Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
BirdChat

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Monday, January 26 at 08:30 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Varied Thrush,©David Sibley

26 Jan Re: Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo) ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
26 Jan Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
24 Jan Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone? []
24 Jan Birding Community E-bulletin - January 2015 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
24 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 25, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
23 Jan RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone? [dmark ]
23 Jan Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone? [Jim Hully ]
23 Jan Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone? [Laurie Foss ]
23 Jan Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone? ["John J. Collins" ]
22 Jan Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 20 Jan 2015 to 21 Jan 2015 (#2015-15) [Chuck & Lillian ]
22 Jan Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) [dmark ]
21 Jan Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) ["Bryan J. Smith" ]
22 Jan Re: Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area [Eric Jeffrey ]
22 Jan Re: Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area [Richard Carlson ]
21 Jan Re: Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area [Adrian & Esme Douglas ]
21 Jan Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area [Tom Dougherty ]
21 Jan Re: What type of birder? [Mike Wanger ]
21 Jan ADMIN: Advertising and List Maintenance [Chuck Otte ]
21 Jan Re: Bird Books [Michael Wiegand ]
21 Jan Bird Books [Adrian & Esme Douglas ]
21 Jan Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) [William Glenn ]
21 Jan Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) [Joseph Morlan ]
21 Jan What type of birder? [Al Schirmacher ]
21 Jan What type of birder? [Al Schirmacher ]
21 Jan Redpoll Photo ID Article [Jean Iron ]
21 Jan Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) ["John J. Collins" ]
21 Jan RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) [dmark ]
20 Jan Help Me Get to Hog Island! [Jeremy Taylor ]
18 Jan Interesting thing about turkey photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
17 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 18, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
16 Jan A Beautiful Common Bird (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
16 Jan Bar-headed Geese [Joyanne Hamilton ]
14 Jan Hidden in plain sight [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
13 Jan New DNA Discovery [Al Schirmacher ]
13 Jan New DNA Discovery [Al Schirmacher ]
11 Jan Manu Road in May? (Post for Phil Hansbro) [ ]
10 Jan Hilton Pond 12/22/14 (2014 Bird Banding Summary) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
10 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 7, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
8 Jan "Blond" House Sparrow? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Jan one more Las Vegas question... [ ]
7 Jan Re: New Bird ID Resource? [Roy Harvey ]
7 Jan Re: New Bird ID Resource? [Dick Cannings ]
7 Jan Re: New Bird ID Resource? ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
7 Jan Re: New Bird ID Resource? ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
7 Jan New Bird ID Resource? [Joyanne Hamilton ]
5 Jan Halfsider: a bizarre half-male half-female bird [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
3 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 4, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
2 Jan Operation RubyThroat Neotropical Anniversary ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
2 Jan Fwd: [sabirdnet] On a more Jocular note: [Birding-Aus] A Knotty situation [Dr Ronald Orenstein ]
1 Jan 2015! [Vader Willem Jan Marinus ]
30 Dec Re: RFI Field Guide to Birds of Machu Picchu by Barry Walker & Jon Fjeldsa ["John J. Collins" ]
30 Dec RFI Field Guide to Birds of Machu Picchu by Barry Walker & Jon Fjeldsa [Lynea ]
29 Dec RFI: Birding in Norway [Chuck & Lillian ]
29 Dec Birding Community E-bulletin - December 2014 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
27 Dec Re: RFI: What are the best times for Spring migration on Vancouver Island [Wayne Weber ]
27 Dec BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 28, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
27 Dec Re: RFI: What are the best times for Spring migration on Vancouver Island [dmark ]
26 Dec RFI: What are the best times for Spring migration on Vancouver Island [Theo Hofmann ]
24 Dec Re: Hybrid Western-Clark's in winter? [Jerry Friedman ]
24 Dec Hilton Pond 12/01/14 (York/ Rock Hill Christmas Bird Count Results) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
23 Dec Re: Sibley 2nd printing [William Leigh ]
22 Dec Re: Hybrid Western-Clark's in winter? [Joseph Morlan ]
22 Dec back from Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean cruise [ ]
22 Dec Hybrid Western-Clark's in winter? [Jerry Friedman ]
20 Dec Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech []
20 Dec BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 21, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
19 Dec Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
19 Dec Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech [Elliott Bedows ]
19 Dec Norway - man rescues duck ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
18 Dec Sibley 2nd printing [Jerry Blinn ]
18 Dec feathered forecasters []
17 Dec Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech []
17 Dec Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech []
17 Dec Re: Sibley [Laura Erickson ]
17 Dec Re: Sibley [Jim ]
17 Dec Sibley [Jerry Blinn ]

Subject: Re: Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo)
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:52:28 -0500
Good luck to hi, and you and yours through the coming storm.  It's a nasty one.


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
je suis charlie



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: January-26-15 6:29 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day 
(photo) 


The snow had started picking up in advance of our forecasted "historic"
blizzard here in Jersey. Looked out the living room window and managed to snap 
a photo of this Red-bellied Woodpecker brightening up an otherwise very gray 
and snowy day... 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16190174289/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Red-bellied Woodpecker: a bright spot on a snowy day (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:28:57 -0500
The snow had started picking up in advance of our forecasted "historic"
blizzard here in Jersey. Looked out the living room window and managed to
snap a photo of this Red-bellied Woodpecker brightening up an otherwise
very gray and snowy day...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16190174289/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?
From: TAHARRISON AT AOL.COM
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:43:18 -0500
David,

I use iBirdPRO and BirdTunes.

Tom Harrison
La Quinta, CA USA


In a message dated 1/24/2015 2:05:43 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU writes:

Hello  again chatters!

Which iPhone apps are recommended for a complete set of  bird songs/calls
of
North America?

Thanks in  advance!

David

BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - January 2015
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 12:02:02 -0500
The January 2015 issue of the Birding Community E-bulletin is now
available the web, covering news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for active and
concerned birders, those dedicated to the joys of birding and the
protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of superb quality birding
binoculars and scopes, Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past E-bulletins on the
website of the National Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The January 2015 edition includes the following topics:


RARITY FOCUS
    - Rustic Bunting found in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park and
      a Common Crane at Muleshoe National Wildlife Refuge in Texas

GENOMIC SEQUENCING BREAKTHROUGH
    - project has re-arranged what we know about birds and has
      revealed unexpectedly close family relationships

IBA NEWS:  NEXT TO THE NIAGARA RIVER CORRIDOR
    - the last and best open area at that end of the lake before the
urban
      Buffalo shoreline is facing serious development

BOOK NOTES: BEYOND BELLROSE
    - newly revised and updated Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North
America

USFWS DECISION ON RED KNOT
    - USFWS lists the rapidly declining and highly diminished race
      rufa Red Knot as Threatened under the ESA

SPECIES OF SPECIAL CONCERN IN CANADA
    -  the status of Red-necked Phalarope, Cassin's Auklet, and
Ancient
       Murrelet.

ACCESS MATTERS: PATON CENTER CELEBRATION
    - celebration at the famous hummingbird haven in Patagonia

TIP OF THE MONTH: MAXIMIZE THE "SHRIMPY EFFECT"
    - Maryland to look for a Kelp Gull and
birder-attraction-promoting-a-business
      response

BIRD STAMP BILL PASSED AND SIGNED
    - The Federal Duck Stamp Act of 2014 will increase the price of
the stamp
      from $15 to $25, with the increased $10 dedicated to providing
easements
      to enhance the National Wildlife Refuge System.

JUST A COUPLE OF "CROMNIBUS" PROBLEMS
   - will block any federal funds going toward determining whether
the Gunnison
     Sage-Grouse or Greater Sage-Grouse may be eligible for listing
under the
     Endangered Species Act. Also includes a provision prohibiting
federal
     funds going toward regulation of lead in ammunition and fishing.

PASSENGER PIGEON RESOLUTION PASSED THE SENATE
   - called attention to the 100th anniversary of the extinction of
     the last known Passenger Pigeon

ADDENDUM
    - Another link to the November female Red-legged Honeycreeper in
the
      Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas:
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/tiffkersten/15709770327/ 


- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National Wildlife Refuge
Association (NWRA) website:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 



If you wish to receive the bulletin or have any friends or co-workers

who want to get onto the monthly E-bulletin mailing list, have them
contact either:

Wayne R. Petersen
Director Massachusetts Important Bird Areas (IBA)
Program Mass Audubon
wpetersen-at-massaudubon.org

Paul J. Baicich
Great Birding Projects
paul.baicich-at-verizon.net

If you wish to distribute all or parts of any of the monthly Birding
Community E-bulletins, they simply request that you mention the
source
of any material used. (Include a URL for the E-bulletin archives, if
possible.)

We never lend or sell our E-bulletin recipient list.


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 25, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 08:54:21 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Migration Routes Evolve, w/Scott Weidensaul
http://bit.ly/XB0KNf
* Blackbird, by Paul McCartney
- In celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day
http://bit.ly/WSY2Mw
* How Evolution Reshaped the Woodcock's Brain
http://bit.ly/1xMV7J5
* Sparrows Kick, Robins Pick
http://bit.ly/15ywZ5s
* Laysan Albatrosses Nest at Midway Atoll
http://bit.ly/VyuKDn
* The Early Bird?
http://bit.ly/VWrqpK
* Tale of a Rascal Corvid
http://bit.ly/V8MvLD
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1CM6fJc
-- Including a video of a Reddish Egret, not to be missed.
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 10:16:52 -0500
Hello again chatters!

Which iPhone apps are recommended for a complete set of bird songs/calls
of
North America?

Thanks in advance!

David

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?
From: Jim Hully <xenospiza AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 12:48:24 -0600
Hi,

I've bought both Audubon Birds & BirdTunes and agree with Laurie's
assessment.  However, I found Audubon Birds the most frustrating app to use
and quickly deleted it.  Every time you launch this app you have to go
through multiple pages/clicks to get to the actual songs. I disliked that
the page with the bird families always defaulted to alphabetical order
rather than taxonomical which, when combined to their odd combining of
smaller families, made finding a particular bird very frustrating. I also
remember being prompted to join some online feature (eBirds?) during this
process. This was back in early 2014 so things may have improved.

With BirdTunes, you go straight to you last page and moving between species
or families is very quick. The quality of the recordings are good but
coverage of the regional calls/songs is spotty.  For example, the only
entry for Northern Shrike is from Arizona(!!) and there are few flight
calls. But these are minor criticisms considering the price and convenience.

If you want a truly comprehensive sound collection you need look no further
than the Cornell Guide for the USA birds.

