Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
BirdChat

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Saturday, December 20 at 04:48 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Streaked Spiderhunter,©BirdQuest

20 Dec Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech []
20 Dec BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 21, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
19 Dec Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
19 Dec Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech [Elliott Bedows ]
19 Dec Norway - man rescues duck ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
18 Dec Sibley 2nd printing [Jerry Blinn ]
18 Dec feathered forecasters []
17 Dec Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech []
17 Dec Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech []
17 Dec Re: Sibley [Laura Erickson ]
17 Dec Re: Sibley [Jim ]
17 Dec Sibley [Jerry Blinn ]
17 Dec Bird Blessing [Al Schirmacher ]
16 Dec Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech [Elliott Bedows ]
16 Dec Best Nature Books of 2014 [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
16 Dec Re: Egyptian Goose clarification (photo) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
15 Dec Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech ["B.G. Sloan" ]
15 Dec Egyptian Goose clarification (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
15 Dec the best bird books of 2014 [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
14 Dec Egyptian Goose on the loose (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
14 Dec RFI: Singapore birding [Chuck & Lillian ]
13 Dec BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 14, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
13 Dec RFI: Singapore birding ["Wallace, Richard" ]
13 Dec Re: Cardinal coloration question (photo) [Ronald Orenstein ]
12 Dec Cardinal coloration question (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
11 Dec The beauty of common birds (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
10 Dec A splash of vivid color on a drab gray day (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
10 Dec Bird Tongues [Laura Erickson ]
9 Dec Emily Dickinson's birds [Laura Erickson ]
6 Dec BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 7, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
6 Dec Christmas Bird Count: Citizen science for the birds [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
3 Dec Re: RFI: New Caledonia [Chuck & Lillian ]
30 Nov Why they're called Red-BELLIED Woodpeckers (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
29 Nov Re: Turkey trivia and tidbits ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
29 Nov BirdNote, last week & the week of Nov. 30, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
29 Nov Re: My old "mystery duck" was a Mallard [Margaret Rider ]
29 Nov My old "mystery duck" was a Mallard ["B.G. Sloan" ]
28 Nov Turkey trivia and tidbits [Allison Wells ]
28 Nov Nine Thanksgiving turkeys in one photo... ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Nov My Turkey/Thanksgiving op-ed piece... ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Nov Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Eight turkeys in one photo (personal record!) ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
26 Nov Eight turkeys in one photo (personal record!) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
25 Nov Re: Kagu in New Caledonia [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
24 Nov Operation Free Anhinga []
24 Nov Re: Panama Birding Tours [Elliot Kirschbaum ]
24 Nov RFI: New Caledonia ["John J. Collins" ]
23 Nov BirdNote, last week & the week of Nov. 23, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
23 Nov Re: Panama Birding Tours [Richard Carlson ]
23 Nov Panama Birding Tours [Elliot Kirschbaum ]
23 Nov Re Budget bins for guide [William Leigh ]
23 Nov Re: Thanks for all the Vegas info! [William Leigh ]
20 Nov Mystery Duck Revisited (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
19 Nov Thanks for all the Vegas info! [ ]
18 Nov Ruby-throats In Guanacaste, Costa Rica ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
15 Nov BirdNote, last week & the week of Nov. 16, 2014 + a new photo blog [Ellen Blackstone ]
15 Nov Re: birding near Las Vegas? [Joseph Morlan ]
15 Nov birding near Las Vegas? [ ]
15 Nov Become a Bird Song Hero [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
8 Nov BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 9, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
8 Nov beauty pageants for chickens [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
7 Nov Hilton Pond 10/01/14 (White Hummingbirds) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
6 Nov Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK [Stephen Elliott ]
6 Nov Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
6 Nov Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
6 Nov John Penhallurick 1946 - 2014 [Phil Davis ]
4 Nov Duck ID? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
4 Nov Olive-backed Pipit in Yorba Linda California [Steve Sosensky ]
4 Nov some gorgeous close-up photos of wild birds [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
3 Nov RFI Birding Buenos Aires [Joseph Morlan ]
3 Nov Re: Merlin vs. Shorebirds - survival tactic [Virginia Nufer ]
3 Nov Cartagena [Dr Ronald Orenstein ]
1 Nov BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 2, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
1 Nov Re: Merlin vs. Shorebirds - survival tactic []
1 Nov Whooooo said that? The distinct voices of owls [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
31 Oct Merlin vs. Shorebirds - survival tactic [Chuck Sexton ]
30 Oct Re: cr: (1) [L Larson ]

Subject: Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 16:16:35 -0500
 Elliott, Alvaro, Larry and interested Chatters,

 I don't think any birder is uninterested in seeing the scientists unravel the 
 mystery. Of course we want to know the "true" relationships which are being, 
and 

 will be revealed. The "problem" is that everyday birding is at the mercy of 
each 

 new finding, whether it be on a checklist or in field guides. Since these 
 sources usually follow the latest order and updates from the AOU Checklist, 
many 

 of them become outdated very quickly, and in need of revision, while those 
using 

 them are wondering why the list of Sandpipers has been rearranged, or the 
 Tanagers aren't where they used to be, or where did all the Dendroicas go, or 
 what's a Pucaea Sparrow, or who thought up Spinus pinus?

Writing a field guide usually takes years of research, and I know from personal 

 experience that over a period of years the AOU changes have given me more than 

 one headache trying to keep up with all of the most recent revisions. I guess 
 that's why I reacted with a half-hearted suggestion that it would be nice if 
the 

 science and the everday birding could somehow live parallel existences. 
Science 

 is extremely important for unravelling the "Truth", but it really does dictate 

 almost every nuance of our general field guides and checklists, and these 
changes can be frustrating at times from that perspective. Even Kaufman in his 
 Focus guide, while explaining that he departs from the AOU sequence in several 

 places, emphasizes that most checklists follow the AOU order, and then lists 
 that order in his introduction (which order, by the way, is out of date, and 
 needs revision!).

 All the best,
 Ernie Jardine
 Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Alvaro Jaramillo 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Fri, Dec 19, 2014 2:27 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs 
Related to Human Speech 



Elliott et al.

   I may have this wrong, but part of what is important (revolutionary?) about 
this recent paper is that it uses whole genome data. So they are not doing the 
classic mtDNA with a nuclear intron type analysis. What is amazing is how 
similar it is to a previous paper (Hackett et al. 2008). 
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/320/5884/1763.short 

using smaller amounts of gene data, but a larger set of species. The new paper 
resolves the early branches of the avian family tree more readily. But the fact 

that so much is similar between the two trees means that we are beginning to 
reach the asymptote of change in the higher order organization of the bird 
family tree.
   You will all laugh at me, particularly those who scowl at the changes that 
"these scientists" :-) thrust upon us birders, but I almost get emotional 
thinking about data like this. Within my life time we will come to understand 
the major relationships of the birds, we will know their history. We will erase 

the major issues of creating a phylogeny (family tree) of the birds based on 
their perceived similarity, as opposed to their true and real relationship. 
With 

the help of computers, and genetic techniques, some of which are so new and so 
much more powerful than what was available even a decade ago, we will have 
answers. We will continue to argue about what is a species, but we will have a 
pretty solid idea of the real relationships of the groups of birds. That is so 
beautiful! Amazing. Really, it makes me emotional. To me, seeing a finely 
resolved and robust phylogeny is a spiritual event. We are peering into the 
background, the history, the ups and downs, The Story of th!
 ese creatures we love so much. Keep it coming scientists!!!

Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of Elliott Bedows
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2014 10:38 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs 
Related to Human Speech

Hi Larry (and others),

I feel the need to disagree with you here.  The current method of determining 
avian phylogenic relationships relies on comparing genetic sequences of 
specified genes between species.  This is a reasonable approach, but the 
selection of the genes used to do these comparisons is quite arbitrary.  In 
fact, genes known to mutate most rapidly, such as satellite DNA sequences, are 
preferred for current taxonomic evaluations because the gene sequence changes 
are amplified.  But this approach can lead to problems (recall that New World 
Vultures were once considered to be Storks). Thus, the "TRUTH" you allude to is 

not "truth" at all, but rather a snippet of various relationships based on a 
limited number of possibly non-representative criteria.

I believe that the use of super computers to obtain DNA sequence data has the 
'potential' of yielding more accurate taxonomic relationships because a variety 

of gene sequences can be compared simultaneously. In my opinion, that would 
include, but not be limited to, both the coding and non-coding sequences of 
genes directly required for reproduction.  I am not complaining about using 
'new' criteria for establishing taxonomic order; rather I am complaining that 
too many previous taxonomy studies have been conducted in a manner that limits 
their usefulness and that many recent changes avian taxonomy are ultimately 
going to be reversed. This makes casual birding confusing and why I think that 
changes in avian taxonomy could be accepted less frequently.

My 2-cents worth!!

Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 8:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech

I have to disagree. The changes are interesting, particularly when you read up 

on the reasons for them. I will once again get used to the change in ordering. 

And it really seems that we are getting closer to the TRUTH, even if we can 
never get 100% there.

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>

 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 21, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 10:16:25 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Northern Forest Owls - Coming South this Winter?
http://bit.ly/1aJ1Nvp

* The Benefits of a Raven's Black Feathers
http://bit.ly/1Hg4yFc

* Christmas Bird Count - Join In!
http://bit.ly/ROXT1i

* The Rooster
http://bit.ly/1vbwHYm

* Freeway Hawks
http://bit.ly/QAsRZ2

* The Avocets of Bolivar Flats
http://bit.ly/RVm4eG

* Morning in Oaxaca
http://bit.ly/Zvfrmv

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:http://bit.ly/1ARj5Fd

------------------------------------------------------------
365 days of BirdNote -- Check out the Birds of BirdNote calendar:
http://bit.ly/1xlUmqA
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.

... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 11:25:20 -0800
Elliott et al.

 I may have this wrong, but part of what is important (revolutionary?) about 
this recent paper is that it uses whole genome data. So they are not doing the 
classic mtDNA with a nuclear intron type analysis. What is amazing is how 
similar it is to a previous paper (Hackett et al. 2008). 
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/320/5884/1763.short using smaller amounts of 
gene data, but a larger set of species. The new paper resolves the early 
branches of the avian family tree more readily. But the fact that so much is 
similar between the two trees means that we are beginning to reach the 
asymptote of change in the higher order organization of the bird family tree. 

 You will all laugh at me, particularly those who scowl at the changes that 
"these scientists" :-) thrust upon us birders, but I almost get emotional 
thinking about data like this. Within my life time we will come to understand 
the major relationships of the birds, we will know their history. We will erase 
the major issues of creating a phylogeny (family tree) of the birds based on 
their perceived similarity, as opposed to their true and real relationship. 
With the help of computers, and genetic techniques, some of which are so new 
and so much more powerful than what was available even a decade ago, we will 
have answers. We will continue to argue about what is a species, but we will 
have a pretty solid idea of the real relationships of the groups of birds. That 
is so beautiful! Amazing. Really, it makes me emotional. To me, seeing a finely 
resolved and robust phylogeny is a spiritual event. We are peering into the 
background, the history, the ups and downs, The Story of th! 

 ese creatures we love so much. Keep it coming scientists!!!

Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliott Bedows 

Sent: Friday, December 19, 2014 10:38 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs 
Related to Human Speech 


Hi Larry (and others),

I feel the need to disagree with you here. The current method of determining 
avian phylogenic relationships relies on comparing genetic sequences of 
specified genes between species. This is a reasonable approach, but the 
selection of the genes used to do these comparisons is quite arbitrary. In 
fact, genes known to mutate most rapidly, such as satellite DNA sequences, are 
preferred for current taxonomic evaluations because the gene sequence changes 
are amplified. But this approach can lead to problems (recall that New World 
Vultures were once considered to be Storks). Thus, the "TRUTH" you allude to is 
not "truth" at all, but rather a snippet of various relationships based on a 
limited number of possibly non-representative criteria. 


I believe that the use of super computers to obtain DNA sequence data has the 
'potential' of yielding more accurate taxonomic relationships because a variety 
of gene sequences can be compared simultaneously. In my opinion, that would 
include, but not be limited to, both the coding and non-coding sequences of 
genes directly required for reproduction. I am not complaining about using 
'new' criteria for establishing taxonomic order; rather I am complaining that 
too many previous taxonomy studies have been conducted in a manner that limits 
their usefulness and that many recent changes avian taxonomy are ultimately 
going to be reversed. This makes casual birding confusing and why I think that 
changes in avian taxonomy could be accepted less frequently. 


My 2-cents worth!!

Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET 

Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 8:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech 


I have to disagree. The changes are interesting, particularly when you read up 
on the reasons for them. I will once again get used to the change in ordering. 
And it really seems that we are getting closer to the TRUTH, even if we can 
never get 100% there. 


Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related
> to Human Speech
>
> From Scientific American:
>
> "The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the
> evolutionary roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human
> speech disorders".
>
> See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [BIRD CHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: Elliott Bedows <ebedows AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:38:29 -0600
Hi Larry (and others),

I feel the need to disagree with you here. The current method of determining 
avian phylogenic relationships relies on comparing genetic sequences of 
specified genes between species. This is a reasonable approach, but the 
selection of the genes used to do these comparisons is quite arbitrary. In 
fact, genes known to mutate most rapidly, such as satellite DNA sequences, are 
preferred for current taxonomic evaluations because the gene sequence changes 
are amplified. But this approach can lead to problems (recall that New World 
Vultures were once considered to be Storks). Thus, the "TRUTH" you allude to is 
not "truth" at all, but rather a snippet of various relationships based on a 
limited number of possibly non-representative criteria. 


I believe that the use of super computers to obtain DNA sequence data has the 
'potential' of yielding more accurate taxonomic relationships because a variety 
of gene sequences can be compared simultaneously. In my opinion, that would 
include, but not be limited to, both the coding and non-coding sequences of 
genes directly required for reproduction. I am not complaining about using 
'new' criteria for establishing taxonomic order; rather I am complaining that 
too many previous taxonomy studies have been conducted in a manner that limits 
their usefulness and that many recent changes avian taxonomy are ultimately 
going to be reversed. This makes casual birding confusing and why I think that 
changes in avian taxonomy could be accepted less frequently. 


My 2-cents worth!!

Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET 

Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 8:44 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech 


I have to disagree.  The changes are interesting, particularly when you
read up on the reasons for them.  I will once again get used to the
change in ordering.  And it really seems that we are getting closer to
the TRUTH, even if we can never get 100% there.

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related
> to Human Speech
>
> From Scientific American:
>
> "The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the
> evolutionary
> roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech
> disorders".
>
> See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Norway - man rescues duck
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 10:16:12 -0500
One lucky lady goldeneye; one human hero.   A warm and fuzzy (starting out
cold and harsh) feel-good story for the season:



http://www.viralnova.com/drowning-duck-rescue/?mb=vnnl

__._,_.___








Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Sibley 2nd printing
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:46:52 -0700
My thanks to all who responded to my inquiry re: a second printing of Sibley.

I should have taken a breath before posting here.  Today the ABA
Birder's Guide to Gear arrived in the mail, with an explanation of
the second printing, including illustration color and text quality
improvements.

When buying, look for "Second printing, July 2014."

Also:  tinyurl.com/stiteler-on-sibley

Jerry


Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: feathered forecasters
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 14:54:11 -0800
Hi all,

I thought this was interesting....  nice to see this species in MSM.


http://www.nbcnews.com/science/environment/feathered-forecasters-tiny-birds-knew-killer-tornadoes-were-coming-n270381 


Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas
www.utopianature.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:44:13 -0500
I have to disagree.  The changes are interesting, particularly when you
read up on the reasons for them.  I will once again get used to the
change in ordering.  And it really seems that we are getting closer to
the TRUTH, even if we can never get 100% there.

Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL


On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:52 PM, birding AT AOL.COM wrote:

> Elliott and Chatters,
>  We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my
> gut reaction (full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the
> scientists continue with their research, but leave recreational
> birders an intact checklist, in the same order (Loons first), and with
> the same names (with the exception of cases like
> "Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin
> names. Then we wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and
> checklists), about whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or
> whether it's still Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on
> how many Crossbills there are.  Serious listers wouldn't like this,
> because they love splits, but maybe there's room for 2 groupings:
> Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, those who
> like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds
> seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having
> 10 checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change. 
> The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming),
> especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most
> radical seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've
> had changes appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or
> your latest purchase. In light of all this, maybe your 10 year
> proposal is worthy of consideration......for some of us anyway. The
> way things are going though, after 10 years, there would probably be
> an avalanche of changes to deal with. It really is a problem
> separating the science from the everyday birding for those of us who
> would like to slow down the merry-go-round.
>  All the best,
> Ernie Jardine
> Pickering Ontario
> birding AT aol.com
>  www.birdsongidentification.com
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Elliott Bedows 
> To: BIRDCHAT 
> Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs
> Related to Human Speech
>
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that
> there may enough genetic information obtained to, once again,
> reorganize the avian phylogenic tree.  Personally, I'd like to see an
> update once every ten years or so, rather than a seemingly endless
> tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy is what it is ........
>
> Elliott Bedows,
> Bellevue, NE
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
> Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related
> to Human Speech
>
> From Scientific American:
>
> "The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the
> evolutionary
> roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech
> disorders".
>
> See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:52:59 -0500
Elliott and Chatters,
 
We've been through this one before. There is no one answer, but my gut reaction 
(full of holes I know) to all the changes is, let the scientists continue with 
their research, but leave recreational birders an intact checklist, in the same 
order (Loons first), and with the same names (with the exception of cases like 
"Oldsquaw"/Long-tailed Duck), and maybe even leave off the Latin names. Then we 
wouldn't have to worry about updating field guides (and checklists), about 
whether the shorebirds are in the correct order, or whether it's still 
Dendroica, or whether they've finally decided on how many Crossbills there are. 

 
Serious listers wouldn't like this, because they love splits, but maybe there's 
room for 2 groupings: Serious listers and Scientists, and recreational birders, 
those who like just watching the birds and maybe keeping a casual list of birds 
seen in their backyard, or on a holiday, but could live without having 10 
checks under Crossbills......or who like me just hate change.  

 
The changes really have become almost annoying (if not overwhelming), 
especially if you've been birding for many years, although the most radical 
seem to have been more recently. Even more annoying if you've had changes 
appear, hot on the heels of your latest publication, or your latest purchase. 
In light of all this, maybe your 10 year proposal is worthy of 
consideration......for some of us anyway. The way things are going though, 
after 10 years, there would probably be an avalanche of changes to deal with. 
It really is a problem separating the science from the everyday birding for 
those of us who would like to slow down the merry-go-round. 

 
All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com
 
www.birdsongidentification.com
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Elliott Bedows 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, Dec 16, 2014 9:29 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to 
Human Speech 



Hi everyone,

One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that there 
may 

enough genetic information obtained to, once again, reorganize the avian 
phylogenic tree. Personally, I'd like to see an update once every ten years or 

so, rather than a seemingly endless tweaking of the order.  But avian taxonomy 
is what it is ........

Elliott Bedows,
Bellevue, NE


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan
Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human 

Speech

From Scientific American:

"The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the evolutionary
roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech disorders".

