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Updated on Thursday, July 31 at 12:54 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Painted Snipe,©Jan Wilczur

31 Jul Re: The Greatest Show On earth [Paul Champlin ]
31 Jul Swallows Massing on Beach Photos ["Lesley Mattuchio" ]
31 Jul Tree Swallows / Newbury [Lynette Leka ]
31 Jul Cape Cod Bird Festival - Registration Deadline is looming! []
31 Jul Re: The Greatest Show On earth [Andy Todzia ]
31 Jul Re: The Greatest Show On earth [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
31 Jul Re: The Greatest Show On earth ["Lesley Mattuchio" ]
31 Jul 2014 AOU Check-list Supplement [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
31 Jul The Greatest Show On earth [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
31 Jul Common Ravens, Plymouth [Kathryn Doyon ]
30 Jul CT Report 07/30/2014 Rufous Humm [Roy Harvey ]
30 Jul Birds of West Africa [Linda Ferraresso ]
30 Jul Bent Life Histories [George W Gove ]
30 Jul Bent Life Histories [George W Gove ]
30 Jul Eastern Mass Hi-Lites - 7/21-7/25 [Steve Arena ]
30 Jul Gooseberry migrants this morning [Paul Champlin ]
30 Jul Great Meadows NWR - Concord, Weekly species census [Kat Birder ]
30 Jul Dark-eyed Junco / Newbury [Lynette Leka ]
29 Jul CT Report 07/29/2014 Rufous Hum, WS Petrel [Roy Harvey ]
29 Jul Plum Island this morning []
29 Jul Short Beach Nahant - Black Skimmers []
29 Jul Gooseberry this morning [Paul Champlin ]
28 Jul Re: Re: Bird ID help? [jon giacomini ]
29 Jul Fwd: Quabbin loon banding [Joshua Rose ]
28 Jul CT Report 07/28/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
28 Jul OT: Maine Tropicbird - again [James Purcell ]
28 Jul question regarding birds eating slugs [Lynette Leka ]
28 Jul Re: Bird ID help? [Dan M ]
28 Jul FW: BBC birding on the Seven Seas Whale-watch boat 7/27/14 ["Ida Giriunas" ]
28 Jul Bear Creek Sanctuary - Rumney Marsh, Saugus, Jul 27, 2014 ["Soheil Zendeh" ]
28 Jul Bird ID help results [Paul Guidetti ]
28 Jul Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Jul 27, 2014 [Danielle Geller ]
27 Jul Ward Reservation, Andover/N. Andover, Jul 27, 2014 ["Jim Berry" ]
27 Jul Bird ID help? [Dan M ]
27 Jul CT Report 07/27/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
27 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Jul 27, 2014 [Cliff Cook ]
27 Jul Royal Tern - Long Beach DCR Nahant []
27 Jul Plymouth Beach, Jul 26, 2014, skimmer photo [Garry Kessler ]
27 Jul Plum Island ["Bates, David Westfall,M.D." ]
26 Jul CT Report 07/26/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
27 Jul Plymouth Beach, Jul 26, 2014 ["Glenn d'Entremont" ]
26 Jul Rufous Hummingbird - no ["Marj. Rines" ]
26 Jul ID Help needed! [Paul Guidetti ]
26 Jul Helens Place in Machias ["Myer S. Bornstein" ]
26 Jul PRNWR - good shorebirding 7/26 [Bird Watchers Supply & Gift ]
26 Jul Rufous Hummingbird Ph and Owen Big Year Blog Updates! [Justin Lawson ]
26 Jul RE: Rufous Hummingbird - 24 July 2014 ["Floyd, Chris" ]
26 Jul Rufous Hummingbird - 24 July 2014 [Margo Goetschkes ]
25 Jul 3 Kestrels / Newbury [Lynette Leka ]
25 Jul Hummingbird ID? [Lynn ]
25 Jul 101 Yellow Warblers migrating from Gooseberry [Paul Champlin ]
24 Jul CT Report 07/24/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
24 Jul Townsend Rufous Hummingbird......photos [Dan Prima ]
24 Jul Rufus Hummingbird yes [Liam Waters ]
24 Jul Plum Island - Wed. eve. []
24 Jul Black skimmer, Plum Island [Bird Watchers Supply & Gift ]
24 Jul RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, Townsend-YES [Justin Lawson ]
24 Jul RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, Townsend [Jason Forbes ]
23 Jul Plum Island, MA; Tues., 22 July 2014. [Richard Heil ]
23 Jul CT Report 07/23/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
23 Jul Trip Report - BBC Extreme Pelagic - 19 July 2014 [Jeremiah Trimble ]
23 Jul Call note resource for European Golden Plover [Paul Champlin ]
23 Jul Seabirds and Whales trips out of Newburyport Harbor later this summer [David Larson ]
23 Jul Seabirds and Whales trips out of Newburyport Harbor later this summer [David Larson ]
23 Jul Skimmers, Avocets Plum Is 7/23 [Bird Watchers Supply & Gift ]
23 Jul Great Meadows NWR--Concord, Weekly Species census, Jul 23, 2014 [Kat Birder ]
22 Jul CT Report 07/22/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
22 Jul Whimbrel returned to Westport [Paul Champlin ]
22 Jul Boston Harbor Oystercatchers [Bob Stymeist ]
22 Jul Re: Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID [Jonathan Jones ]
22 Jul Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID [Sue McGrath ]
22 Jul Hawk Surfing! []
21 Jul Fledgling Barred Owls - Norfolk [Peter Gaines ]
21 Jul Neponset River Reservation, Newton Center Ravens [Paul Peterson ]
21 Jul CT Report 07/21/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
21 Jul Red-Headed Woodpecker, No [Kat Birder ]

Subject: Re: The Greatest Show On earth
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 12:43:04 -0400
With all of those mouths to feed they tend to be ephemeral in any one place 
since foraging efficiency drops in a very short time, esp. when consuming 
fruits, which take time to ripen and stay in one place. If a particular fruit 
crop (like bayberry) is poor in an area one year, the large flocks of Tree 
Swallows will be absent for that season. 


Paul Champlin
Westport, MA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 31, 2014, at 9:38 AM, "Lesley Mattuchio"  wrote:
> 
> I was at Sandy Point on Tuesday morning right at sunrise and the beach was a 
blanket of Swallows... 100's of them! 

> 
> 
> Lesley Mattuchio
> Photography By Lesley
> lesleymattuchiophotography.zenfolio.com
> leslm AT verizon.net
> Melrose, MA
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________
> 
> Massbirders:
> 
> Last week when Lois and I birded Plum Island I couldn't help but
> notice that I had trouble finding a Tree Swallow. In fact, there was
> a day when we couldn't find one at all.  I found this most peculiar
> and a cause for concern. Just when I expected to see the first
> indications of the oncoming staging of the Tree Swallows; that
> glorious and awe inspiring annual spectacle, I was finding quite the
> opposite.  No Tree Swallows.They had nested here and brought forth
> their fledgies and had proceeded to feed in modest numbers, up and
> down the island.  Just as they had always done.  Now suddenly they
> had vanished.  I suspected that my memory of the middle of July was
> somehow faulty; that this happened every year but that I just failed
> to notice it.  Still I was haunted by the possibility that something
> had gone awfully wrong. I even paused at one point to inspect some
> Bayberry bushes at the side of the road. I was somewhat encouraged by
> the fact that the berries were numerous but still a time away from
> being ripe. Although I fully subscribe to the warnings and findings
> of the scientific community about the decline of bird species, I also
> reflexively recoil from the more apocalyptic visions. I suppose I am
> a hopeless optimist but I couldn't imagine a deep summer on the
> island without the greatest Show on earth; the staging of the Tree
> Swallows.
> 
> Of course Plum island has other bird extravaganzas occurring on a
> regular, reliable schedule.  In fact right now the shorebird
> migrations have arrived with their multitudes and with an endless
> series of expectations and surprises.  There is the spring arrival of
> warblers and other migrants as well. These, however are sights that
> are almost reserved for the birding community; almost by invitation
> only. One has to know where to go and when. The Tree Swallow staging
> is a different case altogether.  Anyone who drives down the length of
> Plum island on a late August or early September day will encounter
> this show and only the incredibly dense or opaque will fail to notice
> the packs of Tree Swallows; feeding at the side of the road, roaming
> through the air or spread across the road.  To me it would be
> heartbreaking if anything happened to this special event.
> 
> Therefore it was heartening a few days ago when Lois and I noticed a
> few clusters of Tree Swallows near Parking Lot#1 and a few more
> scattered up the length of the island.  Today (July 30) there was a
> measurable revival of Tree Swallows numbers. Not the dense flocks
> that we will eventually see but they are clearly building to a
> crescendo. It was a welcome moment when I arrived early enough to
> come across a number of swallows just as they began breaking from a
> roost they had taken in the phragmites at the small pond by the
> Wardens. Even though they were thinning out as I watched, there was
> about 100 tree swallows in the group; many of them new boys; along
> with seventeen Barn Swallows and a dozen Bank Swallows.  Clearly it
> has begun. One of the grand annual events on Plum island has started.
> 
> 
> Yesterday Lois and I came across, or at least heard, four Great
> Crested flycatchers in the S Curves very near the Tick Farm.  They
> were calling out to one another in their distinctive first note
> "weep" : no doubt a family group keeping in touch. The one Flycatcher
> I actually saw was clearly a juvenile; a little scruffy and a bit
> clumsy, as it flew from a roadside perch and dove into a thickly
> leafed cherry tree. Young birds at the roadside; the flats at Bill
> Forward filling up with shorebirds on the rising tide; and the Tree
> Swallows gathering for a spectacular show. The returning warblers
> will be flicking in the trees before we know it.  Every year. The
> Greatest Show on earth; or at least in Eastern Massachusetts. Can
> there be anything finer?
> 
> Doug Chickering
> Groveland
> dovekie AT comcast.net
> 
> 
Subject: Swallows Massing on Beach Photos
From: "Lesley Mattuchio" <leslm AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 11:25:22 -0400
Tuesday morning at sunrise I arrived at Sandy Point, Plum Island and when I 
walked on to the beach I was greeted with a sight I have never seen. The 
Swallows were a blanket on the sand. It was quite remarkable! I have posted 4 
images of it. Unfortunately I had my telephoto lens on so it was hard to 
encompass the scope of all the Swallows, but hopefully you will get the idea. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/125349441 AT N03/


Lesley Mattuchio
Photography By Lesley
lesleymattuchiophotography.zenfolio.com
leslm AT verizon.net
Melrose, MA
Subject: Tree Swallows / Newbury
From: Lynette Leka <lynetteleka AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 08:19:24 -0700
this year the utility lines on Pine Island Road were absolutely packed with 
Tree Swallows, but a good two weeks earlier than usual - it was all over by a 
week ago... change in timing or route of migration? 



------------------------------------

Lynette Leka


Newbury, MA 01951


email: lynette.leka AT yahoo.com
Subject: Cape Cod Bird Festival - Registration Deadline is looming!
From: birder526 AT comcast.net
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:26:16 +0000 (UTC)
Der Massbirders, 

You are welcome to join us for the Cape Cod Bird Club's annual Bird Festival, 
September 19 - 22, and headquartered at the beautiful DoubleTree by Hilton in 
Hyannis. The registration deadline is August 7! 


Two trips are currently full, Pelagic Photography and North Beach Island, 
however, there are many other field trips with room! Don't miss out on South 
Monomoy, North Monomoy, and Tern Island for excellent shorebirding, a tour of 3 
community gardens for many great land birds, a full day Falmouth birding trip, 
with Greg Miller as a co-host, and a full day Outer Cape trip. A hike to the 
incredible Pochet Island is filling up quickly, as is the ever-popular 
"Leader's Choice"with David Sibley as a co-leader. Check the website for 
complete details at www.capecodbirdclub.org . 


The entertaining Greg Miller will co-lead a super trip to Cuttyhunk on Monday, 
September 22. Great opportunities for vagrants! If pelagic birding is your 
thing, join us on Sunday as we travel on the Yankee II out of Harwichport to 
the waters off Chatham and beyond. 


Greg and David are our special guests with David doing a presentation Friday 
evening at the pizza social and Glen at Saturday night's dinner. 


A Vendor Marketplace on Friday and Saturday with many top artists, companies, 
organizations etc., will be present to showcase their missions and products. 


And Family Day will be held at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History on Sunday 
for the entire family! Free all day with the exception of two live raptor 
shows. 


It's a great weekend to bird and meet other birders from all over the country! 
But, registrations must be in by August 7 if registering on-line, or postmarked 
by August 7 if registering by paper. If you register on-line you will learn 
immediately which trips have availability and once you register, you are 
immediately confirmed for those trips. 


Visit our website for all of the details! It is www.capecodbirdclub.org . 
Register ASAP! 


