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Updated on Thursday, October 30 at 08:22 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Pied Imperial Pigeon,©Barry Kent Mackay

30 Oct Re: cr: (1) [L Larson ]
30 Oct cr: (1) []
30 Oct Interesting sparrow profile photo... ["B.G. Sloan" ]
29 Oct Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
29 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [Jerry Blinn ]
28 Oct Birding guide--Santiago, Chile [Gary Nunn ]
28 Oct cheap binocs [D & Y Bree ]
28 Oct A book about passenger pigeons [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
28 Oct Re: Budget binoculars [David Gascoigne ]
28 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation []
28 Oct Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation []
28 Oct Re: Budget binoculars [Jack Stephens ]
28 Oct Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
28 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [Phil Davis ]
27 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [Rick King ]
27 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [Sandra Savage ]
27 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation ["Gregory J. Harber" ]
27 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [Chip Clouse ]
28 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [ ]
28 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [Elizabeth Dodd ]
27 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation []
27 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation [Jim Hully ]
28 Oct Re: budget binocular recommendation ["Tangren, Gerald Vernon" ]
27 Oct budget binocular recommendation [ ]
27 Oct The beauty of common birds (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
27 Oct some hope for birds after all? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
27 Oct a fun suggestion from the Cornell Lab of O [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
25 Oct BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 26, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
25 Oct sharing breakfast with a hummingbird [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
25 Oct Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain [Dr Ronald Orenstein ]
23 Oct Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain [Joseph Morlan ]
23 Oct Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
23 Oct Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain [dmark ]
23 Oct Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
23 Oct California - Arizona Trip Report [Dave DeReamus ]
22 Oct Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain [MM ]
22 Oct Hummingbirds in Costa Rica: An Opportunity ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
20 Oct Birding near Athens, Greece? []
20 Oct the most unusual fishing partner anyone has ever had [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
19 Oct Last Week's Banding ["R.D. Everhart" ]
19 Oct Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [William Leigh ]
19 Oct Caw vs. Kraa: meaning in the calls of crows and ravens [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
18 Oct BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 19, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
18 Oct Interesting Radar from last night ["R.D. Everhart" ]
18 Oct RFI New York City area [Eran Tomer ]
16 Oct Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
16 Oct Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [Allan and Cathy Murrant ]
16 Oct The sound of many ducks dabbling (30 second video/sound recording) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Oct Front Stopping Migrants ["R.D. Everhart" ]
16 Oct Birding Community E-bulletin - October 2014 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
16 Oct Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [Allan and Cathy Murrant ]
16 Oct SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem [kittiwake ]
11 Oct BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 12, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
10 Oct Where do the Red-throated Pipits go? [Steve Sosensky ]
9 Oct Software for ID-ing bird songs/calls in the field (article) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
9 Oct passenger pigeons in NYS ["Taylor, Jeremy J (DEC)" ]
8 Oct Front Stopping Migrants ["R.D. Everhart" ]
8 Oct Front Stopping Migrants ["R.D. Everhart" ]
8 Oct Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds)--correct link ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
8 Oct Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
7 Oct Mercury in the environment causes birds to reduce complexity of song ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
6 Oct Adventures in bird ID-ing (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
4 Oct BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 5, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
27 Sep BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 28, 2014 [Ellen Blackstone ]
27 Sep Banding Note ["R.D. Everhart" ]
25 Sep Hilton Pond 09/13/14 (Requiem For A Queen) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
25 Sep Re: Why? [Linda Lee Baker ]
24 Sep Re: Why? [Eric Jeffrey ]
24 Sep Re: Why? [Roger ]
24 Sep Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why? ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? ["Tangren, Gerald Vernon" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? ["Barry K. MacKay" ]
24 Sep Re: Why? [Arie Gilbert ]
24 Sep Why? [Al Schirmacher ]
23 Sep Prairie Warbler inh Southern California [Chuck Otte ]

Subject: Re: cr: (1)
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:46:54 -0400
Thomas,
This looks like an infected link that was posted by a so-called "spambot" 
without your knowledge. 

Please do the following:
--change your email password immediately
--do not click on the link
--disinfect your computer with a commercial security scanning product

we will remove the link from the list archives. This message serves to remind 
Birdchat members not to follow the link which is very likely to infect their 
computers, in turn, with malware. 


Laurie Larson
Birdchat co-listowner

On Oct 30, 2014, at 6:16 PM, thomasdoc AT COMCAST.NET wrote:

> http://tszabo.net/9b8v7c6h5g4f3d2s1.xxxxx
>
>
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: cr: (1)
From: thomasdoc AT COMCAST.NET
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:16:28 +0000
http://tszabo.net/9b8v7c6h5g4f3d2s1.php





























Alyse Cradle

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Subject: Interesting sparrow profile photo...
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:04:33 -0400
I've lately been into taking profile photos of birds, usually larger birds
on dead branches and against a gray or dark sky...very natural
environments. But early this morning I happened to take a profile photo of
a small bird against an unnatural background. The sparrow (Savannah?) was
perched in the shade on a dark chain-link fence at a local park baseball
field. In the background is the yellow dirt baseball infield illuminated by
the rising sun. Here's the photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15667612405/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:50:10 -0400
Thanks, Jerry!

--BTW: Has anyone named their bins? -- Chann's oughta be "Sherman," sounds 
like... ! 


Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jerry Blinn 

Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 2:32 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation

The Chandler Robbins binos appear to me to be the original US made Bausch & 
Lomb 7x50s (back when it was a real optics company), which were built like a 
tank and went through a few wars in the military. 


Jerry

Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

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Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: Jerry Blinn <support AT AVISYS.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:31:47 -0600
The Chandler Robbins binos appear to me to be the original US made
Bausch & Lomb 7x50s (back when it was a real optics company), which
were built like a tank and went through a few wars in the military.

Jerry

Jerry Blinn
AviSys Software
Placitas, NM
505-867-6255
jerry AT avisys.net
Web Site: http://www.avisys.net

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Subject: Birding guide--Santiago, Chile
From: Gary Nunn <garybnunn AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:58:39 -0700
Hi Everyone, I am looking for information on local birding guides in/near
Santiago, Chile.

If you can recommend someone please contact me offline, thanks!

garybnunn AT gmail.com
--
Gary Nunn
*San Diego Birding - my blog *

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Subject: cheap binocs
From: D & Y Bree <dbree AT KOS.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:36:16 -0400
Date:    Tue, 28 Oct 2014 00:13:31 +0000
From:    "Tangren, Gerald Vernon" 
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation

I dont have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
the competency of a guide if he only thought he required inexpensive
binocs.


Jerry 
WA State University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
Wenatchee, WA
509-663-8181 x 231
USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 7a
http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites


Jerry Please

Competency does not necessarily relate to income.  I've know many competent
guides that didn't own shoes let alone binocs. They still knew birds and
could find them very well. I don't know the average income level in
Seychelles but I am impressed this guy is willing and able to upgrade.  As
we all know birders providing better than average income to locals to see
wildlife is the best means of ensuring habitat survival.

David

David and Yvette Bree
2410 Victoria Road
Carrying Place, Ontario
Canada
K0K 1L0

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Subject: A book about passenger pigeons
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:17:33 +0000
hello everyone,

after lots of travel & illness, i'm catching up with my book reviews. only
3 to go!

This absorbing book is an engaging and wistful, yet measured, chronicle
about the tragic loss of one very special, iconic, species, the passenger
pigeon.


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/oct/28/a-message-from-martha-by-mark-avery-review 


this would be a superb gift book as well.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: Re: Budget binoculars
From: David Gascoigne <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 12:02:22 -0400
Probably enough has been said on this topic, but let me add my two cents worth 
anyway. I agree that many of the guides in the less than wealthy countries we 
travel to could not even imagine being able to spend the kind of money we spend 
on optics. Having said this, I do believe that there is a diminishing return in 
the enhanced quality of high end binoculars for every few hundred dollars extra 
invested. I am happy with my Swarovski ELs but I am not sure that the king's 
ransom I spent on them really gives me that much extra performance than 
binoculars at half the price. 


David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 28, 2014, at 10:00 AM, Jack Stephens  wrote:
>
> I regards to the posts yesterday, I like the Nikon Monarch series of
> binoculars, and Monarch 3's run about $230 in 8 x 42's. It looks like
> Eagle Optics does not carry them for some reason, and I am not sure how
> they compare to their store-brand Ranger series.
>
> Jack Stephens
> Edmonds, WA
> jstephens62 AT comcast.net
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

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Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:57:48 -0400
Gregory and Chatters,
 
Once again, I tend to be echoing what others have already mentioned. For some 
reason my Birdchat messages are ending up in my Spam folder, sometimes more, 
sometimes none, but it is very frustrating to check it, and see a whole list of 
posts, as I did this time, only after sending my own message (unaware of what 
was written previously, buried in my Spam folder). My apologies. 


Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
birding AT aol.com

www.birdsongidentification.com
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Gregory J. Harber 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Mon, Oct 27, 2014 10:22 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation


Same here.  I've been on trips with guides who I thought didn't really need 
binoculars at all because they knew the birds, their songs and their calls so 
well that optics were only used to confirm what they already knew by ear.


Gregory J. Harber
Birmingham, AL
gharber AT mindspring.com
"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
Tom Robbins


-----Original Message-----
>From: Elizabeth Dodd 
>Sent: Oct 27, 2014 7:58 PM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
>
>Wow.
>
>I've been fortunate enough to have a few guide experiences--not very many, 
admittedly. But it seemed to me that my guides were people of limited economic 
means, though not of limited knowledge, experience, or generosity.  I think my 
binoculars were more expensive than theirs, but the excursions under their 
leadership were priceless, at least to me.
>
>I bet Eagle Optics will have some models in an educator-range budget. Check 
out 

the Denali 8 X 42. Our university has had good luck with these.
>
>Elizabeth Dodd
>Manhattan, KS
>
>________________________________________
>From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 

on behalf of Tangren, Gerald Vernon 
>Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 7:13 PM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
>
>I don¹t have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
>the competency of a guide if he only thought he required inexpensive
>binocs.
>
>‹
>Jerry 
>WA State University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
>Wenatchee, WA
>509-663-8181 x 231
>USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 7a
>http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites
>
>
>"He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool
>you. He really is an idiot.² ‹Groucho Marx
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"
> wrote:
>
>>Hi all,
>>
>>We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles.
>>We have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he
>>has asked if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA
>>as his current pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge,
>>about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.
>>
>>I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins --
>>however any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather
>>remote location, durability as well as optical quality are important. I
>>would think climate would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as
>>well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this
>>price range so if anyone has experience with these models, that would be
>>great.
>>
>>Gail Mackiernan
>>Silver Spring, MD
>>
>>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
From: birding AT AOL.COM
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:16:34 -0400
Gerald and Chatters,
 
I might be more worried if he were asking for a pair of hearing aids. From my 
experience, local guides find a great number of their birds by hearing them 
first. I love that picture of Chandler Robbins' bins taken by Laura Erickson. A 
man after my own heart. 

