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Updated on Tuesday, August 30 at 11:04 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Turquoise Jay,©Dan Lane

30 Aug Abbott's Mill Nature Center: Bird Walks start 9/15 [Alice Mohrman ]
29 Aug Last Heronry Survey of 2016 [Christopher Bennett ]
29 Aug Delaware Nature Society's Coverdale Farm Bird Walks Begin September 1 [Derek Stoner ]
29 Aug Reeve at Prime Hook Rd ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
28 Aug Results of Aug 21 Overnight Pelagic out of Lewes [Paul Guris ]
27 Aug Ashland Hawk Watch Begins September 1st [Derek Stoner ]
27 Aug Tricolored Heron NCC [ ]
27 Aug Black Skimmer and Clapper Rail, Prime Hook Beach Road, Sussex County [Dave Kerr ]
26 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 26th, 2016 [Andrew Ednie ]
26 Aug GRAY KINGBIRD - maybe ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
25 Aug A Shorebird Day [Andrew Ednie ]
25 Aug Prime Hook Road, Sussex County [Dave Kerr ]
25 Aug Bombay Hook White Ibises, Shorebirds, Dickcissel, etc [Alan Belford ]
25 Aug Brandywine Birdwalk on Saturday [Andrew Ednie ]
25 Aug RN Phalarope, Bombay Hook NWR, Kent County [Dave Kerr ]
25 Aug White Ibis, Bombay Hook NWR, Kent County [Dave Kerr ]
24 Aug Ruby-throated Hummingbird [Marie Gardner ]
24 Aug Re: Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE [Jerald Reb ]
24 Aug Re: Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE [Patricia Valdata ]
24 Aug Re: Fwd: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook [Maryanne Dolan ]
24 Aug Re: Fwd: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook [Jerald Reb ]
24 Aug Fwd: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook [Dave Kerr ]
24 Aug Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook [Dave Kerr ]
23 Aug Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE [Harry Tiebout ]
23 Aug RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook [Gina Sheridan ]
22 Aug Re: de-birds Digest - 20 Aug 2016 to 21 Aug 2016 (#2016-195) ["sheilaannand ." ]
22 Aug Re: de-birds Digest - 20 Aug 2016 to 21 Aug 2016 (#2016-195) [Joel & Sheryl Martin ]
21 Aug DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop a Tower [Bill Stewart ]
20 Aug Re: Question about shorebirding in the Prime Hook NWR area [Joshua Malbin ]
20 Aug Re: Frawley Stadium - Common Nighthawks [Meghann ]
19 Aug Migrants in Dover Today [Jerald R ]
19 Aug Re: Frawley Stadium - Common Nighthawks ["Carolyn D'Amico" ]
19 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 19th, 2016 [Andrew Ednie ]
19 Aug Frawley Stadium - Common Nighthawks ["Sarah L." ]
18 Aug Shorebirds August 17 [Michael A Smith ]
13 Aug Birds at Bombay Hook Today [Jerald R ]
13 Aug Question about shorebirding in the Prime Hook NWR area [Joshua Malbin ]
13 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 12th, 2016 [Andrew Ednie ]
11 Aug Least bittern [Jeff & Deborah Climie ]
8 Aug Turkey Point Hawk Watch [Patricia Valdata ]
8 Aug Joint DOS-ABA Shorebird Trip 8/13 BHNWR [Bill Stewart ]
8 Aug Middle Run Migrants Today (New Castle County) [Derek Stoner ]
8 Aug Oak Grove area 8/7 ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
8 Aug Oak Grove area 8/7 ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
5 Aug RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 5th, 2016 [Andrew Ednie ]
5 Aug Bucktoe Creek Preserve bird walks [joe sebastiani ]
5 Aug Delaware Pacific Loon - any photos? [Tom Johnson ]
5 Aug Re: de-birds Digest - 3 Aug 2016 to 4 Aug 2016 (#2016-187) [Clarks Captures ]
4 Aug DOS Flyer Satisfaction Survey - Take 3 Minutes To Help Us Better Serve the Delaware Birding Community [Kelley Nunn ]
4 Aug Pacific Loon & GB Tern [Gina Sheridan ]
3 Aug Re: Pacific Loon [Jerald Reb ]
3 Aug Re: Pacific Loon [Patricia Valdata ]
3 Aug Re: Pacific Loon + Prime Hook Rd [Jerald Reb ]
3 Aug Re: Pacific Loon + Prime Hook Rd ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
3 Aug Pacific Loon closeup? [John ]
2 Aug Pacific Loon [Colin Campbell ]
2 Aug thanks for the location info [Patricia Valdata ]
2 Aug Re: Summering Loons in DE [Patricia Valdata ]
1 Aug Red-headed woodpecker [MannyB ]
1 Aug 7/31 at Oak Grove ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
1 Aug 7/31 at Oak Grove ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
30 Jul Brandywine Creek SP birdwalk [Andrew Ednie ]
30 Jul 1 Marbled Godwit and 3 Hudsonian Godwits over Prime Hook Rd [Robert McLean ]
29 Jul RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 29th, 2016 [Andrew Ednie ]
29 Jul Birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State Park, 7/30/16 [Andrew Ednie ]
29 Jul Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern [Michael Moore ]
29 Jul Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern [Anne Meddings ]
29 Jul Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern [Dave Kerr ]
29 Jul Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern [joe sebastiani ]
29 Jul Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern [dcoffin5 ]
29 Jul Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern [Rob Blye ]
28 Jul Grier's Pond Least Bittern [ ]
28 Jul Red-headed Woodpecker Locations [Jerald R ]
27 Jul Cape Henlopen Pacific Loon Photos [Ed Sigda ]
26 Jul Forster's Tern [Jerry ]
26 Jul Evening Herons Survey Tomorrow [Christopher Bennett ]

Subject: Abbott's Mill Nature Center: Bird Walks start 9/15
From: Alice Mohrman <alice AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 12:01:26 -0400
Hello All Birders --Novice to Expert!  
Join us on Thursday mornings, 8:30 am to 10, starting Sept. 15 through Oct. 27. 

Meet at the Abbott's Mill Nature Center, 15411 Abbott's Pond Road, Milford, DE 
19963. Binoculars are available to borrow. 

For more information:  (302) 422-0847

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Subject: Last Heronry Survey of 2016
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:28:22 -0400
I will be conducting the final Evening Heron Survey this Wednesday
beginning at 5:34 pm and ending at 8:04 pm.  The survey is a non-invasive
method of monitoring the heronry on Pea Patch Island that DNREC's Division
of Parks and Recreation has been conducting since 2003.  The last Wednesday
of each month from February through August we gather in Battery Park at the
end of Clinton Street in Delaware City, and start counting herons, egret
and ibis flying to and from the island 2 hours before sunset and stop 30
minutes after sunset.  In recent years we have relied on the help of
dedicated keen-eyed volunteers that are able to identify the nine species
of long-legged wading birds that nest and roost on the island.  Not sure if
you are up to IDing birds in flight (often from a long way off) but still
want to come out and help - the more eyes on the sky the less likely that
birds will slip by undetected.  Or you can come out and just enjoy the
birds.  August is a relatively slow month, count-wise, but we usually get
at least one or two really good non-herons to make the count go by a bit
faster,  And with fewer birds to count - we can spend more time helping
with ID tips - especially for those pesky white young Little Blue Herons.
Traditionally we have gone to dinner afterwards at one of the local
restaurants - but usually wait until the night of to see how many people
are interested.

I hope you can come out and join us.

Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environrnental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation

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Subject: Delaware Nature Society's Coverdale Farm Bird Walks Begin September 1
From: Derek Stoner <derek AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 18:18:05 +0000
Greetings:

The Delaware Nature Society's weekly Thursday morning bird walks will be held 
this Fall at the scenic Coverdale Farm Preserve, a 356-acre oasis of 
carefully-managed habitat in the Piedmont hills north of Hockessin, DE. These 
guided walks will introduce the birders to the diverse birdlife found on the 
preserve during Fall migration. 


The walks will be held every Thursday morning until the end of October. The 
walks begin at 8:00am and end around 10:00am. The meeting place is the parking 
lot at Coverdale Farm (543 Way Road, Greenville, DE). Directions are available 
at: www.delnature.org/Coverdale 


The Coverdale Farm Preserve eBird page may be viewed at: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L1974500 


Coverdale Farm is only open to birding during these guided walks, so we 
encourage folks to come take part in these free programs on Thursdays in 
September and October. Membership in the Delaware Nature Society is encouraged 
but not required to participate. 


Join us this Thursday, September 1, for the kick-off walk of the season. Jim 
White will be the leader of this outing. 


Good birding,

Derek Stoner

Seasonal Program Team Leader
Delaware Nature Society
302-239-2334, ext. 106
derek AT delnature.org
Visit the Middle Run Birding Trail:
www.DelNature.org/MiddleRun
www.flickr.com/photos/middlerunbirding/


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Subject: Reeve at Prime Hook Rd
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 17:49:30 +0000
Good afternoon,
 I was out at Prime Hook Rd for work this morning and, of course, squeezed in a 
little time for birding. Most of the bird population was at the bridge site on 
both sides of the road. While scanning the massive egret flock south of the 
road, I found a Reeve feeding on a mat of vegetation between two islands and 
right of the new channel when looking south. However, it had disappeared (easy 
to do among the grassy islands) when I re-scanned the area. 

 I had hoped to find a White Ibis, but could not. The egret flock was 
predominately Snowies, some Greats, one LB Heron and 1 Tricolored Heron (though 
I did not scrutinize every bird). Caspian and Royal Terns loafing on both sides 
and 1 Gull-billed Tern on the north side, left of the channel. 


Good birding,
Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE


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Subject: Results of Aug 21 Overnight Pelagic out of Lewes
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Aug 2016 12:21:41 -0400
See Life Paulagics ran a very successful overnight pelagic trip on Sun, Aug
21.  Sees were calm, winds were light, the water was blue and over 81 F,
and the birds were excellent.

The big highlight was Maryland's first state record of MASKED BOOBY, a
nice, clean adult.  Other highlights included our second highest count of
BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETRELS for this port, nice repeated looks at LEACH'S
STORM-PETRELS, a beefy POMARINE JAEGER, a cooperative group of sitting
RED-NECKED PHALAROPES, a BLUE SHARK chewing on our chum right next to the
boat.  We had some real nice marine mammals including several pods of
CUVIER'S BEAKED-WHALES, some that even breached, some brief but diagnostic
looks at BLAINVILLE's BEAKED-WHALES, and good looks at PILOT WHALES
(Long-finned or Short-finned undetermined, but likely the latter in water
that warm).  Here's the list for the day.

Cory's Shearwater          --  42
Great Shearwater           --   5
Cory's/Great Shearwater    --   4
Audubon's Shearwater       --  18
black&white shearwater sp. --   1
Wilson's Storm-Petrel      -- 626
Leach's Storm-Petrel       --   8
Band-rumped Storm-Petrel   --  81
Masked Booby               --   1
Great Blue Heron           --   1
Ruddy Turnstone            --   4
Semipalmated Sandpiper     --   1
peep sp.                   --   1
Red-necked Phalarope       --   8
shorebird sp.              --  10
Pomarine Jaeger            --   2
jaeger sp.                 --   2
Laughing Gull              --   1
Great Black-backed Gull    --   4
Bridled Tern               --   1
Black Tern                 --  21
Royal Tern                 --   1
tern sp.                   --   9
Bank Swallow               --   1

Blue Shark                 --   1
Mobula ray sp.             --   2
White Marlin               --   1
Pilot Whale                --   7
Loggerhead Sea Turtle      --   3
Blaineville's Beaked Whale --   2
Cuvier's Beaked Whale      --  10
Small Dolphin sp           --   2

Thanks to our leaders Mike Fritz, Ed Sigda, Mikey Lutmerding (official list
keeper), Zach Baer, and Matt Haffner.  And thanks to everybody who signed
up and made this trip possible.  We can't sail without you.


Stay tuned for our 2017 schedule which we'll be releasing in September.

Anita and I are also planning on leading the famous 5-day pelagic out of
San Diego aboard the Searcher again.  We can't recommend this trip enough!
We'll also do some land birding before the trip and invite people to join
us if they'd like to search for California Gnatcatcher, California
Thrasher, "Belding's" Savannah Sparrow (likely split), "Large-billed"
Savannah Sparrow (likely split), Ridgeway's Rail (already split), Bell's
Sage Sparrow (already split), and other western species.  For more
information on the trip and the company running it, you can take a look at
the link below.  You can also drop us a line with any questions on our past
experiences, all of which were great!

http://www.bajawhale.com/pelagic/pelagic-birding-tour/

And you can check out the layout and amenities of the boat here:

http://www.bajawhale.com/explore-the-boat/


-PAG

-- 







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
 AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
*

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Subject: Ashland Hawk Watch Begins September 1st
From: Derek Stoner <derek AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 20:56:49 +0000
Greetings DE-Birders:


The 10th season of the Ashland Hawk Watch kicks off this Thursday, September 
1st. The hawk watch will run every day through the end of November, being 
staffed full-time during standard hours of 9:00am to 4:00pm. Raptors are 
already on the move in the region, with Broad-winged Hawks, Ospreys, and Bald 
Eagles moving south past regional hawk watches. 



The Ashland Hawk Watch is a partnership program of the Delaware Nature Society, 
Delmarva Ornithological Society, and the Delaware Division of Fish and 
Wildlife. Important raptor migration data is gathered at this site (and dozens 
more around the country) for scientific use by the Hawk Migration Association 
of North America. 



We are pleased to announce that the Ashland Hawk Watch Coordinator this season 
is Hannah Greenberg, who is a top field birder and environmental educator with 
leadership experience working for Delaware State Parks, the Land Conservancy 
for Southern Chester County, and Delaware Nature Society. With Hannah's 
familiarity with Delaware's birdlife and our friendly community of birders, we 
know that she will be a great host for all visitors to Hawk Watch Hill. 



If you are interested in volunteering at the Ashland Hawk Watch this season, 
you may contact Hannah by email at (h.greenberg12 AT gmail.com). 



Good hawk watching,


Derek Stoner

Seasonal Program Team Leader

Delaware Nature Society



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Subject: Tricolored Heron NCC
From: Christopher Rowe <0000011d90053296-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 10:18:58 -0400
There is a single bird hunting next to rt
 9 in the small Impoundment just north of Thorntown RD easily seen from a car.

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Subject: Black Skimmer and Clapper Rail, Prime Hook Beach Road, Sussex County
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2016 00:46:50 +0000
I drove out to Prime Hook Beach Road this evening and found
four Black Skimmers and a Clapper Rail, both life birds for me.
I had excellent views of both species and may have some decent
photos, too.

I was parked at the east end of the road, in front of the Road Closed
sign for the new bridge.  The Skimmers were on the south side, initially
standing among Laughing Gulls. I later saw them flying and skimming,
with beaks in the water.  Very cool.
Glancing behind me on the north side, I saw a large gray bird out in the open,
which then scurried into the salt grass. I kept my scope fixed there, at a 
large blue 

tub (?) with a depressed center. The bird came out of the grass and stood
on this thing, allowing me to confirm that it was a Clapper Rail. Took many
photos.

I earlier saw a Peregrine Falcon perched on a snag at the east end of the road.
It appeared to be an immature with bands.

Thanks, again, to all of the folks who gave me advice on PHB Road.
I will be back there again tomorrow morning.

Dave Kerr
Carlisle, PA

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 26th, 2016
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 18:35:42 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
*August 26, 2016
* DEST1608.26
	
*Birds mentioned
Blue-winged Teal
Green-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Black Scoter
Ring-necked Pheasant
Northern Bobwhite
Pied-billed Grebe
CORY'S SHEARWATER
GREAT SHEARWATER
AUDUBON'S SHEARWATER
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
LEACH'S STORM-PETREL
BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL
Brown Pelican
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Black Vulture
Osprey
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Bald Eagle
Broad-winged Hawk
Clapper Rail
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
Marbled Godwit
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Dunlin
Stilt Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Willet
POMARINE JAEGER
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
BRIDLED TERN
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
GULL-BILLED TERN
Black Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech-Owl
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher
GRAY KINGBIRD
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Purple Martin
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Ovenbird
Worm-eating Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Blue-winged Warbler
Black and White Warbler
American Redstart
Magnolia Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Canada Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Grasshopper Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Dickcissel
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole 

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 26, 2016
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, August 26th,  this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware year list
increased to 323 species this week. 

