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Updated on Monday, September 1 at 07:56 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hermit Warbler,©Shawneen Finnegan

1 Sep Click here for just a sense of what we lost the last of, 100 yrs ago today ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
1 Sep A feathered river across the sky [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
30 Aug BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 31, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
30 Aug About Martha (passenger pigeon) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
29 Aug Secrets of animal camouflage research (video) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
28 Aug Hilton Pond 08/16/14 (Late August Walkabout) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
28 Aug Ruby-throated Hummingbird No. 5,000 ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
27 Aug A birding video game you'll love [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
25 Aug pelagic birding from a cruise ship [ ]
25 Aug Re: Pelagic Birding On a Cruise Ship, Part 2 of 2 [Richard Carlson ]
25 Aug Pelagic Birding On a Cruise Ship, Part 1 of 2 [MM ]
25 Aug Pelagic Birding On a Cruise Ship, Part 2 of 2 [MM ]
24 Aug Special 6-week project at EHN.org on bird environmental health science [JPMyers ]
23 Aug BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 24, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
22 Aug a bird-themed citizen science video game [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
20 Aug 1st World Shorebirds Day, 6 September [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
19 Aug Fall Migration Banding ["R.D. Everhart" ]
19 Aug New River Hummingbird Festival (23 Aug) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
19 Aug Hilton Pond 08/01/14 (Truth About Ruby-throats) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
18 Aug 9th Supplement to 6th edition of the Clements Checklist! [dmark ]
18 Aug Birding Community E-bulletin - August 2014 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
16 Aug BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 17, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
14 Aug Competition for ecological niches limits evolution of new songbirds [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
12 Aug Petrel [Al Schirmacher ]
11 Aug "petrel" [Rick Wright ]
11 Aug Re: "petrel" [Eric Jeffrey ]
11 Aug Re: "petrel" ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
11 Aug Re: "petrel" [Eric Jeffrey ]
11 Aug Re: "petrel" ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
11 Aug Re: "petrel" [Rick Wright ]
11 Aug Re: "petrel" [Elizabeth Dodd ]
11 Aug Re: "petrel" [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
11 Aug "petrel" [Rick Wright ]
11 Aug Re: "dadin" [Laura Erickson ]
11 Aug "dadin" [Rick Wright ]
10 Aug Re: "petrel" [Jerry Friedman ]
10 Aug Re: "petrel" [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
10 Aug Re: "petrel" [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
10 Aug Re: "petrel" [Laura Erickson ]
10 Aug Re: "petrel" ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
10 Aug Re: "petrel" ["sandfalcon1 ." ]
10 Aug Re: strange seabird story ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
10 Aug Re: "petrel" [Laura Erickson ]
10 Aug "petrel" [Rick Wright ]
11 Aug Re: strange seabird story [Dr Ronald Orenstein ]
10 Aug Re: strange seabird story [Susan Fogleman ]
10 Aug Re: strange seabird story ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
10 Aug strange seabird story [Rick Wright ]
10 Aug a forest year (yep, there's birds in this, too) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
10 Aug RH Woodpecker Calls - NO and MAYBE? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
9 Aug Vancouver in November [Rick Wright ]
9 Aug BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 10, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
9 Aug Birding in Vancouver in November [Laura Erickson ]
8 Aug Turkey and deer in same photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Aug Re: Birding Book [Jim Rogers ]
8 Aug Re: Birding Book [danafox AT comcast.net ]
8 Aug Birding Book [Al Schirmacher ]
8 Aug Birding Book [Al Schirmacher ]
7 Aug Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa? [Stephen Elliott ]
7 Aug Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa? [Jerry Friedman ]
7 Aug Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa? [Blake Maybank ]
7 Aug Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa? [Stephen Elliott ]
7 Aug anyone going to Kenya's Rift Valley or the Serengeti? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
7 Aug Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa? ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
6 Aug Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa? [Richard Carlson ]
6 Aug Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa? [Rick King ]
6 Aug Trip to France/Spain ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
5 Aug Re: Oh, the irony [Eric Jeffrey ]
5 Aug Oh, the irony ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
5 Aug Red-headed Woodpecker call? (recording) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
4 Aug Hilton Pond 07/16/14 (Arthropod Architecture) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
3 Aug Don't flood me with replies, but does anyone noah the answer to my questions? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
2 Aug BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 3, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
1 Aug Re: replacement eyecups for Nikon bins []
1 Aug Re: replacement eyecups for Nikon bins [Jerry Blinn ]
1 Aug Re: replacement eyecups for Nikon bins [Steve Sosensky ]

Subject: Click here for just a sense of what we lost the last of, 100 yrs ago today
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 08:27:18 -0400
Click here to see something like it must have been like, not a century
ago.too late by then.but just a few decades before that, when Passenger
Pigeons thrived and there were no wildlife managers telling us that species
were "hyperabundant" (nor any laws to protect them once we had reduced them
to endangered status).



Martha, the last known Passenger Pigeon, died in captivity, where she had
lived her entire life, a century ago today.



Click here:



http://vimeo.com/92192308



Barry





Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, ON., Canada




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Subject: A feathered river across the sky
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 10:04:20 +0100
hello everyone,

you probably know that today is a most inauspicious day: it is the
centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon, which was likely the
most numerous single bird species on the planet. this extinction was due
entirely to humans.

i wrote a review of joel greenberg's new book, A feathered river across the
sky, that you may wish to read. my book review is the opening salvo in a
series of opinion pieces and book reviews that i plan to publish this week
about the passenger pigeon. although this is a book review, i think it
reads like a stand alone essay because it provides the context that i will
build upon this week, and deserves some attention.


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/sep/01/a-feathered-river-across-the-sky-by-joel-greenberg-review 


or tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x6t2/tw

--
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 31, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 07:53:19 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

The last few days of summer vacation, and people are catching some rays.
Birds, too!
Check out this photo blog of birds sunbathing: http://bit.ly/1n6EXFe
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Texas Hill Country Conservation - Paul Davis manages his land to
protect the Golden-cheeked Warbler and the Black-capped Vireo
http://bit.ly/NkKm9q

* A Vast Unseen Migration Offshore
http://bit.ly/1ots8V8

* California Condor
http://bit.ly/1tLuPYv

* Burrowing Owl Hisses Like a Rattlesnake!
http://bit.ly/1rFjkTN

* Grassland Meander in Saskatchewan
http://bit.ly/17TcJXo

* Wilson's Warbler Near Summer's End
http://bit.ly/1nKrmDK

* Birds and Navigation
http://bit.ly/Z1flnN

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1vVBfDL
------------------------------------------------------------
Travel to Cuba with BirdNote and Earthbound Expeditions, October 18th -
26th, 2014. Join us on a unique trip to experience the culture, history,
and birds of this vibrant island. http://bit.ly/1sOyNyW
-----------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: About Martha (passenger pigeon)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 11:00:01 +0100
hello everyone,

I just published a "caturday" piece featuring a couple videos that provide
a look at martha, a captive-bred female passenger pigeon whose death on 1
september 1914 at the Cincinnati Zoo marked the extinction of the most
numerous bird species on earth:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/aug/30/about-martha-passenger-pigeon-video 


tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x4vv/tw

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: Secrets of animal camouflage research (video)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:31:53 +0100
hello everyone,

here's a fun and informative little video that you may enjoy, shot in
Africa. it includes lots of birds and as a bonus, especially for harry
potter fans, it includes footage of a live boomslang:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/aug/29/secrets-of-animal-camouflage-research?view=mobile#opt-in-message 


tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x5ej/tw

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 08/16/14 (Late August Walkabout)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 22:20:26 -0400
"This Week at Hilton Pond" I'm responding to folks who think we only write 
about hummingbirds by taking a "Late August Walkabout" around Center property. 
The photo essay for 16-31 Aug 2014 includes info about native wildflowers, 
pignuts, a couple of reptiles, pollinating butterflies, and predator-prey 
relationships, so everyone should find something to help satisfy their nature 
fixes. (P.S. There might even be a sentence or two about a very special 
hummingbird.) To view the latest installment, please see 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140816.html

While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded and 
recaptured during the period, plus some miscellaneous nature notes. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

DR. BILL HILTON JR., Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird No. 5,000
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:35:25 -0400
Another big celebration today (28 Aug 2014) at Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont 
Natural History: This morning I applied band #H81031 to a hatch-year female 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird, making her forever famous as the 5,000th of her 
species banded here at the Center since 1984. I'm hopeful all you hummingbird 
enthusiasts share in my excitement at reaching this milestone and in wishing 
her safe travels to the Neotropics--and back again next spring. :-) 


Happy Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: A birding video game you'll love
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 11:29:11 +0100
hey everyone,

i just published this piece about a fun little citizen science/birding game
where the viewer is challenged to spot camouflaged nightjar eggs. the
research project that gave rise to this game is studying animal vision and
the evolution of camouflage, and how camouflage affects survival. the best
part is that you don't need to be a birder to enjoy this game, so share it
with your friends, neighbours and co-workers!


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/aug/27/eggcellent-citizen-science-evolution-of-camouflage-in-bird-eggs 


or tiny URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x39x

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: pelagic birding from a cruise ship
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 15:22:27 +0000
Hi all,

We have been doing pelagic birding from commercial cruise ships for over a 
decade, quite a few of our trip reports are on-line (many on Surf Birds) -- in 
that time we have visited all the world's oceans save the Indian and are doing 
that this coming December. We always use our scopes and we try to get as low as 
possible on the ship. Some of the Holland-America ships have open access to the 
bow (the very tip is a "wind shadow") and a number of the newer Princess 
vessels have a low walk-around promenade under the bow which is excellent, 
being sheltered and covered. A camera is very useful to clinch ID of some 
species. 


The best routes we have found for seabirding are:

1. west coast of the Americas from California to Valparaiso, Chile -- wide 
variety of tubenoses, plus boobies and skuas. Actually, a trip from San Diego 
or LA to Mexico is very good, lots of birds and cetaceans off Baja. 


2. Alaska to Russia (Petropavlovsk) and then to Japan -- few ships do this now, 
Silversea being one of the few, the route north of Attu along the 53rd parallel 
takes one south of the Commodore Islands and is not well-explored. In 2011 we 
had 25+ Solander's (aka Providence) petrels in US waters, the first for USA. 
Good possibility of Short-tailed Albie. In May 2007 we had over a dozen Ross' 
Gulls in full pink plumage flying north. 


3. around the Horn from Valpo to Buenos Aires, hopefully with a stop in the 
Falklands. The bight between Falklands and B.A. is a major feeding area for 
seabirds, including some from Tristan da Cunha such as Spectacled Petrel, 
Tristan Albie. 


4. the above with added dip down to Antarctica, only Holland-America does this 
route now. Chance to add Antarctic species such as Antarctica and Snow Petrel, 
various penguin species (have seen Chin-strap, Gentoo, King, So. Rockhopper, 
Macaroni. Adele, Magellanic) also across Drake Passage twice which is a seabird 
spectacle. 


5. New Zealand north to Japan -- not offered very often, but brilliant except 
for "doldrums" near Equator which are almost a "bird-free zone." 


6. Australia to New Zealand, a commonly offered trip -- we just did this and 
had lots of albatrosses (Gibson's, So. and No. Royal, Campbell's, White-capped, 
etc.) plus White-headed and other petrels and shearwaters. 


7. Australia to Vanuatu -- usually stops at New Caledonia where you can forget 
seabirds for a day and see goodies such as Kagu and Cloven-feathered Dove. lots 
of good petrels such as Collared, Cook's, Kermadec, Providence, Gray-faced 
(Great-winged), Black-winged etc. 


8. mid-Atlantic to the Maritimes, need to be sure the ship does the Bay of 
Fundy -- 


Later this year we are doing a cruise from Sri Lanka to Mauritius, not sure 
what we'll see but hope for Barau's and Jouanin's Petrels, some shearwaters new 
to us plus a lot of good endemic landbirds on the islands. 


In fact, careful planning of shore-days is very important -- we either try to 
hire a local guide or get local "gen" and hire a car or taxi. In this way we 
have managed to see some endemic island birds rarely viewed by birders, such as 
Ouvea Parakeet and Yap Monarch. The ship's excursions are rarely good for 
birders, with the exception of (on the Falklands) a trip to one of the penguin 
colonies. 


