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Updated on Monday, May 30 at 10:54 AM EST
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Sickle-billed Vanga,©BirdQuest

30 May Capital Chpt. FT - Merrimack River-Canterbury [Stephanie Parkinson ]
30 May 2 Pacific Loons right now at Little Boars Head [Steve Mirick ]
30 May Airport Marsh and Cannon Mt. [Rebecca ]
29 May Bobolinks and redstart, Durham ["'Molly Jacobson' via NHBirds" ]
29 May Re: NH Coast (Sooty Shearwater, Tricolored Heron) [Steve Mirick ]
29 May NH Coast (Sooty Shearwater, Tricolored Heron) [Steve Mirick ]
29 May NH Audubon Pelagic Birding Trip CANCELED [Jon Woolf ]
29 May Birding Old Cherry Mountain Road in the White Mountains - in new issue of NH Bird Records ["K. Barnes" ]
29 May Migrants in Hampton [Steve Mirick ]
29 May hinsdale coot [Hector Galbraith ]
29 May Mourning Warbler, Durham ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]
28 May 05-26-16 More images of a 4th Year BAEA from Maine. [David Lipsy ]
28 May Concord birding, Vesper Sparrow/Orchard Oriole & more []
29 May Coast highlights [Rebecca ]
28 May 5 Mississippi Kites in Newmarket! [Steve Mirick ]
28 May Big Day - 158 Species (Blue Grosbeak, Parasitic Jaeger, BL Kittiwake, Common Gallinule, etc.) [Steve Mirick ]
27 May Alewife Run - Oyster River, Warren Maine - Bald Eagle Images!! [David Lipsy ]
27 May coast quiet-few highlights [Dorothy Currier ]
27 May Jefferson Notch Road is Open 27 May 2016 [David Govatski Gmail ]
27 May Horseshoe Pond Merrimack, wood duck chicks ["'Molly Jacobson' via NHBirds" ]
27 May Hoodie Outwits Barred Owl [Alfred Maley ]
27 May cerulean warbler, Durham ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]
27 May Whip-poor-will [Larry Dole ]
26 May POSSIBLE Black-backed Woodpecker, Newport []
26 May Collared Dove - NO [Steve Mirick ]
26 May Scarlet Tanager Pic ["chris gagnon" ]
26 May Odiorne Point State Park, Rye -- May 26, 2016 [Steve Mirick ]
26 May Canada warbler [Jacob Hoag ]
26 May 15 Warbler species at Odiorne [Steve Mirick ]
26 May Collared Dove - NO [Steve Mirick ]
26 May Black Vulture 101 near Depot Rd, Candia [Susan Wrisley ]
25 May GRASSHOPPER SPARROW Today at Concord Airport on SW fence. (Photos) [David Lipsy ]
25 May Eurasian Collared-Dove in East Kingston - YES [Steve Mirick ]
25 May Perfect day for Pondicherry? Accipiter attack? [Jeanne-Marie Maher ]
26 May Tennessee’s, Blackpoll - 9 warbler species today Keene ["'Wendy Ward' via NHBirds" ]
25 May Eurasian collared Dove in East Kingston [Steve Mirick ]
25 May 2016 Olive-sided Flycatcher surveys - volunteers needed [Pamela Hunt ]
25 May Jefferson Notch Road Still Closed as of 25 May 2016 [David Govatski Gmail ]
25 May Purple Martins in Seabrook [DENNIS ]
25 May Concord-Birch St gardens 6-8 AM [Dorothy Currier ]
25 May Concord Airport [Pamela Hunt ]
25 May Hummingbird courtship behavior ["Dana Duxbury-Fox" ]
25 May 05-23-16 Blackburnian and a few more at St. Patrick's Church in Hampton, NH (Photo's) [David Lipsy ]
24 May birding west of Crawford Notch; Red Crossbills & Yellow-bellied Flycatcher [Charlie Nims ]
24 May probable Arctic Terns, Hampton Harbor ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]
24 May Common Gallinule at Airport Marsh in Whitefield on 24 May 2016 [David Govatski Gmail ]
24 May Tim Gallagher to Keynote LL Bean / Maine Audubon Birding Festival [CK Borg ]
24 May Vortex Scope & Vortex/Manfrotto Tripod For Sale [Sue McGrath ]
24 May Birds around Keene [Joshua Jarvis ]
23 May Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, May 23, 2016 ["Mark Suomala" ]
23 May Breeding Merlins in Tilton [Iain Macleod ]
23 May Lakes Region Purple Martins - Volunteers needed! [Pamela Hunt ]
23 May Mountain birds - Spruce Grouse, Fox Sparrows, Black-backed Woodpecker, Bicknell's, etc. [Adam Burnett ]
23 May Field Trip Saturday 5/28 - Powder Major's Farm & Forest - registration required [Lauren Kras ]
22 May Recent Birds [Joshua Jarvis ]
22 May Seacoast Audubon, Urban Forestry Field Trip [Jim Sparrell ]
22 May Yellow-throated Vireo in Ashland [Iain Macleod ]
22 May Orford and Lebanon Chimney Swift roosts. ["'Jeff MacQueen' via NHBirds" ]
22 May NH Coast (Jaeger, alcid, PACIFIC LOON, AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER) [Steve Mirick ]
22 May Star Island Report [eric masterson ]
22 May Human Powered Birdathon [Richard Frechette ]
22 May PHOTOS from the Third Week of May ["Jim Block" ]
22 May Whitefield - Common Gallinule, Green Heron [Joe Scott ]
22 May Birdathon report (long) - Statewide category, 148 species ["'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" ]
22 May "Bird Brains" Birdathon total-108 species [Dan Hubbard ]
22 May Orchard Orioles + nest - Concord []
22 May Pondicherry area [Charlie Nims ]
22 May waterfowl migration at Hinsdale [Hector Galbraith ]
22 May Lake Wantastiquet and Surry Mtn Lake for Birdathon - 81 species [Christian Martin ]
21 May Chuck-wills-widow star island [eric masterson ]
22 May photos from Rob's Walk ["J. Esten" ]
21 May Last chance for NH Audubon spring pelagic birding trip [Jon Woolf ]
21 May top this list! - Clough State Park []
21 May Sandhill Crane ["Kathy Dube" ]
21 May Hinsdale Bluffs crypto-cerulean [Hector Galbraith ]
21 May Whip-poor-will Survey/Evans-Parker Mt Strafford [Scott Young ]

Subject: Capital Chpt. FT - Merrimack River-Canterbury
From: Stephanie Parkinson <sparkinson AT sulloway.com>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 11:48:45 -0400
Field Trip: Merrimack River in Canterbury
Saturday, June 4, 7-9:30 AM
Join Pam Hunt to explore a couple of locations along the Merrimack River in 
Canterbury: the Riverlands Conservation Area and Brookford Farm (former sod 
farm). Meet at the Hannah Dustin Park-n-Ride off Exit 17 of I-93. 

Contact Pam Hunt at 753-9137 or 
biodiva AT myfairpoint.net. 




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Subject: 2 Pacific Loons right now at Little Boars Head
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 10:26:10 -0400
Amazing!  Both in breeding plumage.

Steve Mirick
Bradford MA


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Subject: Airport Marsh and Cannon Mt.
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 30 May 2016 13:21:02 +0000 (UTC)
Yesterday (5/29) we took the 9:15 tram up Cannon Mountain and birded Airport 
Marsh before and after. Unlike the southern part of the state, it was sunny and 
warm north of the mountains but there was a fog cap on Cannon that obscured any 
views. Here are the highlights. 


Cannon Mt.
Bicknell's Thrush at least 3, probably 4-5 doing "veer" calls along the rim 
trail 

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher at least 2 calling down slope from the overlook along 
the rim trail 

Blackpoll Warbler 14, including quite a few heard calling from the tram car 
ride 

Winter Wren 4 singing constantly from the overlook 
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Magnolia Warbler, only 2
Blackburnian Warbler pair at the parking lot

Airport Marsh, Whitefield
Black-billed Cuckoo 1 (thanks to Michael and Harold, Manchester birders who we 
encounter at Pondicherry every spring!) 

American Bittern 1
Alder Flycatcher 3
Blackpoll Warbler 1
Bobolinks singing like crazy
We did not se the Common Gallinule but thought we heard it calling although we 
could not locate it. 


Becky Suomala, Chichester
Zeke Cornell, Bow

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Subject: Bobolinks and redstart, Durham
From: "'Molly Jacobson' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 23:56:41 +0000 (UTC)
Despite the less than enjoyable weather, I managed to get out and explore some 
birding places. Moore Fields was mostly quiet but had four singing male 
bobolinks (probably more I couldn't see, but those let me get a good look at 
them). Oyster River Landing had a pileated woodpecker and a male redstart in 
the shrubby area by the parking lot. I saw something flitting about in the 
undergrowth and stood there patiently until it came out- worth it! Redstarts 
are not a common find for me. Also had a single female cowbird and chimney 
swift there. -Molly Jacobson 


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Subject: Re: NH Coast (Sooty Shearwater, Tricolored Heron)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 19:34:43 -0400
Forgot to mention that the Tricolored Heron was found by Jason Lambert and 
Katrina Fenton.

Steve Mirick
Bradford MA


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Subject: NH Coast (Sooty Shearwater, Tricolored Heron)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 19:30:08 -0400
Jane and I poked around today.  A remarkable weather change from 
yesterday (sunny and high near 94!) and today (Mist, NE winds, 54F!)!!!!

The Church Street parking lot area continues to amaze.  Despite very few 
migrants at Odiorne, this small (tiny) patch had a great variety and 
number of migrants!  Too bad, they cut back much of the lower shrubs on 
the parking lot side.  Despite the cold weather, the insect activity is 
very evident with lots of Barn Swallows coursing the Spruce trees.

Other highlights for the coast included 10 species which we did not 
record on our Big Day two days ago!

Including:

Northern Gannet - 1 flying north through fog at Little Boar's Head.
Red-necked Grebe - 1 off Seal Rocks
SOOTY SHEARWATER - 1 swimming in water in rocks north of Science Center 
and south of Frost Point.  Often times within 2 or 3 feet of rocks and 
swimming with cormorants and eiders!  Appears likely this bird is 
sick/oiled.  Possibly the same bird seen last Monday on a boat just 
outside of Rye harbor?
TRICOLORED HERON - 1 on north side of Wooden Bridge at Odiorne.  On sand 
bar near parking area and also on opposite shore of creek.
Ruddy Turnstone - 1 near Wooden Bridge in Rye.

A few photos from today:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: NH Audubon Pelagic Birding Trip CANCELED
From: Jon Woolf <jsw AT jwoolfden.com>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 12:48:50 -0400
Listfolk,

I greatly regret to have to announce that the NH Audubon Pelagic 
Birding Trip scheduled for tomorrow HAS BEEN CANCELED due to forecast 
bad weather offshore: high seas, rain, and a chance of thunderstorms.

If you have signed up for the trip, then please email me at 
jsw AT jwoolfden.com ASAP to confirm that you've seen this notice.

Again, I regret the necessity, but the weather is simply too bad.  I 
hope for better luck with our fall trip.

-- Jon Woolf

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Subject: Birding Old Cherry Mountain Road in the White Mountains - in new issue of NH Bird Records
From: "K. Barnes" <kb AT ecrane.com>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 10:46:29 -0400
Find out about the warblers of Old Cherry Mountain Road and the birding
there in an article by Charlie Nims at the new issue of New Hampshire Bird
Records

 

.

Remember last spring with the LeConte’s Sparrow?

Also in the Spring 2015 issue of New Hampshire Bird Records are articles on
how to count birds, bluebird mortality early last spring, Osprey satellite
tagging, and aging Herring Gulls by plumage, plus the usual features –
Photo Quiz, Season Summary of bird highlights, Field Trip Reports, and
Field Notes of fascinating bird observations including the “Black Swallows”
of Nashua!

Visit the website for more . For subscription
information, click here

, 

or go directly to the online subscription page

 

.

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Subject: Migrants in Hampton
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 09:57:52 -0400
Nice numbers of birds on coast.   We tallied the following migrant birds in 
about 1 hour.

Steve and Jane Mirick

Church St. water tower parking lot, Hampton
May 29, 2016
9:07 AM
Incidental
All birds reported? No
Comments:
Nice fallout of migrant birds despite gloomy, foggy skies with strong NE 
winds. Mostly immature male and female birds.
Submitted from eBird Android 1.2.1

1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
1 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
1 Alder Flycatcher
2 Red-eyed Vireo
30 Cedar Waxwing
6 Common Yellowthroat
4 American Redstart
1 Northern Parula
4 Magnolia Warbler
1 Blackburnian Warbler
2 Yellow Warbler
3 Blackpoll Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler
1 Canada Warbler
2 Wilson's Warbler
1 Lincoln's Sparrow
1 Baltimore Oriole

Number of Taxa: 18

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Subject: hinsdale coot
From: Hector Galbraith <hg2 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 09:22:46 -0400
Not much at Hinsdale Setbacks this am except for a single coot - pretty unusual 
for this time of year. 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
hg2 AT myfairpoint.net 
802 258 4836




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Subject: Mourning Warbler, Durham
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 11:33:27 +0000
Birders,

I was lamenting how quiet the neighborhood was this morning, just about 7 
(Tigger disagreed, saying that it smelled great), when I heard a faint song 
from behind the Port-a-potty at the Fogg Dr. playing fields. A shy, even by its 
species' standards, Mourning Warbler sang quietly 4-5 times and provided brief 
glimpses of the grey head and olive back. When I got too close, it clammed up, 
so the last time I heard it sing was from about 25 feet away. 