Good birding, 

Diane 

Diane Silverstein 
Cape Cod, MA 
birder526 AT comcast.net 
CAPE COD BIRD FESTIVAL SEPT. 19-22, 2014 

Subject: Re: The Greatest Show On earth
From: Andy Todzia <atodzia AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 10:06:31 -0400
Here are a few pics taken in the last few years of this event at Plum
Island, for those who have not seen it.
http://bit.ly/UNGibX
http://bit.ly/1oQmKjh
http://bit.ly/1ptdvo8
http://bit.ly/1pItkVk

Andy Todzia
Haverhill
atodzia at comcast.net

On Thu, 31 Jul 2014 09:42:28 -0400, you wrote:

>In my haste to post this, I forgot to thank Doug Chickering for this 
>post.  If you haven't ever seen the tree swallows as they stage, do 
>go see this event!  It's breathtaking.
>
>Barbara Volkle
>Northborough, MA
>barb620 AT theworld.com
http://www.AndyTodzia.com
http://www.AndyTodzia.com
Subject: Re: The Greatest Show On earth
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT theworld.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 09:42:28 -0400
In my haste to post this, I forgot to thank Doug Chickering for this 
post.  If you haven't ever seen the tree swallows as they stage, do 
go see this event!  It's breathtaking.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com
Subject: Re: The Greatest Show On earth
From: "Lesley Mattuchio" <leslm AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 08:59:01 -0400
I was at Sandy Point on Tuesday morning right at sunrise and the beach was a 
blanket of Swallows... 100's of them!


Lesley Mattuchio
Photography By Lesley
lesleymattuchiophotography.zenfolio.com
leslm AT verizon.net
Melrose, MA






_______________

Massbirders:

Last week when Lois and I birded Plum Island I couldn't help but
notice that I had trouble finding a Tree Swallow. In fact, there was
a day when we couldn't find one at all.  I found this most peculiar
and a cause for concern. Just when I expected to see the first
indications of the oncoming staging of the Tree Swallows; that
glorious and awe inspiring annual spectacle, I was finding quite the
opposite.  No Tree Swallows.They had nested here and brought forth
their fledgies and had proceeded to feed in modest numbers, up and
down the island.  Just as they had always done.  Now suddenly they
had vanished.  I suspected that my memory of the middle of July was
somehow faulty; that this happened every year but that I just failed
to notice it.  Still I was haunted by the possibility that something
had gone awfully wrong. I even paused at one point to inspect some
Bayberry bushes at the side of the road. I was somewhat encouraged by
the fact that the berries were numerous but still a time away from
being ripe. Although I fully subscribe to the warnings and findings
of the scientific community about the decline of bird species, I also
reflexively recoil from the more apocalyptic visions. I suppose I am
a hopeless optimist but I couldn't imagine a deep summer on the
island without the greatest Show on earth; the staging of the Tree
Swallows.

Of course Plum island has other bird extravaganzas occurring on a
regular, reliable schedule.  In fact right now the shorebird
migrations have arrived with their multitudes and with an endless
series of expectations and surprises.  There is the spring arrival of
warblers and other migrants as well. These, however are sights that
are almost reserved for the birding community; almost by invitation
only. One has to know where to go and when. The Tree Swallow staging
is a different case altogether.  Anyone who drives down the length of
Plum island on a late August or early September day will encounter
this show and only the incredibly dense or opaque will fail to notice
the packs of Tree Swallows; feeding at the side of the road, roaming
through the air or spread across the road.  To me it would be
heartbreaking if anything happened to this special event.

Therefore it was heartening a few days ago when Lois and I noticed a
few clusters of Tree Swallows near Parking Lot#1 and a few more
scattered up the length of the island.  Today (July 30) there was a
measurable revival of Tree Swallows numbers. Not the dense flocks
that we will eventually see but they are clearly building to a
crescendo. It was a welcome moment when I arrived early enough to
come across a number of swallows just as they began breaking from a
roost they had taken in the phragmites at the small pond by the
Wardens. Even though they were thinning out as I watched, there was
about 100 tree swallows in the group; many of them new boys; along
with seventeen Barn Swallows and a dozen Bank Swallows.  Clearly it
has begun. One of the grand annual events on Plum island has started.


Yesterday Lois and I came across, or at least heard, four Great
Crested flycatchers in the S Curves very near the Tick Farm.  They
were calling out to one another in their distinctive first note
"weep" : no doubt a family group keeping in touch. The one Flycatcher
I actually saw was clearly a juvenile; a little scruffy and a bit
clumsy, as it flew from a roadside perch and dove into a thickly
leafed cherry tree. Young birds at the roadside; the flats at Bill
Forward filling up with shorebirds on the rising tide; and the Tree
Swallows gathering for a spectacular show. The returning warblers
will be flicking in the trees before we know it.  Every year. The
Greatest Show on earth; or at least in Eastern Massachusetts. Can
there be anything finer?

Doug Chickering
Groveland
dovekie AT comcast.net

Subject: 2014 AOU Check-list Supplement
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT theworld.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 08:52:03 -0400
The 2014 AOU Check-list Supplement is out.

You'll find a nice summary by the ABA here:

http://blog.aba.org/2014/07/2014-aou-check-list-supplement-is-out.html
Every summer, birders anxiously await publication of the "Check-list 
Supplement" by the American Ornithologists' Union's North American 
Classification Committee (NACC). The Supplement details revisions to 
its Check-list (e.g., lumps, splits, new species, new 
classifications, etc.). Below is a brief rundown of those changes...

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com
Subject: The Greatest Show On earth
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT theworld.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 08:08:00 -0400
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:47:30 +0000 (UTC)
From: dovekie AT comcast.net
Subject: The Greatest Show On earth


Massbirders:

Last week when Lois and I birded Plum Island I couldn't help but 
notice that I had trouble finding a Tree Swallow. In fact, there was 
a day when we couldn't find one at all.  I found this most peculiar 
and a cause for concern. Just when I expected to see the first 
indications of the oncoming staging of the Tree Swallows; that 
glorious and awe inspiring annual spectacle, I was finding quite the 
opposite.  No Tree Swallows.They had nested here and brought forth 
their fledgies and had proceeded to feed in modest numbers, up and 
down the island.  Just as they had always done.  Now suddenly they 
had vanished.  I suspected that my memory of the middle of July was 
somehow faulty; that this happened every year but that I just failed 
to notice it.  Still I was haunted by the possibility that something 
had gone awfully wrong. I even paused at one point to inspect some 
Bayberry bushes at the side of the road. I was somewhat encouraged by 
the fact that the berries were numerous but still a time away from 
being ripe. Although I fully subscribe to the warnings and findings 
of the scientific community about the decline of bird species, I also 
reflexively recoil from the more apocalyptic visions. I suppose I am 
a hopeless optimist but I couldn't imagine a deep summer on the 
island without the greatest Show on earth; the staging of the Tree 
Swallows.

Of course Plum island has other bird extravaganzas occurring on a 
regular, reliable schedule.  In fact right now the shorebird 
migrations have arrived with their multitudes and with an endless 
series of expectations and surprises.  There is the spring arrival of 
warblers and other migrants as well. These, however are sights that 
are almost reserved for the birding community; almost by invitation 
only. One has to know where to go and when. The Tree Swallow staging 
is a different case altogether.  Anyone who drives down the length of 
Plum island on a late August or early September day will encounter 
this show and only the incredibly dense or opaque will fail to notice 
the packs of Tree Swallows; feeding at the side of the road, roaming 
through the air or spread across the road.  To me it would be 
heartbreaking if anything happened to this special event.

Therefore it was heartening a few days ago when Lois and I noticed a 
few clusters of Tree Swallows near Parking Lot#1 and a few more 
scattered up the length of the island.  Today (July 30) there was a 
measurable revival of Tree Swallows numbers. Not the dense flocks 
that we will eventually see but they are clearly building to a 
crescendo. It was a welcome moment when I arrived early enough to 
come across a number of swallows just as they began breaking from a 
roost they had taken in the phragmites at the small pond by the 
Wardens. Even though they were thinning out as I watched, there was 
about 100 tree swallows in the group; many of them new boys; along 
with seventeen Barn Swallows and a dozen Bank Swallows.  Clearly it 
has begun. One of the grand annual events on Plum island has started. 


Yesterday Lois and I came across, or at least heard, four Great 
Crested flycatchers in the S Curves very near the Tick Farm.  They 
were calling out to one another in their distinctive first note 
"weep" : no doubt a family group keeping in touch. The one Flycatcher 
I actually saw was clearly a juvenile; a little scruffy and a bit 
clumsy, as it flew from a roadside perch and dove into a thickly 
leafed cherry tree. Young birds at the roadside; the flats at Bill 
Forward filling up with shorebirds on the rising tide; and the Tree 
Swallows gathering for a spectacular show. The returning warblers 
will be flicking in the trees before we know it.  Every year. The 
Greatest Show on earth; or at least in Eastern Massachusetts. Can 
there be anything finer?

Doug Chickering
Groveland
dovekie AT comcast.net
Subject: Common Ravens, Plymouth
From: Kathryn Doyon <gizzybird AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 04:34:49 -0700
While walking my dog at Forges Field in Plymouth, this morning about 7:00am,  I 
saw 3 Common Ravens. I attempted to take a few photos with my phone. None are 
great photos, but hopefully will work for a confirmed ID, if needed.  I talked 
to another walker who said that they are seen there frequently. Nice start to 
my morning. 


Kathy Doyon
Manomet, MA
Gizzybird AT verizon.net
Subject: CT Report 07/30/2014 Rufous Humm
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 22:16:47 -0400
 From Mark Szantyr:
07/30/14 - Kent -- Joy and I paid a visit to the Makarewich home  in
Kent and enjoyed the male Rufous Hummingbird they are hosting.  They
are wonderful folks who made us feel very welcomed.  The gallery above
shows the bird and that it has a distinctly damages proximal portion
of its bill.  It appears to be missing some sheathing.  It is still
very active and feeds well.

 From Emily and Dan Rottino:
07/30/14 - Meriden, Castle Craig -- 11:21 AM; 2 Peregrine Falcons seen
from I-691.

 From John Oshlick:
07/30/14 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 1 Red Knot and 1 Black Skimmer.

 From Peter DeGennaro:
07/30/14 - West Hartford, West Farms Mall -- While waiting for the
bus, I watched 5 Common Ravens move into the parking lot chasing away
all nearby gulls, pigeons, and crows.
Subject: Birds of West Africa
From: Linda Ferraresso <tattler1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 21:26:01 -0400
Can someone recommend a good field guide to birds of West Africa?  A 
friend has just moved to Mali (her husband is in the foreign service) 
and she has written that the birds are incredible but she needs a good 
guide to ID them.  A budding birder maybe???

Please reply off line.
Thanks
Linda

-- 
Linda Ferraresso
Salem, MA
tattler1(at)comcast(dot)net

"Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark" 
- Tagore 

Subject: Bent Life Histories
From: George W Gove <gwgove AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:06:28 -0400
I have the following A.C. Bent Life Histories of North American birds 
and I would like to give them free to anyone interested. All are titled 
"Life Histories of North American..."

  * Shore Birds

  * Cuckoos, Goatsuckers, Hummingbirds etc.

  * Jays, Crows, and Titmice

  * Cardinals, Grosbeaks, Buntings, Towhees, Finches, Sparrows etc.

  * North American Wood Warblers

All of the above except Wood Warblers are Dover Publications and each 
are in 2 volumes.
Wood Warblers is Bulletin 203 of the Smithsonian, US National Museum, 
and is in 1 volume.

Please contact me off line if interested. Thanks.


George Gove
Southboro

Subject: Bent Life Histories
From: George W Gove <gwgove AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:06:28 -0400
I have the following A.C. Bent Life Histories of North American birds 
and I would like to give them free to anyone interested. All are titled 
"Life Histories of North American..."

  * Shore Birds

  * Cuckoos, Goatsuckers, Hummingbirds etc.

  * Jays, Crows, and Titmice

  * Cardinals, Grosbeaks, Buntings, Towhees, Finches, Sparrows etc.

  * North American Wood Warblers

All of the above except Wood Warblers are Dover Publications and each 
are in 2 volumes.
Wood Warblers is Bulletin 203 of the Smithsonian, US National Museum, 
and is in 1 volume.

Please contact me off line if interested. Thanks.


