Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
BirdChat

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Saturday, August 27 at 08:15 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-browed Nuthatch,©BirdQuest

27 Aug BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of August 28, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
25 Aug Re: Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-) [Richard Carlson ]
25 Aug Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
24 Aug Hilton Pond 07/16/16 (Finches, Hummingbirds, And An Owl) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
23 Aug Name [Jim Williams ]
23 Aug Need author name [Jim Williams ]
20 Aug Birds Moving South with Cold Front [Roger Everhart ]
20 Aug BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 21, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
18 Aug Hotel Hong Kong [Patty O'Neill ]
16 Aug RFI Hong Kong ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
14 Aug sign of life from 70*N [Vader Willem Jan Marinus ]
13 Aug BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 14, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
13 Aug W. Mass. guide going out of print ["Spector, David (Biology)" ]
9 Aug New River Hummingbird Festival (13 Aug, Oak Hill WV) []
8 Aug Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic [Joyanne Hamilton ]
8 Aug Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic []
8 Aug An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic [Joyanne Hamilton ]
6 Aug 10-tips-photographing-birds [Paulo Boute ]
6 Aug BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 7, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
3 Aug Re: Bird camera [Laurie Foss ]
3 Aug Birds' "Redness Gene" Traced Back To The Dinosaurs [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera ["B.G. Sloan" ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Joseph Morlan ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [marys1000 ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Laura Erickson ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Jim ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Jim Hully ]
2 Aug Re: Bird camera [Laura Erickson ]
2 Aug Chipping Sparrow and Cowbird [Roger Everhart ]
31 Jul Do Wildlife-Friendly Yards Increase Bird-Window Collisions? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
30 Jul BirdNote, last week and the week of July 31, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
28 Jul Hilton Pond 07/01/16 (Hot Summer Flowers) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
27 Jul Inbred Songbirds Cannot Carry A Tune [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
27 Jul Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
27 Jul Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po [David Starrett ]
26 Jul Annotated Checklist for Mai Po ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
25 Jul why are robins' eggs blue? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
23 Jul Re: The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
23 Jul BirdNote, last week and the week of July 24, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
23 Jul The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey []
21 Jul Birding and "Pokemon Go" (similarities) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
20 Jul Re: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds [Chuck & Lillian ]
20 Jul South American bird taxonomy and checklists [Mark Mulhollam ]
19 Jul how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
17 Jul Re: Alaska birding cruises []
17 Jul Re: Alaska birding cruises ["snorkler AT juno.com" ]
17 Jul World Shorebirds Day 2016 [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
16 Jul Re: Alaska birding cruises [Richard Carlson ]
16 Jul Re: Alaska birding cruises []
16 Jul BirdNote, last week & the week of July 17, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
14 Jul Re: AviSys birding software [Arie Gilbert ]
14 Jul Re: AviSys birding software []
14 Jul AviSys birding software []
13 Jul Dolphin Motel, San Diego? [Ross Silcock ]
13 Jul any raptor experts out there? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
12 Jul Do Tool-Using Cockatoos Make Good Economic Decisions? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
11 Jul Switching from BirdBase to Birder's Diary [Chuck & Lillian ]
11 Jul Re: Robin eating bird seed? ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
11 Jul Robin eating bird seed? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
9 Jul BirdNote, last week & the week of July 10, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
3 Jul Re: Birding in Taiwan [Paulo Boute ]
6 Jul Re: Birding in Taiwan [Hanno Stamm ]
5 Jul Hilton Pond 1-30 Jun 2016 (Trail Cam Surprises) ["research AT hiltonpond.org" ]
5 Jul RFI: Peru Birding Tours ["John J. Collins" ]
4 Jul Re: FBI: Is there an Australian equivalent to Birdchat? [Jim Danzenbaker ]
4 Jul FBI: Is there an Australian equivalent to Birdchat? [Theo Hofmann ]
4 Jul Fw: [BIRDCHAT] Black-capped Chickadee irruption years and Boreal Chick adee [Alan Wormington ]
4 Jul Black-capped Chickadee irruption years and Boreal Chickadee [Ross Silcock ]
3 Jul New Birding Destination near Sao Paulo: Monte Alegre do Sul County. [Paulo Boute ]
2 Jul Re: Birding in Taiwan [dmark ]
2 Jul Re: Birding in Taiwan [Chuck & Lillian ]
2 Jul BirdNote, last week and the week of July 3, 2016 [Ellen Blackstone ]
1 Jul Frigate birds [Richard Carlson ]
1 Jul Birding in Taiwan ["David M. Gascoigne" ]
30 Jun parrot, presumed extinct in the wild, found again? [Devorah the Ornithologist ]
29 Jun 99 million year old feathers in amber []

Subject: BirdNote, Last Week & the Week of August 28, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 06:11:09 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Singin' Like a Bird and Feelin' Good
-- What bird would YOU want to sing like?
http://bit.ly/O7e07K
* Shorebirds Watch Their Feet
http://bit.ly/2badG7e
* Young Bald Eagles on the Move
http://bit.ly/1mvhld1
* The Crow vs. the Gull - Who Wins?
http://bit.ly/OA5VWy
* Texas Hill Country Conservation
http://bit.ly/NkKm9q
* One Square Inch of Silence
-- With Gordon Hempton, SoundTracker
http://bit.ly/15le5Hd
* A Song Sparrow Learns to Sing
-- With Sievert Rohwer
http://bit.ly/NRkoMs
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2bnQe81
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-)
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 14:39:15 -0700
Great article

Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Aug 25, 2016, at 1:51 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> 
> Interesting article from Cornell's "All About Birds":
> 
> 
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/goodbye-yellow-rump-will-we-see-a-return-to-myrtle-and-audubons-warblers/ 

> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Will Yellow-rumped Warblers cease to exist? :-)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 16:51:26 -0400
Interesting article from Cornell's "All About Birds":


https://www.allaboutbirds.org/goodbye-yellow-rump-will-we-see-a-return-to-myrtle-and-audubons-warblers/ 


Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Hilton Pond 07/16/16 (Finches, Hummingbirds, And An Owl)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 15:43:44 -0400
During mid-summer at Hilton Pond Center we're typically immersed in banding 
fledgling House Finches and ever-abundant Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, but this 
week we had a very unusual encounter with a Barred Owl. To read about recent 
work with all three species, please visit our latest photo essay for 16-31 July 
2016 at http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160716.html 
 


While there please remember to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured during the period. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Name
From: Jim Williams <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:37:52 -0500
Crossley  in hand. Thanks to all.

Jim Williams
birding blog at www.startribune.com/Wingnut

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Need author name
From: Jim Williams <woodduck38 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:06:06 -0500
A few years ago a photographer created a bird field guide composed entirely of 
photos imposed on photo backgrounds. It was not very good, I thought at that 
time, which perhaps is why I cannot remember the author's / photographer's 
name. 


Help, please. I want to mention his book in a review of a new guide to birds of 
Britain and Ireland. It uses the same idea, but does it very well. It's a 
beautiful piece of work. 


Thanks.

Jim Williams
Wayzata, Minnesota
birding blog at www.startribune.com/Wingnut

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Birds Moving South with Cold Front
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 23:07:29 -0500





Hey folks,

 I have posted a radar image of tonight's migration movement in the upper 
midwest. Lots of reports of mixed warbler flock showing up. See image at: 




 http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


Good birding,
Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN





For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 21, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 07:57:19 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Who’s the Next Aldo Leopold?
-- With George Archibald
http://bit.ly/1smfZIB
* Crow and Tools
http://bit.ly/14exjOu
* Vermilion Flycatcher
-- Be sure to watch the video
http://bit.ly/2bdu1an
* The Call of the Loon
http://bit.ly/Q4S4Zs
* Sapsuckers and Sap
http://tinyurl.com/9yunppw
* White Ibis's Tricky Nesting Schedule
http://bit.ly/2bmJlCM
* Honeybees and Red-tails
http://bit.ly/2aRf9QZ
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2baJHMA
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Hotel Hong Kong
From: Patty O'Neill <pattyoneill AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 10:28:59 -0500
 Sorry, I hope this goes through. I think I formatted the previous email 
incorrectly 



On 08/17/16, Patty O'Neill wrote:

The Butterfly in Kowloon is very conveniently located and reasonably priced, 
about $100 for a single. I am not at home and don't have the address but you 
can find it on the net. If you take the Metro from the airport you have to 
transfer, but the airport bus will drop you at the door and pick you up. The 
subway was a short walk around the corner, and if I recall correctly there was 
a line that took you without transferring to the stop where you get the taxi to 
Mai Po. It was close to Nathan Road and walkable to the Star Ferry. I was there 
2 or 3 years ago. 


Patty O'Neill
pattyoneillatverizon.net
MiltonMA


On 08/17/16, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:

There is 1 message totaling 69 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

 1. RFI Hong Kong

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 13:03:49 +0000
From: "David M. Gascoigne" 
Subject: RFI Hong Kong

If anyone has stayed in Hong Kong recently and can recommend a hotel in the 
Kowloon/New Territories area that is reasonably priced and close to a train 
station, I would appreciate hearing from you. 


Thank you!


David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

------------------------------

End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 14 Aug 2016 to 16 Aug 2016 (#2016-99)
**************************************************************

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: RFI Hong Kong
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 13:03:49 +0000
If anyone has stayed in Hong Kong recently and can recommend a hotel in the 
Kowloon/New Territories area that is reasonably priced and close to a train 
station, I would appreciate hearing from you. 


Thank you!


David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: sign of life from 70*N
From: Vader Willem Jan Marinus <wim.vader AT UIT.NO>
Date: Sun, 14 Aug 2016 16:14:13 +0000

END OF SUMMER IN TROMS



I am still alive and living in Troms, even though I have fallen silent on the 
bird lists. 




