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Updated on Saturday, February 13 at 12:59 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Crested Kingfisher,©BirdQuest

13 Feb BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 14, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Feb Re: South Africa [Ronald Orenstein ]
12 Feb Darn Gyrfalcons...they are just such a nuisance, eh? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
12 Feb Re: South Africa [Richard Carlson ]
12 Feb South Africa [Barbara Wilson ]
11 Feb RFI Birding tour to Cuba [Janet Zinn ]
11 Feb Hilton Pond 10/03/15 (October Thrushes) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
10 Feb Re: RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon [Richard Carlson ]
10 Feb RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon [Lamont ]
9 Feb RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon [sj wexlr ]
9 Feb Re: European Starkings in Alaska ["B.G. Sloan" ]
9 Feb Re: European Starkings in Alaska [Jay Greenberg ]
8 Feb Hilton Pond 01/01/16 (2016: Hilton Pond Center's 35th Year) []
8 Feb Re: European Starlings in Anchorage [Joyanne Hamilton ]
8 Feb Re: European Starlings in Anchorage [Marcel Gahbauer ]
8 Feb European Starlings in Anchorage [Joyanne Hamilton ]
8 Feb Costa Rica Trip Report ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
6 Feb Macaw research in Tambopata Peru [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
6 Feb BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 7, 2016 + new photo blog [Ellen Blackstone ]
6 Feb RFI birding guide in Petropavlovsk, Russia [sj wexlr ]
5 Feb Re: Jakarta [Paulo Boute ]
5 Feb Re: RFI: Birding Tokyo area in May [Paulo Boute ]
4 Feb Federal authorities to end use of ultralights for whooping crane project (newspaper article) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
3 Feb Jakarta [Andy Mabbett ]
3 Feb St Kitts Bird Guide [Rob Woods ]
3 Feb Dominica Bird Guide [Rob Woods ]
3 Feb RFI: Birding Tokyo area in May [sj wexlr ]
3 Feb ravens and the "theory of mind" [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
2 Feb Super guide Falmouth and all No Jamaica [Lamont ]
31 Jan Important birding and conservation thoughts via interview with Alvaro Jaramillo [Daniel Edelstein ]
31 Jan Help with reported hybrids of Swallows [Serge Dumont ]
30 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 31, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
23 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 24, 2016 + new blog [Ellen Blackstone ]
22 Jan New Species Of Bird Identified In India & China [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
22 Jan Re: Photographic nemesis birds? [Eric Jeffrey ]
22 Jan all about bird anatomy [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
22 Jan Re: Photographic nemesis birds? [Vernon Ball ]
21 Jan Photographic nemesis birds? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
16 Jan Re: Tucson AZ and environs [Richard Carlson ]
16 Jan duluth birds [Jim ]
16 Jan Ivory Gull, kittiwakes in Duluth [Jim ]
16 Jan Winter: Murmuration Season For Starlings [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
16 Jan Tucson AZ and environs [Patricia Burden ]
16 Jan BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 17, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
16 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Peter Wilkinson ]
15 Jan "Rat Island" on the Aleutians is now Hawadax [Joyanne Hamilton ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Eran Tomer ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Paulo Boute ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Ronald Orenstein ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Eran Tomer ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Peter Wilkinson ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Ronald Orenstein ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Laura Erickson ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Ronald Orenstein ]
14 Jan Re: Heckle and Jeckle [Laura Erickson ]
13 Jan Heckle and Jeckle [Joyanne Hamilton ]
12 Jan Sapsucker sap wells on maple tree (Photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
12 Jan top-14-bird-photographers-world-achievements-goals [Paulo Boute ]
9 Jan Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 7 Jan 2016 to 8 Jan 2016 (#2016-7) [Dennis Burnette ]
9 Jan rfi Edmonton [Terry Witt ]
9 Jan BirdNote, last week and the week of Jan. 10, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
8 Jan Birding classes ["Guttman, Burt" ]
7 Jan Fw: SIGN: This bird is a piece of history [Ronald Orenstein ]
7 Jan Edmonton rail yard becomes roost for rare falcons ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
6 Jan Re: RFI - Birding South Korea [Paulo Boute ]
6 Jan Re: RFI - Birding South Korea [Stephen Elliott ]
5 Jan RFI - Birding South Korea [David Starrett ]
5 Jan Lecture Invitation. [Paulo Boute ]
5 Jan Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur []
5 Jan Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur [Jerry Tangren ]
5 Jan Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists [Ronald Orenstein ]
5 Jan Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists []
5 Jan Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists [Jerry Tangren ]
5 Jan Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists [Bob Gosford ]

Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 14, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Feb 2016 09:53:26 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters!

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* The Crane Wife
http://bit.ly/1PHfbc5
* Examining Owl Pellets
http://bit.ly/1XaP0w8
* Altamira Oriole
http://bit.ly/1pH2YWQ
* Identifying a Bird in Flight
http://bit.ly/1nPFEcA
* Sanderlings, Wave Dancers
http://bit.ly/1Q0fXwJ
* Annual Great Backyard Bird Count
http://bit.ly/1yBS4D4
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1PukpGS
----------------------------
Please let us know what shows appeal to you or don't -- and why.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: South Africa
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 23:58:42 +0000
There is lots on the web about this.  For starters try:

http://www.capetown.travel/blog/entry/10-Brilliant-Bird-watching-Spots-in-Cape-Town 

Absolutely do not miss Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens and the drive down to Cape 
Point (including the penguin colony at Boulders Beach (Simonstown).  This is 
not just for birds - there are few more beautiful places on the planet IMHO.  
Also, Kirstenbosch (a must for anyone who loves wild flora) has (or at least 
did on my last visit in 2006) a terrific bookstore where you can stock up on 
field guides, etc. 

Also - Cape Town may not have the biggest bird list in the country (but wait 
till you see the Cape Sugarbird, Malachite Sunbird and Orange-breasted 
Sunbird!), but it is in a very special place.  The heathland country, or 
fynbos, is one of the richest botanical realms on the planet.  April may not 
be the best flowering season (see http://fynbosblog.com/2015/04/), but 
widflower-watching should still be rewarding.  See 
http://www.sanbi.org/gardens/kirstenbosch/seasons/autumn-pictures if you don't 
believe me.  There are quite a few good birding guides operating in the area - 
I've been out with Callan Cohen whom I can certainly recommend (see 
http://www.birdingafrica.com/aboutus_team.htm).  The Cape also is the world's 
centre for tortoise diversity, with some very rare and beautiful species - and 
on the Cape Point drive you can see rare mammals such as Bontebok and Mountain 
Zebra. 


If you can get further afield, there are wonderful areas to explore - Sir 
Lowry's Pass for Cape Rockjumper, for example. Hermanus is nice too, though you 
won't be at the right time for whale-watching, the town's specialty (see 
http://www.hermanus.co.za/land-based/169-birding), or try the karoo (very 
different from the Cape area). 


As for the Limpopo, see 
http://www.southafrica.net/za/en/articles/entry/article-southafrica.net-greater-limpopo-birding-routehttp://www.birdlife.org.za/component/k2/item/405http://birdinglimpopo.com/ 

Remember that some areas of the Lowveld (eg Kruger Park) are malarial at some 
times of the year - if you go to those areas you need to take precautions.  
This is not a minor matter - tourists have died of malaria after visiting the 
Kruger, and April is in the high risk period.  
See:https://www.sanparks.org/parks/kruger/tourism/malaria.php 

If you stay in the highveld, though, you may not have a problem.

Bear in mind that some of the excellent South African field guides (for birds 
and other things) are available as iPhone apps, so you don't have to lug a 
library around. 

Good luck - I love South Africa (I'll be there in September/October, and I 
can't wait!). 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

      From: Barbara Wilson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, February 12, 2016 2:23 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] South Africa
   
We will be in South Africa for three weeks in April; mostly Cape Town, but
also 6 days safari in Limpopo province.  I would appreciate any helpful
advice; we are not expert birdwatchers but hope to be prepared to see some
unusual species.

Thank you

Barbara Wilson

Buffalo, NY


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Subject: Darn Gyrfalcons...they are just such a nuisance, eh?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 16:59:13 -0500
For some birders this is high on the list of "wants", but if you are
studying the northern lights.



https://www.facebook.com/theglobeandmail/videos/10153876635238904/



Cheers,



Barry



Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada




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Subject: Re: South Africa
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 14:00:28 -0700
You need a guide Strongly recommend patrick at avianleisure.com. Don't miss 
botanic gardens, penguins and Robben island 


Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Feb 12, 2016, at 12:23 PM, Barbara Wilson  wrote:
>
> We will be in South Africa for three weeks in April; mostly Cape Town, but
> also 6 days safari in Limpopo province.  I would appreciate any helpful
> advice; we are not expert birdwatchers but hope to be prepared to see some
> unusual species.
>
> Thank you
>
> Barbara Wilson
>
> Buffalo, NY
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: South Africa
From: Barbara Wilson <bherrick AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 14:23:49 -0500
We will be in South Africa for three weeks in April; mostly Cape Town, but
also 6 days safari in Limpopo province.  I would appreciate any helpful
advice; we are not expert birdwatchers but hope to be prepared to see some
unusual species.

Thank you

Barbara Wilson

Buffalo, NY


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Subject: RFI Birding tour to Cuba
From: Janet Zinn <bkbirdr AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 13:18:18 -0500
We are looking into a Cuba birding tour for next winter and I was wondering
if anyone has had experience with the tour offered by Environmental
Adventure Company. http://eac.ourcuba.com/tours/birding-cuba-tour/ The
guide is Arturo Kirkconnell, who wrote the field guide; so I'm not really
concerned about the guide; but would like some feedback on the company
itself, its reliability, arrangements, etc.  Can't seem to find anything
much that is specific to the birding tour.

Thanks for any info.

Janet Zinn
Brooklyn, NY
www.janetzinnphotography.com

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Subject: Hilton Pond 10/03/15 (October Thrushes)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 07:56:42 -0500
I don't know that anyone will ever see them, but for the sake of the scientific 
record I'm trying to finish up back installments of "This Week at Hilton Pond." 
(I have an excuse in all those surgeries and extended travel.) To that end I 
just put together my latest photo essay covering 3-31 October 2015; it focuses 
on thrushes (Turdidae) I've banded at Hilton Pond Center through the years and 
includes lots of images for comparison of the various species. If you’d like 
to brush up on your thrush I.D.s I hope you'll visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek151003.html 😊 


Happy (Back-dated) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Re: RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 12:02:46 -0700
Immediately adjacent to the airport is a seaplane base & lake that is full of 
ducks and loons. North of that about 1.5 miles is earthquake park with a path 
along Turnagain arm and its mudflats. There will be many shorebirds plus cranes 
and ducks. Land birds in the forests. Adjacent homes have many feeders with 
redpolls etc. you didn't specify a date, birding much more limited in winter. 


Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Feb 10, 2016, at 11:26 AM, Lamont  wrote:
>
> Likely the closest good spot to bird close to the Anchorage airport would be
> Westchester Lagoon.   There are a lot of ducks on the lake and
> gulls/shorebirds on the water.  Additionally there was enough wooded area
> [in 2012] to get passerines as well.  Westchester Lagoon is near downtown.
>
> Another good spot on the edge of town would be Potter's Marsh.
>
> Both would require a car, although distance wise Westchester Lagoon may be
> able to be done with a taxi, but you would need to check the distance from
> airport to determine if viable.
>
> Lamont Brown
> Denton, Texas
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 9 Feb 2016 21:28:17 +0000
> From:    sj wexlr 
> Subject: RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon
>
> Hi All:
>
> I'll have about 6 hours in the afternoon in the Anchorage airport waiting=
> for flights.  Can anyone suggest someplace nearby I could bird?  I could r=
> ent a car if that would be helpful.
>
>
> Thanks
>
> Sally Wechsler
>
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>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 8 Feb 2016 to 9 Feb 2016 (#2016-26)
> ************************************************************
>
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Subject: RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon
From: Lamont <lamont AT GVII.CC>
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 12:26:49 -0600
Likely the closest good spot to bird close to the Anchorage airport would be
Westchester Lagoon.   There are a lot of ducks on the lake and
gulls/shorebirds on the water.  Additionally there was enough wooded area
[in 2012] to get passerines as well.  Westchester Lagoon is near downtown.

Another good spot on the edge of town would be Potter's Marsh.

Both would require a car, although distance wise Westchester Lagoon may be
able to be done with a taxi, but you would need to check the distance from
airport to determine if viable.

Lamont Brown
Denton, Texas
------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 9 Feb 2016 21:28:17 +0000
From:    sj wexlr 
Subject: RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon

Hi All:

  I'll have about 6 hours in the afternoon in the Anchorage airport waiting=
for flights.  Can anyone suggest someplace nearby I could bird?  I could r=
ent a car if that would be helpful.


Thanks

Sally Wechsler

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------------------------------

End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 8 Feb 2016 to 9 Feb 2016 (#2016-26)
************************************************************

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Subject: RFI: Birding Anchorage, Alaska for an afternoon
From: sj wexlr <merganser AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 21:28:17 +0000
Hi All:

 I'll have about 6 hours in the afternoon in the Anchorage airport waiting for 
flights. Can anyone suggest someplace nearby I could bird? I could rent a car 
if that would be helpful. 



Thanks

Sally Wechsler

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Subject: Re: European Starkings in Alaska
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 13:32:38 -0500
Years ago I watched a Red-bellied Woodpecker excavating a nest hole in a
dead tree. Took several days. A pair of starlings perched nearby watching
the process. Several days later I visited the site and the starlings were
nesting in the cavity. :-(

On Tue, Feb 9, 2016 at 12:35 PM, Jay Greenberg <
conservationist AT earthlink.net> wrote:

> In my area (western New York State) starlings are a big threat to
> cavity-nesting birds.  Eastern Bluebirds were nearly wiped out by starlings
> until people learned how to build starling-proof nest boxes.  They have
> made a great comeback, but they are now almost entirely dependent on
> man-made nest boxes.  Red-headed Woodpeckers have nearly disappeared from
> this area, and I suspect that competition for starlings is the culprit.
>
> Jay Greenberg
> conservationist AT earthlink.net 
> http://www.thegreenjay.com 
> Rochester, NY
>
>
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Subject: Re: European Starkings in Alaska
From: Jay Greenberg <conservationist AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 12:35:57 -0500
In my area (western New York State) starlings are a big threat to 
cavity-nesting birds. Eastern Bluebirds were nearly wiped out by starlings 
until people learned how to build starling-proof nest boxes. They have made a 
great comeback, but they are now almost entirely dependent on man-made nest 
boxes. Red-headed Woodpeckers have nearly disappeared from this area, and I 
suspect that competition for starlings is the culprit. 


Jay Greenberg
conservationist AT earthlink.net 
http://www.thegreenjay.com 
Rochester, NY


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Subject: Hilton Pond 01/01/16 (2016: Hilton Pond Center's 35th Year)
From: research AT HILTONPOND.ORG
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 20:23:56 -0500
One of my New Year's resolutions was to try to write more installments of "This 
Week at Hilton Pond," but wrist surgery and a speaking gig in Florida have 
hindered such progress in 2016--the Center's 35th year. To get caught up I've 
lumped all my natural history observations for January and offer them for you 
perusal and, I hope, your enjoyment and edification. This latest photo essay is 
about bird-banding and list-keeping, bug-smelling and Coyote-listening, and a 
few other natural things of interest--including lists of all birds captured or 
recaptured during the period. It's all posted at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160101.html 
 


Happy (Midwinter) Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Re: European Starlings in Anchorage
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 07:01:59 -0900
Thank you, Marcel.
Ive been researching Audubons site all morning and doing the good ol Google 
searches for articles. 

Very interesting indeed. I didnt think of eBird. THANK YOU!

I was contemplating planting a mountain ash tree in Shageluk but not anymore!
Thanks again for the data and link here!

Joy

> On Feb 8, 2016, at 6:55 AM, Marcel Gahbauer  
wrote: 

>
> Hi Joyanne,
>
> eBird is a great tool to investigate at least some of your questions - use 
the "explore data" tab (http://ebird.org/ebird/eBirdReports). 

>
> For example, a simple plot of the frequency of observations in Alaska as a 
whole (http://tinyurl.com/jgtggnu) shows that on average European Starlings are 
reported on around 5% of checklists for the state; looking at some other tabs 
in that output, it seems that a flock of 40 is larger than average, but far 
short of the record. Looking at the map of all records 
(http://tinyurl.com/hcyyhkh), Anchorage does seem to be the hub of observations 
for Alaska, though there are other sightings scattered around; if you zoom in 
(enter Anchorage in the location box), you'll see an intense cluster of 
sightings there. You can play around extensively with locations, date ranges, 
etc. to explore spatial and temporal patterns of occurrence. 

>
> Marcel Gahbauer
> Ottawa ON
>
> ________________________________________
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Joyanne Hamilton  

> Sent: February 8, 2016 9:39 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] European Starlings in Anchorage
>
> Hello Bird People,
>
> Im in Anchorage with my students at the Alaska Forum on the Environment. 
They are presenting on invasive plants and their impacts on traditional foods 
for Alaska Native Tribes. 

>
> Yesterday we saw a tremendous flock of about 40 birds in the downtown 
Anchorage area that I couldnt identify high in a tree, singing away. I posted 
a short video clip on the Birds of Alaska Facebook page and someone responded 
they were the "invasive bird", European Starlings. 

>
> I know the topic has come up before, that there were a few in Anchorage 
spotted the last few years. Oh, my goodness, A FEW? I have since seen other 
flocks of around the same numbers by local department stores. I havent checked 
the local bird counts, but I was quite shocked to see so many. 

>
> Does anyone know if there are any studies going on in Alaska documenting 
their spread? Are they spreading just because they can? Habitat loss? Climate 
change/warming in the Anchorage area? What other parts of Alaska have they been 
seen? I have heard about their reputation. With the Arctic being so 
environmentally sensitive are their any predictions as to which species of 
birds may be threatened by their arrival? 

>
> Always interested in your advice, knowledge and wisdom.
> Thanks for the help.
>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska
> (currently in Anchorage for a few more days)
>
>
> "If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes." --Charles 
Lindbergh 

>
>
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Subject: Re: European Starlings in Anchorage
From: Marcel Gahbauer <marcel AT MIGRATIONRESEARCH.ORG>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 15:55:42 +0000
Hi Joyanne,

eBird is a great tool to investigate at least some of your questions - use the 
"explore data" tab (http://ebird.org/ebird/eBirdReports). 


For example, a simple plot of the frequency of observations in Alaska as a 
whole (http://tinyurl.com/jgtggnu) shows that on average European Starlings are 
reported on around 5% of checklists for the state; looking at some other tabs 
in that output, it seems that a flock of 40 is larger than average, but far 
short of the record. Looking at the map of all records 
(http://tinyurl.com/hcyyhkh), Anchorage does seem to be the hub of observations 
for Alaska, though there are other sightings scattered around; if you zoom in 
(enter Anchorage in the location box), you'll see an intense cluster of 
sightings there. You can play around extensively with locations, date ranges, 
etc. to explore spatial and temporal patterns of occurrence. 


Marcel Gahbauer
Ottawa ON

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Joyanne Hamilton  

Sent: February 8, 2016 9:39 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] European Starlings in Anchorage

Hello Bird People,

Im in Anchorage with my students at the Alaska Forum on the Environment. They 
are presenting on invasive plants and their impacts on traditional foods for 
Alaska Native Tribes. 


Yesterday we saw a tremendous flock of about 40 birds in the downtown Anchorage 
area that I couldnt identify high in a tree, singing away. I posted a short 
video clip on the Birds of Alaska Facebook page and someone responded they were 
the "invasive bird", European Starlings. 


I know the topic has come up before, that there were a few in Anchorage spotted 
the last few years. Oh, my goodness, A FEW? I have since seen other flocks of 
around the same numbers by local department stores. I havent checked the local 
bird counts, but I was quite shocked to see so many. 


Does anyone know if there are any studies going on in Alaska documenting their 
spread? Are they spreading just because they can? Habitat loss? Climate 
change/warming in the Anchorage area? What other parts of Alaska have they been 
seen? I have heard about their reputation. With the Arctic being so 
environmentally sensitive are their any predictions as to which species of 
birds may be threatened by their arrival? 


Always interested in your advice, knowledge and wisdom.
Thanks for the help.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska
(currently in Anchorage for a few more days)


"If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes." --Charles 
Lindbergh 



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Subject: European Starlings in Anchorage
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 05:39:04 -0900
Hello Bird People,

I”m in Anchorage with my students at the Alaska Forum on the Environment. 
They are presenting on invasive plants and their impacts on traditional foods 
for Alaska Native Tribes. 


Yesterday we saw a tremendous flock of about 40 birds in the downtown Anchorage 
area that I couldn’t identify high in a tree, singing away. I posted a short 
video clip on the Birds of Alaska Facebook page and someone responded they were 
the "invasive bird", European Starlings. 


I know the topic has come up before, that there were a few in Anchorage spotted 
the last few years. Oh, my goodness, A FEW? I have since seen other flocks of 
around the same numbers by local department stores. I haven’t checked the 
local bird counts, but I was quite shocked to see so many. 