Cheers,

Jim Hully
Mundelein, IL
xenospiza AT gmail.com
Images at http://jimhully.smugmug.com/

On Fri, Jan 23, 2015 at 11:22 AM, Laurie Foss  wrote:

> Here's another way to take care of bird calls on your iPhone. Audubon Birds
> has the exact same vocalizations found on BirdTunes plus a full field guide
> (photos, range maps, identifying info) plus access to up-to-date location
> info using eBird. Both apps cost $9.99.
> There are two pluses for using BirdTunes over Audubon Birds. One is that
> you can set up a playlist to make a subset of the songs easily accessed
> while in the field (I'm using one for an upcoming Owl Prowl that I'm
> co-leading).
> The other is that if space is a concern on your device, Audubon Birds uses
> 784 MB of storage and BirdTunes uses 324 MB.
> Otherwise I find no difference in performance between the two.
>
> I have no connection or stake in either app and own both.
>
> Laurie Foss
> Austin, TX
>
> Laurie Foss
> Austin, TX
>
> On Fri, Jan 23, 2015 at 10:07 AM, John J. Collins 
> wrote:
>
> > David,
> >
> > I use BirdTunes.  It is excellent, having a complete set of both the
> songs
> > and calls of North American birds.  Also, it usually provides songs and
> > calls for different areas of the continent if the species in question is
> > wide-spread.  For example, for Song Sparrow there are 2 songs for the
> east,
> > one for the mountain west and one for California plus various calls; for
> > Fox
> > Sparrow there are 2 songs for the red subspecies in the east of Canada, 2
> > for the red subspecies in Alaska, one for slate-colored in Utah, one for
> > thick-billed in California and one for sooty in Arizona plus various
> calls.
> >
> > John J. Collins
> > Raritan, NJ
> > jjcbird AT verizon.net
> > "God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
> > The earth should not be injured.
> > The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
> > "I will sing to the Lord all my life;
> > I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> > [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of dmark
> > Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 10:17 AM
> > To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?
> >
> > Hello again chatters!
> >
> > Which iPhone apps are recommended for a complete set of bird songs/calls
> of
> > North America?
> >
> > Thanks in advance!
> >
> > David
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?
From: Laurie Foss <lauriefoss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 11:22:46 -0600
Here's another way to take care of bird calls on your iPhone. Audubon Birds
has the exact same vocalizations found on BirdTunes plus a full field guide
(photos, range maps, identifying info) plus access to up-to-date location
info using eBird. Both apps cost $9.99.
There are two pluses for using BirdTunes over Audubon Birds. One is that
you can set up a playlist to make a subset of the songs easily accessed
while in the field (I'm using one for an upcoming Owl Prowl that I'm
co-leading).
The other is that if space is a concern on your device, Audubon Birds uses
784 MB of storage and BirdTunes uses 324 MB.
Otherwise I find no difference in performance between the two.

I have no connection or stake in either app and own both.

Laurie Foss
Austin, TX

Laurie Foss
Austin, TX

On Fri, Jan 23, 2015 at 10:07 AM, John J. Collins 
wrote:

> David,
>
> I use BirdTunes.  It is excellent, having a complete set of both the songs
> and calls of North American birds.  Also, it usually provides songs and
> calls for different areas of the continent if the species in question is
> wide-spread.  For example, for Song Sparrow there are 2 songs for the east,
> one for the mountain west and one for California plus various calls; for
> Fox
> Sparrow there are 2 songs for the red subspecies in the east of Canada, 2
> for the red subspecies in Alaska, one for slate-colored in Utah, one for
> thick-billed in California and one for sooty in Arizona plus various calls.
>
> John J. Collins
> Raritan, NJ
> jjcbird AT verizon.net
> "God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
> The earth should not be injured.
> The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
> "I will sing to the Lord all my life;
> I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of dmark
> Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 10:17 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?
>
> Hello again chatters!
>
> Which iPhone apps are recommended for a complete set of bird songs/calls of
> North America?
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> David
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 11:07:55 -0500
David,

I use BirdTunes.  It is excellent, having a complete set of both the songs
and calls of North American birds.  Also, it usually provides songs and
calls for different areas of the continent if the species in question is
wide-spread.  For example, for Song Sparrow there are 2 songs for the east,
one for the mountain west and one for California plus various calls; for Fox
Sparrow there are 2 songs for the red subspecies in the east of Canada, 2
for the red subspecies in Alaska, one for slate-colored in Utah, one for
thick-billed in California and one for sooty in Arizona plus various calls.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of dmark
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2015 10:17 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Bird songs/calls app for the iPhone?

Hello again chatters!

Which iPhone apps are recommended for a complete set of bird songs/calls of
North America?

Thanks in advance!

David

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 20 Jan 2015 to 21 Jan 2015 (#2015-15)
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:13:31 -0800
David, et.al.
The Huntington Beach location(s) mentioned are normally very
reliable. The birds like the tall grass & the brush east of the small
restaurant, located east of Golden West Blvd. Also in the reeds a bit
to the south.

In Los Angeles County, the following blotsite is useful for locating
birds for both visiting birders and locals.
Santa Monica Bay Audubon Society - Los Angeles County Birding Sites
https://smbasblog.wordpress.com/los-angeles-county-birding-spots/
Specifically for the Munias:

https://smbasblog.wordpress.com/los-angeles-county-birding-spots/#4.%20Doves%20and%20Other%20Oddities 

Then scroll down to the Munia part.

They look like the typical Sb munia pictured so abundantly via Google.

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

At 10:00 PM 1/21/2015, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:
>Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 09:00:19 -0500
>From:    dmark 
>Subject: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia
>(Lonchura punctulata)
>
>Dear Chatters,
>A friend and I will be spending 2-3 days birding along the southern
>California coast in early February, and we would like to know about
>reliable sites where Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) can
>be observed. Preferably in a 1-hour-ish stop. Feeders that they
>frequent that are in public places.
David Mark
Amherst, NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata)
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:59:17 -0500
Thanks, Bryan!

That will probably be our first stop specifically looking for the Munias
as we drive down the coast from Morro Bay.

David


On 01/21/2015 10:21 pm, Bryan J. Smith wrote:
> We were at Huntington Central Park in mid-December when we saw several
> SCBRMUs in the reeds on the East side of Talbert Lake.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Bryan
> bryanjsmith
>
> bryanjsmith AT comcast.net
>
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/bryanjsmitheci/sets
>
>
> 520 400 4748
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata)
From: "Bryan J. Smith" <bryanjsmith AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 20:21:23 -0700
We were at Huntington Central Park in mid-December when we saw several SCBRMUs 
in the reeds on the East side of Talbert Lake. 


Cheers,

Bryan
bryanjsmith

bryanjsmith AT comcast.net

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bryanjsmitheci/sets


520 400 4748

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 11:45:00 +0900
Yes, you will need a national guide. I prefer Pizzey & knight, also available 
as an app. 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2015, at 11:36 AM, Richard Carlson  wrote:
>
> Denise's book would be useless around Cairn's. You need one of the nat'l 
books 

>
> Richard Carlson
> Tucson & Lake Tahoe
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>> On Jan 22, 2015, at 11:18 AM, Adrian & Esme Douglas <2adouglas AT WGN.NET> 
wrote: 

>>
>> Denise Goodfellow's "Birds of the Top end" is lightweight and
>> comprehensive.  She is very knowledgeable and it shows in the guide.
>>
>>> On 1/21/2015 10:51 AM, Tom Dougherty wrote:
>>> Fellow Birders,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I am planning to go on a tour to the Queensland area of Australia in June 
of 

>>> 2015.
>>>
>>> Can anyone suggest the best bird guide to buy for a birding trip like this?
>>> In the future, I would
>>>
>>> like to visit other parts of Australia to bird, but for now the tour I am
>>> participating on will
>>>
>>> only cover the Queensland area to include Cairns, the Great Barrier reef,
>>> etc.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In advance, thank you for your input.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Respectfully
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Tom Dougherty
>>>
>>> Chambersburg, PA
>>>
>>> Franklin County
>>>
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 13:36:31 +1100
Denise's book would be useless around Cairn's. You need one of the nat'l books 


Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Jan 22, 2015, at 11:18 AM, Adrian & Esme Douglas <2adouglas AT WGN.NET> 
wrote: 

>
> Denise Goodfellow's "Birds of the Top end" is lightweight and
> comprehensive.  She is very knowledgeable and it shows in the guide.
>
>> On 1/21/2015 10:51 AM, Tom Dougherty wrote:
>> Fellow Birders,
>>
>>
>>
>> I am planning to go on a tour to the Queensland area of Australia in June of
>> 2015.
>>
>> Can anyone suggest the best bird guide to buy for a birding trip like this?
>> In the future, I would
>>
>> like to visit other parts of Australia to bird, but for now the tour I am
>> participating on will
>>
>> only cover the Queensland area to include Cairns, the Great Barrier reef,
>> etc.
>>
>>
>>
>> In advance, thank you for your input.
>>
>>
>>
>> Respectfully
>>
>>
>>
>> Tom Dougherty
>>
>> Chambersburg, PA
>>
>> Franklin County
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area
From: Adrian & Esme Douglas <2adouglas AT WGN.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:18:44 -0800
Denise Goodfellow's "Birds of the Top end" is lightweight and
comprehensive.  She is very knowledgeable and it shows in the guide.

On 1/21/2015 10:51 AM, Tom Dougherty wrote:
> Fellow Birders,
>
>
>
> I am planning to go on a tour to the Queensland area of Australia in June of
> 2015.
>
> Can anyone suggest the best bird guide to buy for a birding trip like this?
> In the future, I would
>
> like to visit other parts of Australia to bird, but for now the tour I am
> participating on will
>
> only cover the Queensland area to include Cairns, the Great Barrier reef,
> etc.
>
>
>
> In advance, thank you for your input.
>
>
>
> Respectfully
>
>
>
> Tom Dougherty
>
> Chambersburg, PA
>
> Franklin County
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Australian Field Guide--Queensland Area
From: Tom Dougherty <thomasdoc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 13:51:51 -0500
Fellow Birders,



I am planning to go on a tour to the Queensland area of Australia in June of
2015.

Can anyone suggest the best bird guide to buy for a birding trip like this?
In the future, I would

like to visit other parts of Australia to bird, but for now the tour I am
participating on will

only cover the Queensland area to include Cairns, the Great Barrier reef,
etc.



In advance, thank you for your input.



Respectfully



Tom Dougherty

Chambersburg, PA

Franklin County


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: What type of birder?
From: Mike Wanger <misterwanger AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:36:38 -0600
Well said, Al. I too bird for several reasons, and find that they can
change in priority. For example, sometimes I feel like chasing, sometimes
not.
My list would also include the satisfaction of being a "citizen scientist".
I see birding in part as a "job" (a job that I love): I am contributing to
the mass of data that scientists and conservationists might use in their
attempts to better the environment for this planet, which after all is our
home.


