspired by to what appear to a
non-birder to be unusual names.Examples include Ovenbird, Nuthatch,
Sandwich Tern, Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher.
Enjoy
Manley Olson
Minneapolis MN


  4/14/2015 6:27 PM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E
wrote:
> Or the One-winged Tern (can only fly in circles) -- this from a Rare Bird 
Alert which *meant* to announce a WHITE-winged Tern... 

>
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, MD
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: "John Walters" 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 7:05:01 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>
> Gotta watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.
>
> John Walters
> Bonita, CA
> johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: Manley Olson <manleyolson AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 09:38:00 -0500
Every birder should have a copy of one of the many versions of A Field
Guide To Little- Known & Seldom-Seen Birds Of North America by Ben Sill
et.al.  For example ,in addition to Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, it
includes 5 other yellowlegs such as the Middle Yellowlegs and the
Greatest Yellowlegs.
Along that same line see Jim Morin's Field Guide To Birds. My copy has a
1985 publication date so it is probably out of print. It has unusual
illustrations of common species, inspired by to what appear to a
non-birder to be unusual names.Examples include Ovenbird, Nuthatch,
Sandwich Tern, Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher.
Enjoy
Manley Olson
Minneapolis MN


  4/14/2015 6:27 PM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E
wrote:
> Or the One-winged Tern (can only fly in circles) -- this from a Rare Bird 
Alert which *meant* to announce a WHITE-winged Tern... 

>
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, MD
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: "John Walters" 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 7:05:01 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>
> Gotta watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.
>
> John Walters
> Bonita, CA
> johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: New species: Downeast birdline, Jan. 18, 1996
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 10:48:07 -0400
From the archives.... There was a Downeast Maine Birdline for a while, and 
compiler Ann Bacon once ran it through her spell-checker for fun. As a result, 
this classic "new species" post made the rounds back in the day. I thought it 
might be amusing to revive it. 


Laurie  Larson, Princeton NJ


-=-=-=-


You have reached the Downeast Bismol at 244-4116. This message was recorded on 
Thursday, January 18. If you would like to leave a message without listening to 
the tape, please call 244-9945 with your sightings. After the recorded message, 
the caller will be given the opportunity to share sightings and other 
observations. 


HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: BARROW'S GOLDBERG at Belfast and on MID; ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS 
on MID; RUDDY DUCKS in Stockton Springs; and ICELAND and GLASGOW GULLS at 
Cambodian Island, NUB. 


ON MOUNT DESERT ISLAND, a male and a female BARROW'S GOLDBERG were found in 
Somali Sound near Northeast Harbor on 01/12. The birds were viewed from a spot 
on Manchester Or. which is about 1/8 of a mile from the spot where Manchester 
splits off of Sargent Or.... Also of note on 01/10 in the waters at the Bar 
Island Bar in Bar Harbor were at least 2 female GREATER SCALA with orange tags 
on their bills (which seemed to be attached at the nostril). 


4 immature BALD EAGLES were at the Bar Island Bar on 01/12. Approximately 1,500 
seabeds were in the waters there on 01/14 including c. 900 COMMON EIDERS and c. 
300 GREATER SCALA as well as smaller numbers of BULGARIANS, OLDSMOBILES, 
WHITE-WINGED SCOTSMEN, COMMON GOLDBERG and a few COMMON LOONS. 2 ROUGH-LEGGED 
HAWKS were spotted over Burnt Porcupine Island, and a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK was 
over the end of Bridge St. on the same day. Although the lakes and ponds on MID 
are frozen solid, various BALD EAGLES have been frequenting them in order to 
obtain handouts from ice fishermen. 


Other sightings include 1 BOHEMIAN WAXWORK along Sargent Or. near the Northeast 
Harbor Golf Club on 01/12 as well as small numbers of BLACK GUILLOTINES and 
HORNED GREENBERG at Sealab, a RED-TAILED HAWK in the skies over Manchester, and 
a ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK over Town Hill on 01/14. 


TO THE NORTH AND WEST, sightings include 20 BARROW'S GOLDBERG near the 
footbridge (at the end of Pierce St.) in Belfast as well as 25 RUDDY DUCKS and 
12 GREATER SCALA at Cape Jelling in Stockton Springs on 01/13. BARRED OWLS were 
reported this week at feeder areas in Orono and Old Town. 2 TUFTED TITMICE, 6 
DARK-EYED BUNCOS, and 4 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS frequented an Orrington feeder 
this week. 


TO THE EAST, sightings include 12 BOHEMIAN WAXWORKS near the MacGregor Savings 
Bank in MacGregor on 01/11, 1 SNOW BUNTING and 1 COMMON REDSTONE at the NAVAJO 
Base in Cutler on 01/13, and 30 BOHEMIAN WAXWORKS in a tree next to Barnard's 
Nursing Home in Calcutta on 01/15. 


TO THE FAR EAST, a report from Cambodia Island, NUB includes 10 ICELAND GULLS 
and 1 GLENDA GULL at Wilson's Beach, 4 ICELAND GULLS 1/4 me. to the north of 
there (on the way to East Quoddy Head), and 5 ICELAND GULLS and 1 GLENDA GULL 
at East Quoddy Head 01/16. 5-6 BLACK-LEGGED KITTIES and 12 BLACK GUILLOTINES 
were also at the Breakwater at Wilson's Beach. 12-24 BLACK GUILLOTINES and a 
couple of hundred OLDSMOBILES were observed flying out of Head Harlem Passage 
later that afternoon. 


The Bismol tape will be updated on Thursday January 25. If you would like to 
leave a report, you may leave a message at the end of this tape, call me 
directly at 244-9945, or mail your sightings to: Ann Bacon at P. O. Box 19--- 
St. Desert, Me. 04660. Either way, please state your name, phone number and 
specific information. If you wish to leave a message, please wait for the beep 
tone, and thank you for calling the Downeast Bismol. 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: New species?
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 23:27:54 +0000
Or the One-winged Tern (can only fly in circles) -- this from a Rare Bird Alert 
which *meant* to announce a WHITE-winged Tern... 


Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD

----- Original Message -----

From: "John Walters" 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 7:05:01 PM
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?

Gotta watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.

John Walters
Bonita, CA
johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Blue Jay love (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 19:12:00 -0400
One adult Blue Jay filled its crop full of sunflower seed pieces and flew
up into a tree and proceeded to feed another adult Blue Jay:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16965035499/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: New species?
From: John Walters <johnfwalters5552 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 16:05:01 -0700
Gotta watch out for Violent Green Swallows and Western Teenagers, too.

John Walters
Bonita, CA
johnfwalters5552 AT gmail.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: New species?
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 17:01:37 -0400
A slight twist.......no new species here. A friend up in Buckhorn Ontario 
reports Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, House Wren, Gulls and a Kingfisher over his 
frozen lake, as well as Song Sparrows and blackbirds that have been back for a 
while. A bird by any other name still migrates north. 


And yes, I checked the spelling twice.

Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Eastman 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, Apr 14, 2015 1:50 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?


On 4/14/2015 6:52 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
 > gulls are
 > simply too complex
to identify well.  So,
 > we divide them into three categories:
 > Seagulls,
Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.

There are also baygulls which are good with
cream cheese and lox.

Les

===========
Les
Eastman
mailto:les AT birdtreks.com
Scottsdale, AZ

The redtail hawk writes
songs across the sky,
There's music in the waters flowing by,
And you can hear
a song each time the wind sighs
                           KATE
WOLF

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



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Subject: Re: New species?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 14:41:11 -0400
Oy!

Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA


-----Original Message-----
From: Ronald Orenstein 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, Apr 14, 2015 2:30 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?


Add crossbills, and you've got baygulls and Loxia.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825
Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L
3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

From: Les Eastman 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
 Sent:
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 1:48 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?

On
4/14/2015 6:52 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
 > gulls are
 > simply too complex to
identify well.  So,
 > we divide them into three categories:
 > Seagulls,
Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.

There are also baygulls which are good with
cream cheese and lox.

Les

===========
Les
Eastman
mailto:les AT birdtreks.com
Scottsdale, AZ

The redtail hawk writes
songs across the sky,
There's music in the waters flowing by,
And you can hear
a song each time the wind sighs
                          KATE
WOLF



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



BirdChat Guidelines:
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Subject: Re: New species?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 18:04:15 +0000
Add crossbills, and you've got baygulls and Loxia.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Les Eastman 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 1:48 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
   
On 4/14/2015 6:52 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
 > gulls are
 > simply too complex to identify well.  So,
 > we divide them into three categories:
 > Seagulls, Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.

There are also baygulls which are good with cream cheese and lox.

Les

===========
Les Eastman
mailto:les AT birdtreks.com
Scottsdale, AZ

The redtail hawk writes songs across the sky,
There's music in the waters flowing by,
And you can hear a song each time the wind sighs
                          KATE WOLF



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: New species?
From: Les Eastman <les AT BIRDTREKS.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 10:48:36 -0700
On 4/14/2015 6:52 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
 > gulls are
 > simply too complex to identify well.  So,
 > we divide them into three categories:
 > Seagulls, Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.

There are also baygulls which are good with cream cheese and lox.

Les

===========
Les Eastman
mailto:les AT birdtreks.com
Scottsdale, AZ

The redtail hawk writes songs across the sky,
There's music in the waters flowing by,
And you can hear a song each time the wind sighs
                           KATE WOLF

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 11:33:58 -0500
On 4/14/2015 11:10 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:

> Many years ago I used an early version of Dragon Dictate while writing a book 
on songbirds. It rendered "Seaside Sparrow" as "Suicide Sparrow" (I did catch 
the error, fortunately). 


In the early days of the listservs, a message was posted to our LABIRD
that kept referring to a Black-legged Caduca.  Kittiwake was not in his
spell check menu.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com

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Subject: Re: New species?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 16:10:33 +0000
Many years ago I used an early version of Dragon Dictate while writing a book 
on songbirds. It rendered "Seaside Sparrow" as "Suicide Sparrow" (I did catch 
the error, fortunately). 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Sandra Savage 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 11:11 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
   
How about:

standing gulls, flying gulls, swimming gulls?

