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Updated on Tuesday, April 15 at 08:26 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Band-tailed Earthcreeper,©Sophie Webb

15 Apr request for location in Ft Davis TX area [Thomas and Sheri Roberts ]
15 Apr Hilton Pond 04/07/14 (Belize Hummingbirds) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
14 Apr ABA Field Guides [Rick Wright ]
14 Apr Re: ADMIN: BirdChat list problems [Ronald Orenstein ]
14 Apr ADMIN: BirdChat list problems [Chuck Otte ]
14 Apr Migration in Pacific Northwest ["R.D. Everhart" ]
12 Apr BirdNote - Last week & the week of Apr. 13, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
12 Apr Re: true facts about the owl [Laura Erickson ]
12 Apr true facts about the owl [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
11 Apr Re: "Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius" - online, too [Ellen Blackstone ]
10 Apr Steak-backed Oriole continues SENM [Lamont ]
10 Apr Tripod Heads - Thanks [Marcia Balestri ]
10 Apr NOVA series "Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius" airing on PBS [Patricia Rossi ]
9 Apr Re: Tripod Heads [Steve Sosensky ]
9 Apr Telomere length: a potential new measure of chronic stress in wildlife? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
9 Apr RFI: Kansas ..... road trip, Lesser Prairie Chickens [Elliott Bedows ]
9 Apr Tripod Heads [Marcia Balestri ]
7 Apr Hummingbirds: still evolving endless forms most wonderful [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
5 Apr Re: London question on behalf of a friend ["Collinson, Professor Jon M." ]
5 Apr Re: London question on behalf of a friend []
5 Apr Re: London question on behalf of a friend ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
5 Apr Re: London question on behalf of a friend [Adrian & Esme Douglas ]
5 Apr Re: London question on behalf of a friend [Laura Erickson ]
5 Apr Re: London question on behalf of a friend [Bill Porteous ]
5 Apr Re: London question on behalf of a friend [Laura Erickson ]
5 Apr London question on behalf of a friend ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
5 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes [Phil Davis ]
5 Apr RFI quick alpha index of bird names, Panama guide [Mike Mulligan ]
5 Apr Free Checklists for Major World Areas []
5 Apr BirdNote - Last week & the week of Apr. 6, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
4 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes [Ozzie ]
4 Apr Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
4 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
4 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes [Dominik Mosur ]
4 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes [Dominik Mosur ]
4 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes ["William H. Barnard" ]
4 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes [Hilary Powers ]
4 Apr Re: Clark's and Western Grebes [Elliot Kirschbaum ]
4 Apr Kansas Birding Festival [Chuck Otte ]
3 Apr Songbird US Postal Stamps [Patricia Rossi ]
3 Apr Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
3 Apr Clark's and Western Grebes [Linda Jones ]
3 Apr Important Issue Of "Birding Community E-Bulletin" Newsletter [Daniel Edelstein ]
2 Apr SV: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finland [Morten Günther ]
2 Apr A National Audubon Summer program in Maine of possible interest [Tom Arny ]
2 Apr RFI: Finland ["Nancy L. Newfield" ]
1 Apr Re: Non-hummingbirds using hummingbird feeders []
1 Apr Thanks Gregg….Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDC HAT] Bird Nest Field Guides & Book [Daniel Edelstein ]
1 Apr Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird Nest Field Guides & Book ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
1 Apr Bird Nest Field Guides & Book [Daniel Edelstein ]
1 Apr "Breaking Bird" [Laura Erickson ]
31 Mar Costa Rica Guides [Eric Jeffrey ]
1 Apr Re: Getting burnt out on birding [Dr Ronald Orenstein ]
31 Mar Re: Getting burnt out on birding [Dominik Mosur ]
31 Mar Getting Burnt Out on Birding [Al Schirmacher ]
31 Mar Re: Getting burnt out on birding [Douglas Carver ]
30 Mar Birds headed north ["R.D. Everhart" ]
30 Mar Birds headed north ["R.D. Everhart" ]
30 Mar Birds headed north ["R.D. Everhart" ]
30 Mar Re: non-hummingbirds using feeders [Katharine Mills ]
30 Mar non-hummingbirds using feeders [Rick Wright ]
30 Mar Non-hummingbirds using hummingbird feeders [Jim Royer ]
30 Mar SV: [BIRDCHAT] Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July [Morten Günther ]
30 Mar 2007 ABA Ecuador Conference [Marcia Balestri ]
29 Mar Re: Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July [donald lewis ]
29 Mar Re: Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July [Jerry Friedman ]
29 Mar My review of the new Sibley guide [Laura Erickson ]
29 Mar Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July [Jim Royer ]
29 Mar BirdNote - Last week & the week of Mar. 30, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
29 Mar Re: GPS Locator App [stephen christopher ]
28 Mar Re: Getting burnt out on birding [marys1000 ]
28 Mar Birding trail advice wanted [Patricia Burden ]
28 Mar overseas payments -continued [Sally Wech ]
27 Mar Re: Getting burnt out on birding [Richard Carlson ]
28 Mar Re: birding southern arizona (and lodging) [Greg Scott ]
28 Mar Re: Getting burnt out on birding [Patricia Burden ]

Subject: request for location in Ft Davis TX area
From: Thomas and Sheri Roberts <troberts2459 AT ATLANTICBB.NET>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 21:01:03 -0400
Any information and/or directions for good areas for local and area
exclusives in the Ft Davis/Alpine TX area.  Will be in the area 22 and 23
APR.
Thanks in advance,
Tom Roberts
Davidsville, PA

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 04/07/14 (Belize Hummingbirds)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 14:49:47 -0400
What with an unusual abundance of spring hummingbirds to be banded--plus 
renovations on the old farmhouse at Hilton Pond Center--I've been slowed 
considerably in producing my summary report about our March 2014 Operation 
RubyThroat expedition to Crooked Tree in Belize. At long last it is finished 
and posted. 


I provide this detailed summary as a thank-you and permanent record for the 
generous and hard-working citizen scientists who help these trips succeed, but 
I also like sharing everything with other birders and naturalists. I hope 
you'll enjoy the latest write-up, which serves as the 7-16 March 2014 
installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond." 


The photo essay includes nearly 150 images of Neotropical flora and fauna--more 
than usual and my attempt to drive away this winter blast affecting much of the 
U.S. this week. 


The installment is at  http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140307.html

Happy (Neotropical) Nature Watching!

BILL

P.S. Please "Like" our new Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
for timely updates on nature topics. Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond. 


=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: ABA Field Guides
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:46:57 -0400
As some of you may know, the American Birding Association and Scott and Nix
Publishers are producing a new series of field guides to the US states.
These are guides intended in the first instance for new and potential
birders, but I like to think that some of the tricks and techniques
included in each volume will be of use to even more experienced observers.

The first two volumes, for New Jersey and for Colorado, are available for
ordering at amazon.com and at ABA Sales / Buteo Books. Amazon tells me that
the New Jersey guide is ready for delivery Thursday, the day after
tomorrow; Ted Floyd's Colorado volume is scheduled to be released May 5.

There are many reasons that those two states were selected to inaugurate
the new series. Chief among them, though, is the fact that New Jersey and
Colorado are each home to a large number of very widespread species, such
that birders in nearby states and provinces should find these books useful,
too.

We hope so at least! And we hope, too, that those of you who have an
opportunity to test-drive these first volumes will leave your comments and
impressions at Amazon.

Best wishes,
--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
http://birdingnewjersey.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: ADMIN: BirdChat list problems
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:37:36 -0700
I have an address that uses yahoo mail but ends in rogers.com rather than 
yahoo.com.  Can I still post? 

 
Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com


________________________________
 From: Chuck Otte 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 2:18:08 PM
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] ADMIN: BirdChat list problems
 

Good day BirdChat!

There are several announcements about the list. Please read and save for
future use.

We have been seeing problems with emails sent from Yahoo email
addresses on several of the BirdXXXX lists. Yahoo´s policy change last week
is also causing problems that affect e-mail addresses from other domains,
such as Comcast, ATT, Hotmail, and MSN. You can read a technical
explanation of why this occurs at:

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9247512/Yahoo_email_anti_spoofing
_policy_breaks_mailing_lists?pageNumber=1

Because the problem occurs _every time_ a message from a Yahoo.com
address is posted to the list, our mail administrators have advised us to set
all subscriptions with Yahoo.com to NOPOST. I am in the process of doing
this. I apologize for the inconvenience this will cause some of you. I realize 
it 

is NOT your fault, Yahoo has caused this through their actions.

Other providers have "honored" Yahoo´s policy although they have not set
the same restrictive policy; they should stop seeing rejections once we
remove the Yahoo posts. These include Comcast, ATT, MSN, and Hotmail.

If you have a Yahoo address, I encourage you to contact Yahoo.com support
and tell them "I have been inconvenienced because I am unable to
participate in Listserv mailing lists because of Yahoo's DMARC policy." I also
suggest that you may want to get a different e-mail provider for your listserv
subscriptions (and maybe for all your e-mail). While I cannot and do not
recommend any particular provider, I can inform you that two large providers
which have had no problems are Google (Gmail.com) and Apple
(iCloud.com, me.com, mac.com). There have also been no problems with
any .org, .gov, or .edu address as far as I know right now.

To repeat, if you are subscribed to the list with a Yahoo address your
subscription will be set to "nopost"  -  if you are a Yahoo
user, you will be able to read messages but not post to the list.

As always don´t hesitate to contact the list owners if you have questions, but
please be considerate at this busy time, and try to write us only if you have
tried to solve your problem first and gotten stuck.  The address to write is:

BirdChat-Request AT listserv.ksu.edu

To manage your subscription, please use the following information

How to UNSUBSCRIBE:
To stop receiving list messages, send an e-mail with no subject AND no
signature, to
    LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only this command:
    UNSUBSCRIBE BirdChat

How to SUBSCRIBE:
To start receiving list messages, send an e-mail with no subject AND no
signature, to
    LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only this command:
    SUBSCRIBE BirdChat Ima Birder
(Replace Ima Birder with your full name)

How to STOP YOUR LIST MAIL Temporarily:
To suspend delivery without dropping your list subscription,
send a message to
LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only the command
SET BirdChat NOMAIL

How to RESTART YOUR LIST MAIL:
When you want to resume delivery of messages,
send a message to
LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only the command
SET BirdChat MAIL

This is a world wide issue and is very dynamic. If things change in the
coming days, we can quickly set those Yahoo addresses back to POST.
Again, we apologize for having to take this action but it is the only way in 
the 

short run to minimize the disruption to the largest group of subscribers.

Chuck Otte
BirdChat co-listowner

-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: ADMIN: BirdChat list problems
From: Chuck Otte <cotte AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 13:18:08 -0500
Good day BirdChat!

There are several announcements about the list. Please read and save for
future use.

We have been seeing problems with emails sent from Yahoo email
addresses on several of the BirdXXXX lists. Yahoo´s policy change last week
is also causing problems that affect e-mail addresses from other domains,
such as Comcast, ATT, Hotmail, and MSN. You can read a technical
explanation of why this occurs at:

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9247512/Yahoo_email_anti_spoofing
_policy_breaks_mailing_lists?pageNumber=1

Because the problem occurs _every time_ a message from a Yahoo.com
address is posted to the list, our mail administrators have advised us to set
all subscriptions with Yahoo.com to NOPOST. I am in the process of doing
this. I apologize for the inconvenience this will cause some of you. I realize 
it 

is NOT your fault, Yahoo has caused this through their actions.

Other providers have "honored" Yahoo´s policy although they have not set
the same restrictive policy; they should stop seeing rejections once we
remove the Yahoo posts. These include Comcast, ATT, MSN, and Hotmail.

If you have a Yahoo address, I encourage you to contact Yahoo.com support
and tell them "I have been inconvenienced because I am unable to
participate in Listserv mailing lists because of Yahoo's DMARC policy." I also
suggest that you may want to get a different e-mail provider for your listserv
subscriptions (and maybe for all your e-mail). While I cannot and do not
recommend any particular provider, I can inform you that two large providers
which have had no problems are Google (Gmail.com) and Apple
(iCloud.com, me.com, mac.com). There have also been no problems with
any .org, .gov, or .edu address as far as I know right now.

To repeat, if you are subscribed to the list with a Yahoo address your
subscription will be set to "nopost"  -  if you are a Yahoo
user, you will be able to read messages but not post to the list.

