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Updated on Thursday, July 2 at 06:27 PM EST
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Emus,©BirdQuest

2 Jul Need one more person for So. Argentna trip [ ]
2 Jul Minnesota Tropical Kingbird ["R.D. Everhart" ]
1 Jul My Bird Photos [Jay Greenberg ]
1 Jul tropical kingbird near minneapolis [Jim ]
30 Jun Interesting aspect of Fish Crow identification []
30 Jun Re: Least Tern feeds moth to nestling ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
30 Jun Least Tern feeds moth to nestling [Chuck Sexton ]
29 Jun recording bird sounds around the world [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
29 Jun Why are seabirds abandoing their ancestral nesting grounds in the Gulf of California? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
27 Jun BirdNote, last week & the week of June 28, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
26 Jun Hilton Pond 1017 Jun 2015 (June Miscellany) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
25 Jun RFI on Kruger and Okavango [Fred Vir ]
24 Jun PHOTO: Northern Rough-winged Swallow Adult and Two Fledglings Perched in a Tree ["B.G. Sloan" ]
24 Jun Lincoln's Sparrow song [Bernie Carr ]
24 Jun Article about Birdwatching at the NY Times. [Paulo Boute ]
22 Jun Lincoln's Sparrow alternate song question ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Jun Photo of a Mourning Dove "anting" ["B.G. Sloan" ]
20 Jun Eight Blue Jays -- & Cabbage White butterfly photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
20 Jun BirdNote, last week & the week of June 21, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
18 Jun Mystery Bird (two photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 Jun Red-winged Blackbird fledgling (hiding) - photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
16 Jun Moscow ID and Pullman WA birding [David Rintoul ]
13 Jun BirdNote, last week & the week of June 14, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Jun Killdeer chicks (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
12 Jun Fw: Act Now: Protect the Migratory Bird Treaty Act! [Ronald Orenstein ]
11 Jun endangered NZ birds [Elizabeth Dodd ]
10 Jun Fw: Help Us Secure a Future for Hawaiian Birds [Ronald Orenstein ]
8 Jun Re: Nz v Hawaii endangered species []
8 Jun Re: Nz v Hawaii endangered species [Allan Wofchuck ]
8 Jun Nz v Hawaii endangered species [Richard Carlson ]
8 Jun Hilton Pond 05/20/15 (Daisy Fleabane & Friends) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
8 Jun Fwd: Article: Green Humour by Rohan Chakravarty, June 02, 2015 Via @GoComics [Ronald Orenstein ]
6 Jun BirdNote, last week & the week of June 7, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
3 Jun Re: FW: [BIRDCHAT] Bird Fossil found in Brazil. [Ronald Orenstein ]
3 Jun FW: [BIRDCHAT] Bird Fossil found in Brazil. [Paulo Boute ]
3 Jun Re: Bird Fossil found in Brazil. [Ronald Orenstein ]
2 Jun Bird Fossil found in Brazil. [Paulo Boute ]
2 Jun The Atlantic Forest in Brazil. [Paulo Boute ]
2 Jun winter is coming! [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
1 Jun Re: RFI: Field Guide for India [Ronald Orenstein ]
1 Jun RFI: Field Guide for India ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
30 May BirdNote, last week & the week of May 31, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
28 May Re: interesting (non-avian-lethal) development in wind turbines [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
27 May Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory - Fall Season Job Postings [Janelle Long ]
27 May interesting (non-avian-lethal) development in wind turbines [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
26 May Re: Cornell eBird app [Brian Sullivan ]
26 May Birds identify good nuts by listening to them [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
26 May Re: Cornell eBird app [Ronald Orenstein ]
26 May Re: Cornell eBird app [Brian Sullivan ]
24 May Birds of Banff [Vernon Ball ]
23 May BirdNote, last week & the week of May 24, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
22 May Re: Birdlist Banff NP Alberta Canada [Brian Sullivan ]
22 May Birdlist Banff NP Alberta Canada [Theo Hofmann ]
22 May Re: Cornell eBird app [Ronald Orenstein ]
22 May Re: Cornell eBird app [Brian Sullivan ]
22 May Cornell eBird app [Ronald Orenstein ]
21 May Bicycle Birdathon in the Okanagan Valley, BC [Dick Cannings ]
19 May Hilton Pond 05/03/15 (Birds Of Spring 2015) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
19 May PBS Nature Series "The Sagebrush Sea" [Patricia Rossi ]
16 May BirdNote, last week & the week of May 17, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
16 May Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100) [jkennedy366 ]
15 May Finally some migration movement in the midwest ["R.D. Everhart" ]
15 May Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
15 May Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) [Sam Sinderson ]
15 May Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
14 May Pine Warbler behavior [Bernie Carr ]
13 May Short video clips - bird and interesting behaviors [Allison Wells ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Jerry Friedman ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Geoffrey Williamson ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Jim Royer ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Katrina Knight ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Jerry Friedman ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Katrina Knight ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? [Eric Jeffrey ]
12 May Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs? []
12 May CA - Vancouver, British Columbia Trip Story [Dave DeReamus ]

Subject: Need one more person for So. Argentna trip
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 23:21:57 +0000
Hi --

I am posting this for Phil Hansbro, sounds like a great trip!

Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring,
Md

_____



Hi all

We have planned a 17 day trip to Argentina over Christmas/new year 2015/16. 
Starts around 15 th Dec. We are looking for another 1 keen birder to 
participate in this intensive trip. This would make 7 of us. This is a custom 
designed itinerary where we will be going for all the iconic species and major 
targets in Argentina such as Hooded Grebe, Lesser Rhea, Chubut Steamer Duck, 
White-bellied Seedsnipe, Magellanic Plover, South Am Painted-Snipe, 
Rufous-tailed Plantcutter, seabirds, seaducks/geese, waders, etc, etc, and will 
try and see as many other targets as possible in the areas. It will be awesome. 
Costs will be reasonable and on a cost and room share basis. 





I can send itineraries and costs on request.




Please contact me for further information and if interested. Please feel free 
to pass on to other people. 





Philip dot Hansbro at newcastle dot edu dot au




Thanks very much

Phil

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Subject: Minnesota Tropical Kingbird
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 12:59:22 -0500
Hey everyone-

    I went out to chase the Tropical Kingbird that has been seen at
Murphy-Hanrahan Park south of Minneapolis/St. Paul and got a few
photos that I have posted here:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   The bird was seen off and on between about 7 am and 9:30 am. It
did not vocalize while I was there.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: My Bird Photos
From: Jay Greenberg <conservationist AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 12:15:17 -0400
My gallery of world bird photos has been updated. It now consists of 645 photos 
of 321 bird species in 59 families. A Google search box has been added. The 
gallery can be viewed at http://thegreenjay.com/World_Bird_Photos/index.html 
. 


Jay Greenberg
conservationist AT earthlink.net 
http://www.thegreenjay.com 
Rochester, NY


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Subject: tropical kingbird near minneapolis
From: Jim <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 03:20:52 -0500
A Tropical Kingbird has been positively identified in a park in suburban 
Minneapolis. It has been on site for over a week. 


Jim Williams
Wayzata, Minnesota
birding blog at 
http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/homegarden/blogs/Wingnut.html 


"Our climate had no dallying, no mercies." ó Alice Munro

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Subject: Interesting aspect of Fish Crow identification
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:28:14 -0400
Chatters,

I live in the Toronto area, where we don't see many Fish Crows. I've seen and 
heard plenty in the southern U.S., where I identify them by ear, but I don't 
think I've ever really seen them up close. Recently, during spring migration at 
a local hotspot east of Toronto, a fellow showed me an image in his camera of a 
bird he had seen on his route as a mailman. (Yes he carries a camera in his 
delivery van.) 


The image enlarged (blown up), showed a distinct downward hook at the end of 
the bill (unlike American Crows). I wasn't aware of this feature, and none of 
my field guides mentioned it. After searching online, I found only one source 
that did (Fish Crow ID on the Cornell Lab of Ornithology site - great 
pictures). I'm wondering if other birders, especially those where Fish Crows 
are abundant, are aware of this feature, or it tends to be overlooked, as in my 
field guides. 


His image certainly showed that he had seen a Fish Crow, east of Toronto, not 
unheard of, but definitely worthy of note. 


All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com

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Subject: Re: Least Tern feeds moth to nestling
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 06:35:14 -0400
From the Birds of North America account for Least Tern by Bruce C. Thompson, 
Jerome A. Jackson, Joannna Burger, Laura A. Hill, Eileen M. Kirsch, and 
Jonathan L. Atwood: 


"Occasionally captures flying insects over land and water, or skims water 
surface to capture swimming insects (McDaniel and McDaniel 1963, Wilson et al. 
1993) and tadpoles (JB). Occasionally captures crustaceans while standing in 
shallow water (Carreker 1985). Incubating birds sometimes capture insects 
hovering near head (Schulenberg et al. 1980, Wilson et al. 1993)." 


David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.
________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Chuck Sexton [gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM] 

Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2015 2:21 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Least Tern feeds moth to nestling

On June 26, I watched as an adult Least Tern arrived at a nesting colony on the 
Navarre Beach Causeway (Florida 399) in Santa Rosa Co., FL, with a noctuid moth 
(Noctuidae) in its bill. It presented the moth to a medium-sized chick (about 
1/3 grown?). The chick initially rejected the moth and dropped it on the 
ground. I watched the chick peck at the moth a few more times but could not 
determine whether it eventually ate the moth. (The moth was lost to view in a 
clump of vegetation.) This is the first time Iíd ever seen any tern ever 
attempt to eat or deliver a moth as a food item. I canít find any reference to 
such a dietary item in a quick search of available online resources. (My Bent 
Life Histories are buried in a box in the garage.) I watched the exchange from 
about 30 ft away with 8X binocs; I am familiar enough with moth IDs to be 
confident of the family but I couldnít see enough detail on the moth to get a 
better ID. I had only a small point-and-shoot ca! 

 mera with me so I could not document the event.

Has anyone else seen a similar event?

Chuck Sexton
Austin, TX

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Subject: Least Tern feeds moth to nestling
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 01:21:03 -0500
On June 26, I watched as an adult Least Tern arrived at a nesting colony on the 
Navarre Beach Causeway (Florida 399) in Santa Rosa Co., FL, with a noctuid moth 
(Noctuidae) in its bill. It presented the moth to a medium-sized chick (about 
1/3 grown?). The chick initially rejected the moth and dropped it on the 
ground. I watched the chick peck at the moth a few more times but could not 
determine whether it eventually ate the moth. (The moth was lost to view in a 
clump of vegetation.) This is the first time I’d ever seen any tern ever 
attempt to eat or deliver a moth as a food item. I can’t find any reference 
to such a dietary item in a quick search of available online resources. (My 
Bent Life Histories are buried in a box in the garage.) I watched the exchange 
from about 30 ft away with 8X binocs; I am familiar enough with moth IDs to be 
confident of the family but I couldn’t see enough detail on the moth to get a 
better ID. I had only a small point-and-shoot ca! 

 mera with me so I could not document the event.

