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Updated on Monday, September 26 at 08:23 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Adelie Penguins,©BirdQuest

26 Sep Re: Simple book bag for the belt [Chuck & Lillian ]
26 Sep Simple book bag for the belt [Chuck & Lillian ]
24 Sep Pigeons Vote On Leaders With Their Wings [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
24 Sep BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 25, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
22 Sep WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2016 - 2017 [Ron Pittaway ]
21 Sep Series on "Sexual Dimorphism Reversal and Polyandry" [Chuck & Lillian ]
20 Sep Photos from last weekends banding [Roger Everhart ]
17 Sep Passing of George C. West [Ken Birding ]
17 Sep BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 18, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
15 Sep Alaska Field Guide [Richard Wolfert ]
14 Sep i couldn't resist: Bird Lives Matter responds to John Oliver [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
12 Sep john oliver's special message to birds [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
10 Sep Could Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Save Hawaiifs Endangered Birds? - The New Yorker []
10 Sep BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of Sept. 11, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, IV [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, III [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, II [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep AviSys birding software ["Patrick C. Hodgson" ]
9 Sep why do birds sing in the autumn? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
7 Sep Red-breasted Nuthatches: irruption year in Eastern USA? [Robert DeCandido PhD ]
6 Sep A different perspective on eagles [MM ]
5 Sep Re: Starlings as shorebirds []
5 Sep Re: Starlings as shorebirds [Douglas Carver ]
3 Sep Starlings as shorebirds [Willem Jan Marinus Vader ]
3 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia [Willem Jan Marinus Vader ]
3 Sep BirdNote: Last Week & Next -- and Vultures! [Ellen Blackstone ]
3 Sep wanna see something remarkable? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
30 Aug Conflict:) [Al Schirmacher ]
27 Aug BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of August 28, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
25 Aug Re: Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-) [Richard Carlson ]
25 Aug Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
24 Aug Hilton Pond 07/16/16 (Finches, Hummingbirds, And An Owl) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
23 Aug Name [Jim Williams ]
23 Aug Need author name [Jim Williams ]
20 Aug Birds Moving South with Cold Front [Roger Everhart ]
20 Aug BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 21, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
18 Aug Hotel Hong Kong [Patty O'Neill ]
16 Aug RFI Hong Kong ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
14 Aug sign of life from 70*N [Vader Willem Jan Marinus ]
13 Aug BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 14, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
13 Aug W. Mass. guide going out of print ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
9 Aug New River Hummingbird Festival (13 Aug, Oak Hill WV) []
8 Aug Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic [Joyanne Hamilton ]
8 Aug Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic []
8 Aug An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic [Joyanne Hamilton ]
6 Aug 10-tips-photographing-birds [Paulo Boute ]
6 Aug BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 7, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
3 Aug Re: Bird camera [Laurie Foss ]
3 Aug Birds' "Redness Gene" Traced Back To The Dinosaurs [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera ["B.G. Sloan" ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Joseph Morlan ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [marys1000 ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Laura Erickson ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Jim ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Jim Hully ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Laura Erickson ]
2 Aug Chipping Sparrow and Cowbird [Roger Everhart ]
31 Jul Do Wildlife-Friendly Yards Increase Bird-Window Collisions? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
30 Jul BirdNote, last week and the week of July 31, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
28 Jul Hilton Pond 07/01/16 (Hot Summer Flowers) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
27 Jul Inbred Songbirds Cannot Carry A Tune [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
27 Jul Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
27 Jul Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po [David Starrett ]
26 Jul Annotated Checklist for Mai Po ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
25 Jul why are robins' eggs blue? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
23 Jul Re: The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
23 Jul BirdNote, last week and the week of July 24, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
23 Jul The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey []
21 Jul Birding and "Pokemon Go" (similarities) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
20 Jul Re: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds [Chuck & Lillian ]
20 Jul South American bird taxonomy and checklists [Mark Mulhollam ]
19 Jul how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
17 Jul Re: Alaska birding cruises []
17 Jul Re: Alaska birding cruises ["snorkler AT juno.com" ]
17 Jul World Shorebirds Day 2016 [Gyorgy Szimuly ]

Subject: Re: Simple book bag for the belt
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 18:11:47 -0700
Thanks, Robert.
I'll take a look.
My wife and I birded around Australia in 1988. We 
used the Slater guide, although I had the Pizzey.
At one point, on some dirt road near Kakadu, we 
bumped into three Auzzie birders. When I whipped 
out my Slater to ID a Pitta, the woman commented, 
"Oh, you should use my husband's book."
Me: Why? Is it good? (I'm thinking that he has a 
good copy of someone's book I hadn't heard of."
She: My husband, Graham, wrote a field guide. It's very good.
Me: Gulp!
Chuck


At 01:55 PM 9/26/2016, Robert McNab wrote:

>Chuck,
>
>
>I wanted a bag to hold a field guide the first 
>time I went to Australia  to fit the rather 
>large Pizzey & Knight field guide (which is 
>larger than a Nat Geo and maybe even larger than a Sibley).
>
>Found this on amazon dot com which is canvas and 
>neutral colors and about 15 bucks:
>
>
>Rothco Vintage Canvas Military Tech Bag
>

>https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00695TAYM/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 

>
>
>It is not designed for the belt, but you could 
>probably add some belt loops rather easily. 
>Might be a little big for just the National Geo 
>guide, but for 15 bucks you may want to give it a try.
>
>It is thick canvas and has a soft feel to it. Good luck,
>
>
>
>Robert McNab
>
>Laguna Niguel, CA
>
>
>Sent from Outlook
>
>
>
>----------
>From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat 
>Line)  on behalf of 
>Chuck & Lillian 
>Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 1:34 PM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Simple book bag for the belt
>
>Hi Birders:
>
>I've owned this very simple canvas (cordura?) book pouch for about 30
>years. It's slightly too small for my NGS field guide, although
>Sibley-Western fits in quite nicely. The brand name label fell off
>long ago, and I don't remember who made it. It cost about $8 or $10
>at the time.
>
>It has:
>1 main pocket; 1 thin pocket about 4.5" wide suitable for a couple of
>pens & some paper, a cover flap the width of the bag (no side
>overhang) so it tucks smoothly into the bag, velcro flap closure, two
>webbing belt loops with snap closures.
>
>Really basic, but perfect for 1 field guide and almost nothing else,
>which is what I like. With the flap tucked in, I can whip out my
>field guide and stuff it back in 1-handed, no struggle, no extra
>bulk. It weighs maybe 2-4 oz. People frequently ask me where I got it.
>
>I'm considering making my own replacement, as I can't find anything
>like it. I've looked at everything on the web I can find. Pajaro
>seems to be the closest, but not quite there. I've got fancy bags
>with pockets, belts, straps, water bottle holders, etc. etc., but I
>prefer the simple one.
>
>Any suggestions/web links?
>
>Chuck Almdale
>North Hills, Ca.
>
>For BirdChat Guidelines go to
>http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>Archives: 
>https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Simple book bag for the belt
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 13:34:46 -0700
Hi Birders:

I've owned this very simple canvas (cordura?) book pouch for about 30
years. It's slightly too small for my NGS field guide, although
Sibley-Western fits in quite nicely. The brand name label fell off
long ago, and I don't remember who made it. It cost about $8 or $10
at the time.

It has:
1 main pocket; 1 thin pocket about 4.5" wide suitable for a couple of
pens & some paper, a cover flap the width of the bag (no side
overhang) so it tucks smoothly into the bag, velcro flap closure, two
webbing belt loops with snap closures.

Really basic, but perfect for 1 field guide and almost nothing else,
which is what I like. With the flap tucked in, I can whip out my
field guide and stuff it back in 1-handed, no struggle, no extra
bulk. It weighs maybe 2-4 oz. People frequently ask me where I got it.

I'm considering making my own replacement, as I can't find anything
like it. I've looked at everything on the web I can find. Pajaro
seems to be the closest, but not quite there. I've got fancy bags
with pockets, belts, straps, water bottle holders, etc. etc., but I
prefer the simple one.

Any suggestions/web links?

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Pigeons Vote On Leaders With Their Wings
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 20:35:44 +0100
Hello everyone,

here's a piece I just finished about leadership amongst pigeons. According
to a recently published study, pigeons replace misinformed flock leaders by
collectively choosing to follow better-informed individuals. How did the
authors figure this out? well, they jet-lagged their study birds! here's
the story of how they did this study:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/09/24/pigeons-vote-on-leaders-with-their-wings/ 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 25, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 12:17:04 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Cedar Waxwings - Sleek and Handsome
http://bit.ly/WY47yF
* Pirates and Parrots - Int'l Talk Like a Pirate Day!
http://bit.ly/Og3dsD
* When Birds Get Stranded in Parking Lots
http://bit.ly/Q4fnDo
* Common Merganser
http://bit.ly/2cnDfFb
* Sandhill Cranes Wait Out the Storm
http://bit.ly/P1qucE
* Ravens and Crows - Who’s Who?
http://bit.ly/UycGKL
* Voices of Our National Public Lands
http://bit.ly/1aypU1K
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2dsftYR
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2016 - 2017
From: Ron Pittaway <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 14:13:16 -0400
Please see link for this year's Winter Finch Forecast.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2016/finchforecast16.htm

Ron Pittaway
Ontario Field Ornithologists
Toronto, Ontario

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Subject: Series on "Sexual Dimorphism Reversal and Polyandry"
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 13:24:24 -0700
Birders:

I wrote a three-part series on "Sexual Dimorphism Reversal and
Polyandry" which you might find interesting.

Part I:

https://smbasblog.com/2016/07/19/sexual-dimorphism-reversal-and-polyandry-part-i/ 

The three parts are interlinked.

yours,
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

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Subject: Photos from last weekends banding
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 21:53:43 -0500






Hey everyone,




 Thought I'd put up a couple of photos from last weekend. The most common 
migrant by far that we banded were red-eyed Vireos. We also had a few 
Philadelphia Vireos. All in all the migration is pretty strong in our area 
right now. 





http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com







Good Birding,

Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN





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Subject: Passing of George C. West
From: Ken Birding <curlewbird AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 10:39:53 -0400
Dear Bird Chat friends - My dear friend George C. West passed away on August
31. He illustrated my weekly bird columns for the life of the Nantucket
Independent newspaper and many of those same illustrations are in the eight
different books I've published about Nantucket birding.

The September/October issue of Bird Watcher's Digest mentions the recent
publication of George's, 'North American Hummingbirds: An Identification
Guide, 2nd Edition, which he finished only recently. He was so glad to have
this done.

Here is a note I received from his wife, Ellen, letting us know that we've
lost George.
******************
I am sad to tell you that George passed away on August 31.  He suffered a
massive stroke and spent just one week in hospice. His sons and brother made
it in time, which was nice.

His wish would be that a donation be made to Friends of Madera Canyon, PO
Box 1203, Green Valley, AZ 85622, Scholarship Fund.  As you know, and like
yourselves, the preservation of our natural surroundings was his life's
work.  Thank you for the wonderful dipper picture!
Ellen
******************
Madera Canyon is a very special place and perhaps you might contribute in
George's name.

