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Updated on Thursday, August 21 at 04:15 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Iberian Woodpecker,©BirdQuest

21 Aug RFI Caddo Parish Winter Birding [aidan place ]
21 Aug LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #1 ["Johnson, Erik" ]
20 Aug Re: strategies for finding shorebirds around New Orleans [Ed Wallace ]
20 Aug Re: strategies for finding shorebirds around New Orleans [Chris Johnston ]
20 Aug Central Louisiana Birding & Wildlife blog, details on Cameron trip [Jonathan Clark ]
20 Aug Pomarine Jaeger - Breton Sound ["James W. Beck" ]
20 Aug strategies for finding shorebirds around New Orleans [Peter H Yaukey ]
18 Aug 2013-2014 Winter Hummingbirds Report [Kevin Morgan ]
18 Aug location report [Bill Fontenot ]
17 Aug Grand Isle Saturday [David Muth ]
17 Aug Blue Grosbeaks moving [John Dillon ]
16 Aug Early Canada Warbler, first for Livingston Parish [Jane Patterson ]
16 Aug Swallow-tailed Kite [Beth Maniscalco ]
16 Aug Cameron Parish 8/14/14 [Jonathan Clark ]
15 Aug Re: Any Recent Black-whiskered Vireo Sightings at City Park NOLA? [Missy Bowen ]
15 Aug Any Recent Black-whiskered Vireo Sightings at City Park NOLA? [Bryan Lenz ]
15 Aug Bobwhite/Pelican Roads and vicinity, Aug 15, 2014 [Michael Musumeche ]
14 Aug Re: Kites in SE Baton Rouge [Paul Ory ]
14 Aug Re: A Talented Hummingbird [Bill Wood ]
14 Aug A Talented Hummingbird [thomas finnie ]
13 Aug Contacting Curt Sorrells [David Muth ]
13 Aug Re: Kites in SE Baton Rouge [Russ Norwood ]
13 Aug Kites in SE Baton Rouge [Russ Norwood ]
12 Aug Re: Birding Vermilion Parish, help with an ID and eBird etiquette ["Steven W. Cardiff" ]
12 Aug Yellow warbler [janine robin ]
11 Aug Birding Vermilion Parish, help with an ID and eBird etiquette [Jody Shugart ]
11 Aug LOS Fall Meeting, October 24-25 [JOELLE FINLEY ]
11 Aug Email Distribution [Brad Price ]
10 Aug FWDU Bayou Sauvage NWR [David Muth ]
9 Aug Re: ducks in August [Paul Dickson ]
9 Aug Re: ducks in August [Jay V Huner ]
9 Aug ducks in August [Paul Dickson ]
8 Aug Re: RRNWR Bayou Pierre Unit, Yates Tract/ Red River Par- FNI for Alder Flycatcher- 5, 3 GADW 08/08/14 [Terry Davis ]
8 Aug RRNWR Bayou Pierre Unit, Yates Tract/ Red River Par- FNI for Alder Flycatcher- 5, 3 GADW 08/08/14 [Terry Davis ]
7 Aug Phooey - Geography ! - Desoto Parish, LA Birding - Oak Ridge Park and Converse Bay, 8-7-14 [Jay V Huner ]
7 Aug Desoto Parish, LA Birding - Oak Ridge Park and Converse Bay, 8-7-14 [Jay V Huner ]
5 Aug Canvasback, Willet, 4300 shorebirds, etc., St. Landry Par., 5 Aug. ["James V. Remsen, Jr." ]
4 Aug a couple of decent finds in New Orleans East [Marybeth Lima ]
4 Aug MAPS report ["Henry, Donata R" ]
4 Aug Mouton Cove and vicinity, Aug 4, 2014 [Michael Musumeche ]
3 Aug RRNWR Headquarters Unit- 08/03/14 FOF Alder Flycatcher [Terry Davis ]
3 Aug Re: BWVI IN Couturie [David Muth ]
3 Aug BWVI IN Couturie [David Muth ]
2 Aug Black Terns at Cotile Lake - Rapides Parish [Jay V Huner ]
2 Aug Re: Shreveport Bird Study group shorebird outing to RRNWR Bayou Pierre/ Yates tract [Rosemary Seidler ]
2 Aug Shreveport Bird Study group shorebird outing to RRNWR Bayou Pierre/ Yates tract [Terry Davis ]
2 Aug Re: Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird ["Johnson, Erik" ]
2 Aug Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird ["H. Putnam" ]
2 Aug Shiny cowbird Batou Sauvage NWR [David Muth ]
2 Aug Re: Black-whiskered Vireo [Ed Wallace ]
2 Aug Black&white warbler in backyard [janine robin ]
2 Aug Black whiskered Vireo [Elizabeth Wiggins ]
2 Aug Re: Black-whiskered Vireo [Clairedthomas ]
1 Aug Fwd: eBird Report - City Park--Couturie Forest, Aug 1, 2014-Black-whiskered Vireo [Claire Thomas ]
1 Aug Black-whiskered Vireo [Clairedthomas ]
1 Aug Re: Yellow-billed Cuckoo ["Driscoll, Melanie" ]
1 Aug Re: Yellow-billed Cuckoo [Bill Fontenot ]
1 Aug Yellow-billed Cuckoo [Claire Thomas ]
30 Jul Swallow-tailed Kite, American Woodcock, Wading Birds and Shorebirds [Jay V Huner ]
30 Jul Fwd: Ornithology in South Western Louisiana [Robb Brumfield ]
29 Jul Visitor looking for birdwatching guide [Delaina LeBlanc ]
28 Jul Mouton Cove and vicinity, Jul 28, 2014 [Michael Musumeche ]
28 Jul Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: eBird Report - Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Jul 27, 2014 [Charles Lyon ]
28 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Jul 27, 2014 [Charles Lyon ]
27 Jul Re: 6000+ shorebirds, 3000+ herons etc., St. Landry Par. 7-27 [Jay V Huner ]
27 Jul 6000+ shorebirds, 3000+ herons etc., St. Landry Par. 7-27 ["James V. Remsen, Jr." ]
26 Jul RRNWR Headquarters Unit/ Bossier Par. 07-26-14- 2 LEFL [Terry Davis ]
26 Jul New Orleans Black-whiskered Vireo- maybe [Peter H Yaukey ]
25 Jul Re: Question about Northern Wheatear Records [Nancy Newfield ]
25 Jul Re: Question about Northern Wheatear Records ["James V. Remsen, Jr." ]
25 Jul Re: Question about Northern Wheatear Records [Nancy Newfield ]
24 Jul Catahoula NWR, 7/23/14, two units [Jonathan Clark ]
23 Jul Urgent! Help & favor (Helena Putnam) [Helena Putnam ]
21 Jul Red Phalarope on Ms./La. border [Eric Liffmann ]
19 Jul Elm Grove area, 04/19/14 Fof Bank Swallow, Blue-winged Teal [Terry Davis ]
18 Jul Caracara - facepalm [John Dillon ]

Subject: RFI Caddo Parish Winter Birding
From: aidan place <placea AT WINCHESTERTHURSTON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 16:39:17 -0400
Hello all.
I will be in Shreveport this December to visit relatives and was trying to
find some good places to go birding. I am specifically interesting in
finding Sprague's pipit, Smith's longspur, sedge wren, and Le Conte's
sparrow. Looking on eBird and there seemed to be a lot of reports of many
of these birds (especially Sprague's pipit and Smith's longspur) from the
Shreveport airport. So I was wondering, are the areas of the airport that
hold these birds open to the public? If not are there any other areas that
people recommend for finding these birds. A reply off of the list would be
fine.
Thanks,
Aidan Place
Subject: LA Western Winter Hummingbird Report #1
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:00:29 +0000
Louisiana birders,

The first western "winter" hummingbirds have arrived!! Keep a sharp eye out for 
non-Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and please report your western winter hummer 
observations to me (ejohnson AT Audubon.org), LAbird, or HUMNET for recording 
in our weekly report and database, providing the following information: 


Please continue to report winter hummingbirds to me for including in the 
western winter hummingbird database. 

- Your name
- Your address (town only is acceptable)
- First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed) 

- Species
- Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
- Sex (Male, female, unknown)
- Whether banded, when and by whom.

If additional information is learned through further observation or banding or 
if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll make 
the changes. 


Happy hummingbirding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

THIS IS THE FIRST LOUISIANA WESTERN WINTER HUMMINGBIRD REPORT FOR THE 2014-2015 
SEASON. 


1.Janelle Bergeron, Thibodaux, LA (Lafourche)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/11/2014 (Banded on left leg) 


2.Robb Brumfield, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/15/2014

3.Beth Erwin, Collinston, LA (Morehouse)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/12/2014

4.Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA (Lafayette)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/18/2014

5.Russ & Lisa Norwood, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/13/2014

6.Helen & Mike Putnam, Basile, LA (Evangeline)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/1/2014 LO 8/2/2014

7.Linda Stewart, Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge)
     #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  M  FO 8/16/2014

8.Noel Venezia, Slidell, LA (St. Tammany)
 #1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 8/3/2014 ("Ms. Pink"; first 
banded by LB 11/26/2006) 

     #2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous)  Ad  F  FO 8/4/2014 (banded)
________________________________
Summary of Reports as of 8/21/2014

Selasphorus Rufous/Allens
   9 reports
   6 parishes
   8 sites
--Identified Rufous
   9 reports
   6 parishes
   8 sites
________________________________
SELASPHORUS RUFOUS/ALLENS

East Baton Rouge Parish:  3 reports  3 sites

1. Russ & Lisa Norwood, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/13/2014

2. Robb Brumfield, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/15/2014

3. Linda Stewart, Baton Rouge, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/16/2014

Evangeline Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Helen & Mike Putnam, Basile, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/1/2014  LO 8/2/2014

Lafayette Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Rose and Jack Must, Lafayette, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/18/2014

Lafourche Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Janelle Bergeron, Thibodaux, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad M FO 8/11/2014 (Banded on left leg) 


Morehouse Parish:  1 report  1 site

1. Beth Erwin, Collinston, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  M  FO 8/12/2014

St. Tammany Parish:  2 reports  1 site

1. Noel Venezia, Slidell, LA
#1 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens (Rufous) Ad F FO 8/3/2014 ("Ms. Pink"; first 
banded by LB 11/26/2006) 

#2 Selasphorus Rufous/Allens  (Rufous) Ad  F  FO 8/4/2014  (banded)
________________________________
Subject: Re: strategies for finding shorebirds around New Orleans
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:03:09 -0500
Other locatons I have found shorebirds in New Orleans are:
* the boat ramp near Fort Pike - this area had very good diversity during the 
Spring. * at the pool at the end of Industrial Parkway - I had found a 
phalerope there in May* when the river is down, I have seen good numbers of 
peeps on the sandbars in Lower Coast Algiers and at the Fly* I can't remember 
the name of the park, but it overlooks a pond in the Lower Ninth Ward. I have 
seen peeps and spotted sandpipers. 


> Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 16:53:52 -0500
> From: cmjohnston AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] strategies for finding shorebirds around New Orleans
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> 
> I have found some in the ponds and marshes at the end of Recovery One Rd
> (across the street from Bayou Sauvage). It's quite a hike though to get
> back there.
> 
> 
> 
> *Christopher Johnston - PhotographerChrisJohnstonPhotography.com
> 
* 

> *504-388-6865*
> 
 

> * Mobile*
> [image: Flickr]
> 
 

> [image:
> 500px]
> 
 

> [image:
> Facebook Page]
> 
 

> [image:
> Instagram]
> 
 

> [image:
> LinkedIn]
> 
 

> [image:
> Twitter]
> 
 

>   Get a signature like this.
> 
 

> CLICK
> HERE.
> 
 

> 
> 
> 
> On Wed, Aug 20, 2014 at 10:09 AM, Peter H Yaukey  wrote:
> 
> > I just posted a blog entry summarizing ways/places to find shorebirds
> > around New Orleans, for anyone interested.
> >
> > Not a lot of hot shorebirding here right now, but it provides an overview
> > of the normal prospects.
> >
> > birdingneworleans.blogspot.com
> >
> > Peter Yaukey
> >
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: strategies for finding shorebirds around New Orleans
From: Chris Johnston <cmjohnston AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 16:53:52 -0500
I have found some in the ponds and marshes at the end of Recovery One Rd
(across the street from Bayou Sauvage). It's quite a hike though to get
back there.



*Christopher Johnston - PhotographerChrisJohnstonPhotography.com

* 

*504-388-6865*

 

* Mobile*
[image: Flickr]

 

[image:
500px]

 

[image:
Facebook Page]

 

[image:
Instagram]

 

[image:
LinkedIn]

 

[image:
Twitter]

 

  Get a signature like this.

 

CLICK
HERE.

 




On Wed, Aug 20, 2014 at 10:09 AM, Peter H Yaukey  wrote:

> I just posted a blog entry summarizing ways/places to find shorebirds
> around New Orleans, for anyone interested.
>
> Not a lot of hot shorebirding here right now, but it provides an overview
> of the normal prospects.
>
> birdingneworleans.blogspot.com
>
> Peter Yaukey
>
Subject: Central Louisiana Birding & Wildlife blog, details on Cameron trip
From: Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 12:54:23 -0700
labirders,

   A few weeks ago I started a blog that I plan to focus on birding and
other wildlife-related topics in the central part of Louisiana (Cenla).
Even though its not Cenla, I included a fairly detailed post on our recent
trip to Cameron, including a decent assortment of photos from the day.
Well, I couldn't resist; its Cameron. haha.  Also, some of my recent
Catahoula NWR trips are covered on their own posts and an introductory post
that might be worth a look.
   If you're interested, here's a link to the blog.
http://falloutbird2014.blogspot.com/

   There's only five posts so far, but more are coming soon. Thanks, and I
hope you enjoy if you do choose to check it out!

