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Updated on Tuesday, July 28 at 08:45 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Horned Coots,©BirdQuest

28 Jul Re: name that tern [Phyllis ]
28 Jul Inland Sandpipers [Dylan Jackson ]
28 Jul Glossy Ibis at Rochester WTP [Dan Hubbard ]
28 Jul name that tern [Jeanne-Marie ]
28 Jul Nesting Chimney Swifts at Whipple Hill in Lyme ["'Blake Allison' via NHBirds" ]
26 Jul Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, July 27, 2015 ["Mark Suomala" ]
27 Jul Mt Sunapee Sandpipers and a Trask Brook newcomer [Dylan Jackson ]
28 Jul Avocet am, and those cranes [Len Medlock ]
27 Jul nighthawk confirmed breeding on the Green Hills Preserve ["'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" ]
27 Jul The passing of Maureen Lein [Steve Mirick ]
27 Jul Swan I.D. followup [Amy Kane ]
27 Jul Ponemah Bog Bird Walk 7/25 ["'Molly J' via NHBirds" ]
27 Jul squabbling kingfishers, fledgling ospreys [DAGForsyth via NHBirds ]
26 Jul Red-bellied Woodpecker eating grape jelly [Dan Hubbard ]
26 Jul 80 Chimney Swifts & 1 Juv. BC Night Heron - Exeter [Samuel Lewis ]
26 Jul Red-shouldered Hawk, Exeter [Samuel Lewis ]
26 Jul Swan I.D.? [Amy Kane ]
26 Jul Coastal Odds & Ends (AVOCET, Least Terns, Lesser Black-backed Gulls, etc.) [Steve Mirick ]
26 Jul Nesting Ospreys in Bath plus falcons, no Monroe cranes today [Jeff MacQueen ]
26 Jul Avocet in Seabrook [Steve ]
26 Jul Old Mill Road, Lee ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]
25 Jul Expert opinions needed [Dylan Jackson ]
25 Jul Horseshoe Pond Peregrine and more [Dylan Jackson ]
25 Jul Alpha bins for sale ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
25 Jul Alpha binoculars for sale ["hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" ]
25 Jul Black-backed Woodpecker at Pondicherry NWR in Jefferson [David Govatski ]
25 Jul Evening Grosbeak [Sandy Turner ]
25 Jul Sandhill Cranes [Sandy Turner ]
25 Jul Horseshoe Pond Peregrine YES [Dylan Jackson ]
24 Jul Trask Brook 7/24 [Dylan Jackson ]
24 Jul Least Tern Chick ["'Jenna Pettipas' via NHBirds" ]
24 Jul MID-SUMMER BIRDING IN CONCORD [Stephanie Parkinson ]
24 Jul Peregrine and Grasshopper Sparrows, Fish Crows, Nashua area [Christine Sheridan ]
24 Jul Fish Crow, Durham ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]
24 Jul Nashaway Chapter Field Trip - Ponemah Bog July 25 [Jane Wing ]
24 Jul Spotted a Spotted Sandpiper [keith chamberlin ]
23 Jul MS KITE at Piscassic St again today, flight photos [Joel Huntress ]
23 Jul RE: judging age of juvenile Bald Eagle [Christian Martin ]
23 Jul judging age of juvenile Bald Eagle [jennmckown1 via NHBirds ]
23 Jul Sandhill Cranes [Sandy Turner ]
23 Jul a day at the beach [Jeanne-Marie ]
22 Jul Indigo bunting, Bedford [Cheryl Champy ]
22 Jul Peregrine Falcon Flyover - Concord, NH [David Lipsy ]
22 Jul Peregrine Falcon juvenile in Kingston [Scott Heron ]
22 Jul Rockingham Park Osprey, nesting success [Kyle Wilmarth ]
22 Jul More Barred Owl mortality [Dylan Jackson ]
21 Jul Fwd: Photo of young Peregrine with a first catch, Nashua [Christine Sheridan ]
21 Jul Nashua Peregrines have fledged, and a Ring-billed Gull... [Christine Sheridan ]
21 Jul Lake Sunapee area shorebirds [Dylan Jackson ]
21 Jul Little Blue Heron, yes [Kyle Wilmarth ]
21 Jul Barred Owl mortality [Dylan Jackson ]
20 Jul Green Heron [Phyllis ]
20 Jul Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, 7/20/15 ["Mark Suomala" ]
20 Jul Quick coast run - no LBH, but shorebirds + ibis [Jon Woolf ]
20 Jul Monarch Butterfly Program by Lincoln Brower in Lancaster and Jackson, NH Thursday and Friday Evening [David Govatski Gmail ]
20 Jul Ammonoosuc Chapter Program on Moths in Bethlehem Wednesday 22 July 2015 [David Govatski Gmail ]
20 Jul Little Blue Heron - YES [Steve Mirick ]
20 Jul 7/18/15 High Country Report Part II / Carter Range [CK Borg ]
19 Jul Little Blue Heron in Rye [Jason Lambert ]
19 Jul Trask Brook this morning [Dylan Jackson ]
20 Jul Cory's and storm-petrels [Rebecca ]
19 Jul Top of 1st, bottom of Osprey [Cliff Otto ]
20 Jul Peregrine attacks gull - Concord []
19 Jul Nighthawks and Bittern in Springfield [raqbirds via NHBirds ]
18 Jul Enfield and Trask Brook Road [Dylan Jackson ]
18 Jul Hampton/Seabrook/Exeter - Glossy Ibis, Black-crowned Night-Herons, shorebirds [Scott Heron ]
18 Jul NH Coast (Wilson's Storm-Petrels, ICELAND GULL) [Steve Mirick ]
18 Jul purple martins FunSpot [Matt Tarr ]
18 Jul turkeys [Sylvia Miskoe ]
18 Jul not a bird - west Concord [Anne Hadshi ]
18 Jul Spotted Sandpipers Ashland [Keith chamberlin ]
17 Jul Trask Brook newcomers [Dylan Jackson ]
17 Jul Rochester WTP Pectoral Sandpiper [Dan Hubbard ]
17 Jul Black-crowned Night Heron - Great Island Common, New Castle [Colleen Prieto ]
17 Jul Mount Washington birding (Ring-necked Ducks, American Pipits, WHITE MOUNTAIN ARCTICS) [Steve Mirick ]
17 Jul tricky juvenile birds/plumages, rare birds of summer, "fall" migration, and my July 25 field trip [raqbirds via NHBirds ]