Has anyone else seen a similar event?

Chuck Sexton
Austin, TX

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Subject: recording bird sounds around the world
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 11:37:00 +0100
recording bird sounds around the world

hello everyone,

i've recently been working on a piece about xeno-canto, which is a
community of people who record the many different sounds produced by birds
around the world. this international community, which just celebrated its
tenth anniversary, is entirely volunteer-run, and the bird sounds are
entirely crowdsourced and are licensed under a creative commons license, so
they're free for anyone around the world to download and use. basically, it
is a labour of love so we all can hear the sounds made by the birds we
love.

you may enjoy reading the story i've put together about xeno-canto:

http://gu.com/p/4a5qg/stw

please do share with everyone you know who is interested in learning more
about crowdsourcing, wildlife recording or voice recognition software. (and
birds, of course!)

tsch√ľss,

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Why are seabirds abandoing their ancestral nesting grounds in the Gulf of California?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 00:43:55 -0400
FYI:




 Why are seabirds abandoning their
ancestral nesting grounds in the Gulf of California?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150627081208.htm?utm_source=fee
dburner

&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%28Latest+Science+News+-
-+ScienceDaily%29\\



Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca



Markham, Ontario, Canada




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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of June 28, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 08:36:48 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out our latest blog - orioles and their nests:
http://bit.ly/1GDAliw We're looking for a few more images, as you'll
see. Please let me know if you have some. Thanks!
---------------------------------

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* The Longest Day of the Year
http://bit.ly/1LLS4ZC
* Red Knot Migration
http://bit.ly/1dnIKPE
* Life as a Naturalist - With Bruce Beehler
http://bit.ly/1HmugvE
* Thick-billed Euphonia - Deceitful Mimic
http://bit.ly/1LN5btn
* Crow Parents, Fearless Defenders
http://bit.ly/13e3rYS
* The Arctic Plain in June, With Gerrit Vyn
http://bit.ly/1SSB8od
* Kipukas and Akis
http://bit.ly/MgBgPC
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1Jd5RI4
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Hilton Pond 1017 Jun 2015 (June Miscellany)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 11:23:02 -0400
If you like bird portraits, you may enjoy my "This Week at Hilton Pond" photo 
essay for 1-17 Jun 2015--although one image is necessarily less than pleasant. 
(You'll see what I mean if you visit the on-line installment.) There are also 
some comments about bird nests, the importance of pollinators, and native 
plants intros early June miscellany at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150601.html 
 Enjoy and share! 


As always we include a list of birds banded or recaptured during the period, 
plus an acknowledgement of recent supporters of Hilton Pond Center’s 
education, research, and conservation endeavors. 


Happy Nature Watching,

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================





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Subject: RFI on Kruger and Okavango
From: Fred Vir <avtrader AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 19:25:55 -0400
Hello.... RFI Africa

Would anyone know a few independent good bird guides that might know the
endemics, spots and logistics for doing both Kruger and Okavango Delta
area, Africa in early 2016 for our forming private group?

Has anyone done the travel gap overland, and if yes, was there any
endemics or area that makes this worth the 500 miles versus an
intra-African flight?

thanks

Fred Virrazzi
NJ

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Subject: PHOTO: Northern Rough-winged Swallow Adult and Two Fledglings Perched in a Tree
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:54:34 -0400
Lots of Northern Rough-winged Swallow activity today along the Raritan
River here in NJ. Fledglings are out and about, but still hitting up the
parents for food. There were a lot of birds lounging in a dead tree. I have
one photo showing six perched swallows, but this photo is the clearest of
the bunch. An adult keeping watch over two fledglings:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19098812316/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Lincoln's Sparrow song
From: Bernie Carr <mycocarex AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 12:03:56 +0000
I've heard Lincoln's sparrow do a variation on its standard song in the 
Adirondacks. I'm not familiar with Lincoln's sparrow being present in New 
Jersey as a breeder. Try the Cornell McCauley Library for more sounds or 
purchase their master set of bird songs. I've found the more you listen to 
birds, the more variation you find in species and individuals. 


Bernie Carr
Syracuse, NY
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Article about Birdwatching at the NY Times.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 04:40:05 -0400
Hello from Brazil!
But, this news are coming from NYC...

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/21/magazine/identification-please.html?smid=fb-share&_r=1 

Yours,
Paulo Boute. 		 	   		  
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Subject: Lincoln's Sparrow alternate song question
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 17:14:26 -0400
I'm pretty sure I was listening to a Lincoln's Sparrow song today. It sounded
pretty much to me EXACTLY like this recording from the Audubon online field
guide. Go to http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/lincolns-sparrow and
then scroll down to "Songs and Calls". Click on "Song #1".

After I listened today for a while, my bird started an alternate song that
went kind of like this: "WHEEE (brief pause) tu-tu-tu-tu-tu-tu-tu-tu (brief
pause) WHEAT CHA!".

Just wondering if that second/alternate song rings a bell with anyone?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Photo of a Mourning Dove "anting"
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 20:39:32 -0400
From what I've read, many bird species do this. They get down on the ground
in a sunny spot where there are ants, spread their feathers, and then let
the ants pick off the birds' parasites. The birds seem to be in a
trance-like state while this is going on:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18849012540/

Photo taken from my deck...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Eight Blue Jays -- & Cabbage White butterfly photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 20:27:59 -0400
Set a personal yard bird record this morning. Eight Blue Jays on my ground
feeding area at the same time! None of them seemed like young birds, e.g.,
no begging behavior. For some reason we have had a LOT of Blue Jays around
here. Other than that, the yard has pretty slim pickings species-wise:
House Sparrows, Catbird, Mourning Doves, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Robin, and
the occasional Cardinal and Titmouse.

Also had a major (to me) butterfly photography accomplishment yesterday
This spring I set a goal of taking a decent photo of a Cabbage White
butterfly. Those small whitish butterflies that are constantly flitting
around and don't stand still for long. It's been quite a challenge,
especially considering my camera (I have to get within a few inches). I bet
I've taken at least 500 bad photos of this species! But yesterday I FINALLY
had success and got a photo I feel good about:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18781877290/

And I also managed to snap this interesting photo of a small crab spider
hiding in a flower, waiting for an unsuspecting insect to come along:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18780422680/

*Bernie Sloan*
*Highland Park, NJ*

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of June 21, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 08:40:31 -0700
Hello, BirdChat, and Happy Summer Solstice!

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Voices and Vocabularies - Exquisite Thrush Songs
http://bit.ly/14CGE6L
* Dunlins Adapt to Peregrines' Rebound
http://bit.ly/1H5kLCH
* Sungrebe: Baby on Board
http://bit.ly/1Ftfmy7
* How Do Birds Brake from Flight?
http://bit.ly/1IqA97w
* Detroit River Int'l Wildlife Refuge
http://bit.ly/126q224
* The Tail of the Wren
http://bit.ly/1K2Nh71
* Dawn in the Marsh
http://birdnote.org/show/dawn-marsh
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1QIwMCB
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Mystery Bird (two photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 16:53:23 -0400
Saw this bird in a local wetland. I will plead ignorance here. It does not
look like anything I've seen before, but it could be something easily
explained by those with more experience.

Images are not good, but they were the best I could get. Mostly white bird
in center of photos. I was shooting in bright sunlight through a small
opening looking out into the marsh. Images were worse when I cropped them...

Frontal view:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/

Rear view:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/

Thanks in advance, and forgive me if this was a dumb posting about an
obvious bird. :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Red-winged Blackbird fledgling (hiding) - photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 15:07:48 -0400
I really like this photo of a Red-winged Blackbird fledgling hiding in its
native habitat (cattails). Donaldson Park, Middlesex County, NJ. The bird
could barely fly, but it knew how to hide:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18904320686/

I also like this photo of two very tiny Red-eared Slider turtles basking in
the sun:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18902806795/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Moscow ID and Pullman WA birding
From: David Rintoul <drintoul AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 14:45:14 +0000
Greetings

I will be in the Moscow/Pullman area next week, and would appreciate 
information on good places to bird near those cities. I will have a vehicle, 
and am mostly interested in sites where numbers of birds and/or varieties of 
birds would be good for photography. Rarities are not needed; just good birding 
spots and good photography spots. Birding companions would also be an added 
bonus, if you are free sometime during the week of June 22-26. 


Thanks in advance for any information you can provide!

Cheers

Dave

David A. Rintoul, Ph.D.
BirdChat list co-owner
Associate Director/Graduate Program Director
Biology Division
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS 66506
ICBM: 39.1926N, 96.5842W


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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of June 14, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 08:48:24 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Meadowlarks and Grasslands
http://bit.ly/1fievos
* North with the Spring - Bruce Beehler follows in the footsteps of
Edwin Way Teale
http://bit.ly/1HDBD2i
* How Many Eggs to Lay?
http://bit.ly/1BaaBhO
* Turkey Vultures Find Gas Leaks
http://bit.ly/1BaaDX0
* Do Woodpeckers Harpoon Their Prey?
http://bit.ly/1IBQ5q4
* How Much Birds Sing
http://bit.ly/Mk9kV0
* Songs and Calls - They're Not the Same
http://bit.ly/1G1D2dn
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1GA2Sdf
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Killdeer chicks (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 18:12:06 -0400
I am pretty sure this is the first time I have photographed Killdeer
chicks. I've found Killdeer nests before and taken photos of the nests. The
chicks are so tiny and cute:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18559047980/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Fw: Act Now: Protect the Migratory Bird Treaty Act!
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 14:10:46 +0000
Perhaps the Americans on this list would like to weigh in with their 
senators? Ronald Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
    ----- Forwarded Message -----
  From: American Bird Conservancy 
 To: ron.orenstein AT rogers.com 
 Sent: Friday, June 12, 2015 10:03 AM
 Subject: Act Now: Protect the Migratory Bird Treaty Act!
   