As always don´t hesitate to contact the list owners if you have questions, but
please be considerate at this busy time, and try to write us only if you have
tried to solve your problem first and gotten stuck.  The address to write is:

BirdChat-Request AT listserv.ksu.edu

To manage your subscription, please use the following information

How to UNSUBSCRIBE:
To stop receiving list messages, send an e-mail with no subject AND no
signature, to
    LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only this command:
    UNSUBSCRIBE BirdChat

How to SUBSCRIBE:
To start receiving list messages, send an e-mail with no subject AND no
signature, to
    LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only this command:
    SUBSCRIBE BirdChat Ima Birder
(Replace Ima Birder with your full name)

How to STOP YOUR LIST MAIL Temporarily:
To suspend delivery without dropping your list subscription,
send a message to
LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only the command
SET BirdChat NOMAIL

How to RESTART YOUR LIST MAIL:
When you want to resume delivery of messages,
send a message to
LISTSERV AT listserv.ksu.edu
containing only the command
SET BirdChat MAIL

This is a world wide issue and is very dynamic. If things change in the
coming days, we can quickly set those Yahoo addresses back to POST.
Again, we apologize for having to take this action but it is the only way in 
the 

short run to minimize the disruption to the largest group of subscribers.

Chuck Otte
BirdChat co-listowner

-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Migration in Pacific Northwest
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 08:16:25 -0500
    This mornings radar appears to show good migratory movement in
the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S.. I have posted a radar image
for those interested.

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


  Here in Minnesota the conditions are still cold and gray. Migration
has slowed but I did have my FOY Fox Sparrows in the yard this
weekend.

Hang in there,

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN
www.ncbo.org

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of Apr. 13, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 08:23:26 -0700
Hello, BirdChat!

Check out this series of images of a pair of Bushtits building their
amazing hanging nest:
http://birdnote.org/blog/2014/04/bushtits-build-their-nest All that
work, and they use it for only one year!
---------------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Dawn Song - Emily Dickinson
http://bit.ly/1qobQ3l
* Sharp-tailed Grouse on a Lek
http://bit.ly/PY61N8
* Song Sparrow in your Brush Pile
http://bit.ly/1n19ZlA
* Rusty Blackbirds - A Rusty Recovery
(W/a link to get involved in the Spring Migration Blitz 2014, a
citizen-science project with the Int'l Rusty Blackbird Working Group)
http://bit.ly/1lQyaRd
* Rachel Carson and Silent Spring
http://bit.ly/1kQR9JV
* How Birds Produce Sound
http://bit.ly/OPRstz
* Unlikely Places to Go Birding
http://bit.ly/1ggxi3z
------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1giwH1p
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, read the transcript, sign up for
weekly mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the website.
http://www.birdnote.org All episodes are in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: true facts about the owl
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 06:23:17 -0500
The one inaccuracy is that owls do NOT have "zygodactylous" feet, as
woodpeckers and parrots do. Like hawks and falcons, owls have three
forward-facing toes and one rear toe. The difference is that one forward
toe on owls is opposable. The birds virtually always perch with that
opposable toe facing backward, so we see two toes in front and two behind.
But if you find a dead owl, you can see that there really is only one true
hind toe.

Best from the anal-retentive birder,

Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN


On Sat, Apr 12, 2014 at 4:10 AM, Devorah the Ornithologist <
birdologist AT gmail.com> wrote:

> hello everyone,
>
> even before harry potter exploded onto the scene (and onto my
> consciousness), i loved owls. today's lovely caturday video is about owls
> -- it's a parody that is both funny and factually accurate -- a rare
> combination, in my experience.
>
>
> 
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/apr/12/owls-facts-video-birds 

>
> i also include a story about one of my favourite owl species and hope that
> you might also share a story about your favourite owls in the comments.
>
> cheers,
>
> --
> GrrlScientist
> Devorah Bennu, PhD
> birdologist AT gmail.com
> http://about.me/grrlscientist 
> http://www.grrlscientist.net/
> http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
> http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist<
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/grrlscientist>
> *sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
> ff.]
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: true facts about the owl
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 2014 10:10:15 +0100
hello everyone,

even before harry potter exploded onto the scene (and onto my
consciousness), i loved owls. today's lovely caturday video is about owls
-- it's a parody that is both funny and factually accurate -- a rare
combination, in my experience.


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/apr/12/owls-facts-video-birds 


i also include a story about one of my favourite owl species and hope that
you might also share a story about your favourite owls in the comments.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist

http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist 

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: "Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius" - online, too
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 09:34:07 -0700
Looks as if you can also watch online:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/inside-animal-minds.html#animal-minds-birds

Bless them for putting all this stuff online!

Thanks for the note, PatriciaR.

Ellen Blackstone, Seattle

ellenAT123imagineDOTNET
------------------------------------------
Date:    Thu, 10 Apr 2014 09:36:15 -0500
From:    Patricia Rossi 
Subject: NOVA series "Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius" airing on PBS

Greetings!

A new series is now airing on PBS: NOVA "Inside Animal Minds". I just
watched the specific episode "Bird Genius" last night and it is
terrific. It is being repeated again tonight in some locales and will be
rebroadcast in the coming weeks on local PBS stations. You can find your
local area NOVA listings at:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/schedule.html

On a similar note, check out The Vulture Chronicles post and videos of
Striated Caracaras performing intelligence tests:

http://hawkmountain.wordpress.com/2014/03/10/johnny-rooks-and-their-15-minutes-of-fame/ 


Patricia Rossi
Levittown, PA
circus_cyaneus AT verizon.net

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Steak-backed Oriole continues SENM
From: Lamont <lamont AT GVII.CC>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 20:16:25 -0500
The Streak-backed Oriole continues as of yesterday morning, 9 April at Camp 
Washington Ranch about 25 miles south of Carlsbad NM. The bird was seen by Ted 
Probut a Michigan birder and me between 0630-0645. The bird is still being seen 
there about 4 or 5 days out of 7. This is the earliest in the day it has been 
seen. The pattern is the same, starting in the tall trees by the two 
residences, then quickly moving to 5-7 other trees moving toward the tennis 
court and office. It moves through quickly then abruptly departs. This 
presumably is the same bird seen earlier at Rattlesnake Springs, which is next 
door. 


Camp Washington Ranch is a great place to overnight and they enjoy having 
birders visit. 


It took me three attempts to get this bird as I stopped on the way out to my AZ 
chase trip last week. Thanks John Groves for keeping me abreast of this 
bird’s sightings during the week I was in AZ. 


Lamont Brown
Denton and Harlingen, Texas
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Tripod Heads - Thanks
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 10:58:38 -0400
I knew I could count on this chat for the right info on these tripod heads, and 
I have ordered a new one. Thanks to those of you who responded. 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com






BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: NOVA series "Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius" airing on PBS
From: Patricia Rossi <circus_cyaneus AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 09:36:15 -0500
Greetings!
(Sorry if this appears twice - had to re-send it because if problems with my 
email) 


A new series is now airing on PBS: NOVA "Inside Animal Minds". I just watched 
the specific episode "Bird Genius" last night and it is terrific. It is being 
repeated again tonight in some locales and will be rebroadcast in the coming 
weeks on local PBS stations. 

You can find your local area NOVA listings at:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/schedule.html

On a similar note, check out The Vulture Chronicles post and videos of Striated 
Caracaras performing intelligence tests: 


http://hawkmountain.wordpress.com/2014/03/10/johnny-rooks-and-their-15-minutes-of-fame/ 


Patricia Rossi
Levittown, PA
circus_cyaneus AT verizon.net(

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Tripod Heads
From: Steve Sosensky <steve AT OPTICS4BIRDING.COM>
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 12:28:34 -0700
Hi Marcia,



The 128RC is the 3130 with a new number. A few years ago when Manfrotto
acquired Bogen, they changed the Bogen part numbers to Manfrotto numbers.



We have them in stock.





Good viewing,



Steve Sosensky, VP

Optics4Birding

  www.Optics4Birding.com

Phone: 949-360-6789

Toll Free: 877-674-2473











On 4/9/2014 5:06:07 AM, mebalestri AT gmail.com wrote:
> My Manfrotto 3130 tripod head bit the dust yesterday.  I really like this
> one, but it appears that they don't make it anymore.  It looks like the
> closest replacement is the 128RC-is there someone out there that is
> knowledgeable about these that can tell me if that is true?  Is there a
> better one out there?
> _____________________
>
> Marcia Balestri
> Worcester County, Maryland
> mebalestri AT gmail.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Telomere length: a potential new measure of chronic stress in wildlife?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 17:38:02 +0100
hello everyone,

you might be interested to read this piece about telomere length and
chronic stress -- social isolation -- in pet grey parrots. it points to a
potential new way to measure chronic stress in individual animals, and
potentially in wildlife:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/apr/09/telomere-stress-parrot-wildlife 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist

http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist 

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI: Kansas ..... road trip, Lesser Prairie Chickens
From: Elliott Bedows <ebedows AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 09:43:02 -0500
Hi all,



I am planning out a road trip next week  that would include  western
portions of Nebraska and Kansas.  I was wondering if anyone could provide
information on possible locations for  Le. Prairie Chicken.  I have seen
them previously  in the Cimarron Nat'l Grassland near Elkhart, KS, but that
was years ago and I'm wondering if that is still the best local area to view
the 'little chickens'.  Any advise would be appreciated.  Thanks in advance.



Elliott Bedows,

Bellevue, NE





























nat.'l


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Tripod Heads
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 08:06:07 -0400
My Manfrotto 3130 tripod head bit the dust yesterday. I really like this one, 
but it appears that they don’t make it anymore. It looks like the closest 
replacement is the 128RC—is there someone out there that is knowledgeable about 
these that can tell me if that is true? Is there a better one out there? 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com






BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hummingbirds: still evolving endless forms most wonderful
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2014 14:22:07 +0100
hello everyone,

i thought you might enjoy reading this new study of the evolutionary
history of the hummingbirds:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/apr/07/grrlscientist-hummingbirds-evolution-phylogeny-andes 


it includes a number of interesting findings that birders and
ornithologists will appreciate!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://about.me/grrlscientist 
http://www.grrlscientist.net/
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist

http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist 

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: London question on behalf of a friend
From: "Collinson, Professor Jon M." <m.collinson AT ABDN.AC.UK>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 21:08:49 +0000
You can listen to the Nightingales and Bombers here 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_MHqW5KVds 


It was meant to be a live broadcast of Nightingale song from a Surrey garden on 
19 May 1942, but the sound engineer pulled the plug on the broadcast when the 
bombers started going over to maintain security. Nevertheless, recording 
continued. 197 Wellington and Lancaster bombers went over on a mission to 
Mannheim and 11 did not return. 


Best wishes
Martin

---------------------------------------------------------------
J. Martin Collinson,  Professor in Genetics
m.collinson AT abdn.ac.uk

Room 4.37
School of Medical Sciences
University of Aberdeen
Institute of Medical Sciences
Foresterhill
Aberdeen AB25 2ZD
UK

Tel:       +44 (0) 1224 437515
Fax:      +44  (0) 1224 437465
Mobile:  +44  (0) 7899 065930

Aberdeen Clubfoot Consortium - Naked Scientist Interview.
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/interviews/interview/1784/

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Coddlers AT AOL.COM  

Sent: 05 April 2014 21:34
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] London question on behalf of a friend

Thanks to Google

RAF BOMBER COMMAND AT WAR 1939-45 (VOL 2) CD41-030  £10

This 73 minute audio CD collection of rare archive recordings from  the
Second World War, featuring broadcast and actuality recordings relating to  RAF
Bomber Command operations. Raids covered include Augsburg, Kiel, Dortmund,
the Rhine Dams, Amiens gaol and Aarhus, as well as low level precison
strikes  and the first unaided destruction of a U-boat. The recordings also
include first-hand accounts of early raids (1940-42) in Hampdens, Blenheims and 

Wellingtons, as well as later four-engined heavies. The booklet features
detailed recording and historical notes by James Hayward, with images. All
audio  content has been carefully digitally restored. The CD is an absolute
must for  all historians and researchers, as well as collectors of archive
sound and  broadcast recordings.

Tracklist: Blenheim Destroys U-boat (1940),  Raid on Danzig (1940), Raid on
Munich (1940), Wellington Bombs Kiel (1941),  Roving Patrol By Hampdens
(1942), Augsburg - Lancaster VC (1942),  Nightingales & Bombers (1943), 617
Squadron - Dambusters  (1943), Stirling Loses Turret & Ditches (1943), Dortmund
Raid - Stirling  Base (1943), Mosquito Raid - Amiens (1944), Normandy
Ground Support (1944), Mosquito Base/Osnabruck Raid (1944), Work of Rear Gunner 

(1944), Air Gunner  Debrief (1944), Mosquito Raid - Aarhus (1944), Damaged
Beaufighter (1944), An  Airman's Letter to his Mother (1940). ISBN:
978-1-906310-05-9

Bruce Barrett
San Jose, CA


In a message dated 05-Apr-14 1:00:45 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
2adouglas AT WGN.NET writes:

Nightingales are pretty rare nowadays in England and never in  Berkeley
Square since the buildings of London spread westward from the City  of
London in the 16th century.  But I do remember a wonderful  recording
that the BBC have of a nightingale singing in a wood in Kent  which was
then overshadowed by the sound of Luftwaffe bombers on their way  to
London during the 2nd World War.  I don't know if this recording  is
still available but I heard it as a boy on the "wireless" probably  in
the early 50s.

