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Updated on Tuesday, July 22 at 10:15 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-tailed Shrike,©BirdQuest

22 Jul CT Report 07/22/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
22 Jul Whimbrel returned to Westport [Paul Champlin ]
22 Jul Boston Harbor Oystercatchers [Bob Stymeist ]
22 Jul Re: Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID [Jonathan Jones ]
22 Jul Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID [Sue McGrath ]
22 Jul Hawk Surfing! []
21 Jul Fledgling Barred Owls - Norfolk [Peter Gaines ]
21 Jul Neponset River Reservation, Newton Center Ravens [Paul Peterson ]
21 Jul CT Report 07/21/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
21 Jul Red-Headed Woodpecker, No [Kat Birder ]
22 Jul Piping Plover chicks - Falmouth - Photos! [Craig Gibson ]
21 Jul P'town/Truro shearwater bonanza [Blair Nikula ]
21 Jul Bear Creek walk, Sunday July 27 at 9 am ["Soheil Zendeh" ]
21 Jul RE: Tree Swallows [Nancy Murphy ]
21 Jul Gloucester whale watch []
21 Jul Red-Headed Woodpecker, Sleepy a Hollow, Concord--NO 7/21 [David Swain ]
21 Jul BBC Extreme Pelagic Photos - July 19, 2014 [Peter Flood ]
20 Jul South Beach Saturday, photos [Henry D Mauer ]
20 Jul CT Report 07/20/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
20 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Revere Beach--Point of Pines, Jul 20, 2014 [Soheil Zendeh ]
20 Jul Red-headed Woodpecker, adult - Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord [Neil Hayward ]
20 Jul Pair of sandhill cranes in Maine [Lynn ]
20 Jul Whale Watch Pelagic, July 20, Gloucester [John Hepburn ]
20 Jul Re: Black Skimmer Sandy Point 8:50 am Sunday [Cherrie Corey ]
20 Jul July 19 BBC Extreme Pelagic - Photos [Erik Nielsen ]
20 Jul Recent Pelagic to Hydrographers Canyom ["John Hoye" ]
20 Jul BBC Extreme Pelagic trip Saturday, July 19 (brief report) ["Ida Giriunas" ]
20 Jul Hudsonian godwits, Newburyport Harbor now []
20 Jul Drumlin Farm today [Pamela Sowizral ]
20 Jul 3 Red Knots at sandy point pl island now [Jim Guion ]
20 Jul Black Skimmer Sandy Point 8:50 am Sunday [tattler1 ]
20 Jul New Jersey European Golden Plover [Paul Champlin ]
19 Jul North Stellwagen Very Nice, 7-18-14 [Daan Sandee ]
19 Jul CT Report 07/19//2014 [Roy Harvey ]
20 Jul Re: Southern Stellwagen Very Slow, 7/19/2014 ["Glenn d'Entremont" ]
19 Jul Chatham Seabird Extravaganza [Paul Champlin ]
19 Jul North Stellwagen Trip VERY Productive 7-19-14 [Paul Roberts ]
19 Jul Southern Stellwagen Very Slow, 7/19/2014 ["Floyd, Chris" ]
19 Jul no joy in wrenville [Susan Hedman ]
18 Jul CT Report 07/18/2014 Miss Kite [Roy Harvey ]
18 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Jul 18, 2014 [Kat Birder ]
18 Jul Re: Draw Down of The Pools - Parker River NWR []
18 Jul Red-headed Woodpecker in PTown [Paul Champlin ]
18 Jul Re: Draw Down of The Pools - Parker River NWR [John Nelson ]
18 Jul Least Bittern Great Meadows ["a.e. strauss" ]
18 Jul Draw Down of The Pools - Parker River NWR [Sue McGrath ]
17 Jul CT Report 07/17/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
17 Jul Front yard Goshawk []
17 Jul European Sandwich Tern [Larry Scacchetti ]
17 Jul Shorebird Migration & Water Levels - PRNWR - Plum Island [Sue McGrath ]
17 Jul Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Pools [Sue McGrath ]
17 Jul Black-crowned Bight Heron in Metropolitan Boston [Paul Roberts ]
17 Jul Sandhill Cranes - Cumberland Farms fields [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
16 Jul Let the festivities begin! [Paul Champlin ]
16 Jul OT: Tropicbird in ME [James Purcell ]
16 Jul CT Report 07/16/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
16 Jul Shorebird Migration & Water Levels - Parker River National Wildlife Refuge [Sue McGrath ]
16 Jul Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Pools [Sue McGrath ]
16 Jul Plum Island, MA; Tues., 15 July 2014: Avocets, Gull-billed, Royal, skimmers. [Richard Heil ]
16 Jul Re: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 15, 2014 [ted g purcell ]
16 Jul Re: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 15, 2014 [Richard Heil ]
16 Jul Sandhill Cranes - Cumberland Farms fields [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
16 Jul : Crane records at Cumberland Farms fields in Halifax []
16 Jul Re: BC night heron question ["Marj. Rines" ]
16 Jul Crane Beach, Ipswich, Jul 16, 2014 ["Jim Berry" ]
16 Jul Re: BC night heron question [Lois ]
16 Jul RE: BC night heron question [KIRK ]
16 Jul BC night heron question [Anne Hubbard ]
16 Jul Royal Tern cont.7/16 [Bird Watchers Supply & Gift ]
16 Jul Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 15, 2014 ["Jim Berry" ]
16 Jul Nauset Marsh Sandwich Tern [Mary Keleher ]
15 Jul Fwd: eBird Report - Winthrop--Sisters, Jul 15, 2014 [Bob Stymeist ]
15 Jul Bolton Flats WMA - 7/12 [Steve Arena ]
15 Jul Black Skimmer- Winthrop Beach [Bob Stymeist ]
15 Jul Barred Owl, IRWS Topsfield 7/15 [Bird Watchers Supply & Gift ]
15 Jul 2 GULL-BILLED TERNS Plum Island [Suzanne Sullivan ]

Subject: CT Report 07/22/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:06:25 -0400
 From Frank Mantlik:
07/22/14 - Milford, Milford Point -- One WHITE-WINGED SCOTER
continues; eight species of shorebirds during morning high tide
including 3700 Semipalmated Sandpipers (no stint among them that I
could find).
Stratford, Oak Bluff Ave, salt marsh corner just before entrance to
Long Beach Park -- One WHIMBREL.

 From Ryan MacLean with Mike Warner & Stefan Martin:
07/22/14 - Sherman, Wimisink Marsh -- 10:45 AM; Momma American Bittern
was right infront of the platform actively hunting. Only one of the
young ones was seen and it seems to have figured out how to hunt on
its own (caught atleast one frog).
Litchfield, White Memorial -- 1:30 PM; 2 VIRGINIA RAILS (seen/heard)
on the Little Pond boardwalk. Also 2 BOBOLINKS, 3 ALDER FLYCATCHERS, 1
female PURPLE FINCH and a BROAD WINGED HAWK. A quick stop at Cemetery
Pond yielded 3 SOLITARY SANDPIPERS.

 From Jason and Anthony Rieger:
07/22/14 - West Haven, Sandy Pt -- 6:05 PM; CASPIAN TERN flew by low
heading west just in front parking lot.

Subject: Whimbrel returned to Westport
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:36:08 -0400
Hi All,

I have neglected to mention that the Whimbrel have returned to Horseneck Beach 
in Westport, associating with a flock of 30(ish) Willets foraging on mole crabs 
in the breaking waves. Three to six Whimbrel have been seen in the late 
afternoon between the westernmost part of Horseneck to Cherry and Webb (the 
town beach) for the last five days or so. Numbers should build and there are 
other shorebirds working their way along the shore. There are literally tens of 
millions of mole crabs along the shore. In several 1000 square cm amples, we 
counted 306 and 183. We plan on continuing sampling through the summer to get 
some estimate of numbers of larger mole crabs, but there are uncountable 
millions of head-of-a-pin-sized ones. Astounding! I can't imagine what the 
shorebird show would be like if the place was devoid of people. 


Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA
 		 	   		  
Subject: Boston Harbor Oystercatchers
From: Bob Stymeist <bobstymeist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 15:13:16 -0400
This morning on a Boston Harbor National Park coastal breeding bird
monitoring program we focused on American Oystercatchers, we had a good
day with 52, 34 adults and 18 juveniles; the breakdown:

Snake Island : 19, 12 adults, 7 young
Sheep Island:  14,  9 adults,  5 young
Rainsford Island: 8, 4 adults,  4 young
Hangman Island: 6,  4 adults,  2 young
Calf Island:         3,   3 adults
Green Island:      2,   2 adults

Willets are doing well on Snake Island with 27, a few still aggressively
protecting young

We also noted a high number of young Common Eiders, many of which now are
the size of the adults, this was our last trip for the 2014 season, thanks
to Carol Lynn Trocki, our leader and to UMass for our transportation around
the Islands
-- 
Bob Stymeist
bobstymeist AT gmail.com
Subject: Re: Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID
From: Jonathan Jones <brewbird AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:04:06 -0400
The hawk was obviously a Red-houldered Hawk, despite the fact that they 
mis-identified it as a Red-tailed Hawk. 


Jonathan Jones
Wrentham

On Jul 22, 2014, at 8:31 AM, Sue McGrath  
wrote: 


> Birders,
> 
> Check out this clip:
> 
> http://boston.cbslocal.com/video/10377312-man-attacked-by-hawk-in-lakeville/ 
> 
> Good birding,
> Sue
> 
> Sue McGrath
> Newburyport Birders
> Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
> Newburyport, MA
> Website:www.newburyportbirders.com
> Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
> Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders

Subject: Lakeville Hawk Makes News - Mistaken ID
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:31:17 -0400
Birders,

Check out this clip:

http://boston.cbslocal.com/video/10377312-man-attacked-by-hawk-in-lakeville/ 


Good birding,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport Birders
Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
Newburyport, MA
Website:www.newburyportbirders.com
Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders

     


     


     


Subject: Hawk Surfing!
From: ploranger AT comcast.net
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 11:57:29 +0000 (UTC)
Hello- 


Yesterday afternoon, while playing golf at the Dedham Country Club I observed 
an amazing bird interaction. While walking up to the tee, I looked up to see a 
red tailed hawk flying low over the fairway with a kingbird giving chase. 
However, instead of just harassing the hawk, this kingbird actually landed on 
it's back and took a ride for about 15 feet before flying off! I have seen lots 
of songbirds harassing hawks over the years but I have never seen one surf 
before. The hawk did not seem too bothered by this as it flew to the other side 
of the fairway and perched on a telephone pole to look for an easier snack. 



Thanks, Pat Loranger 
Natck, MA 
ploranger AT comcast.net 
Subject: Fledgling Barred Owls - Norfolk
From: Peter Gaines <pgainesbaystate AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 19:54:57 -0400
An adult and 4 fledgling Barred Owls in backyard in Norfolk. No more than 25 
feet away. Fledglings sitting on fence, adult perched in tree. 


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Neponset River Reservation, Newton Center Ravens
From: Paul Peterson <petersonpaul63 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:06:51 -0700
Hi,
Today from 2:00-4:20p.m. at the Neponset River Reservation in Dorchester's 
Cedar Grove/ Lower Mills sections: 

Black-crowned Night-Heron 2 (ad. and near ad.)
Great Blue Heron 1+
Great Egret 1
GREEN-WINGED TEAL 1 fem. type opp. Milton Yacht Club
Turkey Vulture 3
Osprey 2
Red-tailed Hawk 4
accipiter sp. 1
Killdeer 2
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Short-billed Dowitcher 4
Greater Yellowlwgs 1
Saltmarsh Sparrow 1 (on dead-end marsh road, as usual)
On FRIDAY, AT 4:00 P.M., A FAMILY OF FOUR COMMON RAVENS PERCHED ON BUILDINGS 
AND THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH SMACK DAB IN THE MIDDLE OF NEWTON CENTER. They 
were calling and making me feel I was in a Hitchcock movie! Awesome! There have 
been several reports this year of ravens in Newton, especially from Pete 
Gilmore. 

Paul Peterson
petersonpaul63 AT yahoo.com
Boston  
Subject: CT Report 07/21/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:35:37 -0400
Note: Just two reports today, but the same species many miles apart.


