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Updated on Tuesday, June 28 at 12:43 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Lichtensteins Sandgrouse,©Jan Wilczur

28 Jun Re: Fort Huachuca Information [Chuck & Lillian ]
27 Jun Close-up photo of Cliff Swallow in nest (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Jun Costa Rica Photographic Trip Report [Jay Greenberg ]
26 Jun Arizona Trip story and photos [Dave DeReamus ]
25 Jun WorlBird Plus by Penhallurick [Theo Hofmann ]
25 Jun Hilton Pond 05/01/16 (WV Wildflowers & SC Birds) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
25 Jun BirdNote, last week and the week of June 26, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
25 Jun Rare Spix's Macaw is Back, in Brazil!!! [Paulo Boute ]
22 Jun Hummingbird, Los Angeles [Robert DeCandido PhD ]
19 Jun Baby Birds Learn Calls From Their Mothers While Still In The Egg! [Paulo Boute ]
18 Jun BirdNote, last week and the week of June 19, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
15 Jun Re: Garganey Information [Arie Gilbert ]
15 Jun Parrots, songbirds pack more neurons into their forebrains than most mammals [Paulo Boute ]
15 Jun Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 13 Jun 2016 to 14 Jun 2016 (#2016-58) [Ken Birding ]
14 Jun Re: Garganey Information ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
14 Jun Garganey Information [Marcia Balestri ]
13 Jun Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 11 Jun 2016 to 12 Jun 2016 (#2016-56) [Chuck & Lillian ]
13 Jun How Birds Became Red (reprise) [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
12 Jun Central Georgia birding ideas [Richard Wolfert ]
11 Jun A Birdwatcher's Guide to Norway []
11 Jun BirdNote, last week and the week of June 12, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
10 Jun Phoebe Snetsinger. [Paulo Boute ]
9 Jun Re: Red-tailed Hawk Question [Hilary Powers ]
9 Jun Red-tailed Hawk Question [Joyanne Hamilton ]
9 Jun Would A Parrot Be A Reliable Murder Witness? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
9 Jun Clifford Miles Obituary. [Paulo Boute ]
6 Jun Re: Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years! [Ronald Orenstein ]
6 Jun Re: Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years! [Ronald Orenstein ]
6 Jun Re: Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years! [Bill Porteous ]
6 Jun Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years! [Paulo Boute ]
4 Jun Re: Birding The Deadliest Catch ["snorkler AT juno.com" ]
5 Jun RFI ["R. Cicerello" ]
5 Jun Hawaii Trip [Dave DeReamus ]
5 Jun The Ornithologist that wanted to be a bird... [Paulo Boute ]
5 Jun Ireland field guide? ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
4 Jun Blue-eyed Ground-Dove, on E-bird. [Paulo Boute ]
4 Jun BirdNote, last week and the week of June 5, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
4 Jun Re: Birding The Deadliest Catch [Phil Davis ]
2 Jun Hilton Pond 04/01/16 (Spring Chill) []
2 Jun BirdChat patches and pins ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
2 Jun Can An Old Parrot Learn New Tricks? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
2 Jun Hummingbird Rediscovered! [Paulo Boute ]
31 May Fw: [BIRDCHAT] Birding coverage in North America, VIII [Alan Wormington ]
31 May Birding coverage in North America, X (last) [Eran Tomer ]
31 May Birding coverage in North America, IX [Eran Tomer ]
31 May Birding coverage in North America, VIII [Eran Tomer ]
31 May Birding coverage in North America, VII [Eran Tomer ]
30 May Birding coverage in North America, VI [Eran Tomer ]
30 May Birding coverage in North America, V [Eran Tomer ]
30 May Birding coverage in North America, IV [Eran Tomer ]
30 May Birding coverage in North America, III [Eran Tomer ]
30 May Birding coverage in North America, II [Eran Tomer ]
30 May Birding coverage in North America [Eran Tomer ]
28 May NYTimes: Dutch Firm Trains Eagles to Take Down High-Tech Prey: Drones []
28 May BirdNote - Last week and the week of May 29, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
26 May the haunting beauty of a love song lost forever [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
24 May rare-species-x-rediscovered-brazil-after-75-year-disappearance [Paulo Boute ]
22 May Birding The Deadliest Catch ["snorkler AT juno.com" ]
22 May Sunday Banding - Lakeville, Minnesota [Roger Everhart ]
22 May Blue-eyed-Ground Dove - Rediscovered, in Brazil, After 75 Years! [Paulo Boute ]
21 May BirdNote, last week and the week of May 22, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
20 May How Birds Became Red [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
18 May Radar Image from Midwest [Roger Everhart ]
17 May RFI Birding South Korea [David Starrett ]
17 May International Raptor Council [Ken Birding ]
16 May Sunday Birds in Dakota County, MN [Roger Everhart ]
15 May Now there's an idea: Gannets on Gannet Rock! ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
14 May BirdNote, last week and the week of May 15, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
7 May BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 8, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
30 Apr BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 1, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
29 Apr Re: Darwin's Finches ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
28 Apr Re: Darwin's Finches [Douglas Carver ]
28 Apr RFI - Southern Texas and Whooping Cranes [John Arnfield ]
28 Apr Darwin's Finches [Laurie Larson ]
28 Apr those fascinating fairy-wrens [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
26 Apr Hawaii Birding Festival. [Paulo Boute ]

Subject: Re: Fort Huachuca Information
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 10:05:07 -0700
That's correct. A small group of us did this last January, and my
memory of it is a bit rusty. You stop at a building at the gate, take
a number, fill out several pages of forms and they take a photo of
you. Process took about an hour for all four of us. For some reason,
they didn't take a photo of one of us, and that person had to go back
in and get it taken. I'm about 98% sure we didn't need passports. The
pass is good for some period of time, a year maybe, maybe longer.

If you're looking for the Sinaloa Wren (or anything, really) make
sure you know how to find the location so you don't get lost driving
around this large base. No cameras allowed, I believe.

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.


>Date:    Mon, 27 Jun 2016 09:04:26 -0400
>From:    jbird558 AT AOL.COM
>Subject: Fort Huachuca Information
>
>Chatters,
>Am planning my annual trip to Arizona in about a month. I'm
>wondering what the procedure is for getting access to Fort Huachuca?
>Last year some new regulations were starting, but they were put into
>place shortly after I was there. If anyone knows more about this,
>I'd appreciate the information regarding how to get access, and
>where to go. I understand there is some sort of form that needs to
>be filled out, and a background check is now needed to get on the Base.
>Thanks so much.
>Jane Barnette
>Harrisburg, PA
>jbird558 AT aol.com

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Subject: Close-up photo of Cliff Swallow in nest (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 16:50:07 -0400
Accidentally stumbled across a colony of Cliff Swallows while visiting my
family in Utah. Probably two dozen nests. Not a new bird for me (there's a
small colony under a bridge in my NJ neighborhood). But it's by far the
closest I've ever been to a nest! Managed to snap this photo as I hastily
backed out of the colony. A marvel of animal engineering, one beak full of
mud at a time:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/27867975651/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Costa Rica Photographic Trip Report
From: Jay Greenberg <conservationist AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 13:51:45 -0400
I’ve posted a Costa Rica photographic trip report at 
http://thegreenjay.jalbum.net/thegreenjay.com/CostaRica2014/album/index.html 
. 
The emphasis is on birds, but it also has photos of monkeys, other animals, and 
insects. 


Jay Greenberg
conservationist AT earthlink.net 
http://www.thegreenjay.com 
 

Rochester, NY


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Subject: Arizona Trip story and photos
From: Dave DeReamus <becard AT RCN.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 04:47:11 -0400
I’ve posted a story with photos of an early June Arizona trip that provided 
three life birds and copulating Elegant Trogons. It can be found at: 
http://becard.blogspot.com/2016_06_01_archive.html 

To view the entire trip, click on “Older Posts” once you reach the bottom 
of the page. 


Good birding,
Dave DeReamus
Palmer Township, PA
becard -at- rcn.com
Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com
PicasaWeb Photo Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/becard57
Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html

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Subject: WorlBird Plus by Penhallurick
From: Theo Hofmann <theo AT HERA.MED.UTORONTO.CA>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 19:55:44 -0400
Hello,

Has anyone on Birdchat used or is still using John Penhallurick's
WorldBird Plus bird record software? If so, does anyone know how one can
export the whole WorldBird Plus data for transfer into e-Bird or
HBW-myBirding system.

I will be very grateful for any information.

