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Updated on Wednesday, June 29 at 06:18 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Dovekie,©Barry Kent Mackay

29 Jun Cut Trees at Chest Height to Make Roosting, Nesting Sites for Woodpeckers, Chickadees [Alfred Maley ]
27 Jun Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 27, 2016 ["Mark Suomala" ]
27 Jun Whale on the beach! [Steve Mirick ]
27 Jun correction [Evelyn Nathan ]
27 Jun more bobolinks, and a surprise [Evelyn Nathan ]
26 Jun Birding by ear at Tower Hill Pond, Auburn/Candia [Roger Frieden ]
27 Jun Pittsburg weekend [Rebecca ]
26 Jun Cerulean/Black throated Blue songs ["Cook Anderson" ]
26 Jun Morning Whale Watch (3 species of shearwaters, great whale show!) [Steve Mirick ]
26 Jun Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs [Steve Mirick ]
26 Jun Canada Warblers in Canaan -- Photos ["Jim Block" ]
26 Jun the birds of Turkey Pond []
26 Jun Caps Ridge Trail ["Aaronian, Richard S." ]
26 Jun Birding by ear at Tower Hill Pond, Auburn/Candia [Roger Frieden ]
26 Jun Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs [Susan Fogleman ]
26 Jun Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs [Justin Lawson ]
26 Jun Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs [Christine Sheridan ]
26 Jun cerulean/black-throated blue songs [Hector Galbraith ]
26 Jun Least Tern Chick gets chased 6-23-2016 video []
25 Jun Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Added to Deck, Mulberry Tree List [Alfred Maley ]
24 Jun Acadian Flycatcher - NO & Kite update [Steve Mirick ]
24 Jun bobolinks [Evelyn Nathan ]
23 Jun Berserk Broadwing Auditions for Remake of "The Birds" [Alfred Maley ]
23 Jun thrasher [Evelyn Nathan ]
23 Jun Possible Acadian Flycatcher in Durham [Steve Mirick ]
23 Jun Chipping Sparrow Feeding Young, Manchester [Roger Frieden ]
23 Jun Pelagic birds picking up offshore [Steve Mirick ]
22 Jun Black-crowned Night-Heron at Pickering Ponds [Dan Hubbard ]
23 Jun Re: BBS Routes and an upcoming Friday field trip ["'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" ]
22 Jun Wantastiquet Mt. Natural Area, Chesterfield/Hinsdale, Jun 22, 2016 [Jack Swatt ]
22 Jun Baby Bluebirds in need in Derry [Jonathan Smith ]
22 Jun BBS Routes and an upcoming Friday field trip ["'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" ]
21 Jun Least Tern family doing ok [Len Medlock ]
20 Jun Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 20, 2016 ["Mark Suomala" ]
20 Jun Hampton Laughing Gull ["Aaronian, Richard S." ]
20 Jun Redhead [Charlie Nims ]
20 Jun Mt Starr King & Mt Waumbek 6/18 [Kyle Wilmarth ]
20 Jun Mt. Washington Auto Road [Rebecca ]
20 Jun Bellamy WMA Saturday [Rebecca ]
19 Jun sorry no black-billed cuckoo but it's cousin a mocking bird [gerry coffey ]
19 Jun Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Lempster []
19 Jun Kites, plovers, and Least Terns [Steve Mirick ]
19 Jun American Woodcock nest-Effingham ["'Pam McGovern' via NHBirds" ]
19 Jun Wiley Mountain [paul dionne ]
19 Jun redhead ["Kathy Dube" ]
19 Jun Photos of Kearsarge area birds, mid-June ["Jim Block" ]
19 Jun black-billed cuckoo Milford behind Market Basket [gerry coffey ]
19 Jun Head's Pond in Hooksett this morning ["Jane Hills" ]
19 Jun Evening Grosbeaks in Derry [Barbara Horton ]
18 Jun jeffreys ledge [eric masterson ]
19 Jun today's Pondicherry field trip []
18 Jun Anting crows in Newmarket [Steve Mirick ]
18 Jun Mississippi Kites X 4 in Newmarket [Steve Mirick ]
18 Jun belted kingfisher nest milford [gerry coffey ]
17 Jun Re: Digest for nhbirds@googlegroups.com - 4 updates in 4 topics [Sylvia Miskoe ]
17 Jun Broad-winged Hawk Fascinated By Our Windows [Alfred Maley ]
17 Jun Unknown Bird, Peterborough [Bruce Boyer ]
17 Jun Lakes Region Purple Martins ["'Stephen Whitney' via NHBirds" ]
17 Jun Fitzwilliam BBS Route ["'Wendy Ward' via NHBirds" ]
15 Jun Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 13, 2016 ["Mark Suomala" ]
15 Jun Pondicherry field trip - Saturday []
15 Jun MS Kite above Piscassic St [Dorothy Currier ]
15 Jun almost in Kingston heron family [Evelyn Nathan ]
15 Jun Nottingham- Milbert's Tortoise shell - Black billed Cuckoo ["'paul miliotis' via NHBirds" ]
15 Jun Whip-poor-will surveyor needed in Milford area [Pamela Hunt ]
14 Jun ID? ["Al Howard" ]
13 Jun Evening Grosbeaks [Bob Crowley ]
13 Jun peaceable kingdom addendum [Sylvia Miskoe ]
13 Jun peaceable kingdom at noon [Sylvia Miskoe ]
13 Jun Concord BBS Route ["Pam Hunt" ]
13 Jun Canada Warblers, Canaan []
13 Jun Canterbury BBS route [Rebecca ]
13 Jun Pickering Ponds - Orchard Oriole and Virginia Rail [Rebecca ]
12 Jun hairies and falcons [Evelyn Nathan ]
12 Jun barn swallows [Sylvia Miskoe ]
12 Jun Bicknell's Thrush [Anne Daugherty ]

Subject: Cut Trees at Chest Height to Make Roosting, Nesting Sites for Woodpeckers, Chickadees
From: Alfred Maley <alfredmaley AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 07:18:13 -0400
For some forgotten reason, a few year ago I cut down a Douglas Fir in the
yard, but happened to cut it off at 4 feet above ground. Last Fall a Downy
Woodpecker excavated a Winter roost hole just below the top. This Spring
Black-capped Chickadees refurbished the woodpecker pad, rearranged the
decor and nested in the hole. All this in a stump that is just 4.5 inches
in diameter.

If you have to cut down a tree of this size or somewhat larger, especially
if it is an evergreen, consider cutting the top off at about 5 feet.
Important - cut just an inch or so above a whorl of branches. The
resin-heavy knots will form a hard roof above the softer wood below.

Deciduous trees will sprout tons of suckers unless you first girdle the
tree and use an herbicide in the cut to kill the tree before cutting it
down. If you have to cut down a dead tree of any type, just cut it off at 5
feet and wait for the fun to begin.

Al Maley, Hampstead

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 27, 2016
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 20:21:35 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 27th, 2016.



2 MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen in treetops located near the boat launch at 
the end of Piscassic Street in Newmarket on June 25th.



A pair of SANDHILL CRANES has returned to Monroe and they were most recently 
reported on June 26th. The birds are most often seen in farm fields along 
Plains Road. If you look for the birds, please look from the road and do not 
enter the fields.



An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was reported from Bennett Road near Route 108 in 
Durham on June 23rd.



A REDHEAD was discovered at the Lancaster Wastewater Treatment Plant on June 
18th, and has been seen there numerous times since then. It was last 
reported on the 24th.



A SURF SCOTER was seen on Ossipee Lake on June 22nd.



3 CORY’S SHEARWATERS were seen at Jeffrey’s Ledge off of the coast on June 
26th.



A pair of LEAST TERNS (with a chick), and a pair of PIPING PLOVERS (with at 
least 1 chick) were all reported from Hampton Beach on June 21st.



2 RED CROSSBILLS were reported from New Hampshire Audubon’s 
dePierrefeu-Willard Pond Wildlife Sanctuary in Antrim on June 25th.



A FOX SPARROW was reported from Tripoli Road in Livermore on June 24th.



5 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were reported from Cemetery Fields in Amherst, and 5 
were reported from the Manchester landfill, all on June 22nd.



A MOURNING WARBLER, a PHILADELPHIA VIREO, a WILSON'S SNIPE, a PIED-BILLED 
GREBE, and 5 GRAY JAYS were reported from Scott Bog Road, and 3 MOURNING 
WARBLERS, a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER, an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, 5 BOREAL 
CHICKADEES, 3 GRAY JAYS, a BLACKPOLL WARBLER, a BAY-BREASTED WARBLER, and 4 
RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were reported from East Inlet Road, all in Pittsburg on 
June 25th and 26th.



A female BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER, a GRAY JAY and 2 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES were 
reported by a hiker on the Caps Ridge Trail in Jefferson on June 26th.



4 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES were reported from Cannon Mountain on June 26th.



A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON and a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO were reported from 
Pickering Ponds in Rochester on June 22nd.



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org



Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Whale on the beach!
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 19:12:46 -0400
The dead whale which we saw offshore on the whale watch boat washed up 
onto Foss Beach north of Ragged Neck.  Certainly an unusual occurrence 
for New Hampshire.


http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20160627/marine-officials-investigate-dead-whale-off-rye-beach 


Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: correction
From: Evelyn Nathan <evynathan AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 09:55:46 -0400
ooop….my juvenile peregrine is apparently a kestrel. Well, that’s still 
neat. Sorry for the blooper. 


Evy Nathan
Kingston

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Subject: more bobolinks, and a surprise
From: Evelyn Nathan <evynathan AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 09:44:04 -0400
Checked out the Rockingham County fields in Brentwood this morning for 
bobolinks, (partly because the woods are too buggy right now) and was not 
disappointed! The BBL’s were foraging as a flock, my guestimate was 50-75 in 
one flock, and that was just a part of the field. I saw small groups of 
individuals all over, and suspect there were lots more. A nice surprise on the 
way out was a juvenile peregrine falcon on a telephone wire. 


Evy Nathan
Kingston

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Subject: Birding by ear at Tower Hill Pond, Auburn/Candia
From: Roger Frieden <roger AT frieden.org>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 22:38:37 -0400
>> This morning (Sunday) while running around Tower HIll Pond we heard 21 
species firmly ID'd ( and a few question marks.) Highlights were Scarlet 
Tanager, Hermit Thrush, Veery, and 6 warblers. But the biggest highlight was 
being followed down the trail by a very confiding porcupine. 


