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Updated on Sunday, July 26 at 08:44 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-tailed Tropicbird,©Sophie Webb

26 Jul Re: Bombay Hook -- Raymond Pool concentration 7/26 [Taylor McLean ]
26 Jul Bombay Hook -- Raymond Pool concentration 7/26 [Alan Kneidel ]
26 Jul Bombay Hook Photos: Ibis, Tricolored, frenetic Abocets [Taylor McLean ]
26 Jul extralimital call for volunteers [Patricia Valdata ]
26 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 25, 2015 [Phillip Kenny ]
25 Jul NCCO -- Port Penn Impoundments -- 7/25 [Alan Kneidel ]
25 Jul Re: Bombay Hook on Jul 24, 2015 [Taylor McLean ]
25 Jul Bombay Hook on Jul 24, 2015 [Taylor McLean ]
24 Jul Port Penn Impoundments [christopher rowe ]
24 Jul Swallow-tailed Kite - Gordon's Pond, Cape Henlopen SP [Chris Stanger ]
24 Jul Temporary Access Closure to the Little Creek Impoundments from Pickering Beach Road ["Gonzon, Anthony T. (DNREC)" ]
24 Jul Evening Heronry Survey next Wednesday ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
23 Jul RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 23rd, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
23 Jul 9 White Pelicans at Prime Hook NWR [Bill Fintel ]
23 Jul Brandywine Bird Walk, 7/25/15 [Andrew Ednie ]
22 Jul Bombay Hook today: Tricolored Heron, White Ibis, Ruff (and almost no flies) [Patricia Valdata ]
21 Jul DVOC Special Informal Summer Meeting at Palmyra Cove Nature Park this Saturday [Steve Kacir ]
21 Jul Ruff continues at Bombay Hook 7/21 [Alan Kneidel ]
20 Jul Ruff - Yes! [Gina Sheridan ]
20 Jul No Subject [Rodney Murray ]
19 Jul Ruff at Shearness, Bombay Hook NWR 7/19 [Steve Collins ]
19 Jul Eastern kingbirds [Diane Kane ]
18 Jul RFI: Delaware Target Birds - Thank you!! [Josh Adams ]
16 Jul RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 16th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
15 Jul Bird program at White Clay Creek State Park ["Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" ]
15 Jul Juv White Ibis [John Hoyt ]
15 Jul Dickcissel [Rodney Murray ]
14 Jul DOS Beginning Birders' Field Trip - Shorebirds at Bombay Hook NWR - July 18, 2015 @ 8:00 a.m. [Bob Rufe ]
14 Jul Re: RFI: Delaware Target Birds ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
13 Jul RFI: Delaware Target Birds [Josh Adams ]
12 Jul Re: Sandwich Tern, Cape Henlopen SP [Andrew Ednie ]
10 Jul New Castle: White Ibis at Delaware City Waterfront [Tim Schreckengost ]
10 Jul Bombay Hook N Bobwhites [Rodney Murray ]
9 Jul RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 9th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
8 Jul Sure, birds ... and WISPs [Colin Campbell ]
8 Jul DOS Local Patch Trip to Joy Run Saturday [John and Sandra Janowski ]
6 Jul Fowler and environs [Kurt Schwarz ]
5 Jul White Ibis in Lewes [John Hoyt ]
4 Jul Sussex: Roseate Terns at Fowler Beach Rd. [Tim Schreckengost ]
4 Jul Sussex: Sandwich Tern at Gordon's Pond [Tim Schreckengost ]
3 Jul Birding by bike [Colin Campbell ]
3 Jul nottingham park very chatty [Mary Ann Levan ]
3 Jul Dickcissel [ ]
3 Jul Dickcissel @ Prime Hook [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Jul RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 2nd, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
2 Jul Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts Under Attack [Kurt Schwarz ]
2 Jul Re: White Ibis [Joe Sebastiani ]
2 Jul Question about Prime Hook [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Jul Juv White Ibis [Teddy Burke ]
2 Jul White Ibis [Hugh McGuinness ]
2 Jul White Ibis Fowler Beach Rd now [Hugh McGuinness ]
30 Jun June Challenge Totals Due by tomorrow [Christopher Bennett ]
30 Jun Ruff - seen on Mon, 6/29 [Marcy Stutzman ]
29 Jun More brown pelicans! [Diane Kane ]
28 Jun Prime Hook Rarities [Kevin Ebert ]
28 Jun 8 brown pelicans [Diane Kane ]
27 Jun Scissor-tailed Flycatcher [Robert Edelen ]
27 Jun Ruff [Sharon Lynn ]
26 Jun RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 26th, 2015 [Andrew Ednie ]
26 Jun Fledgling Screech Owls ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
26 Jun Fledgling Screech Owls ["Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" ]
26 Jun Brandywine Birdwalk [Andrew Ednie ]
26 Jun Beginner Bird Walk [Joe Sebastiani ]
25 Jun Prime Hook NWR highlights -- Ruff update - 6/25 [Alan Kneidel ]
25 Jun Evening Heron Survey Report ["Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" ]
24 Jun White Clay Creek this mornng [Maurice Barnhill ]
24 Jun June Challenge Storm-Petrel in Kent County [Christopher Bennett ]
23 Jun Re: Ruff at Prime Hook NWR [Tim Schreckengost ]
23 Jun ADMIN: Unsubscribing [ ]
23 Jun Mailing List [Jim Hay ]
23 Jun Ruff at Prime Hook NWR [John Hoyt ]
22 Jun Evening Heron Survey [Christopher Bennett ]
22 Jun Mailing List [Neil Christner ]
22 Jun BIRD CONSERVATION ACTION ALERT - HB178 Community Cats [Matthew Sarver ]
22 Jun Re: Great crested flycatcher! [Meghann ]
22 Jun Great crested flycatcher! [Lydia Robb ]

Subject: Re: Bombay Hook -- Raymond Pool concentration 7/26
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 21:40:32 -0400
Hi Alan (and Tim):
Could you please give some detail on your Id of the Long-billed Dowitchers? By 
sound? If by sight, then what field marks and at what distance. I would really 
appreciate it if you would help me out. 


I will be visiting Prime Hook tomorrow. Bombay Hook later this week.

Thanks!

Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com

> On Jul 26, 2015, at 3:42 PM, Alan Kneidel  wrote:
> 
> DE-Birders,
> 
> Tim Schreckengost and I hit Bombay Hook at dawn this morning, coinciding
> with the rising tide. We spent the following 2+ hours sorting through the
> mass of birds in Raymond Pool, trying our best to count all species. Quite
> the scene in the morning light.
> 
> Here is a breakdown of the numbers we came up with of birds in the pool -
> 29 species of ~9,485 individuals.
> 
> Canada Goose - 64
> Mallard - 5
> Double-crested Cormorant - 1
> Great Blue Heron - 15
> Great Egret - 420
> Snowy Egret - 300
> Little Blue Heron - 6
> Tricolored Heron - 3
> Cattle Egret - 1
> Green Heron - 1
> White Ibis - 8
> Glossy Ibis - 320
> Black-necked Stilt - 30
> American Avocet - 413
> Semipalmated Plover - 14
> Greater Yellowlegs - 150
> Willet - 1
> Lesser Yellowlegs - 65
> Stilt Sandpiper - 12
> Least Sandpiper - 6
> Semipalmated Sandpiper - 2480
> Western Sandpiper - 60
> Short-billed Dowitcher - 4890
> Long-billed Dowitcher - 4
> Laughing Gull - 194
> Ring-billed Gull - 2
> Herring Gull - 1
> Caspian Tern - 2
> Forster's Tern - 17
> 
> Complete checklist with additional songbirds etc. and nice photos by Tim S.:
> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24387932
> 
> Not many birds in Shearness, Woodland Beach had a nice concentration of
> shorebirds as well on the falling tide.
> 
> -- 
> Alan Kneidel
> M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
> Delaware State University
> 980-254-2706
Subject: Bombay Hook -- Raymond Pool concentration 7/26
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 15:42:50 -0400
DE-Birders,

Tim Schreckengost and I hit Bombay Hook at dawn this morning, coinciding
with the rising tide. We spent the following 2+ hours sorting through the
mass of birds in Raymond Pool, trying our best to count all species. Quite
the scene in the morning light.

Here is a breakdown of the numbers we came up with of birds in the pool -
29 species of ~9,485 individuals.

Canada Goose - 64
Mallard - 5
Double-crested Cormorant - 1
Great Blue Heron - 15
Great Egret - 420
Snowy Egret - 300
Little Blue Heron - 6
Tricolored Heron - 3
Cattle Egret - 1
Green Heron - 1
White Ibis - 8
Glossy Ibis - 320
Black-necked Stilt - 30
American Avocet - 413
Semipalmated Plover - 14
Greater Yellowlegs - 150
Willet - 1
Lesser Yellowlegs - 65
Stilt Sandpiper - 12
Least Sandpiper - 6
Semipalmated Sandpiper - 2480
Western Sandpiper - 60
Short-billed Dowitcher - 4890
Long-billed Dowitcher - 4
Laughing Gull - 194
Ring-billed Gull - 2
Herring Gull - 1
Caspian Tern - 2
Forster's Tern - 17

Complete checklist with additional songbirds etc. and nice photos by Tim S.:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24387932

Not many birds in Shearness, Woodland Beach had a nice concentration of
shorebirds as well on the falling tide.

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Bombay Hook Photos: Ibis, Tricolored, frenetic Abocets
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 12:30:17 -0400
Bombay Hook birds

White Ibis:

http://flic.kr/p/vwUh6A
http://flic.kr/p/wteDVJ
http://flic.kr/p/wcqC9i

Tricolored Heron:

http://flic.kr/p/wteEgo
http://flic.kr/p/wteC2o

Other:
http://flic.kr/p/vwUg8U


Video of Avocets Frenetically Feeding:

http://youtu.be/eIdtP3VhiXQ


Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com
Subject: extralimital call for volunteers
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 12:10:27 -0400
It's that time of year when I issue a call for observers for the Turkey
Point Hawk Watch. We will begin on Tuesday, September 8, and conclude on the
Saturday after Thanksgiving. We ask observers to arrive at the Hawk Watch
(either the meadow or the lighthouse) by 9:00 a.m. and stay at least through
noon. On a strong flight day, it would be helpful if observers could stay
later. Observers are welcome to arrive earlier if they want-Sharp-shinned
Hawks and the smaller falcons seem to be up and about early. 

 

One of the great pleasures of this hawk watch is the walk in, especially
during September when the fall songbird migration is going on. However,
those of us with mobility issues can get permission to drive in. I just need
to know that when you sign up.

 

If you can help out, you may sign up for just one day or as many days as you
like. If you are new to hawk watching, I'll provide instructions and make
sure you are paired up with an experienced observer your first time. But in
a nutshell, we record each raptor that flies south/southeast/southwest. The
Hawk Migration Association of North America (HMANA) provides a form for
recording the final count each day, but I am also happy to take that
information via email. I also maintain the volunteer schedule and send an
email reminder the week before.

 

Please let me know if you would like to participate this year.

 

Thank you,

Pat Valdata

Cecil Bird Club

 

 

 
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 25, 2015
From: Phillip Kenny <philkenny AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 09:14:04 -0400
Four of us Virginians (Kurt Gaskil, Larry Meade, Phil Silas & Phil Kenny) 
searched in vain for the elusive Ruff. We did find Tricolored, Little Blue, 
Long-billed Dowitcher, and White Ibis. After crab cake sandwiches at Sambos, we 
headed over to Mispillion and found a Red Knot, Willet and anther Long-billed 
Dowitcher. All in all a very pleasant day birding! 

Cheers,
Phil

Phillip Kenny
1731 Killarney Court
Vienna VA 22182-2133
703-255-5423
philkenny AT verizon.net


Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 25, 2015
> Date: July 26, 2015 at 9:03:32 AM EDT
> To: philkenny AT verizon.net
> 
> Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Kent, Delaware, US
> Jul 25, 2015 8:25 AM - 1:07 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 5.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.0.0 Build 2 > 80 species > > Canada Goose 133 > Mute Swan 5 > Wood Duck 4 > American Black Duck 2 > Mallard 26 > Double-crested Cormorant 3 > Great Blue Heron 22 > Great Egret 183 > Snowy Egret 101 > Little Blue Heron 2 > Tricolored Heron 1 > Green Heron 2 > Black-crowned Night-Heron 3 > White Ibis 4 Im, 3 mixed w/GLIB when stirred by BAEA > Glossy Ibis 228 > Black Vulture 2 > Turkey Vulture 8 > Osprey 4 > Bald Eagle 12 > Red-tailed Hawk 1 > Clapper Rail 10 > Virginia Rail 1 > Black-necked Stilt 5 > American Avocet 235 > Semipalmated Plover 2 > Killdeer 1 > Greater Yellowlegs 76 > Lesser Yellowlegs 53 > Least Sandpiper 7 > Semipalmated Sandpiper 175 > Short-billed Dowitcher 1095 > Long-billed Dowitcher 1 > Laughing Gull 57 > Ring-billed Gull 7 > Herring Gull 1 > Caspian Tern 4 > Forster's Tern 68 > Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6 > Yellow-billed Cuckoo 2 > Ruby-throated Hummingbird 2 > Eastern Wood-Pewee 2 > Willow Flycatcher 1 > Eastern Phoebe 2 > Great Crested Flycatcher 1 > Eastern Kingbird 8 > Red-eyed Vireo 2 > Blue Jay 1 > American Crow 1 > Purple Martin 87 > Tree Swallow 36 > Bank Swallow 9 > Barn Swallow 23 > Tufted Titmouse 2 > White-breasted Nuthatch 1 > Marsh Wren 21 > Carolina Wren 2 > Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1 > Eastern Bluebird 2 > American Robin 15 > Gray Catbird 12 > Brown Thrasher 2 > Northern Mockingbird 3 > European Starling 3 > Common Yellowthroat 15 > Yellow Warbler 1 > Yellow-breasted Chat 1 > Eastern Towhee 5 > Field Sparrow 5 > Grasshopper Sparrow 1 > Seaside Sparrow 3 > Song Sparrow 2 > Swamp Sparrow 1 > Northern Cardinal 12 > Blue Grosbeak 7 > Indigo Bunting 16 > Red-winged Blackbird 34 > Common Grackle 20 > Orchard Oriole 6 > American Goldfinch 15 > House Sparrow 5 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24382674 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) DuPont Nature Center (Mispillion), Sussex, Delaware, US Jul 25, 2015 3:14 PM - 4:36 PM Protocol: Traveling 0.2 mile(s) Comments:
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.0.0 Build 2 29 species Double-crested Cormorant 15 Great Blue Heron 1 Green Heron 1 Turkey Vulture 6 Osprey 12 American Oystercatcher 4 Willet 1 Ruddy Turnstone 11 Red Knot 1 Sanderling 10 Least Sandpiper 1 Semipalmated Sandpiper 75 Short-billed Dowitcher 20 Long-billed Dowitcher 1 All red, top & bottom, brown body Laughing Gull 16 Herring Gull 2 Great Black-backed Gull 3 Least Tern 4 Caspian Tern 1 Forster's Tern 20 Royal Tern 20 Barn Swallow 15 Northern Mockingbird 1 European Starling 24 Seaside Sparrow 1 Song Sparrow 1 Red-winged Blackbird 3 Boat-tailed Grackle 2 House Sparrow 2 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24382676 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: NCCO -- Port Penn Impoundments -- 7/25
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 16:07:16 -0400
Tim Schreckengost and I made a visit to the Port Penn Impoundments late
this morning. We successfully walked around the entire impoundment,
starting on the boardwalk and winding our way to the river's edge. From the
river culvert we were able to scan a large flock of terns and gulls
(150-200 birds) roosting on an exposed sandbar in the river.