Jonathan Clark
Jena, Louisiana
Subject: Pomarine Jaeger - Breton Sound
From: "James W. Beck" <carpodectes AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 10:33:21 -0500
About 1/2 hour into our marine mammal / sea turtle survey aboard the
seismic vessel yesterday evening, I had a dark morph adult Pomarine Jaeger
that followed the boat briefly before flying directly overhead and
continued heading further out into the Gulf.  I have the exact GPS
coordinates from where it was, but left them on the boat.....working 6 p.m.
until 9 a.m. will do that to ya...

Otherwise, general estimated numbers for other species are as follows (only
from Breton Sound):

Magnificent Frigatebird  3 (1 male, 2 females)
Double-crested Cormorant  75
Brown Pelican  435
Laughing Gull  290
Gull-billed Tern  3
Caspian Tern  20
Black Tern  500
Forster's Tern  3
Royal Tern  40
Sandwich Tern  80
Black Skimmer  5
Barn Swallow  7
-----------
Species along the channel and cut:

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  12
Double-crested Cormorant  55
Brown Pelican  390
White Ibis  75
Black-crowned Night-Heron  4
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  2
Great Blue Heron  1
Great Egret  11
Snowy Egret  7
Tricolored Heron  3
Least Bittern  1
Laughing Gull  275
Caspian Tern  6
Black Tern  175
Forster's Tern  6
Royal Tern  55
Sandwich Tern  25
Black Skimmer  3
Mourning Dove  1
Eurasian Collared-Dove  6
Rock Pigeon  3
Barn Swallow  3
European Starling  3
Yellow Warbler  1
Boat-tailed Grackle  50
-j

-- 
--------

James W. Beck
Environmental Specialist
SWCA Baton Rouge Field Office
5745 Essen Lane, Suite 105
Baton Rouge, LA 70810
(225) 663-3830
(225) 663- 3831 [fax]
www.swca.com
jbeck AT swca.com
carpodectes AT gmail.com
Subject: strategies for finding shorebirds around New Orleans
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey AT UNO.EDU>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 15:09:24 +0000
I just posted a blog entry summarizing ways/places to find shorebirds around 
New Orleans, for anyone interested. 


Not a lot of hot shorebirding here right now, but it provides an overview of 
the normal prospects. 


birdingneworleans.blogspot.com

Peter Yaukey
Subject: 2013-2014 Winter Hummingbirds Report
From: Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:59:58 -0500
Howdy LABIRD and HUMNET folk:

We've put the final polish on our 2013-2014 Louisiana Winter Hummingbird
Project report (just in time for the new arrivals for the 2014-2015
season!). The report is posted to Nancy Newfield's website on the Winter
Hummingbird Project page (http://www.casacolibri.net/winterbanding.asp)
along with the last few years' reports, or you can link directly to the
report at
http://www.casacolibri.net/publications/LA-Winter_Hummingbird_Report_2013-20
14.pdf.

Thanks to all who made the report possible - the scores of hosts, the
banders, the assistants, and everyone else who is helping expand our
knowledge of this remarkable phenomenon.

Kevin Morgan
Baton Rouge, LA
Subject: location report
From: Bill Fontenot <natrldlite AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:24:39 +0000
our rain gauge tube was warm & sweaty when I pulled on it to empty it this 
morning……and that sort of sums up the type of summer we’ve had here in 
northern Lafayette parish -- warm & sweaty…………..which is better than 
hot & sweaty……………the 0.45” of rain we had yesterday represented the 
22nd rain event of this summer, giving us a total of 18.00” thus far; about 
8.00” above normal………………as david muth earlier commented re: the 
live oak woods at grand isle, our own woods here north of Lafayette have never 
looked more lush here at the end of the growing season (n=32 
summers)………the extra moisture combined with many heat-mitigating overcast 
days -- not to mention the passage of at least 5 “cool” fronts -- have 
encouraged additional growth and spared us the stifling hot temps (>92F) that 
normally predominate our summer days…………… 




looks like the local birds have responded accordingly as well…………on the 
morning of 16 aug I observed an adult female cardinal escorting a recently 
fledged bird to the main seed feeder and then bringing black-oil sunflower seed 
to it on 3 separate occasions (as if to say, “here…this is good…..take ye 
and eat……and quit buggin’ me……”)………which got me wondering how 
many cardinal broods went off here during the summer…..2?…..3? 



we were loaded down with ruby-throats as well…………using professor 
Remsen's(?) 1 feeder ounce per bird per day formula, it looks like we peaked at 
about 32 local birds at the end of july……..presently it appears as if those 
birds have departed and have been replaced (as of the last puff of temperate 
air last week) by (scrawnier-looking) migrants……probably of the 
short-distance variety……. 



other probable short-distance migrants coursing through the yard late last week 
included ReVi, WeVi, gnatcatchers, NoPa (probable HY female), and Prothonatary 
(looked like an adult male)…..the warblers came right down into the shrubs 
around the deck, but were quickly run off by scruffy/delinquent HY 
CaWrens………… 



so things are moving and fall migration is in the air…………..


bill Fontenot

lower prairie basse

upper Lafayette parish, LA
Subject: Grand Isle Saturday
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 23:52:08 +0000
Labird:

Phillip Wallace and I birded the woods, the Exxon Fields and made one stop on 
the beach Saturday. The woods were very quiet, missing even local breeders, and 
there were no non-warbler migrants to speak of. But somehow we managed to eke 
out ten species of warbler, including two Canadas, always welcome in southeast 
Louisiana. 


The only surprises included a Red-shouldered Hawk adult over the woods. 
Red-shouldered does not breed anywhere near Grand Isle, and while occasional 
late fall migrants occur (usually immatures), and some even winter, I did not 
expect a mid-August adult. The other oddity was a Least Bittern in the cooling 
pond marsh fringe just east of the Exxon fields. 


The woods are in exceptional state-though dry, it is obvious that they have had 
just the right amount of rainfall this growing season as they are lush, showing 
none of the stress they often show by late summer. 


The patch of native Canna Lily, Canna flacida, in the front of the Grilletta 
Track looks like it is on steroids, and it is full of Brazilian Skippers, a 
canna specialist. 


While walking ahead of me through Griletta Phillip flushed a dragonfly from its 
hanging perch in a dark thicket. It was not at all familiar to me in color and 
behavior (not that I know dragonflies, but I'm trying to learn) so I pointed it 
out to Phillip, who got good photos, and later we found another in better 
light. Phillip matched up his photos with Phantom Darner, a species from 
Florida and the southeast Atlantic coast. As far as we know, the closest 
previous record to Louisiana is Mobile. 


All of which might give you a sense of how slow the birding was.

David Muth
New Orleans
Subject: Blue Grosbeaks moving
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 09:45:29 -0500
Working in the backyard this morning and saw half a dozen migrating Orchard 
Oriole, so I decided to take a break and grab my bins. Ended up having at least 
18 Blue Grosbeak moving through my rural yard, possibly 21 or more. 2 were 
adult males, and all others looked like they were from this year's crop. 
Flagged in eBird and rightly so; 18 in 1 spot in mid-August doesn't happen 
often around here. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Early Canada Warbler, first for Livingston Parish
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 19:54:59 -0500
As far as I can tell, the Canada Warbler I found today while kayaking on
Bayou Barbary in Livingston Parish is early and is also a first for
Livingston Parish.  I'm sure it's a function of lack of detection, there's
lots of opportunity for warbler migrants and not a lot of access.  Bayou
Barbary is on highway 444 near Frost, LA.  There's a private landing
(accessed for a fee) that gives one access to the bayou which also leads to
the Amite River.

Otherwise a nice morning but a very slow bird day...

Full checklist here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S19489585

--Jane Patterson
Baton Rouge
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
From: Beth Maniscalco <beth.maniscalco AT NICHOLLS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 14:02:19 -0500
Single SWKI observed 1:45 pm over the West Thibodaux By-Pass Road (LA 3185)
juncture with LA.

Always a thrilling sight!

Beth Maniscalco
Thibodaux, LA
(approx. 60 miles SW of New Orleans)
Subject: Cameron Parish 8/14/14
From: Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 11:39:30 -0700
labirders,

   Jay Huner, Tom Pollock and I made a run down to Cameron Parish the day
before yesterday (8/14/14). Though it wasn't the most exciting time of year
to get out there, there's still plenty of birdy goodness to make it worth
the ride.
   Highlights include...

Two Least Bitterns; one a flyover on hwy 27 and the other a couple of miles
further down the road at the Sabine NWR wetland walkway.

Snowy Plover on the beach at Holly Beach.

Reddish Egrets on the beach west of Holly Beach and again at the East Jetty
Park.

An Olive-sided Flycatcher at Peveto Woods. Thanks to Dave Patton for
guiding us to the Olive which he'd located earlier. He also mentioned the
presence of "Trail's" Flycatchers and Yellow Warbler earlier in the day,
neither of which we managed to locate when we were there around midday.

Nice photo ops with families of Fulvous Whistling-Ducks, Common and Purple
Gallinules at Pintail Loop was really nice as well.

What must have been more than one family group of Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
together on Chalkley Rd between hwy 27 and Arceneaux Road.

A complete list of species parish-wide is below. When I get the lists for
the individual sections submitted on ebird I'll share the links on here for
those who are interested.

Fulvous Whistling-Duck
Mottled Duck

Pied-billed Grebe

Wood Stork

Neotropic Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant
Anhinga
Brown Pelican

Least Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Reddish Egret
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
White Ibis
pleg. sp.
Roseate Spoonbill

Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture

Clapper Rail
Purple Gallinule
Common Gallinule
American Coot

Black-necked Stilt
Snowy Plover
Wilson's Plover
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Willet
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling

Laughing Gull
Herring Gull
Least Tern
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern

Eurasian Collared-Dove
Inca Dove
White-winged Dove
Mourning Dove

Common Nighthawk

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker

Olive-sided Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Loggerhead Shrike

Blue Jay
Fish Crow
crow sp.

Purple Martin
Barn Swallow

Marsh Wren

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Northern Mockingbird

European Starling

Common Yellowthroat

Northern Cardinal
Painted Bunting

Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle
Great-tailed Grackle
Orchard Oriole

House Sparrow

I had hoped to post something like this sooner, but I wanted to include
links to some of the pics. Well, its a long story as to why, but I won't be
able to upload the pics to a computer until at least tonight or tomorrow,
sooo...maybe links to them when I post links to complete ebird lists
breaking down the parish list by area. Also am likely to spot a thing or
two in need of correction in the process. Hope this piques someone's
interest in getting out to  Cameron in the "off season". Still a heck of a
lot to see down in Cameron P., at least from my point of view up here in
Cenla.

Also, other wildlife included Blanchard's Cricket Frog, Pig Frog, Six-lined
Racerunner, American Alligator, Pond Slider, Swamp Rabbit, dolphin sp. and
porpoise sp. I think I got them all without looking back at notes.

Some birds of interest noted along the route to and from Cameron
Parish include flyover Black-bellied Whistling Ducks north of Fenton on hwy
165, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on hwy 1200 in Rapides Parish between I-49
and Cotile Lake, and flyover Wood Stork flock on hwy 121 in Rapides Parish
between I-49 and Cotile Lake.

Happy Birding!
Jonathan Clark
Jena, Louisiana
Subject: Re: Any Recent Black-whiskered Vireo Sightings at City Park NOLA?
From: Missy Bowen <mbowen2 AT UNO.EDU>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 19:17:06 +0000
Joan Garvey and I got skunked last Sunday morning 7:30 - 9:30.

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bryan Lenz 

Sent: Friday, August 15, 2014 2:16 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Any Recent Black-whiskered Vireo Sightings at City Park 
NOLA? 


It may be that the birds are gone, but I am going to make another attempt this 
weekend. 


Has anyone seen them recently?

Thanks.

Bryan


Bryan Lenz, Ph.D.
Subject: Any Recent Black-whiskered Vireo Sightings at City Park NOLA?
From: Bryan Lenz <bblenz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 14:15:46 -0500
It may be that the birds are gone, but I am going to make another attempt
this weekend.

Has anyone seen them recently?

Thanks.

Bryan


Bryan Lenz, Ph.D.
Subject: Bobwhite/Pelican Roads and vicinity, Aug 15, 2014
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 12:17:19 -0500
LaBirders,

This morning I birded an area new to me in Vermilion Parish. It is located a 
few miles southwest of the town of Erath, LA.  The habitat is primarily 
recently cut rice fields, marshy areas and scattered  wood lots.

Mike

Bobwhite/Pelican Roads and vicinity, Vermilion, US-LA
Aug 15, 2014 7:10 AM - 11:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
17.0 mile(s)
56 species (+2 other taxa)

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  18
Fulvous Whistling-Duck  12
Wood Duck  3
Mallard (Domestic type)  1
Neotropic Cormorant  36
Least Bittern  1
Great Blue Heron  5
Great Egret  44
Snowy Egret  76
Little Blue Heron  20
Tricolored Heron  28
Cattle Egret  170
Green Heron  15
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  5
White Ibis  178
White-faced Ibis  106
Turkey Vulture  4
Red-tailed Hawk  1
King Rail  3
Common Gallinule  2
Black-necked Stilt  34
Killdeer  11
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Solitary Sandpiper  4
Lesser Yellowlegs  19
Least Sandpiper  1
Pectoral Sandpiper  2
peep sp.  22
Laughing Gull  3
Eurasian Collared-Dove  2
Mourning Dove  15
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Eastern Kingbird  7
Loggerhead Shrike  4
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  8
Tree Swallow  6
Bank Swallow  24
Barn Swallow  75
Cliff Swallow  4
Carolina Wren  3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
Brown Thrasher  2
Northern Mockingbird  10
European Starling  140
Yellow Warbler  6
Northern Cardinal  15
Painted Bunting  1
Red-winged Blackbird  165
Eastern Meadowlark  4
Common Grackle  3
Boat-tailed Grackle  85
Great-tailed Grackle  10
Brown-headed Cowbird  5
Orchard Oriole  8
House Sparrow  21

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19476083

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net 
Subject: Re: Kites in SE Baton Rouge
From: Paul Ory <glennory AT SBCGLOBAL.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 22:04:36 -0500
There was a Mississippi Kite flying over downtown New Orleans, I saw it near
the corner of Girod and Loyola, last Friday.  I was 15 floors up so I had a
very good view.