Gail Mackiernan and Barry Cooper
Silver Spring, MD


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Subject: Re: Pelagic Birding On a Cruise Ship, Part 2 of 2
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 07:03:00 -0700
The other super birdy stretch is Seward to Homer which includes Glacier Bay on 
many cruises. Seward has excellent birding day trips almost daily. Seward to 
Homer has tons of Tufted and Horned Puffins plus a few Laysan Albatross. Seward 
has Kittlitz's Murrelets, Parakeet Auklets, etc. Seward Alcids are nesting in 
June. One way from Seward to Vancouver costs about the same as Homer Vancouver 
round trip. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Aug 25, 2014, at 5:18 AM, MM  wrote:

> *Enlisting help from staff and passengers*
>
>
>
> Dozens of people stopped me during my viewing time at the railings to ask
> what I was seeing. Most thought I was photographing whales, though only the
> scope and binoculars were apparent. When I described the goal of
> identifying and counting seabirds, particularly for contributing to the
> extraordinary citizen science of Cornell/Audubon's eBird program, many
> curious passengers became intrigued . They were stunned at the species and
> numbers of marine mammals I'd seen, and seemed amazed to hear of albatross
> and puffins near the boat as well as the dolphins diving under it. During
> my 11 days on the ship, I saw many albatross, puffins and at least 60
> Humpback whales, 6 Orcas, dozens of Pacific White-Sided Dolphin and Dall's
> Porpoise. The majority of people speaking with me had seen none of these,
> as few had the patience to stand at the rail for more than 2-3 minutes.
>
>
>
> But a few curious passengers would return with binoculars and cameras; some
> stayed with me for hours searching for spouts and seabirds. One sociable
> and amusing fellow San Franciscan focused on land mammals while we were in
> bays and fjords, spotting moose and mountain goats. Many enjoyed studying
> the field guides (Sibley's Birds, 2nd edition & Marine Mammals of Alaska)
> for comparisons of shearwaters and storm-petrels, dolphins and porpoises. I
> felt it important also to mention eBird, especially to young birders, as an
> avenue for them to contribute in ways that are clearly valuable to
> ornithology.
>
>
>
> The ship had a naturalist aboard but his specialty was Geology, not
> wildlife. At one point, near Glacier Bay, 3 NPS rangers boarded the ship to
> talk with passengers about the natural history of that area. One was a
> birder and was helpful in pointing out what might be in the area, but
> otherwise there wasn’t any professional assistance. Some cruises have a
> greater focus on wildlife and may have more to offer from a naturalist or
> three. I was often mistaken for the ship’s naturalist as it seemed I was at
> a post and helping passengers see wildlife for most of the daylight onboard
> hours. With the help of newfound friends and with many hours at the
> railing, I was able to identify 36 bird species and 6 marine mammal species
> while at sea.
>
>
>
> *Tracking locations for personal and public records*
>
>
>
> eBird asks that pelagic birders use latitude/longitude coordinates each
> hour at sea (http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/pelagic-birding/). A
> Garmin hand held device was very easy for this task. Apparently cell phones
> have the technology to gather this data but I didn't use mine for this,
> preferring the Garmin GPS equipment. I suggest caution in using the cell
> phone at sea given possible roaming charges, though I believe that gaining
> GPS data doesn't involve roaming. Others want to weigh in here?
>
>
>
> A cell phone or other handheld recording device was useful for recording
> time and place each hour as well as an ongoing count of species. This freed
> me from having to write notes regularly. With practice, I was able to hold
> the small recording device (an old Sony model) as I viewed through my
> binoculars, allowing me to see a bird and describe it simultaneously.
>
>
>
> *Web access during the cruise*
>
>
>
> The least expensive internet option on board and away from cell phone
> coverage was the ship's satellite connection at $.79/minute. As a result, I
> did little web surfing. I recorded the day's sightings after dark and saved
> them until I logged on again, putting the data in the cloud. High usage
> plans are also available, though the least expensive was around $70 for 100
> minutes on a very slow web connection.
>
>
>
> Be careful about accidentally keeping your phone in roaming mode. One
> father complained to me of his daughter’s absent-minded behavior when she
> kept her roaming on and incurred a $400+ charge in two days.
>
>
>
> *Other advantages and disadvantages*
>
>
>
> Compared to the 7 or 8 pelagic birding trips I’ve taken, using a cruise
> ship for many hours of birding each day over the course of 6-7 days at sea
> (ignoring port days) was an exceptionally rewarding experience. The birds
> could be spectacular, the whales and dolphins too, the sunfish and glaciers
> and stunning sunsets all added to a fine time aboard that 900 ft. long
> behemoth.
>
>
>
> Yet there could be considerable drawbacks. If the weather had not
> cooperated, the week-and-a-half would have been closer to miserable than
> pleasurable. Two cruise trips prior to mine had 8 days of rain out of the11
> days’ journey. Though you can bird from a warm, windowed space in the
> dining hall or even a stateroom, the tinted glass and ship’s speed would be
> considerable challenges along with the very narrow viewing angle. Standing
> on deck might be possible (given safety issues), in which case winter
> birding and waterproof clothing/gear are essential.
>
>
>
> If one’s particularly sensitive to motion sickness, the cruise ship is
> vastly superior to most other boats in the world. Our huge ship barely
> reacted to 10-12 foot swells, and would likely have handled 15-20 foot
> swells easily too. Apparently sophisticated stabilizers minimize lurching
> and drifting. Yet there’s still enough motion under those conditions to
> upset stomachs, especially in the first few days at sea, before one’s had
> time to acclimate to motion. I saw passengers with scopolamine patches and
> on one afternoon I took a low dose tablet of Dramamine, but that was all I
> required. Pressure point wrist bands likely would have been fine under
> those circumstances too.
>
>
>
>
>
> Where a pelagic birding boat can chum, head for known productive sites, and
> chase rarities, the cruise ship will plow straight ahead for hours and
> days. The height of the vessel is an advantage, though fewer eyes scanning
> the horizon is a notable disadvantage. It’s intriguing to imagine what a
> birding club or group of friends could achieve with multiple stations and
> walkie-talkies. Given the short period to get on a bird, however, running
> shoes might be useful to shift from one side to the other swiftly and
> safely across a dry deck.
>
>
>
> I found this to be a relatively cost-effective trip which amounted to about
> $190/day, all-in. Many pelagic birding trips are not far from this amount,
> so when room, board, unusual waters and lengthy birding hours are included,
> it seems reasonable. Cruise pricing varies wildly according to demand, so
> look for bargains and websites that will alert you to lower costs. One
> fellow traveler told me that another trip to Alaska from Seattle, 7 days
> long, cost him $350 as a base price.
>
>
>
> Some birders have begun using the cruise lines’ repositioning opportunities
> to take a much shorter voyage. This may involve only a day or two of
> birding, but the costs are much reduced while many of the amenities are
> still available. I recommend you learn as much about the planned route as
> possible to ensure the likelihood of productive seas.
>
>
>
> I learned too from my trip that the super-birdy stretch between Ketchikan
> and Victoria can be accessed by ferry out of Bellingham, WA, Juneau &
> Homer, AK, etc. It doesn’t appear to be an inexpensive option, though
> discounts may be available at certain times of year or if the ferry wants
> to fill its berths. If you’ve had experience with this voyage and its
> costs, please add to this thread.
>
> ______________________________
>
>
>
> I hope this has been a helpful account for birders considering a cruise
> trip. Whether birding is the central focus or a side interest while aboard,
> there’s a great deal to be seen under certain circumstances. If you pursue
> the idea of casually or seriously birding at sea on a large vessel like the
> one I experienced, please consider adding your observations to Birdchat or
> other forums for birders to learn from. Feel free to post these
> observations to other birding sites for better visibility of these issues.
> Finally, contribute all you can for science and other birders by adding to
> the database of eBird. These people will, I hope, appreciate your efforts
> for millennia to come.
>
>
>
> Oscar Canino
>
> San Francisco, CA
>
> oscarboy AT gmail.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Pelagic Birding On a Cruise Ship, Part 1 of 2
From: MM <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 05:20:32 -0700
The following are suggestions from my recent experience aboard a large
cruise ship travelling from San Francisco to Alaska's Inner Passage. I
should note that this cruise had exceptionally favorable weather: no rain,
mostly superb visibility and light to moderate chop for the days at sea.



*Finding the best locations onboard*



Given that most ships differ considerably in architecture, it’s valuable to
explore your vessel on Day 1 in order to learn what sites are available,
the visibility, what might be wind protected, etc. During the voyage,
occasionally recheck these places for new ideas and seeing how they fare
under different conditions.



The best spots I found for identifying wildlife were typically high and
near the front of the ship. Often, though, these areas can be closed due to
high winds, rough seas or slippery decks. Alternative locations that don't
seem to be as restricted are mid-ship, but fewer birds may be seen there.
Unlike the typical boat trip to see pelagic species with 30-40 fellow
birders, cruise ships move swiftly (18-25 knots/hour) and neither chum nor
chase rarities. So getting an early glimpse and staying on the bird is
critical. That's tougher to do from the railing mid-ship and points aft.



The best spot I found on this cruise was on Deck 8, about half way up the
ship's height, at the foremost spot. It was nicely shaded from sun between
930 am and 530 pm in late July and early August. This location made it easy
to see species we were bearing down on, both on the water and in flight.
More than 180 degrees of viewing angle was possible here and it was easy to
move left or right to follow a key bird or marine mammals.



Yet in some weather conditions, this spot is very difficult to bird due to
strong winds. If the ship is moving at 15 knots into a 15 knot headwind,
the birder is contending with a 30 knot breeze. It’s tough to hold optics
steady and make clear identifications in this circumstance. Tailwinds are
ideal, neutralizing the ship’s speed and making most locations on the decks
wind-free.



Birds directly ahead on the water would sometimes stay put until the ship
was less than 50 meters away. This was particularly true of alcids, though
I saw Black-Footed Albatross behaving this way too. Often the bird would
flap and paddle to get out of the direct path without ever taking flight.
Alcids tended to dive and then come up alongside the ship; from there,
they'd dive again or 'wing row' against the ocean to gain greater distance.
From railings mid-ship on the highest deck, this behavior was clear to see
and IDs were relatively easy.



The mid-ship location has clear pluses and minuses. The ship I was on
placed blue-tinted glass panels perpendicular to the railing that could
block some wind and sound and sun. No glass panels were at the bow or
stern. I often chose port or starboard mid-ship depending on where the sun
was in order to have it at my back whenever possible. Best times, clearly,
were within 3 hours of dawn and dusk when light is more horizontal. The
viewing angle from mid-ship was about 90 degrees, sometimes a bit more if
conditions and proximity to the bird/mammal were good.



The largest drawback to this location was noise from the ship's
entertainment programs. Consistently accessible sites were close to the
huge video monitor that played movies, documentaries and on-board
programming. From 6am to 10pm, there were perhaps 2-3 hours when there
wasn't very loud audio. I kept an iPod and headphones handy, but friends I
made onboard wanted to watch the ocean with me and engage in conversation
for much of the day. On Deck 8, far from the audio/video entertainment,
there were even more people stopping to ask questions and study the
wildlife since that area is part of the running/walking track on the ship.



*Anticipating the best areas*



Our cruise moved northwest from San Francisco to Skagway, AK, then began a
southeastern and southern journey back to SF. For parts of this voyage,
there was very little activity (day 2 had a total of 5 birds). On other
days there was constant seabirding from dawn to dusk.



Part of the explanation for this, given my weak understanding of oceans,
nutrients and seabirds, has to do with the upwelling of the ocean when it
hits the continental shelf. These very cold waters rise rapidly to the
surface and carry vast amounts of food to the surface. At these points
there’s a marine buffet attended by many mammals and, potentially,
thousands of seabirds.



The most productive birding occurred when we were around these upwelling
seas. In particular, the leg from Ketchikan, AK to Victoria, BC was superb.
Had I planned a bit better, I might have known in advance when we’d arrive
at these spots.



Luckily on the ship there was a marine map plotting our course and
indicating ocean depths. This gave me some idea of where and when to pay
closest attention to the seas. Also, when exhausted, I could take comfort
knowing that a particular patch of ocean was likely to be minimally
productive and I could grab some sleep before we entered more birdy waters.