George Gove
Southboro

Subject: Eastern Mass Hi-Lites - 7/21-7/25
From: Steve Arena <pokedaddy151 AT aim.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:18:10 -0400


Last week Amy O'Neill and I birded eastern Mass. Here is a quick synopsis of 
places and birds/wildlife seen: 

 
7/21: Whale watch out of Gloucester on the 7 Seas with Capt. Jay. A spectacular 
trip with great whales and seabirds. The hi-lite were the whales. At one point 
we had three (3) mother-calf pairs around the boat actively feeding and 
checking us out. Pelagic bird wise, it was very productive. Dave Williams 
already reported the number of birds Amy and I estimated. It was wonderful to 
have so many great views of pelagics. Capt. Jay took special care to seek out 
birds for us on the way back. Kudos to him and the 7 Seas outfit. Here are a 
couple of images from the trip: 


Cory's Shearwater - 120 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14533750338/
Great Shearwater - 50 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14697403456/
Manx Shearwater - 2 - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14717223091/in/photostream/ 

Sooty Shearwater - 3
Wilson's Storm-Petrel - ~200 - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14720403855/in/photostream/ 


 
We then headed up to PRNWR where we treated to a Ruddy Duck at Hellcat: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14533748459/ 

 
7/22: We started the day at PRNWR. It was a really beautiful day that was made 
better by spending time in the Bill Forward Blind with Paul Roberts, his wife, 
and Rick Heil. Bird wise, it was nice. Hi-lights include: 


Black Skimmer - 1 - Stage Island - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14594390149/ 

American Bittern - 1 - adult in heavy wing molt, Stage Island.
Little Blue Heron - 1 - immature, Stage Island.
American Avocet - 1 of 2 birds present - Hellcat - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14780708072/ 

Stilt Sandpiper - 1 adult, thanks to Rick - Hellcat - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14594552657/ 

Hudsonian Godwit - 2 - 1 in high breeding plumage and one drab individual - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14777908951/ 


 
7/23: Tern Island Mud Flats, Chatham. We canoed out to the mud flats at just 
the right time to observe many shorebirds and terns. It was very windy. 
Hi-lites included: 


American Oystercatcher - 2 - including this banded individual - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14585032097/ 

Red Knot - 257 adults - really nice to see so many - 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14584866928/ 


 At Morris Island in Chatham there was one adult Black Tern.

7/24: We started the day at Hatches Harbor. The horizon was littered with 
birds. We observed several hundred Cory's Shearwater feeding in tight clusters. 
We did have one dark Parasitic Jaeger plying its wares. There were also decent 
numbers (in the 20s) of Wilson's Storm-Petrels 

 
We went to Race Point and were treated to two Fin Whales that were feeding off 
shore. We first HEARD them and then saw them as they rapidly worked the waters. 
We also had two Minke Whales. 

 
We then canoed out to the mud flats in Nauset Marsh. It was pretty windy and 
cold but birds were present. At this point, I counted 53 Red Knots. The 
surprise bird was an ADULT YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON that flushed from the 
marsh next to our canoe. 

 
We returned to Hatches Harbor in the late afternoon when lighting conditions 
improved. We had looks at Roseate and Common Terns. We were treated to four (4) 
Parasitic Jaegers as they slowly circled and soared off of the bay, over the 
terns and gulls, and across the cape towards Race Point. We were so busy 
scoping the terns that it wasn't until 1 of the 4 called from overhead did we 
get on them. Here is a record type shot. 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14748496276/ The terns and gulls 
somehow knew the PAJAs were not in bandit mode and did not flush up. We were 
treated to a stunning sunset: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14594391387/ 

 
7/25: Hatches Harbor again at daybreak. This time the terns were nicely grouped 
and in excellent light. We spent considerable time with the terns and got 
excellent views of both Common and Roseate Terns. The tern grad students and 
volunteers were very helpful and informative. There were: 


Common Tern - ~400 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14571931150/
Roseate Tern - ~50 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14738229266/ ; 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14574536010/ 

Little Gull - 3 - observed on the walk back to Herring Cove parking lot - 
video: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14800680063/ 


 We revisited Nauset Marsh by canoe and were treated to huge numbers of birds 
in excellent light. 


Terns - ~ 1500, mostly common
Caspian Tern - 2 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14791369453/ and 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14780471242/ 

Lesser Black-backed Gull - 5 at least
Black Skimmer - 2 adults - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14584796470/

 
We then made our way to Plymouth Airport and were treated to:

Vesper Sparrow - 3 including 1 juv
Grasshopper Sparrow - 2 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14780898045/
We did not see any Upland Sandpipers.

 
Lastly, we made our way to Plymouth Beach after hooking up with Amy's son Liam 
Waters. We got out to the tip fairly quickly and were treated to many terns, 
shorebirds, and gulls. Hi-lites include: 


Black Tern - 1 - full adult that came in high from the ENE, circled Plymouth 
Bay by Bug Light, and the headed off again to the ENE 

Black Skimmer - 2 
Arctic Tern - 1 - adult
Roseate Tern - 3 at least
Herring Gull Chicks were out and were well protected by their parents.  

Chicks:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14771168852/
Protective Parent:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/14585029727/

On the long walk back, we were surrounded by the piping and whistles of many 
Piping Plovers. 


 

Steve





 
 

-------------------------------------------------
Steve Arena
 
Westborough, MA    
PokeDaddy151 AT aol.com
 

Photos:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/ 



Subject: Gooseberry migrants this morning
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 12:53:46 -0400
This morning was idyllic out on Gooseberry Neck in Westport. As overnight radar 
had indicated, a handful of migrants were moving south and we ended up with 
about that many during the 45 minutes I was there. We had at least 4 
waterthrush, two of which were confirmed Northerns, 3 American Redstarts, and a 
half dozen Yellow Warblers. We also had a few misses, one of which was a 
smaller and more compact warbler than the accompanying Yellow (Parula?). A 
Black-bellied, several Semipalmated Plovers, Turnstone, Pectoral Sandpiper, and 
Least Sandpipers were trickling by, and I flushed a a Peregrine Falcon from the 
beach as I departed. Later, a pair of Solitary Sandpipers were seen passing by. 
Interestingly, there were almost no Laughing Gulls after the stream of them 
moving by yesterday. The nearly dead calm conditions were not conducive to 
forcing migrants through/over the island as much as during moderate northerly 
breezes. 


Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA

Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Great Meadows NWR - Concord, Weekly species census
From: Kat Birder <katbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 11:42:29 -0400
Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Middlesex, US-MA
Jul 30, 2014 6:01 AM - 10:51 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Weekly species census for the NWR. Mostly sunny, mid- 50's F
early warming to mid 70's F. Observers: Will Martens, Maryellen Stone,
Soheil Zendeh, Andy Scholten, Kathy Dia. We also met ornithology grad
student Charles who joined us for a while. 
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.5.3 55 species (+1 other taxa) Canada Goose 26 Wood Duck 10 American Black Duck 1 Mallard 8 Least Bittern 1 Spotted by Will flying in Upper Pool Great Blue Heron 11 Great Egret 2 Osprey 1 Fishing in Lower Pool, 10:45 am Accipiter sp. 1 Red-tailed Hawk 2 Flying on a thermal together Killdeer 1 Spotted Sandpiper 1 Solitary Sandpiper 1 Ring-billed Gull 1 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6 Mourning Dove 21 Most near the river Chimney Swift 2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 5 Various locations: start of Dike Tr. , two together and one single on Dike Tr river side of Lower pool, one on Timber Tr. Feeding on jewelweed or gathering insects from buttonbushes. Belted Kingfisher 1 Possibly two Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 Downy Woodpecker 7 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 3 Family group Eastern Wood-Pewee 5 Including family group on Timber Tr. Willow Flycatcher 2 Eastern Phoebe 1 Great Crested Flycatcher 2 Eastern Kingbird 6 Warbling Vireo 2 Blue Jay 8 American Crow 1 Tree Swallow 9 Barn Swallow 22 Black-capped Chickadee 17 Tufted Titmouse 8 White-breasted Nuthatch 9 Marsh Wren 27 Careful count, continuing birds Carolina Wren 1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 7 Eastern Bluebird 3 American Robin 16 Gray Catbird 9 Cedar Waxwing 4 Common Yellowthroat 5 Yellow Warbler 16 Pine Warbler 1 Chipping Sparrow 1 Song Sparrow 29 Careful count; juveniles now feeding themselves often on the path Swamp Sparrow 7 Northern Cardinal 2 Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 Heard near restrooms Red-winged Blackbird 78 Common Grackle 12 Brown-headed Cowbird 1 River Baltimore Oriole 1 House Finch 1 American Goldfinch 18 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19270081 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) Kathy Dia Concord, MA
Subject: Dark-eyed Junco / Newbury
From: Lynette Leka <lynetteleka AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 06:28:22 -0700
I've occasionally noticed a male around my yard this summer - he just jumped up 
to the bird bath for a drink; I'm surprised that one is here at the coast... 



------------------------------------

Lynette Leka


Newbury, MA 01951


email: lynette.leka AT yahoo.com
Subject: CT Report 07/29/2014 Rufous Hum, WS Petrel
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 22:19:39 -0400
 From Charles Makarewich:
07/29/14 - Kent, Kent Hollow -- Rufous Hummingbird at feeder.
Brilliant in color and, never having seen one, assume it to be an
adult male. Have a lot of great photos. 

 From Nick Bonomo with Glenn Williams, Phil Rusch, and Andy
Griswold in part:
07/29/14 - Old Lyme, Griswold Pt with GW and PR -- flyby SOLITARY
SANDPIPER, a single CLIFF SWALLOW.
Old Lyme, offshore with AG, GW and PR -- We set up a fish oil slick
around 11:00 AM at 41.230619, -72.303386 on a 10-15mph breeze from the
west. After 30-45 minutes of chumming, a single WILSON'S STORM-PETREL
flew in directly from the east. The bird worked the slick briefly
before moving on. Another half-hour of chumming produced no more
birds.
Lower CT River from Deep River to Essex with AG, GW and PR -- 16
FORSTER'S TERNS including family groups with begging juveniles. Some
of these could be scoped from the Deep River town dock looking up
river.
Guilford, Shell Beach Rd marsh with GW and PR -- 2 adult LITTLE BLUE
HERONS, continuing STILT SANDPIPER and LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER (the only
dowiticher on site while we were there), and a PECTORAL SANDPIPER.

 From John Oshlick:
07/29/14 - Guilford, Shell Beach -- 1 Long-billed Dowitcher, 1 Stilt
Sandpiper.

 From Hank Golet:
07/29/14 - Westbrook, Menunketesuck River, Kayak, between Rt 145 and
RR track -- SOLITARY SP, 3 LITTLE BLUE HERONS.

 From Paul Desjardins:
07/29/14 - Windsor, Northwest Park -- about 8 or so Orchard Orioles.

 From Chris Loscalzo:
07/29/14 - Guilford, Leete's Island (Shell Beach) marsh -- the
Long-billed Dowitcher continues.  Also seen: one Pectoral Sandpiper,
in one of the shallow pools at the western most side of the marsh,
near the osprey platform.  No sign of the Stilt Sandpipers.

 From Aidan Kiley:
07/28/14 - Milford, Milford Point -- 1 White-winged Scoter, 1
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron.

Subject: Plum Island this morning
From: brianrfg AT aol.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 17:08:41 -0400 (EDT)
Hi Massbirders,
 The main action at Plum Island this morning seemed to be at Bill Forward Pool, 
where there were about 2000 or so shorebirds, the vast majority Semipalmated 
Plovers and Semipalmated Sandpipers, followed, in order of abundance, greatest 
to fewest (at least to my eye) : Short-billed Dowitcher, Least Sandpiper, 
Black-bellied Plover, Stilt Sandpiper, Lesser Yellowlegs, Greater Yellowlegs, 
Hudsonian Godwit, White-rumped Sandpiper, Spotted Sandpiper. 

 A Yellow-billed Cuckoo put in a brief appearance, flying over to the tower, 
perching in the tree there for a minute or so, and then flying back across the 
marsh to the woods. 

     Brian Cassie, Foxboro
Subject: Short Beach Nahant - Black Skimmers
From: lpivacek AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:25:55 +0000 (UTC)
Nahant--Short Beach 
Jul 29, 2014 8:50 AM - 9:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
0.2 mile(s) 
Comments: seen initially from my house. went to Short Beach for closer look at 
Black Skimmers.. 

12 species 

Common Eider 24 
Semipalmated Plover 10 
Sanderling 24 
Semipalmated Sandpiper 140 
Bonaparte's Gull 150 
Ring-billed Gull 6 
Herring Gull 34 
Great Black-backed Gull 3 
Common Tern 2 
Black Skimmer 2 unmistakable in adult plumage . black upperparts, white 
underside, large orange bill with black tip and longer lower mandible. bright 
orange legs. long wings. 