-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Russ Norwood
Sent: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 4:52 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Kites in SE Baton Rouge

Oops.  Make that the day before yesterday.

 

From: Russ Norwood [mailto:russn71 AT cox.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 4:51 PM
To: 'LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU'
Subject: Kites in SE Baton Rouge

 

I saw my first swallowtail kite in Baton Rouge on Monday.  The bird swooped
surprisingly low directly over my street in Woodlawn Estates in SE Baton
Rouge yesterday afternoon.

 

On another note I've seen more Mississippi kites in this area this year than
I can ever recall.  I saw a group of 30-40 birds soaring near the
intersection of Tiger Bend Rd and Jefferson Hwy last week and a similar
sized group farther east down Jefferson Hwy the week before.  

 

Russ Norwood

 
Subject: Re: A Talented Hummingbird
From: Bill Wood <labirder11 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 02:53:28 -0500
thomas finnie  wrote:

>Labirders,
>
>Check out this talented Hummingbird recently at our sugar water feeder.
>
>http://tfinnie.blogspot.com/
>
>Best, :)
>Tom
Subject: A Talented Hummingbird
From: thomas finnie <finnie.tom AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 02:58:24 -0500
Labirders,

Check out this talented Hummingbird recently at our sugar water feeder.

http://tfinnie.blogspot.com/

Best, :)
Tom
Subject: Contacting Curt Sorrells
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 21:58:39 +0000
LABIRD:

Curt Sorrells is having computer problems and asks that if you need to contact 
him, please call him at 504-469-2225. 


Thanks,

David Muth
New Orleans
Subject: Re: Kites in SE Baton Rouge
From: Russ Norwood <russn71 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 16:52:24 -0500
Oops.  Make that the day before yesterday.

 

From: Russ Norwood [mailto:russn71 AT cox.net] 
Sent: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 4:51 PM
To: 'LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU'
Subject: Kites in SE Baton Rouge

 

I saw my first swallowtail kite in Baton Rouge on Monday.  The bird swooped
surprisingly low directly over my street in Woodlawn Estates in SE Baton
Rouge yesterday afternoon.

 

On another note I've seen more Mississippi kites in this area this year than
I can ever recall.  I saw a group of 30-40 birds soaring near the
intersection of Tiger Bend Rd and Jefferson Hwy last week and a similar
sized group farther east down Jefferson Hwy the week before.  

 

Russ Norwood

 
Subject: Kites in SE Baton Rouge
From: Russ Norwood <russn71 AT COX.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 16:50:58 -0500
I saw my first swallowtail kite in Baton Rouge on Monday.  The bird swooped
surprisingly low directly over my street in Woodlawn Estates in SE Baton
Rouge yesterday afternoon.

 

On another note I've seen more Mississippi kites in this area this year than
I can ever recall.  I saw a group of 30-40 birds soaring near the
intersection of Tiger Bend Rd and Jefferson Hwy last week and a similar
sized group farther east down Jefferson Hwy the week before.  

 

Russ Norwood

 
Subject: Re: Birding Vermilion Parish, help with an ID and eBird etiquette
From: "Steven W. Cardiff" <scardif AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 08:41:04 -0500
Jody- perhaps others have replied off- list, but...... I would go with 
female-plumages Painted Bunting. For sure it's not a goldfinch, because of bill 
shape, tail length, etc. 


Steve Cardiff

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 11, 2014, at 8:00 PM, Jody Shugart  wrote:

> I've been working south of Erath, LA since last week so I'm a little out of
> my area, but can someone help me with an ID?
> 
> I saw it at the corner of Hwy 668 and 331 while I was heading back to Don's
> Boat Landing to see if the smorgasbord of swallows from last week was still
> calling their power lines home (they weren't, at least not this evening).
> I was photographing some kingbirds and shrikes when I saw something yellow
> go from the side of the sugar cane field, to the power line to a tree row.
> 
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/ymuyqTxbjOkJzRt8aSXtWdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 

> The photo is in the sun so there are a few bright yellow spots that are
> just leaves, but I assure you, it had a yellow belly, a grayish wing and a
> greenish-yellow back.  I saw it in full shade and in the top of the tree.
> Some of my other pictures made it look like it could have a darkish cap.
> 
> It looks like it could be a goldfinch to me though the colors don't leave
> me feeling too confident.  The beak is too stubby to be a tanager, right?
> I went to post on eBird as "american goldfinch" and it came up as rare.
> What do you do if you have a photo of a bird you can't positively ID but
> comes up as rare.  Post it with a photo and all your observations and see
> what happens?  Maybe ask around until you've got a consensus?  Just don't
> post it?
> 
> thanks,
> 
> -- 
> Jody Shugart
> 985-237-5091 (cell)
Subject: Yellow warbler
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 07:07:25 -0500
Finally saw my backyard FOS yellow warbler at 6:45 this morning. It was
perched on the garden gate post for easy viewing, then joined in the feast
going on in our large pear tree. FOS last year was 8/3.
Janine Robin
Folsom
St Tammany parish
Subject: Birding Vermilion Parish, help with an ID and eBird etiquette
From: Jody Shugart <jodyshugart AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 20:00:34 -0500
I've been working south of Erath, LA since last week so I'm a little out of
my area, but can someone help me with an ID?

I saw it at the corner of Hwy 668 and 331 while I was heading back to Don's
Boat Landing to see if the smorgasbord of swallows from last week was still
calling their power lines home (they weren't, at least not this evening).
 I was photographing some kingbirds and shrikes when I saw something yellow
go from the side of the sugar cane field, to the power line to a tree row.


https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/ymuyqTxbjOkJzRt8aSXtWdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink 

The photo is in the sun so there are a few bright yellow spots that are
just leaves, but I assure you, it had a yellow belly, a grayish wing and a
greenish-yellow back.  I saw it in full shade and in the top of the tree.
 Some of my other pictures made it look like it could have a darkish cap.

It looks like it could be a goldfinch to me though the colors don't leave
me feeling too confident.  The beak is too stubby to be a tanager, right?
I went to post on eBird as "american goldfinch" and it came up as rare.
 What do you do if you have a photo of a bird you can't positively ID but
comes up as rare.  Post it with a photo and all your observations and see
what happens?  Maybe ask around until you've got a consensus?  Just don't
post it?

thanks,

-- 
Jody Shugart
985-237-5091 (cell)
Subject: LOS Fall Meeting, October 24-25
From: JOELLE FINLEY <joelle_finley AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 13:59:20 -0700
2014 LOS FALL MEETING
Friday and Saturday, October 24-25
Cameron
 
Please pre-register by October 17th
 
Friday Evening:  First Baptist Church in Cameron, 110 School
Street off of Marshall Street (the main street)
 
6 P.M.-7 P.M.  Registration: Light snacks will be
provided by the Cameron Parish Tourist Commission.
7 P.M.-8 P.M.  Meeting and Evening Program
 
New Guinea: Birds,
People and Natural Beauty
 
John Sevenair is
a retired chemistry professor from Xavier University in New Orleans who has
been an avid traveler/photographer/birder for most of his adult life.
Retirement has given John the opportunity to add to his life list of birds,
countries, mammals and more. He has traveled literally to the four corners of
the world! At this writing, John has not yet been to New Guinea but in October,
he will present his “up to the minute” report on what his travels revealed.
Just in case, we do have a fall back plan from one of his many slide shows!
Join us for a fun filled evening from the wilds of New Guinea. Will there be
any photos of Birds of Paradise? 
 
Saturday
 
7:00 A.M.  Field
Trip   Meet in the parking lot of the Cameron Motel. Ed
Wallace and Marty Floyd will lead a field trip to the Cameron Parish hot spots. 
Bring lunch, drinks, bug spray and 

walkie talkies if you have them. 
 
Saturday Evening: First Baptist
Church in Cameron, 110 School Street off of Marshall Street (the main street)
 
6:00 P.M.-6:30 P.M.
Registration 
6:30 P.M.-7:30 P.M.  Dinner- chicken/sausage gumbo dinner, potato
salad, bread, dessert
7:30 P.M. Meeting and
Evening Program  
 
Election of officers   
                                 
                                  
Program: Toucan-driven Seed Dispersal in Fragmented
Costa Rican Rainforest
 
Landon Jones is a
6th year PhD student in the Environmental and Evolutionary Biology
Program at ULL, advised by Dr. Paul Leberg. He received his BS and MS degrees
in 
Wildlife Conservation at Brigham Young University in Utah,
where he got hooked on birds and studied Ring-necked Pheasants. Landon
conducted his PhD fieldwork in Costa Rica, where he trapped and tracked two
species of toucans to estimate their contribution to seed dispersal in
fragmented habitats. Landon enjoys birding and traveling, and has studied and
observed birds in North and Central America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle 
East 

and Africa.
 
Cameron Accommodations:
The phone number for the Cameron Motel
is 337-775-5442. The Cameron Motel also has sites
available for RV campers.  Several lunch
places are open in Cameron and Johnson Bayou and gas is available. Bring your
own breakfast food. Other accommodations can be found in Sulphur or Lake
Charles. East Jetty also has camper spaces with hook-ups.
 
 
 
 
Please pre-register by October 17th!
 
 

********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************* 

Pre-registration Form
LOS 2014 Fall Meeting October 24-25
Cameron, LA
 
Name(s)_________________________________________________________________

Address: ________________________________________________________________
 
Email:__________________________________________________________________

Number registering for meeting _______ at $10.00/person= $_________ 
 
Number
registering for Saturday’s dinner________ AT  $15/person=$________

Membership Dues ____________ enclosed
 
Donation_____________________
 
Total
____________ enclosed


Please make check payable to LOS, and mail to: Judith
O’Neale,
504 Whitebark Drive, Lafayette LA 70508
jloneale AT aol.com

Subject: Email Distribution
From: Brad Price <bprice AT CERTAPRO.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 11:02:38 -0500
I want to stop any emails to this address.

Brad Price
Subject: FWDU Bayou Sauvage NWR
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 15:02:38 +0000
Pair with 4 ducklings at Madere Marsh boardwalk.

David Muth

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: ducks in August
From: Paul Dickson <Paul AT MORRISDICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 23:39:40 +0000
I could have said more clearly that I am referring to inland situations. 
Coastal marsh, bays and the Gulf do have a lot of summer holdovers. I am 
reporting what see in Northwest La. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 9, 2014, at 5:53 PM, "Jay V Huner"  wrote:
> 
> Friends,
> 
> Paul's learned explanation is much appreciated. The drake Mallard I found at 
the Richard-Smith Working Wetland back in late June persisted in the crawfish 
pond until it was drained in late July. At that time, it was obviously going 
through a molt and could "lift off" but flew with great difficulty. 

> 
> I had found what, I think were two pairs of Northern Shovelers, in the same 
area. [Never saw two drakes and two hens at the same time but there were 
apparently 4 shovelers in the crawfish pond.] By the time the fields were 
drained, the drakes were really "ratty looking" and presumably going trough a 
molt. 

> 
> Do crippled ducks recover? Well, back around 2002, my technician at the ULL 
Crawfish Research Center came to work one day in late November with something 
wrapped in a piece of paper towel. To call Will an avid duck hunter doesn't do 
him justice. Will had shot a hen Wood Duck over the weekend and, as I would 
have done, ate it! When he was eating one of the wings, he discovered a 
completely healed compound fracture of a wing. That was what he had to show me! 
The bird was flying normally. 

> 
> My guess is that Will's duck was an exception, not the rule. But, ducks can 
survive some pretty nasty wounds. 

> 
> Jay Huner
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Paul Dickson" 
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> Sent: Saturday, August 9, 2014 7:01:09 AM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] ducks in August
> 
> LABIRD: 'Northern' ducks seen while birding in summer in the south are an 
often mentioned anomaly. Discussion about these is often of injured vs. 
apparently healthy and of early fall migration. With a portion of most 
neo-tropical migrant species moving through in late summer it seems logical 
that ducks would occasionally do the same thing. Problem is, most ducks are not 
neo-tropical migrants. Blue-winged Teal and the whistling ducks are an 
exception and we are correct to call a Blue-winged Teal in August an early 
migrant. 

> Speculating with any confidence on the summer presence of the others however, 
is not so easy. It is true that some North American breeding waterfowl, 
particularly males, undergo post-breeding dispersal, often a migration of 
hundreds of miles. These migrations coincide with the onset of wing molt, and 
the 4 week period of flightlessness unique to ducks. These movements, are 
towards areas of low predator density and cooler water temperatures where 
dissolved oxygen is higher and thus food resources are higher in the protein 
needed to grow new feathers. This does not describe Louisiana. 

> Some years ago a vagrant King Eider was found in Spring on the Louisiana 
coast where he remained into summer and died. Coots are fairly regular 
holdovers. I have recorded undamaged immature geese summering on two occasions 
and this is more regular near the coast. Old or sick individuals may stay. 
Mallards and Canada Geese have leaned on humans to creep into Louisiana as 
permanent residents in recent years. None of this, however explains most of our 
perplexing summer records of apparently healthy, strong, normally flying 
'northern' type ducks. 

> 
> So here is my punchline which I believe explains the vast majority of such 
July-August records. I (actually my Labs) have captured many ducks on permanent 
wetlands in summer that had been rendered flightless or nearly so by being shot 
in hunting season. Note I am not describing them as "wounded". This is because 
in many cases of those I have had in hand, only their primaries were damaged, 
not the wing. Shot can cut the primaries on one wing without touching flesh or 
bone. With only one complete set of primaries, the bird is out of balance and 
cannot fly normally, if at all. Otherwise healthy, they escape retrieval 
attempts by the hunter and go into hiding. These wing-clipped individuals 
behave just as they would in flightless wing molt, staying out of sight most of 
the time in cattails and other emergent vegetation or getting far out on open 
water. I often do not see known flightless individuals in known spots, even 
when visiting these ponds every day. Again, it is my ex! 

 pe!
> 
> rienced duck hunting dog that usually finds them. Birders visiting once a 
week might never know they were present. These ducks undergo wing molt, usually 
in late June through July and when this is completed, they can fly once more. 
Then they come out of hiding and are readily observed. I have seen this 
scenario with several species many times on both shallow impoundments and on 
the Red River, observing known wing-clipped individuals take early low flights 
on still soft feather shafts. Once endowed with new, strong primaries these 
ducks disappear. 

