Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
BirdChat

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Tuesday, May 24 at 03:11 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Greater Spotted Cuckoo,©Jan Wilczur

24 May rare-species-x-rediscovered-brazil-after-75-year-disappearance [Paulo Boute ]
22 May Birding The Deadliest Catch ["snorkler AT juno.com" ]
22 May Sunday Banding - Lakeville, Minnesota [Roger Everhart ]
22 May Blue-eyed-Ground Dove - Rediscovered, in Brazil, After 75 Years! [Paulo Boute ]
21 May BirdNote, last week and the week of May 22, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
20 May How Birds Became Red [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
18 May Radar Image from Midwest [Roger Everhart ]
17 May RFI Birding South Korea [David Starrett ]
17 May International Raptor Council [Ken Birding ]
16 May Sunday Birds in Dakota County, MN [Roger Everhart ]
15 May Now there's an idea: Gannets on Gannet Rock! ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
14 May BirdNote, last week and the week of May 15, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
7 May BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 8, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
30 Apr BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 1, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
29 Apr Re: Darwin's Finches ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
28 Apr Re: Darwin's Finches [Douglas Carver ]
28 Apr RFI - Southern Texas and Whooping Cranes [John Arnfield ]
28 Apr Darwin's Finches [Laurie Larson ]
28 Apr those fascinating fairy-wrens [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
26 Apr Hawaii Birding Festival. [Paulo Boute ]
23 Apr Woodland bird habitat question (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
23 Apr BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of April 24, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
22 Apr Last Night's Bird Migration Radar [Daniel Edelstein ]
21 Apr It’s time to protect the USFWS from its own worst impulses [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
19 Apr Acoustic Scarecrows: A Humane, Non-Lethal Way To Reduce Bird Strikes? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
16 Apr BirdNote, last week and the week of April 17, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Apr Very cool experience... ["B.G. Sloan" ]
12 Apr Hummingbirds Wintering in Costa Rica []
12 Apr New Book: Thumbs Up For "The Most Perfect Thing: Inside (and Outside) a Bird's Egg" [Daniel Edelstein ]
11 Apr RFI: SE Virginia birding [donald lewis ]
11 Apr unusual migrant irruptions due to weather [tom and sheri ]
11 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Gail Mackiernan ]
11 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Jay Greenberg ]
11 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones []
9 Apr Argentina-suspends-reciprocity-fee-for-us-citizens [Paulo Boute ]
11 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Ken Birding ]
11 Apr feeding turnstones [Vader Willem Jan Marinus ]
10 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Jim Royer ]
10 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [L Markoff ]
11 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
10 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Joseph Morlan ]
11 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Ronald Orenstein ]
10 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Laurie Foss ]
10 Apr More migrants move [Roger Everhart ]
11 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Ronald Orenstein ]
10 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Sandra Savage ]
10 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Katharine Mills ]
10 Apr Re: Feeding Turnstones [Laura Erickson ]
10 Apr Feeding Turnstones [Ken Birding ]
9 Apr BirdNote, last week and the week of April 10, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
8 Apr Hilton Pond 03/16/16 (Springtime Chores) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
8 Apr Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico? ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
8 Apr Birding Guyana and Harpy Eagle [Stephen Elliott ]
7 Apr Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico? [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
8 Apr Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
7 Apr Description vs. Photo [Jerry Friedman ]
7 Apr Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico? [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
7 Apr Re: Reputation vs. Photo [Douglas Carver ]
7 Apr Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
6 Apr Photos v reputation [Richard Carlson ]
6 Apr Re: Reputation vs. Photo [Reginald David ]
6 Apr Re: Reputation vs. Photo [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
6 Apr Re: Reputation vs. Photo [Ronald Orenstein ]
6 Apr Re: Reputation vs. Photo [Laura Erickson ]
6 Apr Re: Reputation vs. Photo [Jim Royer ]
6 Apr Re: Reputation vs. Photo [Ronald Orenstein ]
6 Apr Re: Kokako ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
6 Apr Re: Kokako [Joseph Morlan ]
6 Apr Reputation vs. Photo [Patty O'Neill ]
6 Apr FOY Ruby-throated Hummingbird ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
5 Apr Re: Birding Pals [David Starrett ]
5 Apr Fwd: [birders] Puerto Rican Refuge threatened [Patricia Burden ]
5 Apr Re: Birding Pals []
5 Apr Re: Birding Pals [Lewis Brown ]
5 Apr Re: Kokako [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
5 Apr Birding Pals in Puerto Rico [Sam Sinderson ]

Subject: rare-species-x-rediscovered-brazil-after-75-year-disappearance
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 06:07:00 -0400
Good Morning!
Just found this link, in English!

http://www.birdlife.org/americas/news/extremely-rare-species-x-rediscovered-brazil-after-75-year-disappearance 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.
                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Birding The Deadliest Catch
From: "snorkler AT juno.com" <snorkler@JUNO.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 15:57:26 GMT
Does anyone else bird this show? There are a lot of unusual birds pictured 
around the crab boats. I've seen Sooty and/or Short-tailed Shearwater, Northern 
Fulmar, jaegers, kittiwakes, Sabine and Glaucous and Glaucous-winged Gulls. 
Having worked and birded the industry, I know there are some real treasures 
possible, like Ancient Murrelets, Crested Auklets, Thick-billed Murres, and 
Red-legged Kittiwakes. 


On a side note, I haven't posted regularly on Birdchat in 15 years, but you 
old-timers will remember my birding buddy Floyd (Margaret) from our many 
adventures together. Floyd was my foil on my infamous Costa Rica and Baja 
California trips, and many others (Central Pacific Mexico, Manitoba, Kenya, 
Australia) since I stopped posting here. Floyd is fighting Stage 3 inflammatory 
breast cancer, and could use your thought, support, and prayers. 


Darrell Lee
Alameda, CA

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Sunday Banding - Lakeville, Minnesota
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:02:01 -0500

Good Evening,




 We held the second spring banding program at Ritter Farm Park in Lakeville, 
Minnesota this morning. Our numbers were low which seems to be the story this 
spring but we had a couple of nice catches including a White-crowned Sparrow. 
Ended with only 9 birds but had 8 species. 






Photos at -




http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com







Good Birding,

Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN









For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Blue-eyed-Ground Dove - Rediscovered, in Brazil, After 75 Years!
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 06:18:20 -0400
Good Morning & Good News!!!
The Blue-eyed-Ground Dove, one of the rarest Brazilian Birds, was - finally - 
Rediscovered after 75 years!!! 

For mor information about this bird, I suggest this site:
http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=2568
 
It is already in the News, in Brazil: ( The use of a Online Translator, will be 
necessary, but it has great pictures of it!) 


http://ciencia.estadao.com.br/noticias/geral,cientistas-redescobrem-especie-ave-desaparecida-ha-75-anos-,1871624 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.

                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of May 22, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 07:19:04 -0700
Hey, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* The Ballet of the Grebes
http://bit.ly/StTzpu
* Long-billed Curlew - Singing over the Grassland
http://bit.ly/108JHO7
* The Turaco's Non-colorfast Plumage
--A story from 'Chatter Rick Wright
http://bit.ly/1XhWTkN
* Tufted Titmouse - What's in a Name?
http://bit.ly/1m41qm6
* Robins Raise a Brood - In a Hurry
http://bit.ly/1FGgDXi
* The Endangered Palila of Hawaii
http://bit.ly/27GZsBO
* Lazuli Bunting - Jewel of Western Canyons
http://bit.ly/146KDrX
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1WIAlLI
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: How Birds Became Red
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 16:34:26 +0100
hello everyone,

I've been madly writing about a couple newly published papers that detail
the mechanism of how birds got their red coloration -- i published the
short, "reader's digest" version on Forbes, and a longer, more detailed,
version will publish on The Evolution Institute. Here's the link:

How Birds Became Red
http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/05/20/how-birds-became-red/

the studies are truly elegant, and are a real pleasure to read. i hope
you'll also enjoy reading about the highlights (in the above link) and the
details (link to come).

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Radar Image from Midwest
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:11:14 -0500





Hey everyone,

 The Mississippi River Flyway looks pretty busy tonight along with areas to the 
east. Radar image at: 


http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com



Good Birding,
Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN





For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: RFI Birding South Korea
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 21:58:29 -0500
BirdChatters,
In January I asked if anyone had good leads on birding guide in S Korea. 
Overwhelming response was Nials Moore. I have emailed him 3 times in past 2 
months with no answer. Bird pal isn't yielding anything. A suggested Korean 
birding forum bounces messages. I have a full day June 2 that I was hoping to 
find a guide for. Any chance anyone has a suggestion for finding a guide aside 
from what I have tried? 

Thanks for any leads. My Plan B is walking to Namsan Park which is a couple 
blocks from where we will be staying and has some recent eBird submissions. 

Thanks,
Dave
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Columbia, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: International Raptor Council
From: Ken Birding <curlewbird AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 10:57:09 -0400
At a recent meeting of the International Raptor  Council, the subject of
splitting several species came up and failed to be resolved.

It was decided to form an 'add hawk' committee to resolve these issues!! ;-)

Best -
Ken Blackshaw --
Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
Nantucket Island -- 30 miles at sea

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Sunday Birds in Dakota County, MN
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 May 2016 09:47:31 -0500

In spite of being pretty windy I had a pretty good day finding migrants around 
Dakota County, MN. Best birds were a Loggerhead Shrike, 2 Lark Sparrows along 
some county backroads and 9 species of shorebirds at Lake Byllesby. Migration 
weather looks promising for the next several days. 





www.http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com







Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN












For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Now there's an idea: Gannets on Gannet Rock!
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 19:28:40 -0400

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/n-s-conservation-group-hopes-to-bring-namesake-se
abird-back-to-gannet-rock-1.2903067





Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada




For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of May 15, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 06:20:15 -0700
Hey, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Two Wings and a Tail - Wilson's Snipe
http://bit.ly/IPpqYR
* Red-Tailed Hawks - Adaptable Diners
http://bit.ly/23AR2Y0
* Burrowing Owls
http://bit.ly/1oq4POE
* Peacocks in India
http://bit.ly/1VSQeP9
* Designing a Spider Web to Evade Bird Collision
http://bit.ly/1WrELGb
* The World of Warblers
http://bit.ly/1VVq5ir
* Bobolinks and Grasslands, A Natural Match
http://bit.ly/J7xalC
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1VWlVXE
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 8, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 May 2016 08:12:27 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters!