Overall highlights included a careful count of 1,300 shorebirds of nine
species, dominated by Semipalmated Sandpiper (1,100) and Short-billed
Dowitcher (190). Species uncommon for the county included Tricolored Heron
(3), Stilt Sandpiper (1), and Western Sandpiper (3).

We totaled 62 species, detailed in the checklist below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24376939

Good birding,

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Re: Bombay Hook on Jul 24, 2015
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 10:42:34 -0400
I meant to say the Ruff was reported much earlier in the day at Raymond 's Pool 
(not Shearness). But I was unable to locate at either place 


Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com

> On Jul 25, 2015, at 6:52 AM, Taylor McLean  wrote:
> 
> A quiet day at Bombay Hook yesterday. I was there at low tide, and so the 
shorebird concentrations were not great or diverse. 

> White Ibis and Tricolored Heron were seen just before Raymond's Pool on the 
right hand side and near the dead trees cluster that often attracts herons. 

> 
> Also, a quick stop at Taylor's Gut earlier did not produce many shorebirds
> 
> 
> Bombay Hook NWR--Shearness Pool
> Jul 24, 2015
> 10:30
> Traveling
> 6.00 miles
> 145 Minutes
> 
> 
> 74 Great Egret
> 33 Snowy Egret
> 1 Tricolored Heron
> 1 Green Heron
> 6 White Ibis -- Invasion year; photos or photo links to be attached; all 
first year birds: down curved bills with thick base, one had a significant 
amount of orangy pink in it; back and breast - brown; belly - white; 3 were 
seen from within 60 yards 

> 54 Glossy Ibis
> 1 Turkey Vulture
> 2 Osprey
> 7 Bald Eagle
> 3 Red-tailed Hawk
> 4 Black-necked Stilt
> 234 American Avocet
> 13 Greater Yellowlegs
> 6 Lesser Yellowlegs
> 44 Least Sandpiper
> 17 Short-billed Dowitcher
> 7 Laughing Gull
> 4 Caspian Tern
> 11 Forster's Tern
> 1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
> 2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
> 2 Eastern Phoebe
> 3 Great Crested Flycatcher
> 7 Eastern Kingbird
> 1 crow sp.
> 48 Purple Martin
> 2 Barn Swallow
> 1 House Wren
> 9 Marsh Wren
> 1 American Robin
> 2 Gray Catbird
> 2 Brown Thrasher
> 1 Northern Mockingbird
> 1 European Starling
> 2 Common Yellowthroat
> 2 Eastern Towhee
> 1 Field Sparrow
> 1 Northern Cardinal
> 3 Blue Grosbeak
> 4 Indigo Bunting
> 3 Red-winged Blackbird
> 2 Common Grackle
> 1 House Finch
> 3 American Goldfinch
> 1 House Sparrow
> 
> Number of Taxa: 45
> 
> Good birding!
> 
> Taylor Mclean
> Towson, MD
> mcleant11 AT gmail.com
Subject: Bombay Hook on Jul 24, 2015
From: Taylor McLean <mcleant11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 06:52:44 -0400
A quiet day at Bombay Hook yesterday. I was there at low tide, and so the 
shorebird concentrations were not great or diverse. 

White Ibis and Tricolored Heron were seen just before Raymond's Pool on the 
right hand side and near the dead trees cluster that often attracts herons. 


Also, a quick stop at Taylor's Gut earlier did not produce many shorebirds


Bombay Hook NWR--Shearness Pool
Jul 24, 2015
10:30
Traveling
6.00 miles
145 Minutes


74 Great Egret
33 Snowy Egret
1 Tricolored Heron
1 Green Heron
6 White Ibis -- Invasion year; photos or photo links to be attached; all first 
year birds: down curved bills with thick base, one had a significant amount of 
orangy pink in it; back and breast - brown; belly - white; 3 were seen from 
within 60 yards 

54 Glossy Ibis
1 Turkey Vulture
2 Osprey
7 Bald Eagle
3 Red-tailed Hawk
4 Black-necked Stilt
234 American Avocet
13 Greater Yellowlegs
6 Lesser Yellowlegs
44 Least Sandpiper
17 Short-billed Dowitcher
7 Laughing Gull
4 Caspian Tern
11 Forster's Tern
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
2 Eastern Phoebe
3 Great Crested Flycatcher
7 Eastern Kingbird
1 crow sp.
48 Purple Martin
2 Barn Swallow
1 House Wren
9 Marsh Wren
1 American Robin
2 Gray Catbird
2 Brown Thrasher
1 Northern Mockingbird
1 European Starling
2 Common Yellowthroat
2 Eastern Towhee
1 Field Sparrow
1 Northern Cardinal
3 Blue Grosbeak
4 Indigo Bunting
3 Red-winged Blackbird
2 Common Grackle
1 House Finch
3 American Goldfinch
1 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 45

Good birding!

Taylor Mclean
Towson, MD
mcleant11 AT gmail.com
Subject: Port Penn Impoundments
From: christopher rowe <ewor11 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:15:31 -0400
The Port Penn Impoundments are once again hosting shorebirds.  Stilt
Sandpiper was the highlight along with a juvenile Tricolored Heron seen
from the Dike Trail.
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite - Gordon's Pond, Cape Henlopen SP
From: Chris Stanger <Chris.Stanger AT ROCHESTER.RR.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 16:55:19 -0400
I got clear views/photos of a Swallow-tailed Kite over Gordon's Pond at Cape
Henlopen State Park today at noon. I saw all the Gulls and Egrets taking
flight as if a Bald Eagle was nearby, I looked up and saw the Kite. I'm not
familiar with this area since I'm just here on vacation but the Bird
checklist at Cape Henlopen and Ebird both show this bird as being rare for
this time of year. I figured I'd post if others are in the area to keep an
eye out.

https://flic.kr/p/vuxLET

https://flic.kr/p/wrqq5a

https://flic.kr/p/wrT9aX

https://flic.kr/p/wrTa14

 

Chris Stanger (chris.stanger AT rochester.rr.com)
Subject: Temporary Access Closure to the Little Creek Impoundments from Pickering Beach Road
From: "Gonzon, Anthony T. (DNREC)" <Anthony.Gonzon AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 17:07:42 +0000
Greetings all,

I wanted to pass along to everyone that the entrance from Pickering Beach Road 
to the Little Creek impoundments will be temporarily closed to the public 
beginning Monday, July 27. This closure is anticipated to last about a week so 
that the Division can make repairs to the dike. Until the repairs are 
completed, the entrance and road to the impoundments will be closed to all 
public access. I will post again once the area is reopened to public access. 


If you have any questions, feel free to contact Jeremey Ashe at 
jeremey.ashe AT state.de.us. 


Good birding, 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Anthony T. Gonzon, Jr.
Bayshore Conservation Planner
DE Division of Fish & Wildlife, DNREC
89 Kings Highway
Dover, DE 19901
Office: 302-735-8673
Mobile: 302-531-5165

      Delaware Division of Fish & Wildlife
                         
  We Bring You Delaware's Great Outdoors
            Through Science and Service

Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/DelawareFishWildlife




                                  
Subject: Evening Heronry Survey next Wednesday
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 15:24:42 +0000
I will be conducting the 2nd to last evening heron survey next Wednesday from 
Battery Park in Delaware City starting at 6:18 pm. The survey begins and 2 
hours before and ends 30 minutes after sunset which will occur at 8:18 pm. 
Volunteers are always welcome to help count and identify birds or be the scribe 
and record the data (not a job for the faint of heart - at times the birds are 
flying non-stop and multiple observers are calling out numbers and species 
nearly continuously). Or you can just join us and enjoy the show. July numbers 
are usually a bit lower than the busy nesting months of May and June but we see 
a larger number of juvenile birds (especially the tricky all white juvenile 
Little Blue Herons) but the birds are usually flying in large mixed flocks. And 
as you may have heard a small number of juvenile White Ibis have been observed 
flying to roost in the heronry this summer. With luck they will still be around 
and we can add them to the count. We have not had a White Ibis on an evening 
count since May 2003 when we had a single adult White Ibis fly into the heronry 
during the survey. 


The survey is conducted from Battery Park at the end of Clinton Street along 
the sea wall in front of the flag pole across from Crabby Dicks. I hope you can 
join us. 


Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19963
302-739-9230
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 23rd, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 22:32:19 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* July 23, 2015
* DEST1507.23
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Gadwall
Green-winged Teal
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Cory's Shearwater
Great Shearwater
Audubon Shearwater
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Leach's Storm-Petrel
American White Pelican 
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron 
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron 
Black-crowned Night Heron 
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
King Rail
Sora
SANDHILL CRANE
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
UPLAND SANDPIPER
Sanderling
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
RUFF
Short-billed Dowitcher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer 
Pomarine Jaeger
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Common Nighthawk
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Willow Flycatcher
Warbling Vireo
Purple Martin
Bank Swallow
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Veery
Cedar Waxwing
Prairie Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Eastern Towhee
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark
Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: July 23, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Thursday, July 23rd, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list annual
list increased to 313 species with the addition of several pelagic species
this week.

But first, a RUFF was seen this week at the southeast end of Sheerness Pool
in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. This bird was found on
Sunday and has been seen all week. It is a molting black Ruff with bicolor
bill and yellow-orange legs. Yesterday it was seen at Raymond Pool prior to
flying over toward Sheerness. Also reported have been 200 AMERICAN AVOCETS,
30 BLACK NECKED STILTS, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, plus SPOTTED, STILT, PECTORAL,
WESTERN, SEMIPALMATED, and LEAST SANDPIPER. Along with the shorebirds have
been 3 TRICOLORED HERONS at Raymond Pool plus as many as 6 immature WHITE
IBIS. Also reported have been MUTE and TUNDRA SWAN, PIED-BILLED GREBE,
GADWALL, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL. LEAST BITTERN plus both YELLOW-CROWNED and
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were seen at Bear Swamp. A DICKCISSEL continues
to be seen and heard at the woods edge heading towards the Alle House.
NORTHERN BOBWHITE, WILD TURKEY, and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW were also reported
there. NORTHERN BOBWHITE was also seen at the visitor center, along with a
calling WILLOW FLYCATCHER.

The Delaware invasion of WHITE IBIS continues in all three counties,
especially in Sussex Co. with a peak count 111 birds flying over Lewes at
dusk! That makes this the largest concentration of WHITE IBIS on the east
coast north of Wilmington, North Carolina. All the WHITE IBIS have been
immature's, except one second year bird that is mostly white. This may be
the same bird that has been seen along the jersey show shore at Ocean City.
WHITE IBIS have been seen as far north as above Harrisburg in Dauphin Co. at
Wildwood Lakes Park. There is a substantial invasion going on this year,
with birds reported at the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Huntley Meadows
Virginia, a peak count of 34 WHITE IBIS at Tom's Cove in Chincoteague, and
28 at Craney Island near Hampton Roads, Virginia.

In Delaware, five WHITE IBIS were seen crossing the Delaware line from
Maryland at Glasgow, heading towards Lum's Pond State Park. One WHITE IBIS
was seen in downtown Wilmington at the Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge along
the Christiana River. WHITE IBIS was also seen flying into Pea Patch Island
from Veteran's Park in Delaware City. WHITE IBIS continue to be seen at
Fowler's Beach, Broadkill Marsh, and Gordon's Pond in Sussex County. One
immature WHITE IBIS was photographed flying over Savages Ditch in Delaware
Seashore State Park south of Dewey Beach.

Once again, UPLAND SANDPIPERS were reported from the Dover Air Force Base on
Route 9 below Dover across from Bergold Road. This is a restricted area and
if you park along Route 9, the MP's will call the state police to ticket
you. If you continue to drive slowly, you might get a quick look. Also found
at the Dover AFB runway was GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. 

A fishing trip that went 75 miles offshore this week to Wilmington Canyon
found 75 WILSON'S and 4 LEACH'S STORM-PETRELS. SHEARWATERS included 15
CORY'S, 5 GREAT, and 2 AUDUBON'S SHEARWATERS. There was also a POMARINE
JAEGER and a very large Mako Shark.

WILSON'S STORM-PETREL was also seen from the Cape Henlopen State Park
Hawkwatch AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER and PIPING PLOVER were seen at The Point at
Cape Henlopen. BROWN PELICANS and 6 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were also
reported today. Terns seen included LEAST, ROYAL, and COMMON. PRAIRIE
WARBLER and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were found in the woods. Several COMMON
NIGHTHAWKS were found flying at dusk. A SANDWICH TERN was found at Gordon's
Pond, north of Rehoboth Beach, flying out over the ocean. Also seen there
were ROYAL and LEAST TERN. BROWN PELICAN and 50 SANDERLING were seen on the
beach. WILSON'S STORM-PETREL was also seen from the Cape May - Lewes ferry
along with BALD EAGLE, LEAST and ROYAL TERN.

The previous reported 10 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue to be seen at
Fowler's Beach. CASPIAN, LEAST, and FORSTER'S TERN were seen on the sandbar
with AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER. BLACK-NECKED STILT were seen plus LEAST and
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. BLACK TERN and BLACK
SKIMMER were at Broadkill Marsh, along with WESTERN SANDPIPER. Also reported
at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton this week was LEAST
BITTERN and KING RAIL. A SUMMER TANAGER and the rare WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH
was found at Turkle Pond. An AMERICAN KESTREL was seen along Draper road.

ROYAL TERN and AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER were found at Fenwick Island. BROWN
PELICANS were reported at Bethany Beach. COMMON LOON was seen in Rehoboth
Bay. COOPER'S HAWK and PROTHONOTARY WARBLER were found at the McCabe Nature
Preserve along the Broadkill River. A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was reported at
Oakley, west of Ellendale. 

