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Updated on Friday, July 25 at 01:22 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Canary Island Chat,©Tony Disley

25 Jul House Wrens [Katherine Kuckens via CTBirds ]
25 Jul E.T. Grasso to Fair Haven trail. 7:00 am - 8:00 am. [Robert Hutton via CTBirds ]
25 Jul Kingfishers again [Chris Elphick via CTBirds ]
25 Jul kingfishers redux [Chris Elphick via CTBirds ]
25 Jul Another birdsong ID Challenge [Don Morgan via CTBirds ]
25 Jul Am. Bitterns, Little Blue Heron - NO [Angela Dimmitt via CTBirds ]
25 Jul Re: Coastal migration-Greenwich [greg hanisek via CTBirds ]
25 Jul Kingfishers [greg hanisek via CTBirds ]
25 Jul Slater Museum Exhibit [zellene via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Re: Robins' natural habitat [Steve Mayo and Rebecca Horowitz via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Cutthroat, Hamden. [Arthur Shippee via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Coastal migration-Greenwich [Stefan Martin via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Forster's Terns [Hank Golet via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Hammo white-faced ibis [Russ Smiley via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Re: Robin question [Mary Mushinsky via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Audubon, "Early Drawings" [Arthur Shippee via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Re: Robins' natural habitat [Don Morgan via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Crackles [Lisa Gagnon via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Common yellowthroats [sosipatra via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Re: Robins [Jonathan Schwartz via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Re: Question on Grass Lawns [Robert Mirer via CTBirds ]
24 Jul King Fishers [Lisa Gagnon via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Long-tailed Duck, Mliford Point [Stephen Spector via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Robin question [Gary Prestash via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Question on Grass Lawns [Carrier Graphics via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Re: Sandy Pt [Frank Mantlik via CTBirds ]
24 Jul Sandy Pt [Maria Stockmal via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Bird song ID - nenesis bird [Don Morgan via CTBirds ]
23 Jul CACC [Beverly Propen via CTBirds ]
23 Jul oops! [Paul Desjardins via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Rocky Hill [Paul Desjardins via CTBirds ]
23 Jul FYI - Free State Parks Weekend - parking and museum fees waived Sat. & Sun. ["Breslin, Sandy via CTBirds" ]
23 Jul Re: Birds feeding [Tammy Eustis via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Kingfishers -- ebird where missing? [Arthur Shippee via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Re: Kingfishers [Jim Pfeifer via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Kingfishers [Tricia Reid via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Am. Bitterns, LITTLE BLUE HERON [Angela Dimmitt via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Silver Sands ["Batsford, William via CTBirds" ]
23 Jul Ospreys fledged! [Bev via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Red Tailed Hawk-Milford [Beverly Perkins via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Caspian continues [Dan Rottino via CTBirds ]
23 Jul Stilt Sandpiper and Monk Parakeets at Hammonasset [Micky Komara via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Louisiana Waterthrush [Roy Harvey via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Re: Kingfisher [Steve Mayo and Rebecca Horowitz via CTBirds ]
22 Jul CASPIAN TERN - Sandy Pt [Jason Rieger via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Re: ID help needed [Don Morgan via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Sherman Bitterns + Litchfield Virginia Rails [Ryan MacLean via CTBirds ]
22 Jul East Granby [Paul Desjardins via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Re: WHIMBREL, Semi. Sands [Frank Mantlik via CTBirds ]
22 Jul WHIMBREL, Semi. Sands [Frank Mantlik via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Warbler ID [Carrier Graphics via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Wilton Purple Martin [James Hunter via CTBirds ]
22 Jul 'Our Birds': Migratory Journeys Converge In Baltimore Gardens [Arthur Shippee via CTBirds ]
22 Jul Re: I D help needed [Paul Desjardins via CTBirds ]
22 Jul ID Help needed! [Don Morgan via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Accipiter ID [Carrier Graphics via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Kingfisher [Rick Gedney via CTBirds ]
21 Jul 7/21 birds [Nick Bonomo via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Re: Stratford Greenway Incident [Donna Caporaso via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Old Lyme WW Scoter [Hank Golet via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Bbb b [Comcast via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Bird I'd. Please [Lisa Gagnon via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Accipiter ID [Joseph Cala via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Re: Accipitor ID [Don Morgan via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Milford WW SCOTER, Semi Sands [Frank Mantlik via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Sniffens Lane [Robert Hutton via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Re: Stratford Greenway Incident [Tina and Peter Green via CTBirds ]
21 Jul Hummingbird ["minor.craig via CTBirds" ]
20 Jul Accipiter ID - Answer [Joseph Cala via CTBirds ]
20 Jul Stratford Greenway Incident [Donna Caporaso via CTBirds ]
20 Jul Re: Accipiter ID quiz - Answer [Arthur Shippee via CTBirds ]
20 Jul Birds I saw at Harkness State Park today [Jerilyn Duefrene via CTBirds ]
20 Jul Accipiter ID quiz - Answer [Joseph Cala via CTBirds ]
20 Jul NJ Euro Golden-Plover Pix [Frank Mantlik via CTBirds ]
20 Jul Marsh wren - Westport [Jo via CTBirds ]
20 Jul Post dispersel is under way! [Carrier Graphics via CTBirds ]

Subject: House Wrens
From: Katherine Kuckens via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 13:57:05 -0400
We have a wren house  hanging from a big tree in our back yard. It's old
and decrepit, but I keep putting it up every spring it because it attracts
wrens every year.  For the last few weeks I've really enjoyed a second
batch of house wren babies, how clearly I can see their little mouths open
when I walk by and hear their noise.  Soon the parents come bearing
caterpillars,  and they scold me loudly.

Then yesterday morning I walked out and noticed -- nothing.  Complete
silence.  No little mouths or noisy calls.  I was quite alarmed. What
happened?  Did they fall out? Were they eaten by a predator?  I glanced
anxiously around the grass but saw nothing.  Then it occurred to me that
they had fledged!  And I never thought about this, but when baby birds
fledge, are they gone from the house, or the nest, forever?  Do they only
roost and perch in trees once they've fledged?  I keep hoping to see the
parents feeding them up in the tree, or hear them, but so far there is no
sign of them.  And the parents used to sing and scold all day long.

Katherine Kuckens in WeHa
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Subject: E.T. Grasso to Fair Haven trail. 7:00 am - 8:00 am.
From: Robert Hutton via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:59:39 -0700
Sims Metal Management

Ring Billed Gulls x 8
Grackles x 6
Female Mallard x 1
House Sparrows x 4


Domus Academy

Canada Geese x 10
Male Belted Kingfisher hovering x 1  
Lesser Yellowlegs x 1
Greater Yellowlegs x 3|American Black Duck x 1
Great Blue Heron x 1
Mourning Doves x 6
American Robins x 2
Male House Finch x 1
Female Mallard x 1
Chimney Swifts x 2
Fish / American Crow x 1 strange "awp."

Car Wash Rt.1 x E.T.Grasso

The West River is teeming with peanut bunker.
Great Blue Herons x 3
Belted Kingfisher x 1
Grackles x 5
Ring-billed Gulls x 3
Mourning Doves x 2
European Starlings x 30+
Great Egrets x 3
American Robins x 6

The Sound School

Snowy Egret x 1
Swallows x 8
Northern Mockingbirds x 3
Monk Parakeets x 5
Mourning Doves x 3
European Starlings x 7
American Crows x 2
Song Sparrow x 1
American Robins x 5

Long Wharf Pier structural work being done - pier quiet.

Snowy Egrets x 2
Osprey x 1
Ring-billed Gulls x 2
??? Terns x 2 (orange bill)



Lenny and Joe's Fish Place
Ruddy Ducks ? x 4 (Hersheys kisses with upturned tail [distant])
Scaup pair
Barn Swallows x 16
Double Crested Cormorants (x 1 Juvenile + 3 Adults)
Herring Gulls x 2
Ring-billed Gulls x 3
Grackles x 7
House Sparrows x 6

Returning from work. I did not have my camera?
Only the Ruddy Ducks were too far to identify by photograph.


Robert Hutton
New Haven,
203-809-1763
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Subject: Kingfishers again
From: Chris Elphick via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:45:19 -0400
And for what it is worth, this year I've heard kingfishers more frequently than 
normal over my house in Mansfield .... 


Chris Elphick
Storrs, CT
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Subject: kingfishers redux
From: Chris Elphick via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:30:47 -0700
I've been meaning to write something about kingfishers, but Greg beat me to the 
punch. As a population ecologist, I would first point out that at some level 
ALL populations fluctuate up and down, and that these fluctuations are often 
especially pronounced at a local scale. It would be very surprising if there 
were not some species that occasionally disappeared or reappeared from a 
particular location in a given year. Sometimes these changes may indicate a 
longer term trend, but often (perhaps usually) they do not. 