Sandra Savage
Calgary, Alberta

On 4/14/2015 8:41 AM, Barry K. MacKay wrote:
> That's a riot.
>
> We have a street near where I live called "Morning Dove Court".
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher
> Sent: April-14-15 9:53 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>
> Reported Birds That
> Give Me The Giggles:
>
>
> (For some, results of spellcheck.  For others, lack thereof.)
>
>
> ·
> Swanson’s Hawks – probably taste like chicken
>
>
>
> ·
> Show Goose – vagrant from Las Vegas
>
>
>
> ·
> Surf Scooter – endemic to Hawaii?
>
>
>
> ·
> Mergs – on ramp masters of eight lane highways
>
>
>
> ·
> Ruffled Grouse – very formal, closely related to full plumage Ruff
>
>
>
> ·
> Pie Billed Grebe – coconut crème?
>
>
>
> ·
> Great Regret – sequel to Great Expectations
>
>
>
> ·
> Sharpie – rendered down for ink?
>
>
>
> ·
> Roughleg – too busy to shave
>
>
>
> ·
> Spotted Sandpiper – yes, but which one did you see?
>
>
>
> ·
> Forester’s Tern – favorite of rangers
>
>
>
> ·
> Morning Dove – enemy of sleeping in
>
>
>
> ·
> Mockingjay – proof that movies influence American culture heavily
>
>
>
> ·
> English Sparrow – top hat, tails, elegant cousin of our hated weaver finch
>
>
>
> ·
> Blackpole, Redpole – best seen in migration near maypoles
>
>
>
> ·
> Junko – found near landfills and second hand thrift stores
>
>
>
> ·
> Scarlet Tanger – easily discovered in outlet malls
>
>
>
> ·
> Redwing – experts feel rare U.S. vagrant, but actually very common in
> wetlands
>
>
>
> ·
> And last, but not least, Seagulls – gulls are simply too complex to 
identify 

> well.  So, we divide them into three categories:
> Seagulls, Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.  Understand there is also a
> movement to lump them into Whitegulls and Notwhitegulls.
> Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Bird call ID question
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 11:59:32 -0400
Thanks to all who suggested Wilson's Snipe. The bird I heard yesterday was
indeed a Wilson's Snipe. Habitat was good for a snipe, as well.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

On Mon, Apr 13, 2015 at 4:30 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> I was hanging out in a grassland in New Jersey today near a small pond.
> Every now and then I would hear several loud insistent relatively
> lower-pitched "weep" calls from near the edge of the pond in an area with
> lots of cover. Just wondering if someone might point me in the right
> direction so I can narrow down which recordings to listen to?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: Sandra Savage <savagebirder AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 09:11:38 -0600
How about:

standing gulls, flying gulls, swimming gulls?

Sandra Savage
Calgary, Alberta

On 4/14/2015 8:41 AM, Barry K. MacKay wrote:
> That's a riot.
>
> We have a street near where I live called "Morning Dove Court".
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher
> Sent: April-14-15 9:53 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] New species?
>
> Reported Birds That
> Give Me The Giggles:
>
>
> (For some, results of spellcheck.  For others, lack thereof.)
>
>
> 
> Swansons Hawks  probably taste like chicken
>
>
>
> 
> Show Goose  vagrant from Las Vegas
>
>
>
> 
> Surf Scooter  endemic to Hawaii?
>
>
>
> 
> Mergs  on ramp masters of eight lane highways
>
>
>
> 
> Ruffled Grouse  very formal, closely related to full plumage Ruff
>
>
>
> 
> Pie Billed Grebe  coconut crme?
>
>
>
> 
> Great Regret  sequel to Great Expectations
>
>
>
> 
> Sharpie  rendered down for ink?
>
>
>
> 
> Roughleg  too busy to shave
>
>
>
> 
> Spotted Sandpiper  yes, but which one did you see?
>
>
>
> 
> Foresters Tern  favorite of rangers
>
>
>
> 
> Morning Dove  enemy of sleeping in
>
>
>
> 
> Mockingjay  proof that movies influence American culture heavily
>
>
>
> 
> English Sparrow  top hat, tails, elegant cousin of our hated weaver finch
>
>
>
> 
> Blackpole, Redpole  best seen in migration near maypoles
>
>
>
> 
> Junko  found near landfills and second hand thrift stores
>
>
>
> 
> Scarlet Tanger  easily discovered in outlet malls
>
>
>
> 
> Redwing  experts feel rare U.S. vagrant, but actually very common in
> wetlands
>
>
>
> 
> And last, but not least, Seagulls  gulls are simply too complex to identify
> well.  So, we divide them into three categories:
> Seagulls, Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.  Understand there is also a
> movement to lump them into Whitegulls and Notwhitegulls.
> Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New species?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 10:41:43 -0400
That's a riot.

We have a street near where I live called "Morning Dove Court".


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher
Sent: April-14-15 9:53 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] New species?

Reported Birds That
Give Me The Giggles:


(For some, results of spellcheck.  For others, lack thereof.)



Swansons Hawks  probably taste like chicken




Show Goose  vagrant from Las Vegas




Surf Scooter  endemic to Hawaii?




Mergs  on ramp masters of eight lane highways




Ruffled Grouse  very formal, closely related to full plumage Ruff




Pie Billed Grebe  coconut crme?




Great Regret  sequel to Great Expectations




Sharpie  rendered down for ink?




Roughleg  too busy to shave




Spotted Sandpiper  yes, but which one did you see?




Foresters Tern  favorite of rangers




Morning Dove  enemy of sleeping in




Mockingjay  proof that movies influence American culture heavily




English Sparrow  top hat, tails, elegant cousin of our hated weaver finch




Blackpole, Redpole  best seen in migration near maypoles




Junko  found near landfills and second hand thrift stores




Scarlet Tanger  easily discovered in outlet malls




Redwing  experts feel rare U.S. vagrant, but actually very common in
wetlands




And last, but not least, Seagulls  gulls are simply too complex to identify
well.  So, we divide them into three categories:
Seagulls, Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls.  Understand there is also a
movement to lump them into Whitegulls and Notwhitegulls.
Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: New species?
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2015 08:52:46 -0500
Reported Birds That
Give Me The Giggles:


(For some, results of spellcheck.  For others, lack thereof.)


        
Swansons Hawks  probably taste like chicken

 

        
Show Goose  vagrant from Las Vegas

 

        
Surf Scooter  endemic to Hawaii?

 

        
Mergs  on ramp masters of eight lane highways

 

        
Ruffled Grouse  very formal, closely related to
full plumage Ruff

 

        
Pie Billed Grebe  coconut crme?  

 

        
Great Regret  sequel to Great Expectations

 

        
Sharpie  rendered down for ink?

 

        
Roughleg  too busy to shave

 

        
Spotted Sandpiper  yes, but which one did you
see?

 

        
Foresters Tern  favorite of rangers

 

        
Morning Dove  enemy of sleeping in

 

        
Mockingjay  proof that movies influence
American culture heavily

 

        
English Sparrow  top hat, tails, elegant cousin
of our hated weaver finch

 

        
Blackpole, Redpole  best seen in migration near
maypoles

 

        
Junko  found near landfills and second hand
thrift stores

 

        
Scarlet Tanger  easily discovered in outlet
malls

 

        
Redwing  experts feel rare U.S. vagrant, but actually
very common in wetlands

 

        
And last, but not least, Seagulls  gulls are
simply too complex to identify well.  So,
we divide them into three categories: 
Seagulls, Lakegulls, and Parkinglotgulls. Understand there is also a movement 
to lump 

them into Whitegulls and Notwhitegulls.
Al SchirmacherMuscotah, KS


 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 03/22/15 (Early Hummingbird)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 22:12:46 -0400
March came in with a glut of Pine Siskins and went out with the arrival of a 
very early adult male Ruby-throated Hummingbird (above)--my earliest ever at 
York SC. The latest installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond” for 22-31 March 
2015 describes this pioneering hummer and blissfully delves into the realm of 
nature "poetry." Other topics covered in our potpourri photo essay include a 
special Chipping Sparrow, our first Brown-headed Cowbirds, and recent yearly 
yard birds at the Center. All this and more are at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150322.html 
 


While reading don’t forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded and 
recaptured during the period—including several “old” birds from years 
ago. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============


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Subject: Bird call ID question
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2015 16:30:25 -0400
I was hanging out in a grassland in New Jersey today near a small pond.
Every now and then I would hear several loud insistent relatively
lower-pitched "weep" calls from near the edge of the pond in an area with
lots of cover. Just wondering if someone might point me in the right
direction so I can narrow down which recordings to listen to?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Experiment: online book club to read ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY REVISTED
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2015 22:27:02 +0000
$60 paperback and $35 kindle is a pricey.  Try a book most of us can 
afford. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
      From: Devorah the Ornithologist 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2015 8:51 AM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Experiment: online book club to read ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY 
REVISTED 

   
hello everyone,

i am trying an experiment: an online book reading club. the group is
reading the book ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY REVISITED -- a book that has a
significant number of chapters devoted to birds (which is the reason i
think it may interest you). the group is working scientists at the
biogeography and climate research centre in Frankfurt Germany and i will be
sharing their discussions online. you all are welcome to follow along with
the reading assignments and to share your comments, questions and insights
in the comments section for each piece that i publish. the reading group
will respond to you online as time allows. if you are interested to join
in, you can read more about it (and get relevant links to the book --
chapter 1 is available online at Princeton for free), here:

http://gu.com/p/47c2z/stw

the first meeting will be the 14th of April and we will be discussing
chapters 1 & 2.

tschüss,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

  
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Subject: Re: Keas in New Zealand
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2015 21:58:14 +0000
We were in NZ in 2103, stayed for a couple of nights at Arthur's Pass on the 
South Island. We worried about the Keas but other than one trying to make off 
with my meat pie at an outdoor dining area, they left us and our car alone. 
They are not doing well population-wise, according to biologists studying them 
-- a number get killed by cars and otherwise get into trouble because people 
(illegally) feed them. The biologist we spoke to tried to ask people at a 
popular overlook to not feed the Keas, and got lots of nasty back-talk from 
tourists. 


Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD

----- Original Message -----

From: "David M. Gascoigne" 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2015 11:48:11 AM
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Keas in New Zealand

We were told while hiking the Milford Trek 20 years ago to beware of the Keas, 
not to leave our boots outside the cabin door at night because the Keas might 
gouge chunks out of the soles, not to mention make a huge racket dragging them 
along the wooden walkways while people are trying to sleep. Also at risk were 
the windshields of planes and helicopters, same reason, pecking the rubber 
holding the glass in place. Chris Van BeverenBeck Travel565 Baywood WayLos Osos 
CA 93402Phone: 805 439-2023Fax: 805 439-2042becktravel AT yahoo.com 



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Subject: an actual link to the Drew Lanham video
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2015 11:17:47 -0700
Pardon, BirdChat,

I have whatever crud is going around and totally missed adding the link.
Here is the link to the video of Drew Lanham leading the Maryland
Coastal Bays Program Coastal Stewards on a field trip to Assateague
Island and Ocean City, Maryland.

http://birdnote.org/video/2015/04/behind-binoculars-birding-drew-lanham

Take care and have a good rest of weekend.