Subject: Re: name that tern
From: Phyllis <pyaffie AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:41:24 -0400
Caspian

Phyllis Yaffie
Deerfield

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 28, 2015, at 7:04 PM, Jeanne-Marie  wrote:
> 
> I came across these terns today, not making a sound, sitting quietly on 
meadow pond. 

> Having a bit of a time deciding what they are. These birds appeared large, 
were relatively close, (perhaps lighting artifact? ) with what appears to be a 
sizable red-orange sizable bill, and dusky tip. 

> https://flic.kr/p/wknjNq , https://flic.kr/p/wknkPJ
> Thoughts?
> thanks 
> 
> Jeanne-Marie
> 
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Subject: Inland Sandpipers
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 21:17:07 -0400
Today I visited a few areas after work and ended up finding a decent diversity 
of shorebirds. 


My first stop to the sand and gravel pit owned by United Construction in 
Newport yielded a continuing Spotted Sandpiper. I initially saw it on the 
ground but as I approached it quickly flew back to where I photographed it 
last, on top of a bunch of parked trailers: https://flic.kr/p/wkvEAU 


Next, I went back to Mount Sunapee State Park. There I found some continuing 
shorebirds. The four Killdeer were still present as was he single Solitary 
Sandpiper. The juvenile Semipalmated Sandpiper continued today as well but this 
time was in the company of an adult: https://flic.kr/p/vF8MyQ 


Finally, I stopped briefly at Trask Brook Road. It's been a few days since I've 
seen or heard any Wilson's Snipe there (although the second hay-cutting has 
begun so hopefully they'll be more visible again), but I was happy to see one 
fly from one side of the road to the other, calling in flight. 