Sadly,
Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch

Nantucket Island -- 30 miles at sea

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 18, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 08:05:07 -0500
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Why Dippers Dip
http://bit.ly/1eciAxF
* Common Murre - Underwater Flyer
http://bit.ly/NQVDVf
* Birdwatching 103
http://bit.ly/2cnCpGq
* The Heron and the Snake
http://bit.ly/1uQbrYG
* Acorn Woodpecker Granaries
http://bit.ly/2cT7XXL
* Buff-breasted Sandpiper
http://bit.ly/1nCmC3l
* Responsible Birdfeeding
http://bit.ly/179M7zs
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2cfS7FB
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
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Subject: Alaska Field Guide
From: Richard Wolfert <rwolfert AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 21:44:07 -0400
There is a real chance that we will be going on a land/sea vacation to Alaska 
next summer. 


I have Sibley western edition (the new one). Is there any recommended FG for 
Alaska or is Sibley sufficient? 


Thanks,
Rich Wolfert
East Brunswick, NJ
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Subject: i couldn't resist: Bird Lives Matter responds to John Oliver
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 08:54:47 +0100
Hello everyone,

yes, i know I am silly, and the response I published is silly, too. But
someone had to do it, methinks, so why shouldn't I be that someone?


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/09/13/bird-lives-matter-responds-to-john-oliver/ 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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Subject: john oliver's special message to birds
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 17:25:04 +0100
(brace yourselves: unless you're talking about penguins, he's not a fan):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8l2Y6Z-maAU

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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Subject: Could Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Save Hawaiifs Endangered Birds? - The New Yorker
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 13:07:08 -0700
Controversial techniques....



http://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/could-genetically-modified-mosquitoes-save-hawaiis-endangered-birds?mbid=nl_160910_Daily&CNDID=11811219&spMailingID=9493365&spUserID=MTMzMTc5NTY1MTY4S0&spJobID=1000781526&spReportId=MTAwMDc4MTUyNgS2 


Oscar Canino
SF, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

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Subject: BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of Sept. 11, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 06:52:36 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Check out the new photo blog of first-year birds. http://bit.ly/2c5HvHS
How many can you name?

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* A Swath Uncut - Paying Back a Favor
http://bit.ly/1wOcUAf
* Ducks - Diving and Dabbling
http://bit.ly/1uuVHxM
* Juvenile Shorebirds Head South
http://bit.ly/2cpaYO7
* Birdsong Wanes with the Season
http://bit.ly/QcZji8
* Myles North in East Africa
http://bit.ly/2bUESFF
* How High Birds Fly - The Bar-headed Goose
http://bit.ly/1vFfPMJ
* Vaux's Swift Roost in Monroe
http://bit.ly/Uswuix
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2cNWCHq
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, IV
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:40:08 -0400
However, translocations can and have been done properly, and this is where
ideology comes in. Environmentalist circles are noted for a
deeply-entrenched conservatism that envisions a greater righteousness, or
absolute legitimacy, in the natural order of things. Any “tampering with
nature” is thus condemned categorically, regardless of forethoughts or
consequences. It is essentially a spiritual world view that sees a
conscious mind or plan behind the state of nature, and therefore sacrilege
in any attempt to alter it. It also relies on the fallacious logic of,
“many human effects on nature are bad, therefore any human effect on nature
is bad”. Or similarly, “many alien species are detrimental to native ones,
therefore all alien species are”. Such advocates exhibit utter distrust of
scientific process and planning. Back to fear of the unknown and intrinsic
defensiveness of the familiar status quo.

For example, several years ago my state birding list discussed whether
Eurasian Collared-Doves were displacing native species. Neither I nor
others knew of any evidence for it but different views were expressed: “As
with other non-native invasive species, a cautious outlook would be "guilty
until proven innocent".  There may not be any studies/publications to date
that unequivocally show ECD do harm native species, but I don't know of any
that say it definitely WON'T”. Elsewhere, apprehension was seen concerning
the limited establishment of the Mediterranean Gecko in the Southeastern
U.S. even though it fills a niche unoccupied by any native species. See
also the coyote example above. I have long argued in vain that non-native
species’ “guilt”, or any credible threat they pose, must be demonstrated
cogently before action is taken against them. The mere fact that they
aren’t native does not automatically mean they are bad.

In sum, defensiveness of one’s turf and preference for the known, the
extant, the native and the similar are rooted firmly in social biology. Yet
not all outsiders are pernicious or loathed and not all natives are
harmless or well-liked. These matters are very context-dependent. Birds
have been introduced deliberately outside of their ranges as an effective
conservation strategy. Therefore dismissing the entire picture as
`xenophobia’ is undue.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, III
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:38:35 -0400
Relatedly, the removal of game animals introduced outside their ranges is a
recurring problem in bird conservation. The detrimental effects of
non-native ungulates and boar are well documented, but hunters and others
have argued that these long-established aliens should now be considered
native and left alone. Such `foreigners’ are welcomed by many.


Conversely, more than a few attractive, native species are despised far
more than aliens. Brown-headed Cowbird is detested for brood parasitism
despite its spread’s having anthropogenic origins and its pretty appearance
in good light. Blue Jay, one of the continent’s avian splendors, is reviled
as a nest robber. Common Grackles are hated for aggressive domination of
feeders and other things despite their spectacular iridescence. The
effervescent House Wren is bad-mouthed for invading nest boxes and
destroying eggs. Of late, Barred Owl has been declared evil for
out-competing the threatened Spotted Owl, notwithstanding its (Barred’s)
dramatic appearance and unique calls. Or the anthropogenic causes of its
expansion and the Spotted’s decline. Barry MacKay could chime in about
Double-crested Cormorants. Raptors and crows used to be destroyed as
threats to livestock and agriculture (much as New Zealand's Kea), and so on.


This phenomenon is not restricted to birds. Coyotes have been expanding
eastwards in North America for decades, ultimately due to human actions,
only to be greeted with ubiquitous hostility. I once heard a wildlife
biologist here in Georgia say he wanted to shoot them “because they aren’t
native”. Yet the Coyote is not only native but an iconic, all-American
`trademark’ animal. I am very fond of this comic, long-eared rascal and
simply cannot fathom the incredible hatred leveled at it.


Another facet of this complex issue: carefully executed, science-based
translocations constitute an effective conservation tool. Introduced
populations act as extinction safeguards since small geographic ranges are
major liabilities and risk factors, especially in stochastic environments
(e.g. arid ecosystems, volcanic islands). Species distributed across
multiple continents, or widely within a single continent, will not face
demise due to local or regional threats. For example, Erckel’s Francolin
has a strikingly small range in central Ethiopia and Eritrea. It isn’t
threatened currently but a restricted range in a conservation-challenged
region makes for precarious prospects. However, this fowl has introduced
populations in Italy and (unfortunately) Hawaii, which may save the species
should it become imperiled in its native range. Same for Golden and Lady
Amherst’s Pheasants, both of which have very small ranges in southeast
China but also feral populations in Britain. Translocations can be
short-distance too or involve a species’ former range, as in Hawaii
(Millerbird, Nihoa Finch), New Zealand, Seychelles and elsewhere. There are
many other examples. Such species as the Pink-headed Duck, Crested
Shelduck, Himalayan Quail, Ryukyu Woodpigeon and Carolina Parakeet may have
survived had they been introduced somewhere outside their native ranges.


Such translocations require supreme care as the introduced birds can wreak
havoc in multiple ways. On top of dominating or out-competing indigenous
species they can decimate food supplies, interrupt ecological
relationships, interfere with the natives’ breeding cycles, spread
parasites, introduce virulent diseases or act as reservoirs for them, among
other woes.
​
[cont. -> part IV]

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, II
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:34:29 -0400
Unacceptance of alien species and alien people stems from fundamental
defensiveness that emanates from inherent, biologically-adaptive fear of
the unknown - hence a preference for the similar / familiar - and
protectiveness of one’s group, thus of one’s self-definition and identity.
Theodor Herzl, leading thinker and consolidator of Zionism in the 19th
century, wrote that “Jews carry antisemitism with them”. Antisemitism, he
demonstrated, develops inevitably wherever Jews arrive, even in places that
have never known it, by virtue of their being non-indigenous “outsiders”
everywhere.


But very saliently, non-acceptance applies to natives too, not only to
outsiders. This happens when larger groups fracture into smaller ones due
to humans’  powerful group forming compulsion (notice how difficult it is
for people to achieve and retain long-term unity, in any context).
Europeans have spent their entire history in perennial warfare and
bloodshed; xenophobia has nothing to do with this culture of violence and
hatred. Of course, we have a different culture of violence in America.
Moreover, several sectors of our population - notably racist groups that
claim ethnic purity - are loathed profoundly by most of their own
compatriots. We also had our civil war, Americans killing fellow Americans
partly over the abolition of slavery. Prior to that era, American Indians
used to fight each other too and several groups practiced massive religious
sacrifice of their own people. Civil conflicts in Latin America, Africa and
Asia have claimed millions of lives. Numerous, closely-related tribal
groups in New Guinea have spent much of their history in constant
internecine warfare, as have some South American natives (e.g. the Waorani).


From 1865 to about 1936, Western countries experienced immense immigration
waves. These invariably triggered powerful, at times violent,
anti-immigration backlashes that lasted many decades. Immigrants were
viewed as inferior to the `natives’, e.g. as “hyphenated Americans”. Yet
these immigrants were themselves western, white and predominantly
Christian. Hence the opposition to immigrants was, and is, largely
defensive as noted above rather than racist. Quantity is further evidence:
foreigners, like alien species, are frequently regarded as interesting
“exotics” in small numbers because then they aren’t perceived as threats.
(Exceptions do exist, however). Thus, being native and similar does not
categorically imply acceptance.


Dissimilarity, in turn, doesn’t categorically mean rejection. Any minority
group will face some de facto inequality and antagonism just for being
different – the said defensiveness - yet in some cases this is the
exception rather than the rule. Multiple immigrant groups have assimilated
very well into American society and some are highly regarded. Strikingly
numerous minority groups in India, as well as China’s non-Han ethnicities,
are likewise well-integrated. So are Israel’s Druze and Arab minorities,
and other groups worldwide.


So it is with birds and other organisms. In North America one hears few
complaints against the Ring-necked (Common) Pheasant, Gray Partridge,
Chukar, Himalayan Snowcock, Eurasian Skylark, Red-whiskered Bulbul,
Spot-breasted Oriole, Scaly-breasted Munia and Eurasian Tree Sparrow.
Currently at least, there is no widespread condemnation of the Eurasian
Collared-Dove, Spotted Dove and House Sparrow. Maligned introductions are
few – e.g. the Starling, Rock Pigeon, Monk Parakeet or Mute Swan - and such
resentment is founded, if unfair. We have ourselves to blame for starlings’
presence here and their pursuant usurpation of nesting cavities.
Reminiscnet of these people who mass-destroy habitat and then, so piously
and self-righteously, scream bloody murder when native animals try to
survive and adapt rather than sit and starve or commit suicide. I, for one,
find the said birds very attractive despite appreciating the problems they
cause.
​
[cont. -> part III]

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:30:37 -0400
Hello all,



Apologies for the very belated reply but I still wanted to comment on this
significant yet charged topic. First about the `fear and loathing’, then
its application to birds.