> Probably the most bizarre summer duck observation I have had was of a 
normally flighted Greater Scaup in summer in an open spot in a rice pond. It 
was a one time sighting. I will not try to guess about what these ducks do and 
where they go once flighted again, other than to say I have seen a few Gadwall 
and Green-winged Teal stick around a few weeks on the Red River. 

> 
> One last observation and point is this. Since I hold this theory, I look 
closely at the primaries when I see a normally flying duck in summer. Molt can 
occur as early as the first week in June. I have never seen a wild, undamaged 
and flying, pre-molt 'northern' duck in summer. 

> Paul Dickson
Subject: Re: ducks in August
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 17:52:57 -0500
Friends,

Paul's learned explanation is much appreciated. The drake Mallard I found at 
the Richard-Smith Working Wetland back in late June persisted in the crawfish 
pond until it was drained in late July. At that time, it was obviously going 
through a molt and could "lift off" but flew with great difficulty. 


I had found what, I think were two pairs of Northern Shovelers, in the same 
area. [Never saw two drakes and two hens at the same time but there were 
apparently 4 shovelers in the crawfish pond.] By the time the fields were 
drained, the drakes were really "ratty looking" and presumably going trough a 
molt. 


Do crippled ducks recover? Well, back around 2002, my technician at the ULL 
Crawfish Research Center came to work one day in late November with something 
wrapped in a piece of paper towel. To call Will an avid duck hunter doesn't do 
him justice. Will had shot a hen Wood Duck over the weekend and, as I would 
have done, ate it! When he was eating one of the wings, he discovered a 
completely healed compound fracture of a wing. That was what he had to show me! 
The bird was flying normally. 


My guess is that Will's duck was an exception, not the rule. But, ducks can 
survive some pretty nasty wounds. 


Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul Dickson" 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Saturday, August 9, 2014 7:01:09 AM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] ducks in August

LABIRD: 'Northern' ducks seen while birding in summer in the south are an often 
mentioned anomaly. Discussion about these is often of injured vs. apparently 
healthy and of early fall migration. With a portion of most neo-tropical 
migrant species moving through in late summer it seems logical that ducks would 
occasionally do the same thing. Problem is, most ducks are not neo-tropical 
migrants. Blue-winged Teal and the whistling ducks are an exception and we are 
correct to call a Blue-winged Teal in August an early migrant. 

Speculating with any confidence on the summer presence of the others however, 
is not so easy. It is true that some North American breeding waterfowl, 
particularly males, undergo post-breeding dispersal, often a migration of 
hundreds of miles. These migrations coincide with the onset of wing molt, and 
the 4 week period of flightlessness unique to ducks. These movements, are 
towards areas of low predator density and cooler water temperatures where 
dissolved oxygen is higher and thus food resources are higher in the protein 
needed to grow new feathers. This does not describe Louisiana. 

Some years ago a vagrant King Eider was found in Spring on the Louisiana coast 
where he remained into summer and died. Coots are fairly regular holdovers. I 
have recorded undamaged immature geese summering on two occasions and this is 
more regular near the coast. Old or sick individuals may stay. Mallards and 
Canada Geese have leaned on humans to creep into Louisiana as permanent 
residents in recent years. None of this, however explains most of our 
perplexing summer records of apparently healthy, strong, normally flying 
'northern' type ducks. 


So here is my punchline which I believe explains the vast majority of such 
July-August records. I (actually my Labs) have captured many ducks on permanent 
wetlands in summer that had been rendered flightless or nearly so by being shot 
in hunting season. Note I am not describing them as "wounded". This is because 
in many cases of those I have had in hand, only their primaries were damaged, 
not the wing. Shot can cut the primaries on one wing without touching flesh or 
bone. With only one complete set of primaries, the bird is out of balance and 
cannot fly normally, if at all. Otherwise healthy, they escape retrieval 
attempts by the hunter and go into hiding. These wing-clipped individuals 
behave just as they would in flightless wing molt, staying out of sight most of 
the time in cattails and other emergent vegetation or getting far out on open 
water. I often do not see known flightless individuals in known spots, even 
when visiting these ponds every day. Again, it is my expe! 

 
 rienced duck hunting dog that usually finds them. Birders visiting once a week 
might never know they were present. These ducks undergo wing molt, usually in 
late June through July and when this is completed, they can fly once more. Then 
they come out of hiding and are readily observed. I have seen this scenario 
with several species many times on both shallow impoundments and on the Red 
River, observing known wing-clipped individuals take early low flights on still 
soft feather shafts. Once endowed with new, strong primaries these ducks 
disappear. 

Probably the most bizarre summer duck observation I have had was of a normally 
flighted Greater Scaup in summer in an open spot in a rice pond. It was a one 
time sighting. I will not try to guess about what these ducks do and where they 
go once flighted again, other than to say I have seen a few Gadwall and 
Green-winged Teal stick around a few weeks on the Red River. 


One last observation and point is this. Since I hold this theory, I look 
closely at the primaries when I see a normally flying duck in summer. Molt can 
occur as early as the first week in June. I have never seen a wild, undamaged 
and flying, pre-molt 'northern' duck in summer. 

Paul Dickson
Subject: ducks in August
From: Paul Dickson <Paul AT MORRISDICKSON.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 12:01:09 +0000
LABIRD: 'Northern' ducks seen while birding in summer in the south are an often 
mentioned anomaly. Discussion about these is often of injured vs. apparently 
healthy and of early fall migration. With a portion of most neo-tropical 
migrant species moving through in late summer it seems logical that ducks would 
occasionally do the same thing. Problem is, most ducks are not neo-tropical 
migrants. Blue-winged Teal and the whistling ducks are an exception and we are 
correct to call a Blue-winged Teal in August an early migrant. 

Speculating with any confidence on the summer presence of the others however, 
is not so easy. It is true that some North American breeding waterfowl, 
particularly males, undergo post-breeding dispersal, often a migration of 
hundreds of miles. These migrations coincide with the onset of wing molt, and 
the 4 week period of flightlessness unique to ducks. These movements, are 
towards areas of low predator density and cooler water temperatures where 
dissolved oxygen is higher and thus food resources are higher in the protein 
needed to grow new feathers. This does not describe Louisiana. 

Some years ago a vagrant King Eider was found in Spring on the Louisiana coast 
where he remained into summer and died. Coots are fairly regular holdovers. I 
have recorded undamaged immature geese summering on two occasions and this is 
more regular near the coast. Old or sick individuals may stay. Mallards and 
Canada Geese have leaned on humans to creep into Louisiana as permanent 
residents in recent years. None of this, however explains most of our 
perplexing summer records of apparently healthy, strong, normally flying 
'northern' type ducks. 


So here is my punchline which I believe explains the vast majority of such 
July-August records. I (actually my Labs) have captured many ducks on permanent 
wetlands in summer that had been rendered flightless or nearly so by being shot 
in hunting season. Note I am not describing them as "wounded". This is because 
in many cases of those I have had in hand, only their primaries were damaged, 
not the wing. Shot can cut the primaries on one wing without touching flesh or 
bone. With only one complete set of primaries, the bird is out of balance and 
cannot fly normally, if at all. Otherwise healthy, they escape retrieval 
attempts by the hunter and go into hiding. These wing-clipped individuals 
behave just as they would in flightless wing molt, staying out of sight most of 
the time in cattails and other emergent vegetation or getting far out on open 
water. I often do not see known flightless individuals in known spots, even 
when visiting these ponds every day. Again, it is my expe! 

 rienced duck hunting dog that usually finds them. Birders visiting once a week 
might never know they were present. These ducks undergo wing molt, usually in 
late June through July and when this is completed, they can fly once more. Then 
they come out of hiding and are readily observed. I have seen this scenario 
with several species many times on both shallow impoundments and on the Red 
River, observing known wing-clipped individuals take early low flights on still 
soft feather shafts. Once endowed with new, strong primaries these ducks 
disappear. 

Probably the most bizarre summer duck observation I have had was of a normally 
flighted Greater Scaup in summer in an open spot in a rice pond. It was a one 
time sighting. I will not try to guess about what these ducks do and where they 
go once flighted again, other than to say I have seen a few Gadwall and 
Green-winged Teal stick around a few weeks on the Red River. 


One last observation and point is this. Since I hold this theory, I look 
closely at the primaries when I see a normally flying duck in summer. Molt can 
occur as early as the first week in June. I have never seen a wild, undamaged 
and flying, pre-molt 'northern' duck in summer. 

Paul Dickson
Subject: Re: RRNWR Bayou Pierre Unit, Yates Tract/ Red River Par- FNI for Alder Flycatcher- 5, 3 GADW 08/08/14
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 20:26:35 -0500
Oops- Copied and pasted link from  gmail page instead of the correct
one..../: Here goes-

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19371865

Hope that works better.

T




On Fri, Aug 8, 2014 at 8:13 PM, Terry Davis  wrote:

> Good evening birders,
>
> Jeff and I had a slow but enjoyable morning birding yates for 3 hours
> today. We had 55 spp with best notes being -
>
> Gadwall- 3. basic-plumaged birds at barn pond. First thought at a distance
> bare-eyed to be BWTE- until a look through bins showed the square heads,
> then flashing bold white squares in secondaries as they rose and flew to
> southeast. This seems extremely early! I could not prove the Elm Grove
> birds found earlier this season weren't injured- but these were certainly
> healthy. It was certainly odd finding these, yet no Blue-winged Teal....
>
> Alder Flycatcher- 5- First noted increase- found in groups of 2, 1, 2,
>
> Short-billed Dowitcher- 1 non age-able (bad angle) but close flyby calling.
>
> Long-billed Dowitcher- 2 rather worn adults- all in unit 4. The only
> shorebirds found away from unit 4 today were - 1 Solitary sandpiper and 2
> Killdeer in recently plowed unit 2. First noted increase for Killdeer.
>
> A Field Sparrow and Bell's Vireo were both singing at the stretch of
> Baccharis/mix adjacent unit 7 and levee. This is .35 mile north of the bird
> heard during previous survey.
>
> We had a notably high number of Little Blue Heron today. A juv Tricolored
> Heron in unit 4 was unusual. Unit 3 is chock full of waders. However,
> shorebirds that are frequently found there after it's been recently plowed
> in past seasons seem to be avoiding it like the plague now- for two surveys
> in a row!
>
> More details at
>
> https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox?compose=147b852828f7f243
>
> Good birding,
>
> Terry
>
>
>
Subject: RRNWR Bayou Pierre Unit, Yates Tract/ Red River Par- FNI for Alder Flycatcher- 5, 3 GADW 08/08/14
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 20:13:06 -0500
Good evening birders,

Jeff and I had a slow but enjoyable morning birding yates for 3 hours
today. We had 55 spp with best notes being -

Gadwall- 3. basic-plumaged birds at barn pond. First thought at a distance
bare-eyed to be BWTE- until a look through bins showed the square heads,
then flashing bold white squares in secondaries as they rose and flew to
southeast. This seems extremely early! I could not prove the Elm Grove
birds found earlier this season weren't injured- but these were certainly
healthy. It was certainly odd finding these, yet no Blue-winged Teal....

Alder Flycatcher- 5- First noted increase- found in groups of 2, 1, 2,

Short-billed Dowitcher- 1 non age-able (bad angle) but close flyby calling.

Long-billed Dowitcher- 2 rather worn adults- all in unit 4. The only
shorebirds found away from unit 4 today were - 1 Solitary sandpiper and 2
Killdeer in recently plowed unit 2. First noted increase for Killdeer.

A Field Sparrow and Bell's Vireo were both singing at the stretch of
Baccharis/mix adjacent unit 7 and levee. This is .35 mile north of the bird
heard during previous survey.

We had a notably high number of Little Blue Heron today. A juv Tricolored
Heron in unit 4 was unusual. Unit 3 is chock full of waders. However,
shorebirds that are frequently found there after it's been recently plowed
in past seasons seem to be avoiding it like the plague now- for two surveys
in a row!

More details at

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox?compose=147b852828f7f243

Good birding,

Terry
Subject: Phooey - Geography ! - Desoto Parish, LA Birding - Oak Ridge Park and Converse Bay, 8-7-14
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 22:01:55 -0500
[I was not planning to bird Converse Bay but got to the end of the gravel road 
that extends north from the parking/boat launch area. When I got to the end of 
the road, a LOT of birds flew up so I did a point count for ebird. Species 
were: Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Red-headed Woodpecker, Red-bellied 
Woodpecker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Eastern Kingbird, American Crow, Brown-headed 
Nuthatch, Carolina Wren, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Eastern Bluebird, Northern 
Mockingbird, Yellow-throated Warbler, Pine Warbler, Chipping Sparrow, Summer 
Tanager, and Northern Cardinal.] 


Phooey -  

Converse Bay is IN Sabine Parish! Still, a good place to bird in NE Toledo Bend 
Reservoir. 


Regards,

Jay H. 
Subject: Desoto Parish, LA Birding - Oak Ridge Park and Converse Bay, 8-7-14
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 20:33:51 -0500
I bird in De Soto Parish several times a year when taking my wife to visit her 
sister in east Texas. Both Oak Ridge Park and Converse Bay are located on 
Toledo Bend Reservoir immediately off LA 191. This usually involves birding 
after 10:30 AM most times, normally not a very good period for finding birds. 
But, had a decent visit to Oak Ridge Park. After I left Oak Ridge Park, I went 
about 10 miles south to Converse Bay "park". The main problem with Converse Bay 
is that there are no rest rooms. However, the road to Converse Park is across 
the road to the intersection with LA 174 where there is a convenience store 
with rest rooms. 


