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Updated on Tuesday, September 2 at 06:12 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hyacinth Macaw,©BirdQuest

02 Sep Invitation to Bird exhibit ["Eduardo del Solar" ]
1 Sep 9/1 Dickcissel W Bridgewater [Liam Waters ]
01 Sep HSR: Wachusett Mountain (01 Sep 2014) 15 Raptors []
01 Sep CT Report 09/01/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
01 Sep Chatham pelagic - Thursday (9/4) [Blair Nikula ]
1 Sep Crane Beach shorebirds []
1 Sep Wompatuck State Park raptors, etc. []
1 Sep Fwd: eBird Report - Essex Bay, Sep 1, 2014 [Derek Brown ]
1 Sep Sanderling with leg band & green flag - Photos! [Craig Gibson ]
1 Sep Bray St. pond Little Blues and Red-breasted Merganser [John Nelson ]
1 Sep Plum Island this morning [Tom Murray ]
1 Sep Fwd: eBird Report - Hobbs Brook (Cambridge) Reservoir, Sep 1, 2014 [Sam Miller ]
1 Sep Buff-breasted Sandpiper PI Airport [Timothy Walker ]
1 Sep Whimbrels shack newburyport []
1 Sep Bristol County Highlights - 8/31 [james sweeney ]
1 Sep Bristol County Highlights - 8/31 [james sweeney ]
01 Sep C. Nighthawk COUNT-ALL TIME HIGH [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
1 Sep The chain unbroken []
31 Aug Sora, Bairds SP, around Lexington and Concord [Cliff Cook ]
31 Aug HSR: Wachusett Mountain (29 Aug 2014) 39 Raptors []
31 Aug Re: odd Morning Dove behavior [Joshua Rose ]
31 Aug CT Report 08/31/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
31 Aug odd Morning Dove behavior [Tom Murray ]
31 Aug C. Nighthawk COUNT-ALL TIME HIGH []
31 Aug Stellwagen Bank NMS, Aug 31, 2014 ["Jim Berry" ]
31 Aug Chatham pelagic - 8/30 [Blair Nikula ]
31 Aug Canada Warbler,Townsend, MA [Robert Templeton ]
31 Aug Caspian Tern PI [Newburyowls ]
31 Aug Winthrop Beach [Newburyowls ]
31 Aug Bairds SP Bill Forward [tattler1 ]
31 Aug Drumlin Farm this morning [Pamela Sowizral ]
31 Aug Passenger Pigeons [Deborah Radovsky ]
31 Aug Buff breasted sand [David Deifik ]
31 Aug Red-necked phalarope [Jason Huestis ]
31 Aug RE: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine ["Dave Small" ]
31 Aug CT Report 08/30/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
31 Aug Re: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine ["Glenn d'Entremont" ]
30 Aug Plum Island, Pictures of Red-necked Phalarope and Gull-billed Tern (8/30) [Henry D Mauer ]
30 Aug Linear Park, Williamstown, Sat. Afternoon []
31 Aug Chatham Seabirds [Peter Flood ]
30 Aug Re: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine ["Eric" ]
30 Aug Plymouth whale watch 8/30 [Mark Lynch ]
30 Aug Re: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
30 Aug Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 8/29 Fenway Victory Garden [Paul Peterson ]
30 Aug HSR: Blueberry Hill (30 Aug 2014) 6 Raptors []
30 Aug Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine! [Joshua Rose ]
30 Aug Marbled Godwit at Bill Forward, 11:45 [David Swain ]
30 Aug ESA opinion and Martha [Peter Doherty ]
30 Aug Red-necked phalarope plum island [Nancy Landry ]
30 Aug NYTimes Opinion Piece on Conservation: Saving Our Birds [Bob Parker ]
30 Aug Gull-billed Tern, Plum Island, stage island pool, 8 am []
29 Aug CT Report 08/29/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
29 Aug BBC Extreme Pelagic Trip Magic 8/23,24/2014 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
29 Aug Found on Plum Island: tripod swivel-head handle [Sam Miller ]
29 Aug Hawk Migration Forecast Email Service [Paul Roberts ]
29 Aug Gull-Billed Tern SIP 1:30 8/29 [Bird Watchers Supply & Gift ]
29 Aug Gooseberry morning flight KENTUCKY W., UPLAND SANDPIPER, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW [Paul Champlin ]
29 Aug Black Vultures -- Fall River and Westport [Lynn Abbey ]
29 Aug Lark Sparrow at McLaughlin Woods, Roxbury [Ryan Merrill ]
29 Aug Pileated Woodpecker [Glenn Long ]
29 Aug Hummingbird nest [George W Gove ]
29 Aug Ruby throat hummingbird question [Robert Mussey ]
28 Aug CT Report 08/28/2014 [Roy Harvey ]
28 Aug sandhill cranes in cummington []
28 Aug HSR: Wachusett Mountain (28 Aug 2014) 9 Raptors []
28 Aug American Birding Association area checklist addition [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
28 Aug 460+ Black Terns at Great Point on Nantucket 8/28/14 []
28 Aug Nighthawks in Grafton [John Liller ]
28 Aug Chatham Pelagic - Saturday (8/30) [Blair Nikula ]
28 Aug PRNWR Marbled godwit []
28 Aug South Coast Birder's Celebration [Paul Champlin ]
28 Aug Gooseberry this morning and a godwit at Allens Pond [Paul Champlin ]
28 Aug pelagic - Sept 27-28 [Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore ]
27 Aug Focus on Kestrels Friday Sept 5th, 7 p.m. at Eastern Mass Hawk Watch Annual Meeting [Paul Roberts ]
27 Aug Re: [Arlington Birds] Nighthawks in Watertown [Bob Stymeist ]
27 Aug Manomet 8/27/14 - White-winged Dove [Ian Davies ]

Subject: Invitation to Bird exhibit
From: "Eduardo del Solar" <delsolar AT bellatlantic.net>
Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 06:04:53 -0400
I would like to invite you to my largest Birds of the Americas exhibit, a 
project now in it's eight year. The exhibit will take place at the Hunneman 
Hall area of the Brookline Public Library located in Brookline Village. It is 
comprised of 42 images from my native Peru, Galapagos, Costa Rica, Canada, 
Florida, and New England. Below is the schedule of the four viewings for my 
exhibit: 

Saturday September 13, 2014            1:00 - 4:00 PM
Thursday October 23, 2014                5:00 - 8:00 PM
 
Opening Reception
Saturday September 27, 2014            1:00 - 4:00 PM
 
Live Tango Music Orquesta Atìpica Quintet 
Thursday October 2, 2014                   5:30 - 8:00 PM

You can see all the images in this exhibit as well as directions and 
information for my exhibit at this link: 

 http://www.delsolar.org/docs/exhibits/brookline.html

Brookline Public Library
361 Washington Street
Brookline, Mass.
Tel. 617- 730-2370 
Eduardo del Solar
Boston, Mass
delsolar AT bellatlantic.net
http://www.delsolar.org/
Subject: 9/1 Dickcissel W Bridgewater
From: Liam Waters <youngeaglewaters AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:16:30 -0400
This morning there was a juvenile Dickcissel at the Model Airplane field in
West Bridgewater. We also got to watch ~6000 Tree Swallows lift off out of
the phragmites and swirl around before dispersing.
Complete list with a photo
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19636064

Other stops in the area did not produce anything of note but in case you
were wondering what it is like there here are the lists with minor habitat
comments.

Cumbies -- Yellow-throated Vireo
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19635817

Lake Sabbatia -- 64 Wood Ducks 2 Green Herons
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19642671

Erwin S Wilder WMA -- Probable Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19642942



Happy Birding,
Liam Waters
Sharon
Subject: HSR: Wachusett Mountain (01 Sep 2014) 15 Raptors
From: reports AT hawkcount.org
Date: 01 Sep 2014 19:09:38 -0400
Wachusett Mountain
Princeton, Massachusetts, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 01, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0              0              3
Bald Eagle                   0              0              4
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           4              4             35
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              2
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              1
Broad-winged Hawk            9              9             69
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              0              5
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             1              1              2
Unknown Accipiter            1              1              1
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                      15             15            122
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 10:00:00 
Observation end   time: 16:00:00 
Total observation time: 6 hours

Official Counter:        Steve Olson

Observers:        

Visitors:
Brian Rusnica


Weather:
AM - Blue Sky, PM - 70% Cumulus
Temp: 78 in AM, 83 in PM
Wind: West to SW  AT  5 mph
Hazy to West & East, Clearer to the North 45 mile viewing
range.

Raptor Observations:
Not many raptors moving. 15 to 20 non-migrating Turkey Vultures

Non-raptor Observations:
Crow - 1

Predictions:
Same as today - Hot, Humid. Showers possible in late PM.
========================================================================
Report submitted by  ()
Wachusett Mountain information may be found at:
www.massbird.org/emhw

Subject: CT Report 09/01/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 22:00:05 -0400
 From Bill Asteriades:
09/01/01 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- 8:10 AM; Two American
Golden-Plovers and a Pectoral Sandpiper in previously described
location.

 From Bill Asteriades with Karen Prager:
09/01/01 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- 8:55; Buff-breasted
Sandpiper and two White-rumped Sandpipers flew into the same field
where the American Golden-Plovers have been feeding.  Enter via the
ferry landing.  First field on left after the zig zag.

 From Tina Green:
09/01/01 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- 10:15; Buff-breasted
Sandpiper, 4 American Golden-Plovers, at the end of Great Meadows Rd,
past the motor cross intersection, but of course (10:22) they flew off
toward the original location.

 From Patrick Comins:
09/01/01 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- 11 AM; Buff-breasted
Sandpiper being seen in plowed field near original location with 4
American Golden-Plover.  Three White-rumped Sandpipers very close to
the road and occasional views of at least one Pectoral Sandpiper.  

 From Stefan Martin:
09/01/01 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- 11:25; Buff-breasted
Sandpiper flew SWish.  American Golden-Plovers continue.  12:25 PM;
Buff-breasted Sandpiper has returned.

 From Chris Loscalzo and Marianne Vahey:
09/01/01 - Orange, at the Racebrook Tract -- one YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT.
Seen in a vine-covered tree along the trail just north of the parking
area.

 From Dan Cimbaro:
09/01/01 - Colchester yard -- Male & Female Wilson's Warbler in my
yard Monday morning.

 From Ricki Soucy:
09/01/01 - Meriden, Meriden Landfill -- 1 Common Nighthawk, 1 Acadian
Flycatcher.

 From Russ Naylor via Angela Dimmitt:
09/01/01 - Woodbury, Church Road -- 53 Common Nighthawks flying over
house 6 PM.

 From Paul Carrier:
09/01/01 - Torrington, Middle school -- Olive-sided Flycatcher.

 From Gina Nichol & Steve Bird:
09/01/01 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 6 to 8 PM, outgoing tide;
FORSTER'S TERN, 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS, RED KNOT, 2 WILSON'S
PHALAROPE, BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER.

 From Chris Loscalzo and Marianne Vahey:
08/31/01 - Woodbridge, along the power line cut between the JCC and
Pease Road -- one adult male HOODED WARBLER, as well Wilson's Warbler.

Subject: Chatham pelagic - Thursday (9/4)
From: Blair Nikula <odenews AT odenews.org>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:38:16 -0400
We've scheduled another Chatham pelagic for this Thursday (9/4), leaving 
the Chatham Fish Pier at 7:00 a.m. and returning about 11:00 a.m., with 
a cost of $95/person.  Contact me a.s.a.p. if interested.  The mobs have 
thinned, it's now safe to travel to the Cape, and it's peak season for 
seabirds, so join us for a morning on the water.

Blair Nikula

-- 
2 Gilbert Lane
Harwich Port, MA  02646
http://www.odenews.org/
http://www.capecodbirds.org/

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus - Mark 
Twain 

Subject: Crane Beach shorebirds
From: dave.williams6 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:00:58 -0400
At low tide this morning on a large patch of green and brown algae there was a 
very interesting group of shorebirds foraging. Included in this group were: 

Least sandpiper - 2
White-rumped sandpiper - 2
Ruddy turnstone - 3
Red knot - 1
Semipalmated sandpiper - 6
Semipalmated plover - 1
Sanderling - 6
Baird's sandpiper - 1  My first Crane Beach Baird's
In addition, a Black tern flew in and put on a show.

