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Updated on Thursday, September 3 at 11:56 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Greater Sage Grouse,©BirdQuest

3 Sep farming versus tropical birds: who wins? who loses? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
2 Sep Hilton Pond 08/01/15 (Knee Replacements, Part 2) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
29 Aug iceland puffin menu []
29 Aug Birding the British Isles 2015 []
29 Aug Birding Iceland []
29 Aug Polar bears and Pelagics []
29 Aug BirdNote, last week & the week of August 30, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
28 Aug World's least-findable birds [Eran Tomer ]
28 Aug Re: World birds chaseability [Eran Tomer ]
28 Aug Why do tropical songbirds have fewer chicks than temperate songbirds? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
27 Aug Condor Nest Cam in Sespe Condor Sanctuary, California [Patricia Rossi ]
25 Aug Re: World birds chaseability [Eric Jeffrey ]
25 Aug Re: World birds chaseability [Jim Hully ]
25 Aug Re: World birds chaseability []
26 Aug does light pollution stress out nesting birds? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
25 Aug Polar Bears and Pelagics Svalbard 2015 []
25 Aug Re: How to use AviSys going forward [Dave Moore ]
25 Aug World birds chaseability [Eran Tomer ]
23 Aug Re: Dog life list [Laura Erickson ]
23 Aug Dog life list ["sandfalcon1 ." ]
22 Aug Re: How to use AviSys going forward []
22 Aug How to use AviSys going forward [Lamont ]
22 Aug BirdNote, last week & the week of August 23, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
21 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Chuck & Lillian ]
20 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Mary Beth Stowe ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Marcia Balestri ]
19 Aug Hummingbird Festival in Fayette County ["Bill Hilton Jr." ]
19 Aug Birds stalking a cat (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
19 Aug Southeast Arizona Trip Part 1 [Mary Beth Stowe ]
19 Aug Southeast Arizona Trip Part 1 ["Mary Beth Stowe" ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Jim Hully ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Jim ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Janet Zinn ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Kay & Rob Grimmond ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Arie Gilbert ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives ["William H. Barnard" ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives []
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives--entering older sightings in EBird [Jim ]
19 Aug Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [Arie Gilbert ]
19 Aug Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives [danafox AT comcast.net ]
18 Aug Re: Avisys users: an invitation from eBird [Chuck & Jaye Otte ]
18 Aug Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo) [Bill Adams ]
18 Aug Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (resource link) [JackDaynes ]
18 Aug Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo) ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
18 Aug Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo) ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
18 Aug Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo) [Peter Wilkinson ]
18 Aug Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 Aug Re: Avisys users: an invitation from eBird ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
18 Aug Re: Avisys users: an invitation from eBird [William Leigh ]
17 Aug Images from the Santa Jacinto Restudy [JackDaynes ]
17 Aug Trip Report England and Scotland ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
15 Aug 2015 revision of the Clements/eBird world bird checklist is out! [dmark ]
15 Aug BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 16, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Aug DNA shows cape parrots are a real species [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
11 Aug Avisys users: an invitation from eBird [Brian Sullivan ]
11 Aug Sign off Birdchat [Don Williams ]
11 Aug Beauty even in death... ["B.G. Sloan" ]
10 Aug Eagle/falcon/kite/something else? (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Aug Yellow-eyed Junco Question []
8 Aug BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 9, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
7 Aug First Class, Million Dollar Falcons []
5 Aug Raptor photo ID quiz ["B.G. Sloan" ]
4 Aug Cornell Lab of Orno. "Home Study Course" Discussion Group = Birder's Version of "Book Club Discussion Group" [Daniel Edelstein ]
2 Aug Re: AviSys Announcement [Richard Carlson ]
2 Aug AviSys Announcement [Jerry Blinn ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Ronald Orenstein ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Jules Levin ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Ronald Orenstein ]
2 Aug birds singing in winter [Vader Willem Jan Marinus ]
2 Aug winter birdsong [John Arnfield ]
1 Aug Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song []
1 Aug Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song [Joyanne Hamilton ]
1 Aug BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 2, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
30 Jul Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
30 Jul Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song [Laura Erickson ]

Subject: farming versus tropical birds: who wins? who loses?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2015 17:49:18 +0100
Hello everyone,

I just published a piece about a Current Biology paper that investigates
two farming strategies and their impacts upon tropical birds. Basically,
the study found that some farming practices have the potential to
simultaneously protect natural habitats and boost farm yields -- good news
for birds, tropical birds and for endangered species worldwide:

Could some farming practices benefit tropical birds?
http://gu.com/p/4cvzp/stw

This piece is accompanied by a photo gallery of some of the agricultural
winners and losers that you may enjoy looking at:

Farms versus birds: winners & losers - in pictures
http://gu.com/p/4c37j/stw

as always, feel free to share widely, with friends, family and fellow
bird-nerds.

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Hilton Pond 08/01/15 (Knee Replacements, Part 2)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 21:57:27 -0400
I'm starting to get back in the swing of things since my 30 June dual knee 
replacements, and I'm happy to finally be able to offer the latest installment 
of "This Week at Hilton Pond" for 1-31 August 2015. It's partly an expansion of 
some Facebook page postings but there's also lots of new info that should be of 
interest to nature lovers (especially hummingbird enthusiasts). I'm glad to be 
back with this latest photo essay at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150801.html 


As always I include a list of all birds banded or recaptured during the period, 
plus miscellaneous notes. 


Happy Nature Watching,

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

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Subject: iceland puffin menu
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 23:49:44 +0000
No! No!  No!  We did not eat the Puffin, we just tok a picture of the menu. 
 Ditto for the Icelandic pony. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
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Subject: Birding the British Isles 2015
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 22:45:52 +0000
We toured Britain and Ireland from May 27 through June 18, 2015.  Since we 
started and ended our European trip with serious birding in Iceland and 
Svalbard, this middle segment was my wife's civilized history and literary 
tour, with birding on the side.  It was a super trip, everything worked, every 
hotel but one was lovely; even the food was good!  

Our first nights were at the runnymede on thames hotel and spa, Surrey | 4 
Star Hotel near Windsor, London 

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| runnymede on thames hotel and spa, Surrey | 4 Star Hotel...The Runnymede on 
Thames is a 4 star Hotel & Spa in Egham, Surrey. Perfectly located by the River 
Thames and close to... | 

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Expensive, but just a great location for birders.  Birding is super along the 
Thames and many nearby hotspots.  We spent most of the first day on a Jane 
Austen tour into her two home towns.  Lots of history plus good birds.  Next 
we went to Greenwich, which combines great museums with good birding in the 
royal park.  Rain forced me into the museums, but the birds were great when it 
stopped.  We then spent a night at Cambridge, more park birding, more history 
and a don't miss evensong in Trinity college chapel.  Leaving Cambridge I 
finally had some serious biding at RSPB's Strumpshaw Fen, just a lovely swamp 
with Harriers etc. Next day we got in more birding at Cley, still my favorite 
English bird reserve. We hit the non-migrant breeding pause; later is better 
but it's still good in mid-June.  We then drove to lovely but relatively 
birdless York.  Don't miss for history and the best City Wall in England. 
 Next day was Bronte day, but we visited RSPB Fairburn Ings on the way for 
more excellent birds.   Finally we got to the Lake District where we stayed 
at Sawrey House, next to Beatrix Potter's Hilltop. Just a wonderful spot for 
birds and everything. Sawrey House Hotel 

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| Sawrey House HotelSawrey House Hotel offers you a very special combination of 
comfort and elegance set amidst the stunning beauty of the... | 

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 The Potter will protects much of the area.  The don't miss is her studio and 
nature trail by the nearby lake.  The lady was a serious naturalist; her 
drawings are incredible.  After a full day here we went to Carlisle castle and 
the Roman Fort.  The next day was supposed to be my best birding at 
Lindisfarne.  I've dreamt of birding there for decades, but we were blown out 
by a gale.  The mud flats should have been full of birds, but they were all 
hiding.  Don't miss and spend more time.  After failing at Lindisfarne we 
drove to Edinburgh for more history and then took the ferry across to N 
Ireland.  I hoped for pelagics, but saw only Gannets.  We toured the Giant's 
Causeway, which has lots of wild bird area but is expensive.  We then drove to 
lovely Dublin, which has great birds in its parks, if you can arrive before the 
hundreds of sun-loving students.  After Dublin we drove to Killiane castle: 
full of birds and a lovely place to stay.  Killiane Castle - Farmhouse 
Accommodation in Co. Wexford, Ireland 

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| Killiane Castle - Farmhouse Accommodation in Co. Wexfor...Killiane Castle is 
situated in the south east corner of Wexford, on a narrow leafy country road - 
a haven of tranquility, “fa... | 

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We then took another ferry back to England, which passes some gigantic Gannet 
colonies, but saw no pelagics.  After touring Bath and Stonehenge, we ended up 
at Oxford where we discovered our last great RSPB reserve, Otmoor.  We birded 
every morning and toured Oxford in the afternoon.  It was a great combination. 



Ebird lists for the trip start 
at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23680818 

Pictures (mostly history) at London to Lindisfarne 2015
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  Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
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Subject: Birding Iceland
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 21:28:20 +0000
We birded Iceland by ourselves from May 21 through 27, 2015.  It was a great 
rip, even though we were a little early and the weather was quite cool.  We 
arrived early in the morning and started the day with a vista to the national 
museum which is adjacent to great birding.  We then drove to nearby 
Grundarfjordur which has great birding.  Hundreds of gulls, shorebirds and 
ducks cluster around the waste outlet of the local fish processor.  There were 
a few iceland gulls and many harlequin ducks.  The next day we drove out the 
Snaefells peninsula to the Svortuloft lighthouse.  Good birds along the way 
and thousands of murres etc at the lighthouse.  We drove back to catch the 
Baldur ferry.  From the ferry we drove to distant but spectacular Breidavik 
and the Latrabjorg bird cliffs.  It was a do not miss spot with hundreds of 
puffins within arms reach. We stayed two nights at the comfy guesthouse Hotel 
Breidavik - only 12 km from Latrabjarg cliffs 

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| Hotel Breidavik - only 12 km from Latrabjarg cliffsHotel Breidavik has 
comfortable rooms, sleeping bag accommodation and camping ground. Hotel 
Breidavik is only 12 ... | 

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 which we loved.  Nesting Black-tailed Godwits, Whooper Swans etc. here. 
 Then it was a long bird less drive through snow-covered hills to Hraunsneff. 
 The has good birding along the river and a nice hike up a recent volcanic 
cone.  Next day we drove throat spectacular and birdy THingvellir NP, visited 
Geysir and ended up at Frost and Fire hotel Home 

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This was near the a birdy river and excellent Floi Nature reserve.  We hit 
badly windy day the next day so missed a lot of birds.  We ended up at don't 
miss but $$$$$ blue lagoon giant hot pools.  Flew out the next day. 
 Altogether, great birds, lovely people, and a spectacular island.  Pictures 
are 
at https://www.flickr.com/photos/40829440 AT N02/20694090790/in/album-72157657762559895/ 




Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
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Subject: Polar bears and Pelagics
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 20:06:49 +0000
The  picture URL was fouled up.  Pictures are 
at https://www.flickr.com/gp/40829440 AT N02/0959a6 



 Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of August 30, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Aug 2015 07:50:48 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

International Vulture Awareness Day is Saturday, September 5th.
Celebrate the day -- Visit our latest photo blog about the vultures of
the world: http://bit.ly/1i9Kjnj
------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* The Barred Owl Calls
http://bit.ly/1NtS0l5
* Why Are There Flightless Birds?
http://bit.ly/1EcQGAj
* A Vast Unseen Migration -- Off-shore
http://bit.ly/1MLL0QH
* Burrowing Owls Hiss Like a Rattlesnake
http://bit.ly/1hSUJaK
* Grassland Meander in Saskatchewan
http://bit.ly/1hbxsjP
* Happy Birthday, Roger Tory Peterson
http://bit.ly/1Jh0xSo
* The Bonaparte's Gull Chorus-line
http://bit.ly/15YrRFR
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1JCoIKa
---------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive. Please let us know
what shows you like -- or don't -- and why.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: World's least-findable birds
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 17:43:33 -0400
Hello all,

As per my last post - the following 50 ghosts are the world's rarest birds
and, if they still exist, nearly impossible to find:


Antioquia Brush-Finch, Atlapetes blancae

Bachman's Warbler, Vermivora bachmanii

Blue-bearded Helmetcrest, Oxypogon cyanolaemus

Bryan's Shearwater, Puffinus bryani

Cebu Brown-dove, Phapitreron frontalis

Cozumel Thrasher, Toxostoma guttatum

Crested Shelduck, Tadorna cristata

Eskimo Curlew, Numenius borealis

Glaucous Macaw, Anodorhynchus glaucus

Guadalupe Storm-Petrel, Oceanodroma macrodactyla = Hydrobates macrodactylus

Himalayan Quail, Ophrysia superciliosa

Hooded Seedeater, Sporophila melanops

Imperial Woodpecker, Campephilus imperialis

Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Campephilus principalis

Jamaican Pauraque = Jamaican Poorwill, Siphonorhis americana

Jamaican Petrel, Pterodroma caribbaea

Javan Lapwing = Sunda Lapwing, Vanellus macropterus

Kinglet Calyptura, Calyptura cristata

Liberian Greenbul, Phyllastrephus leucolepis

Makira Moorhen, Pareudiastes silvestris = Gallinula silvestris

Negros Fruit-Dove, Ptilinopus arcanus

New Caledonian Buttonquail, Turnix novaecaledoniae

New Caledonian Lorikeet, Charmosyna diadema

New Caledonian Nightjar, Eurostopodus exul

New Caledonian Owlet-Nightjar, Aegotheles savesi

New Caledonian Rail, Gallirallus lafresnayanus

Nukupuu, Hemignathus lucidus

Oahu Alauahio = Oahu Creeper, Paroreomyza maculata

Olomao, Myadestes lanaiensis

Ou, Psittirostra psittacea

Pernambuco Pygmy-Owl, Glaucidium mooreorum

Pink-headed Duck, Rhodonessa caryophyllacea

Pohnpei Starling, Aplonis pelzelni

Poo-uli, Melamprosops phaeosoma

Red-throated Lorikeet, Charmosyna amabilis

Rueck's Blue-Flycatcher, Cyornis ruckii

Samoan Moorhen, Gallinula pacifica = Pareudiastes pacificus

Sangihe Dwarf-kingfisher, Ceyx sangirensis

Sangihe White-eye, Zosterops nehrkorni

Semper's Warbler, Leucopeza semperi

Siau Scops-owl, Otus siaoensis

Sinu Parakeet, Pyrrhura subandina

Slender-billed Curlew, Numenius tenuirostris

Sulu Bleeding-heart, Gallicolumba menagei

Tachira Antpitta, Grallaria chthonia

Turquoise-throated Puffleg, Eriocnemis godini

Ua Pou Monarch, Pomarea mira

White-chested White-eye, Zosterops albogularis

White-eyed River Martin, Pseudochelidon sirintarae = Eurochelidon sirintarae

Zapata Rail, Cyanolimnas cerverai​


Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Re: World birds chaseability
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 17:38:56 -0400
​Hello all,

A follow-up and some particulars concerning comments sent to the list, and
privately.