See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Sibley
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:24:57 -0500
The text in the bad printing was, I'm pretty sure, due to young designers
who just don't have a clue how hard pale font is to read. But yes, from
everything I've seen and heard, it has been improved vastly in a second
printing--someone listened! Tragically for my poor 63-year-old eyes, we're
still paying off too many college expenses for our kids to be able to
justify forking out the money for the second printing. Oh, well.

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:45 PM, Jerry Blinn  wrote:
>
> Has there been a second printing of the new Sibley with improved text
> quality?
>
> When I go birding, I leave the new Sibley on the shelf and take my
> beat up, 14 year-old Sibley.
>
> I feel David is a victim of the printers in China.  I originally had
> an order for a dozen copies for friends and associates, but when I
> saw the text quality I canceled the order.  It is very hard to read
> in poor light.
>
> Jerry
>
>
> Jerry Blinn
> AviSys Software
> Placitas, NM
> 505-867-6255
> jerry AT avisys.net
> Web Site: http://www.avisys.net
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>


--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Sibley
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 16:11:46 -0500
Yes.  It is available at Buteo Books among other places:
http://www.buteobooks.com/product/SIBL2.html

From the photos I've seen the second printing appears to solve all the
color issues and the problem with text appearing too light.

Jim Moore
Rockville, MD

On Wed, Dec 17, 2014 at 3:45 PM, Jerry Blinn  wrote:
>
> Has there been a second printing of the new Sibley with improved text
> quality?
>
> When I go birding, I leave the new Sibley on the shelf and take my
> beat up, 14 year-old Sibley.
>
> I feel David is a victim of the printers in China.  I originally had
> an order for a dozen copies for friends and associates, but when I
> saw the text quality I canceled the order.  It is very hard to read
> in poor light.
>
> Jerry
>
>
> Jerry Blinn
> AviSys Software
> Placitas, NM
> 505-867-6255
> jerry AT avisys.net
> Web Site: http://www.avisys.net
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Sibley
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 13:45:58 -0700
Has there been a second printing of the new Sibley with improved text quality?

When I go birding, I leave the new Sibley on the shelf and take my
beat up, 14 year-old Sibley.

I feel David is a victim of the printers in China.  I originally had
an order for a dozen copies for friends and associates, but when I
saw the text quality I canceled the order.  It is very hard to read
in poor light.

Jerry


Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bird Blessing
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 09:25:06 -0600
Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Blessed Holidays, Prospero Nuevo Ano to each 
of you. 


2015 blessing:  May none of you run into these birds in the coming year.

Decoyus Deceivus

Leafate Tremulus

Silhouetate Statuous

Plasticus Owlus

Baggis Snowyus

Falsecallus Guidate

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS


Sent from my iPhone
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: Elliott Bedows <ebedows AT COX.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 20:27:08 -0600
Hi everyone,

One of the ramifications of this super computer-aided approach is that there 
may enough genetic information obtained to, once again, reorganize the avian 
phylogenic tree. Personally, I'd like to see an update once every ten years or 
so, rather than a seemingly endless tweaking of the order. But avian taxonomy 
is what it is ........ 


Elliott Bedows,
Bellevue, NE


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: Monday, December 15, 2014 7:45 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human 
Speech 


From Scientific American:

"The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the evolutionary
roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech disorders".

See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Best Nature Books of 2014
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 20:44:09 +0000
Hello everyone,

I just shared my choices for the best nature books for 2014:

http://gu.com/p/44773/stw

these books, all beautifully written, explore the connection between people
and plants or animals, and also how this connection is facilitated by
modern technology, especially citizen science via the internet. all
interesting themes, and all worth spending some time reading and thinking
about. And all are worthy books for anyone's christmas or holiday gift
list, either for others or for yourselves!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Egyptian Goose clarification (photo)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:32:26 +0000
interesting!

there's LOTS of Egyptian geese here in Frankfurt Germany. Although feral,
these birds allow a very close approach -- i've even snapped some very good
photos of them using my iPhone camera.


On Mon, Dec 15, 2014 at 10:26 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>
> Just wanted to emphasize that I know that Egyptian Goose is non-native and
> not listable (except maybe in Florida?). The point of my previous posting
> was that this particular Egyptian Goose was behaving like a wild bird,
> rather than a domestic escapee. It was hanging with a flock of wild
> Mallards along a river. It was very skittish and swam away before I could
> ever get close. Just made me think that this bird might have been bred and
> raised in the wild:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16019229011/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>


--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 20:44:57 -0500
From Scientific American:

"The sequencing of genomes of 48 bird species explains the evolutionary
roots of vocalization and could offer insight into human speech disorders".

See: http://bit.ly/1IVva21 for more details...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Egyptian Goose clarification (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 17:26:07 -0500
Just wanted to emphasize that I know that Egyptian Goose is non-native and
not listable (except maybe in Florida?). The point of my previous posting
was that this particular Egyptian Goose was behaving like a wild bird,
rather than a domestic escapee. It was hanging with a flock of wild
Mallards along a river. It was very skittish and swam away before I could
ever get close. Just made me think that this bird might have been bred and
raised in the wild:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16019229011/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: the best bird books of 2014
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:16:30 +0000
hello everyone,

those of you who have read my blog for more than a decade (and my private
emails for longer than that!) know that i've never before compiled a list
of what i consider to be the best bird books of the year. but it seems that
there are very few people out there (and no one in the MSM) who actually
focus on such things as "bird lit".

so i felt it was my duty to fill that gaping hole with my"best bird books
of 2014" list, which is here:

short:

http://gu.com/p/4475z/stw

long:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/dec/15/the-best-bird-books-of-2014 


these books are a nice mix between personal stories with conservation,
pets, falconry, language, evolution, monograph, and of course, the
encyclopedic -- something for everyone.

the only requirements i had are that the book is about birds (duh!) and
that it was published in 2014. if you have additions to make to this list,
i'd be thrilled if you share them on the guardian where everyone can read
about them, and add them to their own holiday gift purchase lists. i am
sure the books' authors would love to read your comments as to why you
chose their book or books as your "best of 2014".

i also am working on a "best of" naturalists' book list, which i will
likely publish tomorrow.

of course, i am interested to read what you think are the best books of
2014 published about natural history -- do email me at
grrlscientist AT gmail.com

many thanks!

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Egyptian Goose on the loose (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 22:48:28 -0500
Egyptian Goose on the loose. Hanging out with a flock of Mallards along the
Raritan River, Middlesex County, NJ. Very striking bird with an odd
call...sounds like the Aflac duck with a bad cough. :-)

Here's a photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16019229011/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: Singapore birding
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 12:27:02 -0800
Richard:

Raj Subaraj may still be leading people around.
I don't know if this email address is still good 
for him: "Raj Subaraj" 
You can probably google him.

We birded with him in 1989, and found 110 species 
in 14 hours, using public transportation, which 
may still be some sort of Singapore record.

If you can get a copy of Birds of Singapore 
before you leave, I suggest doing so. Its hard to 
find a bookstore in Singapore these days, let 
alone one that actually carries real books 
written in English. Everything is electronic.

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=birds+of+singapore&tag=googhydr-20&index=stripbooks&hvadid=19937262197&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5376036294108668203&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_75ulxpjr7_b 

The book we had (disappeared somewhere) was Christopher Hails' book.
I don't know about the Li & Chuah book.
There are several for "Singapore & Peninsular 
Malaysia," which of course cover a much larger 
area. IMHO, having one that focuses on the area 
you're actually going to (Singapore) is helpful, 
as it eliminates the hundreds of birds which simply aren't there.

This site has photos & info on 99% of Singapore's 
387 listed species. I used it on last trip to ID what I saw.
http://singaporebirds.blogspot.com/

The Bird Group of Singapore Nature Society is the 
equivalent of an Audubon chapter, more or 
less.  They have field trips and the website has 
an interactive (sort of) Birding Hotspots pages.
http://www.nss.org.sg/nss_group.aspx?group_id=yclleUod3WM=

Be prepared for hot & humid weather with 12 hours 
of daylight, always. (You're 1 north of the 
equator). Frequent rain year-round, and daily 
deluges during monsoon season. Malaria is not a 
problem but dengue fever from daytime-biting 
tiger mosquitoes is currently a problem. I saw 
one mosquito in 16 days in November. The food is 
great and safe to eat nearly everywhere. Water is 
safe to drink. Don't take chewing gum or plan on 
spitting. Don't look for shopping bargains except 
maybe shoes. Eat some durian if you see it.

ParkRoyal on Kitchener Rd. cost us about US$160 
per night, (yes, that's reasonably priced) and is 
centrally located. You probably won't need (or 
want!) to rent a car as they have subways, buses 
and taxis galore. Driving is on the left side of 
the road. Local GPS is unreliable (my relative 
who lives there will vouch for that) and the street system is bizarre.

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.


>Date:    Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:04:50 -0500
>From:    "Wallace, Richard" 
>Subject: RFI: Singapore birding
>
>Hi all,
>
>I am headed to Singapore on business in early March, and am hoping to take =
>a day to go birding locally. Can someone recommend to me local birders or b=
>ird guides (i.e., people who run guided day trips) whom I may contact to ar=
>range an outing? There are lots of listings online, but I'd love recommenda=
>tion from folks who have been and can recommend someone first-hand.
>
>Thanks much!
>
>Rich Wallace
>Collegeville, PA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 14, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:43:57 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out this video about Dorian Anderson, who's doing a Big Year on a
bicycle. http://bit.ly/12YjUAF More than 16,000 miles and 600 species of
birds so far!
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Carrier Pigeons Go to War
http://bit.ly/VIFapb

* Why Some Birds Sing in the Winter
http://bit.ly/1wJtKV6

* Northern Goshawk - Esteemed Bird of Prey
http://bit.ly/VMSns1

* The Music of Long-tailed Ducks
http://bit.ly/J583Yg

* Margaret Morse Nice and the Song Sparrow
http://bit.ly/13him5O

* Birds on a Cold Night
http://bit.ly/13hinXB

* The Majestic Gyrfalcon

http://bit.ly/1uwBaDC

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:http://bit.ly/12Hye0u

------------------------------------------------------------

Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: Singapore birding
From: "Wallace, Richard" <rwallace AT URSINUS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:04:50 -0500
Hi all,

I am headed to Singapore on business in early March, and am hoping to take a 
day to go birding locally. Can someone recommend to me local birders or bird 
guides (i.e., people who run guided day trips) whom I may contact to arrange an 
outing? There are lots of listings online, but I'd love recommendation from 
folks who have been and can recommend someone first-hand. 