Yesterday morning my lawn in Troms, N.Norway (69*50'N) was suddenly full of 
birds, where there usually is nothing more than the usual magpies and hooded 
crows, and our 'house gulls', the Common Gull. But now, when I looked out (I 
have the basement apartment) the lawn was full of thrushes, most of them 
Fieldfares, but with also quite a number of Redwings among them, mostly keeping 
to less open places. There were also a couple of White Wagtails, a few 
Redpolls, and in the trees young Willow Warblers. All this is preparatory to 
the autumn migration; many birds are leaving their territories and flocking 
together. 




Summer 2016 here in Troms has not been (as we say here) 'to shout Hurrah for': 
too many days and weeks with grey, wet weather and temperatures around 10-12 
*C. But today, although not much warmer, we had a sunny quiet day and I decided 
to go and check some of my usual haunts, mostly to look for shorebirds, usually 
the first birds migrating through here. It is late summer here; most of our 
luxuriant forbs have almost stopped flowering, only the Fireweed Chamaenerion 
colours some large patches vividly violet, while today I also found a very rich 
stand of the beautiful late-summer flowers of Felwort Gentianella. The very 
common and enormous 'Troms palms' Heracleum are already yellowing, another 
sign of the end of summer. 




I started out at the Langnes area near the airport, about which I have written 
several times before (I feel I have written several times before about almost 
every area here, main reason I stopped writing). It is a small low peninsula 
between a main road and the sea, where many people walk their dogs, and park 
their cars when they fly (to avoid parking fees; I counted some 40 parked cars 
in the area today)); there are willow copses, large areas covered with tall 
forbs, and extensive tidal areas. A skerry just offshore (you can walk there 
when the water is low enough, we have a 3.5m tidal amplitude) is always used by 
Cormorants, except in the nesting season, when they move elsewhere; today there 
were already 5 cormorants there, another sign of the near end of summer. There 
is a sandy beach, where always Ringed Plovers breed, and where in summer you 
have to be very careful not to be hit by angry Arctic Terns. Now the plovers 
were still alarming, but the young could fly; also a few young terns flew 
around, and the parents still attacked me half-heartedly; but most of the 
ternshere had gone, and I found a large flock elsewhere. The sandy beach and 
stony mudflat before it also held quite large groups of sandpipers, today 
mostly Purple Sandpipers, but also Dunlins, Turnstones and as a surprise a 
single Red Knot. In addition a snall flock of 6 Lapwings flew up and away when 
I arrived; this is a species that nests here, but decreases alarmingly in the 
area; several territories where I always found the birds earlier are now no 
longer in use. There were also a few Golden Plovers, but I saw no Redshanks nor 
any other Tringa, and no Ruffs either, usually the most common shorebird on 
autumn migration here. Lots of wagtails and Meadow Pipits on the beach and this 
time also many young Northern Wheatears. As usual, several Eiders with young 
are present, and of course also Oystercatchers and various gulls. 




The wetland of Tisnes, som 30 km from Troms on the island of Kvalya, is 
another place I have written about many times. It is a peninsula of low-lying 
agricultural wetlands, now sadly for a quite large part taken over by a horse 
farm; the horses have trampled and largely destroyed a wonderful chalk meadow 
and its very diverse flower vegetation. Most of the fields have now been mowed 
and most places the glittering white 'tractor eggs' with hay still lie around 
in the fields (A lone whimbrel was foraging in one of these fields); elsewhere 
they have already been gathered and lie in neat rows near the barns. Very few 
shorebirds today at Tisnes: where I saw some 50 Ruffs a week ago, I now saw 
only a single one. Surprisingly, Barn Swallows were still criss-crossing the 
area in some numbers, just as last week; this is not at all a common bird so 
far North and one rarely sees tens together , as is the case here. (The nearby 
colony of Bank Swallows is deserted now). A few Golden Plovers, a single 
Lapwing and the unavoidable Oystercatchers were all I could find today. But 
there was something else: at least 100 Greylag Geese, with quite a number of 
youngsters, sat close together in one of the Fields; another species flocking 
preparatory to the autumn migration. 




But as you can see; it is largely business as usual here at 70*N.



Wim Vader, Troms, Norway

wim.vader AT uit.no

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 14, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 08:37:38 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Birds and Navigation
http://bit.ly/Z1flnN
* Ospreys Weather the Storm
http://bit.ly/Nem6M4
* Solon Towne and the Meadowlarks
http://bit.ly/2aCSBTN
* The Elegant Trogon
http://bit.ly/NYVwqn
* Woodpeckers Love Ants
http://bit.ly/1dyO5CF
* Bird Life at the Grand Canyon
http://bit.ly/18B75Kk
* Flammulated Owl, Summer Visitor
http://bit.ly/RRX7QF
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2bdYPvQ
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
--------------------------------
BirdNote and VENT head to Panama, Sept. 13-25.
Join us! http://bit.ly/1TyuJg9
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: W. Mass. guide going out of print
From: "Spector, David (Biology)" <spectord AT CCSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 14:22:43 +0000
Anyone interested in a copy of The Bird Finding Guide to Western Massachusetts* 
should buy immediately, as the publisher is withdrawing it: 

https://umassextensionbookstore.com/products/42

David Spector
Belchertown, Massachusetts, U.S.


*Yes, I am one of the editors. No, I have no financial stake in the book, but I 
would like to see it used. 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: New River Hummingbird Festival (13 Aug, Oak Hill WV)
From: research AT HILTONPOND.ORG
Date: Tue, 9 Aug 2016 12:20:19 -0400
Hope to see you there!  -)

http://birding-wv.com/birding-nature-events/hummingbird-festival.html 
 


Happy Birding!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 09:46:12 -0800
=) I thought it looked a little different than what they posted.
Maybe they just threw in any kind of photo. 
Thanks for the keen eye!
Joy

> On Aug 8, 2016, at 9:34 AM, mitch AT utopianature.com wrote:
> 
> Say, isn't that a Least Sandpiper in the photo at the
> link?  Photo is credited to U.S. F. & W., caption
> calls it a Baird's.
> 
> Thanks for the interesting post Joyanne.
> 
> Mitch Heindel
> Utopia Texas
> 
> 
> On 2016-08-08 08:42, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:
>> Hello Bird friends,
>> I thought you would like to read this article on climate change’s
>> impact on Arctic nesting shorebirds that just came out today.
>> 
http://www.adn.com/arctic/2016/08/07/warming-climate-expected-to-squeeze-out-arctic-bird-habitat/ 

>> Joyanne Hamilton
>> Shageluk, Alaska
> 

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic
From: mitch AT UTOPIANATURE.COM
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 10:34:33 -0700
Say, isn't that a Least Sandpiper in the photo at the
link?  Photo is credited to U.S. F. & W., caption
calls it a Baird's.

Thanks for the interesting post Joyanne.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia Texas


On 2016-08-08 08:42, Joyanne Hamilton wrote:
> Hello Bird friends,
> I thought you would like to read this article on climate change’s
> impact on Arctic nesting shorebirds that just came out today.
>
> 
http://www.adn.com/arctic/2016/08/07/warming-climate-expected-to-squeeze-out-arctic-bird-habitat/ 

>
> Joyanne Hamilton
> Shageluk, Alaska

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: An Interesting and Sad Perspective on Shorebirds in the Arctic
From: Joyanne Hamilton <innoko_bird AT ME.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 07:42:55 -0800
Hello Bird friends,
I thought you would like to read this article on climate change’s impact on 
Arctic nesting shorebirds that just came out today. 



http://www.adn.com/arctic/2016/08/07/warming-climate-expected-to-squeeze-out-arctic-bird-habitat/ 
 


Summer is winding down here with very few Tree and Cliff swallow still around. 
Most other migrants have already gone their merry way with their offspring in 
tow. Rusty blackbirds, Warblers of various yellow and orange varieties, 
White-crowned sparrows, Fox Sparrows and Juncos still abound in our area. The 
Sandhill cranes haven’t started gathering in their spiral flight above our 
meadows; that will happen in September. Overall it’s been a good nesting year 
in our area for interior shorebirds, songbirds and raptors. Yesterday I saw a 
Northern Shrike being chased by a dozen Redpolls and a flying Bald Eagle being 
hollered at by Common loons. I’ve been seeing what I think are Olive-sided 
Flycatchers gathering up on the power lines here and there. Even though 
according to the range maps they are abundant, this is the first I have ever 
seen them. 


Several species of salmon have completed their migration on our interior Alaska 
river and our transplanted Wood Bison herd have made their way full circle to 
calve this spring and have since dispersed to meadows in a 150 mile radius. 
Many waterfowl have headed to the hills to feast on the berries that are 
plentiful this summer. 


I look forward to spider migration ballooning their webs on the fall breezes 
and the Sandhill cranes circling, calling and gathering together higher and 
higher above the Innoko River area we live in. 


I also look forward to one single Magpie that has been our local guest now for 
about 7 years. I don’t know where he/she goes in the spring—to procreate, I 
guess—but has been returning back to our village each fall. I have never seen 
any other Magpies in our area. I don’t know where his/her family is! I 
don’t know why we only see one! 


School starts here August 17. All the teachers are migrating to their 
inservices at various locations in the state most with tans and fun summer 
vacation stories. 


That’s life for now.
Enjoy the southern migration sightings.

