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Updated on Thursday, December 8 at 02:00 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Oilbird,©BirdQuest

7 Dec Bird Names Again [Joyanne Hamilton ]
7 Dec RFI iPhone bird guides for Amazon & Peru [Ellen Blackstone ]
7 Dec peaceful coexistence, an Indian snapshot [Willem Jan Marinus Vader ]
30 Nov Odd couple (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
30 Nov Odd couple (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
3 Dec BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 4, 2017 [Ellen Blackstone ]
30 Nov Cuban Trip Report ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
24 Nov Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on Cuba ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
26 Nov BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 27, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
24 Nov Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on Cuba []
19 Nov BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 20, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Nov BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 13, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Nov A Brazilian Birding in Olrando. [Paulo Boute ]
8 Nov Can We Save Europe's Migratory Birds? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
5 Nov BirdNote: last week & the week of Nov. 6, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
4 Nov Birder's-Eye View of Birds in the Bible [Chuck & Lillian ]
4 Nov Hilton Pond 10/01/16 (American Robins) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
4 Nov Birding in Indiana - interesting sites ["baikalteal13 AT netzero.net" ]
2 Nov Re: RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet [Ronald Orenstein ]
2 Nov Re: RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet []
2 Nov RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet [dmark ]
2 Nov Calling All Canadian Birders … ["Richard Gregson (Sparroworks)" ]
1 Nov ABA Practice of giving bird location by county rather than city [Tom Arny ]
1 Nov Costa Rica Trip Report [Mary Beth Stowe ]
30 Oct Banding season is slowing down [Roger Everhart ]
30 Oct Kaeng Krachan National Park, Thailand; advise? [Lewis Brown ]
29 Oct BirdNote: last week & the week of Oct. 30, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
28 Oct Pictures from my "bird study" trip to Cuba [Laura Erickson ]
26 Oct Ancient Parrot Fossil Unearthed In Deepest Siberia [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
23 Oct birding on the border [James Williams ]
22 Oct BirdNote - last week & the week of Oct. 23, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
20 Oct Are California Condors A 'Pleistocene Relict'? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
19 Oct Hilton Pond 09/01/16 (Magnificent Muscadines) []
17 Oct Re: Book suggestion [Patricia Burden ]
17 Oct Re: Looking for book suggestion ["David L. Gorsline" ]
16 Oct 2 days in Cape May [Richard Wolfert ]
16 Oct Banding Summary Oct.15-16 [Roger Everhart ]
16 Oct Looking for book suggestion [Patricia Burden ]
15 Oct BirdNote - last week & the week of Oct. 16, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
14 Oct "Can a college course on birding change the world?" ["B.G. Sloan" ]
12 Oct red color in birds -- nature or nurture? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
8 Oct BirdNote - last week & the week of Oct. 9, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
8 Oct Re: Hurricane [Patricia Burden ]
7 Oct Re: Hurricane [Dave DeReamus ]
7 Oct Re: Hurricane ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
7 Oct Hurricane [Jim Williams ]
7 Oct autumn reads about birds & nature [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
5 Oct Wallcreeper in Slovenia ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
4 Oct UN Wildlife Conference Bans Global Trade Of Africa's Grey Parrots [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
3 Oct Hilton Pond 08/01/16 (Too Many Hummingbirds To Write!) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
1 Oct BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 2, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
26 Sep Re: Simple book bag for the belt [Chuck & Lillian ]
26 Sep Simple book bag for the belt [Chuck & Lillian ]
24 Sep Pigeons Vote On Leaders With Their Wings [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
24 Sep BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 25, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
22 Sep WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2016 - 2017 [Ron Pittaway ]
21 Sep Series on "Sexual Dimorphism Reversal and Polyandry" [Chuck & Lillian ]
20 Sep Photos from last weekends banding [Roger Everhart ]
17 Sep Passing of George C. West [Ken Birding ]
17 Sep BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 18, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
15 Sep Alaska Field Guide [Richard Wolfert ]
14 Sep i couldn't resist: Bird Lives Matter responds to John Oliver [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
12 Sep john oliver's special message to birds [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
10 Sep Could Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Save Hawaiifs Endangered Birds? - The New Yorker []
10 Sep BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of Sept. 11, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, IV [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, III [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, II [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia [Eran Tomer ]
9 Sep AviSys birding software ["Patrick C. Hodgson" ]
9 Sep why do birds sing in the autumn? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
7 Sep Red-breasted Nuthatches: irruption year in Eastern USA? [Robert DeCandido PhD ]
6 Sep A different perspective on eagles [MM ]
5 Sep Re: Starlings as shorebirds []
5 Sep Re: Starlings as shorebirds [Douglas Carver ]
3 Sep Starlings as shorebirds [Willem Jan Marinus Vader ]

Subject: Bird Names Again
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 21:52:38 -0900
Here is a fun little article in Alaska Dispatch News (our old Anchorage Daily 
News edition). 


Just wanted to let you know before you read it that it does mention killing. 
Sorry if that offends folks. 


Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventure/2016/12/06/new-words-for-birds-field-names-vs-identification-book/ 
 




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Subject: RFI iPhone bird guides for Amazon & Peru
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 15:12:23 -0800
Hello, BirdChat,

I'm requesting information and reviews of  iPhone bird guides for the
Amazon Basin & Peru. Anybody use these on a trip? Offline responses are
fine.

Thanks in advance,

Ellen Blackstone, Seattle

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Subject: peaceful coexistence, an Indian snapshot
From: Willem Jan Marinus Vader <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 10:06:05 +0000
I am just back from a very successful Sunbird trip to Gujarat in western India. 
This state sports a completely flat landscape, mostly agricultural, with cotton 
and Ricinus the most important crops. There were, however, also many fields 
that were recently harvested and now plowed and made ready for the next crop. 
The area is very dry and almost semi-desert many places and irrigation plays an 
important role in agriculture; we were seldom out of earshot of the many pumps 
pumping up water from the many, often somewhat saline (lots of flamingos 
everywhere) pools and lakes. The fields were made ready for the irrigation by 
an ingenious network of shallow ditches, and it was often here that the people 
were at work, directing the stream of water. 

And it was wonderful to see how many birds had taken advantage of this chance 
and kept themselves close to the workers, often within 2 meters. Yellow 
Wagtails patrolled along the ditches, Black Drongos (extremely opportunistic 
birds, also often seen on the back of cows and goats, and even on the offal at 
a slaughter house) hovered above and dived for juicy morcels, and Cattle Egrets 
stalked around and clearly also found a lot to eat. Unfortunately I was too far 
away to be able to see exactly what the birds fed on. 

These fields otherwise held the ubiquitous Rock Pigeons, flocks of Greater 
Short-toed Larks and here and there Desert Wagtails on sticks or small bushes. 
But the picture of peaceful coexistence between the workers and their entourage 
of three different species of birds will stick longest in my mind. 


Wim Vader, Troms, Norway


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Subject: Odd couple (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 12:59:14 -0500
Odd couple! A white Muscovy Duck hanging out with a Canada Goose as if they
were a bonded pair. Watched them wandering around for quite a while and
they never got more than a couple of feet apart. There was a large flock of
Canada Geese maybe two hundred feet away, but the Canada Goose wasn't
interested in joining them. Donaldson Park, Middlesex County, NJ.

See: https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/31339265835/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Odd couple (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 13:24:18 -0500
Odd couple! A white Muscovy Duck hanging out with a Canada Goose as if they
were a bonded pair. Watched them wandering around for quite a while and
they never got more than a couple of feet apart. There was a large flock of
Canada Geese maybe two hundred feet away, but the Canada Goose wasn't
interested in joining them. Donaldson Park, Middlesex County, NJ.

See: https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/31339265835/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Dec. 4, 2017
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 07:11:41 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Ducks Get Fancy
http://bit.ly/17R1FPq
* Common Redpoll
http://bit.ly/QGH8ks
* A Blizzard of Snow Geese
http://bit.ly/RWKoXG
* More Eyes and Ears - Safety in Numbers
http://bit.ly/1czE8Qn
* Just What Are Flamingos?
http://bit.ly/2fjrmBL
* Winter Brings Snow Buntings
http://bit.ly/Jkxs0j
* Who Was Anna?
http://bit.ly/2fjvcea
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2fQUj8o
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote


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Subject: Cuban Trip Report
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 14:43:05 +0000
I just returned from a trip to Cuba. For anyone interested here is the report: 
https://travelswithbirds.blogspot.ca/2016/11/trip-report-cuba-16-23-november-2016.html 



[https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BSRDqAJaPxU/WDcbiWYNzfI/AAAAAAAALIo/oxbqzxh6OYsyB-xDK_sGU1LpQpclyqgmgCLcB/w1200-h630-p-nu/IMG_7774.JPG] 


Trip Report - Cuba, 16 - 23 November 
2016 

travelswithbirds.blogspot.ca
Organizer and Trip Leader: David M. Gascoigne Participants: Miriam Bauman, 
Carol Burrell, Jim Burrell. Francine Gilbert, Carol Gorenc, Fra... 





David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on Cuba
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 17:45:17 +0000
I just organized a trip for twelve members of our local naturalists club, 
returning early this morning. 


We had very successful birding, including some significant sightings, not the 
least of which was a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. 


From the Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba (2000), Garrido and Kirkconnell. 
Cornell University Press: Status: Vagrant. Four records: 21 Nov. (1952); 11 
Nov. (1984); two undated. 


Our sighting is supported by decent photographs and was witnessed by several 
seasoned birders. 


Does anyone know the official Cuban authority to whom we should submit this 
sighting, preferably with an email address, since the Cuban mail service is 
unreliable to non-existent, I am told? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 27, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2016 06:09:43 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Basalt as Shelter
http://bit.ly/1qfG9Yo
* Frigatebirds - Seabirds That Can't Get Wet
http://bit.ly/2fGxjb5
* Winter Birds Love Suet
http://bit.ly/Sv3dSO
* How Much Do Birds Eat?
http://bit.ly/2ffqZq1
* Audubon's Wild Turkey
http://bit.ly/1837qHM
* Gull Identification II
http://bit.ly/17yqOcm
* Birding with Grandpa -- With Dick Ashford of the
Klamath Bird Observatory: Take those kids outside!
http://bit.ly/TgrAq4
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2fAM0Ml
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
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========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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Subject: Re: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on Cuba
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 19:41:58 -0600
Arturo Kirkconnell, author of the birds of Cuba. His son's email is
arthur160587 AT gmail.com and his son will get word to his father.
Larry GardellaMontgomery, AL

	-----------------------------------------From: "David M. Gascoigne" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: 24-Nov-2016 17:45:38 +0000
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on Cuba

	I just organized a trip for twelve members of our local naturalists
club, returning early this morning. 