Regarding the various difficulty threshold​s - these were generalized. For
example: if one person managed to see 9435 species, that's a `proof of
concept' that tallies of this sort are possible. The exact number would
depend not only on the birds but on the birdwatcher too due to diminishing
returns, as Larry Gardella notes. As the list gets longer, increasingly
more time, money and energy are required to see progressively fewer new
species. If a person starts the chase at an early-enough age, is in good
health, manages other life obligations and has sufficient time & money,
something like 9600 species could be attainable.


Technological progress is another factor. The kinds of mega life lists we
see today would have probably been impossible 40-50 years ago. The Internet
on numerous counts, GPS, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), sound
recording & playback developments, satellite remote sensing (for mapping)
etc. have revolutionized the ability to locate birds. Other technologies
have made travel cheaper and safer than it used to be. Knowledge of birds'
distributions and occurrence also accumulates over time, making it ever
easier to locate desired species. All of these continue full-steam, as does
the growth of bird-based tourism, facilitating the breaking of records. Of
course, the number of living species also diminishes with time... But
that's another story.


Regarding Noah Strycker (now at 4076 species, 4 months left) - I won't
enter the guessing contest Audubon is sponsoring but consider some of his
upcoming travels: India, China, Mynammar / Burma, Thailand, Philippines,
Malaysia, Indonesia (including Borneo), Papua New Guinea and Australia -
some of these with multiple destinations, far apart. He will be in that
region while many northern Asian birds winter there. He also has good
connections; e.g. with local help he got all 28 Jamaican endemics in one
day, and in west Africa he found difficult birds like both Picathartes /
Rockfowl and Mt. Kupe Bush-Shrike. He isn't spoiled but willing to tolerate
rough conditions. Hence my expectation that he will exceed his goal of 5000
species, possibly by an appreciable margin. Just hope he will remain
healthy & safe.


Two people inquired about a list of the 250 species I had assessed as
nearly impossible to find. Please note that I worked with numerical tallies
and didn't evaluate each of 10,000+ species. Also that the figures are
approximations only. However, I did review species missing from eBird
(which covers 10,143 species = 98% of total) per its 2014 press release,
and those classified as critically endangered. Hence, I can offer some
data. A couple of pertinent points to bear in mind:


First, "chaseability" combines several factors: rarity, species'
elusiveness and habits, size of geographic range, remoteness of range, cost
of getting there, habitat accessibility & conditions within range, ability
to arrange requisite logistics, official access restrictions and risks /
dangers of travel to viewing locations. Some of these parameters change
over time. They are also not comparable. For example, which is more
difficult to see: a rare species with no known occurrence hotspots, a
fairly common species found in a small, remote, expedition-necessitating
area, or a common species found in a country that won't issue you a visa or
allow foreigners access to far-out sites ? (Or one with a raging pandemic,
war etc.).


Chaseability also varies with personal attributes - not only time, money
and life circumstances but also physical fitness, health, energy,
willingness to endure discomfort, level of risk aversion, patience,
frustration threshold, nationality (as regards access permissions), birding
style and more. That is, a species may be difficult for one birder to find
but easy for another. So, there is no true metric for "chaseability" and I
never tried to develop one.


Secondly, the intuitive association between chaseability and rarity doesn't
always hold. A small geographic range both qualifies a species as rarer and
typically makes it more difficult to chase. Small-range species also tend
to be somewhat scarce where they occur. It is also true that the rarer a
species is numerically, usually the more difficult it is to find. However -

* Some critically endangered species are not difficult to find where they
occur.

* Some apparently secure species have small, remote ranges so they are
rarely reported and considered difficult.

* Regardless of rarity, getting to a bird's range is the first determinator
of chaseability.


Nevertheless, overall it remains true that the more threatened the species,
the more difficult it is to see. This helps in assessing chaseability. With
all that in mind, here are some specifics. The taxonomy follows BirdLife
International since it is the authority on conservation status, but it
matches Clements / eBird closely.


Easy part first - six species are extinct in the wild. So they exist, all
valid, but are entirely unfindable in nature: Alagoas Curassow, Guam
Kingfisher, Guam Rail, Hawaiian Crow, Socorro Dove and Spix's Macaw.


Next, 18 species are classified formally as Possibly Extinct but in reality
another 32 Critically Endangered species fit this description. They are
ghosts - no sightings in a long time (minor exceptions) and probably
extinct, or very nearly so. Yet in each case, either the species' range
hasn't been surveyed conclusively (with proper habitat remaining) and / or
probable but unconfirmed reports suggest persistence. Many of these are
surely gone but several may well survive. More than a few species have gone
undetected for decades, sometimes even near human settlements, before being
rediscovered or first described to science. Note several rediscoveries just
over the past 15 years or so, e.g. Madagascar Pochard, Indigo-winged
Parrot, Cherry-throated Tanager, Large-billed Reed-warbler, Night Parrot,
Palkachupa Cotinga and probably Zapata Rail.​

LISTSERV won't allow me to paste the whole list here due to message size
restrictions, so I'll post it separately in a minute.

A small number of other species - I don't have an exact figure - also
qualify squarely as next-to-impossible as their existence is known only
from 1 or 2 specimen. Their conservation statuses vary. Examples include
Nechisar Nightjar, Red Sea Swallow, Sillem's (=Tawny-headed)
Mountain-finch, White-chested Tinkerbird and Bogota Sunangel.


A further 163 species are classified as Critically Endangered. As noted,
some are not impossibly difficult to find, e.g. Black Stilt, Bali Starling
/ Myna, Bengal Florican, Hooded Grebe, Palila, White-bellied Cinclodes,
Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Sociable Lapwing, several Asian vultures and
California Condor. Some others are also findable but require travel to more
remote locations, e.g. Okinawa Woodpecker, Juan Fernandez Firecrown,
Northern Bald Ibis, Tuamotu (Mangareva) Kingfisher, Djibouti Francolin,
Reunion Cuckooshrike, Gough Bunting (=Gough Island Finch) and Dwarf (Sao
Tome) Ibis.


But many Critically Endangered species are very- to exceptionally difficult
to see due to rarity, remoteness or both. Examples include Banggai Crow,
Beck's Petrel, Blue-eyed Ground-Dove, Cuban Kite, Alagoas Foliage-gleaner,
Fatuhiva Monarch, Jerdon's Courser, Black-hooded Coucal, Bugun Liocichla,
Isabela Oriole, Nightingale Reed-Warbler, Sulu Hornbill, Purple-winged
Ground-Dove, Sao Tome Grosbeak and Tooth-billed Pigeon. Some species in
this category are not altogether impossible to locate but easily rank among
the world's most difficult. In some cases, e.g. Kakapo, Nihoa Finch,
Millerbird and Maui Parrotbill, they occur mostly or entirely in
closed-access conservation areas. Some, like Blue-fronted Lorikeet and
Stresemann's Bristlefront, are semi-ghosts - extant but very rarely
observed. Rather than copy the whole `critical' species list here, it can
be retrieved from BirdLife's website:


http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/search


Another group of very difficult birds are the 62 species classified as Data
Deficient. The data lack because these birds are poorly known and many are
rarely observed. Examples include Luzon Buttonquail, Mayr's Forest-rail
(=Mayr's Rail), Somber / Sombre Chat, Obscure Berrypecker, Nicobar
Scops-Owl and Slender-tailed Cisticola. Data Deficient species' list can
also be retrieved from BirdLife's database.


The final group of mission-almost-impossible birds includes numerous
species that occur in locations which birdwatchers (understandably)rarely
frequent and hence are scarcely reported. Many are very little known and
their conservation statuses vary. Examples include Waigeo (Bruijn's)
Brush-turkey, Congo Peafowl / Peacock, Talaud Rail, Narcondam Hornbill,
Blue-eared Lory, Mali Firefinch, Rapa Fruit-dove, Santo Starling (Mountain
Starling), White-eyed Starling, Rockefeller's Sunbird, Somber (=Sombre, or
Kulambangra) Leaf-warbler, Brass's Friarbird, Louisiade Flowerpecker,
Sclater's Monal, Quailfinch Indigobird, New Hanover Munia, White-headed
Robin-chat, Vilcabamba Brush-finch, Tristan Thrush, Somali Grosbeak, Ouvea
Parakeet, White-faced Redstart, Iranian Ground-Jay, Long-billed
Bush-warbler and Rusty-necked Piculet.


Such species are not unfindable but very few birdwatchers have ever seen
them. Several regions stand out as harboring a disproportionate number of
these: the islands of Indonesia, Wallacea, Papua-New Guinea region and
southwest Pacific (e.g. Solomon Islands, Fiji and New Caledonia areas);
isolated Pacific Ocean archipelagos, south-central Asia (parts of China,
Nepal, Bhutan and the 7 'stans); and western, central and northeastern
Africa (Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Eritrea). Interestingly, Latin America -
the bioregion with most bird species - has fewer exceptionally difficult
birds than one might expect. It has become far better explored, known and
developed ornithologically than it used to be. Still, much to discover
there.


My estimate of approximately 250 next-to-impossible species was based on
the 50 ghosts, single-specimen species, plus the most elusive
representatives of the above groups - roughly 200 species. Perhaps this
figure should be slightly higher. I was thinking about species that would
be stubbornly difficult even if one traveled to their distant range.


Finally, a quality vs. quantity issue becomes apparent when looking at all
these numbers and species lists. Few birdwatchers would decline an
opportunity to see new species but the nature of these becomes important
given the numerous constraints mentioned above. Some of the world's most
spectacular birds are not particularly rare while some of the most
difficult species are, with all due respect, not much to look at or hear. I
certainly wouldn't mind having one of those high-end, global life lists but
I'd much rather just get the 100 or so species I want most to see.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Why do tropical songbirds have fewer chicks than temperate songbirds?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2015 07:58:29 +0100
Hello everyone,

As an ornithology grad student who was breeding tropical birds as a hobby,
i remember asking this question of my advisor.

A paper just came out in SCIENCE that explains the reasons why tropical
songbirds produce fewer chicks per breeding attempt than do temperate
songbirds. In this amazing paper, the author, Tom Martin from the
university of Montana, draws upon several decades of field work in Arizona,
Venezuela and Borneo to support his hypothesis. The paper itself is
amazing, although it's short, it sheds light on our fuzzy understanding of
breeding bird biology, it corrects several long-held misunderstandings, and
adds valuable information to our understanding to the subtle interplay of
ecology and evolution.

Life history trade-offs: why tropical songbirds have fewer chicks
http://gu.com/p/4bz5f/stw

i hope you enjoy the story i wrote about this important breakthrough. i
also hope you share it with your colleagues, friends, and family, and of
course, on social media and twitter.

tschüss.

-- 
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Condor Nest Cam in Sespe Condor Sanctuary, California
From: Patricia Rossi <circus_cyaneus AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 27 Aug 2015 18:21:16 -0500
Greetings!

Cornell Lab of Ornithology has a live Condor nest cam streaming from a 
cliffside cavity in the Sespe Condor Sanctuary, in southern California 


http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/49/California_Condor

Patricia Rossi
Levittown, PA
circus_cyaneus AT verizon.net

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Subject: Re: World birds chaseability
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 22:35:04 -0400
I don't know about Noah. He has 130 days left to get about 1,950 birds, and has 
not hit Australia/pacific or Asia. Even if he misses, I expect he will get 
pretty close. 