Best regards

Theo Hofmann

----------------------------------------------------------------------
You don't stop playing because you get old,
You get old because you stop playing.  George Bernhard Shaw
---------------------------------------------------------------
Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
Thornhill  Ontario
Canada   L4J 1C1
---------------------------------------------------------------

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Subject: Hilton Pond 05/01/16 (WV Wildflowers & SC Birds)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 10:41:56 -0400
For the 1-31 May 2016 installment of "This Week at Hilton Pond" we take a look 
at an assortment of wildflowers (and their pollinators) from West Virginia 
where we spent the first week of the month before returning to South Carolina 
for some interesting bird banding sessions. To view the latest edition, please 
visit http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160501.html 
 


While there please remember to scroll down for an impressive list of returns 
and recaptures--including 21 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds that showed up after 
being banding in 2015 or earlier. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of June 26, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 05:43:56 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Father Birds, In Honor of Father's Day
http://bit.ly/MHc0wg
* How Birds Move from Fresh to Salt Water
http://bit.ly/28J5jkP
* City Gulls - Rooftop Nesters
http://bit.ly/11SXh99
* From Egg-laying to Hatching and Beyond
http://bit.ly/1oqmKbr
* The Phoebe and the Pewee
http://bit.ly/28PpvNb
* Where Birds Sleep
http://bit.ly/UnpgSr
* Band-tailed Pigeon
http://bit.ly/LZ3Q3J
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/28T2Kwl
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



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Subject: Rare Spix's Macaw is Back, in Brazil!!!
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 03:50:54 -0400
Sharing:
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-36628290
Yours,
Paulo Boute.

                                          
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Subject: Hummingbird, Los Angeles
From: Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 14:02:47 -0500
thought this TV story about a hummingbird would be of interest to some here:

http://1funny.com/man-dog-hummingbird/

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Subject: Baby Birds Learn Calls From Their Mothers While Still In The Egg!
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 07:10:16 -0400
What a Surprise!!!

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/baby-birds-learn-calls-from-their-mothers-while-still-in-the-egg/?utm_source=Cornell%20Lab%20eNews&utm_campaign=b800c90c02-Cornell%20Lab%20eNews%2006_13_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-b800c90c02-307895021 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.
                                          
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of June 19, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 08:12:37 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Frank Chapman and the Solitaire
http://bit.ly/11vc664
* Northern Hawk Owl - One of a Kind
http://bit.ly/1UMwPJE
* Hummingbirds, By a Hair
http://bit.ly/1U8pmuw
* Voices and Vocabularies - Robin's Evening Song
http://bit.ly/ZSpxvK
* Loons Go Fishing
http://bit.ly/Lq9Ovi
* Keep Your Cats Indoors
http://bit.ly/10FHSNf
* California Quail, Up and Running
http://bit.ly/MtExL5
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1tuvAsk
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
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Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
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show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote



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Subject: Re: Garganey Information
From: Arie Gilbert <ArieGilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 15:33:00 -0400




Subject: Parrots, songbirds pack more neurons into their forebrains than most mammals
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 06:39:08 -0400
Sharing...

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/06/parrots-songbirds-pack-more-neurons-their-forebrains-most-mammals?utm_campaign=news_daily_2016-06-14&et_rid=16743099&et_cid=559581 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.

                                          
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Subject: Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 13 Jun 2016 to 14 Jun 2016 (#2016-58)
From: Ken Birding <curlewbird AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 07:24:28 -0400
Plenty of reports on eBird, including this one with a photo -

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30179455

If you start out here – you can zoom in and see all the locations – in the 
Montezuma NWR area. 


Best - Ken

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Subject: Re: Garganey Information
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 13:24:48 +0000
Maybe certain events in Florida had people a tad preoccupied with other 
stuff......... 


David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 14, 2016, at 8:41 AM, Marcia Balestri 
> wrote: 


I hate when other people do this, but I notice that there were no report, 
either yea or nay, on the Garganey in New York yesterday. Is this because 
everyone in US has seen this bird but me, and no one went to look, or that it 
just wasn’t seen? Sorry, but I am unfamiliar with the refuge and don’t know 
how much traffic it gets. So I repeat the worn phrase—any information on 
yesterday’s sightings (or not) is much appreciated. 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com
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Subject: Garganey Information
From: Marcia Balestri <mebalestri AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 08:41:05 -0400
I hate when other people do this, but I notice that there were no report, 
either yea or nay, on the Garganey in New York yesterday. Is this because 
everyone in US has seen this bird but me, and no one went to look, or that it 
just wasn’t seen? Sorry, but I am unfamiliar with the refuge and don’t know 
how much traffic it gets. So I repeat the worn phrase—any information on 
yesterday’s sightings (or not) is much appreciated. 

_____________________

Marcia Balestri
Worcester County, Maryland
mebalestri AT gmail.com
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Subject: Re: BIRDCHAT Digest - 11 Jun 2016 to 12 Jun 2016 (#2016-56)
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 12:56:01 -0700
This is quite near Savannah, all lowland riparian, pond, marsh habitat.
It has a driving route (you can get out and walk around too), plus
lots of areas where you can walk.
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/Savannah/about.html

Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.


At 10:01 PM 6/12/2016, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:
>Date:    Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:41:00 -0400
>From:    Richard Wolfert 
>Subject: Central Georgia birding ideas
>
>A couple with whom we are friends live near Atlanta. We will be in
>Savannah. Is there any really good spot to bird somewhere in-between?
>
>Thanks,
>Rich Wolfert

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Subject: How Birds Became Red (reprise)
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 09:41:50 +0100
Hello everyone,

there were quite a few people who were dismayed about Forbes' restrictive
anti-ad blocker, which prevents them reading anything i publish there (my
apologies! this was enacted after i signed the contract, so i had no idea
it was coming).

anywho, just wanted to mention that my piece, How Birds Became Red, is now
freely available for anyone to read (and hopefully, to enjoy) on my Medium
site:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/how-birds-became-red-grrlscientist-55e51899a549#.xxregs2sr 


Whilst you're there, take a look around my Medium site: there's lots of
interesting pieces (including LOTS and LOTS of bird pieces) that are there
now for the public to freely read and hopefully, to enjoy. Of course, if
you wish to share these works with others, especially on social media
(facebook, linkedin, G+, etc), on twitter, or "recommend" them (click the
green heart at the bottom of the piece), i strongly encourage you to do so.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Central Georgia birding ideas
From: Richard Wolfert <rwolfert AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:41:00 -0400
A couple with whom we are friends live near Atlanta. We will be in Savannah. Is 
there any really good spot to bird somewhere in-between? 


Thanks,
Rich Wolfert
New Jersey
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Subject: A Birdwatcher's Guide to Norway
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 18:12:01 -0500
To prepare for our cruise to Norway, Andrea and I would like to get
our hands on the book, A Birdwatcher's Guide to Norway: Where, When
and How to find the Birds of Norway including Svalbard. Unfortunately,
it is out of print.
If anyone has this book and would be willing to lend, please let me
know.
Thank you,
Larry GardellaMontgomery, AL

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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of June 12, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 10:14:26 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Begging Sounds and Postures
http://bit.ly/12tUx6k
* The Pelicans of Castle Pinckney
http://bit.ly/1X4Nm1S
* The Baltimore Oriole
http://bit.ly/1ln64tD
* Cuckoos - Tent Caterpillar Birds
http://bit.ly/11PvPgz
* Common Murres - Nature's Laugh Track
http://bit.ly/28crVQo
* American Golden-Plover Lays Claim to the Tundra
http://bit.ly/13smFnG
* Black-headed Grosbeak Sings!
http://bit.ly/1rJZPFz
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1toEqZi
----------------------------
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mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
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Subject: Phoebe Snetsinger.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 06:48:03 -0400
Sharing...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/phoebe-snetsinger-the-woman-who-listed-more-than-8000-bird-species-a7071596.html 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
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Subject: Re: Red-tailed Hawk Question
From: Hilary Powers <hilary AT POWERSEDIT.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 18:01:16 -0700
On 6/9/2016 12:43 PM, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:
> My question is, what do ornithologists call these variations in a
> breed? Just variations or morphs or subspecies or something else?
> Mind-boggling the first time you try identifying these.

I think they're all just morphs, even Harlan's, which lacks the red tail
lifelong. (None of them have red tails as juveniles.)

> Is there another way to identify Red-tailed Hawks positively other
> than their call and possibly the shape of wing/tail feathers? The red
> tail was not very evident either.

The two field marks you can mostly rely on are the cummerbund across the
middle of the breast and the dark plumage on the inside of the elbow.
Not 100%, especially in very dark birds, but you can usually sort of
pick it out.

What a treat to have lots of them to compare!

--
-       Hilary Powers - hilary AT powersedit.com - Oakland CA         -
- "Making Word 2010 Work for You" - www.the-efa.org/res/booklets.php -
-     Needle Felting: www.SalFelt.com;  www.facebook.com/SalFelt     -

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Subject: Red-tailed Hawk Question
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 11:43:36 -0800
Hello Bird People,

I am amazed how simply getting a new camera can improve a person’s bird 
identification skills and expand lists. 


Alaska’s skies are filled with many species of raptors and noticeably 
increasing in numbers and nests. 

One of the areas near where I live hosts many new nests each year. I have a 
question though regarding the identification of Red-tailed Hawks. I took 
several (hundred) photos of a hawk and identified a few of them as Red-tailed 
Hawks. The ones I saw weren’t the typical Red-tailed Hawks that you see in 
movies and basic bird books. Online bird books shows several different types of 
Red-tailed Hawks. Adult morphs, light morphs, dark morphs, rufous morphs! The 
only way I could conclusively identify the hawks was from their significant 
piercing call. 


My question is, what do ornithologists call these variations in a breed? Just 
variations or morphs or subspecies or something else? Mind-boggling the first 
time you try identifying these. 