Ellen Blackstone
Seattle



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Keas in New Zealand
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2015 11:48:11 -0400
We were told while hiking the Milford Trek 20 years ago to beware of the Keas, 
not to leave our boots outside the cabin door at night because the Keas might 
gouge chunks out of the soles, not to mention make a huge racket dragging them 
along the wooden walkways while people are trying to sleep. Also at risk were 
the windshields of planes and helicopters, same reason, pecking the rubber 
holding the glass in place. Chris Van BeverenBeck Travel565 Baywood WayLos Osos 
CA 93402Phone: 805 439-2023Fax: 805 439-2042becktravel AT yahoo.com 


 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Experiment: online book club to read ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY REVISTED
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2015 16:51:00 +0100
hello everyone,

i am trying an experiment: an online book reading club. the group is
reading the book ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY REVISITED -- a book that has a
significant number of chapters devoted to birds (which is the reason i
think it may interest you). the group is working scientists at the
biogeography and climate research centre in Frankfurt Germany and i will be
sharing their discussions online. you all are welcome to follow along with
the reading assignments and to share your comments, questions and insights
in the comments section for each piece that i publish. the reading group
will respond to you online as time allows. if you are interested to join
in, you can read more about it (and get relevant links to the book --
chapter 1 is available online at Princeton for free), here:

http://gu.com/p/47c2z/stw

the first meeting will be the 14th of April and we will be discussing
chapters 1 & 2.

tschüss,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next?
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2015 20:38:15 -0700
Hi Nancy

 I doubt there is a connection, at least a direct one, between Booby 
occurrences on the Pacific and the Atlantic/Gulf. They are two separate 
systems, with little evidence of seabirds such as these moving between one 
ocean and the other at least in numbers. I should point out that the Brown, and 
Blue-footed boobies are not really pelagic birds. They can be found miles out 
to sea of course, but they are much more comfortable in inshore waters. The two 
are not difficult to see from land in areas where they are common. The 
Red-footed and Masked on the other hand are much more pelagic, more likely to 
associate with tuna etc. 


Regards
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Nancy L. Newfield 

Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2015 8:18 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next?

Richard, Alvaro,

On 4/11/2015 12:10 PM, Alvaro Jaramillo wrote:

> We shall see what happens in the next few years. As a pelagic tour operator I 
get to see firsthand what is going on here in the ocean off California. The 
northbound movements of birds, fish, and marine mammals has essentially been 
unprecedented in the last year and a half. Lots and lots of record happenings, 
and patterns that people in their lifetime have not seen. 

> In any case, to the subject line. Blue-footed Boobies were actually the first 
effect we saw of the blob. The incursion of Blue-footed Boobies to California 
and beyond happened in the fall of 2013. That was the first sign of weirdness 
from a Half Moon Bay, CA perspective. There were a few BF Boobies in 2014, but 
definitely in 2014 the Brown Booby was the prevalent one, it was not odd to see 
multiples on a single trip. Here in the SF Bay Area spring winds have started 
in earnest, the upwelling is churning and the temperatures are dropping to near 
normal levels now on the ocean. Salmon are being caught and things look normal 
for the time being although this appears to be on the surface. A press release 
from the Farallon Islands last week noting essentially no breeding by various 
seabirds thus far, failures by sea lions suggest that we are far from being out 
of the woods on the warm water. My guess is that come the summer when the winds 
decrease we will be back to more wa! 

 rm !
> water, probably another round of Craveri's Murrelets going north, Black 
Storm-Petrel may once again be the common species here instead of Ashy...we 
shall see. 


Interesting thoughts here! It will take me some time to digest it all and come 
up with a theory about how the Pacific situation might relate to our Gulf Coast 
Brown Booby sightings. It is no secret that the Gulf of Mexico has a dearth of 
pelagic thrills compared to the Pacific Coast. 


Louisiana can claim no Blue-footed Booby sightings ever, but records of Brown 
Booby prior to 2013 were very modest. Not sure of other gulf states. I recall 
in the summer of 2012, there was a record from north Texas and one from 
Arkansas. Some of us suffered 'pelagic envy'. 


All of the changed in late summer 2013, when a boat full of pelagic hungry 
birders encountered an adult Brown Booby flying northward up the Mississippi 
River about 8 miles below the Venice Marina, about an hour from the actual Gulf 
and farther yet from deep pelagic waters. Then in late October into early 
November, a group of 3 was found in Lake Calcasieu on the western side of the 
state. Then, late in December 2013, a lone adult was discovered on a Christmas 
Bird Count on the north side of Lake Pontchartrain. That bird remained about 2 
weeks, extending its stay into the new year. The rest of 2014 played out 
without additional reports, but a group of 4 was reported from the same area 
during the same CBC on 3 January 2015. Those birds could not be relocated. 


Just a few weeks ago, while crossing the 24-mile long Lake Pontchartrain 
Causeway, I caught a glimpse of what I thought was an adult Brown Booby. 
However, the bird was flying north while the vehicle in which I was riding was 
travelling south. We pass this same route about the same time every Saturday 
morning so I was on the lookout the next time. My associate and I were 
discussing the possible sighting, and very shortly found ourselves looking at 
an adult Brown Booby about 100 feet away, flying toward us. 


Our sighting was duly reported on the Louisiana listserv. In the 2 weeks since 
our report, there have been about 6 more sightings of 1 or 2 individuals. 
Additionally, There were 2 sightings along Interstate 10 and another from the 
Mississippi River well below New Orleans. 


I have wondered how an inhabitant of deep pelagic waters could be making a 
living in Louisiana's shallow, muddy waters. I've also wondered how many 
individuals are out there and what factors are driving this phenomenon. 


Nan

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  Nancy L Newfield
  Casa Colibrí
  Metairie, LA USA
  
  http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


---
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Subject: Re: Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2015 22:18:05 -0500
Richard, Alvaro,

On 4/11/2015 12:10 PM, Alvaro Jaramillo wrote:

> We shall see what happens in the next few years. As a pelagic tour operator I 
get to see firsthand what is going on here in the ocean off California. The 
northbound movements of birds, fish, and marine mammals has essentially been 
unprecedented in the last year and a half. Lots and lots of record happenings, 
and patterns that people in their lifetime have not seen. 

> In any case, to the subject line. Blue-footed Boobies were actually the first 
effect we saw of the blob. The incursion of Blue-footed Boobies to California 
and beyond happened in the fall of 2013. That was the first sign of weirdness 
from a Half Moon Bay, CA perspective. There were a few BF Boobies in 2014, but 
definitely in 2014 the Brown Booby was the prevalent one, it was not odd to see 
multiples on a single trip. Here in the SF Bay Area spring winds have started 
in earnest, the upwelling is churning and the temperatures are dropping to near 
normal levels now on the ocean. Salmon are being caught and things look normal 
for the time being although this appears to be on the surface. A press release 
from the Farallon Islands last week noting essentially no breeding by various 
seabirds thus far, failures by sea lions suggest that we are far from being out 
of the woods on the warm water. My guess is that come the summer when the winds 
decrease we will be back to more warm ! 

> water, probably another round of Craveri's Murrelets going north, Black 
Storm-Petrel may once again be the common species here instead of Ashy...we 
shall see. 


Interesting thoughts here!  It will take me some time to digest it all
and come up with a theory about how the Pacific situation might relate
to our Gulf Coast Brown Booby sightings.  It is no secret that the Gulf
of Mexico has a dearth of pelagic thrills compared to the Pacific Coast.

Louisiana can claim no Blue-footed Booby sightings ever, but records of
Brown Booby prior to 2013 were very modest.  Not sure of other gulf
states.  I recall in the summer of 2012, there was a record from north
Texas and one from Arkansas.  Some of us suffered 'pelagic envy'.

All of the changed in late summer 2013, when a boat full of pelagic
hungry birders encountered an adult Brown Booby flying northward up the
Mississippi River about 8 miles below the Venice Marina, about an hour
from the actual Gulf and farther yet from deep pelagic waters.  Then in
late October into early November, a group of 3 was found in Lake
Calcasieu on the western side of the state.  Then, late in December
2013, a lone adult was discovered on a Christmas Bird Count on the north
side of Lake Pontchartrain.  That bird remained about 2 weeks, extending
its stay into the new year.  The rest of 2014 played out without
additional reports, but a group of 4 was reported from the same area
during the same CBC on 3 January 2015.  Those birds could not be relocated.

Just a few weeks ago, while crossing the 24-mile long Lake Pontchartrain
Causeway, I caught a glimpse of what I thought was an adult Brown
Booby.  However, the bird was flying north while the vehicle in which I
was riding was travelling south.  We pass this same route about the same
time every Saturday morning so I was on the lookout the next time.  My
associate and I were discussing the possible sighting, and very shortly
found ourselves looking at an adult Brown Booby about 100 feet away,
flying toward us.

Our sighting was duly reported on the Louisiana listserv.  In the 2
weeks since our report, there have been about 6 more sightings of 1 or 2
individuals.  Additionally, There were 2 sightings along Interstate 10
and another from the Mississippi River well below New Orleans.

I have wondered how an inhabitant of deep pelagic waters could be making
a living in Louisiana's shallow, muddy waters.  I've also wondered how
many individuals are out there and what factors are driving this
phenomenon.

Nan

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  Nancy L Newfield
  Casa Colibrí
  Metairie, LA USA
  
  http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


---
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Subject: Sleeping hummingbird "snores"
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2015 20:39:18 +0100
hello everyone,

the subject of snoring in birds has been a topic of conversation recently.
so i dug up a video of a "snoring" hummingbird that you might enjoy
watching:

http://gu.com/p/47dqt/stw

tschüss,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of April 12, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2015 11:37:05 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the latest BirdNote video. Drew Lanham leads the Maryland
Coastal Bays Program Coastal Stewards on a field trip to Assateague
Island and Ocean City, MD.
--------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* The Lark Ascending
http://bit.ly/1D3PB9N
* Spring Rain Refreshes a Desert
http://bit.ly/19wImbM
* The Ten Commandments of Subirdia
http://bit.ly/1Nlm8jp
* Northern Mockingbird
http://bit.ly/18kwEU4
* Voices and Vocabularies - How Birds Sing So Loudly
http://bit.ly/1HZN7dL
* Turkey Calling - Real or Unreal?
http://bit.ly/1GxqOPc
* State Birds - What's Yours?
http://bit.ly/1IzQDyT
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1OjqYuE
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next?
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2015 10:10:53 -0700
Hi

 We shall see what happens in the next few years. As a pelagic tour operator I 
get to see firsthand what is going on here in the ocean off California. The 
northbound movements of birds, fish, and marine mammals has essentially been 
unprecedented in the last year and a half. Lots and lots of record happenings, 
and patterns that people in their lifetime have not seen. 