 From Frank Mantlik:
07/21/14 - Milford, Milford Point -- 1 male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER
(swimming off nesting bar), at least 2000 Semipalmated Sandpipers on
marsh mudflats behind CAS Coastal Center as tide falling.

 From Hank Golet:
07/21/14 - ld Lyme, Great Island -- male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER.  As I
was kayaking around the south tip of Great Island I saw the birds head
above the grass at the edge of the bank .  When I got closer it went
into the water and swam out a ways.  When I came back by an hour later
it was out a hundred feet diving/feeding.

Subject: Red-Headed Woodpecker, No
From: Kat Birder <katbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:17:59 -0400
Jay and I walked at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery this evening in search of the
Red-Headed Woodpecker kindly reported by Neil Hayward, but we did not find
it.

Sleepy Hollow is always a nice spot for a walk though, and five woodpecker
varieties were present including a loudly calling Pileated. Other
highlights: one Red Fox, several Great Crested Flycatchers, Brown Creeper,
Bluebirds in interesting assorted plumages and of course the loudly
croaking remaining herons which have not yet all left the nearby rookery.

Good Birding,
Kathy Dia
Concord, MA
Subject: Piping Plover chicks - Falmouth - Photos!
From: Craig Gibson <cbgibson AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 01:34:55 +0000 (UTC)

Nice opportunity to observe 16 day old Piping Plover chicks at Surf Drive, 
Falmouth location as well as plover chicks at Black Beach in West Falmouth. The 
Surf Drive chicks are 16 days old per Mass Audubon Coastal Waterbird staffers. 
Age uncertain for Black Beach pre-fledge chicks. 3 photos posted for each 
location for those with an interest: 



http://www.pbase.com/birdshots/image/156680004 
Click "next" in upper right to advance frames! 

Enjoy, 
Craig Gibson 
cbgibson AT comcast.net 
Subject: P'town/Truro shearwater bonanza
From: Blair Nikula <odenews AT odenews.org>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 20:08:58 -0400
The "here today, gone tomorrow" nature of seabirds has certainly been on 
display this summer.  I've been to Provincetown each of the last three 
mornings, with widely varying results.  On Saturday (7/19) morning, 
under calm conditions and glassy seas, I saw about two dozen 
shearwaters, all but one being Cory's, and most off of Race Point 
Beach.  There was very little activity overall, consistent with Chris 
Floyd's report of a slow whale watch trip to southern Stellwagen Bank.  
Later in the morning I saw another 50 or so distant shearwaters off Head 
of the Meadow Beach in North Truro, most or all of which appeared to be 
Cory's (the "default" shearwater - at least from land - so far this summer).

Yesterday (7/20) morning under cloudy skies with a light to moderate 
(10-15mph) north wind, I was not expecting much of a change. However, in 
less than an hour at Race Point Beach I recorded over 700 shearwaters, 
the vast majority Cory's and 95+% flying west (i.e., toward Cape Cod 
Bay).  I saw another 100+ shearwaters at Herring Cove Beach, many of 
them heading south into the Bay.  I then went to Head of the Meadow and 
was amazed to see shearwaters streaming by, all heading south 
(essentially the opposite direction they were heading at Race Point).  
In an hour I totaled about 3600, again the vast majority (of those that 
were identifiable) Cory's. Full checklists at:
Race Point Beach (7/20): 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19159992
Head of the Meadow (7/20): 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19160005

This morning (7/21) under similar weather conditions to yesterday I 
stopped at Head of the Meadow first and again shearwaters were streaming 
by, but this time heading north (go figure).  I totaled about 1500 birds 
in half an hour, so a comparable rate to the previous day, and virtually 
all were Cory's.  There were more very distant shearwaters, but I made 
no attempt to count them though there were hundreds at least, some of 
which appeared to be moving south.  Then at Race Point Beach, 
shearwaters were also streaming by (2800 in an hour), heading east this 
time (the opposite of the previous morning), and a with a much better 
representation of "non-Cory's," both Sooty and Greats numbering in the 
hundreds (the most Greats I've seen so far this summer).  These birds 
were all heading toward Truro, whereas the Head of the Meadow birds were 
all heading toward P'town, so there must have been a heck of a traffic 
jam somewhere along the backside of North Truro!  (It's about 8 miles as 
the tubenose flies between Race Point Beach and Head of the Meadow.)  
Full checklists at:
Head of the Meadow (7/21): 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19171945
Race Point Beach (7/21): 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19171944

Wilson's Storm-Petrels, which were absent off P'town and Truro during 
June and early July, have been present in decent numbers over the past 
week or two (consistent with whale watch reports).  Despite the 
abundance of tubenoses, Manx Shearwaters have been scarce so far this 
summer.  And among all the seabird activity the past three days, I saw 
only 3 jaegers, a Parasitic off Truro yesterday and two off Race Point 
this morning.

Blair Nikula

-- 
2 Gilbert Lane
Harwich Port, MA  02646
http://www.odenews.org/
http://www.capecodbirds.org/

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus - Mark 
Twain 

Subject: Bear Creek walk, Sunday July 27 at 9 am
From: "Soheil Zendeh" <sohzendeh AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 17:10:27 -0400
Folks,
Now that breeding season is winding down, we'll resume Bear Creek walks. The
next walk is on Sunday July 27 at 9 am. 
Bear Creek is an upland sanctuary built on the old RESCO landfill (now
called Wheelabrator) at the northern end of Rumney Marsh in Saugus and
Revere. Access information is below. Wear good walking shoes and be prepared
to hike 3 Ė 4 miles. The property is mostly very open, so be prepared for
sun and wind.  Wheelabrator has graciously stocked up on some extra pairs of
binoculars, so if you or someone you know wants to learn about birds and
birding, come on down.
Let me know if youíre coming so Iíll have a head count.
My cell no. is below. Call me if youíre running late. Iíll wait for you.
Bear Creek sanctuary access is via the Wheelabrator plant, 100 Salem
Turnpike (Rte 107), Saugus. The  rotary at the intersection  of Rtes 60 and
107 is about 1Ĺ miles southwest of the Wheelabrator plant and about 1 mile
east of Rte 1 exit on Rte 60. When traveling northeast on 107, if you go
over the Ballard Street bridge (just after a set of lights) youíve gone too
faróturn back. Here is a link to google maps: http://tinyurl.com/326v87d
When you arrive, drive through the plant gates, park in the parking lot
immediately and wait for the group. Please do not drive farther into the
property without an escort.


Soheil Zendeh
42 Baker Avenue
Lexington, MA 02421

cell 617-763-5637
home 781-863-2392

sohzendeh AT gmail.com

Subject: RE: Tree Swallows
From: Nancy Murphy <nanseagold AT aol.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:17:01 -0400


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Peter Trull
Date:06/24/2014 9:22 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: massbird AT TheWorld.com
Subject: [MASSBIRD] Tree Swallows
massbirders, This is a good parent, making sure the food goes where it should.... http://www.flickr.com/photos/26676688 AT N03 Peter Trull Brewster, MA petrull AT comcast.net
Subject: Gloucester whale watch
From: dave.williams6 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:09:51 -0400
Stellwagen Bank--North, Essex, US-MA
Jul 21, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Protocol: Traveling
50.0 mile(s)
Comments: My wife and I went on the 7 Seas Whale Watch out out of Gloucester 
with Capt. Jay. The whale show was super! The birding was slow to start bit 
picked up nicely at the end. Capt. Jay was great getting the birders on board 
on birds. 

14 species (+1 other taxa)

Common Eider  4
Cory's Shearwater  120
Great Shearwater  50
Sooty Shearwater  3
Manx Shearwater  2
Wilson's Storm-Petrel  200     Very rough estimate
Double-crested Cormorant  12
Laughing Gull  1
Ring-billed Gull  25
Herring Gull  X
Great Black-backed Gull  X
Common Tern  12
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  4     Inner harbor while tied up.
American Crow  2     Inner harbor while ties up
swallow sp.  2

Dave Williams
Reading, MA

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19175570 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Red-Headed Woodpecker, Sleepy a Hollow, Concord--NO 7/21
From: David Swain <davidswain79 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 09:39:52 -0400
Tim and I had only 45 minutes this morning to check along Authors Ridge--no
luck. I would urge people to also walk the trails around Moores Swamp,
which has a lot of woodpecker habitat. Park in small lot by A.R. and walk
dirt path down on left to circle; trails begin there.

Please report either way.

David Swain
Concord Birds Project
Subject: BBC Extreme Pelagic Photos - July 19, 2014
From: Peter Flood <pomarine AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 12:20:35 +0000 (UTC)
I have uploaded some of the more tolerable photos I took from the BBC Extreme 
Pelagic. Enjoy...... 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/9191812 AT N02/


Peter Flood
5 Hokum Rock Road
Dennis, MA
pomarine AT comcast.net
Subject: South Beach Saturday, photos
From: Henry D Mauer <henryd.mauer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 22:07:10 -0400
On Saturday I was with Mass Audubon's Drumlin Farm trip to South Beach.
With transportation south of the breach blocked by the shifting sands,
Outermost dropped us just north of the breach, leaving limited real estate
for birding.  We still managed to see 10 species of shorebirds, many
Wilson's Storm Petrels following fishing boats headed back to the harbor,
and a variety of other species.  The photography highlight of the day was
right when we landed, three Long-tailed Ducks plus terns diving and feeding
young.  Pics at my usual link:

http://henrymauer.phanfare.com/

Choose the album, click on slideshow for the largest images, and use the
pause button.

Henry Mauer
henryd.mauer AT gmail.com
Salisbury, MA
Subject: CT Report 07/20/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:53:15 -0400
NOTE: Frank Mantlik posted the following heads-up on CTBirds.
EXTRALIMITAL EUROPEAN GOLDEN-PLOVER in New Jersey.
On early May, Newfoundland experienced an incredible influx of
European shorebirds including at least 2 Common Redshanks and dozens
of European Golden-Plovers. It stands to reason some might appear in
the U.S. during this current southbound migration. Here's the first
one.


 From Mark Danforth:
07/20/14 - Simsbury, Great Pond -- 9:00; Mississippi Kite over north
end of pond for about two minutes, left heading  south.

 From Carolyn Johns:
07/20/14 - Old Lyme, Rt 156 -- Bobwhite around Noon.  Not certain of
ID, but cannot find anything else that resembles the quail like bird
that crossed the road in front of my car.

 From Robert Hutton:
07/20/14 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 1 Black Skimmer.

Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Revere Beach--Point of Pines, Jul 20, 2014
From: Soheil Zendeh <sohzendeh AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 21:51:23 -0400
Folks, I spent a couple of hours at Point of Pines (Revere Beach) at dead
low tide around midday today. A few shorebirds and some Bonaparte's Gulls
were there in addition to the usual gulls and Common Terns. The ebird list
follows. I spent some time photographing the Short-billed Dowitchers:


https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/WinthropRevereEastBoston?authuser=0&feat=directlink 



Revere Beach--Point of Pines, Suffolk, US-MA
Jul 20, 2014 12:45 PM - 2:15 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     Arrived at dead low tide
10 species

Canada Goose  8
Double-crested Cormorant  10
Semipalmated Plover  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper  4
Short-billed Dowitcher (Atlantic)  4
Bonaparte's Gull  66
Ring-billed Gull  100
Herring Gull  25
Great Black-backed Gull  6
Common Tern  8






*Soheil Zendeh42 Baker AvenueLexington, MA 02421781-863-2392
home617-763-5637 cell*
Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker, adult - Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord
From: Neil Hayward <opororniswarbler AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:03:14 -0400
Dear Massbirders,

While giving my parents a tour of Sleepy Hollow Cemetery late this
afternoon (7.20), we found an adult Red-headed Woodpecker. The bird was
active in the group of trees above the Thoreau memorial on Author's Ridge,
at the back of the cemetery. The bird vocalized and showed extremely well -
until, that is, I ran back to the car for the only camera we had. I managed
to get a couple of poor photos after the bird had retreated back to the
tree tops...

https://flic.kr/s/aHsjZem2jM

-- 
Neil Hayward
Cambridge, MA
Subject: Pair of sandhill cranes in Maine
From: Lynn <blsalinger AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 19:18:07 -0400
We drove past a pair of sandhill cranes foraging in the grass alongside N. 
Raymond Rd, between Gray and Poland Maine around 2 pm today. Thought they were 
wild turkeys from a distance, but they were taller, thinner, and their 
red-tufted heads were very distinctive... Incredible sight! 