Mike Wanger
Milwaukee



On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 9:13 AM, Al Schirmacher 
wrote:

> Ever discovered you're more than one kind of birder?
>
> Large part of me is a local birder, enjoying my patch a walk at a time,
> content to see & hear whatever is out there.
>
> Small part of me is a chaser, and I want everything rare the target
> destination has to offer, preferably right away:)
>
> Significant part of me is an appreciator, relishing whatever happens,
> writing poetry about it when inspired.
>
> Another significant part of me is a lister, enjoying numerical growth
> towards a goal.
>
> But, despite appreciating others' scientific efforts within ornithology,
> only a very small part is a scientist.  Which is not to depreciate
> scientists.  I'm just not one.
>
> You?
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
> formerly Madison, WI
>
> Sent from my iPhone####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
> Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn
>
>
>


####################
You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin Birding 
Network (Wisbirdn). 

To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: 
http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn 

To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: 
http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn 

Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn

Subject: ADMIN: Advertising and List Maintenance
From: Chuck Otte <cotte AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 15:27:25 -0600
Good afternoon BirdChatters!

The listowners apparently need to remind everyone that BirdChat does have
a no-advertising policy. This is listed in the BirdChat guidelines. The
guidelines are on-line and the link is at the bottom of every BirdChat
message, and is http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/

Specifically, the paragraph states:

"Any offer of a product or service for sale is considered advertising.
Advertising is not allowed on BirdChat, with the exception of brief one-time
announcements by nonprofit organizations of events in which they participate
or new products they produce. These should be in the form of a single
sentence, indicating a link to either a person or a website where additional
information can be obtained."

If you have never read the BirdChat guidelines the listowners ask that you
take some time today to do so. If you haven't read them for a couple of
years, please take a few minutes to go back and review them.

Finally, sometime in the next couple of weeks, there's going to be some
maintenance and upgrades to the Kansas State University ListServ software.
The listowners haven't been given a solid date of when that will happen but
when it does the lists will be down for a few hours. Following that the web
interface, for those who use the archives or manage their subscriptions, will
probably look different but should still function the same way. If we receive a
solid date/time of when the maintenance is going to occur I will advise
BirdChat.

If you have any questions, please drop me an email!

You may now return to your normal birding messages.

Chuck Otte
BirdChat co-listowner

-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Bird Books
From: Michael Wiegand <onwingsof_pearl AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 12:16:13 -0700
I have a complete, pristine set of Roger Tory Peterson's 50th Annivesary 
Edition Field Guides (20 volumes in all) 


Michael Wiegand 
Pearl, Idaho 
 
208-859-3643-c 
208-286-0506-h 

www.habiscapes.com 

"the truth is out there!"

> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:36:44 -0800
> From: 2adouglas AT WGN.NET
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Bird Books
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> I have a complete set, in matched hard cover binding, of /Life Histories
> of North American Birds/, selected from the hundreds of species
> biographies assembled and written by Arthur Cleveland Bent and his
> collaborators and published in a twenty-one volume series between 1919
> and 1968 by the United States Government Printing Office.  The set is in
> pristine condition.  Is anyone interested?
> 
> I also have a bunch of other books if anyone wants a list.
> 
> Adrian Douglas
> Santa Monica, California
> 2adouglas AT wgn.net
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bird Books
From: Adrian & Esme Douglas <2adouglas AT WGN.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:36:44 -0800
I have a complete set, in matched hard cover binding, of /Life Histories
of North American Birds/, selected from the hundreds of species
biographies assembled and written by Arthur Cleveland Bent and his
collaborators and published in a twenty-one volume series between 1919
and 1968 by the United States Government Printing Office.  The set is in
pristine condition.  Is anyone interested?

I also have a bunch of other books if anyone wants a list.

Adrian Douglas
Santa Monica, California
2adouglas AT wgn.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata)
From: William Glenn <bglenn AT NMSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 15:55:19 +0000
Does anyone have a good picture of this bird? Thanks, Bill

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 21, 2015, at 8:48 AM, Joseph Morlan  wrote:
>
>> On Wed, 21 Jan 2015 09:00:19 -0500, dmark  wrote:
>>
>> From clicking on some of the large red 'pins' on ebird, it seems
>> to me
>> that Huntington Beach Central Park would be a good place. Any comments?
>
> Huntington Central Park is where I used to see them regularly.  They are
> common in the tall grass and around the reed beds by the seasonal ponds
> (Talbert Lake) in the Jack Green Nature Area which is adjacent to the Park
> Bench Cafe.  Here is a map.
>
> 
http://www.ci.huntington-beach.ca.us/images/users/community_services/hcp-hcpmap.jpg 

>
> Park on the east side of Golden West by the cafe and walk around the
> adjacent wetlands.  Beware that the immatures may segregate from the adults
> into separate flocks.
>
> Good luck.
> --
> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
> "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata)
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 07:47:13 -0800
On Wed, 21 Jan 2015 09:00:19 -0500, dmark  wrote:

> From clicking on some of the large red 'pins' on ebird, it seems
>to me
>that Huntington Beach Central Park would be a good place. Any comments?

Huntington Central Park is where I used to see them regularly.  They are
common in the tall grass and around the reed beds by the seasonal ponds
(Talbert Lake) in the Jack Green Nature Area which is adjacent to the Park
Bench Cafe.  Here is a map.


http://www.ci.huntington-beach.ca.us/images/users/community_services/hcp-hcpmap.jpg 


Park on the east side of Golden West by the cafe and walk around the
adjacent wetlands.  Beware that the immatures may segregate from the adults
into separate flocks.

Good luck.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: What type of birder?
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 09:13:20 -0600
Ever discovered you're more than one kind of birder?

Large part of me is a local birder, enjoying my patch a walk at a time, content 
to see & hear whatever is out there. 


Small part of me is a chaser, and I want everything rare the target destination 
has to offer, preferably right away:) 


Significant part of me is an appreciator, relishing whatever happens, writing 
poetry about it when inspired. 


Another significant part of me is a lister, enjoying numerical growth towards a 
goal. 


But, despite appreciating others' scientific efforts within ornithology, only a 
very small part is a scientist. Which is not to depreciate scientists. I'm just 
not one. 


You?

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS
formerly Madison, WI

Sent from my iPhone

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: What type of birder?
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT live.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 09:13:20 -0600
Ever discovered you're more than one kind of birder?

Large part of me is a local birder, enjoying my patch a walk at a time, content 
to see & hear whatever is out there. 


Small part of me is a chaser, and I want everything rare the target destination 
has to offer, preferably right away:) 


Significant part of me is an appreciator, relishing whatever happens, writing 
poetry about it when inspired. 


Another significant part of me is a lister, enjoying numerical growth towards a 
goal. 


But, despite appreciating others' scientific efforts within ornithology, only a 
very small part is a scientist. Which is not to depreciate scientists. I'm just 
not one. 


You?

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS
formerly Madison, WI

Sent from my iPhone####################
You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin Birding 
Network (Wisbirdn). 

To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: 
http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn 

To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: 
http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn 

Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn

Subject: Redpoll Photo ID Article
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:02:23 -0500
Redpoll sightings are increasing in Ontario as winter advances. Late winter
is often the best time to see the largest numbers of redpolls and this year
is fitting that pattern. Watch for redpolls to increase at feeders which are
the best place to study them. Hoary Redpolls (subspecies exilipes) are being
seen regularly in flocks of Common Redpolls. And we've had reports of
"Greater" Common Redpolls (rostrata), which is the large more northern
subspecies.

REDPOLL SUBSPECIES ID: We have prepared a photo article about the
identification of Common and Hoary Redpolls and their subspecies. Please see
link.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2015/redpollsRP.htm

Ron Pittaway and Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata)
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 09:42:20 -0500
I am also interested the answer to Mark's question as I too will be going to
California in the coming year.  Please respond to the list.

Thanks,

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of dmark
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 9:00 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia
(Lonchura punctulata)

Dear Chatters,

A friend and I will be spending 2-3 days birding along the southern
California coast in early February, and we would like to know about reliable
sites where Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) can be observed.
Preferably in a 1-hour-ish stop. Feeders that they frequent that are in
public places.
Etc.

Yes, I have done some homework on eBird, and seen large numbers of sighting
places. Yet I bird in SoCal about once a year and have never run into the
Munias. From clicking on some of the large red 'pins' on ebird, it seems to
me that Huntington Beach Central Park would be a good place. Any comments?
Other suggestions?

Thanks in advance!

David Mark
Amherst, NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: Best California places to see Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata)
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 09:00:19 -0500
Dear Chatters,

A friend and I will be spending 2-3 days birding along the southern
California
coast in early February, and we would like to know about reliable sites
where
Scaly-breasted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) can be observed. Preferably
in a
1-hour-ish stop. Feeders that they frequent that are in public places.
Etc.

Yes, I have done some homework on eBird, and seen large numbers of
sighting
places. Yet I bird in SoCal about once a year and have never run into
the
Munias. From clicking on some of the large red 'pins' on ebird, it seems
to me
that Huntington Beach Central Park would be a good place. Any comments?
Other suggestions?

Thanks in advance!

David Mark
Amherst, NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Help Me Get to Hog Island!
From: Jeremy Taylor <jeremy.taylor AT DEC.NY.GOV>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 10:43:30 -0600
Apologies for cross-posting, and if this is inappropriate for the list....
Just trying to get creative in my fundraising efforts!
Jeremy
------------------------------------------------------------
From July 19-24, National Audubon Society is holding their "Sharing Nature:
An Educator’s Week" program at their Hog Island camp in Maine. I work as an
environmental educator, and editor of a kids nature magazine, so this would
be an excellent educational and networking opportunity for me. I have
applied for some scholarships to attend, but my employer does not provide
travel funding for things like this, so if I can't raise the funds, I won't
be able to go. I already work 2 jobs just to make ends meet, and have not
had a real "vacation" in years, so this is something I am really hoping to
be able to do! I also have a life-long interest in birds, nature, and
environmental education, making this an incredible opportunity. The
information about the program can be found at
http://hogisland.audubon.org/sharing-nature-educator-s-week for those of you
who are interested in helping me to get there!

If you are interested in donating, you can do so online at my personal
fundraising page, "Help Get Me to Hog Island" on Indiegogo,
https://life.indiegogo.com/fundraisers/help-get-me-to-hog-island/x/5354674

I greatly appreciate your consideration in helping me reach my goal!!