There is been a plethora of BANK SWALLOW reports this week in central
Delaware. 20 were at Thousand Acre Marsh near Delaware City, 40 BANKS were
seen at Bombay Hook on Monday. 70 BANK SWALLOWS were reported at Port Mahon,
75 were reported at the Pickering Beach impoundments at Little Creek
Wildlife Management Area. Three were at the Pioneer Dredge Ponds, but there
were no reports from Sussex Co.

Six ROYAL TERNS were found at Port Mahon along with SPOTTED SANDPIPER and
LESSER YELLOWLEGS. SEMIPALMATED PLOVER plus PECTORAL, STILT, and SPOTTED
SANDPIPER were found at the South Impoundments of Little Creek. Another
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was found at Pickering Beach. Both SWAMP and
SEASIDE SPARROWS plus MARSH WREN were found marsh by Pickering Beach. An
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were found at Big Stone
Beach in Milford Neck Wildlife Area.

Three DICKCISSELS were found across from St. Anne's Pond, south of
Middletown. A SORA was calling at the Charles E Price Park. GLOSSY IBIS were
seen by the pond. Also found there was SAVANNAH SPARROW and EASTERN
MEADOWLARK. A SOLITARY SANDPIPER was found at Stave's Landing Road. KING
RAIL was found calling at Blackbird Creek.

An AMERICAN AVOCET was found at the Port Penn Impoundments at Augustine
Beach Wildlife Area on Route 9 north of Port Penn. GREEN HERON was seen
here, along with SNOWY EGRET, LITTLE BLUE HERON, and CATTLE EGRET. SANDHILL
CRANE was seen at Thousand Acre Marsh, flying over Route 9 to Port Penn, but
it landed in the weeds and disappeared. 

Not much is happening in northern Delaware right now. BLUE GROSBEAK and
EASTERN MEADOWLARK were found along the entrance road to Brandywine Creek
State Park. PURPLE MARTINS are beginning to congregate along the ridgeline
there. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, WARBLING VIREO, and VEERY were seen at the
Woodlawn Trust property along Ramsey Road. CEDAR WAXWING was found at
Ashland Nature Center with TOWHEE and INDIGO BUNTING. PILEATED WOODPECKER
and WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH were seen near North Star, West of Hockessin.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Bob Rufe, Al
Guarante, Jim White, David Fees, Bill Fintel, Mike Fritz, Michael Bowen,
Gina Sheridan, Leo Custer, Teddy Burke, Colin Campbell, Andrew McGann , Sean
McCandless, Steve Collins, Brian Henderson, Bill Stewart, Kelly Nunn, Hannah
Greenberg, Rod Murray, Marcy Stutzman, Armas Hill, Rachael Shapiro, Ken Wat,
Damon Orsetti, Joe Sebastiani, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, John Hoyt, Sue
Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Tim Schreckengost, Tim Freiday, Alan Kneidel, Chandler
Wiegand, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs
your sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: 9 White Pelicans at Prime Hook NWR
From: Bill Fintel <kittiwakebill AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 22:00:24 -0400
Our Prime Hook field trip with 10 participants this morning observed 9 Am.
White Pelicans soaring over the eastern end of Prime Hook Rd. Everyone had
excellent, extended looks at the birds. For photos, see
http://www.billfintel.blogspot.com/

Other observations included adult and juvenile Least Terns, approx. 4 of
each, Long and Short-billed Dowitchers, maybe 30 total, and 12 Black-necked
Stilts with about 1/2 being juveniles, so apparently a good breeding season
for them.

Bill Fintel
Lewes, DE
Subject: Brandywine Bird Walk, 7/25/15
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 09:01:49 -0400
The monthly Birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State Park is this Saturday, July
25th. We'll meet at 8 am in the observation deck of the nature center. The
park is off Adams Dam Road, near the intersections of Route's 100 & 92,
north of Wilmington. The walk is free but park fees are in effect. The
Dickcissel has not been seen lately, but we'll be looking for post-breeding
birds that are dispersing from their remote breeding grounds. 

Good birding, 
Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Bombay Hook today: Tricolored Heron, White Ibis, Ruff (and almost no flies)
From: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata AT ZOOMINTERNET.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:24:50 -0400
It was a perfect day to go to Bombay Hook! Low humidity, not stinking hot, a
breeze that kept almost all the bugs away. Didn't need long sleeves or bug
spray-a July first.

 

Ken Drier and I were delighted to spot a Tricolored Heron perched in a snag
just as we approached Raymond Pool. It posed for a long time and we got
incredible scope views of it as it preened and napped. At Raymond we saw two
immature White Ibis in a flock of Glossy ibis, Avocets, Stilts, and
Snowy/Great Egrets.

 

At Shearness, it took a while to locate the odd-looking shorebird on a sand
spit with some Yellowlegs and peeps. Two other birders joined us (so sorry I
don't remember your names) and as the bird moved closer we were able to ID
it as the Ruff thanks to the bill shape and color, pot-bellied look, and
large black spots near the shoulders (very like the "summer molting" plumage
in the Nat Geo field guide, but it had much less black). Definitely required
a scope. 

 

We were happy to hear several calling Bobwhites in the fields near Allee
House. 

 

Pat Valdata

Cecil Bird Club

Elkton, MD

 

 
Subject: DVOC Special Informal Summer Meeting at Palmyra Cove Nature Park this Saturday
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 17:00:32 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets this Saturday at Palmyra 
Cove Nature Park at 9:00AM. All who have an interest are invited to attend; the 
program is free with no admission charged. 


Join us for a fun informal summer meeting, featuring "Swallowtails of the 
Philadelphia Region" by Frank Windfelder, followed by a short butterfly walk at 
Palmyra Cove Nature Park. 


Afterwards, Steve Kacir will present "Don't Fear the Raptor: An Avian Odyssey 
of Reptilian Proportions" which will be a lively talk attempting to cover 
everything from birds to dinosaurs to the Jersey Devil - at least briefly. 


Steve Kacir will also be providing baked goods to attendees, and requests only 
that if you enjoy the cookies and brownies that attendees simply donate a 
dollar or two in support of funding the DVOC's Annual Photo Contest - or even 
just a few coins if that's all you have. 


Directions to Palmyra Cove Nature Park: 
http://www.dvoc.org/Directions/Directions.htm#Palmyra

Palmyra Cove Nature Park Website: 
http://www.palmyracove.org/

Google Map: 
http://www.google.com/maps/place/Palmyra+Cove+Nature+Park/ AT 40.002726,-75.045052,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x89c6b5e91136fad5:0x644aebed463f000b 


---------------

Swallowtails of the Philadelphia Region:
An illustrated discussion of the six swallowtail species that can be seen in 
our region: identification, host plants, and where to look. Followed by a 
butterfly walk led by Frank Windfelder. 


Frank Windfelder:
Frank Windfelder is alifelong resident of Philadelphia, has been a DVOC member 
since 1981, but became interested in butterflies about a dozen years ago. Since 
then he has extended his interests to include dragonflies, herps and mammals. 


---------------

Don't Fear the Raptor: An Avian Odyssey of Reptilian Proportions
Sixty-five million years ago, the earth saw the loss of a great many species 
during the Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction Event, but, luckily, we still have 
some dinosaurs with us today. Find out how fact is stranger than fiction when 
you've got a few billion years to play around with, and how it's cool to be a 
reptile - with or without feathers. 


Steve Kacir: 
Steve Kacir is the Vice President of DVOC and finds beauty and wonder in all 
living things from E. coli to Harpy Eagles - and everything in between. He's 
often seen happily wandering around a saltmarsh, but also enjoys staring at 
fossils and imagining worlds he'll never seen. 



Hope to see you there!
Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com


 

 





 
Subject: Ruff continues at Bombay Hook 7/21
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 12:31:51 -0400
DE-Birders,

According to the Facebook, the male RUFF continues to be seen at the south
end of Shearness Pool in Bombay Hook NWR. The report was from ~11:30 AM.

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Ruff - Yes!
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 16:34:06 -0400
After regrouping from a long birding/road trip through all of New England,
the Maritimes of Canada, and Quebec, Dennis and I managed to twitch the
continuing Ruff at South Shearness this morning. Upon our arrival at South
Shearness, Colin Campbell and half a dozen other birders already had their
scopes trained on my state lifer Ruff The good morning light allowed a
decent plumage study of the bird through our scope views. There was a
Pectoral Sandpiper lurking around too.

Returning this afternoon to recover my lost binocular eye piece protector,
we quickly re-found the actively feeding  Ruff. We enjoyed sharing views of
it with several other birders (including two from NY, one from Colorado
Springs, and DOS birder - Sarah MacLellan).  The bird was still there as of
2:10 PM. In addition, there were three juvenile Tricolored Herons on
Raymond Pool

Thanks to everyone who kept us posted on the Ruff's status on DE RBA and
DE-Birds. That certainly aided me in seeing this nice state lifer

Good summer birding to all,

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE
Subject: No Subject
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 09:22:29 -0400
  The Ruff is still at the south end of Shearness at Bombay Hook.  Nearby
were two Pectoral Sandpipers and a wide assortment of other
shorebirds.  One Tri-colored Heron was perched in the large snag (bayside)
by Raymond Pool, and one was in the water beneath it.  No sign of the juv.
W Ibis.

Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: Ruff at Shearness, Bombay Hook NWR 7/19
From: Steve Collins <stevendouglascollins AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 11:43:22 -0400
Hi folks,

There is currently a Ruff at the south end of Shearness Pool.  The immature 
White Ibis is still at Raymond too. 


Good birding,
Steve Collins
Columbia, MD
Subject: Eastern kingbirds
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 10:28:33 -0400
Eastern kingbirds on the tower in the front of the lifesaving station north of 
the Indian river bridge eating bugs and easy to view sans binoculars. 


Diane Kane 

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RFI: Delaware Target Birds - Thank you!!
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 13:57:49 -0400
Hello all,
I just wanted to send out a big thank you to all the birders that replied
to my request.I haven't had a chance to respond to everyone individually,
but all the messages were extremely helpful and I truly appreciate them.

I ended up having a mostly free day on Wednesday so I drove out. My first
lifer of the day was an easy one. Driving across the Bay View Bridge I had
several Great Black-Backed Gulls fly by me in the early morning light.
Based on some very specific advice from Alan Kneidel on Saltmarsh Sparrow I
started my morning at Port Mahon. After some much safer looks at the dozens
of GBBG's I began searching for Saltmarsh Sparrow. Alan's directions proved
absolutely perfect and after brief distant views (confirmed only by photos)
of one bird I eventually lucked into a couple much more compliant birds.
While I was searching a Black Duck also flew by. Other nice treats at this
spot included singing Swamp Sparrows (first time I've ever heard them
sing), many Seaside Sparrows (a bird I'd only seen once before). I also had
a few Glossy Ibis flyby. Previously I'd mostly encountered this species at
times and places where they mix with White-Faced Ibis so it was nice to
have them be an easy ID for once.

My next stop was Fowler Beach. Since I'd already found many of the birds I
was going to look for here I didn't spend much time. I was going to scope
for Wilson's Storm-Petrels. Unfortunately the tide was too high for me to
access the beach so I moved on.

I decided to hit Cape Henlopen SP next. I scoped from the hawkwatch for
Wilson's Storm-Petrels, but I only had a small travel scope and monopod so
I gave up relatively quickly. Gull numbers on the ocean side were limited
to only a couple Laughing Gulls. The weather went down hill very quickly
and I found myself waiting out several waves of rain in my car. I
eventually ran out of time and had to make my way back to DC without the
ferry ride.

Fortunately I had another free day on Friday and despite the very long
drive I headed back to take another shot at the ferry. I started my morning
at Fowler Beach and found the tides much more conducive  to beach access. I
enjoyed the shorebirds and flushed another Am. Black Duck here. Looking
through my photos I also appear to have photographed another Saltmarsh
Sparrow here mixed in with dozens of Seasides, although the markings are
much less obvious than the ones I'd seen earlier in the week.

I moved on to the Lewes-Cape May ferry. After a few distant looks early on
that I couldn't quite bring myself to count I eventually got quite a few
good looks and a few photos of Wilson's Storm-Petrels. In total I probably
had about twenty birds on the ride over, mostly near the center of the
channel and similar numbers on the way back.

Thanks again to everyone that provided advice!

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 16th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2015 21:53:03 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* July 16, 2015
* DEST1507.16
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Black Swan (exotic)
Black Scoter 
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Pied-billed Grebe
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican
American Bittern
Least Bittern
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Bald Eagle 
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
King Rail
Virginia Rail
Sora
Common Gallinule
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
UPLAND SANDPIPER
Willet
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Least Tern
Black Tern
Caspian Tern
Common Tern
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Pileated Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher
Warbling Vireo
Cliff Swallow
Bank Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Prothonotary Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Scarlet Tanager
Summer Tanager
DICKCISSEL
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: July 16, 2015
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

For Thursday, July 16th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list annual
list increased to 310 species this week.

An UPLAND SANDPIPER was reported on Saturday at Bergold Fields (formerly
Bergdoll Fields) across from the Dover Air Force Base on Route 9 below
Dover. This is the first occurrence of the year for this once common
shorebird. Also found at the Dover AFB runway was GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and
EASTERN MEADOWLARK. 

The Delaware invasion of WHITE IBIS continues in all three counties,
especially in Sussex Co. with a high count 77 birds flying over Lewes at
dusk! Two immature WHITE IBIS were seen in the pond before the fishing
bridge at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. WHITE IBIS
was also seen along Prime Hook Beach Road. Three immature WHITE IBIS were
also reported at Gordon's Pond in Cape Henlopen State Park. Three more WHITE
IBIS were seen flying around to forage at the Pea Patch Island Rookery from
Veteran's Park in Delaware City at dusk. Another immature WHITE IBIS was
seen at Raymond Pool in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday and
today. 

A SANDWICH TERN was seen on Sunday afternoon at The Point at Cape Henlopen.
That bird was along the bayside with CASPIAN, COMMON, ROYAL, LEAST and
FORSTER'S TERNS. A pair of BROWN PELICANS were also at the Point on
Saturday. A female BLACK SCOTER was along the bayside cove. Four AMERICAN
AVOCETS were seen, an unusual species for the park. Other Shorebirds seen
included AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, PIPING PLOVER and WHIMBREL. WHIMBRELS were
also seen at Gordon's Pond, flying out over the ocean. BLACK-NECKED STILTS
and lots of WILLETS were reported, with GLOSSY IBIS. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES
were found in the woods around the pond. 

A pair of BLACK TERNS, one in breeding plumage was seen at Broadkill Marsh
at Prime Hook. Other terns present included COMMON, LEAST FORSTER'S and
BLACK SKIMMER. A PIED-BILLED GREBE continues to be seen at Broadkill. Both
GREEN HERON and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON were reported. Shorebirds seen
included BLACK-NECKED STILTS, LESSER YELLOWLEGS and LEAST SANDPIPERS. 