Dave Williams
Reading, MA

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Wompatuck State Park raptors, etc.
From: brianrfg AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:12:43 -0400 (EDT)
Hi,
 I walked some of Wompatuck State Park (in Hingham and other towns) around noon 
today and found, in the loop road/hunting area, three Barred Owls, a 
Broad-winged Hawk, and an immature Northern Goshawk. There are turtles (both 
native Painted Turtle and released Red-eared Slider) at the pond there that 
come right up to you if you make some splashes at the dock. I presume people 
have been feeding them. Clamp-tailed Emerald dragonflies were swarming along 
the main road close to here. 

 At two other spots in Hingham, there were flocking Fish Crows, with 78 at 
World's End Reservation and 113 at the Derby Street Shops. 

    And that was the excitement on this hot, humid first of September.
    Brian Cassie, Foxboro
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Essex Bay, Sep 1, 2014
From: Derek Brown <derekbrownbuild AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:35:47 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: 
Date: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 at 5:29 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Essex Bay, Sep 1, 2014
To: derekbrownbuild AT gmail.com

A phenomenal day in essex bay,  all birds seen before tidal overflow on the
Spit.  We've been unable so far to locate high tide roosts, so the
possibilities are the crane beach dunes or plum island.  Sunday evening we
naked eye   saw a potential sandhill crane flyover conomo point, but
couldn't get enough information for ebird.

Essex Bay, Essex, US-MA
Sep 1, 2014 12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments:     80 deg. mid tide rising  All seen from the Spit
27 species

Mallard  1
Double-crested Cormorant  124
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  11
Snowy Egret  44
Turkey Vulture  1
Osprey  3
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Black-bellied Plover  91
Semipalmated Plover  243
Greater Yellowlegs  6
Willet  4
Hudsonian Godwit  2
Ruddy Turnstone  3
Red Knot  10     3 juv
Sanderling  146
Least Sandpiper  4
White-rumped Sandpiper  11     4juv
Buff-breasted Sandpiper  1
Semipalmated Sandpiper  72
Short-billed Dowitcher  1
Long-billed Dowitcher  1
Bonaparte's Gull  176
Herring Gull  35
Great Black-backed Gull  11
Black Tern  1
Common Tern  31

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19639687

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Sanderling with leg band & green flag - Photos!
From: Craig Gibson <cbgibson AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:21:57 +0000 (UTC)
Recently observed and photographed a single Sanderling while it was foraging 
among the waves along Surf Drive beach in Falmouth. Mark Faherty at Mass 
Audubon Wellfleet Bay provided insight on how to report resightings of banded 
shorebirds and then how to view resightings map. According to Mark, 


it was banded in Delaware in 2011 as part of the Red Knot project. It was seen 
there again the following spring but has never been resighted anywhere else. 
Site is located at www.bandedbirds.org You can map resightings like Mark did by 
creating a log in. Mark uses it all the time for Red Knots. 


For those with an interest, photos posted: 
http://www.pbase.com/birdshots/image/157222267 Click "next" upper right to 
advance frames! 





Enjoy, 

Craig Gibson 

cbgibson AT comcast.net 
Subject: Bray St. pond Little Blues and Red-breasted Merganser
From: John Nelson <jnelson AT northshore.edu>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:17:21 -0400
There was a nice group of birds at the Bray Street pond in West Gloucester
around 5:00 this afternoon. Most surprising was a female Red-breasted
Merganser--never seen this species here and never seen it anywhere on Cape
Ann at this date. Other highlights:

4 Little Blue Herons
1 Green Heron
1 Belted Kingfisher
1 Pileated Woodpecker (flyover--scarce in West Gloucester)

For the past four days we've also had a highly vocal immature Broad-winged
Hawk flying around the woods on our hilltop in West Gloucester.

John Nelson
Gloucester
Subject: Plum Island this morning
From: Tom Murray <tmurray74 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 14:16:15 -0700
Julie and I headed out to Plum and arrived at Sandy Point at 6:45am. The tide 
was going out and the peep that were feeding in the washed up seaweed at the 
edge of the water with mostly Sanderling and Semipalmated Sandpipers. But there 
were a couple of different ones we were able to pick out, a White-rumped and 
what I believe is a Baird's. Terns were flying over the water's edge with a 
couple Forster's and a Black Tern. From there we made our way back with stops 
at Hellcat where we briefly saw a Stilt Sandpiper. Next stop was the Wardens 
with lots of Robins plus 3 Whimbrel. 



highlights:

Cooper's Hawk 2
Piping Plover 1
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Whimbrel 3 http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/157221558
White-rumped Sandpiper 1 http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/157221548
Baird's Sandpiper 1 http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/157221550 
http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/157221553 

Stilt Sandpiper 1 http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/157221556
Forster's Tern 2
Black Tern 1

Tom Murray
Groton, Ma. 

tmurray74 AT yahoo.com
Subject: Fwd: eBird Report - Hobbs Brook (Cambridge) Reservoir, Sep 1, 2014
From: Sam Miller <zamziller AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 16:43:55 -0400
I followed up on Cliff Cook’s report of Baird’s Sandpiper at Hobbs Brook area 
of Cambridge Res and found five! Four quickly flew, but one hung around for 
extended observation. 

Ebird report below.
Sam Miller
Acton, MA

Begin forwarded message:

> From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu
> Subject: eBird Report - Hobbs Brook (Cambridge) Reservoir, Sep 1, 2014
> Date: September 1, 2014 at 4:29:17 PM EDT
> To: zamziller AT gmail.com
> 
> Hobbs Brook (Cambridge) Reservoir, Middlesex, US-MA
> Sep 1, 2014 12:30 PM - 1:40 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.25 mile(s)
> Comments:     
Submitted from BirdLog NA for iOS, version 1.7.6 > 17 species > > Canada Goose 7 > Mallard 17 > Great Blue Heron 3 > Osprey 1 > Killdeer 1 > Spotted Sandpiper 2 > Solitary Sandpiper 2 On the other side of the road from the reservoir, along the edge of the black water there. > Baird's Sandpiper 5 Went looking for Baird's after Cliff Cook's report, and hit pay dirt. First and only peeps I saw were Baird's. A group of five, all initially fairly close across the water from the road. All juveniles. Lanky long-winged peep, dark legs, buffy tan neck and breast, bold dark eye, foraging close to the water, but not in it, rather up in the shortest grass. Four of them soon flew off together, but one remained for long observation, working the shoreline. Could not relocate any after they flew. > Ring-billed Gull 2 > Belted Kingfisher 2 Flying together, suspect adult and young. > Downy Woodpecker 2 > Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1 > Blue Jay 2 > Common Raven 1 > Black-capped Chickadee 2 > American Robin 1 > Gray Catbird 1 > > View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19638687 > > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
Subject: Buff-breasted Sandpiper PI Airport
From: Timothy Walker <timothypwalker AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 11:51:32 -0400
Leaving Plum Island, across the street from the east end of the airport
were 4 Buff-breasted sandpipers

Tim & Nancy Walker
Subject: Whimbrels shack newburyport
From: m.goetschkes AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 15:41:37 +0000 (UTC)




Subject: Bristol County Highlights - 8/31
From: james sweeney <assawompsett AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 06:51:12 -0700
Massbirders,

 Vin Zollo and I spent the day birding at several locations in the towns of 
Fairhaven and Freetown (and part of the city of Fall River). The following is a 
list of highlights only. Most of the shorebirds at the Freetown State Forest 
(Southeastern Mass Bioreserve) were found at Doctor's Mill Pond. The water 
level at this location is very low and mud flats, interspersed with vegetation, 
have attracted a number of migrating shorebirds. Vin and I observed two 
White-rumped Sandpipers at this pond. 


West Island, Fairhaven:

5              Semiplamated Plover
1              Piping Plover
1              Spotted Sandpiper
3              Lesser Yellowlegs
1              Ruddy Turnstone
2              Least Tern
3              Black Tern
75            Roseate Tern
1              Forster's Tern
1              Merlin

Egypt Lane, Fairhaven

4             Wood Duck
7             Black-crowned Night-Heron
1             Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (continuing immature)

Freetown State Forest (Southeastern Mass Bioreserve), Fall River/Freetown:

2              Wood Duck
15            Semipalmated Plover
24            Killdeer
1              Solitary Sandpiper
25            Least Sandpiper
2              White-rumped Sandpiper

Jim Sweeney
Providence, RI 
Subject: Bristol County Highlights - 8/31
From: james sweeney <assawompsett AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 06:51:12 -0700
Massbirders,

 Vin Zollo and I spent the day birding at several locations in the towns of 
Fairhaven and Freetown (and part of the city of Fall River). The following is a 
list of highlights only. Most of the shorebirds at the Freetown State Forest 
(Southeastern Mass Bioreserve) were found at Doctor's Mill Pond. The water 
level at this location is very low and mud flats, interspersed with vegetation, 
have attracted a number of migrating shorebirds. Vin and I observed two 
White-rumped Sandpipers at this pond. 


West Island, Fairhaven:

5              Semiplamated Plover
1              Piping Plover
1              Spotted Sandpiper
3              Lesser Yellowlegs
1              Ruddy Turnstone
2              Least Tern
3              Black Tern
75            Roseate Tern
1              Forster's Tern
1              Merlin

Egypt Lane, Fairhaven

4             Wood Duck
7             Black-crowned Night-Heron
1             Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (continuing immature)

Freetown State Forest (Southeastern Mass Bioreserve), Fall River/Freetown:

2              Wood Duck
15            Semipalmated Plover
24            Killdeer
1              Solitary Sandpiper
25            Least Sandpiper
2              White-rumped Sandpiper

Jim Sweeney
Providence, RI 
Subject: C. Nighthawk COUNT-ALL TIME HIGH
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT TheWorld.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Sep 2014 10:22:53 -0400
Some of you did not receive this.  Thanks to Tom Gagnon for this 
post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

From: Tombwhawk AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 20:20:29 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: [MASSBIRD] C. Nighthawk COUNT-ALL TIME HIGH


Hi Folks:

      The Common Nighthawk season is coming to an end soon but below 
you can see my records for the month of August, 2014.   It was a very 
good season.   I think this was my 41st year counting from the same 
spot here in the Connecticut River Valley Area.  My previous high 
count was  7,028 in  1981.   With this evening high count, I passed 
that record by quite a bit.
                  Common Nighthawks
      August   15        0
                   16        9
                   17        3
                   18       38
                   19      299
                   20      354
                   21      949
                   22        23
                   23   2,696
                   24      973
                   25      614
                   26      353
                   27      332
                   28         2
                   29         9
                   30         7
                   31   1,130

TOTAL             7,791

Tom Gagnon   Florence,  (Bear Country)   Massachusetts


Subject: The chain unbroken
From: dovekie AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 1 Sep 2014 02:45:28 +0000 (UTC)
Massbirders: 
 It first appeared just above the high nut tree and followed a straight and 
steady course due east. Although I had to pick it out from a cluster of Tree 
Sparrows, it was an easy find. Common Nighthawk over Lois Coopers back yard; 
fairly low; quick, sharp and elegant. I had been stationing myself dutifully, 
some would characterize it as obsessively, on the deck since right after my 
birthday; since August 15th, searching the southern sky for the yearly passing 
of the Nighthawks. For over a decade they have not failed us; yet this is the 
longest we've waited for its appearance. August 31st, is a good week after the 
former latest appearance. There were times in the last week; as I sat and 
waited that I had the sinking fear that this year the chain would be broken; I 
began to feel as if I were waiting for the Great Pumpkin. Now the Nighthawk has 
passed over our yard; a benediction; a reward for our patience. 