If you don’t see a map posted like this, inquire at passenger services and
they’ll likely provide you with the data you’re looking for.



*Choosing optical equipment*



To my surprise, a high-powered scope on a heavy tripod worked very well. My
eyepiece zooms 20x-75x, but using it to get on birds that were apparent
naked-eye or with binoculars took a bit of practice. This new skill paid
large benefits for easier ID of rapidly moving albatross, storm-petrels,
petrels, jaegers, terns, whales, etc. If I'd had a camera with a lens of
400mm-600mm, I might have used that instead for identifying species and
documenting with photographs. But one advantage of the scope, an angled one
in particular, was letting others use it, even 8 year-old children who were
thrilled to look across the horizon at dozens of shearwaters and albatross.



One birder who showed up briefly in the early stages of the voyage had 15x
stabilized binoculars from Canon. They appeared heavy for extended use, but
in choppy seas they may have been the best for getting on and staying on
birds. She loved using them and didn’t seem to mind the weight, though I
didn’t see her holding them up for more than 10 seconds at a time.


Oscar Canino
San Francisco, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

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Subject: Pelagic Birding On a Cruise Ship, Part 2 of 2
From: MM <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 05:18:11 -0700
*Enlisting help from staff and passengers*



Dozens of people stopped me during my viewing time at the railings to ask
what I was seeing. Most thought I was photographing whales, though only the
scope and binoculars were apparent. When I described the goal of
identifying and counting seabirds, particularly for contributing to the
extraordinary citizen science of Cornell/Audubon's eBird program, many
curious passengers became intrigued . They were stunned at the species and
numbers of marine mammals I'd seen, and seemed amazed to hear of albatross
and puffins near the boat as well as the dolphins diving under it. During
my 11 days on the ship, I saw many albatross, puffins and at least 60
Humpback whales, 6 Orcas, dozens of Pacific White-Sided Dolphin and Dall's
Porpoise. The majority of people speaking with me had seen none of these,
as few had the patience to stand at the rail for more than 2-3 minutes.



But a few curious passengers would return with binoculars and cameras; some
stayed with me for hours searching for spouts and seabirds. One sociable
and amusing fellow San Franciscan focused on land mammals while we were in
bays and fjords, spotting moose and mountain goats. Many enjoyed studying
the field guides (Sibley's Birds, 2nd edition & Marine Mammals of Alaska)
for comparisons of shearwaters and storm-petrels, dolphins and porpoises. I
felt it important also to mention eBird, especially to young birders, as an
avenue for them to contribute in ways that are clearly valuable to
ornithology.



The ship had a naturalist aboard but his specialty was Geology, not
wildlife. At one point, near Glacier Bay, 3 NPS rangers boarded the ship to
talk with passengers about the natural history of that area. One was a
birder and was helpful in pointing out what might be in the area, but
otherwise there wasn’t any professional assistance. Some cruises have a
greater focus on wildlife and may have more to offer from a naturalist or
three. I was often mistaken for the ship’s naturalist as it seemed I was at
a post and helping passengers see wildlife for most of the daylight onboard
hours. With the help of newfound friends and with many hours at the
railing, I was able to identify 36 bird species and 6 marine mammal species
while at sea.



*Tracking locations for personal and public records*



eBird asks that pelagic birders use latitude/longitude coordinates each
hour at sea (http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/pelagic-birding/). A
Garmin hand held device was very easy for this task. Apparently cell phones
have the technology to gather this data but I didn't use mine for this,
preferring the Garmin GPS equipment. I suggest caution in using the cell
phone at sea given possible roaming charges, though I believe that gaining
GPS data doesn't involve roaming. Others want to weigh in here?



A cell phone or other handheld recording device was useful for recording
time and place each hour as well as an ongoing count of species. This freed
me from having to write notes regularly. With practice, I was able to hold
the small recording device (an old Sony model) as I viewed through my
binoculars, allowing me to see a bird and describe it simultaneously.



*Web access during the cruise*



The least expensive internet option on board and away from cell phone
coverage was the ship's satellite connection at $.79/minute. As a result, I
did little web surfing. I recorded the day's sightings after dark and saved
them until I logged on again, putting the data in the cloud. High usage
plans are also available, though the least expensive was around $70 for 100
minutes on a very slow web connection.



Be careful about accidentally keeping your phone in roaming mode. One
father complained to me of his daughter’s absent-minded behavior when she
kept her roaming on and incurred a $400+ charge in two days.



*Other advantages and disadvantages*



Compared to the 7 or 8 pelagic birding trips I’ve taken, using a cruise
ship for many hours of birding each day over the course of 6-7 days at sea
(ignoring port days) was an exceptionally rewarding experience. The birds
could be spectacular, the whales and dolphins too, the sunfish and glaciers
and stunning sunsets all added to a fine time aboard that 900 ft. long
behemoth.



Yet there could be considerable drawbacks. If the weather had not
cooperated, the week-and-a-half would have been closer to miserable than
pleasurable. Two cruise trips prior to mine had 8 days of rain out of the11
days’ journey. Though you can bird from a warm, windowed space in the
dining hall or even a stateroom, the tinted glass and ship’s speed would be
considerable challenges along with the very narrow viewing angle. Standing
on deck might be possible (given safety issues), in which case winter
birding and waterproof clothing/gear are essential.



If one’s particularly sensitive to motion sickness, the cruise ship is
vastly superior to most other boats in the world. Our huge ship barely
reacted to 10-12 foot swells, and would likely have handled 15-20 foot
swells easily too. Apparently sophisticated stabilizers minimize lurching
and drifting. Yet there’s still enough motion under those conditions to
upset stomachs, especially in the first few days at sea, before one’s had
time to acclimate to motion. I saw passengers with scopolamine patches and
on one afternoon I took a low dose tablet of Dramamine, but that was all I
required. Pressure point wrist bands likely would have been fine under
those circumstances too.





Where a pelagic birding boat can chum, head for known productive sites, and
chase rarities, the cruise ship will plow straight ahead for hours and
days. The height of the vessel is an advantage, though fewer eyes scanning
the horizon is a notable disadvantage. It’s intriguing to imagine what a
birding club or group of friends could achieve with multiple stations and
walkie-talkies. Given the short period to get on a bird, however, running
shoes might be useful to shift from one side to the other swiftly and
safely across a dry deck.



I found this to be a relatively cost-effective trip which amounted to about
$190/day, all-in. Many pelagic birding trips are not far from this amount,
so when room, board, unusual waters and lengthy birding hours are included,
it seems reasonable. Cruise pricing varies wildly according to demand, so
look for bargains and websites that will alert you to lower costs. One
fellow traveler told me that another trip to Alaska from Seattle, 7 days
long, cost him $350 as a base price.



Some birders have begun using the cruise lines’ repositioning opportunities
to take a much shorter voyage. This may involve only a day or two of
birding, but the costs are much reduced while many of the amenities are
still available. I recommend you learn as much about the planned route as
possible to ensure the likelihood of productive seas.



I learned too from my trip that the super-birdy stretch between Ketchikan
and Victoria can be accessed by ferry out of Bellingham, WA, Juneau &
Homer, AK, etc. It doesn’t appear to be an inexpensive option, though
discounts may be available at certain times of year or if the ferry wants
to fill its berths. If you’ve had experience with this voyage and its
costs, please add to this thread.

 ______________________________



I hope this has been a helpful account for birders considering a cruise
trip. Whether birding is the central focus or a side interest while aboard,
there’s a great deal to be seen under certain circumstances. If you pursue
the idea of casually or seriously birding at sea on a large vessel like the
one I experienced, please consider adding your observations to Birdchat or
other forums for birders to learn from. Feel free to post these
observations to other birding sites for better visibility of these issues.
Finally, contribute all you can for science and other birders by adding to
the database of eBird. These people will, I hope, appreciate your efforts
for millennia to come.



Oscar Canino

San Francisco, CA

oscarboy AT gmail.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Special 6-week project at EHN.org on bird environmental health science
From: JPMyers <jpmyers AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 14:28:59 +0200
True, I've not been a practicing ornithologist for 25 years, and I suspect some 
of you would challenge even before that. Endocrine disruption is just too much 
fun. So much good news. Not. 


BUT!  

The nonprofit news operation I launched 13 years ago, EHN.org, has recruited a 
team of world class freelance reporters to launch a special 6-week project on 
bird environmental health science. What can we learn from bird threats about 
people, and vice-versa? 18 stories in all. 


It starts Monday August 25. Our reporters follow the risks to birds large and 
small – from eagles and ospreys to songbirds – and what those risks may 
mean for human health and the environment. 


National Geographic is republishing a selection of the stories beginning next 
week, one each day Monday through Friday. EHN is thrilled to be partnering with 
one of the world’s most distinguished science and environment publishers for 
the series, "Winged Warnings." Make that 

"Beak Week" instead of "Shark Week."

A summary of our stories is here, http://bit.ly/VLKrNY

and an introductory video on our YouTube channel is here. http://bit.ly/1ByJeL2 


You'll be able to see new stories on our home page, EHN.org and at 
News.NationalGeographic.com all next week and then at a pace of about 2 per 
week for the next 5 weeks after that. 


Birds are at risk from long-banned pesticides like DDT; ubiquitous ones like 
neonicotinoids; human-influenced diseases; chemicals including flame 
retardants; lead contamination and much more. The bottom line is that every 
bird is a Canary in the Coal Mine. 


For those of you at universities, this might provide useful teaching material 
about how science intersects with the media. 


Please share broadly.

And if you tweet, pun intended, use the #wingedwarnings hashtag.


Best wishes,
Pete Myers
White Hall VA


John Peterson Myers, Ph.D.
CEO/Chief Scientist
Environmental Health Sciences
421 Park St.
Charlottesville VA 22902
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry
Carnegie Mellon University
EnvironmentalHealthNews.org
DailyClimate.org
434-220-0348
jpmyers AT ehn.org
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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 24, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 05:24:36 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Sky Dancing Raptors - A Rare Sight
http://bit.ly/Q51jcJ

* "You Need a Mister!" -- A misunderstanding...
http://bit.ly/1p2Eaoa

* Great Blue Heron, Alone Again
http://bit.ly/TX50S4

* Shifts in Habitat = Shifts in Species, With David Sibley
http://bit.ly/1tn3I3V

* Willow Flycatcher -The Last Sneeze of Summer
http://bit.ly/1oiQgte

* Sapsuckers and Sap - Why don't they get stuck?
http://bit.ly/LYFUkS

* The Gulls of Summer

http://bit.ly/OtAqzq

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://p0.vresp.com/RHS0rA
------------------------------------------------------------
Travel to Cuba with BirdNote and Earthbound Expeditions, October 18th -
26th, 2014. Join us on a unique trip to experience the culture, history,
and birds of this vibrant island. http://bit.ly/1sOyNyW
-----------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: a bird-themed citizen science video game
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:36:42 +0100
hey everyone,

thanks to my pals, currently at IOC26 in Tokyo who are sharing so many
wonderful things with me via twitter, i've got something fun to share with
all of you, too.

do you love hidden object video games? do you like helping scientists with
their research? if so, you will LOVE this research project into the
evolution of egg camouflage for three species of ground-nesting birds. it's
citizen science and yes, it's so much fun! give it a go here:

https://nightjar.exeter.ac.uk/egglab/

i warn you: it's fun, it's interesting and dang, but it's addictive.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: 1st World Shorebirds Day, 6 September
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 21:28:43 +0100
Dear All,

My last update about the very first World Shorebirds Day was posted months ago. 
Let me share a few details with you. Id like to encourage you to support this 
initiative by taking a part of it. 


The 6th of September is selected for celebrating shorebirds and raising public 
awareness for the need of conservation, research and fundraising. 


Birdwatchers and researchers have joined the Global Shorebird Counting Program, 
and nearly 300 sites have already been registered covering many of the 
shorebird sites of international importance. Please find the map of the 
registered sites: 
https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=z3yRwAVo2mAw.k42bDqIRe7a4 


If you have not joined yet, please think about it and register your site where 
you go counting shorebirds on 6-7 September. 
(http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/global-shorebird-counting/) 


Last but not least, the shorebird community voted for the Shorebirds of the 
Year for this year. The enigmatic Spoon-billed Sandpiper was selected and will 
hold this title until 15/08/2015. All of our fundraising activity will focus 
this species. However, I have already opened the new poll to decide which 
shorebird will be chosen for the 2015/2016 shorebird year. 
http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2014/08/19/shorebirds-of-the-year-2015-poll-opens/ 
Maybe a North American species will be selected. :) 


Come and join us and celebrating shorebirds on the 6th of September.

