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Updated on Sunday, August 2 at 05:27 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Greater Rhea,©Barry Kent Mackay

2 Aug Re: AviSys Announcement [Richard Carlson ]
2 Aug AviSys Announcement [Jerry Blinn ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Ronald Orenstein ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Jules Levin ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
2 Aug Re: winter birdsong [Ronald Orenstein ]
2 Aug birds singing in winter [Vader Willem Jan Marinus ]
2 Aug winter birdsong [John Arnfield ]
1 Aug Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song []
1 Aug Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song [Joyanne Hamilton ]
1 Aug BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 2, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
30 Jul Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
30 Jul Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song [Laura Erickson ]
30 Jul FLEDGED Birdies and Song [Joyanne Hamilton ]
29 Jul Interesting white pigeon family(?) (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
29 Jul Hilton Pond 06/18/15 (Piedmont To Mountains, And Back) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
29 Jul Field Guide Recommendation for Japan [Patrick Belardo ]
26 Jul BirdNote - Last week & the week of July 26, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
23 Jul Ducks in a row (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [COBB_ROGER ]
21 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["snorkler AT juno.com" ]
20 Jul "Raptors and a Changing Climate" symposium--Abstracts due Aug. 3rd [Jeff Lincer ]
20 Jul Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 19 Jul 2015 (#2015-147) [Carl Perretta ]
20 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Dick Cannings ]
20 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Chip Clouse ]
20 Jul Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Joe Byrnes ]
20 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [ ]
20 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Mary Beth Stowe ]
20 Jul Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Mike Feighner ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Ronald Orenstein ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Elliott Bedows ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [L Larson ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Darlene ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Mike Feighner ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["sandfalcon1 ." ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? []
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? []
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Laura Erickson ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Richard Carlson ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Mike Feighner ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Dixie Burkhart ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Eric Jeffrey ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Susan Fogleman ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Eric Jeffrey ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Joseph Morlan ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Ronald Orenstein ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Ronald Orenstein ]
19 Jul Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
18 Jul Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? [Daniel Edelstein ]
18 Jul BirdNote, last week & the week of July 19, 2015 [Ellen Blackstone ]
18 Jul Watch: This brilliant bird dances for her supper [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
17 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) [Hilary Powers ]
17 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) [Katrina Knight ]
17 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
17 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
17 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
17 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
17 Jul Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
17 Jul Mystery not-bird [Elizabeth Dodd ]
16 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) []
16 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) []
16 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) [Theo Hofmann ]
16 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) [Katharine Mills ]
16 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) [Joyanne Hamilton ]
16 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
16 Jul Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) [Joyanne Hamilton ]
16 Jul Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
16 Jul AUDUBON Society and ArcGIS Mapping [Joyanne Hamilton ]
15 Jul Fw: Article: Kookaburra and magpie among Australian birds in decline, says report [Ronald Orenstein ]
15 Jul Starlings on Prozac [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
12 Jul Re: 6 week exploration of birds and new discoveries about environmental health [JPMyers ]

Subject: Re: AviSys Announcement
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 22:21:17 +0000
Thanks to Jerry for worrying about his customers when he obviously has 
more important things on his mind. Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965
      From: Jerry Blinn 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2015 3:08 PM
 Subject: [BIRDCHAT] AviSys Announcement
   
There is an important announcement at the AviSys web site:
http://www.avisys.net
If you have visited recently, you may have to click F5 to refresh the
main page.

Jerry


Jerry Blinn

Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: AviSys Announcement
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 16:08:19 -0600
There is an important announcement at the AviSys web site:
http://www.avisys.net
If you have visited recently, you may have to click F5 to refresh the
main page.

Jerry


Jerry Blinn

Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 16:01:35 -0400
I'll have to check, but I believe European Dippers sing on their winter 
territories. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 2, 2015, at 11:52 AM, Alvaro Jaramillo  wrote:
>
> Ron,
> At least in the Americas most birds that are winter territorial defend their 
territories with call notes rather than songs (Ovenbird, Am. Redstart, Summer 
Tanager etc.). 

> Regards
> Alvaro
> Alvaro Jaramillo
> alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
> www.alvarosadventures.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein 

> Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2015 6:13 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] winter birdsong
>
> Many birds establish territories on their wintering grounds, and defend them 
by singing. Others will begin singing late in winter as the song centre in 
their brain begins to regrow, possibly for practice. Some birds establish pair 
bonds en route to the breeding grounds, so singing may play a role in finding 
mates before breeding commences. 

>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>> On Aug 2, 2015, at 4:55 AM, John Arnfield  wrote:
>>
>> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
>> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
>> They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
>> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).
>>
>> John
>>
>>> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>>> breeding season.
>>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>>
>>>        -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
>>> To:
>>> Cc:
>>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>>
>>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>>
>>> Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just
>>> reserved for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the 
spring? 

>>>
>>> Many thanks again.
>>> Joyanne Hamilton
>>> Shageluk, Alaska
>>>
>>>> On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>>> year.
>>>>
>>>> Laura Erickson
>>>> Duluth, MN
>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton  > wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>>>>
>>>>> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>>> stop their  >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones
>>> fledge?
>>>>>
>>>>> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>>> to do with  >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and
>>> Hermit Thrush still  >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned
>>> Sparrows, warblers of various  >> yellows and green, Crossbills and
>>> basically no one sings anymore!
>>>>>
>>>>> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as
>>> of last  >> week.
>>>>>
>>>>> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>>> quite  >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>>>>
>>>>> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>>>>
>>>>> Joyanne Hamilton
>>>>> Shageluk, Alaska
>>>>>
>>>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  >>
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> --
>>>> Laura Erickson
>>>>
>>>> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds  >  > There
>>> is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
>>>> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>>>> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>>> the  > winter.
>>>>
>>>> --Rachel Carson
>>>>
>>>> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>>>
>>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  > Archives:
>>> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> --
>> ===============================================
>> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Jules Levin <ameliede AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 11:25:32 -0700
On 8/2/2015 1:55 AM, John Arnfield wrote:
> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
>  They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not
> sure).
Based on the odd mocking bird I've heard around here, I've thought that
they might be
first-year males rehearsing for the big time in the spring.  I actually
saw the bird; he was a little pudgier than a summer male who has been
singing his heart out 24/7--June nights are the worst. The song was, as
you say,
wistful, without the aggressive harshness of summer, but definitely a
mocking bird repertory of varied phrases, I assume imprinted on those
short nights in June by his dad.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles





>
> John
>
> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>> breeding season.
>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>
>>          -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne
>> Hamilton"
>> To:
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>
>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>
>>   Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
>> for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?
>>
>>   Many thanks again.
>>   Joyanne Hamilton
>>   Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>>   On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>
>>   > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>> year.
>>   >
>>   > Laura Erickson
>>   > Duluth, MN
>>   >
>>   > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton
>>   > wrote:
>>   >
>>   >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>   >>
>>   >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>> stop their
>>   >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>   >>
>>   >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>> to do with
>>   >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
>> Thrush still
>>   >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
>> various
>>   >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>>   >>
>>   >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
>> last
>>   >> week.
>>   >>
>>   >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>> quite
>>   >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>   >>
>>   >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>   >>
>>   >> Joyanne Hamilton
>>   >> Shageluk, Alaska
>>   >>
>>   >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>   >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>   >>
>>   >
>>   >
>>   >
>>   > --
>>   > --
>>   > Laura Erickson
>>   >
>>   > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>>   >
>>   > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
>> birds.
>>   > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>>   > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>> the
>>   > winter.
>>   >
>>   > --Rachel Carson
>>   >
>>   > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>   >
>>   > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>   > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>   BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>   Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
> --
> ===============================================
> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 08:52:14 -0700
Ron,
 At least in the Americas most birds that are winter territorial defend their 
territories with call notes rather than songs (Ovenbird, Am. Redstart, Summer 
Tanager etc.). 

Regards
Alvaro
Alvaro Jaramillo
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com
www.alvarosadventures.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein 

Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2015 6:13 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] winter birdsong

Many birds establish territories on their wintering grounds, and defend them by 
singing. Others will begin singing late in winter as the song centre in their 
brain begins to regrow, possibly for practice. Some birds establish pair bonds 
en route to the breeding grounds, so singing may play a role in finding mates 
before breeding commences. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 2, 2015, at 4:55 AM, John Arnfield  wrote:
>
> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
> They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).
>
> John
>
>> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>> breeding season.
>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>
>>         -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
>> To:
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>
>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>
>>  Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just
>> reserved for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the 
spring? 

>>
>>  Many thanks again.
>>  Joyanne Hamilton
>>  Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>>  On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>
>>  > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>> year.
>>  >
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  > Duluth, MN
>>  >
>>  > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton  > wrote:
>>  >
>>  >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>  >>
>>  >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>> stop their  >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones
>> fledge?
>>  >>
>>  >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>> to do with  >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and
>> Hermit Thrush still  >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned
>> Sparrows, warblers of various  >> yellows and green, Crossbills and
>> basically no one sings anymore!
>>  >>
>>  >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as
>> of last  >> week.
>>  >>
>>  >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>> quite  >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>  >>
>>  >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>  >>
>>  >> Joyanne Hamilton
>>  >> Shageluk, Alaska
>>  >>
>>  >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  >>
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>  >>
>>  >
>>  >
>>  >
>>  > --
>>  > --
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  >
>>  > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds  >  > There
>> is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
>>  > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>> > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>> the  > winter.
>>  >
>>  > --Rachel Carson
>>  >
>>  > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>  >
>>  > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/  > Archives:
>> http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
> --
> ===============================================
> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: winter birdsong
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 09:13:18 -0400
Many birds establish territories on their wintering grounds, and defend them by 
singing. Others will begin singing late in winter as the song centre in their 
brain begins to regrow, possibly for practice. Some birds establish pair bonds 
en route to the breeding grounds, so singing may play a role in finding mates 
before breeding commences. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Aug 2, 2015, at 4:55 AM, John Arnfield  wrote:
>
> Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
> song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
> They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
> get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).
>
> John
>
>> On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
>> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
>> breeding season.
>> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>>
>>         -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
>> To:
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>>
>> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>>
>>  Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
>> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
>> for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?
>>
>>  Many thanks again.
>>  Joyanne Hamilton
>>  Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>>  On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>>
>>  > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
>> year.
>>  >
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  > Duluth, MN
>>  >
>>  > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton
>>  > wrote:
>>  >
>>  >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>  >>
>>  >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
>> stop their
>>  >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>  >>
>>  >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
>> to do with
>>  >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
>> Thrush still
>>  >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
>> various
>>  >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>>  >>
>>  >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
>> last
>>  >> week.
>>  >>
>>  >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
>> quite
>>  >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>  >>
>>  >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>  >>
>>  >> Joyanne Hamilton
>>  >> Shageluk, Alaska
>>  >>
>>  >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>  >>
>>  >
>>  >
>>  >
>>  > --
>>  > --
>>  > Laura Erickson
>>  >
>>  > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>>  >
>>  > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
>> birds.
>>  > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>>  > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>> the
>>  > winter.
>>  >
>>  > --Rachel Carson
>>  >
>>  > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>  >
>>  > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>  Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
> --
> ===============================================
> John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: birds singing in winter
From: Vader Willem Jan Marinus <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 13:02:34 +0000
Here in Europe the birds that sing often in winter--the European Robin is a 
good example---also hold territories in Winter, and the birdsong in that season 
is probably almost exclusively territorial. In the Robin both males and females 
hold separate territories , and both sexes sing in Winter. Some Flock-living 
birds, like the Willow Tit, have a short song in Winter---different from the 
spring song--that probably mainly serves as contact sounds. 