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2 
House Sparrow 4 

Cheers! 
Linda 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19257687 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 ( http://ebird.org ) 


Linda Pivacek, Nahant, 
lpivacek AT comcast.net 
Subject: Gooseberry this morning
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 10:39:22 -0400
The late passage of last night's front kept most migratory movement to our west 
(Finger Lakes region of NY had a really heavy migration night). That didn't 
stop a few migrants from moving, among which were 28 YELLOW WARBLERS, 4 
AMERICAN REDSTARTS, a BANK SWALLOW, and a constant stream of mainly imm. 
LAUGHING GULLS heading east to west (an annual passage of this species that can 
max out in the many thousands per day - about 500 today). 


Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Re: Bird ID help?
From: jon giacomini <rg9403 AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:56:49 -0700
Hi Dan,

Looks clearly like a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak to me.  

-jonathan


On Monday, July 28, 2014 3:04 PM, Dan M  wrote:
 


So I now know that (a) the list can't take image attachments and (b) if you try 
to include an imgur image link, it thinks you're a spammer :) 

That said, here's the photo my wife took of the bird at Plum Island 
yesterday... 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/126590165 AT N06/14769415342/

...Tom Wetmore (who somehow got the image) ID'ed it as a Rose-breasted 
Grosbeak, clearly a female, and that definitely looks right to me.  Never seen 
one of them before! 


Cheers,
-Dan





On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 9:57 PM, Dan M  wrote:

Hello all,
>
>
>Saw this bird very fleetingly at Plum Island today, as it flew from tree to 
tree.  My wife snapped the photo -- it was pretty far away, but hopefully 
enough distinguishing marks are visible that it should be identifiable to 
someone who knows more than I do :) 

>
>
>
>
>
>
>Best,-Dan 
Subject: Fwd: Quabbin loon banding
From: Joshua Rose <opihi AT mindspring.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 00:16:05 -0400
Hi MassBirders,

My wife came across this article and accompanying video. I thought some here 
might enjoy it: 



http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2014/07/chasing_loons_banding_the_elus.html 


Good birding,

Josh


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi



Subject: CT Report 07/28/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:33:20 -0400
 From Frank Mantlik:
07/28/14 - Guilford, Shell Beach Rd, salt marsh pools opposite red
house -- adult STILT SANDPIPER continues at 9:15 AM, along with many
other usual shorebirds.  A bit later... in addition there is now an
adult LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER feeding by itself (and apart from 4
Short-billed Dowitchers). Rich Rusty underparts, white barred
undertail coverts, very long bill (probably female), exhibiting hump-
back and pot belly ("swallowed a grapefruit look").

 From Paul Desjardins:
07/28/14 - Suffield, Suffield Wildlife Management Area -- Grasshopper
Sparrow and Eastern Meadowlark.
East Granby, East Granby Farms -- Black Billed Cuckoo.

 From Maria Stockmal:
07/28/14 - Milford, Milford point -- Red Knot, Yellow-crowned
Night-Heron, White-winged Scoter.

 From Dan, Emily and Danny Rottino:
07/28/14 - Milford, Coastal Center -- 8:00 AM; 2 RED KNOT.
Guilford, Shell beach -- 1:00 PM; 1 STILT SANDPIPER, then at 6:00 PM
(just Dan); 1 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER and 2 STILT SANDPIPER.

 From Chris Loscalzo, Patrick Comins, Paul and Maureen Wolter:
07/28/14 - Guilford, Leete's Island (Shell Beach) Marsh -- one
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER, and two STILT SANDPIPERS.

 From Chris Loscalzo:
07/28/14 -  Westbrook, Menunketesuck River Marsh (observed from the
SBM NWR Salt Meadow Unit) -- Seven LITTLE BLUE HERON (four adults and
three juveniles).

 From Don Morgan:
07/27/14 - Windham, Boston Hollow/Yale Forest -- 1 Yellow-bellied
Sapsucker, 1 Brown Creeper, 

Subject: OT: Maine Tropicbird - again
From: James Purcell <jpurcell1616 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:10:39 -0400
Again, I apologize for the off-topic post again, but Alex Burdo and I
unfortunately missed the tropicbird last week with a lot of bad luck and we
are thinking about going again this Sunday and Monday, the 4th and 5th,
staying over in Vinalhaven on Sunday night and then Monday night if
necessary (if we miss the bird on Sunday, we would be going out again on
Monday).

Please let me know if you have interest in joining us and email me off-list
at jpurcell1616 AT gmail.com

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT
Subject: question regarding birds eating slugs
From: Lynette Leka <lynetteleka AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:05:07 -0700
passed on from my daughter:


what birds routinely eat slugs, and are they harmed if the slugs have ingested 
'Sluggo', which is the iron phosphate organic-approved anti-slug stuff? 



thanks for any information about this - LL



------------------------------------

Lynette Leka


Newbury, MA 01951


email: lynette.leka AT yahoo.com
Subject: Re: Bird ID help?
From: Dan M <danmbagg AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:45:01 -0400
So I now know that (a) the list can't take image attachments and (b) if you
try to include an imgur image link, it thinks you're a spammer :)

That said, here's the photo my wife took of the bird at Plum Island
yesterday...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/126590165 AT N06/14769415342/

...Tom Wetmore (who somehow got the image) ID'ed it as a Rose-breasted
Grosbeak, clearly a female, and that definitely looks right to me.  Never
seen one of them before!

Cheers,
-Dan



On Sun, Jul 27, 2014 at 9:57 PM, Dan M  wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> Saw this bird very fleetingly at Plum Island today, as it flew from tree
> to tree.  My wife snapped the photo -- it was pretty far away, but
> hopefully enough distinguishing marks are visible that it should be
> identifiable to someone who knows more than I do :)
>
>
>
> Best,
> -Dan
Subject: FW: BBC birding on the Seven Seas Whale-watch boat 7/27/14
From: "Ida Giriunas" <ida8 AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:47:16 -0400
 

Massbirders:

 

It was a fabulous trip today. Five people ventured out with storms
threatening, but we had perfect weather (smooth seas,  overcast then clear
skies,  Lots of birds and whales,   then watching a storm approach  upon
returning to harbor.   .

 

Highlights were 100+ Cory's shearwaters,  100+ Greater Shearwaters,  40+
Manx Shearwaters,  30 + Sooty Shearwaters, only a few Wilson's storm petrels
(10+) and 12 Laughing Gulls,  but one of our participants spotted a RED
PHALAROPE.   However, it was not seen by anyone else.  And,  Oh, yes,
several Hump whales (2 sets of cow and calf pairs) and a few Minke whales. 

 

Ida Giriunas

For the Brookline Bird Club.

 

Reading, MA
Subject: Bear Creek Sanctuary - Rumney Marsh, Saugus, Jul 27, 2014
From: "Soheil Zendeh" <sohzendeh AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:39:28 -0400
Folks,

On Sunday 27 July we resumed our regular Bear Creek walks. Nearly 20 people 
came out and we enjoyed a gorgeous morning of cool weather and breezes, 
finishing just as the first rain drops started. Land birds and shorebirds were 
scarce. Just one Savannah Sparrow seen, out of the hordes that nested there 
earlier in the summer; also very few Bobolinks (I didn't see any, heard one). 
No shorebirds at all were seen. 


Raptors, on the other hand, were aplenty. All three Osprey platforms visible 
from the upland were occupied. We counted (conservatively) 7 Ospreys. It's hard 
to know how many young hatched in each nest, but one nest seemed to have at 
least 2 nearly full-grown young. 


American Kestrels and Redtailed Hawks were in nearly constant view as well.

Our next walk there will be later in August. I will make the announcement in 
time. 


The list below was compiled with the help of Tim O'Malley:

Bear Creek Sanctuary, Saugus, Essex, US-MA Jul 27, 2014 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     High tide at noon. Cldy, breezy
27 bird species

Canada Goose  8
Double-crested Cormorant  51
Great Blue Heron  8
Great Egret  6
Snowy Egret  6
Osprey  7
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Herring Gull  7
Great Black-backed Gull  2
Common Tern  25
Mourning Dove  3
Chimney Swift  6
American Kestrel  2
American Crow  5
Tree Swallow  2
Barn Swallow  8
American Robin  3
European Starling  150
Cedar Waxwing  2
Yellow Warbler  1
Savannah Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  7
Bobolink  2
Red-winged Blackbird  14
House Finch  4
American Goldfinch  25
House Sparrow  2



Soheil Zendeh
42 Baker Avenue
Lexington, MA 02421

cell 617-763-5637
home 781-863-2392

sohzendeh AT gmail.com

TASL website: http://032acf2.netsolhost.com/tasl.htm



Subject: Bird ID help results
From: Paul Guidetti <guidettipaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 08:20:36 -0400
Thanks to so many Massbirders for their feedback on the very poor quality
photos of a woodpecker that my sister took in her yard in Kingston, MA.

Most votes were for red bellied woodpecker with one pileated vote.

What had some folks scratching their heads was the black back on this bird.
Perhaps, as was suggested, this is due to the low quality of the photos.
One birder suggested a partially melanistic bird.

I've asked my sister to try and get better pics of the subject bird so
we'll see...hopefully!

Thanks again!

Paul Guidetti
Tewksbury MA
guidettipaulATgmailDOTcom
Subject: Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Jul 27, 2014
From: Danielle Geller <danielle.geller AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 07:56:06 -0400
I just wanted to chime in and say that I went to Great Meadows yesterday
morning, and I also saw the least bittern! It flew across the main trail
leading toward the river--twice!--but there was too much vegetation in the
way for me to try and snap a picture.

Also saw three belted kingfishers at the river.

Danielle

On Sunday, July 27, 2014, Cliff Cook  wrote:

> I went to Great Meadows later in the afternoon not expecting anything too
> much, given the over growth of Lotus, which has carpeted virtually the
> entire upper and lower pools.  Nonetheless, I was pleasantly surprised.  A
> number of shorebirds are hanging around the upper end of the upper pool,
> roosting out of sight. I was able to hear or see several in flight from the
> bench located by the river path, In addition to the ones recorded below,
> there may have been a Lesser Yellowlegs calling.  Near the shorebird look
> out I came across a patch of bright red Cardinal Flower near the river.
> Nearby, I saw a very hummingbird-like insect a couple inches in size
> briefly hover and inspect a flower for pollinating. A brief internet search
> suggests this was a Hummingbird Clearwing moth - quite interesting.
>
> Along the main dike, by the water control structure, a large number of
> fish of a variety of types have pooled together.  In addition to usual
> monster Carp, several other smaller species were hanging there in large
> numbers.  It appears that oxygen levels are a problem; a number of dead
> fish were floating at or near the surface.  Where there are fish there are
> birds and, in this case, reptiles.  In addition to a Great Blue Heron, a
> Northern Water Snake, and a Snapping Turtle, a medium size Blandings Turtle
> was hanging around.  This is likely my life specimen of the species.  While
> I standing there Dave Hursh, who was there with family, tapped me on the
> shoulder, and we both turned to see a Least Bittern flying by our heads.
> This bird flew about 2/3s of the way into the upper pool and dropped down
> into the Lotus.
>
> Cliff Cook
> Watertown
>
> Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Middlesex, US-MA
> Jul 27, 2014 4:40 PM - 6:10 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> Comments:     Also noted Blandings Turtle, Cardinal Flower
> 31 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose  X
> Wood Duck  1
> Least Bittern  1
> Great Blue Heron  X
> Great Egret  1
> Turkey Vulture  1
> Killdeer  2
> Solitary Sandpiper  1
> Greater Yellowlegs  1
> Least Sandpiper  6
> peep sp.  4
> Mourning Dove  5
> Belted Kingfisher  2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  1
> Eastern Kingbird  X
> Blue Jay  X
> American Crow  X
> Tree Swallow  X
> Barn Swallow  X
> Black-capped Chickadee  X
> Marsh Wren  X
> American Robin  X
> Gray Catbird  X
> Cedar Waxwing  X
> Common Yellowthroat  X
> Song Sparrow  X
> Swamp Sparrow  X
> Northern Cardinal  1
> Red-winged Blackbird  50
> Common Grackle  X
> American Goldfinch  X
>
> View this checklist online at
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19239848
>
>
>
>
Subject: Ward Reservation, Andover/N. Andover, Jul 27, 2014
From: "Jim Berry" <jim.berry3 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 23:20:03 -0400
> Ward Reservation, Andover/N. Andover
> Jul 27, 2014 7:30 AM - 10:45 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     Miles Brengle and I birded the Ward Reservation (a TTOR 
> property) in part to check out a new viewing platform overlooking a huge 
> open brushy swamp.  It proved to be superbly located and well worth the 
> hike.  We birded only the southern portion of the reservation today.
> 41 species; partial list:
>
> Wood Duck  2
> Great Blue Heron  9
> Great Egret  7
> Green Heron  2     all herons in the aforesaid swamp, and all near the 
> viewing platform
> Broad-winged Hawk  1
> Virginia Rail  2     one responded to my sora calls in the swamp
> Barred Owl  2 juveniles, begging and perched together at one point in a 
> pine grove on Holt Hill, the highest point in Essex County at a staggering 
> 420 feet
> Chimney Swift  2
> Belted Kingfisher  1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
> Downy Woodpecker  8
> Northern Flicker  5
> Eastern Wood-Pewee  5
> Eastern Phoebe  4
> Great Crested Flycatcher  2
> Eastern Kingbird  3
> Yellow-throated Vireo  1
> Warbling Vireo  1
> Red-eyed Vireo  2     all three vireo species singing at the viewing 
> platform!  (the 2nd red-eye was elsewhere feeding a cowbird)
> Tree Swallow  20+
> Barn Swallow  10+
> Black-capped Chickadee  12
> Tufted Titmouse  7
> White-breasted Nuthatch  7
> House Wren  2
> Carolina Wren  3
> Eastern Bluebird  8
> Pine Warbler  1     singing male; the only warbler of the day!
> Chipping Sparrow  65+     flocks all over the place, esp. in open fields 
> (I have seen such large flocks before along powerlines in late July)
> Brown-headed Cowbird  1 juvenile, being fed by REVI
>
> View this checklist online at 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19239700


Jim Berry
Ipswich, Mass.
jim.berry3 AT verizon.net
Subject: Bird ID help?
From: Dan M <danmbagg AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 21:57:25 -0400
Hello all,

Saw this bird very fleetingly at Plum Island today, as it flew from tree to
tree.  My wife snapped the photo -- it was pretty far away, but hopefully
enough distinguishing marks are visible that it should be identifiable to
someone who knows more than I do :)



Best,
-Dan
Subject: CT Report 07/27/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 21:57:27 -0400
 From From Greg Hanisek with Newington Adult Ed class:
07/27/14 - Milford, Milford Point - 8-10 a.m. 1 RED KNOT, 3 PECTORAL
SANDPIPERS, 11 sps of shorebirds including 3000+ Semipalmated
Sandpipers.