Does anyone know if there are any studies going on in Alaska documenting their 
spread? Are they spreading just because they can? Habitat loss? Climate 
change/warming in the Anchorage area? What other parts of Alaska have they been 
seen? I have heard about their reputation. With the Arctic being so 
environmentally sensitive are their any predictions as to which species of 
birds may be threatened by their arrival? 


Always interested in your advice, knowledge and wisdom.
Thanks for the help.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska
(currently in Anchorage for a few more days)


"If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes." --Charles 
Lindbergh 



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Subject: Costa Rica Trip Report
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 12:00:27 +0000
I just returned from a two week trip to Costa Rica. My trip report is available 
to anyone who cares to read it: 
http://www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.ca/2016/02/trip-report-costa-rica-2016.html 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: Macaw research in Tambopata Peru
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 18:30:22 +0000
hi everyone,

I just published a piece that features a lovely video created by some of my
parrot research colleagues. This video reveals what it's like to research
wild macaws in Tambopata, Peru:

Macaw Research in Tambopata, Peru
http://onforb.es/1ofMxVo

As always, feel free to share widely with family, friends and colleagues,
and please do share on social media -- facebook, linkedin, G+ and on
twitter. Also; if you install privacy badger (freeware) or uBlock Origin
(freeware), these will allow you to access the Forbes site without turning
off your ad blocker. (I use both, actually, and do not have a problem.)

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
Forbes blog 
Evolution Institute blog

TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Feb. 7, 2016 + new photo blog
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 06:03:31 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters!

New photo blog: Owl Pellets 101 -- Check out these amazing photos by
Gregg Thompson
http://bit.ly/1USht8r

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Birds, Nests, and Camouflage
http://bit.ly/1DO23wH
* Searching for the Araripe Manakin, With Gerrit Vyn
http://bit.ly/1m7Ggt8
* Recording the Araripe Manakin, With Gerrit Vyn
http://bit.ly/1JTjuAS
* Golden Eagle - The Other Eagle
http://bit.ly/1jmivHk
* The Savvy Wren
http://bit.ly/1iYZHOE
* Riding the Bus with Red-tails
http://bit.ly/1jRuAV8
* Hakalau Forest National Refuge, With Jack Jeffrey
http://bit.ly/201W3XO
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1QjJ6n9
----------------------------
Please let us know what shows appeal to you or don't -- and why.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: RFI birding guide in Petropavlovsk, Russia
From: sj wexlr <merganser AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 13:38:01 +0000
Hi

 My cruise ship will be stopping for a day in Petropavlovsk. Can anyone suggest 
a local bird guide or a boat tour operator? 



Thanks

Sally Wechsler

silver spring, md

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Subject: Re: Jakarta
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 04:44:43 -0300
Hi Andy,
Good Morning!Please, at your earliest convenience, check the local knowledge 
with: 

http://www.birdingpal.org/Indonesia.htm
Best Regards,
Paulo Boute.
_________________________________________________________Birding, Jaguar Photo 
Safaris and Nature Tours , Since 1982.Expertise and Passion for Birds & 
Wildlife!WWW.BOUTE-EXPEDITIONS.COM 


> Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 23:12:03 +0000
> From: andy AT PIGSONTHEWING.ORG.UK
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Jakarta
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Hi folks,
> 
> I have a speaking engagement in Jakarta, Indonesia, in a couple of weeks.
> It will be my first visit to the country. I may have one free day before I
> leave.
> 
> Weather permitting (it seems to be raining a lot there, lately!), what's my
> best bet for a birding hit?
> 
> --
> Andy Mabbett
>  AT pigsonthewing
> http://pigsonthewing.org.uk
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
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Subject: Re: RFI: Birding Tokyo area in May
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 04:36:38 -0300
Hi Sally,
Here it is:
http://birdingpal.org/Japan.htm
Enjoy Japan & its birds!
Yours,
Paulo Boute.
_________________________________________________________Birding, Jaguar Photo 
Safaris and Nature Tours , Since 1982.Expertise and Passion for Birds & 
Wildlife!WWW.BOUTE-EXPEDITIONS.COM 


> Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 20:53:22 +0000
> From: merganser AT HOTMAIL.COM
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Birding Tokyo area in May
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Hi:
> 
> I'm going to be in the Tokyo area for a few days in early May - can anyone 
suggest good places to bird and/or local bird guide? 

> 
> 
> Thanks
> 
> Sally Wechsler
> 
> silver spring, md
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
                                          
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Subject: Federal authorities to end use of ultralights for whooping crane project (newspaper article)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Feb 2016 16:25:36 -0500
Interesting article from the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel  from about ten
days ago. I very well may have missed a post, but I don't recall a
reference to this on the BIRDCHAT list:

"Experts in crane biology and other fields have concluded that the use of
aircraft and other human interaction are having a negative effect on the
birds. Another worrisome technique is the use of costumed humans who help
care for chicks. The practices apparently are not allowing the birds to
imprint parenting skills they need to raise their own chicks."

Full text at:


http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/fish-and-wildlife-service-to-end-whooping-crane-migration-project-b99657191z1-366304761.html 


Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Jakarta
From: Andy Mabbett <andy AT PIGSONTHEWING.ORG.UK>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 23:12:03 +0000
Hi folks,

I have a speaking engagement in Jakarta, Indonesia, in a couple of weeks.
It will be my first visit to the country. I may have one free day before I
leave.

Weather permitting (it seems to be raining a lot there, lately!), what's my
best bet for a birding hit?

--
Andy Mabbett
 AT pigsonthewing
http://pigsonthewing.org.uk

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Subject: St Kitts Bird Guide
From: Rob Woods <rrtwoods AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 21:48:32 +0000
 If looking for a local bird guide on the Island of St Kitts. You can contact 
Percy Hanley ( percivalh  AT  yahoo.com ). He is was able to meet us at the cruise 
ship and showed us to a variety of spots on the island. He is very friendly and 
knowledgeable about the history and natural history of the island. Only 
negative is he did not have a scope which would have been helpful for scanning 
some of the larger lagoons. 

My reports from early January are posted on ebird where he also reports 
sometimes. 

Rob WoodsCranbrook BC

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Subject: Dominica Bird Guide
From: Rob Woods <rrtwoods AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 21:40:45 +0000
 Thanks to those who recommended Bertrand ( drbirdy2  AT  cwdom.dm ). He is a 
wonderful friendly fellow. He met us at our cruise ship and took us to a few 
good hot spots in the morning picking up 14 of 19 Caribbean endemics found on 
the island. 

My bird reports from early January are on ebird.
An interesting item of note is that there is a ferry that runs from Guadeloupe 
to Dominica to Martinique if you were trying to bird a few islands on one trip 
without inter island flights 

Rob WoodsCranbrook BC

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Subject: RFI: Birding Tokyo area in May
From: sj wexlr <merganser AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 20:53:22 +0000
Hi:

 I'm going to be in the Tokyo area for a few days in early May - can anyone 
suggest good places to bird and/or local bird guide? 



Thanks

Sally Wechsler

silver spring, md

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Subject: ravens and the "theory of mind"
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 12:01:31 +0000
hello everyone,

i thought you might be interested to read a piece about a sweet research
paper that investigates whether a raven has any concept of other ravens (or
animals) having their own minds/perceptions and can plan and act
accordingly. This idea is called the "Theory of Mind" and was thought to be
the thing that separates humans from all the other animals. welp! it looks
like ravens have proven that us humans are not unique in this respect,
either:

http://bit.ly/20px46m

(no, i did not write this piece, but i am already planning to write a
long-form piece that incorporates this and other research.)

original literature (PDF):
http://bit.ly/1P5Untq

happy birding,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
Forbes blog 
Evolution Institute blog

TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Super guide Falmouth and all No Jamaica
From: Lamont <lamont AT GVII.CC>
Date: Tue, 2 Feb 2016 13:22:44 -0600
Chatters,

Two weeks ago our cruise ship stopped at Falmouth Jamaica.  I had arranged
for a guide, Wendy Lee to meet me at the port.  I had given her a list of 28
targets.  We were gone a total of 6 hours, including an hour driving each
way and got 19 targets, 16 of which were endemics and the other 3 ssp
endemics.  We got good pics of most including the Crested Quail-Dove.  Wendy
is excellent and knows where the endemics are in all of Northern Jamaica.
She is willing to meet cruise ships at any of the Northern ports.  Her email
is wendylee at cwjamaica.com.  I plan to go back to get 11 other targets
that are too scattered for a cruise ship stop.

There is a reasonable fee and well worth it.  I have no financial interest
in this recommendation.

Lamont Brown
Denton, Texas

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Subject: Important birding and conservation thoughts via interview with Alvaro Jaramillo
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 10:30:15 -0800
. . . at a past Birding article (via my membership in the American Birding 
Association): 


http://www.aba.org/birding/v42n1p18.pdf 
 


Enjoy, regards, 

Daniel Edelstein

warblerwatch.com 

415-382-1827 (O)
415-246-5404 (iPhone)





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Subject: Help with reported hybrids of Swallows
From: Serge Dumont <dumontse AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jan 2016 00:04:40 -0500
Hi,


I am looking for some references for the following hybrids mentioned in the

Macaulay library:

https://macaulaylibrary.org/browse/taxa/hirundinidae

*Stelgidopteryx serripennis x Tachycineta thalassina* -- Northern
Rough-winged x Violet-green Swallow (hybrid)
*Tachycineta bicolor x Hirundo rustica* -- Tree x Barn Swallow (hybrid)
*Petrochelidon fuliginosa/Psalidoprocne nitens* -- Forest
Swallow/Square-tailed Sawwing


Moreover, Avibase lists the following surprising hybrid:

Hirundo rustica x Carduelis carduelis, no doubt obtained in captivity.


I was unable to find any references to support such claims.


Regards,




Serge Dumont
Montréal, Québec
dumontse AT gmail.com

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 31, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 2016 09:30:48 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters!

Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Jynx - The Eurasian Wryneck will put a spell on you!

http://bit.ly/1dDM02L

* Voices of a Costa Rican Winter Sunrise
http://bit.ly/1nEFllm

* Comparing Chickadee Calls
http://bit.ly/LTzJAq

* Bohemian Waxwings Wander South
http://bit.ly/1lZtwOF

* Hanging-Parrots - hidden beneath the leaves
http://bit.ly/1ZSSTe7

* How Feathers Insulate
http://bit.ly/1mbo1MS

* Gerrit Vyn Photographs Spoon-billed Sandpipers in South Korea
http://bit.ly/1eXtdS1
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1Uwu8xL
----------------------------
Please let us know what shows appeal to you or don't -- and why.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
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========================
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show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 24, 2016 + new blog
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jan 2016 07:20:15 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters!