Many migrant birds already start singing at the end of the winter season while 
still in the winter quarters. Much of the physiology of song birds is regulated 
by hormones, and these need time to build up in spring; accordingly, also 
spring song builds up gradually from simple beginnings to full song, and many 
birds sing already before arriving at the summer territories 




                                             Wim Vader, Troms, Norway

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: winter birdsong
From: John Arnfield <arnfield.2 AT OSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 09:55:38 +0100
Resident European Robins are noted for singing in winter (although the
song seems to be slightly more wistful than the spring and summer one).
  They continue to defend a territory throughout the winter (whether to
get a jump up on breeding, for its food resources or both, I am not sure).

John

On 02/08/2015 03:58, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
> Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
> breeding season.
> Larry GardellaMontgomery
>
>          -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton"
> To:
> Cc:
> Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song
>
> Thank you all for your responses to this question.
>
>   Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
> wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
> for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?
>
>   Many thanks again.
>   Joyanne Hamilton
>   Shageluk, Alaska
>
>   On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:
>
>   > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
> year.
>   >
>   > Laura Erickson
>   > Duluth, MN
>   >
>   > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton
>   > wrote:
>   >
>   >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>   >>
>   >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
> stop their
>   >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>   >>
>   >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
> to do with
>   >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
> Thrush still
>   >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
> various
>   >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>   >>
>   >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
> last
>   >> week.
>   >>
>   >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
> quite
>   >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>   >>
>   >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>   >>
>   >> Joyanne Hamilton
>   >> Shageluk, Alaska
>   >>
>   >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>   >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>   >>
>   >
>   >
>   >
>   > --
>   > --
>   > Laura Erickson
>   >
>   > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>   >
>   > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
> birds.
>   > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>   > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
> the
>   > winter.
>   >
>   > --Rachel Carson
>   >
>   > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>   >
>   > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>   > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>   BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>   Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>


--
===============================================
John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 22:58:04 -0400
Birds often sing in winter. Late winter could be getting ready for
breeding season.
Larry GardellaMontgomery

        -----------------------------------------From: "Joyanne Hamilton" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] FLEDGED Birdies and Song

Thank you all for your responses to this question.

 Here’s another question. So when these same birds reach their
wintering destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved
for wooing, territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring?

 Many thanks again.
 Joyanne Hamilton
 Shageluk, Alaska

 On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:

 > Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this
year.
 >
 > Laura Erickson
 > Duluth, MN
 >
 > On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
 > wrote:
 >
 >> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
 >>
 >> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically
stop their
 >> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
 >>
 >> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had
to do with
 >> the time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit
Thrush still
 >> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of
various
 >> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
 >>
 >> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of
last
 >> week.
 >>
 >> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is
quite
 >> rare. Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
 >>
 >> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
 >>
 >> Joyanne Hamilton
 >> Shageluk, Alaska
 >>
 >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
 >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 >>
 >
 >
 >
 > --
 > --
 > Laura Erickson
 >
 > For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
 >
 > There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of
birds.
 > There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
 > nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
the
 > winter.
 >
 > --Rachel Carson
 >
 > Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
 >
 > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
 > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

 BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
 Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 17:14:36 -0800
Thank you all for your responses to this question.

Heres another question. So when these same birds reach their wintering 
destinations, do they sing there or is singing just reserved for wooing, 
territory claiming, baby-making, child care in the spring? 


Many thanks again.
Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska




On Jul 30, 2015, at 3:26 PM, Laura Erickson  wrote:

> Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this year.
>
> Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
> wrote:
>
>> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>
>> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically stop their
>> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>
>> This is the first time Ive noticed this and wondered if it had to do with
>> the time of fledging.  Lots and lots of Swainsons and Hermit Thrush still
>> around, American Robins, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of various
>> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>>
>> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of last
>> week.
>>
>> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is quite
>> rare.  Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>>
>> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>>
>> Joyanne Hamilton
>> Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>            --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of August 2, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 1 Aug 2015 07:24:03 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Aldo Leopold and the Field Sparrows
http://bit.ly/13AJWJ4
* Negotiation - What to Talk About When You Talk About Birds
--With Rosalind Renfrew of Vermont Center for Ecostudies
http://bit.ly/1MBnft1
* Waterfalls, Caves, and White-collared Swifts
http://bit.ly/LuTJ71
* Sparrows Sing in an Arizona Monsoon
http://bit.ly/19oFgIO
* Turkey Vulture, A Poem by Robinson Jeffers
http://bit.ly/M7GreZ
* A Crossbill's Beak Does the Job
http://bit.ly/OCqcew
* A Childhood Love of Birds - With Gordon Orians
http://bit.ly/1HekRSa
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1MDQrk5
--------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening! Let us know what shows you like -- or don't -- and
/why./
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 18:33:40 -0500
Joyanne, Laura,

On 7/30/2015 6:26 PM, Laura Erickson wrote:

> Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this year.
>
> Laura Erickson
> Duluth, MN
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
> wrote:
>
>> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>>
>> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically stop their
>> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>>
>> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had to do with
>> the time of fledging.  Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit Thrush still
>> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of various
>> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!

I believe  lot of birds also molt [at least partial] immediately after
nesting chores are done.  A bird's life is all about cycles.

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Subject: Re: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 18:26:08 -0500
Yep. No need to defend a territory or attract a mate anymore this year.

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 5:47 PM, Joyanne Hamilton 
wrote:

> Hello my Favorite Bird Family,
>
> Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically stop their
> beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge?
>
> This is the first time I’ve noticed this and wondered if it had to do with
> the time of fledging.  Lots and lots of Swainson’s and Hermit Thrush still
> around, American Robin’s, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of various
> yellows and green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore!
>
> By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of last
> week.
>
> This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is quite
> rare.  Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh?
>
> Enjoy the remainder of the summer.
>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: FLEDGED Birdies and Song
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2015 14:47:50 -0800
Hello my Favorite Bird Family,

Is it my imagination or do adult migratory songbirds basically stop their 
beautiful singing shortly after their little ones fledge? 


This is the first time Ive noticed this and wondered if it had to do with the 
time of fledging. Lots and lots of Swainsons and Hermit Thrush still around, 
American Robins, White-Crowned Sparrows, warblers of various yellows and 
green, Crossbills and basically no one sings anymore! 


By the way, Tree and Cliff Swallows already heading your way as of last week.

This has been a bug-sparce summer in our part of Alaska which is quite rare. 
Maybe more mosquitoes where you are, eh? 


Enjoy the remainder of the summer.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Interesting white pigeon family(?) (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 19:15:47 -0400
Today I ran across these interesting white pigeons foraging in a parking
lot. From a distance I first thought they were small gulls.

This first photo shows the largest bird with wings that were always
drooping. I don't think it's an injury...I think it was bred to look like
this:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19938535328/

This photo shows what I think is the family group of four birds:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19938535288/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 06/18/15 (Piedmont To Mountains, And Back)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 17:44:21 -0400
What with double knee replacement surgery looming in late June, I never had 
time to complete my "This Week at Hilton Pond" photo essay for 18-30 June 2015. 
Now that I'm home and slowly recuperating, I've been able to return to the task 
at hand and have just posted that installment. It deals with some interesting 
nature observations here in the Carolina Piedmont and in West Virginia's 
Appalachian Mountains—everything from weevils to blacksnakes and invasive 
plants to a stinky little skunk with a taste for eggs. I even make mention of 
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, whose young first appeared near the end of last 
month. 


As always I include a list of birds banded and recaptured during the period, as 
well as a few nature notes. 


I'm not sure when I'll be well enough to get into the field and/or produce 
another installment, so please enjoy and share this latest: 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek150618.html 


Happy Nature Watching,

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Field Guide Recommendation for Japan
From: Patrick Belardo <pbelardo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2015 12:48:17 -0400
Hello,

I'll be in Japan for work for 2 weeks at the end of August. I'm hoping to
fit in some birding. Does anyone have a recommendation on the best field
guide? I see the Princeton Guide by Mark Brazil that covers East Asia, an
out of print guide from 1985 specific to Japan published by the Wild Bird
Society, and a photographic guide by Tadao Shimba. I'm leaning towards the
Princeton Guide because it's the most recent. Any suggestions? Please reply
off list.

--
Patrick Belardo
Piscataway, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of July 26, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 11:02:28 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Finding Your Way Home - With Help from the Birds
http://bit.ly/1CP5qEB
* Most Kingfishers Don't Fish
http://bit.ly/1MAKuS3
* Peatlands - Maine's Sunkhaze Meadows Refuge
http://bit.ly/17rDR07
* Towhees' Distractive Plumage
http://bit.ly/18fPRWQ
* Are Birds' Nests Reused?
http://bit.ly/1LiXmil
* Birds in Summer - The Heat of the Day
http://bit.ly/MB2lgs
* Murres' Swimming Migration - They Can't Fly!
http://bit.ly/1On4QPI
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1LM12Ia
--------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Ducks in a row (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 10:27:38 -0400
Every now and then very common birds will pose in a way that makes for an
interesting photo. Mallards on the lip of a pond spillway with a river in
the background:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19933186842/

Also, since my birding is sort of in a seasonal slump right now, I've tried
to keep my photographic eye sharp by attempting to shoot dragonflies. Lots
of blurry photos usually, but I like this one of what I think is an Eastern
Amberwing dragonfly on a bed of duckweed:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19754167690/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: COBB_ROGER <COBB_ROGER AT SMC.EDU>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:42:17 +0000
MANY years ago, I was told Neil Young ( the musician ) birded.

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of snorkler AT juno.com 

Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2015 7:18 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Our host and birding guide in Brisbane, southern Queensland, told us he had 
taken Bette Midler birding. 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: Mary Beth Stowe 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 08:20:29 -0500

On a January 2000 Sparrow Workshop tour that Jon Dunn led, one of the 
participants was a TV actress (soaps) named Ellen Ratner; since I didn't watch 
much TV (much less soaps) I had never heard of her, so we got along famously 
(i.e., no "celebrity syndrome" to worry about... :-)) 


MB

Mary Beth Stowe
McAllen, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 9:14 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Actress Lili Taylor is a member of the American Birding Association's Board of 
Directors. 


On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 1:20 AM, Daniel Edelstein 
wrote:

> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight,
> though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the
> following:
>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is
> an ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in
> the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to
> the conservation of extant bird species).
>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "snorkler AT juno.com" <snorkler@JUNO.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 14:17:31 GMT
Our host and birding guide in Brisbane, southern Queensland, told us he had 
taken Bette Midler birding. 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: Mary Beth Stowe 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 08:20:29 -0500

On a January 2000 Sparrow Workshop tour that Jon Dunn led, one of the 
participants was a TV actress (soaps) named Ellen Ratner; since I didn't watch 
much TV (much less soaps) I had never heard of her, so we got along famously 
(i.e., no "celebrity syndrome" to worry about... :-)) 


MB

Mary Beth Stowe
McAllen, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 9:14 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Actress Lili Taylor is a member of the American Birding Association's Board of 
Directors. 