The pelagic trip out of Lewes into Delaware and Maryland waters was very
successful this weekend. Highlight of the trip was a MASKED BOOBY in
Maryland waters, a new state record. Highlights for Delaware included 8
AUDUBON's , 6 CORY'S and a GREAT SHEARWATER plus lots of storm-petrels
including 20 LEACH'S and 25 BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL. Also seen were 2
POMARINE JAEGER, 8 RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, 15 BLACK and 2 BRIDLED TERN. A peak
count of 48 WHITE IBIS including 2 adults were seen flying over the
Lewes-Rehoboth Canal as the boat returned dock plus 16 OSPREY.

Another great bird was a GRAY KINGBIRD found Wednesday afternoon in the town
of Little Creek, east of Dover. That bird was at the south end of the town
near the defunct Cavaliers East Restaurant. The bird was sitting in brush
and on wires around the back of the building, seen from the parking lot.
This is just north of the intersection of Delaware Route 9 and the S. Little
Creek Rd. This is only the second state record and first record for Kent Co.
The bird was seen and photographed for two hours before flying east towards
the marshes. There have been a couple of unsubstantiated reports of possible
GRAY KINGBIRDS since the initial sighting, but nothing confirmed. 

Along with the RED-NECKED PHALAROPE seen offshore, 2 more RED-NECKED
PHALAROPE are being seen at Bear Swamp in Bombay Hook National Wildlife
Refuge near Smyrna. A WILSON'S PHALAROPE was seen at Shearness Pool on
Tuesday. Lots of shorebirds have been seen in Bombay Hook this last week
including 2 MARBLED GODWITS, 400 AMERICAN AVOCET, 8 BLACK-NECKED STILT,
BLACK-BELLIED and 600 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, DUNLIN, WESTERN, WHITE-RUMP,
STILT, and PECTORAL SANDPIPER, LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and
RED KNOT. There is also been 6 species of tern reported in the refuge
including BLACK, LEAST, CASPIAN, and a GULL-BILLED TERN over Sheerness Pool,
plus BLACK SKIMMER. Waterbirds found included PIED-BILLED GREBE, NORTHERN
SHOVELER, BLUE-WINGED and GREEN-WINGED TEAL. Seven WHITE IBIS were reported,
plus TRICOLORED, GREEN, and LITTLE BLUE HERON, plus a single CATTLE EGRET.
YELLOW-CROWNED and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON continue be seen at Night Heron
Island in Bear Swamp. NORTHERN BOBWHITE and RING-NECKED PHEASANT reported by
the headquarters building. BANK and CLIFF SWALLOW were picked out among the
TREE SWALLOWS flying over the refuge. An early YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER was
seen in the woods by Bear Swamp. A DICKCISSEL was heard calling at the
intersection of the Bear Swamp and Finis Pool roads. Also reported were
WILLOW FLYCATCHER, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, BOBOLINK and
EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

Eight WHITE IBIS with 20 GLOSSY IBIS was seen along the Prime Hook Beach
Road, along with TRICOLORED and LITTLE BLUE HERON. Five MARBLED GODWITS with
western WILLETS were seen at the east end of the Prime Hook Beach Road
yesterday. Other shorebirds seen at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near
Milton included AMERICAN AVOCET, RED KNOT, RUDDY TURNSTONE, DUNLIN, plus
STILT, PECTORAL, LEAST, and WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER. Terns along the road
included a GULL-BILLED TERN photographed this weekend plus CASPIAN, ROYAL,
LEAST, and BLACK SKIMMER, plus a winter plumaged BONAPARTE'S GULL. PRAIRIE
WARBLER and BOBOLINK were seen along the Prime Hook Beach Road. DICKCISSEL
continues to be seen along the Fowler's Beach Road along with AMERICAN
KESTREL and ORCHARD ORIOLE. 

YELLOW-CROWNED and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were seen along Lighthouse
Road at Mispillion Inlet, along with CLAPPER RAIL. Also reported were
AMERICAN AVOCET and Western WILLET, plus RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, LEAST,
CASPIAN and ROYAL TERN at the DuPont Nature Center.

WHITE IBIS was also seen at Gordon's Pond in Cape Henlopen State Park.
NORTHERN HARRIER was seen hunting over the marsh. Shorebirds at the pond
included SPOTTED SANDPIPER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS. A WHIMBREL was seen at The
Point at Cape Henlopen along with 5 PIPING PLOVER. BLACK-BELLIED and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and SANDERLING were seen along the
beach. Terns found included LEAST, CASPIAN, COMMON, and ROYAL TERN.

WHIMBREL was also seen from the Cape May-Lewes Ferry along with BROWN
PELICAN. COMMON and ROYAL TERNS were seen feeding in Delaware waters from
the ferry. In the harbor were 4 BLACK SCOTERS, 5 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS,
RUDDY TURNSTONE and SANDERLING. Swallows at the Lewes ferry terminal
included BANK, BARN, and PURPLE MARTIN.

A half dozen LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were seen along the beach at Tower
Road in Delaware Seashore State Park. Four WHITE IBIS, TRICOLORED HERON and
a BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were seen at Burton's Island, behind the North
Marina at Indian River Inlet. Another immature WHITE IBIS was seen on Long
Neck with GLOSSY IBIS. 

BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, and
SPOTTED SANDPIPER were seen along the Port Mahon Road. Also reported were
OSPREY and 26 ROYAL TERNS. A PEREGRINE FALCON was also seen hunting in the
area. PECTORAL SANDPIPER was seen at Taylor's Gut in Woodland Beach Wildlife
Area. BLUE and GREEN-WINGED TEAL were seen there along with BANK SWALLOWS.

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER and NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH were reported in Dover near
Silver Lake. The Old Dover High School in North Dover had BARRED OWL,
COOPER'S HAWK, and KILLDEER. An AMERICAN REDSTART was seen at the
Aquaculture Farm for Delaware State College, along with GREEN HERON. A peak
count of 31 BLACK VULTURES were seen today. Swallows seen included NORTHERN
ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW and PURPLE MARTIN.

A BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER was reported at Middle Run Natural Area near Newark,
along with BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, CANADA, CHESTNUT SIDED, MAGNOLIA, YELLOW,
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH and AMERICAN REDSTART. An immature BROAD-WINGED HAWK
was seen soaring over the fields. New this week was a LEAST FLYCATCHER and
ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, plus BOBOLINK and BALTIMORE ORIOLES. A BLACK AND
WHITE WARBLER was found by the pond complex off Paper Mill Road.

Three immature LITTLE BLUE HERONS was also found near Paper Mill Road along
the White Clay Creek. A pair of BARRED OWLS were calling along the creek at
White Clay Creek State Park plus YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, BALTIMORE ORIOLE and
SCARLET TANAGER.  Warblers reported included OVENBIRD, BLACK AND WHITE, and
CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER. LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH and 3 BROAD-WINGED HAWKS were
reported at Hopkin's Bridge. 

10 species of warbler were found at Brandywine Creek State Park this week
including WORM-EATING, BLUE-WINGED, CHESTNUT-SIDED, MAGNOLIA, PRAIRIE, BLACK
AND WHITE, OVENBIRD, and AMERICAN REDSTART. EASTERN SCREECH-OWLS were
calling at several locations. SOLITARY SANDPIPER was found along the creek
along with OSPREY. BLUE GROSBEAK and BALTIMORE ORIOLE continue by the park
entrance booth. BLUE GROSBEAK was also photographed by the Rt. 100 ponds at
Winterthur Museum. 

YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER were also found at Ashland
Nature Center. CHESTNUT-SIDED, YELLOW, BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER and REDSTART
were seen at Shortwood off Grubbs Road, YELLOW WARBLER and 12 BLACK VULTURES
were seen near Alapocos Woods. 

A WILSON'S SNIPE with 2 SOLITARY SANDPIPERS was seen at the University of
Delaware Ag Farm, along with WILLOW FLYCATCHER and ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW.
LITTLE BLUE HERON and GLOSSY IBIS were reported at Beck's pond in Bear. A
BARRED OWL was also reported near Beck's Woods. NORTHERN BOBWHITE was
calling along the north side of the C&D Canal Wildlife Area. Landbirds seen
included ORCHARD ORIOLE, PRAIRIE WARBLER and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. A CLIFF
SWALLOW was seen over Thousand Acre Marsh along with BANK, BARN, and PURPLE
MARTIN. CASPIAN TERNS were also reported at Thousand Acre Marsh along with
LITTLE BLUE HERON. An immature LITTLE BLUE HERON was seen at Grier's Pond. 

COMMON NIGHTHAWK migration was seen with eight birds seen at Brandywine
Creek State Park on Saturday. Another COMMON NIGHTHAWK was seen at White
Clay Creek. One COMMON NIGHTHAWK was seen flying over Beck's Woods
yesterday. There were 12 NIGHTHAWKS seen from Granogue last evening. 

Two dozen RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS were seen at a garden near Georgetown.
Hummingbird banding will start there this weekend. Also seen was a SUMMER
TANAGER. Hummingbirds are increasing this week, with sightings reported at
Granogue, Newark, Dover, Lewes, Greenwood, Old Landing, and Rehoboth Beach. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week, including, Harry Tiebout,
Alan Belford, Pat Valdata, Peter Lev, Maureen Markow, Alissa Kegelman, Barry
Blust, Bob Crews, Colin Campbell, Joe Swertinski, Marie Gardner, Chuck
Fullmer, Ryan Lazlo, Denis Helman, Gina Sheridan, Jim Dunn, Dave Kerr, Keith
Maley, Bert Filmyer Bill Chambers, Jim Austin-Cole, Paul Matthews, John
Long, Steve Cottrell, Bill Stewart, Kim Steininger, Daniel Sloan, Marshall
Illiff, Joe Hanfman, Kurt Schwartz, Carole Griffiths, Steve Graff, Joel
Martin, Chris Bennett, Phil Thompson, Keith Leonard, Tim Freiday, Derek
Stoner, Joe Sebastiani, Jerald Reb, Ken Wat, and Dave Fees. Remember, the
birdline needs your sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or
email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you
good birding!

-end transcript

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Subject: GRAY KINGBIRD - maybe
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 12:38:49 +0000
Good morning,
 I visited Little Creek this morning from 7:15 to 8AM. It was mainly 
uneventful, but I did briefly see a kingbird that was at least a candidate. It 
was in the treeline off to the southeast looking across the bridge from the 
Cavaliers East parking lot. But lighting conditions were terrible in that 
direction looking into the early morning glare. I relocated to the sidewalk on 
the bridge (which seems to be a good vantage point), but could not relocate the 
bird. Please post if anyone searches for it today, whether yes or no. 


Good birding,
Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE

-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Jerald Reb
Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 5:43 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE

I looked for it around 2:00. A flycatcher flew directly over us that could have 
been the Gray Kingbird (It didn't look like an Eastern to me), but it 
disappeared flying east before I could identify it. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 24, 2016, at 5:30 PM, Patricia Valdata  
wrote: 

> 
> Looked for the kingbird this morning but didn't see it. We did find two 
Red-necked Phalaropes at Bombay Hook, though. Lovely day to be birding! 

> 
> Pat Valdata
> Elkton, MD
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Harry 
Tiebout 

> Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 8:04 PM
> To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [de-birds] Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE
> 
> For about 2 hours this afternoon I watched and photographed what appeared to 
be a GRAY KINGBIRD in Little Creek, DE. The bird was perching on wires and dead 
snags around the now defunct restaurant Cavaliers East, located at the south 
end of town on the west side of Route 9. The bird flew off about 4 PM, possibly 
heading east and crossing Route 9 before being lost from view. Chris Bennett 
and Jan Swertinski (sorry if I butchered your name!) also viewed and 
photographed the bird for part of that time. The bird was relatively tame, 
catching and consuming a number of insects while we watched. Given its tameness 
and the apparently good foraging, there is a reasonable chance it might 
return/remain there for some unknown length of time. If you go to look for it, 
search the wires around the restaurant and the dead snags behind the restaurant 
in the vicinity of the abandoned house (the antenna of which was also a 
frequent perch). 

> 
> Good birding!
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
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Subject: A Shorebird Day
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 19:50:40 -0400
This is from Colin Campbell
____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________


I set off this morning, determined to get a 20-shorebird species day,
despite the tides not being too favorable. First stop was inevitable, of
course, Helen's Sausage House, which was up to its usual standard. A few
weeks ago, I took my 13-year old grandson birding - via HSH. To show you how
much it fills you up, he divided the sausage and egg sandwich between
breakfast and lunch - and he's real glutton.


In summary, I was pleased to reach 22 spp of shorebird. The highlights:


Bombay Hook: top billing goes to the single adult non-breeding (ie the white
with black bits job) Red-necked Phalarope in Bear Swamp Pool. It needed a
scope. Also in the north end of Bear were 6 Spotted Sandpipers with rapidly
decreasing spots, 2 White-rumped Sandpipers and one Stilt Sandpiper.
Shearness Pool had the only Black-necked Stilt seen and Raymond had 2
Pectoral Sandpipers on the edge and 2 Long-billed Dowitchers in the Dowy
mob.


Port Mahon added Sanderling and Ruddy Turnstone in a poor shorebird showing.


Mispillion added a single American Oystercatcher and a Western Willet.


Prime Hook Road had another three Willet - again all Western, and at the
distance observed, initially suggesting Hudsonian Godwits with their long
bill and hints of a white flash on the tail as they probed, Godwit-like, in
the mud. Making a bit of a mockery of their name, 2 Solitary Sandpipers flew
together over the road and landed close by. Joe Swertinski's Marbled
Godwits, now numbering 5, were viewed distantly from the bridge
reconstruction towards the end of the road in a flock of Avocets.


Other birds of interest were three juvenile Night-Herons in the trees at the
north end of Bear Swamp (no adults) - two were Black-crowned (partially
yellow-billed) and one a Yellow-crowned (all black bill). Quite a few N.
Shoveler there as well. Big Woods Pond (on the road to Allee House) is
always a good place, for whatever reason, to find juvenile Little Blue Heron
at this time of year. There were four today. Lots of Caspian Terns at BH and
Royals at Mispillion. Three Gull-billed Terns seen from the Prime Hook Beach
Road - a full breeding-plumaged adult and a mottle-headed adult feeding a
red-gaped and noisy youngster. I wonder where he/she was born. Still a good
crowd of Skimmers there, always a delight when they fly close by in numbers.


Colin Campbell
Claymont, DE.

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Subject: Prime Hook Road, Sussex County
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 23:48:34 +0000
I am driving down to Prime Hook Road tomorrow
for the first time.

I would like to get some recommendations and advice
on this Hotspot, please.

Google Maps suggests the causeway has no place to pull
off the road and safely view the areas north and south.

   
Thanks.

Dave Kerr
Carlisle, PA

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Subject: Bombay Hook White Ibises, Shorebirds, Dickcissel, etc
From: Alan Belford <alan_belford AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 17:36:55 -0400
Sorry for my late post - my brother and I were at Bombay on Saturday (8/20) and 
we too found White Ibis at Raymond. We had 5 birds - 4 juvenile and one first 
summer bird which was molting into adult plumage. 

The shorebird show was also excellent at Raymond with thousands of birds 
present including a few hundred Avocets, 2 Marbled Godwits, both Dow species, 
Westerns, Pectorals, and about half a dozen Stilt Sandpipers on the backside of 
Shearness. Constant harassment by a Peregrine eventually sent many of the 
Raymond shorebirds elsewhere. 

Also of note was the distinct buzzy calls of a Dickcissel in the brushy fields 
near the junction of the Bear Swamp Loop and the turn towards Finis and the 
Allee House. 

We also had a nice assortment of egrets and herons as you might expect which 
included an American Bittern and we had nice numbers of Blue Grosbeaks as well. 