 
All the best,
Ernie Jardine
Pickering Ontario
 
birding AT aol.com
 
www.birdsongidentification.com
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Gorton, Gregg 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Tue, Oct 28, 2014 9:25 am
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular 
recommendation 



Where can I buy bins like these?

LOL

(But, seriously, I wonder what the optics are like--these might have been "top 
shelf" in their day!)

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA 19072


Homoaves [at] gmail.com
-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] 

On Behalf Of Phil Davis
Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 1:10 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation

Hi Chatters:

I can add one more data point to this thread ...

Check out these binoculars ...

         http://www.flickr.com/photos/lauraerickson/3173109880/

They belong to none other than Chandler S.
Robbins, one of the godfathers of modern field birding.

You can see Chan wearing them in the beginning of this video clip and then 
again 

around 2:20 and 3:14. (The full clip runs 3:56).

         http://vimeo.com/71432056

This year he is 96 and is planning a trip to Ecuador. As a friend of mine just 
said, "Amazing!"

I would guess that every binocular manufacturer in the county has probably 
offered him free use of their bins by now ...

Phil

At 20:13 10/27/2014, Tangren, Gerald Vernon wrote:
>I don¹t have an answer to that question because in my mind I would
>doubt the competency of a guide if he only thought he required
>inexpensive binocs.

>On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan
>%3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"  wrote:
> >We are going on a trip in December that will
> take us to the Seychelles. We have engaged a local bird guide for some
> of the harder species and he
> >has asked if we could buy him a better pair of
> binoculars here in the USA as his current pair is not in good
> condition. His budget is not huge,
> >about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com ==================================

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Subject: Re: Budget binoculars
From: Jack Stephens <jstephens62 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 07:00:24 -0700
I regards to the posts yesterday, I like the Nikon Monarch series of
binoculars, and Monarch 3's run about $230 in 8 x 42's. It looks like
Eagle Optics does not carry them for some reason, and I am not sure how
they compare to their store-brand Ranger series.

Jack Stephens
Edmonds, WA
jstephens62 AT comcast.net

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:21:23 -0400
Where can I buy bins like these?

LOL

(But, seriously, I wonder what the optics are like--these might have been "top 
shelf" in their day!) 


Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA 19072


Homoaves [at] gmail.com
-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Phil Davis 

Sent: Tuesday, October 28, 2014 1:10 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation

Hi Chatters:

I can add one more data point to this thread ...

Check out these binoculars ...

         http://www.flickr.com/photos/lauraerickson/3173109880/

They belong to none other than Chandler S.
Robbins, one of the godfathers of modern field birding.

You can see Chan wearing them in the beginning of this video clip and then 
again around 2:20 and 3:14. (The full clip runs 3:56). 


         http://vimeo.com/71432056

This year he is 96 and is planning a trip to Ecuador. As a friend of mine just 
said, "Amazing!" 


I would guess that every binocular manufacturer in the county has probably 
offered him free use of their bins by now ... 


Phil

At 20:13 10/27/2014, Tangren, Gerald Vernon wrote:
>I dont have an answer to that question because in my mind I would
>doubt the competency of a guide if he only thought he required
>inexpensive binocs.

>On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan
>%3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"  wrote:
> >We are going on a trip in December that will
> take us to the Seychelles. We have engaged a local bird guide for some
> of the harder species and he
> >has asked if we could buy him a better pair of
> binoculars here in the USA as his current pair is not in good
> condition. His budget is not huge,
> >about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com ==================================

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Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: Phil Davis <pdavis AT IX.NETCOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 01:10:19 -0400
Hi Chatters:

I can add one more data point to this thread ...

Check out these binoculars ...

         http://www.flickr.com/photos/lauraerickson/3173109880/

They belong to none other than Chandler S.
Robbins, one of the godfathers of modern field birding.

You can see Chan wearing them in the beginning of
this video clip and then again around 2:20 and 3:14. (The full clip runs 3:56).

         http://vimeo.com/71432056

This year he is 96 and is planning a trip to
Ecuador. As a friend of mine just said, "Amazing!"

I would guess that every binocular manufacturer
in the county has probably offered him free use of their bins by now ...

Phil

At 20:13 10/27/2014, Tangren, Gerald Vernon wrote:
>I dont have an answer to that question because
>in my mind I would doubt the competency of a
>guide if he only thought he required inexpensive binocs.

>On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan
>%3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"  wrote:
> >We are going on a trip in December that will
> take us to the Seychelles. We have engaged a
> local bird guide for some of the harder species and he
> >has asked if we could buy him a better pair of
> binoculars here in the USA as his current pair
> is not in good condition. His budget is not huge,
> >about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.

==================================
Phil Davis      Davidsonville, Maryland     USA
                 mailto:PDavis AT ix.netcom.com
==================================

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Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: Rick King <rickbking AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:35:55 -0400
I think REI has some fantastic binoculars in the sub-$200 range.

Very close focus, built-in lens covers, easy eye-relief adjustment,
waterproof (pretty sure, have to check that). I used to be an avid
birder and have some $700 baush & lomb 10's (from some 15 years ago) and
frankly I can't tell the difference.

Rick King
Southfield MI

On 10/27/2014 7:57 PM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E
wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles. We 
have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he has asked 
if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA as his current 
pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge, about $150-$200, maybe a 
tad more. 

>
> I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins -- however 
any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather remote location, 
durability as well as optical quality are important. I would think climate 
would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as well. 8's may be best. I know 
Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this price range so if anyone has 
experience with these models, that would be great. 

>
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, MD
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: Sandra Savage <savagebirder AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:34:21 -0600
I agree totally!!!  Many of the guides have learned to identify birds
without any binoculars - our larger binoculars and scopes are a treat
for them and totally out of their price ranges.

Sandra Savage
Calgary


On 10/27/2014 6:26 PM, ECJ100 AT AOL.COM wrote:
> I don't agree that the measure of a birder, or guide, is the cost of
> his/her binoculars.  I have birded with many people whose binoculars are  not
> terribly good, but who can out-ID those with expensive bins or even a good
> scope.
>
> There is also a difference in my mind between what a person may think they
> need and what they can afford.
>
> Eric Jeffrey
> Falls Church, VA
>
>
> In a message dated 10/27/2014 8:15:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
> tangren AT WSU.EDU writes:
>
> I don¹t  have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
> the  competency of a guide if he only thought he required  inexpensive
> binocs.
>
> ‹
> Jerry 
> WA State  University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
> Wenatchee,  WA
> 509-663-8181 x 231
> USDA Cold Hardiness Zone  7a
> http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites
>
>
> "He may look  like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool
> you. He really  is an idiot.² ‹Groucho Marx
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 10/27/14, 4:57  PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan  %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"
>   wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> We are going on a trip in December  that will take us to the Seychelles.
>> We have engaged a local bird guide  for some of the harder species and he
>> has asked if we could buy him a  better pair of binoculars here in the USA
>> as his current pair is not in  good condition. His budget is not huge,
>> about $150-$200, maybe a tad  more.
>>
>> I know there have been discussions about the best  "budget" bins --
>> however any recent insights would be appreciated.  Based on his rather
>> remote location, durability as well as optical  quality are important. I
>> would think climate would necessitate  water-resistant roof prisms as
>> well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle  Optics has some binoculars in this
>> price range so if anyone has  experience with these models, that would be
>> great.
>>
>> Gail  Mackiernan
>> Silver Spring, MD
>>
>> BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
> BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: "Gregory J. Harber" <gharber AT MINDSPRING.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 21:20:54 -0500
Same here. I've been on trips with guides who I thought didn't really need 
binoculars at all because they knew the birds, their songs and their calls so 
well that optics were only used to confirm what they already knew by ear. 



Gregory J. Harber
Birmingham, AL
gharber AT mindspring.com
"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
Tom Robbins


-----Original Message-----
>From: Elizabeth Dodd 
>Sent: Oct 27, 2014 7:58 PM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
>
>Wow.
>
>I've been fortunate enough to have a few guide experiences--not very many, 
admittedly. But it seemed to me that my guides were people of limited economic 
means, though not of limited knowledge, experience, or generosity. I think my 
binoculars were more expensive than theirs, but the excursions under their 
leadership were priceless, at least to me. 

>
>I bet Eagle Optics will have some models in an educator-range budget. Check 
out the Denali 8 X 42. Our university has had good luck with these. 

>
>Elizabeth Dodd
>Manhattan, KS
>
>________________________________________
>From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Tangren, Gerald Vernon 
 

>Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 7:13 PM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
>
>I don¹t have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
>the competency of a guide if he only thought he required inexpensive
>binocs.
>
>‹
>Jerry 
>WA State University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
>Wenatchee, WA
>509-663-8181 x 231
>USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 7a
>http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites
>
>
>"He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool
>you. He really is an idiot.² ‹Groucho Marx
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"
> wrote:
>
>>Hi all,
>>
>>We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles.
>>We have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he
>>has asked if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA
>>as his current pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge,
>>about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.
>>
>>I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins --
>>however any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather
>>remote location, durability as well as optical quality are important. I
>>would think climate would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as
>>well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this
>>price range so if anyone has experience with these models, that would be
>>great.
>>
>>Gail Mackiernan
>>Silver Spring, MD
>>
>>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: Chip Clouse <chip.clouse AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:58:14 -0600
Jim Hully mentioned the Cornell Review and I would specifically look at the
Opticron Trailfinder 8x42 that was a top pick in the $200-$399 category.
You can get these for $189.  5 foot close focus, 7.2 degree field of view,
super fast focusing system so you don't have to keep turning to focus from
near to far.  There are lighter binoculars but these are solid and have
metal eyecups covered in rubber, NOT plastic.  They are recommended by the
Urban Birder. I recommend them as well, especially if you have under $200
to spend. These are waterproof as well and come with rainguard, objective
lens covers, cordura case and strap.  Limited Lifetime warranty (5 years
no-fault)