Last week's BirdNote stories:
* Silly Willow Ptarmigan - Celebrating World Laughter Day
http://bit.ly/1WxXsXv
* Nest Building - Robins Compared to Humans
http://bit.ly/1q5TG5U
* The Ruby-crowned Kinglet Tunes Up
http://bit.ly/JGx7At
* Singing Sandpipers
http://bit.ly/NeobmR
* America's Love of the Lawn
http://bit.ly/1Ncd6Gk
* Three Brown Thrushes, Three Distinctive Singers
http://bit.ly/10TMaw3
* Shorebirds in Kansas - Oval Migration Pattern
http://bit.ly/1ndYJQT
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1s0bLJw
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 1, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 07:56:19 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters!

Check out the latest photo blog – Gregg Thompson catches a
Double-crested Cormorant in the act of nabbing a rockfish:
http://bit.ly/26E7nQ5
-----------------------------------------------
Last week's BirdNote stories:
* High Island - Not an Island and Not Very High,
But a Great Place to Watch Migratory Birds
http://bit.ly/1WM6Ua8
* The Sage Thrasher and Sagebrush Habitat
http://bit.ly/1VrYHbO
* Mississippi Kites - Strength in Numbers
http://bit.ly/1U9rH6T
* Hovering with Horned Larks
http://bit.ly/Xxrlcr
* The Marsh Wren's Repertoire
http://bit.ly/1SCyWoD
* The Color of Birds' Eyes
http://bit.ly/1ToFG6B
* Probing with Sandpipers
http://bit.ly/13jIOG9
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1VY7jr1
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Darwin's Finches
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 13:47:34 +0000
I agree with Douglas. It's a fascinating book, well written and very readable.

If you want something a little heavier, it doesn't hurt to tackle Peter Grant's 
own volume Ecology and Evolution of Darwin's Finches. You probably wouldn't 
want to take it to bed to read before falling asleep, but it's a fine study and 
well worth the effort to read it. 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com


________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Douglas Carver  

Sent: April 28, 2016 6:19 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Darwin's Finches

Thanks for posting this -- and any BirdChatters who have not yet read Jonathan 
Weiner's "The Beak of the Finch" should do so! 


Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM

On Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 7:50 AM, Laurie Larson 
> wrote: 

Hi Birdchatters,

I've always been interested in these birds. Here's an article from Princeton's 
web site, summarizing a new paper in the journal Science. 



http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/12/46E51/index.xml?section=topstories 


Laurie Larson
Princeton NJ

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu



--
Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.

(I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)
For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Darwin's Finches
From: Douglas Carver <dhmcarver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 16:19:19 -0600
Thanks for posting this -- and any BirdChatters who have not yet
read Jonathan Weiner's "The Beak of the Finch" should do so!

Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM

On Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 7:50 AM, Laurie Larson 
wrote:

> Hi Birdchatters,
>
> I’ve always been interested in these birds. Here’s an article from
> Princeton’s web site, summarizing a new paper in the journal Science.
>
>
> 
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/12/46E51/index.xml?section=topstories 

>
> Laurie Larson
> Princeton NJ
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



-- 
Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.

(I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: RFI - Southern Texas and Whooping Cranes
From: John Arnfield <arnfield.2 AT OSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 15:26:51 +0100
Is anyone able to tell the LATEST data to visit Port Aransas in spring
with a guarantee to see Whooping Crane, please?

Thanks...John
--
===============================================
John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Darwin's Finches
From: Laurie Larson <llarson2 AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 13:50:05 +0000
Hi Birdchatters,

I’ve always been interested in these birds. Here’s an article from 
Princeton’s web site, summarizing a new paper in the journal Science. 



http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/12/46E51/index.xml?section=topstories 


Laurie Larson
Princeton NJ

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: those fascinating fairy-wrens
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:04:25 +0100
hello everyone,

you may recall that i wrote about superb fairy-wrens and how mother birds
teach their offspring a "vocal password" that allows the parents to avoid
feeding the chicks of cuckoos:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/sing-for-your-supper-fairy-wren-chicks-must-sing-vocal-password-for-food-grrlscientist-163d1fd2be45#.uu1auq98u 


well, now a new study was published recently that explores this "in the
egg" learning phenomenon further. this study looked at a close relative,
the red-backed fairy-wren, and found something quite similar:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/04/27/baby-fairy-wrens-learn-mothers-calls-before-hatching/ 


except ... this new study provides data that suggest two things: first,
learning whilst an embryo may be more widespread in songbirds than ever
before thought, and second, that "vocal passwords" might actually NOT be
for the purpose of avoiding feeding cuckoo chicks. so why did this "in the
egg" learning phenomenon evolve?

those who are interested in reading more about red-backed fairy-wrens might
enjoy this piece, where duet singing appears to strengthen the pair bond in
these fascinating little birds:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/birds-sing-duets-to-reduce-cheating-grrlscientist-6d6c9272e24c#.vev9wsvfo 


that piece also includes several videos that you will enjoy.

i'm working on another piece about red-backed fairy-wrens that will publish
next week (i think), so keep an eye out for that.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Hawaii Birding Festival.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 03:02:28 -0400
Sharing:
https://hawaiibirdingtrails.com/
Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Woodland bird habitat question (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2016 12:58:13 -0400
Before Hurricane Sandy (3+ years ago) the understory in the 400 acre woods
behind where I live was pretty much nonexistent. Heavy shading and too many
deer. It looked pretty much like the foreground in this photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/26529066391/

Hurricane Sandy took down quite a few large trees and opened up the canopy.
Now there are places where the understory looks like this:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/26529066331/

Today there are alternating patches of bare ground with leaf litter, and
brushy areas. There are also numerous wooded ravines. Seems like the kind
of habitat that would be attractive to birds like Ovenbird, Woodthrush, and
Worm-eating Warbler, with one catch: the plants in the understory are
mostly non-native. Anyone aware of studies of woodland birds nesting in
habitats where the understory is largely non-native?

Thanks,

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of April 24, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2016 09:06:32 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters!

Last week's BirdNote stories:
* Double-crested Cormorant
http://bit.ly/1JZbl8v
* Sapsuckers and Hummingbirds
http://bit.ly/1tlW5fz
* Birds Dress for Spring
http://bit.ly/1q2h5DI
* The Ten Commandments of Subirdia, By John Marzluff
http://bit.ly/1Nlm8jp
* Restoring the Land - With Aldo Leopold's Granddaughter
http://bit.ly/1fEd7g3
* Nocturnal Migration of Songbirds
http://bit.ly/1eMmkb0
* American Woodcock
http://bit.ly/1HzHG8E
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1QtrPau
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Last Night's Bird Migration Radar
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2016 06:46:23 -0700
. . .is present at:

https://twitter.com/RSkleney 

(Thank you to 
Ron Skleney  AT RSkleney 
 

Naturalist & birder sharing bird and wildlife news in and around Illinois. )


Regards to all, Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA 

& 

Ellison Bay, WI

warblerwatch.com



For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: It’s time to protect the USFWS from its own worst impulses
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2016 08:11:24 +0100
hello everyone,

this long-form piece is an important read, especially if you care about our
vanishing sage grouse:

http://bit.ly/20ZxRXZ


--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Acoustic Scarecrows: A Humane, Non-Lethal Way To Reduce Bird Strikes?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Apr 2016 07:57:37 +0100
Hello everyone,

I wrote a piece that will greatly interest everyone here, particularly
those who are conflicted about the use of green technologies, such as wind
and solar, which tend to kill birds and bats.

Acoustic Scarecrows: A Humane, Non-Lethal Way To Reduce Bird Strikes?
http://blogs.forbes.com/grrlscientist/?p=2122

This newsstory discusses an innovative technology that uses a non-lethal
method to convince birds and wildlife to stay away from airports, and other
places where they're not wanted. This "acoustic scarecrow" thereby reduces
the risk of a bird or wildlife strike, with an annual savings of millions
of dollars, and hundreds of human lives.

cheers!

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of April 17, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2016 08:18:30 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters!

Check out the latest photo-blog, by Dasha Gudalewicz: Black-capped
Chickadees that nested in her yard east of Seattle.
http://bit.ly/1VrTfFB Cute overload!
--------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Patterns in Songs of the Song Sparrow
?http://bit.ly/1ScZ42V
* Limpkin - Bird of the Swamp
?http://bit.ly/1kgg9eq
* Bird Songs Suit Surroundings
?http://bit.ly/1XhMHqD
* Rainwater Basin of Nebraska
?http://bit.ly/1MT0RhA
* Rachel Carson and Silent Spring
?http://bit.ly/1kQR9JV
* Fledgling Chickadees - Like Toddlers!?
http://bit.ly/1WdDwt3
* Walk Down an Arroyo
http://bit.ly/1MfdRhj?
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1W6RIDU
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Very cool experience...
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2016 18:05:36 -0400
Not a rare bird, but still a very cool experience! Yesterday I was sitting
on my deck when a Carolina Wren landed on the arm rest of my deck chair
about five inches away from my hand. Sat there for a full 15 seconds. Very
attractive little bird. I've taken photos of this species before (and most
likely this exact same bird). But photos don't compare to seeing a live
bird that close!!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Hummingbirds Wintering in Costa Rica
From: research AT HILTONPOND.ORG
Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2016 13:02:31 -0400
Today, as spring migrant Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are returning to the 
Carolinas, I’m already thinking about their fall departure and our upcoming 
Operation RubyThroat expedition to Costa Rica in November. What could be more 
fun that to follow “our" hummers to their wintering grounds in the 
Neotropics? 