Last night I explored various places where Whip-poor-wills would seem plausible 
in Lee and Durham, based on my own guesses and eBird data, but I got skunked. 
If anyone has reliable places in the greater Durham area, I'd be obliged to 
learn about them. 



Kurk Dorsey

Durham

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Subject: 05-26-16 More images of a 4th Year BAEA from Maine.
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 23:26:33 -0400
Hello Fellow Birders,

This Bald Eagle had been observing us for hours… and then it decided to fly 
to the other side of the river. I was lucky to be in the lens on this bird when 
it took off. It happened so fast that I was only able to get off a few images 
before it was gone. Unfortunately for the others there, they were all getting 
ready to pack it in, as we were loosing light, and clouds were moving in. 


Next up: sifting thru the many images of fishing Ospreys...
Last Monday’s trip to Star Island…
And more...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/albums/72157669025440705



David Lipsy
Eagle Eye Photography
Concord, NH
Email: dlipsy AT comcast.net Website: 
http://davidlipsy.zenfolio.com/  

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/ 
 

Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/eagleeyephoto/portfolio 
 

Google+ : google.com/+DavidLipsyEagleEyePhotography 
 

ViewBug: http://www.viewbug.com/member/davidlipsy 
 














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Subject: Concord birding, Vesper Sparrow/Orchard Oriole & more
From: jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 21:36:39 -0400
This morning I had a few hours to get out to do some birding so I went to 
Concord to nab a few species I haven't seen yet this year. I first went to the 
airport in hopes of a Vesper Sparrow. I began by walking the fence along 
Airport Road. There were plenty of Prairie Warblers and Field Sparrows and I 
was able to find three separate singing GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS. 

https://flic.kr/p/HvcfQZ

Unfortunately, no Vesper here, so I moved on towards the Karner Blue Easement 
where I saw one last year. However, while slowly driving on Regional Drive, I 
heard the song of a VESPER SPARROW right outside my car window. I pulled over 
and found the bird singing along the fence where I was able to get some photos. 

https://flic.kr/p/HsNcbo
https://flic.kr/p/HsNcbU

Since finding the Vesper so quickly saved me so much time, I decided to go to 
Horseshoe Pond and hopefully get an Orchard Oriole (which I frustratingly 
missed in my trip to Connecticut last week where they are much more common). 
With limited time I huffed down to the tracks to the reported nest site, nearly 
killing myself in the heat. Despite an extensive search I came up empty handed 
and had to return to Commercial Street in defeat. However, as luck would have 
it, while I was photographing a Willow Flycatcher near the railroad bridge by 
Commercial St, a bird flew into a maple above my head and began letting out the 
"chitt" calls of an ORCHARD ORIOLE. I tried to get a photo but it flew off just 
before I could and moved towards Commercial St. I could see it well in flight 
and it was a first year male. 


Other notes from Horseshoe Pond include 4 Willow Flycatchers and 0 Alders. A 
complete 180 from what I usually find there. Most trips include much more 
Alders if any Willows. 

I also had a singing BLACKPOLL WARBLER along the tracks just south of the 
prison fields. 


Later in the day I tackled the heat again and explored a more local airport, 
Parlin Airfield in Newport. I was hoping for an exciting grassland species, but 
I couldn't turn up anything out of this world. There were a few takeaways, 
however. 

There were at least two Killdeer families. Two adults and three chicks were in 
the grass right by the parking lot. I was able to find another adult and chick 
with my scope much further down the runway. 

I also had a peculiar BARRED OWL that was hooting away across the runway 
starting at 5:29pm. 

Finally, I barely caught an AMERICAN BITTERN flying over making its way east. I 
couldn't help but see the eerie similarity to Pam Hunt's Bittern-flyover at the 
Concord Airport the other day. 


Other non-avian notable sights include:

As I was walking back towards Commercial Street from the Orchard Oriole nesting 
area, I came up on two birders looking at something on the tracks. As I got 
close they alerted me to what they were looking at. Interestingly enough there 
was a large Gartersnake and a Painted Turtle staring watch other down in the 
middle of the tracks. The snake eventually slithered under the tracks and I 
decided to help the turtle get out from between the rails. 

https://flic.kr/p/HyqKmY

On my way home I spotted a WOOD TURTLE (only my second ever) attempting to 
cross Route 103 in Newbury. I happily pulled over and helped it across. 

https://flic.kr/p/Hcy8Ew
https://flic.kr/p/GGh3qc

-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee



Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Coast highlights
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 29 May 2016 00:17:37 +0000 (UTC)
A few highlights from the coast today. We started out walking Odiorne which was 
quiet compared to the past couple of days, and then did a brief drive down the 
coast before the traffic got bad (almost made it). 


Odiorne Pt. State Park
Roseate Tern - at least 2 with a group of 50 Common Terns
Willow Flycatcher 1
Alder Flycatcher 2
Canada Warbler 2
Magnolia Warbler 4
Marsh Wren 1
Loads of Common Yellowthroats and American Redstarts.

Rt. 1A pools south of Odiorne
Semipalmated Plover 3
Semipalmated Sandpiper 22

Rt. 1A wooden bridge n. of Odiorne
Black-bellied Plover 22
Semipalmated Plover 5
Ruddy Turnstone 1
Blackpoll Warbler 1

Marsh behind Little Jack's, Hampton
Saltmarsh Sparrow 1
Willet 3

And as Steve mentioned, the 5 Mississippi Kites were pretty cool to see! The 
ice cream after helped too. :-) 


Becky Suomala, Chichester
Zeke Cornell, Bow

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Subject: 5 Mississippi Kites in Newmarket!
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 19:44:34 -0400
Jane and I met up with Becky Suomala, Zeke Cornell and Steve Bennett at 
the Piscassic Street territory in Newmarket today in mid-afternoon.  
Near the parking area for the boat ramp.  We spent a bit of time talking 
and catching up and watching for the kites.  The kites were busy hunting 
today with the HOT weather.  At one time we had at least 5 kites over 
our heads at once with 4 high up in the clouds hunting and one low over 
the tree tops.  We may have actually had 6!  One kite flew in and landed 
in a nearby tree with some food in its mouth, but didn't stay long.  
Mostly there was just a lot of high flying and feeding.  There is a nest 
in a tree over a nearby parking lot which I "think" is the active nest 
being built.

As far as I know, there have been no reports from the other two nest 
locations off Gonet Drive and Hutchins Road, but they should start 
getting active with nest building and incubation very soon.

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, A

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Subject: Big Day - 158 Species (Blue Grosbeak, Parasitic Jaeger, BL Kittiwake, Common Gallinule, etc.)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 28 May 2016 17:41:09 -0400
Jane and I attempted a "Big Day" yesterday where we tried to locate as 
many species of birds (by sight or sound) as we could in a single day.  
We started the day at about 2:00 AM in Jefferson, NH and ended the day 
at 9:00 PM in Kensington, NH.   We ended the day with 158 species.  This 
total is excellent for us, and my 4th highest ever, and my 2nd highest 
count with Jane since we got 164 species on 5/24/09.  My highest counts 
for this northern route (pioneered by Pam Hunt) are 170 on 5/28/97, 164 
on 5/23/09, 163 on 5/24/96.  I've been doing these May Big Days, 
sometimes two a year for over 25 years!

An interesting day in many respects.  Usually the most successful big 
days with highest counts relate to "not missing any common birds".  For 
this day, we missed a lot of common birds, but got several rarities.  
Including 5 NEW SPECIES that I have never recorded (in over 25 years) on 
a May Big Day including Northern Shoveler, Parasitic Jaeger, 
Black-legged Kittiwake, Blue Grosbeak, and Palm Warbler.  All but the 
Palm Warbler were total surprises, and these all came within a span of 
about 1 hour in the mid to late afternoon along the seacoast.

In addition, we made a big deviation in our planned route, when we heard 
of the Cerulean Warbler in Durham....which we missed anyway! So we 
failed to visit the Pawtuckaway State Park and the Exeter Wastewater 
Treatment plant.  It is a rare day when we skip these two locations on a 
Big Day!  I don't think it hurt us too much, however.

The weather was also a rollercoast, but generally nice.  Variable skies 
for the day.  Started at 2:00 AM up north with a very mild temperature 
of 66F, then it dropped over the next hour or two to 62F when some brief 
showers moved through.  Then it climbed to a high of 76F with some sun 
further south.  But then dropped back down to about 62F on the seacoast 
with the moderate seabreeze.  This cool seabreeze brought some light to 
moderate fog late in the day. Caused us to miss a few birds, but also 
may have contributed to our getting two rare pelagic species.

Visiting (in chronological order).....Whipple Road in Jefferson - Hazen 
Road in Jefferson/Whitefield - Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge, hiking into 
Big Cherry and Little Cherry - Airport Marsh and Mount Washington 
Airport - Trudeau Road in Bethlehem (Left the north country at 9:00 AM) 
- Concord Airport - Durham area - Newmarket Area - NH Coast from south 
to north, all 18 miles - Pease Tradeport from McIntyre Road and Short 
Street - Surrey Lane Marsh in Durham.

Total steps according to Fitbit - About 27,000.

Complete List
-------------------
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
American Black Duck - Only 2 for the day.  In salt marsh in Rye.
Mallard
NORTHERN SHOVELER - MY FIRST MAY BIG DAY RECORD.  Late pair on Meadow 
Pond.  Interesting as there is a continuing bird in Exeter as well.  
Used to be a rare sighting to see this species in New Hampshire at any 
time of the year.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/27029701500/in/dateposted-public/
Common Eider - LOTS of young babies along the coast right now in Rye.
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Hooded Merganser
Wild Turkey
Red-throated Loon - 1 flyby at Rye Ledge in Rye.
Common Loon
PIED-BILLED GREBE - 1 on Surrey Lane marsh in Durham.  WITH 2 TINY 
BABIES.  I think Kurk reported 3, but we could only discern 2 with our 
binoculars.
Double-crested Cormorant
American Bittern - 1 heard and seen at Moorhen Marsh at Pondicherry.
Great Blue Heron
Snowy Egret
Green Heron
Glossy Ibis - Flock of 7 continue in Massacre Marsh area of Rye.
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
MISSISSIPPI KITE - Luckily we got one in Newmarket.  We stopped to get a 
latte at the drive-through on Dame Road and saw one soaring over the 
parking area!  We continued to Piscassic and Hutchins, but couldn't find 
any there.
Bald Eagle - At least one chick on nest in New Castle.
Northern Harrier - 1 female over Whitefield Airport.
Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1 apparently on territory near Little Cherry Pond.
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Merlin - 1 teed up nicely in snag along airport access road at 
Whitefield Airport.  Didn't need to chase Ian's birds in Tilton!
Virginia Rail
Sora - 1 at Surrey Lane marsh in Durham.  My first here in several years.
COMMON GALLINULE - 1.  Bird found by Katie and Jim continues at Airport 
Marsh in Whitefield.  Took us a lot of precious time to find it, however!
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Upland Sandpiper - 1 at Pease
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper - 2 nice breeding plumage adults across from 
Wallis Sands Beach.  Beautiful in breeding plumage.
Purple Sandpiper - A few from at least 2 or 3 locations on coast.
Wilson's Snipe - Winnowing up north.
American Woodcock - 2 displaying along trail to Big Cherry at dawn.
BLACK-LEGGED KITTWAKE - MY FIRST MAY BIG DAY RECORD.  1 immature (1st 
cycle) bird first seen off Pulpit Rocks heading north.  Then, 
surprisingly, we found the (presumed) same bird with feeding flock of 
Common Terns from Great Island Common in New Castle.  A rare sighting 
for date and from shore.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/27304935475/in/dateposted-public/
Bonaparte's Gull
Laughing Gull - Four adults in Hampton harbor inlet.  First of year for 
us..and apparently the first report for NH this year?!?
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Roseate Tern - A few from Hampton area, and also up in New Castle.
Common Tern
PARASITIC JAEGER - MY FIRST MAY BIG DAY RECORD.  Fantastic adult or near 
adult bird just offshore inside of fog at Concord Point.  Made a pass 
briefly at the guillemot, and then continued northward. Excellent views 
from (relatively) very close range.  Easily seeing central tail spikes.
BLACK GUILLEMOT - One off Concord Point sitting in water.
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Cuckoo sp. - 1 before dawn near Whipple Road in Jefferson.
Northern Saw-whet Owl - 1 off Whipple Road in Jefferson.
Common Nighthawk - 1 at dusk at Surrey Lane marsh in Durham.
Eastern Whip-poor-will - 1 calling before dawn near Whitefield Airport.
Chimney Swift
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker - At least 6 for the day.
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - 1 singing at Trudeau Road bogs.
Alder Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Blue-headed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Purple Martin - Lots in Seabrook.
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow - A few over nesting location at Route 4 bridge near Cedar 
Point.
Barn Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
House Wren
Winter Wren
Marsh Wren - One or two at Pondicherry at Moorhen Marsh.  Also two at 
Surrey Lane marsh.
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Jane only at Kurk's house in Durham.
Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1 at Trudeau Road.
Eastern Bluebird - Almost missed this, but the nesting birds at Odiorne 
Point State Park (north parking lot) pulled through late in the day!
Veery
Swainson's Thrush - One at Trudeau Road.  Only one for the day.
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Blue-winged Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler - 1 on trail to Little Cherry.
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
PALM WARBLER - MY FIRST MAY BIG DAY RECORD.  1 singing on territory at 
Little Cherry Pond.  Not a big surprise as they've been expanding there 
nesting range southward, and, I believe, have nested here for several 
years.  But it's the first time I've gotten one on a Big Day.
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler - Lots up at Pondicherry.
Wilson's Warbler - 1 off Worthely Ave. in Seabrook.  Only one for day.
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow - 2 at Concord Airport.
Saltmarsh Sparrow - 1 at Philbrick Marsh.  Walked around in the marsh, 
but only had this single bird.  No Nelson's seen or heard.
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco - 1 at Trudeau Road.  Steve only.
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
BLUE GROSBEAK - MY FIRST MAY BIG DAY RECORD.  1 female off Worthely Ave. 
in Seabrook near water crossing.  STUNNING, but very brief views of bird 
perched, unobstructed, in great lighting about 30 feet from the car.  
Jane found it and identified it, and I got on it to conclusively 
(without a doubt) ID it.  But when I turned to get my camera, the bird 
disappeared.  We spent about 20 minutes trying to find it again, but no 
luck.  We searched again this morning with no luck.
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
RUSTY BLACKBIRD - 2, apparently a pair on territory, near trail to 
Little Cherry.  Thanks to Dave G. for this tip!
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole - 1 immature male continuing off Worthely Ave. in Seabrook.
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Pine Siskin - 1 at Pondicherry.
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