 American Bird Conservancy#yiv2146962487 P {margin-bottom:1em;}
|  |
| 
|  |
| 
One of the oldest environmental laws in our country, the Migratory Bird Treaty 
Act (MBTA), is coming under attack by Members of Congress. This week, the House 
of Representatives passed a provision in a bill that would bar the Department 
of Justice from enforcing the MBTA - essentially declaring that it's open 
season on birds!The MBTA is the primary piece of legislation in the United 
States established to protect over 1,000 species of migratory birds (like this 
Baltimore Oriole, pictured). Ifthis measure is adopted by the United States 
Senate, it could result in the harm and or death of millions of birds with no 
consequences for perpetrators.Tell your Senators to stand up and fight for 
birds by protecting the Migratory Bird Treaty Act! | 


 |
|  |
| Donate | ABC Action Alerts
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|  |  |  |  |  |

 |
| American Bird Conservancy | P.O. Box 249 | The Plains, VA 20198 | 
888-247-3624  | 

| Subscribe | Unsubscribe |


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Subject: endangered NZ birds
From: Elizabeth Dodd <edodd AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2015 13:28:17 +0000
Dear Chatters,

I meant to send this out when Richard contrasted, so rightly, the heroic 
efforts in NZ with those in Hawaii. 


My younger brother is working as the general manager for a new one of these 
reserves under development on NZ's South Island, Brook Waimarama. 


http://www.brooksanctuary.org/

They are currently building the fence that will enclose the sanctuary; once the 
fence is complete they plan to eliminate all the rats, stoats, etc. 


I'm writing a bit about this work, and touch on it in this column, if I may 
share with the list. (Photos by Dave Rintoul, too.) 


http://www.terrain.org/2015/columns/sanctuary-by-elizabeth-dodd/


Elizabeth Dodd
Manhattan, KS

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Subject: Fw: Help Us Secure a Future for Hawaiian Birds
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 20:37:55 +0000
I have no connection with ABC.  However, those wishing to do something about 
the extremely threatened and grossly under-supported Hawaiian avifauna may be 
interested in the following. 

I have birded Hawaii twice, in 1968 and 1999.  Between my two visits five 
species of Hawaiian birds went extinct (one of which, the Kamao, I heard 
singing in Kauai on my first visit).  And one more, the Po'o Uli, has vanished 
since. Ronald Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
    ----- Forwarded Message -----
  From: American Bird Conservancy 
 To: ron.orenstein AT rogers.com 
 Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2015 4:31 PM
 Subject: Help Us Secure a Future for Hawaiian Birds
   
 American Bird Conservancy#yiv2323192390 P {margin-bottom:1em;}
| 
 |
|  
| 
 |
| 
For the first time in nearly a century, Millerbirds (pictured above) now reside 
on the Northwestern Hawaiian Island of Laysan. This project is a global success 
story, and it was made possible by donors like you. With your help, ABC will 
replicate this success for more Hawaiian birds.There are only three weeks left 
to take advantage of a generous challenge grant: every gift between now and 
June 30 will double in value. Please help us keep more Hawaiian birds on the 
map. 

|    |
| Scientists successfully translocate Millerbirds to Laysan Island. (Photos 
courtesy of Chris Farmer, ABC) | 


Right now, ABC is leading projects on six Hawaiian Islands to protect some of 
the most threatened, remaining bird species. The next 12 months are critical.In 
fall 2014, ABC and its partners completed construction of a predator-proof 
fence on Kaua'i. Later this year, endangered Hawaiian Petrels will be moved 
into the protected area, with threatened Newell’s Shearwaters to follow. In 
doing this, we are creating the first fully protected colony of these seabirds 
anywhere on Earth. We are truly mapping a future for these birds. 

|    |
| The predator-proof fence on Kaua'i (left, photo by Jessica Behnke) will 
create fully protected areas for seabirds, including endangered Hawaiian 
Petrels (right, photo by Jim Denny). | 


Moving birds to protected sites is one of the many ways we are working to save 
threatened Hawaiian species. Together, the impact of habitat restoration, 
predator removal, and community outreach have resulted in incredible gains. We 
continue to build on these successes with support from individuals like 
you.Innovative conservation projects, like those we are leading in Hawai'i, are 
only made possible by donors like you. Please consider making a gift to ABC 
today.Best regards, | 

| 
 |
|  Banner photo: Millerbirds, Cameron Rutt |

 |
|   
 |
|  |
| American Bird Conservancy | P.O. Box 249 | The Plains, VA 20198Unsubscribe
 |
|  |

 
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Subject: Re: Nz v Hawaii endangered species
From: ECJ100 AT AOL.COM
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 18:59:15 -0400
While I appreciate the concern for Hawaiian birds. the gratuitous and
inaccurate attack on global climate change was gratuitous.  In fact, the  rate
of CO2 release increased by about 9% between 2006 and 2013, and the rate of
atmospheric CO2 climbed even faster.

Ironically, many believe that one of the big threats to Hawaiian birds
comes from global warming.  Many native birds in Hawaii survived precisely
because they were at higher altitudes, too cool for the mosquitos.  As  Hawaii
warms, the mosquitos reach higher altitudes and affect more birds.

We could undoubtedly save more Hawaiian birds just by diverting some of the
 funds we spend on single charismatic animals.

Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA




On Monday, June 8, 2015 2:10 PM,  Richard Carlson 
wrote:


We  happened to visit Hawaii and New Zealand within a year of each other.
Both  are avian disasters, but the contrast between the impressive NZ
response and  Hawaii's pitiful attempts was appalling.  Both bird populations
collapsed  within my childrens' life times.  In 1964, when my pregnant wife and
I  camped at Hosmer Grove in Maui, we woke to clouds of I'iwi.  Now there
are  none.  Same thing happened to New Zealand birds.  There it was
introduced predators; in Hawaii it's avian malaria.

New Zealand has  responded with an amazing program of establishing predator
free reserves.   They are the world experts in doing this.  They started
with islands,  killed all the predators and re-established the birds.  No
years of permit  wrangling, no court fight with PETA, they just killed or
poisoned all the rats,  stoats and possums. A guide told me they used humane
hammers to dispatch the predators. Once they proved it worked on islands, they 

built miles of  12ft predator proof fences to do the same thing on land.
These reserves,  Tiritiri Matanga island, Ulva island, Zeelandia, and
Tawharanui peninsula north of Auckland are basically the only places you'll see 

native birds in NZ.   The reserves are amazing, they're just crawling with
native  birds.

Hawaii's native birds are similarly restricted to a few reserves,  but the
protection afforded by these reserves is a joke.  We visited  Hakalau forest
reserve on the day the locals had broken into the ramshackle shed  and
stolen most of the equipment, again.  The fences were a few strands of  barbed
wire, mostly broken.  The wild pigs, key creators of mosquito  breeding
pools, had clearly been everywhere in the reserve.

Both nations  faced clear solvable problems to save their birds.  New
Zealand responded, we didn't. With 0.1% of the $100 billion a year thrown into 

the global  warming black hole, where the rate of CO2 increase has been
constant for over 50  years, we could save Hawaii's birds, right now.

Richard Carlson
Full  time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe,  CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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On Monday, June 8, 2015 2:10 PM, Richard Carlson  
wrote:


We happened to visit  Hawaii and New Zealand within a year of each other.
Both are avian  disasters, but the contrast between the impressive NZ
response and Hawaii's  pitiful attempts was appalling.  Both bird populations
collapsed within my  childrens' life times.  In 1964, when my pregnant wife and
I camped at  Hosmer Grove in Maui, we woke to clouds of I'iwi.  Now there
are  none.  Same thing happened to New Zealand birds.  There it was
introduced predators; in Hawaii it's avian malaria.

New Zealand has  responded with an amazing program of establishing predator
free reserves.   They are the world experts in doing this.  They started
with islands,  killed all the predators and re-established the birds.  No
years of permit  wrangling, no court fight with PETA, they just killed or
poisoned all the rats,  stoats and possums. A guide told me they used humane
hammers to dispatch the predators. Once they proved it worked on islands, they 

built miles of  12ft predator proof fences to do the same thing on land.
These reserves,  Tiritiri Matanga island, Ulva island, Zeelandia, and
Tawharanui peninsula north of Auckland are basically the only places you'll see 

native birds in NZ.   The reserves are amazing, they're just crawling with
native  birds.

Hawaii's native birds are similarly restricted to a few reserves,  but the
protection afforded by these reserves is a joke.  We visited  Hakalau forest
reserve on the day the locals had broken into the ramshackle shed  and
stolen most of the equipment, again.  The fences were a few strands of  barbed
wire, mostly broken.  The wild pigs, key creators of mosquito  breeding
pools, had clearly been everywhere in the reserve.

Both nations  faced clear solvable problems to save their birds.  New
Zealand responded, we didn't. With 0.1% of the $100 billion a year thrown into 

the global  warming black hole, where the rate of CO2 increase has been
constant for over 50  years, we could save Hawaii's birds, right now.

Richard Carlson
Full  time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe,  CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Re: Nz v Hawaii endangered species
From: Allan Wofchuck <ajmtwof AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 22:33:29 +0000
thanks for posting  plight of  bird in Hawaii My wife  and  I 
have  visited  Kauai   for about  15 yearsThe native  birds are in 
decline   We go to the alakai swamp and  Wamea canyoneach year  we have seen 
less  birds  avian disease taken its toll.I wonder why there are still wild 
pigs and goats  roaming around   I went to New Zealand  and the subantaric 
Island  and Have seen where there is an effort to preserve  the wildlife  . 
The  wildlife   rebounds  when the predators  are  gone   

  Killing  rats and other introduced predators should be a priorityMosquito 
control  in The Alakai  and predator control is importantAt Kokee  meadows 
  they say due to global warming  the Mosquitors at a higher elevation the 
Native birds are decling due to avian  disease .   Hopefully something will 
be done to save the  native birds 


Allan Wofchuck
64 Woodsworth Ave.
Redwood city , California
94062-2744
USA
ajmtwof AT pacbell.net
650-3686991 


 On Monday, June 8, 2015 2:10 PM, Richard Carlson  wrote: 

   

 We happened to visit Hawaii and New Zealand within a year of each other.  
Both are avian disasters, but the contrast between the impressive NZ response 
and Hawaii's pitiful attempts was appalling.  Both bird populations collapsed 
within my childrens' life times.  In 1964, when my pregnant wife and I camped 
at Hosmer Grove in Maui, we woke to clouds of I'iwi.  Now there are none.  
Same thing happened to New Zealand birds.  There it was introduced predators; 
in Hawaii it's avian malaria. 