> https://flic.kr/p/Jx58GZ

Kathryn and Roger Frieden

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Subject: Pittsburg weekend
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 01:46:40 +0000 (UTC)
We arrived in Pittsburg at the Deer Mountain Campground late on Friday night 
for a weekend of beautiful weather for birding. It was actually chilly on 
Saturday morning (40 degrees) but warmed to the comfortable 70s and we drove 
Scott Bog Road, East Inlet Road, and a bit of Magalloway Road. Today was warmer 
by a bit and we drove to Scott Bog again, then Day Road and Indian Stream Road. 
Our Pittsburg species total for the weekend was 89, including 17 species of 
warblers and quite a few of the sought after boreal species (highlights below). 
Our only misses were Tennessee Warbler and Spruce Grouse. 


And finally, on the way home, we had both SANDHILL CRANES on Plains Road in 
Monroe. 


Highlights

Scott Bog Rd.
Mourning Warbler 1
Philadelphia Vireo 1
Wilson's Snipe 1
Pied-billed Grebe 1 calling
Gray Jay 5

East Inlet Road
Mourning Warbler 3
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 1
Olive-sided Flycatcher 1
Boreal Chickadee 5, including one family group with 2 young
Gray Jay 3 (adults with 1 young)
Blackpoll Warbler 1
Bay-breasted Warbler 1
Rusty Blackbird 4 (appeared to be a family group)

Magalloway Road
Gray Jay 1

Partridge Cabins, Rt. 3
Cliff Swallows - 5 active nests, including 4 in the artificial Cliff Swallow 
nesting structures to which the swallows have added mud to create the 
appropriately size openings. The rest of the building has been re-sided and 
there are no swallow nests but the owners have been working with NH Audubon, 
Fish&Game and others to still keep swallow nesting at the site. Cliff Swallows 
have declined dramatically in NH but Pittsburg seems to remain a stronghold and 
this is the most northerly nesting site. 


Deer Mountain Campground
Gray Jay, a family group of two adults and one young - watched them raid a 
Blue-headed Vireo nest. An adult threw one of the nestlings to the ground then 
they all flew off. As soon as they were gone, another nestling popped up and 
jumped from the nest to the ground. Heard it continuing to beg for food. 


Day Road
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Wilson's Snipe 2
Ring-necked Pheasant 1

Indian Stream Rd.
Brown Thrasher 1 near the beginning of the road, in the same area as we had one 
last year 


Lots of morning song with some species continuing well into the morning, while 
others quieted quickly. There were many Swainson's Thrush. We had several 
encounters with Ruffed Grouse along the road, including a female with young, 
but no Spruce Grouse. 


Becky Suomala, Chichester
Zeke Cornell, Bow 

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Subject: Cerulean/Black throated Blue songs
From: "Cook Anderson" <hca314 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 20:26:15 -0400
Ah, ha, this confirms my long held belief that many sound records are not
above suspicion.  That is why birding was originally called "Bird Watching"
and not "Bird Listening". Seeing is believing.

Cranky Yankee



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Subject: Morning Whale Watch (3 species of shearwaters, great whale show!)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 19:08:06 -0400
Jane and I got out this morning on the early Granite State Whale Watch 
boat out of Rye.  Hoping for a few shearwaters.  Lots of other birders 
on the boat including Jon Woolf, Ben Griffith and Lauren Kras, Jeanne 
Marie-Maher, and Robbie Prieto.

Still a bit early in the season, so pelagic birds were a bit scarce, but 
we (barely) eked out about 4 Cory's, 2 Manx, and a Great Shearwater (in 
MA waters).  The Cory's Shearwater is close to a record early date for 
New Hampshire.  I believe the record early date is June 24th.  This is 
hardly surprising given the incredible expansion of this specie's range 
into the Gulf of Maine over the last 8 years.

A big, dead, bloated Humpback Whale (!) was remarkable, not far 
offshore, and there was a small flock of storm-petrels was in its 
slick.  A few other storm-petrels were seen along the route.  The whale 
show was FANTASTIC with lots of Humpbacks on southern Jeffrey's Ledge in 
Massachusetts waters.  One Humpback Whale gave us a show of "tail 
lobbing", "flipper slapping", "head breaching", and "full-twist 
breaching"!!!!  Over and over!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevemirick/

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 17:50:12 -0400
Thanks Hector for posting this.  I've meant to in the past.  This 
appears to be true for many areas in the northeast, and appears to me to 
be a fairly COMMON song of Black-throated Blue Warbler at times in 
south-central NH.  Over the last decade or so, I believe Black-throated 
Blue Warblers have become more common as likely nesting at Pawtuckaway 
State Park, and I have chased many of them to try to get Cerulean, and 
each time, I have been deeply disappointed when they turned out as 
Black-throated Blues.  During our "big day" in late May, I believe I 
counted 3 Black-throated Blue Warblers singing Cerulean type songs.   
Back when Ceruleans were more regular at Pawtuckaway State Park (mid 
90's or so), some sang some VERY strange songs, including one that sang 
a Hooded Warbler song, and another that sang a Restart song!

Many birds can occasionally sound different from usual so for many/most 
rarities, a visual confirmation is very important!

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA


On 6/26/2016 1:16 PM, Justin Lawson wrote:
> this also holds true in Worcester County Massachusetts!
>
> On Sunday, June 26, 2016, Christine Sheridan  > wrote:
>
>     This seems to hold true in south-central NH also, as last
>     spring several of us were fooled by a Black-throated Blue singing
>     a very Cerulean-sounding song in Brookline NH, which we compared
>     to Cerulean directly in the field.
>
>     To compound the confusion, this particular bird preferred to sing
>     high up in the oak canopy, and it took several tries to lure it
>     down into view.
>
>     Chris Sheridan
>     Nashua
>
>     On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 11:18 AM, Hector Galbraith
>          > wrote:
>
>         Over the last couple of months I have learned, to my cost in
>         mosquito, blackfly and tick bites, just how difficult it can
>         be separate the songs of these two species, at least in
>         southwest NH and southern VT.  BTBW seem to sing at least two
>         basic songs: one is the “typical" rising beer-beer-beer song,
>         but the second begins with a downward inflected and ringing
>         quality of two or three notes before going into the beer-beer-
>         beer component. This second song is not uncommon among BTBW in
>         my part of New England - almost as common as the “typical”
>         song. The problem is that the second song type sounds
>         remarkably like a cerulean. I have spent some time on Xeno
>         Canto comparing these songs and have to admit that I have
>         pretty much lost all confidence in being able separate BTBW
>         from CEWA on sound alone. Jack Swatt, in an earlier email,
>         pointed out the difficulty of this situation on Mt.
>         Wantastiquet, but it also applies further south in the CT
>         Valley and in the West River Valley of VT. If y’all are still
>         not convinced, I suggest that you go to Xena Canto and compare
>         the songs. As for me, I am going to be very circumspect in
>         claiming future CEWA by song alone. It is _essential_ to see
>         the bird.
>
>
>         Hector Galbraith, PhD
>         EcoSolutions
>         hg2 AT myfairpoint.net
>         
>         802 258 4836 
>         802 222 1916  (c)
>
>
>
>
>
>
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> -- 
> Justin Lawson
> Worcester, Ma
>
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Subject: Canada Warblers in Canaan -- Photos
From: "Jim Block" <jab AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 17:11:02 -0400
I posted a few photos of Canada Warblers from Bear Pond in Canaan, NH here:

http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/06/canada-warblers-at-bear-pond/

 

Jim Block

Etna, NH

 

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Subject: the birds of Turkey Pond
From: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 21:01:58 +0000 (UTC)
TURKEY POND, CONCORD, NH, 26 JUNE 2016, 0445 - 0925, 51 - 66 F, CLR, CALM, DRY 

Early this morning I ran the 317th edition of the Turkey Pond Bird Survey. 
Conditions were ideal and the numbers reflect this: 58 species is above average 
for the date and 499 individuals is also high. There were a few noticeable 
changes in the environment, most notably a deforestation .. er... uh.. I mean 
timber management project completed last winter. Pine Warbler numbers were high 
so no ill-effect there. The other change, which is very positive, is that the 
field next to Audubon House is now a pure grassy pasture. I believe we have the 
Scottish Highlander cattle from the Miles Smith Farm of Loudon to thank for the 
removal of virtually all the milkweed and goldenrod, leaving only the rich tall 
grass that Boblinks love. 


I can also compare today's data to a count I took on Oak Hill yesterday. The 
City of Concord has laid a fine network of trails through this beautiful 
primarily deciduous woodland where high numbers of forest interior species can 
be recorded, such as Ovenbird, Red-eyed Vireo, Hermit Thrush, Scarlet Tanager, 
Black-throated Green Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, and Eastern 
Wood-Pewee. See the city's website for maps and directions. 


Today's Turkey Pond highlights: 

Canada Goose - 0. Three weeks ago I found 3 pairs with goslings at adjacent 
Little Turkey Pond. Meanwhile, it has never nested at Big Turkey. 


American Woodcock - 2 birds jumped up from the same spot, a rare summer record. 
The second engaged in a protracted distraction display with whimpering and 
whining along with the broken wing act. I can assume the first bird was a 
fledgling, providing my first breeding confirmation at Turkey Pond. 


Northern Flicker - 2 versus 1 for Red-bellied Woodpecker. Since last year, 
whenever I find both species anywhere in Concord, Red-bellied is more numerous. 


Eastern Wood-Pewee - 8. This species continues to hold its own. Its long-term 
June average is 6. I counted 6 at Oak Hill yesterday. 


Alder Flycatcher - 6, its average is less than 4. I believe this is the Concord 
stronghold for this species. 


Red-eyed Vireo - 21. The long-term average is 20. Oak Hill also had 21. 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher- 3 in 3 different places. They probably nested below the 
old orchard. They seem more numerous around town this year, I found a nest 
around the corner from my house. 


Veery - 52, a new record high. The long term average is 33. The 9 at Oak Hill 
doesn't sound like many but it is the most I have ever counted there too. 


Ovenbird - 21, long term average is 15. Yesterday at Oak Hill there were 40!, 
including one that put on a good distraction display, which I had never seen 
before in this species but it is a defense deployed by many ground nesting 
birds. 


American Redstart - 9, a very good number, maybe a summer high count, I believe 
they have been aided by a deforestation ... er.. uh.. I mean exotic invasive 
control project in the old orchard. 


Pine Warbler - 21, well above the long term average of 14.5. 