 Even though I have adhered to this tradition of sitting out on the deck to see 
the special event, I always find that just the act itself has produced 
supplementary rewards. There is of course the usual crowd at the feeders. There 
are year around customers: Goldfinch, Chickadee, Titmouse, Mourning Dove, Downy 
Woodpecker, Cardinal; the rough gang of House Sparrows et.al. There are the 
more season regulars like Catbird, Chipping Sparrow, Hummingbird and Grackle. I 
usually can list over twenty species a night after the nesting is over and the 
young are out and about. And as in other years there are less common birds that 
seem to show up off and on. For the last week I have had a Great Crested 
Flycatcher, foraging among the trees, and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. One evening I 
watched three Gnatcatchers popping around the Mountain Ash; obviously familiar 
with one another and probably all related. Like every summer on the deck I got 
some great looks of an ever-mysterious Em! 

 pidonax Flycatcher with a bold eye ring. Not at Traill's but still an Empi and 
I dare not call it for it did not call. I had a Redstart earlier in the summer 
that came for about three straight days as well as a Red-eyed Vireo and just 
two nights ago a Nashville Warbler working his secretive way through the dense 
foliage of the Crab Apple tree. For the last week or so we have been 
entertained by more than fifty Tree Swallows flying high and low and with the 
occasional Barn Swallow and Chimney swift mixed in. Probably a fringe element 
of the great Tree Swallow staging ten miles away on Plum island. So it has been 
occasionally exciting and always entertaining; and now the Nighthawk has 
appeared and all is right with the world. Of course tomorrow I will be back for 
more. 

  
Doug Chickering 
dovekie AT comcast.net 
  
       
Subject: Sora, Bairds SP, around Lexington and Concord
From: Cliff Cook <ccook13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 20:33:36 -0400
I checked out a few spots in Lexington earlier in the day then later in the
afternoon headed out to Kaveski Farm in Concord.  I went to Kaveski
thinking that Buff Breasted Sandpiper might turn up.  No luck today but
there are several very inviting plowed fields along the road and nearby to
the west. Definitely a place to keep an eye on the next few days, esp. if
we get any rain.

Highlights today were Cooper's Hawk and an unidentified Buteo at Dunback,
Baird's Sandpiper at Hobbs Brook area, and Sora, Sharp-Shinned Hawk , and 8
Indigo Buntings at Kaveski Farm.

Dunback Meadows, Middlesex, US-MA
Aug 31, 2014 9:15 AM - 11:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
27 species (+1 other taxa)

Cooper's Hawk  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Buteo sp.  1     Seen from a distance with the Red Tail.  Clearly a smaller
bird soaring with little or no dihedral.  Tried to turn this into a Coopers
Hawk, knowing they are in the area but came away convinced this was a
Buteo.  Unable to get any detail given the distance.  Saw a Broadwing here
recently and Red Shouldered has been known to turn up in the area.
Mourning Dove  9
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  7
Hairy Woodpecker  2
Northern Flicker  3
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1     Calling
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  5
Tree Swallow  3
Black-capped Chickadee  8
Tufted Titmouse  6
White-breasted Nuthatch  4
House Wren  3
Carolina Wren  1
American Robin  48
Gray Catbird  13
European Starling  50
Cedar Waxwing  20
American Redstart  1
Song Sparrow  4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
Bobolink  18     The Bobolinks hang out in the middle of the large field,
so it is really not possible to count them.  There count be far more than
the small numbers flying around suggest.

Hobbs Brook (Cambridge) Reservoir, Middlesex, US-MA
Aug 31, 2014 12:15 PM - 12:44 PM
Protocol: Stationary
15 species

Canada Goose  35
Mallard  35
Great Blue Heron  2
Great Egret  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Killdeer  26
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Baird's Sandpiper  1     Almost the first bird I saw.  Peep type
sandpiper.  Overall buffy wash, esp across the breast. Black legs and bill.
Bill longish but straight. Elongated body but tail feathers did not cross
as with a White Rumped. Across mantle black feather centers contrasted with
light colored edges giving the classic scaly look.  Prob a juvenal. In
company of several Least Sandpipers, which were smaller and far more
brown.  A nearby Semipalm Sandpiper was noticeably grayer.
Least Sandpiper  5
Semipalmated Sandpiper  1
Mourning Dove  1
Belted Kingfisher  2
Blue Jay  1
American Crow  4
Northern Mockingbird  1

Kaveski Farm Conservation Land, Middlesex, US-MA
Aug 31, 2014 4:15 PM - 5:37 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.33 mile(s)
34 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose  125     Many flocks in area.  This is a best guess estimate.
Wild Turkey  6
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1     I looked at this bird expecting to see the
immature Coopers Hawk but noticed right away it was not as heavily marked
then saw the tail - square tip with a distinct notch in the middle. Large
size suggests female
Cooper's Hawk  2     First bird I saw I think was an adult.  After that an
immature bird repeatedly passed through the area.
Red-tailed Hawk  2
hawk sp.  1     Another intriguing raptor.  I'm not at all sure what this
was.  Not a Red Tail. Buoyant flight. Soared with wings flat.
Sora  1     Complete surprise.  I walked down the track to the wetlands
crossing and was watching a few Redwings when this bird scooted across the
road and into the reeds.  I may have seen it again later.  the second time
a blackbird sized bird with no tail flew up out of the reeds on one side
and dropped into the reeds again on the other.  AT that point the Redwings
were all moving around on perches.
Herring Gull  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  1
Mourning Dove  12
Common Nighthawk  1     Seen around 5PM flying east at the tree line.
Chimney Swift  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue Jay  9
American Crow  3
Tree Swallow  4
Black-capped Chickadee  1
Eastern Bluebird  20     Low estimate
American Robin  15
Gray Catbird  6
Northern Mockingbird  1
European Starling  75
Cedar Waxwing  5
Common Yellowthroat  3
Chipping Sparrow  31     Low estimate
Song Sparrow  12
Indigo Bunting  8     7 of the 8 were in a single flock in the flower field
near the tractor shed.
Red-winged Blackbird  25
Common Grackle  10
House Finch  10
American Goldfinch  8
House Sparrow  5

Cliff Cook
Watertown
Subject: HSR: Wachusett Mountain (29 Aug 2014) 39 Raptors
From: reports AT hawkcount.org
Date: 31 Aug 2014 19:08:58 -0400
Wachusett Mountain
Princeton, Massachusetts, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 29, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       2              3              3
Bald Eagle                   0              4              4
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           6             31             31
Cooper's Hawk                1              2              2
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              1              1
Broad-winged Hawk           27             60             60
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             2              5              5
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             1              1              1
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                      39            107            107
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 14:00:00 
Total observation time: 6 hours

Official Counter:        Rod Chase

Observers:        

Visitors:
Special Guests - Helen & Joe Thoesen from Indiana. Wanted to experience a
local hawk watch. Worked out great for them. Barry Billingsley, Elaine
Williams & her friends, Sue and Priscilla.


Weather:
AM- Blue Sky, NNE wind - 0 to 5 mph, Temp - 54 degrees
PM- Cumulus Clouds - 80%, E Wind - 0 to 3 mph, Temp - 68 degrees

Raptor Observations:
Around early PM, local Goshawk made an appearance.

Non-raptor Observations:
Raven - 1

Predictions:
Sunny, Nice. More clouds and much stronger wind. Still on cool side and not
very humid. Humidity may occur later in early part of next week.
========================================================================
Report submitted by  ()
Wachusett Mountain information may be found at:
www.massbird.org/emhw

Subject: Re: odd Morning Dove behavior
From: Joshua Rose <opihi AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 22:03:27 -0400
Tom and MassBirders,

I’ve seen similar behavior in other species, including a Blue Jay here in east 
Amherst yesterday, but probably the most times from Plain Chachalacas down in 
the LRGV of Texas. My theory is that it is some sort of anti-parasite behavior, 
that the birds are maximizing the exposure of their feathers or skin to the sun 
in order to kill some sort of feather louse or other insect. 


Good birding,

Josh


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi



Subject: CT Report 08/31/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 21:51:58 -0400
 From Sara Zagorski:
08/31/14 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- American Golden Plover
continues in same location as yesterday, sod field on left after zig
zag in road from ferry park entrance.
West Haven, Sandy Pt -- 2:20 PM; Caspian Tern showed up on rocks with
gulls, off of left trail from parking lot. Big red bill, black cap.

 From Russ Smiley:
08/31/14 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- American Golden Plover
continues where previously reported.

 From John Marshall & Dan Rottino:
08/31/14 - Madison, Hammonasset Beach SP, boulder pond -- BAIRD'S
SANDPIPER, WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, the latter with Tina Green.

 From Jerry Connolly:
08/31/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- Baird's Sandpiper
continues  AT 11:30 AM at Boulder Pond (seen best from boat launch area).

 From Bill Asteriades:
08/31/14 - East Hartford, Hockanum River Linear Trail -- 14
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER, 4 SOLITARY SANDPIPER and 2 PECTORAL SANDPIPER.

 From From Steve Spector, with Charlie Barnard:
08/31/14 - Milford,  Milford Pt, sandbars -- around 3:25 PM; Caspian
Tern flew in and sat on fugitive sandbar next to western end of main
sandbar.  Also, 3 juvenile Red Knots, 3 Saltmarsh Sparrows, likely
Seaside SP, the continuing White-winged Scoter, Marsh Wrens.

 From Fran Zygmont:
08/31/14 - Barkhamsted Yard -- 9 Common Nighthawks.

 From Nancy Morand:
08/31/14 - Durham, Mica Hill Ledges -- aerial display included 5
Common Ravens , 1 Black Vulture.  Ravens were very vocal the entire
time.

Subject: odd Morning Dove behavior
From: Tom Murray <tmurray74 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 17:42:59 -0700
Yesterday I had 3 Morning Doves under my feeder and all were laid out on the 
ground with wings spread like this one: 
http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/157207452 


Any idea what they were doing? 


Tom Murray
Groton, Ma.
tmurray74 AT yahoo.com
Subject: C. Nighthawk COUNT-ALL TIME HIGH
From: Tombwhawk AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 20:20:29 -0400 (EDT)
Hi Folks:
 
     The Common Nighthawk season is coming to an end  soon but below you 
can see my records for the month of August, 2014.    It was a very good 
season. I think this was my 41st year counting from the same spot here in the 

Connecticut River Valley Area.  My previous  high count was  7,028 in  1981.  
 With this evening high  count, I passed that record by quite a bit.   
                  Common Nighthawks
     August    15        0
                  16         9
                  17         3
                  18       38
                  19      299
                   20      354
                  21      949
                   22        23
                   23   2,696
                   24      973
                   25      614
                   26      353
                   27      332
                   28         2
                   29         9
                  30          7
                  31   1,130
 
TOTAL              7,791
 
Tom Gagnon   Florence,  (Bear Country)    Massachusetts 
 
                  
Subject: Stellwagen Bank NMS, Aug 31, 2014
From: "Jim Berry" <jim.berry3 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:02:21 -0400
> Stellwagen Bank NMS
> Aug 31, 2014 8:50 AM - 12:40 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 18.0 mile(s)
> Comments:     Nate Dubrow, Miles Brengle, and I took the 7 Seas boat from 
> Gloucester this morning (but without Jay Frontierro) on a choppy sea that 
> calmed down over the morning.  Perhaps needless to say, we didn't seen 
> anywhere near the numbers of seabirds seen by Blair & co. yesterday. 
> There were no real highlights, though 32 Cory's shearwaters were a 
> pleasure to see, especially as Nate had never seen one.  The birds listed 
> were all well outside the breakwater.  No terns, shorebirds, jaegers, or 
> wayward songbirds.
> 9 species (+1 other taxon)
>
> Cory's Shearwater (borealis)  32
> Great Shearwater  16
> Sooty Shearwater  1
> shearwater sp.  40     Flock seen on water as the boat went by several 
> hundred yards away.  They were too distant to identify on the water, 
> though the majority if not all were probably Cory's and greats.  This was 
> the only real concentration of seabirds on the whole trip.
> Wilson's Storm-Petrel  19
> Northern Gannet  14     mix of ages; mostly adults
> Double-crested Cormorant  5     the crew (and we) were surprised to see 
> these immatures apparently fishing out with the whales
> Laughing Gull  5     juvs.
> Herring Gull  65
> Great Black-backed Gull  30
>
> View this checklist online at 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19627209

We saw 6 humpbacks but no dolphins.  We also saw two fins that could have 
been basking sharks.  In the harbor we saw about 65 common eiders, 120 d-c 
cormorants, 2 Bonaparte's gulls, and another laughing gull.