New Zealand has responded with an amazing program of establishing predator free 
reserves.  They are the world experts in doing this.  They started with 
islands, killed all the predators and re-established the birds.  No years of 
permit wrangling, no court fight with PETA, they just killed or poisoned all 
the rats, stoats and possums. A guide told me they used humane  hammers to 
dispatch the predators.  Once they proved it worked on islands, they built 
miles of 12ft predator proof fences to do the same thing on land. These 
reserves, Tiritiri Matanga island, Ulva island, Zeelandia, and Tawharanui 
peninsula north of Auckland are basically the only places you'll see native 
birds in NZ.  The reserves are amazing, they're just crawling with native 
birds. 


Hawaii's native birds are similarly restricted to a few reserves, but the 
protection afforded by these reserves is a joke.  We visited Hakalau forest 
reserve on the day the locals had broken into the ramshackle shed and stolen 
most of the equipment, again.  The fences were a few strands of barbed wire, 
mostly broken.  The wild pigs, key creators of mosquito breeding pools, had 
clearly been everywhere in the reserve. 


Both nations faced clear solvable problems to save their birds.  New Zealand 
responded, we didn't.  With 0.1% of the $100 billion a year thrown into the 
global warming black hole, where the rate of CO2 increase has been constant for 
over 50 years, we could save Hawaii's birds, right now. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


   
 On Monday, June 8, 2015 2:10 PM, Richard Carlson  wrote: 

   

 We happened to visit Hawaii and New Zealand within a year of each other.  
Both are avian disasters, but the contrast between the impressive NZ response 
and Hawaii's pitiful attempts was appalling.  Both bird populations collapsed 
within my childrens' life times.  In 1964, when my pregnant wife and I camped 
at Hosmer Grove in Maui, we woke to clouds of I'iwi.  Now there are none.  
Same thing happened to New Zealand birds.  There it was introduced predators; 
in Hawaii it's avian malaria. 


New Zealand has responded with an amazing program of establishing predator free 
reserves.  They are the world experts in doing this.  They started with 
islands, killed all the predators and re-established the birds.  No years of 
permit wrangling, no court fight with PETA, they just killed or poisoned all 
the rats, stoats and possums. A guide told me they used humane  hammers to 
dispatch the predators.  Once they proved it worked on islands, they built 
miles of 12ft predator proof fences to do the same thing on land. These 
reserves, Tiritiri Matanga island, Ulva island, Zeelandia, and Tawharanui 
peninsula north of Auckland are basically the only places you'll see native 
birds in NZ.  The reserves are amazing, they're just crawling with native 
birds. 


Hawaii's native birds are similarly restricted to a few reserves, but the 
protection afforded by these reserves is a joke.  We visited Hakalau forest 
reserve on the day the locals had broken into the ramshackle shed and stolen 
most of the equipment, again.  The fences were a few strands of barbed wire, 
mostly broken.  The wild pigs, key creators of mosquito breeding pools, had 
clearly been everywhere in the reserve. 


Both nations faced clear solvable problems to save their birds.  New Zealand 
responded, we didn't.  With 0.1% of the $100 billion a year thrown into the 
global warming black hole, where the rate of CO2 increase has been constant for 
over 50 years, we could save Hawaii's birds, right now. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
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Subject: Nz v Hawaii endangered species
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 22:10:40 +0100
We happened to visit Hawaii and New Zealand within a year of each other. Both 
are avian disasters, but the contrast between the impressive NZ response and 
Hawaii's pitiful attempts was appalling. Both bird populations collapsed within 
my childrens' life times. In 1964, when my pregnant wife and I camped at Hosmer 
Grove in Maui, we woke to clouds of I'iwi. Now there are none. Same thing 
happened to New Zealand birds. There it was introduced predators; in Hawaii 
it's avian malaria. 


New Zealand has responded with an amazing program of establishing predator free 
reserves. They are the world experts in doing this. They started with islands, 
killed all the predators and re-established the birds. No years of permit 
wrangling, no court fight with PETA, they just killed or poisoned all the rats, 
stoats and possums. A guide told me they used humane hammers to dispatch the 
predators. Once they proved it worked on islands, they built miles of 12ft 
predator proof fences to do the same thing on land. These reserves, Tiritiri 
Matanga island, Ulva island, Zeelandia, and Tawharanui peninsula north of 
Auckland are basically the only places you'll see native birds in NZ. The 
reserves are amazing, they're just crawling with native birds. 


Hawaii's native birds are similarly restricted to a few reserves, but the 
protection afforded by these reserves is a joke. We visited Hakalau forest 
reserve on the day the locals had broken into the ramshackle shed and stolen 
most of the equipment, again. The fences were a few strands of barbed wire, 
mostly broken. The wild pigs, key creators of mosquito breeding pools, had 
clearly been everywhere in the reserve. 


Both nations faced clear solvable problems to save their birds. New Zealand 
responded, we didn't. With 0.1% of the $100 billion a year thrown into the 
global warming black hole, where the rate of CO2 increase has been constant for 
over 50 years, we could save Hawaii's birds, right now. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 05/20/15 (Daisy Fleabane & Friends)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 14:34:54 -0400
‚ÄúThis Week at Hilton Pond‚ÄĚ I went out into our front yard ‚Äúwilderness‚ÄĚ 
and encountered a patch of Daisy Fleabane--a native and neglected composite 
that sprung up after spring rains. Aiming my macro lens at its flowers, leaves, 
and stems I discovered each plant was its own little ecosystem, complete with 
pollinators and folivores, nectar-eaters and sap-suckers, and predators and 
prey. For a look at some of these fascinating little creatures, please visit my 
latest photo essay for 20-31 May 2015 at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150520.html 
 


While there don’t forget to scroll down for a tally of birds banded during 
the period, plus an interesting list of returning Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. 
As always we include miscellaneous nature notes about birds and other things. 


Happy Nature Watching,

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Fwd: Article: Green Humour by Rohan Chakravarty, June 02, 2015 Via @GoComics
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 2015 07:10:47 -0400
Green Humour by Rohan Chakravarty, June 02, 2015 Via  AT GoComics

> http://www.gocomics.com/green-humour/2015/06/02
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of June 7, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Jun 2015 08:19:30 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* A Maryland Coastal Steward Meets an Osprey
http://bit.ly/1HSiRjn
* Tree Swallows and Feathers
http://bit.ly/1IkkskH
* A Rufous in the Rain
http://bit.ly/19S4Rs4
* Spring Bursts Forth
http://bit.ly/1ARM6WH
* Robins and Relative Humidity
http://bit.ly/1dlfsl3
* What's Different this Year? We Asked Listeners
http://bit.ly/1BRnBDT
* Hermit Thrush: Ethereal Singer
http://bit.ly/1IkkFUZ
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1HRsgaT
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: FW: [BIRDCHAT] Bird Fossil found in Brazil.
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2015 18:38:43 +0000
The paper specifically states that the new fossil is an enantiornithine 
("opposite bird"), which would place it solidly within the Pygostylia (and 
specifically within the Ornithothoraces, which includes both enantiornithines 
and modern birds (Euornithes), but outside the Confuciusornithiformes, which 
form a sister group to the Ornithothoraces within Pygostylia: 

Pygostylia    Confuciornithiformes [including Confuciusornis]
    Ornithithoraces        Enantiornithes [including the Ceara bird]
        Euornithes [modern birds]
So, to expand on Dr Remold's comments, the new bird is actually more "modern" 
(ie closer to the line of birds that survive today, though on a different, 
extinct branch) than is Confuciusornis.  The most interesting things (to me) 
about the discovery are that the bird is so tiny (literally hummingbird-sized - 
I believe that would make it the smallest known bird to have coexisted with the 
(non-avian) dinosaurs), and that it is well-preserved enough to shed light on 
the type of long, blade-like tail feathers found in many early birds (including 
Confuciusornis).  These feathers are very different from the tail plumes of 
modern birds; they appear to consist of a broadened rachis (the part of the 
feather "stem" that normally bears the barbs) but with very few barbs. 

The full paper is free to download, and is worth reading.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Paulo Boute 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2015 1:58 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] FW: [BIRDCHAT] Bird Fossil found in Brazil.
   
Hello! 
Here, the comments,  that I just got from Dr. Heinz Remold:









I assume that the Cearan species reported here belongs to the pygiostylians, 
like Confuciornis, in contrast to Jeholornis, also from the early Cretacian. 
Jeholornis 

 has a long feathered tail similar to Archaeopteryx. Jeholornis also has teeth 
like Archaeopteryx. The pygostyle, the short tail of modern birds, which 
consists of fused vertebrae,  is considered to be a more recent evolutionary 
development. So the Cearan form 

 seems to be more modern and similar to Confuciornis.
Heinz
 


Paulo Boute.                         
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Subject: FW: [BIRDCHAT] Bird Fossil found in Brazil.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2015 13:58:00 -0400
Hello! 
Here, the comments,  that I just got from Dr. Heinz Remold:









I assume that the Cearan species reported here belongs to the pygiostylians, 
like Confuciornis, in contrast to Jeholornis, also from the early Cretacian. 
Jeholornis 

 has a long feathered tail similar to Archaeopteryx. Jeholornis also has teeth 
like Archaeopteryx. The pygostyle, the short tail of modern birds, which 
consists of fused vertebrae, is considered to be a more recent evolutionary 
development. So the Cearan form 

 seems to be more modern and similar to Confuciornis.
Heinz
 


Paulo Boute. 		 	   		  
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Subject: Re: Bird Fossil found in Brazil.
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2015 02:10:09 +0000
Or try this in English (a very interesting discovery!)
Ismar de Souza Carvalho, Fernando E. Novas, Federico L. Agnolín,
Marcelo P. Isasi, Francisco I. Freitas & José A. Andrade (2015)
A Mesozoic bird from Gondwana preserving feathers.
Nature Communications 6, Article number: 7141
doi:10.1038/ncomms8141
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150526/ncomms8141/full/ncomms8141.html


The fossil record of birds in the Mesozoic of Gondwana is mostly based
on isolated and often poorly preserved specimens, none of which has
preserved details on feather anatomy. We provide the description of a
fossil bird represented by a skeleton with feathers from the Early
Cretaceous of Gondwana (NE Brazil). The specimen sheds light on the
homology and 3D structure of the rachis-dominated feathers, previously
known from two-dimensional slabs. The rectrices exhibit a row of
rounded spots, probably corresponding to some original colour pattern.
The specimen supports the identification of the feather scapus as the
rachis, which is notably robust and elliptical in cross-section. In
spite of its juvenile nature, the tail plumage resembles the
feathering of adult individuals of modern birds. Documentation of
rachis-dominated tail in South American enantiornithines broadens the
paleobiogeographic distribution of basal birds with this tail feather
morphotype, up to now only reported from China.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Paulo Boute 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, June 2, 2015 3:51 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Bird Fossil found in Brazil.
   