	We had very successful birding, including some significant sightings,
not the least of which was a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. 

	From the Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba (2000), Garrido and
Kirkconnell. Cornell University Press: STATUS: _Vagrant. Four records:
21 Nov. (1952); 11 Nov. (1984); two undated._ 

	Our sighting is supported by decent photographs and was witnessed by
several seasoned birders. 

	Does anyone know the official Cuban authority to whom we should
submit this sighting, preferably with an email address, since the
Cuban mail service is unreliable to non-existent, I am told? 

   David M. Gascoigne  Waterloo, ON   blog:
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 20, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2016 08:33:24 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Bufflehead Return
http://bit.ly/TgHdgZ
* The Jay Game
http://bit.ly/2g5za7u
* Birds Winter at the Salton Sea
http://bit.ly/TGTise
* On the Trail of the Bobwhite
http://bit.ly/TGXyrB
* Who's Laughing Now? - Gull-billed Terns
http://bit.ly/2fXF8aN
* Birds in The Winter Garden
http://bit.ly/QGGCmA
* Swans Come Calling
http://bit.ly/11qwpoE
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2fErB9t
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
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For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Nov. 13, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2016 08:54:41 -0800
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Goldeneyes and Whistling Wings
http://bit.ly/181Xwbu
* The Eagle Eye
http://bit.ly/1zMRuVP
* The Stealthy Shoebill (Don't miss this picture!)
http://bit.ly/2fFr3yd
* Great Horned Owls Calling
http://bit.ly/1tc7rjL
* Alex Chadwick at Big Bend - Banding Hummingbirds
http://bit.ly/1EOwoch
* Spectacled Eiders Dive in the Ice in Winter
http://bit.ly/1bebEiy
* Project FeederWatch Starts This Weekend
http://bit.ly/VRPEjp
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2fFBVMz
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
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Subject: A Brazilian Birding in Olrando.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Nov 2016 11:57:07 +0000
Hello from Brazil!


I will be in Orlando, from Nov. 18-22th.


I would appreciate tips for birding there.


Thanks.


Paulo Boute.


pauloboute AT hotmail.com

______________________________________________
WWW.BOUTE-EXPEDITIONS.COM
Birding,  Jaguar Photo Safaris and Nature Tours , in Brazil, Since 1982.
Expertise and Passion for Birds  & Wildlife!


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Subject: Can We Save Europe's Migratory Birds?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 8 Nov 2016 11:14:29 +0000
hello everyone,

I finally managed to publish this piece about a letter that was published
at the end of last week in the journal, SCIENCE. the author of that letter,
Franz Bairlein, is concerned about the ongoing survival of Europe's
long-distance migrating birds (due to the same problems that also plague
neotropical migrants):

Can We Save Europe's Migratory Birds?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/11/07/can-we-save-europes-migratory-birds/ 


This is a letter that got a strong response from everyone whom I
interviewed -- so much so that it is likely I will be writing more about
this topic in the future. (I ended up having to severely trim the piece
before publication since there was SUCH a deluge of information and comment
that it generated!)

As always, please share this piece widely, especially on social media &
twitter, since readership is how I get paid for my work.

thank you.

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: BirdNote: last week & the week of Nov. 6, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 5 Nov 2016 09:24:48 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Sandpipers! A Chorus Line in the Sky
http://bit.ly/1pk9MaC
* The Amazing, Head-turning Owl
http://bit.ly/QX8Byk
* Birds Can Brighten a Gloomy Day
http://bit.ly/1eZuQlL
* Is It the Same Robin?
http://bit.ly/18Wcjm1
* Big Bird - America's Favorite Flightless Bird
http://bit.ly/2flJQ3D
* Aplomado Falcon - Species Recovery in the Works
http://bit.ly/1afRwGy
* The Return of Snowbird
http://bit.ly/RWHmD3
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2fMZXbg
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
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Subject: Birder's-Eye View of Birds in the Bible
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 4 Nov 2016 15:34:08 -0700
Birders:

I couldn't find anything remotely resembling a birder's-eye view of
the bible anywhere on the web, so I wrote it myself. The first
"lesson" is here:
https://smbasblog.com/2016/08/14/sunday-morning-bible-bird-study/

This ten-part series looks at the bible's major citations of birds, including:

Which dove would Noah use to find land during the flood?
Would the Exodus Israelites, stuck in the Sinai, eat sandgrouse or quail?
What were Red Junglefowl doing in 1st-century Judea, thousands of
miles from home?
Do some birds "sow, reap and store in barns," despite what Jesus said?
Might ravens bring food to hungry people in the desert?
Who are the twenty "unclean" birds, and why are so many of them owls?
The hoopoe through history.

Each lesson comes with a "bible factoid" - an interesting tidbit new
to most people, such as:
The flood in the Epic of Gilgamesh
New Testament  Koine Greek peculiarities
The evolution of the name "Jesus"
The two Bar-Abbases
Was the Sea "Red" or "Reed"?
Problems of biblical translation.

A bonus lesson visits the Quran's tale of King Solomon and his trusty
explorer-hoopoe, and we Discover Some Peculiar Things.

Along the way we discuss Hebrew, Greek, multiple explanations of
biblical events, biblical textual analysis, rare words in the bible,
and we settle, once and for all, just exactly what is a "glede" and
why you might not want to eat one.

First installment:
https://smbasblog.com/2016/08/14/sunday-morning-bible-bird-study/
Each installment contains links to all other installments.

I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did writing it.
Good Birding!
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

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Subject: Hilton Pond 10/01/16 (American Robins)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Fri, 4 Nov 2016 12:10:21 -0400
American Robins--often thought of as harbingers of spring—actually flock to 
Hilton Pond Center each fall and winter. This year is no exception, so these 
big orange-breasted thrushes have been splashing about in our water features 
and foraging for inverts among fallen leaves. To read all about robins and some 
of their interesting adaptations, please visit our “This Week at Hilton 
Pond” photo essay for 1-31 October 2016 at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek161001.html 
 


While there, don’t forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured during the period. 


Happy (Autumn) Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Birding in Indiana - interesting sites
From: "baikalteal13 AT netzero.net" <baikalteal13@NETZERO.NET>
Date: Fri, 4 Nov 2016 14:51:51 GMT
Friends, I have a group of birders from Michigan that are headed to Indiana 
next weekend. We will be driving to Terra Haute and wanted to know if there are 
any good birding sites that could be visited en route that provide good birding 
opportunities. If you have suggestions, please write me off-line at 
baikalteal13 AT netzero.net. Thanks. Appreciate any help. Don BurlettOxford, MI 


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Subject: Re: RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2016 22:40:41 -0400
Try Wakodahatchee Wetlands or Green Cay Nature Center in Delray for Swamphen 
and possible Egyptian Goose; Nandays show up there too, or try the FSU campus 
in Boca Raton. 


Ronald Orenstein 
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Nov 2, 2016, at 10:28 PM, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
> 
> Swamphens were easy to find in the Silver Lakes area of Pembroke Pines in 
November 2014. Nanday Parakeets are easy in St. Pete Beach and in the Miami 
area generally. I am going to have to look for Egyptian Goose. 

> 
> Larry Gardella
> Montgomery AL
> 
> -----------------------------------------
> 
> From: "dmark" 
> To: 
> Cc: 
> Sent: 03-Nov-2016 02:07:37 +0000
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed 
Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet 

> 
> Dear Birders,
> 
> I am coming to Florida next week to help a friend try to see countable
> Nanday Parakeet, Gray-headed Swamphen, and Egyptian Goose for his ABA
> life list.
> 
> I went around and saw all three species in April 2014, but birds are
> dynamic! I have studied October/November records of these species
> in eBird, and would appreciate comments on the best places to see them.
> 
> For Nanday Parakeet, the best places seem to be Evergreen Cemetery near
> Harbordale, Fort Lauderdale; Seacrest Scrub Natural Area; and
> Snook Islands Natural Area, Palm Beach.
> 
> For Gray-headed Swamphen I plan to go to Green Cay Wetlands & Nature
> Center.
> 
> Egyptian Goose seeems to be wide spread.
> 
> Thanks in advance for any advice about exact places, time of day, etc.!
> 
> David Mark
> dmark AT buffalo.edu
> Buffalo, NY
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> /> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> /> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


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Subject: Re: RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2016 21:28:00 -0500
Swamphens were easy to find in the Silver Lakes area of Pembroke Pines
in November 2014. Nanday Parakeets are easy in St. Pete Beach and in
the Miami area generally. I am going to have to look for Egyptian
Goose.
Larry GardellaMontgomery AL

	-----------------------------------------From: "dmark" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: 03-Nov-2016 02:07:37 +0000
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed
Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet

 Dear Birders,

 I am coming to Florida next week to help a friend try to see
countable
 Nanday Parakeet, Gray-headed Swamphen, and Egyptian Goose for his ABA
 life list.

 I went around and saw all three species in April 2014, but birds are
 dynamic! I have studied October/November records of these species
 in eBird, and would appreciate comments on the best places to see
them.

 For Nanday Parakeet, the best places seem to be Evergreen Cemetery
near
 Harbordale, Fort Lauderdale; Seacrest Scrub Natural Area; and
 Snook Islands Natural Area, Palm Beach.

 For Gray-headed Swamphen I plan to go to Green Cay Wetlands & Nature
 Center.

 Egyptian Goose seeems to be wide spread.

 Thanks in advance for any advice about exact places, time of day,
etc.!