Lynn Salinger
Concord, MA
Blsalinger AT gmail.com

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Whale Watch Pelagic, July 20, Gloucester
From: John Hepburn <john.hepburn AT bc.edu>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 18:52:36 -0400
Birders,
  We had a good day on the Seven Seas Whale Watch today, lots of birds and
lots of whales.
   We were on the morning boat at 8:30am out of Gloucester with birder Jay
in command.
   As soon as we left the harbor we started seeing Wilson Storm-Petrels to
be followed soon after by Shearwaters.    We travelled some 12 or so miles
SE of Gloucester to Stellwagen Bank where there was a large cluster of
Humpback Whales, 20 in all, who were preforming at and near the surface,
including 2 complete breaches and lots of tail and flipper slapping.  Quite
a show!

 Rough counts and estimates of the pelagic birds included:
   160 Greater Shearwaters--several large flocks on the water
    60 Cory's Shearwaters
    60 Sooty Shearwaters
    200 Wilson's Storm-Petrels
    1 Northern Gannet--adult
    12 Common Terns

  Good birding
   Chris, Judy and Sabrina Hepburn
   Newton & Waltham
Subject: Re: Black Skimmer Sandy Point 8:50 am Sunday
From: Cherrie Corey <cherrie.corey AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:23:49 -0400
My friend Janice Koskey (Lynn) asked me to send along report of her 
sighting of a Black Skimmer sitting on the sand at Crane's Beach 
yesterday at 5:30.   May be the same bird that you saw this morning.

Cherrie Corey
Concord, MA


-- 
Cherrie A. Corey
Naturalist, educator, and photographer
Concord, MA
978.760.1933 mobile
http://sense-of-place-concord.blogspot.com/
Subject: July 19 BBC Extreme Pelagic - Photos
From: Erik Nielsen <erikbogh AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:38:45 -0400
The BBC Pelagic to Hydrographer Canyon left Hyannis at 2am Saturday morning
and returned to port around 8pm. Thanks to the leaders - Jeremiah Trimble,
Nick Bonomo, Mark Faherty, and Tom Johnson. A special thanks to Ida
Giriunas  for doing the heavy lifting in arranging the trip.

Highlights included:
1 White-faced Storm-Petrel
10+ Band-rumped Storm-Petrels
Good numbers of Leach's Storm-Petrels
`10 Audubon's Shearwaters
2 Long-tailed Jaegers
1 or 2 Scopoli's Shearwater (I didn't get pictures)
3 Species of Dolphins - Common, Risso's, and Striped
a few Fin Whales
several Flying Fish sp.

Pictures:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/erikbogh/sets/72157645798165054/


Erik Nielsen
Westwood, MA



-- 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/erikbogh
Subject: Recent Pelagic to Hydrographers Canyom
From: "John Hoye" <Lt.Jaeger AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:31:42 -0400
Below is a link to some pictures taken yesterday on BBC Pelagic to 
Hydrographers canyon 


  Enjoy
    John Hoye Wayland Ma
    Lt.Jaeger AT verizon.net


https://picasaweb.google.com/101375529793030642051/20140720?authuser=0&feat=directlink 
Subject: BBC Extreme Pelagic trip Saturday, July 19 (brief report)
From: "Ida Giriunas" <ida8 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:11:35 -0400
Massbirders:

 

This is a brief report pending an extensive one being prepared by the
leaders of the trip (Jeremiah Trimble,  Mark Faherty, Nick Bonomo and Tom
Johnson). Thanks are in order to them for their keen ornithological and
observational skills, who,  with the help of all our participants,  our very
competent Captain Joe Huckenmeyer and crew of the Helen H,  the cooperative
weather (for a change) and our special "chum" made this a very successful
trip.  In addition to the usual Shearwaters (Greater, Cory's, Manx and
Sooty) and the abundant Wilson's Storm Petrels, a WHITE-FACED STORM PETREL
was well seen by all  aboard thanks to Capt. Joe  who circled the boat
around it.  Later, he did the same with a BAND-RUMPED  STORM PETREL. Several
AUDUBON SHEARWATERS were also seen out there in the warmer waters.  Then on
the long trip back to Hyannis two LONG-TAILED JAEGERS in the Nantucket
Shoals area were spotted and enjoyed by all.  

 

I must make special mention of the pod of Dolphins that greeted us along
with the rising sun on Saturday morning...

 

Ida Giriunas

Reading, MA
Subject: Hudsonian godwits, Newburyport Harbor now
From: birdwsg AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 16:33:39 +0000 (UTC)
From clam shack at12:30pm
Steve & Margo
Subject: Drumlin Farm today
From: Pamela Sowizral <psowizral AT massaudubon.org>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 15:56:21 +0000
Nice morning at Drumlin Farm. Kingfisher at the Ice Pond and three pileated 
woodpeckers were highlights. 




Pam Sowizral

Mass Audubon - Drumlin Farm

Lincoln



Cooper's Hawk  1

Red-tailed Hawk  1

Killdeer  2

Mourning Dove  8

Chimney Swift  2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1

Belted Kingfisher  1

Downy Woodpecker  4

Pileated Woodpecker  3

Eastern Wood-Pewee  1

Eastern Phoebe  5

Blue Jay  4

Tree Swallow  2

Barn Swallow  19

Black-capped Chickadee  4

Tufted Titmouse  1

White-breasted Nuthatch  2

Eastern Bluebird  3

American Robin  6

Gray Catbird  6

Northern Mockingbird  2

European Starling  30

Cedar Waxwing  3

Yellow Warbler  2

Chipping Sparrow  3

Savannah Sparrow  1

Song Sparrow  20

Northern Cardinal  3

Red-winged Blackbird  35

House Finch  9

American Goldfinch  8

House Sparrow  1


Subject: 3 Red Knots at sandy point pl island now
From: Jim Guion <jim_guion AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 09:39:31 -0400
Red knots in mud flats

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Black Skimmer Sandy Point 8:50 am Sunday
From: tattler1 <tattler1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 08:51:26 -0400

Sent from my iPhone

Linda Ferraresso
Salem, MA
Tattler1 AT comcast.net
Subject: New Jersey European Golden Plover
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 08:47:08 -0400
Forwarded on from NJ list which can be viewed 
here:http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NJ01. Keep your eyes open in those 
agricultural fields! 

Paul Champlin
Westport, MA


Subject:  European Golden-Plover continues, Hunterdon County
Date: Sun Jul 20 2014 7:36 am

From: sam.galick AT gmail.com†The European Golden-Plover was seen again this 
morning, observation and photos have been taken of the underwing- it's white. 
Please look at previous messages for directions, and again use caution while 
parking along this busy CR with no shoulder. 




If anybody needs assistance with directions, please feel free to drop me a 
line. But to reiterate, here's Alan's text directions again: 




Some added details. The sod field (west side Rt 615) is in the process of being 
harvested and is opposite the Dubrow's Nursery sign (east side of 615). I think 
Sam's map is pretty accurate. The bird was by itself and stayed in the same 
basic location (a little south and west of the fields center) almost directly 
across from sign. I viewed the bird from about2:15-2:45. It remained nearly 
motionless (head view only) for the first 15 mins. When it moved, showing its 
full body, it may have move another 15 ft south. It did not fly while I was 
there and therefore I have no info on underwing color. 




http://goo.gl/maps/c8fc1



Good birding,



Sam



--

Sam Galick

Cape May, NJ

sam.galick AT gmail.com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/s...

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

How to report NJ bird sightings: - See more at: 
http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=738448&MLID=NJ01&MLNM=New%20Jersey#sthash.7FlJZ04d.dpufSubject: 
European Golden-Plover continues, Hunterdon County 

Date: Sun Jul 20 2014 7:36 am
From: sam.galick AT gmail.com†The European Golden-Plover was seen again this 
morning, observation and photos have been taken of the underwing- it's white. 
Please look at previous messages for directions, and again use caution while 
parking along this busy CR with no shoulder. 




If anybody needs assistance with directions, please feel free to drop me a 
line. But to reiterate, here's Alan's text directions again: 




Some added details. The sod field (west side Rt 615) is in the process of being 
harvested and is opposite the Dubrow's Nursery sign (east side of 615). I think 
Sam's map is pretty accurate. The bird was by itself and stayed in the same 
basic location (a little south and west of the fields center) almost directly 
across from sign. I viewed the bird from about2:15-2:45. It remained nearly 
motionless (head view only) for the first 15 mins. When it moved, showing its 
full body, it may have move another 15 ft south. It did not fly while I was 
there and therefore I have no info on underwing color. 




http://goo.gl/maps/c8fc1



Good birding,



Sam



--

Sam Galick

Cape May, NJ

sam.galick AT gmail.com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/s...

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

How to report NJ bird sightings: - See more at: 
http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=738448&MLID=NJ01&MLNM=New%20Jersey#sthash.7FlJZ04d.dpuf 

Subject: North Stellwagen Very Nice, 7-18-14
From: Daan Sandee <sandee AT shell.TheWorld.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 20:39:00 -0400 (EDT)
Friday morning Noel and I did a Seven Seas whale watch out of Gloucester to 
North Stellwagen, and our experience agrees with  Paul Roberts.  It was a 
beautiful day with little wind, calm sea, good for whalewatching but not 
very good for shearwaters.

The shearwater flocks started soon after leaving the harbor, and never really 
stopped.  The whalewatching was phenomenal, with the naturalist saying this was
the best trip she'd had in years.  In the matter of numbers, she was probably 
right.  There were at least thirty humpbacks, with maybe some double-counting,
ctively feeding, with little slapping, jumping, or breaching ; they were too
busy feeding, sometimes six or eight around the boat at close range.  And six
fin whales.  We didn't get very far south as the captain was happy to hang
around with the whales at the north end and save fuel.

I would have estimated fewer birds than Paul saw, but then I wasn't counting.
Great Shearwater in the hundreds, Cory's up to a hundred, dozens of Sooties,
and one (1) Manx, in the very first flock.  The Cory count was exceptionally
high, but not unexpected, giving the reports of the past week.  Maybe a 
couple of hundred storm-petrels, in ones and twos.

The highlight was a bird which I first put down as a Pomarine, but then I
got the size and shape, and realized I was looking at a skua.  Medium brown,
virtually no contrast anywhere except for bright wing flashes (which is what 
caught my attention in the first place.)  I assume it was a South Polar Skua,
largely on probability.  The color was intermediate between the cold gray-brown
of the SPSK and the warmer brown of the Great Skua.  There was not a trace 
of a dark cap, but given the color it may well have been an immature, and 
the immatures of both species are said to be often indistinguishable.  It 
was flying around busily with a large gull/shearwater flock, but didn't have 
any success, as the birds were not feeding, just hanging around, and I don't 
think that even a skua will harass a whale to give up its prey.  Whether
this was the same skua as was reported a week ago I don't know ; when I saw
it, I didn't have that report in mind, being just vaguely aware that a skua
had been reported this season.   Altogether, quite a nice trip.

Daan Sandee
Gloucester, MA                                   sandee AT theworld.com

Subject: CT Report 07/19//2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 22:01:12 -0400
 From Robert Dixon:
07/19/14 - Sterling yard -- EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL (calling at 4:30
AM), PURPLE FINCH and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO.

 From Angela Dimmitt with Maureen Connolly:
07/18/14 - Sherman, Wimisink Marsh -- 3 charismatic young American
Bittern continue to chase Mom demanding food, she sometimes feeds
them, sometimes flies off.  One of them can fly and has fished
(frogged?) on its own, the other two tend to just sit and  chill, but
all 3 get aggressive with Mom when she is willing to feed them.  They
all stab at each other, not so nice.  Never see second parent.
Additional entertainment includes a Yellow-billed Cuckoo often seen
flying into low trees to the left  of the boardwalk (we also heard a
Black-billed Cu off to the right).

Subject: Re: Southern Stellwagen Very Slow, 7/19/2014
From: "Glenn d'Entremont" <gdentremont1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 01:01:31 +0000 (UTC)
The comment about Arthur is inaccurate. A combined SSBC/BBC whale watch out of 
Plymouth last Saturday (7/12) had lots of Cory's (1500) and smaller numbers of 
Great (250) and Sooty (25) and only 1 Manx. There were only 3 Wilson's 
Storm-Petrel. There were ~25 Humpbacked, 2 Fin and 1 Minke all actively 
feeding. This was on the south part of the banks to off of P'town. This was 
after Arthur by several days. 