Best regards, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Coordinator of the Global Events of the World Shorebirds Day
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
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Subject: Fall Migration Banding
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 12:12:40 -0500
   We have started our fall bird banding season with last Saturday's
session at the Lowry Nature Center near Victoria, Minnesota. It was a
good day with good diversity. I have posted photos and a list of
birds banded at:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


  Our next public program will be the 3rd Saturday of September.

Roger Everhart
North Central Bird Observatory
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: New River Hummingbird Festival (23 Aug)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 12:19:13 -0400
New River Hummingbird Festival
(hummingbird banding demonstration)
Saturday, August 23
8 am until noon
Lively Family Amphitheater, at the corner of Kelly Avenue and Main Street
Oak Hill WV

No admission charge
Hummingbird feeders & Operation RubyThroat T-shirts for sale

Details at https://www.facebook.com/NewRiverBirdingNatureCenter

Hope to see you there!

BILL

=========

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Hilton Pond 08/01/14 (Truth About Ruby-throats)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:28:05 -0400
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds may be the most common and best understood of all 
hummer species, but misinformation about these tiny birds always seems to float 
around. "This Week at Hilton Pond" I offer a photo essay to clear up incorrect 
information I've read lately about ruby-throat behavior and morphology. To view 
this latest "fact-checking" installment for 1-15 August 2014, please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140801.html 


While there don't forget to scroll down for miscellaneous nature notes and a 
list of all birds banded and recaptured during the period, plus info about 
banding hummers in the Neotropics. 


Happy Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: 9th Supplement to 6th edition of the Clements Checklist!
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 20:38:09 -0400
Dear BIRDCHATters:

The 9th set of updates and corrections to the Sixth Edition of The
Clements Checklist
of Birds of the World is out!

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/2014-overview/

There are links to download an Excel spreadsheet of the revised
checklist, and
there is also a document describing all the updates and corrections.

I'm surprised that there has not been an announcement on BIRDCHAT, or I
missed it,
but maybe I got lucky and happened to check just as it was posted.

Personally, I am anxious to see whether my World Life List increases or
decreases
due to the changes between versions 6/8 and 6.9!

David

David Mark
Amherst, NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu

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Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - August 2014
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 17:44:48 -0400
The August 2014 issue of the Birding Community E-bulletin is now
available the web, covering news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for active and
concerned birders, those dedicated to the joys of birding and the
protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of superb quality birding
binoculars and scopes, Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past E-bulletins on the
website of the National Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The August 2014 edition includes the following topics:

RARITY FOCUS
   - Plain-capped Starthroats in southeastern Arizona

ACCESS MATTERS: THE SANTA RITA LODGE EXAMPLE
   - located in the Santa Rita Mountains, at the heart of Madera
Canyon
     in the Coronado National Forest it offers a popular consolidated
viewing
     area for visitors and lodge guests alike

WOODCOCK REPORT
   - significant decline in the Central Region

LOOKING AT A SAGE-GROUSE DEADLINE
   - September 2015 deadline to decide whether or not to list the
Greater
     Sage-Grouse under the Endangered Species Act (ESA)

SAGE-GROUSE FEMBOT
   - studies at a sage-grouse lek, or mating ground, from a female's
     eye view

TIP OF THE MONTH: HERE COMES THE SUN
   - keep the sun at your back while in the field - planning before
your
     birding trip

BIRDS AND DINOSAURS: FEATHER CONSIDERATIONS
   - feathers may have been far more widespread in dinosaurs than
previously thought

IBA NEWS: PANAMA BAY STRUGGLE CONTINUES
   - altering the boundaries of the existing protected area

ROOSTING CHIMNEY SWIFTS IN THE MARITIMES
   - Chimney Swift monitoring efforts in New Brunswick and Nova
Scotia

80 YEARS AGO: THE FIRST DUCK STAMPS SOLD
   - approximately $900 million have been collected through the sale
     of this stamp, and over 5.5 million acres of wetland, grassland,

     riparian, and bottomland habitats in the National Wildlife
Refuge
     System secured

100 YEARS AGO: MARTHA
   - the last Passenger Pigeon

- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National Wildlife Refuge
Association (NWRA) website:

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 17, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:17:40 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Pied-billed Grebe Pair Switches Roles
http://bit.ly/MLhrkA

* Hawaiian Petrels Atop Haleakala Volcano
http://bit.ly/14KA1QC

* Common Nighthawk, Uncommon Sound
http://bit.ly/1oZXQ17

* Advice to Beginning Birders from David Sibley
http://bit.ly/Y4x3X1

* How Birds Drink
http://bit.ly/N6bF7r

* Bird Life at the Grand Canyon
http://bit.ly/18B75Kk

* Flammulated Owl, Summer Visitor
http://bit.ly/RRX7QF

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1yKPtY1
------------------------------------------------------------
Travel to Cuba with BirdNote and Earthbound Expeditions! October 18th -
26th, 2014. Join us on a unique trip to experience the culture, history,
and birds of this vibrant island.  http://bit.ly/1sOyNyW
-----------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find nearly
1200 episodes in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Competition for ecological niches limits evolution of new songbirds
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 16:16:17 +0100
hello everyone,

I just published this piece that discusses a truly lovely paper about
Himalayan songbirds. This paper finds that competition for ecological
niches (NOT reproductive isolation) affects the rate of speciation in
songbirds. It also finds that, as these niches fill up with species, the
rate of speciation slows or stops altogether. there are lots of other
interesting nuances that this leads to, which are also mentioned in the
piece:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/aug/14/birds-evolution-phylogeny-speciation-ecology-himalayas?view=classic 


of course, it includes lots of pretty pictures of gorgeous songbirds --
including one astonishingly rare songbird that none of us have ever seen --
along with lots of breathtaking pics of the himalayas that make me want
very much to visit! (i may try to weasel my way into the next expedition,
to document everything, of course!)

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: Petrel
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 06:48:38 -0500
Joan of Arc was walking along the rocky shore of France one afternoon. She 
stopped to look at some pictures in the rocks, turned to her friend Simon, and 
asked, 


"What bird is that in the petre - petro- petrel-thingy there in the rock wall?"

Petrel, derived from petroglyph.  Case solved:)

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: "petrel"
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 19:07:56 -0400
You're right: it would have been fabrication only had Laura Erickson
claimed to know what that "original, lost name" looked like. The mere
assertion of the existence of that "original, lost name" is different--
Best,
rick

Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 17:55:25 -0400
Thanks Barry! As you know, I share your frustrations. The world is too complex 
to be governed by simple, and simplistic, assumptions. 

 
Best
 
Eric Jeffrey
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Barry K. MacKay 
To: 'Eric Jeffrey' ; BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Mon, Aug 11, 2014 5:50 pm
Subject: RE: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"



Good point.
 
I get tired of the times I’ve had people and agencies decide major policy on 
the bases of presumptions derived at without adequate consideration of other 
views or data, which is what I was thinking of at the time. I agree that Laura 
didn’t do that, thus “fabrication” is incorrect, she made quite valid 
speculation, indeed, and speculation has none of the negativity that comes with 
fabrication. 

 
Cheers,
 
Barry
 
 
Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada
 
 
From: Eric Jeffrey [mailto:ecj100 AT aol.com] 
Sent: August-11-14 5:30 PM
To: mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA; BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"
 

Much as I respect Rick and Barry, I have to object to their comparison of 
Laura's "suspicion" to a fabrication. When one states a suspicion, one simply 
states a logical possibility, which this certainly was. A fabrication, in 
contrast, is a deliberate lie, or cock & bull story, which would seem 
potentially applicable only if one made a more affirmative statement that ____ 
is true, despite an absence of evidence. In any event, to the best of my aging 
memory, one of Laura's early posts on the matter cited some etymological 
sources. 


 

In sum, speculation, perhaps; fabrication, no.

 

Eric Jeffrey

Falls Church, VA

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Barry K. MacKay 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Mon, Aug 11, 2014 4:06 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

Oh hey,  I thought everyone knew!
 
Okay, when you fill up your tank with gas in North America you call it "gas" 
but 

in England, they say "petrol".
 
Petrol is derived from oil.
 
Petrels are oily.
 
Therefore petrel is just a misspelling of petrol.
 
Glad I got that straightened out.
 
Just kidding, of course, but as Rick says (and I quite agree), absent a source 
is the same as fabrication.
 
Great thread, though.
 
Cheers,
 
Barry
 
 
Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of Rick Wright
Sent: August-11-14 3:24 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"
 
Writes Laura Erickson:
 
"I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!] from 
some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the bird's 
easily observable habits."
 
One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same as 
fabrication.
 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ
 
Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New 

Jersey 
 

 
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 17:49:55 -0400
Good point.



I get tired of the times I've had people and agencies decide major policy on
the bases of presumptions derived at without adequate consideration of other
views or data, which is what I was thinking of at the time.  I agree that
Laura didn't do that, thus "fabrication" is incorrect, she made quite valid
speculation, indeed, and speculation has none of the negativity that comes
with fabrication.



Cheers,



Barry





Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada





From: Eric Jeffrey [mailto:ecj100 AT aol.com]
Sent: August-11-14 5:30 PM
To: mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA; BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"



Much as I respect Rick and Barry, I have to object to their comparison of
Laura's "suspicion" to a fabrication.  When one states a suspicion, one
simply states a logical possibility, which this certainly was.  A
fabrication, in contrast, is a deliberate lie, or cock & bull story, which
would seem potentially applicable only if one made a more affirmative
statement that ____ is true, despite an absence of evidence.  In any event,
to the best of my aging memory, one of Laura's early posts on the matter
cited some etymological sources.



In sum, speculation, perhaps; fabrication, no.



Eric Jeffrey

Falls Church, VA





-----Original Message-----
From: Barry K. MacKay 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Mon, Aug 11, 2014 4:06 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

Oh hey,  I thought everyone knew!

Okay, when you fill up your tank with gas in North America you call it "gas"
but
in England, they say "petrol".

Petrol is derived from oil.

Petrels are oily.

Therefore petrel is just a misspelling of petrol.

Glad I got that straightened out.

Just kidding, of course, but as Rick says (and I quite agree), absent a
source
is the same as fabrication.

Great thread, though.

Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU  ]
On Behalf Of Rick Wright
Sent: August-11-14 3:24 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

Writes Laura Erickson:

"I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!]
from
some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the bird's
easily observable habits."

One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same as

fabrication.

Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of
New
Jersey
 &qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 17:29:42 -0400
Much as I respect Rick and Barry, I have to object to their comparison of 
Laura's "suspicion" to a fabrication. When one states a suspicion, one simply 
states a logical possibility, which this certainly was. A fabrication, in 
contrast, is a deliberate lie, or cock & bull story, which would seem 
potentially applicable only if one made a more affirmative statement that ____ 
is true, despite an absence of evidence. In any event, to the best of my aging 
memory, one of Laura's early posts on the matter cited some etymological 
sources. 


In sum, speculation, perhaps; fabrication, no.

Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Barry K. MacKay 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Mon, Aug 11, 2014 4:06 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"


Oh hey,  I thought everyone knew!

Okay, when you fill up your tank with gas in North America you call it "gas" 
but 

in England, they say "petrol".

Petrol is derived from oil.

Petrels are oily.

Therefore petrel is just a misspelling of petrol.

Glad I got that straightened out.

Just kidding, of course, but as Rick says (and I quite agree), absent a source 
is the same as fabrication.

Great thread, though.

Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of Rick Wright
Sent: August-11-14 3:24 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

Writes Laura Erickson:

"I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!] from 
some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the bird's 
easily observable habits."

One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same as 
fabrication.

Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New 

Jersey 
 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 16:04:35 -0400
Oh hey,  I thought everyone knew!

Okay, when you fill up your tank with gas in North America you call it "gas" 
but in England, they say "petrol". 


Petrol is derived from oil.

Petrels are oily.

Therefore petrel is just a misspelling of petrol.