The previously reported AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue to be seen at
Fowler's Beach. Four WHIMBRELS were found at the beach, along with AMERICAN
OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, and
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS. A pair of immature YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were
seen, plus more LEAST TERN. CASPIAN, COMMON, and LEAST TERN were found along
Prime Hook Beach Road along with AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-NECKED STILT, both
YELLOWLEGS and WESTERN SANDPIPER. Four OYSTERCATCHERS were found at
Mispillion Inlet from the duPont Nature Center.

BROWN PELICANS were also seen from Rehoboth Beach and at Middle Island at
the end of Long Neck in Indian River Bay. TRICOLORED HERON was seen at
Savage's Ditch in Delaware Seashore State Park. SPOTTED SANDPIPER and GREEN
HERON were seen at Indian River Inlet. AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was also seen
further south at Fenwick Island. 

A COOPER'S HAWK was seen at Fresh Pond near Bethany Beach. YELLOW-BILLED
CUCKOO and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT were also reported. COOPER'S HAWK, PILEATED
WOODPECKER and PROTHONOTARY WARBLER were reported at the McCabe Preserve on
the Broadkill River near Milton. PROTHONOTARY and SUMMER TANAGER were seen
at Trap Pond near Laurel. 

SCARLET and SUMMER TANAGERS were found at Redden State Forest along W.
Robbins Road. YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, WORM-EATING and PINE WARBLERS were also
seen. VESPER SPARROWS were found at Ponders Road, northeast of Ellendale. A
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was found on Fleatown Road by the railroad tracks. 

A SNOW GOOSE was found along the Port Mahon Road, along with a flyby CLIFF
SWALLOW.  A LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER was heard flying over the coast today. Two
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS were seen, along with increasing numbers of other
shorebirds. SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROWS continue to found in the marsh.
Shorebird habitat is improving at the Pickering Beach impoundments at Little
Creek Wildlife Management Area. Seen there today were SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
STILT and WESTERN SANDPIPERS plus about 40 BANK SWALLOWS. Four BALD EAGLES
were seen, along with a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK. 

Shorebirds are arriving at Bombay Hook, with 500 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS and
over 1000 PEEPS present. STILT and WESTERN SANDPIPERS were seen at the north
end of Shearness Pool. Also reported were BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS, 44 AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-NECKED STILTS and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. A
BLACK TERN was seen flying over Raymond Pool. CASPIAN and LEAST TERN were
seen opposite Shearness. Besides the previously mentioned WHITE IBIS, other
waders included GLOSSY IBIS, TRICOLORED HERON and immature LITTLE BLUE,
LEAST and AMERICAN BITTERN, and YELLOW-CROWNED and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT
HERONS. A VIRGINIA RAIL was calling from the south side of Shearness.
Scanning the pool found 7 BALD EAGLES and a single OSPREY. An immature
PEREGRINE FALCON was along the entrance road. A single TUNDRA SWAN and a
pair of MUTE SWANS with 3 cygnets were seen from Shearness Tower.
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER was also identified from the tower, which gives great
looks at te south sand bar if you can stand the flies. Lots of BANK SWALLOWS
are being seen mixed in with the TREE and BARN SWALLOWS flying over the
ponds. Landbirds reported included a WARBLING VIREO, plus WILLOW FLYCATCHER,
BOBOLINK, and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. 

NORTHERN BOBWHITE continues to found at Bombay Hook, by the entrance and
along the Allee House Road. A female DICKCISSEL was found at the woods edge
along the Allee House Road, plus GRASSHOPPER SPARROW. WILD TURKEY with 12
poults was seen north of Dutch Neck road on Route 9 in the refuge. Another
TURKEY with young was also found at Staves Landing Road. 

Lots of shorebirds were seen at Taylor's Gut at Woodland Beach Wildlife Area
on Route 9. There were 400 DOWITCHERS and 2000 PEEPS seen, including 4
AMERICAN AVOCETS, 14 STILT and 2 WESTERN SANDPIPERS. CASPIAN TERNS and BANK
SWALLOWS were also seen. 

SEASIDE SPARROWS were found along the Smyrna River at Eagles Nest Landing
Road. Also reported were 2 KING RAILS, this is just a little further inland
from where interbreeding with CLAPPER RAILS occur at Flemings Landing.
SPOTTED SANDPIPER, LEAST BITTERN and GREEN HERON were also reported. 

CLIFF SWALLOWS were also reported at the Leipsic Bridge and the
Appoquinimink Bridge, but only a very few remain. Most have nested and moved
on. An early BOBOLINK was reported at Staves Landing. 

Another DICKCISSEL was reported in Middletown, across from the St Anne
Church Road Pond near the Charles e. Price Park. Over 60 GLOSSY IBIS were
seen at Price Park, along with KILLDEER and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW. 

A SORA was found at the Port Penn Impoundments walking on the boardwalk.
COMMON GALLINULE was also found near the boardwalk. CATTLE, SNOWY and GREAT
EGRETS were seen, along with LITTLE BLUE and GREEN HERON at Port Penn. STILT
SANDPIPER was found with SPOTTED, SEMIPALMATED and LEAST SANDPIPER. 

COMMON GALLINULE was also found at the Yardley Tract of Thousand Acre Marsh.
2 LEAST BITTERNS were seen at Grier's Pond. A high count of 276 LITTLE BLUE
HERONS, including several "Calico" herons were seen from Veterans Park in
Delaware City at dusk. 

A BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO was reported at White Clay Creek State Park near
Newark. RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was also reported there and at Newark Reservoir.
A LEAST SANDPIPER was also at the reservoir. Another RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was
reported at Country Creek in Bear. A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was reported at
Ashland Nature Center, along with VEERY. The previously reported BLACK SWANS
continue at the waterfowl pond at Carousel Park in Pike Creek. 

A SNOW GOOSE was at the Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge in Wilmington.
SPOTTED SANDPIPER and WILLOW FLYCATCHER were also there. OSPREY and BALD
EAGLES were seen at Battery Park in New Castle. Two PEREGRINE FALCONS
continue to be seen in downtown Wilmington, at the Brandywine Building. 

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Frank Rohrbacher,
Al Guarente, Robert Klarquist, Holly Merker, Brian Henderson, Kelly Nunn,
Hannah Greenberg, Rod Murray, Chihkang Cheng, Marcy Stutzman, Eli Anders,
Rachael Shapiro, Ken Wat, Chris and Karen Bennett, Hank Davis, Damon
Orsetti, Joe Sebastiani, Jerald Reb, Rich Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith,
John Hoyt, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Josh Adams, Tim Schreckengost, Tim and
Don Freiday, Alan Kneidel, Katie Barnes, Armando Aispuro, Chandler Wiegand,
Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your
sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Bird program at White Clay Creek State Park
From: "Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC)" <Kathleen.Sullivan AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 19:34:17 +0000
Birding at White Clay Creek---by ear and sight
3rd Tuesdays 7/21, 8/18, 9/15, 10/20
8:00-10:00a.m.
Meet at the Nature Center Parking area
Join Gary Stolz, Park Naturalist to explore the beautiful riparian corridor of 
White Clay Creek, important wildlife habitat for some 200 species of 
neo-tropical migratory birds, as well as a wide diversity of native mammals, 
reptiles, amphibians, butterflies and other wildlife. 

Bring binoculars, plenty of water and good walking shoes for this 2 hour 
program over moderate terrain. 

Pre-registration strongly suggested, Free!
Call 302-368-6900.

Kathleen Sullivan
Naturalist/Environmental Educator
WCCSP
302-368-6560
Subject: Juv White Ibis
From: John Hoyt <jhoyt.webmail AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 07:51:21 -0400
Three juv White Ibis on the Gordon Pond bike trail near the obs tower right 
now. 7:45 am. 


John Hoyt
Lewes, DE

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Dickcissel
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015 07:08:59 -0400
       There was a calling dickcissel in the weedy area directly across
from the pond on St Anne's Church Rd. in Middletown yesterday afternoon.
My bet it is one of the two that were seen in June at Chas Price Park which
is just down the road.

Rod Murray, Middletown
Subject: DOS Beginning Birders' Field Trip - Shorebirds at Bombay Hook NWR - July 18, 2015 @ 8:00 a.m.
From: Bob Rufe <00000188473bce75-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2015 11:07:29 -0400
Hi Everybody! 

Since we always talk about the tides for this annual trip, in recent years I 
decided to set the trip dates after checking out the tide tables. 



Following are the tides near BBH for this Saturday, July 18, 2015:



Day        High  Tide   Height  Sunset    Moon  Time    % Moon
                  Time     Feet    Sunset                  Visible
19July    High   10:49AM  5.7  8:33 PM   Rise  8:03 PM   98


Yes - That's a HIGH TIDE at about 11 a.m.! Great for shorebirds in the 
impoundments. 

Join us for this trip and I'll explain the tidal relationship to shorebirding 
at BBHNWR. 

Hmmm - it's also raining right now... I'll explain that relationship too.
Our goal this year is 15 species of shorebirds.
BTW - Next year's date is already set (and easy to remember!) - July 16, '16.


All are welcome - there is no charge to participate, but refuge fees are in 
effect ($4 per car). 

Of course, you can gain "free" admission by purchasing this year's 
duck/conservation stamp ($25). 

ABA has them for sale... stop by in Delaware City before the trip 9-5 all week, 
or after the trip this Saturday. 



Here is a link to the Bombay Hook NWR FAQ page: 
http://www.fws.gov/northeast/bombayhook/FAQ.htm
 
Bring snacks, liquids, sunscreen and bug repellent - I've had success with 
clothes dryer antistat sheets... one under my birding cap seems to have some 
effect; however, it's usually one participant who attracts all the critters... 
(you know who you are, and we all thank you!) . 



Someone at the Falcon Watch asked how long I have been leading this trip, so I 
checked my notes and found this Field Trip report dated 4 August 1979: 



Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, DE, BBT - 4 August 1979. Twenty-one 
participants observed 90 species between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on a 
hazy-to-clear and warm day. Planned as a Beginning Birders' Trip, more veterans 
than beginners joined in for a good day of shorebirding and, as expected, 
participation tapered shortly after noon. Ten species of waders (HEIB's - heron 
egret, ibis, and bittern), 12 species of waterfowl, and 16 species of 
shorebirds were noted. Highlights included one Merlin (4:30 p.m. at Price's 
Corner, DE), eight Upland Sandpipers (3 p.m. at Greater Wilmington Airport), 
and close studies of Pectoral and Stilt Sandpipers at Bombay Hook. Many 
attempts to make other species become Baird's Sandpipers failed and none was 
found. Participants: Andy Ednie, A. and E. Epstein, Clarence W. Gault, Jeffrey 
and Kathleen Gordon, Helen Griffith, Gene K. Hess, D. and S. Holmes, Carmen ?, 
Jean ?, Lois Kinckiner, Harry and Shirley Keller, Nan Lloyd, Rita Panar, Hart 
Rufe, and Phil and Hazel Vanderhorst. Bob Rufe (leader). 



This will be my 37th annual trip. 


This is a half day outing, and we officially conclude at noon - earlier if 
weather dictates. 

We may include side trips to either Port Mahon or Taylor's Gut if warranted by 
advance scouting. 

We bird leisurely and take time to show every bird to every participant!
Reservations are not necessary, but advance indication appreciated - I DO have 
surprise giveaways this year! 

I'll plan an optional (Dutch treat) recap lunch at Boondocks, which is casual - 
and air-conditioned! 

Questions? Send a note "offline" - do not "Reply All!" - or call 302-998-9298.


C'mon out! 


Bob Rufe - Trip Leader
Subject: Re: RFI: Delaware Target Birds
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Tue, 14 Jul 2015 13:00:20 +0000
Hey Josh,

Great Black-backed Gull is a common summer resident and you should see them 
just about anywhere there is salt water. 


Lesser Black-backed Gull is far less common but you should still be able to 
find a few. It helps if you are familiar with immature plumages - as there tend 
to be more first, second and third cycle birds around than adults this time of 
year. But there are usually at least a couple adults around in summer as well. 
The best places to look are Cape Henlopen and Delaware Seashore State Park - 
but they can show up just about anywhere. At Cape Henlopen check the beach 
north of Herring Point and/or the beach in front of the Hawk Watch. The best 
spot at Delaware Seashore is the beach north of the Indian River Inlet. This 
time of year the best time to look is early in the morning or evening after the 
crowds of swimmers and surf fishermen have left the beach. Another spot where I 
have had luck this time of year is Beach Plum Island Nature Preserve at the 
south end of Broadkill Beach. They usually hang out on the beach to the north 
of the pedestrian crossing from the parking lot. 


Wilson's Storm-Petrel is fairly easy to get from shore this time of year - so 
you can skip the ferry if you want to maximize your birding time on land (a 
round-trip walk on trip will take about 3.5 hours). It is possible to find WISP 
anywhere along the ocean coast and lower bay, though you will need a scope. It 
helps to get higher than the beach to do your search. Best scoping locations 
are the Point, Hawk Watch and Herring Point at Cape Henlopen State Park. But I 
had one a few days ago off the beach between Herring Point and Gordons Pond at 
Cape Henlopen. 


American Black Duck should be pretty easy to find at Prime Hook.

Saltmarsh Sparrow is always a challenge - but the best places to look are 
Oyster Rocks Road (first road on the east side of RT 1 south of the Broadkill 
River) and Lighthouse Road at the north end of Slaughter Beach (just north of 
the drawbridge over Cedar Creek). Fowler Beach Road is also a good place to 
check. I have also had luck in the marsh on the west side of the Gordons Pond 
Trail in about the first 1/2 mile north of the observation platform. 


There are guides to birding the Delaware Coast (from Indian River Inlet to 
Woodland Beach) on the Sussex Bird Club website if you are not familiar with 
some of the places mentioned above. Here is a link 


http://sussexbirdclub.com/travel

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE

-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Josh Adams
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2015 10:21 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] RFI: Delaware Target Birds

Hello all,
I'm doing some work in the DC area this week, but I'm hoping to get out to 
Delaware at some point for a day to chase some lifers. Looking at eBird it 
appears that I have a shot at the following four species: 


Great Black-Backed Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
American Black Duck
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Wilson's Storm-Petrel

I'm planning on concentrating my efforts around Prime Hook NWR as well as 
taking the Lewes ferry back and forth in hopes of seeing some Storm-Petrels. 
Most of the birds seem like they should be in pretty straightforward, but I 
imagine Saltmarsh Sparrow has stopped singing at this point and may be hard to 
locate. Lesser Black-Backed Gull also appears to be pretty uncommon this time 
of year as well? I'd appreciate any advice anyone wants to pass along. 