On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 1:20 AM, Daniel Edelstein 
wrote:

> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight,
> though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the
> following:
>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is
> an ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in
> the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to
> the conservation of extant bird species).
>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: "Raptors and a Changing Climate" symposium--Abstracts due Aug. 3rd
From: Jeff Lincer <jefflincer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 19:09:05 -0700
 Dear Colleagues--Apologies for cross-mailings, of course. The *RAPTOR
RESEARCH FOUNDATION* is pleased to announce that its 2015 conference in
Sacramento, California, USA, will feature a symposium on “*Raptors
and Climate Change*” on November 6, 2015, which will include both
nocturnal  and  diurnal   birds    of prey and address:


   - *How climate change is impacting raptors, their prey, and their
   ecosystems*
   - *Experimental approaches and analytical tools*
   - *Translating research findings into on-the-ground management and
   conservation*


The Call for Abstracts
​has been distributed.

*INTERESTED IN PRESENTING A PAPER?​ **All abstracts must be submitted by
August 3rd, **2015,* which is rapidly approaching.
​​
See

http://www.raptorresearchfoundation.org/conferences/current-conference/abstract-submission 

for
guidelines. If you have questions, suggested contacts, or your organization
would
li
​k​
e to participate in this symposium, email Symposium Chair: Dr. Jeff Lincer,
*R*esearcher’s *I*mplementing *C*onservation *A*ction (RICA).
JeffLincer AT gmail.com. Co-Chairs: Zachary Ormsby (RICA) and Neil Paprocki
(Hawkwatch International).

Other symposia will include Golden Eagle Conservation and Raptor
Interactions with Wind Energy.

If you are involved with an appropriate newsletter or journal, and you wish
to include a short announcement for this symposium, please do so. If you
need help with that announcement, have questions or suggested
contacts/mailing lists, or your organization would like to participate in
this symposium, please contact me.

Thank you and best regards,

*Jeff*


Jeffrey L. Lincer, Ph.D.

President, RICA (a non-profit organization)

*R*esearchers* I*mplementing *C*onservation *A*ction

9251 Golondrina Dr., La Mesa, CA 91941 USA

(619) 668-0032 (Office); JeffLincer AT gmail.com

 501(C)3; EIN 46-0831411; DUNS 040563933


[image:

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Western Section web site 
The Wildlife Society web site 
Find Western Section on facebook! 


   - Research Associate, San Diego Museum of Natural History


   - Southern California Chapter Representative to TWS Western Section (
   http://www.wildlife.org)  


   - Board Member, Nurtured by Nature (www.facebook.com/swimwithotters)


“*Ecosystems are not only more complex than we think, they are more complex
than we can think*.” Frank Egler

 "*It is reckless to suppose that biodiversity can be diminished
indefinitely without threatening humanity itself.*" Edward O. Wilson


*SAVE THE DATE *​ November 6, 2015 for​*: “RAPTORS and a CHANGING CLIMATE 

SYMPOSIUM” to be held in conjunction with the *2015 Raptor Research
Foundation meeting in Sacramento, CA; Nov. 4-8

​

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Subject: Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 19 Jul 2015 (#2015-147)
From: Carl Perretta <cjperretta AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 16:20:42 -0400
How about conservative columnist John Leo, who has written some very funny 
pieces about birding? 



https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19930809&id=eKIaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=rSwEAAAAIBAJ&pg=4585,136559&hl=en 
 



==================
Carl Perretta
cjperretta AT comcast.net
Wallingford, PA  USA

> 
> 
>  1. Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Sun, 19 Jul 2015 19:24:30 -0700
> From:    Mike Feighner 
> Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
> 
> I found 10 suggestions in the following article from 5 years back, "The 10 
best celebrity birdwatchers": << 
http://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2010/oct/24/ten-best-celebrity-birdwatchers 
>> 

> You may be surprised:


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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Dick Cannings <dickcannings AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 08:39:41 -0700
Hi chatters:
I also went birding with James Schlesinger one day. I was working at the 
University of British Columbia and the university president's office called me, 
basically ordering me to stop whatever I was doing and go birding with him--I 
was happy to oblige. He really wanted to see a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, as that 
was the only likely species he could add to his lifelist in Vancouver. It was 
mid-summer and too early for Sharp-taileds, so we went up into the mountains 
instead, finding (among other things) a Red-breasted Sapsucker, a species that 
was on the verge of being split. So I think he did get one new bird that day. 

Cheers
Dick Cannings
Penticton, BC

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joe Byrnes 

Sent: July 20, 2015 7:11 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

I had a similar encounter with James Schlesinger. I ran into him birding in 
Virginia while looking for the reported Hoary Redpoll. I introduced myself to 
him, and he said "I'm Jim Schlesinger", so I asked him if he were the Jim 
Schlesinger I thought he was, and he said "Yes" with a twinkle in his eye. Nice 
easy-going guy. 


Another time I saw Cyrus Vance walking his dog near the C&O Canal. I didn't get 
to meet him and I suspect he just wanted to get away (with man's best friend) 
from the pressure of the State Department. 


-Joe Byrnes
Columbia, Md.

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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Chip Clouse <chip.clouse AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 08:28:38 -0600
Chatters,
Former Treasury Secretary, Henry (Hank) Paulson is a birder -
http://articles.latimes.com/2006/may/31/nation/na-paulson31
and I'm surprised no one has mentioned multi-award winning and multi-Oscar
nominated actress Jane Alexander - also a former ABA Board Member.

Chip Clouse
Arvada, CO - soon to be Silver Spring, MD

On Mon, Jul 20, 2015 at 8:11 AM, Joe Byrnes  wrote:

> I had a similar encounter with James Schlesinger.  I ran into him birding
> in Virginia while looking for the reported Hoary Redpoll.  I introduced
> myself to him, and he said "I'm Jim Schlesinger", so I asked him if he were
> the Jim Schlesinger I thought he was, and he said "Yes" with a twinkle in
> his eye.  Nice easy-going guy.
>
> Another time I saw Cyrus Vance walking his dog near the C&O Canal.  I
> didn't get to meet him and I suspect he just wanted to get away (with man's
> best friend) from the pressure of the State Department.
>
> -Joe Byrnes
> Columbia, Md.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Joe Byrnes <lbroller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 10:11:12 -0400
I had a similar encounter with James Schlesinger. I ran into him birding in 
Virginia while looking for the reported Hoary Redpoll. I introduced myself to 
him, and he said "I'm Jim Schlesinger", so I asked him if he were the Jim 
Schlesinger I thought he was, and he said "Yes" with a twinkle in his eye. Nice 
easy-going guy. 


Another time I saw Cyrus Vance walking his dog near the C&O Canal. I didn't get 
to meet him and I suspect he just wanted to get away (with man's best friend) 
from the pressure of the State Department. 


-Joe Byrnes
Columbia, Md.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 13:35:34 +0000
Hi -- 

I've been out of town and thus late to this thread (so perhaps someone has 
already named James Schlesinger, Sec'y of Defense under Nixon and Ford) -- 
however my husband Barry Cooper had a unique encounter with him. It was the 
height of the Vietnam War protests (maybe 1973), thousands of demonstrators in 
Washington DC carrying signs reading "down with Nixon) "Down with Schlesinger" 
and similar. It was also height of spring migration. Barry and his friend Lou 
were birding the C&O Canal just outside DC when who should come along the 
towpath in the opposite directions but James S.! He saw Barry and Lou were 
birders and hurried over -- "Seen anything good?" "Well, we just had a male 
Golden-wing a few hundred yards back..." At that, Schlesinger broke into a trot 
and hurried off in the direction of the prize. They didn't see him again that 
day so never knew if he saw the bird. In later years, Barry and I sometimes ran 
into him at Huntley Meadows Park in northern Virginia. 


Gail Mackiernan 
Silver Spring, MD 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Mary Beth Stowe"  
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
Sent: Monday, July 20, 2015 9:20:29 AM 
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? 

On a January 2000 Sparrow Workshop tour that Jon Dunn led, one of the 
participants was a TV actress (soaps) named Ellen Ratner; since I didn't watch 
much TV (much less soaps) I had never heard of her, so we got along famously 
(i.e., no "celebrity syndrome" to worry about... :-)) 


MB 

Mary Beth Stowe 
McAllen, TX 
www.miriameaglemon.com 


-----Original Message----- 
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 9:14 AM 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions? 

Actress Lili Taylor is a member of the American Birding Association's Board of 
Directors. 


On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 1:20 AM, Daniel Edelstein  
wrote: 

> Hello Chatters: 
> 
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, 
> though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the 
> following: 
> 
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list. 
> 
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is 
> an ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in 
> the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to 
> the conservation of extant bird species). 
> 
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
> icons/entertainment luminaries? 
> 
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions. 
> 
> Daniel Edelstein 
> Novato, CA 
> & 
> Ellison Bay, WI 
> 
> www.warblerwatch.com 
> 
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com 
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site) 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ 
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html 
> 

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ 
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html 

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ 
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html 


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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe AT MIRIAMEAGLEMON.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 08:20:29 -0500
On a January 2000 Sparrow Workshop tour that Jon Dunn led, one of the 
participants was a TV actress (soaps) named Ellen Ratner; since I didn't watch 
much TV (much less soaps) I had never heard of her, so we got along famously 
(i.e., no "celebrity syndrome" to worry about... :-)) 


MB

Mary Beth Stowe
McAllen, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of B.G. Sloan 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 9:14 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Actress Lili Taylor is a member of the American Birding Association's Board of 
Directors. 


On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 1:20 AM, Daniel Edelstein 
wrote:

> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight,
> though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the
> following:
>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is
> an ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in
> the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to
> the conservation of extant bird species).
>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 07:55:44 -0400
Justice Stephen Breyer and his wife Johanna are avid birders, as are Jimmy and 
Rosalind Carter. 


Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Darlene 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 5:21 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Former First Lady, Laura Bush, is a birder and keeps a bird journal.

Darlene
Tucson
On Jul 19, 2015, at 2:00 PM, sandfalcon1 . wrote:

> Daryl Hannah was featured in an interview in Birding magazine in the
> last year (was it December?).  She is more of an environmental
> activist than a birder, but as has been discussed at length on this
> list "birder" is a fluid term that defies simple definition.  Perhaps
> the best is that if you identify as a birder, then you are in fact a
> birder.
>
> Brandon Best
> Lawrenceville, GA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Mike Feighner <feinerVogel94551 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 19:24:30 -0700
I found 10 suggestions in the following article from 5 years back, "The 10 best 
celebrity birdwatchers": << 
http://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2010/oct/24/ten-best-celebrity-birdwatchers 
>> 

You may be surprised:

Alison Steadman
Damon Albarn
Jonathan Franzen
David Bailey
Bill Bailey
Vic Reeves
Eric Morecambe,
Bill Oddie
Rupert Hartley
Rex Features
Ken Clarke
Trudie Goodwin
Guy Garvey
Martin Noble
Prince Philip
Paul McCartney



Rory McGrath

--
Michael Feighner
Livermore, CA, Alameda County

http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
--
“We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn 
back.” –Martin Luther King 


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliott Bedows 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 5:41 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Hi everyone,

I recall watching an episode of CBS's 'The Late Show' when DAVID LETTERMAN 
related a story of how he saw an Eagle in Central Park(?) and proceeded to 
describe the field marks that led him to realize that he'd seen an imm. Bald 
Eagle rather than a very rare (for NYC) golden Eagle. He also has, over the 
years, told other bird stories. I deduce that birding it was a hobby of his. 


Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 12:20 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Hello Chatters:

Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 


1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.

2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an ardent 
birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New Yorker 
relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of extant 
bird species). 


3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 


Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Daniel Edelstein
Novato, CA
&
Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
(my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)








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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 21:55:11 -0400
Bond's widow wrote a book on the subject, called "How James Bond Got His Name". 
Fleming indeed owned a copy of Bond's "Birds of the West Indies" (a guide, not 
a checklist). He liked the name because it sounded ordinary, and wrote Bond 
asking permission to use it. 


I met the real James Bond in 1966, at the International Ornithological Congress 
in Oxford. Many years after his death I visited the Academy of Natural Sciences 
in Philadelphia, where I was saddened to learn that the Museum guides had no 
idea that Jsmes Bond had once worked there. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 6:05 PM, L Larson  wrote:
>
> I don’t think anyone has mentioned that Ian Fleming was a “keen 
birdwatcher” — the story goes that James Bond was named after the author of 
the Checklist of Birds of the West Indies, whose book was on Fleming’s shelf. 

>
> Laurie
> Princeton NJ
>
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Daniel Edelstein  
wrote: 

>>
>> Hello Chatters:
>>
>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered 

>> an opinion based on the following:
>>
>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>
>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an 

>> important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its 
relationship to the conservation of extant bird species). 

>>
>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>>
>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>
>> Daniel Edelstein
>> Novato, CA
>> &
>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>
>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>
>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Elliott Bedows <ebedows AT COX.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 19:41:20 -0500
Hi everyone,

I recall watching an episode of CBS's 'The Late Show' when DAVID LETTERMAN 
related a story of how he saw an Eagle in Central Park(?) and proceeded to 
describe the field marks that led him to realize that he'd seen an imm. Bald 
Eagle rather than a very rare (for NYC) golden Eagle. He also has, over the 
years, told other bird stories. I deduce that birding it was a hobby of his. 


Elliott Bedows
Bellevue, NE

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 12:20 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Hello Chatters:

Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered 

an opinion based on the following:

1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.

2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an ardent 
birder (and who recently published an 

important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its 
relationship to the conservation of extant bird species). 


3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 


Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Daniel Edelstein
Novato, CA
&
Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
(my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)








BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 18:05:35 -0400
I don’t think anyone has mentioned that Ian Fleming was a “keen 
birdwatcher” — the story goes that James Bond was named after the author of 
the Checklist of Birds of the West Indies, whose book was on Fleming’s shelf. 


Laurie
Princeton NJ


> On Jul 19, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Daniel Edelstein  
wrote: 

>
> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered 

> an opinion based on the following:
>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an 

> important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its 
relationship to the conservation of extant bird species). 

>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Darlene <dsmyth3 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 14:20:52 -0700
Former First Lady, Laura Bush, is a birder and keeps a bird journal.

Darlene
Tucson
On Jul 19, 2015, at 2:00 PM, sandfalcon1 . wrote:

> Daryl Hannah was featured in an interview in Birding magazine in the
> last year (was it December?).  She is more of an environmental
> activist than a birder, but as has been discussed at length on this
> list "birder" is a fluid term that defies simple definition.  Perhaps
> the best is that if you identify as a birder, then you are in fact a
> birder.
>
> Brandon Best
> Lawrenceville, GA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Mike Feighner <feinerVogel94551 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 14:04:24 -0700
At the Edison/Ford Winter Home in Fort Meyers, Florida, exhibited are his egg 
collection, binoculars, and bird guides. 


<< 
http://www.edisonfordwinterestates.org/collections/biographies/edison-ford-winter-estates/ 
>> 


" From their own backyard the Edisons dabbled in bird watching, and were 
continually fascinated by the pelicans, herons, and cranes that call the waters 
of southwest Florida home. Mina Edison, a prolific letter writer, often noted 
the songbirds that graced the Seminole Lodge property. In a letter to Henry 
Ford’s wife Clara she wrote of the “sparkling atmosphere and birds filling 
the air with music.” - See more at: 
http://www.edisonfordwinterestates.org/collections/biographies/edison-ford-winter-estates/#sthash.xAa8TSLX.dpuf 



--
Michael Feighner
Livermore, CA, Alameda County

http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
--
“We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn 
back.” –Martin Luther King 


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Erickson 

Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 12:28 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Is there evidence that Thomas Edison watched birds in the wild, rather than the 
ones in his huge aviary? 


Best,
Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 2:06 PM, Mike Feighner  wrote:

> Thomas Edison
>
> --
> Michael Feighner
> Livermore, CA, Alameda County
>
> http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
> --
> “We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.  We cannot
> turn back.” –Martin Luther King
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Susan Fogleman
> Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 10:21 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>
> Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington
> Post, April 1977.  In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary
> of Defense, other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont).
> Interesting reading!
>
>
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/wa
> shingt on-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/
>
> It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense
> Sec'y, planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding.
> This practice apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a
> quick surprise trip to New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in
> March of 1975.
> Coincidentally, the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting
> hundreds of birders to nearby Newburyport, MA.  The VIP pol twitched
> the VIP larid, and apparently found all to be well at Pease.  Mission
> accomplished.
>
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton NH
>
>
>
> On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
>
> > In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would
> > hope)
> list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont,
> author of books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and
> central character in the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see).
> >
> > Ronald Orenstein
> > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > Mississauga, ON
> > Canada L5L 3W2
> > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> >
> >> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay 
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Jack Black?
> >>
> >> Just kidding.
> >>
> >> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can
> sound, eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about
> movie stars and "artists" who are "household names") but I can tell
> you that noted author Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband,
> Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, has written a book on birding.
>
> http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/ma
> rgaret
>
> -atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writ
> ing.ht
> ml
> >>
> >> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of.    He was a
> coroner, sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert"
> opinion sent many innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for 
killing 

> their respective infants.   Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his
> unintended  ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many
> since it turned out that what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned
> out to have causes other than what he postulated at the time.
> >>
> >> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age.  But what is not
> >> known
> is that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in
> the news not in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding.
> 
> >>
> >> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity";
> >> I'm
> not sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably
> more famous ones, although not necessarily famous to me.
> >>
> >> Barry
> >>
> >>
> >> Barry Kent MacKay
> >> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> >> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> >> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> >> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> >> Markham, Ontario
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein
> >> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
> >> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> >> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
> >>
> >> Hello Chatters:
> >>
> >> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight,
> >> though
> I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following:
> >>
> >> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
> >>
> >> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen
> >> is an
> ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the
> The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the
> conservation of extant bird species).
> >>
> >> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
> >>
> >> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
> >>
> >> Daniel Edelstein
> >> Novato, CA
> >> &
> >> Ellison Bay, WI
> >>
> >> www.warblerwatch.com
> >>
> >> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> >> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >>
> >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature--the 
assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter. 


            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "sandfalcon1 ." <sandfalcon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 17:00:52 -0400
Daryl Hannah was featured in an interview in Birding magazine in the
last year (was it December?).  She is more of an environmental
activist than a birder, but as has been discussed at length on this
list "birder" is a fluid term that defies simple definition.  Perhaps
the best is that if you identify as a birder, then you are in fact a
birder.

Brandon Best
Lawrenceville, GA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Coddlers AT AOL.COM
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 16:23:45 -0400
Comedian Bill Oddie (The Goodies) is a high profile birder in the UK,  
having written several books, including maybe the funniest ever on the subject 

"Little Black Bird Book"
 
Bruce Barrett
San Jose, CA
 
 
In a message dated 19-Jul-15 10:23:02 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,  
sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM writes:

Apropos  this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post, 
April  1977.  In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense,  
other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont).  Interesting  
reading!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washingt
on-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/

It  mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y,  
planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This 
practice apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick 
surprise 

trip  to New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975.   
Coincidentally, the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting hundreds 

of birders to nearby Newburyport, MA.  The VIP pol twitched the  VIP larid, 
and apparently found all to be well at Pease.  Mission  accomplished.

Susan Fogleman
Campton NH



On Jul 19,  2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:

> In addition to Leopold,  of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope) 
list of birder-murderers  would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, 
author of books on birds of the  Philippines and South Pacific and central 
character in the movie 'Foxcatcher'  (which I have yet to see).
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady  Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
>  ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM,  Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>>
>> Jack  Black?
>>
>> Just kidding.
>>
>> I don't  really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can 
sound, eh?...but  younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars 
and "artists" who  are "household names") but I can tell you that noted 
author Margaret Atwood is  a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a 
novelist, has written a book  on birding.   

http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson 

-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html
>>
>>  And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of.    He was a  
coroner, sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion  
sent many innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing  
their respective infants.   Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent,  and his 
unintended  ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so  many since it 
turned out that what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out  to have 
causes other than what he postulated at the  time.
>>
>> That much is known to Canadians of a certain  age.  But what is not 
known is that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the 

news not in a good way, he took up the gentle  art of birding.   

>>
>>  He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm 
not  sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more 
famous  ones, although not necessarily famous to me.
>>
>>  Barry
>>
>>
>> Barry Kent MacKay
>> Bird  Artist, Illustrator
>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>>  http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>>  Markham,  Ontario
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>  -----Original Message-----
>> From: National Birding Hotline  Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel  Edelstein
>> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
>> To:  BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity  Birder Suggestions?
>>
>> Hello  Chatters:
>>
>> Nothing too important to read that follows  from my “pen” tonight, 
though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion  based on the following:
>>
>> 1. Many people know Jimmy  Carter has a robust life list.
>>
>> 2. That  highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder  (and who recently published an important article in the The 
New Yorker  relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the 
conservation of extant  bird species).
>>
>> 3. But who can share and tell one or  more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment  luminaries?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for any  suggestions.
>>
>> Daniel Edelstein
>> Novato,  CA
>> &
>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>
>>  www.warblerwatch.com
>>
>>  http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>> (my eight-year-old  warbler-centric blog  site)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>  BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat  Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 13:23:05 -0700
Hi all,

When I was young, a long long time ago, Jim (the James A.) Lane,
father of the Birder's Guide to.... series, said he birded with
Humphrey Bogart at Bogie's place in I think it was Laurel or Bundy
Canyon (L.A.).

Jim was sworn to secrecy to not divulge their meetings and activity,
watching birds, for fear it would ruin his image and threaten his
career if it were known tough-guy Bogie partook in such a silly
sissy "little old ladies in tennis shoes" activity.  This of course
would have been back in the late 50's or early 60's.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas

Where I just got yard bird 200, a heard Purple Gallinule
that must have been flying upriver.