Hello Everyone,
This is in Portuguese but the plate is quite good & we always can count with a 
translator... 


http://g1.globo.com/ciencia-e-saude/noticia/2015/06/fossil-de-passaro-de-150-milhoes-de-anos-e-descoberto-no-brasil.html 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.                                       
          

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Subject: Bird Fossil found in Brazil.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Jun 2015 15:51:18 -0400
Hello Everyone,
This is in Portuguese but the plate is quite good & we always can count with a 
translator... 


http://g1.globo.com/ciencia-e-saude/noticia/2015/06/fossil-de-passaro-de-150-milhoes-de-anos-e-descoberto-no-brasil.html 

Yours,
Paulo Boute. 		 	   		   		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: The Atlantic Forest in Brazil.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Jun 2015 04:29:02 -0400
Hello Everyone!
Today, a very good friend, just posted on his Facebook:
The World has 10.000 species of birds.
South America has 3.000 species of birds.
Brazil has 2.000 species of birds.
The Atlantic Forest has 893 species of birds.
Among them, 215 are endemics!!!
(His county Peruibe in the State of Sao Paulo, has 407 species of birds 48% of 
the total!) 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.


 		 	   		  
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Subject: winter is coming!
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Jun 2015 08:37:05 +0100
hello everyone,

if you watch Game of Thrones, you might think i am talking about the phrase
"winter is coming" that they repeat ad nauseam.

well, no.

i am talking about New Zealand, the land of upside down seasons from those
in the northern hemisphere. and i am also talking about tiny birds. in this
case, i am talking about New Zealand fantails, which are commonly known by
their Maori name, pńęwakawaka.

inspired by the most adorable photograph i've seen in 2015 (so far), i
hunted down the photographer and got permission to share this photograph
with my readers. the photographer also shared a video, so i wrote an
informative little piece about New Zealand fantails that might interest you
as you watch and listen to their charming little calls as they huddle
together for warmth as a big snowstorm approaches.

http://gu.com/p/49cfv/stw

please do share with your friends, who will no doubt, appreciate these
birds as much as we do!

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: RFI: Field Guide for India
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2015 14:25:26 +0000
In addition to several print bird guides there is a very good iphone app based 
on "Birds of the Indian Subcontinent". See  
https://itunes.apple.com/in/app/eguide-to-birds-indian-subcontinent/id530104501?mt=8. 

  Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Nancy L. Newfield 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Monday, June 1, 2015 10:04 AM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Field Guide for India
   
Howdy Chatters:

I have a friend who wishes to purchase a field guide to the birds of
India.  Of course, he wants one that is easy to use, but he also needs
one that is as up to date as possible with regard to nomenclature.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: RFI: Field Guide for India
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2015 09:04:32 -0500
Howdy Chatters:

I have a friend who wishes to purchase a field guide to the birds of
India.  Of course, he wants one that is easy to use, but he also needs
one that is as up to date as possible with regard to nomenclature.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of May 31, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 May 2015 07:23:08 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Long-billed Curlew, Singing over the Grassland
http://bit.ly/108JHO7
* The Fine Art of Dabbling
http://bit.ly/1GLUaZK
* Birds of Block Island, With Scott Comings
http://bit.ly/1FKrbDD
* Listening to Nuthatches - Which is which?
http://bit.ly/1KEgM0z
* Sky Lark, With Aretha Franklin
http://bit.ly/18g3yUB
* Unique Chaparral
http://bit.ly/14epICs
* Strange Sounds
http://bit.ly/1Qhsb4S
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1PUNApw
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: interesting (non-avian-lethal) development in wind turbines
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 May 2015 09:50:40 +0100
as as follow-up, i thought i'd share comments from chuck otte with all of
you because he makes important points -- points we all should be aware of,
points that i did gloss over when i shared that story about a new wind
turbine.

chuck writes:

Interesting. But to say it's non-avian-lethal might be a stretch. Any
structure
humans put up in the air is going to kill birds. But I would agree it's
much less
avian-lethal than those stinking bird choppers out there now. It still
doesn't
get away from the issues of grassland nesting species moving away from tall
structures. So few non-biologists understand that issue - they think it's
only
about impact kills. When will people realize there is NO true green energy?
Everything has an impact.



On Wed, May 27, 2015 at 12:32 PM, Devorah the Ornithologist <
birdologist AT gmail.com> wrote:

>
> hey everyone,
>
> i ran across this story about a new development in wind turbines that does
> not chop up birds and bats in mid-flight:
>
>
> 
http://grist.org/news/this-wind-turbine-has-no-blades-and-thats-why-its-better/ 

>
> although each device is less efficient at capturing wind energy, wind
> farms can cram more of these things into a given space, which translates
> into more wind being harnessed for energy overall. it's also cheaper than
> the bladed wind turbines and it might also be easier to clean and maintain.
>
> --
> GrrlScientist
> Devorah Bennu, PhD
> birdologist AT gmail.com
> http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
> http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist
> 
> http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
> http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
> *sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]
>



--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory - Fall Season Job Postings
From: Janelle Long <jlong AT HAWKRIDGE.ORG>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 13:00:19 -0500
Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory in Duluth, MN is hiring for the fall
migration season! Three traineeships are being offered for those
wishing to gain professional hands-on training experience in the field
with Hawk Ridge staff: 1) Bird Banding Traineeship, 2) Bird Migration
Count Traineeship, and 3) Environmental Education Traineeship. Hawk
Ridge is also seeking a seasonal Bird Migration Counter and School
Program Director. If you are interested, more details can be found at:
http://www.hawkridge.org/about-us/employment-internships/

Thanks!

Janelle Long
Executive Director
Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory
www.hawkridge.org
(218) 428-6209

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: interesting (non-avian-lethal) development in wind turbines
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 May 2015 12:32:59 +0100
hey everyone,

i ran across this story about a new development in wind turbines that does
not chop up birds and bats in mid-flight:

http://grist.org/news/this-wind-turbine-has-no-blades-and-thats-why-its-better/

although each device is less efficient at capturing wind energy, wind farms
can cram more of these things into a given space, which translates into
more wind being harnessed for energy overall. it's also cheaper than the
bladed wind turbines and it might also be easier to clean and maintain.

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Cornell eBird app
From: Brian Sullivan <bls42 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 12:30:25 -0700
Ron

You can manage all your lists at eBird.

Thanks

Brian

On Tue, May 26, 2015 at 10:38 AM, Ronald Orenstein  wrote:

> Thanks, Brian.  Even if I am online, can I save the observations for my
> own use, build up a list over time etc - or failing that, export to
> iGoTerra or an equivalent site to do this?
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>
>   ------------------------------
>  *From:* Brian Sullivan 
> *To:* BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> *Sent:* Tuesday, May 26, 2015 12:44 PM
> *Subject:* Re: [BIRDCHAT] Cornell eBird app
>
> Hi Ron
>
> The app lets you record what you see in the field and send the data
> directly to eBird. If you are offline, without cell coverage, you can
> create and store data on the device and upload it once you get back to a
> connection. We are currently in the process of partnering with the Bird
> iWitness group in Malaysia.
>
> Thanks
>
> Brian
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 9:46 AM, Ronald Orenstein <
> ron.orenstein AT rogers.com>
> wrote:
>
> > OK - I'll look forward to it.  A couple of questions:  Will it allow you
> > to sae observations on your device or computer as well as uploading them
> to
> > eBird, and will it be integrated with bird iWitness (im Malaysia) which I
> > understand is merging with eBird?
> >
> > Thanks - Ron
> >
> > Ronald Orenstein
> > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> > Canada
> > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> > ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
> >
> >  ------------------------------
> >  *From:* Brian Sullivan 
> > *To:* BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > *Sent:* Friday, May 22, 2015 10:48 AM
> > *Subject:* Re: [BIRDCHAT] Cornell eBird app
>
> >
> > Hi Ron
> >
> > We are currently beta testing a data entry app for eBird on iOS. We had
> it
> > up in the iTunes store only briefly the other day so a few people could
> get
> > it to help test. We expect it to be available worldwide for free within a
> > month. Stay tuned to eBird for the latest announcements on this.
> >
> > Thanks
> >
> > Brian
> >
> >
> >
> > On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:01 AM, Ronald Orenstein <
> > ron.orenstein AT rogers.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks
> > > most interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App
> > Store. I
> > > am not sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything
> about
> > > it - does anyone know?
> > >
> > > Ronald Orenstein
> > > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > > Mississauga, ON
> > > Canada L5L 3W2
> > > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> >
> > >
> > > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > >
> > > --
> > > ===========
> > >
> > >
> > > *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> > > www.ebird.org
> > >
> > > *Photo Editor*
> > > Birds of North America Online
> > > http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
>
>
>
> > > -------------------------------
> > >
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> ===========
>
>
> *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> www.ebird.org
>
> *Photo Editor*
> Birds of North America Online
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> -------------------------------
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>


--
===========


*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
-------------------------------

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Subject: Birds identify good nuts by listening to them
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 20:20:31 +0100
hello everyone,

you might be interested to learn how birds can identify good seeds and nuts
without first opening their shells to inspect the contents. a recently
published study found that wild Mexican jays can identify which seeds and
nuts are the most nutritious by weighing them in their beaks and by rapidly
clicking their beaks on the shells and listening to the sound created:

http://gu.com/p/498tc/stw

happy birding,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Cornell eBird app
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 17:38:28 +0000
Thanks, Brian.  Even if I am online, can I save the observations for my own 
use, build up a list over time etc - or failing that, export to iGoTerra or an 
equivalent site to do this? 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Brian Sullivan 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, May 26, 2015 12:44 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Cornell eBird app
   
Hi Ron

The app lets you record what you see in the field and send the data
directly to eBird. If you are offline, without cell coverage, you can
create and store data on the device and upload it once you get back to a
connection. We are currently in the process of partnering with the Bird
iWitness group in Malaysia.