Black-throated Blue Warbler -4, high, usually only 1 or 2; 7 were at Oak Hill. 

Black-and white Warbler - a female shot up directly from the ground, I searched 
the area and there was the nest! A small tight cup on the ground adjacent to a 
small tree of 3-4 inches in diameter. Inside were tiny chicks resembling larvae 
that surely hatched just this morning. They were mushed together such that you 
could not count them or even separate heads from tails. My first nest of this 
species and not far from my first Veery nest of a few weeks ago. See the 
up-coming summer edition of NH Bird Records for more on the nests I have found 
in Concord. Subscribe today! 


Bobolink - on May 19 I counted 3 males and 1 female in the lush grassy field I 
described above. This is the most I have ever seen here. Today there were none, 
leading me to believe that they successfully nested and moved on. This is a 
great success story at Turkey Pond and a rare instance where running cattle 
leads to an improvement for birds. 



Rob Woodward 
Concord, NH 

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Subject: Caps Ridge Trail
From: "Aaronian, Richard S." <raaronian AT exeter.edu>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 19:03:42 +0000
Met up with Steve Hale and hiked Caps Ridge Trail from 8-11 this morning 
specifically looking for Bicknell's Thrush which I had never seen. Thanks to 
Steve, we had great looks at one! 


Bicknell's Thrush 1 ( and 1 other singing)
Swainson's Thrush 2 ( and many more singing)
Black-backed WP 1 (female)
Magnolia W. 
Blackpoll W.
Black-throated Green W.
American Redstart
Yellow-rumped W.
Yellow-bellied FC 2 ( and more singing)
Winter Wren 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Gray Jay

Black Bear on my way in on Base Station Road!

Thanks again, Steve, for a great morning!

Rich Aaronian

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Birding by ear at Tower Hill Pond, Auburn/Candia
From: Roger Frieden <roger AT frieden.org>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 14:49:11 -0400

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Subject: Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT roadrunner.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 14:10:48 -0400
Thanks for this, Hector! I'm SO glad that someone has finally posted the 
critical reasons for actually SEEing CEWA before claiming its presence. 
XenoCanto is a wonderful tool, and I enthusiastically second your 
recommendation to folks to check it out. There's always something to learn. 


Susan Fogleman
Campton NH

On Jun 26, 2016, at 11:18 AM, Hector Galbraith wrote:

> Over the last couple of months I have learned, to my cost in mosquito, 
blackfly and tick bites, just how difficult it can be separate the songs of 
these two species, at least in southwest NH and southern VT. BTBW seem to sing 
at least two basic songs: one is the “typical" rising beer-beer-beer song, 
but the second begins with a downward inflected and ringing quality of two or 
three notes before going into the beer-beer- beer component. This second song 
is not uncommon among BTBW in my part of New England - almost as common as the 
“typical” song. The problem is that the second song type sounds remarkably 
like a cerulean. I have spent some time on Xeno Canto comparing these songs and 
have to admit that I have pretty much lost all confidence in being able 
separate BTBW from CEWA on sound alone. Jack Swatt, in an earlier email, 
pointed out the difficulty of this situation on Mt. Wantastiquet, but it also 
applies further south in the CT Valley and in the West River Valley of VT. If 
y’all are still not convinced, I suggest that you go to Xena Canto and 
compare the songs. As for me, I am going to be very circumspect in claiming 
future CEWA by song alone. It is essential to see the bird. 

> 
> 
> Hector Galbraith, PhD
> EcoSolutions
> hg2 AT myfairpoint.net
> 802 258 4836
> 802 222 1916 (c)
> 

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Subject: Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs
From: Justin Lawson <justindlawson AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 13:16:20 -0400
this also holds true in Worcester County Massachusetts!

On Sunday, June 26, 2016, Christine Sheridan  wrote:

> This seems to hold true in south-central NH also, as last spring several
> of us were fooled by a Black-throated Blue singing a very Cerulean-sounding
> song in Brookline NH, which we compared to Cerulean directly in the field.
>
> To compound the confusion, this particular bird preferred to sing high up
> in the oak canopy, and it took several tries to lure it down into view.
>
> Chris Sheridan
> Nashua
>
> On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 11:18 AM, Hector Galbraith  > wrote:
>
>> Over the last couple of months I have learned, to my cost in mosquito,
>> blackfly and tick bites, just how difficult it can be separate the songs of
>> these two species, at least in southwest NH and southern VT.  BTBW seem to
>> sing at least two basic songs: one is the “typical" rising beer-beer-beer
>> song, but the second begins with a downward inflected and ringing quality
>> of two or three notes before going into the beer-beer- beer component. This
>> second song is not uncommon among BTBW in my part of New England - almost
>> as common as the “typical” song. The problem is that the second song 
type 

>> sounds remarkably like a cerulean. I have spent some time on Xeno Canto
>> comparing these songs and have to admit that I have pretty much lost all
>> confidence in being able separate BTBW from CEWA on sound alone. Jack
>> Swatt, in an earlier email, pointed out the difficulty of this situation on
>> Mt. Wantastiquet, but it also applies further south in the CT Valley and in
>> the West River Valley of VT. If y’all are still not convinced, I suggest
>> that you go to Xena Canto and compare the songs. As for me, I am going to
>> be very circumspect in claiming future CEWA by song alone. It is
>> *essential* to see the bird.
>>
>>
>> Hector Galbraith, PhD
>> EcoSolutions
>> hg2 AT myfairpoint.net 
>> 802 258 4836
>> 802 222 1916 (c)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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Worcester, Ma

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Subject: Re: cerulean/black-throated blue songs
From: Christine Sheridan <cmsbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 12:38:25 -0400
This seems to hold true in south-central NH also, as last spring several of
us were fooled by a Black-throated Blue singing a very Cerulean-sounding
song in Brookline NH, which we compared to Cerulean directly in the field.

To compound the confusion, this particular bird preferred to sing high up
in the oak canopy, and it took several tries to lure it down into view.

Chris Sheridan
Nashua

On Sun, Jun 26, 2016 at 11:18 AM, Hector Galbraith 
wrote:

> Over the last couple of months I have learned, to my cost in mosquito,
> blackfly and tick bites, just how difficult it can be separate the songs of
> these two species, at least in southwest NH and southern VT.  BTBW seem to
> sing at least two basic songs: one is the “typical" rising beer-beer-beer
> song, but the second begins with a downward inflected and ringing quality
> of two or three notes before going into the beer-beer- beer component. This
> second song is not uncommon among BTBW in my part of New England - almost
> as common as the “typical” song. The problem is that the second song type
> sounds remarkably like a cerulean. I have spent some time on Xeno Canto
> comparing these songs and have to admit that I have pretty much lost all
> confidence in being able separate BTBW from CEWA on sound alone. Jack
> Swatt, in an earlier email, pointed out the difficulty of this situation on
> Mt. Wantastiquet, but it also applies further south in the CT Valley and in
> the West River Valley of VT. If y’all are still not convinced, I suggest
> that you go to Xena Canto and compare the songs. As for me, I am going to
> be very circumspect in claiming future CEWA by song alone. It is
> *essential* to see the bird.
>
>
> Hector Galbraith, PhD
> EcoSolutions
> hg2 AT myfairpoint.net
> 802 258 4836
> 802 222 1916 (c)
>
>
>
>
>
>
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Subject: cerulean/black-throated blue songs
From: Hector Galbraith <hg2 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 11:18:15 -0400
Over the last couple of months I have learned, to my cost in mosquito, blackfly 
and tick bites, just how difficult it can be separate the songs of these two 
species, at least in southwest NH and southern VT. BTBW seem to sing at least 
two basic songs: one is the “typical" rising beer-beer-beer song, but the 
second begins with a downward inflected and ringing quality of two or three 
notes before going into the beer-beer- beer component. This second song is not 
uncommon among BTBW in my part of New England - almost as common as the 
“typical” song. The problem is that the second song type sounds remarkably 
like a cerulean. I have spent some time on Xeno Canto comparing these songs and 
have to admit that I have pretty much lost all confidence in being able 
separate BTBW from CEWA on sound alone. Jack Swatt, in an earlier email, 
pointed out the difficulty of this situation on Mt. Wantastiquet, but it also 
applies further south in the CT Valley and in the West River Valley of VT. If 
y’all are still not convinced, I suggest that you go to Xena Canto and 
compare the songs. As for me, I am going to be very circumspect in claiming 
future CEWA by song alone. It is essential to see the bird. 



Hector Galbraith, PhD
EcoSolutions
hg2 AT myfairpoint.net 
802 258 4836
802 222 1916 (c)






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Subject: Least Tern Chick gets chased 6-23-2016 video
From: loonphotog AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 15:00:54 +0000 (UTC)
Least Tern Chick gets chased 6-23-2016 - Sandy Pt. State Park, Plum Island, MA
 Feel free to share.

https://youtu.be/1ObPgCKWzc4



 John Rockwood

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Subject: Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Added to Deck, Mulberry Tree List
From: Alfred Maley <alfredmaley AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 18:44:45 -0400
Yesterday morning a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher stopped briefly in the dead trees
on the deck, and I was puzzled as to where it came from and where it was
going. In May I had heard one song from the woods behind the house, without
seeing the bird. Today, while watching birds come to the White Mulberry
(Morus alba) in front of the house, I heard the gnatcatcher call, then saw
the bird amongst the Cedar Waxwings, Robins, Catbirds, Red-bellied
Woodpeckers, House Finches, Bluebirds, Downy Woodpeckers, Baltimore
Orioles, Eastern Phoebe, Gray Squirrels et al. that are feasting on the
berries.

White Mulberry is preferable to the Red Mulberry because the berries don't
leave stains on cars, driveways, laundry, etc.

Al Maley, Hampstead

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Subject: Acadian Flycatcher - NO & Kite update
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 18:18:42 -0400
Spent about 1/2 hour listening along Bennett Road in Durham late this 
morning, but no luck with the reported Acadian Flycatcher.  I had an 
empidonax, but I'm pretty sure it was a Willow Flycatcher. It never 
sang, but made a lot of call notes and random noises.  The consolation 
prize was a MISSISSIPPI KITE seen from this location. It was soaring to 
the south over the fields and was near the Lamprey River, not far from 
Piscassic Street.  Only my 2nd record for a kite outside of Newmarket.