Adrian Douglas.

On 4/5/2014 11:38 AM,  Spector, David (Biology) wrote:
> A non-birdwatching friend from the  States with a  serious interest in
popular song is travelling to England  and would like to hear, if possible, a
Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square,  London.
>
> Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might  breed in or near
Berkeley Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard  there in
migration, and if so when?
>
> It has been suggested that  European Robins are more likely to be heard
at Berkeley Square and could have  provided the inspiration for the song.  Do
they breed there, and, if so,  when in the year are they likely to be heard?
>
> Unfortunately,  my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip in
December, but he would  be interested in any information for future trips.
>
> Thanks in  advance for any information,
>
> David Spector
>  Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S
>
> BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>  -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG -  www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4355 / Virus Database: 3722/7305 - Release  Date: 04/05/14
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
The University of Aberdeen is a charity registered in Scotland, No SC013683.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: London question on behalf of a friend
From: Coddlers AT AOL.COM
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 16:34:43 -0400
Thanks to Google
 
RAF BOMBER COMMAND AT WAR 1939-45 (VOL 2) CD41-030  £10

This 73 minute audio CD collection of rare archive recordings from  the 
Second World War, featuring broadcast and actuality recordings relating to RAF 

Bomber Command operations. Raids covered include Augsburg, Kiel, Dortmund,  
the Rhine Dams, Amiens gaol and Aarhus, as well as low level precison 
strikes  and the first unaided destruction of a U-boat. The recordings also 
include first-hand accounts of early raids (1940-42) in Hampdens, Blenheims and 

Wellingtons, as well as later four-engined heavies. The booklet features  
detailed recording and historical notes by James Hayward, with images. All 
audio  content has been carefully digitally restored. The CD is an absolute 
must for  all historians and researchers, as well as collectors of archive 
sound and  broadcast recordings.

Tracklist: Blenheim Destroys U-boat (1940),  Raid on Danzig (1940), Raid on 
Munich (1940), Wellington Bombs Kiel (1941),  Roving Patrol By Hampdens 
(1942), Augsburg - Lancaster VC (1942),  Nightingales & Bombers (1943), 617 
Squadron - Dambusters (1943), Stirling Loses Turret & Ditches (1943), Dortmund 

Raid - Stirling  Base (1943), Mosquito Raid - Amiens (1944), Normandy 
Ground Support (1944), Mosquito Base/Osnabruck Raid (1944), Work of Rear Gunner 

(1944), Air Gunner  Debrief (1944), Mosquito Raid - Aarhus (1944), Damaged 
Beaufighter (1944), An  Airman's Letter to his Mother (1940). ISBN: 
978-1-906310-05-9
 
Bruce Barrett
San Jose, CA
 
 
In a message dated 05-Apr-14 1:00:45 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,  
2adouglas AT WGN.NET writes:

Nightingales are pretty rare nowadays in England and never in  Berkeley
Square since the buildings of London spread westward from the City  of
London in the 16th century.  But I do remember a wonderful  recording
that the BBC have of a nightingale singing in a wood in Kent  which was
then overshadowed by the sound of Luftwaffe bombers on their way  to
London during the 2nd World War.  I don't know if this recording  is
still available but I heard it as a boy on the "wireless" probably  in
the early 50s.

Adrian Douglas.

On 4/5/2014 11:38 AM,  Spector, David (Biology) wrote:
> A non-birdwatching friend from the  States with a  serious interest in 
popular song is travelling to England  and would like to hear, if possible, a 
Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square,  London.
>
> Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might  breed in or near 
Berkeley Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard  there in 
migration, and if so when?
>
> It has been suggested that  European Robins are more likely to be heard 
at Berkeley Square and could have  provided the inspiration for the song.  Do 
they breed there, and, if so,  when in the year are they likely to be heard?
>
> Unfortunately,  my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip in 
December, but he would  be interested in any information for future trips.
>
> Thanks in  advance for any information,
>
> David Spector
>  Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S
>
> BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>  -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG -  www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4355 / Virus Database: 3722/7305 - Release  Date: 04/05/14
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: London question on behalf of a friend
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 16:06:42 -0400
That's how I always took it as well.   I also don't think he meant that real
angels were dining at the Ritz (everyone knows angels don't eat anything by
manna, not even angel cake, and that the Ritz does not have manna on the
menu), and somehow "sparrows chirped in Berkeley Square", while more
probable, sounds less magical and romantic.

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada





-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Laura Erickson
Sent: April-05-14 3:25 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] London question on behalf of a friend

I have 8 different versions of this song in my iTunes favorites. I think the
song actually intends the bird to be a Nightingale with the full knowledge
that it didn't belong there. Here are the lyrics (well, they vary in some
versions, but not much).

When two lovers meet in Mayfair, so the legends tell, Songbirds sing; winter
turns to spring.
Every winding street in Mayfair falls beneath the spell.
I know such enchantment can be, 'cos it happened one evening to me:

That certain night, the night we met,
There was magic abroad in the air,
There were angels dining at the Ritz,
And a nightingale sang in Berkeley Square.

I may be right, I may be wrong,
But I'm perfectly willing to swear
That when you turned and smiled at me
A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square.

The moon that lingered over London town, Poor puzzled moon, he wore a frown.
How could he know we two were so in love?
The whole darn world seemed upside down

The streets of town were paved with stars; It was such a romantic affair.
And, as we kissed and said 'goodnight',
A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square

When dawn came stealing up all gold and blue To interrupt our rendezvous, I
still remember how you smiled and said, "Was that a dream or was it true?"

Our homeward step was just as light
As the tap-dancing feet of Astaire
And, like an echo far away,
A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square

I know 'cos I was there,
That night in Berkeley Square.


Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN where no nightingales sing ever


On Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 2:20 PM, Bill Porteous
wrote:

> I think it is much more likely that a bird singing in Berkeley Square
> would be a European Robin.  The upside is that ERs of both sexes hold
> territory and sing in the dead of winter.  I am fairly sure that the
> idea of a Nightingale singing in such a location is poetic license.
>
> Greetings from.my hammock in Panama.
>
> Bill Porteous
> La Chorrera
> Panama
> On Apr 5, 2014 3:12 PM, "Laura Erickson" 
> wrote:
>
>> I'm interested in that song too--it's one of my favorites. I'm
>> actually hoping Nightingales aren't expected there, because the whole
>> point of the song is about the "magic abroad in the air." It's
>> supposed to be exceptional that a Nightingale would be singing there.
>>
>> Best, Laura Erickson
>> Duluth MN
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 1:38 PM, Spector, David (Biology) <
>> spectord AT mail.ccsu.edu> wrote:
>>
>> > A non-birdwatching friend from the States with a  serious interest
>> > in popular song is travelling to England and would like to hear, if
>> possible,
>> > a Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square, London.
>> >
>> > Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might breed in or
>> > near Berkeley Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard
>> > there in migration, and if so when?
>> >
>> > It has been suggested that European Robins are more likely to be
>> > heard
>> at
>> > Berkeley Square and could have provided the inspiration for the song.
>>  Do
>> > they breed there, and, if so, when in the year are they likely to
>> > be
>> heard?
>> >
>> > Unfortunately, my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip
>> > in December, but he would be interested in any information for
>> > future
>> trips.
>> >
>> > Thanks in advance for any information,
>> >
>> > David Spector
>> > Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S
>> >
>> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> --
>> Laura Erickson
>>
>> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>>
>> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
>> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after
>> the winter.
>>
>>             --Rachel Carson
>>
>> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>


--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: London question on behalf of a friend
From: Adrian & Esme Douglas <2adouglas AT WGN.NET>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 12:58:29 -0700
Nightingales are pretty rare nowadays in England and never in Berkeley
Square since the buildings of London spread westward from the City of
London in the 16th century.  But I do remember a wonderful recording
that the BBC have of a nightingale singing in a wood in Kent which was
then overshadowed by the sound of Luftwaffe bombers on their way to
London during the 2nd World War.  I don't know if this recording is
still available but I heard it as a boy on the "wireless" probably in
the early 50s.

Adrian Douglas.

On 4/5/2014 11:38 AM, Spector, David (Biology) wrote:
> A non-birdwatching friend from the States with a serious interest in popular 
song is travelling to England and would like to hear, if possible, a 
Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square, London. 

>
> Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might breed in or near 
Berkeley Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard there in migration, 
and if so when? 

>
> It has been suggested that European Robins are more likely to be heard at 
Berkeley Square and could have provided the inspiration for the song. Do they 
breed there, and, if so, when in the year are they likely to be heard? 

>
> Unfortunately, my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip in 
December, but he would be interested in any information for future trips. 

>
> Thanks in advance for any information,
>
> David Spector
> Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4355 / Virus Database: 3722/7305 - Release Date: 04/05/14
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: London question on behalf of a friend
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 14:25:14 -0500
I have 8 different versions of this song in my iTunes favorites. I think
the song actually intends the bird to be a Nightingale with the full
knowledge that it didn't belong there. Here are the lyrics (well, they vary
in some versions, but not much).

When two lovers meet in Mayfair, so the legends tell,
Songbirds sing; winter turns to spring.
Every winding street in Mayfair falls beneath the spell.
I know such enchantment can be, 'cos it happened one evening to me:

That certain night, the night we met,
There was magic abroad in the air,
There were angels dining at the Ritz,
And a nightingale sang in Berkeley Square.

I may be right, I may be wrong,
But I'm perfectly willing to swear
That when you turned and smiled at me
A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square.

The moon that lingered over London town,
Poor puzzled moon, he wore a frown.
How could he know we two were so in love?
The whole darn world seemed upside down

The streets of town were paved with stars;
It was such a romantic affair.
And, as we kissed and said 'goodnight',
A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square

When dawn came stealing up all gold and blue
To interrupt our rendezvous,
I still remember how you smiled and said,
"Was that a dream or was it true?"

Our homeward step was just as light
As the tap-dancing feet of Astaire
And, like an echo far away,
A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square

I know 'cos I was there,
That night in Berkeley Square.


Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth, MN where no nightingales sing ever


On Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 2:20 PM, Bill Porteous wrote:

> I think it is much more likely that a bird singing in Berkeley Square
> would be a European Robin.  The upside is that ERs of both sexes hold
> territory and sing in the dead of winter.  I am fairly sure that the idea
> of a Nightingale singing in such a location is poetic license.
>
> Greetings from.my hammock in Panama.
>
> Bill Porteous
> La Chorrera
> Panama
> On Apr 5, 2014 3:12 PM, "Laura Erickson" 
> wrote:
>
>> I'm interested in that song too--it's one of my favorites. I'm actually
>> hoping Nightingales aren't expected there, because the whole point of the
>> song is about the "magic abroad in the air." It's supposed to be
>> exceptional that a Nightingale would be singing there.
>>
>> Best, Laura Erickson
>> Duluth MN
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 1:38 PM, Spector, David (Biology) <
>> spectord AT mail.ccsu.edu> wrote:
>>
>> > A non-birdwatching friend from the States with a  serious interest in
>> > popular song is travelling to England and would like to hear, if
>> possible,
>> > a Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square, London.
>> >
>> > Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might breed in or near
>> > Berkeley Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard there in
>> > migration, and if so when?
>> >
>> > It has been suggested that European Robins are more likely to be heard
>> at
>> > Berkeley Square and could have provided the inspiration for the song.
>>  Do
>> > they breed there, and, if so, when in the year are they likely to be
>> heard?
>> >
>> > Unfortunately, my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip in
>> > December, but he would be interested in any information for future
>> trips.
>> >
>> > Thanks in advance for any information,
>> >
>> > David Spector
>> > Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S
>> >
>> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> --
>> Laura Erickson
>>
>> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>>
>> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
>> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
>> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
>> winter.
>>
>>             --Rachel Carson
>>
>> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>


--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: London question on behalf of a friend
From: Bill Porteous <phaenostictus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 14:20:33 -0500
I think it is much more likely that a bird singing in Berkeley Square would
be a European Robin.  The upside is that ERs of both sexes hold territory
and sing in the dead of winter.  I am fairly sure that the idea of a
Nightingale singing in such a location is poetic license.

Greetings from.my hammock in Panama.