Chip Clouse
Arvada, Colorado

On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 6:58 PM, Elizabeth Dodd  wrote:

> Wow.
>
> I've been fortunate enough to have a few guide experiences--not very many,
> admittedly. But it seemed to me that my guides were people of limited
> economic means, though not of limited knowledge, experience, or
> generosity.  I think my binoculars were more expensive than theirs, but the
> excursions under their leadership were priceless, at least to me.
>
> I bet Eagle Optics will have some models in an educator-range budget.
> Check out the Denali 8 X 42. Our university has had good luck with these.
>
> Elizabeth Dodd
> Manhattan, KS
>
> ________________________________________
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) <
> BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU> on behalf of Tangren, Gerald Vernon <
> tangren AT WSU.EDU>
> Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 7:13 PM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation
>
> I don¹t have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
> the competency of a guide if he only thought he required inexpensive
> binocs.
>
> ‹
> Jerry 
> WA State University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
> Wenatchee, WA
> 509-663-8181 x 231
> USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 7a
> http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites
>
>
> "He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool
> you. He really is an idiot.² ‹Groucho Marx
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"
>  wrote:
>
> >Hi all,
> >
> >We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles.
> >We have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he
> >has asked if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA
> >as his current pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge,
> >about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.
> >
> >I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins --
> >however any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather
> >remote location, durability as well as optical quality are important. I
> >would think climate would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as
> >well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this
> >price range so if anyone has experience with these models, that would be
> >great.
> >
> >Gail Mackiernan
> >Silver Spring, MD
> >
> >BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> >Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 01:48:34 +0000
Many people in this part of the world don't have a lot of money -- in fact, we 
have run into many guides in less-developed countries with no binoculars at 
all! For him $200 probably IS a lot of money! 


Gail 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Gerald Vernon Tangren"  
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 8:13:31 PM 
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation 

I don¹t have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt 
the competency of a guide if he only thought he required inexpensive 
binocs. 

‹ 
Jerry  
WA State University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center 
Wenatchee, WA 
509-663-8181 x 231 
USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 7a 
http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites 


"He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool 
you. He really is an idiot.² ‹Groucho Marx 







On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" 
 wrote: 

>Hi all, 
> 
>We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles. 
>We have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he 
>has asked if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA 
>as his current pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge, 
>about $150-$200, maybe a tad more. 
> 
>I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins -- 
>however any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather 
>remote location, durability as well as optical quality are important. I 
>would think climate would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as 
>well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this 
>price range so if anyone has experience with these models, that would be 
>great. 
> 
>Gail Mackiernan 
>Silver Spring, MD 
> 
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ 
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html 

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ 
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html 


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: Elizabeth Dodd <edodd AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 00:58:15 +0000
Wow.

I've been fortunate enough to have a few guide experiences--not very many, 
admittedly. But it seemed to me that my guides were people of limited economic 
means, though not of limited knowledge, experience, or generosity. I think my 
binoculars were more expensive than theirs, but the excursions under their 
leadership were priceless, at least to me. 


I bet Eagle Optics will have some models in an educator-range budget. Check out 
the Denali 8 X 42. Our university has had good luck with these. 


Elizabeth Dodd
Manhattan, KS

________________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of Tangren, Gerald Vernon 
 

Sent: Monday, October 27, 2014 7:13 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] budget binocular recommendation

I dont have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
the competency of a guide if he only thought he required inexpensive
binocs.


Jerry 
WA State University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
Wenatchee, WA
509-663-8181 x 231
USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 7a
http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites


"He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool
you. He really is an idiot. Groucho Marx







On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"
 wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles.
>We have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he
>has asked if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA
>as his current pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge,
>about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.
>
>I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins --
>however any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather
>remote location, durability as well as optical quality are important. I
>would think climate would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as
>well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this
>price range so if anyone has experience with these models, that would be
>great.
>
>Gail Mackiernan
>Silver Spring, MD
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: ECJ100 AT AOL.COM
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:26:23 -0400
I don't agree that the measure of a birder, or guide, is the cost of  
his/her binoculars.  I have birded with many people whose binoculars are  not 
terribly good, but who can out-ID those with expensive bins or even a good  
scope.
 
There is also a difference in my mind between what a person may think they  
need and what they can afford.
 
Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA
 
 
In a message dated 10/27/2014 8:15:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
tangren AT WSU.EDU writes:

I don¹t  have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
the  competency of a guide if he only thought he required  inexpensive
binocs.

‹
Jerry 
WA State  University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
Wenatchee,  WA
509-663-8181 x 231
USDA Cold Hardiness Zone  7a
http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites


"He may look  like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool
you. He really  is an idiot.² ‹Groucho Marx







On 10/27/14, 4:57  PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan  %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"
  wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>We are going on a trip in December  that will take us to the Seychelles.
>We have engaged a local bird guide  for some of the harder species and he
>has asked if we could buy him a  better pair of binoculars here in the USA
>as his current pair is not in  good condition. His budget is not huge,
>about $150-$200, maybe a tad  more.
>
>I know there have been discussions about the best  "budget" bins --
>however any recent insights would be appreciated.  Based on his rather
>remote location, durability as well as optical  quality are important. I
>would think climate would necessitate  water-resistant roof prisms as
>well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle  Optics has some binoculars in this
>price range so if anyone has  experience with these models, that would be
>great.
>
>Gail  Mackiernan
>Silver Spring, MD
>
>BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines:  http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives:  http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: Jim Hully <xenospiza AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 19:23:50 -0500
Hi Gail,

Take look at this review from Cornell for last year:

Binocular Review - Price/Quality - Autumn 2013 Living Bird


Cheers,

Jim Hully
Mundelein, IL
xenospiza AT gmail.com

On Mon, Oct 27, 2014 at 6:57 PM, Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%
40comcast.net%3E  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles. We
> have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he has
> asked if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA as
> his current pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge, about
> $150-$200, maybe a tad more.
>
> I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins -- however
> any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather remote
> location, durability as well as optical quality are important. I would
> think climate would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as well. 8's
> may be best. I know Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this price range so
> if anyone has experience with these models, that would be great.
>
> Gail Mackiernan
> Silver Spring, MD
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: budget binocular recommendation
From: "Tangren, Gerald Vernon" <tangren AT WSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 00:13:31 +0000
I dont have an answer to that question because in my mind I would doubt
the competency of a guide if he only thought he required inexpensive
binocs.


Jerry 
WA State University-Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
Wenatchee, WA
509-663-8181 x 231
USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 7a
http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pages/webdev/Favorites


"He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool
you. He really is an idiot. Groucho Marx







On 10/27/14, 4:57 PM, "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E"
 wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles.
>We have engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he
>has asked if we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA
>as his current pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge,
>about $150-$200, maybe a tad more.
>
>I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins --
>however any recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather
>remote location, durability as well as optical quality are important. I
>would think climate would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as
>well. 8's may be best. I know Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this
>price range so if anyone has experience with these models, that would be
>great.
>
>Gail Mackiernan
>Silver Spring, MD
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: budget binocular recommendation
From: "Gail B. Mackiernan %3Ckatahdinss%40comcast.net%3E" <katahdinss AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 23:57:05 +0000
Hi all,

We are going on a trip in December that will take us to the Seychelles. We have 
engaged a local bird guide for some of the harder species and he has asked if 
we could buy him a better pair of binoculars here in the USA as his current 
pair is not in good condition. His budget is not huge, about $150-$200, maybe a 
tad more. 


I know there have been discussions about the best "budget" bins -- however any 
recent insights would be appreciated. Based on his rather remote location, 
durability as well as optical quality are important. I would think climate 
would necessitate water-resistant roof prisms as well. 8's may be best. I know 
Eagle Optics has some binoculars in this price range so if anyone has 
experience with these models, that would be great. 


Gail Mackiernan
Silver Spring, MD

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: The beauty of common birds (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:22:18 -0400
I was sitting out on my deck this afternoon when I happened to snap a photo
of a Mourning Dove foraging in the fall leaves. Maybe the best photo I've
ever taken of a Mourning Dove. You can even clearly make out the "pale
bluish orbital ring" around the eye that Sibley describes.

Just started me thinking...in our never ending quest to add new species to
our lists, sometimes we might overlook the beauty of very common species. I
know I'm guilty of that. Here's my photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15621281326/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: some hope for birds after all?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 07:55:52 +0000
hello everyone,

you may wish to add this book to your personal reading list, or give it to
loved ones at holiday time:

http://seattletimes.com/html/books/2024845737_marzluffsubirdiaxml.html

this book was written by John Marzluff, who has studied crows on the
University of Washington campus for more than a decade -- I know him
personally from when he was first starting out during my time as a grad
student at UW.

This new book, which just arrived in the mail here, is an optimistic look
at what we may be able to expect for avifauna in the coming years -- if we
make just a small effort to accommodate birds, they will become more
numerous near our homes and indeed, suburbs may be the last stronghold for
at least a few species that may otherwise go extinct. the link above leads
to a book review, published in today's seattle times.

cheers,
--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: a fun suggestion from the Cornell Lab of O
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 07:39:57 +0000
hello everyone,

since Halloween is fast approaching, i thought i'd share a suggestion from
Cornell's Lab of Ornithology for what to do with all those pumpkins:

http://bit.ly/10qD5mg

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 26, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 07:58:20 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out the 2015 Birds of BirdNote calendar, featuring the photos of
Gerrit Vyn: http://bit.ly/1xlUmqA
---------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* Waterfowl Migration in Flux - A function of climate change?
http://bit.ly/1nDoT3r

* Black-footed Albatross, Graceful Giant
http://bit.ly/SVI6HM

* Geese in V-formation
http://bit.ly/UJxmU3

* Cape May in October
http://bit.ly/UJxmU3

* Pileated Apple-peckers
http://bit.ly/T6GRWz

* Gull Identification - Who's Who?
http://bit.ly/1wqQaXt

* Raven, Dog, Bone  - Those crafty ravens!
http://bit.ly/12uuXC9

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1rtx2mw
------------------------------------------------------------
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=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
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Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: sharing breakfast with a hummingbird
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 11:31:55 +0100
hello everyone,

this sweet amateur video might cheer you up (those who need cheering, that
is). In this video, an elderly man takes pleasure in the small things, by
sharing his kitchen with a hungry hummingbird in Brasil:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/oct/25/a-hummingbird-and-his-man 



--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
From: Dr Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:02:25 +0800
For anyone visiting Perth Rottnest Island is a good place for Banded Stilt 
(though I don't know if they are there year round), plus the best chance to see 
the endangered Quokka, a miniature kangaroo that is common and confiding on the 
island. I saw both easily in September 2013. 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON
Canada L5L 3W2
ronorenstein.blogspot.com

> On Oct 23, 2014, at 11:33 PM, Joseph Morlan  wrote:
>
> Another article with additional detail is at...
>
> http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/10/15/4106711.htm
>
> Banded Stilt is a fascinating species in other ways. I was fortunate to
> photograph it and posted a short essay at...
>
> http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/Australia/BandedStiltP1170730.htm
>
>
>> On Wed, 22 Oct 2014 21:07:35 -0700, MM  wrote:
>>
>> Interesting article on Banded Stilts' ability to sense weather from great
>> distances:
>>
>> 
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/21/science/australian-birds-that-mysteriously-chase-rain.html?ref=science 

> --
> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
> "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 08:33:56 -0700
Another article with additional detail is at...

