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Updated on Monday, October 20 at 09:16 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Northern Oriole,©David Sibley

20 Oct Birding near Athens, Greece? []
20 Oct the most unusual fishing partner anyone has ever had [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
19 Oct Last Week's Banding ["R.D. Everhart" ]
19 Oct Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [William Leigh ]
19 Oct Caw vs. Kraa: meaning in the calls of crows and ravens [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
18 Oct BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 19, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
18 Oct Interesting Radar from last night ["R.D. Everhart" ]
18 Oct RFI New York City area [Eran Tomer ]
16 Oct Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
16 Oct Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [Allan and Cathy Murrant ]
16 Oct The sound of many ducks dabbling (30 second video/sound recording) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Oct Front Stopping Migrants ["R.D. Everhart" ]
16 Oct Birding Community E-bulletin - October 2014 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
16 Oct Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [Allan and Cathy Murrant ]
16 Oct SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [kittiwake ]
11 Oct BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 12, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
10 Oct Where do the Red-throated Pipits go? [Steve Sosensky ]
9 Oct Software for ID-ing bird songs/calls in the field (article) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
9 Oct passenger pigeons in NYS ["Taylor, Jeremy J (DEC)" ]
8 Oct Front Stopping Migrants ["R.D. Everhart" ]
8 Oct Front Stopping Migrants ["R.D. Everhart" ]
8 Oct Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds)--correct link ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
8 Oct Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
7 Oct Mercury in the environment causes birds to reduce complexity of song ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
6 Oct Adventures in bird ID-ing (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
4 Oct BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 5, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
27 Sep BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 28, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
27 Sep Banding Note ["R.D. Everhart" ]
25 Sep Hilton Pond 09/13/14 (Requiem For A Queen) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
25 Sep Re: Why? [Linda Lee Baker ]
24 Sep Re: Why? [Eric Jeffrey ]
24 Sep Re: Why? [Roger ]
24 Sep Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why? ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? ["Tangren, Gerald Vernon" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? [Arie Gilbert ]
24 Sep Why? [Al Schirmacher ]
23 Sep Prairie Warbler inh Southern California [Chuck Otte ]
22 Sep WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015 [Jean Iron ]
22 Sep Big Gull vs Small Crow (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
20 Sep BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 21, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
6 Sep World Shorebird Day ["R.D. Everhart" ]
14 Sep Hilton Pond 09/01/14 (New York Roadside Redux) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
13 Sep BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 14, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Sep Re: Predation on hummingbirds []
12 Sep Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds []
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Laura Erickson ]
12 Sep Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds by Roadrunner ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Jim ]
12 Sep Predation in Hummingbirds by Roadrunner [Jack Daynes ]
12 Sep Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Arie Gilbert ]
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Jim ]
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Roger ]
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Dan Kaiser ]
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Laura Erickson ]
12 Sep Re: Predation on hummingbirds []
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds []
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds []
12 Sep Re: Predation in Hummingbirds [Arie Gilbert ]
12 Sep Predation in Hummingbirds [Ken Bergman ]
12 Sep Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
11 Sep Re: Predation on hummingbirds [Joseph Morlan ]
11 Sep Re: Predation on hummingbirds [David Starrett ]
11 Sep Predation on hummingbirds [Laura Erickson ]
6 Sep World Shorebird Day ["R.D. Everhart" ]
6 Sep World Shorebird Day ["R.D. Everhart" ]
6 Sep BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 7, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
4 Sep Sat. 6 September, World Shorebirds Day [Chuck & Lillian ]
4 Sep Birding Community E-bulletin - September 2014 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
4 Sep OOOPS....RE: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
4 Sep Re: Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
4 Sep Re: Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
4 Sep Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
3 Sep before there were none: what were those flocks of passenger pigeons like? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]

Subject: Birding near Athens, Greece?
From: TAHARRISON AT AOL.COM
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:40:40 -0400
Birders,

Planning a trip to Greece and I'll have a day or so free in Athens for some
 birding. Any local birders out there who could take me around?

Best,
Tom Harrison
San Clemente, CA USA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: the most unusual fishing partner anyone has ever had
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:19:52 +0100
hey everyone,

here's a video (that includes lots of thumb shots) of a lone fisherman near
Nanoose BC who was discovered by a juvenile bald eagle, "swimming" far from
land. the video is interesting and the bird, although malnourished, is
doing well at the last report:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiOaqs9qnt8&feature=youtu.be

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Last Week's Banding
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:18:06 -0500
   For those of you interested, I have posted photos from some of
last week's banding sessions and a complete list of birds banded at
the public program held Saturday at the Lowry Nature Center in Carver
Park near Victoria, Minnesota.
   We have been battling windy days and cool mornings but the birds
keep showing up. I'm afraid this banding season is winding down. If
weather cooperates we might make it into November!

Here's a link to my post:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: William Leigh <leightern AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 10:45:06 +0000
I find this rather surprising in that Swarovski has such an excellent 
reputation for taking care of customers and backing their products. What model 
Swarovski scope do you own? Can you describe the "hard cover" ? Is it a 
SWarovski product as well? 

Also sometimes it can help to call the company you bought the equipment from. I 
had a problem with a Tripod once and it the problem was resolved by having 
Eagle Optics call the manufacturer. 

best,

 



William Leigh leightern AT msn.com

Bridgewater, Virginia 
 

 



> Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:21:41 -0300
> From: kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
> they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
> dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
> blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
> eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
> but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
> that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
> wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy
> 
> On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> > Cathy,
> >
> >
> > Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

> >
> > Roy Harvey
> > Beacon Falls, CT
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> >
> > From: kittiwake 
> > To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > Cc:
> > Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
> > Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
> >
> >
> > Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

> >
> > Sent from Samsung Mobile
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Caw vs. Kraa: meaning in the calls of crows and ravens
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 09:02:43 +0100
hello everyone,

I stumbled across a delightful video created by the Cornell Lab of O that
discusses the meaning in some of the sounds produced by crows and ravens --
and you also learn how to distinguish these two species based on their
voices alone:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/oct/18/caw-vs-kraa-meaning-in-the-calls-of-crows-and-ravens 


needless to say, i plan to feature more Lab of O videos on "caturday" in
the future.

happy birding

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 19, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 07:31:38 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out Barry Kent MacKay's "Common Nighthawk" blog.
http://birdnote.org/blog/2014/10/common-nighthawk Thanks, Barry! [We
welcome other blogs and contributions, too -- natural history, artwork,
photography, etc. Feel free to send things my way. Thank you.]
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Birds and Berries
http://bit.ly/R1bRKS
* Swainson's Hawks Migrate South
http://bit.ly/103USzx
* Shorebirds - Not on the Shore?
http://bit.ly/UB7Lww
* Cattle Egret - You've Got a Friend in Me
http://bit.ly/1riNd62
* Waterfowl and Lead Shot
http://bit.ly/UB7OIv
* Great Missoula Flood - Scablands and Plunge Pools
http://bit.ly/OplanG
* Sandpipers - Chorus Line in the Sky
http://bit.ly/1pk9MaC
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View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1tAB7wx
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You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
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episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Interesting Radar from last night
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 07:51:09 -0500
   I was checking out radar returns last night to see if anything was
moving in Minnesota and found that in many places migration is still
pretty heavy. The most interesting area I saw was the north shore of
Lake Superior in Minnesota. The returns seem to show a big movement
of birds across the lake into northern Wisconsin and the U.P. of
Michigan. I posted a shot of the image at:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

  We have a regular banding session today and I will post results on
Sunday.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI New York City area
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 00:28:23 -0400
Hello all,

I will be in New York City at the end of the month. Not a birding trip but
I'll be able to squeeze in a day or two for the birds.

I have researched various options on eBird and elsewhere, but still will be
immensely grateful for any advice on locating the species noted below.

Sites some distance out of NYC are welcome but I will probably have neither
a vehicle nor (surely) the scope, hence a strong preference for
binocular-friendly sites reachable by public transportation. No aversion to
long walks and rides, however. Distinct extra credit for sites with some
natural habitat  (versus e.g. a landfill) and non-avian wildlife too.

Finally, since I will be on my own - is safety an issue at the area's
birding sites, beyond the normal precautions one would observe in a major
metropolitan area ? Are secluded / wooded areas of large parks generally
safe during daylight, or is it  advisable to remain within earshot of
people ?

Target species - some are a long shot but then, that's exactly why I am
asking:

Cackling Goose
Long-tailed Duck
Common Eider
Common Merganser
Ring-necked Pheasant
Northern Goshawk
Hudsonian Godwit
Black-legged Kittiwake
Snow Bunting
Clay-colored Sparrow
America Tree Sparrow
Evening Grosbeak

Also nice would be Snow Goose, Brant, American Black Duck, Surf Scoter,
Northern Gannet, American Golden Plover, Stilt Sandpiper, Lesser
Black-backed Gull and Lapland Longspur.

Advice on finding any of these species will be profoundly appreciated.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:55:36 -0400
Clay Taylor used to be the Swarovski Rep who regularly attended ABA meetings. A 
very nice fellow. I'm not sure where he is, but maybe someone out there knows 
how to reach him. He may have useful input re this issue and how to deal with 
the company. 


Just  a thought....   good luck!

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Allan and Cathy Murrant 

Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:33 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem

It is a few years since my scope was serviced and we gave up on getting
Swarvoski to solve this problem for us back then.  We were out birding
this morning and saw some shorebirds by the time we set up the scope and
cleaned off the lens the birds had flown. Kind of annoying.  So I just
thought maybe over time the problem might have happened to other people.
Thanks for the responses.

Cathy Murrant
Cape Breton NS CA

http://www.capebretonbirds.ca/

On 10/16/2014 3:55 PM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> That's tough.
>
>
> If you had said that in your post to the list you might have received a 
different range of responses. 

>
> - You didn't say if it was a scope or bins.
> - No model stated, there have been at least three scopes (and more 
eyepieces). 

>
> - No mention that it started after being replaced.
>
> You have one bit of leverage when working with Swarovski - their reputation. 
Posting about a problem on BirdChat is the sort of thing that they will HATE, 
so I think you got that part right. Putting your situation out there in greater 
detail could increase your chance of finding someone looking at their scope and 
finding the same problem. It can also possibly gain sympathy, another level. 

>
> My only dealing with Swarovski's service was much simpler, and they went 
overboard (didn't cost them much $$$) to do their best for me. 

>
> When I bought a DSLR I recycled an old camera case from my SLR days (1980's). 
To my horror I discovered that the lining was disintegrating and getting into 
the camera.! Your description reminded me of that. I suggest taking a really 
close look at the case just to be sure. 