Evil eye of a demon bird? No, just nature's goggles.
Check out our latest photo blog -- about nictitating membranes:
http://bit.ly/1ODGh29

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Photographing the Great Gray Owl, With Paul Bannick
http://bit.ly/1eHeuKu
* The Flicker's White Rump
http://bit.ly/1Orp2RF
* Why Arctic Terns Have Short Beaks
http://bit.ly/WqRj0u
* Alpine Swifts Fly Nonstop
http://bit.ly/1Qdi5nN
* Great Horned Owls Nest in Winter
http://bit.ly/1itjB3L
* Nictitating Membranes - Nature's Goggles
http://bit.ly/1SAMzTT
* Yellow-rumped Warbler - The Winter Warbler
http://bit.ly/1dDLGB5
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1TeAzXO
----------------------------
Please let us know what shows appeal to you or don't -- and why.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
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========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: New Species Of Bird Identified In India & China
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 19:20:56 +0000
Hello everyone,

after lots of work and research, and after even more technical challenges,
i finally finished a piece about a new bird species that has been
discovered in india -- only the FOURTH new bird to be identified since
India gained its independence:

http://onforb.es/1RDHhqN

this is a handsome, but cryptic, bird species that resembles another one
that is found in some places of north america.

as always, please do share widely on social media, and with friends and
family.

i hope you enjoy it.

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
Forbes blog 
Evolution Institute blog

TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: Photographic nemesis birds?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 07:23:22 -0500
Our photographic nemesis is our teenage daughters. They are quicker than birds 
when they sense a photo coming on. 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church VA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2016, at 2:54 AM, Vernon Ball  wrote:
>
> Hello Bernie:
>
> The "photographic nemesis" for my wife and me is Stellar's Jay.
> We have never managed to get a decent picture of one, even 'though we
> visit areas where they are common.
>
> Vern
>
> Vernon Ball
> 10 Guenette Crescent
> Spruce Grove, AB
> T7X 3G8
> Email: vernball AT telusplanet.net 
>
>> On 21/01/2016 11:00 PM, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:
>> There is 1 message totalling 28 lines in this issue.
>>
>> Topics of the day:
>>
>>   1. Photographic nemesis birds? (photo)
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>>
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Thu, 21 Jan 2016 11:21:04 -0500
>> From:    "B.G. Sloan" 
>> Subject: Photographic nemesis birds? (photo)
>>
>> Just wondering if any of you have "photographic nemesis" birds? I define
>> the term as a relatively common bird that's hard to take a decent photo of.
>> In my case it's Tufted Titmouse. They are common yard birds here. It's not
>> unusual to see 4 or 5 of them in one glance. But they are very fidgety
>> birds. They'll swoop in, grab a seed, and fly back into the woods to eat
>> it. They rarely sit still long enough for a decent photo.
>>
>> This is probably my best Tufted Titmouse photo so far. Taken yesterday
>> through my living room window:
>>
>> 
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24521598595/
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park, NJ
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 17 Jan 2016 to 21 Jan 2016 (#2016-15)
>> **************************************************************
>
>
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Subject: all about bird anatomy
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 08:12:05 +0000
hey everyone,

i just ran across this really cool site, built by the cornell lab of o.
it's an interactive bird anatomy site:

https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/features/birdanatomy/

it also creates flashcards.

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
Forbes blog 
Evolution Institute blog

TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: Photographic nemesis birds?
From: Vernon Ball <vernball AT TELUSPLANET.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 00:54:56 -0700
Hello Bernie:

The "photographic nemesis" for my wife and me is Stellar's Jay.
We have never managed to get a decent picture of one, even 'though we
visit areas where they are common.

Vern

Vernon Ball
10 Guenette Crescent
Spruce Grove, AB
T7X 3G8
Email: vernball AT telusplanet.net 

On 21/01/2016 11:00 PM, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:
> There is 1 message totalling 28 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>    1. Photographic nemesis birds? (photo)
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 21 Jan 2016 11:21:04 -0500
> From:    "B.G. Sloan" 
> Subject: Photographic nemesis birds? (photo)
>
> Just wondering if any of you have "photographic nemesis" birds? I define
> the term as a relatively common bird that's hard to take a decent photo of.
> In my case it's Tufted Titmouse. They are common yard birds here. It's not
> unusual to see 4 or 5 of them in one glance. But they are very fidgety
> birds. They'll swoop in, grab a seed, and fly back into the woods to eat
> it. They rarely sit still long enough for a decent photo.
>
> This is probably my best Tufted Titmouse photo so far. Taken yesterday
> through my living room window:
>
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24521598595/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 17 Jan 2016 to 21 Jan 2016 (#2016-15)
> **************************************************************
>


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Subject: Photographic nemesis birds? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Jan 2016 11:21:04 -0500
Just wondering if any of you have "photographic nemesis" birds? I define
the term as a relatively common bird that's hard to take a decent photo of.
In my case it's Tufted Titmouse. They are common yard birds here. It's not
unusual to see 4 or 5 of them in one glance. But they are very fidgety
birds. They'll swoop in, grab a seed, and fly back into the woods to eat
it. They rarely sit still long enough for a decent photo.

This is probably my best Tufted Titmouse photo so far. Taken yesterday
through my living room window:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24521598595/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: Tucson AZ and environs
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 2016 23:21:38 -0700
Mid March is pretty good: all the residents plus many early migrants. Here's 
what I'd suggest: 


1. Catalina's plus Agua Caliente park. Stay at Mary Karrel's. Double k b&b. All 
the desert regular birds at your doorstep in the early am then go up the Mtn . 
Day 2 check TV wash at Wentworth and go up the Mtn again. Gen Hitchcock Campgrd 
will have Olive Warblers plus oak birds. rose Cyn has Pygmy nuthatches , olive 
Warblers and possible early Buff-breasted Flycatchers and Greater Pewee. Molino 
has Black-chinned & Rufous-crowned Sparrows. 


2. Huachucas. Stay at Battiste's, Ramsey Cyn , Ash Cyn b&b, Miller Cyn or 
Sierra Vista. Visit Garden Cyn for Trogons and Spotted Owls, Huachuca Cyn for 
Sinaloa wren, plus feeders at ash, Ramsey and Miller. 


3. Patagonia. Stay at Spirit Tree b&b. Visit Patons, Patagonia Lake, & San 
Rafael grasslands from there. 


4. Tubac: stay at golf course and watch the Black, Gray and Zone- tailed Hawks 
fly by at the ball field. Also visit Pena Blanca Lake from here, bird the De 
Anzac trail and visit Tumacacori. 


5. Madera. Stay at Chuparosa, Madera Kubo, or Santa Rita Lodge and bird Madera 
Cyn plus Florida Cyn for the Rufous-capped Warbler. 


Extra time drive to Buckeye west of Phoenix. Chase thrashers at the thrasher 
spot then drive back via Santa Cruz flats for Mtn Plovers, hawks and Caracara. 


Better yet hire Melody Kiehl, Gavin Bieber or Rich Fray.

Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

On Jan 16, 2016, at 11:35 AM, Patricia Burden  wrote:

> Hello birders,
> We are planning a trip to Tucson in mid-March. I know it might not be
> the absolute best time as far as migration goes, but it is a
> compromise with a non-birding traveler who wanted to go in February to
> get out of the cold.  I know this is a heavily birded area of the
> country, so I am asking for your input as far as where to stay (yes,
> we will consider and stay at a birding oriented B & B).  We are both
> 60+ and not in the best hiking shape for high mountain excursions, but
> do enjoy rambling walks.
> I would appreciate knowing about "don't miss" places in the area.  Our
> plans are very vague at the moment, but I think we would rather not
> stay in the city of Tucson more than a day or two.
> Thanks in advance for your input.
> Pat Burden
> Melvin & Yale, MI
>
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Subject: duluth birds
From: Jim <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 2016 16:53:09 -0600
Correction: the Duluth Ivory Gull was seen Friday but not Saturday.

Jim Williams
Wayzata, Minnesota

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Subject: Ivory Gull, kittiwakes in Duluth
From: Jim <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 2016 15:51:02 -0600
An email was just received reporting that two Black-legged Kittiwakes are being 
seen at the Ivory Gull location in Duluth. 

That email arrived as I was prepping this note:

An Ivory Gull once again is being seen at Canal Park in Duluth. Whether or not 
this is THE Ivory Gull seen and reported last week is unknown. It is an Ivory 
Gull, and it is a juvenile bird, as was the first one. 


The initial bird was found in late December. Hundreds of observers came to the 
park to see it. Concurrently, a second Ivory Gull was found dead in Superior, 
perhaps a mile as the gull flies from the park. Then the gull left Duluth, or 
at least was not seen for a couple of days. Next, a juvenile Ivory Gull was 
found in an Ely backyard. Ely is about 100 miles north of Duluth. That bird was 
captured, examined by a vet and found fit, released, and flew away. 


Now, the action has returned to Canal Park.

A Gyrfalcon continues to be seen in Superior on the Peavey grain elevator near 
Connor's Point. 


The temperature in Duluth at 3:45 p.m. Saturday is -5 degrees, windchill -28 . 
Predicted temp for Sunday is zero. 


Jim Williams
Wayzata, Minnesota
who saw the bird when the temp was +30.

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Subject: Winter: Murmuration Season For Starlings
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 2016 19:07:10 +0000
Hello everyone,

I thought you might enjoy reading a seasonally-appropriate piece about
birds, accompanied by a spectacular video:

Winter: Murmuration Season For Birds
http://onforb.es/206NE7s

Happy January,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
Forbes blog 
Evolution Institute blog

TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Tucson AZ and environs
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 2016 13:35:55 -0500
Hello birders,
We are planning a trip to Tucson in mid-March. I know it might not be
the absolute best time as far as migration goes, but it is a
compromise with a non-birding traveler who wanted to go in February to
get out of the cold.  I know this is a heavily birded area of the
country, so I am asking for your input as far as where to stay (yes,
we will consider and stay at a birding oriented B & B).  We are both
60+ and not in the best hiking shape for high mountain excursions, but
do enjoy rambling walks.
I would appreciate knowing about "don't miss" places in the area.  Our
plans are very vague at the moment, but I think we would rather not
stay in the city of Tucson more than a day or two.
Thanks in advance for your input.
Pat Burden
Melvin & Yale, MI

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Jan. 17, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 2016 07:49:04 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters!

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Why Do Owls Bob Their Heads?
http://bit.ly/1PmYGxD
* Sparrows Kick, Robins Pick
http://bit.ly/15ywZ5s
* Burrowing Snowbirds
http://bit.ly/1ZZrJPv
* 61 Tons of Robins!
http://bit.ly/1e34m0T
* Trogons Nest with Wasps
http://bit.ly/UUX7NC
* American Redstart - The Tale Is in the Tail
http://bit.ly/1loNYgI
* Men Who Stay, a poem by BirdNote writer, Todd Peterson
http://bit.ly/1Qchsg4
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1ST0y6J
----------------------------
Please let us know what shows appeal to you or don't -- and why.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Peter Wilkinson <pjw42 AT WAITROSE.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jan 2016 15:10:41 +0000
Yes, I had actually forgotten the Alpine (saw it about fifty years ago)
and Red-billed (last saw it 2008) Choughs. They are, of course, corvids,
but I'm not sure they are really crows, by which I personally tend to
mean the larger and more black species in the family.