Glenn

Glenn d'Entremont:  gdentremont1 AT comcast.net  Stoughton, MA

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Floyd" 
To: "Massbird" 
Sent: Saturday, July 19, 2014 4:43:27 PM
Subject: [MASSBIRD] Southern Stellwagen Very Slow, 7/19/2014

With all the reports of how good the activity has been on Stellwagen this 
summer, I had high expectations as I set out on a whale watch from Plymouth at 
9:00. Apparently things have changed, at least on the southern part of 
Stellwagen. The only thing unexpectedly "good" was the number of storm-petrels. 
The numbers below tell the story: 


Cory's Shearwater		4, all flying
Greater Shearwater		0 (!)
Sooty Shearwater		1 flying
Unidentified shearwaters	3 rafting together far north of our return route
Wilson's Storm-Petrel		20, the first 10 seen even before reaching SB SW corner
Northern Gannet		8, including one adult between SB and Plymouth

Whales:
Minke				1
Fin				2
Humpback			1 (!)

You know you're in trouble on a whale watch when they spend half an hour trying 
to get mediocre looks at one uncooperative animal. 


I asked a crew member about this. He'd been out every day recently and said 
that their trips have been like this since Hurricane Arthur. The whales moved 
"north" (meaning Gloucester), he said. 


On the plus side, the water was glassy and beautiful. And it was nice to visit 
with Scott and Valerie Surner, who had driven out from Amherst this morning 
also with high hopes for a lot of whales and birds. 


We searched Plymouth Beach intently for skimmers going out and returning but 
saw none until I saw one very distantly flying low over a low-tide-exposed bar 
deep into southern part of the harbor. I ran to get Scott for a look but the 
bird had vanished. 


Bottom line: if I had time to go out onto Stellwagen any time soon, I'd go out 
of Gloucester or Newburyport, in hopes the good numbers are still up there. 


Chris Floyd
Lexington
chrisf AT mitre.org



Subject: Chatham Seabird Extravaganza
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 20:09:01 -0400
Hi all,

Mike Silvia and I headed out of Chatham Harbor at about 6AM and immediately 
made for open ocean to hunt down seabirds in the nearly calm conditions. The 
cold waters off tip of South Beach provided (first) an extremely cold ride(!) 
and (second) three PARASITIC JAEGERS. We tooled well offshore and north, 
remaining several to 5 miles offshore as we went. Birding was pretty quiet at 
the beginning, but as we approached a point due east of Chatham, things started 
picking up, with Wilson's Storm Petrels increasing from one or two at a time to 
five or ten at a time. Shearwaters picked up quickly, and the first raft of 
them had a bonus imm. LONG-TAILED JAEGER paddling in amongst the three species 
of tubenose (Cory's, Great, and Sooty). It took flight with the shearwaters and 
made a second pass by the boat for great looks. From that point on we headed 
deeper and deeper into shearwater territory, totaling approximately 1000 birds 
of all 4 expected species (approximately 40% CORY'S, 40% GREATS, >15% SOOTY, 
and <5% MANX). The real action started opposite Pleasant Bay, and most birds 
were loafing on the surface making us think that they had all stuffed 
themselves with the many long slender schools of Sand Lance that were strung 
along, parallel to shore. Looking north along the lines of loafing shearwaters, 
we could see a relatively narrow stream of shearwaters flying down the lines of 
forage fish from the north - we certainly could have tallied many more with 
little effort. While out, We also stumbled across several Minki Whales and two 
sets of Humpback Whales - a pair of actively tail-lobbing and foraging animals 
and a threesome of animals on the move. We also came by the typical fare, such 
as a few NORTHERN GANNET, LAUGHING GULLS, foraging terns etc. 


On the way in we stopped at Minimoy and encountered a large number of 
shorebirds scattered on the flats at low tide, including SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, 
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, LEAST and SEMIPALMATED 
SANDPIPER (hundreds each), 1 RED KNOT, GREATER YELLOWLEGES, a couple hundred 
WILLET, a dozen OYSTERCATCHERS, and few thousand SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS 
including both subspecies and one that was either xanthistic or partially 
leucistic, with the faded ground coloration giving it a yellow wash. 


Overall, the sunburn was well worth it!

Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA
 		 	   		  
Subject: North Stellwagen Trip VERY Productive 7-19-14
From: Paul Roberts <phawk254 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 19:11:02 -0400
We took a Cape Ann Whale Watch boat out of Gloucester this morning on a trip
that appeared to exceed everyoneĻs expectations. It was very quiet for the
first ten miles or so, with only 10-15 WilsonĻs Storm-Petrels. We then
spotted two Humpbacks, at least one of whom breached 46 times within our
view. There were smatterings of Great, Sooty and a couple of Manx
Shearwaters, most of whom were sitting quietly on the windless gray water,
but occasionally individuals would glide by.

We then continued a short distance where we encountered an additional 15+
Humpbacks, including 5 feeding in sync, though no bubble feeding. There were
another 10 or so seen in the distance. There appeared to be two cows with
calves, with one calf approaching alongside the boat for great views. The
birding picked up dramatically as we approached this group of whales, with
flocks of several hundred shearwaters sitting quietly on the water every 500
yds or so. As the boat approached the shearwaters had difficulty clearing
out, either because of the virtual absence of wind or because they were too
full. I had the clear impression that many shearwaters were just too full to
move very far, period, causing me to wish I had my DSLR with me.
Fortunately, Jane Myers had hers. ( I did get some great shots with my Nikon
P510 megazoom that I could not have gotten with a DSLR, but I also lost a
lot of great shots I could have had with a DSLR.)

These are very rough guesstimates (conservative), as the flocks were mixed
species, large, and wide, and usually sitting until flushed, though we had
several hundred shearwaters gliding close to the boat. Spectacular day.

CoryĻs Shearwater       300+
Great Shearwater      1000+
Sooty Shearwater        150+
Manx Shearwater          10+

WilsonĻs Storm-Petrel    200+

Great Blue Heron        1

Short-billed Dowitcher    20 (Need to review photos to confirm species ID )

Northern Gannet     3 imm
Parasitic Jaeger       1

Tern sp         100+

Humpback Whales         27 (17 close)

A wonderful morning.

Best,

Paul


Paul M. Roberts
Medford, MA
phawk254 AT comcast.net
 





     


Subject: Southern Stellwagen Very Slow, 7/19/2014
From: "Floyd, Chris" <chrisf AT mitre.org>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 20:43:27 +0000
With all the reports of how good the activity has been on Stellwagen this 
summer, I had high expectations as I set out on a whale watch from Plymouth at 
9:00. Apparently things have changed, at least on the southern part of 
Stellwagen. The only thing unexpectedly "good" was the number of storm-petrels. 
The numbers below tell the story: 


Cory's Shearwater		4, all flying
Greater Shearwater		0 (!)
Sooty Shearwater		1 flying
Unidentified shearwaters	3 rafting together far north of our return route
Wilson's Storm-Petrel		20, the first 10 seen even before reaching SB SW corner
Northern Gannet		8, including one adult between SB and Plymouth

Whales:
Minke				1
Fin				2
Humpback			1 (!)

You know you're in trouble on a whale watch when they spend half an hour trying 
to get mediocre looks at one uncooperative animal. 


I asked a crew member about this. He'd been out every day recently and said 
that their trips have been like this since Hurricane Arthur. The whales moved 
"north" (meaning Gloucester), he said. 


On the plus side, the water was glassy and beautiful. And it was nice to visit 
with Scott and Valerie Surner, who had driven out from Amherst this morning 
also with high hopes for a lot of whales and birds. 


We searched Plymouth Beach intently for skimmers going out and returning but 
saw none until I saw one very distantly flying low over a low-tide-exposed bar 
deep into southern part of the harbor. I ran to get Scott for a look but the 
bird had vanished. 


Bottom line: if I had time to go out onto Stellwagen any time soon, I'd go out 
of Gloucester or Newburyport, in hopes the good numbers are still up there. 


Chris Floyd
Lexington
chrisf AT mitre.org



Subject: no joy in wrenville
From: Susan Hedman <winterwren2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 18:48:58 +0000 (UTC)
Up until this morning I had a vocal pair of wrens feeding babies in a nest box. 
Every time the parents came to the nest I could hear the begging cries of the 
babies. This morning it is sadly silent and noticed a mess of twigs and 
feathers below the pear tree. Last year I saw the blue jay gulp down a baby 
that had just fledged, but this year the nest was tampered with and apparently 
at night. So this is a ceramic globe, in the shape of a fat cat with the mouth 
as the entrance and a 2 inch plug at the base for cleaning. I found the plug on 
the ground intact among the debris. So my thought is the who is the villain 
this time? Raccoon,fisher,weasel,and chipmunk were the first come to my mind. 
Raccoon seems like a possibility as they are good climbers and adept with their 
paws. I can imagine the rascal prying open the nest and reaching up inside to 
find a meal. I'd appreciate any other theories my massbird friends might 
conjecture. Clearly I will never know for sure about this mi! 

 ssing wren mystery, but might learn more about nest predation.  
It does make me sad to see these wrens work so hard and have their efforts 
dashed. It also reminds me what a dangerous world our feathered friends really 
live in. Every adult bird I see and admire had to make it through such 
obstacles to be here in the world. Makes me appreciate them even more. 

 
Susan Hedman, Gloucester
"I believe in God, only I spell it Nature."  Frank Lloyd Wright

Subject: CT Report 07/18/2014 Miss Kite
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 23:00:44 -0400
 From Frank Mantlik, with Greg Hanisek:
07/18/14 - Simsbury, Great Pond State Forest -- adult MISSISSIPPI KITE
flying over pond, harassed by Eastern Kingbird at 8:06 AM. It flew
south over pond and us, then went west just south of pond. We were on
trail along south side of pond.

 From Ryan MacLean:
07/18/14 - Sherman, Wimisink Marsh -- 3 young American Bittern.

 From Don Morgan:
07/18/14 - Windham, Boston Hollow/Yale Forest -- 1 Acadian Flycatcher,
2 Winter Wren.

Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Jul 18, 2014
From: Kat Birder <katbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 18:43:19 -0400
Great Meadows NWR--Concord Unit, Middlesex, US-MA
Jul 18, 2014 5:56 AM - 10:16 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:    Weekly species census for the NWR. Mostly sunny, 50's-upper
70's F.  Observers: Will Martens, Maryellen Stone, Joan Stoner, Andy
Scholten, and Kathy Dia. 
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.5.3 49 species (+1 other taxa) Canada Goose 100 Careful count Wood Duck 21 Mallard 5 Least Bittern 1 Addition by Alan Strauss who was visiting from RI. Bird was seen in one of the same locations it has been seen the last couple weeks, from the end of the Dike in the west corner of the Lower Pool (just look right at the end of the Dike and be prepared to wait a good while unless you are lucky:) Great Blue Heron 11 Green Heron 1 Observed by David Swain Red-tailed Hawk 1 Virginia Rail 4 Addition by David Swain who joined us towards the end of the survey. Birds were seen crossing the main Dike Trail. One adult then one adult with chicks. Killdeer 8 Spotted Sandpiper 2 Least Sandpiper 2 Mourning Dove 2 Chimney Swift 1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker 3 Downy Woodpecker 7 Hairy Woodpecker 2 Northern Flicker 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee 2 Willow Flycatcher 3 Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher) 2 Eastern Kingbird 9 Warbling Vireo 9 Blue Jay 10 American Crow 5 Tree Swallow 6 Barn Swallow 4 Black-capped Chickadee 10 Tufted Titmouse 5 White-breasted Nuthatch 4 Marsh Wren 19 Continuing Carolina Wren 3 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 7 Wood Thrush 1 American Robin 21 Gray Catbird 5 Cedar Waxwing 1 Northern Waterthrush 1 Observed by Will Martens near the restrooms as he was leaving! Photo by Will Martens (see checklist for photo) Common Yellowthroat 9 Yellow Warbler 9 Pine Warbler 2 One continuing in the pines near Timber Tr. . One feeding near the parking lot early a.m. Chipping Sparrow 1 Song Sparrow 26 Active and visible adults and juveniles feeding often on the trail Swamp Sparrow 9 Northern Cardinal 4 Red-winged Blackbird 68 Common Grackle 19 House Finch 1 American Goldfinch 8 House Sparrow 4 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19137226 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org) Kathy Dia for the Great Meadows Census Crew Concord, MA
Subject: Re: Draw Down of The Pools - Parker River NWR
From: dovekie AT comcast.net
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 20:43:41 +0000 (UTC)

Massbirders: 

    As I was birding the island this am, I saw refuge personal opening the 
gates at the control structure at Stage Island Pool, presumably to catch the 
falling tide. This morning I, and my friends saw the Gull-billed Tern, three 
red knots and an Hudsonian godwit at sandy point.  Also there was an H 
udsonian Godwit at the Bill Forward Pool.  possible the same bird. Also the 
two Avocets were still stationed at their usual spot near the s mall island in 
the Bill forward Pool.  Also under the most extraordinary circumstances 
I once again saw a Whip-poor-will perched and partially obscured on 
the Hellcat trail and fairly near where T om Wetmore and I sa w on M ay 29. 