Our next citizen science trip will be to Costa Rica’s Caribbean slope where 
we’ll be staying at a new (air conditioned!) lodge at Paraíso. From there 
we’ll go out each morning to the Orosi Valley at Ujarrás, where we’ll 
observe, capture, and band Ruby-throated Hummingbirds feeding on nectar-rich 
Chayote blossoms. Afternoons will be devoted to field trips to nearby nature 
and cultural sites, with plenty of time for photography of tropical flora and 
fauna. 


This will be our 27th Operation RubyThroat expedition to Central America, where 
we’ve banded more than 1,350 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, plus scores of other 
Neotropical migrant warblers, flycatchers, orioles, and tanagers. We also catch 
many species of colorful resident non-migrant birds we do not band but get to 
examine and photograph up-close. (Think motmots, manakins, grassquits, etc.) 


More than 250 people are alumni of our Operation RubyThroat trips, and more 
than a quarter of those have been on more than one expedition. (One couple has 
been six times!) With this satisfaction rate we’re sure you will enjoy 
participating in this exciting and scientifically important activity scheduled 
for 12-20 November 2016. 


For more information, please visit our full itinerary on the Web site for 
Holbrook Travel, which handles logistics for all our trips. It’s at 
http://www.holbrooktravel.com/where-we-travel/americas/costa-rica/costa-rica-operation-rubythroat-dr-bill-hilton 
 


Hope to see you in Costa Rica this fall for some . . .

. . . Happy (Neotropical) Hummingbird Watching!

BILL
Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: New Book: Thumbs Up For "The Most Perfect Thing: Inside (and Outside) a Bird's Egg"
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2016 05:01:31 -0700
Suggest you may enjoy the following title: (reviewed recently in The Wall 
Street Journal weekend section) 


The most perfect thing : inside (and outside) a bird's egg 
 
/ Tim Birkhead 

Birkhead, T. R., author 
 

 BOOKS | 2016

Regards and happy spring birding to all (!), Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA

&

Ellison Bay, WI

warblerwatch.com

http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: RFI: SE Virginia birding
From: donald lewis <donlewis AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 16:12:41 -0700
I will be in Colonial Williamsburg the first week in May with a couple days
and a morning to bird, hopefully within an hour or two's drive. I have the
somewhat outdated ABA Birder's Guide but would really appreciate tips about
good places to go.



Being a west coaster, I just want to reacquaint myself with as many eastern
birds as possible. Only real target bird would be Philadelphia Vireo
although I'm uncertain if they pass through SE Virginia.



Any and all suggestions much appreciated.



Don Lewis

Lafayette, CA






For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: unusual migrant irruptions due to weather
From: tom and sheri <troberts2459 AT ATLANTICBB.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 17:15:05 -0400
Does irregular weather patterns result in higher probability of out-of-range 
migrants being observed? 


 Analogous to hurricanes and large tropical storms blowing pelagics well 
outside of range. 




I will be in Texas in a few weeks and am wondering if the strange weather 
pattern will increase the possibility of western passerines in the eastern part 
of the state and conversely. 




Has there ever been a data analysis of what the weather patterns and increased 
observation of unusual birds? 




If there is a large ‘weather system’, do migrants try to ‘bypass the 
system? By moving around it? 






Tom Roberts

PA





---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Gail Mackiernan <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 11:39:15 -0400
A boyfriend of mine back in grad school told the tale of a gull at his local 
McDonalds (this was in Florida). The gull frequented the parking lot, walking 
around and dragging one apparently broken and useless wing behind it. People of 
course felt sorry for the poor bird and would toss it a French fry or maybe 
even part of their hamburger. As soon as the morsel was grabbed by the gull, it 
would fly away quite easily to eat his snack on the roof of the McD. Then it 
would fly down and repeat his pathetic cripple act to a new set of sympathetic 
customers! 


Gail Mackiernan
Silver spring, MD

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 11, 2016, at 11:27 AM, Jay Greenberg  
wrote: 

> 
> I heard a story about a local woman who was watching birds on the Lake 
Ontario shore when a parasitic jaeger came along and almost snatched a sandwich 
out of her hand. This is a rare bird on Lake Ontario. 

> 
> Jay Greenberg
> conservationist AT earthlink.net
> http://www.thegreenjay.com
> Rochester, NY
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Jay Greenberg <conservationist AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 11:27:49 -0400
I heard a story about a local woman who was watching birds on the Lake Ontario 
shore when a parasitic jaeger came along and almost snatched a sandwich out of 
her hand. This is a rare bird on Lake Ontario. 


Jay Greenberg
conservationist AT earthlink.net 
http://www.thegreenjay.com 
Rochester, NY


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 07:19:32 -0700
I have a photograph somewhere of a Ruddy Turnstone on the
CBBT with a french fry in its beak, this was Aug. 1988
methinks.  I did not throw it, only documented the prey
item, which are slow and easy to catch.  For those keeping
score, it was a crinkle fry.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas

On 2016-04-10 19:52, L Markoff wrote:
> Years ago (2003?) I was birding the islands of the Chesapeake Bay
> Bridge
> Tunnel.  I stopped at the restaurant on one of the islands and saw some
> Ruddy Turnstones scavenging food in the parking lot.  If I am
> remembering
> correctly, a couple of them were wrestling with some French fries.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Argentina-suspends-reciprocity-fee-for-us-citizens
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2016 07:30:17 -0400
In case, someone is planning to bird in Argentina:

http://news.southamerica.travel/argentina-suspends-reciprocity-fee-for-us-citizens/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=october&utm_medium=email&sslid=MzY0sDQzNTEzNjAFAA&sseid=Mza2sDC0MDA1AAA&jobid=e6b25877-a14f-468c-bd71-5e19bf391785 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Ken Birding <curlewbird AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 07:37:36 -0400
Oh my Laura – that letter from Roger Tory Peterson is a treasure! Best - Ken

Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch

Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
Englewood on Florida's SW Coast

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: feeding turnstones
From: Vader Willem Jan Marinus <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 06:17:33 +0000
Last week, in Ostende, Belgium, I was surprised to see turnstones scavenging 
along the quays in town, just like house sparrows. I had seen this behaviour 
earlier in Yucatan, but never yet in Europe. But Turnstones are well known to 
be extraordinarily versatile in what they are feeding on. A series of notes on 
the subject in British Birds years ago climaxed with the note: ' Turnstones 
feeding on human corpse'! 




                                      Wim Vader, Troms, Norway

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Jim Royer <jrmotmot AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 20:04:32 -0700
Is it ok for Turnstones to eat bread?  I have to wonder if bread might be
bad for them. Making them less wary of people might not be a good idea
either. Does anyone have any special knowledge about this? Thanks. (Is
seems cute, but shouldn't we discourage the practice if it's bad for the
birds?)

Jim Royer
Los Osos, CA

On Sunday, April 10, 2016, Ken Birding  wrote:

> Hello Bird Chatters - I've been absent for too long on here. I saw some
> interesting bird behavior while on a walk along the beach here on Manasota
> Key, just below Venice in SW Florida last Friday.
>
> I could see a group of shorebirds clustered around a couple sitting on the
> beach and was surprised to see about a dozen Ruddy Turnstones. I stopped to
> chat them up a bit and they commented they came to this spot every day with
> some breadcrumbs and these birds had adopted them. They also were providing
> fresh water in little clam shells on their beach towels. This all provided
> a
> big treat for the turnstones and they wandered around the couple, well
> within arm's reach.
>
> I have heard of studies that showed that turnstones won't feed unless they
> can turn something over to find their food, so I was surprised to see these
> birds coming to breadcrumbs - no less.
>
> Best - Ken
>
> Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
>
> Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
> Englewood on Florida's SW Coast
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: L Markoff <canyoneagle AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 19:52:29 -0700
Years ago (2003?) I was birding the islands of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge
Tunnel.  I stopped at the restaurant on one of the islands and saw some
Ruddy Turnstones scavenging food in the parking lot.  If I am remembering
correctly, a couple of them were wrestling with some French fries.

Birding the CBBT:  http://www.cbbt.com/activities/birding/


Lori Markoff
Eugene, OR

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ken Birding
Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2016 4:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Feeding Turnstones

Hello Bird Chatters - I've been absent for too long on here. I saw some
interesting bird behavior while on a walk along the beach here on Manasota
Key, just below Venice in SW Florida last Friday.

I could see a group of shorebirds clustered around a couple sitting on the
beach and was surprised to see about a dozen Ruddy Turnstones. I stopped to
chat them up a bit and they commented they came to this spot every day with
some breadcrumbs and these birds had adopted them. They also were providing
fresh water in little clam shells on their beach towels. This all provided a
big treat for the turnstones and they wandered around the couple, well
within arm's reach.

I have heard of studies that showed that turnstones won't feed unless they
can turn something over to find their food, so I was surprised to see these
birds coming to breadcrumbs - no less.

Best - Ken

Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch

Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking) Englewood on Florida's SW Coast

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 02:04:19 +0000
In have had the same experience at Blue Waters Inn on Tobago.
Bananaquits have also shared my cereal bowl at the Trinidad Hilton Hotel in 
Port of Spain, Trinidad. 


David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad

On Apr 10, 2016, at 9:21 PM, Laurie Foss 
> wrote: 


While in Tobago, at the Blue Waters Inn, it was common to see Ruddy Turnstones 
in the dining room scavenging crumbs! 