>
>
> Sorry I can't be of actual help.  Good luck!
>
>
> Roy Harvey
> Beacon Falls, CT
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Allan and Cathy Murrant 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Cc:
> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 1:21 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>
> That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
> they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
> dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
> blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
> eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
> but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
> that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
> wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy
>
>
>
>
> On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
>> Cathy,
>>
>>
>> Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

>>
>> Roy Harvey
>> Beacon Falls, CT
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: kittiwake 
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

>>
>> Sent from Samsung Mobile
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: Allan and Cathy Murrant <kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:33:05 -0300
It is a few years since my scope was serviced and we gave up on getting
Swarvoski to solve this problem for us back then.  We were out birding
this morning and saw some shorebirds by the time we set up the scope and
cleaned off the lens the birds had flown. Kind of annoying.  So I just
thought maybe over time the problem might have happened to other people.
Thanks for the responses.

Cathy Murrant
Cape Breton NS CA

http://www.capebretonbirds.ca/

On 10/16/2014 3:55 PM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> That's tough.
>
>
> If you had said that in your post to the list you might have received a 
different range of responses. 

>
> - You didn't say if it was a scope or bins.
> - No model stated, there have been at least three scopes (and more 
eyepieces). 

>
> - No mention that it started after being replaced.
>
> You have one bit of leverage when working with Swarovski - their reputation. 
Posting about a problem on BirdChat is the sort of thing that they will HATE, 
so I think you got that part right. Putting your situation out there in greater 
detail could increase your chance of finding someone looking at their scope and 
finding the same problem. It can also possibly gain sympathy, another level. 

>
> My only dealing with Swarovski's service was much simpler, and they went 
overboard (didn't cost them much $$$) to do their best for me. 

>
> When I bought a DSLR I recycled an old camera case from my SLR days (1980's). 
To my horror I discovered that the lining was disintegrating and getting into 
the camera.! Your description reminded me of that. I suggest taking a really 
close look at the case just to be sure. 

>
>
> Sorry I can't be of actual help.  Good luck!
>
>
> Roy Harvey
> Beacon Falls, CT
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Allan and Cathy Murrant 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Cc:
> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 1:21 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>
> That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
> they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
> dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
> blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
> eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
> but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
> that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
> wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy
>
>
>
>
> On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
>> Cathy,
>>
>>
>> Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

>>
>> Roy Harvey
>> Beacon Falls, CT
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: kittiwake 
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

>>
>> Sent from Samsung Mobile
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: The sound of many ducks dabbling (30 second video/sound recording)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:53:26 -0400
I went to a local park today where there were large puddles on the lawns.
There were dozens of Mallards dabbling in one puddle looking for food. I
was fascinated by the collective sounds of their bills dabbling in the
water:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8ihIWLfY3U&feature=youtu.be

You might have turn up the volume on your computer a bit to hear the
dabbling sounds at their best...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Front Stopping Migrants
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 21:42:12 -0500
Hey everybody,

    Looking at radar tonight there is a really big movement of birds
in the eastern U.S.. However there is a front moving through Iowa
producing rain that appears to possibly be stopping birds behind it.
This could mean a build up of migrants in southern Minnesota and in
Wisconsin tomorrow morning.

   I've posted a radar image for those interested:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Thursday could be a good birding day behind that front.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN
 


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Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - October 2014
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:37:17 -0400
The October 2014 issue of the Birding Community 
E-bulletin is now available the web, covering 
news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for 
active and concerned birders, those dedicated to 
the joys of birding and the protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of 
superb quality birding binoculars and scopes, 
Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past 
E-bulletins on the website of the National 
Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The October 2014 edition includes the following topics:


RARITY FOCUS
   - Whiskered Tern in Cape May, New Jersey

THE PROBLEM OF LEUCISTIC SANDHILL CRANES
   - while rare, white Sandhill Cranes have been described by
     several observers

ANOTHER CHANCE IN NORTH DAKOTA
   - the effort to respond to ND's oil and gas boom by dedicating
     a portion of the state extraction tax revenue to conservation

ACCESS MATTERS: LOOKING AT YELLOW RAILS
   - the Yellow Rails and Rice Festival (YRARF) in southwest
     Louisiana in late October

NEW MIGRATORY BIRD STAMP ART CHOSEN
   - new artwork to grace the 2015-2016 Migratory Bird Hunting and
     Conservation [Duck] Stamp

SEASONAL CANADIAN LAKES LOON SURVEY
   - more than 700 citizen scientists across Canada monitoring
     loons and their reproductive success

BOOK NOTES: MORE PENGUINS
   - Penguins: the Ultimate Guide is part coffee-table book, part
     informative essays, and part species 
profiles for each of the 18 species

STATE OF THE BIRDS: MIXED MESSAGE
   - a comprehensive review of long-term trend data for U.S. birds -
 
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/ 


THAT PACIFIC MARINE RESERVE
   - expands the existing Pacific Remote Islands Marine
     National Monument to six times its current size

IBA NEWS: 90TH WHSRN SITE
   - the Sistema Tóbari is a Mexican Important 
Bird Area (IBA) site known
     to support large numbers of American Avocets, Marbled Godwits,
     Northern Pintails, and Lesser Scaups

TIP OF THE MONTH: DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT
   - have your guide with you, and don't neglect 
to bring along a specific
     field guide to that family group you are viewing


- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National 
Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA) website:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 



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Great Birding Projects
paul.baicich-at-verizon.net

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Subject: Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: Allan and Cathy Murrant <kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:21:41 -0300
That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy

On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> Cathy,
>
>
> Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

>
> Roy Harvey
> Beacon Falls, CT
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: kittiwake 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Cc:
> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>
>
> Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

>
> Sent from Samsung Mobile

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: kittiwake <kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:26:06 -0300
Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust over 
my lens.  Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
 Cathy 


Sent from Samsung Mobile
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 12, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 07:36:41 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

National Wildlife Refuge Week is October 12 - 18. Check out the latest
blog about refuges: http://bit.ly/1ylrHWP
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* October Migrants - Look Who's Back!
http://bit.ly/ZkflyO

* Black-crowned Night-Heron - Night Raven

http://bit.ly/1vTuHX4

* Swainson's Birds - How many were named after him?
http://bit.ly/1vZay2B

* The Moon of Falling Leaves
http://bit.ly/PoDbnt

* The Bird Is the Word - Music about birds, from the sublime to the
mundane (and just plain silly)
http://birdnote.org/show/bird-word

* Ring-necked Pheasants
http://bit.ly/1soVf27

* How Evolution Works, Featuring Dr. Mike Webster
http://bit.ly/1g9MEvA

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://p0.vresp.com/HQfQOT
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Where do the Red-throated Pipits go?
From: Steve Sosensky <steve AT OPTICS4BIRDING.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 12:37:50 -0700
Hi BirdChatters,



I'm writing a blog post on Red-throated Pipits here in SoCal, but want to
talk about where the individuals that migrate through here end up spending
the winter and what route they take to get back to their breeding grounds. I
don't see any eBird reports south of La Paz in Baja California, nor do I see
any spring reports in North America south of the Arctic Circle. If you have
any solid evidence, I'd appreciate a reply. TIA.







Good viewing,



Steve Sosensky, VP

Optics4Birding

  www.Optics4Birding.com

Phone: 949-360-6789

Toll Free: 877-674-2473






BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Software for ID-ing bird songs/calls in the field (article)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 20:40:16 -0400
Here's an interesting relatively recent (March 2014) article about how
tricky it is to develop software to automatically ID bird songs/calls in
the field:

bit.ly/1tHFdNs

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: passenger pigeons in NYS
From: "Taylor, Jeremy J (DEC)" <jeremy.taylor AT DEC.NY.GOV>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 13:39:53 +0000
Hello,



Apologies if this is somewhat off-topic, but I thought some of you might be 
interested in a short article that I put together regarding the passenger 
pigeon in New York State. The focus of the article is where in the state people 
can go to see them on display- I had no idea there were so many locations! You 
can view the html version online at http://www.dec.ny.gov/pubs/98898.html if 
interested, or download/view the PDF of the article from the main index of the 
October issue of Conservationist, http://www.dec.ny.gov/pubs/98884.html. Please 
feel free to pass along to others who you think might be interested. 




Regards,

Jeremy

Jeremy Taylor
Environmental Educator / Editor, Conservationist for 
Kids 

NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
Office of Communication Services
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-4502
(518) 402-8018 (voice)
(518) 402-9036 (fax)

Connect with DEC on Facebook & 
Twitter 


*Please Note New Email Address* 
Jeremy.Taylor AT dec.ny.gov 



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Subject: Front Stopping Migrants
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 21:42:12 -0500
Hey everybody,

    Looking at radar tonight there is a really big movement of birds
in the eastern U.S.. However there is a front moving through Iowa
producing rain that appears to possibly be stopping birds behind it.
This could mean a build up of migrants in southern Minnesota and in
Wisconsin tomorrow morning.

   I've posted a radar image for those interested:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Thursday could be a good birding day behind that front.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Front Stopping Migrants
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 21:42:12 -0500
Hey everybody,

    Looking at radar tonight there is a really big movement of birds
in the eastern U.S.. However there is a front moving through Iowa
producing rain that appears to possibly be stopping birds behind it.
This could mean a build up of migrants in southern Minnesota and in
Wisconsin tomorrow morning.

   I've posted a radar image for those interested:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Thursday could be a good birding day behind that front.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN
 

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Subject: Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds)--correct link
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 16:42:29 -0400
I apologize for the bad link in the previous e-mail.  :-(

========

I'm in my 33rd consecutive year of bird banding at Hilton Pond Center near York 
SC and data indicate most species found here in late September are fewer in 
number than when I started. "This Week at Hilton Pond" I analyze the decline of 
three species--two residents and a Neotropical migrant--and offer some possible 
explanations. To view the photo essay--which includes images of all species 
banded during the last eight days of the past month, please visit 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140923.html

While there don't forget to scroll down for miscellaneous nature notes.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 09:34:41 -0400
I'm in my 33rd consecutive year of bird banding at Hilton Pond Center near York 
SC and data indicate most species found here in late September are fewer in 
number than when I started. "This Week at Hilton Pond" I analyze the decline of 
three species--two residents and a migrant--and offer some possible 
explanations. To view the photo essay--which includes images of all species 
banded during the last eight days of the past month, please visit 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140923

While there don't forget to scroll down for miscellaneous nature notes.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Mercury in the environment causes birds to reduce complexity of song
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 17:11:56 -0400
FYI,



Researchers found that birds living near a source of mercury contamination
were affected in a way that caused a change in the structure of their song:



http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/26679-heavy-metal-songs-contaminated-song
birds-sing-the-wrong-tunes









Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Adventures in bird ID-ing (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 16:52:43 -0400
A couple of days ago I took a photo of a bird I thought might be a Nelson's
Sparrow. The habitat wasn't right, but I've seen sharp-tailed sparrows in
atypical habitat during migration before. In this case I even first asked
an experienced birder from another (unnamed) state and the birder said it
was a sharp-tailed sparrow, probably a Nelson's.