Glad I got that straightened out.

Just kidding, of course, but as Rick says (and I quite agree), absent a source 
is the same as fabrication. 


Great thread, though.

Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Wright 

Sent: August-11-14 3:24 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

Writes Laura Erickson:

"I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!] from 
some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the bird's 
easily observable habits." 


One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same as 
fabrication. 


Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 16:02:00 -0400
And with that, this conversation peters out....
r


On Mon, Aug 11, 2014 at 3:54 PM, Alvaro Jaramillo 
wrote:

> I have it, St. Peter was named for the Petrel whose name comes from
> pitter-patter.
>
> This makes complete sense. :-)
>
> Alvaro Jaramillo
> alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [mailto:
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Wright
> Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 12:24 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"
>
> Writes Laura Erickson:
>
> "I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!]
> from some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the
> bird's easily observable habits."
>
> One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same
> as fabrication.
>
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds
> of New Jersey <
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>


--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Elizabeth Dodd <edodd AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 20:01:12 +0000
Actually, I have always thought that the name was a corruption of "Petrol" for 
its dark coloration. 


;)
Elizabeth Dodd
Manhattan, KS

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Alvaro Jaramillo 
 

Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 2:54 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

I have it, St. Peter was named for the Petrel whose name comes from 
pitter-patter. 


This makes complete sense. :-)

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Wright 

Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 12:24 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

Writes Laura Erickson:

"I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!] from 
some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the bird's 
easily observable habits." 


One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same as 
fabrication. 


Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 12:54:38 -0700
I have it, St. Peter was named for the Petrel whose name comes from 
pitter-patter. 


This makes complete sense. :-)

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Wright 

Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 12:24 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

Writes Laura Erickson:

"I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!] from 
some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the bird's 
easily observable habits." 


One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same as 
fabrication. 


Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: "petrel"
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 15:23:52 -0400
Writes Laura Erickson:

"I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may indeed have rose [!]
from some original, lost name's similarity to the word Peter, due to the
bird's easily observable habits."

One can suspect all one wants, but absent a source, suspicion is the same
as fabrication.

Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "dadin"
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 09:55:29 -0500
It's of course possible, and perhaps likely, that newer forms of some words
take shape specifically because of associations people make between
original roots of the word lost in the murky past and more familiar
concepts. In this case, I suspect the "petrel" form of the bird's name may
indeed have rose from some original, lost name's similarity to the word
Peter, due to the bird's easily observable habits.

Best, Laura Erickson

Duluth, MN


On Mon, Aug 11, 2014 at 8:58 AM, Rick Wright  wrote:

> Isn't "dadin" just derived from "dandiner," to teeter? At least that's what
> I've always read.
>
> As to "petrel," that form appears more likely to be a folk etymology -- the
> creative re-analysis of a no longer understood term -- of a name like
> "pitter-pat." And I see that others have already adduced many of the
> relevant sources in support, for which thanks.
>
> Best from NJ once again,
> rick
>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey 
> ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> <
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: "dadin"
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 09:58:38 -0400
Isn't "dadin" just derived from "dandiner," to teeter? At least that's what
I've always read.

As to "petrel," that form appears more likely to be a folk etymology -- the
creative re-analysis of a no longer understood term -- of a name like
"pitter-pat." And I see that others have already adduced many of the
relevant sources in support, for which thanks.

Best from NJ once again,
rick

--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 21:58:39 -0600
The DRAE says the Spanish word "petrel" is of uncertain origin.

The OED says the Spanish word is from 1839 or earlier and comes from
English.  Because of the interest in this, I'll copy its whole discussion
of the etymology.  I've added one explanatory word in brackets.

"Origin uncertain and disputed. Dampier's suggested derivation < the name
of *St Peter* (see quot. 1703 at sense 1

) 

is probably a folk etymology, and similar folk-etymological alteration
probably lies behind the analogous names of this and related birds in other
European languages, at least some of which were probably intended as
calques on the English word: compare e.g. German *Petersvogel* (19th cent.
or earlier), *Petersläufer* (end of the 18th cent. or earlier), Norwegian
*Søren-Peder* , *St. Peders-fugl* (both 1764 or earlier), French †*pierrot*
(1751), Spanish (rare) *ave de San Pedro* , Italian regional (rare)
(Elba) *uccello
di San Pietro* , (Venice) *osel de San Pietro* . W. B. Lockwood ( *Zeitschr.
f. Anglistik u. Amerikanistik* (1968) *16* 285–90) suggests a derivation <
the first element of pitter-patter n.2
 and pitter-patter
v.2  + *-erel*
(in cockerel n. ,
etc.), with reference to the characteristic behaviour of petrels in
‘gliding buoyantly over the water, patting it with their feet’, although
this has been challenged on semantic grounds, and it should also be noted
that both pitter-patter n.2
 and pitter-patter
v.2  are only
attested later than the present word. It has also been suggested that the
name is, in spite of the chronology, a Romance loan in English, and is
ultimately related to the Indo-European base of pet n.1
 [fart] (the bird
having been so named perhaps on account of the noises it makes during
copulation, or perhaps on account of a strong-smelling substance which it
emits in order to defend itself), but the case for a Romance origin is not
strong.

"It is unclear whether the following example represents an earlier
attestation of the word; if so, its stem vowel is unexplained:

"1582   R. Madox *Diary* 19 June in E. S. Donno *Elizabethan in 1582*
(1976) 146   A poydrel which is a lytle black byrd cam to the ship, which
M. Fayrwether sayd was a token of wynd.

"Compare French *pétrel* (1723; 1705 as †*petrel* in a translation of
Dampier; 1782 or earlier as †*pétérel*; < English) and Dutch *petrel* (19th
cent. or earlier), Spanish *petrel* (1839 or earlier), Italian *petrello* (
*a*1837 or earlier), all ultimately < English, partly via French."

Jerry Friedman
Española, NM

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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 20:28:43 -0700
All,

 One clarification is that most of the birds we call petrels (Pterodroma, 
Procellaria etc.) are not the original birds that sported the name. The name 
petrel comes from storm-petrels, likely the original name was given to either 
the British Storm Petrel or the Wilson's Storm-Petrel, or a mix of the two. My 
guess is that Wilson's Storm Petrel is the bird that originally had the name, 
and it came from lots of experience with the species not only in the north 
Atlantic, but in other oceans where mariners ventured. This species was also 
the one that was given the name Mother Carey's chickens. Note that Mother 
Carey's geese were the giant petrels of the southern oceans. 

 If you want another ocean legend. The recently described Pincoya Storm Petrel 
which I had some involvement in is named for a Chilean myth, of the Pincoya. 
You can read about her here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pincoya 


Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Erickson 

Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 5:01 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

I'm intrigued that anyone would suggest that St. Peter is the "least plausible" 
explanation for the etymology of the name "petrel." The Oxford English 
Dictionary and American Heritage Dictionary both give that as a possible 
origin, with no alternative suggestions, and the Online Etymology Dictionary 
says, "seabird, 1670s, pitteral, modern spelling first recorded 

1703 by English explorer William Dampier (1651-1715), who wrote the bird was so 
called from its way of flying with its feet just skimming the surface of the 
water, which recalls the apostle's walk on the sea of Galilee (Matt. xiv:28); 
if so, it likely was formed in English as a diminutive of Peter (Late Latin 
Petrus). If this is folk etymology, the true source of the name is 
undiscovered. French pétrel (1760) probably is from English." 


Choate, in *American Bird Names,* provides a longer entry for Petrel than he 
gives for most bird names, but suggests that although "earlier variants of the 
word *pitteral* and *pittrel* are obscure, the *Oxford Dictionary of English 
Etymology* goes on to say that Dampier as early as 1703 '...has the spelling 
*petrel* and derives the name from that of St. Peter in the allusion to his 
"walking upon the lake of Genneserath."'" 


So the origin of the word petrel isn't 100 percent certain, but without 
evidence, the St. Peter explanation is hardly "the least plausible." 


Best,

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN


On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:

> Remember that that is just one explanation, the cleverest and thus
> perhaps the least plausible, for the origin of the name "petrel."
>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to
> Birds of New Jersey <
> http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/193
> 5622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+gu
> ide+birds+new+jersey
> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature--the 
assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter. 


            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 20:15:13 -0700
David

  The fact that Petrel is also used in Spanish makes me think that St. Peter
may be the root for the name. Pitter patter does not work for Spanish
speakers. I have no idea how old the Spanish usage of Petrel is though.

Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Spector, David (Biology)
Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 6:45 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

A couple of quotes with different perspectives:

"Petrel.  First attested in this spelling in 1602, a corruption of
'pitteral' (i.e., *pitterel) and 'pittrel' which, though not actually
recorded until 1676 and 1748 respectively, must represent the original form.
It was inspired by the jingle _pitter-patter_ under the influence of the
suffix erel, alluding of course to the birds tapping the water with their
feet as they skim over the surface.  The present corruption may have been
originally no more than a misspelling; at any rate, the supposed connection
with St. Peter, who walked on the waves, is certainly due to later
speculation."
W. B. Lockwood.  The Oxford Book of British Bird Names.  1984.


"earlier _pitteral_, of uncert. orig.; perh. altered by assoc. with St.
_Peter_ . . . ."
Random House unabridged dictionary 1987

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.



________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Erickson
[bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM]
Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 8:01 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

I'm intrigued that anyone would suggest that St. Peter is the "least
plausible" explanation for the etymology of the name "petrel." The Oxford
English Dictionary and American Heritage Dictionary both give that as a
possible origin, with no alternative suggestions, and the Online Etymology
Dictionary says, "seabird, 1670s, pitteral, modern spelling first recorded
1703 by English explorer William Dampier (1651-1715), who wrote the bird was
so called from its way of flying with its feet just skimming the surface of
the water, which recalls the apostle's walk on the sea of Galilee (Matt.
xiv:28); if so, it likely was formed in English as a diminutive of Peter
(Late Latin Petrus). If this is folk etymology, the true source of the name
is undiscovered. French ptrel (1760) probably is from English."

Choate, in *American Bird Names,* provides a longer entry for Petrel than he
gives for most bird names, but suggests that although "earlier variants of
the word *pitteral* and *pittrel* are obscure, the *Oxford Dictionary of
English Etymology* goes on to say that Dampier as early as 1703 '...has the
spelling *petrel* and derives the name from that of St. Peter in the
allusion to his "walking upon the lake of Genneserath."'"

So the origin of the word petrel isn't 100 percent certain, but without
evidence, the St. Peter explanation is hardly "the least plausible."

Best,

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN


On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:

> Remember that that is just one explanation, the cleverest and thus
> perhaps the least plausible, for the origin of the name "petrel."
>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to
> Birds of New Jersey <
> http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/193
> 5622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+gu
> ide+birds+new+jersey
> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 21:06:07 -0500
David Specter gives an excellent explanation of one alternative origin.
That's useful.