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/10/15/4106711.htm

Banded Stilt is a fascinating species in other ways. I was fortunate to
photograph it and posted a short essay at...

http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/Australia/BandedStiltP1170730.htm


On Wed, 22 Oct 2014 21:07:35 -0700, MM  wrote:

>Interesting article on Banded Stilts' ability to sense weather from great
>distances:
>

>http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/21/science/australian-birds-that-mysteriously-chase-rain.html?ref=science 

--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt

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Subject: Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:17:31 -0400
Good theory!  Never thought of that.

Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: dmark [mailto:dmark AT buffalo.edu]
Sent: October-23-14 10:32 AM
To: Barry K. MacKay
Cc: BIRDCHAT AT listserv.ksu.edu; National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain

I have been doing fieldwork in northwestern Australia, where it only rains when 
a tropical Cyclone comes ashore. One year such a storm came ashore a couple of 
months before my visit, and there were flocks of Budgerigar all over the 
region. I did not see one wild Budgie there on any of my other visits. 


Perhaps they hear the thunder. It has been shown in the labs that pigeons can 
hear ultra-low sounds that would travel hundreds or thousands of miles. 

(I read that about 30 years ago in a book on how pigeons navigate.)

David
David Mark
Amherst NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu


On 10/23/2014 9:36 am, Barry K. MacKay wrote:
> Fascinating.
>
> I just finished a blog (a very minor "fluff" piece) on the Budgerigar,
> and there were hints in material reviewed in my research that they may
> do the same thing, and that the Aboriginal origin of their name (which
> is a matter of various opinions...I doubt we can ever know for sure)
> means "Good" or "Good Bird", and may mean not good to eat, as is
> sometimes suggested, but good for finding water...by watching flock
> flight direction water could be found in the Outback...always a good
> thing in arid terrain.
>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of MM
> Sent: October-23-14 12:08 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
>
> Interesting article on Banded Stilts' ability to sense weather from
> great
> distances:
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/21/science/australian-birds-that-myster
> iously-chase-rain.html?ref=science
>
> --
> *Oscar Canino*
> *SF, CA*
> *oscarboy AT gmail.com *
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:32:26 -0400
I have been doing fieldwork in northwestern Australia, where it only
rains
when a tropical Cyclone comes ashore. One year such a storm came ashore
a couple of months before my visit, and there were flocks of Budgerigar
all over the region. I did not see one wild Budgie there on any of my
other visits.

Perhaps they hear the thunder. It has been shown in the labs that
pigeons
can hear ultra-low sounds that would travel hundreds or thousands of
miles.
(I read that about 30 years ago in a book on how pigeons navigate.)

David
David Mark
Amherst NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu


On 10/23/2014 9:36 am, Barry K. MacKay wrote:
> Fascinating.
>
> I just finished a blog (a very minor "fluff" piece) on the Budgerigar,
> and there were hints in material reviewed in my research that they may
> do the same thing, and that the Aboriginal origin of their name (which
> is a matter of various opinions...I doubt we can ever know for sure)
> means "Good" or "Good Bird", and may mean not good to eat, as is
> sometimes suggested, but good for finding water...by watching flock
> flight direction water could be found in the Outback...always a good
> thing in arid terrain.
>
> Barry
>
>
> Barry Kent MacKay
> Bird Artist, Illustrator
> Studio: (905)-472-9731
> http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
> mimus AT sympatico.ca
>
> Markham, Ontario, Canada
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
> [mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of MM
> Sent: October-23-14 12:08 AM
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
>
> Interesting article on Banded Stilts' ability to sense weather from
> great
> distances:
>
> 
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/21/science/australian-birds-that-mysteriously-chase-rain.html?ref=science 

>
> --
> *Oscar Canino*
> *SF, CA*
> *oscarboy AT gmail.com *
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:36:28 -0400
Fascinating.

I just finished a blog (a very minor "fluff" piece) on the Budgerigar, and 
there were hints in material reviewed in my research that they may do the same 
thing, and that the Aboriginal origin of their name (which is a matter of 
various opinions...I doubt we can ever know for sure) means "Good" or "Good 
Bird", and may mean not good to eat, as is sometimes suggested, but good for 
finding water...by watching flock flight direction water could be found in the 
Outback...always a good thing in arid terrain. 


Barry


Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of MM 

Sent: October-23-14 12:08 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain

Interesting article on Banded Stilts' ability to sense weather from great
distances:


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/21/science/australian-birds-that-mysteriously-chase-rain.html?ref=science 


--
*Oscar Canino*
*SF, CA*
*oscarboy AT gmail.com *

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Subject: California - Arizona Trip Report
From: Dave DeReamus <becard AT RCN.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 03:00:01 -0400
I took a trip out west, mainly to do a San Diego pelagic trip and to check out 
the Grand Canyon’s South Rim. I ended up getting six ‘lifers’ (a tough 
thing for me to do anymore) and one “Lower 48” bird. If interested, a short 
story and many photos can be found at: 
http://becard.blogspot.com/2014_10_01_archive.html . 


Good birding,
Dave DeReamus
Palmer Township, PA
becard -at- rcn.com
Blog: http://becard.blogspot.com/
PicasaWeb Photo Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/becard57
Eastern PA Birding: http://users.rcn.com/becard/home.html
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Subject: Australian Birds That Mysteriously Chase Rain
From: MM <oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 21:07:35 -0700
Interesting article on Banded Stilts' ability to sense weather from great
distances:


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/21/science/australian-birds-that-mysteriously-chase-rain.html?ref=science 


--
*Oscar Canino*
*SF, CA*
*oscarboy AT gmail.com *

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Subject: Hummingbirds in Costa Rica: An Opportunity
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:13:58 -0400
There may be a few Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (RTHU) lingering in the Carolina 
Piedmont this week, but by now nearly all of our Carolina hummers have flown 
south—except, of course, for those hardy individuals that seem determined to 
overwinter on the Outer Banks. 


If you think you’ll need a “hummingbird fix” before these little birds 
return next spring, consider joining me on my 25th Operation RubyThroat 
expedition to the Neotropics—this one in Guanacaste Province on the Pacific 
Coast of Coast Rica. The nine-day trip (24 Jan-1 Feb 2015) includes lots of 
opportunities for in-hand looks at numerous hummingbird species—plus other 
resident and migrant birds we encounter while banding and observing RTHU. And 
there’s plenty of time for discovering and photographing other aspects of the 
tropical dry forest, from butterflies to orchids to howler monkeys. 


For info about the upcoming trip please visit 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/CostaRica(west)AnnounceMain15.html 
 . No field 
experience necessary. Deposit deadline is 15 November. 


Happy (Neotropical) Hummingbird Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Birding near Athens, Greece?
From: TAHARRISON AT AOL.COM
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 21:40:40 -0400
Birders,

Planning a trip to Greece and I'll have a day or so free in Athens for some
 birding. Any local birders out there who could take me around?

Best,
Tom Harrison
San Clemente, CA USA

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Subject: the most unusual fishing partner anyone has ever had
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:19:52 +0100
hey everyone,

here's a video (that includes lots of thumb shots) of a lone fisherman near
Nanoose BC who was discovered by a juvenile bald eagle, "swimming" far from
land. the video is interesting and the bird, although malnourished, is
doing well at the last report:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiOaqs9qnt8&feature=youtu.be

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

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Subject: Last Week's Banding
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 22:18:06 -0500
   For those of you interested, I have posted photos from some of
last week's banding sessions and a complete list of birds banded at
the public program held Saturday at the Lowry Nature Center in Carver
Park near Victoria, Minnesota.
   We have been battling windy days and cool mornings but the birds
keep showing up. I'm afraid this banding season is winding down. If
weather cooperates we might make it into November!

Here's a link to my post:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: William Leigh <leightern AT MSN.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 10:45:06 +0000
I find this rather surprising in that Swarovski has such an excellent 
reputation for taking care of customers and backing their products. What model 
Swarovski scope do you own? Can you describe the "hard cover" ? Is it a 
SWarovski product as well? 

Also sometimes it can help to call the company you bought the equipment from. I 
had a problem with a Tripod once and it the problem was resolved by having 
Eagle Optics call the manufacturer. 

best,

 



William Leigh leightern AT msn.com

Bridgewater, Virginia 
 

 



> Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:21:41 -0300
> From: kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
> they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
> dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
> blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
> eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
> but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
> that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
> wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy
> 
> On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> > Cathy,
> >
> >
> > Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

> >
> > Roy Harvey
> > Beacon Falls, CT
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> >
> > From: kittiwake 
> > To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> > Cc:
> > Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
> > Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
> >
> >
> > Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

> >
> > Sent from Samsung Mobile
> 
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
 		 	   		  
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Subject: Caw vs. Kraa: meaning in the calls of crows and ravens
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2014 09:02:43 +0100
hello everyone,

I stumbled across a delightful video created by the Cornell Lab of O that
discusses the meaning in some of the sounds produced by crows and ravens --
and you also learn how to distinguish these two species based on their
voices alone:


http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/oct/18/caw-vs-kraa-meaning-in-the-calls-of-crows-and-ravens 


needless to say, i plan to feature more Lab of O videos on "caturday" in
the future.

happy birding

--
GrrlScientist
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
http://twitter.com/GrrlScientist
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist

*sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [*Virgil, *Aeneid*, 1.461
ff.]