Turns out most people said that the bird in question was most likely a
Savannah Sparrow. How was I confused?

For starters, this is the image that pops into my brain when I think
Savannah Sparrow. I took this photo along the Lake Michigan lakefront about
two years ago:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/7252300478/

Here's a very grainy cropped photo of the "Nelson's" I saw this week here
in NJ. Way more yellow and brown and buff than I am used to seeing in my
mind's image of a Savannah:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15450183491/

When I consulted my go-to Peterson's guide I didn't see any Savannah that
looked like my bird, so I started considering other sparrow species. I
should have spent a few more minutes with my Sibley guide where I might
have noted an illustration of a "reddish typical adult" Savannah Sparrow
that looked a heck of a lot like the bird that I saw this week. Guess I'm
always learning. :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park. NJ

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 5, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 09:42:14 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* How High Birds Fly
http://bit.ly/1vFfPMJ

* Great Horned Owl Family in October
http://bit.ly/1toBSCE

* The Lost Bird Project

"Forgetting is another kind of extinction"
http://bit.ly/10ixBZA

* What's Up with the Little Red Spot on a Gull's Bill?
http://bit.ly/1cgQksW

* What the Pacific Wren Hears

http://bit.ly/OplnXS

* Meet the Blue Jay!
http://bit.ly/1dA3ijM

* Where Swallows Go in Winter
http://bit.ly/T9DU7o

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1rbCLgd
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 28, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 07:27:54 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Dorian Anderson is doing a Big Year on a bike. 12,000 miles by now!
Check out BirdNote's latest blog about his trip. http://bit.ly/YpThCT
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* The Heron and the Snake
http://bit.ly/1uQbrYG

* Autumnal Equinox
http://bit.ly/Uykzjv

* Sandhill Cranes Wait Out the Storm in Alaska
http://bit.ly/P1qucE

* Ducks - Diving or Dabbling?
http://bit.ly/1uuVHxM

* The Swath Uncut - A poem about a Canadian wheat farmer who gave back
to the geese that sustained his family during dark days
http://bit.ly/1wOcUAf

* Tweety Bird
http://bit.ly/TjlLJc

* Birding Trails - September 27 is National Public Lands Day. Celebrate
-- that day or any day -- by finding a birding trail near you.
http://bit.ly/P8lfvd

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1rqSQ5f
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Banding Note
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 08:15:39 -0500
Banding last weekend we saw the beginning of the end of warbler
migration and the ramping up of sparrow movement. Catches were
typical for September. Late warblers and juvenile sparrows dominated.

I'm heading back out this morning but wanted to post a few photos
from last week at:

 http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

More updates to follow.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 09/13/14 (Requiem For A Queen)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 22:25:55 -0400
This week I witnessed the violent death of the majestic "Queen of Hilton Pond," 
a towering centenarian White Oak that thunderously succumbed to the ravages of 
lightning, fungi, termites, and beetle grubs. For a photo essay about this sad 
but inevitable phenomenon, please visit the installment for 13-22 Sep 2014 at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140913.html

While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded during the 
period (all hummingbirds), plus other nature notes. 


Good Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why?
From: Linda Lee Baker <llbaker AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 00:12:09 -0500
All the reasons given are part of the answer.

Another part of the reason I enjoy birding is puzzle-solving.  Identifying
birds is taking parts of the whole & putting them together to determine what
the species is, like a giant jigsaw puzzle.

Linda Lee Baker
Albuquerque, NM USA

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Subject: Re: Why?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 15:44:45 -0400
I suggest, rather speculatively, that the answer to why not is because for the 
vast majority of mankind's evolutionary history animals would largely have 
fallen into two categories (with some overlap) -- those to be eaten and those 
to be avoided. I doubt that esthetic appreciation of birds would have 
developed, at least not prior to the much more recent development of language. 
I believe this helps explain why humans generally have an innate fear of 
snakes, and spiders. Thus, I think bird appreciation is somewhat alien to our 
nature, and developed as Barry suggests in a somewhat random pattern as humans 
gained more freedom from want and fear. 


Of course collection came to be a big part of it. The wealthy long ago began to 
keep aviaries and other collections, culminating in the 18th and 19th Centuries 
when people began amassing large collections of all sorts of animals and 
plants, as well as cabinets of natural history. People made a living obtaining 
specimens for such collectors. I also believe, however, that humans have a 
interest in learning about the world around them, which expanded with the 
luxury of being able to do so. 

 
 
 As Barry suggests, I think this is very individualized. I became enamored of 
nature at an early age, while my parents and brother were more in the leave 
nature alone camp. 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Roger 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Wed, Sep 24, 2014 3:17 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?


Why not?

--
Roger Craik
Maple Ridge BC

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why?
From: Roger <r_craik AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:15:25 -0700
Why not?

--
Roger Craik
Maple Ridge BC

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:42:54 -0400
Learning how to listen, and how to look, are two of the great joys of 
birding... I never used my whole field of view before I became a birder. I now 
look at things in everyday life in a different way--so, I am a better defensive 
driver, I am better at scanning a page quickly, I am better at picking out 
relevant sounds in a crowd or on a street, and so forth--all because I am now 
aware of a greater totality of my sensory input, and that has become part of 
who I am, whether actively "birding" or not at any given moment... 


I should note also re why some people actively dislike birds and birding--they 
are afraid. There is such a diagnostic entity as Ornithophobia--albeit not in 
the DSM 5 (diagnostic manual of mental disorders). I wrote a chapter some years 
ago on Birds in the Human Mind and its Pathology, and I interviewed a number of 
people whom I was surprised to learn were afraid of birds. 

Some had had traumatic experiences with birds (flying at them to defend a 
nest), some had poor vision and could not handle a rapidly flying creature 
buzzing about them, some had seen "The Birds" of Hitchcock when young and 
carried a traumatic memory, some had been told as a child that birds might peck 
out their eyes, and so forth. In England, pigeon phobia is well known--and 
likely relates to the large flocks of such birds in common spaces such as 
Trafalgar Square, where some people feed them--but the birds approach anyone 
and everyone... 


Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry K. MacKay 

Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 11:57 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Here is what I think may be an unpopular answer.

I think the activity is so "alien" (good word, actually) because it involves
something that IS "alien" to a great many people, and that is an
appreciation of that which is not overwhelmingly entertaining or pleasurable
and not of human origin.

I don't know if I can explain my theory succinctly, but I have come to the
conclusion that some folks are inherently unable to appreciate the sheer
beauty of birds, and in fact, this is neither right nor wrong, good nor bad,
just the way it is.

When I was extremely young I was smitten by birds, and by bird art...and for
the life of me I cannot explain why...why I would spend hours with a book on
birds, or looking into my garden, or walking in the local cemetery with my
six dollar binoculars that seemed to make things look smaller or why I was
so thrilled by and sought to achieve a close-up look, or hung out in the
bird galleries of the museum...I just did.   Why was I thrilled to see my
first meadowlark when I could have been out stealing hubcaps or listening to
the latest chart-busting rock and roll hit "like all the other kids".

I recall a musicologist tell a story about how he was, as a kid, part of a
class who were taken to a live performance of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring,
and was never the same after...he among all the kids was so moved that he
made music is life's work.

Why?

Why are some of us artists, others engineers and still others so heavily
engaged in designed and making clothing or breeding show dogs?

I think that if there is a commonality among birders it is that we are more
"open" to what IS around us, although I do think for some that "collection
instinct" is more highly motivating than for others.

But the reason that my answer may be unpopular is that these days if you
want to demonize anyone who has something "over you", like intelligence or
ability to appreciate things, you call them an elitist.   I don't mean to
suggest that no birder is dumb, just that in balance they, thus we, tend to
be above average in intelligence...now how self-serving is that statement?
Talk about elitism...

If there is another uniting factor it might be described as comfort and
opportunity...we tend to come from middle class ranks who have the luxury of
not having to spend every moment worrying about how to pay the rent or
groceries.

This is not really an answer to the question because I don't think there
really is one...

I have a friend who, for several consecutive decades, teased me for being a
birder.  He is a zoologist, a retired professor, and certainly fits the
birding profile of being bright and middle class, well-travelled and
cultured.

Well guess what?  He got a camera and now his is a birder, although he
refuses to call himself that, does not use binoculars, and yet he is totally
open to the beauty of birds (it is that beauty that so captivates me, BTW,
and from that captivation comes so much more that I admire about birds, and
other animals) and SEES what I see, not just in the obviously colourful or
dramatic species, but in the markings of a sparrow or a hen Mallard.  He
does not much like the tickers who spend a microsecond or two looking at
something to cross off their list, but that form of birding holds no appeal
to me either...it is not "wrong", and in fact can be an entertaining sport,
but it gets in the way of taking the time to simply revel in the beauty
inherent to the object, the bird, at least for me.

We are a diverse species and it takes all kinds.

I'd be interested in any work on that other side of the coin, why people are
not interested in birds, birding, or natural history, and indeed, are so
often hostile to such endeavors.

Barry



Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Arie Gilbert
Sent: September-24-14 10:45 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Good question, and all of the below.

But a better question is why the activity is so 'alien' to so many.

How many times have you had to "explain" birding to someone?

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY



On 9/24/2014 7:45 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
> Why Do We Bird?
>
> Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with
me:
>
> * The collection instinct.  Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls,
trains etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers,
admit it....
>
> * The appreciation factor.  We spend much of our lives resolving issues;
beauty renews us.
>
> * Exercise.  Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without
leaving my vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized.
>
> * Growth.  Birding keeps us learning and growing.  We discover we're part
of a much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets.
>
> * Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
> * Social interaction.  Many birders lean towards introspection,
introversion, even isolation.  But we also desire relationship, and a shared
passion facilitates this.
>
> * Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
> * Expressiveness.  Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and
non-verbal communication.  I preach and write poetry, find birds woven
throughout.
>
> * Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation,
contemplation.
>
> * Fun!
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
>
> (No rights reserved)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

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Subject: Re: Why?
From: "Tangren, Gerald Vernon" <tangren AT WSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:27:38 +0000
Its a thing for people with Aspergers

--
Jerry 




On 9/24/14, 9:02 AM, "Spector, David (Biology)" 
wrote:

>I once posed this question to a birding class at a nature center, and I
>think that we came up with a couple of dozen reasons.
>
>Exercise?  Some, but I walk much more slowly now than before I was a
>birdwatcher, and I drive a lot to get to places with birds.
>
>A few other reasons:
>
>An excuse to get outside to beautiful places--beaches, marshes,
>mountains, forests, prairies, . . . , landfills, sewage plants, . . . .
>
>Something to do while hoping for a mammal to show up; I like to see and
>identify wild mammals, but waiting long hours for an identifiable mouse
>or shrew to show up would be quite boring without the birds to watch.
>
>Learning transferable skills (e.g., how to pay attention to detail and
>how to use a field guide) applicable to insects, trees, herps, . . . .
>
>T-shirts:  Bird clubs, nature centers, refuges, and other organizations
>have beautiful bird t-shirts that we can wear (and that can be subject to
>the collector's urge that Al mentions).
>
>Science--for many of us deeper understanding of process and the
>opportunity to contribute to that understanding means deeper appreciation.
>
>Human context--I enjoy thinking about the people who have contributed to
>our understanding of birds, the many ways in which birds and people
>interact, and the ways in which culture helps to shape concepts of birds.
>
>Sharing--this will be the last item on the list because I have to go
>teach a bird class in a few minutes.
>
>David
>
>David Spector
>Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.
>
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
>[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher
>Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:46 AM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Why?
>
>Why Do We Bird?
>
>Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with
>me:
>
>* The collection instinct.  Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls,
>trains etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers,
>admit it....
>
>* The appreciation factor.  We spend much of our lives resolving issues;
>beauty renews us.
>
>* Exercise.  Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without
>leaving my vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized.
>
>* Growth.  Birding keeps us learning and growing.  We discover we're part
>of a much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets.
>
>* Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
>* Social interaction.  Many birders lean towards introspection,
>introversion, even isolation.  But we also desire relationship, and a
>shared passion facilitates this.
>
>* Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
>* Expressiveness.  Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and
>non-verbal communication.  I preach and write poetry, find birds woven
>throughout.
>
>* Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation,
>contemplation.
>
>* Fun!
>
>Al Schirmacher
>Muscotah, KS
>
>(No rights reserved)
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why?
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:02:21 -0400
I once posed this question to a birding class at a nature center, and I think 
that we came up with a couple of dozen reasons. 


Exercise? Some, but I walk much more slowly now than before I was a 
birdwatcher, and I drive a lot to get to places with birds. 


A few other reasons:

An excuse to get outside to beautiful places--beaches, marshes, mountains, 
forests, prairies, . . . , landfills, sewage plants, . . . . 


Something to do while hoping for a mammal to show up; I like to see and 
identify wild mammals, but waiting long hours for an identifiable mouse or 
shrew to show up would be quite boring without the birds to watch. 


Learning transferable skills (e.g., how to pay attention to detail and how to 
use a field guide) applicable to insects, trees, herps, . . . . 


T-shirts: Bird clubs, nature centers, refuges, and other organizations have 
beautiful bird t-shirts that we can wear (and that can be subject to the 
collector's urge that Al mentions). 


Science--for many of us deeper understanding of process and the opportunity to 
contribute to that understanding means deeper appreciation. 


Human context--I enjoy thinking about the people who have contributed to our 
understanding of birds, the many ways in which birds and people interact, and 
the ways in which culture helps to shape concepts of birds. 


Sharing--this will be the last item on the list because I have to go teach a 
bird class in a few minutes. 


David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher 

Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:46 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Why Do We Bird?

Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with me:

* The collection instinct. Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls, trains 
etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers, admit it.... 


* The appreciation factor. We spend much of our lives resolving issues; beauty 
renews us. 


* Exercise. Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without leaving my 
vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized. 


* Growth. Birding keeps us learning and growing. We discover we're part of a 
much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets. 


* Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.

* Social interaction. Many birders lean towards introspection, introversion, 
even isolation. But we also desire relationship, and a shared passion 
facilitates this. 


* Worship.  True for some, not others.

* Expressiveness. Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and non-verbal 
communication. I preach and write poetry, find birds woven throughout. 


* Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation, contemplation.

* Fun!

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

(No rights reserved)

Sent from my iPhone
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 11:56:33 -0400
Here is what I think may be an unpopular answer.

I think the activity is so "alien" (good word, actually) because it involves
something that IS "alien" to a great many people, and that is an
appreciation of that which is not overwhelmingly entertaining or pleasurable
and not of human origin.

I don't know if I can explain my theory succinctly, but I have come to the
conclusion that some folks are inherently unable to appreciate the sheer
beauty of birds, and in fact, this is neither right nor wrong, good nor bad,
just the way it is.

When I was extremely young I was smitten by birds, and by bird art...and for
the life of me I cannot explain why...why I would spend hours with a book on
birds, or looking into my garden, or walking in the local cemetery with my
six dollar binoculars that seemed to make things look smaller or why I was
so thrilled by and sought to achieve a close-up look, or hung out in the
bird galleries of the museum...I just did.   Why was I thrilled to see my
first meadowlark when I could have been out stealing hubcaps or listening to
the latest chart-busting rock and roll hit "like all the other kids".

I recall a musicologist tell a story about how he was, as a kid, part of a
class who were taken to a live performance of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring,
and was never the same after...he among all the kids was so moved that he
made music is life's work.

Why?

Why are some of us artists, others engineers and still others so heavily
engaged in designed and making clothing or breeding show dogs?

I think that if there is a commonality among birders it is that we are more
"open" to what IS around us, although I do think for some that "collection
instinct" is more highly motivating than for others.

But the reason that my answer may be unpopular is that these days if you
want to demonize anyone who has something "over you", like intelligence or
ability to appreciate things, you call them an elitist.   I don't mean to
suggest that no birder is dumb, just that in balance they, thus we, tend to
be above average in intelligence...now how self-serving is that statement?
Talk about elitism...

If there is another uniting factor it might be described as comfort and
opportunity...we tend to come from middle class ranks who have the luxury of
not having to spend every moment worrying about how to pay the rent or
groceries.

This is not really an answer to the question because I don't think there
really is one...

I have a friend who, for several consecutive decades, teased me for being a
birder.  He is a zoologist, a retired professor, and certainly fits the
birding profile of being bright and middle class, well-travelled and
cultured.

Well guess what?  He got a camera and now his is a birder, although he
refuses to call himself that, does not use binoculars, and yet he is totally
open to the beauty of birds (it is that beauty that so captivates me, BTW,
and from that captivation comes so much more that I admire about birds, and
other animals) and SEES what I see, not just in the obviously colourful or
dramatic species, but in the markings of a sparrow or a hen Mallard.  He
does not much like the tickers who spend a microsecond or two looking at
something to cross off their list, but that form of birding holds no appeal
to me either...it is not "wrong", and in fact can be an entertaining sport,
but it gets in the way of taking the time to simply revel in the beauty
inherent to the object, the bird, at least for me.

We are a diverse species and it takes all kinds.

I'd be interested in any work on that other side of the coin, why people are
not interested in birds, birding, or natural history, and indeed, are so
often hostile to such endeavors.

Barry



Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Arie Gilbert
Sent: September-24-14 10:45 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Good question, and all of the below.

But a better question is why the activity is so 'alien' to so many.

How many times have you had to "explain" birding to someone?

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY



On 9/24/2014 7:45 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
> Why Do We Bird?
>
> Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with
me:
>
> * The collection instinct.  Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls,
trains etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers,
admit it....
>
> * The appreciation factor.  We spend much of our lives resolving issues;
beauty renews us.
>
> * Exercise.  Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without
leaving my vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized.
>
> * Growth.  Birding keeps us learning and growing.  We discover we're part
of a much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets.
>
> * Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
> * Social interaction.  Many birders lean towards introspection,
introversion, even isolation.  But we also desire relationship, and a shared
passion facilitates this.
>
> * Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
> * Expressiveness.  Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and
non-verbal communication.  I preach and write poetry, find birds woven
throughout.
>
> * Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation,
contemplation.
>
> * Fun!
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
>
> (No rights reserved)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

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Subject: Re: Why?
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 10:45:04 -0400
Good question, and all of the below.

But a better question is why the activity is so 'alien' to so many.

How many times have you had to "explain" birding to someone?

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY



On 9/24/2014 7:45 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
> Why Do We Bird?
>
> Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with me:
>
> * The collection instinct. Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls, trains 
etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers, admit it.... 

>
> * The appreciation factor. We spend much of our lives resolving issues; 
beauty renews us. 

>
> * Exercise. Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without leaving my 
vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized. 

>
> * Growth. Birding keeps us learning and growing. We discover we're part of a 
much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets. 

>
> * Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
> * Social interaction. Many birders lean towards introspection, introversion, 
even isolation. But we also desire relationship, and a shared passion 
facilitates this. 

>
> * Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
> * Expressiveness. Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and 
non-verbal communication. I preach and write poetry, find birds woven 
throughout. 

>
> * Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation, contemplation.
>
> * Fun!
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
>
> (No rights reserved)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

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Subject: Why?
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 06:45:39 -0500
Why Do We Bird?

Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with me:

* The collection instinct. Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls, trains 
etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers, admit it.... 


* The appreciation factor. We spend much of our lives resolving issues; beauty 
renews us. 


* Exercise. Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without leaving my 
vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized. 


* Growth. Birding keeps us learning and growing. We discover we're part of a 
much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets. 


* Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.

* Social interaction. Many birders lean towards introspection, introversion, 
even isolation. But we also desire relationship, and a shared passion 
facilitates this. 


* Worship.  True for some, not others.

* Expressiveness. Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and non-verbal 
communication. I preach and write poetry, find birds woven throughout. 


* Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation, contemplation.

* Fun!

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

(No rights reserved)

Sent from my iPhone
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Prairie Warbler inh Southern California
From: Chuck Otte <cotte AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 08:14:44 -0500
Helping out a friend having computer problems. Please contact John directly
if you need more information on this bird!

Chuck

The warbler was spotted as of yesterday(Wednesday 9-17-14). If anyone
wishes to travel across the country to see the bird, the best directions are:
Coming from Los Angeles International Airport, take the San Diego
Freeway(the 405) south to the Hawthorne Blvd exit. Turn right off the
Hawthone Blvd and travel south between 5 to 7 miles to a street called
Carson St. Turn left onto Carson St.,  and travel east on Carson St., until you
come to a street called Madrona Ave. Then turn right on Madrona Ave, and
travel south on Madrona Ave less than 1/4 mile to a street called Plaza Del
Amo St. or Ave, and turn left. Then proceed on Plaze Del Amo going a short
distance to stop light and turn left into the Madrona Marsh Nature Center
parking lot. If coming north on the 405 from either Long Beach City Airport, or
John Wayne/Orange County Airport in Orange County. Exit at Crenshaw
Blvd, and travel south on Crenshaw Blvd about the same distance to Carson
St. When arriving at Carson St., turn right and proceed west on Carson St.
about a mile or a mile and a 1/4 and turn left onto Maple St. and travel south
on Maple St. 1/4 mile to Plaza Del Amo and turn right. Again go west a short
distance to the stop light and turn right. The Prairie Warbler has been seen in
the marsh in an area of willows starting from an area adjacent to 10 foot
measuring pole going in a westerly direction usually ending up in a field of
sunflowers usually associating with a flock of Bushtits

Good Birding
John Small
Torrance,CA
joutandabout AT yahoo.com

-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2014-2015
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:35:20 -0400
Please find the winter finch forecast in the link below.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/forecast14.htm

I thank the many people who gathered tree seed information and the birders
who asked me when the forecast was coming out. You kept me going.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Big Gull vs Small Crow (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:20:46 -0400
Today I watched a prolonged face-off between a Great Black-backed Gull and
a Fish Crow. In the following photo the gull had staked its claim to a dead
fish and is staring down the much smaller crow. But the crow managed to
chase off the gull a couple of times and retrieve some snacks:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15321324161/

Photo taken along the Raritan River, Middlesex County, NJ.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 21, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 09:27:28 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

It's a bird, it's a plane, it's ... a fish?! Check out this strange
gallery from a new book about flying fish.
http://bit.ly/XRVV3N
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* The Golden Eagles of Ireland - A Success Story
http://bit.ly/Z23HJN

* The Pungent Mudflat, Teeming with Life
http://bit.ly/OfTh2b

* Ravens and Crows - Who's Who?
http://bit.ly/UycGKL

* Night-time Flights of Songbirds
http://bit.ly/1v3mluv

* Snail Kite - A Bird of the Everglades
http://bit.ly/1DoOmm7

* Pirates and Parrots - Talk Like a Pirate Day
http://bit.ly/Og3dsD

* Mono Lake - Seeking a Balance
http://bit.ly/1uo0n4R

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1DoOxxC
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: World Shorebird Day
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2014 22:48:51 -0500
I hope everyone had a chance to get out and watch count shorebirds
today. Personally I think every day should be shorebird day.