After that I spent some time in Newmarket looking for kites.  I CAME UP 
COMPLETELY EMPTY.  I spent about 1/2 hour at Piscassic Street, but no 
birds soaring above, none perched in the snags, and no incubation going 
on at the nest.  The nest looked fine, but no birds!  I thought for sure 
there would be a female incubating.  :-(

Then I drove around in the Durrell Woods subdivision.....NO LUCK. Then 
around Gonet Drive.....NO LUCK.

So......I guess we need to do some more investigation!

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: bobolinks
From: Evelyn Nathan <evynathan AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 16:58:08 -0400
2 days posting for me. Two friends and I walked a neat field property today to 
get to a swimmin’ hole, and were surrounded by tons of bobolinks! Every 
common field bird was staking out its territory there. 


The field is in Fremont, NH.

Evy Nathan
Kingston

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Subject: Berserk Broadwing Auditions for Remake of "The Birds"
From: Alfred Maley <alfredmaley AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 19:12:39 -0400
 
We’ve always sought to bring nature close by planting fruiting trees near
the house. Perhaps we’ve gone too far. A Broad-winged Hawk has discovered
its image reflected in our living room windows and insists on sitting on
the windowsill and pecking at its image, with an occasional flutter of its
wings when that fails to drive the intruder away. See some photos at

https://www.flickr.com/gp/133607729 AT N08/2240V3

The hawk goes all around the house, trying to find its enemy. Last night it
landed on the tree on our deck and glared at the sliders while we sat and
watched, just nine feet away. It probably discovered its image because it
happened to land in one of our trees while hunting.

(I originally thought it might be a female since it called vehemently, as
if hungry. But now I have no idea. I once thought that it was just the
males that pecked at mirrors, but I know now that’s not true. Last winter
in Spain we were working in the campo and would leave the vehicle nearby. A
pair of Stonechats would tag-team both rear view mirrors, the male on one
side, the female on the other. In warm weather we’d leave the windows open
and the Stonechats would fly through the car, from one mirror to another,
stopping occasional to rest and poop on the steering wheel.)

While I thought we should shoot the hawk before it broke a window, Linda
argued dissuasion. So I shouted obscenities at the hawk and waved my arms
in its face and it seems to be getting the message. It has not attacked the
window for a day now.

Incidentally, we couldn’t plant trees by the deck because of the septic
system, so we cut saplings from the forest every 4-5 years and “plant” them
in specially constructed sleeves attached to the deck. These Ironwood
(Ostrya virginiana) trees are abundant on our lot and are tall, slender and
easy to manipulate, so they work well. However, almost any small tree would
work. Birds love to pause in the leafless trees on their way to the feeder
or just while crossing the yard. The male hummingbird perches there for
hours at a time. Now, Broad-winged Hawk has been added to our deck-tree
species list.

Al Maley, Hampstead

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Subject: thrasher
From: Evelyn Nathan <evynathan AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 15:53:50 -0400
OK, so maybe they’re not “rare”, but I get to “crow” today because I 
saw a brown thrasher this afternoon in Newton, NH at a conservation parcel. I 
thought it was a thrush, but Scott Heron ID’d the picture as a thrasher. 
It’s a life bird for me. 


Evy Nathan
Kingston

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Subject: Possible Acadian Flycatcher in Durham
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 12:57:04 -0400
Kevin Couture emailed me to report that he heard a possible/probable 
Acadian Flycatcher off Bennett Road in Durham.  He heard it in the exact 
same area that one was singing for much of the summer of 2014.  About 
1/4 mile west of Route 108 (small pond on right and fields on left).  It 
was singing out in the fields.  It would be good if someone can get out 
and confirm this.

Otherwise, he dipped on the kites off Piscassic Street.  I was hoping 
the female would be incubating by now!  :-(

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Chipping Sparrow Feeding Young, Manchester
From: Roger Frieden <roger AT frieden.org>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 09:25:58 -0400
This morning we shared breakfast with some Chipping Sparrows.

> https://www.flickr.com/photos/rogerandkathryn/albums/72157670140406885

Roger and Kathryn Frieden

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Subject: Pelagic birds picking up offshore
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 08:42:34 -0400
A post from the Granite State Whalewatch shows an increase in whales and 
birds offshore.  Their trip yesterday produced upwards of 30 (!!) 
Humpback Whales and a Sei Whale!  And birds included at least 3 species 
of shearwaters (Sooty, Greater, Cory's) as well as a late Northern Fulmar.

https://www.facebook.com/Granite-State-Whale-Watch-125116210835755/?fref=nf

Hopefully the activity continues into the weekend and through the summer!

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Black-crowned Night-Heron at Pickering Ponds
From: Dan Hubbard <danielhubbard AT peoplepc.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 21:34:11 -0400 (EDT)
Among 55 species, there was an immature Black-crowned Night-Heron at Pickering 
Ponds this am. Also, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo was heard. Both cuckoos have been 
heard here for the last couple of weeks. Dan Hubbard, Rochester 


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Subject: Re: BBS Routes and an upcoming Friday field trip
From: "'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 00:55:06 +0000 (UTC)
I should have included a couple of lines about the hiking conditions and 
terrain for Friday's field trip. There will be a mix of hiking conditions 
including old woods roads and trails, as well as off-trail walking in areas 
with some rugged terrain - so this trip is not for everyone. Participants can 
expect to walk about 2+/- miles over these conditions. 


Also, if you are planning to attend, please RSVP to me at pbrown AT nhaudubon.org
Thanks,Phil Brown 

 On Wednesday, June 22, 2016 12:06 AM, 'Phil Brown' via NHBirds 
 wrote: 

 

 I conducted my sixth annual Walpole-Stoddard BBS Route on Saturday and tallied 
77 species, which I believe is a tie for my highest count ever on this route. 
In all birds were up from past years with 725 individuals tallied across the 
usual 50 stops from start to finish. The expected top finishers were red-eyed 
vireo, chipping sparrow, American robin, ovenbird, cedar waxwing, and song 
sparrow, in that order. Highlights included 15 species of warblers including 
Nashville and Canada, 20 sapsuckers, 2 American kestrels, and a visual of a 
black-billed cuckoo at close range across from the Nelson Elementary School. 

The day prior I conducted my third running of my unofficial 'Hancock-Henniker' 
BBS Route that follows the same protocol and found 78 species and 743 
individuals. Highlights included 13 species of warblers including Canada and 
Northern waterthrush, 2 Eastern towhees, 2 barred owls, 1 green heron, 1 
American kestrel, and surprises (for the location) 1st year male orchard oriole 
flying over Bennett Road in Henniker, as well as blue-gray gnatcatcher in 
Antrim. 

Now for the field trip: to learn more about breeding birds and forest 
management, join myself and several other co-leaders for a joint pre-harvest 
tour and introduction to breeding bird surveys, this Friday, June 24, 8-11 am 
at the NH Audubon Kensan-Devan Wildlife Sanctuary in Marlborough. The listing 
follows here:Upcoming Events » Kensan-Devan Pre-Harvest Tour » NH Audubon 

  
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Upcoming Events » Kensan-Devan Pre-Harvest Tour » NH Audubon
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Phil BrownHancock, NH
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Subject: Wantastiquet Mt. Natural Area, Chesterfield/Hinsdale, Jun 22, 2016
From: Jack Swatt <jswattbirds AT snet.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 20:35:39 +0000 (UTC)
I stopped to go hiking at Wantastiquet today while on my way up to 
Lempster.  After hearing and seeing several Cerulean Warblers in Connecticut 
this week, I wanted to see if I could find any at this area where they have 
been reported in the past.  Last year I visited this trail and heard several 
songs that I audibly identified as Ceruleans, but did not visually confirm 
them as I was unaware of the similar song of the Black-throated Blue Warblers 
in the area. Today, patience did not reward me as, of the 3 Cerulean-like 
songs I heard today, taking time to see who made them, two of them were being 
made by Black-throated Blue Warblers.  The other was quite distant and off the 
trail and I was not able to visually ID the songster.     If Cerulean 
Warblers ever do return to this area to breed, confirming their presence is 
going to be quite a challenge. 

Jack Swatt
Wolcott, CTLempster, NH
 
 On Wednesday, June 22, 2016 4:12 PM, "ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu" 
 wrote: 

 

 Wantastiquet Mt. Natural Area, Chesterfield/Hinsdale, Cheshire, New Hampshire, 
US 

Jun 22, 2016 8:40 AM - 11:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
19 species

Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  2
Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  5
American Crow  4
Hermit Thrush  5
Wood Thrush  3
Cedar Waxwing  2
Ovenbird  10
Black-and-white Warbler  2
American Redstart  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  3    all singing Cerulean-like song, two were 
visualized singing the song, third was distant and assumed to be BTBW 

Pine Warbler  9
Black-throated Green Warbler  2
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)  1
Eastern Towhee  1
Scarlet Tanager  3
American Goldfinch  1

View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30346654

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/nh)


  

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Subject: Baby Bluebirds in need in Derry
From: Jonathan Smith <jksmith69 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:15:19 +0000
Hello all, I don't know if there's anything that can be done, but my wife's 
uncle has a birdhouse nesting 3-4 baby bluebirds in Derry. Today, he found the 
father dead in his driveway and the mother is no where to be seen. Is there 
anything that can be done to save the babies? Or anywhere to take them safely? 
Thanks in advance, Jonathan Smith 


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Subject: BBS Routes and an upcoming Friday field trip
From: "'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 03:27:10 +0000 (UTC)
I conducted my sixth annual Walpole-Stoddard BBS Route on Saturday and tallied 
77 species, which I believe is a tie for my highest count ever on this route. 
In all birds were up from past years with 725 individuals tallied across the 
usual 50 stops from start to finish. The expected top finishers were red-eyed 
vireo, chipping sparrow, American robin, ovenbird, cedar waxwing, and song 
sparrow, in that order. Highlights included 15 species of warblers including 
Nashville and Canada, 20 sapsuckers, 2 American kestrels, and a visual of a 
black-billed cuckoo at close range across from the Nelson Elementary School. 

The day prior I conducted my third running of my unofficial 'Hancock-Henniker' 
BBS Route that follows the same protocol and found 78 species and 743 
individuals. Highlights included 13 species of warblers including Canada and 
Northern waterthrush, 2 Eastern towhees, 2 barred owls, 1 green heron, 1 
American kestrel, and surprises (for the location) 1st year male orchard oriole 
flying over Bennett Road in Henniker, as well as blue-gray gnatcatcher in 
Antrim. 