Bill Porteous
La Chorrera
Panama
On Apr 5, 2014 3:12 PM, "Laura Erickson"  wrote:

> I'm interested in that song too--it's one of my favorites. I'm actually
> hoping Nightingales aren't expected there, because the whole point of the
> song is about the "magic abroad in the air." It's supposed to be
> exceptional that a Nightingale would be singing there.
>
> Best, Laura Erickson
> Duluth MN
>
>
> On Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 1:38 PM, Spector, David (Biology) <
> spectord AT mail.ccsu.edu> wrote:
>
> > A non-birdwatching friend from the States with a  serious interest in
> > popular song is travelling to England and would like to hear, if
> possible,
> > a Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square, London.
> >
> > Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might breed in or near
> > Berkeley Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard there in
> > migration, and if so when?
> >
> > It has been suggested that European Robins are more likely to be heard at
> > Berkeley Square and could have provided the inspiration for the song.  Do
> > they breed there, and, if so, when in the year are they likely to be
> heard?
> >
> > Unfortunately, my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip in
> > December, but he would be interested in any information for future trips.
> >
> > Thanks in advance for any information,
> >
> > David Spector
> > Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S
> >
> > BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> >
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Laura Erickson
>
> For the love, understanding, and protection of birds
>
> There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
> There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
> nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
> winter.
>
>             --Rachel Carson
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: London question on behalf of a friend
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 13:56:29 -0500
I'm interested in that song too--it's one of my favorites. I'm actually
hoping Nightingales aren't expected there, because the whole point of the
song is about the "magic abroad in the air." It's supposed to be
exceptional that a Nightingale would be singing there.

Best, Laura Erickson
Duluth MN


On Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 1:38 PM, Spector, David (Biology) <
spectord AT mail.ccsu.edu> wrote:

> A non-birdwatching friend from the States with a  serious interest in
> popular song is travelling to England and would like to hear, if possible,
> a Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square, London.
>
> Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might breed in or near
> Berkeley Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard there in
> migration, and if so when?
>
> It has been suggested that European Robins are more likely to be heard at
> Berkeley Square and could have provided the inspiration for the song.  Do
> they breed there, and, if so, when in the year are they likely to be heard?
>
> Unfortunately, my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip in
> December, but he would be interested in any information for future trips.
>
> Thanks in advance for any information,
>
> David Spector
> Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: London question on behalf of a friend
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 14:38:27 -0400
A non-birdwatching friend from the States with a serious interest in popular 
song is travelling to England and would like to hear, if possible, a 
Nightingale sing in Berkeley Square, London. 


Does anyone know whether the Common Nightingale might breed in or near Berkeley 
Square, or whether it might occasionally be heard there in migration, and if so 
when? 


It has been suggested that European Robins are more likely to be heard at 
Berkeley Square and could have provided the inspiration for the song. Do they 
breed there, and, if so, when in the year are they likely to be heard? 


Unfortunately, my friend is most likely to schedule his next trip in December, 
but he would be interested in any information for future trips. 


Thanks in advance for any information,

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 13:59:10 -0400
Also, check this ...

Konter, André. 2012. Visual Assessment of
Interbreeding by Aechmophorus Grebes. The Wilson
Journal of Ornithology 124(4):713-720. 2012.

Here's the abstract ...

         http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1676/1559-4491-124.4.713

Hope this helps.

Phil


At 10:57 04/04/2014, Elliot Kirschbaum wrote:
>While they look very similar to us, they
>apparently do not to each other. Their breeding
>ranges overlap and yet they do not commonly interbreed.
>
>See
>http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/clarks_grebe/id
>and http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_grebe/id
>
>from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the
>following in the Clark's Grebe entry:
>
>"A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the
>Clark's Grebe formerly was thought to be the
>same species. Differences in face and bill color
>keep the two grebes from interbreeding."

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
==================================

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: RFI quick alpha index of bird names, Panama guide
From: Mike Mulligan <potoo AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 11:23:32 -0600
I'm looking for a source for a quick-reference alpha index of bird names for 
The Birds of Panama, A Field Guide (Angehr & Dean), to stick on the inside 
cover. 


Thanks much for your help.

Mike Mulligan
Calgary
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Free Checklists for Major World Areas
From: SBSP AT AOL.COM
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 12:41:02 -0400
We have comprehensive checklists, with endemics
labeled, for every  nation in the world, almost all of
the world's major islands or island  groups, and each
U.S. state or Canadian province. We will send you
one as  a text file attached to an e-mail in reply to
an e-mail from you telling us  which one you want.
There is no charge.

Robert Eisberg

SANTA BARBARA SOFTWARE PRODUCTS
Our world birding software is  demonstrated at
Web site: birdbase.com
E-mail: _sbsp AT aol.com_ (mailto:sbsp AT aol.com)

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of Apr. 6, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 09:05:45 -0700
Hello, BirdChat!

We talked with Grammy-winning American composer, Maria Schneider, to
learn how birds inspire some of her jazz compositions. Listen to the
interview. (5+ minutes) http://bit.ly/1fJ5DLV
---------------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Watching Birds' Behavior - Birding 102
http://bit.ly/JMe5Ym
* Little Blue Heron, Light and Dark
http://bit.ly/1jcVasn
* Tanagers - Shade-grown Coffee Birds
http://bit.ly/JbH7Bl
* Which Chickadee - Black-capped or Carolina?
http://bit.ly/1mGciYv
* Ultraviolet Vision in Birds
http://bit.ly/1fJ4P9B
* Marbled Godwits Migrate North
http://bit.ly/1jcVxDv
* Birds Dress for Spring!
http://bit.ly/1q2h5DI
------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1eg7Jir
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, read the transcript, sign up for
weekly mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the website.
http://www.birdnote.org All episodes are in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: Ozzie <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 16:34:35 -0700
I also understand that since many species can see in the UV part of the 
spectrum, what looks identical to the human eye can appear very different to 
the avian one. 


Oscar C

> On Apr 4, 2014, at 11:56 AM, Dominik Mosur  wrote:
>
> In response to whether this blurs the species designation:
>
> "No. The biological species concept is often defined as a group of freely 
interbreeding natural populations that are reproductively isolated from other 
such groups. If the two forms were freely or randomly interbreeding, a Clark's 
Grebe would choose a Western Grebe about 85-90% of the time, but instead they 
choose one only about 30-35% of the time, so they definitely prefer to mate 
with their own type and have achieved partial (but not complete) reproductive 
isolation. 

>
> Floyd"
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 4, 2014, at 11:13, "William H. Barnard"  wrote:
>>
>> Appreciate the comments made. Amazing to me how reproductive isolation, a 
prerequisite for speciation, can be so subtle to us. Apparently not the to 
birds. There are many examples out there. The one I use in class is the 
difference between E. and W. Meadowlarks. Remarkably similar, morphologically, 
until they open their mouths and sing. 

>>
>> Though not really familiar with the two grebes being discussed, they differ 
both in appearance and vocalization. 

>>
>>
>> Bill Barnard
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliot Kirschbaum 

>> Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 10:58 AM
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes
>>
>> While they look very similar to us, they apparently do not to each other. 
Their breeding ranges overlap and yet they do not commonly interbreed. 

>>
>> See http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/clarks_grebe/id and 
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_grebe/id 

>>
>> from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the Clark's Grebe 
entry: 

>>
>> "A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe formerly was 
thought to be the same species. Differences in face and bill color keep the two 
grebes from interbreeding." 

>>
>>
>> --
>> Elliot
>>
>> --
>> Elliot Kirschbaum
>> Shepherdstown, WV
>> kingfisher500 at comcast dot net
>>
>>
>>> On Apr 3, 2014, at 2:18 PM, Linda Jones  wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear BirdChatters:
>>>
>>>
>>> A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and Western 
Grebes. I am copying his questions here: 

>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for
>>> sexually reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the
>>> members of which regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring."
>>> In other words, if two populations, even though they may appear
>>> somewhat different, commonly interbreed and their offspring are also
>>> capable of interbreeding, the two populations by definition belong to
>>> one species. Indeed, it's for this reason that many bird populations
>>> that once were treated as separate species are now lumped into one, even 
though they have distinctive external characteristics. 

>>>
>>> So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences
>>> are minimal at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations
>>> interbreed and, if so, are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they
>>> now treated as two species? On the other hand, if they do not
>>> interbreed, what prevents their interbreeding? Do they breed in
>>> different places, have distinctive courtship patterns, have unique 
ecological requirements, have incompatible gametes, or what? 

>>>
>>> Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?
>>>
>>>
>>> Linda Jones
>>> Northridge, CA
>>>
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 16:45:44 -0400
I understand that the barbecues down below (sic) were cancelled. --Cost savings 
measure, apparently. 


Sorry, couldn't resist.

Good Birding this weekend, everyone, wherever you may find yourself...

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA 19072
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry K. MacKay 

Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 4:21 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes

I live in the midst of the American Black Duck - Mallard hybrid swarm, and
I'm tired of hearing how Mallards are "genetically swamping" the decreasing
Black Ducks (who have experienced declines).

 That way hunting and habitat destruction can't be blamed for the decline in
Black Ducks...it's all the Mallard's fault.

But when I go looking I see that while there is certainly the odd hybrid
around, most Black Ducks associate with other Black Ducks, Mallards with
Mallards.   Often you can see a flock of Black Ducks a few meters from a
group of Mallards.  By the criteria you give for the grebes they are good
species...and no one worries about one grebe replacing the other.

An ornithologist friend who is a DNA expert tells me that genetically Blacks
and Mallards are EXTREMELY close to each other....closer than is true of
some subspecies-within-species.

In the wilds of Labrador and eastern Quebec one sees Black Ducks in
(relatively) primal settings -- no Mallards.  But in addition to having
"introduced" Mallards to more eastern climes, we have also so altered the
landscape as to make it more attractive to them...in terms of breeding
Mallards are essentially prairie ducks, the Blacks are boreal forest ducks
(with a strong dependence on Beaver ponds; the decline in value of Beaver
pelts probably has helped them, as well as reduced flooding...all to the
good).

But try telling politicians that we should protect our boreal forests, and
our beavers, and reduce hunting of Black Ducks.

Given that hunters have so much trouble telling Blacks from female Mallards,
I once suggested that a moratorium be placed, in the east, on all Black
Ducks and all female Mallards, BUT that the bag limit for MALE Mallards be
doubled...thus no net decline in the number of ducks hunters get to kill
while reducing the putatively offending Mallards.

A snow ball placed on a lit barbecue in the lowest reaches of Hell has a
better chance of survival than THAT idea!

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Quebec.


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Dominik Mosur
Sent: April-04-14 2:57 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes

In response to whether this blurs the species designation:

"No. The biological species concept is often defined as a group of freely
interbreeding natural populations that are reproductively isolated from
other such groups. If the two forms were freely or randomly interbreeding, a
Clark's Grebe would choose a Western Grebe about 85-90% of the time, but
instead they choose one only about 30-35% of the time, so they definitely
prefer to mate with their own type and have achieved partial (but not
complete) reproductive isolation.

Floyd"

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2014, at 11:13, "William H. Barnard"  wrote:

> Appreciate the comments made.  Amazing to me how reproductive isolation, a
prerequisite for speciation, can be so subtle to us.  Apparently not the to
birds.  There are many examples out there.  The one I use in class is the
difference between E. and W. Meadowlarks.  Remarkably similar,
morphologically, until they open their mouths and sing.
>
> Though not really familiar with the two grebes being discussed, they
differ both in appearance and vocalization.
>
>
> Bill Barnard
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliot Kirschbaum
> Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 10:58 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes
>
> While they look very similar to us, they apparently do not to each other.
Their breeding ranges overlap and yet they do not commonly interbreed.
>
> See http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/clarks_grebe/id and
> http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_grebe/id
>
> from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the Clark's
Grebe entry:
>
> "A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe formerly
was thought to be the same species. Differences in face and bill color keep
the two grebes from interbreeding."
>
>
> --
> Elliot
>
> --
> Elliot Kirschbaum
> Shepherdstown, WV
> kingfisher500 at comcast dot net
>
>
> On Apr 3, 2014, at 2:18 PM, Linda Jones  wrote:
>
>> Dear BirdChatters:
>>
>>
>> A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and
Western Grebes.  I am copying his questions here:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for
>> sexually reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the
>> members of which regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring."
>> In other words, if two populations, even though they may appear
>> somewhat different, commonly interbreed and their offspring are also
>> capable of interbreeding, the two populations by definition belong to
>> one species. Indeed, it's for this reason that many bird populations
>> that once were treated as separate species are now lumped into one, even
though they have distinctive external characteristics.
>>
>> So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences
>> are minimal at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations
>> interbreed and, if so, are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they
>> now treated as two species? On the other hand, if they do not
>> interbreed, what prevents their interbreeding? Do they breed in
>> different places, have distinctive courtship patterns, have unique
ecological requirements, have incompatible gametes, or what?
>>
>> Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?
>>
>>
>> Linda Jones
>> Northridge, CA
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 16:20:58 -0400
I live in the midst of the American Black Duck - Mallard hybrid swarm, and
I'm tired of hearing how Mallards are "genetically swamping" the decreasing
Black Ducks (who have experienced declines).

 That way hunting and habitat destruction can't be blamed for the decline in
Black Ducks...it's all the Mallard's fault.