The funny part of hearing them is that it reminded me of those old wild-west 
movies and shows like “Gunsmoke” and “Bonanza” making it probably one 
of the most recognizable bird sounds ever. Is it safe to say ALL versions of 
Red-tailed Hawks have the same call even though they look very different? 


Is there another way to identify Red-tailed Hawks positively other than their 
call and possibly the shape of wing/tail feathers? The red tail was not very 
evident either. 


Thanks very much for the help.  
Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska

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Subject: Would A Parrot Be A Reliable Murder Witness?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 19:28:34 +0100
Hello everyone,

I've been following the viral story about the grey parrot that (supposedly)
witnessed the murder of its owner with a lot of amusement. basically, as
the sentiment goes, the parrot should be considered to be a witness in a
murder trial. so i spent some time chatting with scientists and attorneys
about how a parrot as a murder witness might play out according to their
views. this is the story i came up with:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/06/09/would-a-parrot-be-a-reliable-murder-witness/ 


i hope you find it instructive and interesting.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Clifford Miles Obituary.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 09:13:12 -0400


I may happen that some of the chatters had the chance to meet Clifford Miles:

http://codeymackeyfh.com/tribute/details/411/Clifford-Miles/obituary.html#tribute-start 

Paulo Boute.


                                          
            
                                          
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Subject: Re: Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years!
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 20:59:59 -0400
Exactly where I saw them, in fact - what a great place!

Ronald Orenstein 
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Jun 6, 2016, at 8:24 PM, Dam Sithichai  wrote:
> 
> I saw them all the time at Doi Ang Kang in Chiengmai.
> Dam Sithichai
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Jun 6, 2016, at 2:00 PM, Ronald Orenstein  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Not as amazing as all that, I'm afraid. The Red-faced Liocichla is not only 
not extinct, it isn't even rare (I've seen it myself in northern Thailand). See 
http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=7828. 

>> 
>> Ronald Orenstein 
>> 1825 Shady Creek Court
>> Mississauga, ON
>> Canada L5L 3W2
>> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
>> 
>>> On Jun 6, 2016, at 9:54 AM, Paulo Boute  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Amazing!!! Almost 200 Years!!!
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Extinct-Bird-Found-After-178-Years-in-Nepal-20160603-0025.html 

>>> 
>>> Yours,
>>> 
>>> Paulo Boute.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
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to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 

>> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
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to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


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Subject: Re: Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years!
From: Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 17:00:56 -0400
Not as amazing as all that, I'm afraid. The Red-faced Liocichla is not only not 
extinct, it isn't even rare (I've seen it myself in northern Thailand). See 
http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=7828. 


Ronald Orenstein 
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Jun 6, 2016, at 9:54 AM, Paulo Boute  wrote:
> 
> Amazing!!! Almost 200 Years!!!
> 
> 
> 
http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Extinct-Bird-Found-After-178-Years-in-Nepal-20160603-0025.html 

> 
> Yours,
> 
> Paulo Boute.
> 
> 
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
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Subject: Re: Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years!
From: Bill Porteous <phaenostictus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 15:30:59 -0500
This only applies to Nepal. Red-faced Liocichla is regularly seen in
neighboring countries.

Bill Porteous

Panama
On 6 Jun 2016 16:54, "Paulo Boute"  wrote:

> Amazing!!! Almost 200 Years!!!
>
>
>
> 
http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Extinct-Bird-Found-After-178-Years-in-Nepal-20160603-0025.html 

>
> Yours,
>
> Paulo Boute.
>
>
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For
> BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives:
> https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a
> message to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

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Subject: Extinct Bird Found After 178 Years!
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Jun 2016 09:54:40 -0400
Amazing!!! Almost 200 Years!!!


http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Extinct-Bird-Found-After-178-Years-in-Nepal-20160603-0025.html 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
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Subject: Re: Birding The Deadliest Catch
From: "snorkler AT juno.com" <snorkler@JUNO.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2016 16:31:57 GMT
That is an excellent sighting, Phil. I only started watching the show this 
season, so I missed the Short-tailed Albatross. In fact, it's one I don't have 
on my life list, the only northern hemisphere albatross I haven't seen ;) 


For neophyte and inexperienced pelagic birders, the smiley face is because 
there are only three northern hemisphere albatross species, the other two being 
Laysan and Black-footed. 


Working the Bering Sea, Aleutians, etc., I saw Bald Eagles nesting on the 
ground, as trees are nonexistent on most of the Aleutians. There was a single 
imported evergreen on Unalaska/Dutch Harbor. It had a wooden sign next to it, 
labeling it the Unalaska National Forest. There's a mounted King Crab in he 
Dutch Harbor airport, with a handwritten sign saying "The reason we're all 
here" next to it. 


One time I skipped dinner to stay at the bird rookery on St. Paul Island while 
the rest of my group ate. They were to return at 9 p.m., so I enjoyed a couple 
of hours of solitude. While they were gone, I watched 7 Arctic Foxes working 
the upper fringes of the rookery. Hundreds of Red-legged Kittiwakes were 
picking dry grass for nesting material. Thick-billed Murres and Crested and 
Parakeet Auklets were new. There's a large cemetery for Russian Orthodox Church 
members, and a much smaller cemetery for Monrovians, Seventh Day Adventists, 
Protestants, Roman Catholics, and other unworthy unfortunates. 


I was on Kodiak Island when crab fishing was stopped. Some bored cannery 
workers started throwing frozen herring (crab bait) out on the water. After a 
while, a Bald Eagle flew over from Near Island to pick up a snack. Pretty soon 
we had 36 Bald Eagles in the air diving for snacks. I took a couple of rolls of 
film, and didn't get a single usable photo. It's so much easier now with 
digital cameras. 


I've been to many of the locales mentioned/shown on the show. I've ridden on a 
crabber from False Pass to the salmon fishing fleet, where the crabber was 
going to be a salmon tender. I've been in Cold Bay, and walked to Izembek NWR 
to see breeding Rock Sandpipers. I flew out of Cold Bay to King Cove one Summer 
on Peter Pan Seafood's Convair 440. That same plane crashed later the same 
Summer, killing 19 cannery workers and the pilot. 


A co-worker and I were staying in a cannery VP's cabin in Dutch Harbor. We 
borrowed a kettle and a pound of butter from the galley, and got the water 
boiling. We bought a 7 lb. King Crab from a crab boat, and I butchered it with 
no experience, from seeing how the processors do it. At 20% recovery, we each 
had .7 lbs of fantastic King Crab meat. It was the best meal I've ever eaten, 
bar none. Better than any meal I've eaten at a Forbes Top 40 Restaurants in 
America, James Beard Best American Chef: Southeast, Food and Wine Magazine's 
Top 25 Restaurants in America, restaurant. That's pretty good birding cuisine. 


Thanks to those who extended their good wishes and prayers to my birding buddy 
Floyd. She's had a mastectomy, is finishing up her chemotherapy regimen, and 
will be scheduled for radiation next. She's back to driving herself around 
town. I drove her out of town to a meeting and shopping last Wednesday. She's 
still the cantankerous curmudgeon birding buddy we know. 


Darrell Lee
Alameda, CA

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Phil Davis 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Birding The Deadliest Catch
Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2016 00:29:11 -0400

Hi Darrell, et al.

Sorry for the delay in replying to this ... been away ...

I think ours could be the prize sighting ... A few years ago, my wife
and I were watching the current episode when they showed a head-on
view of one of the boats (I forget which one) when something very
large flew down one side of the boat and crossed the bow. I suspected
what it was but wanted to make sure. We backed up the DVR and ran it,
frame-by-frame, and there in all of it's glory was a very clear
first-year SHORT-TAILED ALBATROSS !!! Very cool ...

More years ago, a troubled bird landed on one of the boats while it
was out in the Bering Sea and they brought it into the wheelhouse
before they released it ... the crew called it a "freshwater
cormorant" but it was Red-necked Grebe.

I also have a recollection of a brief image of a passerine on a deck
railing ... a repoll, perhaps ...

Phil


At 11:57 05/22/2016, snorkler AT juno.com wrote:
>Does anyone else bird this show?  There are a lot of unusual birds
>pictured around the crab boats.  I've seen Sooty and/or Short-tailed
>Shearwater, Northern Fulmar, jaegers, kittiwakes, Sabine and
>Glaucous and Glaucous-winged Gulls.  Having worked and birded the
>industry, I know there are some real treasures possible, like
>Ancient Murrelets, Crested Auklets, Thick-billed Murres, and
>Red-legged Kittiwakes.

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
==================================

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Subject: RFI
From: "R. Cicerello" <rrcky1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 18:52:06 -0500
I'll be in Cajamarca, Peru, in late July and I would appreciate recommendations 
and email addresses for local bird guides. 

Thank you!

Regards,
R. Cicerello
Frankfort, KY. USA

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Subject: Hawaii Trip
From: Dave DeReamus <becard AT RCN.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 14:40:04 -0400
Jason Horn and I went to Hawaii back in mid-April. I finally got around to 
posting the trip on my blog. 