Now for the field trip: to learn more about breeding birds and forest 
management, join myself and several other co-leaders for a joint pre-harvest 
tour and introduction to breeding bird surveys, this Friday, June 24, 8-11 am 
at the NH Audubon Kensan-Devan Wildlife Sanctuary in Marlborough. The listing 
follows here:Upcoming Events » Kensan-Devan Pre-Harvest Tour » NH Audubon 

  
|  
|   
|   
|   |    |

   |

  |
|  
|   |  
Upcoming Events » Kensan-Devan Pre-Harvest Tour » NH Audubon
   |   |

  |

  |

 

Phil BrownHancock, NH

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Subject: Least Tern family doing ok
From: Len Medlock <lenmedlock AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 20:27:22 +0000 (UTC)
Bumped into Steve Bennett on way home from work to view subject birds. Dad's 
struggling to find a right-sized snack for baby, who is still sporting remnants 
of its egg tooth. I'm sure he'll figure it soon. Glad I stopped by to prevent a 
loose dog from catching up with one of the plovers--owner notified and the dog 
was leashed (whew!) 


Len Medlock
Exeter, NH
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lmedlock/ 

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 20, 2016
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 21:58:49 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 20th, 2016.



4 MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen in treetops located near the boat launch at 
the end of Piscassic Street in Newmarket on June 18th.



A REDHEAD was seen at the Lancaster Wastewater Treatment Plant on June 18th, 
19th, and 20th.



A pair of LEAST TERNS, and a pair of PIPING PLOVERS (with 3 chicks!) were 
all reported from Hampton Beach on June 19th.



2 LAUGHING GULLS, 2 ROSEATE TERNS, and 23 GREAT EGRETS were all seen in 
Hampton Harbor on June 19th.



4 PURPLE MARTINS were seen at the FunSpot in Laconia on June 17th, and 6 
were seen at Cross Beach Road in Seabrook on the 20th.



A pair of EVENING GROSBEAKS was seen in Derry on June 18th.



A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER was seen on the trail to Little Cherry Pond and a 
YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was seen at Cherry Pond, both at New Hampshire Audubon’s 

Pondicherry Wildlife Sanctuary on June 18th.



A pair of BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS and 3 RED CROSSBILLS were reported from 
the trail between Mounts Starr King and Waumbek in Jefferson on June 18th, 
and a female BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER was seen by a hiker on Mount Willey in 
Crawford Notch on the 18th.



4 AMERICAN PIPITS, 4 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES, a FOX SPARROW, and a PHILADELPHIA 
VIREO were all reported from the Mount Washington Auto Road on June 19th, 
and a FOX SPARROW was reported from Magalloway Mountain Road in Pittsburg on 
June 16th.



6 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES were reported from Cannon Mountain on June 18th.



An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was reported from along Hurd Hill Road in Lyman on 
June 18th and 20th.



A pair of SANDHILL CRANES has returned to Monroe and they were most recently 
reported on June 12th. The birds are most often seen in farm fields along 
Plains Road. If you look for the birds, please look from the road and do not 
enter the fields.



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org


Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Hampton Laughing Gull
From: "Aaronian, Richard S." <raaronian AT exeter.edu>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 23:12:13 +0000
Laughing Gull (1) on N. Hampton beach at 545 PM (FOY)
Fair amount of terns moving south as well along Plaice Cove
Killdeer 5

Rich Aaronian


Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Redhead
From: Charlie Nims <charlie.nims AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 17:33:57 -0400
The Redhead found on Saturday at the Lancaster WTP was still present this a.m.

Charlie Nims
Bartlett, NH

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Subject: Mt Starr King & Mt Waumbek 6/18
From: Kyle Wilmarth <kyle.wilmarth AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 10:07:00 -0400
On Saturday morning a friend and I hiked up to Mt Waumbek and back on the
Starr King trail.  We hit the trail at 5am sharp and were off the trail by
10am.  After that it deemed impossible to pass up a monster slice of
breakfast pizza at the country store in Jefferson, so we enjoyed that and a
couple of coffees on the porch after a nice morning out.

Highlights included:

Bicknell's Thrush - 3, all just visual sightings. Others heard in the
distance so likely more.
Black-backed Woodpecker - 2, pair working on a nest hole.  Between Starr
King and Waumbek.
Boreal Chickadee - 4, between Starr King and Waumbek
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - 5
Nashville Warbler - 1
Blackburnian Warbler - 1
Black-throated Green Warbler - 6
Blackpoll Warbler - 10+
Red Crossbill - 3, flyover at summit of Waumbek, a nice surprise

A full checklist with some photos here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/nh/view/checklist/S30290743


Kyle Wilmarth
Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Mt. Washington Auto Road
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 02:30:28 +0000 (UTC)
This morning was one of the three dates this year when the Mt. Washington Auto 
Road opens early to allow people to drive up and see sunrise. We got there just 
after 3:30 am when the road opened and we were on the summit in plenty of time 
for a gorgeous moonset and sunrise. Then we had the rest of the morning to bird 
the road. It was warm, sunny, but still quite windy. We haven't tallied 
everything yet but here are the highlights. 


Bicknell's Thrush 4, most from the former halfway house pullout
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 2
Fox Sparrow, 1 seen and heard about mile 2
Philadelphia Vireo 1 and possibly a second 
American Pipit, at least 4 relatively close to the summit
Swainson's Thrush, MANY
Blackpoll Warbler, singing at most stops

There were many of the other, more commonly expected species. We'll have a full 
list in eBird when we get it entered. 


Also, yesterday we had an Olive-sided Flycatcher on Hurd Hull Rd. in Lyman 
(thanks to Sandy and Mark Turner), but no luck with Sandhills Crane in Monroe. 


Becky Suomala, Chichester 
Zeke Cornell, Bow 

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Subject: Bellamy WMA Saturday
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 02:17:21 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday we checked out Bellamy River Wildlife Management Area in Dover in the 
morning and had 43 species. 

Highlights included:
Orchard Oriole, at least 1 adult male and a female
Blue-winged Warbler 2
Ring-necked Pheasant heard calling
Green Heron 1
Willow Flycatcher 3

Becky Suomala, Chichester
Zeke Cornell, Bow 

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Subject: sorry no black-billed cuckoo but it's cousin a mocking bird
From: gerry coffey <gerrycoffey123 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 21:11:13 -0400
sorry no black-billed cuckoo but it's cousin a mocking bird
wishful birding....the bill, size and tail length threw me off until I
looked at the photos further tonight...

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kindness, happiness and love be like the sun, feel it, taste it, be warmed
by it and share it.*

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Subject: Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Lempster
From: jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 20:16:00 -0400
When seeking out "boreal" birds it's not often one thinks of traveling south, 
especially from the Sunapee area, but there's a spot in Lempster that holds a 
surprise. Two years ago, Pam Hunt discovered a pair of Yellow-bellied 
Flycatchers along the trail at the Ashuelot River Headwaters Forest off 
Mountain Road. Last year, myself and Jack Swatt were able to relocate at least 
one bird there in the same location. This morning, a day shy of the year 
anniversary of my last visit, I returned to see if the birds would return for a 
third year. All was quiet when I arrived, so I used a playback of a YBFL song 
for thirty seconds or so then continued to wait. To my delight, I began to hear 
a quiet "chebunk" of a YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER in the distance. The bird came 
closer but still required me to walk 20 yards or so off the trail to view it. I 
was able to get very close views and listened to it sing for several minutes. 
This bird, like last year, showed only a week yellow wash on the breast/throat 
area, suggesting it might be an older bird. The reliability of their presence 
in this same spot for three years running suggests they may likely be breeding 
here. Being able to find them in the weeks ahead would help to confirm breeding 
here. To find the bird(s), one would want to park near the trailhead (marked by 
a sign) on the side of Mountain Road just west of Long Pond Road. After a 10-15 
minute walk down the trail you will arrive at the Ashuelot River. Just before 
you reach the bridge that spans the river, there will be a peat bog/spruce 
stand area on the left side of the trail. This is where the bird(s) frequent 
and can usually be heard from the trail. The following are some media I was 
able to collect of the birds I found today: 

Video of song:
https://flic.kr/p/JgnR2q
Photos:
https://flic.kr/p/JaFnxd
https://flic.kr/p/JaFnx3
https://flic.kr/p/JaFnwm

Other notes of the day included a pair of Eastern Towhee I found in a 
subdivision lot my family owns in Lempster just near Dodge Pond. This is only 
the third location I know of for this species in the county. 


I've also visited Trask Brook Road in Sunapee over the last few days and have 
made some good and bad observations. Since the first hay cutting was finished I 
noticed the abundance of Bobolink there had vanished. On three consecutive 
visits I couldn't hear or see a single bird. In the 4-5 years I've never seen 
them vanish after a cut, but I have been able to find more in the uncut cow 
pasture nearby across Route 103. 

Also missing is the family of Killdeer that frequented the drainage ditch along 
the side of the road. The family included two adults and four chicks, but in my 
last few visits there's been no sign of any of them. I know they survived the 
cutting so I fear they may have suffered a different fate. 

Not all the news is gloomy though. For quite a while now there's been a Willow 
Flycatcher singing from the small clump of marsh in the field south of the 
road. I've only had this species here on migration so this would would not only 
my first breeding Willow for the location, but for Sunapee as well. 

https://flic.kr/p/HNHNZf

One last non-avian note: I saw the post the other day about the Milbert's 
Tortoiseshell butterfly sighting in MA and thought it might be worth mentioning 
that I saw one at Trask Brook Road today. I don't know if it's as rare as far 
north as Sunapee, but I did get a photo for documentation: 

https://flic.kr/p/HoyoDM

-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Kites, plovers, and Least Terns
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 19:15:09 -0400
Jane and I got out this morning for some more birding.  Random highlights:

Greater Yellowlegs - 2 mid-summer visitors in Hampton salt marsh. Been a 
rather quiet spring for shorebirds except for a couple of flyby 
Oystercatchers.

Nelson's Sparrow - 2 singing males in Philbrick marsh in North Hampton.  
Another singing at end of Pollack Drive in Rye.  One at Philbrick twice 
gave a spectacular "sky-lark" flight song.  The Nelson's Sparrow flies 
in a high arc when it gives this song.  The Saltmarsh Sparrow flies low 
over the grasses when it gives this song.  A distinctive difference 
between these two species.

Saltmarsh Sparow - Not a lot.  Perhaps 6 from Little Jack's in Hampton.  
Only one at Philbrick Marsh.  The Hampton Saltmarshes seemed remarkably 
"quiet" for nesting birds.  Common Terns appear to no longer be nesting 
here anymore after many years of nesting.