Thanks much!

Rich Wallace
Collegeville, PA



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Cardinal coloration question (photo)
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 01:04:11 +0000
I would go for a bit of leucism myself.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: B.G. Sloan 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Friday, December 12, 2014 6:14 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Cardinal coloration question (photo)
   
Had a male Northern Cardinal in the yard today with some interesting
coloration. Face, bill and crest were the usual reddish color. Black mask
was OK too. But the rest of the bird's body was a combination of gray,
peach, light orange, sort-of-bluish, and whitish colors. In other words,
the facial area looked fine for a male Cardinal, but the rest of the
feathers looked a little "different".

Young male not quite transitioned to adult male plumage? Partially
leucistic bird? Artifact of late afternoon light? Here's the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16007510395/

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Cardinal coloration question (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 18:14:23 -0500
Had a male Northern Cardinal in the yard today with some interesting
coloration. Face, bill and crest were the usual reddish color. Black mask
was OK too. But the rest of the bird's body was a combination of gray,
peach, light orange, sort-of-bluish, and whitish colors. In other words,
the facial area looked fine for a male Cardinal, but the rest of the
feathers looked a little "different".

Young male not quite transitioned to adult male plumage? Partially
leucistic bird? Artifact of late afternoon light? Here's the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16007510395/

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: The beauty of common birds (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 19:32:22 -0500
Sometimes I think juvenile gulls are more attractive than adults. Here's a
first winter Ring-billed Gull. I especially like how the tip of the bill
looks like it's been dipped in ink. I also like the splash of
reddish-orange color on what I assume are its nostrils.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15999060321/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: A splash of vivid color on a drab gray day (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 20:30:41 -0500
The red cap and nape of this male Red-bellied Woodpecker seemed almost
fluorescent on this very gray day. Everything else today looked rather
monochromatic. Nice to see a splash of color! (Photo taken through my
living room window)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15373314783/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bird Tongues
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 18:56:23 -0600
I don't normally push my blog on BirdChat, but here I am, a second day in a
row. I just finished a post that I've been working on for a while, called
"More about Bird Tongues than a Normal Person Would Want to Know," and
thought one or two bird chatters might find it interesting. (It's
non-commerical--I write my blog entirely at my own expense, without
financial support, for my own entertainment.)

I'm sure several people here could make corrections here and there. They'd
be welcome!


http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/12/more-about-bird-tongues-than-normal.html 


Best, Laura

--
--
Laura Erickson
Duluth, Minnesota <--- I think I forgot to add that yesterday.

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Emily Dickinson's birds
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 09:55:52 -0600
Tomorrow is Emily Dickinson's birthday, so I put together a post about some
of the birds in her life.

http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/12/emily-dickinsons-birthday.html

--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 7, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2014 09:39:53 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the latest blog post from the newest BirdNote team member, Kim
Bostwick. http://bit.ly/1vqsMG2 Long-tailed Ducks!
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* The Lowly Starling - It has many detractors, but a few fans, too
http://bit.ly/1FZ82v2

* Not Just Any Nectar Will Do
http://bit.ly/1ADkEXS

* Woodpeckers - Why No Pounding Headache?
http://bit.ly/WVD6Fy

* The Dodo
http://bit.ly/TwgGtz

* Ecotourism - A Win-Win-Win Situation
http://bit.ly/TntINb

* Hitchcock's "The Birds" - Any truth to the story?
http://bit.ly/11DcOfs

* Spruce Grouse - Designed for the Boreal Forest
http://bit.ly/QZsQzx

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/129UxvF
------------------------------------------------------------
WIN A TRIP FOR TWO! What do you think of BirdNote? Share your thoughts,
and you could win a trip for two to South Florida, High Island, or Cape
May, New Jersey, with Victor Emanuel Nature Tours. Enter by December 8,
2014. http://bit.ly/1zZs2iF

------------------------------------------------------------

Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Christmas Bird Count: Citizen science for the birds
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2014 12:05:43 +0000
hello everyone,

I am sure all of you know about the upcoming CBC, but do your friends,
colleagues and neighbors know about it? This story is a brief overview of
the CBC, why it matters and why people participate:

gu.com/p/44vej


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/dec/06/christmas-bird-count-citizen-science-for-the-birds 


already, there are some interesting questions and comments!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: RFI: New Caledonia
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2014 11:51:45 -0800
John:
We visited New Caledonia in Nov. 2013 and used 
Arc en Ciel for all our arrangements.
Group - Arc en Ciel Voyages 
Arc en ciel Voyages / 59, av Foch - BP 1244 / 98845 Nouma - New Caledonia
 : (687) 27 19 80 /  : (687) 27 62 77 
group AT arcenciel.nc
Your One Stop Shop for New Caledonia; 
www.arcenciel.nc

Fanny and Armstrong handled the details.

For reasons never determined, our webserver AT&T 
blocked all email coming from New Caledonia. We 
wrote Arc en Ciel about 4 times, but their 
replies couldn't get through AT&T. Only when we 
switched to a Gmail account could we make contact.

New Caledonia is expensive. A simple dinner can easily run you $50.

Seeing the Kagu is a bit tricky. Parc Rivere Bleu 
(Blue River Park) is the only site. It's about 
60-90 minutes out of Noumea (capital city), and 
road signs are not very well marked, with one or 
more intersections and Y-junctions where the 
correct choice is not indicated. Locally 
available maps aren't very good. I would probably 
have gotten lost if I had been driving to the 
park. The park has opening and closing hours (I 
forget what they are) so no point to get there 
too early. A bit of roadside birding along the way may be profitable.

It's several miles of maintained dirt road from 
park entrance to a river. You have to park at the 
river and either walk from there or rent a bike 
to get to the Kagu spot which is maybe 5 miles 
(maybe less) from the bridge, much of it uphill. 
The Kagu spot is in the first real forest you 
come to, and the best spot is a couple of hundred 
yards into the forest where a walking trail is marked.

Arc en Ciel can rent you all your accommodations 
and cars, including the other small islands which 
you may want to visit. They also have guide(s) 
available. The guide they gave us specializes in 
the park and has a van permanently parked at the 
far end of the footbridge bridge and is (so far 
as I know) the only person who can drive from the 
bridge to the Kagu spot. He knows the birds and 
is very well informed on all New Caledonian 
biohistory, which is very interesting. He picked 
us up at our hotel & returned us there.

However...
We had asked for - and were told we would receive 
- a BIRDING trip to the park with a BIRDING GUIDE 
and we wound up with barely 1-2 hours of birding, 
most of it on our own. The guide had tapes, but 
frankly, little effort was put into finding 
birds, other than the Kagu, which - once you're 
in the right spot - is quite easy to find. [One 
followed me around so closely I nearly stepped on 
it when I quickly turned around. They very 
curious and unafraid, which explains why they nearly went extinct.]

So we got maybe 1/2 the endemics, finding them on 
our own except for the Kagu. (We also visited two 
other parks on 2 other days, driving ourselves in a rental car.)

Someone else who used the services of the same 
guide saw only the Kagu. His car was otherwise 
filled with Japanese tourists who weren't interested in birds.

So this particular guide can get you there with a 
minimum of effort, and almost certainly you will 
see the Kagu, but whether you see any other birds 
is not at all certain. Unfortunately, I can't 
find the name of the guide; something French like Francois.

yours,
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.




++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


At 10:00 PM 11/24/2014, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:
>Date:    Mon, 24 Nov 2014 12:55:09 -0500
>From:    "John J. Collins" 
>Subject: RFI: New Caledonia
>
>A while back someone had posted a request on Birdchat for a birding contact
>in New Caledonia to take them to see the Kagu among other birds.
>Unfortunately, I failed to keep copies of the responses received.  I am now
>interested in going to New Caledonia on my way to Indonesia next summer and
>if anyone has any information on a contact in New Caledonia could they
>please let me know who that might be.  I think if I stay for about three
>nights it will give me ample opportunity to see the Kagu and many other of
>the island's endemics.
>Thank you for any information you can give me.
>
>John J. Collins
>Raritan, NJ
>jjcbird AT verizon.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Why they're called Red-BELLIED Woodpeckers (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2014 19:55:00 -0500
Ever wonder why they're called Red-BELLIED Woodpeckers? I've seen it
several times in the field, but this is the first time I've caught it in a
photo. Look down low on the bird's belly near the branch and you will see a
reddish tinge:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15918366755/

Photo taken through my living room window...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Turkey trivia and tidbits
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2014 14:09:07 -0500
Allison and Jeff's essay mentions that Wild Turkeys and Muscovy Ducks are the 
New World's contribution to domesticated farm birds. It is interesting that 
both species have names suggestive of an Old World origin. My scanning of the 
etymological literature suggests that there was a great deal of confusion 
several centuries ago in Europe about the origins of these birds and that we 
will never know exactly how these names came to be used for these two species. 
One idea that is frequently repeated is that the Muscovy Duck was named for its 
musky odor; unfortunately for this hypothesis, I find nothing in the recent 
literature about this species indicating that it is especially odiferous. Is 
anyone aware of any peculiar odor of the Muscovy Duck? 