Good Birding!
Alan BelfordSaranac Lake, NY 		 	   		  
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Subject: Brandywine Birdwalk on Saturday
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 16:26:30 -0400
The monthly birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State Park is this Saturday, August
27th from 8 to 11 am. Bring boots and bug spray. Birding is picking up in
the park, last weekend I saw Osprey, Solitary Sandpiper, Worm-eating,
Magnolia, Prairie, and Black and White Warbler. Common Nighthawks were seen
from the hawkwatch parking lot in the evening between 7-7:30 pm. The walk is
free, but park entrance fees are in effect. 

Good birding,
Andy

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Subject: RN Phalarope, Bombay Hook NWR, Kent County
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 18:01:03 +0000
I found only one RN Phalarope at Bear Swamp Pool
this morning, where I watched it from 0757 to 0830.


Dave Kerr
Carlisle, PA

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Subject: White Ibis, Bombay Hook NWR, Kent County
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2016 00:55:46 +0000
I found seven juvenile White Ibis with 35 Glossy Ibis
at Shearness Pool this evening.

Also, many Avocets and SB Dowitchers.

The two RN Phalaropes were present at Bear
Swamp Pool at 1847.

Dave Kerr
Carlisle, PA

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Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
From: Marie Gardner <00000133d8ee0ba7-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 23:11:10 +0000
A Ruby-throated Hummingbird was visiting my feeders this afternoon.  First 
one for this season, though feedershave been out for several months. 

Marie Z. GardnerNewark


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Subject: Re: Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 17:43:01 -0400
I looked for it around 2:00. A flycatcher flew directly over us that could have 
been the Gray Kingbird (It didn't look like an Eastern to me), but it 
disappeared flying east before I could identify it. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 24, 2016, at 5:30 PM, Patricia Valdata  
wrote: 

> 
> Looked for the kingbird this morning but didn't see it. We did find two 
Red-necked Phalaropes at Bombay Hook, though. Lovely day to be birding! 

> 
> Pat Valdata
> Elkton, MD
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Harry 
Tiebout 

> Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 8:04 PM
> To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [de-birds] Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE
> 
> For about 2 hours this afternoon I watched and photographed what appeared to 
be a GRAY KINGBIRD in Little Creek, DE. The bird was perching on wires and dead 
snags around the now defunct restaurant Cavaliers East, located at the south 
end of town on the west side of Route 9. The bird flew off about 4 PM, possibly 
heading east and crossing Route 9 before being lost from view. Chris Bennett 
and Jan Swertinski (sorry if I butchered your name!) also viewed and 
photographed the bird for part of that time. The bird was relatively tame, 
catching and consuming a number of insects while we watched. Given its tameness 
and the apparently good foraging, there is a reasonable chance it might 
return/remain there for some unknown length of time. If you go to look for it, 
search the wires around the restaurant and the dead snags behind the restaurant 
in the vicinity of the abandoned house (the antenna of which was also a 
frequent perch). 

> 
> Good birding!
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

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Subject: Re: Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 17:30:41 -0400
Looked for the kingbird this morning but didn't see it. We did find two 
Red-necked Phalaropes at Bombay Hook, though. Lovely day to be birding! 


Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Harry 
Tiebout 

Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 8:04 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE

For about 2 hours this afternoon I watched and photographed what appeared to be 
a GRAY KINGBIRD in Little Creek, DE. The bird was perching on wires and dead 
snags around the now defunct restaurant Cavaliers East, located at the south 
end of town on the west side of Route 9. The bird flew off about 4 PM, possibly 
heading east and crossing Route 9 before being lost from view. Chris Bennett 
and Jan Swertinski (sorry if I butchered your name!) also viewed and 
photographed the bird for part of that time. The bird was relatively tame, 
catching and consuming a number of insects while we watched. Given its tameness 
and the apparently good foraging, there is a reasonable chance it might 
return/remain there for some unknown length of time. If you go to look for it, 
search the wires around the restaurant and the dead snags behind the restaurant 
in the vicinity of the abandoned house (the antenna of which was also a 
frequent perch). 


Good birding!

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Subject: Re: Fwd: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
From: Maryanne Dolan <maryanne.dolan AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 16:41:46 -0400
Yes, Pat Valdata, Ken Drier and I found two at Bear Swamp also.  Great
looks, close in.  Couldn't have been better.
maryanne

On Wed, Aug 24, 2016 at 1:48 PM, Jerald Reb  wrote:

> Both phalaropes were still present at 1:30.
>
> Jerald
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Aug 24, 2016, at 10:30 AM, Dave Kerr  wrote:
> >
> > ----- Forwarded Message -----
> > From: dsktc AT comcast.net
> > To: de-birds AT princeton.edu
> > Cc: dsktc AT comcast.net
> > Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:27:27 -0000 (UTC)
> > Subject: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> >
> >
> > ----- Forwarded Message -----
> > From: dsktc AT comcast.net
> > To: Debirds AT princeton.edu
> > Cc: dsktc AT comcast.net
> > Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:26:13 -0000 (UTC)
> > Subject: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> >
> > There are two RN Phalarope at Bear Swamp Pool
> > as of 1024.  They were found by Rodney about forty
> > minutes ago.  I am viewing them with three other birders.
> >
> > Dave Kerr
> > Carlisle, PA
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: Dave Kerr 
> > To: 'Dave Kerr' 
> > Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 07:45:45 -0000 (UTC)
> > Subject: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> >
> >
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of
> Gina Sheridan
> > Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 6:44 PM
> > To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
> > Subject: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> >
> > On this lovely morning (Tuesday, 8/23/16), Dennis and I birded Bombay
> Hook
> > NWR, and enjoyed some nice birds. Starting in Finis Woods, we were
> pleased
> > to see LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, AMERICAN REDSTART, GREEN HERON, and a
> BELTED
> > KINGFISHER.  Along Raymond Neck Road, there were a couple of fussy
> juvenile
> > WHITE-EYED VIREOs.
> >
> > Since it was low tide, shorebird numbers were low on the wildlife loop.
> > Despite the sub-optimal tidal conditions, were treated to some desirable
> > target birds.
> >
> > Highlights included:
> >
> > Raymond Pool - withing a loose mixed swallow flock (e.g. Purple Martin,
> > Bank Swallow, Barn Swallow), there was a CLIFF SWALLOW
> >
> > Shearness Pool - Standing close together were a pair of juvenile LITTLE
> > BLUE HERONs (with a nice comparison with a juvenile Snowy Egret) and a
> > CATTLE EGRET;  a LEAST TERN was on the bayside flats; a CLAPPER RAIL
> > cackled from the saltmarsh and a BOBOLINK flew by our position
> >
> > A juvenile  RED-NECKED PHALAROPE molting into  basic plumage graced Bear
> > Swamp.  This bird was swimming/feeding in the northwest corner of the
> > second to last large pool before one reaches the tree line that holds
> > roosting night herons.
> >
> > Good August birding to all,
> >
> > Gina Sheridan
> > Milford, DE
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> > List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> > List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>

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Subject: Re: Fwd: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 13:48:48 -0400
Both phalaropes were still present at 1:30.

Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 24, 2016, at 10:30 AM, Dave Kerr  wrote:
> 
> ----- Forwarded Message -----
> From: dsktc AT comcast.net
> To: de-birds AT princeton.edu
> Cc: dsktc AT comcast.net
> Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:27:27 -0000 (UTC)
> Subject: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> 
> 
> ----- Forwarded Message -----
> From: dsktc AT comcast.net
> To: Debirds AT princeton.edu
> Cc: dsktc AT comcast.net
> Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:26:13 -0000 (UTC)
> Subject: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> 
> There are two RN Phalarope at Bear Swamp Pool
> as of 1024.  They were found by Rodney about forty 
> minutes ago.  I am viewing them with three other birders.
> 
> Dave Kerr
> Carlisle, PA
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Dave Kerr 
> To: 'Dave Kerr' 
> Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 07:45:45 -0000 (UTC)
> Subject: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Gina 
Sheridan 

> Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 6:44 PM
> To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
> 
> On this lovely morning (Tuesday, 8/23/16), Dennis and I birded Bombay Hook
> NWR, and enjoyed some nice birds. Starting in Finis Woods, we were pleased
> to see LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, AMERICAN REDSTART, GREEN HERON, and a BELTED
> KINGFISHER.  Along Raymond Neck Road, there were a couple of fussy juvenile
> WHITE-EYED VIREOs.
> 
> Since it was low tide, shorebird numbers were low on the wildlife loop.
> Despite the sub-optimal tidal conditions, were treated to some desirable
> target birds.
> 
> Highlights included:
> 
> Raymond Pool - withing a loose mixed swallow flock (e.g. Purple Martin,
> Bank Swallow, Barn Swallow), there was a CLIFF SWALLOW
> 
> Shearness Pool - Standing close together were a pair of juvenile LITTLE
> BLUE HERONs (with a nice comparison with a juvenile Snowy Egret) and a
> CATTLE EGRET;  a LEAST TERN was on the bayside flats; a CLAPPER RAIL
> cackled from the saltmarsh and a BOBOLINK flew by our position
> 
> A juvenile  RED-NECKED PHALAROPE molting into  basic plumage graced Bear
> Swamp.  This bird was swimming/feeding in the northwest corner of the
> second to last large pool before one reaches the tree line that holds
> roosting night herons.
> 
> Good August birding to all,
> 
> Gina Sheridan
> Milford, DE
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

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Subject: Fwd: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:30:12 +0000
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: dsktc AT comcast.net
To: de-birds AT princeton.edu
Cc: dsktc AT comcast.net
Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:27:27 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: dsktc AT comcast.net
To: Debirds AT princeton.edu
Cc: dsktc AT comcast.net
Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:26:13 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook

There are two RN Phalarope at Bear Swamp Pool
as of 1024.  They were found by Rodney about forty 
minutes ago.  I am viewing them with three other birders.

Dave Kerr
Carlisle, PA

----- Original Message -----
From: Dave Kerr 
To: 'Dave Kerr' 
Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 07:45:45 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook



-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Gina 
Sheridan 

Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 6:44 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook

On this lovely morning (Tuesday, 8/23/16), Dennis and I birded Bombay Hook
NWR, and enjoyed some nice birds. Starting in Finis Woods, we were pleased
to see LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, AMERICAN REDSTART, GREEN HERON, and a BELTED
KINGFISHER.  Along Raymond Neck Road, there were a couple of fussy juvenile
WHITE-EYED VIREOs.

Since it was low tide, shorebird numbers were low on the wildlife loop.
Despite the sub-optimal tidal conditions, were treated to some desirable
target birds.

Highlights included:

Raymond Pool - withing a loose mixed swallow flock (e.g. Purple Martin,
Bank Swallow, Barn Swallow), there was a CLIFF SWALLOW

Shearness Pool - Standing close together were a pair of juvenile LITTLE
BLUE HERONs (with a nice comparison with a juvenile Snowy Egret) and a
CATTLE EGRET;  a LEAST TERN was on the bayside flats; a CLAPPER RAIL
cackled from the saltmarsh and a BOBOLINK flew by our position

A juvenile  RED-NECKED PHALAROPE molting into  basic plumage graced Bear
Swamp.  This bird was swimming/feeding in the northwest corner of the
second to last large pool before one reaches the tree line that holds
roosting night herons.

Good August birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE

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Subject: Fwd: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:27:27 +0000
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: dsktc AT comcast.net
To: Debirds AT princeton.edu
Cc: dsktc AT comcast.net
Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:26:13 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: Re: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook

There are two RN Phalarope at Bear Swamp Pool
as of 1024.  They were found by Rodney about forty 
minutes ago.  I am viewing them with three other birders.

Dave Kerr
Carlisle, PA

----- Original Message -----
From: Dave Kerr 
To: 'Dave Kerr' 
Sent: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 07:45:45 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: FW: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook



-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Gina 
Sheridan 

Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2016 6:44 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook

On this lovely morning (Tuesday, 8/23/16), Dennis and I birded Bombay Hook
NWR, and enjoyed some nice birds. Starting in Finis Woods, we were pleased
to see LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, AMERICAN REDSTART, GREEN HERON, and a BELTED
KINGFISHER.  Along Raymond Neck Road, there were a couple of fussy juvenile
WHITE-EYED VIREOs.

Since it was low tide, shorebird numbers were low on the wildlife loop.
Despite the sub-optimal tidal conditions, were treated to some desirable
target birds.

Highlights included:

Raymond Pool - withing a loose mixed swallow flock (e.g. Purple Martin,
Bank Swallow, Barn Swallow), there was a CLIFF SWALLOW

Shearness Pool - Standing close together were a pair of juvenile LITTLE
BLUE HERONs (with a nice comparison with a juvenile Snowy Egret) and a
CATTLE EGRET;  a LEAST TERN was on the bayside flats; a CLAPPER RAIL
cackled from the saltmarsh and a BOBOLINK flew by our position

A juvenile  RED-NECKED PHALAROPE molting into  basic plumage graced Bear
Swamp.  This bird was swimming/feeding in the northwest corner of the
second to last large pool before one reaches the tree line that holds
roosting night herons.

Good August birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE

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Subject: Probable GRAY KINGBIRD in the town Little Creek, DE
From: Harry Tiebout <htiebout AT WCUPA.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 20:04:02 -0400
For about 2 hours this afternoon I watched and photographed what appeared to be 
a GRAY KINGBIRD in Little Creek, DE. The bird was perching on wires and dead 
snags around the now defunct restaurant Cavaliers East, located at the south 
end of town on the west side of Route 9. The bird flew off about 4 PM, possibly 
heading east and crossing Route 9 before being lost from view. Chris Bennett 
and Jan Swertinski (sorry if I butchered your name!) also viewed and 
photographed the bird for part of that time. The bird was relatively tame, 
catching and consuming a number of insects while we watched. Given its tameness 
and the apparently good foraging, there is a reasonable chance it might 
return/remain there for some unknown length of time. If you go to look for it, 
search the wires around the restaurant and the dead snags behind the restaurant 
in the vicinity of the abandoned house (the antenna of which was also a 
frequent perch). 


Good birding!

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Subject: RN Phalarope - Bombay Hook
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 18:44:24 -0400
On this lovely morning (Tuesday, 8/23/16), Dennis and I birded Bombay Hook
NWR, and enjoyed some nice birds. Starting in Finis Woods, we were pleased
to see LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, AMERICAN REDSTART, GREEN HERON, and a BELTED
KINGFISHER.  Along Raymond Neck Road, there were a couple of fussy juvenile
WHITE-EYED VIREOs.

Since it was low tide, shorebird numbers were low on the wildlife loop.
Despite the sub-optimal tidal conditions, were treated to some desirable
target birds.

Highlights included:

Raymond Pool - withing a loose mixed swallow flock (e.g. Purple Martin,
Bank Swallow, Barn Swallow), there was a CLIFF SWALLOW

Shearness Pool - Standing close together were a pair of juvenile LITTLE
BLUE HERONs (with a nice comparison with a juvenile Snowy Egret) and a
CATTLE EGRET;  a LEAST TERN was on the bayside flats; a CLAPPER RAIL
cackled from the saltmarsh and a BOBOLINK flew by our position

A juvenile  RED-NECKED PHALAROPE molting into  basic plumage graced Bear
Swamp.  This bird was swimming/feeding in the northwest corner of the
second to last large pool before one reaches the tree line that holds
roosting night herons.

Good August birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE

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List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: de-birds Digest - 20 Aug 2016 to 21 Aug 2016 (#2016-195)
From: "sheilaannand ." <sheila.annand AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:29:12 -0400
Still have a spot?