Thanks,

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA
Subject: RFI: Delaware Target Birds
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jul 2015 22:20:55 -0400
Hello all,
I'm doing some work in the DC area this week, but I'm hoping to get out to
Delaware at some point for a day to chase some lifers. Looking at eBird it
appears that I have a shot at the following four species:

Great Black-Backed Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
American Black Duck
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Wilson's Storm-Petrel

I'm planning on concentrating my efforts around Prime Hook NWR as well as
taking the Lewes ferry back and forth in hopes of seeing some
Storm-Petrels. Most of the birds seem like they should be in pretty
straightforward, but I imagine Saltmarsh Sparrow has stopped singing at
this point and may be hard to locate. Lesser Black-Backed Gull also appears
to be pretty uncommon this time of year as well? I'd appreciate any advice
anyone wants to pass along.

Thanks,

Josh Adams
Lynnwood, WA
Subject: Re: Sandwich Tern, Cape Henlopen SP
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Jul 2015 22:25:11 -0400
I had a Sandwich Tern at The Point this afternoon, sitting with a bunch of
Forster's and a single Caspian. Probably the same bird that was previously
seen from the ferry and at Gordon's Pond. All the activity flushed it to the
last place left for peace and quiet! Also Piping Plover and 2
Oystercatchers. 

Good birding, 
Andy

-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Frank
Rohrbacher
Sent: Sunday, July 12, 2015 3:22 PM
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] Whimbrel, Brown Pelican at Cape Henlopen SP and Gordons
Pond SP

I arrived at Cape Henlopen SP at 6:00 AM and parked at Herring Point.   I 
walked the Gordons Pond Trail to the Viewing Tower.  In Gordons Pond  itself
I had Least Terns, Forster's Terns, Royal Terns, Caspian Terns and a  Common
Tern.  Shorebirds included both Yellowlegs, Short-billed Dowitchers, Willets
and Semipalmated Sandpipers.  On the marsh side of the trail I  saw many
Great Egrets, Snowy Egrets, Glossy Ibis and one Whimbrel in the  open pans.

I then went to Cape Henlopen Point and saw two Brown Pelicans  as well as
the usual Piping Plovers and terns.
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Wilmington, Delaware
-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4821 / Virus Database: 4365/10217 - Release Date: 07/12/15
Subject: New Castle: White Ibis at Delaware City Waterfront
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 22:15:15 -0400
Birders,

This evening, Elizabeth Porter, Michael Rosengarten, and I saw 6 juvenile
White Ibis fly to roost at Pea Patch Island. We were watching from the
Delaware City Waterfront at the end of Clinton St. There was one flock of
four birds and two single birds. Additionally, there was a single
Tricolored Heron among the usual suspects.

eBird list with photos:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24217603

Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD
(814) 952-2934
Subject: Bombay Hook N Bobwhites
From: Rodney Murray <rcmurray213 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jul 2015 11:03:05 -0400
      About ten yards inside the entrance gate to Bombay Hook NWR, one male
NOBO was leading at least a dozen chicks across the road through the newly
mown grass edging the road to the high grass.   These chicks looked only
days old, so be careful when entering the refuge as they seemingly popped
up out of nowhere and weren't moving fast.  I guess it's okay to say
it...yes, they were cute.
Rod Murray, Middletown DE
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 9th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jul 2015 20:51:00 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* July 9, 2015
* DEST1507.09
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Black Swan (exotic)  
Gadwall 
White-winged Scoter 
Black Scoter
Red-breasted Merganser
Northern Bobwhite
Common Loon
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Northern Gannet
Brown Pelican
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Double-crested Cormorant
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Yellow-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Common Gallinule
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Dunlin
Stilt Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
ROSEATE TERN
Common Tern
Royal Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Screech Owl
Barred Owl
Chuck Wills Widow
Eastern Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
Willow Flycatcher
Warbling Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo
Horned Lark
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Marsh Wren
Worm-eating Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Summer Tanager
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: July 9, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For Thursday, July 9th this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list remained
at 306 species. 

Terns continue to highlight the Delaware birding scene, with 10 species
reported. The best was a SANDWICH TERN with 2 LEAST and 18 ROYAL TERNS at
Gordon's Pond in Cape Henlopen State Park. Also reported was a LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL and two WHIMBRELS flying out over the ocean. Gordon's was
a real mecca for waders including an unusual CATTLE EGRET plus 69 SNOWY and
6 GREAT EGRETS, with 34 GLOSSY IBIS and 4 GREEN HERONS. 28 WILLETS were
counted, plus both YELLOWLEGS and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH and PINE WARBLERS were found in the woods. 

Further north, 2 ROSEATE TERNS were filmed at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday. Those birds were seen with FORSTER'S,
LEAST, and ROYAL TERNS, plus BLACK SKIMMERS. Ten AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS
continue to be seen at Fowler's, plus a peak count of 13 immature WHITE IBIS
still present from last week. An immature YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and
TRICOLORED HERON were also reported. Shorebirds seen included AMERICAN
OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-NECKED STILT, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER,
both YELLOWLEGS, WILLET, RUDDY TURNSTONE, 14 RED KNOT, SPOTTED, LEAST, and
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. A WILSON'S STORM-PETREL
was seen over Delaware Bay. A female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER was found on the
sandbar. The salt marsh had 20 SEASIDE SPARROWS, and the woods along
Fowler's Beach Road had a SUMMER TANAGER. 

A GULL-BILLED TERN was reported from refuge headquarters area. More terns
were found at Broadkill Marsh, including BLACK TERN and BLACK SKIMMER.
Shorebirds seen at Broadkill included SPOTTED, STILT and WESTERN SANDPIPER,
plus AMERICAN AVOCETS and BLACK-NECKED STILTS. The previously reported
DICKCISSEL at Cods Road has not been seen in a week, but another DICKCISSEL
appeared on the Broadkill Beach Road, perhaps the same bird. A VESPER
SPARROW was reported along the road to refuge headquarters. Warblers
reported included YELLOW, PROTHONOTARY, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. WHITE-EYED
and YELLOW-THROATED VIREOS were also reported. WHIP-POOR-WILLS are still
calling in the evening at Oyster Rocks Road. 

WHITE IBIS was also reported in downtown Lewes, at Block House Pond behind
Beebe Hospital. A COMMON LOON was found in the Lewes Canal along Pilottown
Road. BROWN PELICAN was reported at Roosevelt Inlet. An immature
YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was found at the Monroe Avenue pond.

More terns were reported at The Point at Cape Henlopen, including LEAST,
ROYAL and CASPIAN, plus PIPING PLOVER and AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER. A
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER with 2 BLACK SCOTERS was found in the bayside cove from
the point. Four WILSON'S STORM-PETREL plus NORTHERN GANNET and TRICOLORED
HERON were seen from Herring Point along with 9 LESSER BLACK BACKED GULLS.
BLACK, COMMON, ROYAL, and 3 LEAST TERNS were also seen out over the ocean.
The woods around Herring Point had PRAIRIE WARBLER and BLUE GROSBEAK. Three
BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES were found at the Seaside Nature Center.
WHIPPOORWILL was still calling in the park in the evening.

YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON with GLOSSY IBIS was found that Burton's Island
at the North Marina at Indian River Inlet. GADWALL was also reported.
SPOTTED SANDPIPER and WILLET were found at the inlet. Three BROWN PELICANS
and another COMMON LOON were seen at Bethany Beach. CHUCK WILLS WIDOW was
calling at Bayview Park in South Bethany. RED-HEADED WOODPECKER is still
being seen at the Angola Neck Preserve off Route 24 near Midway. SUMMER
TANAGER and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO were found at Trap Pond State Park near
Laurel. Warblers seen there included WORM-EATING and PROTHONOTARY.

Shorebirds are beginning to arrive in numbers along the Delaware coastal
marshes. A WHIMBREL is a surprising bird at Big Stone Beach in Milford Neck
Wildlife Area. Also seen were AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER and 16 BLACK NECKED
STILTS, plus BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, 80
WILLETS, GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, and
SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. The early morning hours at Big Stone produced one
CHUCK WILLS WIDOW, 3 WHIPPOORWILL and 4 EASTERN SCREECH OWLS. Terns seen
there included ROYAL, COMMON, and BLACK SKIMMER. The woods at Big Stone
Beach had YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, plus YELLOW-THROATED, YELLOW, and PINE
WARBLER. Three SALTMARSH SPARROWS and 50 SEASIDE SPARROWS were found in the
marsh

Two WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were seen flying out over the Delaware Bay at
Port Mahon. BARRED OWL was reported calling in a yard in Cheswold.

Taylor's Gut at Woodland Beach Wildlife Area had large numbers of
shorebirds, with over 200 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS. Also seen was WESTERN,
STILT, and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS plus BLACK-NECKED STILT and both
YELLOWLEGS. Also reported was a single DUNLIN.

The north end of Sheerness Pool at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near
Smyrna had a PECTORAL SANDPIPER with LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. Also
reported were BLACK NECKED STILTS and SPOTTED SANDPIPER. Six BALD EAGLES
were seen at Sheerness Pool along with TUNDRA SWAN. A SNOW GOOSE was seen at
Raymond Pool. YELLOW-CROWNED and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON plus LEAST
BITTERN were found at Bear Swamp. GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was found at the Allee
house. NORTHERN BOBWHITE can still be heard calling along the entrance road.

An immature WHITE IBIS was found along Route 13 between Black Diamond and
Anchor Inn Road, just north of Smyrna. NORTHERN BOBWHITE and EASTERN
MEADOWLARK were reported along Cedar Swamp Road, along with CATTLE EGRET.

SNOWY and CATTLE EGRET were also reported at Thousand Acre Marsh with LITTLE
BLUE HERON. A COMMON GALLINULE was also found. CATTLE EGRET and LITTLE BLUE
HERON were found on Cox Neck Road near Dragon Run in Delaware City. Also
reported there were GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and HORNED LARK.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL at Brandywine Creek State Park was not
found this weekend. GREEN HERON was reported, along with NORTHERN
ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, and EASTERN MEADOWLARK. ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS were
also massing at the Peterson Urban Wildlife in downtown Wilmington. Also
seen there were numerous MARSH WRENS plus OSPREY and DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT. WARBLING VIREO was reported at Ashland Nature Center. WILLOW
FLYCATCHER was found at the University of Delaware farm.

COOPER'S HAWKS were reported this week at the Ashland Nature Center, along
Grubb Road in Brandywine Hundred, north of Wilmington and east of Milford.
Two RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS were reported in Bear. At least three PEREGRINE
FALCONS can still be seen in downtown Wilmington near their nest box at the
Brandywine Building. Two BALD EAGLES were reported on the breakwaters at
Battery Park in New Castle.

A pair of BLACK SWANS has recently taken up residence at the pond in
Carousel Park near Pike Creek off Kirkwood Hwy. You can see these stunning
birds with the resident MUTE SWANS and single SNOW GOOSE.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Chihkang Cheng,
Susan Barlow, Richard Ehrlich, Karen Prager, Hugh McGuinness, Marcy
Stutzman, Eli Anders, Lynn Chapman, Peter Paul, Colin Campbell, Rachael
Shapiro, Ken Wat, Chris and Karen Bennett, Joe Sebastiani, Jerald Reb, Joel
Martin Rich Clifton, Chris and Erin Rowe, Lynn Smith, John Hoyt, Sue Gruver,
Sharon Lynn, Bill Stewart, Kim Steininger, Tim Schreckengost, Tim Freiday,
Alan Kneidel, Chandler Weigand, Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember,
the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into
302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy
Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Sure, birds ... and WISPs
From: Colin Campbell <delawaretwitcher AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 16:14:21 -0500
The best two places in northern Delaware for shorebirds today were the muddy 
north end of Sheerness Pool in Bombay Hook NWR and Taylors Gut by Rt9 at the 
Woodland Beach WMA. There were 200-300 birds at each location. It was not high 
tide. These are returning non- or post-breeding adults (the juveniles don't 
usually arrive until August) and many of the twelve species I counted were in 
fine breeding plumage. Particularly attractive were the Western Sandpipers at 
Sheerness (not usually seen in this plumage in Spring in the east - if at all) 
and the Stilt Sandpipers at TG. Even more attractive (addictive?) was the fact 
that both locations could be readily reached in munchable distance from Helen's 
Sausage House. 

 
Sheerness Pool also had a couple of Spotted Sandpipers, photographable 
Black-necked Stilt chicks, Snow Goose and Bobwhite (entrance road). 

 
The reason I then went to what's left of Port Mahon was actually to scan the 
Bay/River (where is the divide anyway?) for Wilson's Storm-Petrel. For those 
not 'in the know' this sounds like a pretty stupid thing to do. However, more 
years ago than I care to think about (when I also thought thus), I was put wise 
to the occurrence of this pelagic sp. here at this time of year. Today, I was 
rewarded with two W. Storm-Petrels. It takes a scope and a careful, slow scan 
from the Port Mahon Road just where it meets the bay (where the dumped rocks 
start, which used to be where awesome photos of shorebirds could be had next to 
the driver's window. Goddam global warming!). Ignore the numerous swallows. It 
is not a storm-driven event, nor a tidal one, they just seem to head up the 
Delaware to Kent County and, who knows, into New Castle County? I did check 
Collins Beach for them (north of which would be NCC), but without luck. 


 
Colin Campbell
Claymont, DE
Subject: DOS Local Patch Trip to Joy Run Saturday
From: John and Sandra Janowski <jsbirders AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 8 Jul 2015 09:07:43 -0500
Hello Birders:

I will be leading a DOS Local Patch Trip to Joy Run Saturday morning, July 11. 
Please meet at the ChesDel Restaurant parking lot at 8:30 AM located at the of 
intersection of Port Penn Road and US 13 just south of the C&D Canal. This 
should be the peak time to identify, listen, and watch the breeding behavior of 
species found here along the Canal. Walking conditions and insects should not 
be a challenge. If you read Colin Campbell's bike/birding trail message this 
week you'll appreciate it even more. 


Hope you can join me!

John

John and Sandra Janowski
Subject: Fowler and environs
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 6 Jul 2015 11:59:24 -0400
Three of us auslanders came to the Prime Hook area seeking the goodies reported 
in the past few days. We dipped on the Dickcissel at both Broadkill and Cods. 
Fowler yielded no White Ibis nor Roseate Tern. Ten White Pelicans were present 
and closer than on previous visits. Seaside Sparrows were cooperative and half 
a dozen Red Knot were to us at least a surprise. 


Kurt Schwarz
Ellicott City MD
goawaybird at Verizon dot net



> On Jul 3, 2015, at 10:09 AM, Hugh McGuinness  wrote:
> 
> After dipping on the Cod's Road Dickcissel two days straight, I was resigned 
to having missed the bird. However, as I tooled down Broadkill Beach Rd at 50 
mph with the windows down, after seeing almost nothing in the marsh, I heard a 
Dickcissel in the field just east of house number 12,176. I stopped for a brief 
view and managed photos for documentation, despite being late for breakfast. 
The exact location can be found in my ensured report. 