And the infamous list of birds "that got away" or would have been 
reasonably possible

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Mute Swan - There have been a few on Great Bay, but we couldn't find 
them.  The local population has plummeted in recent years.  This is a 
good thing.
Greater Scaup - One has been lingering on Great Bay, but we couldn't 
find it.
Surf Scoter - Fog hurt us on coast.
Long-tailed Duck - Fog hurt us on coast.
Common Merganser - None for us up north.
Red-breasted Merganser - Fog hurt us on coast.
Ruffed Grouse - Disappointingly NONE heard at Pondicherry.  Haven't had 
any this year.
Red-necked Grebe - Tough to miss as there had been a few around 
including a cooperative one at Odiorne.
Great Egret - Scarce this spring on seacoast.
Black-crowned Night-Heron - Absent (?) this spring on seacoast? We've 
yet to get one this year.
Cooper's Hawk
American Kestrel
Solitary Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling - Scarce or absent this spring.  We've yet to get one this year.
Dunlin - Lots around recently, but the tide was wrong and I have no idea 
where they are roosting.
Short-billed Dowitcher - A few around lately.
Least Tern - I chose to skip Hampton Beach with the growing crowds in 
the afternoon, hoping to get it at Meadow Pond, but no luck.
Eastern Screech-Owl - Didn't try late in day.
Great Horned Owl - No luck in predawn
Barred Owl - No luck in predawn
Hairy Woodpecker - This is now the hardest of the woodpeckers to get as 
Red-bellys are everywhere.
Black-backed Woodpecker - None heard or seen near Little Cherry Pond or 
Trudeau Road.
Willow Flycatcher - We skipped Exeter WTP.  Could have gotten it there!
Yellow-throated Vireo - Usually get this at Pawtuckaway, but we skipped 
this area.
Fish Crow - TONS around lately, but no luck when you need them!  :-)
Carolina Wren - Why do they always disappear when you need to find them!
Brown Thrasher
Cerulean Warbler - Stopped at Kurk Dorsey's house to look for his bird.  
But just in time for his neighbor to start mowing his lawn!^# AT ^! :-(
Vesper Sparrow - Hoped for one at Concord Airport or at Pease.  No luck.
Lincoln's Sparrow

Other sightings of interest
-----------------------------------
Black Bear - One along trail to Big Cherry pond.  Took off when it saw us.
Coyote - Nice looking animal on rock out on Little Cherry Pond.
Snowshoe Hare - One with white feet at Whitefield Airport.
White-tailed Deer - Two in Durham.

Spring Peeper
Gray Tree Frog - DEAFENING chorus after dark from Surrey Lane Marsh and 
from Kimball Road in Kensington.
American Toad
Green Frog
Bull Frog
Mink Frog - A few calling at Airport Marsh

Fireflys - Several up north pre-dawn and more after dark in Kensington.  
Seems early, but with the mild weather....

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Alewife Run - Oyster River, Warren Maine - Bald Eagle Images!!
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 23:38:38 -0400
Hello Birders!

Sometimes I take a photograph, and when I look at it on the computer, I say to 
myself... did I really take this?! 

Such is the case of this series set of a 4th year Bald Eagle.

Since my first time photographing a Bald Eagle in the wild, I have always 
dreamed of getting a series of images that shows an Eagle coming in, grabbing a 
fish from the water and continuing onward. It's been years in the making, but 
finally I managed to capture one! 


Susan Wrisley, Steve Bennet and myself jumped into my truck and headed up to 
Warren Maine where the Alewife are running. There is an area here where the 
state blocks the river and regulates the flow of the fish for various reasons. 
Because of this back up of fish, Bald Eagles and Osprey come to feed. We only 
saw 5 bald Eagles on the day, however, there was a large number of Osprey. 


Images of Osprey are forth coming, and maybe a few more of this Bald Eagle.

Please be sure to view these full sized... they truly are spectacular (well, 
they are to me 😊 ). 


If you click thru the set fast the first time, up to the image of the bird 
eating the fish in a tree, you can watch this beautifully graceful creature in 
action. 


Thank you for viewing these images.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.
Sincerely,
David


https://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/albums/72157668618303381/with/27297441605/ 



David Lipsy
Eagle Eye Photography
Concord, NH
Email: dlipsy AT comcast.net Website: 
http://davidlipsy.zenfolio.com/  

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/ 
 

Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/eagleeyephoto/portfolio 
 

Google+ : google.com/+DavidLipsyEagleEyePhotography 
 

ViewBug: http://www.viewbug.com/member/davidlipsy 
 














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Subject: coast quiet-few highlights
From: Dorothy Currier <dorocurr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 20:19:23 -0400
Beautiful cool day-breeze off the water.
Odiorne-swarming with children when I got back at 10 AM

north end:
Watched 30 cedar waxwings fly away and two stayed to do a little prenuptial
activity.  They each perched facing the same way and hopped one hop away
from each other, then back together and clasped beaks like they were
kissing.  They did this for about a minute, then copulated and flew off in
the direction of the others.

 2 great crested flycatchers perched in the open next to the rocks and flew
down to get insects from the (warmer) rocks.

1 kingbird sat on a  higher large rock and caught insects from the rocks
and wrack.  A pair doing the same at the south end.

flock ~20 of barn swallows flying around about 6 inches from the rocks.
Always nice to look down at swallows.

few chimney swifts

Only warblers seen were 1 blackburnian, american redstarts, black & whites,
C. yellowthroats

Eider ducklings, terns and cormorants in the harbor very active at almost
low tide.

4 snowy egrets in the pond NW of parking area at south end of Odiorne

Goss farm on Harbor Rd:
1 G C flycatcher, which was great because I hardly ever get to see these
guys.
Nothing in the marsh.

Eel pond-nothing-no swans, no gulls, nada

behind condos:
50 semipalmated sandpipers and ~ 10 SP plovers, few killdeer

Hampton Harbor near high tide-nothing

Exeter WTP
1 willow (fitz bew) flycatcher heard
1 male shoveler
mallard duckings
cormorants
few swallows
numerous killdeer

of course there's always bird song that I don't identify but not all that
much today-I think...

In my spare time I learned from Sibleys that chimney swifts are mostly in
the air because they can't perch.  They can only cling to a vertical
surface.  And as was mentioned by someone recently, they are related to
hummingbirds & have same wing structure.

The other factoid I hadn't noticed before is that the underside of female
goldfinches are white in the last half and female common yellowthroats are
yellow-in case your only view is looking up.

Stay cool.
Dot C

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Subject: Jefferson Notch Road is Open 27 May 2016
From: David Govatski Gmail <david.govatski AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 12:51:51 -0400
I contacted NH DOT on Friday afternoon and was told that the Jefferson Notch 
Road is now open. I do not know the condition of the Caps Ridge Trail yet. 


David Govatski  
Jefferson, NH


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Subject: Horseshoe Pond Merrimack, wood duck chicks
From: "'Molly Jacobson' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 16:19:37 +0000 (UTC)
I wanted to stop by the pond one more time before moving back up to Durham for 
the summer. I was able to make it in the morning(ish) aka 11am, for once, and 
it paid off! Birds I'd never seen there before - house wren, yellowthroat, 
red-eyed vireo, even a singing wood thrush, which surprised me as it was in a 
tiny patch of trees next to the neighborhood, same for the vireo. I would have 
expected those in the heavily wooded area far beyond the pond, but it was 
really cool to find new birds in a place I have been to so many times! In 
addition, I was finally able to catch the mother wood duck and she was toting a 
total of eight chicks through the marsh. Other birds included cedar waxwings, 
which I hadn't seen there in months, orioles, kingbirds, and the warbling vireo 
pair. Still no sign of any rose-breasted grosbeaks which I had last year, or 
the ruby-throated hummingbird.  

-Molly Jacobson(I look forward to having more time and the means to bird in the 
Durham/seacoast area this summer!) 


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Subject: Hoodie Outwits Barred Owl
From: Alfred Maley <alfredmaley AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 10:59:59 -0400
The yard is full of Barred Owls, with the four owlets fledged and flying
awkwardly well, but there are also nesting ducks trying to escape the owls
pillaging their ducklings. This morning the Hooded Merganser nesting in the
box on the artificial tree was looking to jump, but Mrs. Owl was less than
50 yards away. Mrs. Merganser studied the situation for a full half hour,
then finally, at 9:30 A.M. she started moving her bill with soft words of
encouragement and dropped from the nest box to the ground. In quick
succession, seven baby duckies followed. But nobody moved. Finally after
some tense seconds that seemed like minutes, the eighth and last duckie
appeared in the opening and jumped. They were off! With her crest held high
like a flag on Memorial Day, she raced around the edge of the lawn and
headed away from the owls - right into the street in front of the house. A
big Jeep stopped in time and they made it across, past some sleeping dogs
and finally around to a small wetland that is behind the houses across the
street. All that to avoid the direct route to the Sawmill Swamp (which is
less than a quarter mile away as the merganser flies,) but which is
infested with owl dangers.

Last year the Wood Duck nesting in the adjacent box wasn’t so clever. She
headed straight for the swamp and lost two ducklings to Mrs. Owl. Mrs.
Woodie is also now ready to jump, so we may get to see if she’s learned
anything from last year’s episode. I think mergansers are smarter than Wood
Ducks.

Al Maley, Hampstead

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Subject: cerulean warbler, Durham
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 14:56:35 +0000
Birders,

I was almost stunned to find three zebra-striped Pied-billed Grebe chicks with 
two adults right out in the open at the Surrey Land marsh in Durham this 
morning. 



Just now I saw a Cerulean Warbler in my yard along the street, 14 Fogg Dr 
Durham!!!! 



Kurk Dorsey

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Subject: Whip-poor-will
From: Larry Dole <larrydole AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 27 May 2016 07:53:43 -0400
Last night heard two Whip-poor-wills outside my house. Alton Mountain Rd in
Alton Bay! This is the fourth year in a row that I have heard them!

-- 
Larry Dole
566 Alton Mountain Rd
Alton Bay NH 03810
908-672-9804

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Subject: POSSIBLE Black-backed Woodpecker, Newport
From: jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 21:15:56 -0400
I'm not one to report an unconfirmed sighting, but this might be worth getting 
the word out. 

This evening while driving north on Unity Road in Newport, I had a woodpecker 
fly across and land on the side of a telephone pole right in front of me 
between Logging Road and Lorraine Street. I initially assumed Sapsucker, but a 
few features popped out. 

Most notably was the overall black color. Solid black back, wings also almost 
entirely black with only a little white patterning along the outer edge of the 
folded wing (the primary feathers). It also showed a white malar stripe on the 
face and was white underneath. The top of the head appeared all black which 
would suggest female if it was indeed a Black-backed. The size was right for 
Black-backed, somewhere between the size of a Hairy Woodpecker and a 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. 

Though my look was brief, I got a very good view for a solid 1-2 seconds. I 
turned around and tried fruitlessly using a playback to make it come into view. 
As I said before, I don't like to report possibilities, but what I saw was too 
convincing to ignore. The features on this bird were distinctly different than 
our usual woodpeckers. It might be worth keeping an eye on the area if there is 
anyone around is curious enough to try for it. This species would be an 
impressive find in this area. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee



Sent from my iPhone


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Collared Dove - NO
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 18:54:23 -0400
According to Davis Finch, there have been no sightings today of the dove 
despite a fair amount of coverage.