Best, Laura

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN



On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 8:45 PM, Spector, David (Biology) <
spectord AT mail.ccsu.edu> wrote:

> A couple of quotes with different perspectives:
>
> "Petrel.  First attested in this spelling in 1602, a corruption of
> 'pitteral' (i.e., *pitterel) and 'pittrel' which, though not actually
>  recorded until 1676 and 1748 respectively, must represent the original
> form.  It was inspired by the jingle _pitter-patter_ under the influence of
> the suffix –erel, alluding of course to the birds tapping the water with
> their feet as they skim over the surface.  The present corruption may have
> been originally no more than a misspelling; at any rate, the supposed
> connection with St. Peter, who walked on the waves, is certainly due to
> later speculation."
> W. B. Lockwood.  The Oxford Book of British Bird Names.  1984.
>
>
> "earlier _pitteral_, of uncert. orig.; perh. altered by assoc. with St.
> _Peter_ . . . ."
> Random House unabridged dictionary 1987
>
> David
>
> David Spector
> Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.
>
>
>
> ________________________________________
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Erickson [
> bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM]
> Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 8:01 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"
>
> I'm intrigued that anyone would suggest that St. Peter is the "least
> plausible" explanation for the etymology of the name "petrel." The Oxford
> English Dictionary and American Heritage Dictionary both give that as a
> possible origin, with no alternative suggestions, and the Online Etymology
> Dictionary says, "seabird, 1670s, pitteral, modern spelling first recorded
> 1703 by English explorer William Dampier (1651-1715), who wrote the bird
> was so called from its way of flying with its feet just skimming the
> surface of the water, which recalls the apostle's walk on the sea of
> Galilee (Matt. xiv:28); if so, it likely was formed in English as a
> diminutive of Peter (Late Latin Petrus). If this is folk etymology, the
> true source of the name is undiscovered. French pétrel (1760) probably is
> from English."
>
> Choate, in *American Bird Names,* provides a longer entry for Petrel than
> he gives for most bird names, but suggests that although "earlier variants
> of the word *pitteral* and *pittrel* are obscure, the *Oxford Dictionary of
> English Etymology* goes on to say that Dampier as early as 1703 '...has the
> spelling *petrel* and derives the name from that of St. Peter in the
> allusion to his "walking upon the lake of Genneserath."'"
>
> So the origin of the word petrel isn't 100 percent certain, but without
> evidence, the St. Peter explanation is hardly "the least plausible."
>
> Best,
>
> Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:
>
> > Remember that that is just one explanation, the cleverest and thus
> perhaps
> > the least plausible, for the origin of the name "petrel."
> >
> > --
> > Rick Wright
> > Bloomfield, NJ
> >
> > Review Editor, Birding 
> > Senior Leader, WINGS 
> > Birding New Jersey 
> > ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> > <
> >
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> > >
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>             --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 21:45:10 -0400
A couple of quotes with different perspectives:

"Petrel. First attested in this spelling in 1602, a corruption of 'pitteral' 
(i.e., *pitterel) and 'pittrel' which, though not actually recorded until 1676 
and 1748 respectively, must represent the original form. It was inspired by the 
jingle _pitter-patter_ under the influence of the suffix erel, alluding of 
course to the birds tapping the water with their feet as they skim over the 
surface. The present corruption may have been originally no more than a 
misspelling; at any rate, the supposed connection with St. Peter, who walked on 
the waves, is certainly due to later speculation." 

W. B. Lockwood.  The Oxford Book of British Bird Names.  1984.


"earlier _pitteral_, of uncert. orig.; perh. altered by assoc. with St. _Peter_ 
. . . ." 

Random House unabridged dictionary 1987

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.



________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Erickson 
[bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM] 

Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 8:01 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] "petrel"

I'm intrigued that anyone would suggest that St. Peter is the "least
plausible" explanation for the etymology of the name "petrel." The Oxford
English Dictionary and American Heritage Dictionary both give that as a
possible origin, with no alternative suggestions, and the Online Etymology
Dictionary says, "seabird, 1670s, pitteral, modern spelling first recorded
1703 by English explorer William Dampier (1651-1715), who wrote the bird
was so called from its way of flying with its feet just skimming the
surface of the water, which recalls the apostle's walk on the sea of
Galilee (Matt. xiv:28); if so, it likely was formed in English as a
diminutive of Peter (Late Latin Petrus). If this is folk etymology, the
true source of the name is undiscovered. French ptrel (1760) probably is
from English."

Choate, in *American Bird Names,* provides a longer entry for Petrel than
he gives for most bird names, but suggests that although "earlier variants
of the word *pitteral* and *pittrel* are obscure, the *Oxford Dictionary of
English Etymology* goes on to say that Dampier as early as 1703 '...has the
spelling *petrel* and derives the name from that of St. Peter in the
allusion to his "walking upon the lake of Genneserath."'"

So the origin of the word petrel isn't 100 percent certain, but without
evidence, the St. Peter explanation is hardly "the least plausible."

Best,

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN


On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:

> Remember that that is just one explanation, the cleverest and thus perhaps
> the least plausible, for the origin of the name "petrel."
>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey 
> ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> <
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: "sandfalcon1 ." <sandfalcon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 20:35:25 -0400
Laura mentions William Dampier.  For anyone looking for a good book about a
rather intriguing individual, let me suggest "A Pirate of Exquisite Mind".
 For his time, Mr. Dampier was an amazing naturalist along with the fact he
was also a dyed-in-the-wool pirate.  If I am not mistaken he introduced
some 400 words to the English language and the notes he took about the
natural world (and wrote a book about) were what encouraged Charles Darwin
to visit and spend so much time studying on the Galapagos.  All while
engaging in nefarious activities...

No financial incentive for me, just passing along what was a very enjoyable
book for me.

Brandon Best
Lawrenceville, GA


On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 8:01 PM, Laura Erickson 
wrote:

> I'm intrigued that anyone would suggest that St. Peter is the "least
> plausible" explanation for the etymology of the name "petrel." The Oxford
> English Dictionary and American Heritage Dictionary both give that as a
> possible origin, with no alternative suggestions, and the Online Etymology
> Dictionary says, "seabird, 1670s, pitteral, modern spelling first recorded
> 1703 by English explorer William Dampier (1651-1715), who wrote the bird
> was so called from its way of flying with its feet just skimming the
> surface of the water, which recalls the apostle's walk on the sea of
> Galilee (Matt. xiv:28); if so, it likely was formed in English as a
> diminutive of Peter (Late Latin Petrus). If this is folk etymology, the
> true source of the name is undiscovered. French pétrel (1760) probably is
> from English."
>
> Choate, in *American Bird Names,* provides a longer entry for Petrel than
> he gives for most bird names, but suggests that although "earlier variants
> of the word *pitteral* and *pittrel* are obscure, the *Oxford Dictionary of
> English Etymology* goes on to say that Dampier as early as 1703 '...has the
> spelling *petrel* and derives the name from that of St. Peter in the
> allusion to his "walking upon the lake of Genneserath."'"
>
> So the origin of the word petrel isn't 100 percent certain, but without
> evidence, the St. Peter explanation is hardly "the least plausible."
>
> Best,
>
> Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
>
> On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:
>
> > Remember that that is just one explanation, the cleverest and thus
> perhaps
> > the least plausible, for the origin of the name "petrel."
> >
> > --
> > Rick Wright
> > Bloomfield, NJ
> >
> > Review Editor, Birding 
> > Senior Leader, WINGS 
> > Birding New Jersey 
> > ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> > <
> >
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> > >
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>             --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



-- 
You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can
never repay you.
-John Bunyan

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: strange seabird story
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 20:16:43 -0400
The word used in the French original* is not a cognate of the English "petrels" 
but is "dadins." I have not found this word in my references at home, and a 
quick web search did not reveal much except general defintions of "seabird" and 
"fool," and use for shearwaters, an alcid, and a gull. "Dadins" does not seem 
to be in current use in French, and, to confuse the story more, this tale is 
cited in the subsequent paragraph as the reason that church columns decorated 
with grape vines also show pigeons devouring the fruit; the connection between 
the "dadin" seabird and pigeons is left to the reader's imagination! The author 
italicizes his first use of "dadins," suggesting that it is a foreign word to 
him, writing in the 19th century. 


As Rick mentioned, the connection of storm-petrels to St. Peter and/or to Mary 
is not universally accepted. 


Does anyone have more information about the "dadin" bird?

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.



* use the link in Rick's blog or this URL (the paragraph that Rick translated 
is on page 26): 


http://books.google.com/books?id=hhYvAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA1&lpg=PA1&dq=cochet+les+anciens+vignobles&source=bl&ots=W8y_9ZzuOY&sig=H3jzlbA7DDVaGpdaXw8kXuG33VU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=pE3VU5TXNs-TyASUzYKAAw&ved=0CE4Q6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q&f=false 





________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Dr Ronald Orenstein 
[ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM] 

Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2014 6:57 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] strange seabird story

Bear in mind that "petrel" refers to Saint Peter, and that tubenoses were once 
referred to as Mother Carey's chickens  a reference to Mater Cara, the Virgin 
Mary. These birds appear to have had religious significance for Christian 
sailors for a long time  presumably because of the ability of some storm 
petrels to "walk on water". The grape story may be part of that tradition. 


On the other hand, pelagic birdwatching trips may wish to experiment with a new 
source of chum... 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 11, 2014, at 4:03 AM, "Barry K. MacKay"  wrote:
>
> I think the petrels were not the only ones hitting the grapes...post 
fermentation. 

>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Wright 

> Sent: August-10-14 3:41 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] strange seabird story
>
> Ever wonder why there are so many shearwaters off eastern Canada?
> 
http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/08/10/why-are-there-no-shearwaters-in-the-vineyards-of-france/ 

>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 

>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: "petrel"
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 19:01:20 -0500
I'm intrigued that anyone would suggest that St. Peter is the "least
plausible" explanation for the etymology of the name "petrel." The Oxford
English Dictionary and American Heritage Dictionary both give that as a
possible origin, with no alternative suggestions, and the Online Etymology
Dictionary says, "seabird, 1670s, pitteral, modern spelling first recorded
1703 by English explorer William Dampier (1651-1715), who wrote the bird
was so called from its way of flying with its feet just skimming the
surface of the water, which recalls the apostle's walk on the sea of
Galilee (Matt. xiv:28); if so, it likely was formed in English as a
diminutive of Peter (Late Latin Petrus). If this is folk etymology, the
true source of the name is undiscovered. French pétrel (1760) probably is
from English."

Choate, in *American Bird Names,* provides a longer entry for Petrel than
he gives for most bird names, but suggests that although "earlier variants
of the word *pitteral* and *pittrel* are obscure, the *Oxford Dictionary of
English Etymology* goes on to say that Dampier as early as 1703 '...has the
spelling *petrel* and derives the name from that of St. Peter in the
allusion to his "walking upon the lake of Genneserath."'"

So the origin of the word petrel isn't 100 percent certain, but without
evidence, the St. Peter explanation is hardly "the least plausible."

Best,

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN


On Sun, Aug 10, 2014 at 6:19 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:

> Remember that that is just one explanation, the cleverest and thus perhaps
> the least plausible, for the origin of the name "petrel."
>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey 
> ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> <
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: "petrel"
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 19:19:52 -0400
Remember that that is just one explanation, the cleverest and thus perhaps
the least plausible, for the origin of the name "petrel."

--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: strange seabird story
From: Dr Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 06:57:29 +0800
Bear in mind that "petrel" refers to Saint Peter, and that tubenoses were once 
referred to as Mother Carey's chickens – a reference to Mater Cara, the 
Virgin Mary. These birds appear to have had religious significance for 
Christian sailors for a long time – presumably because of the ability of some 
storm petrels to "walk on water". The grape story may be part of that 
tradition. 


On the other hand, pelagic birdwatching trips may wish to experiment with a new 
source of chum... 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 11, 2014, at 4:03 AM, "Barry K. MacKay"  wrote:
>
> I think the petrels were not the only ones hitting the grapes...post 
fermentation. 

>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Wright 

> Sent: August-10-14 3:41 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] strange seabird story
>
> Ever wonder why there are so many shearwaters off eastern Canada?
> 
http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/08/10/why-are-there-no-shearwaters-in-the-vineyards-of-france/ 

>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 

>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: strange seabird story
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:21:45 -0400
Or it could be there was something very fishy about those grapes...

Susan Fogleman
Campton NH


On Aug 10, 2014, at 4:03 PM, Barry K. MacKay wrote:

> I think the petrels were not the only ones hitting the grapes...post
> fermentation.
>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 

> ] On Behalf Of Rick Wright
> Sent: August-10-14 3:41 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] strange seabird story
>
> Ever wonder why there are so many shearwaters off eastern Canada?
> 
http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/08/10/why-are-there-no-shearwaters-in-the-vineyards-of-france/ 

>
> --
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
>
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to
> Birds of New Jersey 
 >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: strange seabird story
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:03:18 -0400
I think the petrels were not the only ones hitting the grapes...post 
fermentation. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Rick Wright 

Sent: August-10-14 3:41 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] strange seabird story

Ever wonder why there are so many shearwaters off eastern Canada?

http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/08/10/why-are-there-no-shearwaters-in-the-vineyards-of-france/ 


--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey  ABA Field Guide to Birds of 
New Jersey 
 


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Subject: strange seabird story
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 15:41:04 -0400
Ever wonder why there are so many shearwaters off eastern Canada?

http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/08/10/why-are-there-no-shearwaters-in-the-vineyards-of-france/ 


--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


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Subject: a forest year (yep, there's birds in this, too)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:18:40 +0100
hello everyone,

i stumbled across a video a couple months ago whilst researching a planned
visit to kew gardens, in london. i've watched this video several times
since then and well, since i kept returning to watch it, i thought others
might enjoy it too. it's a time lapse video of the passing seasons, shot
near bloomington indiana. the videographer was in this location because he
was shooting some documentary footage about the natural history of indiana,
and had a spare camera that he dedicated to shooting this footage. he also
filmed some birds -- easter phoebes -- nesting on the house he stayed in,
and some carolina wrens that were nesting in some sort of human-made
structure, as they do.

it's really beautiful work and i think you'll enjoy it:

http://gu.com/p/4vj2x/tw

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: RH Woodpecker Calls - NO and MAYBE?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 10:19:56 -0400
A while ago I posted a recording that I thought might be a Red-headed
Woodpecker "querr" call. The unanimous response was Northern Flicker. I
checked the Cornell and Audubon sites, and that's what it was. Wishful
thinking on my part.  :-)

But that still leaves the "rattle" call I have been hearing this summer. Go
to this Audubon web page and click on the last recording labeled "rattle
calls":

Any other birds make this sound? Flickers make something that's called a
"rolling rattle call", but it sounds nothing like this.