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 19, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 07:31:38 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Check out Barry Kent MacKay's "Common Nighthawk" blog.
http://birdnote.org/blog/2014/10/common-nighthawk Thanks, Barry! [We
welcome other blogs and contributions, too -- natural history, artwork,
photography, etc. Feel free to send things my way. Thank you.]
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:
* Birds and Berries
http://bit.ly/R1bRKS
* Swainson's Hawks Migrate South
http://bit.ly/103USzx
* Shorebirds - Not on the Shore?
http://bit.ly/UB7Lww
* Cattle Egret - You've Got a Friend in Me
http://bit.ly/1riNd62
* Waterfowl and Lead Shot
http://bit.ly/UB7OIv
* Great Missoula Flood - Scablands and Plunge Pools
http://bit.ly/OplanG
* Sandpipers - Chorus Line in the Sky
http://bit.ly/1pk9MaC
------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1tAB7wx
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: Interesting Radar from last night
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 07:51:09 -0500
   I was checking out radar returns last night to see if anything was
moving in Minnesota and found that in many places migration is still
pretty heavy. The most interesting area I saw was the north shore of
Lake Superior in Minnesota. The returns seem to show a big movement
of birds across the lake into northern Wisconsin and the U.P. of
Michigan. I posted a shot of the image at:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

  We have a regular banding session today and I will post results on
Sunday.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: RFI New York City area
From: Eran Tomer <erantomer AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2014 00:28:23 -0400
Hello all,

I will be in New York City at the end of the month. Not a birding trip but
I'll be able to squeeze in a day or two for the birds.

I have researched various options on eBird and elsewhere, but still will be
immensely grateful for any advice on locating the species noted below.

Sites some distance out of NYC are welcome but I will probably have neither
a vehicle nor (surely) the scope, hence a strong preference for
binocular-friendly sites reachable by public transportation. No aversion to
long walks and rides, however. Distinct extra credit for sites with some
natural habitat  (versus e.g. a landfill) and non-avian wildlife too.

Finally, since I will be on my own - is safety an issue at the area's
birding sites, beyond the normal precautions one would observe in a major
metropolitan area ? Are secluded / wooded areas of large parks generally
safe during daylight, or is it  advisable to remain within earshot of
people ?

Target species - some are a long shot but then, that's exactly why I am
asking:

Cackling Goose
Long-tailed Duck
Common Eider
Common Merganser
Ring-necked Pheasant
Northern Goshawk
Hudsonian Godwit
Black-legged Kittiwake
Snow Bunting
Clay-colored Sparrow
America Tree Sparrow
Evening Grosbeak

Also nice would be Snow Goose, Brant, American Black Duck, Surf Scoter,
Northern Gannet, American Golden Plover, Stilt Sandpiper, Lesser
Black-backed Gull and Lapland Longspur.

Advice on finding any of these species will be profoundly appreciated.

Best regards,

- Eran Tomer
  Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:55:36 -0400
Clay Taylor used to be the Swarovski Rep who regularly attended ABA meetings. A 
very nice fellow. I'm not sure where he is, but maybe someone out there knows 
how to reach him. He may have useful input re this issue and how to deal with 
the company. 


Just  a thought....   good luck!

Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Allan and Cathy Murrant 

Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 5:33 PM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem

It is a few years since my scope was serviced and we gave up on getting
Swarvoski to solve this problem for us back then.  We were out birding
this morning and saw some shorebirds by the time we set up the scope and
cleaned off the lens the birds had flown. Kind of annoying.  So I just
thought maybe over time the problem might have happened to other people.
Thanks for the responses.

Cathy Murrant
Cape Breton NS CA

http://www.capebretonbirds.ca/

On 10/16/2014 3:55 PM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> That's tough.
>
>
> If you had said that in your post to the list you might have received a 
different range of responses. 

>
> - You didn't say if it was a scope or bins.
> - No model stated, there have been at least three scopes (and more 
eyepieces). 

>
> - No mention that it started after being replaced.
>
> You have one bit of leverage when working with Swarovski - their reputation. 
Posting about a problem on BirdChat is the sort of thing that they will HATE, 
so I think you got that part right. Putting your situation out there in greater 
detail could increase your chance of finding someone looking at their scope and 
finding the same problem. It can also possibly gain sympathy, another level. 

>
> My only dealing with Swarovski's service was much simpler, and they went 
overboard (didn't cost them much $$$) to do their best for me. 

>
> When I bought a DSLR I recycled an old camera case from my SLR days (1980's). 
To my horror I discovered that the lining was disintegrating and getting into 
the camera.! Your description reminded me of that. I suggest taking a really 
close look at the case just to be sure. 

>
>
> Sorry I can't be of actual help.  Good luck!
>
>
> Roy Harvey
> Beacon Falls, CT
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Allan and Cathy Murrant 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Cc:
> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 1:21 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>
> That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
> they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
> dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
> blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
> eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
> but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
> that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
> wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy
>
>
>
>
> On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
>> Cathy,
>>
>>
>> Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

>>
>> Roy Harvey
>> Beacon Falls, CT
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: kittiwake 
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

>>
>> Sent from Samsung Mobile
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: Allan and Cathy Murrant <kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:33:05 -0300
It is a few years since my scope was serviced and we gave up on getting
Swarvoski to solve this problem for us back then.  We were out birding
this morning and saw some shorebirds by the time we set up the scope and
cleaned off the lens the birds had flown. Kind of annoying.  So I just
thought maybe over time the problem might have happened to other people.
Thanks for the responses.

Cathy Murrant
Cape Breton NS CA

http://www.capebretonbirds.ca/

On 10/16/2014 3:55 PM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> That's tough.
>
>
> If you had said that in your post to the list you might have received a 
different range of responses. 

>
> - You didn't say if it was a scope or bins.
> - No model stated, there have been at least three scopes (and more 
eyepieces). 

>
> - No mention that it started after being replaced.
>
> You have one bit of leverage when working with Swarovski - their reputation. 
Posting about a problem on BirdChat is the sort of thing that they will HATE, 
so I think you got that part right. Putting your situation out there in greater 
detail could increase your chance of finding someone looking at their scope and 
finding the same problem. It can also possibly gain sympathy, another level. 

>
> My only dealing with Swarovski's service was much simpler, and they went 
overboard (didn't cost them much $$$) to do their best for me. 

>
> When I bought a DSLR I recycled an old camera case from my SLR days (1980's). 
To my horror I discovered that the lining was disintegrating and getting into 
the camera.! Your description reminded me of that. I suggest taking a really 
close look at the case just to be sure. 

>
>
> Sorry I can't be of actual help.  Good luck!
>
>
> Roy Harvey
> Beacon Falls, CT
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Allan and Cathy Murrant 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Cc:
> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 1:21 PM
> Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>
> That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
> they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
> dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
> blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
> eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
> but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
> that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
> wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy
>
>
>
>
> On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
>> Cathy,
>>
>>
>> Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

>>
>> Roy Harvey
>> Beacon Falls, CT
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: kittiwake 
>> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>> Cc:
>> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
>> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

>>
>> Sent from Samsung Mobile
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: The sound of many ducks dabbling (30 second video/sound recording)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:53:26 -0400
I went to a local park today where there were large puddles on the lawns.
There were dozens of Mallards dabbling in one puddle looking for food. I
was fascinated by the collective sounds of their bills dabbling in the
water:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8ihIWLfY3U&feature=youtu.be

You might have turn up the volume on your computer a bit to hear the
dabbling sounds at their best...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Front Stopping Migrants
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 21:42:12 -0500
Hey everybody,

    Looking at radar tonight there is a really big movement of birds
in the eastern U.S.. However there is a front moving through Iowa
producing rain that appears to possibly be stopping birds behind it.
This could mean a build up of migrants in southern Minnesota and in
Wisconsin tomorrow morning.

   I've posted a radar image for those interested:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Thursday could be a good birding day behind that front.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN
 


_______________________________________________
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mnbird AT lists.mnbird.net
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Unsubscribe: %(user_optionsurl)s
Subject: Birding Community E-bulletin - October 2014
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT THEWORLD.COM>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 13:37:17 -0400
The October 2014 issue of the Birding Community 
E-bulletin is now available the web, covering 
news and issues relevant to birders.

Please share with birders you know!

Scroll to the bottom for information on how to subscribe directly.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

This Birding Community E-bulletin is designed for 
active and concerned birders, those dedicated to 
the joys of birding and the protection of birds and their habitats.

This issue is sponsored by the producers of 
superb quality birding binoculars and scopes, 
Carl Zeiss Sport Optics:

http://sportsoptics.zeiss.com/nature/en_us/home.html 


You can access this issue and the archive of past 
E-bulletins on the website of the National 
Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA):

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 




The October 2014 edition includes the following topics:


RARITY FOCUS
   - Whiskered Tern in Cape May, New Jersey

THE PROBLEM OF LEUCISTIC SANDHILL CRANES
   - while rare, white Sandhill Cranes have been described by
     several observers

ANOTHER CHANCE IN NORTH DAKOTA
   - the effort to respond to ND's oil and gas boom by dedicating
     a portion of the state extraction tax revenue to conservation

ACCESS MATTERS: LOOKING AT YELLOW RAILS
   - the Yellow Rails and Rice Festival (YRARF) in southwest
     Louisiana in late October

NEW MIGRATORY BIRD STAMP ART CHOSEN
   - new artwork to grace the 2015-2016 Migratory Bird Hunting and
     Conservation [Duck] Stamp

SEASONAL CANADIAN LAKES LOON SURVEY
   - more than 700 citizen scientists across Canada monitoring
     loons and their reproductive success

BOOK NOTES: MORE PENGUINS
   - Penguins: the Ultimate Guide is part coffee-table book, part
     informative essays, and part species 
profiles for each of the 18 species

STATE OF THE BIRDS: MIXED MESSAGE
   - a comprehensive review of long-term trend data for U.S. birds -
 
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/ 


THAT PACIFIC MARINE RESERVE
   - expands the existing Pacific Remote Islands Marine
     National Monument to six times its current size

IBA NEWS: 90TH WHSRN SITE
   - the Sistema Tóbari is a Mexican Important 
Bird Area (IBA) site known
     to support large numbers of American Avocets, Marbled Godwits,
     Northern Pintails, and Lesser Scaups

TIP OF THE MONTH: DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT
   - have your guide with you, and don't neglect 
to bring along a specific
     field guide to that family group you are viewing


- - - - - - - -

You can access past E-bulletins on the National 
Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA) website:

http://refugeassociation.org/news/birding-bulletin/ 



If you wish to receive the bulletin or have any 
friends or co-workers
who want to get onto the monthly E-bulletin mailing list, have them
contact either:

Wayne R. Petersen
Director Massachusetts Important Bird Areas (IBA)
Program Mass Audubon
wpetersen-at-massaudubon.org

Paul J. Baicich
Great Birding Projects
paul.baicich-at-verizon.net

If you wish to distribute all or parts of any of the monthly Birding
Community E-bulletins, they simply request that 
you mention the source
of any material used. (Include a URL for the E-bulletin archives, if
possible.)