Jeremy
jeremyjtaylor AT yahoo.com
Ravena, NY

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Interesting thing about turkey photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2015 23:45:18 -0500
I posted the following photo link about 6 or 7 weeks ago. What I neglected
to mention at the time is that this is not a flock of nine Wild Turkeys,
but rather one flock of five turkeys (on the left) and a second flock of
four birds (on the right). I just thought it was interesting that even
though they are feeding in a confined area, there is a buffer zone of
several feet between the two flocks:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15708145617/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 18, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2015 09:55:13 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Where Are They Now - The Birds of the Dawn Song
http://bit.ly/1fdazrw
* Birds That Whistle
http://bit.ly/1CaEFr6
* Rough-legged Hawk
http://bit.ly/1p9uM9f
* Kittiwake, Kittiwake
http://bit.ly/1sLAMa2
* An Owl Is Mobbed
http://bit.ly/1KSn1w5
* Birds, Nests, Camouflage - By GrrlScientist
http://bit.ly/1DO23wH
* Clapper Rails on San Francisco Bay
http://bit.ly/X6Ul6c
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/15aqMwX
-- Featuring a peek into a hummingbird's world
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: A Beautiful Common Bird (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 17:38:13 -0500
Red-bellied Woodpecker shot through my living room window at an interesting
angle:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15673513914/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bar-headed Geese
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 07:12:42 -0900
Hello Chatters,

I was sent this interesting article on Bar-headed Geese that have adapted in 
many ways to flying over Mt. Everest. I think I also learned about this bird 
from one of our school video’s several years ago. 


http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30799436

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you know if there are any birds that fly over 
Denali (Mt. McKinley)? I have never heard of any before. 


It is amazing how certain species of any sort of life has adapted to the 
extremes in the many environments of our earth. 


Have a perfect day.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


"If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes." --Charles 
Lindbergh 



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hidden in plain sight
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 14:58:07 +0000
hello everyone,

most of us know how difficult it is to spot a bird's nest, even when it's
sitting right outside the window. But have you ever wondered if this
camouflage is intentional or if it is an accident? i wrote a short piece
about a recent study that investigates this question:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2015/jan/14/hidden-in-plain-sight 


i also link to a BirdNote Radio podcast on this same topic from that story
-- this is the very first podcast i've ever written! so yeah, i am kinda
excited.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: New DNA Discovery
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2015 08:17:07 -0600
Breaking Bird News -

New DNA evidence links Turkey & Black Vultures with leeches, box elder bugs, 
campaigning politicians and certain flu strains. 


Proposed names for the new family include ickytherms and hysteraticus.

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: New DNA Discovery
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT live.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2015 08:17:07 -0600
Breaking Bird News -
New DNA evidence links Turkey & Black Vultures with leeches, box elder bugs, 
campaigning politicians and certain flu strains. 


Proposed names for the new family include ickytherms and hysteraticus.

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

Sent from my iPhone
####################
You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin Birding 
Network (Wisbirdn). 

To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: 
http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn 

To set DIGEST or VACATION modes, use the Wisbirdn web interface at: 
http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn 

Visit Wisbirdn ARCHIVES at: http://www.freelists.org/archives/wisbirdn

Subject: Manu Road in May? (Post for Phil Hansbro)
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2015 12:47:02 +0000
Hi all,

Phil Hansbro asked me to post this for him. The Manu Road is one of the 
greatest birding adventures in the world, so a wonderful opportunity: 


From Phil:

"Hi.

I am planning on 11 days in Peru between 21-31st May going down the Manu road. 
This is a good length of time to do it properly. If anyone is interested in 
coming along on a cost share basis? 4 people would be good. We will do it as 
cheap as we can, have a great guide, etc. Please contact me offline if you are 
interested. Philip dot Hansbro at newcastle dot edu dot au 


Will be a great trip.

Thanks
Phil"

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/22/14 (2014 Bird Banding Summary)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2015 15:02:16 -0500
I spend lots of hours studying birds at Hilton Pond Center, and at year's end I 
devote what seems like a ton of time carefully compiling my annual report 
depicting results of my previous 12 months of banding. I've just finished the 
annual summary (including hummingbirds) and have posted it as the 22-31 Dec 
2014 installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond." I've tried to outline my work 
in easily digestible format and include images of birds of particular interest, 
so please take a look and let me know what YOU think. It's at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek141222.html 
 

You'll have visit the link to see why I felt obligated to make special mention 
of a certain European Starling. 


While there, please scroll down for a list of birds banded or recaptured just 
during the last week of December. There are also some miscellaneous nature 
notes about natural phenomena, as well as acknowledgements of end-of-year 
donors who support our initiatives in education, research, and conservation. 


Happy (Midwinter) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 7, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2015 07:19:48 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Writer/Naturalist John Burroughs
http://bit.ly/1FBmsql
* Saving the Gunnison Sage-Grouse
http://bit.ly/1Du90Td
* The Secret Stash of Eggshell
http://bit.ly/1xRWBW0
* Birdbaths in Winter
http://bit.ly/1AD86mh
* A Swirl of Snow Geese - The Work of Barry Lopez
http://bit.ly/Z9eI9j
* Kleptoparasitism! - Piracy Among Raptors
http://bit.ly/17rxvmW
* Bohemian Waxwings Visit
http://bit.ly/1AD8qRZ
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1Du8PaC
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: "Blond" House Sparrow? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 18:31:04 -0500
There's been a very pale bird hanging out with the House Sparrow flock in
my neighborhood since September. Very skittish bird. Today I managed to
finally get a halfway decent photo. Contrast this pale bird to the "normal"
dark-looking HOSP perched just to the right of the pale bird in the photo.
Both birds were more or less in the same beam of sunlight:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15613818383/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: one more Las Vegas question...
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 14:21:19 +0000
Hi to all who sent me so many great suggestions for a Las Vegas birding 
excursion. 




I did have one more question – we want to go this spring so what would be the 
best time to catch a good passage of migrants? Out here in Maryland the peak is 
the first two weeks in May but I don't have a clear idea what it would be in 
the L. V. area. 




We want to book the trip soon as it is a special deal and dates are limited… 



Thanks, 

Gail Mackiernan 

Silver Spring, MD 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New Bird ID Resource?
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT SNET.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 11:42:38 -0800
This does not appear to be a source of information, but a compendium of 
information. As such there will be inconsistencies because there is no central 
editing, just central gathering. Click on the Details tab. For the 
Ruby-throated there is one item on Distribution followed by one on National 
Distribution, followed by Geographic Range, followed by Range. It is a grab 
everything and sort by keywords crossing your fingers approach. 


Likewise, since it calls itself the "Encyclopedia of Life" you might expect 
that something going far beyond birds would not always adhere to the rules 
followed by ornithologists as there is no agreement across specialties. 


Bottom line: look at it for what it is and it might be of some use. Concentrate 
on the shortcomings and you will never run out of material to support your 
thesis. 


Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New Bird ID Resource?
From: Dick Cannings <dickcannings AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 09:54:09 -0800
Orntithological? :)

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of David M. Gascoigne
Sent: January-07-15 8:58 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New Bird ID Resource?

I am in 100% agreement with Nancy. It drives me crazy when people who
profess to be knowledgeable about birds, or involved with birds, cannot even
take the time to make sure that the names are spelled correctly. As soon as
I see this egregious faux pas I dismiss the rest of the text by not reading
any further. Now whether I agree the the AOU is the MOST authoritative
orntithological organization in the western hemisphere is another matter
entirely!

David M. GascoigneWaterloo, ONblog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com> Date:
Wed, 7 Jan 2015 10:28:19 -0600
> From: nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New Bird ID Resource?
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>
> Joyanne
>
> On 1/7/2015 9:37 AM, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:
>
> > I just received this in my email from the National Science Teacher’s
Association.
> > I was wondering if any of you use this website for bird identification.
I’ve never seen it before.
> >
> > (copy/pasted from my email)
> >
> > Migratory Bird Resources
> >
> > Explore this collection of information and multimedia about migrating
birds on the Encyclopedia of Life.
> >
> > http://eol.org/collections/105714
> >
> >
> > About the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) Our mission is to increase
> > awareness and understanding of living nature through an Encyclopedia of
Life that gathers, generates, and shares knowledge in an open, freely
accessible and trusted digital resource.
> >
> >
> > Encyclopedia of Life
> > Harvard University
> > Museum of Comparative Zoology
> > 26 Oxford Street
> > Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
> >
> > (end of copy/pasted post from my email)
>
> Perhaps I am the only one who would be bothered by the lack of
> adherence to the American Ornithologists' Union style of writing the
> common names.  Ruby-Throated Hummingbird [sometimes] instead of
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird for instance and Black-crowned Night-heron
> instead of Black-crowned Night-Heron.  Does having a Harvard
> University address absolve one from following the style of the most
> authoritative ornithological organization in the Western Hemisphere?
> Why are some of the names written 'correctly', according to accepted
> style, while the same names sometimes written differently?
>
> This may be just nit-picking, but this lack of attention to detail
> suggests to me that the person or persons writing the information are
> not as authoritative as they pretend to be.  I was equally appalled
> when I found a scientific paper in which some of the scientific names
> were misspelled.
>
> I have not examined the content in detail, but for the Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird account, the 'average' weight seems to be a little
> generous and the tail of the female is not 'rounded'.  The information
> is probably adequate to help a beginner to identify a an adult of this
> species in the Smoky Mountains in June, but not good enough to help
> the same person to identify a female in Oregon in August.
>
> NLN
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> http://www.avast.com
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New Bird ID Resource?
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 11:58:12 -0500
I am in 100% agreement with Nancy. It drives me crazy when people who profess 
to be knowledgeable about birds, or involved with birds, cannot even take the 
time to make sure that the names are spelled correctly. As soon as I see this 
egregious faux pas I dismiss the rest of the text by not reading any further. 
Now whether I agree the the AOU is the MOST authoritative orntithological 
organization in the western hemisphere is another matter entirely! 


David M. GascoigneWaterloo, ONblog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com> Date: 
Wed, 7 Jan 2015 10:28:19 -0600 

> From: nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] New Bird ID Resource?
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Joyanne
> 
> On 1/7/2015 9:37 AM, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:
> 
> > I just received this in my email from the National Science Teacher’s 
Association. 

> > I was wondering if any of you use this website for bird identification. 
I’ve never seen it before. 

> >
> > (copy/pasted from my email)
> >
> > Migratory Bird Resources
> >
> > Explore this collection of information and multimedia about migrating birds 
on the Encyclopedia of Life. 

> >
> > http://eol.org/collections/105714
> >
> >
> > About the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL)
> > Our mission is to increase awareness and understanding of living nature 
through an Encyclopedia of Life that gathers, generates, and shares knowledge 
in an open, freely accessible and trusted digital resource. 