LEAST TERN - Two on Hampton Beach INCUBATING EGG(S).  Not sure how many 
eggs.  I think one or two.  In exact same spot as last year at north end 
of the State Park behind fencing.

Piping Plover - 3 fluff balls with 2 adults in same area as Least Tern 
nest.  Didn't search for others.

Laughing Gulls - 2 adults in Hampton harbor.

Great Egret - 23 in Hampton harbor.

Roseate Tern - 2 in Hampton harbor.  A few (but not many) Common Terns.  
Rather quiet in the harbor at low tide.

And inland:

MISSISSIPPI KITE - "Only" 2 at end of Piscassic Street by boat launch.  
Not sure where the other two birds were today.  Male seen bring stick in 
to nest, but incubation has NOT started yet.  Pair seen copulating in 
bare trees near turn-around at boat launch.  Much more gracefully than 
yesterday!  :-)  Another single bird flying around near last year's nest 
site on Huckin's Drive.  But there doesn't appear to be a nest in the 
same tree as last year.  A Red-shouldered Hawk was a nice additional 
bird soaring in this neighborhood.

Some photos, including x-rated shots:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA


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Subject: American Woodcock nest-Effingham
From: "'Pam McGovern' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 22:51:24 +0000 (UTC)
Good Evening,
I was taking my dog out for a walk through our woods when she flushed out a 
bird. The bird started acting as if injured-wings spread and "limping". Once it 
realized the danger had passed, it pulled it's wings in and I was able to get a 
good look at it. It's an American Woodcock...and she has 2 possibly 3 chicks. 
My dog had stumbled on her nest site, which is right at the edge of my yard 
near our bird feeders. 

My husband and I were able to observe her searching for food, chicks in tow, 
for quite a while. 

I'm sorry we stressed her, but very happy we know she is there so we can be 
more careful. Hopefully we'll see the babies start their flight training soon! 


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Subject: Wiley Mountain
From: paul dionne <gratefulpaul AT me.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 16:05:00 -0400
While climbing Tom, Field and Willey mountains yesterday, we heard Swainson's 
thrush twice. The big treat was a life bird I have missed for 45 years of 
climbing. In a stand of dead spruce, just south of Willey peak, we first heard, 
them spotted a female Black-Back woodpecker. Was able to enjoy her for about 
two minutes, then off she flew. 

A great addition to a great day of climbing. 
Paul Dionne,
Derry

Sent from my iPhone 

"Let there be songs to fill the air." Robert Hunter, Jerome Garcia 

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Subject: redhead
From: "Kathy Dube" <kdube AT ncia.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 15:03:00 -0400
Redhead still present at Lancaster WWTP, saw it at 1330. Found by Sam Stoddard 
on 6/18. 


Kathy Dube, Berlin

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Subject: Photos of Kearsarge area birds, mid-June
From: "Jim Block" <jab AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 13:49:49 -0400
I posted photos from New London, Sunapee, and Newport, NH taken the last
three days at:

http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/06/mid-june-birds/  

 

The photos are of Common Loon, White-throated Sparrow, Bobolink, Yellow
Warbler, Black-and-White Warbler, Cedar Waxwing, Eastern Phoebe, Hairy
Woodpecker, Ovenbird, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Great Blue Heron, Scarlet
Tanager, Pine Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Broad-winged Hawk,
Hermit Thrush, Wild Turkey, Eastern Kingbird on nest, and CANADA WARBLER.

 

As a side note, last summer for the first time in over 40 years two loon
chicks hatched and were raised successfully on Lake Sunapee.  You can see my
photos of them and read the article I wrote in the summer issue of Kearsarge
Magazine. http://www.kearsargemagazine.com/  

The loons returned this year and laid two eggs, but sadly the eggs were
abandoned and removed by the Loon Preservation Society. 

 

Jim Block

Etna, NH

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Subject: black-billed cuckoo Milford behind Market Basket
From: gerry coffey <gerrycoffey123 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 13:47:04 -0400
Early this afternoon I saw black-billed cuckoo and chicks in Milford behind
Market Basket.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/110332976 AT N05/?

Gerry

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Subject: Head's Pond in Hooksett this morning
From: "Jane Hills" <jhbird AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 08:35:08 -0400
I took an early morning walk at Head's Pond in Hooksett today and tallied 36
species, many by ear only:

 

Canada Geese with five goslings

Wood Duck

Killdeer

Mourning Dove

Pileated Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Eastern Kingbird

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Least Flycatcher

Tree Swallows

Black-capped Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Gray Catbird

American Robin

Veery

Cedar Waxwing

Red-eyed Vireo

YELLOW-THROATED VIREO

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

Ovenbird

Red-winged Blackbird

American Goldfinch

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Eastern Towhee

White-throated Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

Song Sparrow

 

Non-avian species: Bullfrog, Beaver, White-tailed deer

 

Jane Hills

Manchester, NH

jhbird(at)myfairpoint(dot)net

 

"We are all environmentalists now, but we are not all planetists.  An
environmentalist realizes that nature has its pleasures and deserves
respect.  A planetist puts the earth ahead of the earthlings."  --William
Safire

 

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Subject: Evening Grosbeaks in Derry
From: Barbara Horton <byrder101 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 08:00:31 -0400
Hi

What a thrill to see a a pair of evening grosbeaks on my feeder yesterday
morn at 7am. A very rare visit for sure. We have lived here for almost 30
years and I would guess I have had less then 10 sightings thru out that
time. Was kinda hoping I would see them later in the day yesterday or maybe
I would see them this morning but no. But there is always hope they come
back!!!

Barb Horton Derry

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Subject: jeffreys ledge
From: eric masterson <erictheirish AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 21:45:19 -0400
Three of us hit Jeffreys today with Granite State Whalewatch out of Rye.
Great trip, with calm seas. Good number of Wilson's Storm-Petrels (at least
60), a razorbill, one Sooty Shearwater, and a few Gannets. However a great
show of Basking Shark (at least 11), and Fin Whale. Worth the trip.

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Subject: today's Pondicherry field trip
From: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 00:20:31 +0000 (UTC)
Maybe the early starting time thinned out some of the crowd I expected but I 
think it was worth getting an early start since the sun rises early and it was 
almost hot up there today. And crowded! How many groups of dog walkers did we 
meet! Otherwise the weather was perfect and the mosquitos were practically 
non-existent. 


We walked in to Cherry Pond and Little Cherry Pond, stopped at Airport Marsh, 
and then Trudeau Road on the way back. Here are some highlights: 


Common Loon - a pair on Cherry Pond with 2 very small chicks, 1 of which rode 
on its mother's back. 


Red-shouldered Hawk - 1 soared overhead on the walk back to the cars and 
possibly 2 more at airport Marsh. 


Northern Harrier - 1 male cruising the edge of Cherry Pond, actively hunting. 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1 flew up from near the viewing platform at Cherry Pond 
and was heard singing nearby. 


Black-backed Woodpecker - Success! 

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - 1 was heard-only at Trudeau Road. 

14 species of warblers: 
Black-and-white 
Nashville 
Northern Parula 
Yellow 
Magnolia 
Black-throated Blue 
Yellow-rumped 
Black-throated Green 
Blackburnian 
Chestnut-sided 
Ovenbird 
Common Yellowthroat 
Canada 
A. Redstart 


Rob Woodward 
Concord, NH 


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Subject: Anting crows in Newmarket
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 17:50:50 -0400
One other thing I forgot to mention....

While driving out on Salmon Street toward the kites, Jane and I saw a 
tight group of 4 crows huddled together in a front lawn.  They were 
shoulder to shoulder and three of them flushed when we stopped the car 
to look at them.  When we saw the single bird that remained, it looked 
as if in a trance.  Closer examination showed that it was COVERED with 
ants!  Sadly, I couldn't get a photo before it flew off.

"Anting" is a common (but rarely seen from my experience!) behavior 
among birds.  Some discussion here:


http://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/blog/2013/10/09/anting-widespread-fascinating-purpose-uncertain/ 


Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Mississippi Kites X 4 in Newmarket
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 17:22:20 -0400
Piscassic Street in Newmarket continues to be the focal point for 
Mississippi Kites in the northeastern U.S..  Today, at least 4 continue 
from this area.  In fact, 4 were sitting together in the same tree for a 
short time.  Three were seen sitting together for an extended time.  
There were a few feeble copulation attempts, but the female was on a 
flimsy branch and the male kept falling off!  :-)

The focal point is the turnaround at the boat launch on the Lamprey 
River at the end of Piscassic Street.  The birds are not at all bothered 
by the comings and goings of people.  Three birds were perched together 
in the bare trees above the dumpsters for the apartment complex.  The 
nest (above the parking lot to the east of the turnaround) appears to be 
active as one birds spent a lot of time arranging sticks.  Hopefully 
someone will be incubating within the next few days.

One obvious questions is what's with 4 birds in the same tree at this 
time of year with no aggressive territorial behavior? According to the 
Birds of North America, Mississippi Kites will participate in 
"cooperative breeding":

"One, rarely 2, yearlings consistently were present and associated with 
resident parents for at least 18 of 400 nests in several western states 
and 14 of 16 Illinois nests (Evans 1981, Parker 1988a). Yearling may be 
rebuffed or chased by adult (Evans 1981, Shaw 1985); generally yearlings 
accepted or tolerated when participating with parents in nest defense, 
incubation, and (rarely) brooding (Glinski and Ohmart 1981, Parker and 
Ports 1982, Shaw 1985)".

One of the birds is clearly an adult male and another is clearly an 
adult female (photos).  The other two, I'm not sure.  They didn't appear 
to me to be last year's birds, but I'm not positive.  I believe we only 
had one adult male, however.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/

We also checked last year's nest sites on Huckin's Drive and Gonet 
Drive, but no luck.  We'll keep searching.

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: belted kingfisher nest milford
From: gerry coffey <gerrycoffey123 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 08:32:59 -0400
Belted kingfisher nest Milford NH.