> 
> Earlier in the morning I had delightful luck on Deep Branch Rd (summer 
tanager, grasshopper sparrow) and along the entrance road at Prime Hook NWR 
(more grasshopper sparrows). 

> 
> Hugh McGuinness
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: White Ibis in Lewes
From: John Hoyt <jhoyt.webmail AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 5 Jul 2015 10:51:19 -0400
Just posting as the messenger:

On July 4th, Kevin Moore saw and photographed a juvenile White Ibis at Block 
House Pond (which is near Beebe Hospital) in Lewes. 


John Hoyt
Lewes, DE

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Sussex: Roseate Terns at Fowler Beach Rd.
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 15:20:00 -0400
Birders,

Alan Kneidel and I are currently viewing two Roseate Terns at Fowler Beach Rd. 
They are on the south side of the road about halfway between the fisherman's 
bridge and the end of the road. 


Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost 
Elkton, MD
814-952-2934
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Sussex: Sandwich Tern at Gordon's Pond
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 Jul 2015 09:33:23 -0400
Birders,

Alan Kneidel and I are currently looking at a Sandwich Tern at Gordon's Pond 
(Cape Henlopen State Park). It's in a mixed tern flock that is viewable if you 
walk past the observation platform. A scope is needed. 


Cheers,
Tim Schreckengost 
Elkton, MD
814-952-2934
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Birding by bike
From: Colin Campbell <delawaretwitcher AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 17:06:16 -0500
Yesterday morning I accompanied two companions to try out the Mike Castle Trail 
by the C&D Canal by bicycle. We had trepidations after driving through two 
heavy showers but courage (or idiocy) prevailed and we had a great time 
exploring the area in overcast but dry conditions with a nice biking 
temperature of 70F. 

 
For those unfamiliar with this trail which was opened last year, it is a 7-mile 
paved road, about 8 feet wide, running along the north side of the C&D Canal. 
It is intended for walkers and cyclists, but there is provision for horseback 
riders, but I've never seen one. Perhaps the necessity of carrying a large 
pooper-scooper is off-putting to our equestrian colleagues? I digress. Because 
of the asphalt surface, it is eminently suitable for narrow-tired road bikes. 
The 7-mile section is, as one would expect of a trail running by a canal, flat. 
It is incomplete and the half-mile section linking it to Rt9 in Delaware City 
is still to be completed. At the western end, which is the entrance from the 
canal to the Summit North Marina, there is a 2-3 mile extension, which is not 
flat, but is still paved. This takes you over the bank to the Marina which you 
can swing around and pass the AquaSol Restaurant and Bar (unsampled as yet) to 
enable you to cycle through woods before dropping ! 

 steeply back to the canal. A further half mile brings you to the end of the 
paved trail, just before the spectacular Summit Bridge (Rt896) in its wonderful 
new deep blue finery. The trail continues (into Maryland) but at the moment it 
is a gravel/dirt track. Access points for motor vehicles are at Biddle Point 
(off Cox Neck Road about 1-2 miles west of Delaware City), under St Georges 
Bridge in N. St Georges (both places have paved parking, toilets, information 
board and picnic tables) or the AquaSol restaurant parking lot at the North 
Summit Marina. Full details can be found at 
www.traillink.com/trail/michael-castle-trail.aspx. 

 
So why am I telling you all this? Well, my two biking companions are not 
birders and indeed, fairly green cyclists. This meant that I had to reduce my 
usual speed on my special Bilenky road bike considerably to stay in contact. As 
a result, I was able to do quite a lot of birding (without binox). And the area 
was really birdy, especially for this time of year (OK, we don't all live 
minutes away from Prime Hook NWR which seems deservedly to have hogged all the 
limelight recently). The stretch from Biddle Point to the east end of the trail 
had multiple singing Yellow-breasted Chats and several calling Bobwhites as 
well as a constant passage of herons heading to and fro from Pea Patch Island - 
the three Egrets, Great and Little Blue Herons, Glossy Ibis (no Whites!) and 
three 'local' Green Herons. One Osprey was on a very low nest on a channel 
marker in marked contrast to the one on a nest on the very top of the nearby 
Reedy Point Bridge (Rt9). The Canal had Fish Crows, Bald Eag! 

 le and D-c Cormorants flying over. The trail-side growth had Eastern 
Kingbirds, a Willow Flycatcher and two very vocal Field Sparrows; Purple 
Martins, Barn and Tree Swallows adorned the wires. Common Yellowthroats and 
Indigo Buntings were everywhere and Blue Grosbeaks too, tho' less vocal. 
Further west, 22 Turkey Vultures perched on a gas pipeline tower and 18 Black 
Vultures were on the walls of the approach to the extraordinary railway bridge 
over the canal. Some of the GBHerons and BVultures perched on rocks by the 
canal were very tame, allowing us to cycle past at 6 feet distance without 
flying. In the woods beyond the Marina were singing Wood Thrushes, Red-eyed 
Vireos and all three Mimids were seen. As 90% birders have better ears than I, 
I missed a heck of a lot. Mammals included cottontails, woodchucks and a fox. 

 
No awesome rarities but, mark my words, a great place to bike and bird and, if 
you're into boats, everything from kayaks to sailboats, skidoos to speedboats, 
barges to car-carriers. 

 
My companions enjoyed the 3-4 hours or so immensely and gained a new respect 
for the copious birdlife around and were ecstatic to discover they'd biked 19 
miles. 

 
Colin Campbell
Claymont, DE
Subject: nottingham park very chatty
From: Mary Ann Levan <levanma AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 17:05:10 -0400
Went to Nottingham Park, PA today to try out a new pair of binocs and found it 
was “dominated” by yellow breasted chats. We walked in an area of mixed 
forbs and scattered pitch pines and smilax, and heard and saw 4 boldly 
displayed and loudly singing chats. My husband and I, uncharacteristically, 
decided the place had “chatitude”! 


Mary Ann Levan, Joe Ycas
Hockessin, DE
Subject: Dickcissel
From: Richard Clifton <000000af228ab213-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 11:43:09 -0400
For those looking for the Dickcissel on Cods Road, I haven't seen it since the 
afternoon of June 30. Maybe it has moved to Broadkill Beach Road where one has 
been newly reported. 


Richard Clifton
Cods Road, Milford DE
Subject: Dickcissel @ Prime Hook
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2015 10:09:27 -0400
After dipping on the Cod's Road Dickcissel two days straight, I was resigned to 
having missed the bird. However, as I tooled down Broadkill Beach Rd at 50 mph 
with the windows down, after seeing almost nothing in the marsh, I heard a 
Dickcissel in the field just east of house number 12,176. I stopped for a brief 
view and managed photos for documentation, despite being late for breakfast. 
The exact location can be found in my ensured report. 


Earlier in the morning I had delightful luck on Deep Branch Rd (summer tanager, 
grasshopper sparrow) and along the entrance road at Prime Hook NWR (more 
grasshopper sparrows). 


Hugh McGuinness

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, July 2nd, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 21:31:46 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* July 2, 2015
* DEST1507.02
	
*Birds mentioned
Mute Swan 
Gadwall
Northern Pintail
Blue-winged Teal 
Green-winged Teal
Black Scoter
Ruddy Duck 
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Brown Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Clapper Rail
Sora
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Stilt Sandpiper
RUFF
Short-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Phalarope
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Royal Tern
SANDWICH TERN
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Eastern Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Willow Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Wood Thrush
Louisiana Waterthrush
Kentucky Warbler
Hooded Warbler
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat 
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Scarlet Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: July 2, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

For the 4th of July weekend, this is an early edition of Birdline Delaware,
on Thursday, July 2nd from the Delaware Museum of Natural History in
Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list increased to 306 species. 

The two new birds this week were both seen only once was by single groups of
observers. The first was a SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER reported between Lewes
and Georgetown on Bennum Switch Road, about 1-1/2 miles southwest of
Harbeson. This bird was seen flying between the telephone line and the pine
trees along side of the road. There've been several reports of
SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER these last two weeks from Cape May, New Jersey and
Assateague Island, Maryland. There've also been reports in southwestern
Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia plus one last month in upstate New
York. Other people unsuccessfully looking for the SCISSOR-TAIL found WILD
TURKEY in the area.

Also reported was a SANDWICH TERN from the Cape May -Lewes ferry flying out
over Delaware Bay. Also seen was ROYAL and CASPIAN TERNS plus WILSON'S STORM
PETREL. A good place to look for SANDWICH TERNS would be The Point at Cape
Henlopen State Park, where LEAST and ROYAL TERNS were seen, along with 3
PIPING PLOVER and 4 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS. A BLACK SCOTER continues to be
seen along the inner breakwater.

BLACK SKIMMER and COMMON TERNS were reported at Gordon's Pond at Cape
Henlopen State Park along the North Shore of Rehoboth Beach. This area had a
plethora of waders including 22 GLOSSY IBIS, 42 SNOWY, and 18 GREAT EGRETS.
A high count of 45 WILLETS were found. COOPER'S HAWK was found along the
pines, plus PRAIRIE and PINE WARBLER.

There have been numerous sightings of WHITE IBIS in all three counties
today. A single bird was spotted last evening flying over Lighthouse Road
near Mispillion Inlet. Three immature WHITE IBIS were found today at the
Back Beach in Kent Co. from the DuPont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet.
Thirteen immature WHITE IBIS were found at Fowlers Beach in Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. Those birds were in the marsh by the
turn in the road. Two more WHITE IBIS were seen at Stave's Landing Road in
New Castle Co. near Odessa off Route 9. Those birds were flying west towards
Middletown, where 22 GLOSSY IBIS were seen at the Charles E. Price Park off
St. Anne Church Road. 

Heavy rains in southern Delaware on Saturday flooded the traditional
shorebird sites. On Saturday, a RUFF was still present at Broadkill Marsh at
Prime Hook. Six WILSON'S PHALAROPES were also seen, along with BLACK-NECKED
STILTS, 60 AMERICAN AVOCET, 5 GREATER and 40 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, STILT
SANDPIPER, and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. Those birds were dispersed by the
rain, the last sighting of the RUFF was briefly at the western edge of the
North impoundments at Broadkill on Monday. The bird was observed taking off
and flying north towards Prime Hook Beach. Other birds at Prime Hook
included PIED-BILLED GREBE, GADWALL, NORTHERN PINTAIL, BLUE-WINGED and
GREEN-WINGED TEAL, and LEAST BITTERN. BLACK TERN was observed flying over
the marsh along with LEAST and COMMON TERN plus BLACK SKIMMER.

Four WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS were seen flying out over Delaware Bay from
Fowler's Beach on Sunday. Ten AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue to be seen,
plus BLACK-NECKED STILTS, AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS, BLACK-BELLIED and
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RED KNOT, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and WILLETS. LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL with LEAST TERN and BLACK SKIMMER were also seen. Lots of
SEASIDE SPARROWS were seen in the marsh along with one SALTMARSH SPARROW.
WILLOW FLYCATCHER was found in the woods.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues to be seen at Cods Road at the
southernmost house sitting on the telephone line. AMERICAN KESTREL was
reported at Little Neck Road. Both YELLOW-BILLED and BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS
were found at Prime Hook. Warblers reported included PROTHONOTARY, PRAIRIE,
and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT. Two WHIPPOORWILLS were reported at Oyster Rock
Road, calling at 5 AM.

BROWN PELICANS were seen flying along the Delaware coast at North Indian
Beach near Dewey Beach. A peak count of 11 BROWN PELICANS was recorded at
Savage's Ditch in Delaware Seashore State Park, south of Dewey Beach. Two
TRICOLORED HERONS were also seen at Savage's Ditch. A COMMON LOON was seen
flying over Old Landing near Rehoboth Bay. Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were
seen at Angola Neck Preserve off Angola Neck Road from Route 24. 

The previous reported RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continues to be seen at
Strawberry Landing in Assawoman Wildlife Area near Fenwick Island. Four
PILEATED WOODPECKERS and 3 BROWN HEADED NUTHATCHES were also reported.
GLOSSY IBIS was seen, along with SNOWY and GREAT EGRET.

VESPER SPARROW was found along Ponders Road near Ellendale off Route 16.
VESPER SPARROW along with GRASSHOPPER SPARROW and HORNED LARK were found
near Felton, south of Dover.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL at Brandywine Creek State Park, north of
Wilmington continues be seen. That bird can be heard on the hillside along
the entrance road just before the turn to the Hawkwatch parking lot. Also
reported were EASTERN MEADOWLARK and PRAIRIE WARBLER. A VEERY was reported
along Barley Mill Road near Spring Valley.

VEERY and WOOD THRUSHES were also reported at Thompson Station Road at White
Clay Creek State Park near Newark. Both HOODED and KENTUCKY WARBLERS were
found along Thompson Station Road, along with LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH,
AMERICAN REDSTART, and NORTHERN PAULA. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and SCARLET
TANAGER were also found. KENTUCKY WARBLER was also found at Hopkins Bridge
Road at White Clay with REDSTART, PARULA, and YELLOW WARBLER. Also seen was
YELLOW-THROATED and WARBLING VIREO. OSPREY was seen fishing along the creek.
A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was seen near Newark off Barksdale Road. 

OSPREY was also found near New Castle at Battery Park. CASPIAN TERN was seen
flying out over the Delaware River. BLUE GROSBEAKS were found along the
trail by Gambacorta Marsh. A SORA was heard calling today at Thousand Acre
Marsh. CLAPPER RAIL was reported at the Port Penn Impoundments of Augustine
Beach Wildlife Area. LITTLE BLUE HERONS and CATTLE EGRETS continue to be
seen flying to the heronry at Pea Patch Island. Several BALD EAGLES were
also reported. CLAPPER RAIL was also found at Stave's Landing. 

A SPOTTED SANDPIPER was seen opposite Raymond Pool at Bombay Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Shorebirds there included several nesting BLACK
NECKED STILTS, plus GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS. MUTE SWAN was seen at
Sheerness Pool. NORTHERN BOBWHITE was heard calling by the visitor center.
Lots of GREAT EGRETS are being seen at the refuge, plus SNOWY EGRET, GREEN
HERON, and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON.