 David Mark
 dmark AT buffalo.edu
 Buffalo, NY

 For BirdChat Guidelines go to
  To contact a listowner, send a message to
 birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu


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Subject: RFI: Florida exotics Egyptian Goose, Gray-headed Swamphen, Nanday Parakeet
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2016 22:07:22 -0400
Dear Birders,

I am coming to Florida next week to help a friend try to see countable
Nanday Parakeet, Gray-headed Swamphen, and Egyptian Goose for his ABA
life list.

I went around and saw all three species in April 2014, but birds are
dynamic! I have studied October/November records of these species
in eBird, and would appreciate comments on the best places to see them.

For Nanday Parakeet, the best places seem to be Evergreen Cemetery near
Harbordale, Fort Lauderdale; Seacrest Scrub Natural Area; and
Snook Islands Natural Area, Palm Beach.

For Gray-headed Swamphen I plan to go to Green Cay Wetlands & Nature
Center.

Egyptian Goose seeems to be wide spread.

Thanks in advance for any advice about exact places, time of day, etc.!

David Mark
dmark AT buffalo.edu
Buffalo, NY

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Subject: Calling All Canadian Birders …
From: "Richard Gregson (Sparroworks)" <sparroworks AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2016 16:01:16 -0400
Calling All Canadian Birders …

NEXT year, 2017, will mark the centenary of one of the oldest
conservation charities in Canada. After a century of work acquiring and
managing sanctuaries, supporting scientific research with financial
grants and promoting bird awareness and education, Bird Protection
Quebec feels that  it is time for all Canadian birders to join us in
having some celebratory fun.

Who are the best birders in Canada?

During 2017 we invite you to take part in a little competitive birding
by entering any or all of the following challenges. There will be
prizes. We are very aware that birding conditions vary from region to
region, so we will be levelling the playing field by looking for winners
in each province or territory as well as overall Canadian winners.

This will also be a unique opportunity to engage the public in birding,
even if only cheering from the sidelines, and also to encourage novice
birders to compete against the best we have.

The challenges will be in the following categories – note that, as a
conservation charity, we are emphasizing Green Birding:

You can GO BIRDING for just an HOUR, for a DAY or for the whole YEAR :

For experienced birders – a Green Big Day. The count period must be
completed entirely using self-powered means of transport – no cars etc
at any time at all. Walking, cycling, boats etc are all permitted. It is
accepted that teams may use a car to get and from the starting point
only, but no further and may not use the vehicle again until their count
period has ended. They must travel together in one vehicle.

For everyone, whatever their birding skills, whatever their age – a Big
Foot Hour (aka: Sasquatch Hour) – count the species seen or heard while
walking for just one hour, any time of day.

“My Birding Year” – a form of achievable-for-most people, relaxed Big
Year. Green birding rules apply, but all that is asked is that when
people go for a walk or a cycle ride from home they keep a list of the
birds they see. You can do it very competitively or just as and when the
fancy takes you. To keep the playing field level it is not proposed to
offer major prizes for this challenge (beyond publicity and recognition)
but to seek to involve everyone in Canada in keeping a record of what
they see on their local patches during the year. We will be overjoyed if
any records are broken, and encourage all to have a go, but that is not
the primary objective.
The rules and further information about green birding protocols will be
sent to birders interested in the challenges during early 2016. Note
that Big Days and Big Foot Hours are open to teams of 2-4 birders; Big
Years may be attempted solo.

At the moment we are inviting birders to register an early interest so
that we can keep you up to date with planning for the 2017 challenges –
there is no commitment requested at the moment, but if you would like to
know more please email us at greenbirding AT gmail.com to let us have your
name, location and an email address that we can use (your contact
details will be kept secure and not shared). Later in the year we will
send you the rules and an invitation to put a team together and decide
where you will go birding in 2017.


Celebrate 100 years of Bird Protection Quebec when Canada Goes Birding

We look forward to hearing from you!
--
Richard Gregson
Bird Protection Quebec


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Subject: ABA Practice of giving bird location by county rather than city
From: Tom Arny <tarny AT THERIVER.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2016 19:49:02 -0700
Is there some reason that the American Birding Association frequently gives the 
location of a rare bird by county but not town/city? I realize that some people 
are county listers, but you can just about always find the county from the 
city. Moreover, out of state birders may be unfamiliar with the location of 
given county and some western counties are bigger than some eastern states. In 
short, locating by county seems very unspecific. 

Tom Arny
Box 545
Patagonia, AZ 85624

tarny AT theriver.com

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Subject: Costa Rica Trip Report
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe AT MIRIAMEAGLEMON.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2016 16:17:03 -0500
Hi, all!



I've finally finished the report for a recent trip to Costa Rica; from the
main index page you can read narratives and see pictures of each area
visited, plus peruse individual bird lists with photos and sound recordings,
along with leps, odes, herps, and other critters (would appreciate feedback
on the leps and odes. J)!  The main page is here:



http://miriameaglemon.com/Trip%20Reports/Costa%20Rica%202016/Costa%20Rica%20
2016%20Main%20Page.html



Enjoy!



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

www.miriameaglemon.com








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Subject: Banding season is slowing down
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2016 16:54:11 -0500

Hey everyone,




 In spite of the above normal temps continuing in Minnesota, bird activity is 
quickly shifting from migration to winter residents. I have still been getting 
into the field to do a bit of banding and had a couple of interesting catches. 
I posted photos of a Brown Creeper I caught and a Bluejay with unusual wing 
feathers. Here is a link to the photos if you're curious: 





http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com











Keep getting out in the field!




Good birding,

Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN












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Subject: Kaeng Krachan National Park, Thailand; advise?
From: Lewis Brown <lbrown4100 AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2016 10:24:14 -0400
I am planning two trips to Bangkok, one Nov. 19-Dec. 8 and another Feb. 2-17. I 
am particularly interested in kingfishers. Kaeng Krachen National Park seems to 
have quite a few listed species but if there is a better or equally good 
location, I am very open to suggestions. Three questions: 

1. Are my dates good for kingfisher or will the number of species be limited 
during my time periods? Is one time period better than the other? 

2. Does anyone have a recommendation for a local guide to Kaeng Krachen? I have 
checked the park’s calendar and they show no birding guide available for 
either of my dates. 

3. Does anyone have a recommendation for lodging around or close to Kaeng 
Krachen? Hua Hin seems too far for day trips at approximately 1.5 driving hours 
each way. 


Thanks for any and all help and advice!!

Lew
lbrown4100 AT charter.net
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Subject: BirdNote: last week & the week of Oct. 30, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2016 07:58:02 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Waterfowl and Lead
http://bit.ly/UB7OIv
* Meet the Blue Jay
http://bit.ly/1dA3ijM
* Ravens and Wolves
http://bit.ly/VRzCHW
* Rufous-collared Sparrow - Tico-Tico
http://bit.ly/GWlEiU
* Yogi Berra's Wit and Wisdom:
“You can learn a lot by just watching. ”
http://bit.ly/2fh7csE
* Acorn Woodpecker, Inspiration for Woody
http://bit.ly/1aLukAO
* The Hardy Harlequin
http://bit.ly/TyqoQd
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2dR18Wp
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Pictures from my "bird study" trip to Cuba
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Oct 2016 12:17:00 -0500
I had the amazing good fortune to get to go to Cuba this month. I'm still
processing photos, but here's a link to the flickr gallery that includes
some good birds, and some pretty good pictures, not necessarily of those
good birds. In particular, the Zapata Wren was not very cooperative about
having his picture taken. But the Cuban Tody was another story!

The first photo shows where we went in the country--all in the west.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lauraerickson/albums/72157672156978293

Now I want to go back when todies and trogons are breeding.

Best, Laura Erickson

Duluth, MN

--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: Ancient Parrot Fossil Unearthed In Deepest Siberia
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 26 Oct 2016 20:56:57 +0100
hello everyone,

despite being ill, i managed to finish this piece about a parrot fossil
discovered in eastern Russia -- really exciting news that raises more
questions than it answers, actually:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/10/26/ancient-parrot-fossil-unearthed-in-deepest-siberia/ 


i hope you enjoy reading it as much as i enjoyed writing it!

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: birding on the border
From: James Williams <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 23 Oct 2016 21:22:58 -0500
I am seeking anecdotes about or brief descriptions of encounters by birders 
with border trespassers or the U.S Border Patrol in Texas, Arizona, and 
California. I would like to write about this in the birding column I write for 
the Minneapolis StarTribine. Descriptions of observations, encounters, and 
interactions would be much appreciated. Time lines would be helpful. No names 
will be used. 

Thanks.
 
Jim Williams
birding blog at www.startribune.com/Wingnut

Our warming world is not waiting for you to pay attention.

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Subject: BirdNote - last week & the week of Oct. 23, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2016 07:54:33 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* The Surfbird, Not the Surfin' Bird
http://bit.ly/1aWsgrC
* Swainson's Hawks Migrate South
http://bit.ly/103USzx
* Where Birds Go to Die
http://bit.ly/2egU18X
* Cape May Festival
http://bit.ly/QX8qTB
* Saw-whet Owls Hoot and Hoot
http://bit.ly/2eE108I
* Yellow-eyed Juncos - Bright Eyes
http://bit.ly/2ewBi7y
* Bird Songs Go to Hollywood
http://bit.ly/GTXeHQ
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2dxPpqU
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Are California Condors A 'Pleistocene Relict'?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 20 Oct 2016 14:15:29 +0100
Hello everyone,

I've been hard at work on this piece about a recent paper that investigates
the genetic diversity of California condors. I think you may enjoy reading
it.

Are California Condors A 'Pleistocene Relict'?