For example, when I moved into my current house there were mockingbirds around 
all the time, then there was a couple of years when there weren't any, then a 
few more when we saw them all the time, and now for the last year or two, 
they've been missing again. This is pretty normal, and probably says nothing 
at all about the state of mockingbird populations in the state. 



That said, we should obviously be on the look out for changes that are either 
sustained over multiple years or that occur at lots of different places 
simultaneously. Greg has done a quick look at the spatial pattern, so I thought 
I'd address the temporal pattern as best I can. 



As many of you know a few years ago Chris Field and I analyzed all of the 
Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data for CT and created the ctbirdtrends.org web 
site. That analysis is a few years old now (sooner or later we'll find the 
time to update it), but it is still relevant to the longer-term trend 
question. If you go to the site you can create a custom trend graph for any 
species covered by the BBS, including kingfisher. If you'd rather cut to the 
chase, I've posted the trend graph for kingfisher here: 

https://twitter.com/ssts/status/492382391705817088/photo/1

As you will see, over the 45 year period up until 2009, kingfisher counts went 
up and down, sometimes by a lot. Some of this might be true population 
changes, some of it might be "noise" in the data. (Because these are 
standardized counts, though the noise should be minimal, i.e., variation in 
observer effort should be low.)  Despite these fluctuations, the bottom line 
is that the population size showed no evidence at all of a long term increase 
or decrease over this period. 



Incidentally, if you're on twitter I've been posting results from the 
ctbirdtrends web site somewhat regularly for the past couple of months. I 
always use the #birdtrends hastag, so those posts are all compiled here (along 
with similar trend data from others): 


https://twitter.com/hashtag/birdtrends?src=hash


I've fallen off on posting these results over the past month as I've been busy, 
but I hope to get back to posting regularly again soon. 


Chris ( AT ssts)

Chris Elphick
Storrs, CT
elphick AT sbcglobal.net
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Subject: Another birdsong ID Challenge
From: Don Morgan via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:59:17 -0400 (EDT)
Over the course of this season I've heard several calls that I  just can't 
identify for sure. A lot are incidental, heard once or twice and  gone, But 
some, like this one, I hear over and over. The bird was in  the same area 
for several weeks, at least. Sounds similar to a couple of birds  but not 
close enough that I have any confidence that I'm right. The two I can think of 

are Magnolia and Hooded Warbler. Magnolia is fairly plentiful in  the 
general area; I've never seen or heard a Hooded. Habitat would be ok for either 

one, and the call seems to be consistently coming from the ground or very  
close to it. I have recorded the song several times, but when I play it back 
to  the bird it immediately moves 200 feet away. And yet it's not shy - I 
recorded  this from the road and it was apparently very close, even though, 
once again,  I've never seen the bird or even a movement. Got any ideas?
 
_https://www.dropbox.com/home/UKN%20Bird%2C%20BH%2C%207-12-14_ 
(https://www.dropbox.com/home/UKN%20Bird,%20BH,%207-12-14) 
 
Don Morgan,  Coventry
mntncougar AT aol.com
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Subject: Am. Bitterns, Little Blue Heron - NO
From: Angela Dimmitt via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:32:49 -0400 (EDT)
from Angela Dimmitt
7/25 Sherman/Wimisink marsh - 9:30 - NO American Bitterns this morning, nor 
 Little Blue Heron nor Great Egret.  What was an all-white juvenile little  
blue heron doing up here anyway and could it be connected with the adult 
seen  6/21 in Pawling, NY??? Comments would be appreciated.
Angela
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Subject: Re: Coastal migration-Greenwich
From: greg hanisek via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 05:22:05 -0700
Hi Stefan,

Glad you posted this. I really like keeping track of that kind of thing. 
Bobolinks definitely move early, although they can be hard to detect. I've gone 
to Lighthouse Point on July cold fronts a few times to get a feel for how early 
things move. Your post got me scurrying to my notebooks. 


On July 10, 1995, I had 6 Bobolinks moving through.

On July 20, 1999 I had 50 in 2 hours. I recall that on those dates there were 
males in motley molting plumage, but by the time the main movements occur in 
Aug-early Sept. they'll all be identical, golden in the early morning light at 
Lighthouse. 


Greg Hanisek
Waterbury


On Thursday, July 24, 2014 9:01 PM, Stefan Martin via CTBirds 
 wrote: 

 


I just got finished enjoying a nice coastal flight of Swallows and Blackbirds 
here in Greenwich. The surprise of the evening however were 3 separate groups 
of about 10 Bobolink working their way down as well. I'm not sure I've seen 
Bobolink working the coast this early.. 


About 20 minutes of observing.

Tree Swallows- ~400. 1 large group of about 300 and then a few smaller groups 
following. 

Bank Swallow- 10 (that I could pick out, probably more) mixed in with Tree 
Swallows. 

Red-winged BB- ~200
Purple Martin- ~20 birds feeding over the water and very vocal (not migrant)
Bobolink- ~30-35 total in 3 groups. 


Stefan Martin
Stamford 


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Kingfishers
From: greg hanisek via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 05:05:07 -0700
Regarding the recent discussion about the status of Belted Kingfishers, I 
always get the feeling that these anecdotal threads start to feed off each 
other. Here's some numbers (with obviously many variables possible): 


In July 2014 to date (with a few days left to go) Kingfishers were reported 
from 49 different locations. 

In July 2013 (whole month), they were reported from 53 locations.

So by my count that's almost identical. One of my little pet points is that the 
presence or absence of a species around a yard or a local patch in a given year 
has little meaning for the big picture. In writing newspaper nature columns 
from many years, I'm often contacted by distressed folks who think the absence 
or even reduced number of a species at their feeders or local area has them 
witness to a global cataclysm. Entering all species, including common ones, in 
eBird helps paint the big picture. 


Greg Hanisek
Waterbury
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Subject: Slater Museum Exhibit
From: zellene via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:43:22 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
Yesterday I went to the Slater Museum in Norwich...I had never even heard of it 
before. It is worth a trip, especially for the current exhibit, The Animal 
Heart. This exhibit shows the work of contemporary CT artists, many of birds. 
Keith Mueller has several of his sculptures in the show and it is worth the 
drive just for these alone. His Quetzal is a beautiful sculpture of this bird 
and it is hard to imagine that the delicacy of the piece is actually a carving. 
His Pileated Woodpecker captures this bird perfectly. But the masterwork is his 
Potoo, an amazing piece....I was entranced by this remarkable work and my 
friends had to drag me away. 


The show runs through August 10th.

Zellene

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Subject: Re: Robins' natural habitat
From: Steve Mayo and Rebecca Horowitz via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 18:37:34 -0700
I agree with Don. CT forests are full of breeding American Robins. I'm sure 
that there were at least some forests in pre-Colonial times - that resemble the 
broken, open-undestory, middle-aged forests that currently cover our State. 


Steve Mayo
Bethany





On Thursday, July 24, 2014 4:35 PM, Don Morgan via CTBirds 
 wrote: 

 


I strongly suspect that they have always lived in the deep woods, along 
with most of the other thrushes. I think they probably prefer wet woods of 
mixed conifers and hardwoods, or even all conifers. Actually I suspect any 
woods will do. Probably lakes, streams and marshes all make the surrounding 
woods more attractive. 
Take a drive through the Yale Forest in Ashford/Union if you don't believe 
me. There are more robins there than I've ever seen anywhere except in 
migration. I routinely under-report them on Ebird because I'm afraid the truth 

will not be believed. Next to chickadees they may be the most numerous 
bird there. 

Don Morgan, Coventry
mntncougar AT aol.com
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Subject: Cutthroat, Hamden.
From: Arthur Shippee via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:21:31 -0400
North Lake, Hamden: Immature Rose-breasted Grosbeak at the feeder today. He 
seemed a bit confused by it all. 


Funny, no one one would call them Rose-armpitted Grosbeaks, although that color 
has already come in. 

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Subject: Coastal migration-Greenwich
From: Stefan Martin via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:00:31 -0400
I just got finished enjoying a nice coastal flight of Swallows and Blackbirds 
here in Greenwich. The surprise of the evening however were 3 separate groups 
of about 10 Bobolink working their way down as well. I'm not sure I've seen 
Bobolink working the coast this early.. 


About 20 minutes of observing.

Tree Swallows- ~400. 1 large group of about 300 and then a few smaller groups 
following. 

Bank Swallow- 10 (that I could pick out, probably more) mixed in with Tree 
Swallows. 

Red-winged BB- ~200
Purple Martin- ~20 birds feeding over the water and very vocal (not migrant)
Bobolink- ~30-35 total in 3 groups. 