Steve Mirick
Bradford MA


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Subject: Scarlet Tanager Pic
From: "chris gagnon" <cgagnon AT sau53.org>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 17:22:02 -0400
This past week I got out to a trail that hugs the east side of Dubes pond off 
Whitehall Rd in Hooksett. I saw and was lucky enough to get a photo of a 
scarlet tanager. 

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/138601499 AT N02/27048339416/in/album-72157667444503882/ 

 
Yesterday, with a field trip at school, I took 50 5th and 6th graders through 
the Flume Gorge. Despite the noise from my students, I was able to spot a 
black-throated green warbler and a blackburnian. I heard many other warblers 
but I am not good enough to distinguish one from the next. 

 
-chris gagnon
Hooksett, NH

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Subject: Odiorne Point State Park, Rye -- May 26, 2016
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 14:10:01 -0400
Odiorne Point State Park, Rye
May 26, 2016

Mid afternoon walk around entire park.  Excellent fallout with my highest 
counts ever for park for  swainsons thrushes and Canada Warblers.

1 Red-necked Grebe continuing
6 Spotted Sandpiper
2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
1 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
4 Least Flycatcher
4 Eastern Kingbird
1 Blue-headed Vireo
1 Philadelphia Vireo
12 Red-eyed Vireo
1 House Wren
4 Veery
28 Swainson's Thrush
3 Ovenbird
8 Black-and-white Warbler
25 Common Yellowthroat
36 American Redstart
5 Northern Parula
12 Magnolia Warbler
1 Bay-breasted Warbler
3 Blackburnian Warbler
12 Yellow Warbler
5 Chestnut-sided Warbler
3 Blackpoll Warbler
3 Black-throated Blue Warbler
1 Pine Warbler
9 Black-throated Green Warbler
18 Canada Warbler
4 Wilson's Warbler
1 Lincoln's Sparrow
2 Swamp Sparrow
1 Baltimore Oriole

Steve and Jane Mirick
Bradford MA

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Subject: Canada warbler
From: Jacob Hoag <ryelobsterman AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 12:00:46 -0400
Canada warbler at rays seafood in rye along with Red start. 

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Subject: 15 Warbler species at Odiorne
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 11:21:20 -0400
Things are hopping along the seacoast.

Steve Mirick


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Subject: Collared Dove - NO
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 08:44:43 -0400
Despite several people searching, the dove has not been reported as of 8:15 am.

Steve Mirick


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Subject: Black Vulture 101 near Depot Rd, Candia
From: Susan Wrisley <swrisley13 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 08:13:08 -0400
A Black Vulture flew over us on route 101 in Candida near Depot Road.  It
was flying low - got a great look at it through the windows and sunroof.
White wing-tips with a squared off look really stood out.

Susan Wrisley, Hollis
David Lipsy, Concord

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Subject: GRASSHOPPER SPARROW Today at Concord Airport on SW fence. (Photos)
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 22:11:41 -0400
Hello Birders,

Today Susan Wrisley and I birded the strip of land adjacent to the Southwest 
fence of Concord Airport in Concord, NH. 

At one point, Susan said “Look at that bird on the fence”! and started 
photographing it. I looked and could not see it… thinking it was on top of 
the fence. Unfortunately, it was in the middle of the chain link fence. It was 
looking out towards us when Susan saw it, me, I only got rearward images… but 
they are enough, combined with Susan’s, to make out this lifer for us both. 


Here are links to both of our images.

Susan’s images
https://www.flickr.com/photos/127183139 AT N08/sets/72157666356206174 
 



My images
https://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/albums/72157668510422172 
 



Concord Airport, Merrimack, New Hampshire, US
May 25, 2016 10:20 AM - 12:20 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments: Sunny and very warm. Walked along the SW fence line near the south 
end of the runway. 

16 species

Red-tailed Hawk  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Red-eyed Vireo  3
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  3
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  4
Gray Catbird  2
Cedar Waxwing  4
Prairie Warbler  6
Grasshopper Sparrow 1 This sparrow sat on the fence and gave us nice views. The 
large eye and eye-ring got my attention as well at the buffy chest and striped 
head, with white down the middle. 

Chipping Sparrow  3
Field Sparrow  3
Savannah Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  2
Northern Cardinal  4

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29911588 
 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org 
) 




Good birding,
David Lipsy - Concord, NH
Susan Wrisley - Hollis, NH














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Subject: Eurasian Collared-Dove in East Kingston - YES
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 20:46:45 -0400
The dove continued to be seen and heard until at least about 8 PM in the 
vicinity of 64 South Road.  It apparently was seen coming to some seed 
in the front lawn at this address, but was also seen on the wires and in 
the pine trees on both sides of the road.  If/when accepted, it will be 
yet ANOTHER FIRST STATE RECORD.  Joining Tufted Duck, Mountain Bluebird, 
and Redwing this year.  The Eurasian Collared-Dove has exploded its 
range in the United States over the last 30 years from Florida and now 
throughout much of the United States except for the northeast.

If you go for this bird, please note:

1) This is a VERY busy road so be careful where you park.  There's not a 
lot of room on the shoulder of the road.

2) The people at 64 South Road have not been contacted, but the people 
across the street have been and seem OK.  Just use common sense and 
don't go on any lawns without gaining permission.

Listen for the distinct call.

Photo:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/26647231443/in/dateposted-public/lightbox/ 


Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Perfect day for Pondicherry? Accipiter attack?
From: Jeanne-Marie Maher <jeannemariemaher AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 20:41:09 -0400
Got up before dawn to drive north to Pondicherry, very foggy along the way so 
wasn’t surprised to find the same at the Whitefield Airport Marsh. 

First bird I focused on was the Gallinule, seen through the fog. Bobolinks, 
yellow warblers, Common yellowthroats were all singing away, when right next to 
me there came the very distinctive sound of a Nelson’s Sparrow. (yes my 
hearing is bad but I was wearing my hearing aids and it sounded like it was on 
my shoulder). I looked around to try to find the bird unsuccessfully, another 
call, then a third before I thought to try a playback. I did get a response and 
the song was identical to the Sibley app (MN). I grabbed my phone to try to 
record but was not able to capture it. 


Onto to Pondicherry, where there were many songbirds, but most hidden high into 
trees. (Was hesitant to call Tennessee with all the Nashvilles singing), Black 
and white, Common Yellowthroats, Northern Parula, Yellowrump warblers, Black 
throated blue, Chestnuts, Blackburnians, along the way. Many with clipped short 
songs which left me wondering. 

Along the flooded dike/bike path were Alder Flycatchers, and one lone Pipit 
wandering down the soggy trail. 


Onto Little Cherry where the big event occurred. Shortly after I took the left 
fork toward the Pond, I was nearly taken out by what I initially thought was a 
sharp shinned hawk agilly diving through the trees. It landed high in front of 
me and I got a quick look, - squared off tail, seemed long and lean, but no 
mottling/streaking on chest and what appeared to be very dark eyes. So I 
grabbed my camera, and was trying to focus when the “fun” started. The 
partner (and then the original bird) started to dive bomb me. Believe me I was 
moving away as quickly as I could, until I assumed I was out of reach (of a 
presumed nest) and thought I would be fine. But this continued for several 
minutes. From behind me a shadow warned from overhead then a bird would appear 
nearly on top of me and very silently- (usually) aiming for my head (thank 
goodness I had a hat on!). I picked up a stick and swung it back and forth 
overhead as I hightailed it out of there, finally escaping the 
“entertainment". Afterwards, wondered Goshawk (I didn’t go back to find 
out) ? Is this behavior common with nesting accipiters? Certainly got my blood 
pumping! (In the whole time there were only a few alarm calls at the first 
encounter (from the birds too) but in retrospect I can’t say for sure what I 
heard now). 


The benefits of birding!

Jeanne-Marie Maher
Nashua NH



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Subject: Tennessee’s, Blackpoll - 9 warbler species today Keene
From: "'Wendy Ward' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 26 May 2016 00:09:15 +0000 (UTC)
Ash Brook Wetland in Keene (behind Target) has been ahappening place for 
warblers this year per usual. At least 2 Tennessee’s weresinging their hearts 
out today. Great views of them in their glorious indecriptive-nessin the sub 
canopy along with a brilliant Blackburnian taunting me with my humanlimited 
range of hearing. In the same small group of trees a Blackpoll was singingits 
example of the Doppler effect and he thankfully provided some relief forour 
case of warbler neck to get a few glimpses at eye level. 

Further down the trail a Magnolia was feeding in the willowsand the Redstarts, 
Yellows, Chestnut-Sided, Black and Whites and Common Yellowthroatsare all in 
and singing to beat the band. The Oven Birds kept to the woods, butmade his 
presence known. A Willow Flycatcher is still in the shrub march alongwith the 
expected Alder Flycatcher. The Baltimore Orioles are building nestabove the 
path, unbeknownst to most of the bipedals passing below. 

On the 19th Henry Walters and I had a dozenwarbler species here. Northern 
Waterthrushes, Tennessee’s, Nashville, Canada,Magnolia, Wilsons along with 
the usual cast of characters. The Bobolinks and aSavannah still seem to be in 
the field but the Thrashers and Towhee seemed tohave moved on. The Red Bullseye 
sign marks the spot. 


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Subject: Eurasian collared Dove in East Kingston
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 19:20:11 -0400
Found by Davis Finch.  Currently being seen at 64 South Road in East Kingston.

Steve Mirick


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Subject: 2016 Olive-sided Flycatcher surveys - volunteers needed
From: Pamela Hunt <phunt AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 20:40:41 +0000
Greetings all,



For the last two years, a team of volunteers and myself have been searching for 
Olive-sided Flycatchers in western, central, and northern NH in an effort to 
determine how much the range has changed over the last 30 years (since the 
Breeding Bird Atlas). What we've generally found has been sobering, with OSFL 
apparently now largely absent from southwestern NH (where they were admittedly 
uncommon 30 years ago, perhaps gone from half their former haunts in the 
central part of the state, and even showing some signs of absence in the north 
country. Because we couldn't quite cover everything in 2014-15, I'm decided to 
extend the project one more year in the hopes of filling in a few more holes. 




And YOU can help! Much of the priority work in 2016 will occur in Grafton 
County - primarily along the I-93 corridor, with a little in the southern 
portion of Coos County. There's a bit still to do in the southwest, but 
existing volunteers mostly have that area under control. Doing the survey is 
pretty straightforward: you just need to visit suitable habitat within an 
assigned survey quad THREE TIMES over the season (June-July) and look/listen 
for OSFL. I have maps and instructions for interested parties, and am happy to 
answer any questions. 




Given the results we've been getting, I won't promise OSFL, but experience has 
shown that this is a great way to explore new areas and perhaps discover a new 
birding spot. 




So don't miss out on this final year - operators are standing by!

(and be forewarned, some of you are likely to get a personal solicitation about 
possibly helping!) 




Thanks, and good birding,

Pam

Pamela D. Hunt, Ph.D.
Avian Conservation Biologist
New Hampshire Audubon
84 Silk Farm Road
Concord, NH 03301

(603) 224-9909 x328
phunt AT nhaudubon.org

      ___
_/ -o-- \_____
   \ /     \''''',,,,,,,\__
     \/////////''' _\======

Please consider making a donation to support the work of the Conservation 
Department 


"We have a hunger of the mind. We ask for all the knowledge around us and the 
more we get, the more we desire." 

   - Maria Mitchell, 19th Century American Astronomer


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Subject: Jefferson Notch Road Still Closed as of 25 May 2016
From: David Govatski Gmail <david.govatski AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 13:42:55 -0400
The NH DOT is still grading the Jefferson Notch Road and the road is not open 
as of 25 May 2016. I will check again on Friday. They are hoping to have it 
open for Memorial Day weekend. It is the highest elevation public highway in NH 
and the north or Jefferson side tends to thaw out last. 


David Govatski  
Jefferson, NH


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Subject: Purple Martins in Seabrook
From: DENNIS <d.skillman AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 17:40:42 +0000 (UTC)
During a nest check at Cross Beach Road in Seabrook this morning, I counted 26 
Purple Martins (competing for 12 gourds). The sounds and visual of the swarming 
birds was like nothing I have seen before! Hopefully some of the "excess" 
martins will settle in our new site near Island Path Road in Hampton, John 
Cavanagh's gourd rack in Rye or at the refurbished houses at the Portsmouth 
Country Club. 


Dennis Skillman 
http://www.pbase.com/dennissk 
http://www.liteworksphoto.com 

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Subject: Concord-Birch St gardens 6-8 AM
From: Dorothy Currier <dorocurr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 13:10:28 -0400
Bobolinks in adjacent field-no places for them to perch on to be seen.  Saw
one high on a tree.  Only saw males.  5 or so seen but lots more sounds
coming from the field.
Quite a cacophony when mixed in with house sparrows, cat birds and robins.