 In any case, to the subject line. Blue-footed Boobies were actually the first 
effect we saw of the blob. The incursion of Blue-footed Boobies to California 
and beyond happened in the fall of 2013. That was the first sign of weirdness 
from a Half Moon Bay, CA perspective. There were a few BF Boobies in 2014, but 
definitely in 2014 the Brown Booby was the prevalent one, it was not odd to see 
multiples on a single trip. Here in the SF Bay Area spring winds have started 
in earnest, the upwelling is churning and the temperatures are dropping to near 
normal levels now on the ocean. Salmon are being caught and things look normal 
for the time being although this appears to be on the surface. A press release 
from the Farallon Islands last week noting essentially no breeding by various 
seabirds thus far, failures by sea lions suggest that we are far from being out 
of the woods on the warm water. My guess is that come the summer when the winds 
decrease we will be back to more warm ! 

 water, probably another round of Craveri's Murrelets going north, Black 
Storm-Petrel may once again be the common species here instead of Ashy...we 
shall see. 


Regards
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard Carlson 

Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2015 7:56 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next?

We've already seen our first Elegant Tern in AZ , there are record numbers of 
Brown Boobies in CA. Time to watch for another wave of Blue-footed boobies in 
AZ & CA? The "blob" , explained below, brought warm water to the entire NW 
Pacific and NOAA is forecasting a strong El Niño. Bad for fishermen, good for 
birders looking for rarities. 


The one common element in recent weather has been oddness. The West Coast has 
been warm and parched; the East Coast has been cold and snowed under. Fish are 
swimming into new waters, and hungry seals are washing up on California 
beaches. 


A long-lived patch of warm water off the West Coast, about 1 to 4 degrees 
Celsius (2 to 7 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal, is part of what’s wreaking 
much of this mayhem, according to two University of Washington papers to appear 
in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. 


“In the fall of 2013 and early 2014 we started to notice a big, almost 
circular mass of water that just didn’t cool off as much as it usually did, 
so by spring of 2014 it was warmer than we had ever seen it for that time of 
year,” said Nick Bond, a climate scientist at the UW-based Joint Institute 
for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, a joint research center of the UW 
and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 


Bond coined the term “the blob” last June in his monthly newsletter as 
Washington’s state climatologist. He said the huge patch of water – 1,000 
miles in each direction and 300 feet deep – had contributed to Washington’s 
mild 2014 winter and might signal a warmer summer. 


Ten months later, the blob is still off our shores, now squished up against the 
coast and extending about 1,000 miles offshore from Mexico up through Alaska, 
with water about 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than normal. 
Bond says all the models point to it continuing through the end of this year. 


The new study explores the blob’s origins. It finds that it relates to a 
persistent high-pressure ridge that caused a calmer ocean during the past two 
winters, so less heat was lost to cold air above. The warmer temperatures we 
see now aren’t due to more heating, but less winter cooling. 


Co-authors on the paper are Meghan Cronin at NOAA in Seattle and a UW affiliate 
professor of oceanography, Nate Mantua at NOAA in Santa Cruz and Howard 
Freeland at Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans. 


The authors look at how the blob is affecting West Coast marine life. They find 
fish sightings in unusual places, supporting recent reports that West Coast 
marine ecosystems are suffering and the food web is being disrupted by warm, 
less nutrient-rich Pacific Ocean water. 


The blob’s influence also extends inland. As air passes over warmer water and 
reaches the coast it brings more heat and less snow, which the paper shows 
helped cause current drought conditions in California, Oregon and Washington. 


The blob is just one element of a broader pattern in the Pacific Ocean whose 
influence reaches much further – possibly to include two bone-chilling 
winters in the Eastern U.S. 


A study in the same journal by Dennis Hartmann, a UW professor of atmospheric 
sciences, looks at the Pacific Ocean’s relationship to the cold 2013-14 
winter in the central and eastern United States. 


Despite all the talk about the “polar vortex,” Hartmann argues we need to 
look south to understand why so much cold air went shooting down into Chicago 
and Boston. 


His study shows a decadal-scale pattern in the tropical Pacific Ocean linked 
with changes in the North Pacific, called the North Pacific mode, that sent 
atmospheric waves snaking along the globe to bring warm and dry air to the West 
Coast and very cold, wet air to the central and eastern states. 


“Lately this mode seems to have emerged as second to the El Niño Southern 
Oscillation in terms of driving the long-term variability, especially over 
North America,” Hartmann said. 


In a blog post last month, Hartmann focused on the more recent winter of 
2014-15 and argues that, once again, the root cause was surface temperatures in 
the tropical Pacific. 


That pattern, which also causes the blob, seems to have become stronger since 
about 1980 and lately has elbowed out the Pacific Decadal Oscillation to become 
second only to El Niño in its influence on global weather patterns. 


“It’s an interesting question if that’s just natural variability 
happening or if there’s something changing about how the Pacific Ocean 
decadal variability behaves,” Hartmann said. “I don’t think we know the 
answer. Maybe it will go away quickly and we won’t talk about it anymore, but 
if it persists for a third year, then we’ll know something really unusual is 
going on.” 


Bond says that although the blob does not seem to be caused by climate change, 
it has many of the same effects for West Coast weather. 


“This is a taste of what the ocean will be like in future decades,” Bond 
said. “It wasn’t caused by global warming, but it’s producing conditions 
that we think are going to be more common with global warming.” 



Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Blob brings Blue-footed Boobies next?
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2015 07:56:07 -0700
We've already seen our first Elegant Tern in AZ , there are record numbers of 
Brown Boobies in CA. Time to watch for another wave of Blue-footed boobies in 
AZ & CA? The "blob" , explained below, brought warm water to the entire NW 
Pacific and NOAA is forecasting a strong El Niño. Bad for fishermen, good for 
birders looking for rarities. 


The one common element in recent weather has been oddness. The West Coast has 
been warm and parched; the East Coast has been cold and snowed under. Fish are 
swimming into new waters, and hungry seals are washing up on California 
beaches. 


A long-lived patch of warm water off the West Coast, about 1 to 4 degrees 
Celsius (2 to 7 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal, is part of what’s wreaking 
much of this mayhem, according to two University of Washington papers to appear 
in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. 


“In the fall of 2013 and early 2014 we started to notice a big, almost 
circular mass of water that just didn’t cool off as much as it usually did, 
so by spring of 2014 it was warmer than we had ever seen it for that time of 
year,” said Nick Bond, a climate scientist at the UW-based Joint Institute 
for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, a joint research center of the UW 
and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 


Bond coined the term “the blob” last June in his monthly newsletter as 
Washington’s state climatologist. He said the huge patch of water – 1,000 
miles in each direction and 300 feet deep – had contributed to Washington’s 
mild 2014 winter and might signal a warmer summer. 


Ten months later, the blob is still off our shores, now squished up against the 
coast and extending about 1,000 miles offshore from Mexico up through Alaska, 
with water about 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than normal. 
Bond says all the models point to it continuing through the end of this year. 


The new study explores the blob’s origins. It finds that it relates to a 
persistent high-pressure ridge that caused a calmer ocean during the past two 
winters, so less heat was lost to cold air above. The warmer temperatures we 
see now aren’t due to more heating, but less winter cooling. 


Co-authors on the paper are Meghan Cronin at NOAA in Seattle and a UW affiliate 
professor of oceanography, Nate Mantua at NOAA in Santa Cruz and Howard 
Freeland at Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans. 


The authors look at how the blob is affecting West Coast marine life. They find 
fish sightings in unusual places, supporting recent reports that West Coast 
marine ecosystems are suffering and the food web is being disrupted by warm, 
less nutrient-rich Pacific Ocean water. 


The blob’s influence also extends inland. As air passes over warmer water and 
reaches the coast it brings more heat and less snow, which the paper shows 
helped cause current drought conditions in California, Oregon and Washington. 


The blob is just one element of a broader pattern in the Pacific Ocean whose 
influence reaches much further – possibly to include two bone-chilling 
winters in the Eastern U.S. 


A study in the same journal by Dennis Hartmann, a UW professor of atmospheric 
sciences, looks at the Pacific Ocean’s relationship to the cold 2013-14 
winter in the central and eastern United States. 


Despite all the talk about the “polar vortex,” Hartmann argues we need to 
look south to understand why so much cold air went shooting down into Chicago 
and Boston. 


His study shows a decadal-scale pattern in the tropical Pacific Ocean linked 
with changes in the North Pacific, called the North Pacific mode, that sent 
atmospheric waves snaking along the globe to bring warm and dry air to the West 
Coast and very cold, wet air to the central and eastern states. 


“Lately this mode seems to have emerged as second to the El Niño Southern 
Oscillation in terms of driving the long-term variability, especially over 
North America,” Hartmann said. 


In a blog post last month, Hartmann focused on the more recent winter of 
2014-15 and argues that, once again, the root cause was surface temperatures in 
the tropical Pacific. 


That pattern, which also causes the blob, seems to have become stronger since 
about 1980 and lately has elbowed out the Pacific Decadal Oscillation to become 
second only to El Niño in its influence on global weather patterns. 


“It’s an interesting question if that’s just natural variability 
happening or if there’s something changing about how the Pacific Ocean 
decadal variability behaves,” Hartmann said. “I don’t think we know the 
answer. Maybe it will go away quickly and we won’t talk about it anymore, but 
if it persists for a third year, then we’ll know something really unusual is 
going on.” 


Bond says that although the blob does not seem to be caused by climate change, 
it has many of the same effects for West Coast weather. 


“This is a taste of what the ocean will be like in future decades,” Bond 
said. “It wasn’t caused by global warming, but it’s producing conditions 
that we think are going to be more common with global warming.” 



Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Duck Stamps --- a GOOD deal!
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2015 16:03:05 -0600
Although the following was published by the
Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, it
actually applies to countless refuges across the
US.  Please consider purchasing a Duck Stamp for
your local refuge, or for the benefit of refuges in general.

====================================

Did you know that 99% of Bosque del Apache was
purchased with Federal funds raised through the
sale of Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and
Conservation Stamps, or Duck Stamps? For every
dollar generated by the sale of Duck Stamps, 98
cents go directly to purchase or lease wetland
habitat for protection in the National Wildlife
Refuge System. You can become part of one of the
most successful conservation programs in America
by purchasing your annual Duck Stamp in the
Visitor Center or Bosque Nature Store for only
$15. It is valid from July 1 to June 30 and will
serve as your entrance fee to all National Wildlife Refuges.

====================================

Do you know what a "Bosque" is?  It's a woodland
along a river, stream, or flood plain in the
Southwest.  (Pronounced "boskee," some would say
"bowskee") unless you can pronounce the Spanish patois.

Jerry



Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 18:37:06 +0000
For real damage, you can't beat ratites.  I was once in a safari vehicle in 
Marakele National Park, South Africa, that had been restocked with, among other 
things, a bull Ostrich that had become imprinted on cars.  It courted them 
continuously (the only time I have ever seen an Ostrich go through its full 
mating display is when it was trying to woo our vehicle - I guess that's what 
they mean by autoeroticism).  Our driver had to do a bit of evasive driving to 
avoid the bird, which kept trying to ram into us to keep us from leaving the 
scene.  I was told that in an earlier encounter he had done several hundred 
Rand worth of damage to the vehicle. 