If interested, go to: http://becard.blogspot.com

Good birding,
Dave DeReamus
Palmer Township, PA
becard -at- rcn.com
Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com
PicasaWeb Photo Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/becard57
Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html

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Subject: The Ornithologist that wanted to be a bird...
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 09:09:48 -0400
Sharing...

http://www.theonion.com/article/renowned-ornithologist-always-secretly-wanted-to-b-32781 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.Brazil.


                                          
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Subject: Ireland field guide?
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 5 Jun 2016 15:53:40 +0000
I will be spending a few days in SW Ireland (Beara peninsula) with family in 
early July. Birdwatching will be incidental, and, given that we will be on 
foot, weight is a concern. I see field guides by Wilson and Carmody and by 
Dempsey and O'Clery. Does anyone have any opinions on the relative merits of 
these two books? 


Thanks,

David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.
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Subject: Blue-eyed Ground-Dove, on E-bird.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2016 07:39:22 -0400
Sharing...
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/begd_r/
Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of June 5, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2016 06:51:04 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Peace in Wild Places - From Wendell Berry
http://bit.ly/1qSYjWq
* Beavers and Meadows - Las Vegas!
http://bit.ly/JfsyuA
* Barn Swallow, Natural Pest Control
http://bit.ly/1jbFvWO
* Olive-sided Flycatcher
http://bit.ly/1kTudHz
* House Wrens and Dummy Nests
http://bit.ly/1sEJism
* Baby Birds - Best Left Alone
http://bit.ly/MBDhC4
* Mark Borden and the Swallows - A Win/Win!
http://bit.ly/12xZ9Lu
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1U0wFRR
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
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show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Re: Birding The Deadliest Catch
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jun 2016 00:29:11 -0400
Hi Darrell, et al.

Sorry for the delay in replying to this ... been away ...

I think ours could be the prize sighting ... A few years ago, my wife
and I were watching the current episode when they showed a head-on
view of one of the boats (I forget which one) when something very
large flew down one side of the boat and crossed the bow. I suspected
what it was but wanted to make sure. We backed up the DVR and ran it,
frame-by-frame, and there in all of it's glory was a very clear
first-year SHORT-TAILED ALBATROSS !!! Very cool ...

More years ago, a troubled bird landed on one of the boats while it
was out in the Bering Sea and they brought it into the wheelhouse
before they released it ... the crew called it a "freshwater
cormorant" but it was Red-necked Grebe.

I also have a recollection of a brief image of a passerine on a deck
railing ... a repoll, perhaps ...

Phil


At 11:57 05/22/2016, snorkler AT juno.com wrote:
>Does anyone else bird this show?  There are a lot of unusual birds
>pictured around the crab boats.  I've seen Sooty and/or Short-tailed
>Shearwater, Northern Fulmar, jaegers, kittiwakes, Sabine and
>Glaucous and Glaucous-winged Gulls.  Having worked and birded the
>industry, I know there are some real treasures possible, like
>Ancient Murrelets, Crested Auklets, Thick-billed Murres, and
>Red-legged Kittiwakes.

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
==================================

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Subject: Hilton Pond 04/01/16 (Spring Chill)
From: research AT HILTONPOND.ORG
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 21:51:54 -0400
Now that May 2016 is over, I've finally had a chance to complete my latest 
"This Week at Hilton Pond" installment . . . for the month of APRIL! I regret 
being so far behind but hope you'll enjoy this new post about the effects of 
early April chill on flora and fauna of the Carolina Piedmont. Lots of photos 
of birds, wildflowers, a treefrog and snake, plant galls, and--last but not 
least--Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. 


The installment for 1-30 Apr 2016 (which also has some interesting info about 
recaptured Carolina Chickadees) is at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160401.html 
 
. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================


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Subject: BirdChat patches and pins
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 19:00:28 +0000
A few years ago I undertook the task of having pins and patches (the kind you 
can attach to a backpack, shirt, jacket etc.) produced and many people bought 
them. I still have quantities of both items left and it occurs to me that there 
may be new subscribers who might like to acquire these items. The original 
intent was to break even and initially I carefully broke down the cost of the 
items, the exact postage and the cost of shipping materials. Now I would charge 
$5.00 flat rate postage (I am in Canada and will be shipping primarily to the 
US) so I will gain on some packages and lose on others and $5.00 each for pin 
or patch. If anyone is interested please contact me offline. 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

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Subject: Can An Old Parrot Learn New Tricks?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 12:03:05 +0100
hello everyone,

i just published a piece that you might find interesting. this study
investigates the problem-solving abilities of wild free-roaming kaka in New
Zealand and finds that the young birds are the best problem-solvers, and
adults are the worst:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/06/02/can-an-old-parrot-learn-new-tricks/ 


this is in stark contrast to their closest relatives, the kea, where adults
are the best problem-solvers. although these birds are close relatives,
they live in vastly different habitats, which makes one wonder how ecology
shaped the evolution of these two species' cognitive abilities?

please do share this story widely with your friends and colleagues.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Hummingbird Rediscovered!
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 09:32:55 -0400
Sharing:
https://abcbirds.org/the-search-is-on-for-south-americas-lost-birds/
Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
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Subject: Fw: [BIRDCHAT] Birding coverage in North America, VIII
From: Alan Wormington <wormington AT JUNO.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 16:54:55 GMT
 Thank you Eran for a very thorough analysis, should anyone really want to dig 
into the data. Something that might be worth mentioning about Ontario, which 
will never be reflected in the data. Ontario is of course huge, with also a 
relatively big population at 13.6 million people. Ontario also has a very 
robust birding community. But here is the point I wish to make: At least 75% of 
Ontario (referred to as northern Ontario) is mostly an area of vast wilderness, 
where even roads are often entirely lacking. Northern Ontario has exceptionally 
few birders, and correspondingly very few e-bird checklists are generated from 
this huge region. In contrast, the much smaller area that is referred to as 
southern Ontario is highly populated, and this is where the vast majority of 
all e-bird checklists originate. As such, southern Ontario on its own is 
more-or-less equal in size to many U.S. states. Too bad there couldn't be an 
analysis that focuses strictly on southern Ontario. I am sure the results would 
be interesting when compared to other active areas of North America. Alan 
WormingtonLeamington, Ontario P.S. For the record, I don't use e-bird! 


---------- Forwarded Message ----------
From: Eran Tomer 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 12:17:19 -0400

[Continued from part VII] Ten territories ranked intermediate-low as they had 
average values on one index but low ones on the other. Utah, Kansas, West 
Virginia and Quebec ranked as intermediate on the per-capita index but low on 
the population density index. Geographic coverage lacks in all of them, though 
not grossly (save possibly Quebec), while overall birding activity is typical 
vis--vis the continental average where it does occur. Unlike the rest, though, 
West Virginia had a low number of total checklists (63,346). Missouri, 
Tennessee, Georgia, Indiana, North Carolina and Louisiana had average values on 
the population density index but low ones on the per-capita index. This 
indicates that geographic coverage there is not particularly lacking but the 
proportion of (e)birders in these populations, and hence overall birding 
activity, are lower than in most places. 

 
Next, Alabama and Kentucky ranked intermediate on the population density index 
but very low on the per-capita index. Thus geographic coverage seems 
about-average there but the proportions of eBirders in these populations, and 
hence birding intensity, are among the lowest in the continent. Kentucky 
further had a low number of overall checklists (62,337) while Alabama was 
low-end normal. 

 
10 territories ranked intermediate on the per-capita index but very low on the 
population density index: Alberta, Idaho, Nebraska, New Brunswick, South 
Dakota, Prince Edward Island, Manitoba, North Dakota, Saskatchewan, and 
Newfoundland & Labrador. These evidently have typical proportions of eBirders 
in their populations, possibly boosted by birding tourism, and hence birding 
activity that’s intermediate overall. However, spatial birding coverage 
in all ten ranked among the lowest in North America and many locations therein 
are under-birded or unbirded. Prince Edward Isl., Manitoba and North Dakota 
showed markedly high levels of variation in weekly submissions, suggesting 
either extreme weather that affects birding seasonally and / or significant 
birding tourism. All also had low or very low numbers of total checklists, 
which helps explain the variability, except for Alberta and Idaho which were in 
the normal range. 

 
Next, Arkansas and Iowa ranked low, but not lowest, on both indexes. In other 
words: unlike all of the aforementioned territories, they didn’t reach an 
intermediate rank on either scale. Significantly low numbers of total 
checklists, very low proportions of eBirders in the populations and 
conspicuously lacking geographic scope combine to place these two as runner-ups 
(or downs) for the continent’s lowest birding coverage. 

 
[Continued in part IX]
 
- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA
 ​ 

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, X (last)
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 12:29:37 -0400
[Continued from part IX]

Last but not least, I couldn’t resist calculating all the figures for
Hawaii, which was not a part of the project (because it [project] concerned
continental species). Hawaii had a checklist count at the bottom tier of
the range (54,562) but came out intermediate / average on both the
per-capita index and population density index. Not bad at all. Week to week
submissions variability was in the normal range.



If anything, all of this assessment indicates that North America still has
room for a great deal of ornithological exploration. Exciting stuff.


Sincere thanks to Cornell for the eBird revolution which makes analyses
such as these possible. And of course, deepest gratitude to the tens of
thousands of birdwatchers who share their observations and thus power the
entire knowledge base.