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/10/20/are-california-condors-a-pleistocene-relict/ 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: Hilton Pond 09/01/16 (Magnificent Muscadines)
From: research AT HILTONPOND.ORG
Date: Wed, 19 Oct 2016 19:35:25 -0400
September was a very busy month for banding Ruby-throated Hummingbirds at 
Hilton Pond Center, but I still had time to sample the delightful sweetness of 
wild Muscadine grapes found on the property. These native vines provide food 
for birds and mammals and are increasingly sought as a source of juice for 
craft wines. To read about Muscadines--including suggestions on how to eat them 
correctly--check our "This Week at Hilton Pond" photo essay for 1-30 Sep 2016 
at http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160901.html 


Don't forget to scroll down for a list of all birds banded during the period.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

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Subject: Re: Book suggestion
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 17 Oct 2016 11:48:54 -0400
I guess I didn't make myself clear.  I have found a lot of information
about the act itself and the formation of the law. I have found quite
a bit about subsequent court cases that tested the law and the
additions since the law was passed.
I was wondering if there is a book that described more of the story of
that time.  For example, I know about the formation of the
Massachusetts Audubon Society - it was formed by two women vehemently
opposed to the use of birds and feathers on hats.  I know about George
Grinnell, who campaigned against market hunting and for reasonable
game hunt laws.  I know about Frank Chapman, who was appalled by the
Christmas side-hunts and suggested the forerunner of our modern
Christmas Count.   I also know there was a movement to establish
refuges where migratory birds would be safe from hunters.  I also know
that part of the movement to get the bill passed was emphasis on the
fact that birds eat so many insects which otherwise could be
detrimental to human beings.
I recently played a milliner in a Historical Cemetery Walk.  She,
unlike other milliners in her town, refused to use birds or bird parts
on her hats.  I am writing a column for our local newspaper about this
topic and I was looking for something I could refer my readers to that
is more anecdotal than the legal parts of passing this Treaty.

Pat Burden
Melvin & Yale, MI

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Subject: Re: Looking for book suggestion
From: "David L. Gorsline" <nouveau AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 17 Oct 2016 06:57:19 -0400
Michael W. Giese's doctoral dissertation, "A Federal Foundation for Wildlife 
Conservation: The Evolution of the National Wildlife 

Refuge System, 1920-1968," deals mainly with the establishment and funding of 
the Refuge System, but the first chapter touches on 

the Migratory Bird Treaty of 1916 and sources of information about that period 
of time. It's available from ProQuest at 

http://search.proquest.com/docview/304684418

--
David L. Gorsline
Reston (Fairfax County), Virginia
http://davidgorsline.info/

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Subject: 2 days in Cape May
From: Richard Wolfert <rwolfert AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Oct 2016 22:17:03 -0400
My wife and I will be spending 2 days in Cape May this week. I’ve been there 
3 times but always with others leading a group. 

What areas do you suggest we visit? I am not familiar with the names of places 
that those who frequent the cape know. I just see what is on maps. 


Suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks, 
Rich
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Subject: Banding Summary Oct.15-16
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Oct 2016 19:28:12 -0500





Hey everyone,

I have posted a summary of banding activity from this weekend along with 
photos. Some good birds showed up on what can only be described as a very 
"September-like" October weekend. 


Here's the link to the post:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


Hoping this weather continues,

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN




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Subject: Looking for book suggestion
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 16 Oct 2016 15:19:55 -0400
Hello,
I am interested in learning more about the history of the Migratory
Bird Treaty Act.  Not the law itself but the "goings on" that preceded
it.  I would hope that it would include the people who were
instrumental in pushing for the conservation that eventually required
the legislation.  I know about the slaughter of birds for hats, and
the Christmas "side-hunts."  I am looking for a book that more or less
puts all of these things in the perspective of the time in which they
happened.
I would appreciate your suggestions.
Pat Burden
Melvin & Yale, MI

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Subject: BirdNote - last week & the week of Oct. 16, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 15 Oct 2016 07:13:46 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Investing in Young Naturalists - With Victor Emanuel
http://bit.ly/Qjh3a9
* Monk Parakeets Make Themselves at Home
http://bit.ly/2d6eAQW
* Geese in V-formation - Tailgating
http://bit.ly/UJxmU3
* Raven, Dog, Bone
http://bit.ly/12uuXC9
* White-browed Coucal
http://bit.ly/H3eqKF
* Ancient Murrelet Migration, East to West and Back
http://bit.ly/2e6tOal
* Clark's Nutcracker - Nature's Arborist
http://bit.ly/2e0Npun
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2e4SCCy
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: "Can a college course on birding change the world?"
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 14 Oct 2016 20:43:20 -0400
https://flipboard.com/ AT flipboard/flip.it%2Ff_ctbg-can-a-college-course-on-birding-change-/f-79525706e0%2Fnbcnews.com 


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Subject: red color in birds -- nature or nurture?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 12 Oct 2016 17:04:56 +0100
hello everyone,

some of you may recall that i have a particular passion for plumage
pigments and how they affect behavior, ecology and evolution of birds. for
example, i wrote a reasonably popular piece about how birds became red:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/05/20/how-birds-became-red/

and i followed that up with a piece describing the weird (ironic?) origins
of the "redness gene" and the many cool things it shows us about evolution:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/08/03/which-came-first-seeing-red-or-being-red/ 


an elegant study was published today that also explores the nature of red
plumage pigments, this time in northern (red-shafted & yellow-shafted)
flickers. the paper is just so beautiful, so inspirationally elegant that
it still has me thinking about all the possibilities for behavior, ecology,
evolution (especially taxonomy!), in this familiar species complex:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/10/12/woodpeckers-dyed-red-by-introduced-plants/ 


oh, and don't forget implications for birding!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: BirdNote - last week & the week of Oct. 9, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 8 Oct 2016 08:03:33 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Chipping Sparrows
http://bit.ly/R1qjz6
* Gull Identification - Some Clues...
http://bit.ly/1wqQaXt
* Seasonal Flooding of the Amazon
http://bit.ly/2dFVMsH
* Black-footed Albatross, Graceful Giant
http://bit.ly/SVI6HM
* A Good Birding Teacher Shares the Wonder
http://bit.ly/Qjhpxw
* Where Swallows Go in Winter
http://bit.ly/T9DU7o
* Landscaping for Wildlife
http://bit.ly/16LznFT
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2dlr1th
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Hurricane
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 8 Oct 2016 01:25:15 -0400
I would never say never. Some years ago, there was a heavy snow storm
during Tree Swallow spring migration. Sadly, they were dropping out of
the sky into the St. Clair River (Michigan). Hundreds of birds
drowned.
Pat Burden
Melvin & Yale, MI


On Fri, Oct 7, 2016 at 2:33 PM, Dave DeReamus  wrote:
> IMO, birds are a heck of a lot more agile and adaptable to changing
> conditions than we'll EVER be.  There are MANY people on the planet that
> would die if they were faced with the same situations that birds are.  I
> would think the only way birds would "drown" would be if they're unable to
> fly, but that's just my common sense thinking.
>
> Good birding,
> Dave DeReamus
> Palmer Township, PA
> becard -at- rcn.com
> Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com
> Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html
> Google Photo Albums:
> https://get.google.com/albumarchive/109457857807399603170?source=pwa
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Spector, David (Biology)
> Sent: Friday, October 07, 2016 10:48 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Hurricane
>
> I have been wondering about a different, population-level, effect:  With two
> storms near each other in the western Atlantic, the birds currently flying
> due south from New England and the Maritimes have quite a gantlet to run,
> and I would expect that many birds will drown.  I wonder if any effect will
> be enough to show in populations of species like Blackpoll Warbler next
> spring.
>
> David
>
> David Spector
> Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Williams
> Sent: Friday, October 07, 2016 10:39 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Hurricane
>
> Is the hurricane presently moving up the East coast likely to blow into
> shore bird species rarely seen ashore and hard to find at sea? Just curious.
> I'm wondering if the Big Year competitors will be heading east.
>
> Jim Williams
> Wayzata MN
> birding blog at
> 
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.startribune.com%2fWingnut&data=01%7c01%7cspectord%40CCSU.EDU%7c86f97f98e5f6460a8b5308d3eebfa490%7c2329c570b5804223803b427d800e81b6%7c0&sdata=kwXLTzRDzoLB79k788vl9aiNInttUWW7NfmM25wcyuk%3d 

>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> 
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>
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Subject: Re: Hurricane
From: Dave DeReamus <becard AT RCN.COM>
Date: Fri, 7 Oct 2016 14:33:09 -0400
IMO, birds are a heck of a lot more agile and adaptable to changing
conditions than we'll EVER be.  There are MANY people on the planet that
would die if they were faced with the same situations that birds are.  I
would think the only way birds would "drown" would be if they're unable to
fly, but that's just my common sense thinking.

Good birding,
Dave DeReamus
Palmer Township, PA
becard -at- rcn.com
Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com
Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html
Google Photo Albums:
https://get.google.com/albumarchive/109457857807399603170?source=pwa


-----Original Message-----
From: Spector, David (Biology)
Sent: Friday, October 07, 2016 10:48 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Hurricane

I have been wondering about a different, population-level, effect:  With two
storms near each other in the western Atlantic, the birds currently flying
due south from New England and the Maritimes have quite a gantlet to run,
and I would expect that many birds will drown.  I wonder if any effect will
be enough to show in populations of species like Blackpoll Warbler next
spring.

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Williams
Sent: Friday, October 07, 2016 10:39 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Hurricane

Is the hurricane presently moving up the East coast likely to blow into
shore bird species rarely seen ashore and hard to find at sea? Just curious.
I'm wondering if the Big Year competitors will be heading east.

Jim Williams
Wayzata MN
birding blog at

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.startribune.com%2fWingnut&data=01%7c01%7cspectord%40CCSU.EDU%7c86f97f98e5f6460a8b5308d3eebfa490%7c2329c570b5804223803b427d800e81b6%7c0&sdata=kwXLTzRDzoLB79k788vl9aiNInttUWW7NfmM25wcyuk%3d 


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Subject: Re: Hurricane
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT CCSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 7 Oct 2016 14:48:46 +0000
I have been wondering about a different, population-level, effect: With two 
storms near each other in the western Atlantic, the birds currently flying due 
south from New England and the Maritimes have quite a gantlet to run, and I 
would expect that many birds will drown. I wonder if any effect will be enough 
to show in populations of species like Blackpoll Warbler next spring. 


David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim Williams 

Sent: Friday, October 07, 2016 10:39 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Hurricane

Is the hurricane presently moving up the East coast likely to blow into shore 
bird species rarely seen ashore and hard to find at sea? Just curious. I'm 
wondering if the Big Year competitors will be heading east. 