Thanks

Brian

On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 9:46 AM, Ronald Orenstein 
wrote:

> OK - I'll look forward to it.  A couple of questions:  Will it allow you
> to sae observations on your device or computer as well as uploading them to
> eBird, and will it be integrated with bird iWitness (im Malaysia) which I
> understand is merging with eBird?
>
> Thanks - Ron
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>
>  ------------------------------
>  *From:* Brian Sullivan 
> *To:* BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> *Sent:* Friday, May 22, 2015 10:48 AM
> *Subject:* Re: [BIRDCHAT] Cornell eBird app
>
> Hi Ron
>
> We are currently beta testing a data entry app for eBird on iOS. We had it
> up in the iTunes store only briefly the other day so a few people could get
> it to help test. We expect it to be available worldwide for free within a
> month. Stay tuned to eBird for the latest announcements on this.
>
> Thanks
>
> Brian
>
>
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:01 AM, Ronald Orenstein <
> ron.orenstein AT rogers.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks
> > most interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App
> Store. I
> > am not sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about
> > it - does anyone know?
> >
> > Ronald Orenstein
> > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > Mississauga, ON
> > Canada L5L 3W2
> > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> > --
> > ===========
> >
> >
> > *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> > www.ebird.org
> >
> > *Photo Editor*
> > Birds of North America Online
> > http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA


> > -------------------------------
> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>


--
===========


*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
-------------------------------

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Cornell eBird app
From: Brian Sullivan <bls42 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 09:44:56 -0700
Hi Ron

The app lets you record what you see in the field and send the data
directly to eBird. If you are offline, without cell coverage, you can
create and store data on the device and upload it once you get back to a
connection. We are currently in the process of partnering with the Bird
iWitness group in Malaysia.

Thanks

Brian

On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 9:46 AM, Ronald Orenstein 
wrote:

> OK - I'll look forward to it.  A couple of questions:  Will it allow you
> to sae observations on your device or computer as well as uploading them to
> eBird, and will it be integrated with bird iWitness (im Malaysia) which I
> understand is merging with eBird?
>
> Thanks - Ron
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>
>   ------------------------------
>  *From:* Brian Sullivan 
> *To:* BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> *Sent:* Friday, May 22, 2015 10:48 AM
> *Subject:* Re: [BIRDCHAT] Cornell eBird app
>
> Hi Ron
>
> We are currently beta testing a data entry app for eBird on iOS. We had it
> up in the iTunes store only briefly the other day so a few people could get
> it to help test. We expect it to be available worldwide for free within a
> month. Stay tuned to eBird for the latest announcements on this.
>
> Thanks
>
> Brian
>
>
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:01 AM, Ronald Orenstein <
> ron.orenstein AT rogers.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks
> > most interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App
> Store. I
> > am not sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about
> > it - does anyone know?
> >
> > Ronald Orenstein
> > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > Mississauga, ON
> > Canada L5L 3W2
> > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> > --
> > ===========
> >
> >
> > *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> > www.ebird.org
> >
> > *Photo Editor*
> > Birds of North America Online
> > http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> > -------------------------------
> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>


--
===========


*Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
www.ebird.org

*Photo Editor*
Birds of North America Online
http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
-------------------------------

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Birds of Banff
From: Vernon Ball <vernball AT TELUSPLANET.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 21:50:05 -0600
Try this checklist for Birds of Banff:

http://www.bowvalleynaturalists.org/page40/styled/files/banff-bird-checklist-2011.pdf 


Thanks,
Vern

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of May 24, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 07:49:27 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Cedar Waxwing Courtship - You can see why they call it a "dance." Check
out the latest photo blog: http://bit.ly/1IVoMYY - By Gregg Thompson
---------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Robins Raise a Brood - In a Hurry
http://bit.ly/1FGgDXi
* Common Eiders Recognize - And Favor - Close Relatives
http://bit.ly/1GvAadL
* Northern Saw-whet Owl: A Bird with a Lot to Say
http://bit.ly/1GvAetY
* Ruddy Duck
http://bit.ly/1FKt1rg
* Swallows Return to Nest
http://bit.ly/1Kc9iOS
* Do Crows Sing?
http://bit.ly/1BiqCg5
* Race4Birds Inspires Young Birders - With Tim Keyes
http://bit.ly/1HBETJp
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1Q37Vnx
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Birdlist Banff NP Alberta Canada
From: Brian Sullivan <bls42 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 15:35:55 -0700
Hi Theo

eBird has lots of information on Banff including a number of 'hotspots' in
the National Park. Here is one:

http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L255433

Poke around eBird's Explore Data pages for the rest.

Thanks

Brian

On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:12 PM, Theo Hofmann 
wrote:

> Hello,
>
> Is there a list anywhere which lists the bird species one might encounter
> in Banff National Park (Alberta,Canada)?
>
> Many thanks for any information.
>
> Theo Hofmann
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> You don't stop playing because you get old,
> You get old because you stop playing.  George Bernhard Shaw
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------
> Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
> 199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
> Thornhill  Ontario
> L4J 1C1
> ---------------------------------------------------------------
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> --
> ===========
>
>
> *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> www.ebird.org
>
> *Photo Editor*
> Birds of North America Online
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> -------------------------------
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Birdlist Banff NP Alberta Canada
From: Theo Hofmann <theo AT HERA.MED.UTORONTO.CA>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 19:12:11 -0400
Hello,

Is there a list anywhere which lists the bird species one might encounter
in Banff National Park (Alberta,Canada)?

Many thanks for any information.

Theo Hofmann

----------------------------------------------------------------------
You don't stop playing because you get old,
You get old because you stop playing.  George Bernhard Shaw

---------------------------------------------------------------
Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
Thornhill  Ontario
L4J 1C1
---------------------------------------------------------------

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Cornell eBird app
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 16:46:07 +0000
OK - I'll look forward to it.  A couple of questions:  Will it allow you to 
sae observations on your device or computer as well as uploading them to eBird, 
and will it be integrated with bird iWitness (im Malaysia) which I understand 
is merging with eBird? 

Thanks - Ron
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: Brian Sullivan 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 10:48 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Cornell eBird app
   
Hi Ron

We are currently beta testing a data entry app for eBird on iOS. We had it
up in the iTunes store only briefly the other day so a few people could get
it to help test. We expect it to be available worldwide for free within a
month. Stay tuned to eBird for the latest announcements on this.

Thanks

Brian



On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:01 AM, Ronald Orenstein 
wrote:

> Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks
> most interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App Store. I
> am not sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about
> it - does anyone know?
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> --
> ===========
>
>
> *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> www.ebird.org
>
> *Photo Editor*
> Birds of North America Online
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> -------------------------------
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Cornell eBird app
From: Brian Sullivan <bls42 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 07:48:58 -0700
Hi Ron

We are currently beta testing a data entry app for eBird on iOS. We had it
up in the iTunes store only briefly the other day so a few people could get
it to help test. We expect it to be available worldwide for free within a
month. Stay tuned to eBird for the latest announcements on this.

Thanks

Brian

On Fri, May 22, 2015 at 4:01 AM, Ronald Orenstein 
wrote:

> Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks
> most interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App Store. I
> am not sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about
> it - does anyone know?
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> --
> ===========
>
>
> *Brian L. SullivaneBird Project Leader *
> www.ebird.org
>
> *Photo Editor*
> Birds of North America Online
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> -------------------------------
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Cornell eBird app
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 07:01:34 -0400
Cornell University has just released an eBird app for iPhone that looks most 
interesting. However, it is not available in the Canadian App Store. I am not 
sure if Cornell is aware of this, or if they can do anything about it - does 
anyone know? 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bicycle Birdathon in the Okanagan Valley, BC
From: Dick Cannings <dickcannings AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 19:51:40 -0700
Hi Birders:

We did our annual bicycle birdathon-part of the Okanagan Big Day Challenge
and the Meadowlark Nature Festival-on Sunday, May 17th.  This happens in the
south Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, one of the continent's best
places for breeding bird diversity.  It was an epic adventure as usual,
although a little damper than normal this year.  But we had some great birds
and raised some money for bird conservation.   Here's the link:

http://dickcannings.com/2015/05/21/bicycle-birdathon-2015-a-wet-willety-day/



Good birding!

Dick Cannings

Penticton, BC


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Subject: Hilton Pond 05/03/15 (Birds Of Spring 2015)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 21:22:15 -0400
Orioles and grosbeaks, gnatcatchers and warblers‚ÄĒwe banded so many 
fascinating birds "This Week at Hilton Pond" I'm devoting the entire 
installment to their images and information about them. To view the 3-19 May 
2015 photo essay, please visit http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150503.html 
 


While there don’t forget to scroll down for an impressive lists of old birds 
recaptured at the Center during the period. 


Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============



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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: PBS Nature Series "The Sagebrush Sea"
From: Patricia Rossi <circus_cyaneus AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 19:46:01 -0500
 Greetings!


 Wednesday, May 20, at 8pm (check your local listings) on the PBS NATURE 
Series: 

The "Sagebrush Sea": The life of the greater sage-grouse, which lives on the 
"sagebrush sea" that stretches across 11 states in the American West. 

 Other featured creatures include the golden eagle, great-horned owl, 
cavity-nesting bluebirds and American kestrel. 



Patricia Rossi
Levittown, PA
circus_cyaneus AT verizon.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of May 17, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 07:44:36 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Bluethroat - What a Singer!
http://bit.ly/1H8ZWjS
* Swainson's Warbler
http://bit.ly/KauNU3
* Flickers and Buffleheads
http://bit.ly/1KcJyFb
* Birdsong, Music, and Neuroscience
http://bit.ly/1B3wz0c
* Hold the Phone
http://bit.ly/1JnIrkK
* Endangered Species Day
http://bit.ly/M7Vwj0
* Ponderosa Pine Savanna
http://bit.ly/KVngEm
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1A9A2iH
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100)
From: jkennedy366 <jkennedy366 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 07:09:53 -0500
The birds are tree swallows. I have found them exploring cliff swallow nests
in southeast texas and got pictures of it but did not make it back to the
area to see if they actually nested at that spot. A couple of years later,
tree swallows had just fledged young sitting in nearby shrubs in an area
that had no trees but did have cliff swallow nests. All they need is a hole
into a correctly sized chamber. And they easily switch to bird boxes etc
from hollow trees.

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of BIRDCHAT automatic digest
system
Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2015 12:00 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100)

There are 4 messages totalling 160 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos) (3)
  2. Finally some migration movement in the midwest

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 19:35:45 -0400
From:    "B.G. Sloan" 
Subject: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look like
Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 19:59:12 -0400
From:    Sam Sinderson 
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

These look like a Tree Swallow to me.  Maybe you have a new observation.  If
I'm not mistaken, its been awhile since I've seen Cliff Swallow nest, the
nest is "closed" and has just a hole entrance, pretty much like a birdhouse.
So why not a Tree Swallow using it, especially if the site is abandoned by
Cliff Swallows?

Sam Sinderson
sinderso AT verizon.net

On 5/15/2015 7:35 PM, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old
> Cliff Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active
> in the two years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent
> birds don't look like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank
> Swallows, or some other species?
>
> Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/
>
> And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the
nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/
>
> My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
> swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 20:14:21 -0400
From:    "Spector, David (Biology)" 
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

At first glance look like Tree Swallows to me.