Ron's White-billed Crow I knew not at all. Good looking bird.

Peter

On Thu, 2016-01-14 at 16:34 +0000, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
> The White-billed Crow of the Solomon Islands (Corvus woodfordi) comes even 
closer! see 
http://ibc.lynxeds.com/photo/white-billed-crow-corvus-woodfordi/adult-bird-perched-tree. 

>  Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>
>
>       From: Eran Tomer 
>  To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>  Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 5:17 PM
>  Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
>
> ​Alpine and Red-billed Choughs come close. Impressive birds, all the more
> so due to their striking habitats.
>
> It's easy to forget how visually remarkable this family is because the word
> "corvid" conjures all-black birds. But some ravens and crows are
> not unicolored, let alone the extraordinarily beautiful jays, magpies &
> relatives.
>
> Best regards,
>
> - Eran Tomer
>   Atlanta, Georgia, USA
>
> On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 10:13 AM, Peter Wilkinson 
> wrote:
> ​[snip]​
>
> Now, a yellow-billed crow or raven, why hasn't nature produced one of
> those? Might be pretty spectacular!
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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>
>
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Subject: "Rat Island" on the Aleutians is now Hawadax
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jan 2016 16:17:30 -0900
Hello Bird People,

Here is something those of you who have birded in the Alaskan Aleutians before 
might be interested in, or even if you haven’t birded there. =) 



http://www.adn.com/article/20160115/birds-are-returning-rodent-free-island-formerly-known-rat 


Happy mid-January.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska



"If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes." --Charles 
Lindbergh 



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Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 23:25:55 -0500
​Hi Paulo,

Since you raised the nomenclature issue, I can't resist mentioning two
funny examples:

- The cormorant genus Phalacrocorax means, "Bald Raven".

- One of the birds-of-paradise has the scary scientific name, Lycocorax
pyrrhopterus which means, "Fiery-winged Wolf-Raven". But to compensate it
has the flattering, amusing English name, Paradise Crow (so, there are
crows in paradise). This bird must have an identity crisis or a
split-personality disorder.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 2:06 PM, Paulo Boute  wrote:

> Hi Eran,
>
> I'm glad that you mentioned "corvid"...
>
> The scientific name of the Black-crowned Night-Heron, is Nycticorax
> nycticorax,
>
> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-crowned_Night-Heron/id
>
> Which would means:  "The Crow of the Night".
>
> It think it was named like that due its call...
>
> These are my (little) two cents...
>

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Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 16:06:24 -0300
Hi Eran,
I'm glad that you mentioned "corvid"...
The scientific name of the Black-crowned Night-Heron, is Nycticorax nycticorax, 

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-crowned_Night-Heron/id
Which would means:  "The Crow of the Night".
It think it was named like that due its call...
These are my (little) two cents...
Paulo Boute.



> Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 11:17:55 -0500
> From: erantomer AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> ​Alpine and Red-billed Choughs come close. Impressive birds, all the more
> so due to their striking habitats.
> 
> It's easy to forget how visually remarkable this family is because the word
> "corvid" conjures all-black birds. But some ravens and crows are
> not unicolored, let alone the extraordinarily beautiful jays, magpies &
> relatives.
> 
> Best regards,
> 
> - Eran Tomer
>   Atlanta, Georgia, USA
> 
> On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 10:13 AM, Peter Wilkinson 
> wrote:
> ​[snip]​
> 
> Now, a yellow-billed crow or raven, why hasn't nature produced one of
> those? Might be pretty spectacular!
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 16:34:29 +0000
The White-billed Crow of the Solomon Islands (Corvus woodfordi) comes even 
closer!  see 
http://ibc.lynxeds.com/photo/white-billed-crow-corvus-woodfordi/adult-bird-perched-tree. 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
 

      From: Eran Tomer 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 5:17 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
   
​Alpine and Red-billed Choughs come close. Impressive birds, all the more
so due to their striking habitats.

It's easy to forget how visually remarkable this family is because the word
"corvid" conjures all-black birds. But some ravens and crows are
not unicolored, let alone the extraordinarily beautiful jays, magpies &
relatives.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 10:13 AM, Peter Wilkinson 
wrote:
​[snip]​

Now, a yellow-billed crow or raven, why hasn't nature produced one of
those? Might be pretty spectacular!

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Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 11:17:55 -0500
​Alpine and Red-billed Choughs come close. Impressive birds, all the more
so due to their striking habitats.

It's easy to forget how visually remarkable this family is because the word
"corvid" conjures all-black birds. But some ravens and crows are
not unicolored, let alone the extraordinarily beautiful jays, magpies &
relatives.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 10:13 AM, Peter Wilkinson 
wrote:
​[snip]​

Now, a yellow-billed crow or raven, why hasn't nature produced one of
those? Might be pretty spectacular!

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Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 11:01:32 -0500
And I have no real problem with that (although I'd prefer that cartoon animals 
be more accurate...I've even gone so far as to think, back in the day, of 
trying to use my ability as a bird artist blended with my then-hobby of 
cartooning, to create "realistic" cartoon, species-specific birds.) 


But I have a big problem with children's book illustrators who unnecessarily 
take such liberties in illustrating books for kids. By all means give them 
anthropomorphic characteristics or match them to the rest of the art, if 
necessary, but not arbitrarily, not without reference to what the animal 
otherwise looks like. 


A good example of what I deem the right way would be the work of Beatrice 
Potter. Yep...the bunny may wear a waistcoat but darn...it's a properly drawn 
rabbit. Of course she was a skilled nature artist in her own right, alas adrift 
in a misogynist world, but she sure set a great standard for that kind of art. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Erickson 

Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 9:51 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle

I wrote to Disney in the 80s regarding why they showed the raven in Sleeping 
Beauty and the crows in Dumbo have yellow bills. I asked specifically if they 
had been inspired by the Yellow-billed Magpie. I ended up corresponding briefly 
with Ward Kimball, the actual animator who designed those birds, said that to 
his knowledge not one of the animators had ever heard of a Yellow-billed 
Magpie. He said, "We exercise artistic license, and yellow looks very good with 
black. We're not ornithologists, and we go with whatever looks good and reads 
best against our backgrounds." 

He said black bills get lost in shadows and they could show expression better 
with yellow. He also remarked that no one had ever asked that question before. 


Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 7:10 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:

> Only if they lived in or near Central California.
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [mailto:
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein
> Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 3:40 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
>
> Please be specific.  Presumably they are Yellow-billed Magpies? Ronald
> Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>
>
>       From: Laura Erickson 
>  To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>  Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 7:01 AM
>  Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
>
> Heckle and Jeckle were, indeed, magpies. Wikipedia is especially
> useful for this kind of thing. On the illustration, you can see a
> paler underside--cartoonists never did seem to get bird markings quite right.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckle_and_Jeckle
>
> Best, Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 11:20 PM, Joyanne Hamilton
> 
> wrote:
>
> > Hello Bird People,
> >
> > Last week I sent out bird feeders to schools in our district that
> > were donated by Bird Sleuth, a very popular bird lesson data
> > gathering site for teachers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.
> > They sent me feeders last fall for each of the schools in our
> > district for data gathering bird counts we might be involved in this year.
> >
> > We have a new teacher in our district from the east coast who just
> > went in to his village school, going through Anchorage on the way.
> > He asked me about a black and white bird that looked like a crow. I
> > started wondering if there were any leucistic crows in Anchorage
> > until I asked him for other clues. Did it have a long tail? Yes it
> > had a long
> tail.
> >
> > I then sent him a photo of our Magpie.  He said that was the one.  I
> > had to chuckle. He said, “I am from the Heckle and Jeckle generation.
> > I thought Magpies were all black.”
> >
> > I got to thinking, what species of bird, if any, were Heckle and Jeckle?
> > I can’t remember. I guess I assumed they were Crows!
> >
> > Fun topic, cartoon birds.
> >
> > Thanks for the help.
> >
> > Joyanne Hamilton
> > Shageluk, Alaska
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> >
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
> the winter.
>
>             --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature--the 
assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter. 


            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Peter Wilkinson <pjw42 AT WAITROSE.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 15:13:03 +0000
I love it! Art following nature!

I have to confess that I have reached a stage of life where I am really
no longer much fussed about what birds I do or don't see, but
Yellow-billed Magpie is on the list of birds I would quite like to see
if I ever get to go where they are. Black-billed Magpie (the Eurasian
one, I can't keep up with potential splits) I see every day in my garden
(yard), and have banded around 150 of them over the years.

Now, a yellow-billed crow or raven, why hasn't nature produced one of
those? Might be pretty spectacular!

Peter
England

On Thu, 2016-01-14 at 08:50 -0600, Laura Erickson wrote:
> I wrote to Disney in the 80s regarding why they showed the raven in
> Sleeping Beauty and the crows in Dumbo have yellow bills. I asked
> specifically if they had been inspired by the Yellow-billed Magpie. I ended
> up corresponding briefly with Ward Kimball, the actual animator who
> designed those birds, said that to his knowledge not one of the animators
> had ever heard of a Yellow-billed Magpie. He said, "We exercise artistic
> license, and yellow looks very good with black. We're not ornithologists,
> and we go with whatever looks good and reads best against our backgrounds."
> He said black bills get lost in shadows and they could show expression
> better with yellow. He also remarked that no one had ever asked that
> question before.
>
> Best, Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 7:10 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>
> > Only if they lived in or near Central California.
> >
> >
> > Barry Kent MacKay
> > Bird Artist, Illustrator
> > Studio: (905)-472-9731
> > http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> > mimus AT sympatico.ca
> > Markham, Ontario, Canada
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [mailto:
> > BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein
> > Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 3:40 AM
> > To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
> >
> > Please be specific.  Presumably they are Yellow-billed Magpies? Ronald
> > Orenstein
> > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> > Canada
> > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> > ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
> >
> >
> >       From: Laura Erickson 
> >  To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> >  Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 7:01 AM
> >  Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
> >
> > Heckle and Jeckle were, indeed, magpies. Wikipedia is especially useful
> > for this kind of thing. On the illustration, you can see a paler
> > underside--cartoonists never did seem to get bird markings quite right.
> >
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckle_and_Jeckle
> >
> > Best, Laura Erickson
> > Duluth, MN
> >
> > On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 11:20 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Hello Bird People,
> > >
> > > Last week I sent out bird feeders to schools in our district that were
> > > donated by Bird Sleuth, a very popular bird lesson data gathering site
> > > for teachers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  They sent me
> > > feeders last fall for each of the schools in our district for data
> > > gathering bird counts we might be involved in this year.
> > >
> > > We have a new teacher in our district from the east coast who just
> > > went in to his village school, going through Anchorage on the way. He
> > > asked me about a black and white bird that looked like a crow. I
> > > started wondering if there were any leucistic crows in Anchorage until
> > > I asked him for other clues. Did it have a long tail? Yes it had a long
> > tail.
> > >
> > > I then sent him a photo of our Magpie.  He said that was the one.  I
> > > had to chuckle. He said, “I am from the Heckle and Jeckle generation.
> > > I thought Magpies were all black.”
> > >
> > > I got to thinking, what species of bird, if any, were Heckle and Jeckle?
> > > I can’t remember. I guess I assumed they were Crows!
> > >
> > > Fun topic, cartoon birds.
> > >
> > > Thanks for the help.
> > >
> > > Joyanne Hamilton
> > > Shageluk, Alaska
> > >
> > > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > --
> > Laura Erickson
> >
> > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
> >
> > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> > winter.
> >
> >             --Rachel Carson
> >
> > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> >
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> >
>
>
>
> --

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 16:03:56 +0100
What should Donald Trump be called?