We never lend or sell our E-bulletin recipient list.

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: Allan and Cathy Murrant <kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:21:41 -0300
That's when the problem started.  We sent the scope in for service and
they changed the rubber eye cup and the new one is shedding rubber
dust.  They replaced it and the second one does the same. They are
blaming the scope cover but we have the hard plastic cover on the
eyepiece and the problem is still happening.  They suggested amourall
but we are scared of what that will do if it gets on the lens.  We feel
that they should have not replaced that rubber eye cup there was nothing
wrong with the one I had.  They say no one else has the problem.  Cathy

On 10/16/2014 11:28 AM, Roy Harvey wrote:
> Cathy,
>
>
> Swarovski certainly CAN fix it by replacing the rubber, or replacing the 
assembly that includes the rubber. Part of those stratospheric prices is that 
their products aren't supposed to have those sorts of problems. You may need to 
send it to them for the repair, depending on what device is having the problem. 

>
> Roy Harvey
> Beacon Falls, CT
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: kittiwake 
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Cc:
> Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2014 9:26 AM
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
>
>
> Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust 
over my lens. Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
Cathy 

>
> Sent from Samsung Mobile

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: SWARVOSKI eyepiece problem
From: kittiwake <kittiwake AT SEASCAPE.NS.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:26:06 -0300
Does anyone know how to fix a rubber eyepiece that is shedding rubber dust over 
my lens.  Sworvoski can fix this because they never heard of the problem. 
 Cathy 


Sent from Samsung Mobile
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 12, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2014 07:36:41 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

National Wildlife Refuge Week is October 12 - 18. Check out the latest
blog about refuges: http://bit.ly/1ylrHWP
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* October Migrants - Look Who's Back!
http://bit.ly/ZkflyO

* Black-crowned Night-Heron - Night Raven

http://bit.ly/1vTuHX4

* Swainson's Birds - How many were named after him?
http://bit.ly/1vZay2B

* The Moon of Falling Leaves
http://bit.ly/PoDbnt

* The Bird Is the Word - Music about birds, from the sublime to the
mundane (and just plain silly)
http://birdnote.org/show/bird-word

* Ring-necked Pheasants
http://bit.ly/1soVf27

* How Evolution Works, Featuring Dr. Mike Webster
http://bit.ly/1g9MEvA

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://p0.vresp.com/HQfQOT
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Where do the Red-throated Pipits go?
From: Steve Sosensky <steve AT OPTICS4BIRDING.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 12:37:50 -0700
Hi BirdChatters,



I'm writing a blog post on Red-throated Pipits here in SoCal, but want to
talk about where the individuals that migrate through here end up spending
the winter and what route they take to get back to their breeding grounds. I
don't see any eBird reports south of La Paz in Baja California, nor do I see
any spring reports in North America south of the Arctic Circle. If you have
any solid evidence, I'd appreciate a reply. TIA.







Good viewing,



Steve Sosensky, VP

Optics4Birding

  www.Optics4Birding.com

Phone: 949-360-6789

Toll Free: 877-674-2473






BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Software for ID-ing bird songs/calls in the field (article)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 20:40:16 -0400
Here's an interesting relatively recent (March 2014) article about how
tricky it is to develop software to automatically ID bird songs/calls in
the field:

bit.ly/1tHFdNs

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: passenger pigeons in NYS
From: "Taylor, Jeremy J (DEC)" <jeremy.taylor AT DEC.NY.GOV>
Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2014 13:39:53 +0000
Hello,



Apologies if this is somewhat off-topic, but I thought some of you might be 
interested in a short article that I put together regarding the passenger 
pigeon in New York State. The focus of the article is where in the state people 
can go to see them on display- I had no idea there were so many locations! You 
can view the html version online at http://www.dec.ny.gov/pubs/98898.html if 
interested, or download/view the PDF of the article from the main index of the 
October issue of Conservationist, http://www.dec.ny.gov/pubs/98884.html. Please 
feel free to pass along to others who you think might be interested. 




Regards,

Jeremy

Jeremy Taylor
Environmental Educator / Editor, Conservationist for 
Kids 

NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
Office of Communication Services
625 Broadway, 4th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-4502
(518) 402-8018 (voice)
(518) 402-9036 (fax)

Connect with DEC on Facebook & 
Twitter 


*Please Note New Email Address* 
Jeremy.Taylor AT dec.ny.gov 



BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Front Stopping Migrants
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 21:42:12 -0500
Hey everybody,

    Looking at radar tonight there is a really big movement of birds
in the eastern U.S.. However there is a front moving through Iowa
producing rain that appears to possibly be stopping birds behind it.
This could mean a build up of migrants in southern Minnesota and in
Wisconsin tomorrow morning.

   I've posted a radar image for those interested:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Thursday could be a good birding day behind that front.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Front Stopping Migrants
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT black-hole.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 21:42:12 -0500
Hey everybody,

    Looking at radar tonight there is a really big movement of birds
in the eastern U.S.. However there is a front moving through Iowa
producing rain that appears to possibly be stopping birds behind it.
This could mean a build up of migrants in southern Minnesota and in
Wisconsin tomorrow morning.

   I've posted a radar image for those interested:

http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

   Thursday could be a good birding day behind that front.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN
 

####################
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Subject: Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds)--correct link
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 16:42:29 -0400
I apologize for the bad link in the previous e-mail.  :-(

========

I'm in my 33rd consecutive year of bird banding at Hilton Pond Center near York 
SC and data indicate most species found here in late September are fewer in 
number than when I started. "This Week at Hilton Pond" I analyze the decline of 
three species--two residents and a Neotropical migrant--and offer some possible 
explanations. To view the photo essay--which includes images of all species 
banded during the last eight days of the past month, please visit 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140923.html

While there don't forget to scroll down for miscellaneous nature notes.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Hilton Pond 09/23/14 (Fewer September Birds)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 2014 09:34:41 -0400
I'm in my 33rd consecutive year of bird banding at Hilton Pond Center near York 
SC and data indicate most species found here in late September are fewer in 
number than when I started. "This Week at Hilton Pond" I analyze the decline of 
three species--two residents and a migrant--and offer some possible 
explanations. To view the photo essay--which includes images of all species 
banded during the last eight days of the past month, please visit 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140923

While there don't forget to scroll down for miscellaneous nature notes.

Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond

=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Mercury in the environment causes birds to reduce complexity of song
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 7 Oct 2014 17:11:56 -0400
FYI,



Researchers found that birds living near a source of mercury contamination
were affected in a way that caused a change in the structure of their song:



http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/26679-heavy-metal-songs-contaminated-song
birds-sing-the-wrong-tunes









Barry Kent MacKay

Bird Artist, Illustrator

Studio: (905)-472-9731

http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca

Markham, Ontario, Canada


BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Adventures in bird ID-ing (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 Oct 2014 16:52:43 -0400
A couple of days ago I took a photo of a bird I thought might be a Nelson's
Sparrow. The habitat wasn't right, but I've seen sharp-tailed sparrows in
atypical habitat during migration before. In this case I even first asked
an experienced birder from another (unnamed) state and the birder said it
was a sharp-tailed sparrow, probably a Nelson's.

Turns out most people said that the bird in question was most likely a
Savannah Sparrow. How was I confused?

For starters, this is the image that pops into my brain when I think
Savannah Sparrow. I took this photo along the Lake Michigan lakefront about
two years ago:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/7252300478/

Here's a very grainy cropped photo of the "Nelson's" I saw this week here
in NJ. Way more yellow and brown and buff than I am used to seeing in my
mind's image of a Savannah:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15450183491/

When I consulted my go-to Peterson's guide I didn't see any Savannah that
looked like my bird, so I started considering other sparrow species. I
should have spent a few more minutes with my Sibley guide where I might
have noted an illustration of a "reddish typical adult" Savannah Sparrow
that looked a heck of a lot like the bird that I saw this week. Guess I'm
always learning. :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park. NJ

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Oct. 5, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 4 Oct 2014 09:42:14 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* How High Birds Fly
http://bit.ly/1vFfPMJ

* Great Horned Owl Family in October
http://bit.ly/1toBSCE

* The Lost Bird Project

"Forgetting is another kind of extinction"
http://bit.ly/10ixBZA

* What's Up with the Little Red Spot on a Gull's Bill?
http://bit.ly/1cgQksW

* What the Pacific Wren Hears

http://bit.ly/OplnXS

* Meet the Blue Jay!
http://bit.ly/1dA3ijM

* Where Swallows Go in Winter
http://bit.ly/T9DU7o

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1rbCLgd
------------------------------------------------------------
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... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of Sept. 28, 2014
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellen AT 123IMAGINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 07:27:54 -0700
Hello, BirdChat,

Dorian Anderson is doing a Big Year on a bike. 12,000 miles by now!
Check out BirdNote's latest blog about his trip. http://bit.ly/YpThCT
-------------------------------------------------
Last week, BirdNote aired:

* The Heron and the Snake
http://bit.ly/1uQbrYG

* Autumnal Equinox
http://bit.ly/Uykzjv

* Sandhill Cranes Wait Out the Storm in Alaska
http://bit.ly/P1qucE

* Ducks - Diving or Dabbling?
http://bit.ly/1uuVHxM

* The Swath Uncut - A poem about a Canadian wheat farmer who gave back
to the geese that sustained his family during dark days
http://bit.ly/1wOcUAf

* Tweety Bird
http://bit.ly/TjlLJc

* Birding Trails - September 27 is National Public Lands Day. Celebrate
-- that day or any day -- by finding a birding trail near you.
http://bit.ly/P8lfvd

------------------------------------------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows: http://bit.ly/1rqSQ5f
------------------------------------------------------------
Find us on Facebook. Search for birdnote.
... or Follow us on Twitter. Search for birdnoteradio
=========================================
You can listen to the mp3, see a photo, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast, and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1200+
episodes and more than 500 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

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Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Banding Note
From: "R.D. Everhart" <everhart AT BLACK-HOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 08:15:39 -0500
Banding last weekend we saw the beginning of the end of warbler
migration and the ramping up of sparrow movement. Catches were
typical for September. Late warblers and juvenile sparrows dominated.