Fear of the unknown is rooted deeply in human behavior. It has considerable
evolutionary merit because predictability – foreknowledge of threats or
favorable conditions - is highly conducive to survival and safety. The
faculty of learning from experience, common to nearly all animals, also
relies on predictability: the usually-correct assumption that what happened
last time will happen under similar circumstances in the future too. Thus
an apprehensive conservatism is evident in every facet of human history.
People ever clamor for change yet the greater the magnitude of any change
proposed, the broader the opposition to it – in large part (but not
exclusively) because the novel is unknown.


Note, for example, that many consider nature a dangerous environment. I
have taken many comments for hiking alone in wilderness / backcountry
areas, notwithstanding relatively safe destinations and months of
preparation per trip. Demonstrating that city life is far more hazardous
never helps. The fear stems eminently from unfamiliarity with nature versus
thorough familiarity with “civilization”. The city is more dangerous but
it’s the devil you know.


Birder Noah Strycker did a global Big Year in 2015. He readily befriended
people of many races, religions and cultures. Yet on arriving in Australia
towards the end, he wrote the following, very understandably: “Things in
Australia feel cozily familiar after the past five uninterrupted months in
the rural tropics of Africa and Asia. I’m a pretty easy traveler, but you
never quite shake that underlying sense of staying alert all the time in
foreign places. This country feels more like home than anywhere I’ve been
since I passed through the U.S. in June.”


Biologically, humans are also intensely social organisms. This means that
unlike solitary organisms they form groups naturally, by default –
families, clans, nations, political parties, companies, religions, Facebook
`clubs’, institutions, avocations (e.g. birders), professional associations
and whatnot. Per definition, creating a group means declaring some
individuals as members and others as non-members (i.e., “we vs. they”).
And, this distinction matters as otherwise the group is irrelevant. Group
members are treated differently than non-members (e.g. Birdchat subscribers
can post here, others cannot). Similar group behavior is seen in non-human
primates as well.


Members also defend their own inclusivity vs. others’ exclusivity since
group affiliation is fundamental to individuals’ self-identity (e.g. race,
sex, family, religion, nationality, profession). People gravitate naturally
towards those similar to themselves because the greater the similarity, the
easier it is to identify with the other. Hence the greater the degree of
understanding and support, and the fewer the conflicts and discords. It is
a two-way cycle: people form groups based on similarities, and become
similar by virtue of forming or joining groups.


Thus, humans naturally prefer the known to the unknown and the similar to
the dissimilar. Labelling such behavior as “xenophobia” – a term 
identified 

with racism – is thus unmerited. It is rooted in the biology of sociability
and makes perfect sense logically. Social organisms from insects to wolves
to primates attack members of their own kind if these enter the group’s
home turf. Many birds flock through much of the year but defend territories
during breeding season, when other individuals constitute competition.


[cont. -> part II]

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Subject: AviSys birding software
From: "Patrick C. Hodgson" <hadu AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 11:45:50 -0400
A 2016 taxonomy update to Avisys has been made available to all. See
avisys.faintlake.com/update

I have not seen a post with this info - sorry if I missed it and this is
repetitive.

Pat Hodgson
Toronto, Canada

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Subject: why do birds sing in the autumn?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 09:49:56 +0100
hello everyone,

Since autumn has arrived, I thought I'd share this little piece that I
researched and wrote whilst in grad school in the zoology department at the
University of Washington:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/why-do-songbirds-sing-in-the-autumn-grrlscientist-2017eeec7e03#.4iv9e4ime 


it's a seasonal favourite. Feel free to share with others who might be
interested.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatches: irruption year in Eastern USA?
From: Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 05:32:49 -0500
Red-breasted Nuthatches have been seen in large numbers recently after 
originally (first!) being reported at several locations in the tri-state area 
in mid- to late June: in northwest Connecticut by Fred Baumgarten about 20 
June; in Connecticut (Stamford) on 26 June by Brenda Inskeep; at the "Point" 
(Stratford?), Connecticut on or about 26 June by Patrick Comins; at the New 
York Botanical Garden (2) in the Bronx (NYC) on 25 June (Deborah Allen and 
Robert DeCandido); in Central Park on 26 June (Jeffrey M. Ward with DA and RDC) 
and on Staten Island on 3 July (H. Fischer). The first report in New Jersey was 
on 27 June at Lord Stirling Park, Basking Ridge (bejoba AT ...) 


Migrant Red-breasted Nuthatches are most often found in conifers, but I tracked 
down five in the same area within a group of deciduous trees in Central Park on 
Labor Day. In years past, an early date of arrival is on or about 15 July. In 
exceptionally "early" years, individuals arrive by late June in NYC. These 
early arrival years are indicative of an "irruption" meaning lots more are on 
the way. In some years, other seed eating birds such as Purple Finches, Pine 
Siskins, Crossbills and other species also head south to the tri-state area and 
beyond, in large number - autumn 2007 was a good year for multiple species with 
Red-breasted Nuthatches leading the way. So the little Red-breasted Nutchases 
are an augur of what else might come south. 


Some historical info:

Red-breasted Nuthatches and Pine Finches [Pine Siskin] on Staten Island, N.Y. 
In BIRD-LORE for December, 1906, Mr. Dutcher described a remarkable migration 
of Red-breasted Nuthatches over Fire Island Beach, N. Y. While no such flight 
was noticed on Staten Island, still these birds were unusually abundant 
throughout the fall of 1906, the first being seen about September 1, and the 
last remaining till late in the autumn. Pine Finches, too, were present in for 
large numbers during the winter of 1906-7 than in the two preceding. They were 
most numerous on the beach on the south side of the island, where they fed on 
the ground and in the goldenrods. Singularly enough, both birds were also 
common on Staten Island during the season of 1903-4, when the Nuthatches were 
observed from September till November, and a few the following spring, and the 
Pine Finches were even more numerous in the central part of the island than 
during the past winter. - JAMES CHAPIN, New Brighton, Staten Island, N.Y. 

======================
Finally, for those interested in censusing for Red-breasted Nuthatches in their 
home patch or wherever - since these birds can turn up anywhere including 
backyards, try this: in the Sibley electronic guide for birds on your 
I-phone/I-touch, play the first call provided for this species (called the 
Toots #1_NY). Put it on a loop on your hand-held device and let it play for 
about 2 minutes...then switch to the call named: More Calls #1_NY (Red-breasted 
Nuthatch). Play that for about two minutes (put on a loop so the call keeps 
playing continuously for the two minutes). Having a small blue-tooth speaker 
will aid your field research. 


In my experience, these birds are very social and if any are in the area, they 
will come in and work their way down the tree trunk to very near the sound...it 
is possible to get many more coming in simultaneously - I have gotten as many 
as five at a time recently. They will fly back and forth overhead...usually 
landing nearby to give their "yank-yank" call in return. They look happy 
hearing calls from their compatriots (on the "tape"), but why I believe this is 
a discussion for another day in a different forum. Even in Washington state 
where Deborah and I visited a few weeks ago, it was possible to bring for a 
close look (all the way down from the top of 150-200 foot tall conifers) at 
families of these birds. Indeed if we did not use the calls from an electronic 
device we would not have known the birds were in the area. 


Now before anyone gets bonkers about what I am writing regarding playing calls 
to census for birds, please be advised that (a) you are doing this to learn 
about birds, their numbers and distribution = you have scientific intent; (b) 
the birds will respond for 1-2 minutes then go back to doing what they were 
doing = you have not permanently (or even temporarily) damaged them...you have 
simply changed their behavior for a brief amount of time...and you may even see 
them feeding near you too; (c) this has nothing to do with being ethical or 
not-ethical and you are not a bad/good person for interacting with birds in 
this way; and finally (d) if you have children or other bird watchers with you, 
they will be amazed and their enjoyment (appreciation) of these birds will 
increase greatly particularly if they (the nuthatches) fly back and forth in 
front of your nose and attempt to land on your head (yes this happens). 


So, if you are inclined, go out in your backyard and census for Red-breasted 
Nuthatches...and bring your camera and a 300mm lens. If not, or you hate what I 
wrote, don't...try pishing instead. But pray tell, what's the difference 
between electronic calls and pishing? These are both valid ways of locating 
birds. 


Robert DeCandido PhD
==============================

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Subject: A different perspective on eagles
From: MM <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:00:15 -0700
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/national-eagle-
repository-eagles-go-to-native-american-tribes-and-
science-180960306/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&utm_medium=
email&utm_campaign=20160906-daily-responsive&spMailingID=26434050&spUserID=
NzQwNDUzODAyNTMS1&spJobID=880943564&spReportId=ODgwOTQzNTY0S0

Oscar Canino
SF, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Starlings as shorebirds
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 13:09:46 -0500
Some of the Eurasian Magpies in Norway were doing the same during our
visit last month.
Larry Gardella Montgomery, AL------------------------From: "Douglas
Carver" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 11:42:13 -0600
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Starlings as shorebirds

  Starlings are fascinating and infinitely adaptable.  
   When I lived in Ireland, I would often see magpies (Pica pica)
acting like shorebirds -- but then, they also are splendid
opportunists. (I also saw Hooded Crows-as-shorebirds, as you did in
Norway.)   
   Douglas Carver   Albuquerque, NM    
  On Sat, Sep 3, 2016 at 12:24 PM, Willem Jan Marinus Vader  wrote:

	Starlings as shorebirds 

	As a marine biologist, who is also a birder, and who has worked a lot
in intertidal areas I have regularly come across 'trespassing
landbirds', that act as shorebirds. There are of course a few
specialists also here, such as a number of Cinclodes species in South
America, Cobb's Wren in the Falklands and the Rock Pipit here in
Europe; also our Hooded Crow acts as a regular shorebird much of the
time here in Northern Norway. And when we have a sudden return of
winter weather late in spring, as happens here now and then, and fresh
snow covers much of the ground, lots of passerines flee to the
intertidal and feed there; I have written on such occasions in a
Norwegian journal. 

	But Starlings (and also wagtails) are in an in-between position. They
are not regular shorebirds, but still exploit shore ressources quite
regularly. Most of my examples come from Holland and western Norway,
where I lived earlier, but also here north we find starlings regularly
in the intertidal, and the few that try to winter in the outermost
islands here north, mostly keep to the shore most of the time. 