Eric Jeffrey

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 25, 2015, at 10:00 PM, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>
> Eran,
> It strikes me as a bit optimistic. For example, 9600 is more than
> exceptionally difficult - as evidenced by no one getting within 100 of
> that total so far. Noah Strycker is going to new places, but he still
> has to run into at least a little of the problem of the diminishing
> number of new birds possible the more you see. 6000 may be possible in
> a year, but I'll be very surprised if Noah reaches that number.
> Larry GardellaMontgomery, AL
>
>        -----------------------------------------From: "Eran Tomer"
> To:
> Cc:
> Sent: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 02:05:36 -0400
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] World birds chaseability
>
> ​​​Hello all,
>
> I thought I'd share a quick, speculative brainstorm I've had
> regarding
> birds' chaseability. It is based on the following figures:
>
> 1. On May 9th, 2015 eBird held a much-promoted, global Big Day. 6088
> species were counted. Participation was global but with considerable
> geographic biases. It stands to reason that people did not mount
> helicopter
> expeditions in honor of the event, but mostly visited local sites or
> otherwise readily-accessible locations.
>
> 2. eBird includes records for 98% of bird species, including
> historical
> records for extinct ones. The tally for 2015 is currently 9261
> species, or
> 90% of all extant species.
>
> 3. Birder Noah Strycker is in the midst of a global Big Year, aiming
> to see
> at least 5000 species. Thus far, 64% into the year, he has been
> averaging
> 17.226 new species per day (N=235 days). If he continues at this
> rate, he
> will see 6287 species by the year's end. The actual tally will
> probably be
> somewhat higher given that several of his upcoming destinations are
> global
> bird diversity hotspots. Strycker's method is extensive rather than
> intensive. He travels continuously and uses local guides, so he
> visits some
> less-traveled sites for uncommonly observed endemics. However, a few
> exceptions aside, he does not spend much time trying for stubbornly
> elusive
> species or expend much travel time to see a small number of new
> species.
>
> 4. The Visual Resources for Ornithology (VIREO) project strives to
> compile
> high quality photographs of all the world's bird species. It has been
> running since 1979 and currently, 36 years on, has 7300+ species
> recorded.
> This includes photos of recently-extinct species' specimen.
>
> 5. The Surfbirds website maintains a list of the world's top listers
> (how
> about that, a list of listers ?!). These individuals spend
> considerable
> time and resources chasing birds, so they frequent seldom-visited
> locations
> and see rarely-observed species (this from a global perspective, not
> a
> local one). Starting at 5000 species, the life lists break down as
> follows:
>
> 66 lists between 5000 and 6000 species
> 42 lists between 6000 and 7000 species
> 26 lists between 7000 and 8000 species
> 19 lists between 8000 and 9000 species
> 5 lists 9000 and over, top is 9435 or 92% of extant species
>
> The sizes of these lists, however, reflect birders' circumstances and
> finances as much as they do birds' chaseability. Taxonomic issues are
> also
> involved.
>
> 6. I can't remember where I read this, and can't find the figure on
> the
> website, but I recall reading that Surfbird's galleries contain
> photos of
> about 8000 species. Contributors include numerous global birding
> tours
> operators who offer experienced guides and regular, specialized
> travel to
> remote locations.
>
> 7. In BirdForum's Opus, covering all the world's birds, 7920 species
> have a
> photo. BirdForum has a large, multinational membership but I have no
> idea
> whether it contains numerous photographers who travel to remote
> regions in
> pursuit of birds.
>
> 8. Lynx Edicions' Internet Bird Collection website has photos of 9416
> species. This is a comprehensive collection as Lynx publishes the
> Handbook
> of the Birds of the World and obtains images from photographers who
> specifically chase rarely-photographed birds.
>
> 9. The extensive bird sound database Xeno-canto has recordings of
> 9375
> species.
>
> On examination, the above figures seem to suggest the following
> breakdown:
>
> * Approximately 6500 bird species, or c. 63% of the world total, are
> more-or-less readily findable. Mostly a matter of getting to the
> proper
> locations which, in their cases, is not unduly difficult (if not
> necessarily cheap). And employing the proper search techniques and
> patience
> as is requisite of any bird outing.
>
> * A further c. 1500 species, or about 15%, are challenging to find.
> They
> would frequently require travel off the beaten path, enlisting the
> help of
> local knowledge / guides, and above-average effort and persistence to
> observe.
>
> * Another approx. 1600 species, c. 16%, are truly difficult to find
> due
> variably to rarity, elusiveness, remote range, habitat access
> difficulties,
> political constraints on accessibility and travel dangers. Seeing
> these
> would almost certainly require special arrangements and local
> knowledge /
> guidance.
>
> * The final c. 740 species, 7%, seem exceptionally difficult to see,
> frequently due more to a very small, remote range with considerable
> access
> difficulties rather than strictly to numerical scarcity. Of course, a
> restricted range usually means a smaller global population. This is
> based
> on examination of species missing from eBird, and those with a high
> threat
> status (which is based on multiple factors, not only population
> size). Of
> these, approximately 250 species - the rarest, most elusive and /
> or possibly extinct - seem to be nearly unfindable except under
> extraordinary circumstances and a cosmic stroke of luck.
>
> In other words: if time, money and life circumstances were no
> constraints,
> the following would be true of life lists (assuming a birder wishes
> to pursue new birds to the extent possible):
>
> 1-6500 species - relatively straightforward
> 6500-8000 species - challenging
> 8000-9600 species - truly difficult
> 9600-10100 species - exceptionally difficult
> 10100-10350 species - next to impossible
>
> Does this assessment appear reasonable ? Any thoughts ?
>
> Best regards,
>
> - Eran Tomer
> Atlanta, Georgia, USA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: World birds chaseability
From: Jim Hully <xenospiza AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 21:24:10 -0500
And note that BirdQuest has shown its clients over 10,000 species!

Jim Hully
Mundelein, IL
xenospiza AT gmail.com

On Tue, Aug 25, 2015 at 9:00 PM,  wrote:

> Eran,
> It strikes me as a bit optimistic. For example, 9600 is more than
> exceptionally difficult - as evidenced by no one getting within 100 of
> that total so far. Noah Strycker is going to new places, but he still
> has to run into at least a little of the problem of the diminishing
> number of new birds possible the more you see. 6000 may be possible in
> a year, but I'll be very surprised if Noah reaches that number.
> Larry GardellaMontgomery, AL
>
>         -----------------------------------------From: "Eran Tomer"
> To:
> Cc:
> Sent: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 02:05:36 -0400
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] World birds chaseability
>
>  ​​​Hello all,
>
>  I thought I'd share a quick, speculative brainstorm I've had
> regarding
>  birds' chaseability. It is based on the following figures:
>
>  1. On May 9th, 2015 eBird held a much-promoted, global Big Day. 6088
>  species were counted. Participation was global but with considerable
>  geographic biases. It stands to reason that people did not mount
> helicopter
>  expeditions in honor of the event, but mostly visited local sites or
>  otherwise readily-accessible locations.
>
>  2. eBird includes records for 98% of bird species, including
> historical
>  records for extinct ones. The tally for 2015 is currently 9261
> species, or
>  90% of all extant species.
>
>  3. Birder Noah Strycker is in the midst of a global Big Year, aiming
> to see
>  at least 5000 species. Thus far, 64% into the year, he has been
> averaging
>  17.226 new species per day (N=235 days). If he continues at this
> rate, he
>  will see 6287 species by the year's end. The actual tally will
> probably be
>  somewhat higher given that several of his upcoming destinations are
> global
>  bird diversity hotspots. Strycker's method is extensive rather than
>  intensive. He travels continuously and uses local guides, so he
> visits some
>  less-traveled sites for uncommonly observed endemics. However, a few
>  exceptions aside, he does not spend much time trying for stubbornly
> elusive
>  species or expend much travel time to see a small number of new
> species.
>
>  4. The Visual Resources for Ornithology (VIREO) project strives to
> compile
>  high quality photographs of all the world's bird species. It has been
>  running since 1979 and currently, 36 years on, has 7300+ species
> recorded.
>  This includes photos of recently-extinct species' specimen.
>
>  5. The Surfbirds website maintains a list of the world's top listers
> (how
>  about that, a list of listers ?!). These individuals spend
> considerable
>  time and resources chasing birds, so they frequent seldom-visited
> locations
>  and see rarely-observed species (this from a global perspective, not
> a
>  local one). Starting at 5000 species, the life lists break down as
> follows:
>
>  66 lists between 5000 and 6000 species
>  42 lists between 6000 and 7000 species
>  26 lists between 7000 and 8000 species
>  19 lists between 8000 and 9000 species
>  5 lists 9000 and over, top is 9435 or 92% of extant species
>
>  The sizes of these lists, however, reflect birders' circumstances and
>  finances as much as they do birds' chaseability. Taxonomic issues are
> also
>  involved.
>
>  6. I can't remember where I read this, and can't find the figure on
> the
>  website, but I recall reading that Surfbird's galleries contain
> photos of
>  about 8000 species. Contributors include numerous global birding
> tours
>  operators who offer experienced guides and regular, specialized
> travel to
>  remote locations.
>
>  7. In BirdForum's Opus, covering all the world's birds, 7920 species
> have a
>  photo. BirdForum has a large, multinational membership but I have no
> idea
>  whether it contains numerous photographers who travel to remote
> regions in
>  pursuit of birds.
>
>  8. Lynx Edicions' Internet Bird Collection website has photos of 9416
>  species. This is a comprehensive collection as Lynx publishes the
> Handbook
>  of the Birds of the World and obtains images from photographers who
>  specifically chase rarely-photographed birds.
>
>  9. The extensive bird sound database Xeno-canto has recordings of
> 9375
>  species.
>
>  On examination, the above figures seem to suggest the following
> breakdown:
>
>  * Approximately 6500 bird species, or c. 63% of the world total, are
>  more-or-less readily findable. Mostly a matter of getting to the
> proper
>  locations which, in their cases, is not unduly difficult (if not
>  necessarily cheap). And employing the proper search techniques and
> patience
>  as is requisite of any bird outing.
>
>  * A further c. 1500 species, or about 15%, are challenging to find.
> They
>  would frequently require travel off the beaten path, enlisting the
> help of
>  local knowledge / guides, and above-average effort and persistence to
>  observe.
>
>  * Another approx. 1600 species, c. 16%, are truly difficult to find
> due
>  variably to rarity, elusiveness, remote range, habitat access
> difficulties,
>  political constraints on accessibility and travel dangers. Seeing
> these
>  would almost certainly require special arrangements and local
> knowledge /
>  guidance.
>
>  * The final c. 740 species, 7%, seem exceptionally difficult to see,
>  frequently due more to a very small, remote range with considerable
> access
>  difficulties rather than strictly to numerical scarcity. Of course, a
>  restricted range usually means a smaller global population. This is
> based
>  on examination of species missing from eBird, and those with a high
> threat
>  status (which is based on multiple factors, not only population
> size). Of
>  these, approximately 250 species - the rarest, most elusive and /
>  or possibly extinct - seem to be nearly unfindable except under
>  extraordinary circumstances and a cosmic stroke of luck.
>
>  In other words: if time, money and life circumstances were no
> constraints,
>  the following would be true of life lists (assuming a birder wishes
>  to pursue new birds to the extent possible):
>
>  1-6500 species - relatively straightforward
>  6500-8000 species - challenging
>  8000-9600 species - truly difficult
>  9600-10100 species - exceptionally difficult
>  10100-10350 species - next to impossible
>
>  Does this assessment appear reasonable ? Any thoughts ?
>
>  Best regards,
>
>  - Eran Tomer
>  Atlanta, Georgia, USA
>
>  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>  Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: World birds chaseability
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 21:00:18 -0500
Eran,
It strikes me as a bit optimistic. For example, 9600 is more than
exceptionally difficult - as evidenced by no one getting within 100 of
that total so far. Noah Strycker is going to new places, but he still
has to run into at least a little of the problem of the diminishing
number of new birds possible the more you see. 6000 may be possible in
a year, but I'll be very surprised if Noah reaches that number.
Larry GardellaMontgomery, AL

        -----------------------------------------From: "Eran Tomer" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 02:05:36 -0400
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] World birds chaseability

 ​​​Hello all,

 I thought I'd share a quick, speculative brainstorm I've had
regarding
 birds' chaseability. It is based on the following figures:

 1. On May 9th, 2015 eBird held a much-promoted, global Big Day. 6088
 species were counted. Participation was global but with considerable
 geographic biases. It stands to reason that people did not mount
helicopter
 expeditions in honor of the event, but mostly visited local sites or
 otherwise readily-accessible locations.

 2. eBird includes records for 98% of bird species, including
historical
 records for extinct ones. The tally for 2015 is currently 9261
species, or
 90% of all extant species.

 3. Birder Noah Strycker is in the midst of a global Big Year, aiming
to see
 at least 5000 species. Thus far, 64% into the year, he has been
averaging
 17.226 new species per day (N=235 days). If he continues at this
rate, he
 will see 6287 species by the year's end. The actual tally will
probably be
 somewhat higher given that several of his upcoming destinations are
global
 bird diversity hotspots. Strycker's method is extensive rather than
 intensive. He travels continuously and uses local guides, so he
visits some
 less-traveled sites for uncommonly observed endemics. However, a few
 exceptions aside, he does not spend much time trying for stubbornly
elusive
 species or expend much travel time to see a small number of new
species.

 4. The Visual Resources for Ornithology (VIREO) project strives to
compile
 high quality photographs of all the world's bird species. It has been
 running since 1979 and currently, 36 years on, has 7300+ species
recorded.
 This includes photos of recently-extinct species' specimen.

 5. The Surfbirds website maintains a list of the world's top listers
(how
 about that, a list of listers ?!). These individuals spend
considerable
 time and resources chasing birds, so they frequent seldom-visited
locations
 and see rarely-observed species (this from a global perspective, not
a
 local one). Starting at 5000 species, the life lists break down as
follows:

 66 lists between 5000 and 6000 species
 42 lists between 6000 and 7000 species
 26 lists between 7000 and 8000 species
 19 lists between 8000 and 9000 species
 5 lists 9000 and over, top is 9435 or 92% of extant species

 The sizes of these lists, however, reflect birders' circumstances and
 finances as much as they do birds' chaseability. Taxonomic issues are
also
 involved.

 6. I can't remember where I read this, and can't find the figure on
the
 website, but I recall reading that Surfbird's galleries contain
photos of
 about 8000 species. Contributors include numerous global birding
tours
 operators who offer experienced guides and regular, specialized
travel to
 remote locations.

 7. In BirdForum's Opus, covering all the world's birds, 7920 species
have a
 photo. BirdForum has a large, multinational membership but I have no
idea
 whether it contains numerous photographers who travel to remote
regions in
 pursuit of birds.

 8. Lynx Edicions' Internet Bird Collection website has photos of 9416
 species. This is a comprehensive collection as Lynx publishes the
Handbook
 of the Birds of the World and obtains images from photographers who
 specifically chase rarely-photographed birds.