Doug Chickering 

Groveland 

dovekie AT comcast.net 



  



----- Original Message -----


From: "Sue McGrath"  
To: massbird AT TheWorld.com 
Sent: Friday, July 18, 2014 10:55:24 AM 
Subject: [MASSBIRD] Draw Down of The Pools - Parker River NWR 

Birders, 

I had a long conversation this morning with the PRNWR's Acting Manager, Frank 
Drauszewski, regarding the draw down of the Bill Forward and Stage Island Pools 
for the migrant shorebirds.   The draw downs are underway.  


As birders, we know that the Newburyport area is where nature's most ambitious, 
long-distance migrants feed during their fall migration. Shorebird numbers are 
building, and these birds are an important international conservation priority 
that require proactive efforts as these birds travel pole to pole in 
migration.  


Parker River NWR and Monomoy NWR are both sites in The Western Hemisphere 
Shorebird Reserve Network which is a conservation strategy launched in 1986 
with the designation of the first site, Delaware Bay.  This Network aligns 
with the simple strategy that we must protect key habitats throughout the 
Americas in order to sustain healthy populations of shorebirds. WHSRN's 
site partners are conserving more than 32.1 million acres of shorebird 
habitat.  WHSRN works to build a strong system of international sites used by 
shorebirds throughout their migratory ranges.  


We know that The Great Marsh is famous for shellfish and many recreational 
activities which benefit our local economy. It's this marsh that also buffers 
against costly flood and storm damage as it filters coastal pollutants.  
Tourism, sportsmen, birders, anglers and recreation are all sources of money 
for the region. I read a study back in 1994 which was conducted by the 
University of New Hampshire which showed that local revenues generated by 
visitors to The Great Marsh amount to approximately six million dollars 
annually.  


Historically, the soft-shell clam fishery in the Parker River-Plum Island 
estuary is by far the most valuable commercial fishery in the state.  In the 
mid 1990's, the commercial value of the soft-shell clam harvest in Ipswich, 
Rowley and Newbury was reported to be over one million dollars.  The financial 
impact of the clamming industry is felt by the harvesters, the distributors, 
the processors and the restaurant owners. 



The salt marsh hay framers' commercial value is enormous as well.  Salt 
marshes were a tremendous resource to the early settlers. Salt marsh hay was 
used for insulation, roofing and livestock feed and bedding. There was a 
decline in Salt marsh haying in the 1930's because  farms switched to 
cultivating upland hay. Today, the salt marsh hay harvests that we see along 
the Plum Island Turnpike are almost exclusively used for mulch. 



Bird On, 
Sue 

Sue McGrath 
Newburyport Birders 
Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify 
Newburyport, MA 
Website: www.newburyportbirders.com 
Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/ 
Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders 



Subject: Red-headed Woodpecker in PTown
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 13:32:59 -0400
Just got an e-mail from my mother out at Missionbell, 1.5 miles east of Race 
Point IN Provincetown. Several friends and family members enjoyed the company 
of a Red-headed Woodpecker this morning, as it checked out the only vertical 
structure around - swallow boxes and bell/flag poles. There was a bit if 
movement on radar last night, so this may have come off the water. 


Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Draw Down of The Pools - Parker River NWR
From: John Nelson <jnelson AT northshore.edu>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 11:35:13 -0400
Sue,

Thanks for following through on this and for providing some context.

John Nelson
Gloucester


On Fri, Jul 18, 2014 at 10:55 AM, Sue McGrath <
newburyportbirders AT comcast.net> wrote:

>  Birders,
>
> I had a long conversation this morning with the PRNWR's Acting Manager,
> Frank Drauszewski, regarding the draw down of the Bill Forward and Stage
> Island Pools for the migrant shorebirds.  * The draw downs are underway.
> *
>
> As birders, we know that the Newburyport area is where nature's most
> ambitious, long-distance migrants feed during their fall migration.
> Shorebird numbers are building, and these birds are an important
> international conservation priority that require proactive efforts as these
> birds travel pole to pole in migration.
>
> Parker River NWR and Monomoy NWR are both sites in The Western Hemisphere
> Shorebird Reserve Network which is a conservation strategy launched in 1986
> with the designation of the first site, Delaware Bay.  This Network aligns
> with the simple strategy that we must protect key habitats throughout the
> Americas in order to sustain healthy populations of shorebirds. WHSRN's
> site partners are conserving more than 32.1 million acres of shorebird
> habitat.  WHSRN works to build a strong system of international sites used
> by shorebirds throughout their migratory ranges.
>
> We know that The Great Marsh is famous for shellfish and many recreational
> activities which benefit our local economy. It's this marsh that also
> buffers against costly flood and storm damage as it filters coastal
> pollutants.  Tourism, sportsmen, birders, anglers and recreation are all
> sources of money for the region. I read a study back in 1994 which was
> conducted by the University of New Hampshire which showed that local
> revenues generated by visitors to The Great Marsh amount to approximately
> six million dollars annually.
>
> Historically, the soft-shell clam fishery in the Parker River-Plum Island
> estuary is by far the most valuable commercial fishery in the state.  In
> the mid 1990's, the commercial value of the soft-shell clam harvest in
> Ipswich, Rowley and Newbury was reported to be over one million dollars.
> The financial impact of the clamming industry is felt by the harvesters,
> the distributors, the processors and the restaurant owners.
>
> The salt marsh hay framers' commercial value is enormous as well.  Salt
> marshes were a tremendous resource to the early settlers. Salt marsh hay
> was used for insulation, roofing and livestock feed and bedding. There was
> a decline in Salt marsh haying in the 1930's because  farms switched to
> cultivating upland hay. Today, the salt marsh hay harvests that we see
> along the Plum Island Turnpike are almost exclusively used for mulch.
>
> Bird On,
> Sue
>
> Sue McGrath
> Newburyport Birders
> Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
> Newburyport, MA
> Website: www.newburyportbirders.com
> Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
> Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Subject: Least Bittern Great Meadows
From: "a.e. strauss" <ansch100 AT Cox.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 10:24:52 -0400
Today at GMWS Concord Unit I had a Least Bittern at about 7:30 AM. Here is how 
I found it. Walk out along the central dike. On the right is a viewing 
platform. Looks across the dike (to the left) in the Upper Impoundment. THe 
platform is raised so you can see over the cattails. The bird was flying just 
over the cattails from the left corner and it flew along the waterline then 
crossed the dike and went down in the corner on the Lower Impound in the far 
right corner.... the last place where there is marsh on the right hand side of 
the dike. I walked down from the viewing platform to where I saw the bird go 
down. The lotus plants were moving back and forth and I relocated the bittern 
in a patch of dense lotus pads. Watch for the movement of the vegetation. It 
was there only for a few minutes. I could not focus the camera in time to get 
any pics or videos. I did have the bird fairly close on the pads for about one 
minute when I got killer looks at it. I could see! 

 the dark shoulders, yellowish brown body, and hunched posture and dagger-like 
bill. I never saw it fly out of that corner and the movement seemed to have 
stopped. 


 When it first flew it was low over the marsh grass. It flew with a direct 
straight flight following the shoreline. Overall it was buffy colored except 
for the dark shoulder patches very pale looking and small. I did hear some 
"dog-like" grunts in the right corner of he dike where it was in the lotus 
which may have been the bird vocalizing. 


Willow Flycatcher "Fitz-bew" calling near the tower.

Alan Strauss, Providence

ps thanks to Steve Arena for his suggestions.
 
Subject: Draw Down of The Pools - Parker River NWR
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 10:55:24 -0400
Birders,

I had a long conversation this morning with the PRNWR's Acting Manager, 
Frank Drauszewski, regarding the draw down of the Bill Forward and Stage 
Island Pools for the migrant shorebirds. *The draw downs are underway. *

As birders, we know that the Newburyport area is where** nature's most 
ambitious, long-distance migrants feed during their fall migration. 
Shorebird numbers are building, and these birds are an important 
international conservation priority that require proactive efforts as 
these birds travel pole to pole in migration.

Parker River NWR and Monomoy NWR are both sites in The Western 
Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network which is a conservation strategy 
launched in 1986 with the designation of the first site, Delaware Bay.  
This Network aligns with the simple strategy that we must protect key 
habitats throughout the Americas in order to sustain healthy populations 
of shorebirds. WHSRN's site partners are conserving more than 32.1 
million acres of shorebird habitat.  WHSRN works to build a strong 
system of international sites used by shorebirds throughout their 
migratory ranges.

We know that The Great Marsh is famous for shellfish and many 
recreational activities which benefit our local economy. It's this marsh 
that also buffers against costly flood and storm damage as it filters 
coastal pollutants.  Tourism, sportsmen, birders, anglers and recreation 
are all sources of money for the region. I read a study back in 1994 
which was conducted by the University of New Hampshire which showed that 
local revenues generated by visitors to The Great Marsh amount to 
approximately six million dollars annually.

Historically, the soft-shell clam fishery in the Parker River-Plum 
Island estuary is by far the most valuable commercial fishery in the 
state.  In the mid 1990's, the commercial value of the soft-shell clam 
harvest in Ipswich, Rowley and Newbury was reported to be over one 
million dollars.  The financial impact of the clamming industry is felt 
by the harvesters, the distributors, the processors and the restaurant 
owners.

The salt marsh hay framers' commercial value is enormous as well.  Salt 
marshes were a tremendous resource to the early settlers. Salt marsh hay 
was used for insulation, roofing and livestock feed and bedding. There 
was a decline in Salt marsh haying in the 1930's because  farms switched 
to cultivating upland hay. Today, the salt marsh hay harvests that we 
see along the Plum Island Turnpike are almost exclusively used for mulch.

Bird On,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport Birders
Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
Newburyport, MA
Website:www.newburyportbirders.com
Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders

     


     


     


Subject: CT Report 07/17/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 22:06:19 -0400
 From Angela Dimmitt:
07/17/14 - Sherman, Wimisink Marsh -- 11:00 adult American Bittern
flies out of reeds on far bank for a few feet, followed by two young
scrambling together.  When they reach parent, it takes off again
another few feet, young falling over each other on foot.  Third time
parent flies, one of the young does  too, other scrambles.  They then
disappeared behind grasses/cattails.  Meanwhile a third bird is left
behind whence they first emerged, looks too pale for juvie but can't
tell for sure.  It then disappeared too.  Guess I got really lucky!

 From Paul Desjardins:
07/17/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- morning;  female
Boat-tailed Grackle and 2 large young. She caught a fish to feed them!

 From Frank Mantlik:
07/17/14 - Guilford, Shell Beach Rd, marsh pools -- 1 adult LITTLE
BLUE HERON, male GREATER SCAUP (in cove on beach side by red barn). No
sign of the Tricolored Heron nor any Stilt Sandpipers. What a great
looking spot for a rare wader!

 From James Winkelmann:
07/17/14 - Sherman, Wimisink Marsh --  1 adult, 1 juvenile, American
Bittern in marsh pond area at end of boardwalk.  Also 1 Yellow-Billed
Cuckoo, 2 Black Vulture

Subject: Front yard Goshawk
From: KAWOLFTRAP AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 19:31:00 -0400 (EDT)
As I sat watching the evening news, ca. 0715 PM, I glanced out the living  
room window just
as an adult Goshawk landed on the wire which stretches over the lawn  
between the house
and the pole along the driveway.  Had ample time to enjoy it all, the  
blue-gray back, the
white under parts, the barred tail..and then it took off down the driveway  
toward Winter Street.
It certainly distracted me from all the disturbing news from the Ukraine,  
Israel, and all the
other troubled spots worldwide !
 