At various feeders:
rose breasted grosbeak pair-now I recognize the strong white eyebrows and,
of course the beak, of the female to differentiate it from the female house
finch and other streaked brown females.
house finch pair
few goldfinch
cardinal pair
robins
song sparrow
red-wingeds-finally I recognize the sharp whistle alarm sound as them

Iron Works road where it crosses over the Turkey river:
alder flycatcher-saying "free beer"-on a dead branch hanging over the water
on the north side of the road
willow flycatcher near south end of Birch st-saying "fitz bew"
~ 10 redstarts, mostly males chasing after each other & chattering away.

Now, back to searching for the perfect window air conditioner...

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Subject: Concord Airport
From: Pamela Hunt <phunt AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 14:59:00 +0000
Greetings all,



I conducted my first Grasshopper Sparrow survey in 5 years at the Concord 
Airport this morning, and while this is not an area where the general public 
can gain access, I thought it'd be informative to do a post that illustrates 
the diversity of species found there. As many locals know, there is edge access 
to this airport from both the Karner Blue Easement of Chenell Drive, and from 
Airport Road. At both locations you can approach the fence and look/listen for 
grassland and shrubland birds. 




From 0710-0920 I found a quite respectable 49 species, and thankfully got off 
the airfield just as the heat was starting to kick in. Highlights included: 




American Bittern - one flying north along the abandoned runway

Horned Lark - displaying male and a female FLUSHED OFF A NEST. The latter had 
four eggs, and was a life nest for me. The Concord airport is one of fewer than 
six locations in the state where this species nests, and all are airports. 


Brown Thrasher - 2 (this is relatively high for the airport in my experience, 
so it'll be interesting to see if both stick around 


Prairie Warbler - 7

Eastern Towhee - 7

Field Sparrow - 3

Grasshopper Sparrow - 7 singing males and a presumed female. This is about 
typical for a single survey, and I'll be making a few more visits to get a 
better handle on the local population over the summer 


Vesper Sparrow - 3

Eastern Meadowlark - 1 singing male, only heard a couple of times near the 
beginning. Meadowlarks used to be pretty reliable here, but in recent years 
their detectability from outside the fence seems to have gone down. It'll thus 
be interesting to see what I turn up here this summer with regular inside 
visits. 


Enjoy,
Pam

Pamela D. Hunt, Ph.D.
Avian Conservation Biologist
New Hampshire Audubon
84 Silk Farm Road
Concord, NH 03301

(603) 224-9909 x328
phunt AT nhaudubon.org

      ___
_/ -o-- \_____
   \ /     \''''',,,,,,,\__
     \/////////''' _\======

Please consider making a donation to support the work of the Conservation 
Department 


"We have a hunger of the mind. We ask for all the knowledge around us and the 
more we get, the more we desire." 

   - Maria Mitchell, 19th Century American Astronomer


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Subject: Hummingbird courtship behavior
From: "Dana Duxbury-Fox" <danafox AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 03:28:38 -0400
Bob and I were up at our camp on Lower Beech Pond  in Center Tuftonboro on
Monday afternoon.  While sitting on our deck about 3 PM we observed 2-3
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds - a male and possibly two females  as the females
seemed to have very different styles of feeding.  I had put out my two big
feeders a week earlier (May 16th) one at either end of our deck and
immediately afterwards a male came in to feed.

 

Well, as we were sitting there we twice saw the male with that rapid zooming
up and down behavior that he does when he is courting a female.  

 

A couple of hours later as we were sitting on our porch in view of their
favorite feeder I suddenly saw something new - this floating dance of a
pair. They would float up and then down maybe three feet in distance up and
down around the feeder in unison.  One might pause and feed and then the
floating dance would start again - up and down. Imagine in all my years I
had never seen this before.  Being at the right place at the right time and
being there at the correct moment in their courtship cycle I guess..

 

Their typical behavior is to dart in to feed, possibly chase off another  or
go into the dense Mountain Holly bush near the feeder to alight or move
around possibly catching insects. That early evening both would often be in
the bush at once.

 

At breakfast yesterday a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker wined as it progressed up
a Gray Birch beside the deck.

 

Duty then called and we were off to the Loon Center but not before we
observed a Broad-winged Hawk harassing a Robin as we got out of our boat -
eventually we returned in MA.

 

Dana Duxbury-Fox

Center Tuftonboro and  North Andover, MA

 

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Subject: 05-23-16 Blackburnian and a few more at St. Patrick's Church in Hampton, NH (Photo's)
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 25 May 2016 00:13:51 -0400
Hello Birders,

This is a link to part one of a great day of birding. On Monday 05-23-16, Susan 
Wrisley and I stopped at the Church Parking Lot in Hampton for an hour or so 
before heading up to Rye to join a great crew of fellow birders heading out to 
Star Island. 

I got a few unique perspectives off a Blackburnian Warbler at the church that I 
hope you all enjoy. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/albums/72157668511434231 
 


The images from Star are going to take a while longer…

Good birding,
David

David Lipsy
Eagle Eye Photography
Concord, NH
Email: dlipsy AT comcast.net Website: 
http://davidlipsy.zenfolio.com/  

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/ 
 

Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/eagleeyephoto/portfolio 
 

Google+ : google.com/+DavidLipsyEagleEyePhotography 
 

ViewBug: http://www.viewbug.com/member/davidlipsy 
 














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Subject: birding west of Crawford Notch; Red Crossbills & Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
From: Charlie Nims <charlie.nims AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 20:26:49 -0400
This morning Sheila McCarthy, Joe Scott and I birded Old Cherry Mountain Rd., 
Trudeau Rd. and Base Station Rd. which are all in the Bretton Woods\Bethlehem 
area. We had 15 species of warbler (missed Yellow!) and a Yellow-bellied 
Flycatcher (YBFL) at Trudeau Rd. At Old Cherry Mountain Rd., we had 14 warbler 
species including Blackpoll and 7 Canada Warblers as well as a couple of Red 
Crossbills. Trudeau Rd. birding was cut short as the rain started so the 
highlight was the YBFL. At Base Station Rd., the highlight was an adult Common 
Raven with 4 juvenile (almost adult sized!) ravens on a nest, basically ready 
to fledge and being incredibly raucous. Just off of Base Station Rd. on Mt. 
Clinton Rd., we had a group of 6 Red Crossbills with several heavily streaked 
juvenile birds. 


While warbler specie numbers were reasonable, flycatchers were thin with only 
the Yellow-bellied Flycatcher and an Eastern Phoebe being seen. Also, we were 
basically shut out on raptors. While we had several Hermit Thrushes and a 
Veery, we did not get any Swainson’s. 


Charlie Nims
Bartlett, NH

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Subject: probable Arctic Terns, Hampton Harbor
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 23:55:32 +0000
Birders,

I had this morning free and was determined to ignore whatever the weather 
report said about rain, sleet, wind chill factor, etc. I got to Hampton Harbor 
at pretty low tide and a steady rain, about 8:40, so I decided to see what the 
martins were doing at Cross Beach, like maybe chipping ice off their gourds. As 
I drove down the road, I noticed smoke rising from a backyard on Cross Beach 
and thought it seemed like an odd place and time for a bonfire; as I got to the 
gourd area I realized that the house was on fire! I pulled out my cell to call 
911 when I saw the entire Seabrook fire department roaring down the road, with 
the entire police department right behind it. I got out of there in a hurry, 
but it didn't look good for that house. 



I went back to the harbor with the conviction that I was definitely not going 
to complain about getting rained on, and scanned from the Seabrook rest area 
lot. I noticed two terns on the flats with extremely short legs and silvery 
breasts; one had a small fish and appeared to be offering it to the other, 
which made sense given that the Yankee co-op is right there. In the light I 
couldn't make a judgment about their bills. I see from eBird that Arctics have 
been reported in Maine for a few days and they really looked stumpy-legged, 
especially when they waddled a bit. But I'm not sure that Arctics in the harbor 
would be feeding one another and the leg length might have been wishful 
thinking/no comparison tern/puffed up plumage. So they're in the likely Arctice 
stage in my mind, and I'd welcome any feedback from the many people who have 
more experience with Arctic terns. Otherwise, the rain made the couple hours on 
the coast pretty poor birding. The gate at Hampton Beach State park was closed 
as late as 10:30, so I didn't go out to look for Piping Plovers. 



Back in Durham this afternoon, the Eastern Meadowlark was still at Moore 
Fields, singing and flying across Mast Road near the No Passing Zone signs. 



Kurk Dorsey

Durham

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Subject: Common Gallinule at Airport Marsh in Whitefield on 24 May 2016
From: David Govatski Gmail <david.govatski AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 19:38:31 -0400
The Common Gallinule at Airport Marsh in Whitefield was present at 6 pm on 
Tuesday 24 May 2016. The bird was first observed by Katie Towler and Jim 
Sparrell on 20 May 2016 feeding in the reeds at the southeast corner of the 
pond. The best place to observe it is from an overlook of Airport Marsh reached 
by a short dirt road from Airport Road. You will have to walk a few yards down 
the bank to get a better view of that side of Airport Marsh. The gallinule has 
been coming out to the far left or southeast side of the marsh. 


The Common Gallinule is an uncommon bird for Pondicherry and Coos County. The 
bird is also known as a Moorhen and we labeled a marsh near Cherry Pond as 
Moorhen Marsh because it has been seen there on a couple of occasions. 


Airport Marsh is a great place to see a variety of birds for very little 
effort. Bobolinks, brown thrashers, Savannah sparrows, belted kingfishers, 
yellow warblers, common yellowthroat and hooded mergansers are easy to find 
here at this time of year. There was a greater yellowlegs present when I 
checked on the gallinule. 


David Govatski  
Jefferson, NH


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Subject: Tim Gallagher to Keynote LL Bean / Maine Audubon Birding Festival
From: CK Borg <borealbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 14:58:18 -0400
Yes Steve... I'm still birding NH... Howevah, I thought you all would be
interested in this nearby event:


http://www.llbean.com/dept_resources/shared/160512_MK36557_Birding_Festival_SOE_web.pdf 


Good Birding,
C.K. Borg

Concord, NH

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Subject: Vortex Scope & Vortex/Manfrotto Tripod For Sale
From: Sue McGrath <newburyportbirders AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 11:10:28 -0400
New Hampshire Birders,

I've been in touch with our moderator, Steve Mirick, and have his permission to 
post it. 

If interested, please be in touch with me offline.


I've got a Vortex Scope & Vortex/Manfrotto Tripod in nearly new
[excellent] condition for sale:

Vortex Skyline ED 82mm Angled Scope

Vortex CBX Tripod with a 128 RC Microfluid Head

Complete with original packaging, scope cover & tripod bag.

Vortex has a VIP warranty.  VIP stands for a Very Important Promise to
you, the customer. They'll repair or replace your Vortex product
in the event it becomes damaged or defective at no charge to you. If
they cannot repair your product, they'll replace it with a product in
perfect working order of equal or better physical condition.  You can
count on the VIP Warranty for all Vortex Optics spotting scopes and tripods.

Unlimited Lifetime Warranty -  Fully transferable  -  No warranty card
to complete - No receipt needed to hang on to

If you ever have a problem, no matter the cause, they promise to take
care of you.  The VIP Warranty does not cover loss, theft, deliberate
damage or cosmetic damage that does not hinder the performance of the
product.

Please contact me offline if interested.

Good birding,
Sue

Sue McGrath
Newburyport Birders
newburyportbirders AT comcast.net

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Subject: Birds around Keene
From: Joshua Jarvis <menasor77 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 24 May 2016 02:32:24 -0400
I went on the trail behind Target in Keene and followed it to the bridge.

Redwing Blackbirds and Common Grackles were everywhere. The female Red Wing
Blackbirds were even showing their heads above the cattails.

The fields accross the path from the pond had Bobolinks.

Song Sparrows and Chipping Sparrows were everywhere.

The path leading to the bridge had lots of Catbirds. Also along this path
were the following species.
Black Capped Chickadee
Rose Breasted Grosbeak.
Baltimore Oriole (one female).
Common Yellowthroat
Chestnut Sided Warbler (First of Year and third one I ever saw).
Yellow Warbler (Building a nest in the cherry tree before the bridge making
it amazingly easy to see).

On the way back I saw a Great Blue Heron flying down to the pond.

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, May 23, 2016
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 20:30:01 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, May 23rd, 2016.



A PACIFIC LOON was seen off of the coast of North Hampton on May 22nd.



A SANDHILL CRANE was seen in a field in Berlin on May 21st. A pair of 
SANDHILL CRANES has returned to Monroe and they were most recently seen on 
May 22nd. The birds are most often seen in farm fields along Plains Road. If 
you look for the birds, please look from the road and do not enter the 
fields.



A MISSISSIPPI KITE was seen in Newmarket on May 20th, and 22nd.



A COMMON GALLINULE was seen at Airport Marsh on Hazen Road in Whitefield on 
May 20th. 21st, and 22nd.



A CHUCK-WILLS-WIDOW and a WHITE-WINGED DOVE were reported from Star Island, 
one of the Isles of Shoals, on May 21st.



An AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was seen off the coast of Seabrook on May 22nd.



3 LEAST TERNS and 2 ROSEATE TERNS were seen in coastal Hampton on May 18th, 
and an unidentified JAEGER was seen off the coast on May 22nd.