I'm heading back out this morning but wanted to post a few photos
from last week at:

 http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com

More updates to follow.

Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN

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Subject: Hilton Pond 09/13/14 (Requiem For A Queen)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 22:25:55 -0400
This week I witnessed the violent death of the majestic "Queen of Hilton Pond," 
a towering centenarian White Oak that thunderously succumbed to the ravages of 
lightning, fungi, termites, and beetle grubs. For a photo essay about this sad 
but inevitable phenomenon, please visit the installment for 13-22 Sep 2014 at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek140913.html

While there don't forget to scroll down for a list of birds banded during the 
period (all hummingbirds), plus other nature notes. 


Good Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


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Subject: Re: Why?
From: Linda Lee Baker <llbaker AT AOL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 00:12:09 -0500
All the reasons given are part of the answer.

Another part of the reason I enjoy birding is puzzle-solving.  Identifying
birds is taking parts of the whole & putting them together to determine what
the species is, like a giant jigsaw puzzle.

Linda Lee Baker
Albuquerque, NM USA

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Subject: Re: Why?
From: Eric Jeffrey <ecj100 AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 15:44:45 -0400
I suggest, rather speculatively, that the answer to why not is because for the 
vast majority of mankind's evolutionary history animals would largely have 
fallen into two categories (with some overlap) -- those to be eaten and those 
to be avoided. I doubt that esthetic appreciation of birds would have 
developed, at least not prior to the much more recent development of language. 
I believe this helps explain why humans generally have an innate fear of 
snakes, and spiders. Thus, I think bird appreciation is somewhat alien to our 
nature, and developed as Barry suggests in a somewhat random pattern as humans 
gained more freedom from want and fear. 


Of course collection came to be a big part of it. The wealthy long ago began to 
keep aviaries and other collections, culminating in the 18th and 19th Centuries 
when people began amassing large collections of all sorts of animals and 
plants, as well as cabinets of natural history. People made a living obtaining 
specimens for such collectors. I also believe, however, that humans have a 
interest in learning about the world around them, which expanded with the 
luxury of being able to do so. 

 
 
 As Barry suggests, I think this is very individualized. I became enamored of 
nature at an early age, while my parents and brother were more in the leave 
nature alone camp. 


Eric Jeffrey
Falls Church, VA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Roger 
To: BIRDCHAT 
Sent: Wed, Sep 24, 2014 3:17 pm
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?


Why not?

--
Roger Craik
Maple Ridge BC

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Why?
From: Roger <r_craik AT SHAW.CA>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:15:25 -0700
Why not?

--
Roger Craik
Maple Ridge BC

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:42:54 -0400
Learning how to listen, and how to look, are two of the great joys of 
birding... I never used my whole field of view before I became a birder. I now 
look at things in everyday life in a different way--so, I am a better defensive 
driver, I am better at scanning a page quickly, I am better at picking out 
relevant sounds in a crowd or on a street, and so forth--all because I am now 
aware of a greater totality of my sensory input, and that has become part of 
who I am, whether actively "birding" or not at any given moment... 


I should note also re why some people actively dislike birds and birding--they 
are afraid. There is such a diagnostic entity as Ornithophobia--albeit not in 
the DSM 5 (diagnostic manual of mental disorders). I wrote a chapter some years 
ago on Birds in the Human Mind and its Pathology, and I interviewed a number of 
people whom I was surprised to learn were afraid of birds. 

Some had had traumatic experiences with birds (flying at them to defend a 
nest), some had poor vision and could not handle a rapidly flying creature 
buzzing about them, some had seen "The Birds" of Hitchcock when young and 
carried a traumatic memory, some had been told as a child that birds might peck 
out their eyes, and so forth. In England, pigeon phobia is well known--and 
likely relates to the large flocks of such birds in common spaces such as 
Trafalgar Square, where some people feed them--but the birds approach anyone 
and everyone... 


Gregg

Gregg Gorton
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Barry K. MacKay 

Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 11:57 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Here is what I think may be an unpopular answer.

I think the activity is so "alien" (good word, actually) because it involves
something that IS "alien" to a great many people, and that is an
appreciation of that which is not overwhelmingly entertaining or pleasurable
and not of human origin.

I don't know if I can explain my theory succinctly, but I have come to the
conclusion that some folks are inherently unable to appreciate the sheer
beauty of birds, and in fact, this is neither right nor wrong, good nor bad,
just the way it is.

When I was extremely young I was smitten by birds, and by bird art...and for
the life of me I cannot explain why...why I would spend hours with a book on
birds, or looking into my garden, or walking in the local cemetery with my
six dollar binoculars that seemed to make things look smaller or why I was
so thrilled by and sought to achieve a close-up look, or hung out in the
bird galleries of the museum...I just did.   Why was I thrilled to see my
first meadowlark when I could have been out stealing hubcaps or listening to
the latest chart-busting rock and roll hit "like all the other kids".

I recall a musicologist tell a story about how he was, as a kid, part of a
class who were taken to a live performance of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring,
and was never the same after...he among all the kids was so moved that he
made music is life's work.

Why?

Why are some of us artists, others engineers and still others so heavily
engaged in designed and making clothing or breeding show dogs?

I think that if there is a commonality among birders it is that we are more
"open" to what IS around us, although I do think for some that "collection
instinct" is more highly motivating than for others.

But the reason that my answer may be unpopular is that these days if you
want to demonize anyone who has something "over you", like intelligence or
ability to appreciate things, you call them an elitist.   I don't mean to
suggest that no birder is dumb, just that in balance they, thus we, tend to
be above average in intelligence...now how self-serving is that statement?
Talk about elitism...

If there is another uniting factor it might be described as comfort and
opportunity...we tend to come from middle class ranks who have the luxury of
not having to spend every moment worrying about how to pay the rent or
groceries.

This is not really an answer to the question because I don't think there
really is one...

I have a friend who, for several consecutive decades, teased me for being a
birder.  He is a zoologist, a retired professor, and certainly fits the
birding profile of being bright and middle class, well-travelled and
cultured.

Well guess what?  He got a camera and now his is a birder, although he
refuses to call himself that, does not use binoculars, and yet he is totally
open to the beauty of birds (it is that beauty that so captivates me, BTW,
and from that captivation comes so much more that I admire about birds, and
other animals) and SEES what I see, not just in the obviously colourful or
dramatic species, but in the markings of a sparrow or a hen Mallard.  He
does not much like the tickers who spend a microsecond or two looking at
something to cross off their list, but that form of birding holds no appeal
to me either...it is not "wrong", and in fact can be an entertaining sport,
but it gets in the way of taking the time to simply revel in the beauty
inherent to the object, the bird, at least for me.

We are a diverse species and it takes all kinds.

I'd be interested in any work on that other side of the coin, why people are
not interested in birds, birding, or natural history, and indeed, are so
often hostile to such endeavors.

Barry



Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Arie Gilbert
Sent: September-24-14 10:45 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Good question, and all of the below.

But a better question is why the activity is so 'alien' to so many.

How many times have you had to "explain" birding to someone?

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY



On 9/24/2014 7:45 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
> Why Do We Bird?
>
> Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with
me:
>
> * The collection instinct.  Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls,
trains etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers,
admit it....
>
> * The appreciation factor.  We spend much of our lives resolving issues;
beauty renews us.
>
> * Exercise.  Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without
leaving my vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized.
>
> * Growth.  Birding keeps us learning and growing.  We discover we're part
of a much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets.
>
> * Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
> * Social interaction.  Many birders lean towards introspection,
introversion, even isolation.  But we also desire relationship, and a shared
passion facilitates this.
>
> * Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
> * Expressiveness.  Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and
non-verbal communication.  I preach and write poetry, find birds woven
throughout.
>
> * Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation,
contemplation.
>
> * Fun!
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
>
> (No rights reserved)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



-----

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Subject: Re: Why?
From: "Tangren, Gerald Vernon" <tangren AT WSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:27:38 +0000
Its a thing for people with Aspergers

--
Jerry 




On 9/24/14, 9:02 AM, "Spector, David (Biology)" 
wrote:

>I once posed this question to a birding class at a nature center, and I
>think that we came up with a couple of dozen reasons.
>
>Exercise?  Some, but I walk much more slowly now than before I was a
>birdwatcher, and I drive a lot to get to places with birds.
>
>A few other reasons:
>
>An excuse to get outside to beautiful places--beaches, marshes,
>mountains, forests, prairies, . . . , landfills, sewage plants, . . . .
>
>Something to do while hoping for a mammal to show up; I like to see and
>identify wild mammals, but waiting long hours for an identifiable mouse
>or shrew to show up would be quite boring without the birds to watch.
>
>Learning transferable skills (e.g., how to pay attention to detail and
>how to use a field guide) applicable to insects, trees, herps, . . . .
>
>T-shirts:  Bird clubs, nature centers, refuges, and other organizations
>have beautiful bird t-shirts that we can wear (and that can be subject to
>the collector's urge that Al mentions).
>
>Science--for many of us deeper understanding of process and the
>opportunity to contribute to that understanding means deeper appreciation.
>
>Human context--I enjoy thinking about the people who have contributed to
>our understanding of birds, the many ways in which birds and people
>interact, and the ways in which culture helps to shape concepts of birds.
>
>Sharing--this will be the last item on the list because I have to go
>teach a bird class in a few minutes.
>
>David
>
>David Spector
>Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.
>
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
>[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher
>Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:46 AM
>To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
>Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Why?
>
>Why Do We Bird?
>
>Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with
>me:
>
>* The collection instinct.  Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls,
>trains etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers,
>admit it....
>
>* The appreciation factor.  We spend much of our lives resolving issues;
>beauty renews us.
>
>* Exercise.  Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without
>leaving my vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized.
>
>* Growth.  Birding keeps us learning and growing.  We discover we're part
>of a much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets.
>
>* Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
>* Social interaction.  Many birders lean towards introspection,
>introversion, even isolation.  But we also desire relationship, and a
>shared passion facilitates this.
>
>* Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
>* Expressiveness.  Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and
>non-verbal communication.  I preach and write poetry, find birds woven
>throughout.
>
>* Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation,
>contemplation.
>
>* Fun!
>
>Al Schirmacher
>Muscotah, KS
>
>(No rights reserved)
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
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Subject: Re: Why?
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT MAIL.CCSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 12:02:21 -0400
I once posed this question to a birding class at a nature center, and I think 
that we came up with a couple of dozen reasons. 