Best regards,



- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA
​

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, IX
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 12:24:38 -0400
[Continued from part VIII]

It should be noted that low eBird coverage is probably commensurate with
internet and cell phone connectivity. These can be slow and unreliable in
rural areas, and completely absent in uninhabited ones, with obvious
consequences for on-line reporting. An age factor might also be involved
with some territories’ populations being proportionately younger, or older,
than most. Hypothetically, younger people may be more inclined to use eBird
than their seniors. But this is purely conjectural.



And finally (yes, this post does end somewhere), observations of regional
patterns. In Canada, the West coast is relatively well covered and the
interior West less so. The East has average / intermediate coverage with
Quebec, Ontario and Nova Scotia, which is actually impressive given the
dimensions of remote terrain in these provinces. The Canadian Northeast
excepting NS is much under-covered: New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and
Newfoundland & Labrador. The arctic has sparse coverage but much better
than expected. The central provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan are
distinctly under-birded.



In the U. S., the Northeast stands out as exceptionally well birded. The
mid-Atlantic & vicinity also has excellent coverage though West Virginia is
intermediate and Kentucky is majorly under-birded. The Southeast, excepting
heavily-birded Florida, is low-end intermediate while Mississippi and
Alabama are strikingly under-covered. (By the way, this is one reason I am
not fully convinced that Bachman’s Warbler is extinct. Much of the South is
under-birded, especially its preponderant wetlands). The Midwest is highly
variable with strong coverage in Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan, medium
in Minnesota, medium-low in Indiana and Missouri, and very low in Iowa and
Arkansas (borderline Midwest). Continuing the pattern of central Canada,
the Great Plains and center of the U. S. are under-birded except for starry
Texas. Oklahoma and the Dakotas lack coverage especially while Kansas and
Nebraska are low-end intermediate. The Great Basin, Rockies and interior
West are covered intermediate-low, save very low in Nevada, which would be
expected considering the sparse population densities and remoteness of many
areas. The desert Southwest, again excepting Nevada, is average /
intermediate. The West Coast is very well birded in California and Oregon,
with intermediate coverage in Washington. Alaska is also intermediate
though birding there is highly concentrated in certain localities, leaving
many others uncovered.
​
[Continued in part X, last]

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, VIII
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 12:17:19 -0400
[Continued from part VII]

Ten territories ranked intermediate-low as they had average values on one
index but low ones on the other. Utah, Kansas, West Virginia and Quebec
ranked as intermediate on the per-capita index but low on the population
density index. Geographic coverage lacks in all of them, though not grossly
(save possibly Quebec), while overall birding activity is typical vis-à-vis
the continental average where it does occur. Unlike the rest, though, West
Virginia had a low number of total checklists (63,346). Missouri,
Tennessee, Georgia, Indiana, North Carolina and Louisiana had average
values on the population density index but low ones on the per-capita
index. This indicates that geographic coverage there is not particularly
lacking but the proportion of (e)birders in these populations, and hence
overall birding activity, are lower than in most places.



Next, Alabama and Kentucky ranked intermediate on the population density
index but very low on the per-capita index. Thus geographic coverage seems
about-average there but the proportions of eBirders in these populations,
and hence birding intensity, are among the lowest in the continent.
Kentucky further had a low number of overall checklists (62,337) while
Alabama was low-end normal.



10 territories ranked intermediate on the per-capita index but very low on
the population density index: Alberta, Idaho, Nebraska, New Brunswick,
South Dakota, Prince Edward Island, Manitoba, North Dakota, Saskatchewan,
and Newfoundland & Labrador. These evidently have typical proportions of
eBirders in their populations, possibly boosted by birding tourism, and
hence birding activity that’s intermediate overall. However, spatial
birding coverage in all ten ranked among the lowest in North America and
many locations therein are under-birded or unbirded. Prince Edward Isl.,
Manitoba and North Dakota showed markedly high levels of variation in
weekly submissions, suggesting either extreme weather that affects birding
seasonally and / or significant birding tourism. All also had low or very
low numbers of total checklists, which helps explain the variability,
except for Alberta and Idaho which were in the normal range.



Next, Arkansas and Iowa ranked low, but not lowest, on both indexes. In
other words: unlike all of the aforementioned territories, they didn’t
reach an intermediate rank on either scale. Significantly low numbers of
total checklists, very low proportions of eBirders in the populations and
conspicuously lacking geographic scope combine to place these two as
runner-ups (or downs) for the continent’s lowest birding coverage.



And now, North America’s least-birded places. At the bottom were Nevada and
Mississippi - sorry, guys – as the only two states that ranked in the
lowest tiers of both indexes. They had very low numbers of total eBird
checklists, far fewer than their population figures would predict, and very
low geographic coverage (Nevada especially). Oklahoma was just slightly
higher with a very low per-capita index combined with a low population
density index and total number of lists. Compared to the continental
averages, these three states have both very low proportions of (e)birders
in their populations AND a disproportionately high number of un- or
under-birded places. C’mon folks, put your great birds on the map !
Otherwise, the rest of us have choices for planning the next big birding
trip.


[Continued in part IX]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA
​

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, VII
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 12:13:03 -0400
[Trying to finish the post in as few segments as possible; sincere
apologies again for the multiple messages]

Six more states deserve honorary mention for above-average birding
coverage. New Hampshire and Delaware had high, but not very high, ratios of
lists per capita and an intermediate value on the population density index.
Hence, average (but not low) spatial coverage and appreciably more lists
than expected proportionately from the population sizes. Delaware, however,
had a low number of total checklists (61,991) unlike New Hampshire which
was in the lower normal range. Illinois, Texas, Virginia and Michigan had
high values on the population density index (very high for TX and ILL) and
intermediate values of lists per capita (medium-low for TX and ILL). These
four also had a respectable number of total eBird checklists, comfortably
above average (very high for Texas). Thus they have better geographic
coverage than most places despite normal, or somewhat low, proportions of
(e)birders in their populations. This wraps up the list of places with
stronger-than-normal birding coverage.



Seven intermediate-ranking territories appear so on both the per-capita and
population density indexes: Colorado, Washington, Arizona, Ontario,
Minnesota, Rhode Island and South Carolina. Geographic coverage and birding
intensity there don’t lack vs. the continental average, but don’t stand out
as exceptional either. Rhode Island and South Carolina nevertheless had
rather low per capita index values. Undoubtedly due to being the smallest
state, Rhode Island further had a very low number of total checklists
(36,782). Ontario had a very high number (590,547).



Nine intermediate-ranking territories were interesting as their standing
reflected a compromise of extremes: Montana, British Columbia, Nova Scotia,
New Mexico, Wyoming and the arctic lands of Yukon, Northwest Territories,
Nunavut and Alaska. Even more strikingly, it was the same situation in all
nine cases: significantly high values on the per-capita index and
significantly low values on the population density index. The contrast was
strongest with the arctic territories and Montana, and least with New
Mexico and Nova Scotia. This indicates that geographic coverage in these
nine lacks conspicuously but where it *is* present, birding activity is
strikingly higher than population figures would predict. Again, seasonal
visitation by out-of-state birders and researchers in the arctic accounts
partly for the high per-capita values there, which are still impressive for
such remote areas. The five non-arctic territories had normal variability
in weekly submissions over the year. Thus, either birding tourism is not a
major factor there, or tourism occurs rather evenly through the year, or
the residents match or exceed visitors’ eBird submissions, or any
combination thereof. British Columbia stood out as having a noticeably high
number of total checklists, 372,561. Nova Scotia had a low number (65,336)
and Yukon, Nunavut, NW Territories and Wyoming were very low.


[Continued in part VIII]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA
​

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, VI
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 22:13:03 -0400
[Continued from part V]

Now for the final analysis. Which territories ranked highest, and lowest,
in both eBird lists per capita AND number of lists adjusted by population
density ? That is, where in North America is birding coverage greatest and
least ? (Again, using eBird submissions as a proxy-index for birding in
general). This was determined by averaging the class ranks each territory
attained in both assessments. Please note that “high value” and “low 
value” 

figures below indicate high statistical significance. And recall that
eBirders are a subset of the population and so “population density” also
means “birder density”, though the strength of this correlation varies from
territory to territory.



Three states averaged the highest ranks and thus had the most thorough
birding coverage in North America: Maryland, Massachusetts and Connecticut.
These had high (but not extremely high) ratios of eBird checklists per
capita, i.e. appreciably more lists than their population sizes would
predict. Again, this translates to higher proportions of (e)birders in the
populations vs. the continental average. They also ranked very high on the
population density index, so these lists leave few places uncovered.
Maryland and Massachusetts, but not Connecticut, also had respectably high
numbers of total eBird checklists squeezed into their small areas,
competing with far larger states. Maryland had 382,696 and Massachusetts
had 427,443, compared to the overall median of 143,703 and mean of 223,200.
Connecticut had 232,184, slightly above average.



Close runner-ups were Vermont and Maine. They had very high values of eBird
lists per capita and average, but not low, values on the population (hence
birder) density index. This indicates that these states have some
under-birded areas but overall birding activity is intensive.