Some years earlier I used to see Australian Cassowaries with some regularity on 
the Palmerston Highway in Northern Queensland.  They never gave me any 
trouble, but I was told a supposedly true story about a motorist who had hit 
one with, I believe, a VW Beetle.  He made the mistake of getting out of the 
car to investigate, and the only slightly ruffled bird charged him.  He beat a 
hasty retreat to the Beetle roof, where he watched as the bird stalked around 
the car, kicking it.  As you probably know, cassowaries have a dagger-like 
claw on their innermost toe, and the bird succeeded in puncturing both the car 
doors and the petrol tank. Ronald Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Elizabeth Doull 
 To: Ronald Orenstein  
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 2:12 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
   
Fascinating stuff about birds damaging cars.  I don't see the photo of the 
vulture so I wonder if you can re-send it?  Thanks

Liz    Halifax

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ronald Orenstein" 
To: 
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2015 3:02 PM
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN


In New Zealand Keas have learned to gain access to cars by picking out the 
rubber holding the windshield (or as New Zealanders would say, windscreen) 
in place. They have yet to learn to drive.
Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Richard Carlson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 1:58 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN

Myakka would be Florida location #3. Most incidents occur in Everglades at 
Royal Palm. Some at Flamingo, also. Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
From: "birding AT aol.com" 
 To: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET; birdchat AT listserv.ksu.edu
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 10:33 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN

Richard, I'm sure it was at the parking lot, in Myakka River State Park, 
just beyond the Concession, and beside the water, that visitors were warned 
not to park there, especially early in the morning or later in the 
afternoon, as I remember, because Black Vultures were destroying cars 
exactly as you describe. I wondered why it was just Black Vultures that had 
taken to this activity, and why and how it had started in the first place. 
All the best,Ernie Jardine Pickering Ontariobirding AT aol.com 
www.birdsongidentification.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Carlson 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 1:30 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN

This A growing world wide phenomenon. Apparently a learned behavior since it 
is
so localized. The worst vultures are at Everglades Park where Black Vultures
destroy both wipers and window seals. Damage can be $1,000's. Also reported
attacking wipers are crows in England, Australia and NZ. Keas in NZ are
notorious for attacking car wipers and seals.

Richard Carlson
Full time
birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe,
CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2015, at 6:16 PM, Paul Wicklund
via Mnbird  wrote:

> What would this vulture be
eating? Windshield wiper blades? Has anyone encountered this behavior 
before?
>
Jan Wicklund
>
> 
>
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>
_______________________________________________
> Mnbird mailing list
>
Mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
>
http://lists.mnbird.net/mailman/listinfo/mnbird_lists.mnbird.net

BirdChat
Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


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Subject: Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 14:21:31 -0400
Hopefully this activity remains an isolated phenomenon. There certainly are 
lots of cars and lots of Black Vultures. 


Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Carlson 
To: birding ; rccarl ; birdchat 
 

Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 1:58 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN




Myakka would be Florida location #3. Most incidents occur in Everglades at 
Royal Palm. Some at Flamingo, also. 






Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965






       From: "birding AT aol.com" 
 To: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET; birdchat AT listserv.ksu.edu
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 10:33 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN






        Richard,



I'm sure it was at the parking lot, in Myakka River State Park, just beyond the 
Concession, and beside the water, that visitors were warned not to park there, 
especially early in the morning or later in the afternoon, as I remember, 
because Black Vultures were destroying cars exactly as you describe. I wondered 
why it was just Black Vultures that had taken to this activity, and why and how 
it had started in the first place. 




All the best,

Ernie Jardine

Pickering Ontario

        birding AT aol.com



        www.birdsongidentification.com










-----Original Message-----
 From: Richard Carlson 
 To: BIRDCHAT 
 Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 1:30 am
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN



This A growing world wide phenomenon. Apparently a learned behavior since it is 

so localized.  The worst vultures are at Everglades Park where Black Vultures
destroy both wipers and window seals.  Damage can be $1,000's.   Also reported
attacking wipers are crows in England, Australia and NZ.  Keas in NZ are
notorious for attacking car wipers and seals.

Richard Carlson
Full time
birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe,
CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2015, at 6:16 PM, Paul Wicklund
via Mnbird  wrote:

> What would this vulture be
eating? Windshield wiper blades? Has anyone encountered this behavior before?
>
Jan Wicklund
>
> 
>
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>
_______________________________________________
> Mnbird mailing list
>
Mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
>
http://lists.mnbird.net/mailman/listinfo/mnbird_lists.mnbird.net

BirdChat
Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html















BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 14:13:52 -0400
Doesn't sound like much of a reach, if they've figured this out. Quite the 
"bird brains"! 



-----Original Message-----
From: Ronald Orenstein 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 2:07 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN


In New Zealand Keas have learned to gain access to cars by picking out the
rubber holding the windshield (or as New Zealanders would say, windscreen) in
place.  They have yet to learn to drive.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek
Court
Mississauga, ON L5L
3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

From: Richard Carlson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU

Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 1:58 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird]
Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN

Myakka would be Florida location
#3.  Most incidents occur in Everglades at Royal Palm.  Some at Flamingo,
also. Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time
Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson
520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
      From:
"birding AT aol.com" 
 To: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET;
birdchat AT listserv.ksu.edu
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 10:33 AM
 Subject:
Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN


Richard, I'm sure it was at the parking lot, in Myakka River State Park, just
beyond the Concession, and beside the water, that visitors were warned not to
park there, especially early in the morning or later in the afternoon, as I
remember, because Black Vultures were destroying cars exactly as you describe. 
I 

wondered why it was just Black Vultures that had taken to this activity, and 
why 

and how it had started in the first place. All the best,Ernie Jardine Pickering
Ontariobirding AT aol.com www.birdsongidentification.com

-----Original
Message-----
From: Richard Carlson 
To: BIRDCHAT

Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 1:30 am
Subject: Re:
[BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN

This A growing
world wide phenomenon.  Apparently a learned behavior since it is
so
localized.  The worst vultures are at Everglades Park where Black
Vultures
destroy both wipers and window seals.  Damage can be $1,000's.  Also
reported
attacking wipers are crows in England, Australia and NZ.  Keas in NZ
are
notorious for attacking car wipers and seals.

Richard Carlson
Full
time
birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake
Tahoe,
CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2015, at 6:16 PM, Paul
Wicklund
via Mnbird  wrote:

> What would this
vulture be
eating? Windshield wiper blades? Has anyone encountered this
behavior before?
>
Jan Wicklund
>
> 
>
>
>
>
>

>
>
>
_______________________________________________
>
Mnbird mailing
list
>
Mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
>
http://lists.mnbird.net/mailman/listinfo/mnbird_lists.mnbird.net

BirdChat
Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
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BirdChat Guidelines:
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Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 18:02:34 +0000
In New Zealand Keas have learned to gain access to cars by picking out the 
rubber holding the windshield (or as New Zealanders would say, windscreen) in 
place.  They have yet to learn to drive. 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Richard Carlson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 1:58 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
   
Myakka would be Florida location #3.  Most incidents occur in Everglades at 
Royal Palm.  Some at Flamingo, also. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
      From: "birding AT aol.com" 
 To: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET; birdchat AT listserv.ksu.edu 
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 10:33 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
  
Richard, I'm sure it was at the parking lot, in Myakka River State Park, just 
beyond the Concession, and beside the water, that visitors were warned not to 
park there, especially early in the morning or later in the afternoon, as I 
remember, because Black Vultures were destroying cars exactly as you describe. 
I wondered why it was just Black Vultures that had taken to this activity, and 
why and how it had started in the first place. All the best,Ernie Jardine 
Pickering Ontariobirding AT aol.com www.birdsongidentification.com   


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Carlson 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 1:30 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN

This A growing world wide phenomenon.  Apparently a learned behavior since it 
is 

so localized.  The worst vultures are at Everglades Park where Black Vultures
destroy both wipers and window seals.  Damage can be $1,000's.  Also reported
attacking wipers are crows in England, Australia and NZ.  Keas in NZ are
notorious for attacking car wipers and seals.

Richard Carlson
Full time
birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe,
CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2015, at 6:16 PM, Paul Wicklund
via Mnbird  wrote:

> What would this vulture be
eating? Windshield wiper blades? Has anyone encountered this behavior before?
>
Jan Wicklund
>
> 
>
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>
_______________________________________________
> Mnbird mailing list
>
Mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
>
http://lists.mnbird.net/mailman/listinfo/mnbird_lists.mnbird.net

BirdChat
Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 

  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 17:58:06 +0000
Myakka would be Florida location #3.  Most incidents occur in Everglades at 
Royal Palm.  Some at Flamingo, also. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
      From: "birding AT aol.com" 
 To: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET; birdchat AT listserv.ksu.edu 
 Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2015 10:33 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
   
Richard, I'm sure it was at the parking lot, in Myakka River State Park, just 
beyond the Concession, and beside the water, that visitors were warned not to 
park there, especially early in the morning or later in the afternoon, as I 
remember, because Black Vultures were destroying cars exactly as you describe. 
I wondered why it was just Black Vultures that had taken to this activity, and 
why and how it had started in the first place. All the best,Ernie Jardine 
Pickering Ontariobirding AT aol.com www.birdsongidentification.com   


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Carlson 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 1:30 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN

This A growing world wide phenomenon. Apparently a learned behavior since it is 

so localized.  The worst vultures are at Everglades Park where Black Vultures
destroy both wipers and window seals.  Damage can be $1,000's.   Also reported
attacking wipers are crows in England, Australia and NZ.  Keas in NZ are
notorious for attacking car wipers and seals.

Richard Carlson
Full time
birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe,
CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2015, at 6:16 PM, Paul Wicklund
via Mnbird  wrote:

> What would this vulture be
eating? Windshield wiper blades? Has anyone encountered this behavior before?
>
Jan Wicklund
>
> 
>
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>
_______________________________________________
> Mnbird mailing list
>
Mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
>
http://lists.mnbird.net/mailman/listinfo/mnbird_lists.mnbird.net

BirdChat
Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 

  
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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 13:33:29 -0400
Richard,

I'm sure it was at the parking lot, in Myakka River State Park, just beyond the 
Concession, and beside the water, that visitors were warned not to park there, 
especially early in the morning or later in the afternoon, as I remember, 
because Black Vultures were destroying cars exactly as you describe. I wondered 
why it was just Black Vultures that had taken to this activity, and why and how 
it had started in the first place. 


All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Carlson 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Apr 9, 2015 1:30 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN


This A growing world wide phenomenon. Apparently a learned behavior since it is 

so localized.  The worst vultures are at Everglades Park where Black Vultures
destroy both wipers and window seals.  Damage can be $1,000's.   Also reported
attacking wipers are crows in England, Australia and NZ.  Keas in NZ are
notorious for attacking car wipers and seals.