 From Jim and Jan Sherwonit:
07/27/14 - Lyme -- Today in between rain showers we paddled down the
Lt. River to Watch Rock.  Good look at a Tri-colored Heron.

 From Mike Warner With Tom Murray:
07/26/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- White-faced Ibis
continues in the marsh along the south edge of the Nature Center
parking lot.  Bird seen with 7 other birders.
07/27/14 - Milford, Milford Point Coastal Center -- 3 PM; one Red Knot
retaining a slight blush to the belly on the sandbars with the
dropping tide.

 From Paul and Maureen Wolter:
07/27/14 - Guilford, Leetes Marsh/Shell Beach -- 545 PM; one Stilt
Sandpiper.

 From Michaelene Komara:
07/27/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- Black Skimmer viewable
from Cedar Island platform. Little Blue Heron x Tricolored Heron in
Boulder Pond.

 From Chuck Imbergamo:
07/27/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- A check of the Cedar
Island platform paid off with great looks at a Black Skimmer!

Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Jul 27, 2014
From: Cliff Cook <ccook13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:42:14 -0400
I went to Great Meadows later in the afternoon not expecting anything too
much, given the over growth of Lotus, which has carpeted virtually the
entire upper and lower pools.  Nonetheless, I was pleasantly surprised.  A
number of shorebirds are hanging around the upper end of the upper pool,
roosting out of sight. I was able to hear or see several in flight from the
bench located by the river path, In addition to the ones recorded below,
there may have been a Lesser Yellowlegs calling.  Near the shorebird look
out I came across a patch of bright red Cardinal Flower near the river.
Nearby, I saw a very hummingbird-like insect a couple inches in size
briefly hover and inspect a flower for pollinating. A brief internet search
suggests this was a Hummingbird Clearwing moth - quite interesting.

Along the main dike, by the water control structure, a large number of fish
of a variety of types have pooled together.  In addition to usual monster
Carp, several other smaller species were hanging there in large numbers.
It appears that oxygen levels are a problem; a number of dead fish were
floating at or near the surface.  Where there are fish there are birds and,
in this case, reptiles.  In addition to a Great Blue Heron, a Northern
Water Snake, and a Snapping Turtle, a medium size Blandings Turtle was
hanging around.  This is likely my life specimen of the species.  While I
standing there Dave Hursh, who was there with family, tapped me on the
shoulder, and we both turned to see a Least Bittern flying by our heads.
This bird flew about 2/3s of the way into the upper pool and dropped down
into the Lotus.

Cliff Cook
Watertown

Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Middlesex, US-MA
Jul 27, 2014 4:40 PM - 6:10 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Also noted Blandings Turtle, Cardinal Flower
31 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose  X
Wood Duck  1
Least Bittern  1
Great Blue Heron  X
Great Egret  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Killdeer  2
Solitary Sandpiper  1
Greater Yellowlegs  1
Least Sandpiper  6
peep sp.  4
Mourning Dove  5
Belted Kingfisher  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Kingbird  X
Blue Jay  X
American Crow  X
Tree Swallow  X
Barn Swallow  X
Black-capped Chickadee  X
Marsh Wren  X
American Robin  X
Gray Catbird  X
Cedar Waxwing  X
Common Yellowthroat  X
Song Sparrow  X
Swamp Sparrow  X
Northern Cardinal  1
Red-winged Blackbird  50
Common Grackle  X
American Goldfinch  X

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19239848
Subject: Royal Tern - Long Beach DCR Nahant
From: lpivacek AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:04:06 +0000 (UTC)
posting this for Linda Ferraresso - a Royal Tern roosting with Ring-billed 
Gulls near the Halfway House 10:45am. 



Linda Pivacek, Nahant, 
lpivacek AT comcast.net 
Subject: Plymouth Beach, Jul 26, 2014, skimmer photo
From: Garry Kessler <gkessler001 AT aol.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:35:32 -0400
Following up on Glenn's post, Annie and I walked out the beach at 
Plymouth a bit later than Glenn. I think we saw him walking back as 
we walked out. The male skimmer appeared at the waterline as we made 
our way to the end of the beach. The tide was nearing high tide 
leaving only a sliver of dry sand between the rope line and the 
water. I was surprised that the male let us walk by him without flying.

While out there something spooked the tern/gull colony. Perhaps the 
falcon Glenn reported made another pass. I didn't see it though. 
Thousands of chattering birds, including peeps and short-billed 
dowitchers wheeled around our heads for several minutes. During this 
time both adult skimmers where on the wing sometimes flying quite far 
from shore, returning and flying out again. It was a good show.

Here's a photo of one of the skimmers on the wing. I like that you 
can see most of the bird in this picture. I hadn't noticed how much 
white is in the tail before. Also you can see how worn the feather 
are on the trailing edge of the wing.  Makes me think just how worn 
out parents get raising their kids.

http://garrykessler.zenfolio.com/p595179721/h815cb#h815cb
Click on "Previous" to see earlier photos (not necessarily birds) in 
the stream.

Garry Kessler
Westborough, MA
Subject: Plum Island
From: "Bates, David Westfall,M.D." <DBATES AT partners.org>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 12:09:46 +0000
Black Skimmer at Bill Forward, also one Hudsonian Godwit and two Stilt 
Sandpipers. One Baird's at Stage Island. 


David Bates
Dbates AT partners.org

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: CT Report 07/26/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 23:04:08 -0400
 From Arthur Shippee:
07/26/14 - Hamden, Upper Lake Whitney -- 2 Orchard Oriole, M & F,
Waite St, little meadow at east end of causeway.  F presumably
immature, attentively following around the M, as if awaiting food.

 From Dan Rottino & Family:
07/26/14 - Meriden, Castle Craig -- 6:00 PM; 3 PEREGRINE FALCON AND 2
COMMON RAVEN.  The peregrines put on quite a show with one being
chased off by the other two.  They all made several passes back and
forth directly in front of us.  A great place to see the Peregrines
and Ravens up close.

 From Robert Dixon:
07/26/14 - Sterling yard -- 49 species, including EASTERN
WHIP-POOR-WILL and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO calling before daybreak.

 From Mark Szantyr:
07/26/14 - Salem, RT 85, Burnett's Country Garden -- heard a loud
metallic chip note coming from the rear border of the store. I only
saw the bird twice and both times very briefly but the strong metallic
chip note and size and coloration of the bird was consistent with a
female / first year Blue Grosbeak. Again, I did not see the bird well
enough to be positive but it is worth checking out if you are in the
area. There was also a Yellow- billed Cuckoo calling from the
property.

 From Shai Mitra via Glenn Williams and eBird:
07/25/14 - Orient Point (LI, NY) ferry on the trip to CT -- a Little
Gull seen in CT waters on Friday.

Subject: Plymouth Beach, Jul 26, 2014
From: "Glenn d'Entremont" <gdentremont1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 02:27:45 +0000 (UTC)
A combined South Shore/Brookline Bird Club/Friends of Myles Standish State 
Forest trip had the following. 4 others joined me for a very comfortable (for 
July) walk. THE highlight had to be the Peregrine flushing all the birds out of 
the colony and the beach. Thousands of birds in the air at once, calling and 
carrying on. The skimmer(s) were barking and well seen by all. I had seen one 
bird fly by us and into the colony earlier, but the others could not get on it 
in time. I had moved to adjacent where I thought they went in when the 
Peregrine helped me; we were only 75 or so feet away from the nest site (not 
able to be seen as blocked by dune). Large numbers of Semipalmated Sandpiper 
and Sanderling; must be just arrived as very alarmed-the least amount of 
disturbance and they were flying around. 


Glenn

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: do-not-reply AT ebird.org
To: gdentremont1 AT comcast.net
Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 10:16:43 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Plymouth Beach, Jul 26, 2014

Plymouth Beach, Plymouth, US-MA
Jul 26, 2014 7:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
Comments:     SSBC/BBC/FMSSF trip
49 species

Mallard  19
Double-crested Cormorant  3
Great Blue Heron  4
Great Egret  2
Green Heron  2
Osprey  6
Black-bellied Plover  2
Semipalmated Plover  50
Piping Plover  14
Killdeer  3
Solitary Sandpiper  2
Greater Yellowlegs  5
Willet (Eastern)  8
Sanderling  750
Semipalmated Sandpiper  1500
Short-billed Dowitcher (Atlantic)  500
Laughing Gull  500
Ring-billed Gull  400     1 juv
Herring Gull (American)  X
Great Black-backed Gull  X
Least Tern  60
Common Tern  1000
Black Skimmer  2     Continuing pair, coming and going to unseen nest in colony
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  X
Mourning Dove  19
Chimney Swift  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Peregrine Falcon  1     Flushed all birds in colony and beach
Willow Flycatcher  3
American Crow  8
Horned Lark  1
Tree Swallow  35
Barn Swallow  3
Black-capped Chickadee  2
Carolina Wren  2
American Robin  12
Gray Catbird  4
Northern Mockingbird  6
European Starling  X
Yellow Warbler  6
Song Sparrow  21
Northern Cardinal  2
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Common Grackle  1
Baltimore Oriole  2
House Finch  8
American Goldfinch  2
House Sparrow  X

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19230080 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Rufous Hummingbird - no
From: "Marj. Rines" <marj AT mrines.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:40:32 -0400
I got a note from the homeowner hosting the Rufous Hummingbird in 
Townsend, and she still hasn't seen it today. It's been missing since 
5:30AM yesterday. She has promised to contact me if she sees it again.

She commented, by the way, on how polite and enthusiastic all her 
visitors were.  Nice to hear.

-- 
Marj. Rines
Woburn, MA
marjmrines.com
Subject: ID Help needed!
From: Paul Guidetti <guidettipaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:33:08 -0400
Good afternoon Massbirders!

My sister, a nature loving bird freak, has made some outlandish claims of
late regarding Anna's and black-chinned hummingbirds coming to her rose of
Sharon!

That being said, I usually humor her a bit and say take a picture...well,
she sent me two pictures of a woodpecker that I can't ID!

If you would like to take a shot at it, please email off list and I'll send
you the pics.

Thanks!

Paul Guidetti
Tewksbury MA
Subject: Helens Place in Machias
From: "Myer S. Bornstein" <mborn AT massmed.org>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 11:48:06 -0400
This message was originally HTML formatted. View in a HTML capable client to 
see the original version.\r\n\r\nTo all those who have attended Ida's Fourth of 
July Down East Maine Birding trip will be sorry to here that Helen's Place 
burned to the ground last Friday. The news is that they will rebuild Myer 
Bornstein Photo Bee 1 http://photobee1.blogspot.com/ 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/photobee1/ 
Subject: PRNWR - good shorebirding 7/26
From: Bird Watchers Supply & Gift <birdwsg AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 14:50:19 +0000 (UTC)
We received a call from Oliver Burton around 10:45 this morning reporting some 
good shorebirding on Plum Island. At the Bill Forward Pool Blind, he had 
Pectoral and Baird's Sandpipers, Stilt Sandpiper, Hudsonian Godwits and at 
least one of the American Avocets waas hanging out. 