​
https://www.flickr.com/photos/110332976 AT N05/27712753206/in/dateposted-public/
​









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Subject: Re: Digest for nhbirds@googlegroups.com - 4 updates in 4 topics
From: Sylvia Miskoe <sylviasmiskoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 17:36:21 -0400
Turkey display

A large tom in full display walked behind 2 hens across the back pasture.
At the far end he un-puffed and ate buttercup flowers.
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord

On Fri, Jun 17, 2016 at 4:54 PM,  wrote:

> nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
> 
 
Google 

> Groups
> 
 

> 
 

> Topic digest
> View all topics
> 
 

>
>    - Broad-winged Hawk Fascinated By Our Windows
>    <#m_-7989102760298429859_group_thread_0> - 1 Update
>    - Unknown Bird, Peterborough <#m_-7989102760298429859_group_thread_1>
>    - 1 Update
>    - Lakes Region Purple Martins <#m_-7989102760298429859_group_thread_2>
>    - 1 Update
>    - Fitzwilliam BBS Route <#m_-7989102760298429859_group_thread_3> - 1
>    Update
>
> Broad-winged Hawk Fascinated By Our Windows
> 
 

> Alfred Maley : Jun 17 11:39AM -0400
>
> About 11 A.M. this morning I was alerted to the arrival of a Broad-winged
> Hawk by the alarm call of a male Bluebird. The hawk perched in a tall
> dogwood by our front porch and after a moment or so began to call loudly,
> what I interpreted as being hunger-motivated. I believe she has a nest or
> fledglings real close by.
>
> At that point the hawk (that I believe is a female) flew at a living room
> window about 12 feet from its perch, not fast, but as if to challenge the
> hawk reflected in the window. She sat for a few seconds on the window
> ledge, then flew around to the other side of the house where she had robbed
> nestling robins a day or so ago. Finding no nestlings, she then flew up to
> the windows on that side of the living room and fluttered at them before
> returning to the dogwood. After more loud calls, she then flew off into the
> woods.
>
> I was standing outside quietly watching this from a distance of about fifty
> feet. These hawks are quite tame and generally ignore us, although they do
> take after the female Barred Owl if they have the chance.
>
> Al Maley, Hampstead
> Back to top <#m_-7989102760298429859_digest_top>
> Unknown Bird, Peterborough
> 
 

> Bruce Boyer : Jun 17 09:52AM -0400
>
> Yesterday I was on the Hiroshi Trail and heard an unfamiliar call. It was
> a series of notes, all the same pitch, and about 8 in number. They were
> much too slow to be considered a “trill,” and didn’t sound at all like 
the 

> common trills like that of the Pine Warbler. The notes were clear, not
> buzzy at all. I could not get a look at the bird, but saw a brief view of a
> small, warbler-sized bird which could have been the source. Listening to
> Stokes’ recordings, the call was more like the Kentucky Warbler than
> anything else I heard, but the KW is very unusual around here.
>
> I hope someone else can find this bird and ID it. It was where the trail
> runs along the Nubanusit Brook, and the bird was in deciduous shrubbery
> between the trail and the stream. (Warning: it’s very mosquitoey there 
now.) 

>
>
> Bruce Boyer
> Back to top <#m_-7989102760298429859_digest_top>
> Lakes Region Purple Martins
> 
 

> Stephen Whitney : Jun 17 01:32PM
>
> >> 6/17/2016 08:56
> nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
> "Stephen Whitney" 
> Subject: Lakes Region Purple Martins
>
> Friday morning just before six while the motorcycles still slept I visited
> the Purple Martins at Funspot. One female, and three males peeking out of
> their houses, gurgling, taking short flights.
> Checked the new Purple Martin gourd houses at Prescott farm, no sign of
> occupancy yet. As I walked the path below bordering the field, I startled
> into flight two birds foraging just off the path. One I think was a ruffed
> grouse (not as slender, more chicken like and larger than a mourning dove,
> loud wing noise different). As I took another few steps forward, a wild
> turkey exploded into the air and flew past me.
> Back to top <#m_-7989102760298429859_digest_top>
> Fitzwilliam BBS Route
> 
 

> Wendy Ward : Jun 17 12:24AM
>
> Hi all, I did my BBS route Sunday morning. It starts in Fitzwilliam, winds
> through Troy, Marlborough and Swanzey and finishes in Winchester. It was a
> bit breezy but I had a good count of 72 species with 780 total birds.
> Notables were 2 Bank Swallows and a Louisiana Waterthrush, (third ever on
> the route, my first in 1990). A Hooded Merganser with her un-countable
> babes was a nice surprise. Towhees were down, I only had 1, as most of the
> power lines were mowed last year (can you believe 70 were recorded in 1972
> before I started?). It was nice to have a few Black-throated Blues,
> Blackburnians and Brown Creepers as I don't get them every year.
>
> Alas, no Wood Thrushes, their numbers have plummeted on my route I have
> only had 1 in the past 5 years, the route had a pre-Wendy high of 41 in
> 1977.
>
> Wendy Ward, Keene
> Back to top <#m_-7989102760298429859_digest_top>
> You received this digest because you're subscribed to updates for this
> group. You can change your settings on the group membership page
> 
 

> .
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it send an
> email to nhbirds+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com.
>

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Subject: Broad-winged Hawk Fascinated By Our Windows
From: Alfred Maley <alfredmaley AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 11:39:02 -0400
About 11 A.M. this morning I was alerted to the arrival of a Broad-winged
Hawk by the alarm call of a male Bluebird. The hawk perched in a tall
dogwood by our front porch and after a moment or so began to call loudly,
what I interpreted as being hunger-motivated. I believe she has a nest or
fledglings real close by.

At that point the hawk (that I believe is a female) flew at a living room
window about 12 feet from its perch, not fast, but as if to challenge the
hawk reflected in the window. She sat for a few seconds on the window
ledge, then flew around to the other side of the house where she had robbed
nestling robins a day or so ago. Finding no nestlings, she then flew up to
the windows on that side of the living room and fluttered at them before
returning to the dogwood. After more loud calls, she then flew off into the
woods.

I was standing outside quietly watching this from a distance of about fifty
feet. These hawks are quite tame and generally ignore us, although they do
take after the female Barred Owl if they have the chance.

Al Maley, Hampstead

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Subject: Unknown Bird, Peterborough
From: Bruce Boyer <brumyster AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 09:52:24 -0400
Yesterday I was on the Hiroshi Trail and heard an unfamiliar call. It was a 
series of notes, all the same pitch, and about 8 in number. They were much too 
slow to be considered a “trill,” and didn’t sound at all like the common 
trills like that of the Pine Warbler. The notes were clear, not buzzy at all. I 
could not get a look at the bird, but saw a brief view of a small, 
warbler-sized bird which could have been the source. Listening to Stokes’ 
recordings, the call was more like the Kentucky Warbler than anything else I 
heard, but the KW is very unusual around here. 


I hope someone else can find this bird and ID it. It was where the trail runs 
along the Nubanusit Brook, and the bird was in deciduous shrubbery between the 
trail and the stream. (Warning: it’s very mosquitoey there now.) 



Bruce Boyer

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Subject: Lakes Region Purple Martins
From: "'Stephen Whitney' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 13:32:31 +0000 (UTC)
>> 6/17/2016 08:56
nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
"Stephen Whitney" 
Subject: Lakes Region Purple Martins

Friday morning just before six while the motorcycles still slept I visited the 
Purple Martins at Funspot. One female, and three males peeking out of their 
houses, gurgling, taking short flights. 

Checked the new Purple Martin gourd houses at Prescott farm, no sign of 
occupancy yet. As I walked the path below bordering the field, I startled into 
flight two birds foraging just off the path. One I think was a ruffed grouse 
(not as slender, more chicken like and larger than a mourning dove, loud wing 
noise different). As I took another few steps forward, a wild turkey exploded 
into the air and flew past me. 


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Subject: Fitzwilliam BBS Route
From: "'Wendy Ward' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 00:24:40 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all, I did my BBS route Sunday morning. It starts in Fitzwilliam, winds 
through Troy, Marlborough and Swanzey and finishes in Winchester. It was a bit 
breezy but I had a good count of 72 species with 780 total birds. Notables were 
2 Bank Swallows and a Louisiana Waterthrush, (third ever on the route, my first 
in 1990). A Hooded Merganser with her un-countable babes was a nice surprise. 
Towhees were down, I only had 1, as most of the power lines were mowed last 
year (can you believe 70 were recorded in 1972 before I started?). It was nice 
to have a few Black-throated Blues, Blackburnians and Brown Creepers as I don't 
get them every year. 


Alas, no Wood Thrushes, their numbers have plummeted on my route I have only 
had 1 in the past 5 years, the route had a pre-Wendy high of 41 in 1977. 


Wendy Ward, Keene

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 13, 2016
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 22:38:11 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 13th, 2016.

Single MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen in Newmarket on June 8th, 11th, and 12th.

A BLACK VULTURE was seen in Westmoreland on June 8th.

A pair of SANDHILL CRANES has returned to Monroe and they were most recently
reported on June 12th. The birds are most often seen in farm fields along
Plains Road. If you look for the birds, please look from the road and do not
enter the fields.

An AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was seen at Hampton Beach on June 6th.

3 ARCTIC TERNS were seen on Star Island, one of the Isles of Shoals, on June
14th, and a COMMON TERN was seen at Lake Umbagog in Errol on June 10th.

A RUDDY DUCK was seen in Rochester on June 7th.

8 PURPLE MARTINS were seen in Seabrook on June 10th.

7 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were reported from the Concord Airport on June 14th,
5 were reported from the Manchester landfill on the 9th, and 1 was reported
from the Dillant-Hopkins Airport in Swanzey on the 9th.

A FOX SPARROW was seen at Fourth Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg on June 11th.

A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER nest was reported from the Kinsman Ridge Trail on
the north side of South Kinsman during the past week,

This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at:
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon
web site, www.nhaudubon.org

Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Pondicherry field trip - Saturday
From: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 23:07:02 +0000 (UTC)
The Capital Area Chapter of NH Audubon runs a field trip to the Pondicherry 
Wildlife Refuge in Whitefield this Saturday. You have 2 ways of getting there. 


1) Meet at the McLane Center in Concord at 5:00 am to carpool/caravan. This 
will give some of you a chance for 2 more hours of sleep in the back seat of 
some polite person's car. 


2) Meet at the trailhead at Airport Road at the refuge at 7:00 am. 

Directions (from the south): 
- go up I-93 and continue on Rt 3 after it splits just past Cannon Mtn. 
- in Twin Mtn, you come to a traffic light at the intersection of Rt 302. Go 
straight. 

- in a mile or 2 turn right onto Rt 115. 
- go 4.3 miles and turn left on Airport Road. 
- In about 1.5 miles you will see the parking area on the right. 