On Monday, August 22, 2016, de-birds automatic digest system <
LISTSERV AT lists.princeton.edu> wrote:

> There is 1 message totaling 42 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop a Tower
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu 
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 21 Aug 2016 16:01:29 -0400
> From:    Bill Stewart >
> Subject: DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop a Tower
>
> Good afternoon DE-Birders,
>
> This Thursday, August 25th, I will be entertaining twenty pre-registered
> participants in a DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop the water tower on
> the DuPont Estate, “Granogue”, overlooking the Brandywine River Valley. 
As 

> the Common Nighthawks move south during their fall migration, many use
> waterways as their source of navigation and food replenishment.  Peak
> numbers can be seen during the last week of August coursing through the
> Brandywine River Valley.
>
> This event is limited to the first twenty participants responding to this
> invitation, simply click reply to this email to register yourself and any
> others in your group.  Please leave your full names and a contact number.
> Our Nighthawk Watch will be a very stationary “field trip” and all are
> encouraged to bring beverages of your choice and some cheese and crackers
> or party snacks to share.  The tower is a very safe viewing area with a
> four foot tall wall surrounding the top floor of the tower with a 360° view.
>
> The evening will start at 6:00 PM sharp and end at dusk.  Raindate will be
> the following evening, Friday, August 26th.  Registered participants will
> receive confirmation, directions and event particulars via return email.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Bill Stewart
> DOS President
>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu 
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of de-birds Digest - 20 Aug 2016 to 21 Aug 2016 (#2016-195)
> ***************************************************************
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: de-birds Digest - 20 Aug 2016 to 21 Aug 2016 (#2016-195)
From: Joel & Sheryl Martin <saginaw1971 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 08:56:42 -0400
Hi Bill,
Is it too late to sign up?
Joël
302 670 5878

On 8/22/2016 12:00 AM, de-birds automatic digest system wrote:
> There is 1 message totaling 42 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>    1. DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop a Tower
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Sun, 21 Aug 2016 16:01:29 -0400
> From:    Bill Stewart 
> Subject: DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop a Tower
>
> Good afternoon DE-Birders,
>
> This Thursday, August 25th, I will be entertaining twenty pre-registered 
participants in a DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop the water tower on the 
DuPont Estate, “Granogue”, overlooking the Brandywine River Valley. As the 
Common Nighthawks move south during their fall migration, many use waterways as 
their source of navigation and food replenishment. Peak numbers can be seen 
during the last week of August coursing through the Brandywine River Valley. 

>
> This event is limited to the first twenty participants responding to this 
invitation, simply click reply to this email to register yourself and any 
others in your group. Please leave your full names and a contact number. Our 
Nighthawk Watch will be a very stationary “field trip” and all are 
encouraged to bring beverages of your choice and some cheese and crackers or 
party snacks to share. The tower is a very safe viewing area with a four foot 
tall wall surrounding the top floor of the tower with a 360° view. 

>
> The evening will start at 6:00 PM sharp and end at dusk. Raindate will be the 
following evening, Friday, August 26th. Registered participants will receive 
confirmation, directions and event particulars via return email. 

>
> Good birding,
>
> Bill Stewart
> DOS President
>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of de-birds Digest - 20 Aug 2016 to 21 Aug 2016 (#2016-195)
> ***************************************************************
>

-- 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop a Tower
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Sun, 21 Aug 2016 16:01:29 -0400
Good afternoon DE-Birders,

This Thursday, August 25th, I will be entertaining twenty pre-registered 
participants in a DOS Wine & Cheese Nighthawk Watch atop the water tower on the 
DuPont Estate, “Granogue”, overlooking the Brandywine River Valley. As the 
Common Nighthawks move south during their fall migration, many use waterways as 
their source of navigation and food replenishment. Peak numbers can be seen 
during the last week of August coursing through the Brandywine River Valley. 


This event is limited to the first twenty participants responding to this 
invitation, simply click reply to this email to register yourself and any 
others in your group. Please leave your full names and a contact number. Our 
Nighthawk Watch will be a very stationary “field trip” and all are 
encouraged to bring beverages of your choice and some cheese and crackers or 
party snacks to share. The tower is a very safe viewing area with a four foot 
tall wall surrounding the top floor of the tower with a 360° view. 


The evening will start at 6:00 PM sharp and end at dusk. Raindate will be the 
following evening, Friday, August 26th. Registered participants will receive 
confirmation, directions and event particulars via return email. 


Good birding,

Bill Stewart
DOS President


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: Question about shorebirding in the Prime Hook NWR area
From: Joshua Malbin <joshuamalbin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 20:38:58 -0400
I just wanted to thank the many people on this list who gave us advice
about where to look for birds. We ended up having a very productive trip
and seeing 21 total species of shorebirds.

On Sat, Aug 13, 2016 at 7:49 PM, Joshua Malbin 
wrote:

> My wife and I are staying in Broadkill Beach for the week and had been
> hoping to do a lot of shorebirding in the impoundment just south of
> Broadkill Road. But in driving in this afternoon we noticed that the
> impoundment does not look like it did five years or so ago, the last time
> we visited for the purpose. I noticed that the RBA this week talked about
> shorebirds near Prime Hook beach. Where are the good mudflats to check out?
> Are there other areas nearby we should know about? (We do plan to make at
> least one trip up to Bombay Hook, but we have a child under 1, so an hour
> each way in the car is a big impediment for us.)
>
> Thanks in advance for the advice.
>
> Joshua Malbin
>

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Subject: Re: Frawley Stadium - Common Nighthawks
From: Meghann <spyturtle008 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 01:30:13 -0400
... And about a half-dozen this evening in Hockessin.  They are rolling
into town!

On Fri, Aug 19, 2016 at 10:13 PM, Carolyn D'Amico 
wrote:

> Aha!  I just saw (and heard ) one over our back field this evening in
> Landenberg PA around 6:30 - they're on the move!
>
> On Aug 19, 2016 20:01, "Sarah L."  wrote:
>
> > I'm at Frawley Stadium in Wilmington, DE and 5 Common Nighthawks just
> flew
> > over.
> >
> > - Sarah
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> > List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
> >
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>

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Subject: Migrants in Dover Today
From: Jerald R <Jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 22:52:46 -0400
Hello all,

This afternoon I visited one of my favorite local patches, Old Dover High 
School (which is now an ebird hotspot) looking for migrants. There wasn't much 
at first, mostly goldfinches and Chipping Sparrows, though I did hear a chip 
note that sounded like a warbler. An unidentified buteo (I think it was a 
Red-tailed, but not sure) flew directly south high overhead, presumably 
migrating. 

Finally, after about an hour of searching, I found an empid in one of the trees 
around the field. Unfortunately it never vocalized, and I am not very confident 
in my flycatcher ID abilities, however I suspect that it was a Least. 

As I was leaving, I walked past the pines surrounding the tennis courts and 
found my best bird of the day: Yellow-throated Warbler. I watched it for 
several minutes, and it was still there when I left, but was gone when I 
returned about an hour later. 

Also, on my way out I saw a large flock of about 40 Chimney Swift. Are they 
flocking together preparing to migrate? I usually only see 3-5 of them 
together. I also saw a flock of about 75 outside the Milford Public Library 
last night. 


Jerald

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Subject: Re: Frawley Stadium - Common Nighthawks
From: "Carolyn D'Amico" <carolyndamico AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 22:13:59 -0400
Aha!  I just saw (and heard ) one over our back field this evening in
Landenberg PA around 6:30 - they're on the move!

On Aug 19, 2016 20:01, "Sarah L."  wrote:

> I'm at Frawley Stadium in Wilmington, DE and 5 Common Nighthawks just flew
> over.
>
> - Sarah
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 19th, 2016
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 21:30:25 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
*August 19, 2016
* DEST1608.19
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Green-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Black Scoter
Ruddy Duck
Northern Bobwhite
Common Loon
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Least Bittern
Great Egret 
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey 
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk 
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Clapper Rail
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
American Oystercatcher  
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Stilt Sandpiper
Sanderling
Dunlin
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
BAIRD'S SANDPIPER
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
WILSON'S PHALAROPE 
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer 
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 
Common Nighthawk
Barred Owl  
Red-headed Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Purple Martin 
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Worm-eating Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Black and White Warbler  
American Redstart
Yellow-throated Warbler
Prairie Warbler 
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Grasshopper Sparrow
Dickcissel
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 19, 2016
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, August 19th,  this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware year list
increased to 319 species this week. 

COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were seen this evening over Frawley Stadium in downtown
Wilmington this evening during the Blue Rocks game. None have been reported
in migration previously in the piedmont this fall. I drove by the stadium
last night at sunset and didn't see any. 

New this week was a BAIRD'S SANDPIPER yesterday along Prime Hook Beach Road
in Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. A plethora of peep are
being seen along the wash flats there including WHITE-RUMPED, PECTORAL,
STILT, and WESTERN SANDPIPER. Also seen were BLACK-BELLIED and a peak count
of 70 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. LONG-BILLED and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS were
found plus an early WILSON'S SNIPE. RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, and an
early DUNLIN were reported. Waders included 5 WHITE IBIS and a TRICOLORED
HERON, along with GREAT and SNOWY EGRET plus GLOSSY IBIS. Terns seen along
the Prime Hook Beach Road included LEAST, CASPIAN, ROYAL, and BLACK SKIMMER.
The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues to be seen along the Fowler's
Beach Road along with NORTHERN BOBWHITE, EASTERN MEADOWLARK, and ORCHARD
ORIOLE. Both COOPER'S HAWK and AMERICAN KESTREL were also in the area. Seven
WHITE IBIS were seen along the Broadkill Beach Road along with BLACK-NECKED
STILT, AMERICAN AVOCET, and BLUE-WINGED TEAL. The entrance road to Prime
Hook headquarters had NORTHERN BOBWHITE, PRAIRIE WARBLER, GRASSHOPPER
SPARROW, and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. Swallows seen at Prime Hook this week
included CLIFF, BANK, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, and PURPLE MARTIN.
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was seen at Mispillion Inlet. A total of 20 OSPREYS
were seen on the pilings on the right side of the nature center. 

A MARBLED GODWIT was seen with the 500 AMERICAN AVOCETS at Raymond Pool in
Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. There was a peak count of
25 BLACK-NECKED STILTS today. A high count of 16 TRICOLORED HERONS were
counted at Raymond Pool on August 16. A WILSON'S PHALAROPE was found at the
north end of Sheerness Pool along with STILT, WESTERN, WHITE-RUMP, and
PECTORAL SANDPIPER. BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER numbers are increasing, along with
a peak count of 800 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER, SPOTTED and
SOLITARY SANDPIPER plus WILLET were also reported. Waterfowl seen included
MUTE SWAN, NORTHERN SHOVELER, BLUE-WINGED and GREEN-WINGED TEAL, plus RUDDY
DUCK. A GULL-BILLED TERN was seen flying over Shearness Pool. BLACK SKIMMER
was reported today. CASPIAN and LEAST TERN were seen at Bear Swamp along
with a high count of 11 YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS at Night Heron Island. A
WORM-EATING WARBLER was seen along the Bear Swamp Trail. BOBOLINK and WILLOW
FLYCATCHER were reported along the Shearness Dike. Raptors seen included
OSPREY, BALD EAGLE, and RED-SHOULDERED HAWK.

WORM-EATING WARBLER was also reported at Middle Run Natural Area near
Newark, along with AMERICAN REDSTART and YELLOW WARBLER. LOUISIANA
WATERTHRUSH was reported at the University of Delaware Ag farm along with
YELLOW WARBLER and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. The wet area along the Ag farm
pastures included KILLDEER and 12 LEAST SANDPIPERS.

A CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER was seen at Brandywine Creek State Park along with
AMERICAN REDSTART. SOLITARY SANDPIPER was along the Brandywine Creek.
Another CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER was seen at Shortwood along Naaman's Creek in
Brandywine Hundred with REDSTART, YELLOW, and BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER. BLACK
AND WHITE WARBLER and REDSTART were seen at Ashland Nature Center along with
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, REDSTART and 10 BOBOLINKS were
seen at Mt Cuba Piedmont Wildflower Preserve

LITTLE BLUE HERON and KILLDEER were reported at Glasgow Park south of
Newark. LITTLE BLUE HERONS were also seen flying over Becks Woods in Bear.
18 CASPIAN TERNS were reported on the breakwater at Battery Park in New
Castle.

A LEAST TERN was seen flying over the Ashton Tract at Thousand Acre Marsh
with 4 FORSTER'S TERNS. A big flock of swallows over Thousand Acre Marsh
included ROUGH-WINGED, BANK, and PURPLE MARTIN. Warblers at the Ashton Tract
included YELLOW and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. 26 CASPIAN TERNS were seen at
Thousand Acre Marsh from Dutch Neck Road along with SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
OSPREY and BALD EAGLE. A family group of 5 KESTRELS were seen at St.
George's Bridge along the Mike Castle trail. PEREGRINE FALCON which nests on
the bridge was also seen there.

A flock of CATTLE EGRETS was seen along the highway at Route 1 and Route 13
north of Smyrna. A BARRED OWL was found in Dover at Silver Lake. A
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER was seen today in the pinewoods by Old Dover High
School. A BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER was found at Derby Pond in Camden-Wyoming
along with GREEN HERON. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was seen on Saturday
afternoon at Port Mahon along with BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, LEAST SANDPIPER, and 4 ROYAL TERNS. A NORTHERN
HARRIER was seen along the North Little Creek Road today. 

BROWN PELICANS were seen along the Delaware coast at Fenwick Island, Bethany
Beach, Indian River Inlet, and from the Cape May-Lewes ferry. WILSON'S
STORM-PETREL and BLACK SCOTER were also seen from the ferry. TRICOLORED
HERONS were reported at Indian River Campground, Assawoman Wildlife Area,
and Savages Ditch in Delaware Seashore State Park. A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT
HERON was also reported at Savages Ditch. A SOLITARY SANDPIPER was seen at
the Indian River Campground plus 2 CLAPPER RAIL in the marsh. A PEREGRINE
FALCON was seen flying past Bethany. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER and RUDDY
TURNSTONE were seen at Savages Ditch. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER and COMMON LOON
were seen at Quillen's Point along Cedar Neck. The previous reported
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues to be seen at Assawoman Wildlife Area along
with BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. MUTE SWAN, PIED-BILLED GREBE, and GREEN-WINGED
TEAL were also reported. LESSER BLACK BACKED GULL was found at Little
Assawoman Bay near Fenwick Island.

The Point at Cape Henlopen State Park had 3 PIPING PLOVERS and 3 AMERICAN
OYSTERCATCHERS plus SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, and
WILLET. The tern flock at Cape Henlopen included LEAST, CASPIAN, COMMON, and
ROYAL TERN. The woods behind the Seaside Nature Center had BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH and PINE WARBLER. AMERICAN REDSTART and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were
seen in the woods at Gordon's Pond. LEAST BITTERN, GREEN HERON, plus both
BLACK and YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were found by the water. Shorebirds
included AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER

Sandpipers are still being found in the wet fields in Western Sussex County,
3 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS were seen along Atlanta Rd., north of Seaford along
with LESSER YELLOWLEGS and LEAST SANDPIPER.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week, including, Michael Smith,
Alissa Kegelman, Jeff Holmes, Pete Bacinski, Michael O'Brien, Sarah Fischer,
David Moulton, Joshua Malbin, Kurt Gaskill, Colin Campbell, Bert Filmyer Jim
Austin-Cole, Paul Matthews, Shawn Pfautsch, John Long, Steve Cottrell, Ian
Stewart, Bill Stewart, Holly Merker, Steve Graff, John Eskate, Joel Martin,
Chris Bennett, Hannah Greenberg, Kelley Nunn, Phil Thompson, Derek Stoner,
Joe Sebastiani, Jerald Reb, Ken Wat, and Dave Fees. Remember, the birdline
needs your sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

-end transcript

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Subject: Frawley Stadium - Common Nighthawks
From: "Sarah L." <birdsinde AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 20:01:35 -0400
I'm at Frawley Stadium in Wilmington, DE and 5 Common Nighthawks just flew
over.

- Sarah

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Subject: Shorebirds August 17
From: Michael A Smith <michael.a.smith AT VILLANOVA.EDU>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 20:42:30 +0000
Yesterday Alissa Kegelman and I spent the day birding the Delaware Bayshore. 
After the obligatory pilgrimage to Helen's for sustenance, stops included 
Talyor's Gut, Bombay Hook, Ted Harvey (don't bother), Fowler's Beach Rd for 
Dickcissel, Prime Hook Beach Rd and the Dupont Nature Center at Mispillion 
harbor. Bombay Hook was magnificent: a nice breeze kept the greenheads at bay, 
Alissa picked up a Marbled Godwit that joined the Avocet show at Raymond, over 
a dozen Stilt Sandpiper and 3 Pectoral Sands gave great looks at the north end 
of Shearness, and Bear Swamp rewarded us with a couple more Stilt Sands and the 
previously reported Tricolored Heron (what, no night herons? No night-herons). 
We dug out one immature Dickcissel along Fowler Beach Road, and were pretty 
well spent by the time we hit Prime Hook Beach Road, so it was with more luck 
than skill that I stumbled upon a Baird's Sandpiper not 75 feet from the car 
associating with Leasts on the north side of the road. The bird flew back 
deeper into the impoundment before we could grab a photo; we tried feebly to 
relocate it before moseying over to Mispillion (American Oystercatcher) to 
close the day. We finished with 19 species of shorebirds, certainly one on the 
finest days of Delaware shorebirding I've had in many a year. 