Several other territories also ranked high for birding coverage. Oregon and
Wisconsin had high values on the per capita index and average values on the
population density index. Hence, some lacking geographic scope but strong
coverage overall. The opposite was true for New Jersey, New York and
Pennsylvania, and to a lesser extent California, Florida and Ohio. These
six had high values on the population density index and average values on
the per-capita index (average-low for CA, FL and OH). As noted above, all
of them had both top-tier numbers of total eBird checklists combined with
high or intermediate population densities. This suggests relatively
thorough spatial coverage at typical / average effort intensity. That said,
Ohio is remarkable for being the only territory with a top-tier number of
total checklists (391,165) and yet high, but not very high, variation in
weekly submissions rate. No idea why, as I don’t believe that birding
tourism or weather play a major role there versus neighboring states.


[Continued in part VII]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA
​

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, V
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 22:07:07 -0400
[Continued from part IV]

[Note - LISTSERV is forcing me to cut the text into small bits, so I
apologize very sincerely for flooding everyone with so many messages. This
wasn't my intent. I may need to post the rest tomorrow - will see what
LISTSERV will do].

A final assumption is that eBirders are distributed randomly and bird
randomly - from a geographic standpoint - across a territory’s human
population. This is untrue but no information is available on the matter.
eBirders are statistically more likely to originate from densely-populated
areas because that’s where most people live, but eBird does not collect
such information. Birding effort is also non-random spatially, with a
disproportionate number of lists coming from a relatively small number of
hotspots. This limitation too must be remembered as it biases the results,
but not greatly. That’s because these issues exist in each and every
territory, so the bias is constant.



With all of that in mind, the outcome: New Jersey now took the top spot,
having both a high-end eBird checklist tally and the continent’s highest
population density. Also very high on this index (over twice the mean,
which was far higher than the median) were, in decreasing order,
Massachusetts, New York, California, Maryland, Florida, Connecticut,
Pennsylvania and Ohio. Illinois, Texas, Virginia and Michigan were close
runner-ups (over x1.5 the mean). These territories all have high numbers of
total eBird checklists (save Connecticut) combined with high or
intermediate population densities. Hence they have relatively thorough
geographic coverage on eBird. However, note the aforementioned assumptions
- coverage gaps do exist.



The bottom range of the list was again broader than the top and included
many of the previous high-rankers. This owed to their very low totals of
eBird lists combined with very low population densities, which leaves
numerous places uncovered. The numerical distribution was particularly
skewed and so evaluation was again strictly conservative. Values for 11
territories were significantly low statistically, but more than twice the
median, so they were flagged as intermediate rather than low. At less than
a quarter of the median, which was far lower than the mean (21% of it)
were, bottom up, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Yukon Territory,
Newfoundland & Labrador, Alaska, Saskatchewan, Wyoming, North Dakota,
Manitoba, Prince Edward Island, South Dakota, Montana, New Brunswick,
Nevada, Idaho, Alberta, Mississippi and New Mexico. Close behind – under
half the median - were Nova Scotia, Iowa, Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma,
Quebec, British Columbia, Utah and West Virginia. eBird geographic coverage
lacked conspicuously in all of them compared to the continental average.


Again, these results must be considered with the aforementioned limitation
in mind regarding population distribution. For example, New York’s
population and its eBirders are more spread out within the state than
California’s, leaving fewer places uncovered. Or, North Dakota’s population
is more spread out than Nevada’s.



[Continued in part VI]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, IV
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 21:50:51 -0400
[Continued from part III]
​

Territory size per se is not very useful here because it is humans, not
square miles, who submit eBird checklists. Hence the second assessment
considered population *density*, people per square mile (converted from sq.
kilometers for Canada), again obtained from Wikipedia citing official
sources. eBirders are a subset of the population, so this also represents
eBirders per square mile. The calculation now was not a ratio (division)
but a multiplication of total eBird lists by population density, because an
increase in either parameter would raise the resulting score. In other
words, this was a figure of total eBird lists weighed up or down by a
territory’s population density.



If two territories had a similar population density, the one with more
eBird lists would rank higher as it would have proportionately greater
birding coverage. If two territories had a similar number of eBird lists,
the one with a higher population density would rank higher since its lists
would provide more extensive geographic coverage as explained above.
Territories with few eBird lists AND a low population density would sink to
the bottom of geographic coverage scores, those high on both counts would
rise to the top. Places high on one count and low on the other would be
intermediate to varying extents.



As the previous assessment has shown, the proportion of eBirders in the
population varies among territories and so, despite an intuitive
correlation between “population density” and “(e)Birder density”, 
having a 

higher population density does not automatically equate to having
commensurately more eBird checklists.

This assumes that birding patterns are geographically similar across
territories, which is valid. A large proportion of eBird lists comes from
densely settled places and their vicinities. A smaller proportion comes
from more sparsely-populated countrysides, parks that aren’t near cities
etc. A small (or very small) proportion comes from nearly uninhabited,
remote wilderness. In short: the more remote and thinly-populated the area,
the fewer eBird lists come from it. This is true in every territory even
though minor exceptions do exist.



Another, related assumption is that the human (and eBirder) population is
distributed in the same manner across various territories. Two territories
could have similar population densities but in one  the population might be
spread across the land, while in the other it may be concentrated in one or
two regions. For example, Ontario and Kansas have nearly the same
population density but Ontario’s population is more concentrated in certain
regions, i.e. more clumped, than Kansas’. This leaves more places
uncovered. The said assumption clearly does *not* hold but absent a
population dispersion / clustering parameter for each territory, it cannot
be accounted for. (Such a parameter could be derived from population
density data for each of the continent’s 3,435 counties & equivalents, but
obtaining and entering the data would be prohibitively time consuming. I
don’t do this for a living…). This issue must be borne in mind when looking
at the results.



[Continued in part V]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, III
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 21:42:23 -0400
​[Continued from part II]

Now, a look at the bottom of the list. This examination was particularly
conservative as values for 12 territories were significantly low
statistically, but larger than half the mean, and so were labeled as
intermediate rather than low. 5 states had significantly very low ratios of
eBird lists per capita (under half the median, from bottom up): Kentucky,
Mississippi, Alabama, Nevada and Oklahoma. Rounding up the low end (under
half the mean) were Iowa, Arkansas, Louisiana, North Carolina, Indiana,
Georgia, Tennessee and Missouri. This suggests that these all have a lower
proportion of (e)birders in their populations, and hence lower birding
activity, than the continental average.



To illustrate, please recall that the overall continental ratio of eBird
lists to people is 1 list per 25.7 persons. In Vermont, it is 1 to 3.68
persons. In Kentucky, 1 per 88.6.


The territories with the most eBird lists had only intermediate ratios of
lists per capita. Some were even intermediate-low. None had a high rate of
weekly variation. So, their high tallies are due mostly to having high
population figures, and hence more resident eBirders.



Territories with major out-of-state birding tourism, such as Texas, Florida
and Arizona, also had intermediate ratios and variation. This indicates
either that visitation is more-or-less even through the year, or that state
residents submit enough lists to at least match, if not “swamp out” the
visitors’, or both. Some of these states have high-end tallies due to
contributions by visiting birders.



While these figures are revealing, they still don’t portray the full
picture of birding coverage because they don’t consider territory size. If
two territories have a similar number of eBird checklists, but one is much
larger than the other, then lists from the larger one would be spread more
thinly across the land and thus leave more places uncovered. Alternatively,
if lists are concentrated around cities and towns in both places, then the
larger one would again have more of its territory uncovered. A given number
of eBird lists `squeezed into’ a small area gives better geographic
sampling than the same number of lists distributed within a large area. A
thousand lists from Rhode Island are not comparable to a thousand lists
from Texas in terms of spatial birding coverage.


[Continued in part IV]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America, II
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 21:34:06 -0400
[Continued from part I]​

One might simply use these totals to assess birding coverage levels but
this would be misleading for disregard of human populations. For example,
California has more eBird checklists than any other territory but it is
also the most populous one at over 39 million residents. Hence, if eBirders
were distributed randomly across the continent’s population, this high
total would be expected. Simple tallies don’t indicate where birding
coverage is proportionately stronger or weaker.


Two assessments helped to answer this question. The first entailed entering
population figures into the tables, courtesy of Wikipedia (citing official
sources), and then calculating the ratios of eBird lists per person, per
territory. This allowed an examination of which territories have
significantly more or fewer eBird lists for their population sizes,
relative to the overall continental average. If two territories had a
similar number of eBird lists, the one with the smaller population would
have the higher lists-to-people ratio. This would indicate a larger
proportion of eBirders in the population and hence more intensive birding
activity and coverage. If two territories had similar population figures,
the one with the more eBird lists – indicating proportionately more birding
activity - would have the higher ratio. An assumption here is that the
majority of eBird lists are entered by residents, not out-of-state
visitors, which would bias the results.


The overall ratio of 13.83 million total eBird checklists to 355.87 million
people on the continent was 0.03888 (rounding), or 1 list per 25.7 people.
This constitutes only an index, not a true per capita list count, since
individual eBirders in every territory enter multiple checklists.