This brings my day's total to five shorebird species. Not a bad turnout in an 
area shorebirds may not come easily. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee


Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Glossy Ibis at Rochester WTP
From: Dan Hubbard <danielhubbard AT peoplepc.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 20:34:08 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
There was a Glossy Ibis at the treatment plant this am. It had a white band on 
its crown and white on its throat. Many shorebirds were present including 
Killdeer, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Solitary Sandpipers, Spotted 
Sandpipers, and Semipalmated and Least Sandpipers. A couple of Bobolinks, a 
Green Heron, and a Fish Crow were nice also. 

Dan Hubbard, Rochester

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Subject: name that tern
From: Jeanne-Marie <jeannemariemaher AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 19:04:50 -0400
I came across these terns today, not making a sound, sitting quietly on meadow 
pond. 

Having a bit of a time deciding what they are. These birds appeared large, were 
relatively close, (perhaps lighting artifact? ) with what appears to be a 
sizable red-orange sizable bill, and dusky tip. 

https://flic.kr/p/wknjNq , https://flic.kr/p/wknkPJ
Thoughts?
thanks 

Jeanne-Marie

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Subject: Nesting Chimney Swifts at Whipple Hill in Lyme
From: "'Blake Allison' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 03:03:25 +0000 (UTC)
Three years ago, chimney swifts started visiting the skies over the home 
property. Last fall, maintenance regularly scheduled chimney cleaning produced 
a nest. This spring, four chimney swifts appeared. Today there were five 
chittering overhead. 

The home property is in a rural setting; open fields surrounded by stands of 
mixed hardwoods and conifers. I usually associate chimney swifts with more 
developed circumstances and older chimney habitats. Ours is a relatively new 
and somewhat "afield" settlement. It is a happy and unanticipated occurrence. 
to have the swifts We are enjoying their presence and hope the family prospers. 

Blake Allison 
Lyme, NH 03768-3322

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, July 27, 2015
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 21:17:43 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, July 27th, 2015.



At least 1 AMERICAN AVOCET was seen in Hampton Harbor on July 25th, and 
there were additional sightings of possibly the same individual reported 
from Seabrook Marsh on the 26th, and 27th.



An immature LITTLE BLUE HERON was seen in the salt marsh located on the west 
side of Route 1A and just south of Odiorne Point State Park in Rye, on July 
19th, 20th, 21st, and 23rd.



A pair of LEAST TERNS is nesting on the beach in Hampton Beach State Park, 
where they were seen with a chick on July 25th. 3 more LEAST TERNS were seen 
at Meadow Pond in Hampton, also on the 25th.



2 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were seen at Jenness Beach in Rye on July 25th.



2 adult PIPING PLOVERS and 2 chicks were seen foraging on the Seabrook side 
of Hampton Harbor on July 26th.



3 SANDHILL CRANES were seen behind the cemetery on Plains Road in Monroe on 
July 23rd, and 27th.



At least 2 pairs of MISSISSIPPI KITES have nested in Newmarket this year and 
there is currently at least 1 youngster. The KITES have been seen flying 
near Gonet Road in Newmarket, and 1 has been reported on multiple occasions 
from Piscasssic Street.



There were several sightings of PEREGRINE FALCONS, including juveniles, from 
Concord, Kingston, and Nashua during the past week.



7 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were seen at Cemetery Fields in Amherst on July 23rd.



FISH CROWS were reported from Durham and Nashua during the past week.



COMMON NIGHTHAWK fledglings have been reported from nest sites in Concord, 
Franklin, and North Conway – let’s hope they survive this vulnerable time!



A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER was seen near Little Cherry Pond at the 
Pondicherry National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson on July 25th.



A colony of 13 pairs of PURPLE MARTINS is nesting along Cross Beach Road in 
Seabrook and up to 20 individuals were observed on July 25th.