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN



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Subject: Hilton Pond 09/01/14 (New York Roadside Redux)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 16:04:13 -0400
In late August I wandered north for several reasons, eventually alighting on 
the shores of the St. Lawrence River--a special locale I've visited before but 
never in late summer. As the 1-12 Sep 2014 installment of "This week at Hilton 
Pond" I offer a photo essay about the proliferation of roadside flora I found 
in and around Morristown NY. To view, please visit 

http://hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140901.html
(Note also my mention of the variety of pollinators that assure the plants' 
productivity.) 


While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded during the 
period--including a big bunch of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. 


Happy (Late Summer) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 14, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 08:26:07 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Cedar Waxwings - Sleek and Handsome
http://bit.ly/WY47yF

* Snowy Egrets - Killer Hats
http://bit.ly/19IXt09

* Pale Male - New York City's Famous Red-tail
http://bit.ly/Un7Yzv

* Counting Millions of Raptors Over Veracruz
-- With Scott Weidensaul
http://bit.ly/1dyIUPz

* Swifts Roost in Chimneys
http://bit.ly/WY4xFs

* Northern Gannets Plunge-Dive
http://bit.ly/1wjLPEN

* The Greatest Bird Rescue Ever - The 2000 MV Treasure spill
http://bit.ly/15RiH8S

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/YGfOMh
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Predation on hummingbirds
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:28:27 -0700
Hi Laura, and all,

Great thread......   hopefully this will spread the right word
about the subject.  Great blog post Laura.

I have seen those pesky Roadrunner velociraptors take a dozen hummers
right out my window, feeders were 8' off the ground, I was exhausted
running back and forth chasing them away.  In the winter they
switched to juicy Chipping Sparrows.

I have seen Eastern Screech-Owl and Sharp-shinned Hawk hit my feeders
making failed attempts on hummers, away from feeders I've seen attempts
to take hummers by Summer Tanager and Brown-crested Flycatcher, and
perhaps other Myiarchus as well.

Joe Morlan's point about camo in females is fascinating, and glad
someone
straightened out the recluse web story too.  ;)  Widow webs are the very
strong
ones (in buildings) and outdoors those big Orb Weavers surely catch
hummers.

Mitch

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, TX

On 2014-09-11 06:58, Laura Erickson wrote:
> I've been reading a book published in 2014 that based a whole chapter
> on a
> point from a 1985 paper that had concluded that “hummingbirds in North
> America do not have ‘natural predators’ in the usual sense.” That
> seemed so
> patently ridiculous that I looked into the original paper, and wrote
> about
> it on my blog yesterday. I don't usually post blog links, but this one
> might be interesting for some of you. I hope I wasn't too
> uncharitable--I
> was simply trying to clear up what seems to me a serious misconception.
>
> http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/09/predation-and-hummingbirds.html
>
> Best, Laura
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds
From: PiranhaFem AT AOL.COM
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:28:04 -0400
Are those enormous praying mantis that catch and eat hummers at feeders  
non-native to the Americas?
 
--Maureen Hickey
Tucson, AZ
 
 
In a message dated 9/12/2014 7:19:53 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time,  
Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV writes:

Hummers  are likely preyed on by small owls-- at least in the Neotropics.  
Some  species respond rapidly to imitations of a Ferruginous Pygmy-owl's 
call.  That's the way Bob Ridgley rediscovered the Honduran Emerald 10 years, 
or so,  ago--according to my friend Jan Gordon and her late husband, Ken, who 
were  there with Bob at the time.  Of course, such predatory owls would be 
the  species that hunt diurnally. I wonder if they sometimes pick hummers 
off the  nest, as well as in the air...

Gregg Gorton
Philadelphia,  PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From:  National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)  
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph Morlan
Sent: Friday,  September 12, 2014 1:15 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject:  [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds

I attended a  seminar a few years ago in which it was pointed out that 
hummingbirds on  Caribbean Islands which have few or no predators also have 
females which  resemble the bright males instead of being dull colored.

The  traditional view is that the males have evolved a bright plumage via 
sexual  selection.  It makes them attractive to females.  However, the  
hypothesis in this case was that sexual dimorphism evolved to protect females  
from predation at the nest.  In the absence of predation there is no need  for 
the females to be cryptically colored.  Under this view, the bright  
coloration of hummingbirds is a primitive trait rather than derived in response 

to sexual selection.

If so, this suggests that predation in  hummingbirds is important enough 
that it has effected their evolution in a  rather profound way.

On Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:31:33 -0500, David Starrett  
wrote:

>Interesting.  I could  increase their number by 25%.  I have felt bad 
serving hummers up as food for a local Cooper's hawk who takes advantage of the 

hors d'oeuvres  I so  graciously attract for him flying around the feeders 
in late summer.  He  takes them off to munch elsewhere in what I assume is a 
quick  gulp.
>Dave
>
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>David  Starrett
>
>Cape Girardeau,  MO
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>> Date: Thu, 11 Sep  2014 08:58:10 -0500
>> From: bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM
>>  Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds
>> To:  BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>
>> I've been reading a book  published in 2014 that based a whole chapter
>> on a point from a  1985 paper that had concluded that “hummingbirds in
>> North America  do not have ‘natural predators’ in the usual sense.”
>> That seemed  so patently ridiculous that I looked into the original
>> paper, and  wrote about it on my blog yesterday. I don't usually post
>> blog  links, but this one might be interesting for some of you. I hope
>> I  wasn't too uncharitable--I was simply trying to clear up what seems 
to me a  serious misconception.
>>
>>  http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/09/predation-and-hummingbirds.
>>  html
>>
>> Best, Laura
>> --
>>  --
>> Laura Erickson
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It  turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:23:23 -0500
The first sentence,  "Probably not a significant risk for adult birds in
temperate zone" references Miller and Gass, 1985 (Miller, R. S. and C. L.
Gass. 1985. Survivorship in hummingbirds: is predation important? Auk
102:175-178.) makes direct reference to the paper I'm criticizing.

I cannot find a single other study than Miller and Gass that concludes that
predation on hummingbirds is insignificant. That paper is referenced in
other papers, and the BNA summarizes what is known about species in the
literature, so the BNA account of course included that. But if Miller and
Gass is indeed the only study that concludes that predation is
insignificant, that conclusion is very poorly supported. Hummers are
hyper-vigilant against competitors, which I'm sure also enables them to
detect and avoid predators. Every species has at least some anti-predatory
mechanisms, after all. But predators manage to take even well-protected
species, including hummingbirds.

Best, Laura

On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 11:51 AM, Jim  wrote:

> Here's what BNA on-line has to say about predation on Ruby-throated
> Hummingbirds:
>
> "Probably not a significant risk for adult birds in temperate zone. . ..
> Known predators of adults include Loggerhead Shrike. . . and Sharp-shinned
> Hawk. . .. Most common predator is probably house cat. . ..When faced with
> attack from aerial predators, adults flee into dense cover. Blue Jay . .
> .seen to kill and eat nestling Ruby-throated Hummingbird. . .; frequency of
> this occurrence unknown. Predation on eggs unreported. During mobbing of
> Blue Jay by birds of several other species, a single female came in and
> hovered nearby but did not vocalize or otherwise participate."
>
> I know RTHUs are very responsive to Eastern Screech-Owl playback, though
> these are not mentioned as predators.  I've also read Black-chinned
> Hummingbirds appear to intentionally build there nests close to Cooper's
> Hawk nests--presumably because it keeps other creatures away from the
> hummer nests.
>
> Jim M.
> Rockville, MD
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds by Roadrunner
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:58:20 -0400
Chatters,

FYI, folks are adding comments about things that were thoroughly covered by 
Laura in her blog post that started this thread . I humbly suggest going back 
to that original post and reading her piece--it is well worth it, being a very 
nicely done summary of the extant literature on this topic! 


Best,

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Phila, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jack Daynes 

Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 12:51 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds by Roadrunner

In 2003, while visiting Bosque del Apache I spent some time at the visitor 
center catching images of hummingbirds at their feeders. I came to learn that 
at least one of the local roadrunners had learned to make regular meals of the 
hummingbirds. The feeders were only about four feet off the ground, so it we 
pretty easy pickings for the roadrunner. It would crouch under the feeder and 
wait for a victim to perch, there spring up and snatch the hummer for an easy 
meal. 


Very poor image (but proves the action) at:
http://www.shadetree-imaging.com/ImageGallery.aspx?moid=11901&hr=1

After witnessing the action, I spoke to the docents inside. They knew of the 
activity, but when I suggested either raising the feeder higher or hanging a 
screen below the feeder to remove the straight line attack option, they seemed 
only interested in cursing the roadrunner. The roadrunner was just taking 
advantage of the opportunity that they provided. IMO, humans created the 
situation and should have taken responsibility. 


Be well,

--
-- Jack --
==================================

Wildlife Photography with
Emphasis on Birds
==================================
858-442-1907
Poway, California (San Diego Co.)
N 32 57'  W 117 04'
At 508' Elevation
==================================


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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:51:21 -0400
Here's what BNA on-line has to say about predation on Ruby-throated
Hummingbirds:

"Probably not a significant risk for adult birds in temperate zone. . ..
Known predators of adults include Loggerhead Shrike. . . and Sharp-shinned
Hawk. . .. Most common predator is probably house cat. . ..When faced with
attack from aerial predators, adults flee into dense cover. Blue Jay . .
.seen to kill and eat nestling Ruby-throated Hummingbird. . .; frequency of
this occurrence unknown. Predation on eggs unreported. During mobbing of
Blue Jay by birds of several other species, a single female came in and
hovered nearby but did not vocalize or otherwise participate."