The Birds of North America Account lists a variety of unusual Tree Swallow
nest sites including old Cliff Swallow nests, eaves of buildings, Wood Duck
boxes, and fire hydrants.

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan [bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM]
Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 7:35 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look like
Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 15 May 2015 22:44:10 -0500
From:    "R.D. Everhart" 
Subject: Finally some migration movement in the midwest

I have posted a radar image tonight showing an impressive movement of birds
in the Great Lakes region. I haven't seen it look this heavy in quite a
while. See the image here:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

Saturday could be a banner day in the field!


Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

------------------------------

End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 May 2015 to 15 May 2015 (#2015-100)
***************************************************************

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Finally some migration movement in the midwest
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 22:44:10 -0500
I have posted a radar image tonight showing an impressive movement of
birds in the Great Lakes region. I haven't seen it look this heavy in
quite a while. See the image here:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

Saturday could be a banner day in the field!


Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 20:14:21 -0400
At first glance look like Tree Swallows to me.

The Birds of North America Account lists a variety of unusual Tree Swallow nest 
sites including old Cliff Swallow nests, eaves of buildings, Wood Duck boxes, 
and fire hydrants. 


David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan [bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 7:35 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)

OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look
like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other
species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)
From: Sam Sinderson <sinderso AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 19:59:12 -0400
These look like a Tree Swallow to me.  Maybe you have a new
observation.  If I'm not mistaken, its been awhile since I've seen Cliff
Swallow nest, the nest is "closed" and has just a hole entrance, pretty
much like a birdhouse. So why not a Tree Swallow using it, especially if
the site is abandoned by Cliff Swallows?

Sam Sinderson
sinderso AT verizon.net

On 5/15/2015 7:35 PM, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
> Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
> years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look
> like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other
> species?
>
> Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/
>
> And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/
>
> My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
> swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Do other swallows use Cliff Swallow nests? (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 19:35:45 -0400
OK, so I've been seeing swallows raising young this spring in an old Cliff
Swallow nest under a local bridge. This nest hasn't been active in the two
years I've been watching it, until now. But the parent birds don't look
like Cliff Swallows to me...maybe more like Bank Swallows, or some other
species?

Here are two fuzzy photos of one of the birds that are using the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301116/

And here's a blurry photo of one of the birds feeding nestlings at the nest:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

My basic question is: Do these look like Cliff Swallows? If not, what
swallow species might use abandoned Cliff Swallow nests?

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Pine Warbler behavior
From: Bernie Carr <mycocarex AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 10:34:14 +0000
A few weekendss ago, I watched a male pine warbler "shake". It would shake its 
wings a little and then its body a lot and then it would sing. Someone 
suggested a mating dance? This bird flew from tree to tree doing this behavior. 
Anyone ever seen this behavior. This was about 2 weeks after the pine warblers 
were back on territory. Much more interesting watching this - than running on 
to the next FOS. 

Bernie CarrSyracuse,NY 		 	   		  
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Subject: Short video clips - bird and interesting behaviors
From: Allison Wells <awells AT NRCM.ORG>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 13:32:38 +0000
Here in Maine, migrants are flooding through, but it's also a great time to 
take a few minutes to watch "local" birds as they do interesting things this 
time of year. Below is a series of very short video clips taken around our yard 
here in Maine over the last few weeks, of birds doing interesting spring 
behaviors. We thought fellow Chatters might enjoy. 


Bald Eagle getting mobbed by crows (love that you can hear the White-throat 
singing in the beginning) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An9Y8_lUeEQ 


Male Mourning Dove courtship display:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_mBJbh1p3o

Blue Jays doing matching "bouncing" display
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pza-RkKW3-8

White-crowned Sparrow singing https://youtu.be/qgi-klQukRE

White-throated Sparrow (one of my favorite bird vocalizations - quintessential 
Maine!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSSiSQgVutA 


Also: "Maine 's Other Amazing Tide: Migrating Birds 
http://www.nrcm.org/blogs-of-nrcm/maines-other-amazing-tide-migrating-birds/ 


Hope you enjoy, and good birding!

Allison and Jeff Wells
Gardiner, Maine

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 17:21:17 -0600
On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 4:09 PM, Katrina Knight  wrote:
> At 04:02 PM 5/12/2015 Jerry Friedman wrote:
>>
>> On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight
>>  wrote:
>>
>> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>>
>> As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not
>> trespassing.
>
>
> Have you read the text of the law?

Yes, but apparently I didn't quite understand it.

> It is entitled "Trespassing
> to unlawfully collect resource data; unlawful collection of
> resource data." Its purpose is to define data collection as
> trespassing in situations where it wouldn't normally be
> considered trespassing, making the data collection illegal. They
> really are calling data collection, including photography,
> "trespassing".

I see what you're saying.  If you have the owner's permission to
enter the land, but you intend to collect resource data (as defined
in the act) and you don't have the owner's permission for that,
you're "trespassing to unlawfully collect resource data".

Jerry Friedman
Espanola, N. M.

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Geoffrey Williamson <geoffrey.williamson.21 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 17:53:36 -0500
There are two separate actions dealt with by the act.  One concerns
trespassing, the other concerns data collection.  One can be guilty of
trespassing for the purpose of collecting resource data without having
actually collected the data.   If one does in addition collect data, then
one is guilty of trespassing for the purpose of collecting resource data
while also being guilty of collecting resource data.

I have not followed this mess closely, but there is an earlier version (?)
of the act in which the trespassing clause read "A person is guilty of
trespassing to unlawfully collect resource data if he (i) Enters onto or
crosses private open land for the purpose of collecting resource data;" and
(ii) doesn't have appropriate permission.   It appears to me that the
version that made it into law had the word "private" deleted, and now reads
"... enters onto or crosses open land for the purpose of ...."    So it is
"open land" for determining whether there was trespassing.   The definition
of unlawfully collected resource data still refers to "private open land."



On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 5:09 PM, Katrina Knight  wrote:

> At 04:02 PM 5/12/2015 Jerry Friedman wrote:
>
>> On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight
>>  wrote:
>>
>> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>>
>> As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not
>> trespassing.
>>
>
> Have you read the text of the law? It is entitled "Trespassing
> to unlawfully collect resource data; unlawful collection of
> resource data." Its purpose is to define data collection as
> trespassing in situations where it wouldn't normally be
> considered trespassing, making the data collection illegal. They
> really are calling data collection, including photography,
> "trespassing".
>
> --
> Katrina Knight
> kknight AT fastmail.fm
> Reading, PA, USA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
Geoff Williamson
geoffrey.williamson.21 AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Jim Royer <jrmotmot AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 15:48:26 -0700
I'm a birder in Caifornia and a criminal defense attorney. The link to the
act referred to in this discussion is at:
https://legiscan.com/WY/text/SF0012/id/1151882/Wyoming-2015-SF0012-Enrolled.pdf
.
I would recommend reviewing the actual language of this law before jumping
to conclusions.

First, it does not criminalize anything without actual "entry" into the
land. Parts (a) and (b) of this law define the two basis for violation
of it's provisions. Part (b) requires "entry" into private land, and may
very well be a valid criminal prohibition, if not contrary to some other
Wyoming statute. Under this part, a person would need to get permission to
"collect resource data" (as defined by the code) on private property. So,
for example, if you wanted to enter private land to do a bird count, you
would need permission. You would not appear to need permission to bird from
outside the property, since you have made no entry into the land.

Part (a) also requires actual entry into the land, so it would not appear
to be illegal to bird from outside the affected open land. The rest of Part
(a) is less certain. As a criminal defense attorney, I would argue that
individuals have "legal authorization to enter the land" where the land is
publically owned and accessible land (such as an open park or national
monument or BLM land.) The public also arguably has an "ownership interest"
in any publically owned lands, which would allow entry under this Part.
I don't know if Wyoming courts (or federal courts) would agree with this
logical interpretation. There are also likely problems with the
constitutionality of Part (a) (under the U.S. Constitution), such as those
cited in a prior post. Hopefully, the state or federal courts will strike
down Part (a). In the meantime, it would be prudent to get permission from
the governmental entity that manages a specific publically owned land
before doing a bird count (or gathering other "resource data"). Hopefully,
the appropriate governmental entity (such as the National Park Service in a
national park) will readily grant such permission.

(I am not licensed to practice law in Wyoming. I am licensed to practice in
California. I base the above opinions on my understanding of the laws of my
state, as well as general legal principles. For a completely
legally accurate opinion on this matter, you should ask an attorney
licensed in Wyoming (if you can find one who is so inclined).)

Jim Royer
Los Osos, CA

On Tuesday, May 12, 2015, Jerry Friedman  wrote:

> On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight  > wrote:
> > At 11:41 AM 5/12/2015 ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM  wrote:
> >>
> >> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
> >>
> >> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
> >> condition
> >> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to
> >> share that data> with the state or federal government"
> >
> >
> >
> >>  But I immediately
> >> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of
> >> this new Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
> >
> >
> > It disallows collecting resource data with a plan or intention
> > to submit it to an agency of the state or federal government.
>
> It says information "which is submitted or intended to be submitted
> to any agency of the state or federal government".  Intended by
> who?  What if you submit data to eBird or Audubon that someone
> else intends to pass on to the government?  Does it matter whether
> you know about that other person's intention?
>
> (The double passive construction isn't great style, either.)
>
> > CBC data is collected by Audubon.  Audubon is definitely not a
> > state or federal agency. Cornell University is involved as well.
> > Does Cornell count as a state agency? IIRC, they are a land
> > grant school that is privately endowed. I'm unclear on whether
> > that makes them an arm of the state or not. Does "the state" as
> > written in this law apply to all states or just the state of
> > Wyoming? If Cornell qualifies as a state agency, it would be an
> > agency of New York, not Wyoming.
>
> I was wondering about both of those things too.
>
> Data for the Breeding Bird Survey go to the U. S. Geological
> Survey, which is unquestionably a federal agency.
>
> > The law is clearly unconstitutional as written and if Wyoming
> > tried to prosecute CBC participants in Wyoming I think they'd
> > have a big battle and a lot of bad publicity on their hands.
> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>
> As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not trespassing.
>
> > Telling people
> > they can't take photographs at Yellowstone or other parks then
> > share them would put a definite damper on tourism and I'm pretty
> > sure that would upset a lot of people who make their money off
> > of tourists as well as put a dent in the state budget.
>
> I imagine the National Park Service will give blanket permission to
> photograph in parks and monuments in Wyoming, if it hasn't already.
>
> > In any case, getting permission from appropriate park officals
> > or land owners to collect CBC data would seem to take care of
> > any potential problem.
>
> It will add to the list of people you have to get permission from.  I
> happily give eBird data from state parks without doing anything but
> paying the entry fee.  Maybe people in Wyoming doing BBSs, at
> least, will have to get explicit permission.
>
> Jerry Friedman
> Espanola, N. M.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Katrina Knight <kknight AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 18:09:08 -0400
At 04:02 PM 5/12/2015 Jerry Friedman wrote:
>On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight
> wrote:
>
> > Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.
>
>As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not
>trespassing.