Thanks,

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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Subject: Vancouver in November
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 20:08:33 -0400
I'm sure many responses have come in to Laura Erickson's inquiry about BC
in late autumn. My favorite Vancouver sites at that season include the Iona
jetty for snow buntings and short-eared owls and waterfowl and Jericho Park
for anything and everything.
Let us know what you see--

Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 10, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 08:06:41 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Photobomb of the week: a Toco Toucan? http://bit.ly/1sHVe91
-----------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Ospreys Weather the Storm
http://bit.ly/Nem6M4

* Baby Bald Eagles
http://bit.ly/1mvhld1

* Do You Know the Next Aldo Leopold?
http://bit.ly/1smfZIB

* Woodpeckers and Forest Fires
http://bit.ly/PS6w7W

* Have You Had a Magical Moment with a Bird?
http://bit.ly/1oNZDFN

* The Amazing Aquatic American Dipper
http://bit.ly/1sv9Qql

* Night Voices of Summer
http://bit.ly/1s7bCgZ

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1sHVe91
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find nearly
1200 episodes in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Birding in Vancouver in November
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 07:13:11 -0500
My husband is going to be attending a meeting in Vancouver in November, and
I get to tag along. I'll be there for over a week. I've never been there
before. I'll mostly be birding alone, and may or may not have a car. I've
bought two books (used--they appear to be out of print): The Birder's Guide
to Vancouver and the Lower Mainland (2001) and The Birder's Guide:
Vancouver Island (2000).

Any suggestions about places I shouldn't miss, best ferries to take, and
other tips will be SO appreciated.

Best, Laura
Duluth, MN

--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Turkey and deer in same photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 17:16:38 -0400
I really enjoy my deck. It's a nature oasis in an otherwise urban
environment. The wooded 400 acre Rutgers University Ecological Preserve is
just 20 feet from my deck. I'm one of those people who needs to be exposed
to the natural world on a regular basis to keep an even keel. It's really
nice to just walk out your back door and be immersed in that natural world!

Anyway, the other day I had the good fortune to have a photographic first
for me: a male Wild Turkey AND an antlered White-tailed Deer buck in the
same photo. Photo shot from my deck. Not the best photo in the world, but
it was a very special experience for me:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/14843778434/

And today two male turkeys showed up to pose for a clearer portrait. Once
again...photo from my deck:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/14861980245/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: Birding Book
From: Jim Rogers <jimrogers2007 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 15:02:31 -0600
Hi Al and everyone,

I recently enjoyed reading* A Feathered River Across the Sky *(about the
Passenger Pigeon) by Joel Greenberg* and Imperial Dreams *(on the Imperial
Woodpecker) by Tim Gallagher*.*

Both books were informative and fun to read- if not a little sad- for it's
a shame that we have lost such magnificent birds.

Cheers, jim

Jim Rogers
Polson, Montana


On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 6:31 AM, Al Schirmacher 
wrote:

> Interested in picking up a new birding book or two.  Any recommendations
> for an excellent work from, say, the last three years or so?
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Birding Book
From: danafox AT comcast.net <danafox@COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 09:43:23 -0400
The Birds of New Hampshire by Keith and Fox is a 473 page book describing the 
history of Bird sightings since 1623 in the state with details about birds seen 
regularly. 

It also has history of CBC's,, hawk watching, specimens, breeding bird surveys, 
and changes over time. 

Great read _ but I at be prejudiced!
Published by the Nuttall Ornithological Club and available from NH Audubon and 
Buteo. 

Dana Duxbury_Fox
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone

----- Reply message -----
From: "Al Schirmacher" 
To: 
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Birding Book
Date: Fri, Aug 8, 2014 8:31 AM

Interested in picking up a new birding book or two. Any recommendations for an 
excellent work from, say, the last three years or so? 


Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Birding Book
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 07:31:00 -0500
Interested in picking up a new birding book or two. Any recommendations for an 
excellent work from, say, the last three years or so? 


Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Birding Book
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT live.com>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 07:31:00 -0500
Interested in picking up a new birding book or two. Any recommendations for an 
excellent work from, say, the last three years or so? 


Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone####################
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Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
From: Stephen Elliott <steve_elliott2000 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 14:48:14 +0000
I have been to Uganda twice and on neither occasion did we feel at risk or 
threatened in any way. In fact there is much less hassle from children than in 
most of the rest of Africa. Even walking in Kampala at night was hassle free, 
but like anywhere in the world common sense prevails as to what you do and 
where you go, there are places in England that I'd be wary of late at night. 

 
The first trip was a private trip with some medics and 2 of the ladies were a 
couple, and they had no problems at all. We were based in Mbarara and travelled 
south to Lake Buyonyi where we camped on Bushwara Island - unforgettable 
experience. 

 
The second was a birding trip from the UK and we travelled all over the 
country, from the Murcheson Falls to the Primate Camp at Kabale and then south 
to Bwindi. Again there were no issues at all, and the only threats were from 
the mossies and the tsetse flies. 

 
There have been no reports of personal security issues in Uganda for many 
years, unlike Kenya where there have been plenty. 



Regards
 
Steve 
 
<") 
   ( \
   / |`` 

 
> Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 08:20:58 -0600
> From: jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in 
Africa? 

> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Is Uganda really safer at all for tourists than Kenya or Tanzania?  I felt
> very safe on a safari in Kenya, but we didn't walk around Nairobi, for
> example.
> 
> As far as I can tell from Wikipedia, Ugandan law doesn't forbid LGBT
> identity, just "carnal knowledge against the order of nature", so it's not
> what you happen to be, but what you do while there.  I don't know what the
> practicalities of this are for, say, same-sex couples in Uganda as
> tourists.  I also don't know what they are for something like wearing a
> T-shirt identifiable to East Africans as indicating LGBT identity or
> support for LGBT rights, as public acceptance of homosexuality is the
> lowest in the world throughout the region, including Kenya and Tanzania.
> 
> LGBT rights in Uganda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
> 
> On the subject of wildlife, I went to Kenya in late June and thought it was
> a very good time, as the weather is pleasant for people from the temperate
> zone, there was no problem with insects, and the widowbirds and whydahs
> were in breeding plumage.  Early July might be even better for the last.  I
> think the big herds of wildebeest etc. are in Tanzania at this time, and
> the weather and plumages are probably the same there.  However, to get a
> long bird list you need to go in our winter for the Palearctic migrants.
> 
> I was told that on normal tourist safaris right at Christmas time, there
> are a lot of Europeans who see Africa as a vacation from their normal
> standards of, say, sobriety.  That might be an especially good time to book
> a dedicated birding tour or a normal tour with people you know you get
> along with.
> 
> Jerry Friedman
> Española, New Mexico
> 
> 
> On Thu, Aug 7, 2014 at 4:56 AM, Blake Maybank  wrote:
> 
> > On Aug 6, 2014 Richard Carlson wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in
> > Africa?
> > >
> > > Try Uganda, almost as many birds in a much smaller area with incredible
> > > primate diversity.  Safer, too.  Don't miss the gorillas
> >
> >
> > ​Safer marginally in Uganda, unless anyone in your birding party happens 
to 

> > be a LBGT birder, in which case they could be arrested, with a maximum
> > sentence of death.
> >
> > Safe travels,​
> >
> > --
> > Blake Maybank 
> > Nova Scotia
> > ​,
> > CANADA
> >
> >
> >  
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 08:20:58 -0600
Is Uganda really safer at all for tourists than Kenya or Tanzania?  I felt
very safe on a safari in Kenya, but we didn't walk around Nairobi, for
example.

As far as I can tell from Wikipedia, Ugandan law doesn't forbid LGBT
identity, just "carnal knowledge against the order of nature", so it's not
what you happen to be, but what you do while there.  I don't know what the
practicalities of this are for, say, same-sex couples in Uganda as
tourists.  I also don't know what they are for something like wearing a
T-shirt identifiable to East Africans as indicating LGBT identity or
support for LGBT rights, as public acceptance of homosexuality is the
lowest in the world throughout the region, including Kenya and Tanzania.

LGBT rights in Uganda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

On the subject of wildlife, I went to Kenya in late June and thought it was
a very good time, as the weather is pleasant for people from the temperate
zone, there was no problem with insects, and the widowbirds and whydahs
were in breeding plumage.  Early July might be even better for the last.  I
think the big herds of wildebeest etc. are in Tanzania at this time, and
the weather and plumages are probably the same there.  However, to get a
long bird list you need to go in our winter for the Palearctic migrants.

I was told that on normal tourist safaris right at Christmas time, there
are a lot of Europeans who see Africa as a vacation from their normal
standards of, say, sobriety.  That might be an especially good time to book
a dedicated birding tour or a normal tour with people you know you get
along with.

Jerry Friedman
Española, New Mexico


On Thu, Aug 7, 2014 at 4:56 AM, Blake Maybank  wrote:

> On Aug 6, 2014 Richard Carlson wrote:
>
> >
> > Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in
> Africa?
> >
> > Try Uganda, almost as many birds in a much smaller area with incredible
> > primate diversity.  Safer, too.  Don't miss the gorillas
>
>
> ​Safer marginally in Uganda, unless anyone in your birding party happens to
> be a LBGT birder, in which case they could be arrested, with a maximum
> sentence of death.
>
> Safe travels,​
>
> --
> Blake Maybank 
> Nova Scotia
> ​,
> CANADA
>
>
>  
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
From: Blake Maybank <bmaybank AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 06:56:58 -0400
On Aug 6, 2014 Richard Carlson wrote:

>
> Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
>
> Try Uganda, almost as many birds in a much smaller area with incredible
> primate diversity.  Safer, too.  Don't miss the gorillas


​Safer marginally in Uganda, unless anyone in your birding party happens to
be a LBGT birder, in which case they could be arrested, with a maximum
sentence of death.

Safe travels,​

-- 
Blake Maybank 
Nova Scotia
​,
CANADA


 

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Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
From: Stephen Elliott <steve_elliott2000 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 09:20:59 +0000
Would definitely recommend Uganda
 
Very green and mountainous with plenty of birds. Not the same mammal list as 
the Serengeti, but for primates can't be beaten. 

 
Most importantly very friendly and very safe.


Regards
 
Steve 
 
<") 
   ( \
   / |`` 

 
> Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 21:11:34 -0700
> From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in 
Africa? 

> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Try Uganda, almost as many birds in a much smaller area with incredible 
primate diversity. Safer, too. Don't miss the gorillas. 