Jim Berry
Ipswich, Mass.
jim.berry3 AT verizon.net
Subject: Chatham pelagic - 8/30
From: Blair Nikula <odenews AT odenews.org>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 17:44:20 -0400
We conducted another Chatham pelagic yesterday (8/30), our 9th so far 
this year, and experienced another very enjoyable day on the water.  
Winds were light out of the south, though there was a bit of residual 
chop from the previous day, and we had a dry, comfortable ride.  Not 
having been out in almost three weeks, we had no idea what, if anything, 
was happening off Chatham, but we decided to head southeast from  the 
inlet.  The first few miles were very slow, even terns and Laughing 
Gulls, normally staples inshore at this season, were few and far between.

Eventually we began to see a few Wilson's Storm-Petrels, which were to 
be in evidence throughout the morning.  Then about 10 miles out we found 
a commercial skate boat that had a good slug of gulls along with a few 
shearwaters and many storm-petrels in its wake.  A chumming session here 
was very successful, attracting all four species of shearwaters and 
numerous storm-petrels into point-blank range.  Turning south at this 
point, we quickly found more flocks of shearwaters, terns, and Laughing 
Gulls, many in ephemeral foraging aggregations over schools of bait at 
the surface, others loafing in rafts of up to 50+ birds on the water.

After enjoying this spectacle for a while we began a leisurely return to 
port, continuing to see shearwaters, storm-petrels, and a couple of 
distant jaegers along the way.  About halfway back, the captain spotted 
a couple of Red-necked Phalaropes on the water; although typically 
skittish, everyone had good, albeit brief view of these birds before 
they disappeared.  Capping off the trip was an adult Black Skimmer 
sitting on the flats southeast of the fish pier just before we docked.

Highlights (0715 - 1100 hrs.):
125 Cory's Shearwaters
275 Great Shearwaters
15 Sooty Shearwaters
20 Manx Shearwaters
225 Wilson's Storm-Petrels
2 Red-necked Phalaropes (juv.)
2 Parasitic Jaegers (brief views, identified from Peter Flood's photo 
after the trip)
2 jaeger sp. (distant - Parasitic/Long-tailed types; jaegers were 
definitely not a feature today)
175 Laughing Gulls (almost all well offshore)
1 Black Tern (several miles offshore)
40 Roseate Terns (probably more - most detected by voice)
350 Common Terns (almost all well offshore; several flocks of birds on 
the water)

A complete checklist and image of our route is at: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19613394

Now that the captain's fishing  business has slowed, we hope to do these 
trips on a more regular basis over the next couple of months.

Blair Nikula

-- 
2 Gilbert Lane
Harwich Port, MA  02646
http://www.odenews.org/
http://www.capecodbirds.org/

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus - Mark 
Twain 

Subject: Canada Warbler,Townsend, MA
From: Robert Templeton <rktemp28 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 16:09:04 -0400
Canada Warbler in the yard today along with 

RE Vireo
Am Redstart
Brown Creeper
Chickadees
Titmice
WB Nuthatches

Rob Templeton
Townsend, MA
Rktemp28 AT comcast.net
Subject: Caspian Tern PI
From: Newburyowls <newburyowls AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:35:58 -0400
Yesterday Geoff Woods saw a Caspian Tern fly over 10th street. The basin would 
be a good place to check . 


Interesting back story, Geoff and i were talking about Caspian Terns few days 
ago in context to seeing them within the same time frame every year over 10th 
street. 

2012 - Aug 27th, 2013 - sept 3rd, 2014 - Aug 30th. Kind of interesting. 

Also today at Nelsons Island I had; 3 Harriers, 1 Peregrine, and a Kestrel. 

Sean Riley
Plum island
Newburyowls AT gmail

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 3G smartphone
Subject: Winthrop Beach
From: Newburyowls <newburyowls AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 12:03:39 -0400
Present today:

Least Sandpiper -30
Semi Plover - 25
Semi Sandpiper - 15 +
Black bellied Plover - 2
Piping Plover - 1
American Oystercatcher - 5
Ruddy Turnstone - 1
White rumped Sandpiper - 6+

Sean Riley
Plum island
Newburyowls AT gmail.com

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 3G smartphone
Subject: Bairds SP Bill Forward
From: tattler1 <tattler1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 12:19:02 -0400
Being seen 12:15 from the new blind

Sent from my iPhone

Linda Ferraresso
Salem, MA
Tattler1 AT comcast.net
Subject: Drumlin Farm this morning
From: Pamela Sowizral <psowizral AT massaudubon.org>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 15:30:07 +0000
Nothing unusual today but nice views of a female indigo bunting with two 
recently fledged chicks. 




Pam Sowizral
Mass Audubon - Drumlin Farm
Lincoln



33 species

Canada Goose  3

Wild Turkey  2

Cooper's Hawk  1

Red-tailed Hawk  2

Killdeer  22

Mourning Dove  54

Chimney Swift  9

Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1

Red-bellied Woodpecker  1

Downy Woodpecker  1

Northern Flicker  1

Eastern Phoebe  2

Blue Jay  6

American Crow  4

Tree Swallow  1

Barn Swallow  4

Black-capped Chickadee  8

Tufted Titmouse  1

White-breasted Nuthatch  3

Eastern Bluebird  3

American Robin  5

Gray Catbird  5

Northern Mockingbird  1

European Starling  95

Cedar Waxwing  1

American Redstart  1

Song Sparrow  1

Indigo Bunting  3

Red-winged Blackbird  6

Common Grackle  1

House Finch  2

American Goldfinch  6

House Sparrow  4

Subject: Passenger Pigeons
From: Deborah Radovsky <dp32 AT aol.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:58:34 -0400
In memory of the Passenger Pigeon and in hope that we have learned something 
from its extinction and that of other species: 


http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/century-extinction?src=mp

Deb Radovsky
Sharon
Subject: Buff breasted sand
From: David Deifik <david.deifik AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 08:58:33 -0400
Just seen one at Bill forward pool  PRNWR
Subject: Red-necked phalarope
From: Jason Huestis <jayhuestis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 08:54:47 -0400
The red-necked phalarope at 8:51am was just beyond the rocks at lot seven at 
Parker River. 


A juvenile black guillemont is also present swimming among Emerson rocks.

Jason Huestis
Billerica
Subject: RE: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine
From: "Dave Small" <Dave AT dhsmall.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 07:44:21 -0400
Just for the record. The 1999 Crested Caracara sighting at Cumberland farms
was originally rejected as questionable but revisited and accepted by the
Mass Avian Records Committee

"A 1999 record of Crested Caracara was originally rejected because of
questionable natural occurrence. A resubmission of the record cited a
pattern in the increasing number of extralimital occurrences, effectively
convincing the Committee that it should be added to the State List of
naturally occurring species."
http://www.maavianrecords.com/home/annual-reports/report-12 

It is an impressive species non-the-less and hope it shows up again in
Massachusetts

Dave Small
Athol Massachusetts
978-413-1772
Dave AT dhsmall.net 

-----Original Message-----
From: massbird-approval AT TheWorld.com [mailto:massbird-approval AT TheWorld.com]
On Behalf Of Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore
Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 4:53 PM
To: massbird AT TheWorld.com
Subject: Re: [MASSBIRD] Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine

Thanks to Rob Finch for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 20:00:00 +0000 (UTC)
From: sprucegrouse65 AT comcast.net
To: Joshua Rose , Massbird 
Subject: Re: [MASSBIRD] Extralimital rarity: 
Crested Caracara in Maine!


Obviously an escapee :-) This bird is non migratory!

Rob
East Bridgewater

* * *

From: Joshua Rose 
Subject: [MASSBIRD] Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine!
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 15:10:30 -0400
To: Massbird 


Hi MassBirders,

I just noticed on FaceBook, in the ABA RBA group, 
a Crested Caracara was found in Benton, ME. This 
location is about 2 hours' drive from the MA 
state line if traffic is light on I-95 (but when 
is that ever true in August?).

A photo of the critter:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/92299831 AT N05/15053765151/

Before anyone starts driving, they should know 
that the bird was last seen on the morning of 
August 27. Apparently many people looked for it 
unsuccessfully that afternoon and the following day without success.

Maybe it left and will turn up somewhere further 
south, like at Plum Island..

Good birding,

Josh

Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA


Subject: CT Report 08/30/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 00:08:12 -0400
 From Robert Dixon:
08/30/14 - Sterling yard --between 4:30 AM and 5:45 AM; EASTERN
WHIP-POOR-WILL (2).

 From Tina Green:
08/30/14 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 6:25 AM; Whimbrel seen in cove
near sewage treatment plant (with Greater Yellowlegs) before being
flushed by the a Peregrine Falcon which was actively hunting the
entire time I was there. I did walk out to the outer beach to check
for the Whimbrel and other shorebirds and terns but did not find much.

 From Christina Clayton:
08/30/14 - Old Lyme, Griswold Point -- immature Whimbrel.

 From Sara Zagorski and Deb McTigue:
08/30/14 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- American Golden-Plover
(in with killdeer, least sandpipers and srmipalmated sandpipers). From
ferry park entrance to meadows, first field on left after zig zag.
Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- Buff-breasted Sandpiper flew off
towards the back of the west end.

 From Patrick Comins:
08/30/14 - Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -- American Golden-Plover
still there at 9:30 AM, but a few minutes later flew off to the east,
but may have landed in another field closer to the river.  Back in the
original location at 10 am.  Pretty close to the road.

 From Jim Carr via Deb McTigue & Sara Zagorski:
08/30/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- 10:20 AM; Buff-breasted
Sandpiper at west end.

 From Gina Nichol and Steve Bird:
08/30/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- 4:30 PM; checked the
Boulder Pond and found a White-rumped Sandpiper.

 From Paul Desjardins and Steve Broker:
08/30/14 - morning; Baird's Sandpiper feeding in the boulder pond near
Meig's Point.

 From Steve Spector:
08/30/14 - Milford, Milford Point sandbars -- around 4:00 PM; 2
juvenile Red Knots (beautiful scalloped fringing on coverts,
scapulars) (hanging out with 90 Black-belied Plovers); also a Western
Willet (with 8 Eastern Willets).

 From Frank Mantlik:
08/29/14 - Groton, Avery Point (UConn campus) -- flock of 32 COMMON
EIDERS swimming in cove between here and Eastern Point.
Old Lyme, Watch Rock -- 1 RED KNOT on mudflat during mid tide.
Guilford, Shell Beach Rd marsh -- BAIRD'S SANDPIPER, with Nick Bonomo.
Stratford, Rt 113, Great Meadows marsh near airport entrance -- 3
BOAT-TAILED GRACKLES.

 From Dana Campbell:
08/29/14 - New Haven, Lighthouse Point Park, hawkwatch -- 1 COMMON
RAVEN, 19+ Bobolinks.

Subject: Re: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine
From: "Glenn d'Entremont" <gdentremont1 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 01:57:30 +0000 (UTC)
Folks:

It is shame this comment made it to MASSBIRD. I am sure this was intended as a 
tongue-in-cheek comment to the original poster. 


The history of the 1999 Crested Caracara was this bird was found by Rob Finch 
who then reported it. It was immediately dismissed as an escapee because it was 
supposedly non-migratory. Subsequent to this sighting the species was located 
in other North American locations not in its "range". It was only after these 
reports the MA report was reevaluated by the Massachusetts Avian Records 
Committee (MARC) and elevated to accepted status as a legitimate MA state bird. 


Glenn

Glenn d'Entremont:  gdentremont1 AT comcast.net  Stoughton, MA



"Obviously an escapee :-) This bird is non migratory!"

Subject: Plum Island, Pictures of Red-necked Phalarope and Gull-billed Tern (8/30)
From: Henry D Mauer <henryd.mauer AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 19:49:49 -0400
This morning Deb and I, along with many others, enjoyed good looks at the
Red-necked Phalarope and the Gull-billed Tern at Stage Island Pool on Plum
Island.  The phalarope was close enough for decent pictures and the
Gull-billed Tern close enough to see field marks well in it's pictures.
Photos at my usual link:

http://henrymauer.phanfare.com/

Click on the album cover, click on "Start Slideshow" and then click on
Fullscreen.

Henry Mauer
Salisbury
henryd.mauer AT gmail.com
Subject: Linear Park, Williamstown, Sat. Afternoon
From: chuckjohnson10 AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 20:01:28 -0400 (EDT)
Carrie and I spent 90 minutes or so at Linear early this aftenoon. While there 
were not large numbers of birds, we did have a few nice ones. 