Stefan Martin
Stamford 


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Forster's Terns
From: Hank Golet via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:29:29 -0400
From Hank Golet
7/24/ Old Lyme, Lord's Cove, 5 Adult FORSTER'S TERNS
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Subject: Hammo white-faced ibis
From: Russ Smiley via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:10:16 -0400
Hammonasset Beach SP, Madison, CT 24 July 2014 6:45 PM: white-faced ibis seen 
from Cedar Island platform accompanied by one GLIB. 


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Re: Robin question
From: Mary Mushinsky via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:09:36 -0400
Gary,
I have seen robins eat seeds in winter (the seed heads of staghorn 
sumac).  Mary Mushinsky, Wallingford

On 7/24/2014 11:38 AM, Gary Prestash via CTBirds wrote:
> As a bit of a follow up to Paul Carrier’s question concerning the American 
Robin’s habitat pre-grass lawn days, I have a rather unusual robin in my 
yard. This robin continues to show up on one of my seed feeders. I have a 
plastic tray underneath a tubular feeder filled with hulled sunflower seeds and 
this robin has been up on that plastic tray eating the hulled sunflower off and 
on for several weeks now. Robins are primarily ground feeders, eating worms and 
insects. This guy is actually staying on the plastic tray and chomping away on 
the hulled sunflower! Anyone seen this behavior before? 

>
> Also had a male Baltimore Oriole land on the same feeder/tray a week or so 
ago, but he was not interested in the sunflower seed and flew over to an oriole 
feeder with grape jelly in it. 

>
>
> Gary Prestash
> Hamden
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Subject: Audubon, "Early Drawings"
From: Arthur Shippee via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:45:07 -0400
An opportunity that may interest several of you. A nice local used book store & 
cafe here in Hamden, Books & Co., have copies of the following. 


Audubon: Early Drawings. Published by Harvard UP, 2008, for $125. 116 prints. 
Brand new copies for $38.75. (Several copies, still cello-wrapped & boxed for 
mailing.) 


(More info on the book: 
http://www.hup.harvard.edu/features/audubon-early-drawings.html) 


You can go there or call them:  (It's a great place to drop by.)

Books & Co., Hamden

1235 Whitney Ave (at Putnam Ave.)
Hamden, CT 06517‎
(203) 248-9449

http://booksandcompany.blogspot.com
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Subject: Re: Robins' natural habitat
From: Don Morgan via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:35:01 -0400 (EDT)
I strongly suspect that they have always lived in the deep  woods, along 
with most of the other thrushes. I think they probably prefer wet  woods of 
mixed conifers and hardwoods, or even all conifers. Actually I suspect  any 
woods will do. Probably lakes, streams and marshes all make the surrounding  
woods more attractive.  
Take a drive through the Yale Forest in Ashford/Union if you  don't believe 
me. There are more robins there than I've ever seen anywhere  except in 
migration. I routinely under-report them on Ebird because I'm afraid the truth 

will not be believed. Next to chickadees they may be the most numerous  
bird there. 
 
Don Morgan,  Coventry
mntncougar AT aol.com
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Subject: Crackles
From: Lisa Gagnon via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:25:43 -0700
Lisa Stafford Spgs. I usually have about 12 grackles that fly over the
house every am and evening since spring. Now I have a different group
coming into the woods in the back now big flock of at least 30. Moving
around already. Sad summer is going so fast.
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Subject: Common yellowthroats
From: sosipatra via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:47:57 -0400 (EDT)
Hi there,

I have a young juvenile male, a male and female yellow throated warblers 
hanging around my yard in Barkhamsted. 

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Subject: Re: Robins
From: Jonathan Schwartz via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:33:10 -0400
There have always been natural meadows here, so robins would have had worms
to eat, although Bent (I think) notes that robins were not as common in
early days than they are now.  They have benefited from human manipulation
of the environment.

As for them eating seeds, they eat berries and seeds all winter.

Jon

"Popular is not the same as True."

Information for students, parents and teachers at http://www.jschwartz.com
Blog:  http://blog.jschwartz.com
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Subject: Re: Question on Grass Lawns
From: Robert Mirer via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:53:39 -0400
Hi Paul: Robins are inhabitants of open woodlands, and would have found lots of 
native worms in the leaf litter on the forest floor (though the earthworms they 
are now gleaning from our lawns is a species introduced by European settlors). 
And further west, they would also have found easy pickings in mixed 
prairie-woodland habitat. 


Rob Mirer
Mooodus

From: Carrier Graphics via CTBirds 
Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2014 11:13 AM
To: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org 
Subject: [CT Birds] Question on Grass Lawns

I am once again curious about the following subject, and hope someone on this 
site might know the answer to this. 

I have often wondered about what the American Robin's habitat was before the 
advent of the American Lawn. There were no grass lawns before America was 
settled by the white man. Today our country is now covered with many more open 
grassy areas including numerous cut grass lawns. I can not remember ever seeing 
our Robins living or feeding in other habitat other than our numerous grass 
lawns. Yesterday in my thick back woods, I spotted a Wood Thrush bathing in a 
small stream and thought, "I never saw a Robin in here ever." 

So What is the answer? What habitat did the Robin occupy before their were cut 
grass lawns? 

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Subject: King Fishers
From: Lisa Gagnon via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:39:58 -0700
Lisa G Stafford Springs. 7/24. I've seen my king Fishers in my normal spot.
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Subject: Long-tailed Duck, Mliford Point
From: Stephen Spector via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:37:28 -0700
From Charla & Steve Spector, 7/24/14, 10:45 AM, resting on western end of 
sandbar at CACC, adult male Long-tailed Duck (photo obtained) 


charsjs AT sbcglobal.net
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Subject: Robin question
From: Gary Prestash via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 11:38:31 -0400
As a bit of a follow up to Paul Carrier’s question concerning the American 
Robin’s habitat pre-grass lawn days, I have a rather unusual robin in my 
yard. This robin continues to show up on one of my seed feeders. I have a 
plastic tray underneath a tubular feeder filled with hulled sunflower seeds and 
this robin has been up on that plastic tray eating the hulled sunflower off and 
on for several weeks now. Robins are primarily ground feeders, eating worms and 
insects. This guy is actually staying on the plastic tray and chomping away on 
the hulled sunflower! Anyone seen this behavior before? 


Also had a male Baltimore Oriole land on the same feeder/tray a week or so ago, 
but he was not interested in the sunflower seed and flew over to an oriole 
feeder with grape jelly in it. 



Gary Prestash
Hamden
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Subject: Question on Grass Lawns
From: Carrier Graphics via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 08:13:32 -0700
I am once again curious about the following subject, and hope someone on this 
site might know the answer to this. 

I have often wondered about what the American Robin's habitat was before the 
advent of the American Lawn. There were no grass lawns before America was 
settled by the white man. Today our country is now covered with many more open 
grassy areas including numerous cut grass lawns. I can not remember ever seeing 
our Robins living or feeding in other habitat other than our numerous grass 
lawns. Yesterday in my thick back woods, I spotted a Wood Thrush bathing in a 
small stream and thought, "I never saw a Robin in here ever." 

So What is the answer? What habitat did the Robin occupy before their were cut 
grass lawns?  

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Subject: Re: Sandy Pt
From: Frank Mantlik via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:39:50 -0400
Hi Maria,
Two Red-necked Stints? Or fading Sanderlings, perhaps?
Frank Mantlik

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 24, 2014, at 10:32 AM, Maria Stockmal via CTBirds 
 wrote: 

> 
> Today, 2 Red-necked Stints, Horned Grebe (possibly ill or hurt since it does 
not swim only floats), 5 Bank Swallows 

> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> Maria Stockmal
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Subject: Sandy Pt
From: Maria Stockmal via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 10:32:42 -0400
Today, 2 Red-necked Stints, Horned Grebe (possibly ill or hurt since it does 
not swim only floats), 5 Bank Swallows 


Sent from my iPhone
Maria Stockmal
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Subject: Bird song ID - nenesis bird
From: Don Morgan via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:39:24 -0400 (EDT)
I have been chasing a bird for weeks, trying to spot it, but  all I ever do 
is hear the song. I've never caught a glimpse of it. It does not  respond 
to anything, not even when I record his song and play it back to  him! The 
bird seems to be up in the trees rather than on or near the  ground, and is 
always in the woods.
The only birds I can think of are Yellow-rump and Redstart; I  think they 
could both fit, but I'm open to other suggestions as well. Sorry  about the 
background noise - it was windy today.
 