2 LEAST BITTERNS were reported from Salem on May 21st, and 7 GLOSSY IBIS 
were seen flying along the coast on May 22nd.



An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was reported from East Weare Road near Clough State 
Park on May 21st.



A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was reported from Pittsfield on May 19th.



A DICKCISSEL was seen at Moore Fields on Route 155A in Durham on May 19th.



A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen at the Concord Airport, and 1 was seen in 
Nashua, both on May 17th.



A CERULEAN WARBLER was reported from Mount Wantastiquet in Hinsdale on May 
20th and 21st.



A BREWSTER’S WARBLER was seen along Bennett Road in Durham on May 17th.



20 BRANT were seen along the coast in Rye on May 20th.



7 NORTHERN SHOVELERS were seen at Airport Marsh on Hazen Road in Whitefield 
on May 18th, 2 were seen on Lake Wantastiquet in Hinsdale on the 21st, and 1 
was seen in Penacook on the 20th.



2 RED-NECKED GREBES and an AMERICAN WIGEON were seen on the Connecticut 
River in Hinsdale on May 22nd.



5 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were seen on Squam Lake on May 17th.



2 PIPING PLOVERS were seen at Hampton Beach State Park, and 2 UPLAND 
SANDPIPERS were seen at the Pease International Tradeport, all on May 22nd.



20 PURPLE SANDPIPERS were seen along the coast on May 22nd.



An estimated 140 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS were seen migrating over North 
Sandwich, 11 were seen in Rochester, and 5 were seen on the shore of Lily 
Pond in Gilford, all on May 20th.



An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was reported from Trudeau Road in Bethlehem, and 1 
was reported from Huntress Bridge Road in Effingham, both on May 22nd.



A PHILADELPHIA VIREO and an EVENING GROSBEAK were seen in Rumney on May 
17th, and an EVENING GROSBEAK was seen in Richmond on May 18th.



A pair of MERLINS was seen in New London on May 18th, and a pair was seen in 
Tilton on the 23rd.



2 RED CROSSBILLS were seen in Effingham on May 22nd.



BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS were reported from near Little Cherry Pond in 
Jefferson, and from Trudeau Road in Bethlehem, during the past week.



A hiker in the White Mountains south of Mount Washington reported a SPRUCE 
GROUSE, 7 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES, and 4 FOX SPARROWS on May 22nd.



A few WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS were reported during the past week.



A few COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were seen during the past week.



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org



Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Breeding Merlins in Tilton
From: Iain Macleod <pandiain.im AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 17:49:36 -0400
While doing a round of Osprey and Eagle nest checking in the Lakes Region
today, I found a pair of territorial Merlins in a cemetery in Tilton. Both
were VERY vocal with the female constantly food-begging. The male was still
in brown plumage (1 year old) and at first I thought I had 2 females
chasing each other but the higher pitched courtship and food-pass calls of
the male confirmed his sex.
Both were seen landing in a stick nest (likely Crow) in a tall pine and the
male brought her lunch -- looked like a Phoebe. They did not appear to have
eggs yet (first time breeders).

First hatch confirmed for this year at a Lakes Region Osprey nest today.

Iain MacLeod
Ashland

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Subject: Lakes Region Purple Martins - Volunteers needed!
From: Pamela Hunt <phunt AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 19:51:44 +0000
Greetings all, and apologies if you get it twice!



Given the success of our efforts to increase the size of the Purple Martin 
colony in Seabrook over the last two years, NH Audubon is going to try to 
expand the project into the Lakes Region, the only other part of the state 
where martins currently nest. The main colony in the Lakes Region is at the 
Funspot at Weirs Beach, but it has declined from ~20 pairs in the 1990s to only 
3-4 in recent years. I'm hoping to work with the folks at the Funspot to 
install some artificial gourds like we have in Seabrook, which allow us to more 
actively control European Starlings and House Sparrows. The latter are a 
particular problem at the Funspot, to the extent that they have largely taken 
over a couple of the boxes that are there. Simultaneously with these efforts at 
the Funspot, NH Audubon is partnering with the Prescott Farm Environmental 
Education Center (about 2 miles south of the Funspot) to install a gourd rack 
there as well. I'm guessing we won't get martins at Prescott Farm this year, in 
part because the housing isn't up yet and in part because the Funspot colony is 
currently so small. 




The success in Seabrook is almost entirely due to the dedication of a small 
group of volunteers (thanks again you guys - you know who you are!), and I'm 
hoping to build a similar team for these sites in Laconia. Tasks would include 
regular monitoring at the Funspot, casual monitoring at Prescott Farm, and help 
with maintenance at both sites. Prescott Farm, which sits on 160 acres of 
forests and fields, is also interested in attracting volunteers to help with 
other bird-related projects. For example, there used to be someone who 
maintained swallow and bluebird boxes, but since their departure these have not 
been a priority. The folks at the farm would also love for someone to explore 
their three miles of trails and see what kinds of birds are present. 




So if you're a birder in or near Laconia, and looking for a place to direct 
your passion for birds, birding, or even bird conservation, consider becoming a 
member of the Lakes Region Martin Team! Just let me know if this strikes your 
fancy and I'll keep you in the loop. The first task will likely be to help 
installing the new equipment, which will hopefully happen in the first third of 
June (would have like to have done it by now, but stuff happens - that's why I 
need volunteers!). 




Hope a few of you can help!

Pam

Pamela D. Hunt, Ph.D.
Avian Conservation Biologist
New Hampshire Audubon
84 Silk Farm Road
Concord, NH 03301

(603) 224-9909 x328
phunt AT nhaudubon.org

      ___
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     \/////////''' _\======

Please consider making a donation to support the work of the Conservation 
Department 


"We have a hunger of the mind. We ask for all the knowledge around us and the 
more we get, the more we desire." 

   - Maria Mitchell, 19th Century American Astronomer


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Subject: Mountain birds - Spruce Grouse, Fox Sparrows, Black-backed Woodpecker, Bicknell's, etc.
From: Adam Burnett <adamburnett33 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 12:29:17 -0400
Yesterday I went on a hike to Mount Isolation and Boott Spur, on the south side 
of Mount Washington. I had a lot of great bird sightings. The highlight for me 
was a Spruce Grouse, my long-awaited first-ever. This bold male walked right 
toward our group, passing within six feet of us. Also noteworthy was a total of 
four singing Fox Sparrows—apparently the Fox Sparrows are really moving into 
the Whites. It also was interesting to see which songbirds were in and which 
had yet to arrive. There wasn’t much birdsong, but the fact that I only heard 
two calling Swainson’s Thrushes and found zero Yellow-bellied Flycatchers 
makes me think that most individuals of these species weren’t back yet. By 
contrast, I heard seven calling Bicknell’s Thrushes (but no song) and ten 
Blackpoll Warblers. It was neat to be walking through snow and listening to 
warblers singing! Other highlights included brief views of a Black-backed 
Woodpecker, a couple Boreal Chickadees, a Common Loon migrating overhead, a 
Merlin in flight over the slopes of Boott Spur, and a hardy Common Yellowthroat 
singing at 4000 feet! 


My eBird list for the hike has photos (decent photos of the Spruce Grouse, 
documentation of a couple other species) and additional details: 
http://ebird.org/ebird/nh/view/checklist?subID=S29852719 
 


Adam Burnett
Dartmouth College

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Subject: Field Trip Saturday 5/28 - Powder Major's Farm & Forest - registration required
From: Lauren Kras <lauren.kras AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 May 2016 08:37:54 -0400
This Saturday, May 28 I am leading a bird walk for the Forest Society at
the Powder Major's Farm & Forest, Madbury, Durham, & Lee

This free and fun outing will take walkers out to explore the diverse
habitats of the Powder Major’s Farm & Forest, a 195-acre property in
Madbury, Durham and Lee that the Forest Society and the three towns are in
the process of conserving. During May, songbird migration is at its peak
with the return of warblers, vireos and flycatchers, so we'll be on the
lookout for these species and many more.

Find out more at:

https://www.forestsociety.org/event/spring-birding-walk-powder-majors-farm-forest 


 


No experience with bird watching or identification necessary! Binoculars
are suggested, as well as bug spray. Meeting time is 8:30 a.m. to begin
walking at 9 a.m. at Tibbett Field, 25 Lee Road (N.H. Route 155) in
Madbury. Dogs are not allowed.

Pre-registration required at forestsociety.org/event-rsvp or call
224-9945.  For information regarding the conservation project, visit
forestsociety.org/powder_major


Lauren Kras
Greenland, NH

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Subject: Recent Birds
From: Joshua Jarvis <menasor77 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 23:37:53 -0400
Friday may 20th: Seen my first ever Magnolia warbler where I live in
Richmond
I also seen a sapsucker their

Saturday May 21st: Saw a small warbler like bird that was black above and
orange below in Winchester. I assume it is a red start but I did not see
any orange on the wings and tail. Just black above and orange below.
I then crossed the River to Vernon VT where I saw a FoY Veery and a
blue-grey gnatcatcher.

Sunday May 22: I seen a Flicker at my residence in Richmond.
I went to Keene and by Brickyard pond at the KSC campus I saw Redstarts

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Subject: Seacoast Audubon, Urban Forestry Field Trip
From: Jim Sparrell <jimsparrell AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 21:45:28 -0400
This morning, 11 eagle-eyed and owl-eared congenial observers accompanied
Katie and I for a Seacoast Audubon field trip. While we had almost no
rarities, and very few Chuck-will's-widows (actually none), we did have 9
species of warblers and a total of 47 species including a trip continuation
that several members did in the UFC. The highlight for the trip leader was
discovering several heretofore unknown parts of the park where many of the
warblers were located, a few minutes before the start of the field trip.

A Red-tailed hawk put on a wonderful show, posing, then catching a mouse
and eating it in the marsh while watched by vigilant crows, giving us nice
long looks.

Many thanks to all who participated and helped us spot birds and shared
information, and especially to Alan Murray our list compiler, who also
stayed to find a few additional species!

Jim Sparrell
Katie Towler

Trip list:

Urban Forestry Center, Portsmouth, Rockingham, New Hampshire, US
May 22, 2016 8:00 AM - 11:35 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.7 mile(s)
47 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  19
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  2
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  9
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)  1
Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)  1
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)  1
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)  2
Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis)  1
Herring Gull (Larus argentatus)  8
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon))  9
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  7
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)  4
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  1
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  2
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)  1
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)  1
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)  3
Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus)  1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  4
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  3
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  7
Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus)  1
Common Raven (Corvus corax)  1
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  5
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)  4
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)  4
Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)  2
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)  2
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  7
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  8
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  7
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)  2
Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia)  2
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  4
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)  1
Northern Parula (Setophaga americana)  1
Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia)  2
Blackburnian Warbler (Setophaga fusca)  1
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)  1
Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens)  2
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)  2
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  3
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  5
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  2
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  1
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  5
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  5

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Subject: Yellow-throated Vireo in Ashland
From: Iain Macleod <pandiain.im AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 21:35:39 -0400
New yard bird this morning.... only my second Lakes Region Yellow-throated
Vireo. Not a common bird up here. At the same time a Tennessee Warbler was
singing too.

Iain MacLeod
Ashland

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Subject: Orford and Lebanon Chimney Swift roosts.
From: "'Jeff MacQueen' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 21:07:28 -0400
I counted 86 Chimney Swifts entering the chimney on the old academy
building in Orford to roost this evening. While this is a good roost site,
it is not the best in the Upper Valley. That would probably be the old
Lebanon Junior High School at 75 Bank Street and I plan on checking there
Wednesday night. I am inviting a few of my interested students, but also
anyone on these listserves is welcome to join me. Two years ago, Pam Hunt
trained some of us to count Chimney Swifts in Lebanon and after the
training we went to the old school to count the roost. We weren't
disappointed. Over 200 swifts entered the big chimney that evening to
roost. While I can't promise that kind of spectacle, chances are good that
swifts will be around to roost and even much smaller roosts can be
interesting to watch. I'll be there at 8:00 p.m. Usually the swifts have
roosted by 8:30 to 8:45 this time of year. If anyone wants directions or
has questions, please contact me off list.    Jeff MacQueen,  Orford

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Subject: NH Coast (Jaeger, alcid, PACIFIC LOON, AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:58:07 -0400
Interesting day on the coast today for Jane and I.  Got off to a late 
start, and caught up with a good group of warblers with JoAnn at the 
Church Street parking lot, highlighted by a Bay-breasted and a Canada 
Warbler.  Later in the day, we worked our way down the coast, and with 
excellent visibility and lighting we scanned offshore.  Some highlights:

White-winged Scoter - Only 20 in two flocks MIGRATING.  We hoped for 
more.  Interestingly, several groups (about 15-40 birds each) were seen 
on the water.
Common Loon - Estimated about 30 birds along the coast.  Some in 
breeding plumage.  Some young birds.
Red-throated Loon - Only 3 off Little Boar's Head.
PACIFIC LOON - Adult in high breeding plumage seen very distant from 
Little Boar's Head.  Studied for close to 20 minutes as in the vicinity 
of about 8 Common Loons.
Glossy Ibis - Single group of 7
AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER - Beautiful flyby in the evening light as it flew 
north from Seabrook Beach.
Purple Sandpipers - At least 20 or more.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/26576357364/in/dateposted-public/lightbox/ 

Jaeger sp. - Adult or sub-adult bird well offshore.  Seen chasing terns 
and at times the terns were chasing it!
Large alcid sp. - Distant bird in breeding plumage.  Either a Murre or a 
Razorbill

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA


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Subject: Star Island Report
From: eric masterson <erictheirish AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 20:25:30 -0400
I just returned from the annual spring birding weekend to Star Island,
which has been running now for several years. Firstly, thanks to the
participants, without whom these spring and fall weekends would not be
possible. Secondly, thanks to the staff of Star Island, who continue to be
incredibly hospitable to the birding community. Thirdly, thanks to the
birds.