Canada Warbler - 1 adult male, along river between main park and cornfields
Cape May Warbler - 2 birds, both near parking area at start of trail just 
beyond tennis courts. First bird was pretty bland, likely 1st year female. Seen 
from below. Very faint wingbars, no real contrast on face, but telltale 
streaking underneath. 

2nd bird appeared to be fall adult male - 1 wide white wingbar, heavier 
streaking, quite yellow, with more patterned face, but no apparent chestnut 
cheek. 

Also at Linear - 3 American Redstarts, family groups of Scarlet Tanagers and 
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, 1 Belted Kingfisher, 1 Pileated Woodpecker, 3 TVs, 2 
Red-tailed Hawks, 2 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and a pair of Ravens circling 
and croaking overhead. 


Chuck Johnson, Devens
chuckjohnson10 AT aol.com      
Subject: Chatham Seabirds
From: Peter Flood <pomarine AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 01:19:59 +0000 (UTC)
It was a beautiful day 12 miles East of Chatham today with seabirds at point 
blank range. I posted some photos of today's trip. Trip list will be posted 
over the next day or so. Enjoy..... 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/9191812 AT N02/sets/72157646635652158/

Peter Flood
5 Hokum Rock Road
Dennis, MA
pomarine AT comcast.net
Subject: Re: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine
From: "Eric" <elabato AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 17:59:33 -0400


"Obviously an escapee :-) This bird is non migratory!"

This is not necessarily true.  Massachusetts has 2 accepted records for 
Crested Caracara from 1999 and 2007.  (the 1999 bird was initially rejected 
as an escape).

From what I can tell the species has been showing an increased pattern of 
vagrancy.  Here's a short piece about a Caracara in New Jersey.

http://blog.aba.org/2012/09/abarare-crested-caracara-new-jersey.html


Good birding,

Eric Labato
Malden, MA
elabato AT verizon.net 

Subject: Plymouth whale watch 8/30
From: Mark Lynch <moa.lynch AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:19:06 -0500 (CDT)




Subject: Re: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT TheWorld.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:52:50 -0400
Thanks to Rob Finch for this post.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 20:00:00 +0000 (UTC)
From: sprucegrouse65 AT comcast.net
To: Joshua Rose , Massbird 

Subject: Re: [MASSBIRD] Extralimital rarity: 
Crested Caracara in Maine!


Obviously an escapee :-) This bird is non migratory!

Rob
East Bridgewater

* * *

From: Joshua Rose 
Subject: [MASSBIRD] Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine!
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 15:10:30 -0400
To: Massbird 


Hi MassBirders,

I just noticed on FaceBook, in the ABA RBA group, 
a Crested Caracara was found in Benton, ME. This 
location is about 2 hours’ drive from the MA 
state line if traffic is light on I-95 (but when 
is that ever true in August?).

A photo of the critter:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/92299831 AT N05/15053765151/

Before anyone starts driving, they should know 
that the bird was last seen on the morning of 
August 27. Apparently many people looked for it 
unsuccessfully that afternoon and the following day without success.

Maybe it left and will turn up somewhere further 
south, like at Plum Island….

Good birding,

Josh

Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA


Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 8/29 Fenway Victory Garden
From: Paul Peterson <petersonpaul63 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 09:59:32 -0700
Hi,
A big surprise to find a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in Row X (one of the longest 
rows here) at the victory gardens last evening! The bird was flycatching in the 
large, very brushy plot with the Scottish Broom Tree in it. (tree with pink 
blooms on it). I found out later in the evening by consulting the bird bar 
graph chart that in late August, this empidonax flycatcher is the most likely 
empidonax species to see around here in late August! Who knew! 

Highlights:
Black-crowned Night-Heron 1      edge of Muddy River opp. war memorials area
Great Blue Heron 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2 ad. and juv. in same White Pine in gardens 

YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER 1   yellow belly and all!
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1            tal oaks in war memorial area
American Redstart 1                  victory gardens
Common Yellowthroat 1              victory gardens
P.S. NONE OF THE ABOVE-MENTIONED SONGBIRDS WERE SEEN THIS MORNING THERE
Paul Peterson
petersonpaul63 AT yahoo.copm
Boston
Subject: HSR: Blueberry Hill (30 Aug 2014) 6 Raptors
From: reports AT hawkcount.org
Date: 30 Aug 2014 16:08:15 -0400
Blueberry Hill
Granville, Massachusetts, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 30, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       3              3              3
Bald Eagle                   2              2              2
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           1              1              1
Cooper's Hawk                0              0              0
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              0
Broad-winged Hawk            0              0              0
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Merlin                       0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Vulture              0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                       6              6              6
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:15:00 
Observation end   time: 14:00:00 
Total observation time: 5.75 hours

Official Counter:        John Weeks

Observers:        John Weeks, Scott Fowler

Visitors:
David and Debbie Nochimson, who hail from the same town as we do, Granby,
Connecticut.


Weather:
Mostly cloudy (60-80% cloud-cover); wind SW 5-10 mph; temperature 63-71 F.

Raptor Observations:
A handful of the species that don't mind a headwind.  One eagle was an
immature bird, probably a three-year-old; the other was an adult. 
Non-migrants:  2 Turkey Vultures, Cooper's Hawk, Red-shouldered Hawk,
Red-tail.

Non-raptor Observations:
Great Blue Heron, Rock Pigeons (24), Chimney Swifts (3), Northern Flicker,
Eastern Phoebe, Red-eyed Vireo, Common Raven, Barn Swallows (3), Cedar
Waxwings (10), American Redstarts (male  + female), Magnolia Warbler.

One lovely Common Wood-Nymph.
========================================================================
Report submitted by John Weeks (aerie.john AT cox.net)

Subject: Extralimital rarity: Crested Caracara in Maine!
From: Joshua Rose <opihi AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 15:10:30 -0400
Hi MassBirders,

I just noticed on FaceBook, in the ABA RBA group, a Crested Caracara was found 
in Benton, ME. This location is about 2 hours’ drive from the MA state line if 
traffic is light on I-95 (but when is that ever true in August?). 


A photo of the critter:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/92299831 AT N05/15053765151/

Before anyone starts driving, they should know that the bird was last seen on 
the morning of August 27. Apparently many people looked for it unsuccessfully 
that afternoon and the following day without success. 


Maybe it left and will turn up somewhere further south, like at Plum Island….

Good birding,

Josh


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi



Subject: Marbled Godwit at Bill Forward, 11:45
From: David Swain <davidswain79 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 12:14:50 -0400
Subject bird seen from the blind for 15 minutes before all birds went up.
Awaiting return 12:15.

David Swain
Concord
Subject: ESA opinion and Martha
From: Peter Doherty <leasttern AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 11:33:39 -0400




Greetings. In celebration of Martha the USFWS has recently "construed" the 
Endangered Species Act. Is Environmental Memory of no importance? See below. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/21/opinion/conservation-or-curation.html?_r=0 

Peter Doherty
leastternathotmaildotcom
Virginia Beach, VA

 		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: Red-necked phalarope plum island
From: Nancy Landry <njlandry AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 08:36:00 -0400
There is a Red-necked Phalarope at Stage Island pool and Gull-billed tern as 
well. A Black Guillemot was seen out at Emerson rocks. 


Nancy Landry
Haverhill MA
Sent from my iPhone
Subject: NYTimes Opinion Piece on Conservation: Saving Our Birds
From: Bob Parker <Bob.Parker AT truthltd.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 08:37:01 -0400
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/31/opinion/sunday/saving-our-birds.html?mabReward=RI%3A16&action=click&pgtype=Homepage®ion=CColumn&module=Recommendation&src=rechp&WT.nav=RecEngine&_r=0 
Subject: Gull-billed Tern, Plum Island, stage island pool, 8 am
From: mresch8702 AT aol.com
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 08:05:48 -0400 (EDT)
Gull-billed tern continues at Stage Island Pool thanks to great spotting by 
other birders. Baird's and a likely Long- billed Dowitcher also present. 


Mike Resch

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Subject: CT Report 08/29/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 21:47:05 -0400
 From  Robert Dixon:
08/29/14 - Sterling yard -- nocturnal migrants heard this morning from
4:30 AM to 5:30 AM included a first of season SWAINSON'S THRUSH.
Plainfield, Quinebaug Fish Hatchery -- SOLITARY SANDPIER (6), BOBOLINK
(8).

 From Nick Bonomo:
08/29/14 - Groton, Bluff Point SP -- flyover DICKCISSEL.
Old Lyme, Watch Rock -- juv BAIRD'S SANDPIPER, 3 WHITE-RUMPED
SANDPIPERS.
Old Lyme, Griswold Pt -- juv RED KNOT, WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER.
Madison, Hammonasset Beach SP - "LITTLE BLUE x TRICOLORED" HERON
hybrid, juv BAIRD'S SANDPIPER.
Guilford, Shell Beach Rd with Frank Mantlik -- juv BAIRD'S SANDPIPER
(got up and flew west), no sign of the Wilson's Phalarope while I was
there.

 From Nick Bonomo with Jake Musser:
08/29/14 - West Haven, Sandy Point -- 6:30 PM until nearly dark at 8
PM; 1 Whimbrel, 2 Bonaparte's Gull (basic adult and fresh juvenile), 1
Roseate Tern (possibly more but never saw or heard more than one at a
time)20 Forster's Tern.

 From Bill Asteriades:
08/29/14 - East Hartford, Hockanum River Linear Trail -- 12
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER and 2 SOLITARY SANDPIPER.

 From John Marshall:
08/29/14 - Shelton, Shelton Rec Path, Lane Street section --
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER in the dead tree next to the footbridge south
of Lane Street.

 From Ernie Harris:
08/29/14 - Bolton Backyard -- 6:30 to 7:30 AM; Blackburnian Warbler.

 From Gina Nichol and Steve Bird:
08/29/14 - Branford, off Hosley Avenue -- The upper "Hiking" parking
lot of the Lake Saltonstall recreational area is open with east facing
tamarack trees along the edge and is good sometimes when the morning
light hits it.  Highlight was Cape May Warbler.  A Water Company
permit is required to visit this property.

 From Jake Musser:
08/29/14 - Madison, Hammonasset State Park -- 5:40 PM; 1 Baird's
Sandpipe, 1 Western Sandpiper, and 3 White-rumped Sandpiper at the
boulder pond (the pond across the main rd from Meig's nature center).

 From Paul Carrier:
08/29/14 - New Hartford. Stub Hollow Rd -- One Olive-sided Flycatcher.

Subject: BBC Extreme Pelagic Trip Magic 8/23,24/2014
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT theworld.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:10:17 -0400
Thanks to Jeremiah Trimble for the following report.

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com

* * *

Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:22:52 -0400
Subject: [MASSBIRD] BBC Extreme Pelagic Trip Magic 8/23,24/2014
From: Jeremiah Trimble 


Hello Massbirders,


A few days out, I think (and hope) that we have all recovered from 
yet
another fantastic Brookline Bird Club Extreme Pelagic trip.  It was 
truly a
trip to remember.  A totaly of 50 BBC members and guests boarded the 
Helen
H in Hyannis on a calm mild day this past Saturday at 5:30am.  With 
some
trepidation we set off for the warm waters tucked up against and
overflowing onto the Continental Shelf some 90 miles away to the 
south.
  The trepidation generated by the potential for rough sea conditions 
did
nothing to quell the excitement of those on board.  Leading the trip,
spotting birds, keeping detailed records and working the microphone 
on this
trip were Nick Bonomo, Ian Davies, Mark Faherty, Marshall Iliff, Luke 
Seitz
and myself.  I am deeply appreciative of the monumental efforts of 
the
leaders on this tough trips, and I'd like to single out the efforts 
of Nick
and Marshall.  I would also like to thank Ida Giriunas and Naeem 
Yusuff who
were responsible for putting this trip together and to the Brookline 
Bird
Club for sponsoring it.  Also, especially in conditions such as we 
had, the
successes of this (and all) trip was made possible only by the 
skilled,
generous and impressive efforts of Captain Joe Huckemeyer and his 
crew on
the Helen H.  Finally, a big thanks to all the participants on the 
trip for
being a part of such a great weekend.