Joyanne Hamilton
Shageluk, Alaska


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: 10-tips-photographing-birds
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 11:33:44 -0400
Hello!
Since, in the past days it was discussed bird photography, I would like to 
share this article: 

http://www.audubon.org/news/10-tips-photographing-birds
Yours,
Paulo Boute.( The Olympic) Brazil.
                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of Aug. 7, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2016 07:57:14 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Listening for Bird Song, With Gordon Hempton
http://bit.ly/14oKrq6
* Raptors' Sky Dance - A Rare Sight
http://bit.ly/Q51jcJ
* Advice to Beginning Birders -
With David Sibley
http://bit.ly/Y4x3X1
* Brown-headed Nuthatches of Apalachicola
http://bit.ly/NpuKas
* How Toucans Stay Cool
http://bit.ly/2aDWHZM
* Woodpeckers as Keystone Species
http://bit.ly/1702XpV
* Amazing Aquatic American Dipper
http://bit.ly/1sv9Qql
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2aP7Pox
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
--------------------------------
BirdNote and VENT head to Panama, Sept. 13-25.
Join us! http://bit.ly/1TyuJg9
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Laurie Foss <lauriefoss AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 15:05:54 -0500
Dear Chatters,
In response to the question of weight, I use a mirrorless micro 4/3 camera,
the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 with the Panasonic 100-300mm lens. I find it
very comfortable to carry around all day using a Black Rapid strap that
sits under my binocular harness. Since I am usually leading a group, I also
carry a spotting scope and bag full of "group needs" stuff and find that
the camera does not put an undue burden on me in addition to the rest of
the equipment.
The camera itself is as simple or as complex as I want to use it. It has a
fully automatic setting as well as a full manual mode. One feature I really
like is pre-set modes that I can use for fast motion (a bird in flight),
low light, bright light, etc. This was my first time entering the world of
interchangeable lens cameras and I've been very pleased with my choice.
For what it's worth, I spent some time at a digiscoping workshop to
determine if I would rather use my phone or this camera for digiscoping.
There I was able to use a TLS-APO adapter for this camera and put that rig
on my scope, and compared it side-by-side with my iPhone with PhoneSkope
adapter on a scope, and I preferred the digiscoping method using my phone
rather than using the camera.  Having the adapter on my phone and my camera
fully ready with the zoom lens gave me a great ability to be flexible about
whatever bird might show up for a quick camera shot. When leading a group,
I can't spend much time framing a shot. So having that flexibility really
works well for me.
I also know a lot of birders who use the super-zoom cameras and are very
pleased with the results they get with them. One of the nice things about
these cameras is that you won't be tempted to get the next great lens that
is developed for your rig! Don't ask me how I know this.

Laurie Foss
Spicewood, TX

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Birds' "Redness Gene" Traced Back To The Dinosaurs
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 14:49:23 +0100
hello everyone,

i just published this piece that might interest you, regarding the ancient
origins of color vision in birds.

The gene responsible for red coloration and color vision in birds is also
functional in turtles — arising in a shared dinosaur ancestor where it was
probably used for color vision and possibly also for red coloration more
than 250 million years ago

Birds' "Redness Gene" Traced Back To The Dinosaurs

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/08/03/which-came-first-seeing-red-or-being-red/ 


as always, i encourage you to share widely and freely.

cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 16:44:01 -0400
 OK...so nine years ago I took a really bad fall down 15 stairs and broke
my arm so bad that it took a year to heal with surgery. I had some nerve
damage that left tremors in my left arm. I've been using Panasonic Lumix
mini-zoom cameras since then because they are ultra-lightweight and have
decent image stabilization. I've taken some cool photos with these cameras
but I would like to upgrade. Any suggestions for an upgrade that is still
lightweight but can take better photos? Thanks!

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 13:00:08 -0700
I also use the SX50 which I believe has been discontinued but is still
available.  It has some advantages over the SX60 and newer models.  For one
it shoots RAW which is important to me.  The viewfinder has a knurled focus
knob that constantly gets knocked out of position so I don't use it any
more. Instead, the LCD can be turned around so now I just use that on the
camera back.  A very useful option puts a little green rectangle in the
middle and when you start to press the button, the inside of the rectangle
magnifies so you can see if you are really on the bird and in focus.

On a recent birding trip overseas, about half the participants were using
that camera.

On Tue, 2 Aug 2016 15:31:33 -0400, marys1000  wrote:

>So I bought the Canon SX50.  A lot of people really  like it.  It has a
>drawback that I guess most people deal with better than me. Button
>placement - there is a word for that I can't think of - anyway I so
>constantly mash other buttons while holding it and using it that I get
>kind of frustrated. Suddenly there are things flashing in the LCD, I'm
>in some new mode and I have no idea what's going on.  I'm not a, um,
>active user of the camera and just want to zoom and snap.  There are a
>lot of features and digital menu's and buttons.  It does do RAW (a must
>for "real" photographers).    IDK, like I said, its optical capabilities
>for a non DSLR are pretty good, zoom to 50 is pretty good.  A weakness
>of all the superzooms is looking through the actual viewfinder is darn
>near impossible - very dark.  You have to use the swing LCD which can
>take some practice to use.  Its doable but is sometimes a little slower
>to get on a bird than if you could just put the viewfinder up to yor
>face.   Birdforum.net has a pretty big folder on the SX50, some of those
>guys get pretty technical.  Actually Birdforum.net is a really good
>resource for all cameras, bins and scopes.  There is a facebook page
>that seems to be mostly people posting pictures if you want to see what
>people are doing with the camera.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: marys1000 <marys1000 AT WOH.RR.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 15:31:33 -0400
I had a 24x zoom Panasonic Lumix quite awhile ago (A bridge camera or
superzoom).  The optical quality was really very nice.  Later when
looking for a longer superzoom replacement I read someone saying that
the Lumix optics were no longer made by Leica on their new longer zoom
models.  That explained a lot although I didn't confirm it myself.  I
liked that camera a lot but sold it (there were people looking for that
particular model)  as I got greedy for more zoom.
So I bought the Canon SX50.  A lot of people really  like it.  It has a
drawback that I guess most people deal with better than me. Button
placement - there is a word for that I can't think of - anyway I so
constantly mash other buttons while holding it and using it that I get
kind of frustrated. Suddenly there are things flashing in the LCD, I'm
in some new mode and I have no idea what's going on.  I'm not a, um,
active user of the camera and just want to zoom and snap.  There are a
lot of features and digital menu's and buttons.  It does do RAW (a must
for "real" photographers).    IDK, like I said, its optical capabilities
for a non DSLR are pretty good, zoom to 50 is pretty good.  A weakness
of all the superzooms is looking through the actual viewfinder is darn
near impossible - very dark.  You have to use the swing LCD which can
take some practice to use.  Its doable but is sometimes a little slower
to get on a bird than if you could just put the viewfinder up to yor
face.   Birdforum.net has a pretty big folder on the SX50, some of those
guys get pretty technical.  Actually Birdforum.net is a really good
resource for all cameras, bins and scopes.  There is a facebook page
that seems to be mostly people posting pictures if you want to see what
people are doing with the camera.

Marie, OH

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 14:27:06 -0500
When I was comparing Nikon to Canon, I was comparing extended zoom cameras,
not DSLRs, and I've never had a chance to use the new mirrorless micro
interchangeable lens cameras. I personally use the new Canon 80D and
their EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM. I don't consider myself a
photographer by any stretch--I'm a bird watcher who takes lots and lots of
pictures. For my own purposes, my system is pretty ideal in terms of speed
and quality of photos, and with a shoulder strap, it's not horrifyingly
heavy yet, though at 64, I'm starting to get wearier after a long day
lugging it.

I have Adobe software for my work, and never use Photoshop. Lightroom does
everything I need for photo processing and organizes my photos wonderfully.

That's the tricky thing about photography. Everyone swears by their own
system. When I was using an extended zoom camera, I swore by that and even
did an article for BirdWatching about how to get the best photos you could
through that kind of camera. When I was digiscoping through my spotting
scope, I swore by that. Some of the photos I took through a little Canon
pocket-sized camera and my scope are still used by others. Now I swear by
this camera system.

The main thing to remember, whatever you settle on, is to keep taking
pictures. The more you take, the quicker you will be, and the more
responsive you'll be to the quirks, good and bad, of your system.


Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Jim <epiphenomenon9 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 15:03:27 -0400
There are three main options IMO:

Superzooms:  lightweight, high magnification in a compact package; but
small sensors mean image quality not always the best, especially in low
light; also not good for birds in flight

Mirrorless Micro 4/3 (made by Olympus & Panasonic) interchangeable lens
cameras:  This is what I use.  Larger sensors mean better image quality
than superzooms (close to DSLRs in good light) and better low light
capability; heavier than superzooms but considerably lighter than DSLR
equivalents because of their 2x "crop factor" that effectively doubles the
magnification of the lens (300mm lens is a 200mm equivalent); better birds
in flight capability than superzooms, and new models should be close to
what DSLRs offer.  Not necessarily cheaper than DSLRs.

DSLRs (full frame or APSC sensor):  Heaviest of the bunch, but also the
best image quality and focusing abilities.  If you don't care about weight
(or cost) these are for you.

Best,
Jim M.
Maryland

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Jim Hully <xenospiza AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 13:38:42 -0500
Hi Bill,

You are going to be disappointed with any of the superzoom compacts. Yes,
some offer great zoom ranges, good stabilization  and responsiveness but
not in a single package yet and the weakest link is their focusing prowess
or lack of. The choices are Canon, Nikon & Panasonic. Canon offers a good
compromise of features but are let down by poorer optical qualities at the
longest focal lengths (in their latest models at least) and can be
infuriatingly slow at times. Panasonic models don't offer the kind of focal
lengths we birders need without adding clumsy extenders. They offer better
handling and responsiveness compared to Canon. I don't know enough about
Nikon but they certainly offer extreme focal lengths in rather large
bodies.  However, all use some form of contrast-based focusing which is
often not fast enough for anything that moves and moves irregularly.
Nikon's 1 series is the exception but that is an expensive proposition and
it looks like it is being phased out. If you are serious I would consider
looking at the models with the larger 1" sensor especially from Nikon (e.g.
DL24-500) or perhaps Sony's RX10 III but again we are talking about serious
money!  There is not a single model that stands head and shoulders above
the rest for what you are asking unless you want to consider DSLRs.