Jim Williams
Wayzata MN
birding blog at 
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.startribune.com%2fWingnut&data=01%7c01%7cspectord%40CCSU.EDU%7c86f97f98e5f6460a8b5308d3eebfa490%7c2329c570b5804223803b427d800e81b6%7c0&sdata=kwXLTzRDzoLB79k788vl9aiNInttUWW7NfmM25wcyuk%3d 


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Subject: Hurricane
From: Jim Williams <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 7 Oct 2016 09:38:33 -0500
Is the hurricane presently moving up the East coast likely to blow into shore 
bird species rarely seen ashore and hard to find at sea? Just curious. I'm 
wondering if the Big Year competitors will be heading east. 


Jim Williams
Wayzata MN
birding blog at www.startribune.com/Wingnut

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Subject: autumn reads about birds & nature
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 7 Oct 2016 09:43:11 +0100
hello everyone,

now that autumn is definitely here, i thought that you might enjoy reading
a few short pieces about birds and nature in autumn:

this piece discusses songbirds and the hormones that trigger singing in the
autumn:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/why-do-songbirds-sing-in-the-autumn-grrlscientist-2017eeec7e03#.mp4oez63k 


this is a popular piece that discusses how leaves change into all those
spectacular colours that we love to look at:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/why-do-leaves-change-colour-in-autumn-grrlscientist-9747b0f770be#.o9txscx72 


and, if you grew up alongside a salmon stream, as I did in seattle, then
this piece about how salmon find their way home again to spawn, may evoke a
few memories:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/salmon-scent-and-going-home-again-grrlscientist-57cffde055ae#.1swyctc4r 


I hope you enjoy reading these pieces.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: Wallcreeper in Slovenia
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2016 16:47:40 +0000
I will be in Slovenia in October next year and if I could find Wallcreeper that 
would be about as close to Nirvana as it gets! 


This species breeds in high, remote mountain areas but it is known to descend 
to lower elevations after the breeding season and at least some birds spend the 
winter in Slovenia. Does anyone have any idea as to where one might find this 
bird in October? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: UN Wildlife Conference Bans Global Trade Of Africa's Grey Parrots
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2016 19:48:14 +0100
Hello.

As you all probably know, the African grey parrot was uplisted to CITES
Appendix I. here's the story about how that came about:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/10/04/un-wildlife-conference-bans-global-trade-of-africas-grey-parrots/ 


i was most intrigued by the secret ballot -- the first ever by CITES.

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter

sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: Hilton Pond 08/01/16 (Too Many Hummingbirds To Write!)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 3 Oct 2016 21:41:23 -0400
This has been my busiest summer ever banding Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, so the 
latest installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond" really IS late. The photo 
essay covers 1-31 August 2016 and deals with a cornucopia of topics from 
WeatherUnderground to House Finch disease and from spectacular sunsets to Great 
Egrets--and, of course, hummers. There's also mention of the Center's recent 
nature education outreach activities and some nice contributions that came in 
support of our efforts. Read all about it at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160801.html 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 2, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Oct 2016 08:43:05 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Snail Kite - Bird of the Everglades
http://bit.ly/1DoOmm7
* Binoculars and Birders' Exchange of the ABA
-- A Win:Win:Win for Birds & Birders
http://bit.ly/2dvbR8t
* Great Horned Owl Family - Together?
Not for Very Much Longer!
http://bit.ly/1toBSCE
* Tweety Bird
http://bit.ly/TjlLJc
* Starlings and Roman Divination
http://bit.ly/2dczvpd
* Counting a Million Raptors Over Veracruz
-- With Scott Weidensaul
http://bit.ly/1dyIUPz
* Cacklers and Canadas - Who Is Who?
http://bit.ly/QCEqL9
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2dgS1gn
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Simple book bag for the belt
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 18:11:47 -0700
Thanks, Robert.
I'll take a look.
My wife and I birded around Australia in 1988. We 
used the Slater guide, although I had the Pizzey.
At one point, on some dirt road near Kakadu, we 
bumped into three Auzzie birders. When I whipped 
out my Slater to ID a Pitta, the woman commented, 
"Oh, you should use my husband's book."
Me: Why? Is it good? (I'm thinking that he has a 
good copy of someone's book I hadn't heard of."
She: My husband, Graham, wrote a field guide. It's very good.
Me: Gulp!
Chuck


At 01:55 PM 9/26/2016, Robert McNab wrote:

>Chuck,
>
>
>I wanted a bag to hold a field guide the first 
>time I went to Australia  to fit the rather 
>large Pizzey & Knight field guide (which is 
>larger than a Nat Geo and maybe even larger than a Sibley).
>
>Found this on amazon dot com which is canvas and 
>neutral colors and about 15 bucks:
>
>
>Rothco Vintage Canvas Military Tech Bag
>

>https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00695TAYM/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 

>
>
>It is not designed for the belt, but you could 
>probably add some belt loops rather easily. 
>Might be a little big for just the National Geo 
>guide, but for 15 bucks you may want to give it a try.
>
>It is thick canvas and has a soft feel to it. Good luck,
>
>
>
>Robert McNab
>
>Laguna Niguel, CA
>
>
>Sent from Outlook
>
>
>
>----------
>From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat 
>Line)  on behalf of 
>Chuck & Lillian 
>Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 1:34 PM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Simple book bag for the belt
>
>Hi Birders:
>
>I've owned this very simple canvas (cordura?) book pouch for about 30
>years. It's slightly too small for my NGS field guide, although
>Sibley-Western fits in quite nicely. The brand name label fell off
>long ago, and I don't remember who made it. It cost about $8 or $10
>at the time.
>
>It has:
>1 main pocket; 1 thin pocket about 4.5" wide suitable for a couple of
>pens & some paper, a cover flap the width of the bag (no side
>overhang) so it tucks smoothly into the bag, velcro flap closure, two
>webbing belt loops with snap closures.
>
>Really basic, but perfect for 1 field guide and almost nothing else,
>which is what I like. With the flap tucked in, I can whip out my
>field guide and stuff it back in 1-handed, no struggle, no extra
>bulk. It weighs maybe 2-4 oz. People frequently ask me where I got it.
>
>I'm considering making my own replacement, as I can't find anything
>like it. I've looked at everything on the web I can find. Pajaro
>seems to be the closest, but not quite there. I've got fancy bags
>with pockets, belts, straps, water bottle holders, etc. etc., but I
>prefer the simple one.
>
>Any suggestions/web links?
>
>Chuck Almdale
>North Hills, Ca.
>
>For BirdChat Guidelines go to
>http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>Archives: 
>https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
>To contact a listowner, send a message to
>birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Simple book bag for the belt
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2016 13:34:46 -0700
Hi Birders:

I've owned this very simple canvas (cordura?) book pouch for about 30
years. It's slightly too small for my NGS field guide, although
Sibley-Western fits in quite nicely. The brand name label fell off
long ago, and I don't remember who made it. It cost about $8 or $10
at the time.

It has:
1 main pocket; 1 thin pocket about 4.5" wide suitable for a couple of
pens & some paper, a cover flap the width of the bag (no side
overhang) so it tucks smoothly into the bag, velcro flap closure, two
webbing belt loops with snap closures.

Really basic, but perfect for 1 field guide and almost nothing else,
which is what I like. With the flap tucked in, I can whip out my
field guide and stuff it back in 1-handed, no struggle, no extra
bulk. It weighs maybe 2-4 oz. People frequently ask me where I got it.

I'm considering making my own replacement, as I can't find anything
like it. I've looked at everything on the web I can find. Pajaro
seems to be the closest, but not quite there. I've got fancy bags
with pockets, belts, straps, water bottle holders, etc. etc., but I
prefer the simple one.

Any suggestions/web links?

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

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Subject: Pigeons Vote On Leaders With Their Wings
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 20:35:44 +0100
Hello everyone,

here's a piece I just finished about leadership amongst pigeons. According
to a recently published study, pigeons replace misinformed flock leaders by
collectively choosing to follow better-informed individuals. How did the
authors figure this out? well, they jet-lagged their study birds! here's
the story of how they did this study:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/09/24/pigeons-vote-on-leaders-with-their-wings/ 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]


[image: --]

grrlscientist
[image: https://]about.me/grrlscientist

 


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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 25, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2016 12:17:04 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Cedar Waxwings - Sleek and Handsome
http://bit.ly/WY47yF
* Pirates and Parrots - Int'l Talk Like a Pirate Day!
http://bit.ly/Og3dsD
* When Birds Get Stranded in Parking Lots
http://bit.ly/Q4fnDo
* Common Merganser
http://bit.ly/2cnDfFb
* Sandhill Cranes Wait Out the Storm
http://bit.ly/P1qucE
* Ravens and Crows - Who’s Who?
http://bit.ly/UycGKL
* Voices of Our National Public Lands
http://bit.ly/1aypU1K
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2dsftYR
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: WINTER FINCH FORECAST 2016 - 2017
From: Ron Pittaway <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 14:13:16 -0400
Please see link for this year's Winter Finch Forecast.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2016/finchforecast16.htm

Ron Pittaway
Ontario Field Ornithologists
Toronto, Ontario

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Subject: Series on "Sexual Dimorphism Reversal and Polyandry"
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 13:24:24 -0700
Birders:

I wrote a three-part series on "Sexual Dimorphism Reversal and
Polyandry" which you might find interesting.

Part I:

https://smbasblog.com/2016/07/19/sexual-dimorphism-reversal-and-polyandry-part-i/ 

The three parts are interlinked.

yours,
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

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Subject: Photos from last weekends banding
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2016 21:53:43 -0500






Hey everyone,




 Thought I'd put up a couple of photos from last weekend. The most common 
migrant by far that we banded were red-eyed Vireos. We also had a few 
Philadelphia Vireos. All in all the migration is pretty strong in our area 
right now. 





http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com







Good Birding,

Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN





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Subject: Passing of George C. West
From: Ken Birding <curlewbird AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 10:39:53 -0400
Dear Bird Chat friends - My dear friend George C. West passed away on August
31. He illustrated my weekly bird columns for the life of the Nantucket
Independent newspaper and many of those same illustrations are in the eight
different books I've published about Nantucket birding.