 
_https://www.dropbox.com/s/44l2y6f65ful8nl/nenesis%201%2C%20BH%20140723_04.m
p3_ 
(https://www.dropbox.com/s/44l2y6f65ful8nl/nenesis%201,%20BH%20140723_04.mp3) 
 
Don Morgan,  Coventry
mntncougar AT aol.com
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Subject: CACC
From: Beverly Propen via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:39:15 -0400
​7/23 Milford, Connecticut Audubon Coastal Center,  9am-1PM, 80-90F, sunny,
high tide receding.
It's getting rather crowded on the osprey perch and nest. All three
juveniles have fledged, flying beautifully and landing well on the perch
and the nest. At 9am there was a fish in the nest being devoured.  female
feeding chicks as well as the chicks tearing into the fish.  This was a 3
fish morning.  2 other fish were delivered- male was eating the fish on the
perch with 2 juveniles and female was eating the other fish on the nest
with one juvenile.
On the marsh:  1 SNOWY EGRET-flyover, 2 GREAT EGRETS, D.C.
CORMORANT-flyover, 100 +"SHOREBIRDS" (what I used to refer to as peeps),
flying through marsh, 2 LEAST TERNS fishing.
On grounds: PURPLE MARTINS Active in gourds, 2 JUVENILE CARDINALS, 1 FEMALE
ORCHARD ORIOLE,
COMMON GRACKLES, COWBIRDS, MONK PARAKEETS, MOURNING DOVES, SONG
SPARROW-singing very loudly,
3 RED WINGED BLACKBIRDS (2 females & 1 juvenile), BARN SWALLOWS, HOUSE
FINCHES, STARLINGS.
Bev Propen, orange
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Subject: oops!
From: Paul Desjardins via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:14:05 -0400
Forgot to mention that I also observed an American Kestrel and 3 Purple Martins 
at Rocky Hill meadows. 


Paul Desjardins
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Subject: Rocky Hill
From: Paul Desjardins via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:36:20 -0400
This morning at Rocky Hill meadows about a dozen Killdeers, 2 Semipalmated 
Plovers, Solitary Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper and Semipalmated Sandpiper. I very 
seldom see the latter inland. Also, yesterday I noted 2 Belted Kingfishers at 
Great Pond in Simsbury. 


Paul Desjardins
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Subject: FYI - Free State Parks Weekend - parking and museum fees waived Sat. & Sun.
From: "Breslin, Sandy via CTBirds" <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:15:13 +0000
Gov. Malloy Announces 'Free State Parks Weekend' This Saturday and Sunday At 
All Connecticut State Parks 

All Parking and Museum Fees Waived This Weekend as Part of Celebration of State 
Parks Centennial 

 Governor Dannel P. Malloy and Department of Energy and Environmental 
Protection (DEEP) Commissioner Robert Klee today announced that as part of the 
ongoing celebration of the state parks centennial, this upcoming Saturday and 
Sunday -- July 26 and 27 -- will be "Free State Parks Weekend" in Connecticut. 
For the weekend, all parking and museum fees will be waived throughout 
Connecticut's state park system. 

"To encourage everyone to visit a state park in this Centennial year, we are 
waiving fees at our parks this Saturday and Sunday," said Governor Malloy, who 
made the announcement during an event at Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden -- 
one of Connecticut's 107 state parks. "This means we will not charge the usual 
parking fees and we will not collect admission fees at state park museums. With 
this added incentive, we expect many new patrons to visit a park and experience 
first-hand the beauty and outdoor recreation opportunities they offer so close 
to home." 

For more information, please visit Governor Malloy's website: 
http://www.governor.ct.gov/malloy/cwp/view.asp?a=4010&Q=548928 


All the best,

-          Sandy

Sandy Breslin
Director of Governmental Affairs
Audubon Connecticut
185 East Flat Hill Road
Southbury, CT 06488
(203) 804-0488 Cell (Best!)
(203) 264-5098 x306
(203) 264-6332 Fax
www.audubonct.org

Audubon Connecticut, the state office of the National Audubon Society with more 
than 10,000 members statewide, works to protect birds, other wildlife and their 
habitats using science, conservation, education and advocacy for the benefit of 
people and the earth's biological diversity. Through our network of nature 
centers, protected wildlife sanctuaries and local volunteer Chapters, we seek 
to connect people to nature and inspire the next generation of 
conservationists. 



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Subject: Re: Birds feeding
From: Tammy Eustis via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:02:44 -0700
Hi, Craig! (I've been sitting on this email for a while...)
I've noticed a definite feeder up-tick as well. The finches, of course,
are chowing down in greater numbers - but they're into their nesting
period. But the sunflower (2 feeders' worth) and suet have been
decimated by the end of every day. For us, part of it is the grackle
factor - they nest in the area and visit in an extended family group.
But there are also all the hungry fledglings from this year's "crop":
catbird, wrens, titmice, nuthatches, cardinals, and the various
woodpeckers. They certainly have plenty to eat around the yard, but on
some days, it's like a party at the feeders.
:-)  Tammy

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [CT Birds] Birds feeding
From: "minor.craig via CTBirds" 
Date: Mon, July 14, 2014 5:52 pm
To: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org

Has anyone else noticed the birds seem to be eating alot more the past
two weeks ?  I have four feeders out two with sunflower seeds and two
with cracked corn and seed mix usually only fill them about twice a week
. Lately it's almost everyday . Craig vernon 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
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Subject: Kingfishers -- ebird where missing?
From: Arthur Shippee via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:24:19 -0400
Since it seems a spotty year for Kingfishers (no one reporting extras or new?), 
perhaps it would be good to do some ebird documentation, including zeros where 
none have been seen in regular haunts. 


On Jul 23, 2014, at 12:18 PM, Jim Pfeifer via CTBirds 
 wrote: 


> I've had Kingfishers this year at the Scantic River in Somers at Durkee Road, 
as usual. Also recently had three at the Faney Stebbins track up in Longmeadow, 
MA, also as usual. 

> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: CTBirds [mailto:ctbirds-bounces AT lists.ctbirding.org] On Behalf Of 
Tricia Reid via CTBirds 

> Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 12:11 PM
> To: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Kingfishers
> 
> I'm joining the folks who have not seen any kingfishers this year at any of 
their usual haunts in my area of Mansfield Center (pond at Common Fields, along 
the river on the north side of Rte 89 at Mansfield Hollow). 

> 
> --
> Tricia Reid
> Mansfield Center
> reidtri AT gmail.com
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Subject: Re: Kingfishers
From: Jim Pfeifer via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:18:36 +0000
I've had Kingfishers this year at the Scantic River in Somers at Durkee Road, 
as usual. Also recently had three at the Faney Stebbins track up in Longmeadow, 
MA, also as usual. 


-----Original Message-----
From: CTBirds [mailto:ctbirds-bounces AT lists.ctbirding.org] On Behalf Of Tricia 
Reid via CTBirds 

Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 12:11 PM
To: ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Kingfishers

I'm joining the folks who have not seen any kingfishers this year at any of 
their usual haunts in my area of Mansfield Center (pond at Common Fields, along 
the river on the north side of Rte 89 at Mansfield Hollow). 


--
Tricia Reid
Mansfield Center
reidtri AT gmail.com
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Subject: Kingfishers
From: Tricia Reid via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 12:11:21 -0400
I'm joining the folks who have not seen any kingfishers this year at any of
their usual haunts in my area of Mansfield Center (pond at Common Fields,
along the river on the north side of Rte 89 at Mansfield Hollow).

-- 
Tricia Reid
Mansfield Center
reidtri AT gmail.com
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Subject: Am. Bitterns, LITTLE BLUE HERON
From: Angela Dimmitt via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 10:12:34 -0400 (EDT)
from Angela Dimmitt with Matthew Hoyt and Bill Case
7/23 Sherman/Wimisink Marsh 8:30 AM - adult American Bittern + 1 juvenile  
feeding itself;  Also on south pond - all-white LITTLE BLUE HERON (rare  
here) and a Great Egret (unusual here)
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Subject: Silver Sands
From: "Batsford, William via CTBirds" <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:10:06 +0000
7/23 - Silver Sands, Milford
Northern Harrier, 2 Clapper Rail and both Night-Heron
Bill Batsford
New Haven

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Ospreys fledged!
From: Bev via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:18:00 -0400
7/23 CACC, Milford 9am
All 3 osprey chicks have fledged- soAring  through marsh gracefully!.  :). 
Full report to follow 
Bev Propen , orange

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Subject: Red Tailed Hawk-Milford
From: Beverly Perkins via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:55:32 -0400
 I had a pair of Red Tailed hawks nesting in the spring , but now it seems the 
last remaining baby is causing quite the racket squacking all day. I have seen 
him fly by me carrying a mouse, I'm enjoying it but now the neighbors are 
'squacking'. I hope no one harms him 



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Subject: Caspian continues
From: Dan Rottino via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:14:49 -0400
From Dan and Danny Rottino:
7/23/14 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 1 CASPIAN TERN. A lifer for Danny, a new 
state bird for me. We first spotted it just before 7am briefly landing in the 
grassy dune, then it flew off west past Chick's Seafood possibly with a 2nd. At 
7:30 it reappeared flying gracefully and directly in front of me so I could 
appreciate its massive red bill and dark underside to the outer primaries. 
Thanks to Jason and Anthony Rieger for this great find! 