Yukon Territory took the top ratio spot, with a population of only c.
34,000 but nearly 15,000 eBird lists. This is equivalent to 1 list per 2.3
people. Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Alaska also ranked very high.
One might question what proportion of these lists was submitted by
residents vs. visitors / researchers, and this was checked by examining the
variability of week-to-week list totals (technically, their coefficients of
variation). If seasonal visitation were considerable, the number of lists
submitted weekly would vary much over the course of a year. Sure enough,
the said northern lands showed weekly variations far above the mean &
median. It might be suggested that this is due to seasonal weather patterns
and daylight periods affecting birding, not to rising and falling
visitation. This is certainly a part of the explanation but Newfoundland &
Labrador, which is at similar latitudes, had markedly *low* weekly
variation. So did Nova Scotia, slightly further south. Many eBird
submissions by non-residents thus seem to be a factor. Therefore the high
ratios of eBird lists per capita in the arctic must be considered with
caution.



Incidentally, Prince Edward Island, North Dakota and Manitoba also showed
marked weekly variation in eBird submissions but their per-capita ratios
were intermediate, not high. It should be noted further that the lower a
territory’s total number of eBird checklists, the more weekly variation
would be expected: fewer people submitting fewer lists will generate a more
variable output than many people submitting many lists.



The more typical states of Vermont and Maine also had significantly more
eBird lists per capita vs. the continental average (over twice the mean,
which was larger than the median). Montana, Oregon, Wisconsin and British
Columbia were close runner-ups at over x1.5 the mean. A further eight
territories had high values here to a lesser extent (over x1.5 the median
but still statistically significant): New Mexico, New Hampshire, Wyoming,
Nova Scotia, Delaware, Connecticut, Maryland and Massachusetts. Evidently,
then, all of the above have an appreciably higher proportion of (e)birders
in their populations compared to elsewhere in the continent (in Wyoming’s
case, perhaps boosted by visiting birders). This would translate into
stronger birding coverage. They also had an average amount of weekly
submissions variability over time.


[continued in part III]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Birding coverage in North America
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 21:25:56 -0400
​Hello all,



Recently I have been working on a bird project based on eBird data for
North America, which necessitated an analysis of geographic coverage and
sample sizes from various places. That is, an examination of birding
activity across the continent using eBird submissions as a proxy, or index,
of birding in general. This is reasonable since the greater the birding
activity in a region, the more eBird lists would be submitted from it. The
whole project is for another time but I thought the results of the
geographic analysis were very interesting and so, here they are. There is
much to report so this will be a multi-part post.



North America northwards of Mexico, and excluding Hawaii, contains 13
Canadian provinces and 49 U.S. states for a total of 62 data regions
herein. For brevity I will refer to them collectively as “territories”.
Figures for eBird checklists were downloaded at the beginning of the month
and so, with more accumulating daily, they are not to-date. eBird presents
list totals by week – actually monthly quarters – for a total of 48
standardized weeks per year.



The various calculations below were performed for each territory, and group
statistics were then generated for all of them. All measures showed a
positive skew, i.e. many more low values than high ones, so medians were
always lower than means. Statistical significance tests were performed on
both raw and log-transformed data (due to the skew) to see which territory
values were exceptionally high or low (2-tailed, α=0.01). The asymmetrical
distribution caused some values that were rather close to the mean or
median to qualify as significant. It also caused a disproportionately large
number of low values in the “tail” to qualify as significant, with the
lowest sometimes being orders of magnitude smaller than the highest.
Therefore assessment was very conservative. Minor exceptions aside, values
were considered significantly high if they exceeded both the p<0.01
statistical threshold AND at least x1.5 the mean. They were considered
significantly low if they both exceeded the said threshold AND were no
higher than half the median, or sometimes half the mean (depending on
measure). All the high and low figures below were statistically significant
so this won’t be mentioned every time.



The median number of eBird checklists per territory was 143,703 and the
mean (average) was 223,220. Territories with significantly more lists -
over twice the mean - in descending order, were California (nearly 1.3
million), New York, Texas, Florida, Ontario, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.
Runner-ups were Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, Washington, Ohio,
Maryland and British Columbia. Finishing the higher range (over x1.5 the
mean) were New Jersey, Arizona, Oregon, Virginia and Colorado.



Territories with significantly fewer checklists (less than a quarter of the
mean) were more numerous. From bottom up: Nunavut (3,359 lists), Northwest
Territories, Prince Edward Island, Yukon Territory, North Dakota,
Newfoundland & Labrador, Mississippi, New Brunswick, Rhode Island,
Saskatchewan, South Dakota, Wyoming and Nevada. Also at the low end (less
than half the median ) were, bottom-up, Delaware, Arkansas, Kentucky, Iowa,
West Virginia, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Alabama. The
remaining territories were in the normal, intermediate range.


[Continued in part II]


- Eran Tomer

  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: NYTimes: Dutch Firm Trains Eagles to Take Down High-Tech Prey: Drones
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 23:03:26 -0700
"But they are not pets..."


http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/29/world/europe/drones-eagles.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share 


When small, off-the-shelf models pose security or other threats, birds have the 
advantage of grounding them without a potentially dangerous crash. 


Oscar Canino
SF, CA
Oscarboy AT Gmail.Com

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Subject: BirdNote - Last week and the week of May 29, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 10:23:46 -0700
Hey, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Night Voices - The Nightjars
http://bit.ly/1U6vflt
* Drinking on the Wing
http://bit.ly/1OGjkti
* Eastern Wood-Pewee and Eastern Deciduous Forest
http://bit.ly/KNN8BM
* Voices and Vocabularies - Songs Long and Short
http://bit.ly/1P84X5K
* Morning on the Bayou - Who's There?
http://bit.ly/1U6s4gx
* Dippers on the Elwha River, After the Dams Came Down
http://bit.ly/1YN0kih
* Salmonberry Bird Returns
http://bit.ly/SVbjue
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1XWlrAs
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
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... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: the haunting beauty of a love song lost forever
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 11:33:30 +0100
hi everyone,

just ran across this recording of the song of the (now) extinct kauai o'o:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDRY0CmcYNU&feature=youtu.be

this species was endemic to Kauai, as its name implies, where it lived
until 1987, when its song was recorded for the last time. this bird went
extinct due to a variety of factors -- all human-caused: invasive species
-- pigs, rats, and disease-carrying mosquitos -- all introduced by humans,
combined with habitat destruction.

like listening to a rich symphony comprised of many varied instruments
where one by one, the instruments disappear, we are hearing the loss of
these many voices, one by one, until the only sounds left are human-created
sounds of exploitation and destruction.

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: rare-species-x-rediscovered-brazil-after-75-year-disappearance
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 06:07:00 -0400
Good Morning!
Just found this link, in English!

http://www.birdlife.org/americas/news/extremely-rare-species-x-rediscovered-brazil-after-75-year-disappearance 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.
                                          
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Subject: Birding The Deadliest Catch
From: "snorkler AT juno.com" <snorkler@JUNO.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 15:57:26 GMT
Does anyone else bird this show? There are a lot of unusual birds pictured 
around the crab boats. I've seen Sooty and/or Short-tailed Shearwater, Northern 
Fulmar, jaegers, kittiwakes, Sabine and Glaucous and Glaucous-winged Gulls. 
Having worked and birded the industry, I know there are some real treasures 
possible, like Ancient Murrelets, Crested Auklets, Thick-billed Murres, and 
Red-legged Kittiwakes. 


On a side note, I haven't posted regularly on Birdchat in 15 years, but you 
old-timers will remember my birding buddy Floyd (Margaret) from our many 
adventures together. Floyd was my foil on my infamous Costa Rica and Baja 
California trips, and many others (Central Pacific Mexico, Manitoba, Kenya, 
Australia) since I stopped posting here. Floyd is fighting Stage 3 inflammatory 
breast cancer, and could use your thought, support, and prayers. 


Darrell Lee
Alameda, CA

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Subject: Sunday Banding - Lakeville, Minnesota
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:02:01 -0500

Good Evening,




 We held the second spring banding program at Ritter Farm Park in Lakeville, 
Minnesota this morning. Our numbers were low which seems to be the story this 
spring but we had a couple of nice catches including a White-crowned Sparrow. 
Ended with only 9 birds but had 8 species. 






Photos at -




http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com







Good Birding,

Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN









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Subject: Blue-eyed-Ground Dove - Rediscovered, in Brazil, After 75 Years!
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 06:18:20 -0400
Good Morning & Good News!!!
The Blue-eyed-Ground Dove, one of the rarest Brazilian Birds, was - finally - 
Rediscovered after 75 years!!! 

For mor information about this bird, I suggest this site:
http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=2568
 
It is already in the News, in Brazil: ( The use of a Online Translator, will be 
necessary, but it has great pictures of it!) 


http://ciencia.estadao.com.br/noticias/geral,cientistas-redescobrem-especie-ave-desaparecida-ha-75-anos-,1871624 

Yours,
Paulo Boute.