The September/October issue of Bird Watcher's Digest mentions the recent
publication of George's, 'North American Hummingbirds: An Identification
Guide, 2nd Edition, which he finished only recently. He was so glad to have
this done.

Here is a note I received from his wife, Ellen, letting us know that we've
lost George.
******************
I am sad to tell you that George passed away on August 31.  He suffered a
massive stroke and spent just one week in hospice. His sons and brother made
it in time, which was nice.

His wish would be that a donation be made to Friends of Madera Canyon, PO
Box 1203, Green Valley, AZ 85622, Scholarship Fund.  As you know, and like
yourselves, the preservation of our natural surroundings was his life's
work.  Thank you for the wonderful dipper picture!
Ellen
******************
Madera Canyon is a very special place and perhaps you might contribute in
George's name.

Sadly,
Ken Blackshaw -- Be well, do good work, and keep in touch

Nantucket Island -- 30 miles at sea

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Sept. 18, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 17 Sep 2016 08:05:07 -0500
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Why Dippers Dip
http://bit.ly/1eciAxF
* Common Murre - Underwater Flyer
http://bit.ly/NQVDVf
* Birdwatching 103
http://bit.ly/2cnCpGq
* The Heron and the Snake
http://bit.ly/1uQbrYG
* Acorn Woodpecker Granaries
http://bit.ly/2cT7XXL
* Buff-breasted Sandpiper
http://bit.ly/1nCmC3l
* Responsible Birdfeeding
http://bit.ly/179M7zs
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2cfS7FB
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
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========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening,
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Alaska Field Guide
From: Richard Wolfert <rwolfert AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 15 Sep 2016 21:44:07 -0400
There is a real chance that we will be going on a land/sea vacation to Alaska 
next summer. 


I have Sibley western edition (the new one). Is there any recommended FG for 
Alaska or is Sibley sufficient? 


Thanks,
Rich Wolfert
East Brunswick, NJ
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Subject: i couldn't resist: Bird Lives Matter responds to John Oliver
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2016 08:54:47 +0100
Hello everyone,

yes, i know I am silly, and the response I published is silly, too. But
someone had to do it, methinks, so why shouldn't I be that someone?


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/09/13/bird-lives-matter-responds-to-john-oliver/ 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: john oliver's special message to birds
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2016 17:25:04 +0100
(brace yourselves: unless you're talking about penguins, he's not a fan):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8l2Y6Z-maAU

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Could Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Save Hawaiifs Endangered Birds? - The New Yorker
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 13:07:08 -0700
Controversial techniques....



http://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/could-genetically-modified-mosquitoes-save-hawaiis-endangered-birds?mbid=nl_160910_Daily&CNDID=11811219&spMailingID=9493365&spUserID=MTMzMTc5NTY1MTY4S0&spJobID=1000781526&spReportId=MTAwMDc4MTUyNgS2 


Oscar Canino
SF, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

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Subject: BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of Sept. 11, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2016 06:52:36 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Check out the new photo blog of first-year birds. http://bit.ly/2c5HvHS
How many can you name?

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* A Swath Uncut - Paying Back a Favor
http://bit.ly/1wOcUAf
* Ducks - Diving and Dabbling
http://bit.ly/1uuVHxM
* Juvenile Shorebirds Head South
http://bit.ly/2cpaYO7
* Birdsong Wanes with the Season
http://bit.ly/QcZji8
* Myles North in East Africa
http://bit.ly/2bUESFF
* How High Birds Fly - The Bar-headed Goose
http://bit.ly/1vFfPMJ
* Vaux's Swift Roost in Monroe
http://bit.ly/Uswuix
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2cNWCHq
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Travel to the Amazon with BirdNote and VENT, January 12-22, 2017
http://bit.ly/2c2qzSf
===========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, IV
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:40:08 -0400
However, translocations can and have been done properly, and this is where
ideology comes in. Environmentalist circles are noted for a
deeply-entrenched conservatism that envisions a greater righteousness, or
absolute legitimacy, in the natural order of things. Any “tampering with
nature” is thus condemned categorically, regardless of forethoughts or
consequences. It is essentially a spiritual world view that sees a
conscious mind or plan behind the state of nature, and therefore sacrilege
in any attempt to alter it. It also relies on the fallacious logic of,
“many human effects on nature are bad, therefore any human effect on nature
is bad”. Or similarly, “many alien species are detrimental to native ones,
therefore all alien species are”. Such advocates exhibit utter distrust of
scientific process and planning. Back to fear of the unknown and intrinsic
defensiveness of the familiar status quo.

For example, several years ago my state birding list discussed whether
Eurasian Collared-Doves were displacing native species. Neither I nor
others knew of any evidence for it but different views were expressed: “As
with other non-native invasive species, a cautious outlook would be "guilty
until proven innocent".  There may not be any studies/publications to date
that unequivocally show ECD do harm native species, but I don't know of any
that say it definitely WON'T”. Elsewhere, apprehension was seen concerning
the limited establishment of the Mediterranean Gecko in the Southeastern
U.S. even though it fills a niche unoccupied by any native species. See
also the coyote example above. I have long argued in vain that non-native
species’ “guilt”, or any credible threat they pose, must be demonstrated
cogently before action is taken against them. The mere fact that they
aren’t native does not automatically mean they are bad.

In sum, defensiveness of one’s turf and preference for the known, the
extant, the native and the similar are rooted firmly in social biology. Yet
not all outsiders are pernicious or loathed and not all natives are
harmless or well-liked. These matters are very context-dependent. Birds
have been introduced deliberately outside of their ranges as an effective
conservation strategy. Therefore dismissing the entire picture as
`xenophobia’ is undue.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, III
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:38:35 -0400
Relatedly, the removal of game animals introduced outside their ranges is a
recurring problem in bird conservation. The detrimental effects of
non-native ungulates and boar are well documented, but hunters and others
have argued that these long-established aliens should now be considered
native and left alone. Such `foreigners’ are welcomed by many.


Conversely, more than a few attractive, native species are despised far
more than aliens. Brown-headed Cowbird is detested for brood parasitism
despite its spread’s having anthropogenic origins and its pretty appearance
in good light. Blue Jay, one of the continent’s avian splendors, is reviled
as a nest robber. Common Grackles are hated for aggressive domination of
feeders and other things despite their spectacular iridescence. The
effervescent House Wren is bad-mouthed for invading nest boxes and
destroying eggs. Of late, Barred Owl has been declared evil for
out-competing the threatened Spotted Owl, notwithstanding its (Barred’s)
dramatic appearance and unique calls. Or the anthropogenic causes of its
expansion and the Spotted’s decline. Barry MacKay could chime in about
Double-crested Cormorants. Raptors and crows used to be destroyed as
threats to livestock and agriculture (much as New Zealand's Kea), and so on.


This phenomenon is not restricted to birds. Coyotes have been expanding
eastwards in North America for decades, ultimately due to human actions,
only to be greeted with ubiquitous hostility. I once heard a wildlife
biologist here in Georgia say he wanted to shoot them “because they aren’t
native”. Yet the Coyote is not only native but an iconic, all-American
`trademark’ animal. I am very fond of this comic, long-eared rascal and
simply cannot fathom the incredible hatred leveled at it.


Another facet of this complex issue: carefully executed, science-based
translocations constitute an effective conservation tool. Introduced
populations act as extinction safeguards since small geographic ranges are
major liabilities and risk factors, especially in stochastic environments
(e.g. arid ecosystems, volcanic islands). Species distributed across
multiple continents, or widely within a single continent, will not face
demise due to local or regional threats. For example, Erckel’s Francolin
has a strikingly small range in central Ethiopia and Eritrea. It isn’t
threatened currently but a restricted range in a conservation-challenged
region makes for precarious prospects. However, this fowl has introduced
populations in Italy and (unfortunately) Hawaii, which may save the species
should it become imperiled in its native range. Same for Golden and Lady
Amherst’s Pheasants, both of which have very small ranges in southeast
China but also feral populations in Britain. Translocations can be
short-distance too or involve a species’ former range, as in Hawaii
(Millerbird, Nihoa Finch), New Zealand, Seychelles and elsewhere. There are
many other examples. Such species as the Pink-headed Duck, Crested
Shelduck, Himalayan Quail, Ryukyu Woodpigeon and Carolina Parakeet may have
survived had they been introduced somewhere outside their native ranges.


Such translocations require supreme care as the introduced birds can wreak
havoc in multiple ways. On top of dominating or out-competing indigenous
species they can decimate food supplies, interrupt ecological
relationships, interfere with the natives’ breeding cycles, spread
parasites, introduce virulent diseases or act as reservoirs for them, among
other woes.
​
[cont. -> part IV]

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia, II
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:34:29 -0400
Unacceptance of alien species and alien people stems from fundamental
defensiveness that emanates from inherent, biologically-adaptive fear of
the unknown - hence a preference for the similar / familiar - and
protectiveness of one’s group, thus of one’s self-definition and identity.
Theodor Herzl, leading thinker and consolidator of Zionism in the 19th
century, wrote that “Jews carry antisemitism with them”. Antisemitism, he
demonstrated, develops inevitably wherever Jews arrive, even in places that
have never known it, by virtue of their being non-indigenous “outsiders”
everywhere.


But very saliently, non-acceptance applies to natives too, not only to
outsiders. This happens when larger groups fracture into smaller ones due
to humans’  powerful group forming compulsion (notice how difficult it is
for people to achieve and retain long-term unity, in any context).
Europeans have spent their entire history in perennial warfare and
bloodshed; xenophobia has nothing to do with this culture of violence and
hatred. Of course, we have a different culture of violence in America.
Moreover, several sectors of our population - notably racist groups that
claim ethnic purity - are loathed profoundly by most of their own
compatriots. We also had our civil war, Americans killing fellow Americans
partly over the abolition of slavery. Prior to that era, American Indians
used to fight each other too and several groups practiced massive religious
sacrifice of their own people. Civil conflicts in Latin America, Africa and
Asia have claimed millions of lives. Numerous, closely-related tribal
groups in New Guinea have spent much of their history in constant
internecine warfare, as have some South American natives (e.g. the Waorani).