Veni Vidi eBird !
Dan Rottino
East Haddam, CT
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Subject: Stilt Sandpiper and Monk Parakeets at Hammonasset
From: Micky Komara via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 05:47:35 +0000 (UTC)
A Stilt Sandpiper was in Boulder Pond around 7 pm, hanging out with a couple of 
Yellowlegs. Also in attendance, the Little Blue x Tricolored Heron. Along the 
drive into Middle Beach was a pair of Monk Parakeets feeding on the ground. 

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Subject: Louisiana Waterthrush
From: Roy Harvey via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:58:28 -0700
Passing this along.


From Jalna Jaeger
July 20, 3 East ave driveway, not near water
La Waterthrush bobbing on driveway!
New yard bird!
Jalna Jaeger and Sara Jaeger July 22
Ash creek Fairfield, Bufflehead, has been there all summer


Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT

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Subject: Re: Kingfisher
From: Steve Mayo and Rebecca Horowitz via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:46:52 -0700
'Apologies for this tiny dribble of data, and apologies for not checking New 
Haven Summer Bird Count history, but the New Haven SBC came up with five (5) 
Kingfishers. That's a heck of a lot of coverage hours and good habitat. 
'Seems low. 



Again, I'm looking forward to seeing what Joe Zeranski and Patrick Comins have 
to say about our impressions. Stay tuned for a future SBC article in The 
Connecticut Warbler.... 


Steve Mayo
Bethany





On Monday, July 21, 2014 10:53 PM, Rick Gedney via CTBirds 
 wrote: 

 


From Rick Gedney

Guilford, Lake Quonnipaug MON 7/21/14 7:00 PM 

To add to the discussion regarding Belted Kingfisher sightings this year:

1 Belted Kingfisher over middle of lake heading from east shore to west.

I Swim here regularly and first I have seen while swimming. Gender not 
determined. 



Rick Gedney
rrged AT comcast.net
203.410.6222 cell
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Subject: CASPIAN TERN - Sandy Pt
From: Jason Rieger via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 18:05:48 -0400
CASPIAN TERN just flew by (6:05pm)low heading west just in front parking lot

Jason and Anthony Rieger
Wallingford

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Subject: Re: ID help needed
From: Don Morgan via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:56:53 -0400 (EDT)
Thanks to the many of you who unanimously answered  "Chestnut-sided 
Warbler".
Guess I'm the only one who couldn't quite see it. I thought of  it because 
or the yellow cap, but there are virtually none of the other markings  of a 
CSWA other than the wing bars, and the back is all yellow. Obviously, I  
never saw one in that plumage before. I gather it's a juvenile, by the  way.
 
Don Morgan,  Coventry
mntncougar AT aol.com
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Subject: Sherman Bitterns + Litchfield Virginia Rails
From: Ryan MacLean via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 17:53:59 -0400
With Mike Warner & Stefan Martin

Sherman, Wimisink Marsh 10:45 AM.
Momma bittern was right infront of the platform actively hunting. Only one of 
the young ones was seen and it seems to have figured out how to hunt on its own 
(caught atleast one frog). Besides them 4 Hooded Mergansers, 5 Green Herons, 
Bank Swallows, Marsh Wrens, Swamp Sparrows 


Litchfield, White Memorial 1:30 PM
2 VIRGINIA RAILS (seen/heard) on the Little Pond boardwalk. Also 2 BOBOLINKS, 3 
ALDER FLYCATCHERS, 1 female PURPLE FINCH and a BROAD WINGED HAWK. A quick stop 
at Cemetery Pond yielded 3 SOLITARY SANDPIPERS, 3 Green Herons and many Wood 
Ducks. 


Good birding!
-Ryan MacLean

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Subject: East Granby
From: Paul Desjardins via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:50:04 -0400
This afternoon at East Granby Farms among 5 warbler species was a Worm Eating 
Warbler which I took to be a migrant. 

This is a first for me with this species at this location.

Paul Desjardins
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Subject: Re: WHIMBREL, Semi. Sands
From: Frank Mantlik via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:47:27 -0400
Oops,
I meant the Whimbrel was just before LONG Beach.
Frank Mantlik

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 22, 2014, at 2:02 PM, Frank Mantlik via CTBirds 
 wrote: 

> 
> From Frank Mantlik
> 7/22. Milford, Milford Point - One WHITE-WINGED SCOTER continues; eight 
species of shorebirds during morning high tide including 3700 Semipalmated 
Sandpipers (no stint among them that I could find). 

> 
> Stratford, Oak Bluff Ave., salt marsh corner just before entrance to Short 
Beach Park - One WHIMBREL. 

> 
> 7/21. Stratford, Birdseye Boatramp - 2 juvenile Ring-billed Gulls. Seems very 
early for this age RBGU to be here. 

> 
> Frank Mantlik
> Stratford
> www.sunrisebirding.com
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: WHIMBREL, Semi. Sands
From: Frank Mantlik via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:02:46 -0400
From Frank Mantlik
7/22. Milford, Milford Point - One WHITE-WINGED SCOTER continues; eight species 
of shorebirds during morning high tide including 3700 Semipalmated Sandpipers 
(no stint among them that I could find). 


Stratford, Oak Bluff Ave., salt marsh corner just before entrance to Short 
Beach Park - One WHIMBREL. 


7/21. Stratford, Birdseye Boatramp - 2 juvenile Ring-billed Gulls. Seems very 
early for this age RBGU to be here. 


Frank Mantlik
Stratford
www.sunrisebirding.com

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Subject: Warbler ID
From: Carrier Graphics via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:12:30 -0700
Don - I believe that is an Immature Chestnut sided Warbler -

Paul Carrier
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Subject: Wilton Purple Martin
From: James Hunter via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 15:40:42 +0000
Monday 7/21/2014



Wilton, CT. at Wilton YMCA - 10:55am - 11:20am - 1 Purple Martin see flying and 
heard as well. The only other bird in the area was a cliff swallow flying about 
50-100 feet above the martin the whole time. 




This was my first martin in Wilton.



Jim Hunter

Bridgeport, CT.



J. Hunter
WHS Biology & AP Environmental Science
WHS Organic Garden Organizer
Wilton CT. 06897
(203) 762-0381 x 6032
hunterj AT wilton.k12.ct.us

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Subject: 'Our Birds': Migratory Journeys Converge In Baltimore Gardens
From: Arthur Shippee via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 07:54:07 -0400
A nice story about spreading the base of ecology, down in Baltimore. 

I found the following story on the NPR iPhone App

'Our Birds': Migratory Journeys Converge In Baltimore Gardens
by Ricardo Sandoval-Palos

NPR - July 22, 2014

A couple of times a month, a group of migrant women and their children gather 
to plant shrubs and flowers in Baltimore's expansive Patterson Park.... 



http://www.npr.org/2014/07/22/331612575/our-birds-migratory-journeys-converge-in-baltimore-gardens?sc=17&f=3&utm_source=iosnewsapp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=app 




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Subject: Re: I D help needed
From: Paul Desjardins via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 07:00:57 -0400
Don, it is an immature Chesnut Sided Warbler.

Paul Desjardins

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Subject: ID Help needed!
From: Don Morgan via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 00:13:21 -0400 (EDT)
Thought I knew my warblers but I have to admit, this one's got  me stumped. 
I thought maybe one of the Bluewing/Goldenwing hybrids, but it  doesn't 
seem to fit either one. All pics in set have been cropped and sharpened  (very 
fuzzy - you take what you can get). Only the 4th one has been brightened a  
little to bring out the color. Have at it!
 
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kxndg7hrsrk9e66/AABZE3xeX-3jtfjo81pd8haWa
 
Don Morgan,  Coventry
mntncougar AT aol.com
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Subject: Accipiter ID
From: Carrier Graphics via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 20:54:37 -0700
I agree with Don about the Accipiter ID, these pictures suggest to little to 
make a positive ID. Most of the time with these 2 birds it is easier to tell 
what it is by how it flies, acts or just plain carries itself. On all the field 
marks they are suppose to have, I've seen them all occasionally be wrong. With 
Accipiters it takes field marks plus size, how it presents itself in flight, 
its actions and how good a view you see it in. Another words, we often need 
time to see it well to make an ID. As was mentioned, even the best field marks 
of each can be on or not with any particular Accipiter. I've seen Coops with 
squared off tails and Sharpies with round. Sharpies with largish looking heads 
and Coops with smallish heads, and both can appear the same as the bird passes 
or is on coming. But just a flight picture is usually not enough to positively 
ID these Accips. I wonder if they occasionally have trouble IDing their own 
kind? 