Ronald Orenstein 
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Jan 14, 2016, at 2:23 PM, Paulo Boute  wrote:
> 
> Hello!
> 
> The Portugues version of wikipedia, call them "gralhas" = Jays(!):
> 
> https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckle_and_Jeckle
> 
> Just to remind that there is also a debate if, Donald Duck should be called 
Donald Teal, due the "cocked" tail and other characteristics that has nothing 
to do with a Muscovy Duck, for example. 

> 
> Yours,
> 
> Paulo Boute.
> Fergus, ON - Canada.
> 
> 
> 

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 08:50:54 -0600
I wrote to Disney in the 80s regarding why they showed the raven in
Sleeping Beauty and the crows in Dumbo have yellow bills. I asked
specifically if they had been inspired by the Yellow-billed Magpie. I ended
up corresponding briefly with Ward Kimball, the actual animator who
designed those birds, said that to his knowledge not one of the animators
had ever heard of a Yellow-billed Magpie. He said, "We exercise artistic
license, and yellow looks very good with black. We're not ornithologists,
and we go with whatever looks good and reads best against our backgrounds."
He said black bills get lost in shadows and they could show expression
better with yellow. He also remarked that no one had ever asked that
question before.

Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Thu, Jan 14, 2016 at 7:10 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:

> Only if they lived in or near Central California.
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [mailto:
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein
> Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 3:40 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
>
> Please be specific.  Presumably they are Yellow-billed Magpies? Ronald
> Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
>
>
>       From: Laura Erickson 
>  To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>  Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 7:01 AM
>  Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
>
> Heckle and Jeckle were, indeed, magpies. Wikipedia is especially useful
> for this kind of thing. On the illustration, you can see a paler
> underside--cartoonists never did seem to get bird markings quite right.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckle_and_Jeckle
>
> Best, Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 11:20 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
> wrote:
>
> > Hello Bird People,
> >
> > Last week I sent out bird feeders to schools in our district that were
> > donated by Bird Sleuth, a very popular bird lesson data gathering site
> > for teachers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  They sent me
> > feeders last fall for each of the schools in our district for data
> > gathering bird counts we might be involved in this year.
> >
> > We have a new teacher in our district from the east coast who just
> > went in to his village school, going through Anchorage on the way. He
> > asked me about a black and white bird that looked like a crow. I
> > started wondering if there were any leucistic crows in Anchorage until
> > I asked him for other clues. Did it have a long tail? Yes it had a long
> tail.
> >
> > I then sent him a photo of our Magpie.  He said that was the one.  I
> > had to chuckle. He said, “I am from the Heckle and Jeckle generation.
> > I thought Magpies were all black.”
> >
> > I got to thinking, what species of bird, if any, were Heckle and Jeckle?
> > I can’t remember. I guess I assumed they were Crows!
> >
> > Fun topic, cartoon birds.
> >
> > Thanks for the help.
> >
> > Joyanne Hamilton
> > Shageluk, Alaska
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> >
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>             --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 08:10:12 -0500
Only if they lived in or near Central California.


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein 

Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 3:40 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle

Please be specific. Presumably they are Yellow-billed Magpies? Ronald Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com


      From: Laura Erickson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
 Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 7:01 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle

Heckle and Jeckle were, indeed, magpies. Wikipedia is especially useful for 
this kind of thing. On the illustration, you can see a paler 
underside--cartoonists never did seem to get bird markings quite right. 


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckle_and_Jeckle

Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 11:20 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
wrote:

> Hello Bird People,
>
> Last week I sent out bird feeders to schools in our district that were
> donated by Bird Sleuth, a very popular bird lesson data gathering site
> for teachers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  They sent me
> feeders last fall for each of the schools in our district for data
> gathering bird counts we might be involved in this year.
>
> We have a new teacher in our district from the east coast who just
> went in to his village school, going through Anchorage on the way. He
> asked me about a black and white bird that looked like a crow. I
> started wondering if there were any leucistic crows in Anchorage until
> I asked him for other clues. Did it have a long tail? Yes it had a long tail.
>
> I then sent him a photo of our Magpie.  He said that was the one.  I
> had to chuckle. He said, “I am from the Heckle and Jeckle generation.
> I thought Magpies were all black.”
>
> I got to thinking, what species of bird, if any, were Heckle and Jeckle?
> I can’t remember. I guess I assumed they were Crows!
>
> Fun topic, cartoon birds.
>
> Thanks for the help.
>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature--the 
assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter. 


            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 08:40:28 +0000
Please be specific.  Presumably they are Yellow-billed Magpies? Ronald 
Orenstein 

1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
 

      From: Laura Erickson 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 7:01 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Heckle and Jeckle
   
Heckle and Jeckle were, indeed, magpies. Wikipedia is especially useful for
this kind of thing. On the illustration, you can see a paler
underside--cartoonists never did seem to get bird markings quite right.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckle_and_Jeckle

Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 11:20 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
wrote:

> Hello Bird People,
>
> Last week I sent out bird feeders to schools in our district that were
> donated by Bird Sleuth, a very popular bird lesson data gathering site for
> teachers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  They sent me feeders last
> fall for each of the schools in our district for data gathering bird counts
> we might be involved in this year.
>
> We have a new teacher in our district from the east coast who just went in
> to his village school, going through Anchorage on the way. He asked me
> about a black and white bird that looked like a crow. I started wondering
> if there were any leucistic crows in Anchorage until I asked him for other
> clues. Did it have a long tail? Yes it had a long tail.
>
> I then sent him a photo of our Magpie.  He said that was the one.  I had
> to chuckle. He said, “I am from the Heckle and Jeckle generation. I thought
> Magpies were all black.”
>
> I got to thinking, what species of bird, if any, were Heckle and Jeckle?
> I can’t remember. I guess I assumed they were Crows!
>
> Fun topic, cartoon birds.
>
> Thanks for the help.
>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jan 2016 00:01:04 -0600
Heckle and Jeckle were, indeed, magpies. Wikipedia is especially useful for
this kind of thing. On the illustration, you can see a paler
underside--cartoonists never did seem to get bird markings quite right.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckle_and_Jeckle

Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 11:20 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
wrote:

> Hello Bird People,
>
> Last week I sent out bird feeders to schools in our district that were
> donated by Bird Sleuth, a very popular bird lesson data gathering site for
> teachers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.  They sent me feeders last
> fall for each of the schools in our district for data gathering bird counts
> we might be involved in this year.
>
> We have a new teacher in our district from the east coast who just went in
> to his village school, going through Anchorage on the way. He asked me
> about a black and white bird that looked like a crow. I started wondering
> if there were any leucistic crows in Anchorage until I asked him for other
> clues. Did it have a long tail? Yes it had a long tail.
>
> I then sent him a photo of our Magpie.  He said that was the one.  I had
> to chuckle. He said, “I am from the Heckle and Jeckle generation. I thought
> Magpies were all black.”
>
> I got to thinking, what species of bird, if any, were Heckle and Jeckle?
> I can’t remember. I guess I assumed they were Crows!
>
> Fun topic, cartoon birds.
>
> Thanks for the help.
>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Heckle and Jeckle
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 2016 20:20:29 -0900
Hello Bird People,

Last week I sent out bird feeders to schools in our district that were donated 
by Bird Sleuth, a very popular bird lesson data gathering site for teachers 
from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. They sent me feeders last fall for each of 
the schools in our district for data gathering bird counts we might be involved 
in this year. 


We have a new teacher in our district from the east coast who just went in to 
his village school, going through Anchorage on the way. He asked me about a 
black and white bird that looked like a crow. I started wondering if there were 
any leucistic crows in Anchorage until I asked him for other clues. Did it have 
a long tail? Yes it had a long tail. 


I then sent him a photo of our Magpie. He said that was the one. I had to 
chuckle. He said, “I am from the Heckle and Jeckle generation. I thought 
Magpies were all black.” 


I got to thinking, what species of bird, if any, were Heckle and Jeckle? I 
can’t remember. I guess I assumed they were Crows! 


Fun topic, cartoon birds.

Thanks for the help.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Sapsucker sap wells on maple tree (Photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 2016 19:15:42 -0500
Looked out my living room window this morning and saw fresh sap oozing from
a neatly drilled row of holes on a nearby maple tree. About ten feet above
the ground. I've seen Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers on this tree and adjacent
trees in past winters. Looks like the work of a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker to
me:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24049031360/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: top-14-bird-photographers-world-achievements-goals
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Jan 2016 17:27:45 -0300
Sharing:

http://www.naturephotographysimplified.com/bird-photography/top-14-bird-photographers-world-achievements-goals/ 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.Fergus, ON- Canada.


                                          
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 7 Jan 2016 to 8 Jan 2016 (#2016-7)
From: Dennis Burnette <deburnette AT TRIAD.RR.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 2016 09:13:35 -0500
Burt,

I have offered beginning birder workshops for our local Audubon chapter three 
different years, including this year. I do a 45 minute classroom portion 
followed by about 45 minutes on a bird walk to practice skills. We don't use 
any books, relying on the images in my PowerPoint presentations and in field 
guides the participants bring for class and bird walk information. Typically, I 
do a session in autumn, winter and spring/early summer, each session with 
different content. A participant can take one, two or all three without 
repeating a lot of the same material. 


I'm aware that a birding colleague does an actual beginning birder class as an 
extension course through the local community college for the Audubon chapter in 
the county to our west. He does it one evening a week for most weeks during the 
semester with weekend bird walks to practice. I don't know if he uses books. 