 9. The extensive bird sound database Xeno-canto has recordings of
9375
 species.

 On examination, the above figures seem to suggest the following
breakdown:

 * Approximately 6500 bird species, or c. 63% of the world total, are
 more-or-less readily findable. Mostly a matter of getting to the
proper
 locations which, in their cases, is not unduly difficult (if not
 necessarily cheap). And employing the proper search techniques and
patience
 as is requisite of any bird outing.

 * A further c. 1500 species, or about 15%, are challenging to find.
They
 would frequently require travel off the beaten path, enlisting the
help of
 local knowledge / guides, and above-average effort and persistence to
 observe.

 * Another approx. 1600 species, c. 16%, are truly difficult to find
due
 variably to rarity, elusiveness, remote range, habitat access
difficulties,
 political constraints on accessibility and travel dangers. Seeing
these
 would almost certainly require special arrangements and local
knowledge /
 guidance.

 * The final c. 740 species, 7%, seem exceptionally difficult to see,
 frequently due more to a very small, remote range with considerable
access
 difficulties rather than strictly to numerical scarcity. Of course, a
 restricted range usually means a smaller global population. This is
based
 on examination of species missing from eBird, and those with a high
threat
 status (which is based on multiple factors, not only population
size). Of
 these, approximately 250 species - the rarest, most elusive and /
 or possibly extinct - seem to be nearly unfindable except under
 extraordinary circumstances and a cosmic stroke of luck.

 In other words: if time, money and life circumstances were no
constraints,
 the following would be true of life lists (assuming a birder wishes
 to pursue new birds to the extent possible):

 1-6500 species - relatively straightforward
 6500-8000 species - challenging
 8000-9600 species - truly difficult
 9600-10100 species - exceptionally difficult
 10100-10350 species - next to impossible

 Does this assessment appear reasonable ? Any thoughts ?

 Best regards,

 - Eran Tomer
 Atlanta, Georgia, USA

 BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: does light pollution stress out nesting birds?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Aug 2015 00:25:40 +0100
Hello everyone,

I wrote a piece about a paper that just published in the journal, Biology
Letters, that you may be interested to read. This study investigates the
possibility that different colours of artificial light may have different
effects on the physiology of songbirds that are breeding nearby. it's
preliminary, but it's the first study of its kind that poses such a
question. You can read more here:

White sky at night not a city bird's delight
http://gu.com/p/4btmj/stw

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Polar Bears and Pelagics Svalbard 2015
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 23:18:52 +0000
We spent June 19-26, 2015 cruising the Svalbard islands of Norway searching for 
Polar bears and birds.  (Spitsbergen is the main island).  The main goal of 
the trip was polar bears, of which we saw over 20 very well.  These are active 
polar bears chasing seals on the pack ice, not Hudson's Bay beach bum bears 
lolling around waiting for the ice.  We saw bears fighting, bears hunting, 
bears swimming, bears mating, and bears checking out the ship.  It was 
incredible.  We were on the right ship at the right place at the right time. 
 We heard from passengers on two other ships in the same area at the same 
time.  One saw no bears and the other saw two distant ones.  You need to be 
on a true icebreaker that can go into the pack ice, the other ships saw nothing 
from the edge of the ice.  Svalbard has a stable, protected population of 
3,000 or so Polar Bears and we hit a good ice year.  Norway is the only place 
where polar bear hunting is prohibited.  The captain was amazing: even with 
dozens of eyes with top optics always focussed on the horizon, he always saw 
the bear first.  Our ship was the MV Ortellius run by Oceanwide Expeditions; I 
can't find enough superlatives to give them adequate credit.  They are 
at https://oceanwide-expeditions.com/the-arctic/spitsbergen/cruises?ship=4 

Birdwise, being in the middle of the ice, we had great looks at Ivory Gulls, 
Great Skua, Pomarine and Parasitic jaegers and thousands of alcids.  Alcids 
were mostly Thick-billed Murres, Dovekies and Black Guillemots.  On our two 
land hikes we saw Barnacle and Pink-footed Geese, King Eider, Long-tailed Duck, 
Red-throated Loon and hundreds of Snow Buntings. 

We also saw a pile of Walrus, that's my proposed group name for them.  They 
were so piled together, we couldn't count them.  Estimates were 30 to 50.    

My pictures are at https://www.flickr.com/gp/40829440 AT N02/0959a6Bird list is 
on e-bird starting at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23970455 

Few americans know about this cruise.  Over 90% of the passengers were 
Europeans.  Don't miss it. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
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Subject: Re: How to use AviSys going forward
From: Dave Moore <mooredw AT VIF.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 14:25:52 -0400
Hi
Could you send me these files lease?
Thanks
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Lamont
Sent: Saturday, August 22, 2015 4:30 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] How to use AviSys going forward

We AviSys users can once again appreciate the Brilliance of Jerry Blinn.  In
mid-2011 Jerry wrote an executable program called Edit Master and named it
AviEdit.Exe along with a Text file describing the program.  No doubt this is
what Arie Gilbert referred to in a previous post, when saying "AviSys can be
used for years to come".  I have these two files and will send them to
anyone requesting them offline.  Last year I also Beta Tested a county CSV
maker program for Jerry and will briefly describe it below.

Quotes from the text file accompanying AviEdit.Exe:
Edit Master provides for easy "birding community" support to keep the AviSys
taxonomy up to date, ensuring that AviSys can never become obsolete due to
taxonomy changes, even if the author is out of business......This free and
open taxonomy maintenance process is Another AviSys Exclusive!  [He
describes the operation of the file. Then closes with the next statement.]
....This unique combination of ease of mass editing, ease of mass
distribution of a taxonomy update, and an automated taxonomy update, is
unmatched and unprecedented in birding software.
End Quote

My plan for the 2015 Clements updates are to wait some 2 months to see if
Jerry is able to massage that data.  He stated on the announcement page of
the website that "depending upon circumstances" he may or may not be able to
do that.  And there is no pressure on him to address it from my standpoint
with what he no doubt is facing.  If needed after a couple of months, I will
run the Edit Master for the 2015 updates.  If after using it, should the
instructions need updating, I'll be happy to do so and alert anyone on
Birdchat and provide those without charge too.

Due to participating in TOS's Century Club here in Texas, I have more than
22,000 sightings in all 254 Texas counties.  AviSys can produce CSV files at
the state and nations level, but not at the county level.  [CSV= Comma
Separated Value - a delimited file that can be imported into a spreadsheet
like Excel]  Since I make a lot of county lists, I asked Jerry if there was
a way to get AviSys to produce a county listing in CSV format.   Jerry made
his usual quick response saying, "It is not possible as it is now".  Then
about 3 hours later he emailed me a small executable file called
CSVCountyMaker.Exe  This small program will make a CSV list of all the
counties in a state.  It is a quick two-step process that takes about 30
seconds to create.  I have used this program extensively on a Windows 7
computer, but not on any other operating system.  Jerry has not had the time
to vet the program to make sure if any 'incompatibility bugs' exist.  But if
you have a Win 7 or older Microsoft operating system I cannot imagine anyone
having incompatibility issues with this program.

If you want Edit Master request it offline.  I'll email you both the Exe
program and the accompanying text file as attachments.
If you want the CSVCounty maker, request it and I'll email the Exe file as
an attachment.

Request these with confidence:  All my computers are continually up to date
with Trend Micro Anti Virus; I do not harvest emails; I do not have anything
you can join and I don't have anything for sale.

Finally, it likely goes without saying, but we all need to remember Jerry
and his family in our prayers and warmest thoughts!

Lamont Brown
Denton, Texas

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: World birds chaseability
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 02:05:36 -0400
​​​Hello all,

I thought I'd share a quick, speculative brainstorm I've had regarding
birds' chaseability. It is based on the following figures:

1. On May 9th, 2015 eBird held a much-promoted, global Big Day. 6088
species were counted. Participation was global but with considerable
geographic biases. It stands to reason that people did not mount helicopter
expeditions in honor of the event, but mostly visited local sites or
otherwise readily-accessible locations.

2. eBird includes records for 98% of bird species, including historical
records for extinct ones. The tally for 2015 is currently 9261 species, or
90% of all extant species.

3. Birder Noah Strycker is in the midst of a global Big Year, aiming to see
at least 5000 species. Thus far, 64% into the year, he has been averaging
17.226 new species per day (N=235 days). If he continues at this rate, he
will see 6287 species by the year's end. The actual tally will probably be
somewhat higher given that several of his upcoming destinations are global
bird diversity hotspots. Strycker's method is extensive rather than
intensive. He travels continuously and uses local guides, so he visits some
less-traveled sites for uncommonly observed endemics. However, a few
exceptions aside, he does not spend much time trying for stubbornly elusive
species or expend much travel time to see a small number of new species.

4. The Visual Resources for Ornithology (VIREO) project strives to compile
high quality photographs of all the world's bird species. It has been
running since 1979 and currently, 36 years on, has 7300+ species recorded.
This includes photos of recently-extinct species' specimen.

5. The Surfbirds website maintains a list of the world's top listers (how
about that, a list of listers ?!). These individuals spend considerable
time and resources chasing birds, so they frequent seldom-visited locations
and see rarely-observed species (this from a global perspective, not a
local one). Starting at 5000 species, the life lists break down as follows:

66 lists between 5000 and 6000 species
42 lists between 6000 and 7000 species
26 lists between 7000 and 8000 species
19 lists between 8000 and 9000 species
5 lists 9000 and over, top is 9435 or 92% of extant species

The sizes of these lists, however, reflect birders' circumstances and
finances as much as they do birds' chaseability. Taxonomic issues are also
involved.

6. I can't remember where I read this, and can't find the figure on the
website, but I recall reading that Surfbird's galleries contain photos of
about 8000 species. Contributors include numerous global birding tours
operators who offer experienced guides and regular, specialized travel to
remote locations.

7. In BirdForum's Opus, covering all the world's birds, 7920 species have a
photo. BirdForum has a large, multinational membership but I have no idea
whether it contains numerous photographers who travel to remote regions in
pursuit of birds.

8. Lynx Edicions' Internet Bird Collection website has photos of 9416
species. This is a comprehensive collection as Lynx publishes the Handbook
of the Birds of the World and obtains images from photographers who
specifically chase rarely-photographed birds.

9. The extensive bird sound database Xeno-canto has recordings of 9375
species.


On examination, the above figures seem to suggest the following breakdown:

* Approximately 6500 bird species, or c. 63% of the world total, are
more-or-less readily findable. Mostly a matter of getting to the proper
locations which, in their cases, is not unduly difficult (if not
necessarily cheap). And employing the proper search techniques and patience
as is requisite of any bird outing.

* A further c. 1500 species, or about 15%, are challenging to find. They
would frequently require travel off the beaten path, enlisting the help of
local knowledge / guides, and above-average effort and persistence to
observe.

* Another approx. 1600 species, c. 16%, are truly difficult to find due
variably to rarity, elusiveness, remote range, habitat access difficulties,
political constraints on accessibility and travel dangers. Seeing these
would almost certainly require special arrangements and local knowledge /
guidance.

* The final c. 740 species, 7%, seem exceptionally difficult to see,
frequently due more to a very small, remote range with considerable access
difficulties rather than strictly to numerical scarcity. Of course, a
restricted range usually means a smaller global population. This is based
on examination of species missing from eBird, and those with a high threat
status (which is based on multiple factors, not only population size). Of
these, approximately 250 species - the rarest, most elusive and /
or possibly extinct - seem to be nearly unfindable except under
extraordinary circumstances and a cosmic stroke of luck.

In other words: if time, money and life circumstances were no constraints,
the following would be true of life lists (assuming a birder wishes
to pursue new birds to the extent possible):

1-6500 species - relatively straightforward
6500-8000 species - challenging
8000-9600 species - truly difficult
9600-10100 species - exceptionally difficult
10100-10350 species - next to impossible

Does this assessment appear reasonable ?  Any thoughts ?

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Re: Dog life list
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 12:12:35 -0500
I got a puppy in March, and started keeping a new list of all the birds
we've seen together. She is an extraordinarily observant dog, so she's
actually noticed a lot of them--as I review "our" list, she's definitely
noticed at least 50, but our list together is right now at 198.

To keep track of our birds together, I share my eBird checklist with her. I
keep the number of observers in the birding party at 1, and hide her
checklist so the data is still useful for more scientific purposes. I had
to give her her own email account (pip AT lauraerickson.com), and since it
seemed a fun and silly thing to do, also created her own webpage,
pip.lauraerickson.com

This has added a wonderfully fun dimension to my birding, and also an
educational one, because I could show how I keep her off beaches when
Piping Plovers or other shorebirds might be near, and how I keep her on the
trail when we're in the field.

Best,

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Sun, Aug 23, 2015 at 11:52 AM, sandfalcon1 . 
wrote:

> Do any of you keep a life list for your dog?  If so, what is your
> criteria for a countable bird?  And how many species has your dog
> managed to check off?
>
> I got a 5 month old puppy a couple of weeks ago.  So far my criteria
> is if she stops and takes notice of a specific bird, then it is
> countable.  It makes our walks a little more interesting for me.  I
> need to tally them, but I think we're up to about 6 species.  She also
> enjoys butterflies, grasshoppers and we've had to have long talks
> about how toads are not interested in playing with her.
>
> Brandon Best
> Lawrenceville, GA
>
> --
> You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who
> can never repay you.
> -John Bunyan
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Dog life list
From: "sandfalcon1 ." <sandfalcon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2015 12:52:28 -0400
Do any of you keep a life list for your dog?  If so, what is your
criteria for a countable bird?  And how many species has your dog
managed to check off?

I got a 5 month old puppy a couple of weeks ago.  So far my criteria
is if she stops and takes notice of a specific bird, then it is
countable.  It makes our walks a little more interesting for me.  I
need to tally them, but I think we're up to about 6 species.  She also
enjoys butterflies, grasshoppers and we've had to have long talks
about how toads are not interested in playing with her.