Have you read the text of the law? It is entitled "Trespassing
to unlawfully collect resource data; unlawful collection of
resource data." Its purpose is to define data collection as
trespassing in situations where it wouldn't normally be
considered trespassing, making the data collection illegal. They
really are calling data collection, including photography,
"trespassing".

--
Katrina Knight
kknight AT fastmail.fm
Reading, PA, USA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 14:02:11 -0600
On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:18 PM, Katrina Knight  wrote:
> At 11:41 AM 5/12/2015 ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM wrote:
>>
>> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>>
>> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
>> condition
>> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to
>> share that data> with the state or federal government"
>
>
>
>>  But I immediately
>> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of
>> this new Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>
>
> It disallows collecting resource data with a plan or intention
> to submit it to an agency of the state or federal government.

It says information "which is submitted or intended to be submitted
to any agency of the state or federal government".  Intended by
who?  What if you submit data to eBird or Audubon that someone
else intends to pass on to the government?  Does it matter whether
you know about that other person's intention?

(The double passive construction isn't great style, either.)

> CBC data is collected by Audubon.  Audubon is definitely not a
> state or federal agency. Cornell University is involved as well.
> Does Cornell count as a state agency? IIRC, they are a land
> grant school that is privately endowed. I'm unclear on whether
> that makes them an arm of the state or not. Does "the state" as
> written in this law apply to all states or just the state of
> Wyoming? If Cornell qualifies as a state agency, it would be an
> agency of New York, not Wyoming.

I was wondering about both of those things too.

Data for the Breeding Bird Survey go to the U. S. Geological
Survey, which is unquestionably a federal agency.

> The law is clearly unconstitutional as written and if Wyoming
> tried to prosecute CBC participants in Wyoming I think they'd
> have a big battle and a lot of bad publicity on their hands.
> Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse.

As far as I can tell, they called it data collection, not trespassing.

> Telling people
> they can't take photographs at Yellowstone or other parks then
> share them would put a definite damper on tourism and I'm pretty
> sure that would upset a lot of people who make their money off
> of tourists as well as put a dent in the state budget.

I imagine the National Park Service will give blanket permission to
photograph in parks and monuments in Wyoming, if it hasn't already.

> In any case, getting permission from appropriate park officals
> or land owners to collect CBC data would seem to take care of
> any potential problem.

It will add to the list of people you have to get permission from.  I
happily give eBird data from state parks without doing anything but
paying the entry fee.  Maybe people in Wyoming doing BBSs, at
least, will have to get explicit permission.

Jerry Friedman
Espanola, N. M.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Katrina Knight <kknight AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 15:18:11 -0400
At 11:41 AM 5/12/2015 ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM wrote:
>A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>
>"Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
>condition
>of the environment across most of the state if you plan to
>share that data
>with the state or federal government"


>  But I immediately
>find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of
>this new
>Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?

It disallows collecting resource data with a plan or intention
to submit it to an agency of the state or federal government.
CBC data is collected by Audubon. Audubon is definitely not a
state or federal agency. Cornell University is involved as well.
Does Cornell count as a state agency? IIRC, they are a land
grant school that is privately endowed. I'm unclear on whether
that makes them an arm of the state or not. Does "the state" as
written in this law apply to all states or just the state of
Wyoming? If Cornell qualifies as a state agency, it would be an
agency of New York, not Wyoming.

The law is clearly unconstitutional as written and if Wyoming
tried to prosecute CBC participants in Wyoming I think they'd
have a big battle and a lot of bad publicity on their hands.
Calling photography "trespassing" is even worse. Telling people
they can't take photographs at Yellowstone or other parks then
share them would put a definite damper on tourism and I'm pretty
sure that would upset a lot of people who make their money off
of tourists as well as put a dent in the state budget.

In any case, getting permission from appropriate park officals
or land owners to collect CBC data would seem to take care of
any potential problem.

--
Katrina Knight
kknight AT fastmail.fm
Reading, PA, USA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 14:17:27 -0400
I read this a little more broadly to forbid entry onto open lands -- public or 
private -- for the purpose of collecting data. So it could place a damper on 
CBCs to the extent that it was conducted on public open lands. 

 
Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: lgardellabirds 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, May 12, 2015 1:56 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect 
CBCs? 



The exact language of the statute is
at
https://legiscan.com/WY/text/SF0012/id/1151882   It prohibits entry
onto
open lands to collect data and prohibits the collection of data
on
private open lands without

(A) An ownership interest in the real property
or, statutory,
contractual or other legal authorization to enter or access the
land to
collect resource data; or
(B) Written or verbal permission of the
owner, lessee or agent of the
owner to enter or access the land to collect the
specified resource
data.

The omission of the word "private" from the first
prohibition is
troubling, but the statute still is aimed at private land.  It
would
cover collection of CBC or BBS data but only if someone enters
private
or leased public land to get that data.  Anyone staying on the
street
and collecting data should be fine.


Larry Gardella
Montgomery,
AL


On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 11:03 AM, Tangren, Jerry wrote:

> Seeing that
the linked article was written by a lawyer involved in an
> active lawsuit, I
wouldn¬Ļt panic; he¬Ļs appealing to the court of
> public
> opinion.
>
> I
don¬Ļt believe they plan on criminalizing Christmas Bird Counts.
>
> ‚ÄĻJerry

>
> On 5/12/15, 8:41 AM, "ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM"
 wrote:
>
>> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen
science" in the state.
>>
>> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather
data about the
>> condition
>> of the environment across most of the state if
you plan to share that
>> data
>> with the state or federal
government"
>>
>> Quoted from this article in Slate:
>>
>>
>>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.slate.com/articles/h
>>
>>
ealth_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_prot
>>
>>
ecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=T
>>
>>
uoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sW
>>
>>
tYgE%3D%0A&s=7494c4276613627b76248b896f2533164f965be91fedb83ca97aad4099a81
>>
a51
>>
>> This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is
to
>> curtail
>> citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But
I
>> immediately
>> find myself wondering about what happens on the
intersection of this
>> new
>> Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>>
>>
Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com
>>
>> BirdChat
Guidelines:
>>
>>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat
>>
>>
/&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=
>>
>>
b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=c6055c183f3b87479c1252
>>
5c04c038b4ca55d421f7823e1ddc59490b18d0a952
>> Archives:
>>
>>
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://listserv.ksu.edu/archive
>>
>>
s/birdchat.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6EL
>>
>>
Vg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=474490ec
>>
c9ccb48d914c30c947c658e9b1f2d34046521d55699824d44b294737
>
> BirdChat
Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines:
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Citizen science outlawed in Wyoming. Would this affect CBCs?
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 13:54:22 -0400
The exact language of the statute is at
https://legiscan.com/WY/text/SF0012/id/1151882   It prohibits entry onto
open lands to collect data and prohibits the collection of data on
private open lands without

(A) An ownership interest in the real property or, statutory,
contractual or other legal authorization to enter or access the land to
collect resource data; or
(B) Written or verbal permission of the owner, lessee or agent of the
owner to enter or access the land to collect the specified resource
data.

The omission of the word "private" from the first prohibition is
troubling, but the statute still is aimed at private land.  It would
cover collection of CBC or BBS data but only if someone enters private
or leased public land to get that data.  Anyone staying on the street
and collecting data should be fine.


Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Tue, May 12, 2015 at 11:03 AM, Tangren, Jerry wrote:

> Seeing that the linked article was written by a lawyer involved in an
> active lawsuit, I wouldn¬Ļt panic; he¬Ļs appealing to the court of
> public
> opinion.
>
> I don¬Ļt believe they plan on criminalizing Christmas Bird Counts.
>
> ‚ÄĻJerry 
>
> On 5/12/15, 8:41 AM, "ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM"  wrote:
>
>> A new Wyoming law in outlaws "citizen science" in the state.
>>
>> "Wyoming['s] new law makes it a crime to gather data about the
>> condition
>> of the environment across most of the state if you plan to share that
>> data
>> with the state or federal government"
>>
>> Quoted from this article in Slate:
>>
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.slate.com/articles/h
>>
>> ealth_and_science/science/2015/05/wyoming_law_against_data_collection_prot
>>
>> ecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=T
>>
>> uoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sW
>>
>> tYgE%3D%0A&s=7494c4276613627b76248b896f2533164f965be91fedb83ca97aad4099a81
>> a51
>>
>> This has just come to my attention. The purpose of this law is to
>> curtail
>> citizen watchdog groups over water pollution and so on. But I
>> immediately
>> find myself wondering about what happens on the intersection of this
>> new
>> Wyoming law and CBCs. Thoughts?
>>
>> Elizabeth Winter * Taos, NM * ewinter AT newmex.com
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat
>>
>> /&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6ELVg%3D%3D%0A&m=
>>
>> b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=c6055c183f3b87479c1252
>> 5c04c038b4ca55d421f7823e1ddc59490b18d0a952
>> Archives:
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://listserv.ksu.edu/archive
>>
>> s/birdchat.html&k=EWEYHnIvm0nsSxnW5y9VIw%3D%3D%0A&r=TuoDtrp%2FbjGbBkG1z6EL
>>
>> Vg%3D%3D%0A&m=b0BL37ivH2kSKhhRiI0BYRj8gxczAOfbTEMH5sWtYgE%3D%0A&s=474490ec
>> c9ccb48d914c30c947c658e9b1f2d34046521d55699824d44b294737
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: CA - Vancouver, British Columbia Trip Story
From: Dave DeReamus <becard AT RCN.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 May 2015 13:51:03 -0400
I’ve posted a trip story about my trip from San Diego, CA to Vancouver, 
British Columbia from April 25th through May 1st. The story and many photos can 
be found directly under the Glossy Ibis photos at: 
http://becard.blogspot.com/2015_05_01_archive.html . Click on ‚ÄúOlder Posts‚ÄĚ 
once you reach the bottom to continue on to the end of the trip. 


Good birding,
Dave DeReamus
Palmer Township, PA
becard -at- rcn.com
Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com
PicasaWeb Photo Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/becard57
Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html