Thanks,

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Allison Wells [awells AT NRCM.ORG] 

Sent: Friday, November 28, 2014 6:51 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Turkey trivia and tidbits

Greetings, Birdchatters-

In honor of Thanksgiving, thought we'd share our column (Boothbay Register) 
about the Wild Turkey, including some trivia and tidbits you may not have 
known: 


http://www.boothbayregister.com/article/let-s-talk-turkey/44217

Their conservation comeback truly makes them success story superstars.

Hope you enjoy,

Allison and Jeff Wells
Maine

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Nov. 30, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2014 10:13:36 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the latest from Alex Chadwick, in the field for BirdNote at
Big Bend National Park. And the subject is .... VULTURES!
http://bit.ly/1v2GrI6
  ---------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* A Blizzard of Snow Geese
http://bit.ly/1vXkyMt
* Alex Chadwick at Big Bend - An Oasis for Birds
http://bit.ly/1u2Zli0
* On the Trail of the Bobwhite
http://bit.ly/1w2qinu
* The Ears of an Owl
http://bit.ly/1zFvHyw
* Wishbones and Dinosaurs
http://bit.ly/11D4u4x
* The Music of Black Scoters
http://bit.ly/1pxYBAv
* Winter Birds Love Suet
http://bit.ly/1vXl8tz
--------------------------------------------------------------
WIN A TRIP FOR TWO! What do you think of BirdNote? Share your  thoughts,
and you could win a trip for two with Victor Emanuel Nature  Tours.
http://bit.ly/1zZs2iF
--------------------------------------------------------------
Check out next week's shows & photos: http://eepurl.com/9qlP5
--------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
.... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: My old "mystery duck" was a Mallard
From: Margaret Rider <rider AT XCELCO.ON.CA>
Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2014 11:29:27 -0500
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: B.G. Sloan 
  To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
  Sent: Saturday, November 29, 2014 11:10 AM
  Subject: [BIRDCHAT] My old "mystery duck" was a Mallard


  A few weeks ago I posted a link to a photo of a "mystery duck":

  https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15709943911/

  My first reaction in the field was "odd Mallard". When I viewed the photo I
  started thinking maybe a Gadwall. After reviewing the responses I received
  I'm now going back to my first impression.

  Interestingly, the birders who replied suggested six different species:
  Mallard, Gadwall, Black Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, and
  Mottled Duck!

  Bernie Sloan
  Highland Park, NJ

  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
  Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: My old "mystery duck" was a Mallard
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2014 11:10:51 -0500
A few weeks ago I posted a link to a photo of a "mystery duck":

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15709943911/

My first reaction in the field was "odd Mallard". When I viewed the photo I
started thinking maybe a Gadwall. After reviewing the responses I received
I'm now going back to my first impression.

Interestingly, the birders who replied suggested six different species:
Mallard, Gadwall, Black Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, and
Mottled Duck!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Turkey trivia and tidbits
From: Allison Wells <awells AT NRCM.ORG>
Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2014 23:51:34 +0000
Greetings, Birdchatters-

In honor of Thanksgiving, thought we'd share our column (Boothbay Register) 
about the Wild Turkey, including some trivia and tidbits you may not have 
known: 


http://www.boothbayregister.com/article/let-s-talk-turkey/44217

Their conservation comeback truly makes them success story superstars.

Hope you enjoy,

Allison and Jeff Wells
Maine

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Nine Thanksgiving turkeys in one photo...
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Nov 2014 08:20:00 -0500
Nine Thanksgiving turkeys in one photo!! A new personal record for most
turkeys in one photo. My yard has been crawling with turkeys recently!
Photo taken through the living room window, which is turning out to be a
great blind for wildlife photography...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15708145617/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: My Turkey/Thanksgiving op-ed piece...
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:19:42 -0500
Each year as Thanksgiving draws near I find myself remembering the small
flock of Wild Turkeys that hung out in my old neighborhood in Urbana,
Illinois. They were regulars in my back yard. And they were my first
experience with Wild Turkeys. (I've seen many more turkeys since then in
several neighborhoods that I have lived in: Indiana, Wisconsin, and New
Jersey).

Eventually the Illinois turkeys were deemed a public hazard and were
removed. I memorialized them in this op-ed piece that appeared in the
Champaign-Urbana News-Gazette about five or six years ago:

http://bit.ly/cDEHIU

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Eight turkeys in one photo (personal record!)
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 15:14:01 -0500
Bernie, that's a baker's dozen of turkeys, but tough to fit all of them into 
one pie! 


Happy Holiday, everyone!

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 2:00 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Eight turkeys in one photo (personal record!)

The day before Thanksgiving, and I look out the living room window to see a
flock of ten Wild Turkeys in the yard. I managed to squeeze eight of the
birds into one photo (the other two weren't feeling cooperative). That's a
personal best for me...previous record was four turkeys in one photo, and
that was maybe six years ago. Here's the photo, taken through my living
room window on a dark rainy morning:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15698326029/

Later on two adult males showed up. They weren't part of the original
group. Photo also taken from my living room:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15698919969/

And later a solo female trotted by in the woods that I'm pretty sure I
hadn't seen earlier. Thirteen turkeys so far today!

Very fitting for the day before Thanksgiving!  :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Eight turkeys in one photo (personal record!)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Nov 2014 13:59:32 -0500
The day before Thanksgiving, and I look out the living room window to see a
flock of ten Wild Turkeys in the yard. I managed to squeeze eight of the
birds into one photo (the other two weren't feeling cooperative). That's a
personal best for me...previous record was four turkeys in one photo, and
that was maybe six years ago. Here's the photo, taken through my living
room window on a dark rainy morning:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15698326029/

Later on two adult males showed up. They weren't part of the original
group. Photo also taken from my living room:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15698919969/

And later a solo female trotted by in the woods that I'm pretty sure I
hadn't seen earlier. Thirteen turkeys so far today!

Very fitting for the day before Thanksgiving!  :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Kagu in New Caledonia
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 08:19:42 +0000
just as an aside .... does anyone know if anyone has done or is doing
phylogenetic work that incorporates kagu DNA? i am interested to read more
about this mysterious bird's origins.


On Tue, Nov 25, 2014 at 4:27 AM, Tom & Margot 
wrote:

> We were in New Caledonia years ago (July 2000) but we did get to bird with
> Yves Letocart, a noted ornithogist and refuge manager and happened to
> meet a Dutch ornithogist and his wife (Rene and Charlotte Dekker) at the
> time.  Yves was instrumental in protecting the Kagu and showed the four of
> us a number of birds at the Riviera Bleue park one morning.  Margot and I
> found the Kagu at two different locations on our own, but the first
> location
> was at the Germain camp area within the park based on info from Rene and
> Charlotte.
>
> Tom Southerland
> Princeton, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Operation Free Anhinga
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:40:16 -0500
Chatters,

During a recent round of golf in Hilton Head S.C., we came across an Anhinga 
with a 10 inch piece of thick rope completely entwined in its bill, making 
opening it impossible. How long it had been like this we had no idea. It was 
sitting beside a large pond a short distance from the tee. We managed to 
capture it (that was the easy part), but without a knife, it was almost 
impossible to extricate it. I struggled with a pair of nail clippers for about 
5-10 minutes, and was almost ready to give up, but a few more cuts and tugs, 
and miraculously it was free. 


The Anhinga, for those not familiar with it, has several backward slanting, 
very sharp "hooks" (1/4 inch long), something I was not aware of until that 
moment. I was lucky ever to get the rope freed from these hooks, and to avoid 
inadvertantly, stabbing my fingers on them, although most of the work was done 
while holding the closed bill. 


After we freed it, the bird sat there, wings spread, for a good 10 minutes, 
much to the consternation of the golfers behind us, who wondered why it didn't 
fly off. However, just as in those Walt Disney movies, as we proceeded down the 
next parallel fairway, another Anhinga, who had been watching, swooped down, 
circled "our" Anhinga a couple of times on the ground, and then both flew off 
together, just as it should have been scripted. 


The golf aside, this lifted our spirits and absolutely made our day. Love it!

Good Birding!
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Panama Birding Tours
From: Elliot Kirschbaum <kingfisher501 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 13:14:00 -0500
I just want to say a big thank you to all the BIRD CHATTERS who responded to my 
inquiry about tours in Panama. You are a great bunch of folks who have been 
very helpful with useful and frank information. 


-- 
Elliot

-- 
Elliot Kirschbaum
Shepherdstown, WV
kingfisher501 at gmail dot com




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: New Caledonia
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 12:55:09 -0500
A while back someone had posted a request on Birdchat for a birding contact
in New Caledonia to take them to see the Kagu among other birds.
Unfortunately, I failed to keep copies of the responses received.  I am now
interested in going to New Caledonia on my way to Indonesia next summer and
if anyone has any information on a contact in New Caledonia could they
please let me know who that might be.  I think if I stay for about three
nights it will give me ample opportunity to see the Kagu and many other of
the island's endemics.
Thank you for any information you can give me.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Nov. 23, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 09:26:47 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Artist, naturalist, and BirdChatter, Barry Kent MacKay, shared this blog
about Willets and Sanderlings: http://bit.ly/1p9xOu8
  ---------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper, With Gerrit Vyn
http://bit.ly/RWBTvK

* Rough-legged Hawk
http://bit.ly/1p9uM9f

* Common Redpoll
http://bit.ly/QGH8ks

* Falcons and Blueberries
http://bit.ly/153UMdj

* The Eagle Eye
http://bit.ly/1zMRuVP

* Birding with Grandpa - Dick Ashford of Klamath Bird Observatory
http://bit.ly/TgrAq4

* Great Horned Owls Calling
http://bit.ly/1tc7rjL

--------------------------------------------------------------
WIN A TRIP FOR TWO! What do you think of BirdNote? Share your thoughts,
and you could win a trip for two with Victor Emanuel Nature Tours.

http://bit.ly/1zZs2iF

--------------------------------------------------------------
Check out next week's shows & photos: http://bit.ly/1zPbM0X
--------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Panama Birding Tours
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 07:02:14 -0800
 I used advantage Panama several years ago www.advantagepanama.com

The guide, Guido Berguido, was superb. Birding fantastic. Beats the pants off 
Costa Rica. 