It would not be overstating it to say this weekend was epic - perhaps the
best yet. After last fall's trip, when we recorded a state-first Lazuli
Bunting (pending review by the NH Rare Bird Committee), I cautioned that
this sort of thing could not be routinely expected. The Mets didn't repeat
their World Series win in 1970, and likewise I didn't expect another
mega-rarity any time soon. But pound for pound, acre for acre, Star Island
remains the best place in NH to drum up rarities and should not be
underestimated.

Att the dock in Portsmouth I discovered that one of Star Island's two boats
had broken down. I wasn't sure we would make it to the island before dark,
but we got there by 7pm. Knowing there was only an hour of light left, and
knowing that Star routinely clears out overnight, I didn't want to let
whatever gems were on island disappear without trace. I ducked out as soon
as orientation was over to do a quick reconnaissance of the island, hitting
the pines first to see if there were any roosting nighthawks etc. There
weren't, but I did accidentally flush a roosting White-winged Dove, which
afforded a ten second view before ducking back into cover near the Tuck
Monument. Returning to base with the light almost gone, I flushed a large
caprimulgid from the road. In the fading light, the best I could do was
identify it to Eastern Whip-poor-will/Chuck-will's-widow. As the minutes
passed and the remaining embers of light faded, I realized that a) it was a
very large bird, perhaps too large for Whip-poor-will and b) we weren't
going to relocate it. With clear calm skies, I felt sure that it would
depart, and with it any chance of nailing the identification, which began
to cause me increasing heartburn.

The group agreed to meet at 6am for a birding walk, but before I retired
for the night, I performed my daily ablutions, which in addition to teeth
brushing, includes the checking of weather, the checking of radar, and the
checking of nocturnal vocalizations via a parabolic dish and recorder. The
volume of calls was high, with various species of warblers and lots of
Swanson's Thrush. I went to bed.

The following morning the island was fairly hopping with warblers - nothing
rare, but good numbers of common migrants. We would end up with 18 species
for the weekend, with Louisiana Waterthrush the rarest. A great start, but
no dove, and more importantly, no sign of the caprimulgid. During the
midday lull, I was giving a talk when Jeanne-Marie Maher burst into the
room asking whether I had received her text. After a brief conversation and
a briefer viewing of a couple of photographs, the lecture was cancelled.
Jeanne-Marie's husband, Michael Pahl had found a roosting caprimulgid near
the pines. I will let the photographs speak for themselves, save to say
this was one of the most stunning birds I have seen in a while, certainly
in NH. My audiovisual experience of Chuck-will's-widow is strong on the
former and weak to non-existent on the latter, and it is not much better
with Eastern Whip-poor-will. Not wanting to trust my judgement to the
effects of an adrenalin-doped bloodstream, I sought counsel from those with
more experience of this pairing, and the responses so far have been
positive for Chuck-will's-widow.

Unfortunately, though the weather closed in somewhat overnight Saturday, we
could not relocate the bird on Sunday. The feared clear-out came,
fortunately delayed by 24 hours. With the high octane birding of Saturday
over, the group dynamic felt a bit limp as the adrenaline ebbed from our
bodies, though a first-year male King Eider provided a methadone shot that
cushioned the blow. I will leave it for others to post photographs as I am
exhausted.

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Subject: Human Powered Birdathon
From: Richard Frechette <frechette7 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 22:51:32 +0000
The Peddlin Peregrines; Scott Spangenberg and I set out at 3 AM Saturday 
bicycling by headlamp as part of the NH Audubon’s Birdathon. Our first 
sighting was non-avian, a porcupine that was not all that impressed with our 
interrupting his slow amble across the bike path. The full moon had the coyotes 
singing up a storm as we peddled north to our first stops at marshes to listen 
for rails and bittern. We were rewarded with Virginia Rail but missed Sora. 
Three owl species plus nighthawk and woodcock earned checkmarks on our list. 
When our headlamps light upon a skunk, the animal tried to out run us. A 
sprinting skunk is a sight to see. Rather than veer off the path it just ran as 
fast as its little legs could go right beside me. 


The dawn chorus was surprisingly quiet at the Freemont Conservation Property in 
Peterborough but it did include a nice assortment. Both Cape May and 
Bay-breasted Warblers sang from the forest edge along with the expected Black 
and Whites. Despite the many boxes, no Eastern Bluebirds. 


From there we slowly cycled north along the bicycle path that follows the banks 
of the Contoocook River picking up birds as we went. It seemed as though we 
were always within earshot of a Baltimore Oriole as we were treated to their 
sweet melodies along our route. Each male with its own variation on the theme. 
They were accompanied by Ovenbirds and Hermit Thrushes with Green Frogs adding 
the beat to the symphony. 


Missing this year were Black-throated Blue and Northern Parula Warblers and 
most of the sparrows. 


We ended the day at 3 PM with our tenth mammal species, a Woodchuck which 
actually climbed partway up a tree to get out of the pathway. The day’s total 
was 102 bird species, 10 mammal, 6 amphibian and 1 reptile. 


36 miles by bicycle, 0.5 by foot.

Rich Frechette

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Subject: PHOTOS from the Third Week of May
From: "Jim Block" <jab AT VALLEY.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 16:49:07 -0400
I photographed birds in both NH and VT last week.  If you wish, you can see
some of the photos here:
http://www.jimblockphoto.com/2016/05/3rd-week-of-may/  

 

Photographed species include Green Heron, Broad-winged Hawk, Chestnut-sided
Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, American Redstart, Veery, Bobolink, Red-eyed
Vireo, Ovenbird, Baltimore Oriole, House Wren, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker,
Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Song Sparrow, Least Flycatcher,
White-throated Sparrow, and Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

 

Jim Block

Etna, NH

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Subject: Whitefield - Common Gallinule, Green Heron
From: Joe Scott <joexcski AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 16:08:46 -0400
The Gallinule has been reported for the past two days and today was my day
to give it a try. It was not visible on my first try between 8:00 and 9:00,
but it was right out in the open in Airport Marsh when I returned at noon.
Across the road in Hazen Pond there was a Green Heron this morning, which
lifted out of the marshy area and perched up on a tree for a couple of
minutes.
Other birds in the airport area included Brown Thrasher, Wilson's snipe,
American Bittern vocalizing, Bobolinks and Savannah Sparrow.

Joe Scott
Chatham, NH

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Subject: Birdathon report (long) - Statewide category, 148 species
From: "'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 18:44:34 +0000 (UTC)
For yesterday’s Birdathon/Bloomathon, my team (The SanctuaryBog Suckers – 
myself, Katrina Fenton, Henry Walters, and Ken Klapper – whoended up sitting 
it out because of illness) ‘competed’ in the Statewidecategory of 
yesterday’s event. Our focus this year was goal-oriented, driven 
bynumbers...to find 150 species of birds and as many blooms we could identify 
throughvisiting 10 NH Audubon wildlife sanctuaries, and to raise $2,500 for 
thesanctuaries. Well, we met two of those marks, and ultimately fell short by 
justtwo bird species as we decided our health and sanity mattered more at 10 
pmafter 19 hours of birding across half the state. 


We enjoyed a beautiful day with some excellent birds andbirding in many of the 
special landscapes of the state. Our morning began inSandwich, after spending 
the night (well, a few hours) at our friend, Dave’shouse, arranged by our 
absent teammate and Sandwich resident, Ken. Dave’s houseproved to be more 
than just a resting spot and coffee filling station as westarted our morning at 
3 am with American Woodcock, American Bittern, BarredOwl, and a surprise 
Whip-poor-will! Arriving in cool darkness at the nearbyThompson Wildlife 
Sanctuary, we spent over an hour listening for nocturnalbirds from several 
locations around the trailhead and along the new boardwalk,where we watched a 
young bull moose the evening before. Before sunrise, weadded Sora, Virginia 
Rail, Common Loon (calling from nearby Bearcamp Pond), anda mess of Marsh Wrens 
among 20 others species. After a brief chat with afriendly officer from the 
Ossipee Police Department, we made it to the WattsWildlife Sanctuary in 
Effingham for one of the truly great dawn choruses I haveever experienced. In 
less than one hour of walking along Huntress Bridge Road,we were able to pick 
up 48 species of birds with 18 species of warblers (mostof which breed here) 
including Bay-breasted and Blackpoll (non-breeders), Palm,many Canadas and 
several Northern Waterthrushes, as well as Olive-sidedFlycatcher and two Red 
Crossbills. 

Up the road to the Hoyt Wildlife Sanctuary in Madison,things were a little 
quieter – except for the noise from a nearby Triathlon(and we thought WE were 
crazy!) at the neighboring Purity Spring Resort. Still,we managed to add Hooded 
Merganser and Spotted Sandpiper. Onto the Dahl WildlifeSanctuary after a failed 
attempt to locate Louisiana Waterthrush (but we addeda lucky Swainson’s 
Thrush as a trade-off), we bumped into two other birdingparties and were 
treated to an extension of the fine dawn chorus with a thirdBlackpoll Warbler, 
nesting Bank Swallows along the Saco River, a Blue-grayGnatcatcher, a Brown 
Thrasher (carrying nesting material!), an Osprey, and ourfirst White-breasted 
Nuthatch. Then we checked on nearby Pudding Pond for amale Ring-necked Duck 
(they breed here) and Prairie Warbler at a nearby gravelpit. Things began to 
unravel a bit after this, and we experienced our longest‘drought’ of the 
day between here and our long drive (still without Accipiters)to Dover; 
however, we were at over 100 species by this point. 

Thankfully, things turned around as we walked both the NHAudubon and NH Fish & 
Game Bellamy River properties. Raptors included aflyover Bald Eagle, Cooper’s 
Hawk (given away by the resident Red-wingedBlackbirds), local American Kestrel, 
and a surprise Northern Harrier cruisingover the fields. We also found some 
‘southern’ species like our first ofseveral Orchard Orioles, Red-bellied 
Woodpecker, and Eastern Wood-Pewee. InNewmarket (we got through Durham before 
graduation traffic let out!), we failedto locate the Mississippi Kite that 
Steve Mirick recently reportednest-building, but heard our only Tennessee 
Warbler in this neighborhood andfinally saw a pair of Northern Rough-winged 
Swallows at the boat landing. TheFollett’s Brook (Kwaks) Wildlife Sanctuary 
came through for our onlyBlue-winged Warbler of the day, and we finally added a 
Killdeer (whew). AtChapman’s Landing, we bumped into Dan Hubbard, Mark 
Hatfield, and DottieWendelken (The Bird Brains - Birdathon team), who 
graciously shared two GreenHerons with us…we shortly returned the favor as I 
located a nice surprise here,a distant Mississippi Kite! 

We left the area and headed straight to Hampton Harbor toscan the mudflats as 
they neared low tide. Clammers and other mudflat walkersprovided good landmarks 
as we slowly picked out new species here, shorebirds,terns, and more. A pair of 
Least Terns was our best find, and we also had asingle Ruddy Turnstone. Traffic 
began to work against us as the towtruck-a-thon (or whatever it was) event must 
have just gotten out. Seabrook andHampton beaches provided us birds, but rather 
slowly, as we added sea duckslike scoters and several Red-throated Loons. 
Katrina then located a mysteryloon with good field marks of a Pacific, and we 
studied this distant bird forsome time, trading off new species for a potential 
rare bird…but we couldn’tconfirm it. Coastal birds still lacking, we fought 
the traffic up Rt. 1A withsuccessful stops for shorebirds at Henry’s Pool and 
the last couple of NHAudubon wildlife sanctuaries. It was rewarding to see 
sanctuaries come throughfor new species of birds right until the very last one, 
where we added Least andSolitary Sandpipers at the Little River Saltmarsh in 
North Hampton. 

With just enough daylight to scan the expansive fields atPease Air Force Base, 
we lucked out with a flyby Common Nighthawk low over theaccess road (and also 
feeding on insects by our headlights!). EasternMeadowlark and Field Sparrow 
sang, and we listened to the wonderful song ofUpland Sandpipers as night fell. 
With some target birds missing, we attempted,without luck, to track down 
additional species in the darkness by visitingappropriate habitats. We happily 
called it a night at 10 pm after a final stopat the Joe Ford Wildlife Sanctuary 
(Town of Lee property) for owls or cuckoos. 

We ended with 148 total bird species on a largely un-scoutedroute, including 
110 from NH Audubon’s wildlife sanctuaries. We also identified33 species of 
blooming plants and trees. 