Laurie Foss
Spicewood, TX

Laurie Foss
Spicewood, TX

On Sun, Apr 10, 2016 at 6:44 PM, Ken Birding 
> wrote: 

Hello Bird Chatters - I've been absent for too long on here. I saw some
interesting bird behavior while on a walk along the beach here on Manasota
Key, just below Venice in SW Florida last Friday.

I could see a group of shorebirds clustered around a couple sitting on the
beach and was surprised to see about a dozen Ruddy Turnstones. I stopped to
chat them up a bit and they commented they came to this spot every day with
some breadcrumbs and these birds had adopted them. They also were providing
fresh water in little clam shells on their beach towels. This all provided a
big treat for the turnstones and they wandered around the couple, well
within arm's reach.

I have heard of studies that showed that turnstones won't feed unless they
can turn something over to find their food, so I was surprised to see these
birds coming to breadcrumbs - no less.

Best - Ken

Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch

Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
Englewood on Florida's SW Coast

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 18:56:40 -0700
They also come into the bar at Club Med in Cancun during Happy Hour.

On Sun, 10 Apr 2016 20:21:13 -0500, Laurie Foss 
wrote:

>While in Tobago, at the Blue Waters Inn, it was common to see Ruddy
>Turnstones in the dining room scavenging crumbs!
>
>Laurie Foss
>Spicewood, TX
--
Joseph Morlan
"The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose from." 
A.Tanenbaum 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 01:26:42 +0000
The online Handbook of the Birds of the World notes that the RuddyTurnstone 
"frequently scavenges, occasionally even for bread from people." Ronald 
Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

      From: Laura Erickson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2016 8:00 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Feeding Turnstones
   
I got a letter from Roger Tory Peterson in 1987--I'd written him asking about 
his experiences with birds mooching for food from people--and he wrote, "I have 
been told that, in Florida, Ruddy Turnstones have actually been known to 
scavenge things around the picnic tables: a new habit. It is the only shorebird 
I would ever expect to do a thing like this because it is by far the most 
adaptable in its survival techniques." 


I photocopied the letter (it's only one page) and put it on my flickr page 
here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lauraerickson/4403039180 

Best, Laura EricksonDuluth, MN
On Sun, Apr 10, 2016 at 6:44 PM, Ken Birding  wrote:

Hello Bird Chatters - I've been absent for too long on here. I saw some
interesting bird behavior while on a walk along the beach here on Manasota
Key, just below Venice in SW Florida last Friday.

I could see a group of shorebirds clustered around a couple sitting on the
beach and was surprised to see about a dozen Ruddy Turnstones. I stopped to
chat them up a bit and they commented they came to this spot every day with
some breadcrumbs and these birds had adopted them. They also were providing
fresh water in little clam shells on their beach towels. This all provided a
big treat for the turnstones and they wandered around the couple, well
within arm's reach.

I have heard of studies that showed that turnstones won't feed unless they
can turn something over to find their food, so I was surprised to see these
birds coming to breadcrumbs - no less.

Best - Ken

Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch

Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
Englewood on Florida's SW Coast

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu




-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.  There 
is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature--the 
assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter. 


            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.For BirdChat 
Guidelines go tohttp://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/For BirdChat archives or to 
change your subscription options, go toArchives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.htmlTo contact a listowner, send a message 
tobirdchat-request AT ksu.edu 



For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Laurie Foss <lauriefoss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 20:21:13 -0500
While in Tobago, at the Blue Waters Inn, it was common to see Ruddy
Turnstones in the dining room scavenging crumbs!

Laurie Foss
Spicewood, TX

Laurie Foss
Spicewood, TX

On Sun, Apr 10, 2016 at 6:44 PM, Ken Birding  wrote:

> Hello Bird Chatters - I've been absent for too long on here. I saw some
> interesting bird behavior while on a walk along the beach here on Manasota
> Key, just below Venice in SW Florida last Friday.
>
> I could see a group of shorebirds clustered around a couple sitting on the
> beach and was surprised to see about a dozen Ruddy Turnstones. I stopped to
> chat them up a bit and they commented they came to this spot every day with
> some breadcrumbs and these birds had adopted them. They also were providing
> fresh water in little clam shells on their beach towels. This all provided
> a
> big treat for the turnstones and they wandered around the couple, well
> within arm's reach.
>
> I have heard of studies that showed that turnstones won't feed unless they
> can turn something over to find their food, so I was surprised to see these
> birds coming to breadcrumbs - no less.
>
> Best - Ken
>
> Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
>
> Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
> Englewood on Florida's SW Coast
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: More migrants move
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 20:07:28 -0500

Hey everyone,




 I took a quick drive to 180th street marshes in Dakota County and had some new 
arrivals. Had a single Yellow-headed Blackbird, 4 Wilson's Snipe and 3 Great 
Blue Herons riding the strong winds out of the south. Also got a nice look at a 
Northern Harrier hunting over the fields. First 2 Tree Swallows also made a fly 
by. In spite of the winds it was a good day to be out. 





Photos:


http://www.minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com







Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN









For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2016 01:03:27 +0000
I wonder if this sort of behaviour is a natural extension of "nectar piracy" - 
short-billed nectar-feeding birds breaking into the base of a flower to "steal" 
its nectar, bypassing its pollination system.  The Handbook of the Birds of 
the World (online) notes that the Bananaquit "takes nectar at almost any 
height, from below eye level up to canopy of tall trees, by probing into 
flowers or by piercing, from the outside, the base of tubular flower 
corollas."  From doing that to piercing a sugar packet may be not much of a 
leap.  Ronald Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

      From: Sandra Savage 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2016 8:33 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Feeding Turnstones
   
When I was in Antigua, the morning buffet had netting over it so that
the birds wouldn't eat the fruit

and, the bananaquits would come to the tables, take a packet of sugar,
and break it open to eat the sugar - joined by the grackles

is part of evolution taking advantage of opportunities?

Sandra Savage
Calgary, Alberta

On 4/10/2016 6:13 PM, Katharine Mills wrote:
> That letter is priceless! Thanks for sharing!
> Kathy Mills
> Holden, MA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu



For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Sandra Savage <savagebirder AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 18:33:00 -0600
When I was in Antigua, the morning buffet had netting over it so that
the birds wouldn't eat the fruit

and, the bananaquits would come to the tables, take a packet of sugar,
and break it open to eat the sugar - joined by the grackles

is part of evolution taking advantage of opportunities?

Sandra Savage
Calgary, Alberta

On 4/10/2016 6:13 PM, Katharine Mills wrote:
> That letter is priceless! Thanks for sharing!
> Kathy Mills
> Holden, MA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Katharine Mills <gkmills AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 20:13:53 -0400
That letter is priceless! Thanks for sharing!
Kathy Mills
Holden, MA

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Feeding Turnstones
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 19:00:47 -0500
I got a letter from Roger Tory Peterson in 1987--I'd written him asking
about his experiences with birds mooching for food from people--and he
wrote, "I have been told that, in Florida, Ruddy Turnstones have actually
been known to scavenge things around the picnic tables: a new habit. It is
the only shorebird I would ever expect to do a thing like this because it
is by far the most adaptable in its survival techniques."

I photocopied the letter (it's only one page) and put it on my flickr page
here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lauraerickson/4403039180

Best,
Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Sun, Apr 10, 2016 at 6:44 PM, Ken Birding  wrote:

> Hello Bird Chatters - I've been absent for too long on here. I saw some
> interesting bird behavior while on a walk along the beach here on Manasota
> Key, just below Venice in SW Florida last Friday.
>
> I could see a group of shorebirds clustered around a couple sitting on the
> beach and was surprised to see about a dozen Ruddy Turnstones. I stopped to
> chat them up a bit and they commented they came to this spot every day with
> some breadcrumbs and these birds had adopted them. They also were providing
> fresh water in little clam shells on their beach towels. This all provided
> a
> big treat for the turnstones and they wandered around the couple, well
> within arm's reach.
>
> I have heard of studies that showed that turnstones won't feed unless they
> can turn something over to find their food, so I was surprised to see these
> birds coming to breadcrumbs - no less.
>
> Best - Ken
>
> Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
>
> Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
> Englewood on Florida's SW Coast
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Feeding Turnstones
From: Ken Birding <curlewbird AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2016 19:44:07 -0400
Hello Bird Chatters - I've been absent for too long on here. I saw some
interesting bird behavior while on a walk along the beach here on Manasota
Key, just below Venice in SW Florida last Friday.

I could see a group of shorebirds clustered around a couple sitting on the
beach and was surprised to see about a dozen Ruddy Turnstones. I stopped to
chat them up a bit and they commented they came to this spot every day with
some breadcrumbs and these birds had adopted them. They also were providing
fresh water in little clam shells on their beach towels. This all provided a
big treat for the turnstones and they wandered around the couple, well
within arm's reach.

I have heard of studies that showed that turnstones won't feed unless they
can turn something over to find their food, so I was surprised to see these
birds coming to breadcrumbs - no less.

Best - Ken

Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch

Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
Englewood on Florida's SW Coast

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of April 10, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2016 08:16:16 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters!

Did you see the latest photo-blog from Paolo Taranto of Peregrines that
nested in Bologna, Italy? Please check it out: http://bit.ly/20of5tf

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Bird Songs of April
http://bit.ly/1V3sgyt
* Peregrine Falcons of Rome
http://bit.ly/1SnyHrA
* Which Chickadee - Black-capped or Carolina?
http://bit.ly/1mGciYv
* Sprague's Pipit - The Missouri Skylark
http://bit.ly/1kyR2SQ
* Sharp-tailed Grouse on a Lek
http://bit.ly/PY61N8
* Spider Silk - Duct Tape for Bird Nests
http://bit.ly/1omOyOR
* Tanagers - Shade-grown Coffee Birds
http://bit.ly/JbH7Bl
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1NfsdsX
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Hilton Pond 03/16/16 (Springtime Chores)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2016 09:12:02 -0400
The second half of March at Hilton Pond Center (York SC) was devoted to 
trail-clearing, meadow-maintenance, nestbox-hanging, and observations of 
everything from larval and adult butterflies to songbirds in molt. (And, as 
might be expected, I also banded a few birds.) To view a photo essay about 
"Springtime Chores," please visit my "This Week at Hilton Pond” installment 
for 16-31 Mar 2016 at http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160316.html 


Happy (Spring) Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico?
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2016 10:42:16 +0000
I am in total agreement with Alvaro and to imply in such a derisive tone that 
he may not have read the article was undeserved and unwarranted. 