Here are some links to images from the trip as well as a map of the 
route
we took:

http://www.shorebirder.com/2014/08/aug-23-24-bbc-extreme-pelagic-wfsp-rbtr.html

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jrtrimble/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/9191812 AT N02/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/uropsalis/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rjm284/



Narrative:

The first few hours of the trip were fairly pleasant and by the time 
we
were skirting the eastern shores of Nantucket, we began to see our 
first
pelagic birds.  Given the way the pelagic scene has been going the 
last few
years, we were not surprised that our first pelagic birds were Cory's
Shearwaters.  In the area of Nantucket Shoals, with slightly building 
seas,
we began to encounter more birds including good feeding groups of 
Cory's
and Great Shearwaters and at least one (and the only one of the trip) 
Manx
Shearwater.  There were also a few Wilson's Storm-Petrels, a good 
number (a
few hundred at least) phalaropes (all that were seen well enough were
confirmed as Red-necked).  We had brief and somewhat distant views of 
all
three jaegers this morning, including a very distant full adult 
Pomarine
Jaeger.  In these nearer waters, we were also treated to a sighting 
of two
Parasitic Jaegers which chased each other right over the 
boat!  During a
particularly busy sighting period with lots of shearwaters, at least 
one
Cory's Shearwater photographed proved to be a 'Scopoli's' Cory's 
Shearwater
on review of the images.

Not wanting to limit our time in the warmer waters to the south we 
did not
linger and began the long trek towards Hydrographer Canyon and the
Continental Shelf.  Building winds and seas made for a difficult ride 
and
Captain Joe Huckemeyer was forced to direct the boat more to the east 
to
make the trip more bearable.  As such we actually ended up a bit 
further
east than intended and would miss the northern tip of Hydrographer 
Canyon.
  This did not negatively affect our excitement when Marshall spotted 
a
White-faced Storm-Petrel hopping along the surface of the water.  The 
bird
disappeared quickly but Captain Joe, incredibly in my opinion, 
maneuvered
the boat to just the right position and a few moments later, as we 
were
distracted by some Audubon's Shearwaters close by the boat, the 
White-faced
Storm-Petrel reappeared very close and put on a great show for all to 
see.

Audubon's Shearwaters would become a feature of this trips with a two 
day
total of 100 birds or more, close to 50 each day.  These totals 
represent
the highest for any effort in Massachusetts and are very high for 
anywhere
in the United States.  Indeed throughout this afternoon we 
encountered good
numbers along our route.  At a few dedicated chumming efforts, 
building
numbers of Wilson's Storm-Petrels were joined by a handful of 
Band-rumped
Storm-Petrels, another specialty of these deeper, warmer waters.  As 
we
made our way over the shelf edge, just to the east of Hydrographer 
Canyon
we were extremely lucky to encounter one of the most exciting animals 
of
the trip, a Whale Shark, the largest fish in the world!  Captain Joe 
kept
us on this beautiful shark as it swam around us, eventually cresting 
the
surface with its large flat head and beautifully spotted dorsal 
fin.  At
one point, a few lucky observers watched as a Band-rumped 
Storm-Petrel flew
right between the exposed dorsal and caudal fin of the Whale Shark.

At one point, an interesting small shearwater crossed the bow.  The 
leaders
alerted the boat that we should all get on this bird.  Even with the 
naked
eye, the bird stood out for the patterning on the upper wings.  It 
showed
two obvious lines formed by pale tips on the secondary coverts.  This
feature is a key character for Barolo Shearwater and all those who 
were
able were paying close attention to this bird.  Unfortunately, photo 
review
of the bird seemed to (and still seems) to point to this bird not 
being a
Barolo and perhaps a very oddly plumaged Audubon's Shearwater.  The
taxonomy and field identification of the small "black-and-white"
shearwaters is still very much being worked out.  We will continue to
research this bird and report any conclusions we can make.  In the 
mean
time, if anyone has additional images of this bird that they can 
share,
please send them along.  It would be particularly helpful to have 
some
shots of the undersides of the bird showing the underwing pattern and 
the
undertail coverts.  For reference, this bird was sighted between 410 
and
415pm on Saturday, 23rd in case you can all search your images for 
any you
might have of it!

After this sighting, we made an effort to make our way to the east as 
far
as possible, hoping that we could make it close to Oceanographer 
Canyon by
dark.  The seas had other plans.  The Helen H beat its way into the 
heavy
seas and wind but we could not make much headway slowing us down to a
quarter of our potential cruising speed and making it a very 
uncomfortable
ride.  However, our spirits were lifted when the call came out from
Marshall Iliff who spotted a Black-capped Petrel in the wake.  This 
bird
gave views to many on board but disappeared rather 
quickly.  Diagnostic
photos were obtained by a few on board.  Given the conditions and the
fading light, instead of trying to make it further east (which was 
nearly
impossible) Captain Joe decided to find an anchoring spot nearby to 
hunker
down for the night.  Not long after we anchored, another Black-capped
Petrel was sighted coming up the stern.  Luckily, this one continued 
right
up the port side of the boat giving great views before disappearing 
to the
north.  It should be noted that, like the two previously photographed
Black-capped Petrels in Massachusetts, these two were, based on photo
review, shown to be of the 'White-faced' form of Black-capped 
Petrel.  Some
recent examinations of Black-capped Petrels suggest that there are 
two
discrete and distinctive plumage types ('White-faced' and 
'Black-faced' and
that they may represent different populations.

Due to weather conditions, our overall course along the shelf edge 
was
limited but included a chumming stand at the west wall of Dogbody 
Canyon
our anchorage at the east wall of Dogbody Canyon and on Saturday a 
cruise
north to the head of Dogbody Canyon where we encountered the 
tropicbird (!)
mentioned below. As you may guess this continues to be one of our 
favorite
areas to bird!

As we anchored up for the night some of the crew set up some fishing 
gear
and began chumming.  The sea and wind conditions made for a very 
difficult
and bumpy night but Captain Joe set us up as comfortably as possible.
  Those checking the chumming and fishing efforts after sunset 
witnessed a
few interesting sightings including a Tiger Shark and storm-petrels
including at least four Band-rumped Storm-Petrels!

The morning provided continued heavy seas but a fair number of birds 
in the
chum slick that had been laid out all night.  A dawn sighting was 
made of
another Black-capped Petrel that zipped by on the horizon but 
unfortunately
did not stick around or return and was only seen by two 
observers.  For
this unphotographed individual, the Massachusetts Avian Records 
Committee
would love to receive a write-up!

We lingered here for a few hours before making our way towards the 
north a
bit.  There was still some warm water to be had and we did our best 
to scan
the angry ocean for interesting birds.  Incredibly not too far north 
Ryan
Merrill spotted a bird sitting on the water and as soon as we got 
within a
reasonable distance realized that we were looking at a 
tropicbird!  Closer
inspection revealed the bird as an immature Red-billed Tropicbird.

Captain Joe positioned the boat perfectly and the wind and waves 
pushed the
boat close to the bird and great views were had by all within 50 feet 
of
the boat.  When the bird took off it peeled down the port side of the 
boat
towards the stern.  As we followed its track we noted a bird 
approaching at
lightning speed from further down our wake.  The tropicbird 
recognized it a
bit quicker than we did and went into evasive maneuvers.  It came 
back up
our port side from stern to bow giving incredible views as it was 
chased by
a beautiful Pomarine Jaeger.  The tropicbird even vocalized as it 
flew
past.  The chase lasted for a few minutes before the tropicbird 
disappeared
to the north but we were treated to another close pass by the 
Pomarine
Jaeger.

 From this point on, we generally made our way back towards Nantucket 
Shoals
hoping for lessening seas and more birds.  We found both.  Some of 
the more
noteworthy sightings on the way back were good numbers of Red-necked
Phalaropes with some Red Phalaropes mixed in!  These birds were often 
quite
close to the boat and in mixed flocks which provided great 
comparisons and
a chance to get to know the differences between these species.  One
character which can be used to distinguish these species in 
Massachusetts
is a bird's state of primary molt.  While Red Phalaropes are in 
active
primary molt at this time, Red-necked Phalaropes do not molt their
primaries in Massachusetts.  This clue can help in the identification 
of
these small pelagic shorebirds when seen in flight.

And the highlights kept coming.  At one point, a shout went up as a 
skua
was sighted off the stern.  While distant, the bird was observed for 
a
minute over the wake and many images were taken confirming this to be 
a
South Polar Skua, a lifer for even one of the leaders!  The ride back 
was
capped off by a very fresh juvenile Long-tailed Jaeger.  While this 
bird
lazily kept just ahead of the boat (which was at full speed), Captain 
Joe
kept us on the bird for several minutes and lots of great images and 
views
were had by those on board.


We arrived back into port with a final new bird greeting us for the 
day
list, a noisy flock of Canada Geese.  Despite the trying weather and 
sea
conditions, the trip proved to be one of the most successful we have 
ever
run.  The Red-billed Tropicbird is only the 6th record ever for the 
state.
  Prior to the three Black-capped Petrels seen on the trip, 
Massachusetts
had only 6 previous records!  We managed great views of White-faced
Storm-Petrel one of North America's most sought after pelagic species 
and
saw all three jaegers AND South Polar Skua!  And the Whale Shark was 
only
the second ever for the many trips we have run.


Again, thanks to all those who participated in this trip and made it 
such a
success.  A special thanks to Ida Giriunas and Naeem Yusuff, the 
Brookline
Bird Club and the Helen H!


Trip List (NOTE: eBirders who requested will have the one day totals 
and
the official 1/2 hour lists shared with their accounts very soon):

*The following trip list is cumulative for two days at sea for all 
birds
seen outside Hyannis Harbor


Common Loon (Gavia immer)  2
Black-capped Petrel (White-faced) (Pterodroma hasitata 
(White-faced))  3
  #
Cory's Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea)  283     #
Cory's Shearwater (borealis) (Calonectris diomedea 
borealis)  227     #

'Scopoli's' Cory's Shearwater (diomedea) (Calonectris diomedea 
diomedea) 1+
Great Shearwater (Puffinus gravis)  273
Cory's/Great Shearwater (Calonectris diomedea/Puffinus 
gravis)  7     #
Sooty Shearwater (Puffinus griseus)  5
Manx Shearwater (Puffinus puffinus)  1
Audubon's Shearwater (Puffinus lherminieri)  100     #
black-and-white shearwater sp. (Puffinus sp. (black-and-white 
shearwater
sp.))  X
Wilson's Storm-Petrel (Oceanites oceanicus)  552
Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa)  46     #
Band-rumped Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma castro)  7     (probably 
'Grant's'
based on photos and timing/likelihood)
Oceanodroma sp. (Oceanodroma sp.)  1     #
Red-billed Tropicbird (Phaethon aethereus)  1     #
Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus)  3
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  30
Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla)  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla)  1
Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus)  349     #
Red Phalarope (Phalaropus fulicarius)  9     #
phalarope sp. (Phalaropus sp.)  200     #
South Polar Skua (Stercorarius maccormicki)  1     #
Pomarine Jaeger (Stercorarius pomarinus)  2
Parasitic Jaeger (Stercorarius parasiticus)  2
Long-tailed Jaeger (Stercorarius longicaudus)  2     #
Parasitic/Long-tailed Jaeger (Stercorarius 
parasiticus/longicaudus)  1     =
#
jaeger sp. (Stercorarius sp. (jaeger sp.))  4
Laughing Gull (Leucophaeus atricilla)  2
Herring Gull (Larus argentatus)  18
Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus)  2
Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus)  27
Black Tern (Chlidonias niger)  8
Common Tern (Sterna hirundo)  166
Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri)  1


large whale - 4+

Atlantic Spotted Dolphin - 1+

Bottlenosed Dolphin - 1+

unidentified dolphin sp. - 8+ (photo review needed)


Tiger Shark - 1+

Whale Shark - 1

Mola mola - 2

flying fish sp. - 15+


Finally, a note about an upcoming opportunity to get back out to this
incredible area THIS YEAR!  Below is a notice about a Brookline Bird 
Club
sponsored trip coming up at the end of September:

We have an opportunity to run another Pelagic trip to the Continental 
shelf
at the end of September. Please let us know if you would be 
interested.  We
need enough people registered by 9/6 to plan to do so.  If you want 
to join
us,  contact Ida Giriunas at  ida8 AT verizon.net   (781-929-8772) for
further information and waiver forms and send in a signed waiver form
along with your check  made out to the "Brookline Bird Club Agent" to 
Ida
at 83 Summer Ave,  Reading, MA  01867. If the trip does not go, you 
will get a full refund.