Kathleen S. Anderson
Wolf Trap Hill Farm
Middleboro, MA
Subject: European Sandwich Tern
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 19:10:17 -0400
I plan on driving up from NJ to Plum Island Saturday early morning.  Is the
Sandwich tern still being seen or has it moved on?  Any help would be much
appreciated.  Thanks in advance.

Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Hillsdale, NJ
Subject: Shorebird Migration & Water Levels - PRNWR - Plum Island
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 08:45:11 -0400
Fellow Massbirders,

Nancy Pau's email is:Nancy_Pau AT fws.gov

Frank Drauszewski's  email is:frank_drauszewski AT fws.gov

Good birding,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport Birders
Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
Newburyport, MA
Website:www.newburyportbirders.com
Blog:http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders

     


     


     







Subject: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Pools
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 08:44:09 -0400
Hi, Jim, Rick, & Massbirders,

I wrote to Nancy Pau [Biologist] and Frank Drauszewski [Acting Manager] 
requesting that the water levels in those pools be lowered
and included a copy of the latest shorebird sightings.

Good birding,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport,MA

>


Subject: Black-crowned Bight Heron in Metropolitan Boston
From: Paul Roberts <phawk254 AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 08:17:29 -0400
I live a half block from the Mystic River, just before it turns north to its
headwaters in the Mystic Lakes. One of the great joys of the location was
working or sitting in my yard on late spring and early summer evenings and
seeing (or more often hearing) hundreds of Black-crowned Night Herons flying
from their breeding colonies in Boston Harbor up the Mystic River and to the
Mystic Lakes to feed on herring during the herring run. They would perch
everywhere along the river. Photographic opportunities (with film) were
abundant.

Somewhat the same for the Charles River, where we would regularly drive
along Soldiers Field Road or picnic there and watch dozens if not hundreds
of Black-crowns fly back and forth up the Charles, many going to the
Watertown Dam.

This decade, however, has been a virtual desert for Black-crowns. IĻve seen
or heard fewer than a dozen fly over this year. I see very few at the lakes.

There are several reasons for this, which apparently have little to do with
the herring runs, at least on the Mystic. (There are far fewer herring than
decades ago, but they are still obviously so abundant they could maintain a
far larger population of Black-crowns than we have.)

The Massachusetts Breeding Bird Atlas 2 reports that Black-crowns are stable
or increasing, revealing one of the major limitations of such atlases.
Black-crowns were confirmed in 16 blocks in the first atlas; in 20 blocks in
the second. The most noticeable difference is that 25 blocks were possible
for BCNH in the 2nd atlas, where none were reported in the first. The
atlases show distribution of breeding populations, not actual abundance.

However, the North American Breeding Bird Survey reports a significant
decline for BCNH from 1966-2012, with the trend worsening from 2002-2012.

More specifically, a 2010 Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered
Species report on coastal nesting colonies of cormorants, gulls, herons,
etc., reports a dramatic decline in breeding abundance on the Massachusetts
coast. See  
http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dfg/nhesp/species-and-conservation/colonialwate
rbirdcensusreport2006-08-2010-final.pdf

The 2010 report found BCNH the most abundant wader in the fifteen colonies
surveyed, but reported a population decline of 45% between 1994/95 and
2006/08, their two most recent surveys.

In 1994-95, 834 breeding pairs of BCNH were found on seven islands in Boston
harbor. Between 2006-08, they found 436 pairs, with two colonies completely
abandoned, including the third largest colony in 1994-95.

Those islands are where almost all the birds that had been seen along the
Mystic or Charles watersheds came from.

That is a dramatic decline in little more than a decade, but likely part of
a larger, long-term decline in our area since World War II. (See Atlas 2
discussion.) 

I do not know how the causes of the recent decline relate to the causes of
the longer-term decline. I do know that I really miss the "qua" calls over
the house and the sight on hundreds of Black-crowned Night Heron lining the
banks of the Mystic and the shores of the lakes, gorging on the abundant
herring that they would carry back to their nestlings in the harbor.

Best,

Paul


Paul M. Roberts
Medford, MA
phawk254 AT comcast.net
 













Subject: Sandhill Cranes - Cumberland Farms fields
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT TheWorld.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 07:22:16 -0400
 >  Mike Maurer reports three Sandhill Cranes at the Cumberland Farms 
Fields today, 7/16,  in the Wood Street area.

Mike adds that they were found by Judd Carlisle .

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com
Subject: Let the festivities begin!
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 23:43:05 -0400
Hi all,

On the heels of this latest front the first eruptions of migrant passerines 
(almost certainly all pairs of Yellow Warblers) are appearing on the radar 
screens. One interesting thing is that it's timed to the exact day compared to 
last year. Unfortunately I'm not sure that I'll be able to check my favorite 
spot in the morning. Time to watch for those nights with northwest winds. 


Best!
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: OT: Tropicbird in ME
From: James Purcell <jpurcell1616 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 22:29:50 -0400
I apologize for the off-topic / extralimital nature to this post, but Alex
Burdo and I are planning on undertaking the trip to Maine to see the famous
Red-billed Tropicbird this Sunday and Monday, July 20 and 21, and we were
wondering if anybody else had any interest in joining us.

Basically, the bird is frequently seen around Seal Island, and the captain
will take us out on Sunday afternoon, the time of day the bird is most
often seen. His boat leaves from Vinalhaven Island, which you need to take
a ferry from Rockland Maine to get to. We will be taking the 1:00 ferry
from Rockland on Sunday and will be joining Captain John Drury at around
2:30 when we arrive. Unfortunately, the last ferry leaves the island before
we would return from the boat on Sunday evening so an overnight on
Vinalhaven Island is necessary. There are several places to stay in town,
however.

The price is $80 per person for the boat ride if we can fill it with 6
people. Please let me know off-list at my email jpurcell1616 AT gmail.com if
you have interest in joining us.

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT
Subject: CT Report 07/16/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 22:24:39 -0400
 From Dan, Emily, and Danny Rottino:
07/16/14 - Guilford, Shell Beach -- 1 STILT SANDPIPER continuing (I
did not locate the second bird), 1 TRICOLORED HERON, and 1 LITTLE BLUE
HERON.

 From Bev Propen:
07/16/14 - Milford, Milford Pt, Connecticut Audubon Coastal Center --
3 YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS (2 on marsh, 1 a flyover), 1 female
ORCHARD ORIOLE feeding in the basswood trees.

 From Chris Loscalzo:
07/15/14 - Guilford, Shell Beach marsh -- two STILT SANDPIPERS,
feeding in a shallow pool near the road, in transitional plumage. 

Subject: Shorebird Migration & Water Levels - Parker River National Wildlife Refuge
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 21:00:21 -0400
Birders,

Nancy Pau's email is: Nancy_Pau AT fws.gov

Frank Drauszewski's  email is: frank_drauszewski AT fws.gov

Good birding,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport Birders
Observe ~ Appreciate ~ Identify
Newburyport, MA
Website:www.newburyportbirders.com
Blog: http://nbptbirders.blogspot.com/
Twitter:  AT  nbpt_birders

     


     


     





Subject: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge Pools
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:53:02 -0400
Hi, Jim, Rick, Plum Island Birders & Massbirders,

I wrote to Nancy Pau [Biologist] and Frank Drauszewski [Acting Manager] 
requesting that the water levels in those pools be lowered
and included a copy of the latest shorebird sightings.

Good birding,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport,MA

On 7/16/2014 8:04 PM, Richard Heil wrote:
> Jim, et al.,
>
> They haven't lowered the water levels at the Forward Pool and Stage 
> because they are more concerned with the effect the release of fresh 
> water onto the adjacent clam flats will have of said flats that might 
> affect the clammers.  In other words they are more concerned with the 
> economic interests of a few clammers than they are with providing 
> critical foraging habitat for migratory shorebirds as we fast approach 
> the peak of migration.  The mission statement for the USF&WS proudly 
> proclaims that their objective is "Wildlife First."  I ask, is showing 
> more concern for the clammers than for migratory shorebirds, within 
> the boundaries of a national wildlife refuge, putting wildlife first?
>
> Richard S. Heil
> S. Peabody, MA
> rsheil AT comcast.net
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/?saved=1 
> 
>
>
Subject: Plum Island, MA; Tues., 15 July 2014: Avocets, Gull-billed, Royal, skimmers.
From: Richard Heil <rsheil AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:47:48 -0400
TUESDAY, 15 JULY 2014:
PLUM ISLAND, MASSACHUSETTS (1200-1900 hrs.)
Weather: Mostly cloudy, thunderstorms and heavy rain showers late, S 
winds 5-25 mph, 80-85 F.
Richard S. Heil

Water levels in the poorly managed impoundments at Forward Pool and 
at Stage Island Pool are too high for extensive shorebird 
usage.  Hurricane Arthur leftover "southern terns" still about.

Selective List:

Gadwall: female w/9 young - Forward Pool, female w/6 young - Stage I. Pool.
Common Loon (3)
AMERICAN AVOCET (2) : Continuing pair at Forward Pool.
Black-bellied Plover (5)
Semipalmated Plover (45 ads.)
Piping Plover (12+)
Killdeer (7) : Including an adult with FIVE (rare, usually four) 
downy young in the road together by Stage I. Pool.
Spotted Sandpiper (4) : 3 ads., 1 juv.
Greater Yellowlegs (21 ads.)
Eastern Willet (35+ ads.)
Lesser Yellowlegs (80 ads.)
Whimbrel (19 ads.) : Including flock of 13 at Sandy Pt. 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14692663043/ , 5 in the marsh at 
Cross Farm Hill, and one southbound off Lot 1 beach.
HUDSONIAN GODWIT (2 ads.) - Forward Pool : 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14672769665/
Stilt Sandpiper (2 ads.) - North Pool.
Least Sandpiper (100+ ads.)
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1120 ads.) : Incl. 500 at Sandy Pt.
Short-billed Dowitcher, griseus (280 ads.)
Short-billed Dowitcher, hendersoni (2 ads.)
WILSON'S PHALAROPE (1 juv.) - pans north of Cross Farm Hill: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14486111569/
Laughing Gull (15 ads.) : high number for date.
Ring-billed Gull (275+) : Incl. at least 8 juvs.
Lesser Black-backed Gull (1 - 2S) - Lot 1 beach.
Least Tern (90+) : Incl. one 1S.
GULL-BILLED TERN (1 ad.) - Foraging distant pans, Lot 1 marsh: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14669618551/
Roseate Tern (2 ads.) - Lot 1. ocean.
Common Tern (150+) : Incl. one juvenile.
ROYAL TERN (2 ads.) - Lot 1 ocean and beach: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14486181398/ , 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14669616491/in/photostream/
BLACK SKIMMER (4 ads.) - Sandy Point: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/14672803205/
Red-eyed Vireo (1) - singing, opposite Cross Farm Hill.

Richard S. Heil
S. Peabody, MA
rsheil AT comcast.net

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/?saved=1 

Subject: Re: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 15, 2014
From: ted g purcell <tedgpurcell AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:41:31 -0400
Same management strategy the Feds use on marine fisheries, e.g. Striped bass... 
Definitely fisherman fist wildlife second. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 16, 2014, at 8:04 PM, Richard Heil  wrote:
> 
> Jim, et al.,
> 
> They haven't lowered the water levels at the Forward Pool and Stage because 
they are more concerned with the effect the release of fresh water onto the 
adjacent clam flats will have of said flats that might affect the clammers. In 
other words they are more concerned with the economic interests of a few 
clammers than they are with providing critical foraging habitat for migratory 
shorebirds as we fast approach the peak of migration. The mission statement for 
the USF&WS proudly proclaims that their objective is "Wildlife First." I ask, 
is showing more concern for the clammers than for migratory shorebirds, within 
the boundaries of a national wildlife refuge, putting wildlife first? 