	When I was a student in Holland (terribly long ago by now) we had
every summer a summercamp called ' Shore birds and bottomfauna' on the
island of Vlieland in the Wadden Sea, where many budding
ornithologists (several later famous names there) came together to
study the diet and feeding habits of the different shorebirds, while I
was the bottom fauna man, who was supposed to know all the animals in
the mudflats, as well as the tracks they left on the surface. One of
these tracks was made by the large polychaete worm Nereis
diversicolor, a small hole with a network of tracks radiating from it.
And I soon found out that the local starlings knew these tracks as
well as I did and walked from one to the next, trying to extract the
ragworms (I have later seen Spotless Starlings in NW Spain do exactly
the same). 

	Starlings also came and collected the debris on the shrimp-boats in
the harbour of Den Helder, where I lived at the time. And later, in
the Sognefjord in Western Norway , where at the time there was a large
seasonal Sprat Clupea sprattus fishery, where these small fishes were
for a while kept in large holding nets in the fjord, with some
mortality, starlings cruised like small helicopters over the surface
and picked up the floating corpses. 

	The most shore-bird like behaviour I ave seen in starlings was also
in the Sognefjord, although further inland, in late summer. Here
starlings foraged in the intertidal at ebbtide, and in fact caught the
amphipods I was studying at the time, as I suspect they do quite
regularly many places. But what was very special this time, in my
eyes, was that when the flood came and the intertidal no longer was
accessible to shorebirds, the starlings sat in long rows on the
telephone wires along the road, and rested, exactly as real shorebirds
do at high tide! 

	Starlings are highly interesting birds, just because they are
generalists and always open to new possibilities, and exhibit new
behavioural traits.  For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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Subject: Re: Starlings as shorebirds
From: Douglas Carver <dhmcarver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 11:42:13 -0600
Starlings are fascinating and infinitely adaptable.

When I lived in Ireland, I would often see magpies (Pica pica) acting like
shorebirds -- but then, they also are splendid opportunists. (I also saw
Hooded Crows-as-shorebirds, as you did in Norway.)

Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM

On Sat, Sep 3, 2016 at 12:24 PM, Willem Jan Marinus Vader 
wrote:

> Starlings as shorebirds
>
>
>
> As a marine biologist, who is also a birder, and who has worked a lot in
> intertidal areas I have regularly come across 'trespassing landbirds', that
> act as shorebirds. There are of course a few specialists also here, such as
> a number of Cinclodes species in South America, Cobb's Wren in the
> Falklands and the Rock Pipit here in Europe; also our Hooded Crow acts as a
> regular shorebird much of the time here in Northern Norway. And when we
> have a sudden return of winter weather late in spring, as happens here now
> and then, and fresh snow covers much of the ground, lots of passerines flee
> to the intertidal and feed there; I have written on such occasions in a
> Norwegian journal.
>
>
>
> But Starlings (and also wagtails) are in an in-between position. They are
> not regular shorebirds, but still exploit shore ressources quite regularly.
> Most of my examples come from Holland and western Norway, where I lived
> earlier, but also here north we find starlings regularly in the intertidal,
> and the few that try to winter in the outermost islands here north, mostly
> keep to the shore most of the time.
>
>
>
> When I was a student in Holland (terribly long ago by now) we had every
> summer a summercamp called ' Shore birds and bottomfauna' on the island of
> Vlieland in the Wadden Sea, where many budding ornithologists (several
> later famous names there) came together to study the diet and feeding
> habits of the different shorebirds, while I was the bottom fauna man, who
> was supposed to know all the animals in the mudflats, as well as the tracks
> they left on the surface. One of these tracks was made by the large
> polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor, a small hole with a network of tracks
> radiating from it. And I soon found out that the local starlings knew these
> tracks as well as I did and walked from one to the next, trying to extract
> the ragworms (I have later seen Spotless Starlings in NW Spain do exactly
> the same).
>
>
>
> Starlings also came and collected the debris on the shrimp-boats in the
> harbour of Den Helder, where I lived at the time. And later, in the
> Sognefjord in Western Norway , where at the time there was a large seasonal
> Sprat  Clupea sprattus fishery, where these small fishes were for a while
> kept in large holding nets in the fjord, with some mortality,
> starlings cruised like small helicopters over the surface and picked up the
> floating corpses.
>
>
>
> The most shore-bird like behaviour I ave seen in starlings was also in the
> Sognefjord, although further inland, in late summer. Here starlings foraged
> in the intertidal at ebbtide, and in fact caught the amphipods I was
> studying at the time, as I suspect they do quite regularly many places. But
> what was very special this time, in my eyes, was that when the flood came
> and the intertidal no longer was accessible to shorebirds, the starlings
> sat in long rows on the telephone wires along the road, and rested, exactly
> as real shorebirds do at high tide!
>
>
>
> Starlings are highly interesting birds, just because they are generalists
> and always open to new possibilities, and exhibit new behavioural traits.
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For
> BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives:
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a
> message to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu




--
Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.

(I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)

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Subject: Starlings as shorebirds
From: Willem Jan Marinus Vader <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2016 18:24:30 +0000
Starlings as shorebirds



As a marine biologist, who is also a birder, and who has worked a lot in 
intertidal areas I have regularly come across 'trespassing landbirds', that act 
as shorebirds. There are of course a few specialists also here, such as a 
number of Cinclodes species in South America, Cobb's Wren in the Falklands and 
the Rock Pipit here in Europe; also our Hooded Crow acts as a regular shorebird 
much of the time here in Northern Norway. And when we have a sudden return of 
winter weather late in spring, as happens here now and then, and fresh snow 
covers much of the ground, lots of passerines flee to the intertidal and feed 
there; I have written on such occasions in a Norwegian journal. 




But Starlings (and also wagtails) are in an in-between position. They are not 
regular shorebirds, but still exploit shore ressources quite regularly. Most of 
my examples come from Holland and western Norway, where I lived earlier, but 
also here north we find starlings regularly in the intertidal, and the few that 
try to winter in the outermost islands here north, mostly keep to the shore 
most of the time. 




When I was a student in Holland (terribly long ago by now) we had every summer 
a summercamp called ' Shore birds and bottomfauna' on the island of Vlieland in 
the Wadden Sea, where many budding ornithologists (several later famous names 
there) came together to study the diet and feeding habits of the different 
shorebirds, while I was the bottom fauna man, who was supposed to know all the 
animals in the mudflats, as well as the tracks they left on the surface. One of 
these tracks was made by the large polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor, a small 
hole with a network of tracks radiating from it. And I soon found out that the 
local starlings knew these tracks as well as I did and walked from one to the 
next, trying to extract the ragworms (I have later seen Spotless Starlings in 
NW Spain do exactly the same). 




Starlings also came and collected the debris on the shrimp-boats in the harbour 
of Den Helder, where I lived at the time. And later, in the Sognefjord in 
Western Norway , where at the time there was a large seasonal Sprat Clupea 
sprattus fishery, where these small fishes were for a while kept in large 
holding nets in the fjord, with some mortality, starlings cruised like small 
helicopters over the surface and picked up the floating corpses. 




The most shore-bird like behaviour I ave seen in starlings was also in the 
Sognefjord, although further inland, in late summer. Here starlings foraged in 
the intertidal at ebbtide, and in fact caught the amphipods I was studying at 
the time, as I suspect they do quite regularly many places. But what was very 
special this time, in my eyes, was that when the flood came and the intertidal 
no longer was accessible to shorebirds, the starlings sat in long rows on the 
telephone wires along the road, and rested, exactly as real shorebirds do at 
high tide! 




Starlings are highly interesting birds, just because they are generalists and 
always open to new possibilities, and exhibit new behavioural traits. 


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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia
From: Willem Jan Marinus Vader <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2016 15:31:00 +0000
Egyptian Geese, starlings. lupines and xenophoba



Today was a sunny day in Troms, N. Norway, a respite between rain yesterday 
and rain tomorrow (Not terribly hot, though, +5*C this morning when I went out 
at 10 am). It is clearly autumn here now, the birches are yellowing, mushrooms 
everywhere. the swallows and terns are gone, and the thrushes are raiding the 
berries in the gardens. Few flowers left along the roads, mostly diehards like 
Yarrow and Hawksweed, but at Tisnes the Felwort still is in full flower. And 
there are still a few flowers in the large patches of lupines that from year to 
year become more prevalent in the area, but which of course do not belong here; 
these are American plants. I remember how elated I was the year I lived in 
Bodega Bay in California, now almost 40 years ago and found several species of 
wild lupines on Bodega Head; but here in Troms I don't like them at all, 
beautiful though the flowers may be. 




There is a similar case in Holland with the Egyptian Geese that in the course 
of a few decades have become almost ubiquitous in that country. Rare is the day 
trip where this species is not on the list nowadays. And I loathe them, even to 
the ridiculous point that I don't even fully appreciate them anymore in Africa, 
where they of course are fully at home. 




Several small flocks of Starlings were around and reminded me that every time I 
write something about this most interesting bird, I get a number of irate 
reactions from the USA and Australia, telling me how awful these birds are. 




In all these cases we have arguments that sound somewhat rational: The lupines 
take over the road verges from the local flowers; the Egyptian Geese have the 
nasty habit of killing off other young and smaller birds in their territories, 
and the Starlngs are simply too many and occupy nest holes that 'better' birds 
need for their nests. But recently I have started wondering if there maybe is 
something amiss with these feelings nevertheless. In these later years we have 
here in Europe a serious problem with large numbers of human refugees, largely 
from areas where there is war, famine, and/or repressive dictatorships, and 
also in Australia and now in the USA 'illegal immigrants' are much in the news. 
And the arguments used to keep out these people as much as possible are exactly 
the same as in the case of the other exotic animals and plant: they do not 
belong here, they take up room and jobs from the 'better people', and they have 
undesirable behavour. It has made me think: maybe my strong reluctance to 
accept these foreign plants and animals in our nature here North is in fact 
just a kind of xenophobia, in the same way as I feel much of the fear for 
immigrants is too. 




A further argument for this view is that the 'fear and loathing' only kick in 
when the exotics arrive in numbers. All birders love to see the lone vagrant , 
and I have no problems at all with another American immigrant on our island, 
the Monkey flower Mimulus guttatus, that has only a precarious toehold here, 
and every year is found at only 1 or 2 spots. Nor do I grudge the 2-3 pairs of 
Collared Doves that have held out in Troms since their arrival in 1969, no 
doubt the northernmost in the world. But in the areas in the USA they have 
recently overrun I suppose feelings are maybe quite different towards also this 
species. 




Have you ever had any thoughts along these lines? Or am I completely at sea 
with my ideas? 