But when I go looking I see that while there is certainly the odd hybrid
around, most Black Ducks associate with other Black Ducks, Mallards with
Mallards.   Often you can see a flock of Black Ducks a few meters from a
group of Mallards.  By the criteria you give for the grebes they are good
species...and no one worries about one grebe replacing the other.

An ornithologist friend who is a DNA expert tells me that genetically Blacks
and Mallards are EXTREMELY close to each other....closer than is true of
some subspecies-within-species.

In the wilds of Labrador and eastern Quebec one sees Black Ducks in
(relatively) primal settings -- no Mallards.  But in addition to having
"introduced" Mallards to more eastern climes, we have also so altered the
landscape as to make it more attractive to them...in terms of breeding
Mallards are essentially prairie ducks, the Blacks are boreal forest ducks
(with a strong dependence on Beaver ponds; the decline in value of Beaver
pelts probably has helped them, as well as reduced flooding...all to the
good).

But try telling politicians that we should protect our boreal forests, and
our beavers, and reduce hunting of Black Ducks.

Given that hunters have so much trouble telling Blacks from female Mallards,
I once suggested that a moratorium be placed, in the east, on all Black
Ducks and all female Mallards, BUT that the bag limit for MALE Mallards be
doubled...thus no net decline in the number of ducks hunters get to kill
while reducing the putatively offending Mallards.

A snow ball placed on a lit barbecue in the lowest reaches of Hell has a
better chance of survival than THAT idea!

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Quebec.


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Dominik Mosur
Sent: April-04-14 2:57 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes

In response to whether this blurs the species designation:

"No. The biological species concept is often defined as a group of freely
interbreeding natural populations that are reproductively isolated from
other such groups. If the two forms were freely or randomly interbreeding, a
Clark's Grebe would choose a Western Grebe about 85-90% of the time, but
instead they choose one only about 30-35% of the time, so they definitely
prefer to mate with their own type and have achieved partial (but not
complete) reproductive isolation.

Floyd"

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2014, at 11:13, "William H. Barnard"  wrote:

> Appreciate the comments made.  Amazing to me how reproductive isolation, a
prerequisite for speciation, can be so subtle to us.  Apparently not the to
birds.  There are many examples out there.  The one I use in class is the
difference between E. and W. Meadowlarks.  Remarkably similar,
morphologically, until they open their mouths and sing.
>
> Though not really familiar with the two grebes being discussed, they
differ both in appearance and vocalization.
>
>
> Bill Barnard
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliot Kirschbaum
> Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 10:58 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes
>
> While they look very similar to us, they apparently do not to each other.
Their breeding ranges overlap and yet they do not commonly interbreed.
>
> See http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/clarks_grebe/id and
> http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_grebe/id
>
> from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the Clark's
Grebe entry:
>
> "A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe formerly
was thought to be the same species. Differences in face and bill color keep
the two grebes from interbreeding."
>
>
> --
> Elliot
>
> --
> Elliot Kirschbaum
> Shepherdstown, WV
> kingfisher500 at comcast dot net
>
>
> On Apr 3, 2014, at 2:18 PM, Linda Jones  wrote:
>
>> Dear BirdChatters:
>>
>>
>> A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and
Western Grebes.  I am copying his questions here:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for
>> sexually reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the
>> members of which regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring."
>> In other words, if two populations, even though they may appear
>> somewhat different, commonly interbreed and their offspring are also
>> capable of interbreeding, the two populations by definition belong to
>> one species. Indeed, it's for this reason that many bird populations
>> that once were treated as separate species are now lumped into one, even
though they have distinctive external characteristics.
>>
>> So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences
>> are minimal at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations
>> interbreed and, if so, are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they
>> now treated as two species? On the other hand, if they do not
>> interbreed, what prevents their interbreeding? Do they breed in
>> different places, have distinctive courtship patterns, have unique
ecological requirements, have incompatible gametes, or what?
>>
>> Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?
>>
>>
>> Linda Jones
>> Northridge, CA
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: Dominik Mosur <polskatata AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 11:56:53 -0700
In response to whether this blurs the species designation:

"No. The biological species concept is often defined as a group of freely 
interbreeding natural populations that are reproductively isolated from other 
such groups. If the two forms were freely or randomly interbreeding, a Clark's 
Grebe would choose a Western Grebe about 85-90% of the time, but instead they 
choose one only about 30-35% of the time, so they definitely prefer to mate 
with their own type and have achieved partial (but not complete) reproductive 
isolation. 


Floyd"

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2014, at 11:13, "William H. Barnard"  wrote:

> Appreciate the comments made. Amazing to me how reproductive isolation, a 
prerequisite for speciation, can be so subtle to us. Apparently not the to 
birds. There are many examples out there. The one I use in class is the 
difference between E. and W. Meadowlarks. Remarkably similar, morphologically, 
until they open their mouths and sing. 

>
> Though not really familiar with the two grebes being discussed, they differ 
both in appearance and vocalization. 

>
>
> Bill Barnard
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliot Kirschbaum 

> Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 10:58 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes
>
> While they look very similar to us, they apparently do not to each other. 
Their breeding ranges overlap and yet they do not commonly interbreed. 

>
> See http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/clarks_grebe/id and 
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_grebe/id 

>
> from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the Clark's Grebe 
entry: 

>
> "A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe formerly was 
thought to be the same species. Differences in face and bill color keep the two 
grebes from interbreeding." 

>
>
> --
> Elliot
>
> --
> Elliot Kirschbaum
> Shepherdstown, WV
> kingfisher500 at comcast dot net
>
>
> On Apr 3, 2014, at 2:18 PM, Linda Jones  wrote:
>
>> Dear BirdChatters:
>>
>>
>> A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and Western 
Grebes. I am copying his questions here: 

>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for
>> sexually reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the
>> members of which regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring."
>> In other words, if two populations, even though they may appear
>> somewhat different, commonly interbreed and their offspring are also
>> capable of interbreeding, the two populations by definition belong to
>> one species. Indeed, it's for this reason that many bird populations
>> that once were treated as separate species are now lumped into one, even 
though they have distinctive external characteristics. 

>>
>> So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences
>> are minimal at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations
>> interbreed and, if so, are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they
>> now treated as two species? On the other hand, if they do not
>> interbreed, what prevents their interbreeding? Do they breed in
>> different places, have distinctive courtship patterns, have unique 
ecological requirements, have incompatible gametes, or what? 

>>
>> Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?
>>
>>
>> Linda Jones
>> Northridge, CA
>>
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: Dominik Mosur <polskatata AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 11:27:07 -0700
This is from Floyd Hayes who has been studying Aechmophorus grebes at Clear 
Lake CA: 


"I've been gathering data the last three summers on the frequency of 
hybridization at Clear Lake. I don't have exact numbers at the moment, but 
approximately a third of Clark's Grebes choose a Western Grebe as its mate, 
based on actual observations of nest-building, incubating or mating pairs (not 
just pairs swimming together). About 85-90% of the grebes are Western Grebes, 
so if the Clark's Grebes were randomly picking a mate they'd choose a Western 
Grebe about 85-90% of the time. Identifying hybrids is problematic, but a very 
small percentage of birds--including adults incubating eggs--appear 
intermediate and I believe they're hybrids. I've been working on getting a 
collection of photos of potential hybrids." 


Dominik Mosur
SF, CA

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 4, 2014, at 9:49, Hilary Powers  wrote:

> On 4/4/2014 7:57 AM, Elliot Kirschbaum wrote:
>> from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the
>> Clark's Grebe entry:
>>
>> "A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe
>> formerly was thought to be the same species. Differences in face and
>> bill color keep the two grebes from interbreeding."
>
> The calls are also quite different - two syllables vs. one. If you croak
> properly, you can imitate them by saying "WAS-trn, WAS-trn" and "CLAHKS,
> CLAHKS"....
>
> --
> -       Hilary Powers - hilary AT powersedit.com - Oakland CA        -
> -        Freelance copyediting and developmental editing          -
> -  "Making Word Work for You" - www.the-efa.org/res/booklets.php  -
> -       The edit you want - online, on time, and on target        -
> -  Needle Felting: www.SalamanderFeltworks.com or www.SalFelt.com -
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: "William H. Barnard" <barnard AT NORWICH.EDU>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 18:13:18 +0000
Appreciate the comments made. Amazing to me how reproductive isolation, a 
prerequisite for speciation, can be so subtle to us. Apparently not the to 
birds. There are many examples out there. The one I use in class is the 
difference between E. and W. Meadowlarks. Remarkably similar, morphologically, 
until they open their mouths and sing. 


Though not really familiar with the two grebes being discussed, they differ 
both in appearance and vocalization. 



Bill Barnard

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Elliot Kirschbaum 

Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 10:58 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes

While they look very similar to us, they apparently do not to each other. Their 
breeding ranges overlap and yet they do not commonly interbreed. 


See http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/clarks_grebe/id and 
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_grebe/id 


from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the Clark's Grebe 
entry: 


"A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe formerly was 
thought to be the same species. Differences in face and bill color keep the two 
grebes from interbreeding." 



--
Elliot

--
Elliot Kirschbaum
Shepherdstown, WV
kingfisher500 at comcast dot net


On Apr 3, 2014, at 2:18 PM, Linda Jones  wrote:

> Dear BirdChatters:
>
>
> A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and Western 
Grebes. I am copying his questions here: 

>
>
>
>
>
>
> One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for
> sexually reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the
> members of which regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring."
> In other words, if two populations, even though they may appear
> somewhat different, commonly interbreed and their offspring are also
> capable of interbreeding, the two populations by definition belong to
> one species. Indeed, it's for this reason that many bird populations
> that once were treated as separate species are now lumped into one, even 
though they have distinctive external characteristics. 

>
> So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences
> are minimal at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations
> interbreed and, if so, are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they
> now treated as two species? On the other hand, if they do not
> interbreed, what prevents their interbreeding? Do they breed in
> different places, have distinctive courtship patterns, have unique ecological 
requirements, have incompatible gametes, or what? 

>
> Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?
>
>
> Linda Jones
> Northridge, CA
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: Hilary Powers <hilary AT POWERSEDIT.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 09:49:29 -0700
On 4/4/2014 7:57 AM, Elliot Kirschbaum wrote:
> from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the
> Clark's Grebe entry:
>
> "A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe
> formerly was thought to be the same species. Differences in face and
> bill color keep the two grebes from interbreeding."

The calls are also quite different - two syllables vs. one. If you croak
properly, you can imitate them by saying "WAS-trn, WAS-trn" and "CLAHKS,
CLAHKS"....

--
-       Hilary Powers - hilary AT powersedit.com - Oakland CA        -
-        Freelance copyediting and developmental editing          -
-  "Making Word Work for You" - www.the-efa.org/res/booklets.php  -
-       The edit you want - online, on time, and on target        -
-  Needle Felting: www.SalamanderFeltworks.com or www.SalFelt.com -

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: Elliot Kirschbaum <kingfisher501 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 10:57:46 -0400
While they look very similar to us, they apparently do not to each other. Their 
breeding ranges overlap and yet they do not commonly interbreed. 


See http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/clarks_grebe/id and 
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/western_grebe/id 


from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, says the following in the Clark's Grebe 
entry: 


"A white-faced version of the Western Grebe, the Clark's Grebe formerly was 
thought to be the same species. Differences in face and bill color keep the two 
grebes from interbreeding." 



--
Elliot

--
Elliot Kirschbaum
Shepherdstown, WV
kingfisher500 at comcast dot net


On Apr 3, 2014, at 2:18 PM, Linda Jones  wrote:

> Dear BirdChatters:
>
>
> A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and Western 
Grebes. I am copying his questions here: 

>
>
>
>
>
>
> One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for sexually
> reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the members of which
> regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring." In other words, if two
> populations, even though they may appear somewhat different, commonly 
interbreed 

> and their offspring are also capable of interbreeding, the two populations by
> definition belong to one species. Indeed, it's for this reason that many bird
> populations that once were treated as separate species are now lumped into 
one, 

> even though they have distinctive external characteristics.
>
> So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences are 
minimal 

> at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations interbreed and, if 
so, 

> are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they now treated as two species? On
> the other hand, if they do not interbreed, what prevents their interbreeding? 
Do 

> they breed in different places, have distinctive courtship patterns, have 
unique 

> ecological requirements, have incompatible gametes, or what?
>
> Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?
>
>
> Linda Jones
> Northridge, CA
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Kansas Birding Festival
From: Chuck Otte <cotte AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 09:35:46 -0500
Good morning BirdChat!

Just a quick note that the Kansas Birding Festival, a non-profit organization,
is holding it's bienniel event on April 25 - 27. Information can be found at:

http://kansasbirdingfestival.com/

While I am one of the guides and organizers, I do this as a volunteer and
receive no pay other than the great fun of taking folks birding! Let me know if
you have any questions!