Good birding everyone! Enjoy your day.

Deb La Roy for

Steve Grinley
Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift
Route 1 Traffic Circle
Newburyport, MA 01950
Birdwsg AT comcast.net
978-462-0775

Subject: Rufous Hummingbird Ph and Owen Big Year Blog Updates!
From: Justin Lawson <justindlawson AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 09:00:13 -0400
Hello all! Here are some photos from this week visiting the Rufous
Hummingbird. The homeowners were great and made it very easy for birders to
enjoy their experience.  Wish it stuck around longer (perhaps it shows back
up)!  Thank you to Jason Forbes for all the information and coordination of
allowing the public to be able to enjoy the bird.  Owen and I are off to
the Cape this week to hopefully get him some missing Terns, Whimbrels, and
Shearwaters!

Owens blog is at http://greatgrayowen.blogspot.com/ he had a great time on
his Puffin trip in northern Maine!

Rufous photos
http://www.flickr.com/photos/justinlawson/

Justin Lawson
Millbury, MA
My Wildlife Photos/Videos
http://www.flickr.com/photos/justinlawson/
My 7 year Old's "little" BIG YEAR Blog
http://greatgrayowen.blogspot.com/
justindlawson ATgmail.com
Subject: RE: Rufous Hummingbird - 24 July 2014
From: "Floyd, Chris" <chrisf AT mitre.org>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:47:43 +0000
I haven't seen word posted that the hummingbird was not seen all day yesterday 
(7/25) after 5:30 AM - to the best of my knowledge. I was there 2:00-2:30 PM. 
Many others had been there throughout the day to that point. 


Chris Floyd
Lexington
chrisf AT mitre.org

-----Original Message-----
From: massbird-approval AT TheWorld.com [mailto:massbird-approval AT TheWorld.com] On 
Behalf Of Margo Goetschkes 

Sent: Friday, July 25, 2014 11:32 PM
To: Massbird
Subject: [MASSBIRD] Rufous Hummingbird - 24 July 2014

Massbirders,

We drove out to Townsend on Thursday afternoon and saw the Rufous Hummingbird 
that Jason Forbes posted earlier in the day. This is a beautiful bird! I have a 
couple of photographs, but they just don't show how stunning this bird really 
is. The homeowners are very welcoming and everyone should try and get out to 
see it! 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/24246528 AT N05/14559452228/in/photostream/

Best Regards,
Margo Goetschkes
Steve Grinley
Cambridge, MA
Subject: Rufous Hummingbird - 24 July 2014
From: Margo Goetschkes <m.goetschkes AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jul 2014 03:31:52 +0000 (UTC)
Massbirders,

We drove out to Townsend on Thursday afternoon and saw the Rufous Hummingbird 
that Jason Forbes posted earlier in the day. This is a beautiful bird! I have a 
couple of photographs, but they just don't show how stunning this bird really 
is. The homeowners are very welcoming and everyone should try and get out to 
see it! 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/24246528 AT N05/14559452228/in/photostream/

Best Regards,
Margo Goetschkes
Steve Grinley
Cambridge, MA
Subject: 3 Kestrels / Newbury
From: Lynette Leka <lynetteleka AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:35:39 -0700
perching on the Pine Island Road utility wires and flying around over the 
marsh; looked like females, maybe juvs? if so, indicating a nesting nearby? if 
not, has migration begun already? 



------------------------------------

Lynette Leka


Newbury, MA 01951


email: lynette.leka AT yahoo.com
Subject: Hummingbird ID?
From: Lynn <blsalinger AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:17:24 -0400
Am sitting next to a pot of red flowers on my patio and twice have been visited 
within six inches of my face by a small hummer, all gray and black. He? She? 
Not sure what species? 


Lynn Salinger
Concord, MA
Blsalinger AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPad
Subject: 101 Yellow Warblers migrating from Gooseberry
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:46:11 -0400
Three of us (Bev King, Dan Logan and I) had to break away at 7:20 after 2 hours 
of observation, but we did manage to stumble across a few migrant warblers, 
consistent with overnight radar observations that showed some birds moving over 
Buzzards Bay until about 3AM. It was a chilly early-fallish morning, but we 
were pleased with 101 YELLOW WARBLERS making the crossing (New record for me at 
Gooseberry; certainly more are moving as I write this), a (almost certainly) 
NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH called in the thickets but was not observed crossing, and 
two yellow ORCHARD ORIOLES (one definite female crossed to the mainland). Other 
transit highlights included 


1 SAVANNAH SPARROW
6 GREAT EGRETS headed off shore 
5 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS 
2 RUDDY TURNSTONES
11 KILLDEER in a flock moving offshore, east to west
1 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER
Other shorebirds were seen on the island but were not observed moving. There 
have been at least a dozen Spotted Sandpipers on the island for a couple weeks. 

Approximately 40 BARN SWALLOWS left the island around dawn, and at least
 4 BANK SWALLOWS joined handfuls of BARN SWALLOWS and TREE SWALLOWS making 
their way off the 

island.

There was a Spizella sparrow in the parking lot, but we never got on it, and We 
observed a constant flow of HOUSE SPARROWS, HOUSE FINCHES, and RED-WINGED 
BLACKBIRDS moving toward shore, but they were probably members of the daily 
commute from a roost out there on the island, and a large flock of HOUSE 
SPARROWS headed back onto the island a couple times. Similarly, a dozen or so 
ROSEATE TERNS mixed in with a few dozen COMMONs and LEASTs may have been 
local/dispersal residents, with all birds moving east to west over the island. 
A COMMON LOON, SURF SCOTER, and 9 BLACK SCOTER were present but have been 
hanging around the island for months. 


Next week may present the next decent movement with westerlies forecast for 
Tues/Wed. 


Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA
 		 	   		  
Subject: CT Report 07/24/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 22:00:18 -0400
 From Maria Stockmal:
07/24/14 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 2 Red-necked Stints.

 From Russ Smiley:
07/24/14 - Madison, Hammonasset Beach SP -- 6:45 PM; White-faced Ibis
seen from Cedar Island platform.

 From Hank Golet:
07/24/14 - Old Lyme, Lord's Cove -- 5 Adult FORSTER'S TERNS.

 From Stefan Martin:
07/24/14 - Greenwich, coast(?) -- The surprise of the evening were 3
separate groups of about 10 Bobolink working their way down. I'm not
sure I've seen Bobolink working the coast this early..

Subject: Townsend Rufous Hummingbird......photos
From: Dan Prima <raptormafia AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:03:46 -0700
Hi Massbirders!   

After enjoying a great morning down at Plum with the Black Skimmer, Ruddy 
Turnstone, Hudsonian Godwit, and many others, I was going to spend the rest of 
my day off being lazy.   


Then I saw the posts on the Rufous Hummingbird and decided it was time for a 
road trip!   


Worth the drive!  What a beautiful bird!    And he was putting on quite the 
show with his territorial behavior, chasing off every other hummingbird that 
dared to come near his newly established turf.   Quite vocal as well!   


Want to publicly say thank you to the nice folks who have opened their doors to 
the birding community and sharing this great bird!   


Photos:https://www.flickr.com/photos/111992153 AT N02/


Good birding!

Dan Prima
Tewksbury MA
raptormafia AT yahoo.com
Subject: Rufus Hummingbird yes
From: Liam Waters <youngeaglewaters AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:16:45 -0400
Very territorial the whole 24 minutes I was there. Only out of sight for ~1 
minute total time! Stunning bird. 


Just east of the house along Dudley rd there is a parking area for Townsend 
state forest where there is a large wet field like thing with a Spotted 
Sandpiper. At the end of Fessenden Hill rd (north on rt 13 ~.2mi) there seems 
to be a good access spot for the State Forest. 


List for Rufus Hummingbird 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19206743 


Sent from my iPod so please excuse any errors. 
Happy Birding,
Liam Waters
Sharon
Subject: Plum Island - Wed. eve.
From: chuckjohnson10 AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:43:00 -0400 (EDT)
Sultry weather last night as I went up to Plum after work. I was particularly 
interested in the Skimmers and Godwits that were reported earlier in the day. 

At the south end of the main pans was 1 Glossy Ibis
At Hellcat, as I was setting up my scope, a Peregrine made several passes over 
the myriad shorebirds there. The 3rd pass essentially cleared out the place so 
I headed on down to Sandy Point. 

Just before the parking area was a young Purple Finch singing an abbreviated 
song. 

The Skimmers were on the oceanside of the beach down toward the point, feeding 
and dozing on a spit. Eventually they crossed over to the "pond" where I 
watched them for 30 minutes or so. Also at the pond were a couple of young 
Common Terns lying on the sand, as well as 3 Ruddy Turnstones that flew right 
past me, calling as they went. 

On the way back to the car, 9 Whimbrels flew overhead and across the channel.
Back at Hellcat, shorebirds were back, including the continuing Avocets. No 
Godwits that I could see. 

On the way out, at dusk, a Northern Harrier was hunting near the Wardens.
Lovely evening!
Chuck Johnson, Devens
chuckjohnson10 AT aol.com  
Subject: Black skimmer, Plum Island
From: Bird Watchers Supply & Gift <birdwsg AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:33:09 +0000 (UTC)
Oakes Spalding called the store to 9:45 to report a Black skimmer at Stage 
Island Pool, PRNWR, Plum Island. 


Barrett Bacall 

Steve Grinley
Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift
Route 1 Traffic Circle
Newburyport, MA 01950
Birdwsg AT comcast.net
978-462-0775

Subject: RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, Townsend-YES
From: Justin Lawson <justindlawson AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:27:25 -0400
Owen and I are currently viewing the bird.(927) Constantly attacking
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. Please see Jason Forbes email about location
Justin Lawson
Millbury
On Jul 24, 2014 8:00 AM, "Jason Forbes"  wrote:

> A Rufous Hummingbird in Townsend was called into Mass Audubon's Wildlife
> Information Line yesterday. It has been there since Sunday, and homeowner
> has graciously given permission for birders to view it. It is located at
> 152 Dudley Road, which opposite and just west of Burgess Road. Next to the
> driveway is some state-owned land with a trailer on it, please park there
> and walk down the driveway. The feeder is located in the back of the house
> on the east end, and to access it, please walk around the WEST (right) end
> of the house to the back yard. Please don't come before 8AM or after 6PM.
>
> The hummingbird (an adult male) is very territorial over the feeder, so
> please stay on the west side of the yard. It appears to be mostly hanging
> out in the cherry tree or the large bush near the feeder. In the hour I
> spent there early in the afternoon, it would stay in the tree until a
> Ruby-throat attempted to go to the feeder, at which point it would chase
> off the intruder, come in for a drink, and then return to the tree or bush.
>
> For anyone ebirding, I submitted a 'stakeout Rufous Hummingbird, Townsend
> (2014)' hotspot, it should be available soon.
>
> Lots of nice birds in the area. If anyone wants to explore, there's lots
> of trails through Townsend State Forest, a WMA, and some town conservation
> land all on Dudley Rd. Bet there are some interesting breeding warblers to
> be found.
> --
> Jason Forbes
> Waltham, MA
> jason AT brewsterslinnet.com
> www.brewsterslinnet.com
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, Townsend
From: Jason Forbes <jason AT brewsterslinnet.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 07:34:12 -0400
A Rufous Hummingbird in Townsend was called into Mass Audubon's Wildlife 
Information Line yesterday. It has been there since Sunday, and homeowner has 
graciously given permission for birders to view it. It is located at 152 Dudley 
Road, which opposite and just west of Burgess Road. Next to the driveway is 
some state-owned land with a trailer on it, please park there and walk down the 
driveway. The feeder is located in the back of the house on the east end, and 
to access it, please walk around the WEST (right) end of the house to the back 
yard. Please don't come before 8AM or after 6PM. 


The hummingbird (an adult male) is very territorial over the feeder, so please 
stay on the west side of the yard. It appears to be mostly hanging out in the 
cherry tree or the large bush near the feeder. In the hour I spent there early 
in the afternoon, it would stay in the tree until a Ruby-throat attempted to go 
to the feeder, at which point it would chase off the intruder, come in for a 
drink, and then return to the tree or bush. 


For anyone ebirding, I submitted a 'stakeout Rufous Hummingbird, Townsend 
(2014)' hotspot, it should be available soon. 


Lots of nice birds in the area. If anyone wants to explore, there's lots of 
trails through Townsend State Forest, a WMA, and some town conservation land 
all on Dudley Rd. Bet there are some interesting breeding warblers to be found. 