Since it is a long ways and the days are long near the solstice, we might as 
well make a day of it. After Pondicherry we can bird Airport Marsh and then 
even Trudeau Road. Bring a peanutbutter and jelly sandwich. The trip leader 
likes oatmeal raisin cookies. 


For more details about Pondicherry, go the State Dept of Forest and Lands 
website - www.nhdfl.org . Go to the Site Guide and Map with excellent 
photographs of the area and a trail map. 


My advance scouts are reporting back to me with excellent odds of finding the 
rare and elusive Black-backed Woodpecker. 


See you Saturday. 

Rob Woodward 
Concord, NH 

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Subject: MS Kite above Piscassic St
From: Dorothy Currier <dorocurr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 19:06:02 -0400
Just one seen around 2 PM circling around high in the sky just south of the
grassy circle near the boat ramp at the end of Piscassic St.
What I think is the nest (just above the corner as you turn right to drive
down the parking lot?) didn't look in good shape.  I'm wondering if it was
damaged by the big winds we've had lately.  Someone said these birds make
several nests in case one is damaged.  Does anyone know if that is true?
fyi-There was a woman taking down license plate numbers and telling people
not to park in that nonpaved area to the right of the circle next to the
"private property, do not park here" sign.

Coast was extremely quiet.  Baby eiders mostly out of the protected waters
of the harbor now.  Only 1 tern in the harbor.  It looked like purple
martins were living in a couple of the older houses.  I thought they
weren't supposed to fit in them anymore.

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Subject: almost in Kingston heron family
From: Evelyn Nathan <evynathan AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 15:39:58 -0400
Scott and Alice and I always chuckle about this heron nest, 2nd year running 
that we’ve seen a successful pair here, because it’s -j-u-s-t out of 
Kingston in Danville. (and we have no heron nests that we know of in Kingston) 
You can only see this nest from Kingston, though! Added for fun is my 
two-headed duck. 


Evy Nathan
Kingston
https://evyspictures.smugmug.com/Back-Road-herons-061416/

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Subject: Nottingham- Milbert's Tortoise shell - Black billed Cuckoo
From: "'paul miliotis' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 17:46:34 +0000 (UTC)
NHBirders,

This morning had a Milbert's Tortoise shell on flowers in the garden in 
Nottingham. 

Josh Rose had one of these in Greenfield (western) Mass a day or 2 ago and 
commented 

about it's rarity in Mass Butterfly. This is a boreal butterfly of Canada, 
Northern N H 

which has rare incursions into Mass and Southern NH. Lauren Rowell photographed 

this for documentation, and I found there were actually 2, a worn, ragged one 
and a very fresh 

larger individual.This could be an incursion year for this species. 
Also had good looks at 2 Black billed Cuckoos in the Garden which have been 
calling around 

the Garden. 

Good birding,
Paul Miliotis
Nottingham, NH

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Subject: Whip-poor-will surveyor needed in Milford area
From: Pamela Hunt <phunt AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 17:45:34 +0000
Greetings NH birders!



For roughly 10 years, NH Audubon has been tracking our state's Eastern 
Whip-poor-will population using a set of 21 roadside routes surveyed by 
volunteer observers. Interestingly, the general trend over this period has been 
one of gradual increase, which is counter to broader trends and general 
perceptions (although it seems a lot of folks have been hearing them this 
year). In any event, one of these routes is in the Milford/Mason area, and its 
assigned observer is not able to complete the survey this year. If there is 
anyone in or near that corner of the state who is potentially interested in 
helping out by taking on the route please let me know. 




A few basics about the surveys:

1) There is a fairly narrow window of dates that corresponds to lunar phases. 


2)      Surveys can only be conducted on clear or mostly clear nights

3)      Survey's generally start just after sunset and last 1.5 hours.

4) The only species we track is whip-poor-will, so being an expert birder is 
not required! 


Right now we are in the peak period for conducting the 2016 surveys, and that 
window will be open through the full moon on Monday evening. This isn't a huge 
amount of time, but right now the weather looks good, and it'd be great if 
someone was interested in helping out! If you are, let me know ASAP and I can 
send out directions and a map. There may be openings in other parts of the 
state now or in the future, so if you're interested but can't do Milford please 
let me know and I can let you know if something opens up. 




Many thanks,

Pam



Pamela D. Hunt, Ph.D.
Avian Conservation Biologist
New Hampshire Audubon
84 Silk Farm Road
Concord, NH 03301

(603) 224-9909 x328
phunt AT nhaudubon.org

      ___
_/ -o-- \_____
   \ /     \''''',,,,,,,\__
     \/////////''' _\======

Please consider making a donation to support the work of the Conservation 
Department 


"We have a hunger of the mind. We ask for all the knowledge around us and the 
more we get, the more we desire." 

   - Maria Mitchell, 19th Century American Astronomer


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Subject: ID?
From: "Al Howard" <alanlhoward AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 14:33:43 -0400
Thinking female grackles? Any Ideas?

Al

 

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/dr98epe2oxas6sr/AADjm8yOawKIaGkktHdZz-xTa?dl=0 

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Subject: Evening Grosbeaks
From: Bob Crowley <crbob AT fairpoint.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 21:13:31 -0400
Today the feeders had a visit from two male Evening Grosbeaks. For some 
unknown reason we seem to get more visit in the summer than the winter. 
They like meaties, shelled sunflower seeds.

Bob Crowley
Chatham, NH


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Subject: peaceable kingdom addendum
From: Sylvia Miskoe <sylviasmiskoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 14:04:44 -0400
I noticed a hen turkey come through the grassy
verge and drink from the pond.  A puffball poult followed her.  Over the
next hour I watched her make her way to the other side of the pond often
invisible.  Then as she made her way onto the lawn another poult appeared,
and another until I think counted 10. Then melted in and out of the verge
until they finally disppeared.
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord

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Subject: peaceable kingdom at noon
From: Sylvia Miskoe <sylviasmiskoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 12:42:56 -0400
Robin on a fence post, barn swallows soaring and diving, goldfinch
streaking by, tree swallows hovering over the hay, and8 painted turtles,
mostly large, on the pond shoreline.
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord

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Subject: Concord BBS Route
From: "Pam Hunt" <biodiva AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 06:45:06 -0400
I also did my BBS Route Saturday morning, which starts in Penacook 
(appropriately enough, and only 2.5 miles from my house!) and winds 25 miles 
through Boscawen, Canterbury (where it comes within a half mile or so of 
Becky's route!), Northfield, and Franklin before ending in Sanbornton. I 
recorded 75 species, which ties my high over 14 years of doing this route. The 
highlight was a presumed late-migrant Bay-breasted Warbler singing along 
Intervale Road in Canterbury, followed closely by a personal FFR (first for 
route) Osprey flying over downtown Franklin. Activity in general seemed higher 
than usual, with 686 individual birds tallied (a record). 


My second-ever Blackburnian and third-ever Canada Warblers were also 
noteworthy, and a total of FOUR Red-bellied Woodpeckers was a new record (only 
1 the other 5 times I've recorded this species). 


Pam Hunt
Penacook


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Subject: Canada Warblers, Canaan
From: jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 05:41:25 -0400
Yesterday I went up to Canaan to assist my former Plymouth State University 
professor, Dr. Len Reitsma, and one of his graduate students with his ongoing 
research on Canada Warblers. The goals for our work yesterday were to collect 
data from and band any unbanded birds we could capture as well as attach 
geolocators (devices to record what routes the birds take during migration) to 
several individuals. Though occasional bright sunlight and strong winds aren't 
the most favorable conditions, we still managed to capture 8 individuals, the 
majority of which were unbanded. Though a lot of work, it's still an amazing 
experience to work with birds, especially ones as beautiful as this species. 
The following link will bring you to a gallery of some photos I took throughout 
the day. 


https://flickr.com/photos/103784740 AT N03/sets/72157669175558932

-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Canterbury BBS route
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 01:27:10 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday morning (6/11), I did my Breeding Bird Survey route which starts in 
Canterbury and ends in Barnstead. It was cool but birds were active singing for 
the whole survey period. The 25 mile driving route starts at 4:34 am and ends 
around 9:00 with 3 minute stops every half mile to record the birds. I was 
joined by Zeke Cornell (driver) and Pat Myers (recorder). 


Highlights included:
Red-shouldered Hawk, a first for me on the route (Baptist Rd., Canterbury)
Louisiana Waterthrush, a first on this route (Old Tilton Rd., Canterbury)
Yellow-throated Vireo (Hatch Rd., Barnstead)
Barred Owl

Alas, none of the cuckoos which George and Andrea had on their route.

Becky Suomala, Chichester

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Subject: Pickering Ponds - Orchard Oriole and Virginia Rail
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 01:09:09 +0000 (UTC)
A late morning visit to Pickering Ponds in Rochester turned up 51 species which 
was nice for a windy day starting at 10:30. 

Highlights:
Virginia Rail 1, called after a Green Heron squawked
Green Heron 3
Orchard Oriole 1 immature male
Willow Flycatcher 2
Least Flycatcher 2 calling away on the same dead end spur trail as the rail
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4, same trail as rail
4 species of swallows (no Cliff)
Loads of Wood Duck females with young broods

Becky Suomala, Chichester
Zeke Cornell, Bow 

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Subject: hairies and falcons
From: Evelyn Nathan <evynathan AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 16:59:35 -0400
I have been watching a hairy woodpecker feed its child at my suet daily. Very 
cute. A friend saw a redstart in Kingston yesterday. 

Also, in case you haven’t been a follower of the Manchester Peregrine family, 
all 4 babies have now fledged, the last 2 left today, but one, a female we call 
Pistachio, was also injured today and taken to Wings of the Dawn. 

Evy Nathan, Kingston

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Subject: barn swallows
From: Sylvia Miskoe <sylviasmiskoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 16:43:27 -0400
/the swallows have been chattering up a storm.  It is hard to count nests
but today I noticed broken egg shells under 4 nests.  There are other
active nests but I can't get to the piles to see if there are eggs yet.
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord

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Subject: Bicknell's Thrush
From: Anne Daugherty <rbeamd01 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 06:26:09 -0400
Yesterday while hiking the Hancocks off the Kancamagus Hwy we heard and spotted 
Bicknell's Thrush. We were at approx. 4200 ft elevation on the Hancock Loop 
trail. Bird sang repeatedly and then came close to trail where we clearly saw 
his silhouette and observed him sing. Heard another Bicknell's off to the right 
but no visual. 

Anne Daugherty, Newmarket

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