SEPTEMBER 27, 28, 2014:

HYANNIS TO HYDROGRAPHER, VEATCH, ATLANTIS CANYON area:

5:30 AM SATURDAY =E2=80=93 6PM SUNDAY.

COST: $295 BBC MEMBERS,  $310  NON-MEMBERS

for WHITE-FACED STORM PETREL, Band-rumped and, Leach's Storm-Petrel, 
6
Shearwater species (including possible BAROLO), 3 Jaeger species, 
terns,
gulls and sea ducks, possible Tropicbird, bridled tern, skuas and 
other
rarities.

We already have about 25 folks interested in coming so sign up 
soon!  I
hope you can all make it.



Good birding,
Jeremiah Trimble
Cambridge, MA

Jeremiah Trimble
Curatorial Associate - Ornithology
Museum of Comparative Zoology
Harvard University
26 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
phone: 617-495-2471
fax: 617-495-5667
email: jtrimble AT oeb.harvard.edu

Subject: Found on Plum Island: tripod swivel-head handle
From: Sam Miller <zamziller AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:24:01 -0400
Carla and I found a tripod handle in the first Sandy Point parking lot on Plum 
Island around 3:00 today. We left it at the entry gate house. 

Sam Miller
Acton, MA
Subject: Hawk Migration Forecast Email Service
From: Paul Roberts <phawk254 AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 15:11:42 -0400
For the past several springs the Eastern Massachusetts Hawk Watch has
provided an email service providing brief weather forecasts and basic info
on the likelihood of hawk migration for the Plum Island Spring Hawk Watch
1-3 times per week. We¹ve received multiple requests to do that for
Wachusett Mountain this year, perhaps influenced by the fact that we saw
over 35,000 hawks last fall, an all-time record for the site. If you are
interested in looking for migrating hawks at Wachusett or elsewhere in the
state or the immediate vicinity, please continue reading.

To join the email list, send an email to phawk254 AT comcast.net and in the
body of the email type out your complete name and your email address. I will
email everyone on the list 1-3 times a week during September, depending on
the weather and migration counts. The list will not be used in other
seasons. The hawk migration obviously continues through the fall, but with
generally diminishing numbers. The conditions preferred in September, esp.
for Broadwings, apply throughout the season, though surface winds can be
stronger for good accipiter flights.

In general, the bulk of the birds (primarily Broadwings) pass between
September 10 and 26. There are no guarantees, but the best days tend to be
the first and second day of a cold front that passes through the region,
producing cool nights, clear skies, and winds out of the northwest to the
northeast.  Winds should be under 20-25 mph for observations at Wachusett.

Birds can be moving as soon as the southerly winds shift northerly, or it
can be several days before they appear in numbers at Wachusett. It all
depends on the weather north of us and where the birds are the day before
our clearing front. The weather north of us can also drive the birds on a
slightly westerly path, bad for Wachusett but good for sites like Pack
Monadnock in southern New Hampshire or Mt. Tom.

It is important to check the forecasts every day, including the night before
and the morning of, because forecasts often change hourly, and the weather
can change even if the forecasts don¹t. The hawks pay absolutely no
attention to forecasts. They go with what is!

For weather forecasts, I recommend Googling ³Quick Forecast Fitchburg Mass².
You get a graphical forecast for the next week with sky conditions, wind
speed and direction, etc. forecast  for every three hours for the coming
week. It is critical to check the forecasts at least twice a day. (I also
check similar forecasts for Manchester, New Hampshire, and Augusta, Maine,
areas from  which our birds might come.) You can also check surface winds
maps for the northeast to get a feel for what birds are encountering north
of us. The graphical forecast sites also report current weather conditions
and the ACTUAL weather conditions hourly for the previous 48-72 hours.

A stationary front with several days of rain or a hurricane tends to
function as a dam, preventing birds from moving for several days on the
north side of the front, so that when clearing does occur, the odds for a
large flight improve. Multiple times we have had 80% of the birds seen in an
entire season pass within 3-4 hours.

Please remember that this service is an aid; not a guaranteed forecast. The
only way to see the best migration counts is to get out and look as often as
possible regardless of the forecast. Last year the biggest flight came
several days after a strong cold front, and the second biggest flight
(14,000+) came on a day that would not have been recommended as having great
flight potential. (That¹s a story in itself.) Two years ago in Connecticut
they had one of if not the largest Peregrine flight ever in New England on
totally adverse winds.

For more information on when and where to hawk watch, including directions
to Wachusett, visit the Eastern Mass Hawk Watch Site at
www.massbird.org/EMHW

To see reports from New England (including Wachusett, Watatic, Barre Falls,
and Pinnacle Rock) and across the continent, go to www.hawkcount.org

To subscribe to the EMHW migration forecast list, send your name and email
address to phawk254 AT comcast.net  Forecasts will start September 5.

Best,

Paul


Paul M. Roberts
Medford, MA
phawk254 AT comcast.net
 

 


Subject: Gull-Billed Tern SIP 1:30 8/29
From: Bird Watchers Supply & Gift <birdwsg AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:37:16 +0000 (UTC)
Sam Miller just called to report that he and Carla are looking at a GULL-BILLED 
TERN roosting at the tip of the long spit in Stage Is Pool on Plum Island. 


Steve Grinley
Bird Watcher's Supply & Gift
Route 1 Traffic Circle
Newburyport, MA 01950
Birdwsg AT comcast.net
www.birdwatcherssupplyandgift.com
978-462-0775

Subject: Gooseberry morning flight KENTUCKY W., UPLAND SANDPIPER, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:33:49 -0400
Hi all,

Overnight radar indications suggested that there would be a decent flight of 
migrants over Gooseberry Neck in Westport, MA. While there was a nice diversity 
of birds, numbers were lower than I expected. The highlights were a KENTUCKY 
WARBLER and UPLAND SANDPIPER. The tern show continues, with several Blacks, 
many Forster's, Roseate, Common, and Least, and a few small flocks of 
cormorants passed by. Here's the list of passerines in no particular order: 


Cedar Waxwing 36
Red-breasted nuthatch 4
Eastern Kingbird 2
Baltimore Oriole 7

Northern Waterthrush 6
Kentucky Warbler
American Redstart 10
Cape May Warbler
Yellow Warbler 4
Prairie Warbler 2
Canada Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Unidentified warbler 5
Common Yellowthroat (not seen crossing)

Eastern Phoebe
Warbling Vireo
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 6
Bobolink 9
Upland sandpiper
Catharus thrush sp.
Empidonax sp.
Chimney Swift
Grasshopper Sparrow

Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Black Vultures -- Fall River and Westport
From: Lynn Abbey <osprey1170 AT aol.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:50:16 -0400 (EDT)
 

 This morning I saw a black vulture at rt 88/Hixbridge Rd in Westport. 
Wednesday I had three overhead near Airport Rd and Rt 24 in Fall River These 
are the first I've spotted this summer. So -- heads up! 


Lynn Abbey
Fall River


Subject: Lark Sparrow at McLaughlin Woods, Roxbury
From: Ryan Merrill <rjm284 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 09:08:34 -0400
This morning there was a hatch-year Lark Sparrow hanging out on the
lawn at the southwest corner of the basketball courts at McLaughlin
Playground and Woods on Mission Hill from about 6:30 to 7:45.  Around
7:45 it apparently leave the area, flying high and heading to the
north/northwest.  It didn't seem to return to the park in the next
half hour so may well be gone.  There was also a male Wilson's
Warbler, an Eastern Kingbird, Common Yellowthroat, a couple American
Redstarts, and a Scarlet Tanager.  They're not up yet but I will post
a photo or two to my Flickr site listed below, probably later today.

Good birding,
Ryan Merrill
Newton
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rjm284/
Subject: Pileated Woodpecker
From: Glenn Long <hdtwblg AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 08:54:29 -0400
29 / August / 2014
 
 I just saw my first yard Pileated Woodpecker. That makes 7 species of 
woodpecker since we've lived 

here.
       Glenn Long
 		 	   		  
Subject: Hummingbird nest
From: George W Gove <gwgove AT verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 07:07:29 -0400
Below is a link to a photo of the nest taken after the birds had fledged.

A dime shows the size of the nest. The cut to the left of the nest was 
made by my son with is chain saw after he had cut the limb down and was 
preparing to cut it up. At that point, he saw the birds in the nest and 
stopped cutting. The birds were hanging from the nest so he used a 
gloved finger to flip them into the nest and they happily settled in.

They have now moved on altho there are visits to the hummingbird feeder 
by ay least one bird but they move very quickly.

The link: http://www.pbase.com/gwgove/image/157177562

George Gove
Marlboro
Subject: Ruby throat hummingbird question
From: Robert Mussey <mussey.robert AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 05:36:50 -0500
Starting with one male and two female hummingbirds at my 3 feeders in May,
this increased to as many as 7 or 8 by mid-August. This apparently included
at least 3 juveniles born this year and 2 stray males that wandered in from
other territories later in the season.

I now have at least one male with unusual throat plumage. He has a narrow
ruby-colored throat ring or necklace at the low point on the throat where
the ruby color would normally stop. It is wider on the sides, narrower in
the middle. Above that ring is all white feathers.

Question -- is this a first-year male just getting his adult plumage? I've
never seen this before. Perhaps he was born and fledged early in the
season? But I thought males didn't get their adult plumage until the first
Winter.

Robert Mussey
Milton, Mass.
Subject: CT Report 08/28/2014
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey AT snet.net>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 23:05:33 -0400
NOTE: The last positive report of the Guilford Wilson's Phalarope was
Wednesday evening.  There were only two reports from there today; both
were negative.  There were several responses on CTBirds today to a
request for directions; see the archives such as:
http://birding.aba.org/maillist/CT01


 From Paul Desjardins:
08/28/14 - Windsor, Northwest Park -- Common Raven.

 From James Winkelmann:
08/28/14 - Naugatuck, Hunter's Mountain Road, Naugatuck State Forest
-- 2 Hooded Warblers.

 From Mark Danforth:
08/28/14 - Guilford, Leete's marsh -- 7:00 PM; White-rumped Sandpiper
seen from Shell Beach Rd.  Possible Baird's Sandpiper too.  No
Phalarope.

 From Kevin Finnan:
08/27/14 - Goshen, Valcove Court -- Among a small, mixed flock was a
CAPE MAY WARBLER.

 From Gina Nichol and Steve Bird:
08/27/14 - Guilford, Leete's Island Road, Shell Beach Marsh --
Wilson's Phalarope, White-rumped Sandpiper.

 From Dennis Riordan:
08/27/14 - Guilford, Leete's Island Road, Shell Beach Marsh -- 11:15;
Wilson's Phalarope still there.

 From Angela Dimmitt:
08/27/14 - New Milford yard -- stream of 20-30 Common Nighthawks
flying southwest high over the house around 7 PM, just before the
thunder storm.  First time I've seen them here in years, half a mile
west of the Housatonic.

 From Joseph Budrow:
08/27/14 - Guilford, Leete's Island Road, Shell Beach Marsh -- 5 PM;
Wilson's Phalarope (disturbed by a Merlin).

Subject: sandhill cranes in cummington
From: jbpc AT verizon.net
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:00:38 -0500 (CDT)




Subject: HSR: Wachusett Mountain (28 Aug 2014) 9 Raptors
From: reports AT hawkcount.org
Date: 28 Aug 2014 19:08:36 -0400
Wachusett Mountain
Princeton, Massachusetts, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Aug 28, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       0              1              1
Bald Eagle                   0              4              4
Northern Harrier             0              0              0
Sharp-shinned Hawk           6             25             25
Cooper's Hawk                0              1              1
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              1              1
Broad-winged Hawk            3             33             33
Red-tailed Hawk              0              0              0
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             0              3              3
Merlin                       0              0              0
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                       9             68             68
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 11:00:00 
Observation end   time: 14:00:00 
Total observation time: 3 hours

Official Counter:        Rod Chase

Observers:        

Weather:
Wind - N to NE,5 to 10 mph
Temp - 72 degrees
Partly clear, cumulus cover - 80% which declined to 50% 

Raptor Observations:
12 Turkey Vultures ( non-migrating) 
Goshawk ( Local & not migrating)

Non-raptor Observations:
Raven - 1
Variety of songbirds

Road to Summit was suppose to be closed all day. However,
Summit work moved quickly and by late AM, watchers were able to get to the
Summit.