From 1865 to about 1936, Western countries experienced immense immigration
waves. These invariably triggered powerful, at times violent,
anti-immigration backlashes that lasted many decades. Immigrants were
viewed as inferior to the `natives’, e.g. as “hyphenated Americans”. Yet
these immigrants were themselves western, white and predominantly
Christian. Hence the opposition to immigrants was, and is, largely
defensive as noted above rather than racist. Quantity is further evidence:
foreigners, like alien species, are frequently regarded as interesting
“exotics” in small numbers because then they aren’t perceived as threats.
(Exceptions do exist, however). Thus, being native and similar does not
categorically imply acceptance.


Dissimilarity, in turn, doesn’t categorically mean rejection. Any minority
group will face some de facto inequality and antagonism just for being
different – the said defensiveness - yet in some cases this is the
exception rather than the rule. Multiple immigrant groups have assimilated
very well into American society and some are highly regarded. Strikingly
numerous minority groups in India, as well as China’s non-Han ethnicities,
are likewise well-integrated. So are Israel’s Druze and Arab minorities,
and other groups worldwide.


So it is with birds and other organisms. In North America one hears few
complaints against the Ring-necked (Common) Pheasant, Gray Partridge,
Chukar, Himalayan Snowcock, Eurasian Skylark, Red-whiskered Bulbul,
Spot-breasted Oriole, Scaly-breasted Munia and Eurasian Tree Sparrow.
Currently at least, there is no widespread condemnation of the Eurasian
Collared-Dove, Spotted Dove and House Sparrow. Maligned introductions are
few – e.g. the Starling, Rock Pigeon, Monk Parakeet or Mute Swan - and such
resentment is founded, if unfair. We have ourselves to blame for starlings’
presence here and their pursuant usurpation of nesting cavities.
Reminiscnet of these people who mass-destroy habitat and then, so piously
and self-righteously, scream bloody murder when native animals try to
survive and adapt rather than sit and starve or commit suicide. I, for one,
find the said birds very attractive despite appreciating the problems they
cause.
​
[cont. -> part III]

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Egyptian Geese, lupines and xenophobia
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 21:30:37 -0400
Hello all,



Apologies for the very belated reply but I still wanted to comment on this
significant yet charged topic. First about the `fear and loathing’, then
its application to birds.


Fear of the unknown is rooted deeply in human behavior. It has considerable
evolutionary merit because predictability – foreknowledge of threats or
favorable conditions - is highly conducive to survival and safety. The
faculty of learning from experience, common to nearly all animals, also
relies on predictability: the usually-correct assumption that what happened
last time will happen under similar circumstances in the future too. Thus
an apprehensive conservatism is evident in every facet of human history.
People ever clamor for change yet the greater the magnitude of any change
proposed, the broader the opposition to it – in large part (but not
exclusively) because the novel is unknown.


Note, for example, that many consider nature a dangerous environment. I
have taken many comments for hiking alone in wilderness / backcountry
areas, notwithstanding relatively safe destinations and months of
preparation per trip. Demonstrating that city life is far more hazardous
never helps. The fear stems eminently from unfamiliarity with nature versus
thorough familiarity with “civilization”. The city is more dangerous but
it’s the devil you know.


Birder Noah Strycker did a global Big Year in 2015. He readily befriended
people of many races, religions and cultures. Yet on arriving in Australia
towards the end, he wrote the following, very understandably: “Things in
Australia feel cozily familiar after the past five uninterrupted months in
the rural tropics of Africa and Asia. I’m a pretty easy traveler, but you
never quite shake that underlying sense of staying alert all the time in
foreign places. This country feels more like home than anywhere I’ve been
since I passed through the U.S. in June.”


Biologically, humans are also intensely social organisms. This means that
unlike solitary organisms they form groups naturally, by default –
families, clans, nations, political parties, companies, religions, Facebook
`clubs’, institutions, avocations (e.g. birders), professional associations
and whatnot. Per definition, creating a group means declaring some
individuals as members and others as non-members (i.e., “we vs. they”).
And, this distinction matters as otherwise the group is irrelevant. Group
members are treated differently than non-members (e.g. Birdchat subscribers
can post here, others cannot). Similar group behavior is seen in non-human
primates as well.


Members also defend their own inclusivity vs. others’ exclusivity since
group affiliation is fundamental to individuals’ self-identity (e.g. race,
sex, family, religion, nationality, profession). People gravitate naturally
towards those similar to themselves because the greater the similarity, the
easier it is to identify with the other. Hence the greater the degree of
understanding and support, and the fewer the conflicts and discords. It is
a two-way cycle: people form groups based on similarities, and become
similar by virtue of forming or joining groups.


Thus, humans naturally prefer the known to the unknown and the similar to
the dissimilar. Labelling such behavior as “xenophobia” – a term 
identified 

with racism – is thus unmerited. It is rooted in the biology of sociability
and makes perfect sense logically. Social organisms from insects to wolves
to primates attack members of their own kind if these enter the group’s
home turf. Many birds flock through much of the year but defend territories
during breeding season, when other individuals constitute competition.


[cont. -> part II]

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Subject: AviSys birding software
From: "Patrick C. Hodgson" <hadu AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 11:45:50 -0400
A 2016 taxonomy update to Avisys has been made available to all. See
avisys.faintlake.com/update

I have not seen a post with this info - sorry if I missed it and this is
repetitive.

Pat Hodgson
Toronto, Canada

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Subject: why do birds sing in the autumn?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2016 09:49:56 +0100
hello everyone,

Since autumn has arrived, I thought I'd share this little piece that I
researched and wrote whilst in grad school in the zoology department at the
University of Washington:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/why-do-songbirds-sing-in-the-autumn-grrlscientist-2017eeec7e03#.4iv9e4ime 


it's a seasonal favourite. Feel free to share with others who might be
interested.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatches: irruption year in Eastern USA?
From: Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 05:32:49 -0500
Red-breasted Nuthatches have been seen in large numbers recently after 
originally (first!) being reported at several locations in the tri-state area 
in mid- to late June: in northwest Connecticut by Fred Baumgarten about 20 
June; in Connecticut (Stamford) on 26 June by Brenda Inskeep; at the "Point" 
(Stratford?), Connecticut on or about 26 June by Patrick Comins; at the New 
York Botanical Garden (2) in the Bronx (NYC) on 25 June (Deborah Allen and 
Robert DeCandido); in Central Park on 26 June (Jeffrey M. Ward with DA and RDC) 
and on Staten Island on 3 July (H. Fischer). The first report in New Jersey was 
on 27 June at Lord Stirling Park, Basking Ridge (bejoba AT ...) 


Migrant Red-breasted Nuthatches are most often found in conifers, but I tracked 
down five in the same area within a group of deciduous trees in Central Park on 
Labor Day. In years past, an early date of arrival is on or about 15 July. In 
exceptionally "early" years, individuals arrive by late June in NYC. These 
early arrival years are indicative of an "irruption" meaning lots more are on 
the way. In some years, other seed eating birds such as Purple Finches, Pine 
Siskins, Crossbills and other species also head south to the tri-state area and 
beyond, in large number - autumn 2007 was a good year for multiple species with 
Red-breasted Nuthatches leading the way. So the little Red-breasted Nutchases 
are an augur of what else might come south. 


Some historical info:

Red-breasted Nuthatches and Pine Finches [Pine Siskin] on Staten Island, N.Y. 
In BIRD-LORE for December, 1906, Mr. Dutcher described a remarkable migration 
of Red-breasted Nuthatches over Fire Island Beach, N. Y. While no such flight 
was noticed on Staten Island, still these birds were unusually abundant 
throughout the fall of 1906, the first being seen about September 1, and the 
last remaining till late in the autumn. Pine Finches, too, were present in for 
large numbers during the winter of 1906-7 than in the two preceding. They were 
most numerous on the beach on the south side of the island, where they fed on 
the ground and in the goldenrods. Singularly enough, both birds were also 
common on Staten Island during the season of 1903-4, when the Nuthatches were 
observed from September till November, and a few the following spring, and the 
Pine Finches were even more numerous in the central part of the island than 
during the past winter. - JAMES CHAPIN, New Brighton, Staten Island, N.Y. 

======================
Finally, for those interested in censusing for Red-breasted Nuthatches in their 
home patch or wherever - since these birds can turn up anywhere including 
backyards, try this: in the Sibley electronic guide for birds on your 
I-phone/I-touch, play the first call provided for this species (called the 
Toots #1_NY). Put it on a loop on your hand-held device and let it play for 
about 2 minutes...then switch to the call named: More Calls #1_NY (Red-breasted 
Nuthatch). Play that for about two minutes (put on a loop so the call keeps 
playing continuously for the two minutes). Having a small blue-tooth speaker 
will aid your field research. 


In my experience, these birds are very social and if any are in the area, they 
will come in and work their way down the tree trunk to very near the sound...it 
is possible to get many more coming in simultaneously - I have gotten as many 
as five at a time recently. They will fly back and forth overhead...usually 
landing nearby to give their "yank-yank" call in return. They look happy 
hearing calls from their compatriots (on the "tape"), but why I believe this is 
a discussion for another day in a different forum. Even in Washington state 
where Deborah and I visited a few weeks ago, it was possible to bring for a 
close look (all the way down from the top of 150-200 foot tall conifers) at 
families of these birds. Indeed if we did not use the calls from an electronic 
device we would not have known the birds were in the area. 


Now before anyone gets bonkers about what I am writing regarding playing calls 
to census for birds, please be advised that (a) you are doing this to learn 
about birds, their numbers and distribution = you have scientific intent; (b) 
the birds will respond for 1-2 minutes then go back to doing what they were 
doing = you have not permanently (or even temporarily) damaged them...you have 
simply changed their behavior for a brief amount of time...and you may even see 
them feeding near you too; (c) this has nothing to do with being ethical or 
not-ethical and you are not a bad/good person for interacting with birds in 
this way; and finally (d) if you have children or other bird watchers with you, 
they will be amazed and their enjoyment (appreciation) of these birds will 
increase greatly particularly if they (the nuthatches) fly back and forth in 
front of your nose and attempt to land on your head (yes this happens). 