The Oak Ridge list follows. I was not planning to bird Converse Bay but got to 
the end of the gravel road that extends north from the parking/boat launch 
area. When I got to the end of the road, a LOT of birds flew up so I did a 
point count for ebird. Species were: Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Red-headed 
Woodpecker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Eastern Kingbird, 
American Crow, Brown-headed Nuthatch, Carolina Wren, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, 
Eastern Bluebird, Northern Mockingbird, Yellow-throated Warbler, Pine Warbler, 
Chipping Sparrow, Summer Tanager, and Northern Cardinal. 


Jay Huner


> Oak Ridge Park, De Soto, US-LA
> Aug 7, 2014 11:15 AM - 1:10 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.4 mile(s)
> Comments: Site is located adjacent to Toledo Bend Reservoir off LA 191 about 
5 miles south of its intersection with US 84 at Logansport, LA. Had a good 
diversity of birds mostly found along the riparian area on the east side of the 
park. The site has excellent facilities and costs $2/person. 

> 33 species
> 
> Double-crested Cormorant  2
> Anhinga  4
> Great Blue Heron  3
> Great Egret  10
> Little Blue Heron  1
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Bald Eagle  1     Large, soaring bird - surely a female.
> Eurasian Collared-Dove  1
> Mourning Dove  6
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  3
> Pileated Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
> Alder Flycatcher 1 Medium-sized empid. Slender, paired wing bars, obvious 
white eye rings, light below, grayish green above. Silent but responded to 
Alder Flycatcher playback but ignored Willow Flycatcher playback. 

> Eastern Phoebe  1
> White-eyed Vireo  3
> Yellow-throated Vireo  1
> Blue Jay  4
> American Crow  1
> Barn Swallow  3
> Carolina Chickadee  3
> Tufted Titmouse  5
> Carolina Wren  9
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  7
> Eastern Bluebird  6
> Northern Mockingbird  5
> Hooded Warbler  1
> Pine Warbler  6
> Yellow-throated Warbler  1
> Chipping Sparrow  6
> Summer Tanager  4
> Northern Cardinal  3
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19363269 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Canvasback, Willet, 4300 shorebirds, etc., St. Landry Par., 5 Aug.
From: "James V. Remsen, Jr." <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 21:18:16 -0500
LABIRD: Robb Brumfield, Dan O'Malley, Mike Harvey, John Mittermeier, Cameron 
Rutt, and I surveyed a private crawfish farm complex this morning in St. Landry 
Parish. Canvasback and Willet were probably the best birds. (This seems to be 
THE year for summer waterfowl). 4300+ shorebirds of 17 species were fun to sort 
through, with 2 Buffies, 1 Upland, 9 Avocets, 43 Semi Plovers, and 2 Wilson's 
Phalaropes the best. Also mentionable: Gadwall, Shoveler, 4 Black Terns, 50 
Tree Swallows. 


=================
Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: a couple of decent finds in New Orleans East
From: Marybeth Lima <marybeth.lima AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 18:03:42 -0500
Hi everyone,

Lynn Hathaway and I went to New Orleans East yesterday to try to locate the
shiny cowbird recently seen by David Muth. We were able to locate the flock
of brown-headed cowbirds and starlings in exactly the same location he
described (on SR 11 at the levee, just at the entrance to Irish Bayou), but
we were unable to locate the shiny cowbird needle in the "cow-ling"
haystack.

However, we did have a couple of birds of interest in nearby locations. We
had a reddish egret at the Madere unit in Bayou Sauvage NWR (I'd recommend
a scope for this location, as many of the birds are far back in the marsh).

Also, we had a cave swallow at the I-10 overpass bridge near SR 11 (at the
south end of the SR 11 bridge)--there is a Frontage Road (it's gravel) that
one can take to the West at the base of the SR 11 bridge--there are good
places to stop along this road to observe the I-10 overpass. The cave
swallow was mixed in with cliff swallows. FYI, if you follow the Frontage
Road until it ends, there is a bridge overlook at Irish Bayou Lagoon (part
of Bayou Sauvage NWR)--this location is great for ducks in the winter.
There's also a small boat launch there and excellent kayak birding
throughout the year in the surrounding marshes.

Good birding,

Marybeth
Subject: MAPS report
From: "Henry, Donata R" <droome AT TULANE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 19:22:57 +0000
Our tenth season at the Honey Island Swamp MAPS banding station was, as 
predicted, a slower one. The forest has matured and the understory is thinning 
out - no longer optimal habitat for many of our breeding birds. We captured 16 
different species for a total of 227 captures (145 new captures and 82 
recaptures). We did lose most of one session due to inclement weather. I 
thought it might be interesting to give you a sense of the demographic and 
community change (at least in terms of what we catch in our nets) over time by 
including the data from 2005, our very first year. All told, we have captured 
43 species and netted 3,833 birds. 


Tremendous thanks to Linda Beall, Glenn Ousset, Kristina Crouch, Ashley Peele, 
Renata Duraes, Don Norman, and Susan Epps for holding down the fort while I was 
out of town. We couldn't make this work without the help of many volunteers! 


2014 (recaptures are in italics)
Hooded warbler 32 (23)
Swainson's warbler 22 (14)
Northern cardinal 20 (14)
White-eyed vireo 15 (9)
Carolina wren 14 (7)
Kentucky warbler 14 (5)
Prothonotary warbler 11 (7)
Acadian flycatcher 5 (3)
Carolina chickadee 4
Louisiana waterthrush 2
Black-and-white warbler 2
Great-crested flycatcher 1
Red-eyed vireo 1
Wood thrush 1
Gray catbird 1
Tufted titmouse 1

2005
Hooded warbler 76
White-eyed vireo 51
Northern cardinal 49
Swainson's warbler 35
Carolina wren 31
Kentucky warbler 24
Acadian flycatcher 6
Yellow-breasted chat 6
Wood thrush 5
Prothonotary warbler 5
American redstart 5
Ruby-throated hummingbird 3
Worm-eating warbler 2
Red-bellied woodpecker 2
Downy woodpecker 1
Red-shouldered hawk 1
Eastern screech-owl 1
Louisiana waterthrush 1
Black-and-white warbler 1
Tufted titmouse 1
Brown thrasher 1

Happy birding, Donata

Donata Henry
Professor of the Practice
Tulane University
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department
431 Lindy Boggs Center
New Orleans, LA 70118
Subject: Mouton Cove and vicinity, Aug 4, 2014
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:57:05 -0500
LaBirders,

This morning I birded the working wetlands just west of the community of 
Mouton Cove in Vermilion Parish. Many of the fields are being/have been 
drawn down and are providing good habitats for water-associated birds. 
Wading birds were in good numbers.  Sandpiper species were lower than I 
expected.

Mike

Mouton Cove and vicinity, Vermilion, US-LA
Aug 4, 2014 6:50 AM - 10:35 AM
Protocol: Traveling
22.0 mile(s)
61 species (+2 other taxa)

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  13
Wood Duck  4
Mallard (Domestic type)  11
Wood Stork  5
Neotropic Cormorant  57
Anhinga  1
Great Blue Heron  18
Great Egret  92
Snowy Egret  127
Little Blue Heron  215
Tricolored Heron  1
Cattle Egret  88
Green Heron  36
Black-crowned Night-Heron  1
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  55
White Ibis  63
Glossy Ibis  3     Light-colored stripes from side of each eye to base of 
bill, dark eyes and  faces.
White-faced Ibis  315
Roseate Spoonbill  62
Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
American Coot  1
Black-necked Stilt  118
Black-bellied Plover  1
Semipalmated Plover  57     1x1 body count
Killdeer  23
Solitary Sandpiper  1
Greater Yellowlegs  2
Lesser Yellowlegs  40
Ruddy Turnstone  1
Stilt Sandpiper  13
Least Sandpiper  77
Pectoral Sandpiper  1
Semipalmated Sandpiper  5
Western Sandpiper  2
Long-billed Dowitcher  74
Laughing Gull  67
Black Tern  4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  5
Eurasian Collared-Dove  3
Inca Dove  1
Mourning Dove  30
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Chimney Swift  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Loggerhead Shrike  2
crow sp.  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  6
Purple Martin  22
Tree Swallow  1     Grayish dorsally, white ventrally, white throat, larger 
than nearby Bank Swallows
Bank Swallow  135     1x1 count as they perched on power lines over stream; 
constantly milling about; conservative count.
Barn Swallow  60
Cliff Swallow  15
Carolina Wren  2
Northern Mockingbird  4
European Starling  23
Northern Cardinal  23
Red-winged Blackbird  78
Eastern Meadowlark  3
Boat-tailed Grackle  25
Brown-headed Cowbird  11
House Sparrow  12

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19328434

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net 
Subject: RRNWR Headquarters Unit- 08/03/14 FOF Alder Flycatcher
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 12:14:36 -0500
Hi all, Few are the times (at least in my experience) when one goes out
with the express intention of getting an early fall migration extralimital
date for a select species and is successful. Today was such a day! Mark
Wilson and I birded the overlook, then ran to the Chocolate trail in back
of the unit. On our 3rd stop there, we finally heard an Alder Flycatcher
giving low, almost whispered songs, trills and the sibilant, whistled
"turreyih" or "turyih" calls. I was successful in recording the calls and
song. With the recent, somewhat oddly-timed cold front, it really wasn't
all that surprising. The bird was approximately .14 miles North of the
Southwest end of the trail on the East side- at the exact portion of trail
where the continuous rough-leaf dogwood edge drops in elevation slightly
and mostly ends, then continues on as swamp privet/mix edge with numerous
dead saplings and assorted vines.

 Things were quite slow in terms of other small land birds and there were
few suspected land bird migrants. White-eyed Vireo numbers were up from
previous survey (most locals) but no REVI. One adult Northern Parula and a
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher were the only other probable dispersals. Summer
Tanagers were up at 3 from zero during previous visit but were possibly
just missed, then. Double-crested Cormorant showed a pulse with 9
individuals. The local Pied-billed Grebe population is even healthier than
I suspected with 19 birds counted today- mostly young. Looks like the heat
might be back for awhile!

Good birding,

Terry
Subject: Re: BWVI IN Couturie
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 12:43:45 +0000
Now it or another is singing in the first live oak NW of the traffic circle on 
Harrison across from Coturie. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 3, 2014, at 7:30 AM, "David Muth"  wrote:
> 
> Singing just past path closed sign on main trail from parking area on 
Harrison. 

> 
> David Muth
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 2, 2014, at 11:32 AM, "David Muth"  wrote:
>> 
>> A male Shiny Cowbird was in a mixed flock of cowbirds and starlings on the 
levee at Hwy 11 at the Irish Bayou entrance at about 0815 this morning. 
Unfortunately I did not have my phone with me. 

>> 
>> David Muth 
>> New Orleans 
>> 
Subject: BWVI IN Couturie
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 12:30:47 +0000
Singing just past path closed sign on main trail from parking area on Harrison.

David Muth

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 2, 2014, at 11:32 AM, "David Muth"  wrote:
> 
> A male Shiny Cowbird was in a mixed flock of cowbirds and starlings on the 
levee at Hwy 11 at the Irish Bayou entrance at about 0815 this morning. 
Unfortunately I did not have my phone with me. 

> 
> David Muth 
> New Orleans 
> 
Subject: Black Terns at Cotile Lake - Rapides Parish
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 21:07:07 -0500
This afternoon, I happened to look out over Cotile Lake up the SE arm and 
spotted 6 small, mostly black Black Terns feeding at the water surface. This 
was around 6 PM CDST. I mention this observation because it was flagged by 
e-bird and Terry Davis reported Black Terns about 75 miles NE of here along the 
Red River. 


Nothing special around here. Today's list for the subdivision was: 
Double-crested Cormorant, Cattle Egret, Eurasian Collared-Dove, Mourning Dove, 
Inca Dove, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Belted Kingfisher, Red-bellied 
Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Pileated Woodpecker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Great 
Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Barn Swallow, Blue Jay, American Crow, 
Fish Crow, Carolina Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, Carolina Wren, Eastern 
Bluebird, Brown Thrasher, Northern Mockingbird, Northern Cardinal, and House 
Finch. 


Jay Huner
Subject: Re: Shreveport Bird Study group shorebird outing to RRNWR Bayou Pierre/ Yates tract
From: Rosemary Seidler <rseidler AT CENTENARY.EDU>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 20:47:56 -0500
Clyde Massey found the Roseate Spoonbill and pointed it out to me, Julius and 
Hubert. 


Rosemary Seidler
Shreveport
________________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Terry Davis [terkchip AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Saturday, August 02, 2014 7:11 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Shreveport Bird Study group shorebird outing to RRNWR Bayou 
Pierre/ Yates tract 


Hi all, Despite overnight N winds, nine intrepid observers joined Larry and
I headed to Yates tract at 7 o'clock this morning in search of shorebirds.
Things looked bleak early in the campus parking lot with piles of European
Starlings atop the radio tower but few other birds, other than a double
handful of American Robin overhead moving South, noted on the move.
However, the N winds hadn't quite kicked in and conditions were a bit more
calm the closer we got toward Yates. Quite a few shorebirds were still
lingering. A single Field Sparrow singing along the levee was nice. A noisy
Bell's Vireo in the Baccharis adjacent moist soil unit 7 was great, too-
although the aforementioned 2 species are almost expected there now.
Charlie Lyon met up with us a little later in the morning. We ended the day
with 65 spp, although a few were added by Charlie slightly after the group
had left. We had 12 species of shorebird, not including dowitcher sp. Most
notable birds were-

Black-bellied Whistling Duck- 2. Barn Pond/ Rosemary and Hubert
Roseate Spoonbill- 1 Barn pond by RS, HH
Semipalmated Sandpiper- 4
Buff-breasted Sandpiper- 18. Photo by Ronnie of group in flight overhead.
Numbers flagged by ebird.
Common Tern- alternate ad by Charlie- super early! photos

Ebird also flagged a count of 9 Solitary Sandpipers.