Cheers,

Jim Hully,
Grayslake, IL
xenospiza AT gmail
Bird images: https://jimhully.smugmug.com/

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>



--

Jim Hully
Grayslake, IL
xenospiza AT gmail.com

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Bird camera
From: Laura Erickson <bluejay AT LAURAERICKSON.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 13:03:32 -0500
I'm out of it as far as keeping up with the newest models, but everything
I've experienced in the past and what I've heard from at least a few people
in the past few weeks tells me that Canon is almost always better than
Nikon for lag time between pressing the button and the camera taking the
photo.

On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Bill  wrote:

> Looking for suggestions on good camera for birds. I see there are a number
> of Nikons now with ultra zooms 40x, 60x, even 80x, which should be great
> for birds assuming good image stabilizers. I would also like minimum
> shutter lag and minimum ramp-up lag to catch flyers.
> Bill Adams
> Richmond VA
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>



--
--
Laura Erickson

For the love, understanding, and protection of birds

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of birds.
There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of
nature--the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the
winter.

            --Rachel Carson

Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Chipping Sparrow and Cowbird
From: Roger Everhart <everhart AT BLACKHOLE.COM>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 12:15:40 -0500





I had the opportunity to watch the outcome of an instance of nest parasitism in 
my backyard a couple of days ago. It seems like every year I have a Chipping 
Sparrow raising a Brown-headed Cowbird. It's the only species I've found being 
taken advantage of around my place. I posted a little selection of photos of 
the birds interacting. 


http://minnesotabirdnerd.blogspot.com


It looks like southbound migration is starting to ramp up as some species are 
already grouping into flocks. 


Good Birding,
Roger Everhart
Apple Valley, MN




For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Do Wildlife-Friendly Yards Increase Bird-Window Collisions?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 11:52:20 +0100
hello everyone,

an embargoed study was published a couple days ago in The Condor that
examines a question that i am sure, many of us have wondered about: do
wildlife-friendly yards increase bird-window collisions?


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/29/do-wildlife-friendly-yards-increase-risk-of-bird-window-collisions/ 


this paper is one of the very few published studies on bird-building
collisions, and it relies on thousands of observations made by citizen
scientists -- perhaps some of you helped collect these data?

this piece also features a gorgeous image that was kindly provided by my
friend, list co-owner, dave rintoul.

in this piece, the author of the study offers some suggestions for how to
make your dwellings safer for wild birds, and i add a few more suggestions
of my own.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 31, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 07:46:57 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Birds That Say Their Own Names
http://bit.ly/P9K9eA
* An Evening in Sapsucker Woods, With A.A. Allen
http://bit.ly/RO1Y1v
* Decibels Per Gram - Who's Loudest?
http://bit.ly/2ahycGh
* Stock Tank - A Southwestern Oasis
http://bit.ly/LA6Kjb
* Two Phoebes Share the West
http://bit.ly/2a2bgIB
* Clever Nuthatches
http://bit.ly/NHORBL
* Rock Pigeons: Bobbleheads
http://bit.ly/14qtvAE
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/2ayd9yb
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
--------------------------------
BirdNote and VENT head to Panama, Sept. 13-25.
Join us! http://bit.ly/1TyuJg9
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Hilton Pond 07/01/16 (Hot Summer Flowers)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 09:34:40 -0400
The current installment of “This Week at Hilton Pond” is all about 
flowering plants--both native and invasive--found blooming in recent mid-summer 
heat, with references to pollinators associated with those blossoms. Diverse 
plant families are represented by close-up images in what may be our most 
colorful posting ever! 


To view the flower photos and anecdotal text for 1-15 July 2016, please see 
"Early July 2016: Hot, Humid, Windy . . . And Flowery" at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160701.html 


While there please remember to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured during the period, including our ever-larger population of 
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL


Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Inbred Songbirds Cannot Carry A Tune
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:03:07 +0100
Hi everyone,

a sweet little paper was published today in Proc Roy Society B, that finds
that a male canary's inbreeding status can be detected in its songs -- not
only can we see these song differences, but female canaries can hear them
and choose a mate accordingly:

Inbred Songbirds Cannot Carry A Tune

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/27/inbred-canaries-cannot-carry-a-tune/ 


ok, this is interesting,, but it does, in my opinion, provide a strong
argument in support of placing more weight on "minor" song differences for
identifying new species, especially cryptic species. anywho, some food for
thought!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 01:56:54 +0000
Thanks so much Dave. I forgot the most obvious source of all. What they have 
there is perfect! 

Best regards,

David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 26, 2016, at 8:18 PM, David Starrett 
> wrote: 



You have probably thought of this but I just looked in eBird bar charts for Mai 
Po and they have at least one version of what you may be looking for. 



Dave



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
David Starrett
Columbia, MO
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
> on behalf of 
David M. Gascoigne > 

Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2016 6:40 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Annotated Checklist for Mai Po


I have been trying to find an annotated checklist for the birds of Mai Po (Hong 
Kong). I can find a checklist showing all the birds ever located there but 
nothing that shows seasonal abundance, or other useful information. Does anyone 
know where I can find one, or has anyone visited Mai Po in late February and 
would care to share their list? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: 
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com 

For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po
From: David Starrett <StarrettDA AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 00:18:28 +0000
You have probably thought of this but I just looked in eBird bar charts for Mai 
Po and they have at least one version of what you may be looking for. 



Dave



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
David Starrett
Columbia, MO
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


________________________________
From: National Birding Hotline Cooperative (Chat Line) 
 on behalf of David M. Gascoigne 
 

Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2016 6:40 AM
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Annotated Checklist for Mai Po


I have been trying to find an annotated checklist for the birds of Mai Po (Hong 
Kong). I can find a checklist showing all the birds ever located there but 
nothing that shows seasonal abundance, or other useful information. Does anyone 
know where I can find one, or has anyone visited Mai Po in late February and 
would care to share their list? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com
For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Annotated Checklist for Mai Po
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 11:40:03 +0000
I have been trying to find an annotated checklist for the birds of Mai Po (Hong 
Kong). I can find a checklist showing all the birds ever located there but 
nothing that shows seasonal abundance, or other useful information. Does anyone 
know where I can find one, or has anyone visited Mai Po in late February and 
would care to share their list? 



David M. Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
blog: www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: why are robins' eggs blue?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 17:34:05 +0100
hello everyone,

when i taught ornithology classes, this was a question that i could bet i'd
be asked at some point during the semester. recently, a paper came out,
explaining this very phenomenon!

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/25/why-are-robins-eggs-blue/

and of course, feel free to share this story with your friends and
colleagues and yes, with your kids, too!

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 16:33:15 +0000
Thanks for sharing this, especially for the links to other great papers. I was 
aware that honeyguides are brood parasites, but I learned a good deal about the 
gruesome activities of the young birds. 


David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 23, 2016, at 9:50 AM,   wrote:
> 
> Brood parasitism too...
> 
> Oscar Canino
> SF, CA
> oscarboy AT gmail.com
> 
> These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
> Seriously, this might be the coolest human-animal partnership ever. 
> 
> 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2016/07/21/these-amazing-wild-birds-understand-when-people-call-them-to-help-hunt-for-honey/ 

> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 24, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 07:59:10 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Message of the Mourning Dove
http://bit.ly/Ui0VNj
* Ruffed Grouse: A Different Drummer
http://bit.ly/2amiANI
* Rosalind Renfrew and the Upland Sandpiper
http://bit.ly/1ePOAuh
* Are Birds' Nests Reused? (If so, for how long?)
http://bit.ly/1LiXmil
* Shorebirds - Masters of Long-Distance Migration
http://bit.ly/12NUTF5
* Birds Have No External Ears
http://bit.ly/29ZfTQ5
* Trust and Partnerships Help Birds in Montana
http://bit.ly/18fQ5gI
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/29ZMurc
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: The Washington Post: These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 06:50:12 -0700
Brood parasitism too...

Oscar Canino
SF, CA
oscarboy AT gmail.com

These wild birds understand when people call them to help hunt for honey
Seriously, this might be the coolest human-animal partnership ever. 