Paul Carrier
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Subject: Kingfisher
From: Rick Gedney via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:53:18 -0400
From Rick Gedney

Guilford, Lake Quonnipaug  MON 7/21/14  7:00 PM 

To add to the discussion regarding Belted Kingfisher sightings this year:

1 Belted Kingfisher over middle of lake heading from east shore to west.

I Swim here regularly and first I have seen while swimming. Gender not 
determined. 



Rick Gedney
rrged AT comcast.net
203.410.6222 cell
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Subject: 7/21 birds
From: Nick Bonomo via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:50:51 -0400
Hi all, just a quick note on a few birds today.

Tom Johnson and I had a Red-breasted Nuthatch at Lake Bethany in Bethany.

A low tide stop at Sandy Pt with Tom was pretty quiet. We had 9 common 
shorebird species and a small flock of roosting Common Terns. 


The evening high tide at Milford Pt with Doug Gochfeld, Tom Johnson, Julian 
Hough. The male White-winged Scoter continued. The roosting Semipalmated 
Sandpiper flock was estimated at a minimum of 2,500 birds. 


Nick Bonomo
Wallingford, CT
www.shorebirder.com
nbonomo(at)gmail(dot)com

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Subject: Re: Stratford Greenway Incident
From: Donna Caporaso via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:53:19 -0400 (EDT)
Thanks Tina. Patrick has been corresponding with someone in DEEP who asked for 
clarification as well. In the 4 years I've been spending time at the Greenway, 
a lot of time, I have never heard nor seen any one hazing the birds. It will be 
interesting to see what the outcome is. 



Please keep me and Patrick posted on what the FWS says. DEEP sent me a message 
that they were looking into the matter but I haven't heard from FWS yet. 



Donna


Donna Caporaso
Stratford, CT



-----Original Message-----
From: Tina and Peter Green 
To: Donna Caporaso 
Cc: ctbirds 
Sent: Mon, Jul 21, 2014 6:59 am
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Stratford Greenway Incident


Donna,
Thank you for bringing this incident to our attention. I will call CT FWS today 

to get an explanation as to why this occurred.

Tina Green
Westport
Wellfleet MA
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 20, 2014, at 9:21 PM, "Donna Caporaso via CTBirds" 
 

wrote:
> 
> I have posted this in a private message to the CT FWS and DEEP via their 
Facebook pages. I am appalled! This happened today. 
> "While at the Greenway in Stratford, a man (photo sent to both) was setting 
off what I thought was a shot gun at the geese, swans and other birds that were 

feeding in the cove. I reported it to the Stratford Police officer monitoring 
the Boat Ramp. More "shots" were heard coming from within the plant property 
and 

birds (Gulls and Pigeons mostly, and 4 Osprey that I suspect are the family 
that 

was nesting on the the roof or near the roof of the building closet to the 
Greenway, all took flight. I then drove over to Sniffens Lane to see what was 
going on and the Police told me that this man is a government employee who has 
a 

permit to shoot off charges to scare the birds away. Away from what? I know 
that 

property is to finally be developed and they think they are going to develop 
the 

Cove as well. What right does he have to aim his charges at birds in the cove 
of 

the Greenway?! That is not his concern and it needs to not continue. There are 
Oystercatchers that may have been nesting on that rock peninsula that juts off 
by Knapps Landing, Terns are nesting in the area, Cormorants feed in the cove 
and Housatonic River as well as the Osprey, various Herons, Sandpipers. I am at 

the Greenway in the morning for at least 45 mins, during my lunch break and 
often after work. I am there several times over the weekend (it's great birding 

and bugging and close to home). I have never once heard anyone from the Avco 
property setting off charges from there - only from the airport. Why are they 
all of sudden interested in clearing out the birds - especially the Osprey 
(active nest on a pole in the parking lot on the corner of Main and Sniffens - 
those young have not fledged as of today. I would appreciate any info you can 
share. Thank you."
> 
> 
> I cannot believe the permit would include birds in the cove or even anywhere 
near the Osprey!  Ugh!
> 
> 
> Donna Caporaso
> Stratford, CT
> 
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Subject: Old Lyme WW Scoter
From: Hank Golet via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:23:46 -0400
From Hank Golet
7/21, Old Lyme, Great Island, male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER. As I was kayaking 
around the south tip of Great Island I saw the birds head above the grass at 
the edge of the bank . When I got closer it went into the water and swam out a 
ways. When I came back by an hour later it was out a hundred feet 
diving/feeding. 

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Subject: Bbb b
From: Comcast via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 20:29:12 -0400
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Subject: Bird I'd. Please
From: Lisa Gagnon via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:57:31 -0700
Lisa G. Stafford Springs. 7/21. For the last few days I've had a bird that
I've heard I don't know how many times over the years and I know who it is
but for the life of me I'm drawing a blank. It's call is preee. You can
respond offline
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Subject: Accipiter ID
From: Joseph Cala via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:05:17 -0400
Don-

I was waiting for one of you hawk-watchers to chime in and question the
ID.  :)

You're absolutely correct that it's not a clear cut bird by any means.
This particular bird has quite a few things going on that makes the ID
harder, and the fact that you're dealing with male Coop/female Sharpie
makes the ID even more difficult.

I absolutely agree that the bird is in a state of molt -- it's a juvenile
molting into it's first adult plumage.  I also agree that the tail is long
-- which compared to body size is another point for Cooper's Hawk.

The head looks large, to me, and there is much more projection then I'd
expect for a Sharpie.  Of course both of those items are 100% subjective
unless you're looking at a small male Sharpie or a large female Cooper's
Hawk -- some birds make it easy, others don't.  I don't think that trait is
diagnostic unless you're at either extreme of the spectrum.

The wing shape/position can be tough - especially when you're dealing with
two photos instead of watching the bird.  I'll be completely honest -- I
hate accips in flight.  I find them to be 100x tougher than perched birds.

The streaking, however, is something I'll go to bat on as being one of the
most useful field marks on juvenile Accips.  Of course there's variation,
and some Cooper's hawk (especially in the west) are definitely in the range
of Sharp-shinned, and there's also Sharpies that show reduced streaking,
but it's certainly a very valuable field mark that I don't think should be
tossed aside because it can be variable -- almost all field marks can.

The last several points you make are valid ones, and ones that I'd expect
from a seasoned hawk-watcher.  You all have much more experience with wing
shape and 'behavior (ie flight style, wing beats, etc) and can use those
skills to readily ID birds flying by--when they're too far away to see
plumage details.  I think on the flip side we need to be cautious when
IDing from pictures in the sense that just because we didn't see the bird
fly doesn't mean we can't make a solid ID.  It might make the ID more
difficult, but most birds can be ID'd from decent photos.

The bird was photographed recently in Boise, Idaho.  Quite a few Cooper's
red dots on the map in that area, not a single for Sharpie.  Of course
that's a double edged sword in assuming that others have made correct ID's
on these species.

I'm very confident that based upon the streaking, head size/projection,
tail length, unstreaked throat, etc...that this bird is a Cooper's Hawk.  I
understand that with 'tweener' birds like this there will never be a 100%
agreeance and that's fine.  The debate is always fun, though.

Definitely look forward to seeing some of you at Lighthouse Pt this
fall--just don't ask me to ID anything flying by.  I'll stick with hiding
behind my camera -- raptors in flight without photos are not a strong suit
of mine!
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Subject: Re: Accipitor ID
From: Don Morgan via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:57:40 -0400 (EDT)
Joe, I think, based on the 2 photos you supplied, it is  unrealistic to 
flatly state the bird is a Coop. It well may be, but there is  nothing so 
diagnostic in those photos as to rule out a Sharpie. There are too many things 

that can't be told from these pictures to make a certain ID in my  opinion, 
which is why I didn't respond and perhaps why none of the other LHP  
hawkwatch counters did either. 
It does appear that the bird is still in a molt, or, given that  it's a 
juvenile, may be still growing out it's first full set of flight  feathers. 
However, the tail is quite long for either species, and I doubt that  any 
remaining growth is going to change the shape very much. At the same time, I 
can 

agree, the head PROJECTION,  which is the real ID key, does look long  for 
a Sharpie, although the head itself looks rather small in comparison to the  
body. It is possible the angle the photos were taken from has some 
influence on  the appearance. 
And in the 2nd photo the wings do look rather short for a  Coop. I don't 
think the wing shape in either photo can be considered  diagnostic.  It's true 
that juvenile Sharpies often have darker and more  extensive striping on 
the breast and belly, but it is extremely  variable,  and to use it alone 
would be a mistake. 
One thing not mentioned at all in this discussion is the  white on the tip 
of the tail. Generally a Coop will have more than a Sharpie and  more than 
is shown in the photos. There are some other appearance issues as  well.
But it's the things we cant see in those photos that are the  most 
important. Number one, how big is it? In the 2nd photo it looks fairly small, 
but 