Wim Vader, Troms, Norway

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Subject: BirdNote: Last Week & Next -- and Vultures!
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2016 07:56:55 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Celebrating Vulture Awareness Day, September 3, 2016 — and vultures in
general! Check out the blog:
http://birdnote.org/blog/2016/09/vultures-natures-clean-crew

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Pied-billed Grebes Adapt
http://bit.ly/MLhrkA
* Wilson's Warbler Near Summer's End
http://bit.ly/1nKrmDK
* Cisticolas - Chirping, Croaking, Zitting, and More
http://bit.ly/2bTeVsL
* Great Blue Heron, Alone Again
http://bit.ly/TX50S4
* Birding Trails - Find One Near You
http://bit.ly/P8lfvd
* Gerrit Vyn on the Lammergeier
http://bit.ly/164BkG1
* Zone-tailed Hawks Mimic Vultures
http://bit.ly/2bK4L0u
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2c02xb8
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
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Share shows on Pinterest: http://bit.ly/2bJd4bI
========================
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show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: wanna see something remarkable?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2016 15:15:13 +0100
hello everyone,

i friend tweeted this to me. it is a tweet with a gif embedded that shows
the weather radar detected explosion of birds into the sky after the
oklahoma city earthquake:

https://twitter.com/TxStormChasers/status/772058452906561538

i worry about all those poor, terrified birds crashing into each other as
they tried to flee -- a very similar phenomenon to fireworks:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/birds-flee-en-mass-from-fireworks-grrlscientist-bfab1f14bb2a#.cwnq56yvk 


--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Conflict:)
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 09:52:02 -0500
Have reached, even slightly exceeded, year's birding & butterflying goals.

The 1/2 lister is tempted to revise them with four months left. The 1/2 
contemplative warns against such. 


The old angel/demon on shoulders cartoon illustration comes to mind.

It's always interesting watching these two sides mix, or argue.

Right now choosing the contemplative, appreciative, composing side. Whether 
such will endure a migratory fallout is questionable. 


Enjoy today's, this week's birds!

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of August 28, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 06:11:09 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Singin' Like a Bird and Feelin' Good
-- What bird would YOU want to sing like?
http://bit.ly/O7e07K
* Shorebirds Watch Their Feet
http://bit.ly/2badG7e
* Young Bald Eagles on the Move
http://bit.ly/1mvhld1
* The Crow vs. the Gull - Who Wins?
http://bit.ly/OA5VWy
* Texas Hill Country Conservation
http://bit.ly/NkKm9q
* One Square Inch of Silence
-- With Gordon Hempton, SoundTracker
http://bit.ly/15le5Hd
* A Song Sparrow Learns to Sing
-- With Sievert Rohwer
http://bit.ly/NRkoMs
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2bnQe81
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-)
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 14:39:15 -0700
Great article

Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Aug 25, 2016, at 1:51 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> 
> Interesting article from Cornell's "All About Birds":
> 
> 
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/goodbye-yellow-rump-will-we-see-a-return-to-myrtle-and-audubons-warblers/ 

> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
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to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


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Subject: Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 16:51:26 -0400
Interesting article from Cornell's "All About Birds":


https://www.allaboutbirds.org/goodbye-yellow-rump-will-we-see-a-return-to-myrtle-and-audubons-warblers/ 


Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Hilton Pond 07/16/16 (Finches, Hummingbirds, And An Owl)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 15:43:44 -0400
During mid-summer at Hilton Pond Center we're typically immersed in banding 
fledgling House Finches and ever-abundant Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, but this 
week we had a very unusual encounter with a Barred Owl. To read about recent 
work with all three species, please visit our latest photo essay for 16-31 July 
2016 at http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160716.html 
 


While there please remember to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured during the period. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Name
From: Jim Williams <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:37:52 -0500
Crossley  in hand. Thanks to all.

Jim Williams
birding blog at www.startribune.com/Wingnut

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Subject: Need author name
From: Jim Williams <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:06:06 -0500
A few years ago a photographer created a bird field guide composed entirely of 
photos imposed on photo backgrounds. It was not very good, I thought at that 
time, which perhaps is why I cannot remember the author's / photographer's 
name. 


Help, please. I want to mention his book in a review of a new guide to birds of 
Britain and Ireland. It uses the same idea, but does it very well. It's a 
beautiful piece of work. 


Thanks.

Jim Williams
Wayzata, Minnesota
birding blog at www.startribune.com/Wingnut

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Subject: Birds Moving South with Cold Front
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 23:07:29 -0500





Hey folks,

 I have posted a radar image of tonight's migration movement in the upper 
midwest. Lots of reports of mixed warbler flock showing up. See image at: 




 http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


Good birding,
Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN





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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 21, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 07:57:19 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Who’s the Next Aldo Leopold?
-- With George Archibald
http://bit.ly/1smfZIB
* Crow and Tools
http://bit.ly/14exjOu
* Vermilion Flycatcher
-- Be sure to watch the video
http://bit.ly/2bdu1an
* The Call of the Loon
http://bit.ly/Q4S4Zs
* Sapsuckers and Sap
http://tinyurl.com/9yunppw
* White Ibis's Tricky Nesting Schedule
http://bit.ly/2bmJlCM
* Honeybees and Red-tails
http://bit.ly/2aRf9QZ
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2baJHMA
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Hotel Hong Kong
From: Patty O'Neill <pattyoneill AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 10:28:59 -0500
 Sorry, I hope this goes through. I think I formatted the previous email 
incorrectly 



On 08/17/16, Patty O'Neill wrote:

The Butterfly in Kowloon is very conveniently located and reasonably priced, 
about $100 for a single. I am not at home and don't have the address but you 
can find it on the net. If you take the Metro from the airport you have to 
transfer, but the airport bus will drop you at the door and pick you up. The 
subway was a short walk around the corner, and if I recall correctly there was 
a line that took you without transferring to the stop where you get the taxi to 
Mai Po. It was close to Nathan Road and walkable to the Star Ferry. I was there 
2 or 3 years ago. 


Patty O'Neill
pattyoneillatverizon.net
MiltonMA


On 08/17/16, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:

There is 1 message totaling 69 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

 1. RFI Hong Kong

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 13:03:49 +0000
From: "David M. Gascoigne" 
Subject: RFI Hong Kong

If anyone has stayed in Hong Kong recently and can recommend a hotel in the 
Kowloon/New Territories area that is reasonably priced and close to a train 
station, I would appreciate hearing from you. 


Thank you!


David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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------------------------------

End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 Aug 2016 to 16 Aug 2016 (#2016-99)
**************************************************************

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Subject: RFI Hong Kong
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 13:03:49 +0000
If anyone has stayed in Hong Kong recently and can recommend a hotel in the 
Kowloon/New Territories area that is reasonably priced and close to a train 
station, I would appreciate hearing from you. 


Thank you!


David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: sign of life from 70*N
From: Vader Willem Jan Marinus <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2016 16:14:13 +0000

END OF SUMMER IN TROMS



I am still alive and living in Troms, even though I have fallen silent on the 
bird lists. 




Yesterday morning my lawn in Troms, N.Norway (69*50'N) was suddenly full of 
birds, where there usually is nothing more than the usual magpies and hooded 
crows, and our 'house gulls', the Common Gull. But now, when I looked out (I 
have the basement apartment) the lawn was full of thrushes, most of them 
Fieldfares, but with also quite a number of Redwings among them, mostly keeping 
to less open places. There were also a couple of White Wagtails, a few 
Redpolls, and in the trees young Willow Warblers. All this is preparatory to 
the autumn migration; many birds are leaving their territories and flocking 
together. 




Summer 2016 here in Troms has not been (as we say here) 'to shout Hurrah for': 
too many days and weeks with grey, wet weather and temperatures around 10-12 
*C. But today, although not much warmer, we had a sunny quiet day and I decided 
to go and check some of my usual haunts, mostly to look for shorebirds, usually 
the first birds migrating through here. It is late summer here; most of our 
luxuriant forbs have almost stopped flowering, only the Fireweed Chamaenerion 
colours some large patches vividly violet, while today I also found a very rich 
stand of the beautiful late-summer flowers of Felwort Gentianella. The very 
common and enormous 'Troms palms' Heracleum are already yellowing, another 
sign of the end of summer. 




I started out at the Langnes area near the airport, about which I have written 
several times before (I feel I have written several times before about almost 
every area here, main reason I stopped writing). It is a small low peninsula 
between a main road and the sea, where many people walk their dogs, and park 
their cars when they fly (to avoid parking fees; I counted some 40 parked cars 
in the area today)); there are willow copses, large areas covered with tall 
forbs, and extensive tidal areas. A skerry just offshore (you can walk there 
when the water is low enough, we have a 3.5m tidal amplitude) is always used by 
Cormorants, except in the nesting season, when they move elsewhere; today there 
were already 5 cormorants there, another sign of the near end of summer. There 
is a sandy beach, where always Ringed Plovers breed, and where in summer you 
have to be very careful not to be hit by angry Arctic Terns. Now the plovers 
were still alarming, but the young could fly; also a few young terns flew 
around, and the parents still attacked me half-heartedly; but most of the 
ternshere had gone, and I found a large flock elsewhere. The sandy beach and 
stony mudflat before it also held quite large groups of sandpipers, today 
mostly Purple Sandpipers, but also Dunlins, Turnstones and as a surprise a 
single Red Knot. In addition a snall flock of 6 Lapwings flew up and away when 
I arrived; this is a species that nests here, but decreases alarmingly in the 
area; several territories where I always found the birds earlier are now no 
longer in use. There were also a few Golden Plovers, but I saw no Redshanks nor 
any other Tringa, and no Ruffs either, usually the most common shorebird on 
autumn migration here. Lots of wagtails and Meadow Pipits on the beach and this 
time also many young Northern Wheatears. As usual, several Eiders with young 
are present, and of course also Oystercatchers and various gulls. 




The wetland of Tisnes, som 30 km from Troms on the island of Kvalya, is 
another place I have written about many times. It is a peninsula of low-lying 
agricultural wetlands, now sadly for a quite large part taken over by a horse 
farm; the horses have trampled and largely destroyed a wonderful chalk meadow 
and its very diverse flower vegetation. Most of the fields have now been mowed 
and most places the glittering white 'tractor eggs' with hay still lie around 
in the fields (A lone whimbrel was foraging in one of these fields); elsewhere 
they have already been gathered and lie in neat rows near the barns. Very few 
shorebirds today at Tisnes: where I saw some 50 Ruffs a week ago, I now saw 
only a single one. Surprisingly, Barn Swallows were still criss-crossing the 
area in some numbers, just as last week; this is not at all a common bird so 
far North and one rarely sees tens together , as is the case here. (The nearby 
colony of Bank Swallows is deserted now). A few Golden Plovers, a single 
Lapwing and the unavoidable Oystercatchers were all I could find today. But 
there was something else: at least 100 Greylag Geese, with quite a number of 
youngsters, sat close together in one of the Fields; another species flocking 
preparatory to the autumn migration. 




But as you can see; it is largely business as usual here at 70*N.



Wim Vader, Troms, Norway

wim.vader AT uit.no

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 14, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 08:37:38 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Birds and Navigation
http://bit.ly/Z1flnN
* Ospreys Weather the Storm
http://bit.ly/Nem6M4
* Solon Towne and the Meadowlarks
http://bit.ly/2aCSBTN
* The Elegant Trogon
http://bit.ly/NYVwqn
* Woodpeckers Love Ants
http://bit.ly/1dyO5CF
* Bird Life at the Grand Canyon
http://bit.ly/18B75Kk
* Flammulated Owl, Summer Visitor
http://bit.ly/RRX7QF
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2bdYPvQ
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
--------------------------------
BirdNote and VENT head to Panama, Sept. 13-25.
Join us! http://bit.ly/1TyuJg9
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: W. Mass. guide going out of print
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 14:22:43 +0000
Anyone interested in a copy of The Bird Finding Guide to Western Massachusetts* 
should buy immediately, as the publisher is withdrawing it: 

https://umassextensionbookstore.com/products/42

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


*Yes, I am one of the editors. No, I have no financial stake in the book, but I 
would like to see it used. 