Brandon Best
Lawrenceville, GA

--
You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who
can never repay you.
-John Bunyan

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: How to use AviSys going forward
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 21:19:40 +0000
Thanks, very useful.  I have 50 years of records on Avisys which I'd like to 
move to E-bird, but the prospect is daunting. It looks like the new county add 
on to Avisys might help. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
      From: Lamont 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Saturday, August 22, 2015 1:30 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] How to use AviSys going forward
   
We AviSys users can once again appreciate the Brilliance of Jerry Blinn.  In
mid-2011 Jerry wrote an executable program called Edit Master and named it
AviEdit.Exe along with a Text file describing the program.  No doubt this is
what Arie Gilbert referred to in a previous post, when saying "AviSys can be
used for years to come".  I have these two files and will send them to
anyone requesting them offline.  Last year I also Beta Tested a county CSV
maker program for Jerry and will briefly describe it below.

Quotes from the text file accompanying AviEdit.Exe:
Edit Master provides for easy "birding community" support to keep the AviSys
taxonomy up to date, ensuring that AviSys can never become obsolete due to
taxonomy changes, even if the author is out of business......This free and
open taxonomy maintenance process is Another AviSys Exclusive!  [He
describes the operation of the file. Then closes with the next statement.]
....This unique combination of ease of mass editing, ease of mass
distribution of a taxonomy update, and an automated taxonomy update, is
unmatched and unprecedented in birding software.
End Quote

My plan for the 2015 Clements updates are to wait some 2 months to see if
Jerry is able to massage that data.  He stated on the announcement page of
the website that "depending upon circumstances" he may or may not be able to
do that.  And there is no pressure on him to address it from my standpoint
with what he no doubt is facing.  If needed after a couple of months, I will
run the Edit Master for the 2015 updates.  If after using it, should the
instructions need updating, I'll be happy to do so and alert anyone on
Birdchat and provide those without charge too.

Due to participating in TOS's Century Club here in Texas, I have more than
22,000 sightings in all 254 Texas counties.  AviSys can produce CSV files at
the state and nations level, but not at the county level.  [CSV= Comma
Separated Value - a delimited file that can be imported into a spreadsheet
like Excel]  Since I make a lot of county lists, I asked Jerry if there was
a way to get AviSys to produce a county listing in CSV format.  Jerry made
his usual quick response saying, "It is not possible as it is now".  Then
about 3 hours later he emailed me a small executable file called
CSVCountyMaker.Exe  This small program will make a CSV list of all the
counties in a state.  It is a quick two-step process that takes about 30
seconds to create.  I have used this program extensively on a Windows 7
computer, but not on any other operating system.  Jerry has not had the time
to vet the program to make sure if any 'incompatibility bugs' exist.  But if
you have a Win 7 or older Microsoft operating system I cannot imagine anyone
having incompatibility issues with this program.

If you want Edit Master request it offline.  I'll email you both the Exe
program and the accompanying text file as attachments.
If you want the CSVCounty maker, request it and I'll email the Exe file as
an attachment.

Request these with confidence:  All my computers are continually up to date
with Trend Micro Anti Virus; I do not harvest emails; I do not have anything
you can join and I don't have anything for sale.

Finally, it likely goes without saying, but we all need to remember Jerry
and his family in our prayers and warmest thoughts!

Lamont Brown
Denton, Texas

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: How to use AviSys going forward
From: Lamont <lamont AT GVII.CC>
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 15:30:52 -0500
We AviSys users can once again appreciate the Brilliance of Jerry Blinn.  In
mid-2011 Jerry wrote an executable program called Edit Master and named it
AviEdit.Exe along with a Text file describing the program.  No doubt this is
what Arie Gilbert referred to in a previous post, when saying "AviSys can be
used for years to come".  I have these two files and will send them to
anyone requesting them offline.  Last year I also Beta Tested a county CSV
maker program for Jerry and will briefly describe it below.

Quotes from the text file accompanying AviEdit.Exe:
Edit Master provides for easy "birding community" support to keep the AviSys
taxonomy up to date, ensuring that AviSys can never become obsolete due to
taxonomy changes, even if the author is out of business......This free and
open taxonomy maintenance process is Another AviSys Exclusive!  [He
describes the operation of the file. Then closes with the next statement.]
....This unique combination of ease of mass editing, ease of mass
distribution of a taxonomy update, and an automated taxonomy update, is
unmatched and unprecedented in birding software.
End Quote

My plan for the 2015 Clements updates are to wait some 2 months to see if
Jerry is able to massage that data.  He stated on the announcement page of
the website that "depending upon circumstances" he may or may not be able to
do that.  And there is no pressure on him to address it from my standpoint
with what he no doubt is facing.  If needed after a couple of months, I will
run the Edit Master for the 2015 updates.  If after using it, should the
instructions need updating, I'll be happy to do so and alert anyone on
Birdchat and provide those without charge too.

Due to participating in TOS's Century Club here in Texas, I have more than
22,000 sightings in all 254 Texas counties.  AviSys can produce CSV files at
the state and nations level, but not at the county level.  [CSV= Comma
Separated Value - a delimited file that can be imported into a spreadsheet
like Excel]  Since I make a lot of county lists, I asked Jerry if there was
a way to get AviSys to produce a county listing in CSV format.   Jerry made
his usual quick response saying, "It is not possible as it is now".  Then
about 3 hours later he emailed me a small executable file called
CSVCountyMaker.Exe  This small program will make a CSV list of all the
counties in a state.  It is a quick two-step process that takes about 30
seconds to create.  I have used this program extensively on a Windows 7
computer, but not on any other operating system.  Jerry has not had the time
to vet the program to make sure if any 'incompatibility bugs' exist.  But if
you have a Win 7 or older Microsoft operating system I cannot imagine anyone
having incompatibility issues with this program.

If you want Edit Master request it offline.  I'll email you both the Exe
program and the accompanying text file as attachments.
If you want the CSVCounty maker, request it and I'll email the Exe file as
an attachment.

Request these with confidence:  All my computers are continually up to date
with Trend Micro Anti Virus; I do not harvest emails; I do not have anything
you can join and I don't have anything for sale.

Finally, it likely goes without saying, but we all need to remember Jerry
and his family in our prayers and warmest thoughts!

Lamont Brown
Denton, Texas

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of August 23, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 22 Aug 2015 10:20:28 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* The Crow and the Gull - A listener's story
http://bit.ly/OA5VWy
* Where Do Fledglings Go?
http://bit.ly/1NigJrG
* Groove-billed Anis, Communal Nesters
http://bit.ly/1UKszwF
* Hazel Wolf, Environmental Champion -
Her favorite bird was the Brown Creeper...
http://bit.ly/1JYwsLf
* The Bird Is the Word - Remember these tunes?
http://bit.ly/MuzeLF
* Roadrunner - Beep beep!
http://bit.ly/15profP
* Match Birds with Their Habitats
http://bit.ly/PtJ5kp
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1JbfWU1
---------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening! Let us know what shows you like -- or don't -- and
why.
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2015 12:24:08 -0700
I too have use Birdbase for maybe 20 years - long before Windows was invented.
I haven't done much uploading into eBird, and haven't attempted it
from Birdbase. I'll be surprised if there's a handy way to do it, but
it would be a nice design feature to add to Birdbase, if possible. Hint, hint.

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.


At 10:00 PM 8/20/2015, you wrote:
>Date:    Thu, 20 Aug 2015 08:41:30 -0500
>From:    Mary Beth Stowe 
>Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
>
>I've been using Birdbase for decades, mainly because (at the time)
>it was the only program that had a world bird list.  I don't know if
>it's compatible with EBird or not; really haven't looked into it.
>
>Mary Beth Stowe
>McAllen, TX
>www.miriameaglemon.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe AT MIRIAMEAGLEMON.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Aug 2015 08:41:30 -0500
I've been using Birdbase for decades, mainly because (at the time) it was the 
only program that had a world bird list. I don't know if it's compatible with 
EBird or not; really haven't looked into it. 


Mary Beth Stowe
McAllen, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of danafox AT comcast.net 

Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2015 8:44 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives

I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
Oh, how I will miss Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
I encourage you to explore the options.
Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me. I fully support ebird and 
its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings are not 
currently so detailed. 

And in the end, I need a simple list that I can maneuver like I did with Avisys 
and one that was updated for me. I also loved Jerry's Partners Program as I do 
all of my husband's lists too and how helpful it was to have them linked. 

I encourage folks to let everyone know the options they find.
Dana Duxbury-Fox
MA and NH
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 21:09:08 -0400
For Mac users, BirdBrain is a great program for keeping your records 
(http://www.birdwatching.com/birdbrain/ 
). It is not always updated as quickly 
as Jerry did Avisys, but it keeps up with the latest in taxonomy from year to 
year. Easy to input and will generate any lists you want. Also generates target 
lists. It imports lists into eBird so you don’t have to do double entry. 


Usual disclaimers—no financial interest. I have just used it for years and 
think it has great features. 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com





> On Aug 19, 2015, at 4:26 PM, Jim Hully  wrote:
> 
> Hi Dana (& Bob),
> 
> One option that works for me, and maybe only for me, is to adapt the annual
> Clement's checklist provided by Cornell Labs.  I only keep one list, a
> world list, and that is an Excel version of that checklist.  I add extra
> columns for check marks, dates, etc. It also forces me to determine what
> races/subspecies are involved.
> 
> The downside is the need to the annual update that come every August with
> the release of a new checklist.  Some years it is easier just to start over
> with that year's checklist (such as 2014). For me it is a good mental
> refresher and I always learn lots of new information going through the
> 10,000+ species.
> 
> As an Apple user, Avisys was not an option but when I did use a PC I really
> enjoyed the support from Jerry and I too hope he gets better.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Jim Hully
> Mundelein, IL
> xenospiza AT gmail.com
> http://jimhully.smugmug.com/
> 
> On Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 8:43 AM, danafox AT comcast.net 
> wrote:
> 
>> I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
>> Oh, how I will miss Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
>> I encourage you to explore the options.
>> Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me.  I fully support
>> ebird and its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings
>> are not currently so detailed.
>> And in the end, I need a simple list that I can maneuver like I did with
>> Avisys and one that was updated for me. I also loved Jerry's Partners
>> Program as I do all of my husband's lists too and how helpful it was to
>> have them linked.
>> I encourage folks to let everyone know the options they find.
>> Dana Duxbury-Fox
>> MA and NH
>> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone
>> 
>> 
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


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Subject: Hummingbird Festival in Fayette County
From: "Bill Hilton Jr." <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 20:56:55 -0400
If you’re in Fayette County WV this Saturday morning (22 Aug 2015), I hope to 
see you at our annual New River Hummingbird Festival, held this year at 
Honeysuckle Hill Gardens near Oak Hill. 


I’ll be conducting hummer banding demonstrations and talking about how to 
attract even more of them to your yard. 


Details at 
http://m.fayettetribune.com/news/hummingbird-festival-set-for-aug/article_8cdbcc9c-4458-11e5-8da4-672498bd8821.html?mode=jqm 
 


Happy Birding!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================


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Subject: Birds stalking a cat (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:50:04 -0400
Turning the tables. Two Blue Jays stalking a cat. They had a very
mischievous air about them, but someone walked by and scared them away
before they could continue their nefarious ways:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20715898765/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Southeast Arizona Trip Part 1
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe AT MIRIAMEAGLEMON.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 16:10:58 -0500
Hi, all!

The first installment of last month's trip to southeast Arizona is up on my
website, which includes pictures and recordings.  This portion includes the
drive out from McAllen, TX (with a stop at Lake Balmorhea), a scouting drive
through Fort Bowie, and a check of Twin (Cochise) Lakes in Willcox:

http://miriameaglemon.com/Trip%20Reports/Arizona%202015/Lake%20Balmorhea%20&
%20Twin%20Lakes.html

...or here:

http://tinyurl.com/ol3av6z

Enjoy!  MB

Mary Beth Stowe
McAllen, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Southeast Arizona Trip Part 1
From: "Mary Beth Stowe" <mbstowe AT miriameaglemon.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 16:10:58 -0500
Hi, all!

The first installment of last month's trip to southeast Arizona is up on my
website, which includes pictures and recordings.  This portion includes the
drive out from McAllen, TX (with a stop at Lake Balmorhea), a scouting drive
through Fort Bowie, and a check of Twin (Cochise) Lakes in Willcox:

http://miriameaglemon.com/Trip%20Reports/Arizona%202015/Lake%20Balmorhea%20&
%20Twin%20Lakes.html

...or here:

http://tinyurl.com/ol3av6z

Enjoy!  MB

Mary Beth Stowe
McAllen, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com



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To unsubscribe use the Unsubscribe button on that page.
To view archive: click "Archive" on that page.
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Jim Hully <xenospiza AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 15:26:52 -0500
Hi Dana (& Bob),

One option that works for me, and maybe only for me, is to adapt the annual
Clement's checklist provided by Cornell Labs.  I only keep one list, a
world list, and that is an Excel version of that checklist.  I add extra
columns for check marks, dates, etc. It also forces me to determine what
races/subspecies are involved.

The downside is the need to the annual update that come every August with
the release of a new checklist.  Some years it is easier just to start over
with that year's checklist (such as 2014). For me it is a good mental
refresher and I always learn lots of new information going through the
10,000+ species.

As an Apple user, Avisys was not an option but when I did use a PC I really
enjoyed the support from Jerry and I too hope he gets better.