Only problem is that it's HOT.

Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965


________________________________
 From: Elliot Kirschbaum 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Sent: Sunday, November 23, 2014 7:47 AM
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Panama Birding Tours


I am considering a birding tour of Panama. If anyone has experience with 
Birding Panama (birdingpanama.com ), I would like to 
here what you think of that company. 


Any other tour suggestions would be appreciated as well.

--
Elliot

--
Elliot Kirschbaum
Shepherdstown, WV
kingfisher501 at gmail dot com




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Panama Birding Tours
From: Elliot Kirschbaum <kingfisher501 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 09:47:01 -0500
I am considering a birding tour of Panama. If anyone has experience with 
Birding Panama (birdingpanama.com ), I would like to 
here what you think of that company. 


Any other tour suggestions would be appreciated as well.

-- 
Elliot

-- 
Elliot Kirschbaum
Shepherdstown, WV
kingfisher501 at gmail dot com




BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re Budget bins for guide
From: William Leigh <leightern AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:58:57 +0000
 

 



I would also point out that the expense of ordering a pair of binoculars from 
outside the US could be rather high due to shipping costs and perhaps import 
fees. A friend of mine recently bought a pair of bins for his brother who 
recently moved to South America. The import and shipping fees were very high 
and buying them here in the US cut his cost considerably. 


I wonder if Eagle Optics would have some sort of program to help pay for bins 
for guides who can't afford them. Or if there is a way to start a fund to help 
buy these for the guide. 


best,

William Leigh leightern AT msn.com

Bridgewater, Virginia 
 

 



> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 00:30:12 +0000
> From: katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Thanks for all the Vegas info!
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Hi Chatters,
> 
> Many, many thanks for all the great La Vegas birding info! It certainly looks 
as if Vegas is at the hub of a lot of good birding sites, many of which we will 
definitely try to visit next spring. Since it has been years since we have seen 
most of these species, we are pretty excited about the trip. 

> 
> However, more immediately, my husband and I leave Saturday for almost a month 
away, first in Sri Lanka and then, on a ship seabirding in the Indian Ocean 
with stops in the Seychelles and Mauritius. I will give a run-down of this 
adventure when we get back in late December (just in time for Christmas!) 

> 
> I will turn off BirdChat while we are gone as we will have limited internet 
access... 

> 
> Again, thanks!
> 
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, MD
> 
> 
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		   		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Thanks for all the Vegas info!
From: William Leigh <leightern AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:45:49 +0000
I would also point out that the expense of ordering a pair of binoculars from 
outside the US could be rather high due to shipping costs and perhaps import 
fees. A friend of mine recently bought a pair of bins for his brother who 
recently moved to South America. The import and shipping fees were very high 
and buying them here in the US cut his cost considerably. 

best,

William Leigh leightern AT msn.com

Bridgewater, Virginia 
 

 



> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 00:30:12 +0000
> From: katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Thanks for all the Vegas info!
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Hi Chatters,
> 
> Many, many thanks for all the great La Vegas birding info! It certainly looks 
as if Vegas is at the hub of a lot of good birding sites, many of which we will 
definitely try to visit next spring. Since it has been years since we have seen 
most of these species, we are pretty excited about the trip. 

> 
> However, more immediately, my husband and I leave Saturday for almost a month 
away, first in Sri Lanka and then, on a ship seabirding in the Indian Ocean 
with stops in the Seychelles and Mauritius. I will give a run-down of this 
adventure when we get back in late December (just in time for Christmas!) 

> 
> I will turn off BirdChat while we are gone as we will have limited internet 
access... 

> 
> Again, thanks!
> 
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, MD
> 
> 
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Mystery Duck Revisited (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 16:22:04 -0500
A couple of weeks ago I posted a link to a Flickr photo to the BIRDCHAT and
JERSEYBI e-mail lists. I also sent the photo directly to several birders (a
link to the photo is at the bottom of this e-mail). The photo was of a duck
that I wasn’t quite sure about. When I first saw it in the field I thought
“odd Mallard”. When I got home and looked at the photo I thought possibly a
Gadwall? Anyway, my Flickr photo has almost 400 views now. The dozen or so
responses I received represented a mixed bag of IDs. Just curious if anyone
else might like to chime in? Here’s a summary of the responses:


* Two people thought it was a female Black Duck.


* Four people opted for Gadwall, with two of these folks being more
specific: “male Gadwall still in non-breeding plumage” and “juvenile male
Gadwall”.


* Two people said Mallard, with one of them saying “Apart from the bill
color, this one looks fairly normal by mallard standards.”


* Finally, three people thought it was a hybrid, with two agreeing on the
term “mutt” and one saying: "I'd lean towards Gadwall as the primary
parentage, but there could be a bit of something else in there...”


Here the link to the photo:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15709943911/


Thanks!


Bernie Sloan

Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Thanks for all the Vegas info!
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 00:30:12 +0000
Hi Chatters,

Many, many thanks for all the great La Vegas birding info! It certainly looks 
as if Vegas is at the hub of a lot of good birding sites, many of which we will 
definitely try to visit next spring. Since it has been years since we have seen 
most of these species, we are pretty excited about the trip. 


However, more immediately, my husband and I leave Saturday for almost a month 
away, first in Sri Lanka and then, on a ship seabirding in the Indian Ocean 
with stops in the Seychelles and Mauritius. I will give a run-down of this 
adventure when we get back in late December (just in time for Christmas!) 


I will turn off BirdChat while we are gone as we will have limited internet 
access... 


Again, thanks!

Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Ruby-throats In Guanacaste, Costa Rica
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 18 Nov 2014 12:26:04 -0500
Ever wonder where “our" Ruby-throated Hummingbirds go specifically when the 
weather turns cold? Nobody knows for sure, so here’s a chance to possibly 
solve that mystery once and for all. 


Time is running out to join our upcoming Operation RubyThroat hummingbird 
expedition to Guanacaste Province on the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, where my 
next group of citizen scientists will be enjoying warm, sunny weather while 
observing and photographing all sorts of exotic Neotropical plants and animals. 
Dates are 24 Jan-1 Feb 2015. Sign up today; you'll be very glad you did. 


See the detailed itinerary at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/CostaRica(west)AnnounceMain15.html 


My report on our just-completed record-breaking trip to the Orosi Valley on 
Costa Rica's Caribbean slope will be posted soon. 


Happy (Neotropical) Birding!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Nov. 16, 2014 + a new photo blog
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 09:17:49 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

When a Common Raven landed on snow near photographer Gregg Thompson, the
results were stunning. See for yourself: http://bit.ly/1q3ZEZz
  ---------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Alex Chadwick in Big Bend - Banding Hummingbirds
http://bit.ly/1EOwoch
* Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers
http://bit.ly/1zr40tS
* Alex Chadwick in Big Bend - The Roadrunner
http://bit.ly/1H1sbE6
* Why Bird Poop Is White
http://bit.ly/RWDIsD
* Swans Come Calling
http://bit.ly/11qwpoE
* One Feisty Female Cardinal
http://bit.ly/Pryqtw
* Project FeederWatch - Sign up now!
http://bit.ly/XVXyIT
------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://p0.vresp.com/5sXvEa
   ------------------------------------------------------------
What do you think of BirdNote? Share your thoughts, and you could win a
trip for two with Victor Emanuel Nature Tours.
http://bit.ly/1zZs2iF
--------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: birding near Las Vegas?
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 08:53:00 -0800
The best place for water birds close to Las Vegas is probably the Henderson
Sewer Ponds:

http://www.birdandhike.com/Bird/Urban_LV/Henderson/_Henderson.htm

Excellent for Land Birds is Corn Creek:

http://www.aba.org/wingingit/issues/wi_v17n5.pdf (ABA "Winging It" login
needed)

Here are some additional sites from the 2007 Western Field Ornithologists
conference:


http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/docs/2007/WFO2007ConferenceFieldTrips-revised.pdf 


Here is a bird list from the conference:

http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/docs/2007/LV%20conf%20birdlist.pdf



On Sat, 15 Nov 2014 13:19:55 +0000, "Gail B. Mackiernan
%3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"  wrote:

>HI all,
>
>We have an opportunity to go to Las Vegas for a few days and not being really 
into the casino scene, thought about using it as a base for some desert 
birding. I was out a few years ago for a meeting and had quite a few desert 
species just in the area around our hotel (e.g. Verdin). 

>
>Question is: best time to go and any really good sites within a couple hours' 
drive? 

>
>Thanks,
>Gail Mackiernan
>Silver Spring, MD
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: birding near Las Vegas?
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 13:19:55 +0000
HI all,

We have an opportunity to go to Las Vegas for a few days and not being really 
into the casino scene, thought about using it as a base for some desert 
birding. I was out a few years ago for a meeting and had quite a few desert 
species just in the area around our hotel (e.g. Verdin). 


Question is: best time to go and any really good sites within a couple hours' 
drive? 