David Gascoigne


Sent from my iPad

On Apr 8, 2016, at 2:57 AM, Alvaro Jaramillo 
> wrote: 


??? I am confused. Yes, of course you refer to them as Red-crowned Parrots 
elsewhere, you also give the scientific name and that is great. But in the 
title you use a name that is essentially unknown in the birding world, and you 
are talking to a birding crowd here. I know my Mexican birds relatively well, 
and I had never heard of the Mexican Red-headed Parrot. Using multiple names 
can be confusing. You are Devorah the Ornithologist, so why not use the names 
that the birders and ornithologists have painfully (the process can be painful) 
agreed on? You could easily have said Mexican Red-crowned Parrots and you would 
have drawn the same attention and used a name that is not nearly as confusing 
and is agreed upon by North American ornithologists and birders. 

     Take care,
Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

From: Devorah the Ornithologist [mailto:birdologist AT gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 7, 2016 11:37 PM
To: Alvaro Jaramillo >
Cc: birdchat message 
> 

Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots 
In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico? 


if you'd actually read the piece, you would know that i referred to them as 
red-crowned parrots throughout. the title, using an alternative common name, 
was intentionally meant to draw readers' attention to the idea that there might 
be more of these mexican birds in the USA cities than in mexico. 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Birding Guyana and Harpy Eagle
From: Stephen Elliott <steve_elliott2000 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2016 08:47:39 +0000
Good morning Chatters


I have a trip planned to Guyana Nov 16th -30th and we are looking for one or 2 
more birders to make it viable. The guide has a reliable site for Harpy Eagle 
and we will be focussing on the endemic as as well. Ground price $4250 please 
email me back for full details if this could be of interest to you. 



Best Wishes

from

Steve

<")
   ( \
   / |``

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico?
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2016 23:57:12 -0700
??? I am confused. Yes, of course you refer to them as Red-crowned Parrots 
elsewhere, you also give the scientific name and that is great. But in the 
title you use a name that is essentially unknown in the birding world, and you 
are talking to a birding crowd here. I know my Mexican birds relatively well, 
and I had never heard of the Mexican Red-headed Parrot. Using multiple names 
can be confusing. You are Devorah the Ornithologist, so why not use the names 
that the birders and ornithologists have painfully (the process can be painful) 
agreed on? You could easily have said Mexican Red-crowned Parrots and you would 
have drawn the same attention and used a name that is not nearly as confusing 
and is agreed upon by North American ornithologists and birders. 


     Take care, 

Alvaro 

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: Devorah the Ornithologist [mailto:birdologist AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, April 7, 2016 11:37 PM
To: Alvaro Jaramillo 
Cc: birdchat message 
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots 
In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico? 


 

if you'd actually read the piece, you would know that i referred to them as 
red-crowned parrots throughout. the title, using an alternative common name, 
was intentionally meant to draw readers' attention to the idea that there might 
be more of these mexican birds in the USA cities than in mexico. 


 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2016 07:36:30 +0100
if you'd actually read the piece, you would know that i referred to them as
red-crowned parrots throughout. the title, using an alternative common
name, was intentionally meant to draw readers' attention to the idea that
there might be more of these mexican birds in the USA cities than in mexico.



On Thu, Apr 7, 2016 at 11:47 PM, Alvaro Jaramillo 
wrote:

> Hi,
>
>     I have never heard of “Red-headed Parrot,” note that in the birding
> world pretty much everyone knows this as the Red-crowned Parrot. The cage
> bird trade has created some confusing names for parrots, to sell their
> birds. But just so there is no confusion, the article is about Red-crowned
> Parrot *Amazona viridigenalis http://checklist.aou.org/taxa/628
>  *
>
> Alvaro
>
> Alvaro Jaramillo
>
> alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
>
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
>
>
> *From:* National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [mailto:
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] *On Behalf Of *Devorah the Ornithologist
> *Sent:* Thursday, April 7, 2016 1:49 PM
> *To:* BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> *Subject:* [BIRDCHAT] Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed
> Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico?
>
>
>
>
>
> Hello everyone,
>
>
>
> Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In
> All Of Mexico? In fact, according to a team of US researchers, free-living
> Mexican red-crowned parrots have been adapting so well to urban life in
> California and Texas that their population numbers may rival those in their
> native Mexico. This is important for a number of reasons, which I share
> here:
>
>
>
> Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In
> All Of Mexico?
>
> http://blogs.forbes.com/grrlscientist/?p=2126
>
>
>
> cheers,
>
>
>



-- 
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Description vs. Photo
From: Jerry Friedman <jerryfriedman1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2016 22:50:30 -0600
The interesting discussion about sight records and reputations has
made me think about the eBird rarity reports I see (mostly from New
Mexico).  Some people just provide photos, some people just provide
descriptions and may say they have photos or recordings available, and
some people provide everything, and some people provide nothing.  What
do you do, and why?  (Assuming it's not a continuing bird that a lot
of people have reported, since as far as I can tell, anything goes in
that situation.)

I try to get diagnostic photos of any bird that I think or know is an
eBird rarity--even the early Turkey Vulture I saw last month.  I think
that would be much more definitive for anyone who's interested in the
record (and my reputation is, accurately, not the kind that will get
things accepted on my say-so).  I don't describe anything that seems
clear in the photo, since that seems unnecessary, but I do add any
other description that I think might be helpful.

I'm especially curious about people's reasons for things they do
differently from me.

Jerry Friedman
Española, New Mexico

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico?
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2016 15:47:29 -0700
Hi, 

 I have never heard of “Red-headed Parrot,” note that in the birding world 
pretty much everyone knows this as the Red-crowned Parrot. The cage bird trade 
has created some confusing names for parrots, to sell their birds. But just so 
there is no confusion, the article is about Red-crowned Parrot Amazona 
viridigenalis http://checklist.aou.org/taxa/628 


Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo

  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Devorah the Ornithologist 

Sent: Thursday, April 7, 2016 1:49 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US 
Cities Than In All Of Mexico? 


 

 

Hello everyone,

 

Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All 
Of Mexico? In fact, according to a team of US researchers, free-living Mexican 
red-crowned parrots have been adapting so well to urban life in California and 
Texas that their population numbers may rival those in their native Mexico. 
This is important for a number of reasons, which I share here: 


 

Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All 
Of Mexico? 


http://blogs.forbes.com/grrlscientist/?p=2126

 

cheers,

 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Douglas Carver <dhmcarver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2016 15:41:19 -0600
(Apologies if this is appearing multiple times -- I keep getting rejection
notices for too long a posting, even though I clipped the string.)

Thanks all for the informed and respectful dialogue -- it is one of the
things I most enjoy with this listserve.

And Alvaro, I am looking forward to reading your opinion piece on the
matter, if (when?) you write it -- and please be sure to post it here!

Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM

--
Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.

(I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In All Of Mexico?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2016 21:48:48 +0100
Hello everyone,

Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In
All Of Mexico? In fact, according to a team of US researchers, free-living
Mexican red-crowned parrots have been adapting so well to urban life in
California and Texas that their population numbers may rival those in their
native Mexico. This is important for a number of reasons, which I share
here:

Are There More Free-Living Mexican Red-headed Parrots In US Cities Than In
All Of Mexico?
http://blogs.forbes.com/grrlscientist/?p=2126

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Photos v reputation
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 20:47:40 -0700
This issue brings back memories that illustrate the changes in the record 
system. Back in about 1966 I lucked on to an unusual Waxwing in Belle Haven VA 
near DC. The waxwing was large and had a strange red vent. I called a nearby 
older birder to check it out and he IDed it as a Bohemian Waxwing. That was a 
state record, which I duly reported to the local Audubon Naturalist Society. My 
record was not accepted. Fortunately, I had gotten the phone number of the 
other birder, and he turned out to be the curator of ornithology at the 
Smithsonian . With his corroboration, the record was accepted. That was the old 
system. 

More recently, in June of 2007, I found a Plain-capped Starthroat at Agua 
Caliente Park in Tucson, where I was leading the weekly bird walk. The bird is 
quite rare, even in AZ, and this location was far earlier and lower altitude 
than previous records. Fortunately, my co-leader, Jeff Babson, also saw the 
bird. However, even two top birder ID's now were no longer good enough. In the 
following days the park was flooded with birders but the bird did not cooperate 
right away. With so many birders, a rare Blue-throated Hummingbird was found, 
and a few local experts insisted that my Starthroat had been a mis-identified 
Blue-throated. Finally, the Starthroat perched low enough for someone to get a 
perfect ID picture. Ever since I am never without a good camera. 


Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Reginald David <rdavid AT ILHAWAII.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 17:25:03 -1000
Aloha Alvaro and chatters,

I totally support what Alvaro has posted. Those of us that serve on rare bird 
committees are often faced with these sorts of conundrums. I think it fair to 
say that any of us that have spend years in field have misidentified birds, or 
conversely been able to prove our sightings by photographs. With a bird as rare 
as and Eskimo Curlew that may-or-may not in fact be extinct - not documenting 
the sighting when the bird was observed for 15 minutes is irresponsible at 
best, and puts the sighting into question. 