RUDDY DUCK was reported this week at Port Mahon Road. That bird was seen at
Audubon inlet among the dabblers. RUDDY DUCK was also reported at Pickering
Beach, perhaps the same bird. BLACK-NECKED STILTS and WILLETS were also
reported at Port Mahon. SEASIDE SPARROWS were in the marsh at Port Mahon and
Pickering Beach.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Bob Edelen, Hugh
McGuinness, Steve Collins, Marcy Stutzman, Kevin Ebert, Colin Campbell,
Diane Kane, Sarah MacLellan, Carlton Groff, Ken Bass, Hank Davis, Rachael
Shapiro, Robert Klarquist, Teddy Burke, Alissa Kegelman, Ken Wat, Chris and
Karen Bennett, Sally O'Byrne, Joe Sebastiani, Brian Henderson, Ryan Johnson,
Jerald Reb, Joel Martin Rich Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver,
Sharon Lynn, Alex Wiebe, Bill Stewart, Tim Schreckengost, Tim Freiday, Elora
Grahame, Meg Frantz, Alan Kneidel  Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell.
Remember, the birdline needs your sightings! Please call your reports into
302-792-9591 or email ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, had a happy and
safe Fourth of July holiday. This is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Migratory Bird Treaty and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Acts Under Attack
From: Kurt Schwarz <goawaybird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 13:38:58 -0400
Dear Delaware Birder,

You may recall the action for last week about the MBTA being under attack
in Congress.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is now also on the
chopping block. If you have not already done so, or want to reiterate your
support for the MBTA as well as BGEPA, the American Bird Conservancy has
made it easy to to contact your legislators.

As soon as next week Congress will vote on amendments to prevent
enforcement of a key law protecting our nations symbol the Bald Eagle,
the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA), as well as the Migratory
Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), which protects over 1,000 species of migratory
birds and makes it illegal to harm them except under very specific
circumstances.  The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is a crucial law
needed to ensure that the remarkable recovery of the Bald Eagle continues,
and to conserve struggling populations of Golden Eagle.

Just click on this link and fill in name, etc.
You can also help by contacting your Senators and Representative. Please
use and share this link to generate letters to your elected officials:

http://tinyurl.com/ngz5evm


If the link is not enabled, you will have to copy and paste in your
browser. I have used a tinyurl link so that it will not be corrupted in
copying and pasting into this mail message.

Kurt Schwarz 
Conservation Chair
Maryland Ornithological Society
krschwa1 AT verizon.net
Subject: Re: White Ibis
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 13:38:09 -0400
2 imm. White Ibis flew past Staves Landing New Castle County this morning 
headed west. If birding the area keep a look out. Also almost 200 Glossy Ibis 
feeding at Charles Price Park in the wet meadows. Maybe this is a spot to 
search for the WHIB in the upcoming days. 


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Hugh McGuinness
Date:07/02/2015 7:36 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: de-birds AT PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [de-birds] White Ibis
Final count at Fowlers Beach Rd was thirteen juveniles. The ten White Pelicans also continue. Hugh McGuinness Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Question about Prime Hook
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 11:50:08 -0400
Hello Delaware Birders,

Can anyone give me pointers as to the best approach to looking for shorebirds 
at Broadkill Marsh and Fowlers Beach? Are they better at any particular tide? 
Are there other places to check within Prime Hook. 


This morning I did not see the Dickcissel at Cliftons yard despite spending 
nearly 30 minutes. 


And I must also point out that birding Delaware is really fun. 

Hugh

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Juv White Ibis
From: Teddy Burke <teddyarbeca AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 09:23:57 -0400
Thanks to Hugh. It is 9:20 AMand I am seeing 11 Juv White Ibis at Fowler's
in location Hugh posted. They are fairly close in first patch of water on
right as you enter toward the beach. Easy view with binos.
Subject: White Ibis
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 07:36:36 -0400
Final count at Fowlers Beach Rd was thirteen juveniles. The ten White Pelicans 
also continue. 


Hugh McGuinness

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: White Ibis Fowler Beach Rd now
From: Hugh McGuinness <hdmcguinness AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 06:29:18 -0400
2 juvies south of rd just after bend at the end. 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: June Challenge Totals Due by tomorrow
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 21:27:19 -0400
Hello All June Challengers - Big June Birders,

The month is finally over - out with a rumble and downpour for some of you
- and a great USA win over Germany in the Women's World Cup Semi.  Totals
are in from three of us so far - my Kent, Sussex and New Castle lists and
two Sussex lists - one a limited geographic list.  So far Sussex county has
the lead in both categories. If you are just competing in the Big June and
don't care if your seem only lists gets sent to Florida you can get me your
list before the end of the week.

Hope everyone had a great time.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE
Subject: Ruff - seen on Mon, 6/29
From: Marcy Stutzman <marciastutzman AT NETSCAPE.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 10:29:57 -0400
I posted this information on Delaware Birding Facebook and in eBird and am 
following up here for the record. 


Jay Sheppard and Marcy Stutzman saw the Ruff at 9:35 AM while standing at the 
west end paved pull off on the north side of Broadkill Road (i.e., the causeway 
between the north and south marshes along Broadkill Rd, which ends at Broadkill 
Beach), and looking north from the causeway. The Ruff flew in from the south, 
over the road, and landed in the west end of the marsh right in front of us. It 
was there a short time, enough for both of us to get our scopes on it. The Ruff 
stayed a few minutes and then flew off to the west over the trees, then 
northerly, looking like it was going down to land. A possible spot was to the 
right of the bridge looking north – an inaccessible marsh. We climbed atop 
the guardrail on the right side of the bridge (looking north) to peek over the 
phragmites, but that offered only a partial view of the marsh (no Ruff). 


We hope people keep looking for the Ruff and keep reporting it!

Marcy Stutzman
Jay Sheppard
Laurel, MD 20724
Subject: More brown pelicans!
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 19:14:37 -0400
Just had two brown pelicans heading south low over the ocean heading towards 
tower road state park beach. 


Diane Kane 
Indian Beach, DE

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Prime Hook Rarities
From: Kevin Ebert <kev.ebert AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 18:08:20 -0400
        Broadkill Road

The Ruff was not present this Saturday 3-4 PM and 10-11 AM or 12:40 PM
Sunday.

The Stilt Sandpiper and Wilson's Phalarope were present both times, but
left at around 11 Am Sun and did not return by 12:40.

Other notable birds include a Least Bittern on Saturday and a pair of
Wilson's Storm Petrels on Sunday.


        Fowler's Beach Road

4 American White Pelicans were present on Saturday, but not on Sunday.

       Cod's Road

The Dickcissel was singing frequently and obviously in the Clifton Yard.

       Downtown and Benum Switch Roads

The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was not there.


     Kevin Ebert

     Chevy Chase
Subject: 8 brown pelicans
From: Diane Kane <dianejkane AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 15:07:32 -0400
Just saw 8 brown pelicans flying low and north along the break of today's huge 
waves from in front of my home. 


Diane Kane
Indian Beach, DE

Diane J Kane,
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
From: Robert Edelen <bnorchids AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 13:10:16 -0400
There was a scissor-tailed flycatcher on the power lines at the corner of
Downtown and Benum Switch roads (1 1/2 miles SW of Harbeson) today from
12:20 to 12:40PM.  It was alternately flying between the power lines and
the pines across the road.

Bob Edelen
Subject: Ruff
From: Sharon Lynn <slynn001 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 10:03:27 -0400
The Ruff is currently in the north marsh on Broadkill Beach Road. 

There are 6 Wilson's Phalaropes, and among the Black-Necked Stilts, there are 2 
tiny chicks. Also a good showing of the other birds seen this week. 

Sharon Lynn
Rehoboth Beach

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: RBA: Birdline Delaware, June 26th, 2015
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 20:59:50 -0400
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* June 26, 2015
* DEST1506.26
	
*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Mute Swan 
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck 
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Blue-winged Teal
Black Scoter
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Northern Bobwhite
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
American White Pelican
Least Bittern
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black Crowned Night Heron
Yellow Crowned Night Heron
WHITE IBIS
Glossy Ibis
Northern Harrier
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
Virginia Rail
Common Gallinule
SANDHILL CRANE
American Oystercatcher
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
RUFF
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Least Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
ROSEATE TERN
Common Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Chuck Wills Widow
Eastern Whippoorwill
Red-headed Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Willow Flycatcher
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Veery
Wood Thrush
Ovenbird
Louisiana Waterthrush
Prothonotary Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
American Redstart
Black and White Warbler
Blue Winged Warbler
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Vesper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
Summer Tanager
DICKCISSEL
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: June 26, 2015 
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (ednieap AT verizon.net 
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern New
Jersey, Maryland

This is Birdline Delaware, for Friday, June 26th from the Delaware Museum of
Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware annual list increased
to 304 species. 

What a week it has been at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton!
A breeding plumage ROSEATE TERN was found on Saturday at Broadkill Beach
marsh, along the north side of the road. This is a stunning bird, with long
tail, black sickle bill and rose wash on the breast. It is also a very rare
bird away from the Delaware coast where it is usually found between Cape
Henlopen to Indian River Inlet.

Shorebirds are also starting to arrive, the best place being the Broadkill
Beach Road where up to 5 WILSON'S PHALAROPES were reported on the north side
of the road. a breeding plumage black RUFF was found on Tuesday and has
remained all week. Other shorebirds included 40+ BLACK NECKED STILTS, 65
AMERICAN AVOCETS, plus LONG-BILLED and SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. An immature
WHITE IBIS was seen flying over among a flock of GLOSSY IBIS. A STILT
SANDPIPER was seen at Prime Hook Beach Road. AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS
continue to be seen at Fowler's Beach. Shorebirds seen there included
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, RUDDY
TURNSTONE, RED KNOT, LEAST SANDPIPER, and LESSER YELLOWLEGS. A total of
eight species of tern were reported at Prime Hook including breeding plumage
BLACK TERN at Broadkill Beach Marsh, plus 120 BLACK SKIMMER, and LEAST,
ROYAL, CASPIAN, and COMMON TERN in the refuge. BONAPARTE'S and LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL were also found. BLUE-WINGED TEAL was also reported
Broadkill marsh, plus AMERICAN WIGEON, GADWALL, and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL continues to be seen at the south end of
Cods Road. Both BLACK-BILLED and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO were found on the
refuge, plus YELLOW-THROATED VIREO. Warblers reported included OVENBIRD,
WORM-EATING, PROTHONOTARY, and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT at Turkle's Pond.
AMERICAN KESTRELS were seen along Draper Road, where 4 fledglings were
banded this week. 

WILSON'S STORM PETREL was seen off the Delaware Bay heading towards Kent Co
from the duPont Nature Center at Mispillion Inlet. Two LESSER BLACK-BACKED
GULLS were seen on the jetty, plus FORSTER'S LEAST, COMMON and ROYAL TERNS. 

More WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS continue to be seen offshore from the hawkwatch
at Cape Henlopen State Park. PIPING PLOVER and 4 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS
were seen at the point. Good numbers of terns are collecting at the point,
including 10 ROYAL, 2 COMMON and a LEAST TERN. BLACK SCOTER was reported at
the inner breakwater. There was also a flyover COMMON LOON in basic plumage.


A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was reported at Pocomoke Swamp near Gumboro. Also
reported there were YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, and SUMMER
TANAGER. Warblers seen included WORM-EATING AND LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH. More
RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS continues to be seen at the Angola Neck Preserve off
Route 24 west of Midway. Those birds were seen along the road, where it
turns to gravel. BROWN HEADED NUTHATCH was also reported there.

SUMMER TANAGER was also reported at the McCabe Preserve along the Broadkill
Creek near Milton. YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, WILD TURKEY and BARRED OWL also
found. Warblers reported included PROTHONOTARY, PINE, and YELLOW-THROATED.

VESPER SPARROW was found Ponders Road near Ellendale. Redden Forest near
Georgetown at SUMMER TANAGER plus YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, WORM-EATING and
BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER. SUMMER TANAGER was also found at W. Robbins Rd. in
Redden State Forest along with KENTUCKY, PRAIRIE, and WORM-EATING WARBLER.
GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were calling in the fields.

A SANDHILL CRANE was found at the headwaters to Augustine Creek near Port
Penn. COMMON GALLINULE was found at port Penn impoundments. An AMERICAN
KESTREL was found along Dutch Neck Road. CLIFF SWALLOWS continue to be seen
at the north Appoquinimink Bridge near Odessa.

The Heron survey at Delaware City reported high numbers of LITTLE BLUE HERON
(415), GREAT EGRET (370), CATTLE EGRET (547), and GLOSSY IBIS (623). Low
numbers were found for SNOWY EGRET and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. A single
YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was reported plus a GREEN HERON flying out to the
island. Also reported were CASPIAN TERNS flying over the Delaware River.
NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS was found at ABA headquarters.

The previous reported DICKCISSEL at Brandywine Creek State Park has not been
seen since Sunday. WILLOW FLYCATCHER, PRAIRIE and YELLOW WARBLER, plus
EASTERN MEADOWLARK continue to be reported there. WILLOW FLYCATCHER was also
reported at Ashland Nature Center.

A HOODED WARBLER was found at White Clay Creek State Park off Thompson
Station Road. Other warblers seen there included BLUE-WINGED, KENTUCKY,
PRAIRIE, AMERICAN REDSTART, LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, and 40 OVENBIRD. 12 VEERY
and 38 WOOD THRUSH were also found, along with YELLOW BILLED CUCKOO,
WARBLING and YELLOW THROATED VIREO. NORTHERN BOBWHITE was found at Middle
Run Natural Area today. WILLOW FLYCATCHER was also reported. Warblers
included OVENBIRD, PRAIRIE WARBLER and YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT

The Veolia Water Treatment plant in Wilmington had 25 WOOD DUCKS and 6
GADWALLS. WILLOW FLYCATCHER and YELLOW WARBLER were also reported. 

PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was found at Blackbird State Forest along Saw Mill
Road. Also reported were GREEN HERON, RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, YELLOW-BILLED
CUCKOO, plus YELLOW and PINE WARBLER. Also reported Blackbird this week was
NORTHERN BOBWHITE and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was found at Bombay Hook National Wildlife
Refuge near Smyrna along with BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON and LEAST BITTERN.
MUTE and TUNDRA SWAN continue to be reported along with 3 SNOW GEESE
opposite Sheerness Pool. Shorebirds seen included BLACK-NECKED STILTS,
LESSER and GREATER YELLOWLEGS, and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. NORTHERN HARRIER
was seen along with 8 BALD EAGLES. NORTHERN BOBWHITE and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
were found by the Allee house. WILLOW FLYCATCHER and a calling VIRGINIA RAIL
were reported along the Boardwalk Trail.

RUDDY DUCK and GADWALL were found at Port Mahon. COMMON TERN and LESSER
BLACK BACKED GULL were found on the pilings. SALTMARSH and SEASIDE SPARROWS
were reported at the sharp turn in the road. A pair of LEAST BITTERNS were
seen by the tank farm. The BANK SWALLOW colony at the pioneer gravel pits at
the intersection of route nine and 113 S. of Dover had over 30 nests along
two separate sections of bank.

Goatsuckers are still being found at night along Big Stone Beach in Milford
Neck Wildlife Area Two CHUCK WILLS WIDOW and 6 WHIPPOORWILLS were found,
along with calling VIRGINIA RAIL and SEASIDE SPARROW.