On 2015-07-18 22:20, Daniel Edelstein wrote:
> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight,
> though I’d be flatttered if you offered
> an opinion based on the following:
>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is
> an ardent birder (and who recently published an
> important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and
> its relationship to the conservation of extant bird species).
>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 14:27:46 -0500
Is there evidence that Thomas Edison watched birds in the wild, rather than
the ones in his huge aviary?

Best,
Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN

On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 2:06 PM, Mike Feighner  wrote:

> Thomas Edison
>
> --
> Michael Feighner
> Livermore, CA, Alameda County
>
> http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
> --
> “We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.  We cannot turn
> back.” –Martin Luther King
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Susan Fogleman
> Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 10:21 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>
> Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post,
> April 1977.  In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense,
> other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont).  Interesting
> reading!
>
>
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washingt
> on-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/
>
> It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y,
> planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This
> practice
> apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick surprise
> trip
> to New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975.
> Coincidentally, the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting
> hundreds of birders to nearby Newburyport, MA.  The VIP pol twitched the
> VIP
> larid, and apparently found all to be well at Pease.  Mission accomplished.
>
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton NH
>
>
>
> On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
>
> > In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope)
> list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont,
> author
> of books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central
> character
> in the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see).
> >
> > Ronald Orenstein
> > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > Mississauga, ON
> > Canada L5L 3W2
> > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> >
> >> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay 
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Jack Black?
> >>
> >> Just kidding.
> >>
> >> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can
> sound, eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie
> stars and "artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that
> noted
> author Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a
> novelist, has written a book on birding.
>
> http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret
>
> -atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.ht
> ml
> >>
> >> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of.    He was a
> coroner, sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion
> sent many innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing
> their respective infants.   Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his
> unintended  ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it
> turned out that what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have
> causes other than what he postulated at the time.
> >>
> >> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age.  But what is not known
> is that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the
> news not in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding.
> 
> >>
> >> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm
> not sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more
> famous ones, although not necessarily famous to me.
> >>
> >> Barry
> >>
> >>
> >> Barry Kent MacKay
> >> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> >> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> >> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> >> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> >> Markham, Ontario
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein
> >> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
> >> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> >> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
> >>
> >> Hello Chatters:
> >>
> >> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, 
though 

> I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following:
> >>
> >> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
> >>
> >> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an
> ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The
> New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the
> conservation of extant bird species).
> >>
> >> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
> >>
> >> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
> >>
> >> Daniel Edelstein
> >> Novato, CA
> >> &
> >> Ellison Bay, WI
> >>
> >> www.warblerwatch.com
> >>
> >> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> >> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >>
> >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> >> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



-- 
-- 
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 12:26:54 -0700
Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt

Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Jul 19, 2015, at 12:06 PM, Mike Feighner  
wrote: 

>
> Thomas Edison
>
> --
> Michael Feighner
> Livermore, CA, Alameda County
>
> http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
> --
> “We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.  We cannot turn
> back.” –Martin Luther King
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Susan Fogleman
> Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 10:21 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>
> Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post,
> April 1977.  In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense,
> other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont).  Interesting
> reading!
>
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washingt
> on-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/
>
> It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y,
> planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This practice
> apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick surprise trip
> to New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975.
> Coincidentally, the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting
> hundreds of birders to nearby Newburyport, MA.  The VIP pol twitched the VIP
> larid, and apparently found all to be well at Pease.  Mission accomplished.
>
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton NH
>
>
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
>>
>> In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope)
> list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author
> of books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character
> in the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see).
>>
>> Ronald Orenstein
>> 1825 Shady Creek Court
>> Mississauga, ON
>> Canada L5L 3W2
>> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>>
>>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>>>
>>> Jack Black?
>>>
>>> Just kidding.
>>>
>>> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can
> sound, eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie
> stars and "artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted
> author Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a
> novelist, has written a book on birding.
> http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret
> -atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.ht
> ml
>>>
>>> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of.    He was a
> coroner, sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion
> sent many innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing
> their respective infants.   Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his
> unintended  ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it
> turned out that what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have
> causes other than what he postulated at the time.
>>>
>>> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age.  But what is not known
> is that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the
> news not in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding.
> 
>>>
>>> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm
> not sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more
> famous ones, although not necessarily famous to me.
>>>
>>> Barry
>>>
>>>
>>> Barry Kent MacKay
>>> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>>> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>>> Markham, Ontario
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein
>>> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
>>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>>>
>>> Hello Chatters:
>>>
>>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, 
though 

> I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following:
>>>
>>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>>
>>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an
> ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The
> New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the
> conservation of extant bird species).
>>>
>>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>>
>>> Daniel Edelstein
>>> Novato, CA
>>> &
>>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>>
>>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>>
>>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Mike Feighner <feinerVogel94551 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 12:06:17 -0700
Thomas Edison

--
Michael Feighner
Livermore, CA, Alameda County

http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
--
We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.  We cannot turn
back. Martin Luther King

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Susan Fogleman
Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2015 10:21 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post,
April 1977.  In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense,
other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont).  Interesting
reading!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washingt
on-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/

It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y,
planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This practice
apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick surprise trip
to New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975.
Coincidentally, the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting
hundreds of birders to nearby Newburyport, MA.  The VIP pol twitched the VIP
larid, and apparently found all to be well at Pease.  Mission accomplished.

Susan Fogleman
Campton NH



On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:

> In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope)
list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author
of books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character
in the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see).
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>>
>> Jack Black?
>>
>> Just kidding.
>>
>> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can
sound, eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie
stars and "artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted
author Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a
novelist, has written a book on birding.
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret
-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.ht
ml
>>
>> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of.    He was a
coroner, sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion
sent many innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing
their respective infants.   Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his
unintended  ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it
turned out that what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have
causes other than what he postulated at the time.
>>
>> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age.  But what is not known
is that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the
news not in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding.

>>
>> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm
not sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more
famous ones, although not necessarily famous to me.
>>
>> Barry
>>
>>
>> Barry Kent MacKay
>> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>> Markham, Ontario
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein
>> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>>
>> Hello Chatters:
>>
>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my pen tonight, though
Id be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following:
>>
>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>
>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The
New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the
conservation of extant bird species).
>>
>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
icons/entertainment luminaries?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>
>> Daniel Edelstein
>> Novato, CA
>> &
>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>
>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>
>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 14:10:43 -0400
I must admit, I'm not much for listing or chasing (unless in new territory, 
where what I chase belongs) but I would probably go after one of those 
Razor-billed Larks that the article mentions. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Eric Jeffrey 

Sent: July-19-15 1:53 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Great article, which I had forgotten. Both Claudia Wilds -- the most meticulous 
birder I ever met -- and Paul DuMont (not John DuPont) were somewhat mentors to 
me as I was learning to bird. 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church VA.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 1:20 PM, Susan Fogleman  wrote:
>
> Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post, 
April 1977. In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense, 
other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont). Interesting reading! 

>
> 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washington-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/ 

>
> It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y, 
planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This practice 
apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick surprise trip to 
New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975. Coincidentally, 
the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting hundreds of birders to 
nearby Newburyport, MA. The VIP pol twitched the VIP larid, and apparently 
found all to be well at Pease. Mission accomplished. 

>
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton NH
>
>
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
>>
>> In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope) 
list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author of 
books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character in 
the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see). 

>>
>> Ronald Orenstein
>> 1825 Shady Creek Court
>> Mississauga, ON
>> Canada L5L 3W2
>> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>>
>>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>>>
>>> Jack Black?
>>>
>>> Just kidding.
>>>
>>> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

>>>
>>> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, 
sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 

>>>
>>> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is 
that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not 
in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 

>>>
>>> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not 
sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous 
ones, although not necessarily famous to me. 

>>>
>>> Barry
>>>
>>>
>>> Barry Kent MacKay
>>> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>>> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>>> Markham, Ontario
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

>>> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
>>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>>>
>>> Hello Chatters:
>>>
>>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, 
though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 

>>>
>>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>>
>>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New 
Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of 
extant bird species). 

>>>
>>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>>>
>>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>>
>>> Daniel Edelstein
>>> Novato, CA
>>> &
>>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>>
>>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>>
>>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Dixie Burkhart <dixieburk AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 14:09:20 -0400
Janet Lee was an avid birder.

Dixie Burkhart
Van Buren County, Michigan

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 1:53 PM, Eric Jeffrey  wrote:
>
> Great article, which I had forgotten. Both Claudia Wilds -- the most 
meticulous birder I ever met -- and Paul DuMont (not John DuPont) were somewhat 
mentors to me as I was learning to bird. 

>
> Eric Jeffrey
> Falls Church VA.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 1:20 PM, Susan Fogleman  
wrote: 

>>
>> Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post, 
April 1977. In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense, 
other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont). Interesting reading! 

>>
>> 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washington-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/ 

>>
>> It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y, 
planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This practice 
apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick surprise trip to 
New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975. Coincidentally, 
the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting hundreds of birders to 
nearby Newburyport, MA. The VIP pol twitched the VIP larid, and apparently 
found all to be well at Pease. Mission accomplished. 

>>
>> Susan Fogleman
>> Campton NH
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
>>>
>>> In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope) 
list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author of 
books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character in 
the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see). 

>>>
>>> Ronald Orenstein
>>> 1825 Shady Creek Court
>>> Mississauga, ON
>>> Canada L5L 3W2
>>> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>>>
>>>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Jack Black?
>>>>
>>>> Just kidding.
>>>>
>>>> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

>>>>
>>>> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, 
sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 

>>>>
>>>> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is 
that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not 
in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 

>>>>
>>>> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not 
sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous 
ones, although not necessarily famous to me. 

>>>>
>>>> Barry
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Barry Kent MacKay
>>>> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>>>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>>>> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>>>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>>>> Markham, Ontario
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

>>>> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
>>>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>>>>
>>>> Hello Chatters:
>>>>
>>>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, 
though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 

>>>>
>>>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>>>
>>>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New 
Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of 
extant bird species). 

>>>>
>>>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>>>>
>>>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>>>
>>>> Daniel Edelstein
>>>> Novato, CA
>>>> &
>>>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>>>
>>>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>>>
>>>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>>>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>>
>>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 13:53:10 -0400
Great article, which I had forgotten. Both Claudia Wilds -- the most meticulous 
birder I ever met -- and Paul DuMont (not John DuPont) were somewhat mentors to 
me as I was learning to bird. 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church VA.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 1:20 PM, Susan Fogleman  wrote:
>
> Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post, 
April 1977. In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense, 
other D.C. area notables are mentioned (including DuPont). Interesting reading! 

>
> 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washington-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/ 

>
> It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y, 
planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This practice 
apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick surprise trip to 
New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975. Coincidentally, 
the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting hundreds of birders to 
nearby Newburyport, MA. The VIP pol twitched the VIP larid, and apparently 
found all to be well at Pease. Mission accomplished. 

>
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton NH
>
>
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
>>
>> In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope) 
list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author of 
books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character in 
the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see). 