Chuck

-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

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Subject: Songbird US Postal Stamps
From: Patricia Rossi <circus_cyaneus AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 17:10:10 -0500
Greetings!

The US Post Office is issuing a new set of "Forever" stamps: Songbirds
My local Post Office says they will be available on April 5.


https://store.usps.com/store/browse/productDetailSingleSku.jsp?categoryNavIds=catBuyStamps&categoryNav=false&navAction=jump&navCount=0&productId=S_689304&categoryId=catBuyStamps 


Patricia Rossi
Levittown, PA
circus_cyaneus AT verizon.net

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 14:47:30 -0400
Good questions: I encourage you and/or your friend to go on the Cornell Lab 
website and check out the Birds of North America (BNA) account of those 
species--it will answer your questions. That is the good news. The less good 
news is you will have to subscribe (approx. $40/years, last I checked). I have 
no stake in that website, by the way. But once you start using BNA, you will 
learn a great deal and will grow enormously in your ornithological knowledge! 


Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [ AT ] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Linda Jones 

Sent: Thursday, April 03, 2014 2:18 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Clark's and Western Grebes

Dear BirdChatters:


A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and Western 
Grebes. I am copying his questions here: 







One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for sexually 
reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the members of which 
regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring." In other words, if two 
populations, even though they may appear somewhat different, commonly 
interbreed and their offspring are also capable of interbreeding, the two 
populations by definition belong to one species. Indeed, it's for this reason 
that many bird populations that once were treated as separate species are now 
lumped into one, even though they have distinctive external characteristics. 


So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences are 
minimal at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations interbreed and, 
if so, are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they now treated as two 
species? On the other hand, if they do not interbreed, what prevents their 
interbreeding? Do they breed in different places, have distinctive courtship 
patterns, have unique ecological requirements, have incompatible gametes, or 
what? 


Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?


Linda Jones
Northridge, CA


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Subject: Clark's and Western Grebes
From: Linda Jones <ljonesbird AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 14:18:05 -0400
Dear BirdChatters:


A friend has questions regarding the species status of Clark's and Western 
Grebes. I am copying his questions here: 







One of the most widely used definitions of a species (at least for sexually 
reproducing organisms) is "a population of organisms, the members of which 
regularly interbreed and produce fertile offspring." In other words, if two 
populations, even though they may appear somewhat different, commonly 
interbreed 

and their offspring are also capable of interbreeding, the two populations by 
definition belong to one species. Indeed, it's for this reason that many bird 
populations that once were treated as separate species are now lumped into one, 

even though they have distinctive external characteristics.

So, regarding Clark's and Western Grebes, whose external differences are 
minimal 

at best, the question for me is, Do the two populations interbreed and, if so, 
are the offspring fertile? If so, why are they now treated as two species? On 
the other hand, if they do not interbreed, what prevents their interbreeding? 
Do 

they breed in different places, have distinctive courtship patterns, have 
unique 

ecological requirements, have incompatible gametes, or what?

Any thoughts or opinions on these questions?


Linda Jones
Northridge, CA


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Subject: Important Issue Of "Birding Community E-Bulletin" Newsletter
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 08:50:18 -0700
…is accessed via:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/

The current issue has several important conservation pieces that you may 
appreciate. 


Regards always, Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA (SF Bay Area) & Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

http://warblerwatch.blogspot.com (my 8-year-old warbler-centric blog)


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Subject: SV: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finland
From: Morten Günther <morten AT LAPPUGLE.NET>
Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2014 23:45:12 +0200
This is by far the best field guide for any European country (including
Finland):
Birds of Europe: (Second Edition) (Princeton Field Guides) by Lars Svensson,
Dan Zetterström and Killian Mullarney.

Have a nice trip to Finland!

Morten Günther
Norway


-----Opprinnelig melding-----
Fra: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] På vegne av Nancy L. Newfield
Sendt: 2. april 2014 22:38
Til: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Emne: [BIRDCHAT] RFI: Finland

Chatters,

In late May or early June, I will be travelling to Finland [Helsinki area]
for 2-3 weeks.  It is a family event, so not a dedicated birding trip, but I
have not previously been there or anywhere in Europe, so a lot of birds will
be new to me.  I need recommendations for appropriate field guides in
English and also would like to receive contact information for an
English-speaking guide who can also provide transportation.

Thanks in advance for any information,

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: A National Audubon Summer program in Maine of possible interest
From: Tom Arny <tarny AT THERIVER.COM>
Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2014 14:44:55 -0700
I'm posting this to Birdchat because some birdchat readers might be interested. 
It's a summer birding workshop on Hog Island, ME run by National Audubon. I've 
no financial interest in it nor do I know anymore about it than is at their 
website or in the message below. Hog Island is northeast of Portland and about 
an hour and a half away...plus a short boat trip. 



*******************

Hog Island Maine: Joy of Birding to feature noted leaders
Hone your birding skills during the peak of summer nesting, June 8-13, in one 
of the nation’s most beautiful coastal landscapes, Hog Island, Maine. During 
this 6-day program you will elevate your birding skills, visit a restored 
puffin and tern colony, and see many of the more than 200 species of Mid-coast 
Maine birds. Beginners and experienced birders will find many ways to build 
onto their existing knowledge to become better birders. (Also learn about seven 
other 2014 birding programs at Hog Island- all sponsored by National Audubon 
Society.) 

Joy of Birding Instructors include: Pete Dunne (NJ Audubon), Dr. Stephen Kress 
(Project Puffin), Chris Lewey (Raven Wildlife Tours), Dr. Angelika Nelson (Ohio 
State), Wayne Peterson (MA. Audubon) and John Pumilio (Colgate) 

http://hogisland.audubon.org/learn-explore


=====================


Tom Arny
Box 545
Patagonia, AZ 85624

tarny AT theriver.com




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Subject: RFI: Finland
From: "Nancy L. Newfield" <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Wed, 2 Apr 2014 15:37:33 -0500
Chatters,

In late May or early June, I will be travelling to Finland [Helsinki
area] for 2-3 weeks.  It is a family event, so not a dedicated birding
trip, but I have not previously been there or anywhere in Europe, so a
lot of birds will be new to me.  I need recommendations for appropriate
field guides in English and also would like to receive contact
information for an English-speaking guide who can also provide
transportation.

Thanks in advance for any information,

NLN

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA

http://www.casacolibri.net/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



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Subject: Re: Non-hummingbirds using hummingbird feeders
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2014 14:35:48 -0700
Hi Jim,

Here in Utopia we haven't used a type with the long clear tube and bee
guard,
but instead the red plastic dish, with the bigger oval holes so orioles
can
use them.  We've had Orchard, Hooded, Baltimore, Scott's and Audubon's
Orioles
on our feeders regularly by the dozens (all breed except Baltimore).
Only once
did I see a Bullock's on a feeder here.  Orange-crowned Warbler was
addicted,
Black-crested Titmouse tried but bill too short, dang Ladder-backed
Woodpeckers
will drain them, (I recall Acorns on them at Southwest Research Station
in AZ).
White-winged Dove landed on them trying to see what the deal was, and
Chipping
Sparrow did too, both failed.

Then there are things like Reakirt's Blue, Tropical Leafwing, the
occasional
Pipevine Swallowtail, Cloudless Sulphur, a Queen, Vanessas like Red
Admiral
and American Lady, and several other butterflies.  Sphinx moths of
several species,
and jumping spiders that hunt the bees that come in are cool.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia, Texas
www.utopianature.com

On 2014-03-30 15:44, Jim Royer wrote:
> I had a first today, an Oak Titmouse at one of the hummingbird feeders
> in
> my yard. I decided to list the non-hummingbirds that have been seen
> using my sugar water feeders (the most frequent users listed first):
>
> House Finch
> Townsend's Warbler
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's)
> Hooded Oriole
> Orange-crowned Warbler
> Bullock's Oriole
> Oak Titmouse
>
> I am curious what other non-hummingbird species people have had at
> their
> hummingbird feeders. (I do leave off half of the bee guards on my
> feeders
> to encourage non-hummingbird use). Are there any known problems for
> non-hummingbirds using the sugar water feeders?
>
> Jim Royer
> Los Osos, California

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Subject: Thanks Gregg….Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDC HAT] Bird Nest Field Guides & Book
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2014 10:10:38 -0700
Thanks Gregg (!) for remind folks about the ethics involved with seeing nests. 
Good idea! 


I myself just finished writing a report that noted to a landowner seeking a 
building permit that she must account for two California codes and the federal 
Migratory Bird Treat Act in relation to potential active nesting birds on her 
site. 


On another site, a developer wishes to build a structure, but the active 
Red-tailed Hawk nest utilizing a site that I am monitoring may not fledge its 
chicks as late as June or July, so the project is on hold due to the presence 
of a traditional, annual nest appears to be reused every year…..and I continue 
to 

monitor it with two or more upcoming monitoring visits.

Regards, thanks, Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA & Ellison Bay, WI


On Apr 1, 2014, at 10:01 AM, "Gorton, Gregg"  wrote:

Those are excellent books, indeed. Please keep in mind the ethical issues 
involved in accessing nests in whatever way--whether by sight via binoculars 
(never disturbing a nesting bird or a bird building a next) or by examination 
AFTER the nesting season is over. But I'm sure most of you know that it remains 
illegal to collect nests of all but a few species without a permit... The 
reason there has not been an even better nest book published (with views of 
nests from BELOW or the side, rather than photos from above--looking down onto 
the eggs--a view one rarely gets in the field)-- I understand from talking with 
Paul Baicich and others--, is out of concern that more people will start 
seeking them and disturbing the birds, and collecting them, etc.... 


Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2014 11:52 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird Nest Field Guides & Book

Hello birders:

A question on a different listserv today prompts me to also share here the 
names of three publications that may interest you (?), given the nesting season 
initiation.......Hence: 


For more information about nests, you may wish to see:

- "A Guide to the Nests, Eggs, and Nestlings of N. Am. Birds," 2nd edition, 
Paul J. Baicich and Colin J.O. Harrison 


- "Western Birds' Nests," Hal H. Harrison

- "Fifty Nests and the Birds That Built Them," (amazing!) Sharon Beals....(and 
eloquent Introduction by an excellent writer who has written many bird books: 
Scott Weidensaul) (This latter pubication is exquisite, lyrical, and, 
photographically, will inspire awe and breathtaking sighs of delight.) 


Regards, Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA & Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird Nest Field Guides & Book
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2014 13:01:10 -0400
Those are excellent books, indeed. Please keep in mind the ethical issues 
involved in accessing nests in whatever way--whether by sight via binoculars 
(never disturbing a nesting bird or a bird building a next) or by examination 
AFTER the nesting season is over. But I'm sure most of you know that it remains 
illegal to collect nests of all but a few species without a permit... The 
reason there has not been an even better nest book published (with views of 
nests from BELOW or the side, rather than photos from above--looking down onto 
the eggs--a view one rarely gets in the field)-- I understand from talking with 
Paul Baicich and others--, is out of concern that more people will start 
seeking them and disturbing the birds, and collecting them, etc.... 


Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Daniel Edelstein 

Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2014 11:52 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [BIRDCHAT] Bird Nest Field Guides & Book

Hello birders:

A question on a different listserv today prompts me to also share here the 
names of three publications that may interest you (?), given the nesting season 
initiation.......Hence: 


For more information about nests, you may wish to see:

- "A Guide to the Nests, Eggs, and Nestlings of N. Am. Birds," 2nd edition, 
Paul J. Baicich and Colin J.O. Harrison 


- "Western Birds' Nests," Hal H. Harrison

- "Fifty Nests and the Birds That Built Them," (amazing!) Sharon Beals....(and 
eloquent Introduction by an excellent writer who has written many bird books: 
Scott Weidensaul) (This latter pubication is exquisite, lyrical, and, 
photographically, will inspire awe and breathtaking sighs of delight.) 


Regards, Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA & Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Bird Nest Field Guides & Book
From: Daniel Edelstein <danieledelstein AT ATT.NET>
Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2014 08:52:03 -0700
Hello birders:

A question on a different listserv today prompts me to also share here the 
names of three publications that may interest you (?), 

given the nesting season initiation…….Hence:

For more information about nests, you may wish to see:

- "A Guide to the Nests, Eggs, and Nestlings of N. Am. Birds," 2nd edition, 
Paul J. Baicich and Colin J.O. Harrison 


- "Western Birds' Nests," Hal H. Harrison

- "Fifty Nests and the Birds That Built Them," (amazing!) Sharon Beals….(and 
eloquent Introduction by an excellent writer who has written many bird books: 
Scott Weidensaul) 

(This latter pubication is exquisite, lyrical, and, photographically, will 
inspire awe and breathtaking sighs of delight.) 