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Subject: New River Hummingbird Festival (13 Aug, Oak Hill WV)
From: research AT HILTONPOND.ORG
Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2016 12:20:19 -0400
Hope to see you there!  -)

http://birding-wv.com/birding-nature-events/hummingbird-festival.html 
 


Happy Birding!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================


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Subject: Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 09:46:12 -0800
=) I thought it looked a little different than what they posted.
Maybe they just threw in any kind of photo. 
Thanks for the keen eye!
Joy

> On Aug 8, 2016, at 9:34 AM, mitch AT utopianature.com wrote:
> 
> Say, isn't that a Least Sandpiper in the photo at the
> link?  Photo is credited to U.S. F. & W., caption
> calls it a Baird's.
> 
> Thanks for the interesting post Joyanne.
> 
> Mitch Heindel
> Utopia Texas
> 
> 
> On 2016-08-08 08:42, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:
>> Hello Bird friends,
>> I thought you would like to read this article on climate change’s
>> impact on Arctic nesting shorebirds that just came out today.
>> 
http://www.adn.com/arctic/2016/08/07/warming-climate-expected-to-squeeze-out-arctic-bird-habitat/ 

>> Joyanne Hamilton
>> Shageluk, Alaska
> 

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Subject: Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 10:34:33 -0700
Say, isn't that a Least Sandpiper in the photo at the
link?  Photo is credited to U.S. F. & W., caption
calls it a Baird's.

Thanks for the interesting post Joyanne.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia Texas


On 2016-08-08 08:42, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:
> Hello Bird friends,
> I thought you would like to read this article on climate change’s
> impact on Arctic nesting shorebirds that just came out today.
>
> 
http://www.adn.com/arctic/2016/08/07/warming-climate-expected-to-squeeze-out-arctic-bird-habitat/ 

>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska

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Subject: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 07:42:55 -0800
Hello Bird friends,
I thought you would like to read this article on climate change’s impact on 
Arctic nesting shorebirds that just came out today. 



http://www.adn.com/arctic/2016/08/07/warming-climate-expected-to-squeeze-out-arctic-bird-habitat/ 
 


Summer is winding down here with very few Tree and Cliff swallow still around. 
Most other migrants have already gone their merry way with their offspring in 
tow. Rusty blackbirds, Warblers of various yellow and orange varieties, 
White-crowned sparrows, Fox Sparrows and Juncos still abound in our area. The 
Sandhill cranes haven’t started gathering in their spiral flight above our 
meadows; that will happen in September. Overall it’s been a good nesting year 
in our area for interior shorebirds, songbirds and raptors. Yesterday I saw a 
Northern Shrike being chased by a dozen Redpolls and a flying Bald Eagle being 
hollered at by Common loons. I’ve been seeing what I think are Olive-sided 
Flycatchers gathering up on the power lines here and there. Even though 
according to the range maps they are abundant, this is the first I have ever 
seen them. 


Several species of salmon have completed their migration on our interior Alaska 
river and our transplanted Wood Bison herd have made their way full circle to 
calve this spring and have since dispersed to meadows in a 150 mile radius. 
Many waterfowl have headed to the hills to feast on the berries that are 
plentiful this summer. 


I look forward to spider migration ballooning their webs on the fall breezes 
and the Sandhill cranes circling, calling and gathering together higher and 
higher above the Innoko River area we live in. 


I also look forward to one single Magpie that has been our local guest now for 
about 7 years. I don’t know where he/she goes in the spring—to procreate, I 
guess—but has been returning back to our village each fall. I have never seen 
any other Magpies in our area. I don’t know where his/her family is! I 
don’t know why we only see one! 


School starts here August 17. All the teachers are migrating to their 
inservices at various locations in the state most with tans and fun summer 
vacation stories. 


That’s life for now.
Enjoy the southern migration sightings.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


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Subject: 10-tips-photographing-birds
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 11:33:44 -0400
Hello!
Since, in the past days it was discussed bird photography, I would like to 
share this article: 

http://www.audubon.org/news/10-tips-photographing-birds
Yours,
Paulo Boute.( The Olympic) Brazil.
                                          
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 7, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 07:57:14 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Listening for Bird Song, With Gordon Hempton
http://bit.ly/14oKrq6
* Raptors' Sky Dance - A Rare Sight
http://bit.ly/Q51jcJ
* Advice to Beginning Birders -
With David Sibley
http://bit.ly/Y4x3X1
* Brown-headed Nuthatches of Apalachicola
http://bit.ly/NpuKas
* How Toucans Stay Cool
http://bit.ly/2aDWHZM
* Woodpeckers as Keystone Species
http://bit.ly/1702XpV
* Amazing Aquatic American Dipper
http://bit.ly/1sv9Qql
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2aP7Pox
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
--------------------------------
BirdNote and VENT head to Panama, Sept. 13-25.
Join us! http://bit.ly/1TyuJg9
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Laurie Foss <lauriefoss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 15:05:54 -0500
Dear Chatters,
In response to the question of weight, I use a mirrorless micro 4/3 camera,
the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 with the Panasonic 100-300mm lens. I find it
very comfortable to carry around all day using a Black Rapid strap that
sits under my binocular harness. Since I am usually leading a group, I also
carry a spotting scope and bag full of "group needs" stuff and find that
the camera does not put an undue burden on me in addition to the rest of
the equipment.
The camera itself is as simple or as complex as I want to use it. It has a
fully automatic setting as well as a full manual mode. One feature I really
like is pre-set modes that I can use for fast motion (a bird in flight),
low light, bright light, etc. This was my first time entering the world of
interchangeable lens cameras and I've been very pleased with my choice.
For what it's worth, I spent some time at a digiscoping workshop to
determine if I would rather use my phone or this camera for digiscoping.
There I was able to use a TLS-APO adapter for this camera and put that rig
on my scope, and compared it side-by-side with my iPhone with PhoneSkope
adapter on a scope, and I preferred the digiscoping method using my phone
rather than using the camera.  Having the adapter on my phone and my camera
fully ready with the zoom lens gave me a great ability to be flexible about
whatever bird might show up for a quick camera shot. When leading a group,
I can't spend much time framing a shot. So having that flexibility really
works well for me.
I also know a lot of birders who use the super-zoom cameras and are very
pleased with the results they get with them. One of the nice things about
these cameras is that you won't be tempted to get the next great lens that
is developed for your rig! Don't ask me how I know this.

Laurie Foss
Spicewood, TX

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Subject: Birds' "Redness Gene" Traced Back To The Dinosaurs
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 14:49:23 +0100
hello everyone,

i just published this piece that might interest you, regarding the ancient
origins of color vision in birds.

The gene responsible for red coloration and color vision in birds is also
functional in turtles — arising in a shared dinosaur ancestor where it was
probably used for color vision and possibly also for red coloration more
than 250 million years ago

Birds' "Redness Gene" Traced Back To The Dinosaurs

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/08/03/which-came-first-seeing-red-or-being-red/ 


as always, i encourage you to share widely and freely.

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 16:44:01 -0400
 OK...so nine years ago I took a really bad fall down 15 stairs and broke
my arm so bad that it took a year to heal with surgery. I had some nerve
damage that left tremors in my left arm. I've been using Panasonic Lumix
mini-zoom cameras since then because they are ultra-lightweight and have
decent image stabilization. I've taken some cool photos with these cameras
but I would like to upgrade. Any suggestions for an upgrade that is still
lightweight but can take better photos? Thanks!

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
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>

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 13:00:08 -0700
I also use the SX50 which I believe has been discontinued but is still
available.  It has some advantages over the SX60 and newer models.  For one
it shoots RAW which is important to me.  The viewfinder has a knurled focus
knob that constantly gets knocked out of position so I don't use it any
more. Instead, the LCD can be turned around so now I just use that on the
camera back.  A very useful option puts a little green rectangle in the
middle and when you start to press the button, the inside of the rectangle
magnifies so you can see if you are really on the bird and in focus.

On a recent birding trip overseas, about half the participants were using
that camera.

On Tue, 2 Aug 2016 15:31:33 -0400, marys1000  wrote:

>So I bought the Canon SX50.  A lot of people really  like it.  It has a
>drawback that I guess most people deal with better than me. Button
>placement - there is a word for that I can't think of - anyway I so
>constantly mash other buttons while holding it and using it that I get
>kind of frustrated. Suddenly there are things flashing in the LCD, I'm
>in some new mode and I have no idea what's going on.  I'm not a, um,
>active user of the camera and just want to zoom and snap.  There are a
>lot of features and digital menu's and buttons.  It does do RAW (a must
>for "real" photographers).    IDK, like I said, its optical capabilities
>for a non DSLR are pretty good, zoom to 50 is pretty good.  A weakness
>of all the superzooms is looking through the actual viewfinder is darn
>near impossible - very dark.  You have to use the swing LCD which can
>take some practice to use.  Its doable but is sometimes a little slower
>to get on a bird than if you could just put the viewfinder up to yor
>face.   Birdforum.net has a pretty big folder on the SX50, some of those
>guys get pretty technical.  Actually Birdforum.net is a really good
>resource for all cameras, bins and scopes.  There is a facebook page
>that seems to be mostly people posting pictures if you want to see what
>people are doing with the camera.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: marys1000 <marys1000 AT WOH.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 15:31:33 -0400
I had a 24x zoom Panasonic Lumix quite awhile ago (A bridge camera or
superzoom).  The optical quality was really very nice.  Later when
looking for a longer superzoom replacement I read someone saying that
the Lumix optics were no longer made by Leica on their new longer zoom
models.  That explained a lot although I didn't confirm it myself.  I
liked that camera a lot but sold it (there were people looking for that
particular model)  as I got greedy for more zoom.
So I bought the Canon SX50.  A lot of people really  like it.  It has a
drawback that I guess most people deal with better than me. Button
placement - there is a word for that I can't think of - anyway I so
constantly mash other buttons while holding it and using it that I get
kind of frustrated. Suddenly there are things flashing in the LCD, I'm
in some new mode and I have no idea what's going on.  I'm not a, um,
active user of the camera and just want to zoom and snap.  There are a
lot of features and digital menu's and buttons.  It does do RAW (a must
for "real" photographers).    IDK, like I said, its optical capabilities
for a non DSLR are pretty good, zoom to 50 is pretty good.  A weakness
of all the superzooms is looking through the actual viewfinder is darn
near impossible - very dark.  You have to use the swing LCD which can
take some practice to use.  Its doable but is sometimes a little slower
to get on a bird than if you could just put the viewfinder up to yor
face.   Birdforum.net has a pretty big folder on the SX50, some of those
guys get pretty technical.  Actually Birdforum.net is a really good
resource for all cameras, bins and scopes.  There is a facebook page
that seems to be mostly people posting pictures if you want to see what
people are doing with the camera.