Predictions:
Cooler in 70's
No Wind Predication
Sunny, Nice
========================================================================
Report submitted by  ()
Wachusett Mountain information may be found at:
www.massbird.org/emhw

Subject: American Birding Association area checklist addition
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT theworld.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 21:02:03 -0400
For those of you keeping track of your ABA list, this is of interest:

ABA 

Checklist Committee Adds Egyptian Goose to ABA Checklist

You can also go to aba.org and look for the link under "blog".

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com
Subject: 460+ Black Terns at Great Point on Nantucket 8/28/14
From: ACKBIRD AT aol.com
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 20:33:37 -0400 (EDT)
Dear Massbirders,
   At 9:25 AM today I was at Great Point on Nantucket  and observed a huge 
flock of mixed terns feeding out over the water to the east  of the "rip".  
Scoping I was able to pick out and tally 405 Black Terns in  the feeding 
frenzy.  I suspect there were many more in the mix that were  not very "black" 
Black Terns that I did not feel comfortable counting as  such.  In addition 
to those actively feeding there were 55 Black Terns  resting on the beach on 
the west side of the point.
     It was a good day to be at Great Point!
 
                                            Edie Ray
                                            _ackbird AT aol.com_ 
(mailto:ackbird AT aol.com) 
                                             Nantucket, Ma.
 
Subject: Nighthawks in Grafton
From: John Liller <john.liller AT worcesteracademy.org>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:44:28 -0500 (CDT)
I had 11 nighthawks over Grafton High School this evening, all between 6:15 and 
6:30, and all heading south. I also had 14 chimney swifts, 11 killdeer, 1 
double-crested cormorant, 3 barn swallows, 5 red-winged blackbirds, 60 common 
grackles, 6 eastern bluebirds, and 15+ chipping sparrows. 



----------------------------------- 
John Liller 
Grafton, MA 
Subject: Chatham Pelagic - Saturday (8/30)
From: Blair Nikula <odenews AT odenews.org>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 17:53:42 -0400
This is very short notice, but we've scheduled another Chatham pelagic 
for this Saturday (8/30), leaving the Chatham Fish Pier at 7:00 am and 
returning at 11:00 am., with a cost of $95/person.  It's been quite a 
while since our last trip, so we don't know what's out there at this 
point, but it's prime time now.  Let me know a.s.a.p., if interested.

Blair Nikula

-- 
2 Gilbert Lane
Harwich Port, MA  02646
http://www.odenews.org/
http://www.capecodbirds.org/

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus - Mark 
Twain 

Subject: PRNWR Marbled godwit
From: dave.williams6 AT gmail.com
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:37:18 -0400
Parker River NWR, Essex, US-MA
Aug 28, 2014 9:55 AM - 1:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
12.0 mile(s)
Comments: Beautiful day on the refuge. Sunny, light wind NNW, 74 degrees. 
Wonderful looks at the continuing Marbled godwit at SIP. Photos at : 
http://tinyurl.com/lj9tfpk 

44 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose  26
Mute Swan  3
American Black Duck  2
Mallard  46
Green-winged Teal  4     SIP
Wild Turkey  3
Common Loon  1     Heard!  Standing in the road by SIP.
Double-crested Cormorant  55
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  10
Snowy Egret  21
Green Heron  1     SIP
Glossy Ibis  1     SIP
Osprey  1
Northern Harrier  1
Cooper's Hawk 1 Half-heartedly swooping at at some Tree swallows at the boat 
ramp. 

Black-bellied Plover  192
Semipalmated Plover  75
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Greater Yellowlegs  38
Willet  2     1 from the blind and 1 at SIP
Lesser Yellowlegs  4
Marbled Godwit 1 Continuing bird at SIP. Very big bird, long, up curved bill, 
pink at base, black at tip. Photos at: http://tinyurl.com/lj9tfpk 

Stilt Sandpiper  1
Sanderling  18
Least Sandpiper  2
Semipalmated Sandpiper  175
Short-billed Dowitcher  75
Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher 1 Some barring on under tail, light , rusty 
color on flanks. huge bill and fairly distended belly. 

Ring-billed Gull  9
Herring Gull  12
Great Black-backed Gull  6     2E2
Mourning Dove  1
Eastern Kingbird  2
American Crow  2
Tree Swallow  45
Bank Swallow  4
Barn Swallow  6
American Robin  5
Gray Catbird  4
Northern Mockingbird  1
Cedar Waxwing  1
Eastern Towhee  2
Red-winged Blackbird  2
Brown-headed Cowbird  2

Dave Williams
Reading, MA

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19597940 


Sent from my iPad
Subject: South Coast Birder's Celebration
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:25:00 -0400
Hi All,

Mass Audubon at Allens Pond is sponsoring a South Coast Birder's Celebration - 
a meeting highlighting birding and conservation in the Allens Pond/Westport 
River Watershed Important Bird Area of the SouthCoast. Agenda items include 
walks, brunch, and presentations on birding and bird conservation in this area. 
What better time to be out, birding this part of the state? 


Here's the link to the announcement:


http://www.massaudubon.org/get-outdoors/program-catalog#program:sanctuary=25:program_code=34449 


Hope to see you there!

Feel free to contact Allens Pond (or me) with any questions.

Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA
 		 	   		  
Subject: Gooseberry this morning and a godwit at Allens Pond
From: Paul Champlin <skua99 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 09:56:07 -0400
Hi all,
First, I received a report from Lauren Miller-Donnaly at Allens Pond that she 
had a "rusty brown" godwit yesterday. 


The late passage of the overnight front didn't provide a great flight at 
Gooseberry, but we did have some interesting passerines and plenty of Forster's 
Terns (dozens), Roseate Terns (Sorry Alice... A dozen seen after you left), a 
harrier, and a Peregrine Falcon. The migrant passerines include: 


Pine Warbler
Prairie Warbler 6
Yellow Warbler 6
American Redstart 8
Mourning Warbler (Need to review the photo to be sure but the hood and broken 
eye ring were apparent in the initial look at the photos) 

Common Yellowthroat? (Another interesting warbler that crossed; yellow 
undertail coverts, no tail spots, and the flight call was good for this 
species) 

Magnolia Warbler
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Eastern Kingbird 3
Baltimore Oriole 2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 8

Tomorrow morning could easily be the best morning of the year so far.

Best
Paul Champlin
Westport, MA
Subject: pelagic - Sept 27-28
From: Barbara Volkle and Steve Moore <barb620 AT TheWorld.com>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2014 00:03:52 -0400
Thanks to Naeem Yuseff and Ida Giriunas for this announcement

Barbara Volkle
Northborough, MA
barb620 AT theworld.com


* * *

The Brookline Bird Club has an opportunity to 
visit the productive canyons on the edge of the 
continental shelf (Hydrographer & Dogbody) 
at  the end of September.

WE NEED ENOUGH PEOPLE REGISTERED BY 9/6 to plan 
to go.  Please let us know if you would be 
interested.  So, if you want to join us,  contact 
Ida Giriunas 
at  ida8 AT verizon.net   (781-929-8772) 
for  further information and waiver forms.

September 27 and 28, 2014
Hyannis to Hydrographer, Veaches, Atlantis Canyon area:
5:30 AM Saturday – 6PM Sunday

for WHITE-FACED STORM PETREL, Band-Rumped and, 
Leach's Storm-Petrel, 5 Shearwater species 
(including possible BAROLO), 3 Jaeger species, 
terns, gulls and sea ducks, possible Tropicbird, 
bridled tern, other 
rarities.

Cost: $295 BBC Members,  $310 non-members.

The birds seen on our  August trip included the 
White-faced Storm-petrel,  3 Black-capped Petrel, 
Red-billed Tropicbird, dozens of Audubon's 
shearwaters, a few Band-rumped Storm-petrels, a 
few Leach's Storm-petrels and a SOUTH POLAR SKUA 
as well as our common shearwaters, jaegers and 
phalaropes.  Also seen was a WHALE SHARK and a 
TIGER SHARK….  We have Master birders such as 
Jeremiah Trimble, Marshall Iliff, Nicholas 
Bonomo, Mark Faherty, Luke Seitz,  etc. leading 
our trips. Our boat, the HELEN H, is a very 
comfortable, fast, 100 foot fishing boat with a 
knowledgeable and enthusiastic Captain and crew. 
We use gallons of chum to attract the 
birds..  There are 38 bunks aboard which will be 
available to the first 38 who sign up. There is a 
full galley with excellent food at reasonable 
prices. Parking is free.

Ida Giriunas
For the Brookline Bird Club
ida8 AT verizon.net   781-929-8772

Subject: Focus on Kestrels Friday Sept 5th, 7 p.m. at Eastern Mass Hawk Watch Annual Meeting
From: Paul Roberts <phawk254 AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 21:59:38 -0400
This year the Eastern Mass Hawk Watch annual meeting, on Friday September
5th, focuses on one of our smallest and most beautiful raptors. Tom Sayers,
who has developed a sophisticated kestrel nesting box program in northeast
Connecticut, will talk about ³Rebuilding Local Populations of the American
Kestrel.² Drew Vitz, the Mass State Ornithologist will follow with a short
program on ³The Status and Conservation of the American Kestrel in
Massachusetts.² They have some incredible photography and insights into what
is happening with what was once our most commonly seen falcon.
 
The evening includes a popular raffle on a number of great birding items,
such as photographs, birding wear, books and more.

The EMHW annual meeting is free and open to the public. The meeting will be
held at a new location, the air-conditioned Woburn Elks Lodge, 295
Washington Street, Woburn, MA. A social hour with beverages and snacks
starts at 6 pm, followed at 7 pm by a brief business meeting and the Sayers
and Vitz presentations. For complete information, including driving
directions to the new location in Woburn (plenty of free parking), visit the
Eastern Mass Hawk Watch web site at massbird.org/EMHW
 
The new Woburn location is easy to reach, just blocks from Rte. 128 and a
short distance off Rte 93.
 
Best,
 
Paul
 

Paul M. Roberts
Medford, MA
phawk254 AT comcast.net
 
Subject: Re: [Arlington Birds] Nighthawks in Watertown
From: Bob Stymeist <bobstymeist AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 21:53:29 -0400
In response to Cliff, the Friends of Mount Auburn Cemetery has sponsored a
Nighthawk Watch from the tower since 1985, On Tuesday we had 22 nighthawks
and tonight we had 35.  In the 29 years I have been leading theses trips
for the Friends to witness this migration spectacle we have tallied 5107
individuals passing over the tower. The highest daily total was 432 birds
on August 22 2000 and 363 birds on August 24 1999; there was just one day,
August 18 2008 that we had no nighthawks


Bob Stymeist
Arlington


On Wed, Aug 27, 2014 at 8:29 PM, Cliff Cook ccook13 AT gmail.com
[arlingtonbirds]  wrote:

>
>
> So far this week, watching from the end of French Street in Watertown,
> near the river, has yielded the following results for Nighthawks:
>
> Monday - 0
> Tuesday - 2 very high overhead
> Wednesday - 3 far to the east of Watertown Square
>
> Anyone else seeing any in the area?  How about at Mt Auburn?
>
> Cliff Cook
> Watertown
>
>  __._,_.___
>   ------------------------------
> Posted by: Cliff Cook 
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Bob Stymeist
bobstymeist AT gmail.com
Subject: Manomet 8/27/14 - White-winged Dove
From: Ian Davies <idaviesbird AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2014 20:18:22 -0400
This evening there was a White-winged Dove present at the Holmes Farm in 
Manomet, MA, on the property of Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences. It 
appeared to be roosting for the night in a maple tree (specific location and 
coordinates of the tree in the below eBird checklist), and could potentially be 
present tomorrow morning. This area is right by a local product farm stand, and 
anyone that is interested in looking for the bird might enjoy patronizing the 
local produce available here as well! 


More information about the bird as well as a photo can be seen here: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19591168 


Best,
Ian Davies
Manomet, MA
idaviesbird AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/uropsalis/