Thanks to the 35 individual donors who contributed $2,514 toNH Audubon through 
our Birdathon effort! The FirstGiving fundraising pageremains active a little 
while longer, so you can donate now at 
http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/phil-brown-3/new-hampshire-audubon-2016-birdathon-bloomathon  Bird 
Species List:Canada Goose 

Wood Duck
Mallard
Ring-necked Duck  1    male on Pudding Pond, Conway
Common Eider
White-winged Scoter  1     Great Boar’s Head
Black Scoter  25    two small groups of pure black scoters offSeabrook 
Beach; continuing 

Hooded Merganser  2      Hoyt WS
Red-breasted Merganser    2
Ruffed Grouse
Wild Turkey
Red-throated Loon  5      SeabrookBeach
Common Loon
Double-crested Cormorant
American Bittern     3
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron  2      Chapman’s Landing
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Mississippi Kite  1    adult seen well circling for 5+ minutesfrom Chapman's 
Landing 

Northern Harrier  1    Bellamy RiverWMA
Cooper's Hawk
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk     1    Watts WS
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Virginia Rail  X    Thompson WS andChapman’s Landing
Sora  1      Thompson WS
Black-bellied Plover
Piping Plover  2      Hampton Harbor and Seabrook Beach
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper  1    LittleRiver WS
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Upland Sandpiper  2    Pease AFB
Ruddy Turnstone  1    Hampton Harbor
Dunlin
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
American Woodcock
Bonaparte's Gull  1    HamptonHarbor
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Least Tern  2    pair flying around Hampton Harbor at low tideand again off 
Seabrook beach later 

Common Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Barred Owl
Common Nighthawk  1    Pease AFB
Eastern Whip-poor-will  1    Dave’shouse, Sandwich
Chimney Swift
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel  1    Bellamy RiverWS
Olive-sided Flycatcher  1    WattsWS
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Alder Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Blue-headed Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow  1+    Newmarket
Common Raven
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2    Newmarket
Purple Martin  10    Cross BeachRoad
Tree Swallow
Bank Swallow
Barn Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
House Wren
Marsh Wren  10    Thompson WS
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1    Dahl WS
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Eastern Bluebird
Veery
Swainson's Thrush  1    Madison
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher  1    Dahl WScarrying nesting material
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Blue-winged Warbler  1    Kwaks WS
Black-and-white Warbler
Tennessee Warbler  1    Newmarketnear boat landing
Nashville Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler  1    Watts WS
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler  3
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Palm Warbler  1    Watts WS
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Eastern Towhee
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark  2    Pease AFB
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole  4
Baltimore Oriole
House Finch
Purple Finch
Red Crossbill  2    Watts WS
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow Misses: (lots, so I’m just naming some big ones)American Black 
DuckCommon MerganserGreat CormorantSnowy EgretSharp-shinned HawkSemipalmated 
PloverPurple SandpiperBlack-billed CuckooGreat Horned OwlRuby-throated 
HummingbirdPeregrine FalconHorned LarkWinter WrenCarolina WrenLouisiana 
WaterthrushSaltmarsh SparrowDark-eyed Junco  Phil Brown (for the Sanctuary 
Bog Suckers)  


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Subject: "Bird Brains" Birdathon total-108 species
From: Dan Hubbard <danielhubbard AT peoplepc.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 14:09:53 -0400 (GMT-04:00)




Subject: Orchard Orioles + nest - Concord
From: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 13:40:32 +0000 (UTC)
This morning I had 2 rare sightings along the railroad tracks at Horseshoe 
Pond. The first was one Pam Hunt of Penacook, NH, wandering a little outside 
her territory. The second was the pair of Orchard Orioles we found up the 
tracks near the prison farm. First we saw the first year male, then his mate, 
who, when we followed her, was building a nest! This is only the second nest of 
this species in Concord, the first was found 7 years ago almost to the day - 23 
May 2009, at Horseshoe Pond at the Delta Dental end. 


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Subject: Pondicherry area
From: Charlie Nims <charlie.nims AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 09:31:57 -0400
Yesterday, Sheila McCarthy and I birded the Pondicherry NWR from the rail trail 
to Cherry Pond. While nothing extraordinary, we did have 16 warbler species 
including my FOY Blackpoll. Also, although I did not count the bird, believe 
that I had a Tennessee Warbler as I heard a song several times that was exactly 
TEWA’s 2nd and 3rd parts but without I could not hear the first part. It was 
in the area just as you come to the first pond\railway junction along the rail 
trail. 


Afterwards, we stopped by the airport pond where we did see the previously 
reported Common Gallinule as well as had Bobolinks, Wilson’s Snipe, Greater 
Yellowlegs, etc. 


Charlie Nims
Bartlett, NH

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Subject: waterfowl migration at Hinsdale
From: Hector Galbraith <hg2 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 08:43:39 -0400
The waterbird migration stutters on. This morning there was a male american 
wigeon and two r-n grebes. Also around, singing Tennessee Warblers and 
Wilson’s warblers. Both Alder and Willow flys sining in the reedbeds. 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
hg2 AT myfairpoint.net 
802 258 4836




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Subject: Lake Wantastiquet and Surry Mtn Lake for Birdathon - 81 species
From: Christian Martin <cmartin AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 02:44:30 +0000
Greetings all,

Zero, zippo, zilch people joined me for my early morning canoe exploration of 
Lake Wantastiquet (the impoundment of the CT River above the Vernon Dam) in 
Hinsdale and a shorter on-foot visit to Surry Mtn Lake in Surry around mid-day. 
This was an official Birdathon field trip for the NH Audubon Conservation 
Department. Really people, are there no other birders who like birding from 
their canoe??? All together, from 0700 to 1400, I tallied 81 species of birds 
and basically skipped the blooms. 


Highlights included:

2 migrating common loons over the CT River (1 of which had to make a mile wide 
circle detour to gain enough elevation on the 2nd try to clear a 300-ft high 
powerline that cross the river) 

2 northern shovelers at Lake Wantastiquet
7 bald eagles for the day (5 of which were flightless ... figure that out!)
1 peregrine falcon which caught a blue jay over my canoe in the middle of Lake 
Wantastiquet (heard the impact before I saw it) 

30 (minimum) singing marsh wrens in the cattail islands at Lake Wantastiquet 
(NH side only) 

pair of rough-winged swallows nesting (again this season) in a pipe draining a 
concrete wall at the Surry Dam overflow channel. 


- Chris

Chris Martin
Senior Biologist, NH Audubon
cmartin AT nhaudubon.org

84 Silk Farm Road, Concord, NH 03301
603/224-9909, ext. 317 (office)
603/226-0902 (fax)

www.nhaudubon.org

New Hampshire Audubon - Protecting New Hampshire's natural environment for 
wildlife and for people. 


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Subject: Chuck-wills-widow star island
From: eric masterson <erictheirish AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 22:01:04 -0400
Caprimulgid on island since Friday night was refound today at 3pm - I
checked with several folks who have more experience of the species than me
and signs point to chuck-wills-widow. Will post tomorrow if refound. The
white-winged dove found last nite appears to have moved on (it's been that
kind of weekend). More later.

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Subject: photos from Rob's Walk
From: "J. Esten" <jennifere1234 AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2016 01:28:54 +0000 (UTC)
photos from Rob Woodward's walk this morning at Everett Dam conservation lands, 
Weare, NH, 

including Acadia Flycatcher and Black-billed Cuckoo 
click on link to my ebird report: 

http://ebird.org/ebird/ view/checklist?subID=S29814672 

Jen Esten 
New London 

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Subject: Last chance for NH Audubon spring pelagic birding trip
From: Jon Woolf <jsw AT jwoolfden.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 18:33:16 -0400




Subject: top this list! - Clough State Park
From: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 16:56:24 +0000 (UTC)

----- Original Message -----

From: ebird-checklist AT cornell.edu 
To: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net 
Sent: Saturday, May 21, 2016 12:53:22 PM 
Subject: eBird Report - Everett Dam conservation lands--E. Weare Rd., Weare, 
May 21, 2016 


Everett Dam conservation lands--E. Weare Rd., Weare, Hillsborough, New 
Hampshire, US 

May 21, 2016 7:00 AM - 11:00 AM 
Protocol: Traveling 
2.0 mile(s) 
Comments: What a fantastic day! The park has such a lovely setting with such an 
abundance of birds. Apart from the rarities I'll mention, the close looks at 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, American Redstart, Baltimore Oriole, Yellow Warbler, 
Chestnut-sided Warbler, and the list goes on, is worth the walk alone. After we 
reached the boundary of the state park we turned back. Within a few paces, Fern 
"Eagle Eye Lady " Schneider found a very close BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO! As soon as 
it started to sing it was joined by a SECOND Black-billed Cuckoo. They moved 
together only a little ways where we put them in the scope! By now we were 
strutting. But oh no, there was more, MUCH more! While trying to identify the 
builder of a nest I heard an odd sound. Can't be. It is! ACADIAN FLYCATCHER!!! 
The bird positioned into a better view, in a small dead tree and called out 
"Pizza!" a few times, clinching the identification. We walked back giddy, chins 
up, chests puffed out. Here is the list, including nests: 

60 species 

Mallard 1 a hen out in the marsh, probably resting and not incubating 
Hooded Merganser 1 1 flyby seen and we all got a good look at the nest cavity 
Great Blue Heron 1 
Turkey Vulture 1 
Broad-winged Hawk 1 
Red-tailed Hawk 1 
Spotted Sandpiper 2 
Mourning Dove 6 
Black-billed Cuckoo 2 both seen in same bush very close, then scoped 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1 
Downy Woodpecker 2 
Hairy Woodpecker 1 
Pileated Woodpecker 2 
American Kestrel 1 perched high in the tallest dead pine out in the marsh 
ACADIAN FLYCATCHER 1 heard well at close range, (pizza!) then it flew to a 
nearby tree where it sang again and was well photographed. We were ready to 
attempt a recording of the voice but it would not return. Probably not a 
chaseable bird. 

Alder Flycatcher 1 
Willow Flycatcher 2 
Least Flycatcher 6 
Eastern Phoebe 2 1 nest on the side of a boulder in the river 
Great Crested Flycatcher 1 
Eastern Kingbird 4 we found a nest 
Red-eyed Vireo 2 
Blue Jay 6 
American Crow 2 
Common Raven 1 
Tree Swallow 5 
Black-capped Chickadee 6 
Tufted Titmouse 4 
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1 
White-breasted Nuthatch 1 
House Wren 3 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2 
Veery 6 
Wood Thrush 1 
American Robin 10 we saw 2 nests 
Gray Catbird 10 
Cedar Waxwing 6 
Ovenbird 2 
Louisiana Waterthrush 1 heard singing in the Pascataquag River near the 
T-intersection 

Black-and-white Warbler 5 
Common Yellowthroat 10 
American Redstart 12 
Yellow Warbler 12 we saw 1 nest 
Chestnut-sided Warbler 12 
Pine Warbler 3 
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1 
Canada Warbler 1 heard-only 
Chipping Sparrow 5 
White-throated Sparrow 1 
Song Sparrow 5 
Swamp Sparrow 1 
Eastern Towhee 5 
Scarlet Tanager 3 
Northern Cardinal 1 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 8 
Red-winged Blackbird X 
Common Grackle X 
Brown-headed Cowbird X 
Baltimore Oriole 8 we saw 2 nests 
American Goldfinch X 

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29814559 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/nh) 

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Subject: Sandhill Crane
From: "Kathy Dube" <kdube AT ncia.net>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 11:40:41 -0400
Sandhill Crane flew into field just north of Berlin Industrial park at 0940 
this morning. My husband saw 2 SaCrs 5 years ago in the same vicinity. 4 years 
ago he saw 1. 3 years ago he saw 4 lift off, gain altitude and seemed to 
depart. I never saw them so was reluctant to report. I'm going to walk the area 
this afternoon. 


Kathy Dube, Berlin

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Subject: Hinsdale Bluffs crypto-cerulean
From: Hector Galbraith <hg2 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 10:02:56 -0400
Spent about 90 minutes this morning following the putative HB cerulean warbler 
through tick-infested forest. Bird was singing continuously but never once left 
the high canopy and allow me a glimpse. So, it sings like a cerulean, it 
behaves like a cerulean, but a sighting is needed before we can be sure. If 
anyone wants to take a swing at it - it is at the intersection of the main rail 
trail and the trail out to Hinsdale Bluffs (a map is in my recent ebook, Birds 
of Hinsdale Setbacks and Bluffs). Be prepared, though, for frustration. Also 
around were three Wilson’s warblers and a single Lincoln’s sparrow. 



Hector Galbraith, PhD
hg2 AT myfairpoint.net 
802 258 4836




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Subject: Whip-poor-will Survey/Evans-Parker Mt Strafford
From: Scott Young <SAYoung603 AT outlook.com>
Date: Sat, 21 May 2016 12:12:34 +0000
Last night between 8:30 and 10:15 pm a group of 4 encountered 19 WPWs below the 
ridgeline. A significant portion of the 2.5 mile stretch birds were 
undetectable due to piercing Peeper volume. 



Scott A. Young
Strafford

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