I know RTHUs are very responsive to Eastern Screech-Owl playback, though
these are not mentioned as predators.  I've also read Black-chinned
Hummingbirds appear to intentionally build there nests close to Cooper's
Hawk nests--presumably because it keeps other creatures away from the
hummer nests.

Jim M.
Rockville, MD

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Subject: Predation in Hummingbirds by Roadrunner
From: Jack Daynes <jc_daynes AT SPAMCOP.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 09:50:42 -0700
In 2003, while visiting Bosque del Apache I spent some time at the
visitor center catching images of hummingbirds at their feeders. I came
to learn that at least one of the local roadrunners had learned to make
regular meals of the hummingbirds. The feeders were only about four feet
off the ground, so it we pretty easy pickings for the roadrunner. It
would crouch under the feeder and wait for a victim to perch, there
spring up and snatch the hummer for an easy meal.

Very poor image (but proves the action) at:
http://www.shadetree-imaging.com/ImageGallery.aspx?moid=11901&hr=1

After witnessing the action, I spoke to the docents inside. They knew of
the activity, but when I suggested either raising the feeder higher or
hanging a screen below the feeder to remove the straight line attack
option, they seemed only interested in cursing the roadrunner. The
roadrunner was just taking advantage of the opportunity that they
provided. IMO, humans created the situation and should have taken
responsibility.

Be well,

--
-- Jack --
==================================

Wildlife Photography with
Emphasis on Birds
==================================
858-442-1907
Poway, California (San Diego Co.)
N 32 57'  W 117 04'
At 508' Elevation
==================================


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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:46:23 -0400
... Hmmmmmmm -- finally, we have an explanation why there are no hummingbirds 
in the Old World... 


(couldn't resist)

This is a fun discussion on a meaty topic.

Gregg Gorton, MD
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim 

Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 12:28 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds

It's primarily the large exotic (i.e. non-native) mantids that prey on
hummingbirds, so it's not a predator-prey relationship that has evolved
over time.  See this article by Sheri Williamson:

Another Dangerous Chinese Import

 


Jim M.
Rockville, Maryland



On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 12:06 PM, Dan Kaiser  wrote:

> On YouTube there are numerous videos of mantis capturing hummingbirds. A
> year ago this month I captured a video of a near miss on my hummer
> feeder...
>
>
> 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/dhkaiser/9655705338/in/photolist-fJ9B7U-dahzTi-fJ9AWL-dahAE1-fHf1Nf-dahAEq-cpiGcU-cpiGbW 

>
> Dan Kaiser
> Columbus, IN
>
> On Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:22:21 -0400, you wrote:
>
> >Arie and All,
> >
> >Seeing as we're speaking anecdotally, it seems to me that I remember a
> picture circulating on the internet a while back, that showed a Praying (or
> "preying") Mantis with a hummer in its grasp. I don't know the outcome, but
> it didn't seem promising for the hummer (although how a Mantis would harm
> or "dine on" a hummer is beyond me).
> >
> >All the best,
> >Ernie Jardine
> >Pickering Ontario
> >
> >birding AT aol.com
> >www.birdsongidentification.com
> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:38:05 -0400
All

I have been discreetly informed that Brown Recluse do not use webs and
that it was most likely a Golden Silk Orb Weaver, or other spider in any
case.

... but brown recluse is what the ranger told me...  and the hummer was
most certainly trapped...

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY


On 9/12/2014 11:46 AM, Laura Erickson wrote:
> The issue of spider predation is colored by the fact that hummers
> gather spider silk for nests, so the authors of the paper dismissed
> those deaths as "accidental" rather that predation. I didn't want to
> take the time to find out how many spiders have actually made a meal
> of a hummingbird, but can't imagine they'd not get a nice, filling
> dinner. Really, any animal ensnared in a spider web got there "by
> accident." The spiders build them to capitalize on those accidents.
>
> Best, Laura
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 10:01 AM, Arie Gilbert
> > wrote:
>
>     If I might ad my 2 cents...
>
>     on a trip to Anahuac in TX some time ago,   a Humer was caught in a
>     brown recluse spider web up near the ceiling of the visitor's center.
>     The ranger on duty was trying to get something long enough to free the
>     hummer, and told me that the hummer would definitely end up on the
>     dinner table if not freed.
>
>     I know this is anecdotal, but the good news is the hummer was freed.
>
>     Arie Gilbert
>     North Babylon, NY
>
>
>
>
>
>     On 9/12/2014 10:32 AM, Ken Bergman wrote:
>
>         Interesting discussion, Laura.  It's true that North America
>         doesn't have
>         eyelash pit vipers, which can ambush hummers as they visit
>         Heliconia flowers
>         in the tropics, but we do have mantids, as you point out.  A
>         few years ago,
>         I published an image of mantis predation on a hummingbird at a
>         hummingbird
>         feeder (the photo was taken by the father of one of my students).
>
>         See:
> 
 

>
>         Ken Bergman
>
>         BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>         Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>
>
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>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
> the winter.
>
>             --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:28:09 -0400
It's primarily the large exotic (i.e. non-native) mantids that prey on
hummingbirds, so it's not a predator-prey relationship that has evolved
over time.  See this article by Sheri Williamson:

Another Dangerous Chinese Import

 


Jim M.
Rockville, Maryland



On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 12:06 PM, Dan Kaiser  wrote:

> On YouTube there are numerous videos of mantis capturing hummingbirds. A
> year ago this month I captured a video of a near miss on my hummer
> feeder...
>
>
> 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/dhkaiser/9655705338/in/photolist-fJ9B7U-dahzTi-fJ9AWL-dahAE1-fHf1Nf-dahAEq-cpiGcU-cpiGbW 

>
> Dan Kaiser
> Columbus, IN
>
> On Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:22:21 -0400, you wrote:
>
> >Arie and All,
> >
> >Seeing as we're speaking anecdotally, it seems to me that I remember a
> picture circulating on the internet a while back, that showed a Praying (or
> "preying") Mantis with a hummer in its grasp. I don't know the outcome, but
> it didn't seem promising for the hummer (although how a Mantis would harm
> or "dine on" a hummer is beyond me).
> >
> >All the best,
> >Ernie Jardine
> >Pickering Ontario
> >
> >birding AT aol.com
> >www.birdsongidentification.com
> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Roger <r_craik AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 09:15:41 -0700
The spiders would still be predators albeit tool using ones so I I don't
see any issues with coloured facts.

Roger Craik
Maple Ridge BC

On 12/09/2014 8:46 AM, Laura Erickson wrote:
> The issue of spider predation is colored by the fact that hummers gather
> spider silk for nests, so the authors of the paper dismissed those deaths
> as "accidental" rather that predation. I didn't want to take the time to
> find out how many spiders have actually made a meal of a hummingbird, but
> can't imagine they'd not get a nice, filling dinner. Really, any animal
> ensnared in a spider web got there "by accident." The spiders build them to
> capitalize on those accidents.
>
> Best, Laura
>
> On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 10:01 AM, Arie Gilbert 
> wrote:
>
>> If I might ad my 2 cents...
>>
>> on a trip to Anahuac in TX some time ago,   a Humer was caught in a
>> brown recluse spider web up near the ceiling of the visitor's center.
>> The ranger on duty was trying to get something long enough to free the
>> hummer, and told me that the hummer would definitely end up on the
>> dinner table if not freed.
>>
>> I know this is anecdotal, but the good news is the hummer was freed.
>>
>> Arie Gilbert
>> North Babylon, NY
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On 9/12/2014 10:32 AM, Ken Bergman wrote:
>>
>>> Interesting discussion, Laura.  It's true that North America doesn't have
>>> eyelash pit vipers, which can ambush hummers as they visit Heliconia
>>> flowers
>>> in the tropics, but we do have mantids, as you point out.  A few years
>>> ago,
>>> I published an image of mantis predation on a hummingbird at a hummingbird
>>> feeder (the photo was taken by the father of one of my students).
>>>
>>> See:
>>> >> in/photolist-5ipnFC-5ik67k>
>>>
>>> Ken Bergman
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
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>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>              --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Dan Kaiser <dhkaiser AT SPRYNET.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:06:16 -0400
On YouTube there are numerous videos of mantis capturing hummingbirds. A
year ago this month I captured a video of a near miss on my hummer
feeder...


https://www.flickr.com/photos/dhkaiser/9655705338/in/photolist-fJ9B7U-dahzTi-fJ9AWL-dahAE1-fHf1Nf-dahAEq-cpiGcU-cpiGbW 


Dan Kaiser
Columbus, IN

On Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:22:21 -0400, you wrote:

>Arie and All,
>
>Seeing as we're speaking anecdotally, it seems to me that I remember a picture 
circulating on the internet a while back, that showed a Praying (or "preying") 
Mantis with a hummer in its grasp. I don't know the outcome, but it didn't seem 
promising for the hummer (although how a Mantis would harm or "dine on" a 
hummer is beyond me). 

>
>All the best,
>Ernie Jardine
>Pickering Ontario
>
>birding AT aol.com
>www.birdsongidentification.com
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 10:46:10 -0500
The issue of spider predation is colored by the fact that hummers gather
spider silk for nests, so the authors of the paper dismissed those deaths
as "accidental" rather that predation. I didn't want to take the time to
find out how many spiders have actually made a meal of a hummingbird, but
can't imagine they'd not get a nice, filling dinner. Really, any animal
ensnared in a spider web got there "by accident." The spiders build them to
capitalize on those accidents.

Best, Laura

On Fri, Sep 12, 2014 at 10:01 AM, Arie Gilbert 
wrote:

> If I might ad my 2 cents...
>
> on a trip to Anahuac in TX some time ago,   a Humer was caught in a
> brown recluse spider web up near the ceiling of the visitor's center.
> The ranger on duty was trying to get something long enough to free the
> hummer, and told me that the hummer would definitely end up on the
> dinner table if not freed.
>
> I know this is anecdotal, but the good news is the hummer was freed.
>
> Arie Gilbert
> North Babylon, NY
>
>
>
>
>
> On 9/12/2014 10:32 AM, Ken Bergman wrote:
>
>> Interesting discussion, Laura.  It's true that North America doesn't have
>> eyelash pit vipers, which can ambush hummers as they visit Heliconia
>> flowers
>> in the tropics, but we do have mantids, as you point out.  A few years
>> ago,
>> I published an image of mantis predation on a hummingbird at a hummingbird
>> feeder (the photo was taken by the father of one of my students).
>>
>> See:
>> > in/photolist-5ipnFC-5ik67k>
>>
>> Ken Bergman
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> -----
>
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8200 - Release Date: 09/12/14
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Predation on hummingbirds
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:54:56 -0400
Laura and Chatters,
 
I too Googled Hummingbird and Praying Mantis, and now understand clearly how 
the Mantis attacks and "dines" on the hummer. Very enlightening, and rather 
gruesome, but I guess not much different from a Cooper's Hawk fulfilling its 
needs. 