> 
> Richard S. Heil
> S. Peabody, MA
> rsheil AT comcast.net
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/?saved=1 
> 
> 
> 
> At 07:35 AM 7/16/2014, Jim Berry wrote:
>>> Parker River National Wildlife Refuge
>>> Jul 15, 2014 7:25 AM - 1:15 PM
>>> Protocol: Traveling
>>> 9.0 mile(s)
>>> Comments: Having been in Maine all weekend (friday-monday), I birded the 
refuge this (now yesterday) morning from the gate to Sandy Point. I managed to 
miss all six species of rare or uncommon terns that were reported over the 
weekend, seeing only least and common terns. I even missed the avocets. Major 
stops were lot 1 (twice), the Hellcat dikes, the Bill Forward blind (twice), 
and Sandy Point. Water levels in Stage Island Pool and (to a lesser extent) 
Bill Forward Pool are too high for shorebirds and should be lowered VERY SOON. 

>>> 60 species (+3 other taxa)
>>> 
>>> Canada Goose  32
>>> Gadwall  1
>>> American Black Duck  1
>>> Mallard  80
>>> American Black Duck x Mallard (hybrid) 2 At least this many, with all those 
mallards in eclipse plumage. These two were seen up close. 

>>> Wild Turkey  4     in the salt marsh!
>>> Double-crested Cormorant  24
>>> Great Blue Heron  7
>>> Great Egret  19
>>> Snowy Egret  27
>>> Osprey 11 including 3 or 4 young on two nests and three fishing in the 
ocean off lot 1 

>>> hawk sp.  1     probably a harrier, but seen poorly
>>> Black-bellied Plover  3
>>> Semipalmated Plover  7
>>> Piping Plover  17     all at Sandy Point and including one grown juv.
>>> Killdeer  3
>>> Spotted Sandpiper  2
>>> Greater Yellowlegs  11
>>> Willet (Eastern)  17
>>> Lesser Yellowlegs  10
>>> Stilt Sandpiper 3 north impoundment near hellcat dike, thanks to Tom 
Wetmore 

>>> Least Sandpiper  30
>>> White-rumped Sandpiper 5 at least a few in BFP, told by seeing either white 
rumps in flight or larger size and more tapered appearance than the nearby 
semis 

>>> Semipalmated Sandpiper 35 rough estimate of birds in BFP, with a few at 
Sandy Pt. 

>>> Short-billed Dowitcher  120     most in BFP
>>> Ring-billed Gull  30
>>> Herring Gull  35
>>> Great Black-backed Gull  6
>>> Larus sp. 140 herrings and ring-bills at lot 1, hard to separate without 
scope 

>>> Least Tern  60
>>> Common Tern  4
>>> Black Skimmer 3 continuing birds at Sandy Pt., resting on mud flat keeping 
3 clammers company 

>>> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2     lot 1
>>> Mourning Dove  10
>>> Alder Flycatcher 1 Tom Wetmore's pet bird, giving partial songs at top of S 
curves (seen and heard with Tom) 

>>> Willow Flycatcher  1
>>> Eastern Kingbird  15
>>> American Crow  5
>>> Purple Martin 3 they didn't even outnumber the decoys! (though I'm sure I 
missed some) 

>>> Tree Swallow  50     rough estimate
>>> Bank Swallow  10     at Bar Head, where I counted about 20 burrows
>>> Barn Swallow  15     rough estimate
>>> Marsh Wren  10     singing males
>>> Eastern Bluebird  1
>>> American Robin  10
>>> Gray Catbird  12
>>> Brown Thrasher  1
>>> Northern Mockingbird  5
>>> European Starling  400     rough estimate
>>> Cedar Waxwing  5
>>> Common Yellowthroat  6
>>> Yellow Warbler  3
>>> Eastern Towhee  10
>>> Saltmarsh Sparrow  9
>>> Seaside Sparrow  3
>>> Song Sparrow  32
>>> Northern Cardinal  2
>>> Bobolink  13
>>> Red-winged Blackbird  65
>>> Common Grackle  90
>>> Purple Finch  1
>>> American Goldfinch  8
>>> House Sparrow  5     lot 1
>>> 
>>> View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19111441 

>> 
>> 
>> Jim Berry
>> Ipswich, Mass.
>> jim.berry3 AT verizon.net
Subject: Re: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 15, 2014
From: Richard Heil <rsheil AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:04:19 -0400
Jim, et al.,

They haven't lowered the water levels at the Forward Pool and Stage 
because they are more concerned with the effect the release of fresh 
water onto the adjacent clam flats will have of said flats that might 
affect the clammers.  In other words they are more concerned with the 
economic interests of a few clammers than they are with providing 
critical foraging habitat for migratory shorebirds as we fast 
approach the peak of migration.  The mission statement for the USF&WS 
proudly proclaims that their objective is "Wildlife First."  I ask, 
is showing more concern for the clammers than for migratory 
shorebirds, within the boundaries of a national wildlife refuge, 
putting wildlife first?

Richard S. Heil
S. Peabody, MA
rsheil AT comcast.net

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rsheil/?saved=1 





At 07:35 AM 7/16/2014, Jim Berry wrote:
>>Parker River National Wildlife Refuge
>>Jul 15, 2014 7:25 AM - 1:15 PM
>>Protocol: Traveling
>>9.0 mile(s)
>>Comments:   Having been in Maine all weekend (friday-monday), I 
>>birded the refuge this (now yesterday) morning from the gate to 
>>Sandy Point.  I managed to miss all six species of rare or uncommon 
>>terns that were reported over the weekend, seeing only least and 
>>common terns.  I even missed the avocets.  Major stops were lot 1 
>>(twice), the Hellcat dikes, the Bill Forward blind (twice), and 
>>Sandy Point.  Water levels in Stage Island Pool and (to a lesser 
>>extent) Bill Forward Pool are too high for shorebirds and should be 
>>lowered VERY SOON.
>>60 species (+3 other taxa)
>>
>>Canada Goose  32
>>Gadwall  1
>>American Black Duck  1
>>Mallard  80
>>American Black Duck x Mallard (hybrid)  2     At least this many, 
>>with all those mallards in eclipse plumage.  These two were seen up close.
>>Wild Turkey  4     in the salt marsh!
>>Double-crested Cormorant  24
>>Great Blue Heron  7
>>Great Egret  19
>>Snowy Egret  27
>>Osprey  11     including 3 or 4 young on two nests and three 
>>fishing in the ocean off lot 1
>>hawk sp.  1     probably a harrier, but seen poorly
>>Black-bellied Plover  3
>>Semipalmated Plover  7
>>Piping Plover  17     all at Sandy Point and including one grown juv.
>>Killdeer  3
>>Spotted Sandpiper  2
>>Greater Yellowlegs  11
>>Willet (Eastern)  17
>>Lesser Yellowlegs  10
>>Stilt Sandpiper  3     north impoundment near hellcat dike, thanks 
>>to Tom Wetmore
>>Least Sandpiper  30
>>White-rumped Sandpiper  5     at least a few in BFP, told by seeing 
>>either white rumps in flight or larger size and more tapered 
>>appearance than the nearby semis
>>Semipalmated Sandpiper  35     rough estimate of birds in BFP, with 
>>a few at Sandy Pt.
>>Short-billed Dowitcher  120     most in BFP
>>Ring-billed Gull  30
>>Herring Gull  35
>>Great Black-backed Gull  6
>>Larus sp.  140     herrings and ring-bills at lot 1, hard to 
>>separate without scope
>>Least Tern  60
>>Common Tern  4
>>Black Skimmer  3     continuing birds at Sandy Pt., resting on mud 
>>flat keeping 3 clammers company
>>Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2     lot 1
>>Mourning Dove  10
>>Alder Flycatcher  1     Tom Wetmore's pet bird, giving partial 
>>songs at top of S curves (seen and heard with Tom)
>>Willow Flycatcher  1
>>Eastern Kingbird  15
>>American Crow  5
>>Purple Martin  3     they didn't even outnumber the decoys! (though 
>>I'm sure I missed some)
>>Tree Swallow  50     rough estimate
>>Bank Swallow  10     at Bar Head, where I counted about 20 burrows
>>Barn Swallow  15     rough estimate
>>Marsh Wren  10     singing males
>>Eastern Bluebird  1
>>American Robin  10
>>Gray Catbird  12
>>Brown Thrasher  1
>>Northern Mockingbird  5
>>European Starling  400     rough estimate
>>Cedar Waxwing  5
>>Common Yellowthroat  6
>>Yellow Warbler  3
>>Eastern Towhee  10
>>Saltmarsh Sparrow  9
>>Seaside Sparrow  3
>>Song Sparrow  32
>>Northern Cardinal  2
>>Bobolink  13
>>Red-winged Blackbird  65
>>Common Grackle  90
>>Purple Finch  1
>>American Goldfinch  8
>>House Sparrow  5     lot 1
>>
>>View this checklist online at 
>>http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19111441
>
>
>Jim Berry
>Ipswich, Mass.
>jim.berry3 AT verizon.net
Subject: Sandhill Cranes - Cumberland Farms fields
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT TheWorld.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:54:20 -0400
Mike Maurer reports three Sandhill Cranes at the Cumberland Farms 
Fields today, 7/16,  in the Wood Street area.

Thanks, Mike!

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com
Subject: : Crane records at Cumberland Farms fields in Halifax
From: KAWOLFTRAP AT aol.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 16:13:57 -0400 (EDT)
Hi all...
 
Some of my friends know that I am an addicted record keeper :-(
 
Just back from seeing the 3 cranes found by Judd Carlisle, I checked past  
records :
 
5/18/1987.....One
4/18/1994.....1 in a cornfield
4/5/2013.......3 reported by Bob Lessard
7/16/2014.....3 reported by Judd Carlisle
 
Could they possibly be the same birds ????
 
If anyone knows of records not on this list, please post to MassBird
 
Kathleen Anderson, whose woodland adjoins Cumberlands Farm fields
 
  
____________________________________
 From: treeswallow5 AT aol.com
To: KAWOLFTRAP AT aol.com
Sent: 7/16/2014  1:46:04 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time
Subj: Fwd: cranes




Hello Betty



just got a call from Judd  Carlisle (1:40 pm July 16th)  three sandhill 
cranes at cumby's... he's at manure pit area but prob visible from wood street 

too....from cemetery or  closer toward river st  


Mike Maurer 
Marion, MA 

"The time to save  a species is while it is still common" Rosalie Edge, 
Founder of Hawk Mountain  Sanctuary


Subject: Re: BC night heron question
From: "Marj. Rines" <marj AT mrines.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:14:13 -0400
Same issue on the Mystic River watershed. The decline has been going on 
for a few years, but as recently as 2003 I had as many as 129 on Lower 
Mystic Lake. This year my high count was under 10. I wondered if it had 
anything to do with the fact that they installed a fish ladder a couple 
of years ago. The big draw was the herring run, and if the herring were 
no longer stalled in the lower lake it might have affected the heron 
count. Your experience on the Charles seems to nix that idea.
> Hi all-- just curious to know of others' experience. I live in 
> Cambridge near the Charles. In previous springs/summers night herons 
> flying to and from the river were a common--almost nightly--sight. 
> Usually clusters of 5-7, sometimes alone. This year I have seen one. 
> On one night. That's it.
>
> Trying to figure out if I'm just less observant. Has anyone else 
> noticed a change?
>
> Thanks
>
> -- 
> Anne Hubbard
> 184 Magazine Street
> Cambridge, Massachusetts
>

-- 
Marj. Rines
Woburn, MA
marjmrines.com
Subject: Crane Beach, Ipswich, Jul 16, 2014
From: "Jim Berry" <jim.berry3 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:28:21 -0400
> Crane Beach, Ipswich, Essex, US-MA
> Jul 16, 2014 8:00 AM - 9:50 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     I went to Ipswich Beach this morning and forgot to look at 
> the forecast--rain!  Anyway, I was saved from the elements by two TTOR 
> staff who were monitoring tern and plover chicks.  (There are 30 nesting 
> pairs of plovers this year; I did not learn the number of least tern 
> pairs.)  They picked me up and took me to the end of the beach and back, 
> for which I was mighty grateful.  The tide was wrong for tern aggregations 
> at the tip of the beach, so I saw no fancy terns today.
> 24 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Common Loon  1
> Double-crested Cormorant  8
> Great Egret  3
> Semipalmated Plover  1
> Piping Plover  20     including 6+ chicks
> Killdeer  3
> Sanderling  3
> Semipalmated Sandpiper  250     rough estimate; saw no white-rumps or 
> other peeps
> Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher  2     distant
> Laughing Gull  3     adults
> Ring-billed Gull  15
> Herring Gull  150     estimate; many young
> Great Black-backed Gull  40     almost all adults
> Least Tern  125     estimate of the large nesting colony; saw 2 juvs in 
> flight
> Common Tern  5
> Mourning Dove  2
> Tree Swallow  600     estimate of the massing birds
> Bank Swallow  2     saw very few, but counted 20 or so burrows
> American Robin  1
> Gray Catbird  1
> Northern Mockingbird  1
> Eastern Towhee  1
> Song Sparrow  6
> Red-winged Blackbird  15
> Common Grackle  5
>
> View this checklist online at 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19117479


Jim Berry
Ipswich, Mass.
jim.berry3 AT verizon.net
Subject: Re: BC night heron question
From: Lois <lois.mckim AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:23:39 -0400
Every evening at the Watertown Dam on the Charles five or more Black-Crowned 
Night Herons patiently wait for fish, usually joined by a Great Blue Heron, 
cormorants, and a few gulls. 