--
Jason Forbes
Waltham, MA
jason AT brewsterslinnet.com
www.brewsterslinnet.com



Subject: Plum Island, MA; Tues., 22 July 2014.
From: Richard Heil <rsheil AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:57:44 -0400
TUESDAY, 22 JULY 2014:
PLUM ISLAND Highlights:
Richard S. Heil

Ruddy Duck (1m.) - Continuing at Forward Pool.
Common Loon (11) - Raft far off Emerson Rocks.
Northern Gannet (1 sub-ad.)
Graet Blue Heron (15)
Great Egret (35+)
Snowy Egret (80+)
Green Heron (1 ad.) : Thirty years ago a very common bird on the 
island, now rare.
Black-crowned Night-Heron (1 ad.)
Northern Harrier (1 - 1st-yr. female) - Hellcat.
AMERICAN AVOCET (2) - Pair continuing at Forward Pool.
Black-bellied Plover (22) - Forward Pool.
Semipalmated Plover (480 ads.) : 330 - Forward Pool, 150 - Sandy Pt.
Piping Plover (8+)
Killdeer (7+)
Greater Yellowlegs (17 ads.)
Eastern Willet (25+)
Lesser Yellowlegs (90 ads.)
Hudsonian Godwit (2 ads.)
Ruddy Turnstone (4)
Stilt Sandpiper (7 ads.) - Forward Pool.
Sanderling (35) - Sandy Pt.
Least Sandpiper (150+ ads.)
Pectoral Sandpiper (1) - Flew in off the ocean at Lot One.
Semipalmated Sandpiper (2900+ ads.) : Incl. 2400 - Forward Pool, 500 
- Sandy Pt.; Including a yellow flagged bird at Sandy Point (JK5) 
observed five days earlier at Popham Beach, Maine (by Mike Fahay) 
that had originally been flagged at Warappa Creek, Commewije, 
Surinam, on 23 April 2013: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14543276369/
Short-billed Dowitcher (330 ads.) - Forward Pool.
Short-billed Dowitcher, hendersoni (3 ads.) - Forward Pool: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14543304919/ , 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14727576894/in/photostream/
Bonaparte's Gull (7)
LITTLE GULL (1-1st-summer) : Sandy Pt.: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14706987686/ , 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14543315530/
Laughing Gull (2 ads.)
Ring-billed Gull (410) - Lot one dusk roost.
BLACK SKIMMER (1 ad.) - Sandy Pt.
House Wren (1) : Hellcat parking lot.

Richard S. Heil
S. Peabody, MA
rsheil AT comcast.net

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/?saved=1 

Subject: CT Report 07/23/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:46:57 -0400
NOTE: Free State Park Weekend: On Saturday and Sunday (July 26 & 27)
all CT state parks and museum fees are waived as part of the ongoing
celebration of the state parks centennial.


 From Dan and Danny Rottino:
07/23/14 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 1 CASPIAN TERN.  We first
spotted it just before 7 AM briefly landing in the grassy dune, then
it flew off west past Chick's Seafood possibly with a 2nd.  At 7:30 it
reappeared flying gracefully and directly in front of me so I could
appreciate its massive red bill and dark underside to the outer
primaries.

 From Bill Batsford:
07/23/14 - Milford,  Silver Sands State Park -- Yellow-crowned
Night-Heron.

 From ngela Dimmitt with Matthew Hoyt and Bill Case:
07/23/14 - Sherman, Wimisink Marsh -- 8:30 AM; adult American Bittern
+ 1 juvenile feeding itself.  Also on south pond, all-white LITTLE
BLUE HERON (rare here).

 From Paul Desjardins:
07/23/14 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill meadows -- Solitary Sandpiper.

 From Bev Propen:
07/23/14 - Milford, Milford Point -- 1 FEMALE ORCHARD ORIOLE.

 From Micky Komara:
07/22/14 - Madison, Hammonasset Beach State Park -- A Stilt Sandpiper
was in Boulder Pond around 7 PM Tuesday.  Also in attendance, the
Little Blue x Tricolored Heron.

Subject: Trip Report - BBC Extreme Pelagic - 19 July 2014
From: Jeremiah Trimble <jtrimble AT oeb.harvard.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:15:27 -0400
Dear Massbird,

On Saturday 19 July 2014, a full boat of pelagic enthusiasts boarded the
Helen H bound for the edge of the Continental Shelf some 100 miles south of
Cape Cod.  These trips which are sponsored by the Brookline Bird Club and
organized by Ida Giriunas have been very successful in the past and this
trip was no exception.  First, I would like to extend my thanks to Ida and
the BBC for making these trips possible!  Also, many thanks to my fellow
leaders on the trip including Nick Bonomo, Mark Faherty, Tom Johnson and
special help from Naeem Yusuff.  Finally, many thanks to all the
participants who made the trip a very enjoyable one!

Here is a map of the route taken:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jrtrimble/14538788519/

Bird and other wildlife images can be seen at the following links:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jrtrimble/sets/72157645438457950/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bonxie88/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/9191812 AT N02/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/erikbogh/

Apologies if I forgot other links.

Complete list of species (avian and otherwise!):

Long-tailed Jaeger - 2 (a pair of young birds, one dark and one light, on
the trip back over Nantucket Shoals in the afternoon; excellent views as
these birds circled the boat several times)

jaeger sp. - 1 (early morning; too distant to be certain of ID)

Great Black-backed Gull - 2

Herring Gull - 6

Lesser Black-backed Gull - 1 (over the southern end of Nantucket Shoals)

small shearwater sp. - 1 (this bird may remain unidentified; impressions in
the field and field examination of images suggested Barolo Shearwater but
given the views and the poor distant images, it may prove difficult to be
certain; Manx Shearwater is also a possible candidate; some detailed
examination of photos to follow may prove fruitless!; the bird rocketed by
the boat as we steamed full speed north over the shelf edge from Welker
Canyon, absolutely too fast and far for any possibility of chase (even for
Captain Joe!);  The circumstances could not have been more unfortunate on
this sighting, and although an announcement was quickly made over the loud
speaker, the bird had already vanished;

Audubon's Shearwater - 14+ (minimum count - included 2 groups of 5 - all of
these birds in the warmer water over the edge of shelf or in canyons and
all birds seemed ratty and in heavy molt)

Manx Shearwater - 23+ (all over Nantucket Shoals except see comment under
"small shearwater sp")

Sooty Shearwater - 40 (all early in the morning and in the late afternoon
over Nantucket Shoals)

Great Shearwater - 203 (scattered throughout day but most over the Shoals)

Cory's Shearwater - 115 (many positively ID'd as 'borealis' but some too
distant or fast; seen throughout day)

'Scopoli's' Shearwater - 2+ (photographed; possibly more)

Wilson's Storm-Petrel - 225 (seen throughout the day; chumming efforts in
Hydrographer Canyon and off the shelf edge attracted several large groups
of up to 80 WISP and also brought in some other excellent birds)

Leach's Storm-Petrel - 39 (seen very frequently especially in deeper waters
but throughout day; many great views of birds coming into chum slick behind
and around boat; provided excellent comparisons with Band-rumped
Storm-Petrels);

Band-rumped Storm-Petrel - 8+ (difficult to estimate these birds as they
tended to come into the chum slicks we laid out and disappear for some time
before returning (or perhaps multiple individuals involved whole time;
maximum of 3 in one chum slick off the shelf edge; a mix of molt stages on
these birds from fresh (?) to a ratty bird with three very worn retained
outer primaries; excellent views of birds very close to boat in our chum
slick;)

White-faced Storm-Petrel - 1 (fresh looking bird seen just as we reached
Hydrographer Canyon; we were all afforded exceptional views of this bird as
it kangarooed its way around the boat which Captain Joe deftly maneuvered
to keep us on this bird for several minutes; many good photos obtained);

Bottlenosed Dolphin - 2+

Short-beaked Common Dolphin - 66 (several groups;)

STRIPED DOLPHIN - 125+ (Very unusual; Mega!; a life mammal for most on
board; very cool, boldly-patterned and acrobatic, small dolphins; single
large pod which provided great views; a few even came in to briefly bow
ride)

Risso's Dolphin - 7

Minke Whale - 3

Finback Whale - 3

Large whale sp. - 5

Portuguese Man-o'-War - 1 (interestingly, fairly far up on shelf edge)

Yellow-tailed Flying Fish (Black-winged?) - 10+

Sargassum Midget (boldly yellow patterned flying fish) - 2+

Flying fish spp. - 30+

filefish sp. - dip netted out of sargassum; photo review needed;

Small shark sp. - 1


For all participants interested in having the checklists shared with your
eBird account, please send me your eBird username and I will arrange to
have the checklist shared with you.

Thanks again!

Good birding,

Jeremiah Trimble
Cambridge, MA





-- 
Jeremiah Trimble
Curatorial Associate - Ornithology
Museum of Comparative Zoology
Harvard University
26 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
phone: 617-495-2471
fax: 617-495-5667
email: jtrimble AT oeb.harvard.edu
Subject: Call note resource for European Golden Plover
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:21:48 -0400
Hi all,

I know there are many resources that can be easily accessed to get to know the 
various calls of European Golden Plover (which we might want to bone up on this 
season), but I figured I'd pass on my favorite: 


http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Pluvialis-apricaria?pg=1

The New Jersey list has an informative bit of information posted in it (copied 
below). 


Watch those wet fields!
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA

I can only speak of birds in Scotland they are not at all like the

American ones in habit or habitat choice. They are more akin to Lapwing or

even American Robins. They like fields with sheep or cattle and they prefer

damp areas near a pond or small lake to roost communally. I doubt if I have

ever come across a solitary European GP. Remember however the ones I saw

were either waiting to go on the hills to breed or spending the winter near

the open water. They do not like hard frost and would move to the shore

areas / grass effected by the warmer ocean and not mud and spend the frost

times there. Dogleg at Brig springs to mind.

So I suspect there will be birds on Sod fields with water close by though

are more likely to be found near muddy field with livestock like the

Lapwings were in a few years ago.

Bill Elrick - See more at: 

http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=739351&MLID=NJ01&MLNM=New%20Jersey#sthash.x8VoJTJS.dpuf 

From the NJ list:

"I can only speak of birds in Scotland they are not at all like the American 
ones in habit or habitat choice. They are more akin to Lapwing or even American 
Robins. They like fields with sheep or cattle and they prefer damp areas near a 
pond or small lake to roost communally. I doubt if I have ever come across a 
solitary European GP. Remember however the ones I saw were either waiting to go 
on the hills to breed or spending the winter near the open water. They do not 
like hard frost and would move to the shore areas / grass effected by the 
warmer ocean and not mud and spend the frost times there. Dogleg at Brig 
springs to mind. So I suspect there will be birds on Sod fields with water 
close by though are more likely to be found near muddy field with livestock 
like the Lapwings were in a few years ago. 


The European birds that I would see

often, during the after breeding dispersal were often right next to a major

motorway and huge roundabout junction. This was one if busiest areas in the

south Glasgow area. They are therefore not at all scared of movements by

large numbers of cars and trucks so could turn up easily in Hackensack and

Secaucus type Urban areas.

Again I am only talking about my experience of Scottish birds, though they

could easily have been Icelandic or Greenland overwintering birds. I would

say more likely to be in Pectoral Sandpiper habitat than Golden Plover

habitat.

So to summaries watch all grassy areas not just the usual sod farms or lone

beaches we usually search for American GP.

If you see a small unusual grass area with a  Golden plover that prick's

your interest and you say to yourself that is an odd place for a GP , then

give it extra scrutiny. - See more at: 

http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=739379&MLID=NJ01&MLNM=New%20Jersey#sthash.9jZNrouS.dpufThe 
European birds that I would see often, during the after breeding dispersal were 
often right next to a major motorway and huge roundabout junction. This was one 
if busiest areas in the south Glasgow area. They are therefore not at all 
scared of movements by large numbers of cars and trucks so could turn up easily 
in Hackensack and Secaucus type Urban areas. 


Again I am only talking about my experience of Scottish birds, though they 
could easily have been Icelandic or Greenland overwintering birds. I would say 
more likely to be in Pectoral Sandpiper habitat than Golden Plover habitat. 


So to summaries watch all grassy areas not just the usual sod farms or lone 
beaches we usually search for American GP. If you see a small unusual grass 
area with a Golden plover that prick's your interest and you say to yourself 
that is an odd place for a GP , then give it extra scrutiny. 


Bill Elrick"
I can only speak of birds in Scotland they are not at all like the

American ones in habit or habitat choice. They are more akin to Lapwing or

even American Robins. They like fields with sheep or cattle and they prefer

damp areas near a pond or small lake to roost communally. I doubt if I have

ever come across a solitary European GP. Remember however the ones I saw

were either waiting to go on the hills to breed or spending the winter near

the open water. They do not like hard frost and would move to the shore

areas / grass effected by the warmer ocean and not mud and spend the frost

times there. Dogleg at Brig springs to mind.