> >
> >
> > Encyclopedia of Life
> > Harvard University
> > Museum of Comparative Zoology
> > 26 Oxford Street
> > Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
> >
> > (end of copy/pasted post from my email)
> 
> Perhaps I am the only one who would be bothered by the lack of adherence
> to the American Ornithologists' Union style of writing the common
> names.  Ruby-Throated Hummingbird [sometimes] instead of Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird for instance and Black-crowned Night-heron instead of
> Black-crowned Night-Heron.  Does having a Harvard University address
> absolve one from following the style of the most authoritative
> ornithological organization in the Western Hemisphere?  Why are some of
> the names written 'correctly', according to accepted style, while the
> same names sometimes written differently?
> 
> This may be just nit-picking, but this lack of attention to detail
> suggests to me that the person or persons writing the information are
> not as authoritative as they pretend to be.  I was equally appalled when
> I found a scientific paper in which some of the scientific names were
> misspelled.
> 
> I have not examined the content in detail, but for the Ruby-throated
> Hummingbird account, the 'average' weight seems to be a little generous
> and the tail of the female is not 'rounded'.  The information is
> probably adequate to help a beginner to identify a an adult of this
> species in the Smoky Mountains in June, but not good enough to help the
> same person to identify a female in Oregon in August.
> 
> NLN
> 
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, LA USA
> 
> http://www.casacolibri.net/
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> 
> 
> 
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> http://www.avast.com
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: New Bird ID Resource?
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 10:28:19 -0600
Joyanne

On 1/7/2015 9:37 AM, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:

> I just received this in my email from the National Science Teacher’s 
Association. 

> I was wondering if any of you use this website for bird identification. I’ve 
never seen it before. 

>
> (copy/pasted from my email)
>
> Migratory Bird Resources
>
> Explore this collection of information and multimedia about migrating birds 
on the Encyclopedia of Life. 

>
> http://eol.org/collections/105714
>
>
> About the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL)
> Our mission is to increase awareness and understanding of living nature 
through an Encyclopedia of Life that gathers, generates, and shares knowledge 
in an open, freely accessible and trusted digital resource. 

>
>
> Encyclopedia of Life
> Harvard University
> Museum of Comparative Zoology
> 26 Oxford Street
> Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
>
> (end of copy/pasted post from my email)

Perhaps I am the only one who would be bothered by the lack of adherence
to the American Ornithologists' Union style of writing the common
names.  Ruby-Throated Hummingbird [sometimes] instead of Ruby-throated
Hummingbird for instance and Black-crowned Night-heron instead of
Black-crowned Night-Heron.  Does having a Harvard University address
absolve one from following the style of the most authoritative
ornithological organization in the Western Hemisphere?  Why are some of
the names written 'correctly', according to accepted style, while the
same names sometimes written differently?

This may be just nit-picking, but this lack of attention to detail
suggests to me that the person or persons writing the information are
not as authoritative as they pretend to be.  I was equally appalled when
I found a scientific paper in which some of the scientific names were
misspelled.

I have not examined the content in detail, but for the Ruby-throated
Hummingbird account, the 'average' weight seems to be a little generous
and the tail of the female is not 'rounded'.  The information is
probably adequate to help a beginner to identify a an adult of this
species in the Smoky Mountains in June, but not good enough to help the
same person to identify a female in Oregon in August.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: New Bird ID Resource?
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 06:37:15 -0900
Hello Bird Chatterers, 

I just received this in my email from the National Science Teacher’s 
Association. 

I was wondering if any of you use this website for bird identification. I’ve 
never seen it before. 


(copy/pasted from my email)

Migratory Bird Resources

Explore this collection of information and multimedia about migrating birds on 
the Encyclopedia of Life. 


http://eol.org/collections/105714


About the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL)
Our mission is to increase awareness and understanding of living nature through 
an Encyclopedia of Life that gathers, generates, and shares knowledge in an 
open, freely accessible and trusted digital resource. 



Encyclopedia of Life
Harvard University
Museum of Comparative Zoology
26 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

(end of copy/pasted post from my email)

I was thinking of adding it to our bird identification resources for our 
projects here. 

Thank you for the help!

Joyanne Hamilton
Innoko River School
Shageluk, Alaska

"If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes." --Charles 
Lindbergh 



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Halfsider: a bizarre half-male half-female bird
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2015 19:59:13 +0000
hello everyone,

i've been sitting on a story over the holidays because i was fairly certain
most people were busy doing other things -- can't think of what those
things might have been, though! So now that the hollydaze are mostly over,
i've shared that story, a story about a truly bizarre bird that is half
male and half female:

http://gu.com/p/44tqv/stw

as always, i hope you find this story interesting and educational.

happy holidays,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 4, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2015 11:37:12 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Rock Sandpipers Are Tough - Homer Spit CBC
http://bit.ly/TVGIqy
* Birds Are Evolving Rapidly - Today
http://bit.ly/1A730OS
* Crested Auklets Winter in the Bering Sea
http://bit.ly/SqwyPH
* Rare Sounds Saved by Macaulay Library
http://bit.ly/1ddnQwQ
* A New Year Dawns - Happy New Year to All!
http://bit.ly/VfhmJV
* Ptarmigan in Winter
http://bit.ly/1xEsh2Q
* Sooty Tern - Wide-awake Bird
http://bit.ly/Skj8XV
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1HpvGna
--------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Operation RubyThroat Neotropical Anniversary
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 20:41:42 -0500
Here’s a little blurb I just posted to the Hilton Pond Center Facebook page:

"Today (2 Jan 2015) is a very nostalgic day for me. On this date exactly ten 
years ago my first team of Operation RubyThroat citizen scientists--I called 
them the "Pioneers" (left photo below, including wife Sue Ballard Hilton and 
son Billy Hilton III)--had just finished eight days in the field in Guanacaste 
Province, Costa Rica, and were being replaced by the "Second Wave." These two 
teams and I--along with irreplaceable tico naturalist Ernesto M. 
Carman--observed and captured Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in what was the first 
known attempt to study that species systematically on its wintering grounds in 
the Neotropics. 


"We caught only 15 birds with those first two groups, but in 22 subsequent 
expeditions to Belize, Guatemala, and Nicaragua have trapped or netted more 
than 1,200----far surpassing the 46 that had been banded in all of history in 
Mexico and Central America. We now know much, much more about RTHU on the other 
end of their migratory path, but many mysteries remain. Thus, I'll keep going 
back until we learn even more about these tiny balls of fluff we call "ours" 
but that really belong to every one of the ten counties in which they spend all 
or part of their year. Thanks to my Neotropical alumni--all 195 of you; you're 
the best! You can read about those first two excursions at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek050101.html 
 ” 


Happy Birding!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================



Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Fwd: [sabirdnet] On a more Jocular note: [Birding-Aus] A Knotty situation
From: Dr Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 09:13:58 -0500
Well, I suppose BirdChat should see this too....

Ronald Orenstein 
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

Begin forwarded message:

> A great little joke which I thought I would share with you from the Aussie
> birdnet
> 
> Cheers
> ken
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> Carl Clifford
> Sent: 02 January 2015 06:33 AM
> To: Birding Aus
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] A Knotty situation
> 
> I received this from a friend in the UK. I am passing it on, as I don't see
> why I should suffer alone.
> 
> You may not know that Colin had a distinguished career in the Intelligence
> services. One of his contacts was none other than James Bond and they met
> from time to time on a quiet bit of foreshore on The Wash to exchange
> information. On one such occasion, a small group of Knots were feeding out
> on the mud and, as you would expect, Colin told Bond what they were, and a
> little about their ecology and so forth. Suddenly, there was an audible
> "whoosh" as a stooping Peregrine came hurtling down ..... The falcon missed
> its strike, as the waders scattered in panic.
> One bird, twisting and turning wildly, passed very close to the two men,
> and as it did so it defecated, leaving a white splurge across Colin's
> anorak.
> 
> "Ah," said 007, " shaken Knot's turd!"
> 
> Carl Clifford
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > --- > This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. > http://www.avast.com > > __._,_.___ > Posted by: "Ken Logan" > Reply via web post • Reply to sender • Reply to group • Start a New Topic • Messages in this topic (1) > VISIT YOUR GROUP New Members 1 > • Privacy • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use > . > > > __,_._,___ BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: 2015!
From: Vader Willem Jan Marinus <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2015 12:46:42 +0000
Dear friends,

 Even though I no longer write regularly about birds and seasons in Tromsř, 
N.Norway, I stil lurk on the lists, and want to wish you all a happy, healthy 
and bird-rich 2015. 




 As you may remember , Tromsř is at 70*N, which means that in the Christmas 
holidays we have hardly any daylight at all, and the sun is 'a month away' in 
both directions. In addition, our far North, but coastal situation brings long, 
but not particularly severe winters, with relatively few land birds wintering 
here, but lots of waterbirds on the open fjords (but little daylight to see 
them in). This winter we had beautiful calm clear winter days, with clear 
skies, spectacular Northern Lights, but little snow on the ground, followed 
just after Christmas Eve by some days of quite heavy snowfall (maybe 70 cm in 
2-3 days, something not unusual in our area, so the town is well prepared and 
the streets are cleared within a few hours), to the great pleasure of my 
grandchildren, that were here for Christmas. But it did not last long: the last 
two days it has blown and rained a lot, much of the snow has disappeared, and 
the streets went through a period of very dangerous iciness. 




 Under these circumstances the new year list has a very modest start. No birds 
have been on my feeders today as yet (Now it is 13 45 and again pitch dark), 
but as usual i saw both Hooded Crow and Eurasian Magpie in the garden; they are 
virtually always there. A Herring Gull flew overhead, and when we drove my lady 
to the airport for her return to Holland, I saw a Great Cormorant and lots of 
Common Eiders on the sound. And that is all as yet for 2015! 




                            All the best to all of you!

 Wim Vader, Vesterliv. 23,9013 Tromsř, norway 


 wim.vader AT uit.no 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI Field Guide to Birds of Machu Picchu by Barry Walker & Jon Fjeldsa
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2014 22:59:31 -0500
It is available through Amazon.com but only used and at a rather steep price!

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Lynea 

Sent: Tuesday, December 30, 2014 9:41 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI Field Guide to Birds of Machu Picchu by Barry Walker & 
Jon Fjeldsa 


Hi Birders,

I am looking to purchase a used copy of the Field Guide to Birds of Machu 
Picchu by Barry Walker and illustrated by Jon Fjeldsa. 


It is my understanding that it has 31 color plates and descriptions of 420 
species. I understand that it is published in both English and Spanish. 


If you own a copy of this and are willing to sell it, please get back to me.