> 
> Richard Carlson
> Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
> Part-time Economist
> Tucson, AZ
> Lake Tahoe, CA
> Kirkland, WA
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Aug 6, 2014, at 8:09 PM, Rick King  wrote:
> 
> > I'm thinking of next year taking 2 or 3 weeks in Africa for a birding
> > and wildlife trip and since I have never seen the wildlife spectacle in
> > Kenya and Tanzania, want to go there.
> >
> > Does anyone have any suggestions, positive or negative, about how to do
> > such a trip?
> >
> > Thanks in advance.
> >
> > Rick King
> > Southfield MI
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
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Subject: anyone going to Kenya's Rift Valley or the Serengeti?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 09:07:10 +0100
hello everyone,

i have some field guides that someone (or several someones) on the list may
wish to field-test. the books:

Birds of Kenya's Rift Valley by Adam Scott Kennedy (Princeton)
Birds of the Serengeti by Adam Scott Kennedy (Princeton)
Animals of the Serengeti by Vicki Kennedy (Princeton)

they are beautiful books and are in need of a good home where they will be
(1) used and (2) loved. i am willing to mail them -- either one, two or all
three of them -- to you in exchange for a review of each book after you've
"field tested" it. which of course, means you must be visiting these areas
at some point in the near future (next six months or so?) and be willing to
honestly talk/write about whether the book was useful, and in what ways it
was useful. it would be helpful for your review of the book if you have a
few months to study these field guides prior to departure on your African
adventure.

if you are interested, contact me off-list at grrlscientist AT gmail.com to
talk about this more. (i only check this email address once per day, the
other email address is constantly monitored via a silicon chip embedded
inside my skull.)

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 01:08:28 -0400
Not safer for everyone, depending on the latest court rulings and legislative 
response. 


David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard Carlson [rccarl AT PACBELL.NET] 

Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2014 12:11 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in 
Africa? 


Try Uganda, almost as many birds in a much smaller area with incredible primate 
diversity. Safer, too. Don't miss the gorillas. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Aug 6, 2014, at 8:09 PM, Rick King  wrote:

> I'm thinking of next year taking 2 or 3 weeks in Africa for a birding
> and wildlife trip and since I have never seen the wildlife spectacle in
> Kenya and Tanzania, want to go there.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions, positive or negative, about how to do
> such a trip?
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Rick King
> Southfield MI
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 21:11:34 -0700
Try Uganda, almost as many birds in a much smaller area with incredible primate 
diversity. Safer, too. Don't miss the gorillas. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Aug 6, 2014, at 8:09 PM, Rick King  wrote:

> I'm thinking of next year taking 2 or 3 weeks in Africa for a birding
> and wildlife trip and since I have never seen the wildlife spectacle in
> Kenya and Tanzania, want to go there.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions, positive or negative, about how to do
> such a trip?
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Rick King
> Southfield MI
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Suggestions for a birding and wildlife safari trip in Africa?
From: Rick King <rickbking AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 23:09:41 -0400
I'm thinking of next year taking 2 or 3 weeks in Africa for a birding
and wildlife trip and since I have never seen the wildlife spectacle in
Kenya and Tanzania, want to go there.

Does anyone have any suggestions, positive or negative, about how to do
such a trip?

Thanks in advance.

Rick King
Southfield MI

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Subject: Trip to France/Spain
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 19:15:13 -0400
We have just returned from a trip to the Pyrenees of France and Spain. This was 
a combination of birding and general tourism. If anyone cares to read the trip 
report, here is the link: 
http://www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.ca/2014/08/france-and-spain-july-2014.html 


David M. GascoigneWaterloo, ONblog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com 

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Subject: Re: Oh, the irony
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 18:58:04 -0400
Barry

Well written and well thought out. There is a great tendency to choose the 
"simple" solution and defer the real problem to the next guy. 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church VA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 5, 2014, at 6:30 PM, "Barry K. MacKay"  wrote:
>
> An American organization just posted a blog I wrote on the planned cull of
> 16000 Double-crested Cormorants at the Columbia River Delta:
> http://www.bornfreeusa.org/weblog_canada.php?p=4373
>  &more=1
>
>
>
> It got picked up by some sort of list as well as FaceBook, and I just
> received a polite e-mail from someone who read it and told me she had
> remembered me writing about cormorant culling in Canada, and wondered when
> it would be coming to the U.S.
>
>
>
> The irony is, of course, that it has been there all along and far, far more
> of it than we've ever had in Canada, with at least one state not allowing
> any to nest there at all, even though it is a native species.   I can't
> think of another native species that is deliberately extirpated from an
> entire state as part of government policy (I know there are people who don't
> want grizzly bears returned to California, but that's as close as I can
> come.  It's bizarre.beyond even the vitriol wolves, coyotes and pigeons
> ignite, with all science showing that this species is a natural part of the
> ecosystem ignored (I have still run into people who think it is native to
> Asia).
>
>
>
> I strongly urge everyone to read (and ask local libraries to stock) The
> Double-Crested Cormorant: Plight of a Feathered Pariah, Linda R. Wires, Yale
> University Press, 2014, and no, I do not have and never have had any
> financial interest in it even though I did the illustrations (for free).  It
> is slow going at first, as it gives so much history of the species but then
> it picks up and should infuriate everyone who cares about the environment,
> and the importance of factual information over absurd myth.
>
>
>
> We have a similar situation in Canada with a Prime Minister in denial over
> global climate change.and I started the day when my first e-mail this
> morning was on how many animal species humans have caused the extinction of
> in the last 500 years, with the rate accelerating:
>
>
>
> (http://www.care2.com/causes/humans-to-blame-for-322-animal-extinctions-in-5
> 00-years.html)
>
>
>
> No news there.  It seems to me we have to rethink how we approach things,
> and avoiding knowledge and facts is not a good way to continue to go.
>
>
>
> Barry
>
>
>
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
>
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Oh, the irony
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 18:30:39 -0400
An American organization just posted a blog I wrote on the planned cull of
16000 Double-crested Cormorants at the Columbia River Delta:
http://www.bornfreeusa.org/weblog_canada.php?p=4373
 &more=1



It got picked up by some sort of list as well as FaceBook, and I just
received a polite e-mail from someone who read it and told me she had
remembered me writing about cormorant culling in Canada, and wondered when
it would be coming to the U.S.



The irony is, of course, that it has been there all along and far, far more
of it than we've ever had in Canada, with at least one state not allowing
any to nest there at all, even though it is a native species.   I can't
think of another native species that is deliberately extirpated from an
entire state as part of government policy (I know there are people who don't
want grizzly bears returned to California, but that's as close as I can
come.  It's bizarre.beyond even the vitriol wolves, coyotes and pigeons
ignite, with all science showing that this species is a natural part of the
ecosystem ignored (I have still run into people who think it is native to
Asia).



I strongly urge everyone to read (and ask local libraries to stock) The
Double-Crested Cormorant: Plight of a Feathered Pariah, Linda R. Wires, Yale
University Press, 2014, and no, I do not have and never have had any
financial interest in it even though I did the illustrations (for free).  It
is slow going at first, as it gives so much history of the species but then
it picks up and should infuriate everyone who cares about the environment,
and the importance of factual information over absurd myth.



We have a similar situation in Canada with a Prime Minister in denial over
global climate change.and I started the day when my first e-mail this
morning was on how many animal species humans have caused the extinction of
in the last 500 years, with the rate accelerating:



(http://www.care2.com/causes/humans-to-blame-for-322-animal-extinctions-in-5
00-years.html)



No news there.  It seems to me we have to rethink how we approach things,
and avoiding knowledge and facts is not a good way to continue to go.



Barry





Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada




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Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker call? (recording)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 17:58:52 -0400
I recorded this call a week ago thinking it was a Red-headed Woodpecker
call. It was coming from an area where I heard what sounded a lot like a
Red-headed Woodpecker "rattle" call. I found a recording on an Audubon site
that sounded like this particular call, but I'd appreciate feedback from
others.

Here's my recording (you may have to turn up the volume):

http://bit.ly/1o7Fmft

Thanks in advance,

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Hilton Pond 07/16/14 (Arthropod Architecture)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 09:48:25 -0400
All this rain across the Carolina Piedmont has been good for plants and the 
water table but it has kept me indoors, allowing me to get caught up on "This 
Week at Hilton Pond." I just posted my latest photo essay about the amazing 
diversity of structures built by arthropods--joint-legged animals with 
exoskeletons such as insects, spiders, and crayfish. To view some intimate 
close-ups of their handiwork please visit my 16-31 Jul 2014 installment at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140716.html .

While there don't forget to scroll down for lots of miscellaneous nature notes 
and a list of birds banded or recaptured--including a very old hummingbird. 
There's also a link to a recent newspaper article commemorating our 30th 
anniversary of hummingbird banding, plus info about a new way to help support 
the work of Hilton Pond Center. 


Happy (Midsummer) Nature Watching!

BILL

P.S. Please "Like" our new Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
for timely updates on nature topics. Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond. 


=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Don't flood me with replies, but does anyone noah the answer to my questions?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 17:05:57 -0400
In the new movie, Noah, there is a scene where the lead character handles a
bird that is obviously one of the South American "cardinals" (really a
tanager) of the genus, Paroaria.   Did anyone catch which species?  I
thought I could see a crest.



Doves aside, did anyone identify any other species, digital or otherwise?



Barry





Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada


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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Aug. 3, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 07:30:32 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Kingfishers... what an amazing family! Check out Eric Dinerstein's blog,
with a great gallery of photos. http://bit.ly/1pvUtxG
-----------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Baby Barn Owls Take Flight
http://bit.ly/UQxOAI

* Cowbird Parasitism
http://bit.ly/1tDhdj7

* "Thanks for Making Us Play Outside!" - With David Sibley
http://bit.ly/1uPCRlP

* Vulture, A Poem by Robinson Jeffers
http://bit.ly/M7GreZ

* Birds and Baseball

http://bit.ly/SLs3yv
* Most Abundant Bird in North America - Do you know what it is?

http://bit.ly/1nZzqoX
* Young Song Sparrows Learn to Sing

http://bit.ly/NRkoMs

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://p0.vresp.com/74etg9
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find nearly
1200 episodes in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: replacement eyecups for Nikon bins
From: peeplo AT AOL.COM
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 19:17:13 -0400
Call Jerry at the Audubon Shop in Madison, CT. He often has parts or knows how 
to get them. 


Frank

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 1, 2014, at 1:59 PM, Steve Sosensky  wrote:

> Gail,
>
>
>
> Try www.mirakeloptical.com   . He is in Long
> Island and has done some fabulous work on Bausch & Lomb Elites. If he
> doesn't have the parts, he may know where you can get them.
>
>
>
> On 7/31/2014 5:10:28 AM, Gail B. Mackiernan (katahdinss AT comcast.net) wrote:
>
>
>
>> Does anyone know of a source in USA for Nikon binocular parts such as
> these cups? I can find plenty of sources of minor camera parts (e.g. cups
> for viewfinders) but not bins.
>
>>
>> Otherwise I will have to try gluing them as I won't
>> be without my bins for a month...
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: replacement eyecups for Nikon bins
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 13:08:13 -0600
That surprises me.  In 2008, I called for a set of rubber eyecups for
my wife's 20+ years-old Nikon 10x32 office binoculars.  Nikon sent me
a pair, for a very few dollars, by post, and I had them in less than a week.

Maybe if you escalated the issue with Nikon Service, somebody with
knowledge and common sense (I know, what?) would take over the
problem.  I have heard on the camera blogs that escalation works well
with Nikon Service --- I'm told it's hard for them to get good help these days.

Example:  I sent a Nikon D2x camera to them for CLA.  On return, the
packer forgot to put the top layer of packing material in the box ---
the camera was bouncing around inside the box like change in a piggy
bank.  The UPS driver said, "I sure hope that's not a camera in
there!"  I complained to Nikon, immediately escalated to a manager,
and Nikon shipped me a brand new, complete Nikon D2xS, with an
apology and a return label for the old one.

Jerry


>They want me to send my bins in to them and then wait, for up to a
>month, for the cups to arrive from Japan. To take the old ones off
>and slip on the new ones takes at the most 60 seconds, if that. They
>apparently do not keep even this simple part in stock, even though
>it is the most apt to deteriorate with repeated use.

Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

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Subject: Re: replacement eyecups for Nikon bins
From: Steve Sosensky <steve AT OPTICS4BIRDING.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 10:59:57 -0700
Gail,



Try www.mirakeloptical.com   . He is in Long
Island and has done some fabulous work on Bausch & Lomb Elites. If he
doesn't have the parts, he may know where you can get them.



On 7/31/2014 5:10:28 AM, Gail B. Mackiernan (katahdinss AT comcast.net) wrote:



> Does anyone know of a source in USA for Nikon binocular parts such as
these cups? I can find plenty of sources of minor camera parts (e.g. cups
for viewfinders) but not bins.

>
> Otherwise I will have to try gluing them as I won't
> be without my bins for a month...
>




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