Good birding!

Michael Smith
Associate Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
Villanova University

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Subject: Birds at Bombay Hook Today
From: Jerald R <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 20:52:53 -0400
Hello all,

Today I joined the YMOS group at Bombay Hook for a fantastic (and very hot!) 
morning of birding. We got of to a rather slow start, with a handful of 
swallows, goldfinches, and Field Sparrow at the visitor center. We then moved 
on to the Boardwalk Trail, where we saw Mute Swan and several Little Blue 
Herons. 

Raymond Pool was filled with thousands of shorebirds; there were many 
Semipalmated Plovers (I estimated 3000, they were more numerous than any of the 
peeps), some Least and Semipalmated Sandpipers (someone said there were a few 
Western, but I didn't see any), Avocets, Dowitchers, a single Black-necked 
Stilt, and a few Black-bellied Plovers in the back of the pool. 

Shearness was mostly devoid of birds, however we did find the continuing Ruddy 
Duck, and had amazing views of a Gull-billed Tern in flight. At the north end 
of the pool, we had a single Pectoral Sandpiper, several Stilt Sandpiper, 
dowitchers, avocet, and just as we were about to leave we found a Wilson's 
Phalarope mixed in with a few Lesser Yellowlegs and STSA. 

After leaving Shearness, we continued around to Bear Swamp. The pool was mostly 
empty, with only a few herons, shorebirds and eagles, but at the last turn 
before the Night-heron Island there was a large flock of shorebirds and terns. 
In this flock we found: Least, Forster's, and Caspian Tern, Stilt Sandpiper, 
two Tricolored Herons, twelve juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-herons, and two 
northern shovelers (a female and a male in eclipse plumage). 

Overall it was a fantastic morning of birding, with 54 species seen over 5 
hours, including several rarities. Not too much longer now until we start 
seeing Long-billed Dowitchers and Godwits! 


Jerald 

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Subject: Question about shorebirding in the Prime Hook NWR area
From: Joshua Malbin <joshuamalbin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 19:49:01 -0400
My wife and I are staying in Broadkill Beach for the week and had been
hoping to do a lot of shorebirding in the impoundment just south of
Broadkill Road. But in driving in this afternoon we noticed that the
impoundment does not look like it did five years or so ago, the last time
we visited for the purpose. I noticed that the RBA this week talked about
shorebirds near Prime Hook beach. Where are the good mudflats to check out?
Are there other areas nearby we should know about? (We do plan to make at
least one trip up to Bombay Hook, but we have a child under 1, so an hour
each way in the car is a big impediment for us.)

Thanks in advance for the advice.

Joshua Malbin

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 12th, 2016
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Aug 2016 11:21:46 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
*August 12, 2016
* DEST1608.12
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Black Scoter
Common Merganser 
Ruddy Duck
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Least Bittern
Great Egret 
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey 
Cooper's Hawk 
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk  
Broad-winged Hawk  
Virginia Rail
Clapper Rail 
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Stilt Sandpiper 
Sanderling
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
American Woodcock
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
PARASITIC JAEGER
Bonaparte's Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern  
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech-Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher
Warbling Vireo
Purple Martin
Bank Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Ovenbird
Worm-eating Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Blue-winged Warbler
Black and White Warbler
American Redstart
Yellow Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Canada Warbler
Grasshopper Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 12, 2016
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, August 12th,  this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware year list remains
at 318 species this week. 

This week, the first trickle of migrants began to appear. In northern
Delaware, nine species of WARBLER were found at Middle Run Natural Area near
Newark including, OVENBIRD, AMERICAN REDSTART, BLACK AND WHITE, CANADA,
PRAIRIE, YELLOW, and LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH. Also seen was a CLIFF SWALLOW
overhead among swallows and flyover BOBOLINKS. An AMERICAN WOODCOCK was
flushed along the trail. An adult BROAD-WINGED HAWK was seen plus space 4
RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS. The ponds at Paper Mill Park had WOOD DUCK and GREEN
HERON.

LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH was found at the Curtis Paper Mill in White Clay Creek
State Park. Waterbirds there included a LITTLE BLUE HERON, SPOTTED
SANDPIPER, and BELTED KINGFISHER. GREEN HERON was found at Hopkins Bridge
along the White Clay Creek along with YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. A PEREGRINE
FALCON was reported flying over Main Street in Newark.

GREEN HERON and SPOTTED SANDPIPER was seen at Ashland Nature Center.
Landbirds seen there included YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, WARBLING VIREO, and
REDSTART. REDSTART and BLUE-WINGED WARBLER were seen at Brandywine Creek
State Park along with YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. SPOTTED and SOLITARY SANDPIPERS
were found along the Brandywine plus GREEN HERON. Five EASTERN SCREECH-OWLS
were found calling during the morning hours. BOBOLINK, EASTERN MEADOWLARK
plus BALTIMORE and ORCHARD ORIOLE were found in the fields along the
entrance road to the nature center. AMERICAN REDSTARTS were also at
Shortwood along Naaman's Creek in Brandywine Hundred. 

WHITE IBIS continue be found in the state, which is been seen every week
since May. An immature WHITE IBIS was seen at Bombay Hook National Wildlife
Refuge on Sunday along with LITTLE BLUE and GREEN HERON, GREAT, SNOWY, and
CATTLE EGRET, plus GLOSSY IBIS. Five YELLOW-CROWNS and several BLACK-CROWNED
NIGHT HERONS were found at Night Heron Island. A RUDDY DUCK was found at
Sheerness Pool, along with 3 MUTE SWANS. A remaining BLACK-NECKED STILT was
seen along with a peak count of 450 AMERICAN AVOCETS at Raymond Pool. Other
shorebirds included 250 SEMIPALMATED PLOVER plus a few BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER.
Sandpipers included PECTORAL, STILT, WESTERN, LEAST, and SPOTTED SANDPIPER
along with RUDDY TURNSTONE and LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER. A LEAST TERN continues
to be seen at Bear Swamp. CASPIAN TERNS were seen at Sheerness Pool. Several
BANK SWALLOWS were reported at the refuge plus 40 PURPLE MARTINS. AMERICAN
KESTREL, PEREGRINE FALCON, BALD EAGLE and OSPREY were also seen.

A LEAST BITTERN was seen flying across the road at Garrison Lake on Route
13, south of Smyrna. Shorebirds seen along Port Mahon included RUDDY
TURNSTONE and LEAST SANDPIPER. ROYAL TERNS continue be seen along the
bulkhead. SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROW were seen along the Port Mahon Road.
BLACK SKIMMERS and BLUE-WINGED TEAL were found at the Ted Harvey
Conservation Area along the Kitts Hummock Road. A RING-NECKED PHEASANT was
also seen there along with PEREGRINE FALCON and AMERICAN KESTREL. Landbirds
included WILLOW FLYCATCHER and 4 BOBOLINK.

AMERICAN REDSTARTS were found in Dover this week. YELLOW WARBLER was
reported in Cheswold. EASTERN MEADOWLARK and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW were
reported at Dover Air Force Base along Route Nine.


GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was also reported along Route 36 between Milford and
Slaughter's Beach. SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROWS were seen along Lighthouse
Road going to Mispillion Inlet. BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and CLAPPER RAIL
were also reported. SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and RUDDY TURNSTONE were seen from
the DuPont Nature Center.

Three MARBLED GODWITS were seen along the Prime Hook Beach Road at Prime
Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. Also seen were WHITE-RUMPED
SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, plus BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED
PLOVER. BONAPARTE'S GULL and a flock of 30 BLACK SKIMMERS continue to be
seen at Prime Hook Beach. STILT SANDPIPER and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER were
seen at Cods Road. STILT SANDPIPER plus BLACK SKIMMER, LEAST, and COMMON
TERN were seen at Broadkill Beach Marsh. A huge flock of 300 EGRETS were
seen along the Observation Point Trail at Prime Hook headquarters.

Only COMMON LOON was reported this week at Cape Henlopen State Park along
with BLACK SCOTER. A BLACK TERN was seen at The Point with LEAST, COMMON,
CASPIAN, and ROYAL TERN. Shorebirds seen included AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER,
PIPING PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and SANDERLING.

PIED-BILLED GREBE continues to be seen at Gordon's Pond along with
TRICOLORED HERON. VIRGINIA and CLAPPER RAIL were reported in the marsh.
Shorebirds seen included 4 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER,
SPOTTED SANDPIPER, and WILLET. ROYAL TERNS were along the beach. NORTHERN
ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW was seen flying over the pond. Eight BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCHES were found in the pinewoods alongside the pond.

A PARASITIC JAEGER was seen last week from the Cape May-Lewes Ferry. Two
WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were seen this week from the ferry, along with COMMON
and FORSTER'S TERNS. Also reported was a flyby AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, RUDDY
TURNSTONE, and SPOTTED SANDPIPER.

More WHITE IBIS were seen at the Rehoboth Marshes. One was seen at Delaware
Seashore State Park South of Dewey Beach. Seven were seen at James Farm
Ecology Preserve on Cedar Neck, north of Bethany Beach. TRICOLORED HERONS
were also seen at both of these sites. The marsh at James Farm included
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and CLAPPER
RAIL. 

SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROW were also reported this week at Assawoman
Wildlife Area. RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues to be seen there along with
PILEATED WOODPECKER, YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH. In the
woods was a COOPER HAWK. MUTE SWAN, GREEN HERON, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, and
ROYAL TERN were reported at Mulberry Landing.

Another REDHEADED WOODPECKER continues to be seen along Herring Creek at
Angola Neck. WILD TURKEY, YELLOW BILLED CUCKOO, EASTERN SCREECH-OWL,
PILEATED WOODPECKER, WORM-EATING WARBLER, and SUMMER TANAGER were seen at
Angola. Hummingbirds are filling the garden there with 30 RUBY-THROATED
HUMMINGBIRDS counted this week.

The wet fields along The Atlantic Rd., north of Seaford continue to produce
prodigious shorebirds including SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, KILLDEER, LEAST
SANDPIPER, SOLITARY SANDPIPER, both GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, plus
GLOSSY IBIS.

Back in northern Delaware, a TRICOLORED HERON was seen flying down the
Delaware River from Collins Beach simultaneously with a RUDDY TURNSTONE
flying upriver. VIRGINIA RAIL was found at Stave's Landing Wildlife Area.
CASPIAN TERNS were seen at Augustine Beach. And a COMMON MERGANSER was found
at the Grassdale Center at Fort DuPont State Park along the C&D canal.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week, including, Alan Kneidal,
Keith Leonard, Nick Pulcinella, Pete Saenger, Art Dranglis, Joe Swertinski,
Mark Nale, Racheal Shapiro, John Long, Steve Cottrell, Ian Stewart, Brian
McMahon, Josh Berman, Donna Mario, Rob Blye, Kim Steininger, George
Armstead, Bill Stewart, Holly Merker, Bob Klarquist, Joel Martin, Chris
Bennett, Hannah Greenberg, Kelley Nunn, Phil Thompson, Joe Sebastiani, Derek
Stoner, Jerald Reb, Ken Wat, Teddy Burke, Chris Rowe, Glen Lovelace, and
Dave Fees. Remember, the birdline needs your sightings. Please call your
reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week,
this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

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Subject: Least bittern
From: Jeff & Deborah Climie <climie99 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 18:04:31 -0400
I meant to post this sighting after I got to work this morning, but forgot
to. While driving to Willis Chevy Buick in Smyrna on Rt. 13, a Least
Bittern flew over the highway at Garrison's Lake.

Jeff Climie

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Subject: Turkey Point Hawk Watch
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 20:04:03 -0400
Hi Delaware birders,

 

If any of you would like to cross the state line to Maryland and help out
with the annual, all-volunteer Turkey Point Hawk Watch, please let me know.
We will start observing on September 6 and hope to have a volunteer there
each day through November 26.

 

Best looks at Red-shouldered Hawks, guaranteed!

 

Regards,

 

Pat Valdata

Cecil Bird Club

Hawk Watch Coordinator

 


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Subject: Joint DOS-ABA Shorebird Trip 8/13 BHNWR
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 19:31:12 -0400
Good evening De-birders,

Please plan to attend this Saturday's, 8/13 joint DOS and ABA's shorebird field 
trip at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge starting  AT  7:30 AM. 


This field trip has been a long standing DOS field trip led by Frank 
Rohrbacher, who is currently recovering from successful heart surgery and will 
not be able to join all of us this year. In a backup role for Frank, DOS and 
the ABA have joined forces to provide the field trip leaders and itinerary. 
Please join Holly Merker, Chris Bennett, Anthony Gonzon, along with myself for 
a great morning of shorebirding! 


The birds are arriving in excellent numbers so plan on birding until 11:00 or 
later and than join us for lunch at Boondocks to continue the camaraderie! 


Please be aware that the NWR daily pass is in effect. 

Good birding,

Bill Stewart 

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Subject: Middle Run Migrants Today (New Castle County)
From: Derek Stoner <derek AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 20:11:32 +0000
Greetings DE-Birders:

Today during a lunch-hour visit (for the task of removing interpretive signage 
being updated for the upcoming Fall birding season) to the Middle Run Birding 
Trail, I found an interesting mix of migrant activity. 

An adult Broad-winged Hawk soared overhead in tight circles while being 
bombarded by three juvenile Red-shouldered Hawks at the start of the walk. 


Near Trail Marker 4 and the popular Tree-of-Heaven location, a mixed flock of 
songbirds included a Canada Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler, several American 
Redstarts, and multiple Red-eyed Vireos. 


After removing the sign noting the breeding location for the Louisiana 
Waterthrush at the Biking Bridge location (Trail Marker 11), a very 
sharp-looking Northern Waterthrush popped into view. 


The Walnut and Tuliptree grove between Trail Markers 7 and 8 held a mix of 
migrants, including Black-and-white Warbler, more American Redstarts, and 
another Blue-winged Warbler. 


A flyover Bobolink and a lone Cliff Swallow (mixed with Barn Swallows), are the 
other notable migrants. In about 45 minutes of walking, I found 59 species 
along the trail, with 9 being species that are not found breeding within the 
park boundaries. 


Photos of the Canada Warbler and Northern Waterthrush are viewable on the 
Middle Run Birding Flickr page: 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/middlerunbirding/

The Delaware Nature Society's first guided bird walk of the Fall season at 
Middle Run will be taking place one month from tomorrow, on Tuesday, September 
6th, from 8am to 10am. 


Directions to the Middle Run Birding Trail are available at: 
www.DelNature.org/MiddleRun 


Enjoy Fall Migration,

Derek Stoner

Seasonal Program Team Leader
Delaware Nature Society
302-239-2334, ext. 106
derek AT delnature.org
Visit the Middle Run Birding Trail:
www.DelNature.org/MiddleRun
www.flickr.com/photos/middlerunbirding/






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Subject: Oak Grove area 8/7
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 12:20:56 +0000
Good morning,
 The trickle of early migrants continued this past weekend with a Bank Swallow 
(North Oak Grove Rd - DE), a Yellow Warbler (Horseshoe Rd DE) and an immature 
Redstart (on my farm MD). A few shorebirds were found among fields of young 
soybeans with 12 Semi Plover and 4 Least Sands. Other sightings include a Green 
Heron and 5 Wild Turkey on the farm, a GH Owl flying through the neighbor's 
woods at 10 AM, 2 Screech Owls responding to the tape, a Wood Thrush still 
singing and 4 Grasshopper Sparrows still going as well. 