Thanks much,
Lynea


Lynea Hinchman
Michigan City, Indiana
Heart of the Indiana Dunes
canyonwrenATcomcastDOTnet



http://www.flickr.com/photos/canyon_wren/

”Spread love everywhere you go: first of all in your own home. Give love to 
your children, to your wife or husband, to a next door neighbor . . . Let no 
one ever come to you without leaving better and happier. Be the living 
expression of God’s kindness; kindness in your face, kindness in your eyes, 
kindness in your smile, kindness in your warm greeting.” —Mother Teresa 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI Field Guide to Birds of Machu Picchu by Barry Walker & Jon Fjeldsa
From: Lynea <canyonwren AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2014 20:41:21 -0600
Hi Birders,

I am looking to purchase a used copy of the Field Guide to Birds of Machu 
Picchu by Barry Walker and illustrated by Jon Fjeldsa. 


It is my understanding that it has 31 color plates and descriptions of 420 
species. I understand that it is published in both English and Spanish. 


If you own a copy of this and are willing to sell it, please get back to me.  

Thanks much,
Lynea


Lynea Hinchman
Michigan City, Indiana
Heart of the Indiana Dunes
canyonwrenATcomcastDOTnet



http://www.flickr.com/photos/canyon_wren/

”Spread love everywhere you go: first of all in your own home. Give love to 
your children, to your wife or husband, to a next door neighbor . . . Let no 
one ever come to you without leaving better and happier. Be the living 
expression of God’s kindness; kindness in your face, kindness in your eyes, 
kindness in your smile, kindness in your warm greeting.” —Mother Teresa 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: Birding in Norway
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 15:28:24 -0800
Birders:
I'm posting this on behalf of a birding friend of mine.
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

Birders:
I hope to go to Norway and possibly Sweden this Spring or Summer
(2015) and hope to do some birding while there.  Can anyone suggest a
bird guide, especially in southern Norway near Kristiansand, where I
will be visiting a distant cousin?  I also hope to go to Bergen,
Trondheim and possibly Tromso, all of which are on the Norwegian Sea,
where the fjords are located.  I may also go to Stockholm in search
of other cousins.
Thanks for any leads you may have.

Please reply to: "Marilyn Judson" 

Thank you very much.

Good Birding!
Marilyn Judson
Venice, Ca.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - December 2014
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 12:13:01 -0500
The December 2014 issue of the Birding Community E-bulletin is now
available the web, covering news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for active and
concerned birders, those dedicated to the joys of birding and the
protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of superb quality birding
binoculars and scopes, Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past E-bulletins on the
website of the National Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The December 2014 edition includes the following topics:


RARITY FOCUS
   - a Tundra Bean-Goose at Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge on
the
     northern Oregon coast

ANOTHER RARITY... OR ANOTHER ESCAPED BIRD?
   - Red-legged Honeycreeper at Estero Llano Grande State Park in the

     Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

GUNNISON SAGE-GROUSE OFFICIALLY THREATENED
   - decision to list the Gunnison Sage-Grouse as a Threatened
species
     under the Endangered Species Act (ESA)

CONDORS AND LEAD IN ARIZONA AND UTAH
   - the number of California Condors treated for lead exposure from
lead-bullet
     ingestion in Utah and Arizona dropped to its lowest level since
2005

BOOK NOTES: NOT THE MALTESE FALCON
   - Jan Dunlap's latest contribution to her birder-murder-mystery
series
     is Swift Justice

IBA NEWS: SHEARWATER FATAL ATTRACTION
   - Phillip Island in Australia - the attraction of human-initiated
nighttime lighting
     to fledgling Short-tailed Shearwaters - mortality high

ACCESS MATTERS: MAGEE BOARDWALK RENOVATION
   - Friends of Magee Marsh began a campaign to raise $300,000 to
     refurbish the boardwalk - no state funding available

THE NORTH DAKOTA EXCEPTION
   - in North Dakota Measure 5 was defeated

HOG ISLAND PLANS FOR 2015
   - schedule
here:

http://hogisland.audubon.org 


TIP OF THE MONTH: KEEPING THE CBC FREE
   - it still costs National Audubon about $300,000 a year to run, so

     make a contribution!

BOB SARGENT: GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
   - helped change the understanding of trans-gulf migration and the
status
     of hummingbirds in the southeastern U.S.


- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National Wildlife Refuge
Association (NWRA) website:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 



If you wish to receive the bulletin or have any friends or co-workers

who want to get onto the monthly E-bulletin mailing list, have them
contact either:

Wayne R. Petersen
Director Massachusetts Important Bird Areas (IBA)
Program Mass Audubon
wpetersen-at-massaudubon.org

Paul J. Baicich
Great Birding Projects
paul.baicich-at-verizon.net

If you wish to distribute all or parts of any of the monthly Birding
Community E-bulletins, they simply request that you mention the
source
of any material used. (Include a URL for the E-bulletin archives, if
possible.)

We never lend or sell our E-bulletin recipient list.


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: What are the best times for Spring migration on Vancouver Island
From: Wayne Weber <contopus AT TELUS.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 12:34:55 -0800
Theo and Birdchatters,

As someone who has lived and birded in and near Vancouver, BC for the last 50 
years, I must respectfully disagree with my friend David Mark that "there is 
not much of a spring migration in coastal British Columbia". Compared with 
eastern North America, the spring migration is spread out over a longer time 
period, from the arrival of most Robins in late February to the last few 
warblers and flycatchers passing through in the first week of June. However, 
the number of birds moving through coastal BC is massive, especially when it 
comes to waterfowl and shorebirds. Even with songbirds, although we do not 
(unlike the east) have spring days when you can go out and find 25 species of 
warblers, there are very pronounced "waves" of spring migrants when the woods 
are filled with hundreds if not thousands of warblers, vireos, flycatchers, 
etc. 


David, I seriously doubt that you could show me anything around Buffalo that 
could compare with the huge flocks of Brant, Snow Geese, shorebirds, etc. that 
can be seen in south coastal BC! 


As an indication of when to expect different species of migrants in the 
Vancouver area, a better reference than the one provided by David, although 
from the same website, is the newest (2013) bar-graph checklist of Vancouver 
birds, which can be seen at 


http://naturevancouver.ca/sites/naturevancouver.ca/VNHS%20files/Birds%20of%20Greater%20Vancouver%20Checklist.pdf 
. The timing of migration on southern Vancouver Island is very similar, 
although the abundance of some species differs markedly from that in the 
Vancouver area. 


I would suggest the first 2 weeks of May as the best time to visit, although 
the last week of April is also very good. 


Good luck and good birding to all,

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus AT telus.net
Chairman, Vancouver bird checklist committee



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of dmark 

Sent: December-27-14 6:27 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: What are the best times for Spring migration on 
Vancouver Island 


Hello Theo and all,

I lived in a Vancouver suburb the first half of my life.
There is not much of a spring migration in coastal British Columbia.
Migratory
birds arrive and leave over quite a long period.

The "Reporting Dates for Bird Sightings" document for the city of Vancouver 
area may give you an idea of when spring migrants and summer birds normally are 
back, and when winter birds depart. This won't help much with seabirds on 
Vancouver Island. 



http://naturevancouver.ca/sites/naturevancouver.ca/VNHS%20files/4/20080501_Reporting_Dates_for_Bird_Sightings.pdf 


Good luck!

David

David Mark
Buffalo, New York
dmark AT buffalo.edu



On 12/26/2014 9:00 pm, Theo Hofmann wrote:
> Hello Chatters
>
> I am planning to spend about two weeks on Vancouver Island at any time
> in spring I choose. What would be the best times for spring migration?
>
> With many thanks
>
> Theo Hofmann
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> You don't stop playing because you get old, You get old because you
> stop playing.  George Bernhard Shaw
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------
> Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
> 199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
> Thornhill  Ontario
> L4J 1C1

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 28, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 10:41:33 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Solstice Fires
http://bit.ly/Z2eUqs
* Diving Birds – Below the Surface
http://bit.ly/1xlIaI7
* Carol of the Birds - With Nancy Rumbel
http://bit.ly/VxlsXB
* Why Should You Care About Birds? With Dr. Gordon Orians
http://bit.ly/1xlInuL
* The Julenek - A Scandinavian tradition that's for the birds
http://bit.ly/1JU3V8v
* Myth of the Wren - St. Stephen's Day
http://bit.ly/1CN7viD
* Pigeon Flocks Follow the Leader
http://bit.ly/1zFU2YH
--------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1zn33ke
--------------------------
365 days of BirdNote -- Check out the Birds of BirdNote calendar:
http://bit.ly/1xlUmqA
---------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: What are the best times for Spring migration on Vancouver Island
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 09:26:50 -0500
Hello Theo and all,

I lived in a Vancouver suburb the first half of my life.
There is not much of a spring migration in coastal British Columbia.
Migratory
birds arrive and leave over quite a long period.

The "Reporting Dates for Bird Sightings" document for the city of
Vancouver
area may give you an idea of when spring migrants and summer birds
normally
are back, and when winter birds depart. This won't help much with
seabirds
on Vancouver Island.


http://naturevancouver.ca/sites/naturevancouver.ca/VNHS%20files/4/20080501_Reporting_Dates_for_Bird_Sightings.pdf 


Good luck!

David

David Mark
Buffalo, New York
dmark AT buffalo.edu



On 12/26/2014 9:00 pm, Theo Hofmann wrote:
> Hello Chatters
>
> I am planning to spend abut two weeks on Vancouver Island at any time
> in
> spring I choose. What would be the best times for spring migration?
>
> With many thanks
>
> Theo Hofmann
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> You don't stop playing because you get old,
> You get old because you stop playing.  George Bernhard Shaw
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------
> Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
> 199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
> Thornhill  Ontario
> L4J 1C1
> ---------------------------------------------------------------
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: What are the best times for Spring migration on Vancouver Island
From: Theo Hofmann <theo AT HERA.MED.UTORONTO.CA>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 21:00:11 -0500
Hello Chatters

I am planning to spend abut two weeks on Vancouver Island at any time in
spring I choose. What would be the best times for spring migration?

With many thanks

Theo Hofmann
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You don't stop playing because you get old,
You get old because you stop playing.  George Bernhard Shaw

---------------------------------------------------------------
Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
Thornhill  Ontario
L4J 1C1
---------------------------------------------------------------

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Hybrid Western-Clark's in winter?
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 17:01:00 -0500
Thanks for the advice and the ID judgement, Joseph.  Certainly Western
is the expected species at this time of year.