An EVENING GROSBEAK was seen in Lyman on July 25th.



80 CHIMNEY SWIFTS were seen entering a chimney to roost for the night in 
Exeter on July 26th.



A probable fall season migrant PALM WARBLER was reported from Etna on July 
22nd.  For some birds, the summer is over!



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org


Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Mt Sunapee Sandpipers and a Trask Brook newcomer
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 21:15:20 -0400
After work today I made a couple stops in some local places. I first went to Mt 
Sunapee State Park where I found a continuing large group of Wood Ducks with a 
count of 22. There were four Killdeer, a solitary Solitary Sandpiper and, the 
highlight, a single Semipalmated Sandpiper. This is the first SESA I've had in 
the Lake Sunapee area: 

https://flic.kr/p/wzUi5a
https://flic.kr/p/whPgzW

After that, I went to Trask Brook Road in Sunapee and took a long walk up and 
down the road. A lot of the usuals around. I was delighted to find a first 
winter female Chestnut-sided Warbler at the bridge: 

https://flic.kr/p/wzTVai
I also had a tailless Easter Phoebe juvenile near the bridge. An awful peculiar 
look: 

https://flic.kr/p/whVnFx

One final note is that I had my first-for-the-spot Ruby-throated Hummingbird 
flying about the "island" of thick brush and trees in the field south of the 
road. Getting closer to my 100 total species for the location! 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Avocet am, and those cranes
From: Len Medlock <lenmedlock AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015 01:00:13 +0000 (UTC)
On way to work, the Avocet was present for about 3 minutes in the same pool as 
yesterday (try for it at 8:35am--perhaps it likes this pool at high tide). On 
Friday, "on the way" to help a friend in Maine, I stopped by to snap a photo of 
the cranes in Monroe; one was jumping around a lot, presumably exercising for 
the long journey south (no sure when they split). 


Len Medlock
Exeter, NH
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lmedlock 

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Subject: nighthawk confirmed breeding on the Green Hills Preserve
From: "'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 21:25:56 +0000 (UTC)
On Saturday, while hiking up Black Cap in North Conway with my son and a 
friend, I came across an unusual call that turned out to be a female common 
nighthawk defending one or two small chicks. Though we couldn't see the 
chick(s), their faint calls were audible and distinctively juvenile-sounding. 
In addition, the adult female was clearly agitated so upon observing as closely 
as was comfortable for both the nighthawk and myself (the female was making odd 
sounds and looked fierce!), we decided to give them some distance. I was able 
to take a few photos and videos with my phone, and managed to see two halves of 
a hatched egg on the rock with the adult nighthawk. The young looked to be 
stashed away safely underneath an overhanging rock, so hopefully they will fare 
well with lots of nearby hikers, dogs, and whatever else comes their way until 
migration gets underway - can you believe nighthawk migration peaks in about a 
month?! 

The common nighthawk is a state-endangered breeding bird, and this is the 
first-known natural nesting attempt (not on a rooftop) this year! Anyone who is 
interested in helping NH Audubon monitor this site for nighthawk activity 
should contact Becky Suomala at rsuomala AT nhaudubon.org 


The Nature Conservancy's Black Cap Mountain, at 2,369-feet, offers incredible 
views of the Whites and the surrounding Saco Valley for relatively little 
effort. A modest 650' elevation gain over 1.1 miles gets you to the broad, 
rocky summit - which seemed to have ample nighthawk nesting opportunities. 

Phil Brown
Hancock, NH

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Subject: The passing of Maureen Lein
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 13:46:31 -0400
It is with great sadness, that I share the news of the sudden passing of 
Maureen Lein.

Maureen has been a member and contributor to the NHBirds email list as 
far back as 2004.  Over the years, she has shared her love of birds from 
her neighborhoods in Chester and Ossipee.  On a personal and 
professional level, I have had the pleasure of working with Maureen and 
being a friend of hers for over 25 years.  I just looked through my 
records and see that I shared a sighting of 175 Bohemian Waxwings that 
she found outside the window from her desk in Dover on January 18, 1994!