So I suspect there will be birds on Sod fields with water close by though

are more likely to be found near muddy field with livestock like the

Lapwings were in a few years ago.

Bill Elrick - See more at: 

http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=739351&MLID=NJ01&MLNM=New%20Jersey#sthash.x8VoJTJS.dpuf 

I can only speak of birds in Scotland they are not at all like the

American ones in habit or habitat choice. They are more akin to Lapwing or

even American Robins. They like fields with sheep or cattle and they prefer

damp areas near a pond or small lake to roost communally. I doubt if I have

ever come across a solitary European GP. Remember however the ones I saw

were either waiting to go on the hills to breed or spending the winter near

the open water. They do not like hard frost and would move to the shore

areas / grass effected by the warmer ocean and not mud and spend the frost

times there. Dogleg at Brig springs to mind.

So I suspect there will be birds on Sod fields with water close by though

are more likely to be found near muddy field with livestock like the

Lapwings were in a few years ago.

Bill Elrick - See more at: 

http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=739351&MLID=NJ01&MLNM=New%20Jersey#sthash.x8VoJTJS.dpuf 

Subject: Seabirds and Whales trips out of Newburyport Harbor later this summer
From: David Larson <dlarson AT massaudubon.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:36:35 +0000
I will be resuming our Seabirds and Whales trips out of Newburyport Harbor 
aboard the Captain's Lady III (Newburyport Whale Watch). We will be going out 
on August 25 and September 15 from 10 am - 3:30 pm. The cost will be $52. 
Please make reservations through Newburyport Whale Watch at 800-848-1111. 


There is still time to see some great birds and whales this summer. Hope to see 
you on the water. 


Dave

-- 
David M. Larson, Ph.D. 
Education and Science Coordinator 
Joppa Flats Education Center 
Mass Audubon 
Newburyport, MA 
978-462-9998 
Protecting the Nature of Massachusetts



Subject: Seabirds and Whales trips out of Newburyport Harbor later this summer
From: David Larson <dlarson AT massaudubon.org>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:36:35 +0000
I will be resuming our Seabirds and Whales trips out of Newburyport Harbor 
aboard the Captain's Lady III (Newburyport Whale Watch). We will be going out 
on August 25 and September 15 from 10 am - 3:30 pm. The cost will be $52. 
Please make reservations through Newburyport Whale Watch at 800-848-1111. 


There is still time to see some great birds and whales this summer. Hope to see 
you on the water. 


Dave

-- 
David M. Larson, Ph.D. 
Education and Science Coordinator 
Joppa Flats Education Center 
Mass Audubon 
Newburyport, MA 
978-462-9998 
Protecting the Nature of Massachusetts



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Subject: Skimmers, Avocets Plum Is 7/23
From: Bird Watchers Supply & Gift <birdwsg AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:20:17 +0000 (UTC)
Dave Adrien reported 2 BLACK SKIMMERS and 6 RED KNOTS at Sandy Point on Plum 
Island this morning, as well as 2 HUDSONIAN GODWITS, 2 AVOCETS and 1000's of 
shorebirds at Bill Forward Pool. 


Steve Grinley
Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift
Route 1 Traffic Circle
Newburyport, MA 01950
Birdwsg AT comcast.net
978-462-0775

Subject: Great Meadows NWR--Concord, Weekly Species census, Jul 23, 2014
From: Kat Birder <katbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 11:02:40 -0400
Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Middlesex, US-MA
Jul 23, 2014 5:51 AM - 10:16 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     Weekly volunteer species census for the NWR. Overcast and
humid, upper 60's-80's F. Observers: Will Martens, Maryellen Stone, Joan
Stoner, Larry Warfield, Soheil Zendeh, and Kathy Dia. 
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.5.3 54 species (+4 other taxa) Canada Goose 42 Wood Duck 4 Wild Turkey 5 American Bittern 1 Seen by Will early a.m. flying near the tower Great Blue Heron 20 Green Heron 1 Turkey Vulture 1 Osprey 1 Red-tailed Hawk 1 Virginia Rail 1 On the Dike Tr. early a.m. Killdeer 4 Spotted Sandpiper 5 Solitary Sandpiper 3 peep sp. 2 Flying out of the refuge shorebird sp. 2 Two separate solitary or spotted calling "peet weet" Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 28 Mourning Dove 17 Chimney Swift 2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 Observed by Soheil Belted Kingfisher 1 River Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 River Downy Woodpecker 10 Hairy Woodpecker 2 Heard not seen Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 2 Eastern Wood-Pewee 2 Willow Flycatcher 2 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher) 2 In the "Holt" area northwest of the Lower Pool Eastern Phoebe 2 Eastern Kingbird 7 Warbling Vireo 5 Red-eyed Vireo 1 vireo sp. 1 Warbling or red-eyed; seen at boat launch Blue Jay 11 American Crow 3 Tree Swallow 6 Barn Swallow 5 Black-capped Chickadee 16 Tufted Titmouse 4 White-breasted Nuthatch 5 Marsh Wren 24 Continuing Carolina Wren 2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 American Robin 10 Gray Catbird 12 Cedar Waxwing 2 Common Yellowthroat 2 Yellow Warbler 4 Pine Warbler 1 Timber Tr. Chipping Sparrow 2 Song Sparrow 24 Swamp Sparrow 6 Northern Cardinal 2 Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1 Spotted by Joan Red-winged Blackbird 67 Common Grackle 9 House Finch 4 American Goldfinch 20 House Sparrow 1 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19195813 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) Kathy Dia Concord, MA
Subject: CT Report 07/22/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:06:25 -0400
 From Frank Mantlik:
07/22/14 - Milford, Milford Point -- One WHITE-WINGED SCOTER
continues; eight species of shorebirds during morning high tide
including 3700 Semipalmated Sandpipers (no stint among them that I
could find).
Stratford, Oak Bluff Ave, salt marsh corner just before entrance to
Long Beach Park -- One WHIMBREL.

 From Ryan MacLean with Mike Warner & Stefan Martin:
07/22/14 - Sherman, Wimisink Marsh -- 10:45 AM; Momma American Bittern
was right infront of the platform actively hunting. Only one of the
young ones was seen and it seems to have figured out how to hunt on
its own (caught atleast one frog).
Litchfield, White Memorial -- 1:30 PM; 2 VIRGINIA RAILS (seen/heard)
on the Little Pond boardwalk. Also 2 BOBOLINKS, 3 ALDER FLYCATCHERS, 1
female PURPLE FINCH and a BROAD WINGED HAWK. A quick stop at Cemetery
Pond yielded 3 SOLITARY SANDPIPERS.

 From Jason and Anthony Rieger:
07/22/14 - West Haven, Sandy Pt -- 6:05 PM; CASPIAN TERN flew by low
heading west just in front parking lot.

Subject: Whimbrel returned to Westport
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:36:08 -0400
Hi All,

I have neglected to mention that the Whimbrel have returned to Horseneck Beach 
in Westport, associating with a flock of 30(ish) Willets foraging on mole crabs 
in the breaking waves. Three to six Whimbrel have been seen in the late 
afternoon between the westernmost part of Horseneck to Cherry and Webb (the 
town beach) for the last five days or so. Numbers should build and there are 
other shorebirds working their way along the shore. There are literally tens of 
millions of mole crabs along the shore. In several 1000 square cm amples, we 
counted 306 and 183. We plan on continuing sampling through the summer to get 
some estimate of numbers of larger mole crabs, but there are uncountable 
millions of head-of-a-pin-sized ones. Astounding! I can't imagine what the 
shorebird show would be like if the place was devoid of people. 


Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA
 		 	   		  
Subject: Boston Harbor Oystercatchers
From: Bob Stymeist <bobstymeist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 15:13:16 -0400
This morning on a Boston Harbor National Park coastal breeding bird
monitoring program we focused on American Oystercatchers, we had a good
day with 52, 34 adults and 18 juveniles; the breakdown:

Snake Island : 19, 12 adults, 7 young
Sheep Island:  14,  9 adults,  5 young
Rainsford Island: 8, 4 adults,  4 young
Hangman Island: 6,  4 adults,  2 young
Calf Island:         3,   3 adults
Green Island:      2,   2 adults

Willets are doing well on Snake Island with 27, a few still aggressively
protecting young

We also noted a high number of young Common Eiders, many of which now are
the size of the adults, this was our last trip for the 2014 season, thanks
to Carol Lynn Trocki, our leader and to UMass for our transportation around
the Islands
-- 
Bob Stymeist
bobstymeist AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID
From: Jonathan Jones <brewbird AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:04:06 -0400
The hawk was obviously a Red-houldered Hawk, despite the fact that they 
mis-identified it as a Red-tailed Hawk. 


Jonathan Jones
Wrentham

On Jul 22, 2014, at 8:31 AM, Sue McGrath  
wrote: 


> Birders,
> 
> Check out this clip:
> 
> http://boston.cbslocal.com/video/10377312-man-attacked-by-hawk-in-lakeville/ 
> 
> Good birding,
> Sue
> 
> Sue McGrath
> Newburyport Birders
> Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
> Newburyport, MA
> Website:www.newburyportbirders.com
> Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
> Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders

Subject: Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:31:17 -0400
Birders,

Check out this clip:

http://boston.cbslocal.com/video/10377312-man-attacked-by-hawk-in-lakeville/ 


Good birding,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport Birders
Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
Newburyport, MA
Website:www.newburyportbirders.com
Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders

     


     


     


Subject: Hawk Surfing!
From: ploranger AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:57:29 +0000 (UTC)
Hello- 


Yesterday afternoon, while playing golf at the Dedham Country Club I observed 
an amazing bird interaction. While walking up to the tee, I looked up to see a 
red tailed hawk flying low over the fairway with a kingbird giving chase. 
However, instead of just harassing the hawk, this kingbird actually landed on 
it's back and took a ride for about 15 feet before flying off! I have seen lots 
of songbirds harassing hawks over the years but I have never seen one surf 
before. The hawk did not seem too bothered by this as it flew to the other side 
of the fairway and perched on a telephone pole to look for an easier snack. 



Thanks, Pat Loranger 
Natck, MA 
ploranger AT comcast.net 
Subject: Fledgling Barred Owls - Norfolk
From: Peter Gaines <pgainesbaystate AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 19:54:57 -0400
An adult and 4 fledgling Barred Owls in backyard in Norfolk. No more than 25 
feet away. Fledglings sitting on fence, adult perched in tree. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Neponset River Reservation, Newton Center Ravens
From: Paul Peterson <petersonpaul63 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:06:51 -0700
Hi,
Today from 2:00-4:20p.m. at the Neponset River Reservation in Dorchester's 
Cedar Grove/ Lower Mills sections: 

Black-crowned Night-Heron 2 (ad. and near ad.)
Great Blue Heron 1+
Great Egret 1
GREEN-WINGED TEAL 1 fem. type opp. Milton Yacht Club
Turkey Vulture 3
Osprey 2
Red-tailed Hawk 4
accipiter sp. 1
Killdeer 2
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Short-billed Dowitcher 4
Greater Yellowlwgs 1
Saltmarsh Sparrow 1 (on dead-end marsh road, as usual)
On FRIDAY, AT 4:00 P.M., A FAMILY OF FOUR COMMON RAVENS PERCHED ON BUILDINGS 
AND THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH SMACK DAB IN THE MIDDLE OF NEWTON CENTER. They 
were calling and making me feel I was in a Hitchcock movie! Awesome! There have 
been several reports this year of ravens in Newton, especially from Pete 
Gilmore. 

Paul Peterson
petersonpaul63 AT yahoo.com
Boston  
Subject: CT Report 07/21/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:35:37 -0400
Note: Just two reports today, but the same species many miles apart.


 From Frank Mantlik:
07/21/14 - Milford, Milford Point -- 1 male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER
(swimming off nesting bar), at least 2000 Semipalmated Sandpipers on
marsh mudflats behind CAS Coastal Center as tide falling.

 From Hank Golet:
07/21/14 - ld Lyme, Great Island -- male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER.  As I
was kayaking around the south tip of Great Island I saw the birds head
above the grass at the edge of the bank .  When I got closer it went
into the water and swam out a ways.  When I came back by an hour later
it was out a hundred feet diving/feeding.

Subject: Red-Headed Woodpecker, No
From: Kat Birder <katbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:17:59 -0400
Jay and I walked at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery this evening in search of the
Red-Headed Woodpecker kindly reported by Neil Hayward, but we did not find
it.

Sleepy Hollow is always a nice spot for a walk though, and five woodpecker
varieties were present including a loudly calling Pileated. Other
highlights: one Red Fox, several Great Crested Flycatchers, Brown Creeper,
Bluebirds in interesting assorted plumages and of course the loudly
croaking remaining herons which have not yet all left the nearby rookery.

Good Birding,
Kathy Dia
Concord, MA