Reginald David
davidr003 AT hawaii.rr .com


> On Apr 6, 2016, at 5:11 PM, Alvaro Jaramillo  wrote:
> 
> Ron and Jim, 
> Thanks for the vote of confidence, you have more faith in my abilities than I 
do. I think that if I had been in southern Argentina, seen an Eskimo Curlew for 
15 minutes and not gotten a photo, it would not only have been a shame, but 
irresponsible. I think that in cases like this the importance of evidence far 
outweighs the issue of getting a good look, heck you can see it through the 
viewfinder and then study the photos if you have to. Something this amazing you 
need to not only document for others, but to convince yourself. I am pretty 
tough on myself with odd sightings, and understand how easy it is for your mind 
to be tricked by lighting, a partial view or what have you. Just over a week 
ago at Eilat, Israel we saw a very odd gull fly by. It occurred to me that it 
could be an extremely rare Gray-headed Gull from Africa. If I had just looked 
at it, I would have convinced myself that it was one. But instead I spent some 
of the time taking photos instead of watching. The photos show a very odd gull, 
likely a Black-headed Gull with a plumage anomaly, or a hybrid, but not a 
Gray-headed Gull. It was amazingly important to get photos to figure this out 
and sort out what would have been a much more “clear cut” identification 
without the photo, and this was one of these vagrants of something common 
elsewhere, not a bird near extinction where the stakes are much higher to get 
it right. 

> Alvaro
> Alvaro Jaramillo
> alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com 
> www.alvarosadventures.com 
>  
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ 
 For BirdChat archives or to change your 
subscription options, go to Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html 
 To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu  


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 20:11:29 -0700
Ron and Jim, 

 Thanks for the vote of confidence, you have more faith in my abilities than I 
do. I think that if I had been in southern Argentina, seen an Eskimo Curlew for 
15 minutes and not gotten a photo, it would not only have been a shame, but 
irresponsible. I think that in cases like this the importance of evidence far 
outweighs the issue of getting a good look, heck you can see it through the 
viewfinder and then study the photos if you have to. Something this amazing you 
need to not only document for others, but to convince yourself. I am pretty 
tough on myself with odd sightings, and understand how easy it is for your mind 
to be tricked by lighting, a partial view or what have you. Just over a week 
ago at Eilat, Israel we saw a very odd gull fly by. It occurred to me that it 
could be an extremely rare Gray-headed Gull from Africa. If I had just looked 
at it, I would have convinced myself that it was one. But instead I spent some 
of the time taking photos instead of watching. The photos show a very odd gull, 
likely a Black-headed Gull with a plumage anomaly, or a hybrid, but not a 
Gray-headed Gull. It was amazingly important to get photos to figure this out 
and sort out what would have been a much more “clear cut” identification 
without the photo, and this was one of these vagrants of something common 
elsewhere, not a bird near extinction where the stakes are much higher to get 
it right. 


Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo

  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 14:16:48 -0400
In Alvaro's case I would certainly agree!

Ronald Orenstein 
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Apr 6, 2016, at 1:23 PM, Jim Royer  wrote:
> 
> It's a little ironic that Alvaro would raise this issue because I don't 
believe there are many birders (if any) who would hesitate to chase after a 
bird seen by him, with or without photos. Birders like Alvaro, Guy McCaskie, 
Paul Lehman, Jon Dunn, Kimball Garrett, and others whose experience and 
reputation are impeccable, are as credible today as they were 20 years ago. 
Would a rare bird committee not accept a record of theirs without photos? I 
would hope not, if it is an otherwise well documented sighting. 

> 
> Jim Royer
> Los Osos, CA
> 
>> On Wednesday, April 6, 2016, Patty O'Neill  wrote:
>> Four of us from the greater Boston area raced up to New Hampshire about a 
month ago in search of a Redwing that had been reported on a high school 
athletic field. We arrived at the school and immediately noticed a group of 
people down the lane with telescopes aimed at a thicket. Three of us ran down 
the road without even our telescopes to where those with telescopes very kindly 
immediately put us on the bird. The fourth stayed behind to get his camera 
gear. The bird flew. 

>> I was a happy birder with a new bird for my Lower 48 and ABA lists.  
>> Patty O'Neill
>> Milton MA
>> pattyoneillatverizon.net
>> PS: I think birder #4 did get to see the bird when it returned to the ball 
field briefly a short time later. I don't know if he went back to NH the next 
day for a better view (& photo?). 

>> 
>> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 10:53:15 -0700
>> From: Alvaro Jaramillo 
>> Subject: Re: Kokako
>> 
>> Douglas
>> 
>> I have often thought of writing a short opinion piece on this. The issue is 
that back in the day there was an informal process by which someone became a 
“reputable observer.†You put in your time in the field, you birded 
with many others in the community, you reported birds with a good description 
and others went and confirmed the sightings. Your reputation built up in a 
manner that people had an acute idea of what sightings were “Triple 
A†versus lower levels of confidence. That system had essentially died out 
now. I am not saying that it was a good system, it just was a reality. 

>> 
>> Now reputation does not really matter, birding is a bit more egalitarian in 
that way. But the expectation is that imagery will be available for a really 
good sighting. You see a good bird, and you get a photo. I recently saw a bird 
that ended up being a first for the state (Kelp Gull) while I was jogging on 
the beach. I had no camera, nothing, no binoculars even. I knew that no matter 
how much I have written, seen, photographed or reported, there was absolutely 
NO WAY that this record would be accepted given the circumstances. So I ran 
home like a bat out of hell, and drove back to the spot and re-found the bird 
and snapped a bunch of photos. Fortunately it worked out, and we even had the 
bird show up in various spots and get photographed and it made it to the 
California list. 

>> 
>> Today, no image or recording and a very rare sighting will just not end up 
being taken all that seriously. I think it that the importance of reputation is 
much less now. Times have changed. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Alvaro Jaramillo
>> 
>>  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
>> 
>> 
>> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu 

> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 12:35:22 -0500
I suspect that if Alvaro saw an Ivory-billed Woodpecker in Arkansas and
didn't photograph it, he'd be subjected to the same treatment that Tim
Gallagher got in 2005.

Of course, the natural response might be to point out that Alvaro wouldn't
report an Ivory-billed Woodpecker because there are none to see, but that's
rather circular logic, and explains why the rarer the bird, the more
compelling the evidence must be to accept the sighting from anyone.

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Wed, Apr 6, 2016 at 12:23 PM, Jim Royer  wrote:

> It's a little ironic that Alvaro would raise this issue because I don't
> believe there are many birders (if any) who would hesitate to chase after a
> bird seen by him, with or without photos. Birders like Alvaro, Guy
> McCaskie, Paul Lehman, Jon Dunn, Kimball Garrett, and others whose
> experience and reputation are impeccable, are as credible today as they
> were 20 years ago. Would a rare bird committee not accept a record of
> theirs without photos? I would hope not, if it is an otherwise well
> documented sighting.
>
> Jim Royer
> Los Osos, CA
>
>
> On Wednesday, April 6, 2016, Patty O'Neill 
> wrote:
>
>> Four of us from the greater Boston area raced up to New Hampshire about a
>> month ago in search of a Redwing that had been reported on a high school
>> athletic field.  We arrived at the school and immediately noticed a group
>> of people down the lane with telescopes aimed at a thicket.  Three of us
>> ran down the road without even our telescopes to where those with
>> telescopes very kindly immediately put us on the bird.   The fourth stayed
>> behind to get his camera gear.   The bird flew.
>> I was a happy birder with a new bird for my Lower 48 and ABA lists.
>> Patty O'Neill
>> Milton MA
>> pattyoneillatverizon.net
>> PS:   I think birder #4 did get to see the bird when it returned to the
>> ball field briefly a short time later.  I don't know if he went back to NH
>> the next day for a better view (& photo?).
>>
>> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 10:53:15 -0700
>> From: Alvaro Jaramillo 
>> Subject: Re: Kokako
>>
>> Douglas
>>
>> I have often thought of writing a short opinion piece on this. The issue
>> is that back in the day there was an informal process by which someone
>> became a “reputable observer.†You put in your time in the field, 
you 

>> birded with many others in the community, you reported birds with a good
>> description and others went and confirmed the sightings. Your reputation
>> built up in a manner that people had an acute idea of what sightings were
>> “Triple A†versus lower levels of confidence. That system had
>> essentially died out now. I am not saying that it was a good system, it
>> just was a reality.
>>
>> Now reputation does not really matter, birding is a bit more egalitarian
>> in that way. But the expectation is that imagery will be available for a
>> really good sighting. You see a good bird, and you get a photo. I recently
>> saw a bird that ended up being a first for the state (Kelp Gull) while I
>> was jogging on the beach. I had no camera, nothing, no binoculars even. I
>> knew that no matter how much I have written, seen, photographed or
>> reported, there was absolutely NO WAY that this record would be accepted
>> given the circumstances. So I ran home like a bat out of hell, and drove
>> back to the spot and re-found the bird and snapped a bunch of photos.
>> Fortunately it worked out, and we even had the bird show up in various
>> spots and get photographed and it made it to the California list.
>>
>> Today, no image or recording and a very rare sighting will just not end
>> up being taken all that seriously. I think it that the importance of
>> reputation is much less now. Times have changed.
>>
>>
>>
>> Alvaro Jaramillo
>>
>>  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
>>
>>
>> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For
>> BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives:
>> https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a
>> message to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For
> BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives:
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a
> message to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Jim Royer <jrmotmot AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 10:23:51 -0700
It's a little ironic that Alvaro would raise this issue because I don't
believe there are many birders (if any) who would hesitate to chase after a
bird seen by him, with or without photos. Birders like Alvaro, Guy
McCaskie, Paul Lehman, Jon Dunn, Kimball Garrett, and others whose
experience and reputation are impeccable, are as credible today as they
were 20 years ago. Would a rare bird committee not accept a record of
theirs without photos? I would hope not, if it is an otherwise well
documented sighting.