Thanks to everybody that contributed this week including, Ken Bass, Hank
Davis, Rachael Shapiro, Nick Pulcinella, Chris Berry, Winger West, Nancy
Goggin, Robert Klarquist, Teddy Burke, Andrew Albright, , Alissa Kegelman,
Ken Wat, Chris and Karen Bennett, Sally O'Byrne, Joe Sebastiani, Jerald Reb,
Joel Martin Rich Clifton, Chris Rowe, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn,
Bill Stewart, Tim Schreckengost, Tim Freiday, Alan Kneidel, Sandra Farkas,
Maurice Barnhill, and Joe Russell. Remember, the birdline needs your
sightings! Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
ednieap AT verizon.net. Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

 -end transcript

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Fledgling Screech Owls
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:29:29 +0000
Good Morning,
 Yesterday evening as I was out in the yard, I heard an unfamiliar noise, 
something like a muffled annual cicada trying to get going for the first time 
of the summer. It turned out to be coming from 2 fledgling Screech Owls in one 
of the maple trees in the back yard. One of the parents (presumably) gave a 
very soft trill from the row of pines adjacent. 

 The day before, I cruised through Kinder Rd in the evening. In the woods, I 
found a family of Wood Thrush. I briefly saw a juvenile, watched the female 
bathe in a roadside puddle while the male sang further back in the woods. That 
was a treat because I had never confirmed a Wood Thrush through ten years of 
atlassing. Recent rains have the puddle at the sharp bend of Kinder primed for 
some returning shorebirds. 


Good birding,

Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE
Subject: Fledgling Screech Owls
From: "Lovelace, Glen (DelDOT)" <Glen.Lovelace AT state.de.us>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:29:29 +0000
Good Morning,
 Yesterday evening as I was out in the yard, I heard an unfamiliar noise, 
something like a muffled annual cicada trying to get going for the first time 
of the summer. It turned out to be coming from 2 fledgling Screech Owls in one 
of the maple trees in the back yard. One of the parents (presumably) gave a 
very soft trill from the row of pines adjacent. 

 The day before, I cruised through Kinder Rd in the evening. In the woods, I 
found a family of Wood Thrush. I briefly saw a juvenile, watched the female 
bathe in a roadside puddle while the male sang further back in the woods. That 
was a treat because I had never confirmed a Wood Thrush through ten years of 
atlassing. Recent rains have the puddle at the sharp bend of Kinder primed for 
some returning shorebirds. 


Good birding,

Glen Lovelace III
Seaford, DE

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Subject: Brandywine Birdwalk
From: Andrew Ednie <ednieap AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 06:48:46 -0400
The monthly Birdwalk at Brandywine Creek State park is this Saturday, June
27th. We'll meet at the observation deck of the nature center at 8 am. We'll
start the morning by looking for the Dickcissel reported last week, but also
try for Willow Flycatcher, Prairie Warbler, and Eastern Meadowlark. Last I
heard, Adams Dam Road between Rt 100 and Center Meeting Rd was closed by
fallen trees due to Tuesday's storm, so plan your route accordingly. The
walk is free, but park entrance fees are in effect. 

Andy Ednie 
Claymont, Delaware
Subject: Beginner Bird Walk
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 06:30:58 -0400
Tomorrow I will be leading a Beginner Bird Walk at Battery Park in old New 
Castle. We will begin at 8am at the park on the Delaware River at the end of 
the Delaware Street, and from there we will walk along the river. Water access, 
thickets, and marsh frontage makes for an ideal location to spot birds easily. 
This walk is suitable for families. For directions and more information, please 
visit: 
http://www.dosbirds.org/event/summer-beginner-bird-walk-at-battery-park/. 


Joe Sebastiani
Subject: Prime Hook NWR highlights -- Ruff update - 6/25
From: Alan Kneidel <akneidel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:13:59 -0400
DE-Birders,

I spent the late afternoon and evening birding Prime Hook NWR. Highlights
included:

RUFF -- seen at 7:30 PM on northside of Broadkill, tucked into the corner
closest to the bayshore -- for those looking for this bird, note that it is
shedding its "ruff" quickly. Look at the ebird checklist below for a photo
and link to video.

WHITE IBIS -- imm. flyover at Broadkill with Glossy Ibis at dusk

WILSON's PHALAROPES also continue at Broadkill. The AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS
are still at Fowler. Other seasonally uncommon species seen on the refuge
included: STILT SANDPIPER, RED KNOT, AMERICAN WIGEON, BONAPARTE'S and
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL.

A full checklist of refuge highlights with photos and location details is
included at the link below:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24054679

A brief after-dark visit to Big Stone Beach Road had several of Eastern
Whip-poor-will and Chuck-wills-widow as well as calling Virginia Rail.

-- 
Alan Kneidel
M.S. Candidate, Natural Resources
Delaware State University
980-254-2706
Subject: Evening Heron Survey Report
From: "Bennett, Chris (DNREC)" <Chris.Bennett AT STATE.DE.US>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:02:20 +0000
I was joined last night by 10 volunteers to conduct the fifth evening survey of 
the 2015 season in Delaware City. Conditions were perfect with mild 
temperatures, a light wind all evening (keeping the bugs mostly absent) and 
excellent viewing conditions. Birds were actively traveling to and from the 
heronry from start to end. We ended up with 2514 birds recorded. This is the 
second highest total for a June survey - only surpassed by the 2588 birds 
recorded during the 2004 survey. Individual totals for six of the eight species 
observed were above the average and median for the 10 previous June surveys. 
The two species that were below the average and median were Snowy Egret and 
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron. They were only slightly below those two measures. 
We did not record a Tricolored Heron during the survey, but it has only been 
recorded on one June survey in the past, in 2011. We did see a single Green 
Heron heading into the heronry during the survey. Other birds seen during the 
survey included Caspian Tern, Osprey and Bald Eagle (we didn't really have much 
time to look for other birds). Thank you to Jean Woods, Anthony Gonzon, Joel 
Martin, Mike Hudson, Jerald Reb, Sally O'Byrne, Sheila Smith, Andrew Albright, 
Jeff and Liz Gordon for their invaluable assistance. 


The totals are listed below.

Species To/From:Total - Mean/Median 


Great Blue Heron                             107/76:183 - 151.4/142
Little Blue Heron                              415/6:421 - 300.4/218.5
Great Egret                                         372/17:389 - 318.2/247
Cattle Egret                                        547/33:580 - 478.7/476
Snowy Egret                                       87/6:93 - 102.5/94.5
Black-crowned Night-Heron        49/122:171 - 141.7/154
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron     1/0:1 - 5.9/4
Glossy Ibis                                           625/30:655 - 352.7/270.5
Unidentified White Heron           19/0:19 - 55.5/35.5
Unidentified Heron                         2/0:2 - 1.3/0
Total 2224/290:2514 - 1846.5/1761 


The next survey will be conducted on Wednesday, 29 July from 6:18 pm to 8:48 
pm. 



Chris Bennett
Natural Resource Planner
Environmental Stewardship Program
Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation
152 South State Street
Dover, DE 19901
Phone: (302) 739-9230
Fax: (302) 739-6967
"The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What 
good is it?'" 

 Aldo Leopold A Sand County Almanac 

Subject: White Clay Creek this mornng
From: Maurice Barnhill <mvb AT UDEL.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 10:57:09 -0400
I walked around this morning in the area of the White Clay Creek Nature 
Center and separately at the upstream pedestrian bridge, going north 
along the trail on the east side. Activity was good, and at one point I 
heard a Yellow-billed Cuckoo.  The best bird was a *perched* Red-tailed 
Hawk being pestered by a Northern Oriole.

OK, not so surprising.  My real reason for posting is to tell the many 
friends of mine on the list that I was using a pair of hearing aids I 
got yesterday, and I could finally hear birds all over the place.  I 
doubt I will be able to hear anything similar to a Cape May Warbler, 
etc., but in the future my not mentioning a bird you should normally 
hear will  most likely mean, finally, that it wasn't talking.  To 
misquote Robert Frost,

The woods were lovely, dark, and deep,
And I heard almost ev'ry cheep.

Maurice Barnhill
Newark, DE
mvb AT udel.edu
Subject: June Challenge Storm-Petrel in Kent County
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 09:58:09 -0400
We have entered the last week of the June Challenge - Delaware Big June -
and Sussex County is producing a bunch of great birds.  I hope all
participants are having doing well and amassing sizeable lists.  It has
been a real "challenge" in Kent this year - though I have not been out
birding as much as I have in the past.  I'm hoping to make up for that a
bit this last week.

Yesterday afternoon after a day of training at Killens Pond State Park
(where I heard but did not see Yellow-billed Cuckoo and White-breasted
Nuthatch) I headed over to Mispillion Harbor for another attempt to add
WIlson's Storm-Petrel.  I spent a little over 30 minutes scanning the bay
and was rewarded with a single Storm-Petrel shearing over the bay north of
the inlet (comfortably in Kent County) just before I was ready to pack it
in.  Prior to spotting the WISP I found two first-cycle Lesser Black-backed
Gulls among the throngs of Herring, Great Black-backed, Ring-billed and
Laughing Gulls on the Kent side of the harbor.  I also had Forster's,
Least, Common and Royal Terns.

Chris Bennett
MIlford, DE
Subject: Re: Ruff at Prime Hook NWR
From: Tim Schreckengost <timschreckengost AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 19:14:46 -0400
Birders,

Vince Gambal reports that the Ruff is still present and is associating with
four Wilson's Phalaropes at Broadkill Marsh. The Ruff is at the east end of
the north impoundment.

Reported via the DE RBA text alert.

Good birding,
Tim Schreckengost
Elkton, MD

On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 11:40 AM, John Hoyt  wrote:

> > Yesterday Sue Gruver and I were birding along Broadkill Beach Road and
> via a scope thought we were seeing the Wilson’s Phalarope. It was a long
> way off… However, after looking at some photos that I took “for the heck 
of 

> it”, extreme crops show it was a Ruff.
>
> I will post the photos to the Delaware Birding Facebook group.
>
> John Hoyt
> Lewes, DE
>
> Sent from my iPad




--
Subject: ADMIN: Unsubscribing
From: James Tyler Bell <00000085b810a3aa-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:40:24 +0000
If anyone wants to be removed from DE-Birds, you should refer to the Welcome 
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Tyler Bell
DE-Birds Listowner
Subject: Mailing List
From: Jim Hay <jamesvhay AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:19:51 +0000
Immediately, please delete my name from the mailing list.

Thank you
Subject: Ruff at Prime Hook NWR
From: John Hoyt <jhoyt.webmail AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 11:40:50 -0400
> Yesterday Sue Gruver and I were birding along Broadkill Beach Road and via a 
scope thought we were seeing the Wilson’s Phalarope. It was a long way off… 
However, after looking at some photos that I took “for the heck of it”, 
extreme crops show it was a Ruff. 


I will post the photos to the Delaware Birding Facebook group. 

John Hoyt
Lewes, DE

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Evening Heron Survey
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 22:25:50 -0400
This Wednesday is the last for the month of June, and that can only mean
one thing - Evening Heron Survey in Delaware City.  The survey is conducted
from Battery Park at the end of Clinton Street.  The survey begins at 6:33
pm and ends at 9:03 pm.  Plese come out and join us.

Chris Bennett
Milford,DE
Subject: Mailing List
From: Neil Christner <fairhill AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 17:30:16 -0400
Please take me off of "de-birds" mailing list.

Thank You

Neil Christner
Subject: BIRD CONSERVATION ACTION ALERT - HB178 Community Cats
From: Matthew Sarver <matt AT MATTHEWSARVER.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:02:47 -0400
Folks,

A bill may very soon come up for vote in the Delaware Legislature that
could have long-term and far-reaching negative impacts on bird conservation
in the First State.

House Bill 178, sponsored by Rep.'s Mulrooney, Keeley and Lynn, and Sen.
McBride, has apparently passed out of committee and may come to the floor
for a vote soon.

The language of the Bill is very alarming to say the least, in that makes
it illegal to kill free-ranging cats of unknown ownership, including
so-called "community cats", ear-marked, neutered cats that have been
released via TNR programs. Importantly, the Bill does not place any limits
on where such "community cat" colonies can be located, leaving open the
possibility that an activist group may "adopt" a cat colony on state or
private land, thereby making those cats "community cats" and tying the
hands of the landowner or management agency to then remove the animals. The
Bill would also make it illegal for an individual conservation landowner to
humanely dispose of cats on their land.

Furthermore, this bill requires shelters to return healthy cats "to the
wild" rather than euthanize, with obvious effects on free-roaming cat
populations in the state.

HB 178 is very problematic from a native wildlife perspective, and it would
set an alarming precedent for native wildlife conservation if it passes as
written.  I know this is an emotional issue for many, but we need to
preserve the ability for public and private NGO land managers and
conservation landowners to effectively and efficiently deal with
non-native, invasive species, including cats, on their lands, for the sake
of native mammal and bird conservation.

Please contact the Bill's sponsors and your state legislator and share your
opinion of HB 178 and its impacts on native wildlife. You can find the
contact information for your here:


http://legis.delaware.gov/legislature.nsf/FSMain?OpenFrameset&Frame=right&src=/legislature.nsf/lookup/know_your_legislators 


You can view the text of the Bill here:

http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis148.nsf/vwLegislation/HB+178/$file/legis.html?open 



Thanks,
-Matt

Matt Sarver
Chair, DOS Conservation Committee
6 Walnut Ridge Rd
Greenville, DE 19807
724-689-5845
matt AT matthewsarver.com
Subject: Re: Great crested flycatcher!
From: Meghann <spyturtle008 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 15:26:25 -0400
I wonder if there's a bit of a population boom for these guys in the area
this year -- I don't recall having had them as a 'yard bird' before this
season, and had 3-4 being territorial earlier this spring all in view (and
earshot) at the same time in Hockessin.  Just last week, we had one that
came to our deck to perch and preen near our hummingbird feeder.

Good birding,
Meghann Matwichuk

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 3:11 PM, Lydia Robb  wrote:

> I am delightfully astonished to have just seen an undeniable great crested
> flycatcher in my City of Wilmington neighborhood (Concord-Baynard area) on
> a wire in my back yard. It even squawked-squeaked to confirm. Of course it
> flew before I could grab the camera.
> Lydia Robb
Subject: Great crested flycatcher!
From: Lydia Robb <birdinglydia AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 15:11:11 -0400
I am delightfully astonished to have just seen an undeniable great crested 
flycatcher in my City of Wilmington neighborhood (Concord-Baynard area) on a 
wire in my back yard. It even squawked-squeaked to confirm. Of course it flew 
before I could grab the camera. 

Lydia Robb