Thanks,
Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Become a Bird Song Hero
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 11:24:15 +0000
hello everyone,

I've been playing a fun online game, Bird Song Hero. This game, created by
Cornell's Lab of O, features 50 common songbirds, their songs and
sonograms. It's an online quiz that provides audio and visual cues to help
people learn birdsongs by teaching you how to accurately guess which
sonogram belongs to which songbird. Although being a birder helps, you
don't have to be a bird lover to enjoy this engaging game. learn more about
it:

short URL:

gu.com/p/43bh3

or long URL, if that's your thang:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/nov/15/become-a-bird-song-hero 


please do share this with your friends!

enjoy,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 9, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2014 08:26:50 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the latest photo blog - Mandarin Ducks! http://bit.ly/1uKEIYD
---------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Birds in The Winter Garden
http://bit.ly/QGGCmA

* The Return of Snowbird - The Dark-eyed Junco
http://bit.ly/RWHmD3

* Common Mergansers - Pushed South by Ice

http://bit.ly/1tU1EU8

* Birds Winter at the Salton Sea
http://bit.ly/TGTise

* As the Crow Flies - Huh?
http://bit.ly/TH3r8g

* Is It the Same Robin?
http://bit.ly/18Wcjm1

* The Oystercatcher's World
http://bit.ly/SjcWgN

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://hosted.verticalresponse.com/544840/9807eb24a8/1654020265/ee8aeede91/

  ------------------------------------------------------------
Have you seen the 2015 Birds of BirdNote calendar? Photos by Gerrit Vyn:
http://birdnote.org/2015-birds-of-birdnote-calendar
--------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: beauty pageants for chickens
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 8 Nov 2014 11:01:58 +0000
hello everyone,

i ran across a truly beautiful video about .... beauty pageants for
chickens in malaysia. but these aren't just any chickens, these are the
world's smallest chicken breed, ayam serama, that originated in the
malaysian state of kelantan. they are kept and bred purely for ornamental
reasons and are geven the opportunty to strut their stuff every weekend at
local beauty pageants.

tiny URL

http://gu.com/p/4369t/stw

long URL


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/nov/08/chicken-beauty-pageants-for-cockerels 


after watching this video and researching the piece, i admit that i want to
get some ayam seramas and raise them myself!

three clucks for tiny chickens,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 10/01/14 (White Hummingbirds)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 14:41:16 -0600
Now that feathered, free-flying Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have all departed 
Hilton Pond Center for points south, I couldn't resist one more "This Week at 
Hilton Pond" installment about hummers. None of the birds in my current photo 
essay were actually seen at the Center, but all are white--either albinos, 
leucistos, or pieds. To view this year's eye-popping collection of white 
hummingbird photos sent by Web visitors in 2014, please see 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek141001.html 


While there don’t forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured at the Center, plus some miscellaneous nature notes. 


Happy (Fall) Nature Watching!

BILL 

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

========

BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

The mission of Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History is "to conserve 
plants, animals, habitats, and other natural components of the Piedmont Region 
of the eastern United States through observation, scientific study, and 
education for students of all ages. 


"Never trust a person too lazy to get up for sunrise or too busy to watch the 
sunset." BHjr. 


============


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK
From: Stephen Elliott <steve_elliott2000 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 19:32:16 +0000
This problem or raptor persecution is endemic amongst the lowland estates and 
upland grouse moors in the UK. People can pay up to $3000 for a day shooting so 
the keepers want to maximise bags by keeping all predators out. On the moors 
there are plenty of cage and tunnel traps set to catch stoats and rats etc, 
these are all legally set but amongst the wilds of the moors other illegal 
traps are set and poisoned carcases laid out which are seldom if ever found. 
Hen harriers are persecuted out of England and Scotland, and only one pair 
nested in England this year. 

 
The courts are limited by the penalties they can give, so the punishments must 
be tougher and the estate owners themselves must also be punished. If they are 
to be faced with jail then they will ensure that the keepers behave within the 
law. Unfortunately too many of the law makers in the past have been shooters 
themselves. 



Regards
 
Steve 
 
<") 
   ( \
   / |`` 

 
> Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 13:36:12 -0500
> From: Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird of prey poisoner sentenced 
in UK 

> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> Barry, and all,
> 
> I hope there will come a day when crimes against Nature bear the same 
consequences as crimes against humanity. As is now known--but still not widely 
appreciated enough, as you suggest---all life on this planet is inextricably 
intertwined.... 

> 
> One of my mentors, a psychiatrist, argued more than 20 years ago (in a 
pioneering volume on Ecopsychology) that dysfunctional/maladaptive behaviors 
toward "Nature" should be included in criteria for diagnosing mental illness. 
This chap might well serve as an example... But, whether or not that is the 
case, the crime is too grave for there to be no real consequence... 

> 
> Gregg
> 
> 
> Gregg Gorton, MD
> Narberth, PA 19072
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry K. MacKay 

> Sent: Thursday, November 06, 2014 12:27 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK
> 
> 
> 
> FYI:
> 
> Bird of prey poisoner sentenced http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-29931463
> 
> Reading this story and seeing the picture, I dont know what upset me 
morethe plight of the birds, or the leniency of the sentencing. Amazing when 
you consider how widespread and popular birding is in the U.K., and how strong 
the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. 

> 
> Barry
> 
> 
> 
> Barry Kent MacKay
> 
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> 
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> 
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> 
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 13:36:12 -0500
Barry, and all,

I hope there will come a day when crimes against Nature bear the same 
consequences as crimes against humanity. As is now known--but still not widely 
appreciated enough, as you suggest---all life on this planet is inextricably 
intertwined.... 


One of my mentors, a psychiatrist, argued more than 20 years ago (in a 
pioneering volume on Ecopsychology) that dysfunctional/maladaptive behaviors 
toward "Nature" should be included in criteria for diagnosing mental illness. 
This chap might well serve as an example... But, whether or not that is the 
case, the crime is too grave for there to be no real consequence... 


Gregg


Gregg Gorton, MD
Narberth, PA 19072

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry K. MacKay 

Sent: Thursday, November 06, 2014 12:27 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK



FYI:

Bird of prey poisoner sentenced http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-29931463

Reading this story and seeing the picture, I don’t know what upset me 
more…the plight of the birds, or the leniency of the sentencing. Amazing when 
you consider how widespread and popular birding is in the U.K., and how strong 
the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. 


Barry



Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada






BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bird of prey poisoner sentenced in UK
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 12:27:17 -0500
 

FYI:

Bird of prey poisoner sentenced http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-29931463

Reading this story and seeing the picture, I don’t know what upset me 
more…the plight of the birds, or the leniency of the sentencing. Amazing when 
you consider how widespread and popular birding is in the U.K., and how strong 
the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. 


Barry

 

Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada

 

 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: John Penhallurick 1946 - 2014
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 2014 02:13:53 -0500
Chatters:

Yesterday, I was researching a project and happened upon a reference
to John Penhallurick's World Bird Info web site,
http://worldbirdinfo.net/. I recalled that I had not seen any posts
from or about him since he posted a rather dire message (pasted at
the bottom) in February 2014 concerning his health. Further
investigation yielded the sad news that he died on 5 September 2014
after a long battle with motor neuron disease.

I found a very brief brief obituary and confirmed his passing by
messages posted to the "Birding-Aus"mailing list
(http://birding-aus.org/john-penhallurick/).

I did not know him, at all, but I believe that anyone that has
contributed so much to the birding/ornithology community should be
duly recognized.

The local paper obit is very brief and is archived behind a paywall;
however, the text follows:
John PENHALLURICK
Obituary
DR JOHN MURRAY PENHALLURICK
20 July 1946 - 5 September 2014
Beloved husband of Liz.
Father of Kate and Jane.
Grandfather of Amaya and Evie.
He will be missed
The funeral service for John will be held in the Bluegum Chapel of
William Cole Funerals, 60 Nettlefold Street, Belconnen on Friday 12
September 2014, commencing at 1pm.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Motor Neuron Disease
Association, NSW. Envelopes will be available at the service.
Published in The Canberra Times on Sept. 10, 2014

His Wikipedia "about me" profile includes, in part ...
My name is Dr John Penhallurick and I live in Fraser, Canberra in the
ACT in Australia. I used to be a professor at the University of
Canberra but I retired 5 years ago. My life's work is now my website:
http://www.worldbirdinfo.net where I aim to give for each bird
species a detailed distribution,at least down to country level, and
with large countries, in much finer detail. I also included
subspecies in the distribution data. In addition I am trying to
provide at least the first instance of every distinct form of
scientific name applied to every genus, subgenus, species and
subspecies. I am also trying to include a photo or at least image of
every species, and to include their calls and songs.
He served as a Research Associate - taxonomy of owls of the world -
on the Global Owl Project (http://www.globalowlproject.com/team.php?id=41).

In 2004, his reached 6000 species on his world bird list

(http://bioacoustics.cse.unsw.edu.au/archives/html/canberrabirds/2004-12/msg00064.html). 