Cheers,

Jim Hully
Mundelein, IL
xenospiza AT gmail.com
http://jimhully.smugmug.com/

On Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 8:43 AM, danafox AT comcast.net 
wrote:

> I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
> Oh, how I will miss Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
> I encourage you to explore the options.
> Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me.  I fully support
> ebird and its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings
> are not currently so detailed.
> And in the end, I need a simple list that I can maneuver like I did with
> Avisys and one that was updated for me. I also loved Jerry's Partners
> Program as I do all of my husband's lists too and how helpful it was to
> have them linked.
> I encourage folks to let everyone know the options they find.
> Dana Duxbury-Fox
> MA and NH
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 14:45:43 -0400
Janet,

FYI:  I think eBird may be more flexible than you realize.  Please note the
following:

eBird has an app that will allow you to record sightings, and record your
location via GPS, even when you are offline.  You can also download your
eBird data in CSV form (not an expert at this), or even just copy the web
page with your life or regional lists into a Word document for offline
reference.

Also, please note that eBird is flexible and does not require the use of
detailed information to enter sightings, you can enter sightings and simply
specify a date and state if you wish (though of course the more detail you
provide the more useful your data will be to others).

And most importantly, by entering data into eBird scientists and others
have access to it now and in the future--if you just enter it into a
program on your personal device it cannot be used by others and dies with
you (unless, of course, you also import it into eBird--which AviSys
thankfully facilitates).

Cheers,
Jim M.
Maryland


On Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 2:00 PM, Janet Zinn  wrote:

> I am another long term very satisfied user of Avisys. Ebird does not meet
> my requirements as I need something off-line, and easily transportable
> between
> my PC and netbook for traveling when I'm in remote places. I do not have
> the kind of detailed
> information eBird requires for most of my sightings--nor do I need that
> level of detail for my own personal use. Avisys has just about all the
> functionality I need or anticipate needing.
>
> I of course wish Jerry the best and hope that he can overcome this latest
> challenge, whatever it may be.
>
> Regarding Birder's Diary, I looked into it and it does look like a very
> good program, and seems to do all of what Avisys does, and maybe more; but
> its a subscription product. If you want to keep the taxonomy up-to-date,
> its $59 annually (for Clement's World taxonomy--somewhat less if you only
> want ABA region) which Jerry provided for free. I might be able to live
> with that if I could update it every other year or even two years, but it
> seems that you can't do that. Still, it may be the best option if the
> subscription fee doesn't bother you.
>
> But like Arie, I am hoping to continue to use Avisys for the time being;
> for the moment I'm good
> with the 2014 taxonomy and I am hoping that someone will come forward out
> of Jerry's many thousands of subscribers who is willing to process the 2015
> taxonomy (just released!) and make it available. I would imagine it
> requires some programming skills so unfortunately I'm not the one, but
> there must be a programmer in his subscription base somewhere...Jerry
> indicated that he would be open to such an option if someone volunteered.
> (I'm not
> sure what Arie was referring to in terms of such a provision already being
> available...?)
>
> Janet Zinn
> Brooklyn, NY
> www.janetzinnphotography.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Janet Zinn <bkbirdr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 14:00:33 -0400
I am another long term very satisfied user of Avisys. Ebird does not meet
my requirements as I need something off-line, and easily transportable
between
my PC and netbook for traveling when I'm in remote places. I do not have
the kind of detailed
information eBird requires for most of my sightings--nor do I need that
level of detail for my own personal use. Avisys has just about all the
functionality I need or anticipate needing.

I of course wish Jerry the best and hope that he can overcome this latest
challenge, whatever it may be.

Regarding Birder's Diary, I looked into it and it does look like a very
good program, and seems to do all of what Avisys does, and maybe more; but
its a subscription product. If you want to keep the taxonomy up-to-date,
its $59 annually (for Clement's World taxonomy--somewhat less if you only
want ABA region) which Jerry provided for free. I might be able to live
with that if I could update it every other year or even two years, but it
seems that you can't do that. Still, it may be the best option if the
subscription fee doesn't bother you.

But like Arie, I am hoping to continue to use Avisys for the time being;
for the moment I'm good
with the 2014 taxonomy and I am hoping that someone will come forward out
of Jerry's many thousands of subscribers who is willing to process the 2015
taxonomy (just released!) and make it available. I would imagine it
requires some programming skills so unfortunately I'm not the one, but
there must be a programmer in his subscription base somewhere...Jerry
indicated that he would be open to such an option if someone volunteered.
(I'm not
sure what Arie was referring to in terms of such a provision already being
available...?)

Janet Zinn
Brooklyn, NY
www.janetzinnphotography.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Kay & Rob Grimmond <motcombe AT BTINTERNET.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 18:52:29 +0100
Hi Bill,

Some thoughts from the other side of the Pond.

I use Wildlife Recorder -
seehttp://www.wildlife.co.uk/birding_software/Default.htm
.  It covers not only world
birds, but also North American Butterflies and Dragonflies and World
Mammals. There is also a conversion facility from Avisys available.

Regards,

Rob Grimmond
Somerset UK

On 19/08/2015 18:03, billb55 AT AOL.COM wrote:
> I too am looking for an alternative. It is basically for my life list, though 
I'd also like to use it to generate area and species group checklists, hit 
lists, etc., as well as ideally transfer my butterfly life list, mammals, even 
herps if available. I would like something that I can work on without being 
online, which is why I'd like alternatives to ebird and igoterra, for example. 
Does anyone know anything about Birder's Diary? I haven't heard that one 
mentioned in any of the places I've looked into so far - is that because it's 
not so good, or for some other reason(s)? 

> Thanks,
> Bill Benner
> Whately, Franklin Co., MA
> billb55 AT aol.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: danafox AT comcast.net 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2015 9:45 am
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
>
>
> I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
> Oh, how I will miss
> Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
> I encourage you to explore the
> options.
> Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me.  I fully support
> ebird and its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings 
are 

> not currently so detailed.
> And in the end, I need a simple list that I can
> maneuver like I did with Avisys and one that was updated for me. I also loved
> Jerry's Partners Program as I do all of my husband's lists too and how 
helpful 

> it was to have them linked.
> I encourage folks to let everyone know the options
> they find.
> Dana Duxbury-Fox
> MA and NH
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE
> Smartphone
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 14:01:02 -0400
Just to clarify,

the take away from my previous post should be that users can continue to
use the Avisys program for quite some time before needing to find an
alternative.

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY




On 8/19/2015 1:03 PM, billb55 AT AOL.COM wrote:
> I too am looking for an alternative. It is basically for my life list, though 
I'd also like to use it to generate area and species group checklists, hit 
lists, etc., as well as ideally transfer my butterfly life list, mammals, even 
herps if available. I would like something that I can work on without being 
online, which is why I'd like alternatives to ebird and igoterra, for example. 
Does anyone know anything about Birder's Diary? I haven't heard that one 
mentioned in any of the places I've looked into so far - is that because it's 
not so good, or for some other reason(s)? 

> Thanks,
> Bill Benner
> Whately, Franklin Co., MA
> billb55 AT aol.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: danafox AT comcast.net 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2015 9:45 am
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
>
>
> I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
> Oh, how I will miss
> Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
> I encourage you to explore the
> options.
> Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me.  I fully support
> ebird and its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings 
are 

> not currently so detailed.
> And in the end, I need a simple list that I can
> maneuver like I did with Avisys and one that was updated for me. I also loved
> Jerry's Partners Program as I do all of my husband's lists too and how 
helpful 

> it was to have them linked.
> I encourage folks to let everyone know the options
> they find.
> Dana Duxbury-Fox
> MA and NH
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE
> Smartphone
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

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Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: "William H. Barnard" <barnard AT NORWICH.EDU>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:57:48 +0000
I do not consider myself to be a "birder". I do not chase or even go down the 
road for a rare bird. I am an ornithologist studying blood parasites of birds 
and also have a 23 year study of a colorbanded Gray Jay population here in 
Vermont. Having said that, all ornithologists are birders to some degree or the 
other. 


I have a life list and a yard list. I use an Excel spread sheet and record 
species, AOU #, state first seen, date, comments. Seems to work well for my 
needs. I can sort by any number of criteria. Nice thing is that I do not have 
to be on line. Just a suggestion. 


An aside. Last winter, one day I went through my life list and added 17 species 
in one day without leaving the table. Found I had omitted Hairy Woodpeckers, 
American Robin, and a number of other species. Hard to come up with a first 
sighting date/place, but for me, was okay to list them. 


Bill

Northfield, Vermont

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: billb55 AT AOL.COM
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 13:03:15 -0400
I too am looking for an alternative. It is basically for my life list, though 
I'd also like to use it to generate area and species group checklists, hit 
lists, etc., as well as ideally transfer my butterfly life list, mammals, even 
herps if available. I would like something that I can work on without being 
online, which is why I'd like alternatives to ebird and igoterra, for example. 
Does anyone know anything about Birder's Diary? I haven't heard that one 
mentioned in any of the places I've looked into so far - is that because it's 
not so good, or for some other reason(s)? 

Thanks,
Bill Benner
Whately, Franklin Co., MA
billb55 AT aol.com







-----Original Message-----
From: danafox AT comcast.net 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Wed, Aug 19, 2015 9:45 am
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives


I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
Oh, how I will miss
Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
I encourage you to explore the
options.
Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me.  I fully support
ebird and its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings are
not currently so detailed.
And in the end, I need a simple list that I can
maneuver like I did with Avisys and one that was updated for me. I also loved
Jerry's Partners Program as I do all of my husband's lists too and how helpful
it was to have them linked.
I encourage folks to let everyone know the options
they find.
Dana Duxbury-Fox
MA and NH
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE
Smartphone




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives--entering older sightings in EBird
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 11:36:35 -0400
Dana, et al.,

You can enter older less detailed sightings into eBird quite easily.  Here
are the instructions:


http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/973912-how-to-upload-your-life-list 


EBird also now has the ability to generate target lists, as Avisys does,
and taxonomy updates are automatically applied--you don't have to apply the
update yourself.

Hope this helps,
J. Moore
Rockville, Maryland

On Wed, Aug 19, 2015 at 9:43 AM, danafox AT comcast.net 
wrote:

> I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
> Oh, how I will miss Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
> I encourage you to explore the options.
> Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me.  I fully support
> ebird and its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings
> are not currently so detailed.
> And in the end, I need a simple list that I can maneuver like I did with
> Avisys and one that was updated for me. I also loved Jerry's Partners
> Program as I do all of my husband's lists too and how helpful it was to
> have them linked.
> I encourage folks to let everyone know the options they find.
> Dana Duxbury-Fox
> MA and NH
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 10:59:55 -0400
Chatters,

I have been a loyal user of the Avisys program for many many years. I
wish Jerry Blinn the very best with whatever circumstance has affected him.

As far as alternatives, I would have to say that needing one is
premature. The program continues to function perfectly, and there is no
reason it will not do so for some time.

if you need to update the taxonomy or world checklists, those have
provisions to continue.

For myself, I will continue to use it and do not foresee -having- to
find an alternative.

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY

WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
  WWW.qcbirdclub.org




On 8/19/2015 9:43 AM, danafox AT comcast.net wrote:
> I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
> Oh, how I will miss Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
> I encourage you to explore the options.
> Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me. I fully support ebird 
and its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings are not 
currently so detailed. 

> And in the end, I need a simple list that I can maneuver like I did with 
Avisys and one that was updated for me. I also loved Jerry's Partners Program 
as I do all of my husband's lists too and how helpful it was to have them 
linked. 

> I encourage folks to let everyone know the options they find.
> Dana Duxbury-Fox
> MA and NH
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone
>



-----

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2015.0.6125 / Virus Database: 4401/10466 - Release Date: 08/19/15

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Avisys and Birdbase Users Alternatives
From: danafox AT comcast.net <danafox@COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 09:43:31 -0400
I, too, am looking for an alternative to using my Avisys.
Oh, how I will miss Jerry Blinn and I wish him the best.
I encourage you to explore the options.
Igoterra and Schythbill have been pointed out to me. I fully support ebird and 
its contribution to science but all of my 70+ years of sightings are not 
currently so detailed. 

And in the end, I need a simple list that I can maneuver like I did with Avisys 
and one that was updated for me. I also loved Jerry's Partners Program as I do 
all of my husband's lists too and how helpful it was to have them linked. 

I encourage folks to let everyone know the options they find.
Dana Duxbury-Fox
MA and NH
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone
Subject: Re: Avisys users: an invitation from eBird
From: Chuck & Jaye Otte <otte2 AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 23:05:25 -0500
There are many of us that have older records that may only be to state or
county level that one may not want to import to eBird for various reasons. For
those who are AviSys or BirdBase users that want a stand alone option, let
me suggest Birder's Diary. I have no financial interest in this product other
than a satisfied user for nearly 20 years. I have been very pleased with it. It
has import utilities for both AviSys and BirdBase. If you have questions feel
free to contact me off list or visit their website at http://birdersdiary.com/

Chuck

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chuck & Jaye Otte      mailto:otte2 AT cox.net
613 Tamerisk
Junction City Kansas USA 66441
785-238-8800

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo)
From: Bill Adams <oiseaux831 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 18:49:20 -0400
Yes.

Bill Adams
Richmond VA
831-238-3384

> On Aug 18, 2015, at 3:44 PM, Peter Wilkinson  wrote:
>
> Not entirely sure I would bet against Peacock, if I found that over
> here, but you will have a much better idea of what is likely to be in
> the surroundings than I will.
>
> Peter
> England
>
>> On Tue, 2015-08-18 at 15:25 -0400, B.G. Sloan wrote:
>> Took a photo of this feather yesterday. After searching around online I
>> think it is a body feather from a Wild Turkey. Just wondering if anyone
>> might be able to confirm...
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20660313876/
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park, NJ
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (resource link)
From: JackDaynes <jackdaynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 14:09:10 -0700
On 8/18/2015 12:25 PM, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> Took a photo of this feather yesterday. After searching around online I
> think it is a body feather from a Wild Turkey. Just wondering if anyone
> might be able to confirm...
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20660313876/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
===========================
I found this site as a resource for feather ID:
http://www.featherguide.org/authenticity/Feather_Atlas_WPA.html

I hope this helps,

--
-- Jack --
==================================

Wildlife Photography with
Emphasis on Birds
==================================
858-442-1907
Poway, California (San Diego Co.)
N 32° 57'  W 117° 04'
At 508' Elevation
==================================


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Subject: Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo)
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 16:17:38 -0400
No, not a peacock. The do have a wide variety of colours in their contour (and 
other) feathers, but not with the bronze base and black tip. None of the 
contour feathers on a peacock (or hen) have that distinctive flared, squared 
off tip. 


Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Peter Wilkinson 

Sent: August-18-15 3:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo)

Not entirely sure I would bet against Peacock, if I found that over here, but 
you will have a much better idea of what is likely to be in the surroundings 
than I will. 


Peter
England

On Tue, 2015-08-18 at 15:25 -0400, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> Took a photo of this feather yesterday. After searching around online
> I think it is a body feather from a Wild Turkey. Just wondering if
> anyone might be able to confirm...
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20660313876/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo)
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 15:57:49 -0400
Yep; turkey, whether wild or not I can't say.

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: August-18-15 3:25 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo)

Took a photo of this feather yesterday. After searching around online I think 
it is a body feather from a Wild Turkey. Just wondering if anyone might be able 
to confirm... 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20660313876/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo)
From: Peter Wilkinson <pjw42 AT WAITROSE.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 20:44:21 +0100
Not entirely sure I would bet against Peacock, if I found that over
here, but you will have a much better idea of what is likely to be in
the surroundings than I will.

Peter
England

On Tue, 2015-08-18 at 15:25 -0400, B.G. Sloan wrote:
> Took a photo of this feather yesterday. After searching around online I
> think it is a body feather from a Wild Turkey. Just wondering if anyone
> might be able to confirm...
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20660313876/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Bird feather ID - Wild Turkey body feather? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 15:25:10 -0400
Took a photo of this feather yesterday. After searching around online I
think it is a body feather from a Wild Turkey. Just wondering if anyone
might be able to confirm...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20660313876/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Avisys users: an invitation from eBird
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 12:45:56 -0500
William,

On 8/18/2015 12:33 PM, William Leigh wrote:

> I am sorry to hear Avisys is sunsetting. I use both ebird and Avisys and like 
both. I typically enter data into Avisys and then download into eBird. However, 
i do not have my entire lifelist on ebird because some sightings - particularly 
birds seen as a beginning birder were not documented thoroughly and lack an 
exact date or exact location. Is there a way to enter such sightings into eBird 
without precise date or location? 


I hear your cry . . . I am not a real experienced eBirder nor very
technologically adept.  My handwritten notes go back as far at 1969 and
their usefulness for eBird purposes is mixed.  Most have real dates and
actual locations, but many lack numbers and many of rarities lack
sufficient documentation to pass most bird records committees.  Still, I
am slowly [as time permits] entering some old notes.  Eventually, these
notes may be useful to other people and I should be able to find my own
records when I want to consult them.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibr
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Avisys users: an invitation from eBird
From: William Leigh <leightern AT MSN.COM>
Date: Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:33:14 +0000
I am sorry to hear Avisys is sunsetting. I use both ebird and Avisys and like 
both. I typically enter data into Avisys and then download into eBird. However, 
i do not have my entire lifelist on ebird because some sightings - particularly 
birds seen as a beginning birder were not documented thoroughly and lack an 
exact date or exact location. Is there a way to enter such sightings into eBird 
without precise date or location? 

best,  

William Leigh leightern AT msn.com

Bridgewater, Virginia 
 

 



> Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 15:55:41 -0700
> From: bls42 AT CORNELL.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Avisys users: an invitation from eBird
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Birders
> 
> With the Avisys application sunsetting, wed like to extend a special
> invitation to all Avisys users from eBird. Avisys has served as an amazing
> tool for birders for many years. Jerry Blinn has worked hard to maintain
> this system over the years, and long ago sought a connection with eBird. In
> building this connection, Jerry worked with our team to develop tools that
> allow Avisys users to export their observations to eBird in a meaningful
> way. With a little bit of effort, you can move all your Avisys records to
> eBird, and continue keeping track of your observations using eBirds free
> web-based tools from any computer around the world, as well as a developing
> suite of mobile apps.
> 
> What can eBird offer Avisys users?
> 
> 
>    - A free, online global bird recording system
>    - Full suite of bird listing services
>    - A community of >250,000 users
>    - Automated annual taxonomic updates
>    - Your data used in research, education, and conservation
> 
> eBird welcomes Avisys users, and were here to support you during this
> transition from Avisys to eBird. With more than 250 million observations in
> eBird, and a 100-year tradition of birding excellence at the Cornell Lab of
> Ornithology, were confident youll be pleased with this transition. Please
> consider joining our global birding community. Researchers and
> conservationists are using eBird every day to help conserve birds around
> the world, and your data can add an important piece to the puzzle!
> 
> If youre ready to move your data to eBird, please consult these resources:
> 
> Avisys guidelines: http://www.avisys.net/pub/eBird%20Instructions.pdf
> 
> eBird upload instructions:
> http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/973915
> 
> eBird Contact: id99 AT cornell.edu (Ian Davies)
> 
> Thanks
> 
> Team eBird
> 
> ===========
> 
> *Brian L. Sullivan*
> 
> 
> *eBird Project Leader *
> 
> www.ebird.org
> 
> 
> *Photo Editor*
> 
> Birds of North America Online
> 
> http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA
> 
> -------------------------------
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Images from the Santa Jacinto Restudy
From: JackDaynes <jackdaynes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 12:25:16 -0700
Joseph Grinnell and his team studied California ecosystems a century
ago. Now these areas are being resurveyed to document the changes to the
systems.

 From my blog:
http://shadetreeimaging.com/2015-08-13-santa-rosa-mountain/

Be well all,

--
-- Jack --
==================================

Wildlife Photography with
Emphasis on Birds
==================================
858-442-1907
Poway, California (San Diego Co.)
N 32° 57'  W 117° 04'
At 508' Elevation
==================================



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Subject: Trip Report England and Scotland
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Aug 2015 09:23:45 -0400
I have recently returned from a trip to England and Scotland (with a special 
focus on Little Owls) and I am giving below a link to my report for anyone who 
might be interested in reading 
it.http://www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.ca/2015/08/trip-report-england-and-scotland-2015.html 


David M. GascoigneWaterloo, ONblog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com 

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Subject: 2015 revision of the Clements/eBird world bird checklist is out!
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 17:01:20 -0400
Cornell University has just released the 2015 update for the eBird and
Clements
checklists of birds of the world. 105 species have been affected by
splits, and only
about 3 lumps at the species level.

You can download the updated checklist from
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/taxonomy-update-for-2015/
Also, scroll down the above page to get descriptions of all the lumps,
splits, and
name changes.

Personally, I had a net gain of 7 species for my World Life List, but no
changes
for my bird lists for the Americas.

For those of you who are into world listing or bird taxonomy, have fun!

David

David Mark
Amherst, NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu

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Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 16, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Aug 2015 08:53:16 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Great Blue Heron Cleans Up! - Check out our latest photo blog:
http://birdnote.org/blog/2015/08/great-blue-heron-lunch-and-bath
--------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Nature Prospers in Avalanche Chutes
http://bit.ly/NDJbHz

* Flying and Molting - A Tricky Balance
http://bit.ly/1DSUgiZ

* Jays Identify Good Nuts by Shaking Them
http://bit.ly/1hdDoJL

* Male Mallards Disappear
http://bit.ly/QZhmdv

* How Birds Drink
http://bit.ly/N6bF7r

* Deep-diving Emperor Penguins - How Do They Do It?
http://bit.ly/19T8iAq

* Common Nighthawk, Uncommon Sound
http://bit.ly/1oZXQ17

---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1J7nRAQ
---------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening! Let us know what shows you like -- or don't -- and
why.
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: DNA shows cape parrots are a real species
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 12 Aug 2015 19:15:41 +0100
hello everyone,

i just published a story about a parrot paper that discusses the cape
parrot and its confusingly similar "subspecies":

Taking flight: Cape parrot identified as new species
http://gu.com/p/4bd4d/stw

and of course, if you enjoyed this story, please do share with your
friends, family and other fans of parrots, birds and wild creatures, and
share on twitter, facebook and other social media. readers, comments and
shares are the ONLY way i get paid for my work.

thanks!

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Avisys users: an invitation from eBird
From: Brian Sullivan <bls42 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 15:55:41 -0700
Birders

With the Avisys application sunsetting, we’d like to extend a special
invitation to all Avisys users from eBird. Avisys has served as an amazing
tool for birders for many years. Jerry Blinn has worked hard to maintain
this system over the years, and long ago sought a connection with eBird. In
building this connection, Jerry worked with our team to develop tools that
allow Avisys users to export their observations to eBird in a meaningful
way. With a little bit of effort, you can move all your Avisys records to
eBird, and continue keeping track of your observations using eBird’s free
web-based tools from any computer around the world, as well as a developing
suite of mobile apps.

What can eBird offer Avisys users?


   - A free, online global bird recording system
   - Full suite of bird listing services
   - A community of >250,000 users
   - Automated annual taxonomic updates
   - Your data used in research, education, and conservation

eBird welcomes Avisys users, and we’re here to support you during this
transition from Avisys to eBird. With more than 250 million observations in
eBird, and a 100-year tradition of birding excellence at the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology, we’re confident you’ll be pleased with this transition. Please
consider joining our global birding community. Researchers and
conservationists are using eBird every day to help conserve birds around
the world, and your data can add an important piece to the puzzle!

If you’re ready to move your data to eBird, please consult these resources:

Avisys guidelines: http://www.avisys.net/pub/eBird%20Instructions.pdf

eBird upload instructions:
http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/973915

eBird Contact: id99 AT cornell.edu (Ian Davies)

Thanks

Team eBird

===========

*Brian L. Sullivan*


*eBird Project Leader *

www.ebird.org


*Photo Editor*

Birds of North America Online

http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/BNA

-------------------------------

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Subject: Sign off Birdchat
From: Don Williams <sailbird AT TDS.NET>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 17:48:25 -0400
Thanks
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Beauty even in death...
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 16:01:00 -0400
Note: If photos of dead birds offend you, do not click on the link...

So, anyway, I was walking through my neighborhood last week and came upon a
Mourning Dove that was a recent victim of a window-strike accident
(window-strikes are pretty rare in my neighborhood...it's almost rural here
in the immediate vicinity).

I was struck by the serene, ethereal beauty of the dove, even in death:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20468024665/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

P.S., I did come back several times to make sure the bird wasn't just
stunned and in need of assistance...

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Subject: Eagle/falcon/kite/something else? (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 10 Aug 2015 08:21:09 -0400
Last week I posted links to a couple of cropped photos of what seemed to be
a large bird flying very high in the sky, although there are no reference
points in the photo to accurately gauge size or distance. I might add that
the bird was flying away from me as I watched it and it was doing a
flap-flap-flap-glide kind of thing. Location was central New Jersey, near
the Raritan River.

Just thought I'd provide an update. My gut impression was Bald Eagle.
Responses received so far can be evenly divided into three basic groups:

1. Not an eagle, but I don't know what it is.
2. Photos consistent with an eagle.
3. Kinda "falcon-ish".

I also received an intriguing comment from an experienced birder who said
his first impression was Mississippi Kite (there have been a few confirmed
sightings here in Jersey this summer).

Here's the first photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20135284808/

And here's a more heavily cropped version:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20135284758/

Just wondering what others might think?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Yellow-eyed Junco Question
From: jbird558 AT AOL.COM
Date: Sat, 8 Aug 2015 15:16:53 -0400
Hello Chatters!


I made a stop at a picnic area in Bear Canyon on the way to the top of Mr. 
Lemmon near Tucson on Tuesday, August 4 to do some birding. I realize they are 
very common, but I found a Yellow-eyed Junco with bands on both legs, and took 
a picture of it. Didn't know if there is a study going on or what. On the 
bird's left leg it had white or yellow band/green band, and on the right leg 
there was a silver/orange band. On the silver band I can read a 3 and what also 
looks like a 5. If anyone reading this knows more about this, I'd be happy to 
send somebody a picture of this bird. The bird was an adult. 



Jane Barnette
Harrisburg, PA
Jbird558 AT aol.com

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Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 9, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 8 Aug 2015 07:55:47 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Albatross Surfs the Wind
http://bit.ly/NuL0Hr
* How Birds Stay Cool
http://bit.ly/1EeWUKj
* Bald Eagles Fledge
http://bit.ly/1Td8Hjo
* Shelterbelts and Their Birds
http://bit.ly/14QPd11
* Noticing Birds in the Back Yard
http://bit.ly/1KWxBoe
* Night Voices of Summer
http://bit.ly/1s7bCgZ
* "You Need a Mister!"
http://bit.ly/1p2Eaoa
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1T2Hd55
--------------------------
Travel to Big Bend with BirdNote and Victor Emanuel Nature Tours, April
23 - May 1, 2016.
http://birdnote.org/blog/2015/06/travel-birdnote-big-bend-national-park
---------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening! Let us know what shows you like -- or don't -- and
why.
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: First Class, Million Dollar Falcons
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Fri, 7 Aug 2015 09:25:23 -0700
Interesting article on UAE falconry

Oscar Canino
SF, CA


http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/object-of-intrigue-falcon-passport?utm_source=Atlas+Obscura&utm_campaign=1159d123cc-8_6_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_62ba9246c0-1159d123cc-60527805&ct=t(8_6_2015)&mc_cid=1159d123cc&mc_eid=ea25fac547 


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Subject: Raptor photo ID quiz
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 5 Aug 2015 15:30:27 -0400
I was out the other day photographing wildflowers and insects when I
happened to look up and see a very large bird flying up very high. I only
had time for a quick photo.