Hope this helps.

Dennis Burnette
Greensboro, Guilford County, NC

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 9, 2016, at 1:00 AM, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system 
 wrote: 

>
> There is 1 message totalling 22 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>  1. Birding classes
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Fri, 8 Jan 2016 23:12:17 +0000
> From:    "Guttman, Burt" 
> Subject: Birding classes
>
> Dear Chatters,
> You may be surprised to see my name reappear after a long time, during which 
I’ve been receiving Birdchat messages but haven’t felt up to participating 
in any discussions. (For some time, I’ve been doing relatively little 
birding, trying to work on some broad environmental issues and other stuff.) 
But I hope you’ll recall that my book about how to get started in birding, 
Finding Your Wings, was published as part of the Peterson Field Guide series in 
2008, and a few of you very kindly helped to make it the good book that I think 
it is. ABA Sales and other people, such as some environmental websites, have 
said very nice things about it, and why it hasn’t sold more has been 
something of a mystery. Houghton-Mifflin dropped the book, and I’m now 
talking to folks at another publishing company about picking it up and 
producing a new edition. So now I have what I think is an interesting question: 
Does your local organization (Audubon Society, birding club, whatev! 

 er) give occas!
> ional courses on how to get started in birding, or on learning more even if 
you've started? If so, how many folks take such a course each year, and what 
books or other publications do you use for such courses? (And, very quietly, 
did you ever try mine?) I’d love to hear from any of you and would be very 
grateful for your information. 

> Cheers and best wishes,
> Burt Guttman
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 7 Jan 2016 to 8 Jan 2016 (#2016-7)
> ***********************************************************

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Subject: rfi Edmonton
From: Terry Witt <terrywitt AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 2016 13:18:25 +0000
I noticed the recent posting re the Edmonton Gyrfalcon, and am planning a try 
later this month 

There are 5 other birds in the area that I would also very much like to see:
Any info much appreciated (feeder locations, etc)
Gray PartridgeGreat Gray OwlBlack-backed WoodpeckerBohemian WaxwingHoary 
Redpoll 

Feel free to reply on the net or personally
Thanks in advance
Terry WittMurfreesboro Tennessee

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Jan. 10, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jan 2016 05:09:31 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters!

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Winter Wren in a Carolina Cathedral
-- With sounds recorded by Gordon Hempton
http://bit.ly/1ekdtdK
* Capuchinbirds - What a strange sound...
http://bit.ly/1PauHZQ
* Downy Woodpeckers, Far and Wide
http://bit.ly/Z2zcjW
* Screech-Owls Are Looking for a Home
-- And you can help
http://bit.ly/1TDAAT8
* The Secret Stash of Eggshell
http://bit.ly/1kNIuNw
* Winter Brings Falcons
http://bit.ly/1hnHEn4
* Attu and Its Island-hopping Rock Ptarmigan
http://bit.ly/Tvh26I
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1SF8mZY
----------------------------
Please let us know what shows appeal to you -- or don't -- and why.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Birding classes
From: "Guttman, Burt" <GuttmanB AT EVERGREEN.EDU>
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 2016 23:12:17 +0000
Dear Chatters,
You may be surprised to see my name reappear after a long time, during which 
Ive been receiving Birdchat messages but havent felt up to participating in 
any discussions. (For some time, Ive been doing relatively little birding, 
trying to work on some broad environmental issues and other stuff.) But I hope 
youll recall that my book about how to get started in birding, Finding Your 
Wings, was published as part of the Peterson Field Guide series in 2008, and a 
few of you very kindly helped to make it the good book that I think it is. ABA 
Sales and other people, such as some environmental websites, have said very 
nice things about it, and why it hasnt sold more has been something of a 
mystery. Houghton-Mifflin dropped the book, and Im now talking to folks at 
another publishing company about picking it up and producing a new edition. So 
now I have what I think is an interesting question: Does your local 
organization (Audubon Society, birding club, whatever) give occas! 

 ional courses on how to get started in birding, or on learning more even if 
you've started? If so, how many folks take such a course each year, and what 
books or other publications do you use for such courses? (And, very quietly, 
did you ever try mine?) Id love to hear from any of you and would be very 
grateful for your information. 

Cheers and best wishes,
Burt Guttman

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

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Subject: Fw: SIGN: This bird is a piece of history
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2016 14:22:55 +0000
From: "Aaron V., Care2 Action Alerts" 


 To: Ronald Orenstein  
 Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2016 8:07 AM
 Subject: SIGN: This bird is a piece of history
   
 #yiv6834229200 html, #yiv6834229200 body 
{padding:0;margin:0;background:#e2e2e2;}#yiv6834229200  AT media screen and 
(){#yiv6834229200 #yiv6834229200mainTable .filtered99999 {width:100%;}} AT media 
screen and ( _filtered_a ){#yiv6834229200 #yiv6834229200mainTable 
.filtered99999 {width:100%;}} AT media screen and ( _filtered_a ){#yiv6834229200 
#yiv6834229200mainTable .filtered99999 {width:100%;}}#yiv6834229200 The Tinian 
monarch survived a WWII onslaught on its habitat, but without Endangered 
Species Act protections, that habitat could be developed quickly. Sign the 
Care2 petition urging the Fish and Wildlife Service to keep the bird and its 
habitat safe for future generations today! 

| 
|  
|    |    |

    
|    |

  A World War II Legacy: Protect the Tinian monarch!  
|    |

 
|  
|   Sign Sue Lee's Petition   |

  |

 
|    |

 
| | Ronald, The small, South Pacific island of Tinian played a unique role in 
history. It was the site of a huge battle with the Japanese, and once Allied 
forces claimed the island, they built the largest airbase in World War II. The 
base then launched both atomic bomb missions. Nearly lost to the massive 
deforestation required to build the base is an interesting little warbler, with 
a vocalization that makes it sound like a squeaky dog toy. The Tinian monarch 
recovered from World War II's impacts, but is on the brink of disappearing into 
history again. Sign the Care2 petition urging Fish & Wildlife to take action 
and to protect this bird today. Between 1996 and 2008 the Tinian monarch 
population declined by 40% - and currently over 2,000 acres of these birds' 
dwindling habitat is planned to be logged, developed, and used for military 
training. The bird only lives on one island - it's critical that the Tinian 
monarch be relisted under the Endangered Species Act. The loss of their habitat 
is imminent, so we need to act now! Sign Sue Lee's Care2 petition to the Fish 
and Wildlife Service today, and urge them to relist this special, historic 
bird. Thanks for taking action! 

|  |   |  Aaron V.
 The Care2 Petitions Team  |

  |  |

 
|    |

 
|    |

 |

 |



To stop receiving this newsletter, visit: 
http://www.care2.com/newsletters/unsub/11/0/36805313/39af5bb3 

or send a blank email message to:
ng-u-11-36805313-8666732-13248035-4102b123 AT australia.care2.com 

Care2.com, Inc.
275 Shoreline Drive, Suite 300
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http://www.care2.com



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Subject: Edmonton rail yard becomes roost for rare falcons
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2016 08:12:03 -0500
Anyone want to see a Gyrfalcon where there are good hotels and easy air
access?   Apparently you should head for Edmonton.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/edmonton-rail-yard-becomes-roost-for-
rare-falcons-1.3389863

Happy New Year and good birding one and all.

Barry



Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada






__,_._,___


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Subject: Re: RFI - Birding South Korea
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2016 13:31:22 -0300
Hi David,
I found this:
http://www.birdingpal.org/Korea.htm
Yours,
Paulo Boute.Kearny, NJ.


                                          
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Subject: Re: RFI - Birding South Korea
From: Stephen Elliott <steve_elliott2000 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2016 09:06:39 +0000
Hi there

I have done a birding trip to Korea and I would recommend Nial Moores who is an 
English birder who has lived there many years 


His Blog and contact details are here

http://www.birdskoreablog.org/?author=14

regards
Steve

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of David Starrett 
 

Sent: 06 January 2016 03:37
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI - Birding South Korea

Fellow birders,
It works out that I will be attending a family wedding in South Korea at the 
end of May. We are still laying out the schedule, but it looks promising for 
devoting a day, maybe two, to birding. I did some poking around on the web. 
Birding seems in its infancy in Korea, but growing. I found a few leads. 

My question to the list: Does anyone have experience birding in S Korea (We'd 
be in Seoul area)? Suggestions for good field guide? (I have both the Robson 
and Brazil guides for SE Asia). Suggestions for birding guides? (Nial Moores 
seems to be on the top of the list?) 

Thanks in advance fr any leads anyone can provide.
Dave



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Columbia, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


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Subject: RFI - Birding South Korea
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 21:37:56 -0600
Fellow birders,
It works out that I will be attending a family wedding in South Korea at the 
end of May. We are still laying out the schedule, but it looks promising for 
devoting a day, maybe two, to birding. I did some poking around on the web. 
Birding seems in its infancy in Korea, but growing. I found a few leads. 

My question to the list: Does anyone have experience birding in S Korea (We'd 
be in Seoul area)? Suggestions for good field guide? (I have both the Robson 
and Brazil guides for SE Asia). Suggestions for birding guides? (Nial Moores 
seems to be on the top of the list?) 

Thanks in advance fr any leads anyone can provide.
Dave

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Columbia, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                                          
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Subject: Lecture Invitation.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 20:10:24 -0300
Hello!
I would you like to invite the members of the Birdchat for my lecture & Power 
Point Presentation, on Jan. 20th. at the Queens Bird Club. 

More info. at:

 www.qcbirdclub.org
 or 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1389229044654726/
Yours,
Paulo Boute


                                          
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Subject: Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 13:46:26 -0800
Hi all,

I quite liked the Portland Audubon statement and appreciated
the link.  What seems most astonishing to me is this claim:

> "mostly insignificant resources at Malheur" (from paragraph below)

Mostly insignificant??????????????

Mitch Heindel
Utopia Texas

On 2016-01-05 10:38, Jerry Tangren wrote:
> Just a note, the moderators can slap me down. However, I believe it is
> within the guidelines of BirdChat to not distribute information of a
> political nature. By highlighting the takeover of mostly insignificant
> resources at Malheur you are only granting publicity to their cause.
> --Jerry TangrenEast Wenatchee, WA> Date: Tue,
> 5 Jan 2016 18:22:16 +0930

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Subject: Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur
From: Jerry Tangren <kloshewoods AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 22:01:47 +0000
Sorry I opened my mouth; the less said about this the better; they didn't take 
over the whole refuge as many of you seem to believe. Furthermore, if you 
people make a big deal about this, then throw out all the birdchat rules, and 
I'm gone! 