>>
>> Ronald Orenstein
>> 1825 Shady Creek Court
>> Mississauga, ON
>> Canada L5L 3W2
>> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>>
>>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>>>
>>> Jack Black?
>>>
>>> Just kidding.
>>>
>>> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

>>>
>>> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, 
sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 

>>>
>>> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is 
that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not 
in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 

>>>
>>> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not 
sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous 
ones, although not necessarily famous to me. 

>>>
>>> Barry
>>>
>>>
>>> Barry Kent MacKay
>>> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>>> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>>> Markham, Ontario
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

>>> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
>>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>>>
>>> Hello Chatters:
>>>
>>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, 
though I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 

>>>
>>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>>
>>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New 
Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of 
extant bird species). 

>>>
>>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>>>
>>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>>
>>> Daniel Edelstein
>>> Novato, CA
>>> &
>>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>>
>>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>>
>>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT ROADRUNNER.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 13:20:50 -0400
Apropos this thread is this article(URL below) from The Washington Post, April 
1977. In addition to Elliot Richardson, the US Secretary of Defense, other D.C. 
area notables are mentioned (including DuPont). Interesting reading! 



http://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/magazine/1977/04/10/washington-bird-watch/d887be37-ec4d-48c7-932f-1697a4fcfc45/ 


It mentions James Schlesinger, Richardson's predecessor as Defense Sec'y, 
planning military inspection trips to areas with good birding. This practice 
apparently was passed on to Sec'y Richardson, who made a quick surprise trip to 
New England to inspect Pease Air Force Base in March of 1975. Coincidentally, 
the Lower 48's first record Ross's Gull was attracting hundreds of birders to 
nearby Newburyport, MA. The VIP pol twitched the VIP larid, and apparently 
found all to be well at Pease. Mission accomplished. 


Susan Fogleman
Campton NH



On Jul 19, 2015, at 9:04 AM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:

> In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope) list 
of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author of 
books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character in 
the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see). 

>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
>> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>>
>> Jack Black?
>>
>> Just kidding.
>>
>> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

>>
>> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, 
sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 

>>
>> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is 
that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not 
in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 

>>
>> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not 
sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous 
ones, although not necessarily famous to me. 

>>
>> Barry
>>
>>
>> Barry Kent MacKay
>> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>> Markham, Ontario
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

>> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>>
>> Hello Chatters:
>>
>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my pen tonight, though Id 
be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 

>>
>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>
>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New 
Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of 
extant bird species). 

>>
>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>>
>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>
>> Daniel Edelstein
>> Novato, CA
>> &
>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>
>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>
>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 11:15:17 -0400
Wes Craven, of horror movie fame, has referred to himself as a birder, and Paul 
McCartney has also been said to have an interest in birds (American English as 
well as British). 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church VA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 10:59 AM, Joseph Morlan  wrote:
>
> Alger Hiss.  His famous sighting of a Prothonotary Warbler
>
> https://files.nyu.edu/th15/public/bird.html
>
>
> On Sat, 18 Jul 2015 22:20:12 -0700, Daniel Edelstein
>  wrote:
>
>> Hello Chatters:
>>
>> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered 

>> an opinion based on the following:
>>
>> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>>
>> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an 

>> important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its 
relationship to the conservation of extant bird species). 

>>
>> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>>
>> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>>
>> Daniel Edelstein
>> Novato, CA
>> &
>> Ellison Bay, WI
>>
>> www.warblerwatch.com
>>
>> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> --
> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 07:59:35 -0700
Alger Hiss.  His famous sighting of a Prothonotary Warbler

https://files.nyu.edu/th15/public/bird.html


On Sat, 18 Jul 2015 22:20:12 -0700, Daniel Edelstein
 wrote:

>Hello Chatters:
>
>Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered 

>an opinion based on the following:
>
>1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
>2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an ardent 
birder (and who recently published an 

>important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its 
relationship to the conservation of extant bird species). 

>
>3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>
>Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
>Daniel Edelstein
>Novato, CA
>&
>Ellison Bay, WI
>
>www.warblerwatch.com
>
>http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
>(my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 10:14:22 -0400
Actress Lili Taylor is a member of the American Birding Association's Board
of Directors.

On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 1:20 AM, Daniel Edelstein 
wrote:

> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though
> I’d be flatttered if you offered
> an opinion based on the following:
>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an
> ardent birder (and who recently published an
> important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its
> relationship to the conservation of extant bird species).
>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 10:01:13 -0400
Horror film director Wes Craven (Nightmare on Elm Street).  He became a
member of Audubon California's Board of Directors in 2010.

On Sun, Jul 19, 2015 at 9:20 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:

> Should have remembered that, recently having seen the movie where his
> character constantly calls himself "Golden Eagle" or "Eagle" and refers to
> himself as an "ornithologist".  Apart from identifying the call of a Barred
> Owl and wearing binoculars, he shows little evidence of being a birder
> through the film, although that's not what it was about.
>
> Anyone who has not seen it owes it to him or herself to do so...the acting
> is superb.   The Steve Carrel character draws upon superb direction, as
> well...you can almost see thought processes unfolding in his aristocratic
> mind.  And at first I didn't recognize Mark Ruffalo (I didn't recognize
> either name at the outset, but I did recognize him in the special
> features...thinking...oh yeah...he's the guy who always plays the same
> person...but not this time; he prepared well, drawing upon information from
> his character's real-life counterpart's widow).  They're all good, well
> directed, and well-staged and with a neat appearance by a name I did
> recognize, Vanessa Redgrave.  Great to see her.
>
> Rent it, Ron...you'll like it.
>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ronald Orenstein [mailto:ron.orenstein AT rogers.com]
> Sent: July-19-15 9:04 AM
> To: Barry K. MacKay
> Cc: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>
> In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope)
> list of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont,
> author of books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central
> character in the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see).
>
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON
> Canada L5L 3W2
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>
> > On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
> >
> > Jack Black?
> >
> > Just kidding.
> >
> > I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can
> sound, eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie
> stars and "artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that
> noted author Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson,
> also a novelist, has written a book on birding.
> 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

> >
> > And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of.    He was a
> coroner, sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion
> sent many innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing
> their respective infants.   Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his
> unintended  ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it
> turned out that what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have
> causes other than what he postulated at the time.
> >
> > That much is known to Canadians of a certain age.  But what is not known
> is that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the
> news not in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding.  <
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Randal_Smith>
> >
> > He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm
> not sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more
> famous ones, although not necessarily famous to me.
> >
> > Barry
> >
> >
> > Barry Kent MacKay
> > Bird Artist, Illustrator
> > Studio: (905)-472-9731
> > http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> > mimus AT sympatico.ca
> > Markham, Ontario
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [mailto:
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein
> > Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
> > To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
> >
> > Hello Chatters:
> >
> > Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, 
though 

> I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following:
> >
> > 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
> >
> > 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an
> ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The
> New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the
> conservation of extant bird species).
> >
> > 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood
> icons/entertainment luminaries?
> >
> > Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
> >
> > Daniel Edelstein
> > Novato, CA
> > &
> > Ellison Bay, WI
> >
> > www.warblerwatch.com
> >
> > http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> > (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 09:20:13 -0400
Should have remembered that, recently having seen the movie where his character 
constantly calls himself "Golden Eagle" or "Eagle" and refers to himself as an 
"ornithologist". Apart from identifying the call of a Barred Owl and wearing 
binoculars, he shows little evidence of being a birder through the film, 
although that's not what it was about. 


Anyone who has not seen it owes it to him or herself to do so...the acting is 
superb. The Steve Carrel character draws upon superb direction, as well...you 
can almost see thought processes unfolding in his aristocratic mind. And at 
first I didn't recognize Mark Ruffalo (I didn't recognize either name at the 
outset, but I did recognize him in the special features...thinking...oh 
yeah...he's the guy who always plays the same person...but not this time; he 
prepared well, drawing upon information from his character's real-life 
counterpart's widow). They're all good, well directed, and well-staged and with 
a neat appearance by a name I did recognize, Vanessa Redgrave. Great to see 
her. 


Rent it, Ron...you'll like it.

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada





-----Original Message-----
From: Ronald Orenstein [mailto:ron.orenstein AT rogers.com]
Sent: July-19-15 9:04 AM
To: Barry K. MacKay
Cc: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope) list 
of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author of 
books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character in 
the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see). 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>
> Jack Black?
>
> Just kidding.
>
> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

>
> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, 
sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 

>
> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is 
that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not 
in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 

>
> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not 
sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous 
ones, although not necessarily famous to me. 

>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>
> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 

>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New 
Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of 
extant bird species). 

>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 09:04:00 -0400
In addition to Leopold, of course, the rather exclusive (one would hope) list 
of birder-murderers would have to include John Eleuthere DuPont, author of 
books on birds of the Philippines and South Pacific and central character in 
the movie 'Foxcatcher' (which I have yet to see). 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>
> Jack Black?
>
> Just kidding.
>
> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

>
> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, 
sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 

>
> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is 
that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not 
in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 

>
> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not 
sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous 
ones, although not necessarily famous to me. 

>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>
> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 

>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New 
Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of 
extant bird species). 

>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 09:00:44 -0400
Well, Nathan Leopold would perhaps qualify. He was an amateur ornithologist who 
recorded Kirtland's Warbler in the Chicago area. He was also convicted, with 
his friend Richard Loeb, in the infamous 'thrill-killing' kidnapping and murder 
of a 14-year-old boy in 1924 (Clarence Darrow defended them). After his release 
from prison he moved to Puerto Rico, and published a checklist of the island's 
birds in 1963. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Jul 19, 2015, at 7:35 AM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>
> Jack Black?
>
> Just kidding.
>
> I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 

>
> And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, 
sort of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 

>
> That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is 
that to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not 
in a good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 

>
> He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not 
sure there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous 
ones, although not necessarily famous to me. 

>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

> Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
>
> Hello Chatters:
>
> Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 

>
> 1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.
>
> 2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an 
ardent birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New 
Yorker relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of 
extant bird species). 

>
> 3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 

>
> Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
>
> Daniel Edelstein
> Novato, CA
> &
> Ellison Bay, WI
>
> www.warblerwatch.com
>
> http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
> (my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 07:35:12 -0400
Jack Black?

Just kidding.

I don't really follow that type of celebrity (oh how snobbish I can sound, 
eh?...but younger folks despair at how little I know about movie stars and 
"artists" who are "household names") but I can tell you that noted author 
Margaret Atwood is a birder, and her husband, Graeme Gibson, also a novelist, 
has written a book on birding. 
http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categories/arts-entertainment/literature/margaret-atwood-queen-of-canlit/graeme-gibson-and-margaret-atwood-discuss-writing.html 


And here's an infamous Canadian you won't have heard of. He was a coroner, sort 
of a Medical Examiner, here in Canada, whose "expert" opinion sent many 
innocent parents to prison, some for long stretches, for killing their 
respective infants. Dr. Smith was found to be incompetent, and his unintended 
ineptitude resulted in a huge, tragic loss for so many since it turned out that 
what he called "shaken baby syndrome" turned out to have causes other than what 
he postulated at the time. 


That much is known to Canadians of a certain age. But what is not known is that 
to seek release from the intense pressure of being so much in the news not in a 
good way, he took up the gentle art of birding. 
 