More details at-

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19310651

I couldn't resist a quick 1.5 mile walk among the willows and roughleaf
dogwood atop and adjacent the long sandbar at Marie Hamel on the way home.
However, a quick search there yesterday morning, then today walk, revealed
no early Alder Flycatcher- or any other migrants, for that matter.

Good birding
Subject: Shreveport Bird Study group shorebird outing to RRNWR Bayou Pierre/ Yates tract
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 19:11:30 -0500
Hi all, Despite overnight N winds, nine intrepid observers joined Larry and
I headed to Yates tract at 7 o'clock this morning in search of shorebirds.
Things looked bleak early in the campus parking lot with piles of European
Starlings atop the radio tower but few other birds, other than a double
handful of American Robin overhead moving South, noted on the move.
However, the N winds hadn't quite kicked in and conditions were a bit more
calm the closer we got toward Yates. Quite a few shorebirds were still
lingering. A single Field Sparrow singing along the levee was nice. A noisy
Bell's Vireo in the Baccharis adjacent moist soil unit 7 was great, too-
although the aforementioned 2 species are almost expected there now.
Charlie Lyon met up with us a little later in the morning. We ended the day
with 65 spp, although a few were added by Charlie slightly after the group
had left. We had 12 species of shorebird, not including dowitcher sp. Most
notable birds were-

Black-bellied Whistling Duck- 2. Barn Pond/ Rosemary and Hubert
Roseate Spoonbill- 1 Barn pond by RS, HH
Semipalmated Sandpiper- 4
Buff-breasted Sandpiper- 18. Photo by Ronnie of group in flight overhead.
Numbers flagged by ebird.
Common Tern- alternate ad by Charlie- super early! photos

Ebird also flagged a count of 9 Solitary Sandpipers.

More details at-

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19310651

I couldn't resist a quick 1.5 mile walk among the willows and roughleaf
dogwood atop and adjacent the long sandbar at Marie Hamel on the way home.
However, a quick search there yesterday morning, then today walk, revealed
no early Alder Flycatcher- or any other migrants, for that matter.

Good birding
Subject: Re: Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird
From: "Johnson, Erik" <ejohnson AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 23:52:02 +0000
Congratulations Helena!

LAbirders and HumNetters,

I will again be compiling the western winter hummingbird reports, starting now! 
Hold off on any Ruby-throat reports until November 15, after which we count 
them as "wintering." Please continue to send reports to my email (ejohnson AT 
audubon.org), LAbird, or HUMNET, and provide the following information: 

- Your name
- Your address (town only is acceptable)
- First observed (FO) date (or, if discovered while banding or marking other 
birds, the date it was observed) 

- Species
- Age (Adult, immature, unknown)
- Sex (Male, female, unknown)
- Whether banded, when and by whom.

If additional information is learned through further observation or banding or 
if a mistake needs to be corrected, please report those updates and I'll make 
the changes. I wish you all a fun-filled winter hummingbird season. 


Happy hummingbirding,
Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
ejohnson AT audubon.org





-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of H. Putnam 

Sent: Saturday, August 02, 2014 4:25 PM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird

Happy to announce we are hosting a beautiful adult male Rufous Hummingbird 
since Friday, August 1, 2014! What a treat!  


Helena Putnam
Basile, Louisiana
Extreme southwest corner of Evangeline Parish on the banks of Bayou Nezpique
Subject: Adult Male Rufous Hummingbird
From: "H. Putnam" <0000003a70918a06-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 14:24:58 -0700
Happy to announce we are hosting a beautiful adult male Rufous Hummingbird 
since Friday, August 1, 2014! What a treat!  


Helena Putnam
Basile, Louisiana
Extreme southwest corner of Evangeline Parish
on the banks of Bayou Nezpique
Subject: Shiny cowbird Batou Sauvage NWR
From: David Muth <MuthD AT NWF.ORG>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 16:30:07 +0000
A male Shiny Cowbird was in a mixed flock of cowbirds and starlings on the 
levee at Hwy 11 at the Irish Bayou entrance at about 0815 this morning. 
Unfortunately I did not have my phone with me. 


David Muth 
New Orleans 
Subject: Re: Black-whiskered Vireo
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 11:16:35 -0500
Saw it this morning. If was along the path between the grove and the little 
bridge to the golf course. Louisiana first for me. Cathy Disalvo, Beth Wiggins, 
and a fee others were there 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 2, 2014, at 1:12 AM, "Clairedthomas"  wrote:
> 
> Yes, they were in the forest not the golf course. And that is the grove. They 
were mixed in with other birds. Yellow warblers and an Amer. Redstart. 

> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Aug 1, 2014, at 6:33 PM, Bryan Lenz  wrote:
>> 
>> Hi Claire,
>> 
>> Thanks for the continued reports. I plan to try for the vireos again on 
Sunday. When you say "oak grove at back of Couturie" do you mean that they were 
actually in Couterie as opposed to being out in the golf course to the north 
where they were reported previously? I am guessing that you are referring to 
the Oak Grove that has the picnic benches on the water at the west end of the 
trail, but I just want to be sure. 

>> 
>> Thanks!
>> 
>> Bryan
>> 
>> 
>> Bryan Lenz, Ph.D.
>> 
>> 
>>> On Fri, Aug 1, 2014 at 9:50 AM, Clairedthomas  
wrote: 

>>> BLWV in oak grove at back of Couturie now. Singing softly. A pair.
>>> 
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
Subject: Black&white warbler in backyard
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 10:09:01 -0500
Just saw it gleaning on the branches of an elm tree near the birdbath. It
was a female or an immature. It didn't wait for a photo. FOS last year was
on 8/22.
Janine in Folsom
St Tammany parish
Subject: Black whiskered Vireo
From: Elizabeth Wiggins <macbethie AT ME.COM>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 09:30:06 -0500
Seen by several behind oak grove on edge of lagoon. Possibly both seen. 

Beth Wiggins


Sent from Bethie's iPhone 5S
Subject: Re: Black-whiskered Vireo
From: Clairedthomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Sat, 2 Aug 2014 01:12:19 -0500
Yes, they were in the forest not the golf course. And that is the grove. They 
were mixed in with other birds. Yellow warblers and an Amer. Redstart. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 1, 2014, at 6:33 PM, Bryan Lenz  wrote:
> 
> Hi Claire,
> 
> Thanks for the continued reports. I plan to try for the vireos again on 
Sunday. When you say "oak grove at back of Couturie" do you mean that they were 
actually in Couterie as opposed to being out in the golf course to the north 
where they were reported previously? I am guessing that you are referring to 
the Oak Grove that has the picnic benches on the water at the west end of the 
trail, but I just want to be sure. 

> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Bryan
> 
> 
> Bryan Lenz, Ph.D.
> 
> 
>> On Fri, Aug 1, 2014 at 9:50 AM, Clairedthomas  
wrote: 

>> BLWV in oak grove at back of Couturie now. Singing softly. A pair.
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
> 
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - City Park--Couturie Forest, Aug 1, 2014-Black-whiskered Vireo
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 17:41:56 -0500
Claire Thomas
claire AT clairedthomas.com



Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - City Park--Couturie Forest, Aug 1, 2014
> Date: August 1, 2014 at 5:39:26 PM CDT
> To: claire AT clairedthomas.com
> 
> City Park--Couturie Forest, Orleans, US-LA
> Aug 1, 2014 9:24 AM - 12:01 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 4.9 mile(s)
> Comments: I birded alone until I was joined by Joan Garvey and Kathy Disalvo. 
Vireo's first heard singing in the Oak grove at the rear of Couturie Forest. 
They were traveling with Yellow Warblers and one American Redstart. 

> 
Submitted from BirdLog World for iOS, version 1.7.6 > 31 species > > Great Egret (Ardea alba) 4 > Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) 2 > Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) 2 > Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) 2 > Green Heron (Butorides virescens) 1 > Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) 4 > Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) 2 > Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) 1 > Laughing Gull (Leucophaeus atricilla) 4 > Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 7 > Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica) 5 > Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) 1 > Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 1 > Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) 2 > Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) 4 > Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) 3 > Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) 3 > Black-whiskered Vireo (Vireo altiloquus) 2 Seen by Claire Thomas before being joined by other observers. > > > Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 8 > American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) 13 > Purple Martin (Progne subis) 12 > Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) 4 > Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 1 > Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) 5 > Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) 2 > American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 1 > Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 30 > Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor) 1 Seen by all observers > Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 7 > Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 1 > Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) 5 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19300038 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) >
Subject: Black-whiskered Vireo
From: Clairedthomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 09:50:42 -0500
BLWV in oak grove at back of Couturie now. Singing softly. A pair. 

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Yellow-billed Cuckoo
From: "Driscoll, Melanie" <mdriscoll AT AUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 14:30:46 +0000
Wings of Hope Wildlife Sanctuary is a very responsible rehabilitation facility, 
well equipped and knowledgeable. And they might not be too far for you to want 
to drive. 


Wings of Hope Wildlife Sanctuary
20591 Abe Hoover Rd.
Livingston, LA 70754

Ph: (225) 698-3168
Fax: (225) 698-6099
Email: wohleslie AT gmail.com

Good luck with the cuckoo,

Melanie
______________________________
Melanie Driscoll

Director of Bird Conservation
Gulf Coast Conservation/Mississippi Flyway
National Audubon Society

6160 Perkins Road
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
work:  225-768-0820
cell:    225-938-7209
mdriscoll AT audubon.org
www.audubon.org



-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds 
[mailto:LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Fontenot 

Sent: Friday, August 01, 2014 9:02 AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Claire --


if no one in your neck of the woods replies then you can try Lafayette Wildlife 
In Distress (337.232.0121) and they can probably direct you to a songbird 
rehabber in your area…… 



also, I believe the La Dept of Wildlife & Fisheries has a wildlife rehab 
contact page on its website…. 



bill fontenot








From: Claire Thomas
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎August‎ ‎1‎, ‎2014 ‎7‎:‎27‎ ‎AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU





All,

A Yellow-billed Cuckoo ran into my kitchen window yesterday. It is alive and 
kicking except for only partial use of it’s legs. I think it may be partially 
paralyzed. It is eating (bag worms) and drinking and I can tell it wants to go 
but can’t. It doesn’t seem to have anything broken either. When placed on 
the ground it just lists over to it’s side. It can grip with it’s feet a 
little so I’m hoping it may just be a healing process until it regains full 
use. Does anyone know of someone who rehabilitates songbirds? 


Claire Thomas
Mandeville, LA 70471
Tall Timbers Sub
Hwy. 90 & I-12
claire AT clairedthomas.com
Subject: Re: Yellow-billed Cuckoo
From: Bill Fontenot <natrldlite AT COX.NET>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 14:01:54 +0000
Claire --


if no one in your neck of the woods replies then you can try Lafayette Wildlife 
In Distress (337.232.0121) and they can probably direct you to a songbird 
rehabber in your area…… 



also, I believe the La Dept of Wildlife & Fisheries has a wildlife rehab 
contact page on its website…. 



bill fontenot








From: Claire Thomas
Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎August‎ ‎1‎, ‎2014 ‎7‎:‎27‎ ‎AM
To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU





All,

A Yellow-billed Cuckoo ran into my kitchen window yesterday. It is alive and 
kicking except for only partial use of it’s legs. I think it may be partially 
paralyzed. It is eating (bag worms) and drinking and I can tell it wants to go 
but can’t. It doesn’t seem to have anything broken either. When placed on 
the ground it just lists over to it’s side. It can grip with it’s feet a 
little so I’m hoping it may just be a healing process until it regains full 
use. Does anyone know of someone who rehabilitates songbirds? 


Claire Thomas
Mandeville, LA 70471
Tall Timbers Sub
Hwy. 90 & I-12
claire AT clairedthomas.com
Subject: Yellow-billed Cuckoo
From: Claire Thomas <claire AT CLAIREDTHOMAS.COM>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 07:27:41 -0500
All,

A Yellow-billed Cuckoo ran into my kitchen window yesterday. It is alive and 
kicking except for only partial use of its legs. I think it may be partially 
paralyzed. It is eating (bag worms) and drinking and I can tell it wants to go 
but cant. It doesnt seem to have anything broken either. When placed on the 
ground it just lists over to its side. It can grip with its feet a little so 
Im hoping it may just be a healing process until it regains full use. Does 
anyone know of someone who rehabilitates songbirds? 


Claire Thomas
Mandeville, LA 70471
Tall Timbers Sub
Hwy. 90 & I-12
claire AT clairedthomas.com
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite, American Woodcock, Wading Birds and Shorebirds
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:57:10 -0500
I had occasion to travel to the Church Point area from the Gardner area and 
birded around Oakdale and Oberlin on the way there. Some highlights follow. 


Jay Huner

Swallow-tailed Kite - a single bird 50-75' feeding on the north side of Oberlin 
about 11 AM in the vicinity of the intersection of 9th and 7th avenues. 9th 
Avenue intersects US 165 on the north side of Oberlin with continuous working 
wetlands on the north side and homes on the south side. 


American Woodcock - a single bird flying from west to east across US 167 near 
mile 85 about 8:55 PM. This is about 2 miles SW of the Clearwater Community. It 
was dark but the bird was within 50' of my truck and well seen in the 
headlights. It was about 5' above the road. 


Wading Birds - I drove northward from Oberlin on Garcille Road. The entire area 
for several miles has working wetlands on both sides of the road. Expected 
wading birds were present in several hundred acres of crawfish ponds that were 
being drained. The dominant birds of at least 1,000 wading birds were Great 
Egrets and Little Blue Herons. The working wetlands there are surrounded by 
piney woods in Allen Parish. 


In the afternoon I got to the site I call the Richard-Smith Working Wetland in 
the Church Point area in St. Landry Parish. There were far more wading birds 
there but again, the dominant birds were Great Egrets and Little Blue Herons. 
This is prairie habitat. The location is at least 40 straight line miles from 
Oberlin. 


Note that we take Little Blue Herons for granted in Louisiana but they are a 
species of conservation concern. 