Marie, OH

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 14:27:06 -0500
When I was comparing Nikon to Canon, I was comparing extended zoom cameras,
not DSLRs, and I've never had a chance to use the new mirrorless micro
interchangeable lens cameras. I personally use the new Canon 80D and
their EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM. I don't consider myself a
photographer by any stretch--I'm a bird watcher who takes lots and lots of
pictures. For my own purposes, my system is pretty ideal in terms of speed
and quality of photos, and with a shoulder strap, it's not horrifyingly
heavy yet, though at 64, I'm starting to get wearier after a long day
lugging it.

I have Adobe software for my work, and never use Photoshop. Lightroom does
everything I need for photo processing and organizes my photos wonderfully.

That's the tricky thing about photography. Everyone swears by their own
system. When I was using an extended zoom camera, I swore by that and even
did an article for BirdWatching about how to get the best photos you could
through that kind of camera. When I was digiscoping through my spotting
scope, I swore by that. Some of the photos I took through a little Canon
pocket-sized camera and my scope are still used by others. Now I swear by
this camera system.

The main thing to remember, whatever you settle on, is to keep taking
pictures. The more you take, the quicker you will be, and the more
responsive you'll be to the quirks, good and bad, of your system.


Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 15:03:27 -0400
There are three main options IMO:

Superzooms:  lightweight, high magnification in a compact package; but
small sensors mean image quality not always the best, especially in low
light; also not good for birds in flight

Mirrorless Micro 4/3 (made by Olympus & Panasonic) interchangeable lens
cameras:  This is what I use.  Larger sensors mean better image quality
than superzooms (close to DSLRs in good light) and better low light
capability; heavier than superzooms but considerably lighter than DSLR
equivalents because of their 2x "crop factor" that effectively doubles the
magnification of the lens (300mm lens is a 200mm equivalent); better birds
in flight capability than superzooms, and new models should be close to
what DSLRs offer.  Not necessarily cheaper than DSLRs.

DSLRs (full frame or APSC sensor):  Heaviest of the bunch, but also the
best image quality and focusing abilities.  If you don't care about weight
(or cost) these are for you.

Best,
Jim M.
Maryland

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Jim Hully <xenospiza AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 13:38:42 -0500
Hi Bill,

You are going to be disappointed with any of the superzoom compacts. Yes,
some offer great zoom ranges, good stabilization  and responsiveness but
not in a single package yet and the weakest link is their focusing prowess
or lack of. The choices are Canon, Nikon & Panasonic. Canon offers a good
compromise of features but are let down by poorer optical qualities at the
longest focal lengths (in their latest models at least) and can be
infuriatingly slow at times. Panasonic models don't offer the kind of focal
lengths we birders need without adding clumsy extenders. They offer better
handling and responsiveness compared to Canon. I don't know enough about
Nikon but they certainly offer extreme focal lengths in rather large
bodies.  However, all use some form of contrast-based focusing which is
often not fast enough for anything that moves and moves irregularly.
Nikon's 1 series is the exception but that is an expensive proposition and
it looks like it is being phased out. If you are serious I would consider
looking at the models with the larger 1" sensor especially from Nikon (e.g.
DL24-500) or perhaps Sony's RX10 III but again we are talking about serious
money!  There is not a single model that stands head and shoulders above
the rest for what you are asking unless you want to consider DSLRs.

Cheers,

Jim Hully,
Grayslake, IL
xenospiza AT gmail
Bird images: https://jimhully.smugmug.com/

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>



--

Jim Hully
Grayslake, IL
xenospiza AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 13:03:32 -0500
I'm out of it as far as keeping up with the newest models, but everything
I've experienced in the past and what I've heard from at least a few people
in the past few weeks tells me that Canon is almost always better than
Nikon for lag time between pressing the button and the camera taking the
photo.

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: Chipping Sparrow and Cowbird
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 12:15:40 -0500





I had the opportunity to watch the outcome of an instance of nest parasitism in 
my backyard a couple of days ago. It seems like every year I have a Chipping 
Sparrow raising a Brown-headed Cowbird. It's the only species I've found being 
taken advantage of around my place. I posted a little selection of photos of 
the birds interacting. 


http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


It looks like southbound migration is starting to ramp up as some species are 
already grouping into flocks. 


Good Birding,
Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN




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Subject: Do Wildlife-Friendly Yards Increase Bird-Window Collisions?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 11:52:20 +0100
hello everyone,

an embargoed study was published a couple days ago in The Condor that
examines a question that i am sure, many of us have wondered about: do
wildlife-friendly yards increase bird-window collisions?


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/29/do-wildlife-friendly-yards-increase-risk-of-bird-window-collisions/ 


this paper is one of the very few published studies on bird-building
collisions, and it relies on thousands of observations made by citizen
scientists -- perhaps some of you helped collect these data?

this piece also features a gorgeous image that was kindly provided by my
friend, list co-owner, dave rintoul.

in this piece, the author of the study offers some suggestions for how to
make your dwellings safer for wild birds, and i add a few more suggestions
of my own.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 31, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 07:46:57 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Birds That Say Their Own Names
http://bit.ly/P9K9eA
* An Evening in Sapsucker Woods, With A.A. Allen
http://bit.ly/RO1Y1v
* Decibels Per Gram - Who's Loudest?
http://bit.ly/2ahycGh
* Stock Tank - A Southwestern Oasis
http://bit.ly/LA6Kjb
* Two Phoebes Share the West
http://bit.ly/2a2bgIB
* Clever Nuthatches
http://bit.ly/NHORBL
* Rock Pigeons: Bobbleheads
http://bit.ly/14qtvAE
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2ayd9yb
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
--------------------------------
BirdNote and VENT head to Panama, Sept. 13-25.
Join us! http://bit.ly/1TyuJg9
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Hilton Pond 07/01/16 (Hot Summer Flowers)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 09:34:40 -0400
The current installment of “This Week at Hilton Pond” is all about 
flowering plants--both native and invasive--found blooming in recent mid-summer 
heat, with references to pollinators associated with those blossoms. Diverse 
plant families are represented by close-up images in what may be our most 
colorful posting ever! 


To view the flower photos and anecdotal text for 1-15 July 2016, please see 
"Early July 2016: Hot, Humid, Windy . . . And Flowery" at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160701.html 


While there please remember to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured during the period, including our ever-larger population of 
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

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Subject: Inbred Songbirds Cannot Carry A Tune
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:03:07 +0100
Hi everyone,

a sweet little paper was published today in Proc Roy Society B, that finds
that a male canary's inbreeding status can be detected in its songs -- not
only can we see these song differences, but female canaries can hear them
and choose a mate accordingly:

Inbred Songbirds Cannot Carry A Tune

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/27/inbred-canaries-cannot-carry-a-tune/ 


ok, this is interesting,, but it does, in my opinion, provide a strong
argument in support of placing more weight on "minor" song differences for
identifying new species, especially cryptic species. anywho, some food for
thought!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 01:56:54 +0000
Thanks so much Dave. I forgot the most obvious source of all. What they have 
there is perfect! 

Best regards,

David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 26, 2016, at 8:18 PM, David Starrett 
> wrote: 



You have probably thought of this but I just looked in eBird bar charts for Mai 
Po and they have at least one version of what you may be looking for. 



Dave



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
David Starrett
Columbia, MO
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
> on behalf of 
David M. Gascoigne > 

Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2016 6:40 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Annotated Checklist for Mai Po


I have been trying to find an annotated checklist for the birds of Mai Po (Hong 
Kong). I can find a checklist showing all the birds ever located there but 
nothing that shows seasonal abundance, or other useful information. Does anyone 
know where I can find one, or has anyone visited Mai Po in late February and 
would care to share their list? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: 
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com 

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to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


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Subject: Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po
From: David Starrett <StarrettDA AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 00:18:28 +0000
You have probably thought of this but I just looked in eBird bar charts for Mai 
Po and they have at least one version of what you may be looking for. 



Dave



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
David Starrett
Columbia, MO
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of David M. Gascoigne 
 

Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2016 6:40 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Annotated Checklist for Mai Po


I have been trying to find an annotated checklist for the birds of Mai Po (Hong 
Kong). I can find a checklist showing all the birds ever located there but 
nothing that shows seasonal abundance, or other useful information. Does anyone 
know where I can find one, or has anyone visited Mai Po in late February and 
would care to share their list? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com
For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


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Subject: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 11:40:03 +0000
I have been trying to find an annotated checklist for the birds of Mai Po (Hong 
Kong). I can find a checklist showing all the birds ever located there but 
nothing that shows seasonal abundance, or other useful information. Does anyone 
know where I can find one, or has anyone visited Mai Po in late February and 
would care to share their list? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: why are robins' eggs blue?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 17:34:05 +0100
hello everyone,

when i taught ornithology classes, this was a question that i could bet i'd
be asked at some point during the semester. recently, a paper came out,
explaining this very phenomenon!

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/25/why-are-robins-eggs-blue/

and of course, feel free to share this story with your friends and
colleagues and yes, with your kids, too!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 16:33:15 +0000
Thanks for sharing this, especially for the links to other great papers. I was 
aware that honeyguides are brood parasites, but I learned a good deal about the 
gruesome activities of the young birds. 


David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 23, 2016, at 9:50 AM,   wrote:
> 
> Brood parasitism too...
> 
> Oscar Canino
> SF, CA
> oscarboy AT gmail.com
> 
> These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
> Seriously, this might be the coolest human-animal partnership ever. 
> 
> 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2016/07/21/these-amazing-wild-birds-understand-when-people-call-them-to-help-hunt-for-honey/ 

> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 24, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 07:59:10 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Message of the Mourning Dove
http://bit.ly/Ui0VNj
* Ruffed Grouse: A Different Drummer
http://bit.ly/2amiANI
* Rosalind Renfrew and the Upland Sandpiper
http://bit.ly/1ePOAuh
* Are Birds' Nests Reused? (If so, for how long?)
http://bit.ly/1LiXmil
* Shorebirds - Masters of Long-Distance Migration
http://bit.ly/12NUTF5
* Birds Have No External Ears
http://bit.ly/29ZfTQ5
* Trust and Partnerships Help Birds in Montana
http://bit.ly/18fQ5gI
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/29ZMurc
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
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========================
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Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 06:50:12 -0700
Brood parasitism too...

Oscar Canino
SF, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
Seriously, this might be the coolest human-animal partnership ever. 