He's not really a villain in the classic sense, nor a "celebrity"; I'm not sure 
there are any really evil birders, but there are probably more famous ones, 
although not necessarily famous to me. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario





-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

Sent: July-19-15 1:20 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?

Hello Chatters:

Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered an opinion based on the following: 


1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.

2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an ardent 
birder (and who recently published an important article in the The New Yorker 
relating to Climate Change and its relationship to the conservation of extant 
bird species). 


3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 


Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Daniel Edelstein
Novato, CA
&
Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com
(my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)








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Subject: Famous, Celebrity Birder Suggestions?
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 22:20:12 -0700
Hello Chatters:

Nothing too important to read that follows from my “pen” tonight, though 
I’d be flatttered if you offered 

an opinion based on the following:

1. Many people know Jimmy Carter has a robust life list.

2. That highly-acclaimed and best-selling author Jonathan Franzen is an ardent 
birder (and who recently published an 

important article in the The New Yorker relating to Climate Change and its 
relationship to the conservation of extant bird species). 


3. But who can share and tell one or more birdwatching Hollywood 
icons/entertainment luminaries? 


Thanks in advance for any suggestions. 

Daniel Edelstein
Novato, CA
&
Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com 
(my eight-year-old warbler-centric blog site)








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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of July 19, 2015
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 09:11:44 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Jazz for the Birds
http://bit.ly/13XLEV7
* Where Birdsong Began
http://bit.ly/1MA6Ump
* Small Birds Mob Big Ones
http://bit.ly/KMcX6j
* Puffins - Clowns of the Sea
http://bit.ly/N7Tq1Q
* The Loquacious Chat
http://bit.ly/13rhkjD
* Soaring with Redtails
http://bit.ly/13XLhtG
* White-throated Swifts
http://bit.ly/1J7dF01
---------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1e77Y52
--------------------------
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 600 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Watch: This brilliant bird dances for her supper
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 15:19:42 +0100
hello everyone,

I thought you might enjoy this amusing little video of a gull that has
trained a human passerby to feed her after she "dances":

http://gu.com/p/4anep/stw

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: Hilary Powers <hilary AT POWERSEDIT.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:10:52 -0700
On 7/17/2015 9:46 AM, Spector, David (Biology) wrote:
> To paraphrase Robert Benchley, there are two kinds of birdwatchers:
> those that admit their misidentifications and those that don't.

At least my favorite mis-ID was definitely a bird. I looked up into a
bare tree and there at the very top, a crow was sitting. Since my
companions were emerging from the car and setting up scopes, I rested my
bins on the bird... and choked.

"Look at that crow!" says I. They looked - and howled. It was absolutely
a crow to the naked eyeball, but binoculars reported it as shining green
and with a very long, thin bill... much closer and on a much smaller
tree than it seemed.

--
-       Hilary Powers - hilary AT powersedit.com - Oakland CA         -
-         Freelance copyediting and developmental editing            -
- "Making Word 2010 Work for You" - www.the-efa.org/res/booklets.php -
-        The edit you want - online, on time, and on target          -
-     Needle Felting: www.SalFelt.com;  www.facebook.com/SalFelt     -

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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: Katrina Knight <kknight AT FASTMAIL.FM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:19:22 -0400
At 12:46 PM 7/17/2015, Spector, David (Biology) wrote:
>To paraphrase Robert Benchley, there are two kinds of
>birdwatchers:  those that admit their misidentifications and
>those that don't.

My variation on this is to say that the only birders who don't
make mistakes in identifications are those who don't go out and
identify birds.

A couple months ago a friend and I spent entirely too much time
studying a strange little dove that we couldn't identify.
Eventually it went running over to an adult Mourning Dove that
had just landed on the ground. Oops. I guess I've never looked
closely at a juvenile Mourning Dove of that age.

--
Katrina Knight
kknight AT fastmail.fm
Reading, PA, USA

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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:01:46 -0400
Whenever I have a plastic bag in the hand, I check that chapter in Pyle, 
carefully measure it and place a band on it, and the send it on its way... 


And, yes, some have returned, usually blowing into my face as I cross a 
street... 


Gregg


Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA 19072
Homoaves [at]  gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Spector, David (Biology) 

Sent: Friday, July 17, 2015 12:46 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)

For my part, I would never* mistake a paper wasp nest for a Barred Owl, a 
branch for a Bald Eagle, a plastic owl for a real one, a clump of leaves or of 
snow for a bird, or a plastic bag for anything but a plastic bag. These items 
bear no resemblance at all to birds.** 


To paraphrase Robert Benchley, there are two kinds of birdwatchers: those that 
admit their misidentifications and those that don't. 


David
David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


*I use this word in the same sense that Captain Corcoran uses it in HMS 
Pinafore. 

**When observed at very, very close range.

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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 12:46:25 -0400
For my part, I would never* mistake a paper wasp nest for a Barred Owl, a 
branch for a Bald Eagle, a plastic owl for a real one, a clump of leaves or of 
snow for a bird, or a plastic bag for anything but a plastic bag. These items 
bear no resemblance at all to birds.** 


To paraphrase Robert Benchley, there are two kinds of birdwatchers: those that 
admit their misidentifications and those that don't. 


David
David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


*I use this word in the same sense that Captain Corcoran uses it in HMS 
Pinafore. 

**When observed at very, very close range.

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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 11:36:17 -0400
After several months this past winter mistaking white plastic grocery store
bags for Snowy Owls I was certain I'd taken my first Snowy Owl photo.
Looked realistic from a distance. When I got home and looked at a larger
image I realized it was a tree root covered by freshly fallen snow. Here's
the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15940524954/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ


On Fri, Jul 17, 2015 at 11:16 AM, Gorton, Gregg  wrote:

> Another story: once I was leading a bird walk at the John Heinz NWR
> in/near Philadelphia and wanted to show the group a Great Horned Owl nest
> (in an old squirrel nest in a deciduous tree) that folks had been
> following. No one had yet seen any young in the nest so I alerted the group
> that we had passed proper time for the egg/s to have hatched and we should
> look for any sign of a juvenile.  I looked up with naked eye at first, and
> exclaimed "there's a little fur ball now!" --thinking I was seeing an
> owlet.  The bins of the group and myself quickly revealed that I had been
> correct, but wrong.  --Indeed, the "furball" was there for all to see: it
> was a dead rabbit.  Mama owl was obviously being well-fed by papa owl.
>  --An actual owlet appeared a day later...
>
> Gregg
>
> Gregg Gorton
> Narberth, PA
> Homoaves [at] gmail.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) [mailto:
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Katharine Mills
> Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2015 7:24 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
>
> I heard that Roger Tory Peterson ID's a Pepto Bismol bottle as an indigo
> bunting.  Not sure where I heard this. But if he could make a mistake we
> can do the same!
> Kathy Mills
> Hofden, MA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 11:16:55 -0400
Another story: once I was leading a bird walk at the John Heinz NWR in/near 
Philadelphia and wanted to show the group a Great Horned Owl nest (in an old 
squirrel nest in a deciduous tree) that folks had been following. No one had 
yet seen any young in the nest so I alerted the group that we had passed proper 
time for the egg/s to have hatched and we should look for any sign of a 
juvenile. I looked up with naked eye at first, and exclaimed "there's a little 
fur ball now!" --thinking I was seeing an owlet. The bins of the group and 
myself quickly revealed that I had been correct, but wrong. --Indeed, the 
"furball" was there for all to see: it was a dead rabbit. Mama owl was 
obviously being well-fed by papa owl. --An actual owlet appeared a day later... 


Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Katharine Mills 

Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2015 7:24 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)

I heard that Roger Tory Peterson ID's a Pepto Bismol bottle as an indigo
bunting.  Not sure where I heard this. But if he could make a mistake we
can do the same!
Kathy Mills
Hofden, MA

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Subject: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 11:06:42 -0400
I once drove by a far-off hillside that had been scattered with what were 
obviously wind-blown black garbage bags--talk about littering! -- My 8 yo son 
said, Dad, I think those are birds! So, we drove closer and stopped. He got out 
and inched his way toward them on his belly --finally getting within about 50 
feet; then he inched his way back: "They're turkeys!" he proudly told me. -- It 
was so remarkable that he had never distracted them. --I didn't have the heart 
to tell him I had been watching them/him all the time thru my bins, and had 
already quickly realized my mistake... We still talk about that. 


Good bag-birding, all!

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of mdodder AT SBCGLOBAL.NET 

Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2015 8:00 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)

My class loves reminding me that the Nighthawk I saw resting on the ground, and 
was preparing to report, turned out to be a dusty old Dos Equis bottle... 

Matthew DodderMountain View, CA


 On Thursday, July 16, 2015 3:37 PM, Barry K. MacKay  
wrote: 



 I once identified a clump of dead brown leaves, high in a tree, as an
immature Northern Goshawk.

I'm sure everyone on the list has similar stories!

Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joyanne Hamilton
Sent: July-16-15 6:09 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)

=)  I really got a charge out of this.
GOOD LESSONS for high schoolers about fact and fiction on the internet; an
awesome example!
Good catch Mr. Sloan.
I really do love this story and am going to save it.
Thank you, Mr. Sloan.  =D

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


On Jul 16, 2015, at 12:28 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> About a month ago I posted links to two bird photos asking for help
> with IDs. Responders suggested domestic duck/goose, gull, leucistic
> coot, some sort of heron, etc. The photos were viewed about 1,500
> times on Flickr. The most common response was that the photos weren't
> clear enough to determine species. I acknowledged the poor quality of
> the photos in my original post...they were the best photos I could take
given the conditions.
>
> A week or two later I was able to squeeze through some brush to get a
> better photo. Then I went on vacation and didn't have a chance to
> process the photo until now. I am somewhat chagrined to report that
> the "bird" was not a bird, but rather it was a torn plastic cup:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19727629806/
>
> Guess I should file this under "misadventures in bird identification".
> :-) It's also an interesting testimonial to the power of suggestion.
> It initially looked like a bird to me. I reported it as a bird. And no
> one suggested that it was not a bird. :-)
>
> In case anyone is interested, here are the two "bird" ID photos I
> initially
> posted:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Mystery not-bird
From: Elizabeth Dodd <edodd AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 03:17:44 +0000
And there was the tremendous flock of geese flying near Columbus Ohio, which a 
relative of mine, here unnamed, had to be told was, in fact, an airplane. Yes, 
it was past time for new glasses. 


Elizabeth Dodd
Manhattan, KS

Sent courtesy of the Borg
Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: mdodder AT SBCGLOBAL.NET
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 23:59:47 +0000
My class loves reminding me that the Nighthawk I saw resting on the ground, and 
was preparing to report, turned out to be a dusty old Dos Equis bottle... 

Matthew DodderMountain View, CA 


 On Thursday, July 16, 2015 3:37 PM, Barry K. MacKay  
wrote: 

   

 I once identified a clump of dead brown leaves, high in a tree, as an
immature Northern Goshawk.

I'm sure everyone on the list has similar stories!

Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joyanne Hamilton
Sent: July-16-15 6:09 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)

=)  I really got a charge out of this.
GOOD LESSONS for high schoolers about fact and fiction on the internet; an
awesome example!
Good catch Mr. Sloan.
I really do love this story and am going to save it.
Thank you, Mr. Sloan.  =D

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


On Jul 16, 2015, at 12:28 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> About a month ago I posted links to two bird photos asking for help
> with IDs. Responders suggested domestic duck/goose, gull, leucistic
> coot, some sort of heron, etc. The photos were viewed about 1,500
> times on Flickr. The most common response was that the photos weren't
> clear enough to determine species. I acknowledged the poor quality of
> the photos in my original post...they were the best photos I could take
given the conditions.
>
> A week or two later I was able to squeeze through some brush to get a
> better photo. Then I went on vacation and didn't have a chance to
> process the photo until now. I am somewhat chagrined to report that
> the "bird" was not a bird, but rather it was a torn plastic cup:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19727629806/
>
> Guess I should file this under "misadventures in bird identification".
> :-) It's also an interesting testimonial to the power of suggestion.
> It initially looked like a bird to me. I reported it as a bird. And no
> one suggested that it was not a bird. :-)
>
> In case anyone is interested, here are the two "bird" ID photos I
> initially
> posted:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


  
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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 21:25:52 -0400
In the mountains of Morocco this springm we saw many great birds, a fair
number of endemics and near endemics included.   I found a Dipper, but
Andrea did not get to see it.  I tried hard to find another to show her
and finally did.  It was very far off, but the shape appeared
distinctive.  It held its position for quite some time.  Too long.

I took a photo at 50X and then blew it up in the viewer.  It was an
interesting contrast of rocks alongside the river.


Larry Gardella
Montgomery, AL

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: Theo Hofmann <theo AT HERA.MED.UTORONTO.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 21:30:05 -0400
Peter Harrison once identified  a blue plastic bag as a Eurasian
Kingfisher.

On Thu, 16 Jul 2015, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:

> =)
> Im starting a collection here.
>
> Good fun.
> Thank you.
> Joy
>
>
> On Jul 16, 2015, at 2:33 PM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:
>
>> I once identified a clump of dead brown leaves, high in a tree, as an
>> immature Northern Goshawk.
>>
>> I'm sure everyone on the list has similar stories!
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Barry
>>
>>
>> Barry Kent MacKay
>> Bird Artist, Illustrator
>> Studio: (905)-472-9731
>> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
>> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
>> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joyanne Hamilton
>> Sent: July-16-15 6:09 PM
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
>>
>> =)  I really got a charge out of this.
>> GOOD LESSONS for high schoolers about fact and fiction on the internet; an
>> awesome example!
>> Good catch Mr. Sloan.
>> I really do love this story and am going to save it.
>> Thank you, Mr. Sloan.  =D
>>
>> Joyanne Hamilton
>> Shageluk, Alaska
>>
>>
>> On Jul 16, 2015, at 12:28 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>>
>>> About a month ago I posted links to two bird photos asking for help
>>> with IDs. Responders suggested domestic duck/goose, gull, leucistic
>>> coot, some sort of heron, etc. The photos were viewed about 1,500
>>> times on Flickr. The most common response was that the photos weren't
>>> clear enough to determine species. I acknowledged the poor quality of
>>> the photos in my original post...they were the best photos I could take
>> given the conditions.
>>>
>>> A week or two later I was able to squeeze through some brush to get a
>>> better photo. Then I went on vacation and didn't have a chance to
>>> process the photo until now. I am somewhat chagrined to report that
>>> the "bird" was not a bird, but rather it was a torn plastic cup:
>>>
>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19727629806/
>>>
>>> Guess I should file this under "misadventures in bird identification".
>>> :-) It's also an interesting testimonial to the power of suggestion.
>>> It initially looked like a bird to me. I reported it as a bird. And no
>>> one suggested that it was not a bird. :-)
>>>
>>> In case anyone is interested, here are the two "bird" ID photos I
>>> initially
>>> posted:
>>>
>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/
>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/
>>>
>>> Bernie Sloan
>>> Highland Park, NJ
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: Katharine Mills <gkmills AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 19:23:33 -0400
I heard that Roger Tory Peterson ID's a Pepto Bismol bottle as an indigo
bunting.  Not sure where I heard this. But if he could make a mistake we
can do the same!
Kathy Mills
Hofden, MA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 15:26:49 -0800
=)
Im starting a collection here.

Good fun.
Thank you.
Joy


On Jul 16, 2015, at 2:33 PM, Barry K. MacKay  wrote:

> I once identified a clump of dead brown leaves, high in a tree, as an
> immature Northern Goshawk.
>
> I'm sure everyone on the list has similar stories!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joyanne Hamilton
> Sent: July-16-15 6:09 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
>
> =)  I really got a charge out of this.
> GOOD LESSONS for high schoolers about fact and fiction on the internet; an
> awesome example!
> Good catch Mr. Sloan.
> I really do love this story and am going to save it.
> Thank you, Mr. Sloan.  =D
>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska
>
>
> On Jul 16, 2015, at 12:28 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
>
>> About a month ago I posted links to two bird photos asking for help
>> with IDs. Responders suggested domestic duck/goose, gull, leucistic
>> coot, some sort of heron, etc. The photos were viewed about 1,500
>> times on Flickr. The most common response was that the photos weren't
>> clear enough to determine species. I acknowledged the poor quality of
>> the photos in my original post...they were the best photos I could take
> given the conditions.
>>
>> A week or two later I was able to squeeze through some brush to get a
>> better photo. Then I went on vacation and didn't have a chance to
>> process the photo until now. I am somewhat chagrined to report that
>> the "bird" was not a bird, but rather it was a torn plastic cup:
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19727629806/
>>
>> Guess I should file this under "misadventures in bird identification".
>> :-) It's also an interesting testimonial to the power of suggestion.
>> It initially looked like a bird to me. I reported it as a bird. And no
>> one suggested that it was not a bird. :-)
>>
>> In case anyone is interested, here are the two "bird" ID photos I
>> initially
>> posted:
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/
>>
>> Bernie Sloan
>> Highland Park, NJ
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 18:33:13 -0400
I once identified a clump of dead brown leaves, high in a tree, as an
immature Northern Goshawk.

I'm sure everyone on the list has similar stories!

Cheers,

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Joyanne Hamilton
Sent: July-16-15 6:09 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)

=)  I really got a charge out of this.
GOOD LESSONS for high schoolers about fact and fiction on the internet; an
awesome example!
Good catch Mr. Sloan.
I really do love this story and am going to save it.
Thank you, Mr. Sloan.  =D

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


On Jul 16, 2015, at 12:28 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> About a month ago I posted links to two bird photos asking for help
> with IDs. Responders suggested domestic duck/goose, gull, leucistic
> coot, some sort of heron, etc. The photos were viewed about 1,500
> times on Flickr. The most common response was that the photos weren't
> clear enough to determine species. I acknowledged the poor quality of
> the photos in my original post...they were the best photos I could take
given the conditions.
>
> A week or two later I was able to squeeze through some brush to get a
> better photo. Then I went on vacation and didn't have a chance to
> process the photo until now. I am somewhat chagrined to report that
> the "bird" was not a bird, but rather it was a torn plastic cup:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19727629806/
>
> Guess I should file this under "misadventures in bird identification".
> :-) It's also an interesting testimonial to the power of suggestion.
> It initially looked like a bird to me. I reported it as a bird. And no
> one suggested that it was not a bird. :-)
>
> In case anyone is interested, here are the two "bird" ID photos I
> initially
> posted:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 14:08:47 -0800
=)  I really got a charge out of this.
GOOD LESSONS for high schoolers about fact and fiction on the internet; an 
awesome example! 

Good catch Mr. Sloan.
I really do love this story and am going to save it.
Thank you, Mr. Sloan.  =D

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


On Jul 16, 2015, at 12:28 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> About a month ago I posted links to two bird photos asking for help with
> IDs. Responders suggested domestic duck/goose, gull, leucistic coot, some
> sort of heron, etc. The photos were viewed about 1,500 times on Flickr. The
> most common response was that the photos weren't clear enough to determine
> species. I acknowledged the poor quality of the photos in my original
> post...they were the best photos I could take given the conditions.
>
> A week or two later I was able to squeeze through some brush to get a
> better photo. Then I went on vacation and didn't have a chance to process
> the photo until now. I am somewhat chagrined to report that the "bird" was
> not a bird, but rather it was a torn plastic cup:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19727629806/
>
> Guess I should file this under "misadventures in bird identification". :-)
> It's also an interesting testimonial to the power of suggestion. It
> initially looked like a bird to me. I reported it as a bird. And no one
> suggested that it was not a bird. :-)
>
> In case anyone is interested, here are the two "bird" ID photos I initially
> posted:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Mystery bird was not a bird :-( (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 16:28:48 -0400
About a month ago I posted links to two bird photos asking for help with
IDs. Responders suggested domestic duck/goose, gull, leucistic coot, some
sort of heron, etc. The photos were viewed about 1,500 times on Flickr. The
most common response was that the photos weren't clear enough to determine
species. I acknowledged the poor quality of the photos in my original
post...they were the best photos I could take given the conditions.

A week or two later I was able to squeeze through some brush to get a
better photo. Then I went on vacation and didn't have a chance to process
the photo until now. I am somewhat chagrined to report that the "bird" was
not a bird, but rather it was a torn plastic cup:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19727629806/

Guess I should file this under "misadventures in bird identification". :-)
 It's also an interesting testimonial to the power of suggestion. It
initially looked like a bird to me. I reported it as a bird. And no one
suggested that it was not a bird. :-)

In case anyone is interested, here are the two "bird" ID photos I initially
posted:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: AUDUBON Society and ArcGIS Mapping
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 08:50:18 -0800
Hello Birdites,

There is an excellent article on enhanced mapping of bird data in the summer 
2015 issue of ArcUser magazine p. 36 that you might enjoy. 

A pdf file link is located at:

http://www.esri.com/esri-news/arcuser

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska

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Subject: Fw: Article: Kookaburra and magpie among Australian birds in decline, says report
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 13:45:16 +0000
Kookaburra and magpie among Australian birds in decline, says report

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/15/kookaburra-and-magpie-among-australian-birds-in-decline-says-report 


Ronald Orenstein 1825 Shady Creek CourtMississauga, ONCanada L5L 
3W2ronorenstein.blogspot.com 


  
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Subject: Starlings on Prozac
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 13:42:19 +0100
hello everyone,

after reading the paper about the effects on ethical judgement-making in
humans who were given one dose of an antidepressant, i sought out a paper
that investigates the effects of these drugs upon wildlife. in short, after
a pharmaceutical enters a person's body, it will then leave the body, often
via sewage. as all of us birders know, sewage treatment plants are a
birding bonanza, but what are these birds ingesting along with a tasty
(abeit disgusting) morsel at these treatment plants? this paper presents
some data for starlings on prozac:

http://gu.com/p/46nq7/stw

please do share widely.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

http://birdnote.org/contributor/grrlscientist
http://www.scilogs.com/maniraptora/
*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. *[Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Re: 6 week exploration of birds and new discoveries about environmental health
From: JPMyers <jpmyers AT AOL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jul 2015 20:25:04 +0200
apologies
this was an error
Pete Myers

Pete Myers, from a mobile phone

> On Jul 12, 2015, at 8:11 PM, JPMyers  wrote:
>
>

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