Shorebirds - I was looking for shorebirds in Allen Parish to see if I could add 
to the parish's bird list. To my surprise, I found some Lesser Yellowlegs in 
the fields around Oberlin but no large numbers of such birds. 


But, at the Richard-Smith Working Wetland, there were 1,500-2,000 shorebirds. 
None of the shorebird habitat was visible from public roads - region around LA 
751 x LA 358. But I have access to the interior field roads and that's where I 
found the shorebirds: Killdeer, Black-necked Stilt, Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser 
Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, Semipalmated sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, Stilt 
Sandpiper, and Long-billed Dowitcher. Black-necked Stilt, Lesser Yellowlegs, 
and peeps were the dominant shorebirds. 

Subject: Fwd: Ornithology in South Western Louisiana
From: Robb Brumfield <robb AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 17:06:35 +0000
Birder from France looking for birders in Lafayette area.  See email below.

I've already recommended the Louisiana bird finding guide to them.


Robb Brumfield, Director and Roy Paul Daniels Professor
Museum of Natural Science and Department of Biological Sciences
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803

office telephone: 225-578-3081
cell: 225-202-8892
fax: 225-578-3075

Begin forwarded message:

From: Dominique Leymarie 
> 

Subject: Ornithology in South Western Louisiana
Date: July 29, 2014 at 3:41:38 AM CDT
To: Robb AT LSU.edu

Dear Robb,
Yesterday, I have tried to get in touch with your dept. in order to prepare my 
trip in Louisiana. 

I will be in Lafayette in the second half of september and even if it's perhaps 
not the best period for birdwatchers, I would like to enjoy ornithological 
observations. 

i went on your website and I found quite a lot of information but to be strait 
forward I dont know how to proceed to be efficient in my trip preparation ... 

Based in Lafayette for 2 to 3 weeks, I would like to meet one or two local 
naturalist or ornithologist to better understand bird life in this part of 
Louisiana and best spots in this time of the year. 

an other subject would be to acquire the best bird guide for Louisiana , could 
you give me an advice ..... 

Thanks for your help
Kind regards
Dominique

Dominique Leymarie
98 rue Claude Decaen
75012 Paris
France
Subject: Visitor looking for birdwatching guide
From: Delaina LeBlanc <0000003e44f5c24e-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 09:21:37 -0700
Please respond to Dr. Eugene van der Walt's email listed at bottom if you are 
able to assist. Thanks! 


My son-in-law, BJ Antill gave me your names. I am from South Africa and my wife 
and I are visting Louisiana again from Aug 20, departing Aug 31. I have been 
there before and did some birdwatching on my own as well as going on a swamp 
tour, were we saw some good birds. 

I know that middle August is certainly not the best time for birdwatching, but 
with my daughter having a baby, I did not have any choice on the timing of this 
trip. 

My wife and I would really like to do some birdwatching with a knowledgeable 
birdwatcher in the area around Thibodaux. I was thinking of visiting Grand Isle 
for a day and then some other sites for another day or 2. I have looked at some 
sites close to Houma, but you will know were the best areas are. 

I did not see many species last time and some of the birds i would like to see 
are: 

Roseate Spoonbill, Bald Eagle, Swallow-tailed Kite, Mississippi Kite, Yellow 
Rail, American Oystercatcher and plenty others. I have looked at the bird list 
of Louisiana and obviously most of the birds I have never seen. The 
possibilities look very appealing. 

I would like to know if we can do some birding with you or failing that whether 
you can point me to someone knowledgeable who can escort us. If necessary, I am 
willing to pay for a guide. 

I am looking forward to hearing from you.
Kind Regards
Eugene and Annelize van der Walt


Dr Eugene van der Walt
vdwalte AT medicross.co.za
Subject: Mouton Cove and vicinity, Jul 28, 2014
From: Michael Musumeche <mjmusumeche AT COX.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:08:55 -0500
LaBirders,

This morning I birded the working wetlands just west of the community of 
Mouton Cove in Vermilion Parish. Most of the fields were in rice production 
and others were flooded as a grass deterrent.  The few fields that were 
recently drained held most of the water-associated bird species I observed, 
but not as many birds as I had expected.

Mike

Mouton Cove and vicinity, Vermilion, US-LA
Jul 28, 2014 6:45 AM - 10:05 AM
Protocol: Traveling
21.0 mile(s)
50 species

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck  2
Fulvous Whistling-Duck  2
Wood Duck  1
Neotropic Cormorant  155
Great Blue Heron  4
Great Egret  38
Snowy Egret  20
Little Blue Heron  31
Tricolored Heron  1
Cattle Egret  275
Green Heron  44
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron  23
White Ibis  3
Glossy Ibis  1
White-faced Ibis  65
Roseate Spoonbill  1
Red-shouldered Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Black-necked Stilt  26
Black-bellied Plover  1
Semipalmated Plover  38     1x1 count
Killdeer  23
Greater Yellowlegs  2
Lesser Yellowlegs  34
Least Sandpiper  175     1x1 count
Long-billed Dowitcher  250     counted by 10s
Laughing Gull  1
Black Tern  7
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
Eurasian Collared-Dove  6
Mourning Dove  11
Inca Dove  3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
Loggerhead Shrike  3
Fish Crow  10
Purple Martin  55
Bank Swallow  95     Conservative count, 1x1 as they perched on power lines 
over a small bridge/canal; constantly milling about.
Barn Swallow  40
Cliff Swallow  6
Carolina Wren  1
Northern Mockingbird  5
European Starling  22
Northern Cardinal  6
Red-winged Blackbird  61
Eastern Meadowlark  6
Common Grackle  12
Boat-tailed Grackle  30
Brown-headed Cowbird  15
House Sparrow  6

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19245574

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



_______________________________________________________________
^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^ ^v^
Mike Musumeche
New Iberia, LA 70560
mjmusumeche AT cox.net 
Subject: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: eBird Report - Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Jul 27, 2014
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 01:30:37 -0500
Correction Buff-breasted Sandpiper numbers are 13 not 1

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Charles Lyon 
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: eBird Report - Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit 
Yates Tract, Jul 27, 2014 

> Date: July 28, 2014 1:27:10 AM CDT
> To: LABIRD-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Reply-To: Charles Lyon 
> 
> LA-birders,
> 
> The shorebird list below pales in comparison to that submitted by Van from St 
Landry Parish, but I have submitted the list to the service for a couple of 
reasons. The first point is that fall 

> migration, which is more protracted than that in spring, is in full force. It 
is a good time to get out in the heat of the summer and look for fall migrants. 

> 
> The second point to me is more important than the first. Habitat 
preservation/creation is critical in allowing for stopover of migrating 
shorebirds. In NW LA we don't have a great deal of stopover habitat for 
migrating shorebirds, and the Yates Tract of the Red River National Wildlife 
Refuge is becoming an "oasis" in the forest. The pools in the moist soil area 
are just now being flooded, so stopover habitat is being created. Most of the 
few suitable shorebird stopover areas up here are not accessible to the public, 
but this one is. Granted one may have to hike a bit to get to some of the 
pools, but many are along Hwy 1, and easy to view. Thanks to the folks managing 
this valuable piece of real-estate. 

> 
> Charlie Lyon
> Shreveport, LA
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org
>> Subject: eBird Report - Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Jul 
27, 2014 

>> Date: July 28, 2014 12:53:24 AM CDT
>> To: lyon5516 AT bellsouth.net
>> 
>> Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Red River, US-LA
>> Jul 27, 2014 6:25 PM - 8:10 PM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 2.0 mile(s)
>> Comments: with Hubert Hervey; primary goal was to document early shorebirds, 
thus most of survey conducted in moist soil area 

>> 95-90 degrees clear wind W-SW 5-8 mph
>> 36 species
>> 
>> Anhinga  2
>> Great Egret  8
>> Snowy Egret  3
>> Little Blue Heron  8
>> Cattle Egret  2
>> Green Heron  1
>> White Ibis  2
>> Killdeer  6
>> Spotted Sandpiper  5
>> Solitary Sandpiper  13     good early showing careful count
>> Lesser Yellowlegs  3
>> Least Sandpiper  10
>> Buff-breasted Sandpiper 13 flock noted on field with careful count by both 
observers. Buff-breasted Sandpiper is actually a more common fall migrant in NW 
LA than spring migrant. This is probably an early date for NW LA, but I doubt 
many observers are out in the heat of July looking. The habitat being "created" 
at the Yates tract of the Red River NWR is providing stop over habitat for this 
species and numerous other shorebirds. 

>> Pectoral Sandpiper 71 careful count...one flock came in at sunset, another 
circled and kept heading south, and some were in the fields 

>> Mourning Dove  12
>> Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
>> Belted Kingfisher  1
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
>> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
>> Eastern Kingbird 11 post breeding dispersal starting and large gregarious 
flocks will start to form shortly 

>> Tree Swallow  2     probably local breeders from somewhere nearby
>> Barn Swallow  4
>> Cliff Swallow  2
>> Carolina Chickadee  2
>> Northern Mockingbird  9
>> Common Yellowthroat  9
>> Yellow-breasted Chat  2
>> Eastern Towhee  1
>> Northern Cardinal  11
>> Blue Grosbeak  2
>> Indigo Bunting  2
>> Dickcissel  59
>> Red-winged Blackbird  48
>> Common Grackle  4
>> Orchard Oriole 20 careful count post breeding flocks of mainly 
immature/female birds 

>> Baltimore Oriole  1
>> 
>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19242610 

>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Jul 27, 2014
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516 AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 01:27:10 -0500
LA-birders,

The shorebird list below pales in comparison to that submitted by Van from St 
Landry Parish, but I have submitted the list to the service for a couple of 
reasons. The first point is that fall 

migration, which is more protracted than that in spring, is in full force. It 
is a good time to get out in the heat of the summer and look for fall migrants. 


The second point to me is more important than the first. Habitat 
preservation/creation is critical in allowing for stopover of migrating 
shorebirds. In NW LA we don't have a great deal of stopover habitat for 
migrating shorebirds, and the Yates Tract of the Red River National Wildlife 
Refuge is becoming an "oasis" in the forest. The pools in the moist soil area 
are just now being flooded, so stopover habitat is being created. Most of the 
few suitable shorebird stopover areas up here are not accessible to the public, 
but this one is. Granted one may have to hike a bit to get to some of the 
pools, but many are along Hwy 1, and easy to view. Thanks to the folks managing 
this valuable piece of real-estate. 


Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA

Begin forwarded message:

> From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org
> Subject: eBird Report - Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Jul 27, 
2014 

> Date: July 28, 2014 12:53:24 AM CDT
> To: lyon5516 AT bellsouth.net
> 
> Red River NWR--Bayou Pierre Unit Yates Tract, Red River, US-LA
> Jul 27, 2014 6:25 PM - 8:10 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> Comments: with Hubert Hervey; primary goal was to document early shorebirds, 
thus most of survey conducted in moist soil area 

> 95-90 degrees clear wind W-SW 5-8 mph
> 36 species
> 
> Anhinga  2
> Great Egret  8
> Snowy Egret  3
> Little Blue Heron  8
> Cattle Egret  2
> Green Heron  1
> White Ibis  2
> Killdeer  6
> Spotted Sandpiper  5
> Solitary Sandpiper  13     good early showing careful count
> Lesser Yellowlegs  3
> Least Sandpiper  10
> Buff-breasted Sandpiper 1 flock noted on field with careful count by both 
observers. Buff-breasted Sandpiper is actually a more common fall migrant in NW 
LA than spring migrant. This is probably an early date for NW LA, but I doubt 
many observers are out in the heat of July looking. The habitat being "created" 
at the Yates tract of the Red River NWR is providing stop over habitat for this 
species and numerous other shorebirds. 

> Pectoral Sandpiper 71 careful count...one flock came in at sunset, another 
circled and kept heading south, and some were in the fields 

> Mourning Dove  12
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
> Eastern Kingbird 11 post breeding dispersal starting and large gregarious 
flocks will start to form shortly 

> Tree Swallow  2     probably local breeders from somewhere nearby
> Barn Swallow  4
> Cliff Swallow  2
> Carolina Chickadee  2
> Northern Mockingbird  9
> Common Yellowthroat  9
> Yellow-breasted Chat  2
> Eastern Towhee  1
> Northern Cardinal  11
> Blue Grosbeak  2
> Indigo Bunting  2
> Dickcissel  59
> Red-winged Blackbird  48
> Common Grackle  4
> Orchard Oriole 20 careful count post breeding flocks of mainly 
immature/female birds 

> Baltimore Oriole  1
> 
> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19242610 

> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Re: 6000+ shorebirds, 3000+ herons etc., St. Landry Par. 7-27
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660 AT LOUISIANA.EDU>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:19:43 -0500
Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if Dr. Remsen had found Ruddy Turnstones in 
the mix although I normally find them in working wetlands closer to the coast 
than north of US 190. 


One of the ironies of the working wetland habitat in the alluvial valley is 
that they were constructed by clearing out bottomland hardwood for growing soy 
beans. That went bust and in many areas, catfish was the crop of choice. There 
are many reasons why catfish has gone bust in Louisiana but one reason involves 
cormorants and pelicans. Not only do those species depredate pretty effectively 
on catfish but they are also vectors for flukes that can kill catfish and/or 
disfigure them so that they cannot be sold. 


Crawfish and rice are about the only crops compatible with those heavy clay 
alluvial valley soils along the Atchafalaya and Mississippi rivers. In 
addition, much of the area where catfish were abandoned have been incorporated 
into various USDA - NRCS bottomland hardwood restoration projects. As the trees 
grow, the vistas such as shown in Dr. Remsen's images revert to habitat that is 
less attractive to shorebirds. 


Best,


Jay H. 