All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario

birding AT aol.com
www.birdsongidentification.com
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Erickson 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Thu, Sep 11, 2014 10:10 am
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds


I've been reading a book published in 2014 that based a whole chapter on a
point from a 1985 paper that had concluded that “hummingbirds in North
America do not have ‘natural predators’ in the usual sense.” That seemed 
so 

patently ridiculous that I looked into the original paper, and wrote about
it on my blog yesterday. I don't usually post blog links, but this one
might be interesting for some of you. I hope I wasn't too uncharitable--I
was simply trying to clear up what seems to me a serious misconception.

http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/09/predation-and-hummingbirds.html

Best, Laura
-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:28:24 -0400
Ken and Chatters,
 
Sorry for repeating this story. I just noticed Ken's (your) post neatly placed 
in my "Spam" folder among all the other junk. This kind of thing has been 
happening too often lately. I don't know why only certain Birdchat posts end up 
there. 

 
Cheers,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
 
birding AT aol.com
www.birdsongidentification.com
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Ken Bergman 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 10:35 am
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds


Interesting discussion, Laura.  It's true that North America doesn't have
eyelash pit vipers, which can ambush hummers as they visit Heliconia flowers
in the tropics, but we do have mantids, as you point out.  A few years ago,
I published an image of mantis predation on a hummingbird at a hummingbird
feeder (the photo was taken by the father of one of my students).

See:

 


Ken Bergman

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 

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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:22:21 -0400
Arie and All,
 
Seeing as we're speaking anecdotally, it seems to me that I remember a picture 
circulating on the internet a while back, that showed a Praying (or "preying") 
Mantis with a hummer in its grasp. I don't know the outcome, but it didn't seem 
promising for the hummer (although how a Mantis would harm or "dine on" a 
hummer is beyond me). 


All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario

birding AT aol.com
www.birdsongidentification.com
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Arie Gilbert 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 11:10 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation in Hummingbirds


If I might ad my 2 cents...

on a trip to Anahuac in TX some time ago,   a Humer was caught in a
brown recluse spider web up near the ceiling of the visitor's center.
The ranger on duty was trying to get something long enough to free the
hummer, and told me that the hummer would definitely end up on the
dinner table if not freed.

I know this is anecdotal, but the good news is the hummer was freed.

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY




On 9/12/2014 10:32 AM, Ken Bergman wrote:
> Interesting discussion, Laura.  It's true that North America doesn't have
> eyelash pit vipers, which can ambush hummers as they visit Heliconia flowers
> in the tropics, but we do have mantids, as you point out.  A few years ago,
> I published an image of mantis predation on a hummingbird at a hummingbird
> feeder (the photo was taken by the father of one of my students).
>
> See:
> 
 

>
> Ken Bergman
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Subject: Re: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:01:35 -0400
If I might ad my 2 cents...

on a trip to Anahuac in TX some time ago,   a Humer was caught in a
brown recluse spider web up near the ceiling of the visitor's center.
The ranger on duty was trying to get something long enough to free the
hummer, and told me that the hummer would definitely end up on the
dinner table if not freed.

I know this is anecdotal, but the good news is the hummer was freed.

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY




On 9/12/2014 10:32 AM, Ken Bergman wrote:
> Interesting discussion, Laura.  It's true that North America doesn't have
> eyelash pit vipers, which can ambush hummers as they visit Heliconia flowers
> in the tropics, but we do have mantids, as you point out.  A few years ago,
> I published an image of mantis predation on a hummingbird at a hummingbird
> feeder (the photo was taken by the father of one of my students).
>
> See:
> 
 

>
> Ken Bergman
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Subject: Predation in Hummingbirds
From: Ken Bergman <kbergman AT KEENE.EDU>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 09:32:45 -0500
Interesting discussion, Laura.  It's true that North America doesn't have
eyelash pit vipers, which can ambush hummers as they visit Heliconia flowers
in the tropics, but we do have mantids, as you point out.  A few years ago,
I published an image of mantis predation on a hummingbird at a hummingbird
feeder (the photo was taken by the father of one of my students).

See:

 


Ken Bergman

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 10:17:13 -0400
Hummers are likely preyed on by small owls-- at least in the Neotropics. Some 
species respond rapidly to imitations of a Ferruginous Pygmy-owl's call. That's 
the way Bob Ridgley rediscovered the Honduran Emerald 10 years, or so, 
ago--according to my friend Jan Gordon and her late husband, Ken, who were 
there with Bob at the time. Of course, such predatory owls would be the species 
that hunt diurnally. I wonder if they sometimes pick hummers off the nest, as 
well as in the air... 


Gregg Gorton
Philadelphia, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joseph Morlan 

Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 1:15 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds

I attended a seminar a few years ago in which it was pointed out that 
hummingbirds on Caribbean Islands which have few or no predators also have 
females which resemble the bright males instead of being dull colored. 


The traditional view is that the males have evolved a bright plumage via sexual 
selection. It makes them attractive to females. However, the hypothesis in this 
case was that sexual dimorphism evolved to protect females from predation at 
the nest. In the absence of predation there is no need for the females to be 
cryptically colored. Under this view, the bright coloration of hummingbirds is 
a primitive trait rather than derived in response to sexual selection. 


If so, this suggests that predation in hummingbirds is important enough that it 
has effected their evolution in a rather profound way. 


On Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:31:33 -0500, David Starrett 
wrote:

>Interesting. I could increase their number by 25%. I have felt bad serving 
hummers up as food for a local Cooper's hawk who takes advantage of the hors 
d'oeuvres I so graciously attract for him flying around the feeders in late 
summer. He takes them off to munch elsewhere in what I assume is a quick gulp. 

>Dave
>
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>David Starrett
>
>Cape Girardeau, MO
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:58:10 -0500
>> From: bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>
>> I've been reading a book published in 2014 that based a whole chapter
>> on a point from a 1985 paper that had concluded that “hummingbirds in
>> North America do not have ‘natural predators’ in the usual sense.”
>> That seemed so patently ridiculous that I looked into the original
>> paper, and wrote about it on my blog yesterday. I don't usually post
>> blog links, but this one might be interesting for some of you. I hope
>> I wasn't too uncharitable--I was simply trying to clear up what seems to me 
a serious misconception. 

>>
>> http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/09/predation-and-hummingbirds.
>> html
>>
>> Best, Laura
>> --
>> --
>> Laura Erickson
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Predation on hummingbirds
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:15:20 -0700
I attended a seminar a few years ago in which it was pointed out that
hummingbirds on Caribbean Islands which have few or no predators also have
females which resemble the bright males instead of being dull colored.

The traditional view is that the males have evolved a bright plumage via
sexual selection.  It makes them attractive to females.  However, the
hypothesis in this case was that sexual dimorphism evolved to protect
females from predation at the nest.  In the absence of predation there is
no need for the females to be cryptically colored.  Under this view, the
bright coloration of hummingbirds is a primitive trait rather than derived
in response to sexual selection.

If so, this suggests that predation in hummingbirds is important enough
that it has effected their evolution in a rather profound way.

On Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:31:33 -0500, David Starrett 
wrote:

>Interesting. I could increase their number by 25%. I have felt bad serving 
hummers up as food for a local Cooper's hawk who takes advantage of the hors 
d'oeuvres I so graciously attract for him flying around the feeders in late 
summer. He takes them off to munch elsewhere in what I assume is a quick gulp. 

>Dave
>
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>David Starrett
>
>Cape Girardeau, MO
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:58:10 -0500
>> From: bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>
>> I've been reading a book published in 2014 that based a whole chapter on a
>> point from a 1985 paper that had concluded that “hummingbirds in North
>> America do not have ‘natural predators’ in the usual sense.” That 
seemed so 

>> patently ridiculous that I looked into the original paper, and wrote about
>> it on my blog yesterday. I don't usually post blog links, but this one
>> might be interesting for some of you. I hope I wasn't too uncharitable--I
>> was simply trying to clear up what seems to me a serious misconception.
>>
>> http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/09/predation-and-hummingbirds.html
>>
>> Best, Laura
>> --
>> --
>> Laura Erickson
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Predation on hummingbirds
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 23:31:33 -0500
Interesting. I could increase their number by 25%. I have felt bad serving 
hummers up as food for a local Cooper's hawk who takes advantage of the hors 
d'oeuvres I so graciously attract for him flying around the feeders in late 
summer. He takes them off to munch elsewhere in what I assume is a quick gulp. 

Dave

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Cape Girardeau, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:58:10 -0500
> From: bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Predation on hummingbirds
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> I've been reading a book published in 2014 that based a whole chapter on a
> point from a 1985 paper that had concluded that hummingbirds in North
> America do not have natural predators in the usual sense. That seemed so
> patently ridiculous that I looked into the original paper, and wrote about
> it on my blog yesterday. I don't usually post blog links, but this one
> might be interesting for some of you. I hope I wasn't too uncharitable--I
> was simply trying to clear up what seems to me a serious misconception.
> 
> http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/09/predation-and-hummingbirds.html
> 
> Best, Laura
> -- 
> -- 
> Laura Erickson
> 
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
> 
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
> 
>             --Rachel Carson
> 
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Predation on hummingbirds
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 08:58:10 -0500
I've been reading a book published in 2014 that based a whole chapter on a
point from a 1985 paper that had concluded that “hummingbirds in North
America do not have ‘natural predators’ in the usual sense.” That seemed 
so 

patently ridiculous that I looked into the original paper, and wrote about
it on my blog yesterday. I don't usually post blog links, but this one
might be interesting for some of you. I hope I wasn't too uncharitable--I
was simply trying to clear up what seems to me a serious misconception.

http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/09/predation-and-hummingbirds.html

Best, Laura
-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: World Shorebird Day
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2014 22:48:51 -0500
I hope everyone had a chance to get out and watch count shorebirds
today. Personally I think every day should be shorebird day.

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: World Shorebird Day
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2014 22:48:51 -0500
I hope everyone had a chance to get out and watch count shorebirds
today. Personally I think every day should be shorebird day.