Regards, Daniel Edelstein

Novato, CA & Ellison Bay, WI

www.warblerwatch.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: "Breaking Bird"
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2014 00:08:40 -0500
Often on April 1, I produce a weirder than normal radio program. This year,
it's "Breaking Bird." It'll be funnier if you watched the show Breaking
Bad.  Maybe.

http://lauraerickson.com/Radio/SoundFiles/Current/2014-April/BreakingBird.mp3

--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: Costa Rica Guides
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2014 22:05:23 -0400
We will be going to Costa Rica in late June to early July. It is mostly a 
family trip, but my wife and I plan to spend some time birding. Does anyone 
have any recommendations for guides (the human kind) for the areas of Manuel 
Antonio and Arenal? Any other tips would be welcome as well. 


Many thanks!

Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church VA

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Getting burnt out on birding
From: Dr Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2014 09:13:50 +0800
Well, if there is anyplace in the US where birding is of great social value it 
should be Hawaii. With the number if critically-endangered species out there, 
switching from birding to conservation activism (if that is really a switch) is 
not just a possible option, but comes close to being a necessary one. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Mar 28, 2014, at 9:18 AM, Reginald David  wrote:
>
> Aloha John,
>
> I have been where you are apparently at before. I have been birding as long 
as you and I live on an Island in the Pacific where after a decade or so, 
there’s not much more to see. I have done much of what other responders have 
suggested, started a year list, done big days etc. But what has always 
re-ignited the joy of birding has been to take out folks that have never birded 
in Hawaii before, and taking out young people that are just starting out, or 
don’t even know that they want to be birders. Most birders are observant 
people, so when you take out inexperienced people they ask you questions about 
everything, what’s that plant, what’s that bug, why does the sun shine, and 
to me that process of sharing information, albeit sometimes having to look it 
up and get back to folks is invigorating. 

>
> When it comes right down to it, those of us that spent our lives looking at 
birds and other facets of nature are the folks best equipped to spur on another 
cohort of nature lovers, that to me keeps me birding when I am frankly not 
motivated to go out and look at the same birds again. 

>
> Reg.
>
> Reginald David
> Kailua, Kona, Hawaii
>
> Please consider the environment before printing this email.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Mar 27, 2014, at 11:47 AM, john small  wrote:
>>
>> Good Afternoon Birders across the nation. I have a question that might pose 
an interesting topic. I have been birding for 44 years now. For some 
unexplainable reason actually, since just after the first of the year, I for 
some unexplained reason just haven't felt the wish to go and enjoy birding like 
I used to. Have anyone of you birders felt this way similarly? Anyone have any 
suggestions? I would to keep birding, but I 

>> feel burnt out, and it's really irritating. I definitely would to hear some 
suggestions. 

>>
>> Thank You
>> Sincerely
>> John Small
>> Torrance, CA
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Getting burnt out on birding
From: Dominik Mosur <polskatata AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2014 11:47:17 -0700
Hi All,

Great topic.

I got bit by the birding bug almost 15 years ago. Since then I progressed from 
casual (a few times a week) to obsessed (daily, several times each day) birder 
to the point where my supervisor at work forbade me to look out the window and 
carry my binoculars over my shoulder when I'm on the clock. 


I too sometimes get a little burnt out, especially in Feb-March when all the 
wintering birds have been well seen and migration still hasn't picked up. 
Taking a couple of days break thought seems to always ignite my fire. 


Happy spring everyone (in the Northern Hemisphere at least)

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 31, 2014, at 10:44 AM, Douglas Carver  wrote:

> This has been an interesting thread. I have found that I have a similar
> problem to John's, though without the 44 years background! I simply do not
> have the drive to get out in the field, guide in hand, bins at the ready. I
> rarely even take binoculars on hikes any longer.
>
> Yet, I have also realized that in many ways birding is no longer something
> I "do", so to speak, but is now a way of constantly interacting with the
> world around me. I still notice birds, identify songs as soon as I hear
> them, watch to see what is flitting by as I walk a trail -- or as I walk
> from my train to the office. Perhaps I do not "bird" as I used to -- but
> how I interact with birds still fits within the broad definition of
> "birding".
>
> Thanks, John, for your post!
>
> Douglas Carver
> Albuquerque, NM
>
>
>
> On Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 2:08 PM, marys1000  wrote:
>
>> Perhaps you can solve 2 problems with one stone.
>>
>> You can give back to the birds who gave you decades of enjoyment.
>>
>> Take your interest in birds and investigate and participate in local
>> conservation and habitat efforts.  Check out any local groups of the
>> Nature Conservancy, Sierra Club , metro parks and help
>> plant, weed, or do species surveys.  Add to habitat in your yard or
>> community garden  space, work with neighborhoods and community to plant
>> bird friendly species.
>> In this environment, you will notice birds, watch them, appreciate them
>> and help them without "birding".
>> You will also be using less fuel like that just spilled in the gulf.
>>
>> Marie, Michigander in exile (Dayton OH)
>>
>>
>> On 3/27/2014 5:47 PM, john small wrote:
>>
>>> Good Afternoon Birders across the nation. I have a question that might
>>> pose an interesting topic. I have been birding for 44 years now. For some
>>> unexplainable reason actually, since just after the first of the year, I
>>> for some unexplained reason just haven't felt the wish to go and enjoy
>>> birding like I used to. Have anyone of you birders felt this way similarly?
>>> Anyone have any suggestions? I would to keep birding, but I
>>> feel burnt out, and it's really irritating. I definitely would to hear
>>> some suggestions.
>>>
>>> Thank You
>>> Sincerely
>>> John Small
>>> Torrance, CA
>>>
>>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>>
>>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.
>
> (I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)
>
>    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Getting Burnt Out on Birding
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2014 13:21:22 -0500
This was, indeed, an interesting thread.  Caused contemplation.

Believe I read every post (my apologies if I missed something), have two 
additional ideas: 


* Find a different way to view birding. For me, I've added reading and writing 
nature poetry to enhance my experience. Certainly other artistic, or science, 
or historical, or differing faith/philosophy approaches might help. 


* Give it up. I'm not being facetious. Give it up for a period of time, allow 
things to settle for a while. Take on a completely different avocation. Then 
return, see if the passion reignites. If not, give it up long term. Birding, 
while fantastic, is not the ultimate meaning of the universe:) 


Thanks to both of you for sharing.

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS


 		 	   		  
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Getting burnt out on birding
From: Douglas Carver <dhmcarver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2014 11:44:17 -0600
This has been an interesting thread. I have found that I have a similar
problem to John's, though without the 44 years background! I simply do not
have the drive to get out in the field, guide in hand, bins at the ready. I
rarely even take binoculars on hikes any longer.

Yet, I have also realized that in many ways birding is no longer something
I "do", so to speak, but is now a way of constantly interacting with the
world around me. I still notice birds, identify songs as soon as I hear
them, watch to see what is flitting by as I walk a trail -- or as I walk
from my train to the office. Perhaps I do not "bird" as I used to -- but
how I interact with birds still fits within the broad definition of
"birding".

Thanks, John, for your post!

Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM



On Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 2:08 PM, marys1000  wrote:

> Perhaps you can solve 2 problems with one stone.
>
> You can give back to the birds who gave you decades of enjoyment.
>
> Take your interest in birds and investigate and participate in local
> conservation and habitat efforts.  Check out any local groups of the
> Nature Conservancy, Sierra Club , metro parks and help
> plant, weed, or do species surveys.  Add to habitat in your yard or
> community garden  space, work with neighborhoods and community to plant
> bird friendly species.
> In this environment, you will notice birds, watch them, appreciate them
> and help them without "birding".
> You will also be using less fuel like that just spilled in the gulf.
>
> Marie, Michigander in exile (Dayton OH)
>
>
> On 3/27/2014 5:47 PM, john small wrote:
>
>> Good Afternoon Birders across the nation. I have a question that might
>> pose an interesting topic. I have been birding for 44 years now. For some
>> unexplainable reason actually, since just after the first of the year, I
>> for some unexplained reason just haven't felt the wish to go and enjoy
>> birding like I used to. Have anyone of you birders felt this way similarly?
>> Anyone have any suggestions? I would to keep birding, but I
>> feel burnt out, and it's really irritating. I definitely would to hear
>> some suggestions.
>>
>> Thank You
>> Sincerely
>> John Small
>> Torrance, CA
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>



--
Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.

(I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Birds headed north
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 22:48:51 -0500
   I just looked at the migration on radar tonight and it looks like
movement is mostly in the south and lower Mississippi River Valley. I
posted an image and notes at:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Weather in Minnesota this week will not be conducive to migrants
but keep looking anyway...

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN



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Subject: Birds headed north
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 22:48:51 -0500
   I just looked at the migration on radar tonight and it looks like
movement is mostly in the south and lower Mississippi River Valley. I
posted an image and notes at:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Weather in Minnesota this week will not be conducive to migrants
but keep looking anyway...

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Birds headed north
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 22:48:51 -0500
http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Weather in Minnesota this week will not be conducive to migrants
but keep looking anyway...

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN


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Subject: Re: non-hummingbirds using feeders
From: Katharine Mills <gkmills AT CHARTER.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 19:15:58 -0400
Hi,
   I have seen Hairy woodpeckers at my brother-in-laws feeders in Wisconsin.
Kathy Mills
Holden, MA

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Subject: non-hummingbirds using feeders
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 19:09:31 -0400
In Tucson, our feeders were occupied almost continuously by verdins and
Gila woodpeckers -- jovially known to locals as yellow-headed and
red-crowned hummingbirds, respectively.
Orange-crowned warblers also used them in the winter, and every once in a
while a lesser goldfinch would take a sip.
And then, of course, there were the bats.

--
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
http://birdingnewjersey.com

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Subject: Non-hummingbirds using hummingbird feeders
From: Jim Royer <jrmotmot AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 15:44:10 -0700
I had a first today, an Oak Titmouse at one of the hummingbird feeders in
my yard. I decided to list the non-hummingbirds that have been seen
using my sugar water feeders (the most frequent users listed first):

House Finch
Townsend's Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's)
Hooded Oriole
Orange-crowned Warbler
Bullock's Oriole
Oak Titmouse

I am curious what other non-hummingbird species people have had at their
hummingbird feeders. (I do leave off half of the bee guards on my feeders
to encourage non-hummingbird use). Are there any known problems for
non-hummingbirds using the sugar water feeders?

Jim Royer
Los Osos, California

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Subject: SV: [BIRDCHAT] Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July
From: Morten Günther <morten AT LAPPUGLE.NET>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 21:46:48 +0200
I've been birding in southern France in July a few years ago. There are some
very nice areas just west of Marseille (e.g. Camargue National Park). Here
you can see a variety of southern European species, some of them are not to
be found in England.
If you search for "birding + Camargue" I'm sure you'll find some interesting
trip reports and advice. However, this part of France can be very hot during
summer and quite crowed (especially in August).

The Pyrenees (border mountains between Andorra, Spain and France) is a
really nice place to go in July. The temperatures are nice and you can see
interesting species in a magnificent landscape. However, it may be a little
bit far west if you are heading for Rome. A good alternative could be to
spend some time in the French part of the Alps. The mountains are nice in
summer...

Good luck!

Best regards

Morten Günther
Norway



-----Opprinnelig melding-----
Fra: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] På vegne av Jim Royer
Sendt: 29. mars 2014 18:29
Til: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Emne: [BIRDCHAT] Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July

My wife and I are going on a primarily non-birding 3 week trip to England in
the last week of this coming June, and France and Italy in July. We have not
birded much in England and not at all in Europe. I was hoping bird chatters
could tell me places not to miss in England, France and Italy for that time
of year. We are just looking for places that offer a range of species. Our
trip will be primarily seeing the sights in London west to Exeter, and Paris
to Rome. But, I hope to stop at a place or two to do some birding in all
three countries. Any suggestions? Thanks! I have always gotten good
suggestions in the past for trips, from this listserv, and appreciate it!

Jim Royer
Jrmotmot AT gmail.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: 2007 ABA Ecuador Conference
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 2014 12:59:04 -0400
Hi all,

I hate to do this, but it’s the only way I can think of to try to get in touch 
with some folks I birded with. At the 2007 ABA Ecuador Conference we were all 
put into named groups. I was in with the Conebills (laughingly called ourselves 
the Coneheads—some of you will remember the old SNL skits). I am trying to 
track down anyone in that group who has notes about what we saw and where we 
saw it. I apparently don’t have very good information and now eBird doesn’t 
like what I saw where. 


So if you are one of those folks, please email me offline. Thanks for your 
indulgence. 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com






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Subject: Re: Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July
From: donald lewis <donlewis AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 22:33:53 -0700
In the UK, the RSPB has a lot of great reserves. All the ones I've visited
have nice facilities, trails, hides, friendly people, birds.    See
https://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves/area/  to find some where you're going.