Jim Royer
Los Osos, CA

On Wednesday, April 6, 2016, Patty O'Neill  wrote:

> Four of us from the greater Boston area raced up to New Hampshire about a
> month ago in search of a Redwing that had been reported on a high school
> athletic field.  We arrived at the school and immediately noticed a group
> of people down the lane with telescopes aimed at a thicket.  Three of us
> ran down the road without even our telescopes to where those with
> telescopes very kindly immediately put us on the bird.   The fourth stayed
> behind to get his camera gear.   The bird flew.
> I was a happy birder with a new bird for my Lower 48 and ABA lists.
> Patty O'Neill
> Milton MA
> pattyoneillatverizon.net
> PS:   I think birder #4 did get to see the bird when it returned to the
> ball field briefly a short time later.  I don't know if he went back to NH
> the next day for a better view (& photo?).
>
> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 10:53:15 -0700
> From: Alvaro Jaramillo  >
> Subject: Re: Kokako
>
> Douglas
>
> I have often thought of writing a short opinion piece on this. The issue
> is that back in the day there was an informal process by which someone
> became a “reputable observer.†You put in your time in the field, 
you 

> birded with many others in the community, you reported birds with a good
> description and others went and confirmed the sightings. Your reputation
> built up in a manner that people had an acute idea of what sightings were
> “Triple A†versus lower levels of confidence. That system had
> essentially died out now. I am not saying that it was a good system, it
> just was a reality.
>
> Now reputation does not really matter, birding is a bit more egalitarian
> in that way. But the expectation is that imagery will be available for a
> really good sighting. You see a good bird, and you get a photo. I recently
> saw a bird that ended up being a first for the state (Kelp Gull) while I
> was jogging on the beach. I had no camera, nothing, no binoculars even. I
> knew that no matter how much I have written, seen, photographed or
> reported, there was absolutely NO WAY that this record would be accepted
> given the circumstances. So I ran home like a bat out of hell, and drove
> back to the spot and re-found the bird and snapped a bunch of photos.
> Fortunately it worked out, and we even had the bird show up in various
> spots and get photographed and it made it to the California list.
>
> Today, no image or recording and a very rare sighting will just not end up
> being taken all that seriously. I think it that the importance of
> reputation is much less now. Times have changed.
>
>
>
> Alvaro Jaramillo
>
>  >
> alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
> 
>
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For
> BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives:
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a
> message to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> 

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 14:47:46 +0000
There is nonetheless a huge difference between a sighting of a stray of a 
species that is common in its natural range, and the sighting of a species long 
thought extinct whose rediscovery would have conservation and, perhaps, 
socioeconomic consequences.  In the latter case I think there is an obligation 
t others that the rediscovery might affect to at least try to document such a 
sighting that goes beyond a desire simply to get a good look at it. There are 
lots of photos of Redwings out there as the bird is common in Europe.  The 
South Island Kokako would be in an altogether different category. 

Compare the Kokako to an Ivory-billed Woodpecker.  If you had one of those in 
view for 15 minutes, don't you think you would feel the need to get a 
documentary photo (if possible), given the consequences such a document would 
have (assuming you intended to report it at all, as the birders in New Zealand 
obviously chose to do)? 


PS: anyone interested in the NORTH Island Kokako, and where to see one, might 
want to check out an old blog entry of mine: 
http://ronorenstein.blogspot.ca/2012/02/new-zealand-tiritiri-matangi.html 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

      From: Patty O'Neill 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Wednesday, April 6, 2016 10:09 AM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Reputation vs. Photo
   
Four of us from the greater Boston area raced up to New Hampshire about a month 
ago in search of a Redwing that had been reported on a high school athletic 
field.  We arrived at the school and immediately noticed a group of people 
down the lane with telescopes aimed at a thicket.  Three of us ran down the 
road without even our telescopes to where those with telescopes very kindly 
immediately put us on the bird.   The fourth stayed behind to get his camera 
gear.   The bird flew.  I was a happy birder with a new bird for my Lower 
48 and ABA lists.   Patty O'NeillMilton MApattyoneillatverizon.netPS:   I 
think birder #4 did get to see the bird when it returned to the ball field 
briefly a short time later.  I don't know if he went back to NH the next day 
for a better view (& photo?). 

Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 10:53:15 -0700
From: Alvaro Jaramillo 
Subject: Re: Kokako

Douglas

 I have often thought of writing a short opinion piece on this. The issue is 
that back in the day there was an informal process by which someone became a 
âreputable observer.â You put in your time in the field, you birded with many 
others in the community, you reported birds with a good description and others 
went and confirmed the sightings. Your reputation built up in a manner that 
people had an acute idea of what sightings were âTriple Aâ versus lower 
levels of confidence. That system had essentially died out now. I am not saying 
that it was a good system, it just was a reality. 


 Now reputation does not really matter, birding is a bit more egalitarian in 
that way. But the expectation is that imagery will be available for a really 
good sighting. You see a good bird, and you get a photo. I recently saw a bird 
that ended up being a first for the state (Kelp Gull) while I was jogging on 
the beach. I had no camera, nothing, no binoculars even. I knew that no matter 
how much I have written, seen, photographed or reported, there was absolutely 
NO WAY that this record would be accepted given the circumstances. So I ran 
home like a bat out of hell, and drove back to the spot and re-found the bird 
and snapped a bunch of photos. Fortunately it worked out, and we even had the 
bird show up in various spots and get photographed and it made it to the 
California list. 


 Today, no image or recording and a very rare sighting will just not end up 
being taken all that seriously. I think it that the importance of reputation is 
much less now. Times have changed. 


 

Alvaro Jaramillo

  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com


For BirdChat Guidelines go tohttp://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go toArchives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.htmlTo contact a listowner, send a message 
tobirdchat-request AT ksu.edu 



For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Kokako
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 14:38:42 +0000
Thanks for the link to these really interesting papers.

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 6, 2016, at 10:26 AM, Joseph Morlan  wrote:
> 
> On this general subject, here a couple of academic papers that I think are
> worth a look...
> 
> McKelvey, K. S. et al. 2008. Using anecdotal occurrence data for rare or
> elusive species: The illusion of reality and a call for evidentiary
> standards. BioScience. 58(6):549-555.
> 
> http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2008_mckelvey_k001.pdf
> 
> Roberts, D. L. et al. 2009. Identifying anomalous reports of putatively
> extinct species and why it matters. Conservation Biology, 24(1):189-196
> 
> 
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/26672737_Identifying_Anomalous_Reports_of_Putatively_Extinct_Species_and_Why_It_Matters 

> 
> On Tue, 5 Apr 2016 10:53:15 -0700, Alvaro Jaramillo 
> wrote:
> 
>> Douglas
>> 
>> I have often thought of writing a short opinion piece on this. The issue is 
that back in the day there was an informal process by which someone became a 
“reputable observer.” You put in your time in the field, you birded with 
many others in the community, you reported birds with a good description and 
others went and confirmed 

> the sightings. Your reputation built up in a manner that people had an acute 
idea of what sightings were “Triple A” versus lower levels of confidence. 
That system had essentially died out now. I am not saying that it was a good 
system, it just was a reality. 

>> 
>> Now reputation does not really matter, birding is a bit more egalitarian in 
that way. But the expectation is that imagery will be available for a really 
good sighting. You see a good bird, and you get a photo. I recently saw a bird 
that ended up being a first for the state (Kelp Gull) while I was jogging on 
the beach. I had no 

> camera, nothing, no binoculars even. I knew that no matter how much I have 
written, seen, photographed or reported, there was absolutely NO WAY that this 
record would be accepted given the circumstances. So I ran home like a bat out 
of hell, and drove back to the spot and re-found the bird and snapped a bunch 
of photos. Fortunately 

> it worked out, and we even had the bird show up in various spots and get 
photographed and it made it to the California list. 

>> 
>> Today, no image or recording and a very rare sighting will just not end up 
being taken all that seriously. I think it that the importance of reputation is 
much less now. Times have changed. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Alvaro Jaramillo
>> 
>>  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
>> 
>> www.alvarosadventures.com
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Douglas Carver 

>> Sent: Tuesday, April 5, 2016 7:28 AM
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Kokako
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I have never seen anything that rare (and that's an understatement), but if 
I see an unusual bird, the last thing I want to do is to start fumbling around 
for a camera or something with which to take a photograph (if I have something 
with me). I want to get a good look long, and then perhaps try to get the shot 
-- because I won't 

> want to risk missing the bird to try to capture an image.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Plus, there are still many of us who have dumb phones -- so it is quite 
possible these folks did not have something with them that could make a good 
photo, 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> This raises the broader question of how the advent of new technologies have 
changed what is required for a legitimate sighting. I am old enough to remember 
when a reputable observer noting critical field marks was enough to classify as 
a confirmed sighting. Now, no photo, no bird. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Douglas Carver
>> 
>> Albuquerque, NM
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
>> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
>> To contact a listowner, send a message to
>> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> --
> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Kokako
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 07:26:04 -0700
On this general subject, here a couple of academic papers that I think are
worth a look...

McKelvey, K. S. et al. 2008. Using anecdotal occurrence data for rare or
elusive species: The illusion of reality and a call for evidentiary
standards. BioScience. 58(6):549-555.

http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2008_mckelvey_k001.pdf

Roberts, D. L. et al. 2009. Identifying anomalous reports of putatively
extinct species and why it matters. Conservation Biology, 24(1):189-196


https://www.researchgate.net/publication/26672737_Identifying_Anomalous_Reports_of_Putatively_Extinct_Species_and_Why_It_Matters 


On Tue, 5 Apr 2016 10:53:15 -0700, Alvaro Jaramillo 
wrote:

>Douglas
>
> I have often thought of writing a short opinion piece on this. The issue is 
that back in the day there was an informal process by which someone became a 
“reputable observer.” You put in your time in the field, you birded with 
many others in the community, you reported birds with a good description and 
others went and confirmed 

the sightings. Your reputation built up in a manner that people had an acute 
idea of what sightings were “Triple A” versus lower levels of confidence. 
That system had essentially died out now. I am not saying that it was a good 
system, it just was a reality. 