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2016/07/21/these-amazing-wild-birds-understand-when-people-call-them-to-help-hunt-for-honey/ 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Birding and "Pokemon Go" (similarities)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 12:42:10 -0400
I was birding in a local park yesterday when I saw two guys in their 20s
who were obviously playing "Pokemon Go". Out of curiosity I asked "See
anything interesting?" One on them said "Oh yeah!" The other guy said
"There's some good stuff here!" and proceeded to name a few Pokemon
characters. It was pretty much the same exchange I might expect if I had
encountered a couple of birders in the same spot and asked the same
question. :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 10:30:41 -0700
Devorah:
While I'd like to read the article, and perhaps reprint it on our
blog (if possible), seeing as we are a large beach community, I
didn't want to "whitepage" (whatever that means) forbes.com cookies,
nor do I want to sign up with Forbes for anything. Oh well.

yours,
Chuck Almdale
Santa Monica Bay

At 10:05 PM 7/19/2016, BIRDCHAT automatic digest system wrote:
>Date:    Tue, 19 Jul 2016 14:19:19 +0100
>From:    Devorah the Ornithologist 
>Subject: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds
>
>hello everyone,
>summer is time to hit the beach -- but this is also the time and place when
>shorebirds and seabirds are nesting. so how can one's family enjoy
>themselves without harming nesting birds, some of which are endangered?
>believe it or not, this can be done, and I've collected a number of things
>that can be done to make life easier for everyone this holiday season:

>http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/18/birds-and-bums-can-bond-on-the-beach/ 

>
>please do share with friends, family and on social media so others who are
>less familiar with birds can also learn how to make sure human and avian
>families emerge from this holiday season rested, relaxed -- and alive.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: South American bird taxonomy and checklists
From: Mark Mulhollam <markm3232 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 02:51:35 -0500
HI all,

 If you are looking for a fast way to search the bird taxonomy and distribution 
for South America, I have finished my website which allows one to do just that. 
It is based on the South American Classification Committee’s work 
[http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.htm]. It is totally nonprofit 
with no advertising. 


http://potoococha.net/

You can also create pdf checklists for all the South American countries or csv 
files. 


I hope it is helpful, I try to keep it up-to-date as the taxonomy and country 
lists frequently change. 


Thanks,

Mark Mulhollam
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: how to enjoy yourself at the beach without freaking out the birds
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 14:19:19 +0100
hello everyone,

summer is time to hit the beach -- but this is also the time and place when
shorebirds and seabirds are nesting. so how can one's family enjoy
themselves without harming nesting birds, some of which are endangered?
believe it or not, this can be done, and I've collected a number of things
that can be done to make life easier for everyone this holiday season:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/18/birds-and-bums-can-bond-on-the-beach/ 


please do share with friends, family and on social media so others who are
less familiar with birds can also learn how to make sure human and avian
families emerge from this holiday season rested, relaxed -- and alive.

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Alaska birding cruises
From: rccarl AT PACBELL.NET
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 22:27:17 +0000
There are many ways to see Alaska.  If you want to see the most birds per day, 
forget the cruises or the ferries, fly to Anchorage and grab a tour that 
includes some combination of Gambel, Nome, and Denali. Pribilofs almost as good 
as Gambel.  This is very $$$ but you'll see a lot of birds.  If you are long 
on time and short on money, throw the camping gear in your car and drive to 
Denali, the North Slope, Seward, Homer and Haines, and take the Marine Highway 
back from Haines to Prince Rupert.  It will take at least 4 weeks.  We did 
this in 1970 with our one year old.  Marine Highway "stateroom" was one star 
motel minus.  Not again.The cruise plus car rental option is intermediate in 
both cost and time, much more comfortable, and you'll see a lot of birds.  2-3 
weeks would be fine.  Do not take one of the giant ships where you might be 
200 ft off the water.  Take a lower state room on one of the smaller Holland 
America ships, you'll be 60 ft off the water and see a lot of seabirds.  It 
was easy to ID both pelagic birds and alcids from the ship.  You'll also get 
into difficult to access Glacier Bay NP.  The city stops are 6-8 hours not 
2-3. We had a fabulous whale and glacier tour off the ship in Juneau.  Lots 
of birds plus whales bubble netting up close.  Get off at Seward and take the 
NW Fjord tour and you'll see all the birds of the Pribilofs except the Asian 
rarities, the Least and Crested Auklets and the Red-footed Kittiwakes for 1/10 
the cost.  Drive to Denali (stop at Homer for shorebirds) so you can stop when 
a Hawk Owl sits on the phone wire along the road.  Fly home from 
Anchorage.  Richard Carlson 

Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl AT pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965

      From: "snorkler AT juno.com" 
 To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU 
 Sent: Sunday, July 17, 2016 10:45 AM
 Subject: Re: [BIRDCHAT] Alaska birding cruises
   
Rich,

I suggest you take the Alaska Marine Highway System (ferries) instead of a 
cruise ship.  If your goal is comfort, get staterooms on the ferry, so you 
don't have to sleep on the solarium deck. If you're looking for an economical 
trip, throw a sleeping bag in a ferry lounge, and see Alaska like Alaskans do. 


Cruise ships offer very few birding and sightseeing opportunities.  When 
you're 200' above the water, it's difficult to separate Sooty from Short-tailed 
Shearwaters, or Pomerine from Parasitic Jaegers.  Heck, it's hard to see the 
6'dorsal fin of an Orca to identify it from a Pilot Whale, or (shudder) a Dall 
Porpoise.  Cruises will not give you the time to take excursions more than an 
hour or two out of their southeast Alaska port towns.  What you get on a 
cruise is an inexpensive and insulated slice of the Alaska panhandle. 


You can do the same thing on a ferry, save a lot of money, and arrange the trip 
of a lifetime.  Each SE AK port has private excursion companies that will take 
you to nearby attractions, and get you back to the cruise ship or ferry before 
it leaves port.  So if you're in Skagway and want to do the White Pass RR 
trip, or Juneau and want to see Mendenhall Glacier, you can disembark, buy 
tickets on the pier, see your attraction, and be back in time to reboard your 
ship. 


Other people have mentioned Denali National Park.  You can't do it from a 
cruise ship trip.  By the time you got back to port 2-3 days later, the cruise 
ship would be long gone.  But if you take a ferry to Juneau, You can fly to 
Anchorage, take the train to Denali, and fly back to Juneau for a return ferry 
trip.  


Which leads me to the trip of a lifetime.  You take the money you saved by 
riding the ferry instead of taking a cruise ship, and spend it on Denali and 
the Pribilofs.  From Juneau, fly to St. Paul Island about June 21. June 21 is 
the day the Northern Fur Seal cows arrive to give birth to their pups.  Almost 
every visitor to St. Paul is there for the birding.  You can join a guided 
trip to the bird rookery, or rent a four-wheeler or take a taxi to the 
rookery.  Breeding species you'll see include Parakeet, Least, and Crested 
Auklets, Common and Thick-billed Murres, Horned and Tufted Puffins.  
Black-legged and Red-legged Kittiwakes, Northern Fulmar, Red-faced 
Cormorants.  When I was there, I skipped dinner and a tour of the Russian 
Orthodox Church to spend time alone at the rookery.  My magical moment was 
seeing seven Arctic Foxes working the rookery.  Other species include Snowy 
Owl, Grey-crowned Rosy Finch, Glaucous Gull, and Pribilof Wren. 


Darrell Lee
Alameda, CA







For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Alaska birding cruises
From: "snorkler AT juno.com" <snorkler@JUNO.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 17:45:59 GMT
Rich,

I suggest you take the Alaska Marine Highway System (ferries) instead of a 
cruise ship. If your goal is comfort, get staterooms on the ferry, so you don't 
have to sleep on the solarium deck. If you're looking for an economical trip, 
throw a sleeping bag in a ferry lounge, and see Alaska like Alaskans do. 


Cruise ships offer very few birding and sightseeing opportunities. When you're 
200' above the water, it's difficult to separate Sooty from Short-tailed 
Shearwaters, or Pomerine from Parasitic Jaegers. Heck, it's hard to see the 
6'dorsal fin of an Orca to identify it from a Pilot Whale, or (shudder) a Dall 
Porpoise. Cruises will not give you the time to take excursions more than an 
hour or two out of their southeast Alaska port towns. What you get on a cruise 
is an inexpensive and insulated slice of the Alaska panhandle. 


You can do the same thing on a ferry, save a lot of money, and arrange the trip 
of a lifetime. Each SE AK port has private excursion companies that will take 
you to nearby attractions, and get you back to the cruise ship or ferry before 
it leaves port. So if you're in Skagway and want to do the White Pass RR trip, 
or Juneau and want to see Mendenhall Glacier, you can disembark, buy tickets on 
the pier, see your attraction, and be back in time to reboard your ship. 


Other people have mentioned Denali National Park. You can't do it from a cruise 
ship trip. By the time you got back to port 2-3 days later, the cruise ship 
would be long gone. But if you take a ferry to Juneau, You can fly to 
Anchorage, take the train to Denali, and fly back to Juneau for a return ferry 
trip. 


Which leads me to the trip of a lifetime. You take the money you saved by 
riding the ferry instead of taking a cruise ship, and spend it on Denali and 
the Pribilofs. From Juneau, fly to St. Paul Island about June 21. June 21 is 
the day the Northern Fur Seal cows arrive to give birth to their pups. Almost 
every visitor to St. Paul is there for the birding. You can join a guided trip 
to the bird rookery, or rent a four-wheeler or take a taxi to the rookery. 
Breeding species you'll see include Parakeet, Least, and Crested Auklets, 
Common and Thick-billed Murres, Horned and Tufted Puffins. Black-legged and 
Red-legged Kittiwakes, Northern Fulmar, Red-faced Cormorants. When I was there, 
I skipped dinner and a tour of the Russian Orthodox Church to spend time alone 
at the rookery. My magical moment was seeing seven Arctic Foxes working the 
rookery. Other species include Snowy Owl, Grey-crowned Rosy Finch, Glaucous 
Gull, and Pribilof Wren. 


Darrell Lee
Alameda, CA






___________________________________________________________
With a Galapagos trip appearing more possible in 2018, we and several of our 
friends are concentrating on Alaska for 2017. I’ve called two cruise lines to 
ask if they have birding excursions but no one on the phone seems to have 
access to that information. They suggest calling the excursion companies 
separately to inquire. 


We’re looking for a few chances to bird in and around Alaska, but also to 
enjoy the magnificent scenery and ambiance. We’d like to cruise to and from, 
and have at least a few land or water excursions with people who know birding. 
There could be ‘other’ no-nbirding excursions, too, time permitting. 
Pincess keeps coming up as the preferred cruise line for Alaska, but we’ve 
never been there before. Can anyone make some good suggestions from experience 
including what time of the year you would recommend? 