His February 2014 message to Birdchat and several other listservers follows:
At 22:00 02/15/2014, John Penhallurick wrote:
>Hi Friends,
>I was hoping that I could cotinue working on my website untilo I was eighty.
>But bulbar-onset Motor Neurone Disease has put paid to that. It is a
>horrible disease: in one year it has destroyed all ability to produce
>intelligilbe speech,and 98% of my swallowing.  As you can imagine, this has
>wrewcked my social life.  And noe it has started to affect my limbs. It has
>started destroying the motor neurones that control my right foot, and I
>expect the next target wil be my right hand & arm.
>So Ihave to make some decisions about what to do with my website.  Ihave
>almosy fiished updating the Movements field for the Chsradiidae and
>Svolpacidae, because movements are very impotant for these groups.
>I added photos or images and calls for almost all of them. Check it out and
>let meknow of any species that Ihave mixed.
>One consequece of my short remaining time (and the MND is extremely
>variable- I don't know whether it wil kill me in six months or four years)
>is that I have decided to abandon the original aim of providing full
>synnymies for all generic,subgeneric,species and subspecies names. In
>principle I'lljust give the citations always, plus any synonymd mentioned in
>Peters.Using sources like Ridgway's Birds of North and Middle America takes
>a lot of time, as the synomies are organized by names, not chronology.  I
>will not attach calls where they are relatively uni,portant in indetifying a
>species eg: the Trochiidae.
>I'll keep you posted on progress, and I will have to notiff a change of ISP.
>My present ISP charges $250 a month, and the website would disapar a mnth
>after my death.
>Dr John Penhallurick
>86 Bingley Cres
>Fraser A.C.T. 2615
>Australia
>email:jpenhall AT bigpond.net.au
>Phone: Home (612) 62585428
>Mobile:0408585426
>sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt Aeneid Book 1,line 462  "The
>world is a world of tears, and the burdens of mortality touch the heart."
>Magna est veritas et praevalet Vulgate, Book of Edras
>The legitimate object of government is to do for a community of people
>whatever they need to have done, but can not do at all, or can not so well
>do, for themselves-in their separate, and individual capacities. Abraham
>Lincoln
>"It's good to look beyond the bounds of accepted ideas" James
>Peebles,Princeton University

His web site (http://worldbirdinfo.net/index.php/home) is still up,
for now ... here are his last "news" entries concerning his health ...

         http://worldbirdinfo.net/index.php/news

He certainly dedicated much time and effort to his web site and it
was referenced by many. I have no other information on the status or
plans for his web site. Perhaps someone knows more ...

Phil


===================================================
Phil Davis, Secretary
MD/DC Records Committee
2549 Vale Court
Davidsonville, Maryland  21035     USA
301-261-0184
mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com

MD/DCRC Web site:  http://www.MDBirds.org/mddcrc/rcindex.html
===================================================

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Duck ID? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 4 Nov 2014 16:24:57 -0500
My gut impression for this bird was Gadwall. Someone else has suggested
American Black Duck hen. Of course it could be some kind of Mallard hybrid
as well. Photo taken in Middlesex County, NJ:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15709943911/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Olive-backed Pipit in Yorba Linda California
From: Steve Sosensky <steve AT OPTICS4BIRDING.COM>
Date: Tue, 4 Nov 2014 11:51:07 -0800
Hi Chatters,



An Olive-backed Pipit is currently in Yorba Regional Park in Yorba Linda CA.
This is only the third record for the Lower 48 - there was also a record in
Mexico. The pipit was found on 11/1 by Jeff Bray, seen on 11/2, missed on
11/3, and seen again today, 11/4. Video, photos and a discussion of the bird
can be seen on the Optics4Birding Nature Blog
http://www.optics4birding.com/blog/
 .







Good viewing,.



Steve Sosensky, VP

Optics4Birding

  www.Optics4Birding.com

Phone: 949-360-6789

Toll Free: 877-674-2473






BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: some gorgeous close-up photos of wild birds
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 4 Nov 2014 08:29:44 +0000
hello everyone,

the vancouver avian research centre (in BC, Canada) has a blog where they
share some of the season's banding results and photos. i thought you might
enjoy looking at some of the birds from autumn 2014 that they are sharing
on their site:

http://bit.ly/10QEhj5

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI Birding Buenos Aires
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2014 19:35:53 -0800
I will have two days in Buenos Aires 17-18 February 2015 for birding and am
thinking about hiring an English speaking guide.  Any suggestions?
Thanks.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Merlin vs. Shorebirds - survival tactic
From: Virginia Nufer <nuferv AT OHSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2014 17:01:02 +0000
This tactic is not confined to shorebirds. I have noticed that when a peregrine 
makes a pass at the Vaux's swifts at the migration roost at Chapman school, a 
large portion of the thousands of swifts hightail it so high that all you can 
see is a barely visible grey smudge swirling above. 


Takes them a while to get the nerve to come back down.

This doesn't happen when a Cooper's hawk shows up. They tend to sit on the 
chimney watching the swifts stream by until one becomes dinner. 


Marsie Nufer
Portland Oregon

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Cartagena
From: Dr Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2014 07:05:55 +0800
I will be in Cartagena, Colombia for a meeting on December 8-9 and may have an 
extra day or so for birding. Has anyone had any experience there (guides, 
safety, locales, birds)? I gather that I can rule out any montane birding in 
the time available but species such as Northern Screamer and Violet-bellied 
Hummingbird can be seen in the area? Thanks in advance! 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 2, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 08:46:16 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

5 Things to Do for Birds in Your Autumn Garden -- and 1 Thing for Yourself!
http://bit.ly/1pepuKa
---------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* The Hardy Harlequin
http://bit.ly/TyqoQd

* The Salt Marshes of Connecticut
http://bit.ly/UGsgCn

* Crows' Night Roost - Rivers of Crows!
http://bit.ly/1wSesML

* When Starlings Cheat - The Superb Starling
http://bit.ly/1qfFExB

* The Amazing, Head-turning Owl
http://bit.ly/QX8Byk

* Spooky Shearwaters - A Halloween Fright

http://bit.ly/19kW41Y
* Basalt as Shelter to Gray-crowned Rosy-Finches
http://bit.ly/1qfG9Yo

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://p0.vresp.com/dwglXM
  ------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Merlin vs. Shorebirds - survival tactic
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 07:47:24 -0700
Hi Chuck, and all,

Among a few observations of the behavior you describe, I have seen
this method of escape behavior used by a Baird's Sandpiper which
shamefully out-climbed TWO Peregrine Falcon!  The falcons both gave
up and broke off as the Baird's turned to a pindot nearing the
stratosphere.  It seems once a shorebird learns this they use it.
Since many don't do it, it would not seem instinctive.

I have watched more than one Merlin relentlessly dog a shorebird
that wouldn't (didn't know to?) use this escape method until the
shorebird was exhausted and an easy grab.  So yes, I think many
shorebirds can out-climb many falcons, and some know it and use it.
It may be a scary somewhat counter-intuitive 'learn' for them,
heading out into open airspace in a wing-race with one of those
high-speed flyboys?  Some shorebirds learn falcons are good divers
but not so much as climbers.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas

On 2014-10-31 14:25, Chuck Sexton wrote:
> Twice in the past week or so, I’ve watched a Merlin make impressive
> dives and chases at the shorebirds hanging out at Devine Lake near
> Leander, TX.  He hasn’t been successful in the few passes I’ve seen
> but he seems to be sticking around, so he may be having some success.
> However, today I saw one particular chase that got me to thinking:
>
> The Merlin made a typical low-level (3 ft above water/ground) power
> run at a mixed flock of shorebirds.  A snipe quickly became the focal
> target but then the snipe continued climbing higher and higher.  The
> Merlin began to lose ground and within a few seconds, with the snipe
> up at 100+ ft, climbing and pulling away, the Merlin peeled off and
> turned away.
>
> Q:  Are falcons, and Merlins in particular, just at a disadvantage in
> a *climbing* chase?  Is their aerodynamics such that it’s harder for
> them to power climb vis-a-vis something like a medium-sized
> shorebird??
>
> Certainly in a power dive or a powered level run at prey, a Merlin is
> a formidable preditor.  But maybe aerodynamics and climbing strength
> have saved many a shorebird to date!
>
> Chuck Sexton
> Austin

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Whooooo said that? The distinct voices of owls
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 11:25:33 +0000
Hello everyone,

I ran across a fun little video that shares the voices of some North
American owls -- including the voice of one owl that is the most widespread
bird species on the planet (any idea which owl that is?). This video also
includes images of these birds, so you can see what each species looks
like, but only after you've listened to its voice first.

the short link:

http://gu.com/p/43vj6/stw

or, if you prefer, the long link:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/nov/01/whooooo-said-that-the-distinct-voices-of-owls 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Merlin vs. Shorebirds - survival tactic
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler AT AUSTIN.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 16:25:23 -0500
Twice in the past week or so, I’ve watched a Merlin make impressive dives and 
chases at the shorebirds hanging out at Devine Lake near Leander, TX. He 
hasn’t been successful in the few passes I’ve seen but he seems to be 
sticking around, so he may be having some success. However, today I saw one 
particular chase that got me to thinking: 


The Merlin made a typical low-level (3 ft above water/ground) power run at a 
mixed flock of shorebirds. A snipe quickly became the focal target but then the 
snipe continued climbing higher and higher. The Merlin began to lose ground and 
within a few seconds, with the snipe up at 100+ ft, climbing and pulling away, 
the Merlin peeled off and turned away. 


Q: Are falcons, and Merlins in particular, just at a disadvantage in a 
*climbing* chase? Is their aerodynamics such that it’s harder for them to 
power climb vis-a-vis something like a medium-sized shorebird?? 


Certainly in a power dive or a powered level run at prey, a Merlin is a 
formidable preditor. But maybe aerodynamics and climbing strength have saved 
many a shorebird to date! 


Chuck Sexton
Austin

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: cr: (1)
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:46:54 -0400
Thomas,
This looks like an infected link that was posted by a so-called "spambot" 
without your knowledge. 

Please do the following:
--change your email password immediately
--do not click on the link
--disinfect your computer with a commercial security scanning product

we will remove the link from the list archives. This message serves to remind 
Birdchat members not to follow the link which is very likely to infect their 
computers, in turn, with malware. 


Laurie Larson
Birdchat co-listowner

On Oct 30, 2014, at 6:16 PM, thomasdoc AT COMCAST.NET wrote:

> http://tszabo.net/9b8v7c6h5g4f3d2s1.xxxxx
>
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html