Don Lewis
Lafayette, CA

---------------
Date:    Sat, 29 Mar 2014 10:28:56 -0700
From:    Jim Royer 
Subject: Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July

My wife and I are going on a primarily non-birding 3 week trip to England in
the last week of this coming June, and France and Italy in July. We have not
birded much in England and not at all in Europe. I was hoping bird chatters
could tell me places not to miss in England, France and Italy for that time
of year. We are just looking for places that offer a range of species. Our
trip will be primarily seeing the sights in London west to Exeter, and Paris
to Rome. But, I hope to stop at a place or two to do some birding in all
three countries. Any suggestions? Thanks! I have always gotten good
suggestions in the past for trips, from this listserv, and appreciate it!

Jim Royer
Jrmotmot AT gmail.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July
From: Jerry Friedman <jerry_friedman AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 11:44:27 -0700
Minsmere, which people here and others recommended, was really nice at the end 
of July.    Lots of shorebirds (I mean waders) and that kind of thing, as well 
as passerines, including Bearded Reedling.  I realize it's the wrong direction 
for you. 



Jerry Friedman
Española, NM

On Saturday, March 29, 2014 10:36 AM, Jim Royer  wrote:
 
My wife and I are going on a primarily non-birding 3 week trip to England
>in the last week of this coming June, and France and Italy in July. We have
>not birded much in England and not at all in Europe. I was hoping bird
>chatters could tell me places not to miss in England, France and Italy for
>that time of year. We are just looking for places that offer a range of
>species. Our trip will be primarily seeing the sights in London west to
>Exeter, and Paris to Rome. But, I hope to stop at a place or two to do some
>birding in all three countries. Any suggestions? Thanks! I have always
>gotten good suggestions in the past for trips, from this listserv, and
>appreciate it!
>
>Jim Royer
>Jrmotmot AT gmail.com
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
>
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Subject: My review of the new Sibley guide
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 13:06:48 -0500
I hate writing book reviews when I don't 100 percent love a book, but
people kept asking what I think of the new Sibley, so I put together a
review for my blog.


http://lauraerickson.blogspot.com/2014/03/review-sibley-guide-to-birds-second.html 


Best,

Laura Erickson

Duluth, MN

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

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Subject: Need Advice on birding in England and Europe in July
From: Jim Royer <jrmotmot AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 10:28:56 -0700
My wife and I are going on a primarily non-birding 3 week trip to England
in the last week of this coming June, and France and Italy in July. We have
not birded much in England and not at all in Europe. I was hoping bird
chatters could tell me places not to miss in England, France and Italy for
that time of year. We are just looking for places that offer a range of
species. Our trip will be primarily seeing the sights in London west to
Exeter, and Paris to Rome. But, I hope to stop at a place or two to do some
birding in all three countries. Any suggestions? Thanks! I have always
gotten good suggestions in the past for trips, from this listserv, and
appreciate it!

Jim Royer
Jrmotmot AT gmail.com

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Subject: BirdNote - Last week & the week of Mar. 30, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 07:31:48 -0700
Hello, BirdChat!

Check out this great image of a Costa's Hummingbird on her nest!
With more in the Sights & Sounds gallery - http://bit.ly/1hJmwmp
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Here's a list of the shows that aired:

* Wetland Birds Thrive, Thanks to Saving Habitat
http://bit.ly/Qreb12

* Winter Wren in a Carolina Cathedral, With Gordon Hempton
http://bit.ly/1ekdtdK

* Why Birds Sing
http://bit.ly/1i3yZCO

* How Long Does a Robin Live?
http://bit.ly/1jjp7HX

* The Red-bellied Woodpecker and its Curious Name
http://bit.ly/1igi8lb

* Voices and Vocabularies - The Basics
http://bit.ly/1hleuDK

* What's Your State Bird?
http://bit.ly/1pCSUve


View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1jjpy53
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
========================================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, read the transcript, sign up for
weekly mail or the podcast, and find related resources on the website.
http://www.birdnote.org
All episodes are in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: GPS Locator App
From: stephen christopher <s.christopher22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 09:26:28 +0100
Thanks Arie

Is this App for iPhone too?

Stephen Christopher

www.catalanbirdtours.com
BIRDING IN SPAIN


On Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 1:11 AM, Arie Gilbert wrote:

> Ed
>
> I use 'GPS Share' a free app at google play
>
> it is very easy to use.  after getting a lock on your location, may
> options are presented for use of the data.
>
> I select to have it added to the clipboard, and paste it into an email
> when reporting a good bird sighting.
>
> Arie Gilbert
> North Babylon, NY
>
> WWW.Powerbirder.blogspot.com
>  WWW.qcbirdclub.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 3/27/2014 7:08 PM, Ed Stonick wrote:
>
>> Greetings!
>>
>> Many rare bird locations are now given with gps coordinates (i.e.,
>> degrees, minutes, seconds).  Is there an app for android (I'm sure there
>> are many) where you can find the coordinates for your location?  Has anyone
>> had success with one that's fairly easy to use?
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Ed Stonick
>> Pasadena, CA
>>
>> Regards,
>> Ed
>>
>> Ed Stonick
>> Pasadena, CA
>> edstonick AT earthlink.net
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> -----
>
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 2014.0.4354 / Virus Database: 3722/7258 - Release Date: 03/27/14
>
>
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Subject: Re: Getting burnt out on birding
From: marys1000 <marys1000 AT WOH.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 16:08:52 -0400
Perhaps you can solve 2 problems with one stone.

You can give back to the birds who gave you decades of enjoyment.

Take your interest in birds and investigate and participate in local
conservation and habitat efforts.  Check out any local groups of the
Nature Conservancy, Sierra Club , metro parks and help
plant, weed, or do species surveys.  Add to habitat in your yard or
community garden  space, work with neighborhoods and community to plant
bird friendly species.
In this environment, you will notice birds, watch them, appreciate them
and help them without "birding".
You will also be using less fuel like that just spilled in the gulf.

Marie, Michigander in exile (Dayton OH)

On 3/27/2014 5:47 PM, john small wrote:
> Good Afternoon Birders across the nation. I have a question that might pose 
an interesting topic. I have been birding for 44 years now. For some 
unexplainable reason actually, since just after the first of the year, I for 
some unexplained reason just haven't felt the wish to go and enjoy birding like 
I used to. Have anyone of you birders felt this way similarly? Anyone have any 
suggestions? I would to keep birding, but I 

> feel burnt out, and it's really irritating. I definitely would to hear some 
suggestions. 

>
> Thank You
> Sincerely
> John Small
> Torrance, CA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

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Subject: Birding trail advice wanted
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 09:24:35 -0400
I am looking for some help.  Together with several Audubon chapters
here in eastern Michigan, we are starting to put together a Birding
Trail map.  The first focus is an auto trail that will hopefully
encompass the area from Belle Isle (near Detroit) to Lake Huron.  Our
intention is to have this completed by the Midwest Birding Symposium
to be held in Bay City, Michigan next year.

What is important to you in a map of this kind?  What have you seen in
birding trail maps that helped you or frustrated you?  If you have
worked on this type of project and have any advice, I would be happy
to hear it.
Pat Burden
Yale, MI

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Subject: overseas payments -continued
From: Sally Wech <mergusm AT GMX.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 07:00:30 -0500
Hi All:
 When I've used xe - I can get an estimate of what the exchange rate will be
before I sign in.  I suppose the rate may change a little after I sign in
but no significant that I've noticed.  There are no additional charges - no
wire fee, no fee for minimum amounts.  Has been very dependable.
 I think with paypal there is a service charge but I could be wrong about that. 


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Subject: Re: Getting burnt out on birding
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2014 15:28:02 -0700
My problem is the opposite.  Birding becoming all-consuming.  I'm watching for 
birds every minute wherever I go.  Is there a Birder's Anonymous to help 
control my addiction? 

 
Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965



>________________________________
> From: john small 
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
>Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2014 2:47 PM
>Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Getting burnt out on birding
> 
>
>Good Afternoon Birders across the nation. I have a question that might pose an 
interesting topic. I have been birding for 44 years now. For some unexplainable 
reason actually, since just after the first of the year, I for some unexplained 
reason just haven't felt the wish to go and enjoy birding like I used to. Have 
anyone of you birders felt this way similarly? Anyone have any suggestions? I 
would to keep birding, but I 

>feel burnt out, and it's really irritating. I definitely would to hear some 
suggestions. 

> 
>Thank You
>Sincerely
>John Small
>Torrance, CA
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>
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Subject: Re: birding southern arizona (and lodging)
From: Greg Scott <www AT GREGSCOTT.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 04:17:59 -0400
Wow. It depends very much on your itinerary and birding targets. Assuming
you are starting from the Tucson, area, you have many choices to the
southeast.  Ash Canyon Bed and Breakfast has been a good place (before the
fire a few years back, before a wildfire, haven't returned since) where you
can see quite a few species, most notably the Lucifer hummingbird, but other
species as well.

More rustic is Miller Canyon (Beatty's outfit). Where you are likely to see
white eared hummers. Same deal on the wildfire situation. I'd call each.
They're easy to find on the internet, but you can call me if you aren't
sure.

Cave Creek Ranch, and the hotel in Portal, Arizona is good, for
blue-throated hummers, and perhaps the elegant trogon.

You could stay in the hotel in Patagonia, AZ, and see the Violet crowned
hummingbird at the Senoita Creek Nature (spelling is wrong) preserve and
hopefully at the (former) Patton house, a private residence being converted,
last I knew, to a birding b&b or sanctuary of some hybrid of that sort. Each
of the places mentioned is a destination for days of enjoyment, if you had
the leisure, but an evening/night/morning at any one of them should be
outstanding.  These would make a rather hectic 3 night weekend loop. You
would have to choose

Finally, there is Madera Canyon, with a wide variety of hummingbirds, and
several B&B operations in the canyon, and hotels in nearby Green Valley,
closest to Tucson.

There are others, I'm sure. I've been away for about 5 years, but these are
places my parents, and then I, have frequented for the last 20 years or
more. They're reliable for a wide variety of species, and particularly a
good set of  "choke points" in the migration of every western hummingbirds.
You won't see them all, but you should see many of them. I mainly specialize
in very close up high speed flash photography of those hummingbirds, see my
website for examples.

My phone is 404-445-0980. Feel free to call if you need more info. Be aware
that some relatively rare owls are in the area, also, and that campground
hosts can usually tell you where you can see them as they emerge in the
evening. (I usually camped about 2 weeks at the best campsites. It's
wonderful this time of year at that time and altitude, so consider a
sleeping bag, an air mattress, and a beautiful night under the stars. (I
often slept on the picnic tables in the campgrounds, just to admire the sky,
which is very very clear at Cave Creek,(Portal) and Madera Canyon (Bog
Springs campground).

You can see many of my photographs as http://www.gregscott.com and at
http://gregscott.artistwebsites.com.


-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Vicki Lehmeier
Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2014 2:35 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] birding southern arizona

Does anyone have a recommendation for a birding day-trip to southern
arizona? I plan to go next weekend (april 4 and 5).

Any recommendations for lodging nearby?


Thanks so much in advance

Vicki

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Subject: Re: Getting burnt out on birding
From: Patricia Burden <tallerpat526 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2014 01:07:06 -0400
John,
There are times I feel the same way, so I back off.  I don't "go out"
birding but instead just take a walk, visit a new natural place and
let the birds become part of the entire natural experience.  I find
myself birdwatching rather than birding. I enjoy watching behavior and
interactions.  I pay attention to everything and nothing.  Since I was
a young child, I have enjoyed being in the woods, so I go walk in the
woods.  If I see birds, fine, but if not, I am not disappointed. I
enjoy the sounds and the smells.  I leave my cell phone on vibrate and
leave the world for a while. It just recharges me.
I agree with others who have suggested you change your modus operandi
- if you normally bird alone or just with one other person, try
birding with a group.  If you normally bird with a group, go alone or
with just one other person.
Maybe you have to ask yourself, what part of birding has you burnt
out?  Is it the constant looking?  Stop looking and allow the birds to
be happy coincidences.
You might try picking up some books that are more about the adventure
of birding - even if you read them before - things like The Kingbird
Highway and Feather Quest.  Maybe you will find some part of those
adventures that appeal to you.
But I would say this - if it is not giving you pleasure, stop. Find
something else that gives you pleasure.  The birds will be there when
it is your time to rediscover them.
Pat Burden
Yale, MI

Pat Burden
Yale, MI


On Thu, Mar 27, 2014 at 5:47 PM, john small  wrote:
> Good Afternoon Birders across the nation. I have a question that might pose 
an interesting topic. I have been birding for 44 years now. For some 
unexplainable reason actually, since just after the first of the year, I for 
some unexplained reason just haven't felt the wish to go and enjoy birding like 
I used to. Have anyone of you birders felt this way similarly? Anyone have any 
suggestions? I would to keep birding, but I 

> feel burnt out, and it's really irritating. I definitely would to hear some 
suggestions. 

>
> Thank You
> Sincerely
> John Small
> Torrance, CA
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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