Richard Carlson
Full time
birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe,
CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2015, at 6:16 PM, Paul Wicklund
via Mnbird  wrote:

> What would this vulture be
eating? Windshield wiper blades? Has anyone encountered this behavior before?
>
Jan Wicklund
>
> 
>
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>
_______________________________________________
> Mnbird mailing list
>
Mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
>
http://lists.mnbird.net/mailman/listinfo/mnbird_lists.mnbird.net

BirdChat
Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html



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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: ivory Gulls, Polar Bears etc.
From: William Leigh <leightern AT MSN.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2015 12:38:16 +0000
Barry, 
Thank you for your thorough and informative response! Well done! 

William Leigh leightern AT msn.com

Bridgewater, Virginia 
 

 



> Date: Mon, 23 Mar 2015 16:23:11 -0400
> From: mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] ivory Gulls, Polar Bears etc.
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> I am sorry to take so long to get back to you on this, but we who are 
conservationists tend to get busy with other things...it's quite endless. 

> 
> First, we agree that House Sparrows are not responsible for whatever is 
happening to Polar Bears and Ivory Gulls. Nor are they responsible for declines 
in Purple Martins, but let me take of my bird hat and speak as someone who, as 
a member of the International Association for Bear Research and Management, has 
had discussions on this very issue with some of the world's leading Polar Bear 
researchers. 

> 
> I respectfully suggest that you should not rely on the website of Susan 
Crockford for your information on polar bears. She is a well-known to those 
concerned about the effects of climate change on high latitude species as 
self-promoting climate change denier who was, and may still be, on the payroll 
of The Heartland Institute a major climate change denying "institute" in the US 
that is funded by the Koch brothers. This is also true of another "expert", Dr. 
Mitchell Taylor, who is sometimes cited, especially by the government of 
Nunavut, in its endless efforts to assure us that it's okay to commercially 
exploit Polar Bears as trophy animals, as I explained in this blog last October 
(http://unpublishedottawa.com/letter/1714/are-polar-bears-political-pawns). 

> 
> I would urge that more reliable information on, and explanations of, status 
of the various polar bear subpopulations may be found at the website of the 
IUCN's Polar Bear Specialist Group: 

>  http://pbsg.npolar.no/en/status/status-table.html.
> 
> You have, perhaps unknowingly, stumbled into a raging political battle. The 
same Canadian government that is promoting the Alberta tarsands, is urged by 
Nunavut to oppose extra conservation for Polar Bears, often based on an 
"expert" who is also an advisor to the Heartland Institute (fully exposed by 
Naomi Kline in her new book, This Changes Everything 
(http://books.simonandschuster.com/This-Changes-Everything/Naomi-Klein/9781451697384) 
and has conflated environmentalism with terrorism is under pressure from 
Nunavut to fight an American proposal to list the Polar Bear on Appendix I of 
the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) which would 
prohibit international trade in Polar Bears, their parts and derivatives 
(meaning the trophy pelts so lucrative to Nunavut) 

> 
> Context is important. For example, take the M'Clintock Channel subpopulation; 
it was severely reduced in the past due to overharvesting, a moratorium on 
harvest was put in place, and the population slowly recovered. So, it's current 
status is 'Increasing", but the why is the important point; it is increasing 
from a reduced state. 

> 
> Western Hudson Bay, the area I have visited to see Polar Bears, is currently 
shown as stable, which it apparently has been during the past decade during 
which advances in sea ice break-up in the western half of Hudson Bay slowed 
greatly. 

> 
> However, I think the main thing to remember is that the population declined 
by about 22% between 1987 and 2004 during a period when sea ice break-up 
advanced by about a month. 

> 
> This pause in sea ice changes during the past decade has been well discussed 
and explained by highly respected climate scientists such as Michael Mann (see 
"Atlantic and Pacific multidecadal oscillations and Northern Hemisphere 
temperatures", written by Byron A. Steinman, Michael E. Mann and Sonya K. 
Miller, and published in the 27 February 2015 of Science, Vol 347, Issue 6225. 
It's complicated, but can be found here: 
http://www.meteo.psu.edu/holocene/public_html/Mann/articles/articles/SteinmanEtAlScience15.pdf>) 
. It's the latest from some top climate scientists in a prestigious, 
peer-reviewed science journal. 

> 
> The "false pause" is considered temporary and a return to negative trends in 
sea ice is expected soon. 

> 
> The map produced and published by EC should be viewed by you while at least 
keeping in mind that it was heavily influenced by policy types who, of course, 
fight valiantly even against their own scientific advisory body (the Polar Bear 
Technical Committee of which a friend of mine is a member, and is hired at by a 
provincial government, thus has more latitude, although your best bet is to 
talk to someone like Andrew Derocher (see his explanation of why Polar Bears 
are at risk, here  ) 
who is freer to speak out and a staunch opponent of federal policy) in order to 
maintain the status quo. 

> 
> It has far less to do with Polar Bears than in joy that the opening of the 
Northwest Passage opens up shipping of extractive resources, the extraction 
processes themselves further pressuring high latitude species and, of course, 
the all-important Alberta tarsands and the Keystone and other pipelines. 

> 
> You say that Polar Bear habitat is 100% covered in ice in winter currently. 
Whoop-de-do. If it weren't polar bears would be in even deeper trouble. So, 
that argument is a red herring. 

> 
> The important point you should remember is that the length of the ice-free 
season when polar bears are largely fasting. 

> 
> That ice-free season for the subpopulation my friend and advisor on this 
issue works on is now a full month longer than it was in the early 1980s--a 
month shorter for the bears to hunt seals, and a month longer to live off the 
stored body fat that bears had to accumulate during the now month shorter 
hunting season. 

> 
> He is seeing additive effects of this in large declines in body condition, 
reduced survival of cubs, and reduced frequency of reproduction by females 
(i.e. they often can't raise cubs every 3 years any longer but need an extra 
year to recover energy reserves). Long before we have a large reduction in 
mid-winter sea ice coverage polar bears will be greatly reduced in number or 
extirpated over much of their range. 

> 
> Here is a link to NOAA sea ice data discussing the 2014 minimum: 
 

> 
> Note the text: The Arctic's sea ice cover appears to have reached its minimum 
extent on September 17, 2014. Sea ice extent on that day was measured at 5.02 
million square kilometers (1.94 million square miles). It was the sixth-lowest 
extent recorded since satellites began measuring sea ice in 1979. The number is 
above the 2012 record extent but is still below the long-term average. 

> 
> Yes there can be some recovery of sea ice on an annual basis (i.e., 2013 and 
2014 were greater extent than the all-time low of 2012), but the long-term 
trend is negative and faster than the climate models predicted. 

> 
> I agree that Ivory Gulls are not wholly dependent on Polar Bear excrement and 
kills, although pickings can be slight where they live, and I agree even that 
not all forms of mercury are deleterious to the health of the organism, but I 
will NOT be complacent about such a precipitous decline in the measured and 
best studied population. The entire number for Canada seems to me to equal 
what, not so long ago, a birder could find in winter birding in Newfoundland, 
especially up at the northern peninsula, where the locals call them "ice 
partridges" and they used to be the most common winter bird! 

> 
> Mercury is disproportionately generated by the industrialized south...which 
means southern Canada and the U.S. in the western hemisphere and Eurasia in the 
eastern hemisphere, and I'm not complacent that it is less of a problem in 
Eurasia than in North America even assuming a south to north movement in it, 
bio-accumulating all the way. China and Europe are not without the population 
size and industrial base that, I think we might worry, is the contributing 
factor. 

> 
> Naivet is not a virtue in these times.
> 
> It's no wonder that the climate change deniers (and the offshoot...those 
opposing enhanced conservation, whether or not they blame House Sparrows) 
reminds me of the era of tobacco apologists who ridiculed health concerns...as 
this movie shows (http://sonyclassics.com/merchantsofdoubt/) they are often the 
same folks. I think we are past that. Even Dr. Taylor can't deny the fact of 
climate change since he has lived in Nunavut. One can't see the effects of 
permafrost melt for the first time in human history and continue with the 
illusion all is alright. 

> 
> Neither, I submit, should we.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Barry
> 
> 
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard Carlson 

> Sent: March-22-15 6:31 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] ivory Gulls, Polar Bears etc.
> 
> Cursed as I am with a deep love of data and a corresponding skepticism of 
wild headlines, I dug into the data behind Barry MacKays recent post re Ivory 
Gulls, Polar Bears etc. 

> 
> He summarizes his concern as follows:
> 
> "I have long worried about the Ivory Gull because of its dependence upon the 
Polar Bear, which in turn depends on the Ringed Seal, which in turn depends on 
sea ice, which is rapidly disappearing. " 

> 
> Working backwards from Ivory Gulls it turns out that what he must be talking 
about is the relatively small Canadian population of Ivory Gulls. The great 
majority of Ivory Gulls are in Russia, and there is no evidence of severe 
decline there. (See IUCN) 

> 
> So assuming the Canadian Ivory Gulls didn't just move somewhere in the 
vastness of the Arctic, let's follow Mr. MacKay's logic and look at Canadian 
Polar Bears. Fortunately those are the world's best counted Polar Bears and the 
results are summarized in the following map. 

> 
> 
https://polarbearscience.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/ec_polarbearstatus_and-trends-lg_2010-2014-mapscanada_oct-26-2014.jpg 

> 
> Gee, Canadian Polar Bear populations are stable or increasing. Catastrophic 
global warming's poster child refuses to cooperate. Like the urban bobcats in 
my yard, Polar bears are adapting. Of course, since these results don't fit the 
Catastrophic script, you'll never see them in any newspaper. 

> MacKay's next threatened species is the Polar bear's prime food, Ringed 
Seals, but IUCN says there are millions and they are a species of least 
concern. Of course the Polar bears are OK, there are lots of seals. 

> 
> What about "rapidly disappearing sea ice" ? The 2015 winter ice decline was a 
whole 1%. Wow! Furthermore the decline was mostly west of Kamchatka where there 
are no Polar Bears. See 

> 
> 
http://www.climate4you.com/SeaIce.htm#NSIDC%20recent%20Arctic%20and%20Antarctic%20sea%20ice%20extent 

> Canadian polar bear habitat has 100% winter ice coverage, just like every 
other year for the past 1,000 years or so. 