--JT> Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 13:46:26 -0800
> From: mitch AT utopianature.com
> To: kloshewoods AT outlook.com
> CC: BIRDCHAT AT listserv.ksu.edu
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> I quite liked the Portland Audubon statement and appreciated
> the link.  What seems most astonishing to me is this claim:
> 
> > "mostly insignificant resources at Malheur" (from paragraph below)
> 
> Mostly insignificant??????????????
> 
> Mitch Heindel
> Utopia Texas
> 
> On 2016-01-05 10:38, Jerry Tangren wrote:
> > Just a note, the moderators can slap me down. However, I believe it is
> > within the guidelines of BirdChat to not distribute information of a
> > political nature. By highlighting the takeover of mostly insignificant
> > resources at Malheur you are only granting publicity to their cause.
> > --Jerry TangrenEast Wenatchee, WA> Date: Tue,
> > 5 Jan 2016 18:22:16 +0930
> 
> 
                                          
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Subject: Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 18:58:46 +0000
I don't want to engage in political debate here, but I believe that Devorah has 
done us a service by drawing our attention to this piece.  It clarifies facts 
about the founding and purpose of a major wildlife refuge of great importance 
to birds, and as such provides valuable information (not likely to be 
highlighted in the media) that should be borne in mind whatever one's view of 
the issues involved. 

Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
 

      From: Jerry Tangren 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, January 5, 2016 1:38 PM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur 
occupation by terrorists 

   
Just a note, the moderators can slap me down. However, I believe it is within 
the guidelines of BirdChat to not distribute information of a political nature. 
By highlighting the takeover of mostly insignificant resources at Malheur you 
are only granting publicity to their cause. 

--Jerry TangrenEast Wenatchee, WA> Date: Tue, 5 Jan 
2016 18:22:16 +0930 

> From: bgosford AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur 
occupation by terrorists 

> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Devorah,
> 
> I have taken the liberty of re-posting Bob Sallinger's piece at my Crikey
> blog, The Northern Myth so that Australians (and more) might realise the
> travesty that these fools have wrought.
> 
> See here:
> 
http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/2016/01/05/why-malheur-nwr-matters-and-armed-out-of-state-militia-groups-dont/ 

> 
> Thanks for passing this important note on.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Bob Gosford,
> Alice Springs,
> Australia
> 
> On 5 January 2016 at 16:43, Devorah the Ornithologist  > wrote:
> 
> > hello everyone,
> >
> > this important statement has been published by the Portland Audubon
> > Society. It does something that no one in the media has so far done: it
> > reminds the public of the historic reasons for the establishment of Malheur
> > and other national wildlife refuges, and states how the terrorists' stated
> > objectives are at odds with decades of collaboration and work by vast
> > numbers of people across communities:
> >
> >
> > 
http://audubonportland.org/news/audubon-society-of-portland-statement-on-the-occupation-of-malheur-national-wildlife-refuge 

> >
> > I, for one, am grateful that Portland Audubon has decisively stepped
> > forward with such an informative statement, and has shifted some of the
> > focus away from a self-proclaimed gang of "patriots" and back onto the
> > birds, the wildlife, and the environment that is protected by the national
> > park and refuge system for future generations to experience and enjoy.
> >
> > --
> > GrrlScientist
> > Devorah Bennu, PhD
> > birdologist AT gmail.com
> > twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
> > Forbes blog 
> > Evolution Institute blog
> > 
> > TinyLetter 
> > sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> >
> 
> 
> 
> --
> Bob Gosford
> Crikey.com
> The Northern Myth blog
> http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/
> Alice Springs, NT
> Australia
> Ph: (+61) 0447024968
> Twitter:  AT bgosford
> "The NT Government does not respond to random electronic gossip sites."
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
                                          
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Subject: Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 11:16:31 -0800
Interesting point, Jerry, though it's not much of a leap to note that the 
occupation of the refuge has a direct negative impact on the birds already 
there and others soon to use the Pac Flyway. Normal refuge operations are 
likely shut down fully or mostly. 


If we're discussing birds and issues impacting them, why would this topic be 
off-limits? 


Good birding to all in 2016,

Oscar Canino
SF, CA

> On Jan 5, 2016, at 10:38 AM, Jerry Tangren  wrote:
>
> Just a note, the moderators can slap me down. However, I believe it is within 
the guidelines of BirdChat to not distribute information of a political nature. 
By highlighting the takeover of mostly insignificant resources at Malheur you 
are only granting publicity to their cause. 

> --Jerry TangrenEast Wenatchee, WA> Date: Tue, 5 Jan 
2016 18:22:16 +0930 

>> From: bgosford AT GMAIL.COM
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur 
occupation by terrorists 

>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>
>> Devorah,
>>
>> I have taken the liberty of re-posting Bob Sallinger's piece at my Crikey
>> blog, The Northern Myth so that Australians (and more) might realise the
>> travesty that these fools have wrought.
>>
>> See here:
>> 
http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/2016/01/05/why-malheur-nwr-matters-and-armed-out-of-state-militia-groups-dont/ 

>>
>> Thanks for passing this important note on.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Bob Gosford,
>> Alice Springs,
>> Australia
>>
>> On 5 January 2016 at 16:43, Devorah the Ornithologist >> wrote:
>>
>>> hello everyone,
>>>
>>> this important statement has been published by the Portland Audubon
>>> Society. It does something that no one in the media has so far done: it
>>> reminds the public of the historic reasons for the establishment of Malheur
>>> and other national wildlife refuges, and states how the terrorists' stated
>>> objectives are at odds with decades of collaboration and work by vast
>>> numbers of people across communities:
>>>
>>>
>>> 
http://audubonportland.org/news/audubon-society-of-portland-statement-on-the-occupation-of-malheur-national-wildlife-refuge 

>>>
>>> I, for one, am grateful that Portland Audubon has decisively stepped
>>> forward with such an informative statement, and has shifted some of the
>>> focus away from a self-proclaimed gang of "patriots" and back onto the
>>> birds, the wildlife, and the environment that is protected by the national
>>> park and refuge system for future generations to experience and enjoy.
>>>
>>> --
>>> GrrlScientist
>>> Devorah Bennu, PhD
>>> birdologist AT gmail.com
>>> twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
>>> Forbes blog 
>>> Evolution Institute blog
>>> 
>>> TinyLetter 
>>> sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Bob Gosford
>> Crikey.com
>> The Northern Myth blog
>> http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/
>> Alice Springs, NT
>> Australia
>> Ph: (+61) 0447024968
>> Twitter:  AT bgosford
>> "The NT Government does not respond to random electronic gossip sites."
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu

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Subject: Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists
From: Jerry Tangren <kloshewoods AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 18:38:40 +0000
Just a note, the moderators can slap me down. However, I believe it is within 
the guidelines of BirdChat to not distribute information of a political nature. 
By highlighting the takeover of mostly insignificant resources at Malheur you 
are only granting publicity to their cause. 

--Jerry TangrenEast Wenatchee, WA> Date: Tue, 5 Jan 
2016 18:22:16 +0930 

> From: bgosford AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur 
occupation by terrorists 

> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Devorah,
> 
> I have taken the liberty of re-posting Bob Sallinger's piece at my Crikey
> blog, The Northern Myth so that Australians (and more) might realise the
> travesty that these fools have wrought.
> 
> See here:
> 
http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/2016/01/05/why-malheur-nwr-matters-and-armed-out-of-state-militia-groups-dont/ 

> 
> Thanks for passing this important note on.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Bob Gosford,
> Alice Springs,
> Australia
> 
> On 5 January 2016 at 16:43, Devorah the Ornithologist  > wrote:
> 
> > hello everyone,
> >
> > this important statement has been published by the Portland Audubon
> > Society. It does something that no one in the media has so far done: it
> > reminds the public of the historic reasons for the establishment of Malheur
> > and other national wildlife refuges, and states how the terrorists' stated
> > objectives are at odds with decades of collaboration and work by vast
> > numbers of people across communities:
> >
> >
> > 
http://audubonportland.org/news/audubon-society-of-portland-statement-on-the-occupation-of-malheur-national-wildlife-refuge 

> >
> > I, for one, am grateful that Portland Audubon has decisively stepped
> > forward with such an informative statement, and has shifted some of the
> > focus away from a self-proclaimed gang of "patriots" and back onto the
> > birds, the wildlife, and the environment that is protected by the national
> > park and refuge system for future generations to experience and enjoy.
> >
> > --
> > GrrlScientist
> > Devorah Bennu, PhD
> > birdologist AT gmail.com
> > twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
> > Forbes blog 
> > Evolution Institute blog
> > 
> > TinyLetter 
> > sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> > List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
> >
> 
> 
> 
> --
> Bob Gosford
> Crikey.com
> The Northern Myth blog
> http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/
> Alice Springs, NT
> Australia
> Ph: (+61) 0447024968
> Twitter:  AT bgosford
> "The NT Government does not respond to random electronic gossip sites."
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
                                          
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Portland Audubon statement regarding Malheur occupation by terrorists
From: Bob Gosford <bgosford AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2016 18:22:16 +0930
Devorah,

I have taken the liberty of re-posting Bob Sallinger's piece at my Crikey
blog, The Northern Myth so that Australians (and more) might realise the
travesty that these fools have wrought.

See here:

http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/2016/01/05/why-malheur-nwr-matters-and-armed-out-of-state-militia-groups-dont/ 


Thanks for passing this important note on.

Cheers,

Bob Gosford,
Alice Springs,
Australia

On 5 January 2016 at 16:43, Devorah the Ornithologist  wrote:

> hello everyone,
>
> this important statement has been published by the Portland Audubon
> Society. It does something that no one in the media has so far done: it
> reminds the public of the historic reasons for the establishment of Malheur
> and other national wildlife refuges, and states how the terrorists' stated
> objectives are at odds with decades of collaboration and work by vast
> numbers of people across communities:
>
>
> 
http://audubonportland.org/news/audubon-society-of-portland-statement-on-the-occupation-of-malheur-national-wildlife-refuge 

>
> I, for one, am grateful that Portland Audubon has decisively stepped
> forward with such an informative statement, and has shifted some of the
> focus away from a self-proclaimed gang of "patriots" and back onto the
> birds, the wildlife, and the environment that is protected by the national
> park and refuge system for future generations to experience and enjoy.
>
> --
> GrrlScientist
> Devorah Bennu, PhD
> birdologist AT gmail.com
> twitter:  AT GrrlScientist 
> Forbes blog 
> Evolution Institute blog
> 
> TinyLetter 
> sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



--
Bob Gosford
Crikey.com
The Northern Myth blog
http://blogs.crikey.com.au/northern/
Alice Springs, NT
Australia
Ph: (+61) 0447024968
Twitter:  AT bgosford
"The NT Government does not respond to random electronic gossip sites."

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
List help: birdchat-request AT ksu.edu