                                          
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of May 22, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 07:19:04 -0700
Hey, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* The Ballet of the Grebes
http://bit.ly/StTzpu
* Long-billed Curlew - Singing over the Grassland
http://bit.ly/108JHO7
* The Turaco's Non-colorfast Plumage
--A story from 'Chatter Rick Wright
http://bit.ly/1XhWTkN
* Tufted Titmouse - What's in a Name?
http://bit.ly/1m41qm6
* Robins Raise a Brood - In a Hurry
http://bit.ly/1FGgDXi
* The Endangered Palila of Hawaii
http://bit.ly/27GZsBO
* Lazuli Bunting - Jewel of Western Canyons
http://bit.ly/146KDrX
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1WIAlLI
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: How Birds Became Red
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 20 May 2016 16:34:26 +0100
hello everyone,

I've been madly writing about a couple newly published papers that detail
the mechanism of how birds got their red coloration -- i published the
short, "reader's digest" version on Forbes, and a longer, more detailed,
version will publish on The Evolution Institute. Here's the link:

How Birds Became Red
http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/05/20/how-birds-became-red/

the studies are truly elegant, and are a real pleasure to read. i hope
you'll also enjoy reading about the highlights (in the above link) and the
details (link to come).

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Radar Image from Midwest
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 May 2016 22:11:14 -0500





Hey everyone,

 The Mississippi River Flyway looks pretty busy tonight along with areas to the 
east. Radar image at: 


http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com



Good Birding,
Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN





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Subject: RFI Birding South Korea
From: David Starrett <starrettda AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 21:58:29 -0500
BirdChatters,
In January I asked if anyone had good leads on birding guide in S Korea. 
Overwhelming response was Nials Moore. I have emailed him 3 times in past 2 
months with no answer. Bird pal isn't yielding anything. A suggested Korean 
birding forum bounces messages. I have a full day June 2 that I was hoping to 
find a guide for. Any chance anyone has a suggestion for finding a guide aside 
from what I have tried? 

Thanks for any leads. My Plan B is walking to Namsan Park which is a couple 
blocks from where we will be staying and has some recent eBird submissions. 

Thanks,
Dave
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

David Starrett

Columbia, MO

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                                          
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Subject: International Raptor Council
From: Ken Birding <curlewbird AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 17 May 2016 10:57:09 -0400
At a recent meeting of the International Raptor  Council, the subject of
splitting several species came up and failed to be resolved.

It was decided to form an 'add hawk' committee to resolve these issues!! ;-)

Best -
Ken Blackshaw --
Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
Amateur Radio W1NQT (Never Quits Talking)
Nantucket Island -- 30 miles at sea

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Subject: Sunday Birds in Dakota County, MN
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 May 2016 09:47:31 -0500

In spite of being pretty windy I had a pretty good day finding migrants around 
Dakota County, MN. Best birds were a Loggerhead Shrike, 2 Lark Sparrows along 
some county backroads and 9 species of shorebirds at Lake Byllesby. Migration 
weather looks promising for the next several days. 





www.http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com







Roger Everhart

Apple Valley, MN












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Subject: Now there's an idea: Gannets on Gannet Rock!
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 19:28:40 -0400

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/n-s-conservation-group-hopes-to-bring-namesake-se
abird-back-to-gannet-rock-1.2903067





Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada




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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of May 15, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 14 May 2016 06:20:15 -0700
Hey, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Two Wings and a Tail - Wilson's Snipe
http://bit.ly/IPpqYR
* Red-Tailed Hawks - Adaptable Diners
http://bit.ly/23AR2Y0
* Burrowing Owls
http://bit.ly/1oq4POE
* Peacocks in India
http://bit.ly/1VSQeP9
* Designing a Spider Web to Evade Bird Collision
http://bit.ly/1WrELGb
* The World of Warblers
http://bit.ly/1VVq5ir
* Bobolinks and Grasslands, A Natural Match
http://bit.ly/J7xalC
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1VWlVXE
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 8, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 May 2016 08:12:27 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters!

Last week's BirdNote stories:
* Silly Willow Ptarmigan - Celebrating World Laughter Day
http://bit.ly/1WxXsXv
* Nest Building - Robins Compared to Humans
http://bit.ly/1q5TG5U
* The Ruby-crowned Kinglet Tunes Up
http://bit.ly/JGx7At
* Singing Sandpipers
http://bit.ly/NeobmR
* America's Love of the Lawn
http://bit.ly/1Ncd6Gk
* Three Brown Thrushes, Three Distinctive Singers
http://bit.ly/10TMaw3
* Shorebirds in Kansas - Oval Migration Pattern
http://bit.ly/1ndYJQT
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/1s0bLJw
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 700 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: BirdNote, Last Week and the Week of May 1, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 07:56:19 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters!

Check out the latest photo blog – Gregg Thompson catches a
Double-crested Cormorant in the act of nabbing a rockfish:
http://bit.ly/26E7nQ5
-----------------------------------------------
Last week's BirdNote stories:
* High Island - Not an Island and Not Very High,
But a Great Place to Watch Migratory Birds
http://bit.ly/1WM6Ua8
* The Sage Thrasher and Sagebrush Habitat
http://bit.ly/1VrYHbO
* Mississippi Kites - Strength in Numbers
http://bit.ly/1U9rH6T
* Hovering with Horned Larks
http://bit.ly/Xxrlcr
* The Marsh Wren's Repertoire
http://bit.ly/1SCyWoD
* The Color of Birds' Eyes
http://bit.ly/1ToFG6B
* Probing with Sandpipers
http://bit.ly/13jIOG9
----------------------------
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----------------------------
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Subject: Re: Darwin's Finches
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 13:47:34 +0000
I agree with Douglas. It's a fascinating book, well written and very readable.

If you want something a little heavier, it doesn't hurt to tackle Peter Grant's 
own volume Ecology and Evolution of Darwin's Finches. You probably wouldn't 
want to take it to bed to read before falling asleep, but it's a fine study and 
well worth the effort to read it. 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com


________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Douglas Carver  

Sent: April 28, 2016 6:19 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Darwin's Finches

Thanks for posting this -- and any BirdChatters who have not yet read Jonathan 
Weiner's "The Beak of the Finch" should do so! 


Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM

On Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 7:50 AM, Laurie Larson 
> wrote: 

Hi Birdchatters,

I've always been interested in these birds. Here's an article from Princeton's 
web site, summarizing a new paper in the journal Science. 



http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/12/46E51/index.xml?section=topstories 


Laurie Larson
Princeton NJ

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--
Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.

(I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)
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archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT ksu.edu 


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Subject: Re: Darwin's Finches
From: Douglas Carver <dhmcarver AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 16:19:19 -0600
Thanks for posting this -- and any BirdChatters who have not yet
read Jonathan Weiner's "The Beak of the Finch" should do so!

Douglas Carver
Albuquerque, NM

On Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 7:50 AM, Laurie Larson 
wrote:

> Hi Birdchatters,
>
> I’ve always been interested in these birds. Here’s an article from
> Princeton’s web site, summarizing a new paper in the journal Science.
>
>
> 
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/12/46E51/index.xml?section=topstories 

>
> Laurie Larson
> Princeton NJ
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT ksu.edu
>



-- 
Dilexi iustitiam et odivi iniquitatem, propterea morior in exilio.

(I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile.)

    -- the last words of Saint Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085)

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Subject: RFI - Southern Texas and Whooping Cranes
From: John Arnfield <arnfield.2 AT OSU.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 15:26:51 +0100
Is anyone able to tell the LATEST data to visit Port Aransas in spring
with a guarantee to see Whooping Crane, please?

Thanks...John
--
===============================================
John Arnfield : Church Stretton, Shropshire, UK

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Subject: Darwin's Finches
From: Laurie Larson <llarson2 AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 13:50:05 +0000
Hi Birdchatters,

I’ve always been interested in these birds. Here’s an article from 
Princeton’s web site, summarizing a new paper in the journal Science. 



http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S46/12/46E51/index.xml?section=topstories 


Laurie Larson
Princeton NJ

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Subject: those fascinating fairy-wrens
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:04:25 +0100
hello everyone,

you may recall that i wrote about superb fairy-wrens and how mother birds
teach their offspring a "vocal password" that allows the parents to avoid
feeding the chicks of cuckoos:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/sing-for-your-supper-fairy-wren-chicks-must-sing-vocal-password-for-food-grrlscientist-163d1fd2be45#.uu1auq98u 


well, now a new study was published recently that explores this "in the
egg" learning phenomenon further. this study looked at a close relative,
the red-backed fairy-wren, and found something quite similar:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/04/27/baby-fairy-wrens-learn-mothers-calls-before-hatching/ 


except ... this new study provides data that suggest two things: first,
learning whilst an embryo may be more widespread in songbirds than ever
before thought, and second, that "vocal passwords" might actually NOT be
for the purpose of avoiding feeding cuckoo chicks. so why did this "in the
egg" learning phenomenon evolve?

those who are interested in reading more about red-backed fairy-wrens might
enjoy this piece, where duet singing appears to strengthen the pair bond in
these fascinating little birds:


https://medium.com/ AT GrrlScientist/birds-sing-duets-to-reduce-cheating-grrlscientist-6d6c9272e24c#.vev9wsvfo 


that piece also includes several videos that you will enjoy.

i'm working on another piece about red-backed fairy-wrens that will publish
next week (i think), so keep an eye out for that.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

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Subject: Hawaii Birding Festival.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 03:02:28 -0400
Sharing:
https://hawaiibirdingtrails.com/
Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
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