> So worry about polar bears if you wish. I think we should be spending far 
more effort on some absolute for sure desperate and solvable problems like 
raping the Midwest grassland bird environments for utterly useless "green 
energy" corn-based ethanol. Richard Carlson Full-time Birder, Biker and 
Rotarian Part-time Economist Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA rccarl AT pacbell.net 
Tucson 520-760-4935 Tahoe 530-581-0624 Cell 650-280-2965 BirdChat Guidelines: 
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ 

> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: [Mnbird] Interesting vulture activity--Plymouth MN
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2015 22:33:22 -0700
This A growing world wide phenomenon. Apparently a learned behavior since it is 
so localized. The worst vultures are at Everglades Park where Black Vultures 
destroy both wipers and window seals. Damage can be $1,000's. Also reported 
attacking wipers are crows in England, Australia and NZ. Keas in NZ are 
notorious for attacking car wipers and seals. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2015, at 6:16 PM, Paul Wicklund via Mnbird  
wrote: 


> What would this vulture be eating? Windshield wiper blades? Has anyone 
encountered this behavior before? 

> Jan Wicklund
>
> 
>
>
>
>
> 
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Mnbird mailing list
> Mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
> http://lists.mnbird.net/mailman/listinfo/mnbird_lists.mnbird.net

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Subject: Re: Art fakes and ornithology
From: Paul Rakow <paul.rakow AT CANTAB.NET>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2015 20:10:31 +0100
  All,

 I hope that this Egyptian wildfowl painting which I vividly
 remember from the British Museum is still untainted:

 
 


 (I hope the long link works - if not, you can google
 "Nebamun hunting in the marshes" )

    Now that it is pointed out, your geese picture does look a bit
 too much like a modern painting, when compared with the Nebamun
 mural.

            Paul Rakow
            Liverpool, England

On Mon, April 6, 2015 14:23, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
> We don't often find an intersection between the world's of art forgery
> and ornithology, but here is one. We may have to do some rethinking about
> the historical migratory paths of Palaearctic geese if this story turns
> out to be true.
>
> http://m.livescience.com/50309-egyptian-mona-lisa-may-be-fake.html
>
>
> Sent via Flipboard, your personal magazine. Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com Get it for free to keep up with the news you care
> about.

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Subject: Advice on red spruce forest visit
From: "Tangren, Jerry" <tangren AT WSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2015 14:56:28 +0000
We'll be in Cincinnati the end of June. From there we'd like to make a visit to 
red spruce forest. We'd like to spend several days at one spot and get to know 
the habitat intimately. Please, do folks have a recommendation on a good place 
to stay? Perhaps a place we can rent a cabin for several nights? 


Thanks!

--Lorna & Jerry


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Hilton Pond 03/01/15 (Pine Siskin Invasion)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2015 09:12:05 -0400
After returning from my Belize hummingbird expedition and finding a massive 
computer meltdown, I’m trying to get caught up with back installments of 
“This Week at Hilton Pond.” Today’s photo essay revisits early March and 
the invasion of Pine Siskins (and other winter finches) at Hilton Pond Center. 
To view the images and discussion (which includes a possible explanation for 
the origin of “March comes in a like a lion . . .”) please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150301.html 
 


While there don’t forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded and 
recaptured during the period—including several “old” birds from years 
ago. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============


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Subject: Re: Art fakes and ornithology
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2015 16:13:40 +0000
Wow, indeed.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Richard Carlson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Monday, April 6, 2015 11:47 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Art fakes and ornithology
   
Wow!

Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone




> On Apr 6, 2015, at 6:23 AM, Ronald Orenstein  
wrote: 

>
> We don't often find an intersection between the world's of art forgery and 
ornithology, but here is one. We may have to do some rethinking about the 
historical migratory paths of Palaearctic geese if this story turns out to be 
true. 

>
> http://m.livescience.com/50309-egyptian-mona-lisa-may-be-fake.html
>
> Sent via Flipboard, your personal magazine. Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> Get it for free to keep up with the news you care about.
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Art fakes and ornithology
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2015 08:47:48 -0700
Wow!

Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Apr 6, 2015, at 6:23 AM, Ronald Orenstein  
wrote: 

>
> We don't often find an intersection between the world's of art forgery and 
ornithology, but here is one. We may have to do some rethinking about the 
historical migratory paths of Palaearctic geese if this story turns out to be 
true. 

>
> http://m.livescience.com/50309-egyptian-mona-lisa-may-be-fake.html
>
> Sent via Flipboard, your personal magazine. Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> Get it for free to keep up with the news you care about.
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Art fakes and ornithology
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2015 09:23:48 -0400
We don't often find an intersection between the world's of art forgery and 
ornithology, but here is one. We may have to do some rethinking about the 
historical migratory paths of Palaearctic geese if this story turns out to be 
true. 


http://m.livescience.com/50309-egyptian-mona-lisa-may-be-fake.html

Sent via Flipboard, your personal magazine. Ronald Orenstein 
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
Get it for free to keep up with the news you care about.




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Subject: RFI: NYC birding
From: sj wexlr <merganser AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2015 16:56:35 +0000
RFI:  Birding NYC

Hi All:
 I'm planning on birding in NYC for a couple of days in May. CAn anyone suggest 
where to go exactly in Central Park? Also any other areas that would be good 
for me to bird. 


Thanks
Sally Wechsler
silver spring, md
 		 	   		  
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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of April 5, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 4 Apr 2015 08:04:41 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the latest photo blog, A Rough-legged Hawk Takes Off
http://bit.ly/1CYczQL
--------------------------

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Golden Eagles of the Carpathians
http://bit.ly/1Fa4d5D
* Everybody Knows a Mallard,
    But Did You Know.... ?
http://bit.ly/WaVNeP
* Why a Gorget Glitters
http://bit.ly/1Fa4fuf
* The Delirian - Believe it or not
http://bit.ly/1NNn5Op
* A Wild Goose Chase - Off on a Twitch
http://bit.ly/1J1J5T5
* A Natural Feast for Hummingbirds
http://bit.ly/1GSL50s
* Sunning with Doves
http://bit.ly/1DwEs4z
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1DwEEkq
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Minutes of today's meeting
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Thu, 2 Apr 2015 07:58:18 -0400
David,

You've re-written The Birds, by Aristophanes!! --one of the great comedies of 
classical theater... 


Cheers,

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA 19072
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of MM 

Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2015 10:42 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Minutes of today's meeting

Brilliant!

thanks

Oscar Canino
SF, CA

On Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 6:51 PM, Spector, David (Biology) < 
spectord AT mail.ccsu.edu> wrote: 


> The minutes of the meeting as recorded by the Secretary Bird:
>
> There was dispute as to whether the meeting should be chaired by any
> of many emperors (including a Mikado), kings and kinglets, a sultan,
> tyrants and tyrannulets, monarchs, bishops, cardinals, or a Bonaparte.
> It was finally decided that the highest rank belonged to the Celestial 
Monarch. 

>
> The royalty insisted that the Military Macaw exclude the Jacobins and
> the Zapata Wren from the meeting, and a Royal Flycatcher was appointed
> to protect the nobility from annoying insects.
>
> Forbes's Plover reported the recommendation of the finance committee
> (Bank Swallow, Fiscal Shrike, Rothschild's Swift,  Golden Plover, and
> Rockefeller's Sunbird) for the removal of the skimmer as treasurer and
> appointment of the Dollarbird to fill that post.
>
> The old coots of the history committee gave their report.
>
> Music was provided by the Flutist Wren, Musician Wren, Song Wren,
> Varied Triller, Song Sparrow, Melodious Warbler, trumpeters, and a
> barbet shop quartet.  The hummingbirds, having forgotten the words,
> provided backup harmony and a Calliope accompaniment. The bard owl
> recited poetry, and the Mute Swan and Chaplin's Barbet performed in a mime 
show. 

>
> The Adorable Coquette and the Cock-of-the-Rock eyed each other across
> the room, while the restless Crestless Gardener yearned to get
> outside.  The noddies slept through the meeting.
>
> As debate became heated, members referred to each other as loon,
> screamer, booby, dodo, hammerhead, chat, wigeon, cuckoo, turkey, babbler, . . 
. . 

> The mockingbirds and the sneering contempt of the Supercilious Wren
> intimidated the Tremblers, who were too nervous to speak.
>
> Several orphaned birds were brought to the attention of the group,
> and, in an act of charity, the affected flycatcher, heron, and trogon
> were made Ward's of the state.
>
> The Lazy Cisticola missed the meeting (as did the Solitary Sandpiper
> and various solitaires and hermits).  The Adjutant Stork, as
> sergeant-at-arms, attempted unsuccessfully to prevent other cisticolas
> from bubbling, chattering, chirping, croaking, rattling, singing,
> trilling, wailing, whistling, and zitting.
>
> Despite the raucous tone of the event, the meeting closed with some
> words of wisdom from the Sage Sparrow and Sage Thrasher (the Sage
> Grouse kept its wisdom to itself) and a quiet song by the Vesper Sparrow.
>
> The Barn Owl, Barn Swallow, House Martin, House Sparrow, and House
> Wren each offered to host future meetings.
>
> The scrub-birds cleaned up after the meeting.
>
>
>
> Submitted, 1 April 2015, on behalf of the Secretary Bird David Spector
> Belchertown, Massachusetts, US
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
*Mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it.*

Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
(translated by Maurice Frydman)

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Subject: Re: Minutes of today's meeting
From: MM <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2015 19:42:10 -0700
Brilliant!

thanks

Oscar Canino
SF, CA

On Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 6:51 PM, Spector, David (Biology) <
spectord AT mail.ccsu.edu> wrote:

> The minutes of the meeting as recorded by the Secretary Bird:
>
> There was dispute as to whether the meeting should be chaired by any of
> many emperors (including a Mikado), kings and kinglets, a sultan, tyrants
> and tyrannulets, monarchs, bishops, cardinals, or a Bonaparte.  It was
> finally decided that the highest rank belonged to the Celestial Monarch.
>
> The royalty insisted that the Military Macaw exclude the Jacobins and the
> Zapata Wren from the meeting, and a Royal Flycatcher was appointed to
> protect the nobility from annoying insects.
>
> Forbes's Plover reported the recommendation of the finance committee (Bank
> Swallow, Fiscal Shrike, Rothschild's Swift,  Golden Plover, and
> Rockefeller's Sunbird) for the removal of the skimmer as treasurer and
> appointment of the Dollarbird to fill that post.
>
> The old coots of the history committee gave their report.
>
> Music was provided by the Flutist Wren, Musician Wren, Song Wren, Varied
> Triller, Song Sparrow, Melodious Warbler, trumpeters, and a barbet shop
> quartet.  The hummingbirds, having forgotten the words, provided backup
> harmony and a Calliope accompaniment. The bard owl recited poetry, and the
> Mute Swan  and Chaplin's Barbet performed in a mime show.
>
> The Adorable Coquette and the Cock-of-the-Rock eyed each other across the
> room, while the restless Crestless Gardener yearned to get outside.  The
> noddies slept through the meeting.
>
> As debate became heated, members referred to each other as loon, screamer,
> booby, dodo, hammerhead, chat, wigeon, cuckoo, turkey, babbler, . . . .
> The mockingbirds and the sneering contempt of the Supercilious Wren
> intimidated the Tremblers, who were too nervous to speak.
>
> Several orphaned birds were brought to the attention of the group, and, in
> an act of charity, the affected flycatcher, heron, and trogon were made
> Ward's of the state.
>
> The Lazy Cisticola missed the meeting (as did the Solitary Sandpiper and
> various solitaires and hermits).  The Adjutant Stork, as sergeant-at-arms,
> attempted unsuccessfully to prevent other cisticolas from bubbling,
> chattering, chirping, croaking, rattling, singing, trilling, wailing,
> whistling, and zitting.
>
> Despite the raucous tone of the event, the meeting closed with some words
> of wisdom from the Sage Sparrow and Sage Thrasher (the Sage Grouse kept its
> wisdom to itself) and a quiet song by the Vesper Sparrow.
>
> The Barn Owl, Barn Swallow, House Martin, House Sparrow, and House Wren
> each offered to host future meetings.
>
> The scrub-birds cleaned up after the meeting.
>
>
>
> Submitted, 1 April 2015, on behalf of the Secretary Bird
> David Spector
> Belchertown, Massachusetts, US
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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--
*Mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it.*

Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
(translated by Maurice Frydman)

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Subject: Minutes of today's meeting
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2015 21:51:57 -0400
The minutes of the meeting as recorded by the Secretary Bird:

There was dispute as to whether the meeting should be chaired by any of many 
emperors (including a Mikado), kings and kinglets, a sultan, tyrants and 
tyrannulets, monarchs, bishops, cardinals, or a Bonaparte. It was finally 
decided that the highest rank belonged to the Celestial Monarch. 


The royalty insisted that the Military Macaw exclude the Jacobins and the 
Zapata Wren from the meeting, and a Royal Flycatcher was appointed to protect 
the nobility from annoying insects. 


Forbes's Plover reported the recommendation of the finance committee (Bank 
Swallow, Fiscal Shrike, Rothschild's Swift, Golden Plover, and Rockefeller's 
Sunbird) for the removal of the skimmer as treasurer and appointment of the 
Dollarbird to fill that post. 


The old coots of the history committee gave their report.

Music was provided by the Flutist Wren, Musician Wren, Song Wren, Varied 
Triller, Song Sparrow, Melodious Warbler, trumpeters, and a barbet shop 
quartet. The hummingbirds, having forgotten the words, provided backup harmony 
and a Calliope accompaniment. The bard owl recited poetry, and the Mute Swan 
and Chaplin's Barbet performed in a mime show. 


The Adorable Coquette and the Cock-of-the-Rock eyed each other across the room, 
while the restless Crestless Gardener yearned to get outside. The noddies slept 
through the meeting. 


As debate became heated, members referred to each other as loon, screamer, 
booby, dodo, hammerhead, chat, wigeon, cuckoo, turkey, babbler, . . . . The 
mockingbirds and the sneering contempt of the Supercilious Wren intimidated the 
Tremblers, who were too nervous to speak. 


Several orphaned birds were brought to the attention of the group, and, in an 
act of charity, the affected flycatcher, heron, and trogon were made Ward's of 
the state. 


The Lazy Cisticola missed the meeting (as did the Solitary Sandpiper and 
various solitaires and hermits). The Adjutant Stork, as sergeant-at-arms, 
attempted unsuccessfully to prevent other cisticolas from bubbling, chattering, 
chirping, croaking, rattling, singing, trilling, wailing, whistling, and 
zitting. 


Despite the raucous tone of the event, the meeting closed with some words of 
wisdom from the Sage Sparrow and Sage Thrasher (the Sage Grouse kept its wisdom 
to itself) and a quiet song by the Vesper Sparrow. 


The Barn Owl, Barn Swallow, House Martin, House Sparrow, and House Wren each 
offered to host future meetings. 


The scrub-birds cleaned up after the meeting.



Submitted, 1 April 2015, on behalf of the Secretary Bird
David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, US

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Subject: Article on the Importance of the Boreal Forest for Birds
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 Mar 2015 07:00:49 -0800
From the Anchorage Daily News.

http://www.adn.com/article/20150325/birding-and-conservation-groups-call-canada-us-preserve-boreal-forest 



"If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes." --Charles 
Lindbergh 



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Subject: Birding humor (cartoon)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2015 16:21:49 -0400
I got a chuckle from this comic strip. OK, so maybe you have to be Catholic
to appreciate it more. :-)

http://bit.ly/1G48ltg

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of March 29, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Mar 2015 07:13:42 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* House Finches - Red and Yellow
Turns out that you really are what you eat!
http://bit.ly/1BBHFd1
* Music Inspired by Chicks Hatching - Mussorgsky & Ravel
http://bit.ly/1k6cXk0
* River of Birds - Arctic Terns
http://bit.ly/1xHBTKE
* Homing Pigeons
http://bit.ly/1CVXJdT
* Why Are Bluebirds Blue?
http://bit.ly/1I1xZfJ
* Birds Talk, People Squawk
http://bit.ly/1Eebt5r
* Pigeon Babies Do Exist
http://bit.ly/1IFYkko
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/196FE0C
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Photos and a question
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 29 Mar 2015 09:47:16 -0500
Hey everybody -

   I just posted the latest entry to my blog with a variety of photos
from the last couple of weeks. The purpose of this note is that I
have a question about one of the photos. I got a shot of a Red-tail
in flight (very last photo of series) that shows a real contrast
between the primaries and the secondaries/tertials of the wing. I
don't know much about molt in hawks but assume this is a molt limit
that confirms this is a second year bird. If anyone has any comments
I would love to know what you think. I appreciate any insight.

My blog is at:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

Thanks a bunch!

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: Canadian forests state (was Importance of the Boreal Forest for Birds)
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2015 06:58:54 -0400
​Speaking of the boreal forest -

The University of Maryland has a superb GIS website showing global forest
loss and gain, 2000-2013, on a *very* fine scale (try zooming in):

http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/google.com/science-2013-global-forest

Map layers can be changed in the pull-down menus on the right for better
visibility of localities, borders etc.

The map indicates massive forest losses in north-central Canada, in the
region of lake Athabasca in n. Saskatchewan. This includes Wood Buffalo
National Park in Alberta. Also major losses in southwest Quebec, central
British Columbia and, to a lesser extent, central Alaska.

Would anyone know the causes for these forest losses ? I assume logging,
oil industry and possibly pine bark beetles, but these don't seem to
explain the full picture. And, has any impact been documented on these
areas' avifaunas as a result ?

Thanks in advance and best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Myanmar Jerdon's Babbler rediscovered (last seen in 1941)
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 19:30:29 -0500
Hi Chatters:

I hadn't seen this posted yet.

FYI ...

 
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/03/07/391452765/this-just-flew-in-the-formerly-extinct-jerdon-s-babbler 


This taxon could be elevated to the species level in the future.

Phil


==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
==================================

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Subject: a lovely video to start off your weekend right!
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 13:14:41 +0100
hello everyone,

I have been watching this lovely video of a starling murmuration for a
couple days now. It was filmed a month ago in Utrect, Netherlands, and
captures a spectacular show -- likely one of the last we'll see until
November this year:

http://gu.com/p/46bqb/stw

tschüss!

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: Zapata Rail rediscovered
From: Dana Fox <danafox AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 08:35:50 -0500
Yes, indeed it was discovered to be the Spotted Rail on that Cornell recording.
Dana Duxbury-Fox
North Andover, MA

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Mary Beth Stowe 

Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2015 7:46 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Zapata Rail rediscovered

I had a copy of the old Bird Songs of Cuba (I think Cornell put it out) that 
included Zapata Rail; so you're saying that this turned out to really be a 
Spotted Rail? Sorry I can't give any more detail, as I no longer have the 
record... :-( 


Thanks!

Mary Beth Stowe
McAllen, TX
miriameaglemon.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Gorton, Gregg 

Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 9:45 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Zapata Rail rediscovered

There is apparently no known recording of the Zapata Rail, which is very 
unfortunate, of course, and may speak to the relative lack of availability of 
recorders in Cuba. A premier Neotropical bird recordist, Dan Lane, in a comment 
on his FB site about this issue, wrote: "Recordings that had been attributed to 
the species [in the 90s] .... were actually Pardirallus maculatus." He refers 
to the Spotted Rail, which is one of the other rails in Zapata Swamp that Gail 
alludes to. .. -- Important to keep in mind also that rails may have a variety 
of calls --some better known than others--so it has not been a rare thing in 
ornithological history for particular less common sounds to be misattributed... 
George Reynard famously helped sort out--by means of recordings tied to 
sightings-- one of those confusing issues involving Yellow vs. Black Rail back 
in the 1960s. 


Best to all,

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Gail B. Mackiernan 
%3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E 

Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 9:50 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Bulk] [BIRDCHAT] Zapata Rail rediscovered

We heard one with Arturo Kirkconnell in 1999, Zapata Swamp. It was most 
definitely not the call of any rail species that we were familiar with, 
although other species do occur and may have been responsible for several 
apocryphal sightings in the past few decades. We were wading a flooded track, 
the bird was fairly close but declined to cross the track. Oh well... 


Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD


----- Original Message -----

From: "Ronald Orenstein" 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 9:31:26 AM
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Bulk] [BIRDCHAT] Zapata Rail rediscovered

I think this is a very different kettle of fish. The rail is an extremely shy 
bird found in a large area with few roads. I was told when I visited Cuba in 
2001 that it was heard now and then by people in the area, but was almost 
impossible to see - this is not the case of a large, flamboyant bird that 
should have been seen if it were really there. I see no reason to doubt, or 
even be surprised by, this announcement. 

Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
From: Mark Cranford 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 9:17 AM
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [Bulk] [BIRDCHAT] Zapata Rail rediscovered

I hope BirdLife International offers a bit more detail. Evidence of 
Ivory-billed Woodpecker in Arkansas from a few years back is more convincing 
than this press release. This appears to be a sight record (by an experienced 
observer), nothing more. 


At least I think I saw a photo of a Zapata Rail taken in the late seventies by 
Jim Clements (of the Clements list fame). 


Mark Cranford
Mississauga, Ont.

mark.cranford at rogers dot com

On 03/03/2015 11:25 PM, Eran Tomer wrote:
> Hello all,
>
> Exciting news from BirdLife International - Cuba's critically
> endangered Zapata Rail was documented reliably for the first time in c. ​40 
years. 

> (Previous sightings evidently were not confirmed). Birdlife estimates
> the global population at less than 250 individuals, and decreasing.
>
> http://www.birdlife.org/americas/news/rare-glimpse-elusive-rail
>
> Best regards,
>
> - Eran Tomer
> Atlanta, Georgia, USA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
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