Thanks, 
Rich Wolfert
New Jersey

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: World Shorebirds Day 2016
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 11:11:14 +0100
Dear Friends,

The 3rd World Shorebirds Day is at the corner and many of us has already saved 
the dates of the popular Global Shorebird Counting Program. 2-6 September 2016 
is an extended weekend for counting shorebirds on multiple locations. Please 
save the date for you as well. We cannot encourage enough people from here, but 
surely we can ask for your assistance to invite more people from your local 
community. 


Please find the registration page here:

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/07/12/global-shorebird-counting-2016-registration 


Should you have any question, please don't hesitate to contact us at 
shorebirdsday AT gmail.com 


Best wishes, Szimi
——
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Alaska birding cruises
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 13:36:51 -0700
You'll see more birds in June than later. I prefer Holland Americas smaller 
boats that actually go into Glacier Bay National Park and end at Seward. From 
Seward there are great day cruises that see Puffins and Auklets on their nests. 
NW fjord tour was fantastic. You can take the train from Seward to Denali. Best 
Denali birds are far in on the day tours. There is one super $$$$ place to stay 
at end of the road. 


Richard Carlson
Tucson & Lake Tahoe
Sent from my iPhone


> On Jul 16, 2016, at 10:10 AM, lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET wrote:
> 
> Richard,
> 
> Now is a great time for a cruise to Alaska. Conditions change as you head 
through August into September, but it should be fine for resident birds for at 
least another month from now. You can see whales and birds from a Princess 
ship, including shearwaters and jaegers, but you would do well to take a 
pelagic out of Homer (where we quickly got to great sites for Kittlitz 
Murrelet, Antarctic Tern, breeding puffins and breeding Red-faced Cormorants. A 
trip to Denali by train allows you to see Black Bears and even Trumpeter Swans. 
Denali has Gyrfalcon, Willow Ptarmigan, "Arctic" Warbler, Long-tailed Jaeger, 
Golden Eagle and more. 

> 
> Larry Gardella
> Montgomery Alabama
> 
> -----------------------------------------
> 
> From: "Richard Wolfert" 
> To: 
> Cc: 
> Sent: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 12:16:58 -0400
> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Alaska birding cruises
> 
> 
> 
> With a Galapagos trip appearing more possible in 2018, we and several of our 
friends are concentrating on Alaska for 2017. I’ve called two cruise lines to 
ask if they have birding excursions but no one on the phone seems to have 
access to that information. They suggest calling the excursion companies 
separately to inquire. 

> 
> We’re looking for a few chances to bird in and around Alaska, but also to 
enjoy the magnificent scenery and ambiance. We’d like to cruise to and from, 
and have at least a few land or water excursions with people who know birding. 
There could be ‘other’ no-nbirding excursions, too, time permitting. 
Pincess keeps coming up as the preferred cruise line for Alaska, but we’ve 
never been there before. Can anyone make some good suggestions from experience 
including what time of the year you would recommend? 

> 
> Thanks, 
> Rich Wolfert
> New Jersey
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Alaska birding cruises
From: lgardellabirds AT CHARTER.NET
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 12:10:15 -0500
Richard,
Now is a great time for a cruise to Alaska. Conditions change as you
head through August into September, but it should be fine for resident
birds for at least another month from now. You can see whales and
birds from a Princess ship, including shearwaters and jaegers, but you
would do well to take a pelagic out of Homer (where we quickly got to
great sites for Kittlitz Murrelet, Antarctic Tern, breeding puffins
and breeding Red-faced Cormorants. A trip to Denali by train allows
you to see Black Bears and even Trumpeter Swans. Denali has Gyrfalcon,
Willow Ptarmigan, "Arctic" Warbler, Long-tailed Jaeger, Golden Eagle
and more.
Larry GardellaMontgomery Alabama

	-----------------------------------------From: "Richard Wolfert" 
To: 
Cc: 
Sent: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 12:16:58 -0400
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Alaska birding cruises

    With a Galapagos trip appearing more possible in 2018, we and
several of our friends are concentrating on Alaska for 2017. I’ve
called two cruise lines to ask if they have birding excursions but no
one on the phone seems to have access to that information. They
suggest calling the excursion companies separately to inquire. 

 We’re looking for a few chances to bird in and around Alaska, but
also to enjoy the magnificent scenery and ambiance. We’d like to
cruise to and from, and have at least a few land or water excursions
with people who know birding. There could be ‘other’ no-nbirding
excursions, too, time permitting. Pincess keeps coming up as the
preferred cruise line for Alaska, but we’ve never been there before.
Can anyone make some good suggestions from experience including what
time of the year you would recommend? 

 Thanks, 
 Rich Wolfert
 New Jersey

 Sent from my iPhone

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of July 17, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 07:15:42 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Mid-Summer - Aldo Leopold's Dawn Chorus
http://bit.ly/MwbqWB
* The Painted Bunting
http://bit.ly/29Gk47j
* Rufous Hummingbirds Head South
http://bit.ly/18pZRcA
* A Fascination with Cranes, With George Archibald
-- In celebration of his 70th birthday
http://bit.ly/1lRwKml
* Peregrine-Shorebird Interaction
http://bit.ly/NsC8hN
* Birdhouses in Turkey
http://bit.ly/29CIVW3
* Banding Hummingbirds
http://bit.ly/N9HiS6
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/29WZG0E
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: AviSys birding software
From: Arie Gilbert <ArieGilbert AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 11:00:10 -0400




Subject: Re: AviSys birding software
From: david AT PIBIRD.COM
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 14:12:35 +0000
I don't need to find a link for Version 6.00M for AviSys. I found that you can 
simply copy your full AviSys folder from one computer and paste it onto 
another. It looks like it is working fine. 

I do plan to continue using AviSys, as I have used it for many years and don't 
want to spend hours moving my data to some place else (though I do hope to get 
much of it onto eBird). I plan to update the taxonomy every year, but that has 
been taking more effort than I hoped. My first attempt failed when it somehow 
changed bird ranges. I started trying again to do this (early this year, but 
quit mid-winter as I got busy with other things) and hope to finish it in 
August or September, with the current taxonomy. If it works, I will let 
Birdchat people know and see if I can send the data for anyone else to use in 
AviSys. 

Fingers crossed....again...
David Trently
Olyphant, PADirector of Operations for North America
Partnership for International Birding570-909-8052888-203-7464 ext 926
http://www.pibird.com/

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: AviSys birding software
From: david AT PIBIRD.COM
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 13:45:43 +0000
Does anyone know how to get AviSys Version 6.00M? I have a new computer and 
want to move AviSys data to it. I was able to load the original Version 6, but 
there doesn't appear to be a link to version M any more.Thank you! 

David Trently
Director of Operations for North America
Partnership for International Birding570-909-8052888-203-7464 ext 926
http://www.pibird.com/

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Dolphin Motel, San Diego?
From: Ross Silcock <silcock AT ROSSSILCOCK.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 10:52:46 -0500
Reviews of this motel are split between great and terrible, but overall 4/5 or 
so. It's across the street from the departure dock for pelagic trips. 

Anyone have recent experience with this motel?  

Thanks,
Ross

Ross Silcock
Tabor, IA

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: any raptor experts out there?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 07:50:38 +0100
hello,

i am looking for a raptor expert who can quickly answer a few questions
about eagles.

i also am looking to talk to someone who trains raptors -- well, eagles --
for public bird shows. i have a few questions that need a quick answer.

("quick answer" = deadlines, of course!)

cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Do Tool-Using Cockatoos Make Good Economic Decisions?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 23:14:12 +0100
hello everyone,

i just published a story that you might enjoy about the University of
Vienna's flock of Tanimbar corellas. basically, the researchers found that
their cockatoos make sound economic decisions about tools use (whether to
use tools and which tool to use) to obtain a particular food reward based
upon their assessment of the current “market” situation. This story also
includes a video of some of the trials.

Do Tool-Using Cockatoos Make Good Economic Decisions?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/07/12/do-tool-using-cockatoos-make-good-economic-decisions/ 


cheers,

-- 
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Switching from BirdBase to Birder's Diary
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 14:17:01 -0700
Birders:
I'm a long-time BirdBase(world) user, thinking of switching to
Birder's Diary now that BirdBase went kaput.

Has anyone out there done this switch using the Birder's Diary conversion tool?
http://birdersdiary.com/Home/Birders-Diary-for-BirdBase-Users

If so, did the conversion go easily, and what do you now think of
Birder's Diary, the Advanced World Birder (Clements) version?
yours,
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Robin eating bird seed?
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 19:42:53 +0000
American Robins regularly park themselves underneath my bird feeders and feast 
on the sunflower hearts the American Goldfinches, House Finches, Common 
Grackles and others distribute for them as they strew about four chunks on the 
ground for every one they eat. 


David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com



Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 11, 2016, at 10:06 AM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> 
> Has anyone ever had a Robin that eats bird seed on a regular basis? Just 
about every time I toss bird seed on the ground this Robin shows up with the 
other usual suspects and starts eating bird seed. Everything I've read says 
they eat insects, worms, fruit, etc., but nothing about seeds. I checked the 
ingredients list on the bird seed bag and there's no dried fruit... 

> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park, NJ
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Robin eating bird seed?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 10:06:52 -0400
Has anyone ever had a Robin that eats bird seed on a regular basis? Just
about every time I toss bird seed on the ground this Robin shows up with
the other usual suspects and starts eating bird seed. Everything I've read
says they eat insects, worms, fruit, etc., but nothing about seeds. I
checked the ingredients list on the bird seed bag and there's no dried
fruit...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week & the week of July 10, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 06:47:37 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Sanctuary and Bird Sound - With Patti McLead
Gold Star parents create a haven for birds --
http://bit.ly/WUF3sY
* National Symbol - Turkey vs. Eagle
http://bit.ly/Nm0OHr
* Birds as Pollinators
http://bit.ly/VNKGJi
* Loggerhead Shrike
http://bit.ly/1ors5t4
* Chickadees (& Others) Clean Up After the Young
http://bit.ly/1SfjeK8
* Birds Need Water in Summer
http://bit.ly/Nynu9w
* Palouse Country Birds
http://bit.ly/1b9TtKb
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/29nsIIQ
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Birding in Taiwan
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2016 03:52:39 -0400
Hi David,
Good Morning & Hello from the Pantanal!
Taiwan: 
http://www.birdingpal.org/Taiwan.htm
Just for the record...Birdingpal, has guides listed even in North Korea!
Yours,
Paulo Boute.


                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Birding in Taiwan
From: Hanno Stamm <hannostamm AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 6 Jul 2016 08:31:03 +0700
Hi Chuck,

My trip report is a little out of date but it might give you some 
pointers:http://www.hannostamm.com/taiwan_september_2007a.htm 


Best regards,

Hanno

"I realized that If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes."

Charles Lindbergh

Hanno Stamm (Mr.)
Siem Reap
Cambodia
E-mail:hannostamm AT hotmail.com
Mobile: +855-17 481 649
Homepage:http://www.hannostamm.com/


> Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2016 00:00:21 -0500
> From: LISTSERV AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> Subject: BIRDCHAT Digest - 1 Jul 2016 to 2 Jul 2016 (#2016-70)
> To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
> 
> There are 4 messages totaling 244 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
> 1. Frigate birds
> 2. BirdNote, last week and the week of July 3, 2016
> 3. Birding in Taiwan (2)
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 22:19:47 -0700
> From: Richard Carlson 
> Subject: Frigate birds
> 
> Amazing article re frigate birds ability to fly for days on end
> http://science.sciencemag.org/content/353/6294/26?rss=1
> 
> Richard Carlson
> Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
> Part-time Economist
> Tucson, AZ
> Lake Tahoe, CA
> Kirkland, WA
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 06:03:48 -0700
> From: Ellen Blackstone 
> Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 3, 2016
> 
> Hello, BirdChatters,
> 
> Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
> * Tony Angell Watches a Peregrine Falcon Fledge
> http://bit.ly/Mw36TP
> * Roseate Spoonbill
> http://bit.ly/297emtQ
> * Anting: Avian Spa Treatment?
> http://bit.ly/LN1SCO
> * Tallgrass Prairie
> http://bit.ly/MtEeOc
> * Voices and Vocabularies - Great Horned Owls
> http://bit.ly/1czEN3k
> * Night Singers
> http://bit.ly/OWxLgN
> * Seabirds Converge from the Ends of the Earth
> http://bit.ly/1mHseLX
> ----------------------------
> View the photos and links for next week's shows:
> http://bit.ly/29jYnet
> ----------------------------
> Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
> mailto:info AT birdnote.org
> =========================
> Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
> Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
> ... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
> Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
> ========================
> You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
> show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
> resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
> episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.
> 
> Thanks for listening!
> Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 11:01:13 -0700
> From: Chuck & Lillian 
> Subject: Re: Birding in Taiwan
> 
> There is a Taiwanese bird society or club or association or whatever.
> Like Audubon in the U.S.
> Bird guides would probably be members, or they'd know of such guides.
> BirdingPal may be of use.
> 
> I wouldn't try it on your own. Maps and road signs are impossible to
> follow unless you read Mandarin. You'd get utterly lost.
> They also have a good field guide, although in my copy only the
> English and scientific names are in English - all else is Chinese.
> Chuck Almdale
> North Hills, Ca.
> 
>>Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 16:37:56 +0000
>>From: "David M. Gascoigne" 
>>Subject: Birding in Taiwan
>>
>>I am planning a trip to Hong Kong in February and am seriously
>>considering visiting Taiwan for three or four days on the way home.
>>Does anyone have experience with a local guide or other tips that
>>might be helpful?
>>I would appreciate any advice that anyone would care to offer.
>>David Gascoigne
>>Waterloo, ON
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 14:34:06 -0400
> From: dmark 
> Subject: Re: Birding in Taiwan
> 
> I went to Taiwan in May 2005 as an invited speaker at a conference.
> My hosts arranged a birding guide for me through the Wild Bird
> Federation
> of Taiwan (or some such name). I paid the guide/driver his fee. Here is
> an
> email for the Federation: wbft AT bird.org.tw
> Unfortunately, I am not finding the name of my guide in my records.
> 
> David
> 
> David Mark
> Amherst, NY
> dmark AT buffalo.edu
> 
> 
> On 07/02/2016 2:01 pm, Chuck & Lillian wrote:
>> There is a Taiwanese bird society or club or association or whatever.
>> Like Audubon in the U.S.
>> Bird guides would probably be members, or they'd know of such guides.
>> BirdingPal may be of use.
>>
>> I wouldn't try it on your own. Maps and road signs are impossible to
>> follow unless you read Mandarin. You'd get utterly lost.
>> They also have a good field guide, although in my copy only the
>> English and scientific names are in English - all else is Chinese.
>> Chuck Almdale
>> North Hills, Ca.
>>
>>> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 16:37:56 +0000
>>> From: "David M. Gascoigne" 
>>> Subject: Birding in Taiwan
>>>
>>> I am planning a trip to Hong Kong in February and am seriously
>>> considering visiting Taiwan for three or four days on the way home.
>>> Does anyone have experience with a local guide or other tips that
>>> might be helpful?
>>> I would appreciate any advice that anyone would care to offer.
>>> David Gascoigne
>>> Waterloo, ON
>>
>> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
>> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
>> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
>> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
>> To contact a listowner, send a message to
>> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of BIRDCHAT Digest - 1 Jul 2016 to 2 Jul 2016 (#2016-70)
> ************************************************************
 		 	   		  

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Hilton Pond 1-30 Jun 2016 (Trail Cam Surprises)
From: "research AT hiltonpond.org" <research@HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 21:31:00 -0400
Believe it or not, I had the 1-30 Jun 2016 photo essay for "This Week at Hilton 
Pond" ready in record time and was ready to post it four days ago when my Web 
sites went down. Everything's peachy now and you can take a look at this latest 
installment that includes lots of photos--both diurnal and nocturnal--captured 
with one of the Center's trail cams. It's amazing what a camera can document 
when there's no human around to spook the critters. (We won’t give away any 
surprises here.) The edition is posted for you at 
http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek160601.html 
 


While there please remember to scroll down for a list of all birds banded or 
recaptured during the period, including our first fledgling Ruby-throated 
Hummingbirds of the year. 


Incidentally, our e-mail capability was also compromised for four days, so if 
you tried to send a message to any of our hiltonpond.org 
 or rubythroat.org  addresses 
we did not get it; please try again. 


Happy Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for 
timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats

Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
℅ BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org

==================


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: RFI: Peru Birding Tours
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2016 20:30:05 -0400
Has anyone on this list every used Peru Birding Tours?  If so were you
satisfied with your trip?  Thanks for any info you may have.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: FBI: Is there an Australian equivalent to Birdchat?
From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 16:05:45 -0700
This might be a good starting point:

http://birding.aba.org/maillist/AU

Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA

On Mon, Jul 4, 2016 at 3:46 PM, Eric Jeffrey <
0000012711f2daed-dmarc-request AT listserv.ksu.edu> wrote:

> There is a chat group called birding-aus that some of the Birdchat members
> belong to. I am not where I can easily access the sign up information but
> it should be available through Google or birdlife Australia.
>
> Best regards.
>
> Eric Jeffrey
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jul 4, 2016, at 5:57 PM, Theo Hofmann 
> wrote:
> >
> > Hello,
> >
> > i urgently require  to pose an enquiry to Australian birders about the
> > program WorlBirdPlus produced originally by John Penhallurick. I am
> > looking for a Windows version of the program.
> >
> > Many thanks for any information
> >
> > Theo Hofmann
> >
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------
> > Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
> > 199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
> > Thornhill  Ontario
> > L4J 1C1
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> > http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> > For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> > Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> > To contact a listowner, send a message to
> > birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
>



--
Jim Danzenbaker
Battle Ground, WA
360-702-9395
jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: FBI: Is there an Australian equivalent to Birdchat?
From: Theo Hofmann <theo AT HERA.MED.UTORONTO.CA>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 17:57:45 -0400
Hello,

i urgently require  to pose an enquiry to Australian birders about the
program WorlBirdPlus produced originally by John Penhallurick. I am
looking for a Windows version of the program.

Many thanks for any information

Theo Hofmann

---------------------------------------------------------------
Theo Hofmann                    Email: theo AT hera.med.utoronto.ca
199 Arnold Avenue               Phone: 905-889-1554
Thornhill  Ontario
L4J 1C1
---------------------------------------------------------------

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Fw: [BIRDCHAT] Black-capped Chickadee irruption years and Boreal Chick adee
From: Alan Wormington <wormington AT JUNO.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 13:43:37 GMT
 During the Fall of 1972 there was a massive southward migration of 
Black-capped Chickadees throughout the Great Lakes Region. However, I do not 
know how far west this irruption took place. Surely the various regional 
accounts published in American Birds would provide the answers you need? Alan 
WormingtonLeamington, Ontario ---------- Forwarded Message ---------- 

From: Ross Silcock 
To: BIRDCHAT AT LISTSERV.KSU.EDU
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Black-capped Chickadee irruption years and Boreal Chickadee
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 00:18:57 -0500


According to the Birds of North America Online account for Boreal Chickadee by 
Ficken, Mclaren, and Hailman (1996),"Irruptions in New York, Massachusetts, and 
Ohio always associated with major southward movements of Black-capped 
Chickadees but not all irruptions of Black-capped Chickadees include Boreal 
Chickadees." 