Good birding,
Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE

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Subject: Oak Grove area 8/7
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT state.de.us>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 12:20:56 +0000
Good morning,
 The trickle of early migrants continued this past weekend with a Bank Swallow 
(North Oak Grove Rd - DE), a Yellow Warbler (Horseshoe Rd DE) and an immature 
Redstart (on my farm MD). A few shorebirds were found among fields of young 
soybeans with 12 Semi Plover and 4 Least Sands. Other sightings include a Green 
Heron and 5 Wild Turkey on the farm, a GH Owl flying through the neighbor's 
woods at 10 AM, 2 Screech Owls responding to the tape, a Wood Thrush still 
singing and 4 Grasshopper Sparrows still going as well. 


Good birding,
Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE



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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, August 5th, 2016
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 21:25:33 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
*August 5, 2016
* DEST1608.05
	
*Birds mentioned
Wood Duck
Green-winged Teal
Black Scoter
Surf Scoter
Red-breasted Merganser
Northern Bobwhite 
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
Common Loon 
PACIFIC LOON
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Brown Pelican
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Bald Eagle
Common Gallinule
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
UPLAND SANDPIPER
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
MARBLED GODWIT
WHIMBREL
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot 
Stilt Sandpiper
Sanderling
Dunlin
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech Owl
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk
Chuck-Wills-Widow 
Whip-Poor-will
Red-headed Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker 
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher 
Warbling Vireo 
Yellow-throated Vireo
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Prothonotary Warbler
American Redstart
CERULEAN WARBLER
Yellow Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Grasshopper Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
DICKCISSEL
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: August 5,, 2016
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, August 5th,  this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware year list
increased to 318 species this week with one new addition. 

The previous reported PACIFIC LOON found at the Harbor of Refuge breakwater
at Cape Henlopen State Park continues to be seen intermittently all week.
That bird is best seen in the morning along the outer rock walls of the
jetty. A word of caution, there also two COMMON LOONS also reported in the
area. These birds are all in basic plumage and require a spotting scope for
identification. Also reported at Cape Henlopen was a SANDWICH and BLACK TERN
and along the flock of TERNS out at the point which included CASPIAN,
COMMON, LEAST, and ROYAL TERN, along with AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, PIPING
PLOVER, WHIMBREL, RUDDY TURNSTONE, RED KNOT, and SANDERLING. Other waterfowl
at the outer breakwater included RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, BLACK and SURF
SCOTER. Calling CHUCK-WILL'S-WIDOW and WHIP-POOR-WILL was still in the park
in the evening. WILLOW FLYCATCHER, 5 BROWN HEADED NUTHATCHES, PINE WARBLER,
and BALTIMORE ORIOLE were found by the Seaside Nature Center.

Nearby at Gordon's Pond, north of Rehoboth Beach were  TRICOLORED HERON, 4
GREEN HERONS, and PIED-BILLED GREBE. Shorebirds included BLACK-NECKED STILT,
BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, both GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS,
WILLET, and SANDERLING. LEAST and ROYAL TERNS were on the beach. Flocks of
SWALLOWS over the pond included NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED and BANK SWALLOW.

The Virden Center in Lewes at the University of Delaware Marine School had
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT and 2 YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS. There was also a
flyover PEREGRINE FALCON and a calling gray phase EASTERN SCREECH-OWL.
Visitors coming over the Cape May-Lewes ferry to see the PACIFIC LOON had
WILSON'S STORM-PETREL, BROWN PELICAN, COMMON and ROYAL TERN.

There still is a big flock of WHITE IBIS at Burton's Island in Delaware
Seashore State Park. 24 WHITE IBIS including two adults were found in the
cedar trees along the edge of the island along with TRICOLORED, GREEN, and
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. BROWN PELICAN and LITTLE BLUE HERON were found at
Savage's Ditch in Delaware Seashore State Park. Two BROWN PELICANS were seen
at Indian River Inlet. A YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER was found in Fresh Pond,
south of Indian River inlet.

A large flock of the long-legged waders at Assawoman Wildlife Area near
Fenwick Island included 4 LITTLE BLUES and 5 TRICOLORED HERONS with 18 GREAT
and 11 SNOWY EGRETS and a BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. Also found was
RED-HEADED and PILEATED WOODPECKER, YELLOW-THROATED VIREO, BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH, and GREAT HORNED OWL.

A GULL-BILLED TERN was also found along the Prime Hook Beach causeway in
Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton, with 200 BLACK SKIMMERS,
and COMMON, ROYAL, CASPIAN, and LEAST TERNS plus 2 BONAPARTE'S GULLS in
basic plumage and a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. The previous reported WHIMBREL
continues along the Prime Hook Beach Road. Those birds were joined by 3
HUDSONIAN and a MARBLED GODWITS. Lots of shorebirds are being seen along
Prime Hook Beach including AMERICAN AVOCETS, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED
PLOVER, WESTERN PECTORAL and STILT SANDPIPER, DUNLIN, plus LONGBILLED and
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. A CLIFF SWALLOW was seen flying at Prime Hook Beach
on Wednesday. The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues to be seen at
Fowler's Beach Road along with EASTERN MEADOWLARK, WILLOW FLYCATCHER and
ORCHARD ORIOLE. Two immature WHITE IBIS with 20 GLOSSY IBIS flew over
Fowler's Beach. Four CATTLE EGRETS was seen along Cods Road. WHITE-RUMPED
SANDPIPER and AMERICAN AVOCET were found at Broadkill Beach along with
another BONAPARTE'S GULL. BOBWHITE and WILD TURKEY were found by the refuge
headquarters MERLIN and WILLOW FLYCATCHER were found along the Observation
Point Trail along with SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, LEAST, CASPIAN, and ROYAL TERN
plus BLACK SKIMMER.

SOLITARY SANDPIPER was reported at Frankfort and north of Seaford along
Atlanta Road. COMMON NIGHTHAWK was reported flying over Seaford. A
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was observed near Seaford at Oak Grove. A BLACK-CROWNED
NIGHT HERON was found in Greenwood. RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continue to be
seen at Herring Creek on Angola Neck. WILD TURKEY, YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and
SUMMER TANAGER were seen at a yard in Angola. 

DuPont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet had 5 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS, 45
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, plus RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, SEMIPALMATED and
LEAST SANDPIPER on Monday. COMMON, LEAST and ROYAL TERNS were also seen.
WESTERN SANDPIPER was reported at the fire hall at Slaughter's Beach. There
was a huge flock of waders at Big Stone Beach in Milford Neck Wildlife Area
today, including 305 GREAT EGRETS, 500 SNOWY EGRETS, 2 TRICOLORED HERONS,
and 389 GLOSSY IBIS. Shorebirds included WILLET, 125 GREATER YELLOWLEGS and
79 LESSER YELLOWLEGS. 

New for this week was an UPLAND SANDPIPER along Route 9 at Dover Air Force
Base, along with an EASTERN MEADOWLARK. Unfortunately this is restricted
access and you're not allowed the stop along the roadway. Lots of shorebirds
were seen at the Pickering Beach side of Little Creek Wildlife Management
Area including 2 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS plus 12 BLACK-NECKED STILTS,
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 30 GREATER and 120 YELLOWLEGS plus SPOTTED SANDPIPER.

A NORTHERN HARRIER was seen at Port Mahon. Four BONAPARTE'S GULLS in basic
plumage, ROYAL TERN, and BALD EAGLE were found along the beach. Shorebirds
seen included an AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY
TURNSTONE, and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. In Dover, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH,
AMERICAN REDSTART and OVENBIRD were found near Silver Lake. A BARRED OWL was
reported in Cheswold.

There still a big flock of over 120 AMERICAN AVOCETS at Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna along with 6 BLACK-NECKED STILTS. Other
shorebirds reported included SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, STILT, WESTERN and SPOTTED
SANDPIPER, plus SHORT and LONGBILLED DOWITCHER. Two LEAST TERNS continue at
Bear Swamp, along with GREEN-WINGED TEAL and 4 YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS.
TRICOLORED, LITTLE BLUE and GREEN HERONS were seen at Raymond Pool. Raptors
reported included OSPREY, COOPER'S HAWK, BALD EAGLE, plus an AMERICAN
KESTREL along Big Woods Road. A calling WARBLING VIREO was found in the
refuge along with WILLOW FLYCATCHER, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, and GRASSHOPPER
SPARROW. All three gallinaceous birds were reported in the refuge this week,
NORTHERN BOBWHITE, RING-NECKED PHEASANT, and WILD TURKEY.

The first highlight of the fall migration was a female CERULEAN WARBLER at
Ashland Nature Center near Hockessin. Also seen were YELLOW WARBLER,
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, and OVENBIRD. A BANK SWALLOW was also reported flying
over Ashland. BLUE GROSBEAK was seen at the Sledding Hill.

An AMERICAN REDSTART was found at Shortwood along Grubb Road in Brandywine
Hundred. Four YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS and a SPOTTED SANDPIPER were found at
Brandywine Creek State Park on Saturday. Five WOOD DUCKS were seen along the
creek. An EASTERN SCREECH-OWL was calling by the Freshwater Marsh Preserve.
An EASTERN MEADOWLARK was seen along the entrance road.

A PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was found at Lum's Pond State Park near Glasgow.
COMMON GALLINULE was calling at Dragon Run Marsh near Delaware City. Also
reported at Dragon Run were NORTHERN BOBWHITE, LITTLE BLUE and GREEN HERON
along with BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. The flock of 500 swallows included 10
BANK SWALLOWS.

BLACK TERN was seen this weekend at Thousand Acre Marsh from the Ashton
Tract. Shorebirds there included SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and SPOTTED SANDPIPER.
CASPIAN TERN was reported at the Port Penn Impoundments of Augustine Beach
Wildlife Area. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week, including, Vince Ella, Manny
Barrera, Jim White, Colin Campbell, Joe Swertinski, Gina Sheridan, Racheal
Shapiro, John Long, Rich Clifton, Peter Burns, Steve Cottrell, Donna Mario,
Steve Graff, Eric Hartshaw, Elizabeth Beske, Rob Blye, Shirley Martin, Jill
Nott, Kim Steininger, George Armstead, Bill Stewart, Holly Merker, Bob
Klarquist, Jen Dwyer, Frank Marenghi, Joel Martin, Tim Freiday, Chris
Bennett, Hannah Greenberg, Kelley Nunn, Phil Thompson, Joe Sebastiani, Derek
Stoner, Jerald Reb, Ken Wat, Teddy Burke, Chris Rowe, Sharon Lynn, Sue
Gruver, Alissa Kegelman, Glen Lovelace, and Dave Fees. Special thanks to the
folks at Camp Avocet for reporting their findings! Remember, the birdline
needs your sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

-end transcript

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Subject: Bucktoe Creek Preserve bird walks
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 19:03:45 +0000
Dear Birders: The Delaware Nature Society will resume bird walks at the Bucktoe 
Creek Preserve starting this Sunday. These walks will continue each Sunday 
through November for the fall migration. These are free and open to anyone. If 
you attend, we do appreciate your membership with the Delaware Nature Society. 
No registration required, just show up. The Bucktoe Creek Preserve is a 
private, 350-acre nature preserve near Kennett Square, PA and is only open for 
visitation during special events such as the bird walks. Bucktoe is a very good 
spot to look for migrant warblers and other passerines, so come join the fun! 


When: 8am Sundays, August through November.  Walks last 2 or 3 hours.
Where: 432 Sharp Road, Avondale, PA. Look for BCP sign and "Bird Walk" sign at 
the entrance. 

Leadership:  Hank Davis, Mike Gardner, and Larry Lewis rotate.

We hope to see you there.


Joe Sebastiani
Ashland Nature Center Manager

Delaware Nature Society
Ashland Nature Center
3511 Barley Mill Road
P.O. Box 700
Hockessin, DE 19707
(302) 239-2334 ext. 115
fax (302)239-2473
joe AT delnature.org



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Subject: Delaware Pacific Loon - any photos?
From: Tom Johnson <tbj4 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 10:40:18 -0400
Delaware birders,
I've been reading the reports of a flightless Pacific Loon at Cape Henlopen
with some interest since it was first posted on this listserv on July 23.
The only photos I've seen posted online so far show a Common Loon - has
anyone obtained photos of the Pacific Loon? Even distant digiscoped photos
would be helpful.

Thanks,
Tom Johnson
Cape May, NJ

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Subject: Re: de-birds Digest - 3 Aug 2016 to 4 Aug 2016 (#2016-187)
From: Clarks Captures <clarkscaptures AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2016 09:53:23 +0000
-------- Original message --------
From: de-birds automatic digest system 
Date: 8/5/2016 00:00 (GMT-05:00)
To: de-birds AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: de-birds Digest - 3 Aug 2016 to 4 Aug 2016 (#2016-187)

[LISTSERV mailing list manager] [LISTSERV 16.0] 
 


de-birds Digest - 3 Aug 2016 to 4 Aug 2016 (#2016-187)
Table of contents:

  *   Pacific Loon & GB Tern
 * DOS Flyer Satisfaction Survey - Take 3 Minutes To Help Us Better Serve the 
Delaware Birding Community 


  1.  Pacific Loon & GB Tern
     *   Pacific Loon & GB Tern (08/04)
From: Gina Sheridan 
 2. DOS Flyer Satisfaction Survey - Take 3 Minutes To Help Us Better Serve the 
Delaware Birding Community 

 * DOS Flyer Satisfaction Survey - Take 3 Minutes To Help Us Better Serve the 
Delaware Birding Community (08/04) 

From: Kelley Nunn 




Browse the de-birds online 
archives. 



[Powered by the LISTSERV Email List 
Manager] 



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Subject: DOS Flyer Satisfaction Survey - Take 3 Minutes To Help Us Better Serve the Delaware Birding Community
From: Kelley Nunn <kelley.nunn AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2016 19:00:21 -0400
Hey, DE Birders!

At the Delmarva Ornithological Society (DOS), we are always looking for new
ways to better serve the Delaware birding community.

We want to hear from you about your experience with our online Flyer! If
you've had a chance to view the DOS Flyer online, please take 3 minutes to
fill out our short, 8-question Flyer satisfaction survey. We'd love to hear
your feedback!

Each person who submits the survey will be entered to win a free, one-year
DOS membership.

Survey link: http://goo.gl/9zlDgy

To access the 2015-2016 issues of the Flyer online, please go here:
http://goo.gl/kjPMl6

Thank you for those of you who have already participated, and good birding!

-Kelley Nunn
DOS Flyer Editor
kelley.nunn AT gmail.com

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Subject: Pacific Loon & GB Tern
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Aug 2016 18:28:15 -0400
On this pleasant August morning (Thursday, 8/04/16), Dennis and I enjoyed
the excellent morning light at The Point on Cape Henlopen.  From 7:40 to
8:20, the PACIFIC LOON was loafing in the calm harbor waters near the inner
breakwater lighthouse. Eventually, it slowly glided behind the lighthouse
and disappeared from view.  No others loons were present. Meanwhile,
Bottle-nosed Dolphins provided a backdrop for the Pac Loon, and plenty of
Ghost Crabs were merrily scuttling around the beach.

A mid-morning visit to Prime Hook Beach State Park netted us one MARBLED
GODWIT and a patrolling adult GULL-BILLED TERN. As we chatted with Joe
Swertinski, the GB Tern flew by our position twice, and offered up very
nice flight views.

Yesterday, we observed the same GULL-BILLED TERN (with a full black cap)
for ten minutes resting alone on one of the closer sand bars  For
additional entertainment, there was an active family of CLAPPER RAILs (two
adults and four black chicks), scurrying around the salt marsh close to the
causeway.  Overall, shorebird numbers were down from yesterday, and we were
unable to re-find the Hudsonian Godwits.

Good August birding is here!