frankly that can't really be told from a photo. An experienced  hawk watcher 
will have a fairly good sense of size given that good of a look  (almost 
straight up) in the air. If it appears really small, chances greatly  increase 
that it's a sharpie. A small male is unmistakable. 
Number 2, how does it fly? Both species use "flap flap glide",  but one of 
the better identifiers is how forceful the "flap" is. A Coop  generally has 
a fairly strong, powerful looking stroke, while a Sharpie  usually looks 
relatively weak and tentative. And notice the word "relatively."  Beyond that, 
both birds tend to bounce around a bit, but it is much more  noticeable in a 
Sharpie, particularly if there is a good breeze blowing. 
Head projection is a much better indicator when the bird is  seen flying 
because you generally can see it from different angles. Sometimes  the head 
almost seems to disappear between the wings on a  Sharpie.
Were there any other birds with it? Was there any chasing going  on? 
Sharpies tend to chase both each other and Coops more than Coops do, though 
both 

will, on occasion. Sharpies are somewhat more likely to be in pairs or  
groups than Coops are. 
Another question, of a different sort; what is the  relative abundance of 
the 2 species in the area where it was seen? At Light  House Point we have a 
relatively high count of Coopers Hawks, but in most places  on the east 
coast the Sharpie percentage is far higher. On the other hand,  If you see an 
accipitor in southeastern Arizona, 99 to 1 (or more) it's a Coop.  I've birded 
there for years and only this year did I see a Sharpie. Took  me  a long 
time to make my decision on it. This may seem an odd point, but  I think it 
applies the same as it would to a possible rarity sighting: always  answer why 
it isn't what you would expect to see first. 
Again, I'm not disputing that it may be a Coop, but I think we  have too 
little information to be certain.
 
Don Morgan
Coventry, Ct
 
 
---- Joseph Cala via CTBirds  wrote:  
> All-
> 
> One of the ID forums that I participate in had a  very lengthy debate over
> the ID of this accipiter, and I figured that  since this one species that 
so
> many folks struggle with -- and given  that we'll start seeing a lot more
> juveniles of these species in the  coming months -- a picture quiz might 
be
> fun.
> 
> This  particular bird presents some very fun ID challenges -- I won't cite
>  which ones specifically because that would potentially give away the ID.
>  
> This bird was seen in Boise, Idaho recently.  Here are the two  pictures
> that were presented:
> 
>  
http://i1269.photobucket.com/albums/jj591/Hopsing129/IMGP6071_zpsbf863229.jpg
>  
>  
http://i1269.photobucket.com/albums/jj591/Hopsing129/IMGP6069_zps072b8181.jpg
>  
> I'd love to hear everyone's opinions on this ID -- and why, if  you're
> interested in playing along.  As an FYI I've had two very  esteemed raptor
> ID experts (and authors) concur on the ID.
>  _______________________________________________

From: Joseph Cala 
To:  ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Accipiter ID quiz -  Answer
Message-ID:

Content-Type:  text/plain; charset=UTF-8

All-

Only received a few responses (and  see a few more on the forum) but
hopefully more of you were able to take a  look at the pictures and
formulate an ID.

I specifically picked this  bird because it represents probably the most
mis-ID'd hawk there is out  there.  The whole accipiter complex can be
difficult (remember the  recent backyard Goshawk reports/pics that all
turned out to be Cooper's  Hawks) but the most challenging in that complex
by far is male Cooper's Hawks  and female Sharp-shinned Hawks.

Most hawk watch folks or savvy birders  can instantly recognize a female
Cooper's Hawk or male Sharp-shinned  Hawk--the differences in flight and
size are pretty unmistakable.   Things become infinitely more difficult when
it's the other way around -- as  male Cooper's can be almost as small as
female Sharp-shinned with just a  couple of inches in overlap--obvious in
the hand, not in the field.

In  any event, the bird in question is in fact a male Cooper's Hawk.   The
larger head, unstreaked throat, sparse thin breast streaks that  fade
towards the tail all point towards that ID.  I know the tail is a  major
point of contention - it helps to note that the bird is currently in  molt
which is making the tail appear much more Sharp-shinned like than  the
normal graduated/rounded Cooper's tail.

The wings and profile of  the bird in the 1st picture definitely appear
Sharp-shinned at first glance,  but understand that the bird is in a 'wing
down-flap' and makes those wings  appear much stockier than they are --
which you can see in the 2nd picture  for comparison's sake.  The 2nd photo
shows less stocky, and much longer  wings.



Don Morgan,  Coventry
mntncougar AT aol.com
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Subject: Milford WW SCOTER, Semi Sands
From: Frank Mantlik via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 13:30:44 -0400
From Frank Mantlik,
7/21 - Milford, Milford Point - 1 male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER (swimming off 
nesting bar), at least 2000 Semipalmated Sandpipers on marsh mudflats behind 
CAS Coastal Center as tide falling. 


Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Sniffens Lane
From: Robert Hutton via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 09:34:09 -0700
I worked security at the Stratford Army Engine Plant and patrolled that site 
daily for a while. At this time of year there were many birds nesting in the 
area, and in particular on the roofs of the buildings. The government had a man 
come in to remove the nests and eggs from the entire site. I cannot say too 
much about the site, but it is the condition of the site which has delayed its 
redevelopment. Only two buildings were being used at that time, the main 
building and the Aircraft Museum, across the road. I am not sure if the Museum 
is still open but there are very few staff on that site, though security is 
still strong and essentially so. 

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Subject: Re: Stratford Greenway Incident
From: Tina and Peter Green via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 06:59:00 -0400
Donna,
Thank you for bringing this incident to our attention. I will call CT FWS today 
to get an explanation as to why this occurred. 


Tina Green
Westport
Wellfleet MA
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 20, 2014, at 9:21 PM, "Donna Caporaso via CTBirds" 
 wrote: 

> 
> I have posted this in a private message to the CT FWS and DEEP via their 
Facebook pages. I am appalled! This happened today. 

> "While at the Greenway in Stratford, a man (photo sent to both) was setting 
off what I thought was a shot gun at the geese, swans and other birds that were 
feeding in the cove. I reported it to the Stratford Police officer monitoring 
the Boat Ramp. More "shots" were heard coming from within the plant property 
and birds (Gulls and Pigeons mostly, and 4 Osprey that I suspect are the family 
that was nesting on the the roof or near the roof of the building closet to the 
Greenway, all took flight. I then drove over to Sniffens Lane to see what was 
going on and the Police told me that this man is a government employee who has 
a permit to shoot off charges to scare the birds away. Away from what? I know 
that property is to finally be developed and they think they are going to 
develop the Cove as well. What right does he have to aim his charges at birds 
in the cove of the Greenway?! That is not his concern and it needs to not 
continue. There are Oystercatchers that may have been nesting on that rock 
peninsula that juts off by Knapps Landing, Terns are nesting in the area, 
Cormorants feed in the cove and Housatonic River as well as the Osprey, various 
Herons, Sandpipers. I am at the Greenway in the morning for at least 45 mins, 
during my lunch break and often after work. I am there several times over the 
weekend (it's great birding and bugging and close to home). I have never once 
heard anyone from the Avco property setting off charges from there - only from 
the airport. Why are they all of sudden interested in clearing out the birds - 
especially the Osprey (active nest on a pole in the parking lot on the corner 
of Main and Sniffens - those young have not fledged as of today. I would 
appreciate any info you can share. Thank you." 

> 
> 
> I cannot believe the permit would include birds in the cove or even anywhere 
near the Osprey! Ugh! 

> 
> 
> Donna Caporaso
> Stratford, CT
> 
> _______________________________________________
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Subject: Hummingbird
From: "minor.craig via CTBirds" <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 04:14:06 -0400
Finally got the first hummingbird at the feeder today !


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
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Subject: Accipiter ID - Answer
From: Joseph Cala via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 22:20:43 -0400
Arthur-

Can I claim 'yes and no'?  Ha!

I would *strongly* caution anyone from using a single accipiter field mark
as being 100% diagnostic -- at least in the field.  Clearly size in the
hand is diagnostic, but plumage and/or structure field marks need to be
used with some caution.

The problem with structure field marks is that they're all subjective.
Several of the folks who have looked at this bird (here and ID forum) have
stated that the head isn't that big, that the wings are stocky, etc etc.
So relative head size on a flying bird can certainly be very subjective and
depends on what one considers 'large'.