So, if you are inclined, go out in your backyard and census for Red-breasted 
Nuthatches...and bring your camera and a 300mm lens. If not, or you hate what I 
wrote, don't...try pishing instead. But pray tell, what's the difference 
between electronic calls and pishing? These are both valid ways of locating 
birds. 


Robert DeCandido PhD
==============================

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Subject: A different perspective on eagles
From: MM <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:00:15 -0700
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/national-eagle-
repository-eagles-go-to-native-american-tribes-and-
science-180960306/?utm_source=smithsoniandaily&utm_medium=
email&utm_campaign=20160906-daily-responsive&spMailingID=26434050&spUserID=
NzQwNDUzODAyNTMS1&spJobID=880943564&spReportId=ODgwOTQzNTY0S0

Oscar Canino
SF, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

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Subject: Re: Starlings as shorebirds
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 13:09:46 -0500
Some of the Eurasian Magpies in Norway were doing the same during our
visit last month.
Larry Gardella Montgomery, AL------------------------From: "Douglas
Carver" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 11:42:13 -0600
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Starlings as shorebirds

  Starlings are fascinating and infinitely adaptable.  
   When I lived in Ireland, I would often see magpies (Pica pica)
acting like shorebirds -- but then, they also are splendid
opportunists. (I also saw Hooded Crows-as-shorebirds, as you did in
Norway.)   
   Douglas Carver   Albuquerque, NM    
  On Sat, Sep 3, 2016 at 12:24 PM, Willem Jan Marinus Vader  wrote:

	Starlings as shorebirds 

	As a marine biologist, who is also a birder, and who has worked a lot
in intertidal areas I have regularly come across 'trespassing
landbirds', that act as shorebirds. There are of course a few
specialists also here, such as a number of Cinclodes species in South
America, Cobb's Wren in the Falklands and the Rock Pipit here in
Europe; also our Hooded Crow acts as a regular shorebird much of the
time here in Northern Norway. And when we have a sudden return of
winter weather late in spring, as happens here now and then, and fresh
snow covers much of the ground, lots of passerines flee to the
intertidal and feed there; I have written on such occasions in a
Norwegian journal. 

	But Starlings (and also wagtails) are in an in-between position. They
are not regular shorebirds, but still exploit shore ressources quite
regularly. Most of my examples come from Holland and western Norway,
where I lived earlier, but also here north we find starlings regularly
in the intertidal, and the few that try to winter in the outermost
islands here north, mostly keep to the shore most of the time. 

	When I was a student in Holland (terribly long ago by now) we had
every summer a summercamp called ' Shore birds and bottomfauna' on the
island of Vlieland in the Wadden Sea, where many budding
ornithologists (several later famous names there) came together to
study the diet and feeding habits of the different shorebirds, while I
was the bottom fauna man, who was supposed to know all the animals in
the mudflats, as well as the tracks they left on the surface. One of
these tracks was made by the large polychaete worm Nereis
diversicolor, a small hole with a network of tracks radiating from it.
And I soon found out that the local starlings knew these tracks as
well as I did and walked from one to the next, trying to extract the
ragworms (I have later seen Spotless Starlings in NW Spain do exactly
the same). 

	Starlings also came and collected the debris on the shrimp-boats in
the harbour of Den Helder, where I lived at the time. And later, in
the Sognefjord in Western Norway , where at the time there was a large
seasonal Sprat Clupea sprattus fishery, where these small fishes were
for a while kept in large holding nets in the fjord, with some
mortality, starlings cruised like small helicopters over the surface
and picked up the floating corpses. 

	The most shore-bird like behaviour I ave seen in starlings was also
in the Sognefjord, although further inland, in late summer. Here
starlings foraged in the intertidal at ebbtide, and in fact caught the
amphipods I was studying at the time, as I suspect they do quite
regularly many places. But what was very special this time, in my
eyes, was that when the flood came and the intertidal no longer was
accessible to shorebirds, the starlings sat in long rows on the
telephone wires along the road, and rested, exactly as real shorebirds
do at high tide! 

	Starlings are highly interesting birds, just because they are
generalists and always open to new possibilities, and exhibit new
behavioural traits.  For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/ [2]birdchat/ For BirdChat archives or to
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 (I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

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Subject: Re: Starlings as shorebirds
From: Douglas Carver <dhmcarver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2016 11:42:13 -0600
Starlings are fascinating and infinitely adaptable.

When I lived in Ireland, I would often see magpies (Pica pica) acting like
shorebirds -- but then, they also are splendid opportunists. (I also saw
Hooded Crows-as-shorebirds, as you did in Norway.)

Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM

On Sat, Sep 3, 2016 at 12:24 PM, Willem Jan Marinus Vader 
wrote:

> Starlings as shorebirds
>
>
>
> As a marine biologist, who is also a birder, and who has worked a lot in
> intertidal areas I have regularly come across 'trespassing landbirds', that
> act as shorebirds. There are of course a few specialists also here, such as
> a number of Cinclodes species in South America, Cobb's Wren in the
> Falklands and the Rock Pipit here in Europe; also our Hooded Crow acts as a
> regular shorebird much of the time here in Northern Norway. And when we
> have a sudden return of winter weather late in spring, as happens here now
> and then, and fresh snow covers much of the ground, lots of passerines flee
> to the intertidal and feed there; I have written on such occasions in a
> Norwegian journal.
>
>
>
> But Starlings (and also wagtails) are in an in-between position. They are
> not regular shorebirds, but still exploit shore ressources quite regularly.
> Most of my examples come from Holland and western Norway, where I lived
> earlier, but also here north we find starlings regularly in the intertidal,
> and the few that try to winter in the outermost islands here north, mostly
> keep to the shore most of the time.
>
>
>
> When I was a student in Holland (terribly long ago by now) we had every
> summer a summercamp called ' Shore birds and bottomfauna' on the island of
> Vlieland in the Wadden Sea, where many budding ornithologists (several
> later famous names there) came together to study the diet and feeding
> habits of the different shorebirds, while I was the bottom fauna man, who
> was supposed to know all the animals in the mudflats, as well as the tracks
> they left on the surface. One of these tracks was made by the large
> polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor, a small hole with a network of tracks
> radiating from it. And I soon found out that the local starlings knew these
> tracks as well as I did and walked from one to the next, trying to extract
> the ragworms (I have later seen Spotless Starlings in NW Spain do exactly
> the same).
>
>
>
> Starlings also came and collected the debris on the shrimp-boats in the
> harbour of Den Helder, where I lived at the time. And later, in the
> Sognefjord in Western Norway , where at the time there was a large seasonal
> Sprat  Clupea sprattus fishery, where these small fishes were for a while
> kept in large holding nets in the fjord, with some mortality,
> starlings cruised like small helicopters over the surface and picked up the
> floating corpses.
>
>
>
> The most shore-bird like behaviour I ave seen in starlings was also in the
> Sognefjord, although further inland, in late summer. Here starlings foraged
> in the intertidal at ebbtide, and in fact caught the amphipods I was
> studying at the time, as I suspect they do quite regularly many places. But
> what was very special this time, in my eyes, was that when the flood came
> and the intertidal no longer was accessible to shorebirds, the starlings
> sat in long rows on the telephone wires along the road, and rested, exactly
> as real shorebirds do at high tide!
>
>
>
> Starlings are highly interesting birds, just because they are generalists
> and always open to new possibilities, and exhibit new behavioural traits.
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For
> BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives:
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a
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Subject: Starlings as shorebirds
From: Willem Jan Marinus Vader <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Sat, 3 Sep 2016 18:24:30 +0000
Starlings as shorebirds



As a marine biologist, who is also a birder, and who has worked a lot in 
intertidal areas I have regularly come across 'trespassing landbirds', that act 
as shorebirds. There are of course a few specialists also here, such as a 
number of Cinclodes species in South America, Cobb's Wren in the Falklands and 
the Rock Pipit here in Europe; also our Hooded Crow acts as a regular shorebird 
much of the time here in Northern Norway. And when we have a sudden return of 
winter weather late in spring, as happens here now and then, and fresh snow 
covers much of the ground, lots of passerines flee to the intertidal and feed 
there; I have written on such occasions in a Norwegian journal. 




But Starlings (and also wagtails) are in an in-between position. They are not 
regular shorebirds, but still exploit shore ressources quite regularly. Most of 
my examples come from Holland and western Norway, where I lived earlier, but 
also here north we find starlings regularly in the intertidal, and the few that 
try to winter in the outermost islands here north, mostly keep to the shore 
most of the time. 




When I was a student in Holland (terribly long ago by now) we had every summer 
a summercamp called ' Shore birds and bottomfauna' on the island of Vlieland in 
the Wadden Sea, where many budding ornithologists (several later famous names 
there) came together to study the diet and feeding habits of the different 
shorebirds, while I was the bottom fauna man, who was supposed to know all the 
animals in the mudflats, as well as the tracks they left on the surface. One of 
these tracks was made by the large polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor, a small 
hole with a network of tracks radiating from it. And I soon found out that the 
local starlings knew these tracks as well as I did and walked from one to the 
next, trying to extract the ragworms (I have later seen Spotless Starlings in 
NW Spain do exactly the same). 




Starlings also came and collected the debris on the shrimp-boats in the harbour 
of Den Helder, where I lived at the time. And later, in the Sognefjord in 
Western Norway , where at the time there was a large seasonal Sprat Clupea 
sprattus fishery, where these small fishes were for a while kept in large 
holding nets in the fjord, with some mortality, starlings cruised like small 
helicopters over the surface and picked up the floating corpses. 




The most shore-bird like behaviour I ave seen in starlings was also in the 
Sognefjord, although further inland, in late summer. Here starlings foraged in 
the intertidal at ebbtide, and in fact caught the amphipods I was studying at 
the time, as I suspect they do quite regularly many places. But what was very 
special this time, in my eyes, was that when the flood came and the intertidal 
no longer was accessible to shorebirds, the starlings sat in long rows on the 
telephone wires along the road, and rested, exactly as real shorebirds do at 
high tide! 




Starlings are highly interesting birds, just because they are generalists and 
always open to new possibilities, and exhibit new behavioural traits. 


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