Jerry Friedman
Española, New Mexico

On Mon, Dec 22, 2014 at 11:59 AM, Joseph Morlan  wrote:
> Jerry,
>
> The usual rule is bill color trumps eye pattern.  Bill color should work at
> all seasons, but eye pattern only works during the breeding season.
>
> Putative hybrids can be hard to pin down in winter unless you have clearly
> conflicting eye pattern / bill color.  There is no doubt that some birds
> which are genetic hybrids may be indistinguishable from "pure" birds of one
> or the other species.
>
> I would judge your bird to be a reasonably typical Western Grebe.
>
> On Mon, 22 Dec 2014 10:03:31 -0500, Jerry Friedman
>  wrote:
>
>>Hi, all.  Is anything known about identifying Clark's x Western Grebes
>>in winter?  What would you need to see?  Or should I assume that what
>>look like intermediate characteristics might be within the range of
>>variation of one species or the other (or both)?
>>
>> I'm hoping for an answer in general, but I'm also interested in a
>>specific bird near Española, New Mexico, which I reported to eBird as
>>Aechmophorus sp., but I've been wondering.
>>
>>http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebe72crop.jpg.html
>>

>>http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebeclose73crop.jpg.html 

>>
>>http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebe74crop.jpg.html
>>
>>Thanks,
>>Jerry Friedman
>>Española, New Mexico (well, not right now)
>>
>>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> --
> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
> "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 12/01/14 (York/ Rock Hill Christmas Bird Count Results)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 09:37:36 -0500
I just finished my official summary of the York/Rock Hill (SC) Christmas Bird 
Count, complete with photos and tallies of species we saw. It's posted as the 
1-21 Dec 2014 installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond." (I know you're 
probably busy with holiday happenings, but please take a look.) There's also an 
account of all birds banded and recaptured at the Center during the period, 
plus miscellaneous nature notes. It's all posted at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek141201.html 


Happy (Holiday) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Sibley 2nd printing
From: William Leigh <leightern AT MSN.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2014 13:33:39 +0000
Buteo Books actually lets you select first or second printing and guarantee you 
get the copy of your choice. 

best, 

William Leigh leightern AT msn.com

Bridgewater, Virginia 
 

 



> Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:46:52 -0700
> From: support AT AVISYS.NET
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Sibley 2nd printing
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> My thanks to all who responded to my inquiry re: a second printing of Sibley.
> 
> I should have taken a breath before posting here.  Today the ABA
> Birder's Guide to Gear arrived in the mail, with an explanation of
> the second printing, including illustration color and text quality
> improvements.
> 
> When buying, look for "Second printing, July 2014."
> 
> Also:  tinyurl.com/stiteler-on-sibley
> 
> Jerry
> 
> 
> Jerry Blinn
> AviSys Software
> Placitas, NM
> 505-867-6255
> jerry AT avisys.net
> Web Site: http://www.avisys.net
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Hybrid Western-Clark's in winter?
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2014 08:59:55 -0800
Jerry,

The usual rule is bill color trumps eye pattern.  Bill color should work at
all seasons, but eye pattern only works during the breeding season.

Putative hybrids can be hard to pin down in winter unless you have clearly
conflicting eye pattern / bill color.  There is no doubt that some birds
which are genetic hybrids may be indistinguishable from "pure" birds of one
or the other species.

I would judge your bird to be a reasonably typical Western Grebe.

On Mon, 22 Dec 2014 10:03:31 -0500, Jerry Friedman
 wrote:

>Hi, all.  Is anything known about identifying Clark's x Western Grebes
>in winter?  What would you need to see?  Or should I assume that what
>look like intermediate characteristics might be within the range of
>variation of one species or the other (or both)?
>
> I'm hoping for an answer in general, but I'm also interested in a
>specific bird near Española, New Mexico, which I reported to eBird as
>Aechmophorus sp., but I've been wondering.
>
>http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebe72crop.jpg.html
>

>http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebeclose73crop.jpg.html 

>
>http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebe74crop.jpg.html
>
>Thanks,
>Jerry Friedman
>Española, New Mexico (well, not right now)
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: back from Sri Lanka & Indian Ocean cruise
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2014 15:59:39 +0000
Hi all, 

Just back last night from our trip to Sri Lanka in late November/early December 
and the subsequent cruise from S.L. to Mauritius, on which we hoped for some 
good seabirding. Well, land birding was good throughout but seabirds were 
rather disappointing as the cruise track followed the Equator for much of the 
time and these warm nutrient-poor waters often appear to be "bird-free" zones. 
Relatively few tubenoses except Wedgerumped Shearwaters; one Jouanin's Petrel 
seen only by my husband, a number of Bulwer's Petrels and a couple of 
Matsudaira storm petrels. 


In Sri Lanka we had a custom tour with the Birding and Wildlife Team, guided by 
Deepal Warakagoda; we saw all the endemics except the Wood Pigeon (only 
untickable flight views) plus many other goodies such as Indian Pitta, Pied 
Thrush and Kashmir Flycatcher. In the Maldives we enjoyed about 20 Amur Falcons 
feeding over the airfield on Gan Island; they breed in China and migrate over 
the Indian Ocean to winter in Africa. Quite a sight! On the Seychelles we saw 
all the endemics save the White-eye, which is getting very hard unless you 
visit a single offshore island, which we did not have time to do. We did visit 
Aride off Praslin, where many of the rarest species survive, including the 
Magpie Robin and the Warbler. We also added Crab Plover, a species which has 
eluded us before! On Mahe and Praslin we had considerable help from Steve 
Agricole, a young man who is getting started as a bird and nature guide and who 
is very enthusiastic and reliable. On Mauritius we did see all the endemics as 
well as the Mascarene specialities (Martin and Paradise Flycatcher) although 
some of the rarest species such as Olive White-eye are hard except on Ile aux 
Aigrettes, an offshore predator-free sanctuary. We also had good seabirding off 
the south shore with multiple Barau's Petrels, which was new for all of us. 


I will try and get a trip report together but if anyone wants specific details 
on where we saw some of the island landbirds, please email me. 


Gail Mackiernan 
Silver Spring, MD 



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hybrid Western-Clark's in winter?
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2014 10:03:31 -0500
Hi, all.  Is anything known about identifying Clark's x Western Grebes
in winter?  What would you need to see?  Or should I assume that what
look like intermediate characteristics might be within the range of
variation of one species or the other (or both)?

 I'm hoping for an answer in general, but I'm also interested in a
specific bird near Española, New Mexico, which I reported to eBird as
Aechmophorus sp., but I've been wondering.

http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebe72crop.jpg.html

http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebeclose73crop.jpg.html

http://s905.photobucket.com/user/Jerry_Friedman/media/grebe74crop.jpg.html

Thanks,
Jerry Friedman
Española, New Mexico (well, not right now)

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 16:16:35 -0500
 Elliott, Alvaro, Larry and interested Chatters,

 I don't think any birder is uninterested in seeing the scientists unravel the 
 mystery. Of course we want to know the "true" relationships which are being, 
and 

 will be revealed. The "problem" is that everyday birding is at the mercy of 
each 

 new finding, whether it be on a checklist or in field guides. Since these 
 sources usually follow the latest order and updates from the AOU Checklist, 
many 

 of them become outdated very quickly, and in need of revision, while those 
using 

 them are wondering why the list of Sandpipers has been rearranged, or the 
 Tanagers aren't where they used to be, or where did all the Dendroicas go, or 
 what's a Pucaea Sparrow, or who thought up Spinus pinus?

Writing a field guide usually takes years of research, and I know from personal 

 experience that over a period of years the AOU changes have given me more than 

 one headache trying to keep up with all of the most recent revisions. I guess 
 that's why I reacted with a half-hearted suggestion that it would be nice if 
the 

 science and the everday birding could somehow live parallel existences. 
Science 

 is extremely important for unravelling the "Truth", but it really does dictate 

 almost every nuance of our general field guides and checklists, and these 
changes can be frustrating at times from that perspective. Even Kaufman in his 
 Focus guide, while explaining that he departs from the AOU sequence in several 

 places, emphasizes that most checklists follow the AOU order, and then lists 
 that order in his introduction (which order, by the way, is out of date, and 
 needs revision!).

 All the best,
 Ernie Jardine
 Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Alvaro Jaramillo 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Fri, Dec 19, 2014 2:27 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs 
Related to Human Speech 



Elliott et al.

   I may have this wrong, but part of what is important (revolutionary?) about 
this recent paper is that it uses whole genome data. So they are not doing the 
classic mtDNA with a nuclear intron type analysis. What is amazing is how 
similar it is to a previous paper (Hackett et al. 2008). 
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/320/5884/1763.short 

using smaller amounts of gene data, but a larger set of species. The new paper 
resolves the early branches of the avian family tree more readily. But the fact 

that so much is similar between the two trees means that we are beginning to 
reach the asymptote of change in the higher order organization of the bird 
family tree.
   You will all laugh at me, particularly those who scowl at the changes that 
"these scientists" :-) thrust upon us birders, but I almost get emotional 
thinking about data like this. Within my life time we will come to understand 
the major relationships of the birds, we will know their history. We will erase 

the major issues of creating a phylogeny (family tree) of the birds based on 
their perceived similarity, as opposed to their true and real relationship. 
With 

the help of computers, and genetic techniques, some of which are so new and so 
much more powerful than what was available even a decade ago, we will have 
answers. We will continue to argue about what is a species, but we will have a 
pretty solid idea of the real relationships of the groups of birds. That is so 
beautiful! Amazing. Really, it makes me emotional. To me, seeing a finely 
resolved and robust phylogeny is a spiritual event. We are peering into the 
background, the history, the ups and downs, The Story of th!
 ese creatures we love so much. Keep it coming scientists!!!

Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of Elliott Bedows
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2014 10:38 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs 
Related to Human Speech

Hi Larry (and others),

I feel the need to disagree with you here.  The current method of determining 
avian phylogenic relationships relies on comparing genetic sequences of 
specified genes between species.  This is a reasonable approach, but the 
selection of the genes used to do these comparisons is quite arbitrary.  In 
fact, genes known to mutate most rapidly, such as satellite DNA sequences, are 
preferred for current taxonomic evaluations because the gene sequence changes 
are amplified.  But this approach can lead to problems (recall that New World 
Vultures were once considered to be Storks). Thus, the "TRUTH" you allude to is 

not "truth" at all, but rather a snippet of various relationships based on a 
limited number of possibly non-representative criteria.

I believe that the use of super computers to obtain DNA sequence data has the 
'potential' of yielding more accurate taxonomic relationships because a variety 

of gene sequences can be compared simultaneously. In my opinion, that would 
include, but not be limited to, both the coding and non-coding sequences of 
genes directly required for reproduction.  I am not complaining about using 
'new' criteria for establishing taxonomic order; rather I am complaining that 
too many previous taxonomy studies have been conducted in a manner that limits 
their usefulness and that many recent changes avian taxonomy are ultimately 
going to be reversed. This makes casual birding confusing and why I think that 
changes in avian taxonomy could be accepted less frequently.

My 2-cents worth!!

Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 8:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech

I have to disagree. The changes are interesting, particularly when you read up 

on the reasons for them. I will once again get used to the change in ordering. 

And it really seems that we are getting closer to the TRUTH, even if we can 
never get 100% there.

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>

 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 21, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 10:16:25 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Northern Forest Owls - Coming South this Winter?
http://bit.ly/1aJ1Nvp

* The Benefits of a Raven's Black Feathers
http://bit.ly/1Hg4yFc

* Christmas Bird Count - Join In!
http://bit.ly/ROXT1i

* The Rooster
http://bit.ly/1vbwHYm

* Freeway Hawks
http://bit.ly/QAsRZ2

* The Avocets of Bolivar Flats
http://bit.ly/RVm4eG

* Morning in Oaxaca
http://bit.ly/Zvfrmv

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:http://bit.ly/1ARj5Fd

------------------------------------------------------------
365 days of BirdNote -- Check out the Birds of BirdNote calendar:
http://bit.ly/1xlUmqA
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.

... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 11:25:20 -0800
Elliott et al.

 I may have this wrong, but part of what is important (revolutionary?) about 
this recent paper is that it uses whole genome data. So they are not doing the 
classic mtDNA with a nuclear intron type analysis. What is amazing is how 
similar it is to a previous paper (Hackett et al. 2008). 
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/320/5884/1763.short using smaller amounts of 
gene data, but a larger set of species. The new paper resolves the early 
branches of the avian family tree more readily. But the fact that so much is 
similar between the two trees means that we are beginning to reach the 
asymptote of change in the higher order organization of the bird family tree. 

 You will all laugh at me, particularly those who scowl at the changes that 
"these scientists" :-) thrust upon us birders, but I almost get emotional 
thinking about data like this. Within my life time we will come to understand 
the major relationships of the birds, we will know their history. We will erase 
the major issues of creating a phylogeny (family tree) of the birds based on 
their perceived similarity, as opposed to their true and real relationship. 
With the help of computers, and genetic techniques, some of which are so new 
and so much more powerful than what was available even a decade ago, we will 
have answers. We will continue to argue about what is a species, but we will 
have a pretty solid idea of the real relationships of the groups of birds. That 
is so beautiful! Amazing. Really, it makes me emotional. To me, seeing a finely 
resolved and robust phylogeny is a spiritual event. We are peering into the 
background, the history, the ups and downs, The Story of th! 

 ese creatures we love so much. Keep it coming scientists!!!

Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliott Bedows 

Sent: Friday, December 19, 2014 10:38 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs 
Related to Human Speech 


Hi Larry (and others),

I feel the need to disagree with you here. The current method of determining 
avian phylogenic relationships relies on comparing genetic sequences of 
specified genes between species. This is a reasonable approach, but the 
selection of the genes used to do these comparisons is quite arbitrary. In 
fact, genes known to mutate most rapidly, such as satellite DNA sequences, are 
preferred for current taxonomic evaluations because the gene sequence changes 
are amplified. But this approach can lead to problems (recall that New World 
Vultures were once considered to be Storks). Thus, the "TRUTH" you allude to is 
not "truth" at all, but rather a snippet of various relationships based on a 
limited number of possibly non-representative criteria. 


I believe that the use of super computers to obtain DNA sequence data has the 
'potential' of yielding more accurate taxonomic relationships because a variety 
of gene sequences can be compared simultaneously. In my opinion, that would 
include, but not be limited to, both the coding and non-coding sequences of 
genes directly required for reproduction. I am not complaining about using 
'new' criteria for establishing taxonomic order; rather I am complaining that 
too many previous taxonomy studies have been conducted in a manner that limits 
their usefulness and that many recent changes avian taxonomy are ultimately 
going to be reversed. This makes casual birding confusing and why I think that 
changes in avian taxonomy could be accepted less frequently. 


My 2-cents worth!!

Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET 

Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 8:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech 


I have to disagree. The changes are interesting, particularly when you read up 
on the reasons for them. I will once again get used to the change in ordering. 
And it really seems that we are getting closer to the TRUTH, even if we can 
never get 100% there. 


Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related
> to Human Speech
>
> From Scientific American:
>
> "The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the
> evolutionary roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human
> speech disorders".
>
> See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: Elliott Bedows <ebedows AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:38:29 -0600
Hi Larry (and others),

I feel the need to disagree with you here. The current method of determining 
avian phylogenic relationships relies on comparing genetic sequences of 
specified genes between species. This is a reasonable approach, but the 
selection of the genes used to do these comparisons is quite arbitrary. In 
fact, genes known to mutate most rapidly, such as satellite DNA sequences, are 
preferred for current taxonomic evaluations because the gene sequence changes 
are amplified. But this approach can lead to problems (recall that New World 
Vultures were once considered to be Storks). Thus, the "TRUTH" you allude to is 
not "truth" at all, but rather a snippet of various relationships based on a 
limited number of possibly non-representative criteria. 


I believe that the use of super computers to obtain DNA sequence data has the 
'potential' of yielding more accurate taxonomic relationships because a variety 
of gene sequences can be compared simultaneously. In my opinion, that would 
include, but not be limited to, both the coding and non-coding sequences of 
genes directly required for reproduction. I am not complaining about using 
'new' criteria for establishing taxonomic order; rather I am complaining that 
too many previous taxonomy studies have been conducted in a manner that limits 
their usefulness and that many recent changes avian taxonomy are ultimately 
going to be reversed. This makes casual birding confusing and why I think that 
changes in avian taxonomy could be accepted less frequently. 


My 2-cents worth!!

Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET 

Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 8:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech 


I have to disagree.  The changes are interesting, particularly when you
read up on the reasons for them.  I will once again get used to the
change in ordering.  And it really seems that we are getting closer to
the TRUTH, even if we can never get 100% there.

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related
> to Human Speech
>
> From Scientific American:
>
> "The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the
> evolutionary
> roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech
> disorders".
>
> See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Norway - man rescues duck
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 10:16:12 -0500
One lucky lady goldeneye; one human hero.   A warm and fuzzy (starting out
cold and harsh) feel-good story for the season:



http://www.viralnova.com/drowning-duck-rescue/?mb=vnnl

__._,_.___








Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Sibley 2nd printing
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:46:52 -0700
My thanks to all who responded to my inquiry re: a second printing of Sibley.

I should have taken a breath before posting here.  Today the ABA
Birder's Guide to Gear arrived in the mail, with an explanation of
the second printing, including illustration color and text quality
improvements.

When buying, look for "Second printing, July 2014."

Also:  tinyurl.com/stiteler-on-sibley

Jerry


Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: feathered forecasters
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:54:11 -0800
Hi all,

I thought this was interesting....  nice to see this species in MSM.


http://www.nbcnews.com/science/environment/feathered-forecasters-tiny-birds-knew-killer-tornadoes-were-coming-n270381 


Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas
www.utopianature.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:44:13 -0500
I have to disagree.  The changes are interesting, particularly when you
read up on the reasons for them.  I will once again get used to the
change in ordering.  And it really seems that we are getting closer to
the TRUTH, even if we can never get 100% there.

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related
> to Human Speech
>
> From Scientific American:
>
> "The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the
> evolutionary
> roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech
> disorders".
>
> See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:52:59 -0500
Elliott and Chatters,
 
We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my gut reaction 
(full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the scientists continue with 
their research, but leave recreational birders an intact checklist, in the same 
order (Loons first), and with the same names (with the exception of cases like 
"Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin names. Then we 
wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and checklists), about 
whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or whether it's still 
Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on how many Crossbills there are. 

 
Serious listers wouldn't like this, because they love splits, but maybe there's 
room for 2 groupings: Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, 
those who like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds 
seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having 10 
checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change.  

 
The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming), 
especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most radical 
seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've had changes 
appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or your latest purchase. 
In light of all this, maybe your 10 year proposal is worthy of 
consideration......for some of us anyway. The way things are going though, 
after 10 years, there would probably be an avalanche of changes to deal with. 
It really is a problem separating the science from the everyday birding for 
those of us who would like to slow down the merry-go-round. 

 
All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com
 
www.birdsongidentification.com
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Elliott Bedows 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech 



Hi everyone,

One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that there 
may 

enough genetic information obtained to, once again, reorganize the avian 
phylogenic tree. Personally, I'd like to see an update once every ten years or 

so, rather than a seemingly endless tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy 
is what it is ........

Elliott Bedows,
Bellevue, NE


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human 

Speech

From Scientific American:

"The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the evolutionary
roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech disorders".

See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Sibley
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:24:57 -0500
The text in the bad printing was, I'm pretty sure, due to young designers
who just don't have a clue how hard pale font is to read. But yes, from
everything I've seen and heard, it has been improved vastly in a second
printing--someone listened! Tragically for my poor 63-year-old eyes, we're
still paying off too many college expenses for our kids to be able to
justify forking out the money for the second printing. Oh, well.

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:45 PM, Jerry Blinn  wrote:
>
> Has there been a second printing of the new Sibley with improved text
> quality?
>
> When I go birding, I leave the new Sibley on the shelf and take my
> beat up, 14 year-old Sibley.
>
> I feel David is a victim of the printers in China.  I originally had
> an order for a dozen copies for friends and associates, but when I
> saw the text quality I canceled the order.  It is very hard to read
> in poor light.
>
> Jerry
>
>
> Jerry Blinn
> AviSys Software
> Placitas, NM
> 505-867-6255
> jerry AT avisys.net
> Web Site: http://www.avisys.net
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>


--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Sibley
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:11:46 -0500
Yes.  It is available at Buteo Books among other places:
http://www.buteobooks.com/product/SIBL2.html

From the photos I've seen the second printing appears to solve all the
color issues and the problem with text appearing too light.

Jim Moore
Rockville, MD

On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:45 PM, Jerry Blinn  wrote:
>
> Has there been a second printing of the new Sibley with improved text
> quality?
>
> When I go birding, I leave the new Sibley on the shelf and take my
> beat up, 14 year-old Sibley.
>
> I feel David is a victim of the printers in China.  I originally had
> an order for a dozen copies for friends and associates, but when I
> saw the text quality I canceled the order.  It is very hard to read
> in poor light.
>
> Jerry
>
>
> Jerry Blinn
> AviSys Software
> Placitas, NM
> 505-867-6255
> jerry AT avisys.net
> Web Site: http://www.avisys.net
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Sibley
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 13:45:58 -0700
Has there been a second printing of the new Sibley with improved text quality?

When I go birding, I leave the new Sibley on the shelf and take my
beat up, 14 year-old Sibley.

I feel David is a victim of the printers in China.  I originally had
an order for a dozen copies for friends and associates, but when I
saw the text quality I canceled the order.  It is very hard to read
in poor light.

Jerry


Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html