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN


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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 7, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2014 09:12:39 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Saturday, September 6, 2014, is both World Shorebird Day and
International Vulture Awareness Day. Check out our vulture gallery:
http://bit.ly/WrEaaN
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* The Call of the Loon

http://bit.ly/Q4S4Zs
* The Demise of the Passenger Pigeon
http://bit.ly/1lrzX2A

* The Cuban Tody

http://bit.ly/YkB22c

* When Birds Land in Parking Lots
http://bit.ly/Q4fnDo

* Shorebirds Migrate South
http://bit.ly/1Aj4G3r

* Tree Swallow Roost
http://bit.ly/RMk950

* Buff-breasted Sandpiper - One classy shorebird!
http://bit.ly/1nCmC3l

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Thanks for listening!
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Subject: Sat. 6 September, World Shorebirds Day
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2014 12:19:28 -0700
Birders:
I'm passing along a message from Gyorgy Szimuly in Great Britain.
***************************
You might have heard about the World Shorebirds
Day to be held on 6 September, 2014 for the first
time.  One of the key programs of this special
day is the Global Shorebird Counting, which is a
public awareness initiative. I ask all bird
enthusiasts in the United States and Canada to
take part in the counting in any areas where
shorebirds occur. Don't worry if there are no
huge number of shorebirds in your area. We don't
ask you for money to help. We just ask you to go
out birding, what every birdwatcher loves to do
anyway. Please consider supporting this
initiative and register your location on our
website. By registering a location you can be a
part of a draw to win a fantastic bird book package worth about 150.
Registration of the location and more details
about the Global Shorebird Counting Program can
be found here: http://goo.gl/jNW1VG
The map with more than 340 already registered
locations can be viewed here: http://goo.gl/ICpB7X
Thanks for your time and please help us to reach
our goal of having a thousand locations registered by 6th of September 2014.
Best wishes, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Coordinator of the Global Events of the World Shorebirds Day
Milton Keynes, UK

http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com 


  ***************************
Take a look at the map and you'll see that there
are big chunks of the USA still not covered.
Register your spot!

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

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Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - September 2014
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2014 13:52:02 -0400
The September 2014 issue of the Birding Community E-bulletin is now
available the web, covering news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for active and
concerned birders, those dedicated to the joys of birding and the
protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of superb quality birding
binoculars and scopes, Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past E-bulletins on the
website of the National Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The September 2014 edition includes the following topics:

RARITY FOCUS
   - Lower Rio Grande Valley Collared Plover

WHAT WOULD MARTHA DO
   - the argument that timely conservation really does work

BOOK NOTES: SIBLEY REVISITED
   - new illustrations includes illustrations of rarities that were
not
     included in the first edition

TRICOLORED BLACKBIRD: STILL TROUBLED
   - possible emergency listing of the Tricolored Blackbird on CA
     endangered species list

SURPRISE PUERTO RICAN PARROTS HATCHED IN THE WILD
   - two endangered Puerto Rican parrots were recently hatched for
the
     first time in 144 years

ACCESS MATTERS: SIMPLE PARKING
   -  every effort should be made to adhere to whatever guidelines
have been
      established to regulate birder crowd control

IBA NEWS: HATTERAS REPRIEVE
   - the battle over off-road vehicle (ORV) use at Hatteras National
     Seashore (National Park Service) has gone on for years

NEONICS AND NWRs
   - US FWS bans the use of neonicotinoids at National Wildlife
Refuges

EAGLE "TAKE" PERMIT COULD START A TREND
   - permit was issued to a wind-power project in northern California

TIP OF THE MONTH: PERSONALIZE YOUR FIELD GUIDE
   - opportunities to personalize your field guide are practically
endless

LWCF IS 50 THIS MONTH
   - use the revenues from offshore oil and gas to support the
conservation
     of land and water - underfunded and must be renewed to be
continued

- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National Wildlife Refuge
Association (NWRA) website:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 



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Subject: OOOPS....RE: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2014 12:01:55 -0400
Of course, I meant that I had dissected birds with an egg ready to be LAID, not 
hatched...no signs of internal incubation! 



Barry



-----Original Message-----
From: Barry K. MacKay [mailto:mimus AT sympatico.ca]
Sent: September-04-14 11:11 AM
To: 'Alvaro Jaramillo'; 'BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU'
Subject: RE: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump 
as she soars over open seas: picture 


I was wondering the same thing. I've prepared the odd specimen (of species not 
related to petrels, to be sure) with a ready-to-hatch egg inside, but with no 
external evidence, so unless there is something different about this group of 
birds I am inclined to think it isn't an egg. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Alvaro Jaramillo 

Sent: September-04-14 10:50 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump 
as she soars over open seas: picture 


All,

 I don't know how they are certain that this is an egg? Why not a growth/tumor 
under the feathers. You can go to a gull colony at egg laying time, and no bird 
appears to visibly have an egg in the tract, they just don't show like this. I 
am guessing that this is not an egg. 


Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Devorah the Ornithologist 

Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2014 6:00 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as 
she soars over open seas: picture 


hello everyone,

here's a story that may interest tubenose aficionados: a "pregnant"
Mascarene petrel was photographed with an obvious egg bump as she soars over 
open seas, and i've got the photos to prove it. 


the story is a bit of an experiment. since i was fairly certain only a few 
people in the world would care about a critically endangered all-brown seabird, 
"pregnant" or not (shocking, i know!), the story was modelled after paparazzi 
stories of pregnant celebrities as published in the Sun. 

presumably, it is a serious piece about the bird, containing accurate 
information, but also includes some tongue-in-cheek elements that may appeal to 
... well, someone. 


not sure if the story succeeds, but it has some truly spectacular photographs 
of these birds and includes a link to the actual BOC PDF, which is kindly 
hosted by the good people at the British Ornithologists' Union, so anyone and 
everyone around the world can download it for free. 



http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/sep/04/pregnant-mascarene-petrel-shows-off-ginormous-egg-bump-as-she-soars-over-open-seas-picture?view=mobile#opt-in-message 


compact URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x9nn/tw

as always, share widely.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461 ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8150 - Release Date: 09/04/14

-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8147 - Release Date: 09/03/14

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2014 11:11:29 -0400
I was wondering the same thing. I've prepared the odd specimen (of species not 
related to petrels, to be sure) with a ready-to-hatch egg inside, but with no 
external evidence, so unless there is something different about this group of 
birds I am inclined to think it isn't an egg. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Alvaro Jaramillo 

Sent: September-04-14 10:50 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump 
as she soars over open seas: picture 


All,

 I don't know how they are certain that this is an egg? Why not a growth/tumor 
under the feathers. You can go to a gull colony at egg laying time, and no bird 
appears to visibly have an egg in the tract, they just don't show like this. I 
am guessing that this is not an egg. 


Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Devorah the Ornithologist 

Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2014 6:00 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as 
she soars over open seas: picture 


hello everyone,

here's a story that may interest tubenose aficionados: a "pregnant"
Mascarene petrel was photographed with an obvious egg bump as she soars over 
open seas, and i've got the photos to prove it. 


the story is a bit of an experiment. since i was fairly certain only a few 
people in the world would care about a critically endangered all-brown seabird, 
"pregnant" or not (shocking, i know!), the story was modelled after paparazzi 
stories of pregnant celebrities as published in the Sun. 

presumably, it is a serious piece about the bird, containing accurate 
information, but also includes some tongue-in-cheek elements that may appeal to 
... well, someone. 


not sure if the story succeeds, but it has some truly spectacular photographs 
of these birds and includes a link to the actual BOC PDF, which is kindly 
hosted by the good people at the British Ornithologists' Union, so anyone and 
everyone around the world can download it for free. 



http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/sep/04/pregnant-mascarene-petrel-shows-off-ginormous-egg-bump-as-she-soars-over-open-seas-picture?view=mobile#opt-in-message 


compact URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x9nn/tw

as always, share widely.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461 ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8150 - Release Date: 09/04/14

-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8147 - Release Date: 09/03/14

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2014 07:50:07 -0700
All,

 I don't know how they are certain that this is an egg? Why not a growth/tumor 
under the feathers. You can go to a gull colony at egg laying time, and no bird 
appears to visibly have an egg in the tract, they just don't show like this. I 
am guessing that this is not an egg. 


Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Devorah the Ornithologist 

Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2014 6:00 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as 
she soars over open seas: picture 


hello everyone,

here's a story that may interest tubenose aficionados: a "pregnant"
Mascarene petrel was photographed with an obvious egg bump as she soars over 
open seas, and i've got the photos to prove it. 


the story is a bit of an experiment. since i was fairly certain only a few 
people in the world would care about a critically endangered all-brown seabird, 
"pregnant" or not (shocking, i know!), the story was modelled after paparazzi 
stories of pregnant celebrities as published in the Sun. 

presumably, it is a serious piece about the bird, containing accurate 
information, but also includes some tongue-in-cheek elements that may appeal to 
... well, someone. 


not sure if the story succeeds, but it has some truly spectacular photographs 
of these birds and includes a link to the actual BOC PDF, which is kindly 
hosted by the good people at the British Ornithologists' Union, so anyone and 
everyone around the world can download it for free. 



http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/sep/04/pregnant-mascarene-petrel-shows-off-ginormous-egg-bump-as-she-soars-over-open-seas-picture?view=mobile#opt-in-message 


compact URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x9nn/tw

as always, share widely.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461 ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8150 - Release Date: 09/04/14

-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8147 - Release Date: 09/03/14

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Pregnant Mascarene petrel shows off ginormous egg bump as she soars over open seas: picture
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Sep 2014 14:00:29 +0100
hello everyone,

here's a story that may interest tubenose aficionados: a "pregnant"
Mascarene petrel was photographed with an obvious egg bump as she soars
over open seas, and i've got the photos to prove it.

the story is a bit of an experiment. since i was fairly certain only a few
people in the world would care about a critically endangered all-brown
seabird, "pregnant" or not (shocking, i know!), the story was modelled
after paparazzi stories of pregnant celebrities as published in the Sun.
presumably, it is a serious piece about the bird, containing accurate
information, but also includes some tongue-in-cheek elements that may
appeal to ... well, someone.

not sure if the story succeeds, but it has some truly spectacular
photographs of these birds and includes a link to the actual BOC PDF, which
is kindly hosted by the good people at the British Ornithologists' Union,
so anyone and everyone around the world can download it for free.


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/sep/04/pregnant-mascarene-petrel-shows-off-ginormous-egg-bump-as-she-soars-over-open-seas-picture?view=mobile#opt-in-message 


compact URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x9nn/tw

as always, share widely.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: before there were none: what were those flocks of passenger pigeons like?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Sep 2014 14:26:03 +0100
hello everyone,

one question that everyone asks, and in fact, nearly everyone asks this
question first, is "What was it like to witness a flock of passenger
pigeons flying overhead? What did this spectacle look and sound like?"

Well, you can start by imagining a murmuration of starlings, and multiply
that flock by ten thousand, times, and then you might be getting close to
what passenger pigeons were like ...

here's some interesting first-hand accounts of what the flocks were like,
accompanied by a video that helps provide some idea of passenger pigeon
flocks:

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/sep/03/before-there-were-none

or a compact URL:

http://gu.com/p/4x779/tw

as always, please feel free to share widely.

--
GrrlScientist
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html