Here's the first photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20135284808/

And here's a more heavily cropped version:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/20135284758/

My gut impression was Bald Eagle. Just wondering what others might think?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Cornell Lab of Orno. "Home Study Course" Discussion Group = Birder's Version of "Book Club Discussion Group"
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 4 Aug 2015 05:48:00 -0700
…and good morning…and given I like the idea of having 4-6 birding friends 
over to discuss the latest 

Birding Magazine topics or other related in-depth analysis of bird themes that 
each person may choose 

to initiate for group discussion:

I am looking forward to the imminent publishing of an updated 
Cornell Lab of Orn. Home Study Course, via:

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/courses/home/ 
 


(My old version of this 10-chapter, comprehensive self-learning, in-home 
ornithology class 

(without the hands-on lab) is still fine, but I’ve been told by the editors 
that the soon-to-be-published 

update will feature many new updates.)

Enjoy the rest of the summer, folks & regards,

Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA
&
Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com 

http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com 





BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: AviSys Announcement
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 22:21:17 +0000
Thanks to Jerry for worrying about his customers when he obviously has 
more important things on his mind. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
      From: Jerry Blinn 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2015 3:08 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] AviSys Announcement
   
There is an important announcement at the AviSys web site:
http://www.avisys.net
If you have visited recently, you may have to click F5 to refresh the
main page.

Jerry


Jerry Blinn

Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
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Subject: AviSys Announcement
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 16:08:19 -0600
There is an important announcement at the AviSys web site:
http://www.avisys.net
If you have visited recently, you may have to click F5 to refresh the
main page.

Jerry


Jerry Blinn

Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

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Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 16:01:35 -0400
I'll have to check, but I believe European Dippers sing on their winter 
territories. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 2, 2015, at 11:52 AM, Alvaro Jaramillo  wrote:
>
> Ron,
> At least in the Americas most birds that are winter territorial defend their 
territories with call notes rather than songs (Ovenbird, Am. Redstart, Summer 
Tanager etc.). 

> Regards
> Alvaro
> Alvaro Jaramillo
> alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein 

> Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2015 6:13 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] winter birdsong
>
> Many birds establish territories on their wintering grounds, and defend them 
by singing. Others will begin singing late in winter as the song centre in 
their brain begins to regrow, possibly for practice. Some birds establish pair 
bonds en route to the breeding grounds, so singing may play a role in finding 
mates before breeding commences. 

>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>> On Aug 2, 2015, at 4:55 AM, John Arnfield  wrote:
>>
>> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
>> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
>> They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
>> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).
>>
>> John
>>
>>> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>>> breeding season.
>>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>>
>>>        -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
>>> To:
>>> Cc:
>>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>>
>>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>>
>>> Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just
>>> reserved for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the 
spring? 

>>>
>>> Many thanks again.
>>> Joyanne Hamilton
>>> Shageluk, Alaska
>>>
>>>> On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>>> year.
>>>>
>>>> Laura Erickson
>>>> Duluth, MN
>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton  > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>>>>
>>>>> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>>> stop their  >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones
>>> fledge?
>>>>>
>>>>> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>>> to do with  >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and
>>> Hermit Thrush still  >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned
>>> Sparrows, warblers of various  >> yellows and green, Crossbills and
>>> basically no one sings anymore!
>>>>>
>>>>> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as
>>> of last  >> week.
>>>>>
>>>>> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>>> quite  >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>>>>
>>>>> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>>>>
>>>>> Joyanne Hamilton
>>>>> Shageluk, Alaska
>>>>>
>>>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  >>
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> --
>>>> Laura Erickson
>>>>
>>>> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds  >  > There
>>> is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
>>>> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>>>> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>>> the  > winter.
>>>>
>>>> --Rachel Carson
>>>>
>>>> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>>>
>>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  > Archives:
>>> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> --
>> ===============================================
>> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Jules Levin <ameliede AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 11:25:32 -0700
On 8/2/2015 1:55 AM, John Arnfield wrote:
> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
>  They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not
> sure).
Based on the odd mocking bird I've heard around here, I've thought that
they might be
first-year males rehearsing for the big time in the spring.  I actually
saw the bird; he was a little pudgier than a summer male who has been
singing his heart out 24/7--June nights are the worst. The song was, as
you say,
wistful, without the aggressive harshness of summer, but definitely a
mocking bird repertory of varied phrases, I assume imprinted on those
short nights in June by his dad.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles





>
> John
>
> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>> breeding season.
>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>
>>          -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne
>> Hamilton"
>> To:
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>
>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>
>>   Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
>> for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?
>>
>>   Many thanks again.
>>   Joyanne Hamilton
>>   Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>>   On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>
>>   > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>> year.
>>   >
>>   > Laura Erickson
>>   > Duluth, MN
>>   >
>>   > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton
>>   > wrote:
>>   >
>>   >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>   >>
>>   >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>> stop their
>>   >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>   >>
>>   >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>> to do with
>>   >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
>> Thrush still
>>   >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
>> various
>>   >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>>   >>
>>   >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
>> last
>>   >> week.
>>   >>
>>   >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>> quite
>>   >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>   >>
>>   >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>   >>
>>   >> Joyanne Hamilton
>>   >> Shageluk, Alaska
>>   >>
>>   >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>   >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>   >>
>>   >
>>   >
>>   >
>>   > --
>>   > --
>>   > Laura Erickson
>>   >
>>   > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>>   >
>>   > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
>> birds.
>>   > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>>   > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>> the
>>   > winter.
>>   >
>>   > --Rachel Carson
>>   >
>>   > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>   >
>>   > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>   > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>   BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>   Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
> --
> ===============================================
> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>

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Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 08:52:14 -0700
Ron,
 At least in the Americas most birds that are winter territorial defend their 
territories with call notes rather than songs (Ovenbird, Am. Redstart, Summer 
Tanager etc.). 

Regards
Alvaro
Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein 

Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2015 6:13 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] winter birdsong

Many birds establish territories on their wintering grounds, and defend them by 
singing. Others will begin singing late in winter as the song centre in their 
brain begins to regrow, possibly for practice. Some birds establish pair bonds 
en route to the breeding grounds, so singing may play a role in finding mates 
before breeding commences. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 2, 2015, at 4:55 AM, John Arnfield  wrote:
>
> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
> They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).
>
> John
>
>> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>> breeding season.
>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>
>>         -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
>> To:
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>
>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>
>>  Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just
>> reserved for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the 
spring? 

>>
>>  Many thanks again.
>>  Joyanne Hamilton
>>  Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>>  On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>
>>  > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>> year.
>>  >
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  > Duluth, MN
>>  >
>>  > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton  > wrote:
>>  >
>>  >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>  >>
>>  >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>> stop their  >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones
>> fledge?
>>  >>
>>  >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>> to do with  >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and
>> Hermit Thrush still  >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned
>> Sparrows, warblers of various  >> yellows and green, Crossbills and
>> basically no one sings anymore!
>>  >>
>>  >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as
>> of last  >> week.
>>  >>
>>  >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>> quite  >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>  >>
>>  >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>  >>
>>  >> Joyanne Hamilton
>>  >> Shageluk, Alaska
>>  >>
>>  >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  >>
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>  >>
>>  >
>>  >
>>  >
>>  > --
>>  > --
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  >
>>  > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds  >  > There
>> is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
>>  > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>> > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>> the  > winter.
>>  >
>>  > --Rachel Carson
>>  >
>>  > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>  >
>>  > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  > Archives:
>> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
> --
> ===============================================
> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 09:13:18 -0400
Many birds establish territories on their wintering grounds, and defend them by 
singing. Others will begin singing late in winter as the song centre in their 
brain begins to regrow, possibly for practice. Some birds establish pair bonds 
en route to the breeding grounds, so singing may play a role in finding mates 
before breeding commences. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 2, 2015, at 4:55 AM, John Arnfield  wrote:
>
> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
> They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).
>
> John
>
>> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>> breeding season.
>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>
>>         -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
>> To:
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>
>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>
>>  Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
>> for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?
>>
>>  Many thanks again.
>>  Joyanne Hamilton
>>  Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>>  On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>
>>  > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>> year.
>>  >
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  > Duluth, MN
>>  >
>>  > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton
>>  > wrote:
>>  >
>>  >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>  >>
>>  >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>> stop their
>>  >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>  >>
>>  >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>> to do with
>>  >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
>> Thrush still
>>  >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
>> various
>>  >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>>  >>
>>  >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
>> last
>>  >> week.
>>  >>
>>  >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>> quite
>>  >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>  >>
>>  >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>  >>
>>  >> Joyanne Hamilton
>>  >> Shageluk, Alaska
>>  >>
>>  >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>  >>
>>  >
>>  >
>>  >
>>  > --
>>  > --
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  >
>>  > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>>  >
>>  > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
>> birds.
>>  > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>>  > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>> the
>>  > winter.
>>  >
>>  > --Rachel Carson
>>  >
>>  > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>  >
>>  > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
> --
> ===============================================
> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: birds singing in winter
From: Vader Willem Jan Marinus <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 13:02:34 +0000
Here in Europe the birds that sing often in winter--the European Robin is a 
good example---also hold territories in Winter, and the birdsong in that season 
is probably almost exclusively territorial. In the Robin both males and females 
hold separate territories , and both sexes sing in Winter. Some Flock-living 
birds, like the Willow Tit, have a short song in Winter---different from the 
spring song--that probably mainly serves as contact sounds. 




Many migrant birds already start singing at the end of the winter season while 
still in the winter quarters. Much of the physiology of song birds is regulated 
by hormones, and these need time to build up in spring; accordingly, also 
spring song builds up gradually from simple beginnings to full song, and many 
birds sing already before arriving at the summer territories 




                                             Wim Vader, Troms, Norway

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Subject: winter birdsong
From: John Arnfield <arnfield.2 AT OSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 09:55:38 +0100
Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
  They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).

John

On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
> breeding season.
> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>
>          -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
> To:
> Cc:
> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>
> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>
>   Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
> for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?
>
>   Many thanks again.
>   Joyanne Hamilton
>   Shageluk, Alaska
>
>   On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>
>   > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
> year.
>   >
>   > Laura Erickson
>   > Duluth, MN
>   >
>   > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton
>   > wrote:
>   >
>   >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>   >>
>   >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
> stop their
>   >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>   >>
>   >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
> to do with
>   >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
> Thrush still
>   >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
> various
>   >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>   >>
>   >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
> last
>   >> week.
>   >>
>   >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
> quite
>   >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>   >>
>   >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>   >>
>   >> Joyanne Hamilton
>   >> Shageluk, Alaska
>   >>
>   >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>   >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>   >>
>   >
>   >
>   >
>   > --
>   > --
>   > Laura Erickson
>   >
>   > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>   >
>   > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
> birds.
>   > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>   > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
> the
>   > winter.
>   >
>   > --Rachel Carson
>   >
>   > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>   >
>   > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>   > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>   BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>   Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>


--
===============================================
John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 22:58:04 -0400
Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
breeding season.
Larry GardellaMontgomery

        -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song

Thank you all for your responses to this question.

 Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?

 Many thanks again.
 Joyanne Hamilton
 Shageluk, Alaska

 On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:

 > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
year.
 >
 > Laura Erickson
 > Duluth, MN
 >
 > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
 > wrote:
 >
 >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
 >>
 >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
stop their
 >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
 >>
 >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
to do with
 >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
Thrush still
 >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
various
 >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
 >>
 >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
last
 >> week.
 >>
 >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
quite
 >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
 >>
 >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
 >>
 >> Joyanne Hamilton
 >> Shageluk, Alaska
 >>
 >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
 >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 >>
 >
 >
 >
 > --
 > --
 > Laura Erickson
 >
 > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
 >
 > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
birds.
 > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
 > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
the
 > winter.
 >
 > --Rachel Carson
 >
 > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
 >
 > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
 > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
 Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
Thank you all for your responses to this question.

Heres another question. So when these same birds reach their wintering 
destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved for wooing, 
territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring? 


Many thanks again.
Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska




On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:

> Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this year.
>
> Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
> wrote:
>
>> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>
>> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically stop their
>> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>
>> This is the first time Ive noticed this and wondered if it had to do with
>> the time of fledging.  Lots and lots of Swainsons and Hermit Thrush still
>> around, American Robins, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of various
>> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>>
>> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of last
>> week.
>>
>> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is quite
>> rare.  Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>
>> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>
>> Joyanne Hamilton
>> Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>            --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 2, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 07:24:03 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Aldo Leopold and the Field Sparrows
http://bit.ly/13AJWJ4
* Negotiation - What to Talk About When You Talk About Birds
--With Rosalind Renfrew of Vermont Center for Ecostudies
http://bit.ly/1MBnft1
* Waterfalls, Caves, and White-collared Swifts
http://bit.ly/LuTJ71
* Sparrows Sing in an Arizona Monsoon
http://bit.ly/19oFgIO
* Turkey Vulture, A Poem by Robinson Jeffers
http://bit.ly/M7GreZ
* A Crossbill's Beak Does the Job
http://bit.ly/OCqcew
* A Childhood Love of Birds - With Gordon Orians
http://bit.ly/1HekRSa
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1MDQrk5
--------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening! Let us know what shows you like -- or don't -- and
/why./
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 18:33:40 -0500
Joyanne, Laura,

On 7/30/2015 6:26 PM, Laura Erickson wrote:

> Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this year.
>
> Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
> wrote:
>
>> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>
>> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically stop their
>> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>
>> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had to do with
>> the time of fledging.  Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit Thrush still
>> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of various
>> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!

I believe  lot of birds also molt [at least partial] immediately after
nesting chores are done.  A bird's life is all about cycles.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
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Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 18:26:08 -0500
Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this year.

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
wrote:

> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>
> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically stop their
> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>
> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had to do with
> the time of fledging.  Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit Thrush still
> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of various
> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>
> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of last
> week.
>
> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is quite
> rare.  Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>
> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html