>
> Now reputation does not really matter, birding is a bit more egalitarian in 
that way. But the expectation is that imagery will be available for a really 
good sighting. You see a good bird, and you get a photo. I recently saw a bird 
that ended up being a first for the state (Kelp Gull) while I was jogging on 
the beach. I had no 

camera, nothing, no binoculars even. I knew that no matter how much I have 
written, seen, photographed or reported, there was absolutely NO WAY that this 
record would be accepted given the circumstances. So I ran home like a bat out 
of hell, and drove back to the spot and re-found the bird and snapped a bunch 
of photos. Fortunately 

it worked out, and we even had the bird show up in various spots and get 
photographed and it made it to the California list. 

>
> Today, no image or recording and a very rare sighting will just not end up 
being taken all that seriously. I think it that the importance of reputation is 
much less now. Times have changed. 

>
>
>
>Alvaro Jaramillo
>
>  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
>
>www.alvarosadventures.com
>
>
>
>From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Douglas Carver 

>Sent: Tuesday, April 5, 2016 7:28 AM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Kokako
>
>
>
>I have never seen anything that rare (and that's an understatement), but if I 
see an unusual bird, the last thing I want to do is to start fumbling around 
for a camera or something with which to take a photograph (if I have something 
with me). I want to get a good look long, and then perhaps try to get the shot 
-- because I won't 

want to risk missing the bird to try to capture an image.
>
>
>
>Plus, there are still many of us who have dumb phones -- so it is quite 
possible these folks did not have something with them that could make a good 
photo, 

>
>
>
>This raises the broader question of how the advent of new technologies have 
changed what is required for a legitimate sighting. I am old enough to remember 
when a reputable observer noting critical field marks was enough to classify as 
a confirmed sighting. Now, no photo, no bird. 

>
>
>
>Douglas Carver
>
>Albuquerque, NM
>
>
>
>
>For BirdChat Guidelines go to
>http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Reputation vs. Photo
From: Patty O'Neill <pattyoneill AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 09:09:31 -0500




Subject: FOY Ruby-throated Hummingbird
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2016 09:06:22 -0400
An adult male Ruby-throated hummingbird finally arrived at Hilton Pond Center 
for Piedmont Natural History (York SC) on 5 April 2016 and became the 5,301st 
of his species banded here since 1984. 


Happy Hummingbird Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Birding Pals
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 21:24:30 -0500
This may just be more of the same but I too have had terrible luck with birding 
pals and finally gave up. Every time I query a list such as this looking for 
guides in X country the responses include try birding pals. I either never hear 
back from them (pals) or they tell me they are actually professional guides and 
charge a lot. My suspicion is that many of the pal lists are rather outdated. 


Dave
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Columbia, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 15:13:22 -0400
> From: lbrown4100 AT CHARTER.NET
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Birding Pals
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> I tried bird pals once, Capetown, about one year ago. Emailed three, got no 
response. Never tried again. 

> 
> Lew Brown
> Sault  Ste Marie, MI
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> > On Apr 5, 2016, at 11:08 AM, Sam Sinderson  wrote:
> > 
> > It has been over a month now since I tried to contact two different Pals
> > in San Juan Puerto Rico and I have no response.  I have sent a message
> > to the Birding Pals Contact asking if these names are still valid.  We
> > shall see.
> > 
> > Sam Sinderson
> > sinderso AT verizon.net
> > 
> > On 4/5/2016 9:04 AM, Gail Mackiernan wrote:
> > My most recent Birding Pals experience is only from 2013 (New Zealand)
> > and that was fine. I did just emailed the BP administrator re current
> > status, and have not heard back yet.
> > 
> > Gail Mackiernan
> > Silver Spring, Md
> > 
> > Sent from my iPad
> > 
> > On Apr 5, 2016, at 7:06 AM, Mary Beth Stowe 
> > wrote:
> > 
> > For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> > http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> > To contact a listowner, send a message to
> > birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Fwd: [birders] Puerto Rican Refuge threatened
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 22:04:24 -0400
I thought this was very appropriate to forward to this list,
especially since Puerto Rico has been recently discussed.  I do not
believe this is political; but if some of you do, I apologize in
advance.

Pat Burden
Melvin & Yale, MI



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Janet Hinshaw 
Date: Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 3:44 PM
Subject: [birders] Puerto Rican Refuge threatened
To: birders 


Please spread the word that the Vieques Refuge is threatened by
actions in Congress and urge support to secure its future.  Not only
would this transfer be a calamity for birds, turtles, plants and other
flora and fauna, it would also kill the tourist industry on the island
as Vieques would no longer be a unique tourist destination but like
every other over-developed Caribbean island.  In addition it would set
a terrible precedent where by Congress could give away federal lands
set aside for wildlife to private developers.

Please click on this link to express your support for preserving the
Vieques National Wildlife Refuge in Puerto Rico, which is threatened
by development.

http://refugeassociation.org/action/#/49

It will only take a couple minutes of your time. Please spread the
word in your networks.

Thank you!

Janet Hinshaw
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Birding Pals
From: ewinter AT NEWMEX.COM
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 13:21:43 -0600
Some years ago, I used Birding Pal. Both as birder and as "guide." But,
too, I used
to get emails asking to confirm if I were still a birding pal. They
haven't come for awhile, so maybe it's become somewhat neglected.

I've had very good luck using the ABA membership directory. But again,
some years ago. It was very helpful in France, in particular.

Elizabeth Winter
Taos, NM

> I tried bird pals once, Capetown, about one year ago. Emailed three, got
> no response. Never tried again.
>
> Lew Brown
> Sault  Ste Marie, MI

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Birding Pals
From: Lewis Brown <lbrown4100 AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 15:13:22 -0400
I tried bird pals once, Capetown, about one year ago. Emailed three, got no 
response. Never tried again. 


Lew Brown
Sault  Ste Marie, MI

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 5, 2016, at 11:08 AM, Sam Sinderson  wrote:
> 
> It has been over a month now since I tried to contact two different Pals
> in San Juan Puerto Rico and I have no response.  I have sent a message
> to the Birding Pals Contact asking if these names are still valid.  We
> shall see.
> 
> Sam Sinderson
> sinderso AT verizon.net
> 
> On 4/5/2016 9:04 AM, Gail Mackiernan wrote:
> My most recent Birding Pals experience is only from 2013 (New Zealand)
> and that was fine. I did just emailed the BP administrator re current
> status, and have not heard back yet.
> 
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, Md
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> On Apr 5, 2016, at 7:06 AM, Mary Beth Stowe 
> wrote:
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Kokako
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 10:53:15 -0700
Douglas

 I have often thought of writing a short opinion piece on this. The issue is 
that back in the day there was an informal process by which someone became a 
“reputable observer.” You put in your time in the field, you birded with 
many others in the community, you reported birds with a good description and 
others went and confirmed the sightings. Your reputation built up in a manner 
that people had an acute idea of what sightings were “Triple A” versus 
lower levels of confidence. That system had essentially died out now. I am not 
saying that it was a good system, it just was a reality. 


 Now reputation does not really matter, birding is a bit more egalitarian in 
that way. But the expectation is that imagery will be available for a really 
good sighting. You see a good bird, and you get a photo. I recently saw a bird 
that ended up being a first for the state (Kelp Gull) while I was jogging on 
the beach. I had no camera, nothing, no binoculars even. I knew that no matter 
how much I have written, seen, photographed or reported, there was absolutely 
NO WAY that this record would be accepted given the circumstances. So I ran 
home like a bat out of hell, and drove back to the spot and re-found the bird 
and snapped a bunch of photos. Fortunately it worked out, and we even had the 
bird show up in various spots and get photographed and it made it to the 
California list. 


 Today, no image or recording and a very rare sighting will just not end up 
being taken all that seriously. I think it that the importance of reputation is 
much less now. Times have changed. 


 

Alvaro Jaramillo

  alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Douglas Carver 

Sent: Tuesday, April 5, 2016 7:28 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Kokako

 

I have never seen anything that rare (and that's an understatement), but if I 
see an unusual bird, the last thing I want to do is to start fumbling around 
for a camera or something with which to take a photograph (if I have something 
with me). I want to get a good look long, and then perhaps try to get the shot 
-- because I won't want to risk missing the bird to try to capture an image. 


 

Plus, there are still many of us who have dumb phones -- so it is quite 
possible these folks did not have something with them that could make a good 
photo, 


 

This raises the broader question of how the advent of new technologies have 
changed what is required for a legitimate sighting. I am old enough to remember 
when a reputable observer noting critical field marks was enough to classify as 
a confirmed sighting. Now, no photo, no bird. 


 

Douglas Carver

Albuquerque, NM

 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Birding Pals in Puerto Rico
From: Sam Sinderson <sinderso AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2016 12:47:45 -0400
I contacted the Birding Pal Admin about pals in San Juan area and this
is what they said:

*Sr. Anglero is a professional guide who has not upgraded.  He has not
answered a request since February.  I have rewritten to him.**
**
**J Salguero-Faria turns out to be inactive but not identified.  Thank
you for catching these listings.**
**
**If you don't make contact we can cancel your subscription and refund
your contribution.**
**
**You're help deserves a reward of next year's subscription.

*It least I a got a very prompt response.*

*Since these were the only two pals that were not pros listed, I may be
out of luck.  I will probably contact the one pro listed and see what
the charges are.  Maybe I will hear from the first one since they are
writing him.


--
Sam Sinderson
sinderso AT verizon.net


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT ksu.edu