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE

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Subject: Re: Pacific Loon
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 20:46:48 -0400
I left soon after Pat arrived, and I also missed the PALO (by 15 minutes. Ugh.)
I went back to the point tonight and saw what I believe was the Pacific to the 
left of the lighthouse, but couldn't confirm it due to distance and terrible 
lighting. I also saw two Common Loons (one by the lighthouse, one further out 
in the bay). 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 3, 2016, at 7:31 PM, Patricia Valdata  
wrote: 

> 
> [sigh] Three of us arrived at 8:45 and saw a loon by the lighthouse. We
> tried turning it into the Pacific Loon, but reluctantly decided it was most
> likely a Common. It stayed by the red lighthouse for the nearly two hours
> that we were there, along with a Ruddy Duck and a young Surf Scoter.
> 
> At least we didn't miss our target bird by only 5 minutes, like the Ruff at
> Swan Harbor (Harford County, MD) a couple of weeks ago! I guess we should
> have gotten up an hour earlier.
> 
> Pat Valdata
> Elkton
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Jerald
> Reb
> Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2016 10:53 AM
> To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: Re: [de-birds] Pacific Loon + Prime Hook Rd
> 
> The Pacific Loon was gone by the time I got there at 8:01. However I did
> have good looks at a COLO by the lighthouse.
> 
> Jerald
> 
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Subject: Re: Pacific Loon
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 19:31:30 -0400
[sigh] Three of us arrived at 8:45 and saw a loon by the lighthouse. We
tried turning it into the Pacific Loon, but reluctantly decided it was most
likely a Common. It stayed by the red lighthouse for the nearly two hours
that we were there, along with a Ruddy Duck and a young Surf Scoter.

At least we didn't miss our target bird by only 5 minutes, like the Ruff at
Swan Harbor (Harford County, MD) a couple of weeks ago! I guess we should
have gotten up an hour earlier.

Pat Valdata
Elkton

-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Jerald
Reb
Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2016 10:53 AM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Pacific Loon + Prime Hook Rd

The Pacific Loon was gone by the time I got there at 8:01. However I did
have good looks at a COLO by the lighthouse.

Jerald

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Subject: Re: Pacific Loon + Prime Hook Rd
From: Jerald Reb <jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 10:52:56 -0400
The Pacific Loon was gone by the time I got there at 8:01. However I did have 
good looks at a COLO by the lighthouse. 


Jerald

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 3, 2016, at 10:26 AM, Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT) 
 wrote: 

> 
> Good morning,
> Dave Fees and I arrived at the point around 6:15 this morning. We did not 
immediately find the loon, but when we did (around 6:45) it was floating 
between the lighthouse and the fishing pier. Not sure where it materialized 
from. Anyway, we watched it busily preen and drift toward the fishing pier as 
we tried to decide if this was 'the bird.' It then drifted off to the NW toward 
the ferry jetty. Finished preening, it began actively diving and coming back 
toward us. It passed decently close to us, a bit beyond the Piping Plover 
closure signs and continued off into the distance toward the point by 7:45. Our 
observations of the bird match Colin's description from yesterday. 

> Along Prime Hook Rd, we found the continuing 3 Hudsonian Godwits just west of 
the sharp bend near the bridge project. The Whimbrel was at the same spot, 
further out on a more muddy looking island. The Marbled Godwit was not present. 
We also found 1 Stilt Sand, 1 Pectoral, 2 LBBG and 2 Bonaparte's Gulls. Peep 
and dowitcher numbers were reduced from last week. 

> 
> Good birding,
> Glen Lovelace III
> Seaford, DE
> 
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Subject: Re: Pacific Loon + Prime Hook Rd
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 14:26:36 +0000
Good morning,
 Dave Fees and I arrived at the point around 6:15 this morning. We did not 
immediately find the loon, but when we did (around 6:45) it was floating 
between the lighthouse and the fishing pier. Not sure where it materialized 
from. Anyway, we watched it busily preen and drift toward the fishing pier as 
we tried to decide if this was 'the bird.' It then drifted off to the NW toward 
the ferry jetty. Finished preening, it began actively diving and coming back 
toward us. It passed decently close to us, a bit beyond the Piping Plover 
closure signs and continued off into the distance toward the point by 7:45. Our 
observations of the bird match Colin's description from yesterday. 

 Along Prime Hook Rd, we found the continuing 3 Hudsonian Godwits just west of 
the sharp bend near the bridge project. The Whimbrel was at the same spot, 
further out on a more muddy looking island. The Marbled Godwit was not present. 
We also found 1 Stilt Sand, 1 Pectoral, 2 LBBG and 2 Bonaparte's Gulls. Peep 
and dowitcher numbers were reduced from last week. 


Good birding,
Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE

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Subject: Pacific Loon closeup?
From: John <vcrail AT MSN.COM>
Date: Wed, 3 Aug 2016 00:03:47 +0000
Normally I would not suggesting disturbing wildlife. However, since everyone on 
the Cape Henlopen beach at the Point has staredat the potential Pacific Loon 
with boats, kayaks, and paddleboards going by it, has anyone considered going 
on the Park-sponsored kayak tours armed with a point-and-shoot camera for a 
better view to confirm the species? (Unless someone wants to risk getting their 
more expensive SLR wet.) Even if one came no closer than all of the other 
surrounding watercraft, it would probably be an improved vantage point without 
breaking the birding code of ethics. 



John Dunn

Smyrna

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Subject: Pacific Loon
From: Colin Campbell <delawaretwitcher AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 17:06:56 -0500
 Joe Swertinski and I watched 'the loon' for over two hours this morning 
(approx 9-11am) from the inner shore accessed from the parking lot at Cape 
Henlopen SP Point. 



We had three scopes between the two of us. We had pretty good cameras. 
Conditions were excellent - almost flat water, sun behind, very little wind, 
very few boats, even fewer vacationers, no bugs. 



A loon was quickly picked up in the L-shaped 'bay' opposite (with the red 
lighthouse on the stone jetty nearest the shore) where there are some 
oversummering scoters (Black and Surf) in the distance. 



It took us about half an hour to convince ourselves that this was not a Common 
Loon, generally because of the distance involved, From that moment on, we saw 
no other loon at all. 



The loon very slowly made it's way along the stone wall towards the red 
lighthouse (ie - getting closer). It then passed the light and very slowly 
drifted out into the 'bay' between the lighthouse and the Fishing Pier (there 
were two anchored yachts further out acting as guides). Our scope views as it 
passed the lighthouse clearly showed that is was not a Common Loon. The 
relatively narrow (dagger-shaped) bill, generally held horizontally - except 
when ... calling(?) - and appearing symmetrical, the smooth roundness of the 
head without the steep forehead angle to the bill (best seen in full profile), 
the gray nape and crown (best seen in contrast to the much darker back when 
facing away), all pointed to a non-Common Loon (thus a non-White-billed Loon), 
a non-Red-throated Loon (with its distinctive up-tilted bill) and a non-Arctic 
Loon (which always has an obvious white patch on the rear flank in all ages and 
plumages). This bird did have a small white patch on just one side ! 

 in approximately the right area, but shown to be molting feathers when it 
raised out of the water and flapped its wings. As it did so, it was very plain 
to see that it was flightless - most of the flight feathers were missing. Two 
kayaks and a motorboat passed closely by and it just looked back and made 
little movement. 



The bird made it's way back (it never got nearer to the Fishing Pier to cause 
us to run round there hoping for better, closer, photographable views) passed 
the red light then continued at a much faster pace towards the Point itself, 
often with its head and neck under water, making it nearly impossible to see. 
As it approached shallower waters there it started diving - much to our 
astonishment - but, if loons become flightless as some ducks do when molting 
flight feathers, they still have to fish, so presumably the webbed feet take 
over as sole engines and the residual wings act as rudders. I'm just guessing. 



The photos. Well, they are basically crap due to the distances involved, so I'm 
certainly not posting mine. Joe agrees. However, if the DE Records Committee 
these days insists on identifiable photos for a first state record, our photos 
may help those involved to determine their vote. Otherwise, we need a boat to 
get out there for the definitive pics. This bird ain't gonna leave soon. 
Meanwhile, Joe and I are adding Pacific Loon to our DE list and giving grateful 
thanks to Bruce Peterjohn for discovering this bird. 



Colin Campbell
Claymont, DE

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Subject: thanks for the location info
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 11:41:27 -0400
Thank you to everyone who helped clarify the location of the Pacific Loon.
Fingers crossed that it will be visible tomorrow!

Pat Valdata

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Subject: Re: Summering Loons in DE
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Tue, 2 Aug 2016 11:00:09 -0400
I'd like to try for the Pacific Loon tomorrow. Can someone clarify this
location for those of us who don't live in Delaware?

"The loon has mostly been observed on the north side of the inner
breakwall." 

Thanks,

Pat Valdata
Elkton, MD

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Subject: Red-headed woodpecker
From: MannyB <mb_birder AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 22:34:47 -0400
One seen at Assawoman Wildlife Area on Sunday, July 31. At Strawberry 
Landing. Facing the water, look to the right for 4-5 snags. The bird was 
flying from the top of a snag to the top of another one. Manny

Manny Barrera, Montoursville, PA


-- 
*************************
Manny Barrera
Montoursville, PA

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Subject: 7/31 at Oak Grove
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 15:07:04 +0000
Good morning,
 Yesterday morning (7/31) I birded my home patch around Oak Grove (on the state 
line between Seaford and Federalsburg). My main effort was to search the wheat 
stubble fields. Every summer, I conduct a needle-in-the-haystack search for 
Upland Sandpiper between the time the wheat is cut and the late soybeans get 
too tall. Once again I came up empty (It has worked something 2 years of the 
last 12), but there were a few puddles from recent heavy rains. I found a 
single Lesser Yellowlegs and 2 Least Sandpipers with the Killdeer flock on Oak 
Grove Rd. A small swallow flock congregated nearby held a FOY Bank Swallow 
among Tree, Barn and a high count of Purple Martins. 

 However, the day's highlight was a totally unexpected Prothonotary Warbler 
that appeared with a mixed feeding flock on the east end of Kinder Rd. Previous 
experience has Prothonotaries as migrants in a small window in the last week of 
August and all associated with the stream crossing on Horseshoe Rd. This was a 
first local record for July. 



Good birding,
Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE


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Subject: 7/31 at Oak Grove
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT state.de.us>
Date: Mon, 1 Aug 2016 15:07:04 +0000
Good morning,
 Yesterday morning (7/31) I birded my home patch around Oak Grove (on the state 
line between Seaford and Federalsburg). My main effort was to search the wheat 
stubble fields. Every summer, I conduct a needle-in-the-haystack search for 
Upland Sandpiper between the time the wheat is cut and the late soybeans get 
too tall. Once again I came up empty (It has worked something 2 years of the 
last 12), but there were a few puddles from recent heavy rains. I found a 
single Lesser Yellowlegs and 2 Least Sandpipers with the Killdeer flock on Oak 
Grove Rd. A small swallow flock congregated nearby held a FOY Bank Swallow 
among Tree, Barn and a high count of Purple Martins. 

 However, the day's highlight was a totally unexpected Prothonotary Warbler 
that appeared with a mixed feeding flock on the east end of Kinder Rd. Previous 
experience has Prothonotaries as migrants in a small window in the last week of 
August and all associated with the stream crossing on Horseshoe Rd. This was a 
first local record for July. 



Good birding,
Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE

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Subject: Brandywine Creek SP birdwalk
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 22:06:09 -0400
Here are the results from the Birdwalk today. 

Brandywine Creek SP, New Castle, Delaware, US Jul 30, 2016 8:00 AM - 10:30
AM
Protocol: Traveling 3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     monthly walk along the creek, hot and humid
42 species

Wood Duck  5
Mallard  6
Black Vulture  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Mourning Dove  2
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  3 good looks!
Eastern Screech-Owl  1 calling
Chimney Swift  4
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Downy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  2
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Acadian Flycatcher  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
White-eyed Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  4
Purple Martin  7
Tree Swallow  2
Barn Swallow  2
Carolina Chickadee  6
Tufted Titmouse  4
White-breasted Nuthatch  5
Carolina Wren  3
Wood Thrush  2
American Robin  44
Gray Catbird  1
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  1
Chipping Sparrow  1
Eastern Towhee  1
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  8
Indigo Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Eastern Meadowlark  1 along roadside when leaving
Common Grackle  1
Baltimore Oriole  1 male
American Goldfinch  3

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Subject: 1 Marbled Godwit and 3 Hudsonian Godwits over Prime Hook Rd
From: Robert McLean <tmclean1090 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 14:50:15 -0400
While looking for the Whimbrel that Bruce Peterjohn had recently spotted
off of Prime Hook Road on the nw side of the bridge construction area, 1
Marbled Godwit and 3 Hudsonian Godwits flew from the Fowler Beach side of
the road and down towards the headquarters. The  Hudsonians all had
prominent white upper tail covers and a black tail. The underwent covers
were dark, if not black. Theses were large, fast flying birds with long
bills. The Marbled Godwit was noticeably larger and also having a cinnamon
brown coloration. The upper wings also flashed orange.

Additionally, a nice variety of shorebirds is currently in this area. And
earlier, I saw a basic plummage Bonaparte's Gull. 88 Black Skimmers were
also found by me on this road, may be a quarter mile from the bridge.

Contacting you from the field ....

Good birding!

Taylor McLean
tmclean1090 AT gmail.com
Baltimore, MD

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Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 29th, 2016
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 20:43:40 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
*July 29, 2016
* DEST1607.29
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Black Scoter
Northern Bobwhite
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
PACIFIC LOON
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Cooper's Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Clapper Rail
Virginia Rail
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
RUFF
Sanderling
Stilt Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Bonaparte's Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Barn Owl
Barred Owl
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher
Warbling Vireo
Purple Martin
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Louisiana Waterthrush
American Redstart
Prairie Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Grasshopper Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Scarlet Tanager
Dickcissel
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark


Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: July 29, 2016
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Friday, July 29th,  this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware year list
increased to 316 species this week, including a new species for the state! 

A new state record was a reported PACIFIC LOON at Cape Henlopen State Park.
This bird is being seen from the beach on the bayside of The Point along the
rock wall of the Harbor Of Refuge. First reported last Friday, the PACIFIC
LOON has been seen off and on all week, frequently to far away for adequate
identification. The best pictures of this bird have been from a boat along
the breakwater wall. This might be the same bird reported as a red throated
loon two weeks ago. Pictures are on-line at PrimeHookBirding and eBrirds.
Thank you Ed Sigda and Taylor McLean. 

Some other birds at Cape Henlopen included 3 WHIMBRELS, 5 PIPING PLOVERS,
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER SANDERLING, AND RUDDY TURNSTONE ON THE BEACH. BLACK
SKIMMER AND BLACK TERN were seen out at the  point along with 30 ROYAL and 2
CASPIAN TERNS. AMERICAN KESTREL and PRAIRIE WARBLER were seen by the SEASIDE
NATURE CENTER. A feeding flock of 31 WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were seen in
Delaware waters from the Cape May - Lewes ferry. Four BLACK SCOTERS and 3
RUDDY DUCKS were seen along the breakwater walls from the ferry going over
to New Jersey. Also reported were 10 BROWN PELICANS flying into Delaware
Bay. COMMON, LEAST, and FORSTER'S TERN were seen from the ferry.

At Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton, one of the best shots
for shorebirds has been at Cods Road where 2 REEVES, that's a female RUFF,
were seen on Monday. A female WILSON'S PHALAROPE was seen there Sunday. Also
reported were SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, SPOTTED, LEAST, and PECTORAL SANDPIPER
plus BANK SWALLOW. DICKCISSEL is still being reported along the Fowler's
Beach Road, by the woods before the sharp turn to the marsh. A pair of
WHIMBRELS were seen today along the Prime Hook Beach Road.  BONAPARTE'S GULL
in winter plumage along with LEAST TERN and 155 BLACK SKIMMERS were also
reported. Shorebirds found included AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-BELLIED and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER.

An immature WHITE IBIS was seen flying over Indian River Inlet with 40
GLOSSY IBIS, plus TRICOLORED and BLACK CROWNED NIGHT HERON. Two BROWN
PELICANS were also seen at the inlet. 15 BROWN PELICANS were seen at
Burton's Island at the North Marina along with TRICOLORED HERONS, SPOTTED
SANDPIPERS, and 8 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS. TRICOLORED HERON and 3 BROWN PELICANS
were seen at Savage's Ditch in Delaware Seashore State Park along with LEAST
SANDPIPER, VIRGINIA, and CLAPPER RAIL.

There was a flyover immature WHITE IBIS at Big Stone Beach in Milford Neck
Wildlife Area along with TRICOLORED and LITTLE BLUE HERON, plus BLUE WINGED
TEAL. Big Stone Beach marsh has lots of waders right now including 500 SNOWY
EGRETS, 127 GREAT EGRETS, 174 GLOSSY IBIS, plus 25 BLACK NECKED STILTS, 14
AMERICAN AVOCETS, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, SPOTTED, LEAST and WESTERN SANDPIPER
with 300 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and 14 STILT SANDPIPERS. There were also
126 LESSER and 23 GREATER YELLOWLEGS along with VIRGINIA RAIL, CASPIAN and
ROYAL TERN plus SEASIDE SPARROWS.