Exercise? Some, but I walk much more slowly now than before I was a 
birdwatcher, and I drive a lot to get to places with birds. 


A few other reasons:

An excuse to get outside to beautiful places--beaches, marshes, mountains, 
forests, prairies, . . . , landfills, sewage plants, . . . . 


Something to do while hoping for a mammal to show up; I like to see and 
identify wild mammals, but waiting long hours for an identifiable mouse or 
shrew to show up would be quite boring without the birds to watch. 


Learning transferable skills (e.g., how to pay attention to detail and how to 
use a field guide) applicable to insects, trees, herps, . . . . 


T-shirts: Bird clubs, nature centers, refuges, and other organizations have 
beautiful bird t-shirts that we can wear (and that can be subject to the 
collector's urge that Al mentions). 


Science--for many of us deeper understanding of process and the opportunity to 
contribute to that understanding means deeper appreciation. 


Human context--I enjoy thinking about the people who have contributed to our 
understanding of birds, the many ways in which birds and people interact, and 
the ways in which culture helps to shape concepts of birds. 


Sharing--this will be the last item on the list because I have to go teach a 
bird class in a few minutes. 


David

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.




-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Al Schirmacher 

Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:46 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Why Do We Bird?

Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with me:

* The collection instinct. Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls, trains 
etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers, admit it.... 


* The appreciation factor. We spend much of our lives resolving issues; beauty 
renews us. 


* Exercise. Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without leaving my 
vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized. 


* Growth. Birding keeps us learning and growing. We discover we're part of a 
much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets. 


* Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.

* Social interaction. Many birders lean towards introspection, introversion, 
even isolation. But we also desire relationship, and a shared passion 
facilitates this. 


* Worship.  True for some, not others.

* Expressiveness. Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and non-verbal 
communication. I preach and write poetry, find birds woven throughout. 


* Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation, contemplation.

* Fun!

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

(No rights reserved)

Sent from my iPhone
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Re: Why?
From: "Barry K. MacKay" <mimus AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 11:56:33 -0400
Here is what I think may be an unpopular answer.

I think the activity is so "alien" (good word, actually) because it involves
something that IS "alien" to a great many people, and that is an
appreciation of that which is not overwhelmingly entertaining or pleasurable
and not of human origin.

I don't know if I can explain my theory succinctly, but I have come to the
conclusion that some folks are inherently unable to appreciate the sheer
beauty of birds, and in fact, this is neither right nor wrong, good nor bad,
just the way it is.

When I was extremely young I was smitten by birds, and by bird art...and for
the life of me I cannot explain why...why I would spend hours with a book on
birds, or looking into my garden, or walking in the local cemetery with my
six dollar binoculars that seemed to make things look smaller or why I was
so thrilled by and sought to achieve a close-up look, or hung out in the
bird galleries of the museum...I just did.   Why was I thrilled to see my
first meadowlark when I could have been out stealing hubcaps or listening to
the latest chart-busting rock and roll hit "like all the other kids".

I recall a musicologist tell a story about how he was, as a kid, part of a
class who were taken to a live performance of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring,
and was never the same after...he among all the kids was so moved that he
made music is life's work.

Why?

Why are some of us artists, others engineers and still others so heavily
engaged in designed and making clothing or breeding show dogs?

I think that if there is a commonality among birders it is that we are more
"open" to what IS around us, although I do think for some that "collection
instinct" is more highly motivating than for others.

But the reason that my answer may be unpopular is that these days if you
want to demonize anyone who has something "over you", like intelligence or
ability to appreciate things, you call them an elitist.   I don't mean to
suggest that no birder is dumb, just that in balance they, thus we, tend to
be above average in intelligence...now how self-serving is that statement?
Talk about elitism...

If there is another uniting factor it might be described as comfort and
opportunity...we tend to come from middle class ranks who have the luxury of
not having to spend every moment worrying about how to pay the rent or
groceries.

This is not really an answer to the question because I don't think there
really is one...

I have a friend who, for several consecutive decades, teased me for being a
birder.  He is a zoologist, a retired professor, and certainly fits the
birding profile of being bright and middle class, well-travelled and
cultured.

Well guess what?  He got a camera and now his is a birder, although he
refuses to call himself that, does not use binoculars, and yet he is totally
open to the beauty of birds (it is that beauty that so captivates me, BTW,
and from that captivation comes so much more that I admire about birds, and
other animals) and SEES what I see, not just in the obviously colourful or
dramatic species, but in the markings of a sparrow or a hen Mallard.  He
does not much like the tickers who spend a microsecond or two looking at
something to cross off their list, but that form of birding holds no appeal
to me either...it is not "wrong", and in fact can be an entertaining sport,
but it gets in the way of taking the time to simply revel in the beauty
inherent to the object, the bird, at least for me.

We are a diverse species and it takes all kinds.

I'd be interested in any work on that other side of the coin, why people are
not interested in birds, birding, or natural history, and indeed, are so
often hostile to such endeavors.

Barry



Barry Kent MacKay
Bird Artist, Illustrator
Studio: (905)-472-9731
http://www.barrykentmackay.ca
mimus AT sympatico.ca
Markham, Ontario, Canada



-----Original Message-----
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line)
[mailto:BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Arie Gilbert
Sent: September-24-14 10:45 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Why?

Good question, and all of the below.

But a better question is why the activity is so 'alien' to so many.

How many times have you had to "explain" birding to someone?

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY



On 9/24/2014 7:45 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
> Why Do We Bird?
>
> Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with
me:
>
> * The collection instinct.  Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls,
trains etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers,
admit it....
>
> * The appreciation factor.  We spend much of our lives resolving issues;
beauty renews us.
>
> * Exercise.  Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without
leaving my vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized.
>
> * Growth.  Birding keeps us learning and growing.  We discover we're part
of a much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets.
>
> * Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
> * Social interaction.  Many birders lean towards introspection,
introversion, even isolation.  But we also desire relationship, and a shared
passion facilitates this.
>
> * Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
> * Expressiveness.  Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and
non-verbal communication.  I preach and write poetry, find birds woven
throughout.
>
> * Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation,
contemplation.
>
> * Fun!
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
>
> (No rights reserved)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



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Subject: Re: Why?
From: Arie Gilbert <ariegilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 10:45:04 -0400
Good question, and all of the below.

But a better question is why the activity is so 'alien' to so many.

How many times have you had to "explain" birding to someone?

Arie Gilbert
North Babylon, NY



On 9/24/2014 7:45 AM, Al Schirmacher wrote:
> Why Do We Bird?
>
> Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with me:
>
> * The collection instinct. Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls, trains 
etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers, admit it.... 

>
> * The appreciation factor. We spend much of our lives resolving issues; 
beauty renews us. 

>
> * Exercise. Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without leaving my 
vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized. 

>
> * Growth. Birding keeps us learning and growing. We discover we're part of a 
much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets. 

>
> * Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.
>
> * Social interaction. Many birders lean towards introspection, introversion, 
even isolation. But we also desire relationship, and a shared passion 
facilitates this. 

>
> * Worship.  True for some, not others.
>
> * Expressiveness. Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and 
non-verbal communication. I preach and write poetry, find birds woven 
throughout. 

>
> * Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation, contemplation.
>
> * Fun!
>
> Al Schirmacher
> Muscotah, KS
>
> (No rights reserved)
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
>
>



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Subject: Why?
From: Al Schirmacher <alschirmacher AT LIVE.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 06:45:39 -0500
Why Do We Bird?

Have long pondered our motivation for birding.  These ten resonate with me:

* The collection instinct. Many of us collected stamps, coins, dolls, trains 
etc as children, and never really outgrew it:). Come on, listers, admit it.... 


* The appreciation factor. We spend much of our lives resolving issues; beauty 
renews us. 


* Exercise. Just speaking personally, if I attempt to bird without leaving my 
vehicle and walking, the joy is minimized. 


* Growth. Birding keeps us learning and growing. We discover we're part of a 
much wider world, with multiple dimensions and facets. 


* Contrast & variety.  The sameness of life is broken up.  It needs to be.

* Social interaction. Many birders lean towards introspection, introversion, 
even isolation. But we also desire relationship, and a shared passion 
facilitates this. 


* Worship.  True for some, not others.

* Expressiveness. Birding comes out in, and enriches, our verbal and non-verbal 
communication. I preach and write poetry, find birds woven throughout. 


* Healing.  Peace can come through observation, appreciation, contemplation.

* Fun!

Al Schirmacher
Muscotah, KS

(No rights reserved)

Sent from my iPhone
BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdchat.html
Subject: Prairie Warbler inh Southern California
From: Chuck Otte <cotte AT KSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 08:14:44 -0500
Helping out a friend having computer problems. Please contact John directly
if you need more information on this bird!

Chuck

The warbler was spotted as of yesterday(Wednesday 9-17-14). If anyone
wishes to travel across the country to see the bird, the best directions are:
Coming from Los Angeles International Airport, take the San Diego
Freeway(the 405) south to the Hawthorne Blvd exit. Turn right off the
Hawthone Blvd and travel south between 5 to 7 miles to a street called
Carson St. Turn left onto Carson St.,  and travel east on Carson St., until you
come to a street called Madrona Ave. Then turn right on Madrona Ave, and
travel south on Madrona Ave less than 1/4 mile to a street called Plaza Del
Amo St. or Ave, and turn left. Then proceed on Plaze Del Amo going a short
distance to stop light and turn left into the Madrona Marsh Nature Center
parking lot. If coming north on the 405 from either Long Beach City Airport, or
John Wayne/Orange County Airport in Orange County. Exit at Crenshaw
Blvd, and travel south on Crenshaw Blvd about the same distance to Carson
St. When arriving at Carson St., turn right and proceed west on Carson St.
about a mile or a mile and a 1/4 and turn left onto Maple St. and travel south
on Maple St. 1/4 mile to Plaza Del Amo and turn right. Again go west a short
distance to the stop light and turn right. The Prairie Warbler has been seen in
the marsh in an area of willows starting from an area adjacent to 10 foot
measuring pole going in a westerly direction usually ending up in a field of
sunflowers usually associating with a flock of Bushtits

Good Birding
John Small
Torrance,CA
joutandabout AT yahoo.com

-----
Chuck Otte                      cotte AT ksu.edu
County Extension Agent, Ag & Natural Resources
Geary County Extension Office, PO BOX 28         785-238-4161
Junction City, Kansas 66441-0028             FAX 785-238-7166
http://www.geary.ksu.edu/

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