 
Nebraska has a single equivocal report of Boreal Chickadee, 16 Dec 1972- 21 Jan 
1973, at Chet Ager Nature Center, Lincoln, Lancaster County (Bennett 1973, 
Nebraska Bird Review 41: 43). 

During that same fall of 1972 there were two records of Boreal Chickadee in 
eastern South Dakota, both in November, and still the only records for South 
Dakota (Tallman, Swanson, Palmer, 2002- "Birds of South Dakota"). 

 
My question is: does anyone know if in fall of 1972 there was a significant 
southward movement of Black-capped Chickadees, especially on the northern Great 
Plains? If so, it seems this might be support for the Nebraska record. 

 
Thank you for any help you might provide,Ross
 
Ross Silcock
Co-Editor 
Southern Great Plains Region
North American Birds
Compiler, Seasonal Reports
Nebraska Bird Review
Tabor, IA

 
 
For BirdChat Guidelines go to http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/ For BirdChat 
archives or to change your subscription options, go to Archives: 
https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html To contact a listowner, send a message 
to birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu 


For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Black-capped Chickadee irruption years and Boreal Chickadee
From: Ross Silcock <silcock AT ROSSSILCOCK.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2016 00:18:57 -0500
According to the Birds of North America Online account for Boreal Chickadee by 
Ficken, Mclaren, and Hailman (1996), 

"Irruptions in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio always associated with major 
southward movements of Black-capped Chickadees but not all irruptions of 
Black-capped Chickadees include Boreal Chickadees." 




Nebraska has a single equivocal report of Boreal Chickadee, 16 Dec 1972- 21 Jan 
1973, at Chet Ager Nature Center, Lincoln, Lancaster County (Bennett 1973, 
Nebraska Bird Review 41: 43). 


During that same fall of 1972 there were two records of Boreal Chickadee in 
eastern South Dakota, both in November, and still the only records for South 
Dakota (Tallman, Swanson, Palmer, 2002- "Birds of South Dakota"). 




My question is: does anyone know if in fall of 1972 there was a significant 
southward movement of Black-capped Chickadees, especially on the northern Great 
Plains? If so, it seems this might be support for the Nebraska record. 




Thank you for any help you might provide,

Ross



Ross Silcock

Co-Editor 
Southern Great Plains Region
North American Birds
Compiler, Seasonal Reports
Nebraska Bird Review
Tabor, IA






For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: New Birding Destination near Sao Paulo: Monte Alegre do Sul County.
From: Paulo Boute <pauloboute AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2016 04:08:01 -0400
Dear All,

In the past weekend, I was birding on the county of Monte Alegre do Sul. About 
two hours drive from the International Airport of Sao Paulo. I stayed at the 
Pousada da Fazenda: 


 http://www.pousadadafazenda.com.br/ 

To my surprise, for the very first time, I had the Yellow-legged Thrush and the 
Eastern Slaty Trush, coming to a bird feeder, and not just that, but , 
together! The hummer feeders attracts about 17 different species of 
hummingbirds thru. the year...In my case, I had eleven, among them the Amethyst 
Woodstar, Stripe-breasted Starthroat and White-vented Violet-ear. This place, 
could be a destination for those coming to So Paulo for business and/or go 
there as a pre or post-tour, even for those booking a birding trip, with a 
Birding Company. 


Yours,
Paulo Boute.

                                          
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Birding in Taiwan
From: dmark <dmark AT BUFFALO.EDU>
Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 14:34:06 -0400
I went to Taiwan in May 2005 as an invited speaker at a conference.
My hosts arranged a birding guide for me through the Wild Bird
Federation
of Taiwan (or some such name). I paid the guide/driver his fee. Here is
an
email for the Federation: wbft AT bird.org.tw
Unfortunately, I am not finding the name of my guide in my records.

David

David Mark
Amherst, NY
dmark AT buffalo.edu


On 07/02/2016 2:01 pm, Chuck & Lillian wrote:
> There is a Taiwanese bird society or club or association or whatever.
> Like Audubon in the U.S.
> Bird guides would probably be members, or they'd know of such guides.
> BirdingPal may be of use.
>
> I wouldn't try it on your own. Maps and road signs are impossible to
> follow unless you read Mandarin. You'd get utterly lost.
> They also have a good field guide, although in my copy only the
> English and scientific names are in English - all else is Chinese.
> Chuck Almdale
> North Hills, Ca.
>
>> Date:    Fri, 1 Jul 2016 16:37:56 +0000
>> From:    "David M. Gascoigne" 
>> Subject: Birding in Taiwan
>>
>> I am planning a trip to Hong Kong in February and am seriously
>> considering visiting Taiwan for three or four days on the way home.
>> Does anyone have experience with a local guide or other tips that
>> might be helpful?
>> I would appreciate any advice that anyone would care to offer.
>> David Gascoigne
>> Waterloo, ON
>
> For BirdChat Guidelines go to
> http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
> For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
> Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
> To contact a listowner, send a message to
> birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Re: Birding in Taiwan
From: Chuck & Lillian <misclists AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 11:01:13 -0700
There is a Taiwanese bird society or club or association or whatever.
Like Audubon in the U.S.
Bird guides would probably be members, or they'd know of such guides.
BirdingPal may be of use.

I wouldn't try it on your own. Maps and road signs are impossible to
follow unless you read Mandarin. You'd get utterly lost.
They also have a good field guide, although in my copy only the
English and scientific names are in English - all else is Chinese.
Chuck Almdale
North Hills, Ca.

>Date:    Fri, 1 Jul 2016 16:37:56 +0000
>From:    "David M. Gascoigne" 
>Subject: Birding in Taiwan
>
>I am planning a trip to Hong Kong in February and am seriously
>considering visiting Taiwan for three or four days on the way home.
>Does anyone have experience with a local guide or other tips that
>might be helpful?
>I would appreciate any advice that anyone would care to offer.
>David Gascoigne
>Waterloo, ON

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: BirdNote, last week and the week of July 3, 2016
From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2016 06:03:48 -0700
Hello, BirdChatters,

Here are last week's BirdNote stories:
* Tony Angell Watches a Peregrine Falcon Fledge
http://bit.ly/Mw36TP
* Roseate Spoonbill
http://bit.ly/297emtQ
* Anting: Avian Spa Treatment?
http://bit.ly/LN1SCO
* Tallgrass Prairie
http://bit.ly/MtEeOc
* Voices and Vocabularies - Great Horned Owls
http://bit.ly/1czEN3k
* Night Singers
http://bit.ly/OWxLgN
* Seabirds Converge from the Ends of the Earth
http://bit.ly/1mHseLX
----------------------------
View the photos and links for next week's shows:
http://bit.ly/29jYnet
----------------------------
Did you have a favorite this week? Please let us know.
mailto:info AT birdnote.org
=========================
Sign up for the podcast: http://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
... or Follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
Listen on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
========================
You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a
show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related
resources on the website. http://www.birdnote.org You'll find 1300+
episodes and more than 800 videos in the archive.

Thanks for listening!
Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Frigate birds
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 22:19:47 -0700
Amazing article re frigate birds ability to fly for days on end
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/353/6294/26?rss=1

Richard Carlson
Full time birder,biker, Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ
Lake Tahoe, CA
Kirkland, WA
Sent from my iPad

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: Birding in Taiwan
From: "David M. Gascoigne" <bateleur27 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2016 16:37:56 +0000
I am planning a trip to Hong Kong in February and am seriously considering 
visiting Taiwan for three or four days on the way home. Does anyone have 
experience with a local guide or other tips that might be helpful? 

I would appreciate any advice that anyone would care to offer.

David Gascoigne
Waterloo, ON
www.travelswithbirds.blogspot.com

Sent from my iPad
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: parrot, presumed extinct in the wild, found again?
From: Devorah the Ornithologist <birdologist AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 21:42:31 +0100
hello everyone,

I've just returned from London, which means I finally had a chance to share
the recent birdie excitement about the Spix's little blue macaw, which was
spotted in the wilds of Brazil for the first time in 15 years. One of the
people who saw it also managed to get a poor-quality-but-still-diagnostic
video on her mobile phone:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2016/06/30/lost-and-found-the-worlds-rarest-parrot/ 


cheers,

--
GrrlScientist |  AT GrrlScientist 
Devorah Bennu, PhD
birdologist AT gmail.com
Blogs: Forbes  | Evolution
Institute  |
 Medium 
Keep up with my writing: TinyLetter 
Tiny bio: about.me 
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt. [Virgil, Aeneid]

For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu
Subject: 99 million year old feathers in amber
From: oscarboy AT GMAIL.COM
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 15:41:20 -0700
Some annoying scientific flaws here but a remarkable revelation nonetheless. 


http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/bird-wings-dating-back-age-dinosaurs-found-frozen-amber-180959599/ 


Oscar Canino
San Francisco, CA
Oscarboy AT Gmail.Com
For BirdChat Guidelines go to
http://www.ksbirds.org/birdchat/
For BirdChat archives or to change your subscription options, go to
Archives: https://listserv.ksu.edu/birdchat.html
To contact a listowner, send a message to
birdchat-request AT listserv.ksu.edu