The numbers have been about the same for the last three years. 

Lois

> On Jul 16, 2014, at 11:00 AM, Anne Hubbard  wrote:
> 
> Hi all-- just curious to know of others' experience. I live in Cambridge near 
the Charles. In previous springs/summers night herons flying to and from the 
river were a common--almost nightly--sight. Usually clusters of 5-7, sometimes 
alone. This year I have seen one. On one night. That's it. 

> 
> Trying to figure out if I'm just less observant. Has anyone else noticed a 
change? 

> 
> Thanks
> 
> -- 
> Anne Hubbard
> 184 Magazine Street
> Cambridge, Massachusetts
> 
Subject: RE: BC night heron question
From: KIRK <kirkelwell AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 16:22:50 +0000
Not sure on the latest numbers but when I was the Lead Engineer on the Zakim 
Bridge construction during the Central Artery-Tunnel Project some years ago we 
used to really enjoy the Night-heron show within the locks at the Charles River 
Dam. In each lock there are side "floats" which keep boaters from rubbing up 
against the concrete walls and give them something to tie to and/or hold on to 
during transits. 

I remember many early mornings on my way north to the North Tower workzone 
seeing literally 40 to 60 Night Herons sitting on these floats. Mostly 
Black-crowned but quite often a few Yellow-crowneds. 

Probably best seen either early morning or late evening.
Also I just had two Black-crowned's and one Yellow-crowned fly into the Water's 
River roost area on Rte 35/Water St in Danvers. 

Kirk.

Kirk S Elwell
Amesbury, MA.
or  AT ; gentilisfinder AT gmail.com
 
From: ahubbard184 AT gmail.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 11:00:04 -0400
Subject: [MASSBIRD] BC night heron question
To: massbird AT TheWorld.com

Hi all-- just curious to know of others' experience. I live in Cambridge near 
the Charles. In previous springs/summers night herons flying to and from the 
river were a common--almost nightly--sight. Usually clusters of 5-7, sometimes 
alone. This year I have seen one. On one night. That's it. 




Trying to figure out if I'm just less observant. Has anyone else noticed a 
change? 


Thanks
-- 
Anne Hubbard
184 Magazine Street
Cambridge, Massachusetts


 		 	   		  
Subject: BC night heron question
From: Anne Hubbard <ahubbard184 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 11:00:04 -0400
Hi all-- just curious to know of others' experience. I live in Cambridge
near the Charles. In previous springs/summers night herons flying to and
from the river were a common--almost nightly--sight. Usually clusters of
5-7, sometimes alone. This year I have seen one. On one night. That's it.

Trying to figure out if I'm just less observant. Has anyone else noticed a
change?

Thanks

-- 
Anne Hubbard
184 Magazine Street
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Subject: Royal Tern cont.7/16
From: Bird Watchers Supply & Gift <birdwsg AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:54:19 +0000 (UTC)
Dave Adrien reports the ROYAL TERN on the beach from the Lot 1 Platform on Plum 
Island at 9:10am. 


Steve Grinley
Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift
Route 1 Traffic Circle
Newburyport, MA 01950
Birdwsg AT comcast.net
978-462-0775

Subject: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Jul 15, 2014
From: "Jim Berry" <jim.berry3 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 07:35:37 -0400
> Parker River National Wildlife Refuge
> Jul 15, 2014 7:25 AM - 1:15 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 9.0 mile(s)
> Comments:   Having been in Maine all weekend (friday-monday), I birded the 
> refuge this (now yesterday) morning from the gate to Sandy Point.  I 
> managed to miss all six species of rare or uncommon terns that were 
> reported over the weekend, seeing only least and common terns.  I even 
> missed the avocets.  Major stops were lot 1 (twice), the Hellcat dikes, 
> the Bill Forward blind (twice), and Sandy Point.  Water levels in Stage 
> Island Pool and (to a lesser extent) Bill Forward Pool are too high for 
> shorebirds and should be lowered VERY SOON.
> 60 species (+3 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose  32
> Gadwall  1
> American Black Duck  1
> Mallard  80
> American Black Duck x Mallard (hybrid)  2     At least this many, with all 
> those mallards in eclipse plumage.  These two were seen up close.
> Wild Turkey  4     in the salt marsh!
> Double-crested Cormorant  24
> Great Blue Heron  7
> Great Egret  19
> Snowy Egret  27
> Osprey  11     including 3 or 4 young on two nests and three fishing in 
> the ocean off lot 1
> hawk sp.  1     probably a harrier, but seen poorly
> Black-bellied Plover  3
> Semipalmated Plover  7
> Piping Plover  17     all at Sandy Point and including one grown juv.
> Killdeer  3
> Spotted Sandpiper  2
> Greater Yellowlegs  11
> Willet (Eastern)  17
> Lesser Yellowlegs  10
> Stilt Sandpiper  3     north impoundment near hellcat dike, thanks to Tom 
> Wetmore
> Least Sandpiper  30
> White-rumped Sandpiper  5     at least a few in BFP, told by seeing either 
> white rumps in flight or larger size and more tapered appearance than the 
> nearby semis
> Semipalmated Sandpiper  35     rough estimate of birds in BFP, with a few 
> at Sandy Pt.
> Short-billed Dowitcher  120     most in BFP
> Ring-billed Gull  30
> Herring Gull  35
> Great Black-backed Gull  6
> Larus sp.  140     herrings and ring-bills at lot 1, hard to separate 
> without scope
> Least Tern  60
> Common Tern  4
> Black Skimmer  3     continuing birds at Sandy Pt., resting on mud flat 
> keeping 3 clammers company
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2     lot 1
> Mourning Dove  10
> Alder Flycatcher  1     Tom Wetmore's pet bird, giving partial songs at 
> top of S curves (seen and heard with Tom)
> Willow Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Kingbird  15
> American Crow  5
> Purple Martin  3     they didn't even outnumber the decoys! (though I'm 
> sure I missed some)
> Tree Swallow  50     rough estimate
> Bank Swallow  10     at Bar Head, where I counted about 20 burrows
> Barn Swallow  15     rough estimate
> Marsh Wren  10     singing males
> Eastern Bluebird  1
> American Robin  10
> Gray Catbird  12
> Brown Thrasher  1
> Northern Mockingbird  5
> European Starling  400     rough estimate
> Cedar Waxwing  5
> Common Yellowthroat  6
> Yellow Warbler  3
> Eastern Towhee  10
> Saltmarsh Sparrow  9
> Seaside Sparrow  3
> Song Sparrow  32
> Northern Cardinal  2
> Bobolink  13
> Red-winged Blackbird  65
> Common Grackle  90
> Purple Finch  1
> American Goldfinch  8
> House Sparrow  5     lot 1
>
> View this checklist online at 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19111441


Jim Berry
Ipswich, Mass.
jim.berry3 AT verizon.net
Subject: Nauset Marsh Sandwich Tern
From: Mary Keleher <maryeak AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 02:17:13 -0700
It has been suggested by several people that the Sandwich Terns I reported from 
the Nauset Marsh on 7/11 are most likely the same bird. Though the lighting, 
posture and positioning of the crest are much different in the photos the 
markings appear to be identical.† 


No word yet on subspecies. Hopefully this bird and all the other great 
terns/birds that were there stick around for others to see. 


Mary Keleher,
Mashpee, MA
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Winthrop--Sisters, Jul 15, 2014
From: Bob Stymeist <bobstymeist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 17:02:48 -0400
This morning heavy fog finally lifted around 9:15, I birded Nahant, Revere
Beach, Winthrop and Belle Isle, besides the Black Skimmer on Winthrop
Beach, saw an additional 13 Piping Plover on Revere Beach, 2 Manx
Shearwaters and 20 Bonaparte's Gull and 43 young Common Eider with 5 adult
females off Little Nahant.


Winthrop--Sisters, Suffolk, US-MA
Jul 15, 2014 10:52 AM - 11:56 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.4 mile(s)
Comments:     78F
14 species

Common Eider  24     20 young
Double-crested Cormorant  38
American Oystercatcher  2
Piping Plover  8     Piping Plover- Winthrop Beach, MA- 15 July 2014
Ring-billed Gull  12
Herring Gull  22
Great Black-backed Gull  12
Least Tern  25     at least 8 fledged young
Common Tern  2
Black Skimmer  1     Black Skimmer- Winthrop Beach, MA- 15 July 2014
Black Skimmer- Winthrop Beach, MA- 15 July 2014
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  2
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  15
House Sparrow  12

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19110091

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)



-- 
Bob Stymeist
bobstymeist AT gmail.com
Subject: Bolton Flats WMA - 7/12
From: Steve Arena <pokedaddy151 AT aim.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:45:15 -0400 (EDT)
On Saturday, July 12th, Amy O and I canoed the Still River portion of Bolton 
Flats WMA. Here are the hi-lites 

 
Least Bittern - 3 (1m, 1f, and 1 unknown) including two nests. 1 the previous 
reported nest found in mid June and the 2nd found by Amy this weekend. 

Pied-billed Grebe - 1 - calling: This bird had not been vocal until this past 
weekend. 

Common Gallinule - 5 - These birds are well represented in this marsh. Over the 
past several years, as the beavers do their work, the habitat just keeps 
getting better for them. 

Virginia Rail - 8 including 3 nests
Marsh Wren - ~18
Swamp Sparrow - ~18
Willow Flycatcher - 7
Yellow-throated Vireo - 2
Several Hundred swallows predominantly Tree with decent numbers of Bank and 
Barn mixed in. 

Cooper's Hawk - 1 adult

Steve
 

-------------------------------------------------
Steve Arena
 
Westborough, MA    
PokeDaddy151 AT aol.com
 

Photos:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/pokedaddy/ 
Subject: Black Skimmer- Winthrop Beach
From: Bob Stymeist <bobstymeist AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 11:56:01 -0400
Black Skimmer adult on Winthrop Beach with gulls by life guard stand
Bob Stymeist

Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Barred Owl, IRWS Topsfield 7/15
From: Bird Watchers Supply & Gift <birdwsg AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 15:56:16 +0000 (UTC)
Bev Chaisson called at 11:15am to report a Barred Owl at the Ipswich River 
Wildlife Sanctuary in Topsfield. It was along the Ipswich River trail which 
goes down to the canoe launch. 


Steve Grinley
Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift
Route 1 Traffic Circle
Newburyport, MA 01950
Birdwsg AT comcast.net
978-462-0775

Subject: 2 GULL-BILLED TERNS Plum Island
From: Suzanne Sullivan <swampy435 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 09:30:39 -0400
Hello Massbirders,

When John and I were leaving the refuge after a quick visit ( the
green heads are out in force now btw) I spotted 2 terns circling over
the road by Lot 1. A very strange behavior for terns. For me anyway it
was a first. They hardly maybe once twice flapped a wing. For the most
part they just were riding the thermals circling like raptors. They
were not hawking bugs which they are well known for, just circling
checking the area out. They headed south over the dunes and like I
said hardly flapped a wing until out of sight. I would not be
surprised if there are more than 2 around. Crazy stuff.
Here are the photos below just hit next in right hand corner.
http://www.pbase.com/suzsull/most_recent_birds_wildlife
-- 
Suzanne M. Sullivan
Wilmington, MA
swampy435 AT gmail.com

Be the Voice of the River
http://www.ipswichriver.org

Please support me in Buzz for a Cure
http://my.e2rm.com/PersonalPage.aspx?registrationID=2319868&langPref=en-CA