----- Original Message -----
From: "James V. Remsen, Jr." 
To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2014 4:56:48 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] 6000+ shorebirds, 3000+ herons etc., St. Landry Par. 7-27

LABIRD: A private wetland (restricted access) in St. Landry Par. was totally 
loaded today -- overwhelming, actually. Althought the Wood Storks were down 
from my previous visit (to a pitiful 450+), most other big waterbirds were way 
up, with impressive numbers of Roseate Spoonbils (275), Snowy Egrets (1600+), 
Little Blues (500+), Y-c Night Herons (78), W-f Ibis (1300), and Neotropic 
Cormorants (ca. 1100). The shorebirds have really come in, with impressive 
numbers of Least Sandpipers (2700+ - perhaps the most I've ever seen in a day 
-- including 1500 in one pond), Semipalmated Sandpipers (ca. 700), B-n Stilts 
(1500+), and Pectorals and Stilt Sands (500+ of each), and a notable influx of 
Spotteds (19) and Solitarys (12). 


If Jay had been there, he would have been giddy, expounding nonstop on working 
wetlands, rightfully so -- this one set of impoundments (for crawfish farming 
and duck hunting) is supporting an amazing number and impressive biomass of 
birds. 


No real goodies. Mentionables: 2 Am. Avocet, 4 Wilson's Phalarope, 1 S-b 
Dowitcher, 1 N. Shoveler, 2 Tree Swallow, 3 White Pelican, 300+ Great-tailed 
Grackle. 


It was bedlam trying to sort through the birds in the sun and heat, and when in 
the early afternoon I called a Killdeer a "Ruddy Trurnstone" for a few seconds, 
I decided I'd better retreat to shade and AC. 


Gory details: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19237227


=================
Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: 6000+ shorebirds, 3000+ herons etc., St. Landry Par. 7-27
From: "James V. Remsen, Jr." <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 16:56:48 -0500
LABIRD: A private wetland (restricted access) in St. Landry Par. was totally 
loaded today -- overwhelming, actually. Althought the Wood Storks were down 
from my previous visit (to a pitiful 450+), most other big waterbirds were way 
up, with impressive numbers of Roseate Spoonbils (275), Snowy Egrets (1600+), 
Little Blues (500+), Y-c Night Herons (78), W-f Ibis (1300), and Neotropic 
Cormorants (ca. 1100). The shorebirds have really come in, with impressive 
numbers of Least Sandpipers (2700+ - perhaps the most I've ever seen in a day 
-- including 1500 in one pond), Semipalmated Sandpipers (ca. 700), B-n Stilts 
(1500+), and Pectorals and Stilt Sands (500+ of each), and a notable influx of 
Spotteds (19) and Solitarys (12). 


If Jay had been there, he would have been giddy, expounding nonstop on working 
wetlands, rightfully so -- this one set of impoundments (for crawfish farming 
and duck hunting) is supporting an amazing number and impressive biomass of 
birds. 


No real goodies. Mentionables: 2 Am. Avocet, 4 Wilson's Phalarope, 1 S-b 
Dowitcher, 1 N. Shoveler, 2 Tree Swallow, 3 White Pelican, 300+ Great-tailed 
Grackle. 


It was bedlam trying to sort through the birds in the sun and heat, and when in 
the early afternoon I called a Killdeer a "Ruddy Trurnstone" for a few seconds, 
I decided I'd better retreat to shade and AC. 


Gory details: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19237227


=================
Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: RRNWR Headquarters Unit/ Bossier Par. 07-26-14- 2 LEFL
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 22:18:01 -0500
Hey everyone,

Birded Headquarters for a little over 3 hours this morning. Best birds were
2 separate adult Least Flycatchers along the Chocolate trail in the back of
the refuge, between the two lakes. Other near-certain migrants/dispersals
(non-breeders for immediate vicinity) were-

Black-and-White Warbler- 1
N Parula- 4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher- 3. Possibly breeds in small numbers
Red-eyed vireo- 3.

Also of note were 4 Common Gallinule ad- Two observed just out from
overlook on main lake, then 2 in back. Swallow diversity was low with
Purple Martin only- raptors low, too, with single Red-tailed hawk. Songbird
diversity and numbers seemed low during dawn chorus at the overlook. N
Cardinal numbers were lower than usual throughout. Lots of details at-

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19230059

Cheers and good birding,

Terry
Subject: New Orleans Black-whiskered Vireo- maybe
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey AT UNO.EDU>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 01:18:56 +0000
LABirders:

Just an tidbit for anyone who may still be contemplating trying for the City 
Park Black-whiskered Vireos. 


I tried for an hour on Wednesday, early morning, mainly hoping to confirm 
nesting. For a male songbird to hang around an area for a stretch of days in 
nesting season singing only infrequently, is behavior very typical of a bird 
who is "watching over" a female incubating eggs. Also, Dave Muth did report two 
birds on his initial visit. Incubation is often the most difficult period of a 
nesting attempt to detect the birds- they are often more conspicuous in the ten 
days or so after hatching, as they fly back and forth feeding the young. 


Anyway, I was skunked for the first 50 min or so, but did see a songbird the 
size and shape of this species fly across from a bald cypress next to the water 
to one of the live oaks about 20 m north of the "second pine" referred to in 
earlier posts. Of course I gave pursuit, but could not get a more definitive 
look. However, I had a good enough view of the bird's size and body proportions 
in flight to know it was not one of the other local nesting species (a payoff 
of all those mornings watching fly-bys at South Point!) 


So, the bird is probably still there. And it is still worth looking for 
evidence of nesting. 


A few Orchard Orioles and a Yellow Warbler were pleasant as well.

Peter Yaukey
Subject: Re: Question about Northern Wheatear Records
From: Nancy Newfield <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:19:10 +0300
Van,

On 07/25/2014 03:21 PM, James V. Remsen, Jr. wrote:

> Nancy et al. -- here's what I have in the book draft. " (m?) 12 Sep. 
> 1888, near New Orleans (GEB; Kohn 1889, Beyer 1900, Kopman 1915b, 
> Lowery 1974; specimen subsequently lost)" I think it is a Beyer 
> specimen, now lost (fire?). Although I can't imagine that that this 
> bird could have been misidentified, I do have a lingering doubt 
> because: "Several others were seen on the same day [12 Sep. 1988] 
> (Kohn 1889)."

Thanks.  Food for thought and it points out how important it is to 
properly curate specimens and information and to leave a paper trail for 
future researchers to follow.

NLN
Subject: Re: Question about Northern Wheatear Records
From: "James V. Remsen, Jr." <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:21:13 -0500
On Jul 25, 2014, at 4:14 AM, Nancy Newfield 
 wrote:

> 
> Can anyone provide information on the disposition of the 100+ year old 
specimen? Is it extant? Are there any images of it? 

> 

Nancy et al. -- here's what I have in the book draft. 

" (m?) 12 Sep. 1888, near New Orleans (GEB; Kohn 1889, Beyer 1900, Kopman 
1915b, Lowery 1974; specimen subsequently lost)" 



 I think it is a Beyer specimen, now lost (fire?). Although I can't imagine 
that that this bird could have been misidentified, I do have a lingering doubt 
because: 


"Several others were seen on the same day [12 Sep. 1988] (Kohn 1889)."


=================
Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Re: Question about Northern Wheatear Records
From: Nancy Newfield <nancy AT CASACOLIBRI.NET>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:14:38 +0300
Paul et LABIRD,

On 07/18/2014 04:16 PM, Paul Conover wrote:

> I've been slowly marching through the published records and
> pasting them to the LBRC Photo Gallery page:
> http://losbird.org/lbrc/reviewlist.html
>            and while I wasn't quite to Northern Wheatear yet, I jumped ahead
> because your question got me curious.  The wheatear page is at
> http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/rlnowh.html
>            The last published record is stated to be the 7th record, but I
> could only find 5 published accepted records.  Two, including the original
> specimen record from September 12, 1888, either haven't been reviewed yet,
> or if they have, haven't been published yet.
>            So, formally 5, informally, 7.
>            The dates and parish locations are included on the wheatear page
> linked above.

You have done a marvelous job in putting this together and I appreciate 
that you jumped ahead to the Northern Wheatear.  If I judge this 
correctly, the 2 records that are not 'official' are the first one, 
collected in 1888, and the one that was found by Hubert Hervey on his 
DeSoto Parish farm.

Can anyone provide information on the disposition of the 100+ year old 
specimen?  Is it extant?  Are there any images of it?

Further, has the DeSoto Parish record been submitted to the LBRC? 
Surely, someone has identifiable images and some dates scribbled down 
from which a report could be cobbled together.  It would be great to get 
these records nailed down and added to the body of solid data that we keep.

> By the way, I'm sure I'm not the only one jealous of the scenery
> and the birdlife you're currently enjoying...

Don't envy the weather.  My first week here was cool and comfortable, 
but now we are sweating since housing does not have air-conditioning.  
Mostly, we have stayed in Helsinki, so birding has been in public 
greenspaces, but we made one daytrip up to the 'Lake Country' that was 
productive and tomorrow, we will make another run to the countryside.  
This is my first trip to Europe, but because part of my family will be 
'forever', it will not likely be my last.  Will return to steamy 
Louisiana early next week.  I have learned a lot of Mew Gull 
vocalizations.  They are the most common bird I see and hear.

NLN
Subject: Catahoula NWR, 7/23/14, two units
From: Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:30:06 -0700
labirders,
   So, I went to my usual birding area on the Headquarters Unit of
Catahoula NWR yesterday morning. Sort of ho-hum as water was a little too
high after recent rainfall events to attract much in the way of shorebirds
or concentrate waders. Loggerhead Shrike was a nice bird to get by Duck
Lake; sometimes around, but usually not.
   After a little over an hour I decided to leave HQ unit and do a list for
the Minnow Ponds Road area of Burshley Bayou Unit. The impoundments had a
few waders, but not much open muddy shore stuff for shorebirds the way they
sometimes do. A family of Flickers was nice to get, though. Seems like
that's one species that's been more common/easier to find this summer that
they usually are.

Lists for HQ unit and Burshley Bayou Unit of Catahoula NWR are at the links
below.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19198722

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19203522

Happy Birding!
Jonathan Clark
Jena, Louisiana
Subject: Urgent! Help & favor (Helena Putnam)
From: Helena Putnam <0000003a70918a06-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:02:59 +0100
 - This mail is in HTML. Some elements may be ommited in plain text. -

I really hope you get this fast. I could not inform anyone about our trip, 
because it was impromptu. we had to be in Turkey for Tour. The program was 
successful, but our journey has turned sour. we misplaced our wallet and cell 
phone on our way back to the hotel we lodge in after we went for sight seeing. 
The wallet contained all the valuables we had. Now, our passport is in custody 
of the hotel management pending when we make payment. 

I am sorry if i am inconveniencing you, but i have only very few people to run 
to now. i will be indeed very grateful if i can get a short term loan from you 
($2,600). this will enable me sort our hotel bills and get my sorry self back 
home. I will really appreciate whatever you can afford in assisting me with. I 
promise to refund it in full as soon as I return. let me know if you can be of 
any assistance. Please, let me know soonest. 

Helena Putnam
Subject: Red Phalarope on Ms./La. border
From: Eric Liffmann <eliffmann AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:32:34 -0500
I just saw a photo taken by a Layne Logue reposted by Bruce Reid on
Facebook of a Red Phalarope in breeding plumage on Palmyra Lake on
7-19-14.  Unfortunately on the Ms. side(sorry Dr. Van, close enough...
right?)  Here's what was on Facebook:
" Although this is Palmyra lake... It's really a chute that runs all the
way around Davis Island (+45,000 acres island). The Palmyra lake/chute is
19 miles long. North entrance is at Lower Mississippi River mile marker
425.5

And I was about a mile into the lake when I saw it.

This is Mississippi land (Warren County)... But it's on the west side of
the River.

Accessible: correct, by boat only .. Unless you know a Deer camp member"

-- 
Eric Liffmann
225.937.3405
Subject: Elm Grove area, 04/19/14 Fof Bank Swallow, Blue-winged Teal
From: Terry Davis <terkchip AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 15:26:30 -0500
Hey birders, Jeff Trahan and I took a spin around the pond at White House
Plantation this morning. Although there was rain overnight, the winds were
still calm to light out of the North and shorebirds were unsurprisingly
few. We did find 6 Spotted Sandpiper (good numbers on Red River also
recently reported by Hubert Hervey) and 11 Least. Little Blue Heron numbers
had jumped from few during previous surveys to 9- mostly hy. All usual/
area-breeding swallows were in good numbers for the first time during
surveys there this summer. There were no early migrant neotropical
songbirds to report. Other interesting numbers were

Blue-winged Teal- 9- single group. I wouldn't think that the single male
Northern Shoveler in apparent total eclipse observed today could have been
the very fresh looking breeding-plumaged bird I'd been reporting recently.
Drake and hen Gadwall also observed at same location as previous.

Am White Pelican- 38- mostly juv.

Killdeer- 14- decrease by over half

Black-necked Stilt- 10. As KILL- only a few older juv in these numbers- no
really young birds seen this time.

Tree swallow- 23

Leaving there, we did a quick survey near the old Clark's Marina site where
we observed 3 Bank swallows on a wire with the usual suspects.

God birding,

Terry
Subject: Caracara - facepalm
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:30:09 -0500
Well, it looks like someone on ARBIRDS misinterpreted something about the 
caracara. The photo may have been taken by someone from El Dorado (still not 
exactly sure), but the photo itself was taken near San Antonio. Ugh. Sorry for 
the excitement. It was posted like it had legitimacy, and I believed it. 


John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 18, 2014, at 12:46 PM, Jay V Huner  wrote:
> 
> Check out road kills! They seem to be caracara magnets.
> 
> Jay Huner
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "John Dillon" 
> To: LABIRD-L AT listserv.lsu.edu
> Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 12:39:10 PM
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Be on alert for Caracara in N LA
> 
> Apparently, someone photographed a Crested Caracara in El Dorado (pronounced 
"El Dor-RAY-doe") Arkansas yesterday. That's maybe a couple dozen miles north 
of the state line above my home parish of Claiborne. Any birders near 
appropriate habitat may want to take a look if it's wandering. 

> 
> John Dillon
> Athens, LA
> 
> Sent from my iPhone