Typically when you have an unknown accip with a head that appears large and
sticks out a ways past the wings--yes, it'll be a Coop.  There are also the
weird Sharpies that have larger heads (females) that can fool you.  When
attempting to ID these birds, juveniles especially, I'd advocate for a
multiple field mark approach.

Heck, even rounded tails and tail feather graduation CAN be diagnostic, if
the person making the ID remembers that female Sharpies frequently show
graduation to the tail and molt and wear can turn a square tail into a
rounded one.

:)
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Subject: Stratford Greenway Incident
From: Donna Caporaso via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:14:06 -0400 (EDT)
I have posted this in a private message to the CT FWS and DEEP via their 
Facebook pages. I am appalled! This happened today. 

"While at the Greenway in Stratford, a man (photo sent to both) was setting off 
what I thought was a shot gun at the geese, swans and other birds that were 
feeding in the cove. I reported it to the Stratford Police officer monitoring 
the Boat Ramp. More "shots" were heard coming from within the plant property 
and birds (Gulls and Pigeons mostly, and 4 Osprey that I suspect are the family 
that was nesting on the the roof or near the roof of the building closet to the 
Greenway, all took flight. I then drove over to Sniffens Lane to see what was 
going on and the Police told me that this man is a government employee who has 
a permit to shoot off charges to scare the birds away. Away from what? I know 
that property is to finally be developed and they think they are going to 
develop the Cove as well. What right does he have to aim his charges at birds 
in the cove of the Greenway?! That is not his concern and it needs to not 
continue. There are Oystercatchers that may have been nesting on that rock 
peninsula that juts off by Knapps Landing, Terns are nesting in the area, 
Cormorants feed in the cove and Housatonic River as well as the Osprey, various 
Herons, Sandpipers. I am at the Greenway in the morning for at least 45 mins, 
during my lunch break and often after work. I am there several times over the 
weekend (it's great birding and bugging and close to home). I have never once 
heard anyone from the Avco property setting off charges from there - only from 
the airport. Why are they all of sudden interested in clearing out the birds - 
especially the Osprey (active nest on a pole in the parking lot on the corner 
of Main and Sniffens - those young have not fledged as of today. I would 
appreciate any info you can share. Thank you." 



I cannot believe the permit would include birds in the cove or even anywhere 
near the Osprey! Ugh! 



Donna Caporaso
Stratford, CT

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Subject: Re: Accipiter ID quiz - Answer
From: Arthur Shippee via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:26:10 -0400
Is the size of the head alone diagnostic? Could a SS have so forward-thrusting 
head? 


The other clues give us confidence, but it would seem the head is determinative 
— nu? 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 20, 2014, at 7:47 PM, Joseph Cala via CTBirds 
 wrote: 

> 
> All-
> 
> Only received a few responses (and see a few more on the forum) but
> hopefully more of you were able to take a look at the pictures and
> formulate an ID.
> 
> I specifically picked this bird because it represents probably the most
> mis-ID'd hawk there is out there.  The whole accipiter complex can be
> difficult (remember the recent backyard Goshawk reports/pics that all
> turned out to be Cooper's Hawks) but the most challenging in that complex
> by far is male Cooper's Hawks and female Sharp-shinned Hawks.
> 
> Most hawk watch folks or savvy birders can instantly recognize a female
> Cooper's Hawk or male Sharp-shinned Hawk--the differences in flight and
> size are pretty unmistakable.  Things become infinitely more difficult when
> it's the other way around -- as male Cooper's can be almost as small as
> female Sharp-shinned with just a couple of inches in overlap--obvious in
> the hand, not in the field.
> 
> In any event, the bird in question is in fact a male Cooper's Hawk.  The
> larger head, unstreaked throat, sparse thin breast streaks that fade
> towards the tail all point towards that ID.  I know the tail is a major
> point of contention - it helps to note that the bird is currently in molt
> which is making the tail appear much more Sharp-shinned like than the
> normal graduated/rounded Cooper's tail.
> 
> The wings and profile of the bird in the 1st picture definitely appear
> Sharp-shinned at first glance, but understand that the bird is in a 'wing
> down-flap' and makes those wings appear much stockier than they are --
> which you can see in the 2nd picture for comparison's sake.  The 2nd photo
> shows less stocky, and much longer wings.
> 
> Hope everyone enjoyed the photos!
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for 
the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut. 

> For subscription information visit 
http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org 


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Subject: Birds I saw at Harkness State Park today
From: Jerilyn Duefrene via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:50:36 -0400
Very exciting morning as I was able to add 3-4 birds to my life list!

Piping Plovers - in the marsh area at Harkness State Park
Semipalmated Plover - same area as the Piping Plover
Adult Breeding Piping Plover
Least Tern

There were many of the Plovers there and sanderlings. I saw about 20 Common
Yellowthroat Warblers - they were all in the tall wildflowers. Very fun to
watch them.

Saw about 6 Great Egrets (I see them at Rocky Neck and Harkness every time
I am there). There was also a family of Osprey too - Mom, Dad and 2 or 3
children.

Great morning at Harkness State Park!

Jeri Duefrene
Niantic
kaymad143 AT gmail.com
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Subject: Accipiter ID quiz - Answer
From: Joseph Cala via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:47:06 -0400
All-

Only received a few responses (and see a few more on the forum) but
hopefully more of you were able to take a look at the pictures and
formulate an ID.

I specifically picked this bird because it represents probably the most
mis-ID'd hawk there is out there.  The whole accipiter complex can be
difficult (remember the recent backyard Goshawk reports/pics that all
turned out to be Cooper's Hawks) but the most challenging in that complex
by far is male Cooper's Hawks and female Sharp-shinned Hawks.

Most hawk watch folks or savvy birders can instantly recognize a female
Cooper's Hawk or male Sharp-shinned Hawk--the differences in flight and
size are pretty unmistakable.  Things become infinitely more difficult when
it's the other way around -- as male Cooper's can be almost as small as
female Sharp-shinned with just a couple of inches in overlap--obvious in
the hand, not in the field.

In any event, the bird in question is in fact a male Cooper's Hawk.  The
larger head, unstreaked throat, sparse thin breast streaks that fade
towards the tail all point towards that ID.  I know the tail is a major
point of contention - it helps to note that the bird is currently in molt
which is making the tail appear much more Sharp-shinned like than the
normal graduated/rounded Cooper's tail.

The wings and profile of the bird in the 1st picture definitely appear
Sharp-shinned at first glance, but understand that the bird is in a 'wing
down-flap' and makes those wings appear much stockier than they are --
which you can see in the 2nd picture for comparison's sake.  The 2nd photo
shows less stocky, and much longer wings.

Hope everyone enjoyed the photos!
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Subject: NJ Euro Golden-Plover Pix
From: Frank Mantlik via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:11:23 -0700
7/20 Pittstown, NJ - Not CT, but Greg Hanisek, Sara Zagorski and I traveled to 
Pittstown (Hunterdon Co.), New Jersey this morning to see the EUROPEAN 
GOLDEN-PLOVER confirmed yesterday. This is a true rarity for North America, 
especially away from Newfoundland. Some photos I obtained can be seen here: 


http://www.surfbirds.com/gallery/display.php?gallery=gallery10

click on "N. America Stop Press"

and
www.flickr.com/photos/avocetfm
click on the thumbnail images to see larger photos

Frank Mantlik
Stratford
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Subject: Marsh wren - Westport
From: Jo via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 17:34:39 -0400
Beautiful, very vocal marsh wren in downtown Westport. Seen along the Saugatuck 
River during today's art festival! 


Jo Fasciolo
Norwalk

Sent from my iPhone
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Subject: Post dispersel is under way!
From: Carrier Graphics via CTBirds <ctbirds AT lists.ctbirding.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:09:04 -0700
Oh I just must post this wonderful sighting I had today, on this site! While 
watering my garden at 3:30 this afternoon here in Harwinton, I catch a movement 
to my left, and on the wire fence just 2 feet away lands an Immature BT Green 
warbler looking at me in the eye at eye level. Then another comes over to join 
it. I believe it was the sound of the water they fancied. Then to my right, 5 
feet away, on my small 5 foot Red Cedar tree lands a Redstart. Then another and 
another! Soon I was surrounded with many Warblers, as close as they could get 
to me at eye level! It is a thrill to see these birds so close, so intimately, 
with no fear of me at all. I did see others a bit off, but they were adults and 
did not want to come to close. All in all their were mostly BT Greens, about 6, 
and about 8 Redstarts. Then comes in 2 Immature Yellow rumped warblers ! I was 
communing with young Warblers of the year, and they sure seemed to like 
watching me water the 

 garden. Ah-love communing this close with nature.

Paul Carrier - Harwinton
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