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2016/07/21/these-amazing-wild-birds-understand-when-people-call-them-to-help-hunt-for-honey/ 


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Subject: Birding and "Pokemon Go" (similarities)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 12:42:10 -0400
I was birding in a local park yesterday when I saw two guys in their 20s
who were obviously playing "Pokemon Go". Out of curiosity I asked "See
anything interesting?" One on them said "Oh yeah!" The other guy said
"There's some good stuff here!" and proceeded to name a few Pokemon
characters. It was pretty much the same exchange I might expect if I had
encountered a couple of birders in the same spot and asked the same
question. :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 10:30:41 -0700
Devorah:
While I'd like to read the article, and perhaps reprint it on our
blog (if possible), seeing as we are a large beach community, I
didn't want to "whitepage" (whatever that means) forbes.com cookies,
nor do I want to sign up with Forbes for anything. Oh well.

yours,
Chuck Almdale
Santa Monica Bay

At 10:05 PM 7/19/2016, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:
>Date:    Tue, 19 Jul 2016 14:19:19 +0100
>From:    Devorah the Ornithologist 
>Subject: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds
>
>hello everyone,
>summer is time to hit the beach -- but this is also the time and place when
>shorebirds and seabirds are nesting. so how can one's family enjoy
>themselves without harming nesting birds, some of which are endangered?
>believe it or not, this can be done, and I've collected a number of things
>that can be done to make life easier for everyone this holiday season:

>http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/18/birds-and-bums-can-bond-on-the-beach/ 

>
>please do share with friends, family and on social media so others who are
>less familiar with birds can also learn how to make sure human and avian
>families emerge from this holiday season rested, relaxed -- and alive.

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Subject: South American bird taxonomy and checklists
From: Mark Mulhollam <markm3232 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 02:51:35 -0500
HI all,

 If you are looking for a fast way to search the bird taxonomy and distribution 
for South America, I have finished my website which allows one to do just that. 
It is based on the South American Classification Committee’s work 
[http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.htm]. It is totally nonprofit 
with no advertising. 


http://potoococha.net/

You can also create pdf checklists for all the South American countries or csv 
files. 


I hope it is helpful, I try to keep it up-to-date as the taxonomy and country 
lists frequently change. 


Thanks,

Mark Mulhollam
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA

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Subject: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 14:19:19 +0100
hello everyone,

summer is time to hit the beach -- but this is also the time and place when
shorebirds and seabirds are nesting. so how can one's family enjoy
themselves without harming nesting birds, some of which are endangered?
believe it or not, this can be done, and I've collected a number of things
that can be done to make life easier for everyone this holiday season:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/18/birds-and-bums-can-bond-on-the-beach/ 


please do share with friends, family and on social media so others who are
less familiar with birds can also learn how to make sure human and avian
families emerge from this holiday season rested, relaxed -- and alive.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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Subject: Re: Alaska birding cruises
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 22:27:17 +0000
There are many ways to see Alaska.  If you want to see the most birds per day, 
forget the cruises or the ferries, fly to Anchorage and grab a tour that 
includes some combination of Gambel, Nome, and Denali. Pribilofs almost as good 
as Gambel.  This is very $$$ but you'll see a lot of birds.  If you are long 
on time and short on money, throw the camping gear in your car and drive to 
Denali, the North Slope, Seward, Homer and Haines, and take the Marine Highway 
back from Haines to Prince Rupert.  It will take at least 4 weeks.  We did 
this in 1970 with our one year old.  Marine Highway "stateroom" was one star 
motel minus.  Not again.The cruise plus car rental option is intermediate in 
both cost and time, much more comfortable, and you'll see a lot of birds.  2-3 
weeks would be fine.  Do not take one of the giant ships where you might be 
200 ft off the water.  Take a lower state room on one of the smaller Holland 
America ships, you'll be 60 ft off the water and see a lot of seabirds.  It 
was easy to ID both pelagic birds and alcids from the ship.  You'll also get 
into difficult to access Glacier Bay NP.  The city stops are 6-8 hours not 
2-3. We had a fabulous whale and glacier tour off the ship in Juneau.  Lots 
of birds plus whales bubble netting up close.  Get off at Seward and take the 
NW Fjord tour and you'll see all the birds of the Pribilofs except the Asian 
rarities, the Least and Crested Auklets and the Red-footed Kittiwakes for 1/10 
the cost.  Drive to Denali (stop at Homer for shorebirds) so you can stop when 
a Hawk Owl sits on the phone wire along the road.  Fly home from 
Anchorage.  Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965

      From: "snorkler AT juno.com" 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, July 17, 2016 10:45 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Alaska birding cruises
   
Rich,

I suggest you take the Alaska Marine Highway System (ferries) instead of a 
cruise ship.  If your goal is comfort, get staterooms on the ferry, so you 
don't have to sleep on the solarium deck. If you're looking for an economical 
trip, throw a sleeping bag in a ferry lounge, and see Alaska like Alaskans do. 


Cruise ships offer very few birding and sightseeing opportunities.  When 
you're 200' above the water, it's difficult to separate Sooty from Short-tailed 
Shearwaters, or Pomerine from Parasitic Jaegers.  Heck, it's hard to see the 
6'dorsal fin of an Orca to identify it from a Pilot Whale, or (shudder) a Dall 
Porpoise.  Cruises will not give you the time to take excursions more than an 
hour or two out of their southeast Alaska port towns.  What you get on a 
cruise is an inexpensive and insulated slice of the Alaska panhandle. 


You can do the same thing on a ferry, save a lot of money, and arrange the trip 
of a lifetime.  Each SE AK port has private excursion companies that will take 
you to nearby attractions, and get you back to the cruise ship or ferry before 
it leaves port.  So if you're in Skagway and want to do the White Pass RR 
trip, or Juneau and want to see Mendenhall Glacier, you can disembark, buy 
tickets on the pier, see your attraction, and be back in time to reboard your 
ship. 


Other people have mentioned Denali National Park.  You can't do it from a 
cruise ship trip.  By the time you got back to port 2-3 days later, the cruise 
ship would be long gone.  But if you take a ferry to Juneau, You can fly to 
Anchorage, take the train to Denali, and fly back to Juneau for a return ferry 
trip.  


Which leads me to the trip of a lifetime.  You take the money you saved by 
riding the ferry instead of taking a cruise ship, and spend it on Denali and 
the Pribilofs.  From Juneau, fly to St. Paul Island about June 21. June 21 is 
the day the Northern Fur Seal cows arrive to give birth to their pups.  Almost 
every visitor to St. Paul is there for the birding.  You can join a guided 
trip to the bird rookery, or rent a four-wheeler or take a taxi to the 
rookery.  Breeding species you'll see include Parakeet, Least, and Crested 
Auklets, Common and Thick-billed Murres, Horned and Tufted Puffins.  
Black-legged and Red-legged Kittiwakes, Northern Fulmar, Red-faced 
Cormorants.  When I was there, I skipped dinner and a tour of the Russian 
Orthodox Church to spend time alone at the rookery.  My magical moment was 
seeing seven Arctic Foxes working the rookery.  Other species include Snowy 
Owl, Grey-crowned Rosy Finch, Glaucous Gull, and Pribilof Wren. 


Darrell Lee
Alameda, CA







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Subject: Re: Alaska birding cruises
From: "snorkler AT juno.com" <snorkler@JUNO.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 17:45:59 GMT
Rich,

I suggest you take the Alaska Marine Highway System (ferries) instead of a 
cruise ship. If your goal is comfort, get staterooms on the ferry, so you don't 
have to sleep on the solarium deck. If you're looking for an economical trip, 
throw a sleeping bag in a ferry lounge, and see Alaska like Alaskans do. 


Cruise ships offer very few birding and sightseeing opportunities. When you're 
200' above the water, it's difficult to separate Sooty from Short-tailed 
Shearwaters, or Pomerine from Parasitic Jaegers. Heck, it's hard to see the 
6'dorsal fin of an Orca to identify it from a Pilot Whale, or (shudder) a Dall 
Porpoise. Cruises will not give you the time to take excursions more than an 
hour or two out of their southeast Alaska port towns. What you get on a cruise 
is an inexpensive and insulated slice of the Alaska panhandle. 


You can do the same thing on a ferry, save a lot of money, and arrange the trip 
of a lifetime. Each SE AK port has private excursion companies that will take 
you to nearby attractions, and get you back to the cruise ship or ferry before 
it leaves port. So if you're in Skagway and want to do the White Pass RR trip, 
or Juneau and want to see Mendenhall Glacier, you can disembark, buy tickets on 
the pier, see your attraction, and be back in time to reboard your ship. 


Other people have mentioned Denali National Park. You can't do it from a cruise 
ship trip. By the time you got back to port 2-3 days later, the cruise ship 
would be long gone. But if you take a ferry to Juneau, You can fly to 
Anchorage, take the train to Denali, and fly back to Juneau for a return ferry 
trip. 


Which leads me to the trip of a lifetime. You take the money you saved by 
riding the ferry instead of taking a cruise ship, and spend it on Denali and 
the Pribilofs. From Juneau, fly to St. Paul Island about June 21. June 21 is 
the day the Northern Fur Seal cows arrive to give birth to their pups. Almost 
every visitor to St. Paul is there for the birding. You can join a guided trip 
to the bird rookery, or rent a four-wheeler or take a taxi to the rookery. 
Breeding species you'll see include Parakeet, Least, and Crested Auklets, 
Common and Thick-billed Murres, Horned and Tufted Puffins. Black-legged and 
Red-legged Kittiwakes, Northern Fulmar, Red-faced Cormorants. When I was there, 
I skipped dinner and a tour of the Russian Orthodox Church to spend time alone 
at the rookery. My magical moment was seeing seven Arctic Foxes working the 
rookery. Other species include Snowy Owl, Grey-crowned Rosy Finch, Glaucous 
Gull, and Pribilof Wren. 


Darrell Lee
Alameda, CA






___________________________________________________________
With a Galapagos trip appearing more possible in 2018, we and several of our 
friends are concentrating on Alaska for 2017. I’ve called two cruise lines to 
ask if they have birding excursions but no one on the phone seems to have 
access to that information. They suggest calling the excursion companies 
separately to inquire. 


We’re looking for a few chances to bird in and around Alaska, but also to 
enjoy the magnificent scenery and ambiance. We’d like to cruise to and from, 
and have at least a few land or water excursions with people who know birding. 
There could be ‘other’ no-nbirding excursions, too, time permitting. 
Pincess keeps coming up as the preferred cruise line for Alaska, but we’ve 
never been there before. Can anyone make some good suggestions from experience 
including what time of the year you would recommend? 


Thanks, 
Rich Wolfert
New Jersey

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Subject: World Shorebirds Day 2016
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 11:11:14 +0100
Dear Friends,

The 3rd World Shorebirds Day is at the corner and many of us has already saved 
the dates of the popular Global Shorebird Counting Program. 2-6 September 2016 
is an extended weekend for counting shorebirds on multiple locations. Please 
save the date for you as well. We cannot encourage enough people from here, but 
surely we can ask for your assistance to invite more people from your local 
community. 


Please find the registration page here:

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/07/12/global-shorebird-counting-2016-registration 


Should you have any question, please don't hesitate to contact us at 
shorebirdsday AT gmail.com 


Best wishes, Szimi
——
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
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