RUDDY TURNSTONE, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS were reported at
Port Mahon along with ROYAL TERNS on the stakes. 17 BANK SWALLOWS were
reported at Logan Tract. A pair of BARRED OWLS were found behind Old Dover
High School near Silver Lake. 

At Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna the big flock of
AMERICAN AVOCETS numbered 250 birds this week. A WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was
reported along with SOLITARY, SPOTTED, and PECTORAL SANDPIPER. A few
BLACK-NECKED STILTS are still at the refuge. Two TRICOLORED HERONS were seen
at Raymond Pool along with 3 YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS and BLACK-CROWNED
NIGHT HERON at Night Heron Island in Bear Swamp. Three LEAST TERNS and a
BLACK SKIMMER were seen at the refuge. MUTE SWAN continues at Shearness
Pool. Raptors included PEREGRINE FALCON, BALD EAGLE, COOPER'S HAWK and 3
OSPREY, plus BARN and BARRED OWLS. GRASSHOPPER SPARROW continues to be found
on the road to the Allee House. Five NORTHERN BOBWHITE were along the
entrance road along with RING-NECKED PHEASANT. WILD TURKEY was seen along
the road to Woodland beach.

 A pair of BLACK TERNS molting out of breeding plumage were seen at the
Ashton Tract of Thousand Acre Marsh off Thorntown Road near Port Penn.
CASPIAN TERN was seen in the parking lot at Augustine Beach. LEAST BITTERN
was reported at Grier's Pond along Dutch Neck Road at Thousand Acre Marsh,
along with LITTLE BLUE HERON and CATTLE EGRET, plus a calling
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. CLIFF and BANK SWALLOWS were seen at Silver Run in
Augustine Beach Wildlife Area GRASSHOPPER and SAVANNAH SPARROW with EASTERN
MEADOWLARKS were seen at Prices Park in Middletown.

Kayaking at Dragon Run near Delaware City found 20 WOOD DUCK, 15 LITTLE BLUE
HERON, CATTLE EGRET, and 4 GREEN HERON, GLOSSY IBIS and OSPREY there was
also NORTHERN BOBWHITE, YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, 6 WILLOW FLYCATCHER, and
flyover BOBOLINK. RED-SHOULDERED HAWK and AMERICAN KESTREL were also
reported.

GREAT EGRET was reported at the second pond at the Middle Run Natural Area
along Paper Mill Road. Also reported was BARRED OWL and AMERICAN REDSTART.
WARBLING VIREO and LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH were reported at Mt Cuba Piedmont
Wildflower Preserve along with SCARLET TANAGER. PURPLE MARTINS were seen
flying over near Yorklyn. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week, including, Al Guarente, Drew
Sweet, Mike Hudson, Amy White, Curt Davis, Andy McGann, Colin Campbell, Bob
Stein, Frank Marenghi, Rich Clifton, Steve Graff, Kim Steininger, Bill
Stewart, Holly Merker, Gerry Teig, Jim Austin-Cole, Frank Hawkins, Stephen
Boyle, Steve Sutter, Edie Parmer,  Keith Leonard, Chris Bennett, Hannah
Greenberg, Kelley Nunn, Joe Sebastiani, Derek Stoner, Jerald Reb, Ken Wat,
Rachael Shapiro, Teddy Burke, Chris Rowe, Sharon Lynn, Sue Gruver, Taylor
McLean and Ed Sigda Remember, the birdline needs your sightings. Please call
your reports into 302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next
week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

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Subject: Birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State Park, 7/30/16
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 14:55:35 -0400
The monthly walk along the Brandywine is tomorrow, 7/30/16. We'll meet at
the nature center at Brandywine Creek State Park at 8 am. The entrance is
off Addams Dam Road, in northern Wilmington. The walk goes, rain or shine.
There have been some interesting birds at the park, lots of swallows,
flycatchers and the first Worm-eating Warbler of the season. Post breeding
dispersal will be the highlight of the day. The walk is free, but park
entrance fees are in effect. Boots and bug spray are needed. 

Andy

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Subject: Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern
From: Michael Moore <mcmoore32 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 11:20:06 -0400
Here is a Google Map link to Greer's Pond

Dropped Pin
near 1210 Dutch Neck Rd, Middletown, DE 19709
https://goo.gl/maps/KrsjBEiBX1N2 

You can only see the pond in Satellite view. 

Mike Moore
Newark, DE

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 29, 2016, at 9:17 AM, Anne Meddings  wrote:
> 
> Agreed! 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> 
> From: "Dave Kerr"  
> To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU 
> Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:16:29 AM 
> Subject: Re: [de-birds] Grier's Pond Least Bittern 
> 
> Three counties or not, like Rob, I am often perplexed by 
> the lack of geographical information provided by DE posters. 
> 
> Adding the county name to the subject line would be very helpful. 
> 
> 
> Dave Kerr 
> Carlisle, PA 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of dcoffin5 
> Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:07 AM 
> To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU 
> Subject: Re: [de-birds] Grier's Pond Least Bittern 
> 
> Hi Rob, Great suggestion... but you will find that Delaware is much smaller 
than PA. We only have 3 counties so very quickly you will learn every birding 
hotspot. PA has like a hundred separate counties, right? Wow, big state to 
cover. Welcome to delaware! 

> This location is NCC. Very close to the canal.It is not labeled on most 
maps... it is very small. If you go up route 9 to the foot of Reedy pt. Bridge, 
take little road to the left, go around 1000 acre marsh to the other side via 
the road alongside the canal. Just after you turn left away from canal you will 
find this location. Land side, not marsh side. PRIVATe property, stay on road 
to view pond. 

> I've been there several times. Sometimes you get real good birds... other 
times nothing but red wing bb's. There are several other hotspots around here, 
use eBird to see other locations. Some of the best birding in the state is 
right in this Del.City - Port Penn area. Enjoy! Dean Coffin Wilmington 

> 
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone 
> -------- Original message --------From: Rob Blye  Date: 
7/29/16 8:47 AM (GMT-05:00) To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU Subject: Re: [de-birds] 
Grier's Pond Least Bittern 

> I am a new resident of Delaware. Where is Grier"s Pond. I humbly suggest 
> that we follow the PA Birds list serve requirement that each post include 
> at least the name of the poster and the county where the sighting occurred. 
> 
> *Rob* 
> 
> Robert W. Blye 
> 34603 Doe Run 
> Lewes DE 19958-3332 
> 302 945-8618 
> 610 213-2413 mobile 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS 
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern
From: Anne Meddings <meganbooth AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 13:17:55 +0000
Agreed! 


----- Original Message -----

From: "Dave Kerr"  
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU 
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:16:29 AM 
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Grier's Pond Least Bittern 

Three counties or not, like Rob, I am often perplexed by 
the lack of geographical information provided by DE posters. 

Adding the county name to the subject line would be very helpful. 


Dave Kerr 
Carlisle, PA 


-----Original Message----- 
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of dcoffin5 
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:07 AM 
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU 
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Grier's Pond Least Bittern 

Hi Rob, Great suggestion... but you will find that Delaware is much smaller 
than PA. We only have 3 counties so very quickly you will learn every birding 
hotspot. PA has like a hundred separate counties, right? Wow, big state to 
cover. Welcome to delaware! 

This location is NCC. Very close to the canal.It is not labeled on most maps... 
it is very small. If you go up route 9 to the foot of Reedy pt. Bridge, take 
little road to the left, go around 1000 acre marsh to the other side via the 
road alongside the canal. Just after you turn left away from canal you will 
find this location. Land side, not marsh side. PRIVATe property, stay on road 
to view pond. 

I've been there several times. Sometimes you get real good birds... other times 
nothing but red wing bb's. There are several other hotspots around here, use 
eBird to see other locations. Some of the best birding in the state is right in 
this Del.City - Port Penn area. Enjoy! Dean Coffin Wilmington 


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone 
-------- Original message --------From: Rob Blye  Date: 
7/29/16 8:47 AM (GMT-05:00) To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU Subject: Re: [de-birds] 
Grier's Pond Least Bittern 

I am a new resident of Delaware. Where is Grier"s Pond. I humbly suggest 
that we follow the PA Birds list serve requirement that each post include 
at least the name of the poster and the county where the sighting occurred. 

*Rob* 

Robert W. Blye 
34603 Doe Run 
Lewes DE 19958-3332 
302 945-8618 
610 213-2413 mobile 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS 
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern
From: Dave Kerr <dsktc AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 09:16:29 -0400
Three counties or not, like Rob, I am often perplexed by
the lack of geographical information provided by DE posters.

Adding the county name to the subject line would be very helpful.


Dave Kerr
Carlisle, PA 


-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of dcoffin5
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:07 AM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Grier's Pond Least Bittern

Hi Rob, Great suggestion... but you will find that Delaware is much smaller 
than PA. We only have 3 counties so very quickly you will learn every birding 
hotspot. PA has like a hundred separate counties, right? Wow, big state to 
cover. Welcome to delaware! 

This location is NCC. Very close to the canal.It is not labeled on most maps... 
it is very small. If you go up route 9 to the foot of Reedy pt. Bridge, take 
little road to the left, go around 1000 acre marsh to the other side via the 
road alongside the canal. Just after you turn left away from canal you will 
find this location. Land side, not marsh side. PRIVATe property, stay on road 
to view pond. 

I've been there several times. Sometimes you get real good birds... other times 
nothing but red wing bb's. There are several other hotspots around here, use 
eBird to see other locations. Some of the best birding in the state is right in 
this Del.City - Port Penn area. Enjoy! Dean Coffin Wilmington 


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Rob Blye  Date: 
7/29/16 8:47 AM (GMT-05:00) To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU Subject: Re: [de-birds] 
Grier's Pond Least Bittern 

I am a new resident of Delaware. Where is Grier"s Pond. I humbly suggest
that we follow the PA Birds list serve requirement that each post include
at least the name of the poster and the county where the sighting occurred.

*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern
From: joe sebastiani <joe AT DELAWARENATURESOCIETY.ORG>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 13:15:00 +0000
Best way to do it is to use eBird.org. Got to Explore Data, Explore Hotspots, 
look them up in New Castle County or Delaware, and it will show you where it is 
on the map, and even give you directions if you want. 


Joe Sebastiani
Ashland Nature Center Manager

Delaware Nature Society
Ashland Nature Center
3511 Barley Mill Road
P.O. Box 700
Hockessin, DE 19707
(302) 239-2334 ext. 115
fax (302)239-2473
joe AT delnature.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of dcoffin5
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 9:07 AM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Grier's Pond Least Bittern

Hi Rob, Great suggestion... but you will find that Delaware is much smaller 
than PA.  We only have 3 counties so very quickly you will learn every birding 
hotspot.  PA has like a hundred separate counties, right? Wow, big state to 
cover.  Welcome to delaware! 

This location is NCC. Very close to the canal.It is not labeled on most maps... 
it is very small. If you go up route 9 to the foot of Reedy pt. Bridge, take 
little road to the left, go around 1000 acre marsh to the other side via the 
road alongside the canal.  Just after you turn left away from canal you will 
find this location. Land side, not marsh side.  PRIVATe property, stay on road 
to view pond. I've been there several times. Sometimes you get real good 
birds... other times nothing but red wing bb's. There are several other 
hotspots around here, use eBird to see other locations. Some of the best 
birding in the state is right in this Del.City - Port Penn area.Enjoy!Dean 
CoffinWilmington Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone 

-------- Original message --------From: Rob Blye  Date: 
7/29/16 8:47 AM (GMT-05:00) To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU Subject: Re: [de-birds] 
Grier's Pond Least Bittern I am a new resident of Delaware. Where is Grier"s 
Pond. I humbly suggest that we follow the PA Birds list serve requirement that 
each post include at least the name of the poster and the county where the 
sighting occurred. 


*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 6:22 PM, Christopher Rowe < 
0000011d90053296-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu> wrote: 


> Hunting the edge showing nicely!
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>

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List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu


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List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu

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List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern
From: dcoffin5 <dcoffin5 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 09:06:43 -0400
Hi Rob, Great suggestion... but you will find that Delaware is much smaller 
than PA.  We only have 3 counties so very quickly you will learn every birding 
hotspot.  PA has like a hundred separate counties, right? Wow, big state to 
cover.  Welcome to delaware! 

This location is NCC. Very close to the canal.It is not labeled on most maps... 
it is very small. If you go up route 9 to the foot of Reedy pt. Bridge, take 
little road to the left, go around 1000 acre marsh to the other side via the 
road alongside the canal.  Just after you turn left away from canal you will 
find this location. Land side, not marsh side.  PRIVATe property, stay on road 
to view pond.  

I've been there several times. Sometimes you get real good birds... other times 
nothing but red wing bb's. There are several other hotspots around here, use 
eBird to see other locations. Some of the best birding in the state is right in 
this Del.City - Port Penn area.Enjoy!Dean CoffinWilmington 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Rob Blye  Date: 
7/29/16 8:47 AM (GMT-05:00) To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU Subject: Re: [de-birds] 
Grier's Pond Least Bittern 

I am a new resident of Delaware. Where is Grier"s Pond. I humbly suggest
that we follow the PA Birds list serve requirement that each post include
at least the name of the poster and the county where the sighting occurred.

*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 6:22 PM, Christopher Rowe <
0000011d90053296-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu> wrote:

> Hunting the edge showing nicely!
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>

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Subject: Re: Grier's Pond Least Bittern
From: Rob Blye <rwblye AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 08:47:57 -0400
I am a new resident of Delaware. Where is Grier"s Pond. I humbly suggest
that we follow the PA Birds list serve requirement that each post include
at least the name of the poster and the county where the sighting occurred.

*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 6:22 PM, Christopher Rowe <
0000011d90053296-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu> wrote:

> Hunting the edge showing nicely!
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: DE-BIRDS-request AT princeton.edu
Subject: Grier's Pond Least Bittern
From: Christopher Rowe <0000011d90053296-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 18:22:15 -0400
Hunting the edge showing nicely!

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Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker Locations
From: Jerald R <Jrebelboy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 15:03:51 -0400
Hello,

Next week, I'm doing a big day in Sussex, trying to get some new year birds. I 
would really appreciate it if someone could suggest reliable locations for 
Red-headed Woodpecker. 

Also, would it be worthwhile to stop at Redden for Kentucky and Yellow-throated 
Warbler? I haven't seen them reported there in a while. 


Thank you,

Jerald

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Subject: Cape Henlopen Pacific Loon Photos
From: Ed Sigda <sigdae AT PRIMEHOOKBIRDING.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 01:08:06 -0400
I was able to take some photos of the loon this past evening, which I 
have posted on one of my websites 
(http://www.primehookbirding.com/delmarva/).  The bird was observed 
along the Cape Henlopen Point side of the Inner Breakwater around 7:30 PM.

While searching for the bird I had a flyover White Ibis in with other 
Egrets.

Ed Sigda

Milton, DE

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Subject: Forster's Tern
From: Jerry <jerryhull AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 13:28:35 -0400
This Forster’s Tern was photographed fishing over Bear Swap yesterday at 
Bombay Hook NWR July 25, 2016. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/doxydad/27950240194/in/dateposted-public/

Photographer:  Jerry Hull of Clayton, DE.

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Subject: Evening Herons Survey Tomorrow
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Jul 2016 09:04:59 -0400
I will be conducting the second to last evening heron survey of 2016
tomorrow evening in Delaware City beginning at 6:19 pm.  Surveys are
conducted from Battery Park along the sea wall behind the flagpole across
from Crabby Dick's.  The survey is conducted as the Delaware Division of
Parks and Recreation's ongoing monitoring of the heronry on Pea Patch
Island.  July is the first survey when we see large numbers of juvenile
birds moving to and from the island to forage on their own.  It is a great
opportunity to learn, or refine your ID skills with white egrets.  We
usually also see at least a few shorebirds and terns in addition to wading
birds.  I hope you can join us.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE

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