Our thoughts go out to her husband Steve.


http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/unionleader/obituary.aspx?n=maureen-m-lein&pid=175366318&fhid=4703 


Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Swan I.D. followup
From: Amy Kane <amykane AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:29:38 +0000 (UTC)
Thanks to NH bird experts for identifying the swan that is (still) visiting my 
backyard pond as a Whooper Swan. What I learned from the experts' emailed 
replies... the Whooper Swan is a Eurasian species with the closest wild 
population located in Iceland, so highly unlikely to be a wild bird. It 
probably escaped from some swan keeper or zoo in the area. (Apparently you can 
order a pair of pinioned 3-year-old Whooper Swans from Meyer Hatchery in Ohio 
for $2,100 plus $355 shipping!) This is probably the same bird seen recently at 
Lamprey Pond, Hampton. Flickr album: https://flic.kr/s/aHskgXjGBb 


Amy Kane 
North Hampton, NH 

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Subject: Ponemah Bog Bird Walk 7/25
From: "'Molly J' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:01:38 +0000 (UTC)
Went on a casual morning birding walk at Ponemah Bog in Amherst hosted by 
Pamela Hunt of NH Audubon with about ten others. Although I've been there 
before I haven't gone with birding in mind until now (though in the past I have 
seen a Great Egret at the pond). It was a very overcast day, leading the 
dragonflies to retreat (didn't see a single one all day!) to the bushes. 
Unfortunately not much to report in the way of birds either; several eastern 
towhees singing, a few cedar waxwings, a large flock of grackles, two 
yellowthroats, and a killdeer overhead among the usual others. One person in 
the group reported seeing a black and white warbler but we didn't see it again. 
Overall, more robins than anything else! I'd love to return during migration, 
as the bog is known for being such a hotspot. Afterwards I drove to Cemetery 
Fields, only a few minutes away. I was hoping to see some grasshopper sparrows, 
but alas it wasn't fated to be. There was a flock of bobolinks, only 
females/immatures however. Heard one savannah sparrow, and saw a lone bank 
swallow circling the field amongst some barn swallows. Still hoping to make it 
to the coast for migration, I'm looking into any field trips or birding groups 
headed out there in the month of August or September. -Molly 


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Subject: squabbling kingfishers, fledgling ospreys
From: DAGForsyth via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2015 09:55:34 -0400
Over the weekend, got decent photos of two kingfishers squabbling over a  
fish in Randolph, NH, and two fledgling osprey in Dummer, NH, just minutes 
away  from leaving the nest. Other recent photos include yellow-breasted 
flycatcher,  gray jay, Swainson's thrush, purple finch, pair of rose-breasted  
grosbeaks...
 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/113232207 AT N06/sets/72157641541261483
 
David Forsyth

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Subject: Red-bellied Woodpecker eating grape jelly
From: Dan Hubbard <danielhubbard AT peoplepc.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 22:21:48 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
The usual orioles and catbirds eating grape jelly have been joined by a young 
Red-bellied Woodpecker for the last two days. 

Dan Hubbard, Rochester

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Subject: 80 Chimney Swifts & 1 Juv. BC Night Heron - Exeter
From: Samuel Lewis <samlewis100 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 21:06:04 -0400
    The great evening continues.  We came to check on the swift roost and
were treated to the funny heron activity too.

2    Great Blue Heron - one in the river fishing. The other was on top of
the library chimney surveying the whole place.
    1    Black-crowned Night-Heron - one juvenile attacking a stick on the
dam, (so funny to watch) and then slowly moving along the dam inspecting
it.
    80    Chimney Swift -   all went into the chimney at 2 String Bridge. V
& I separately counted the crowd as they dropped into the chimney and took
the average.
    1    Gray Catbird

Observer: samlewis100
2015-07-26 20:00
Exeter, 2-22 String Bridge
Protocol: Stationary
35 Minutes
Observers: 2
All birds reported? Yes

This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog (
http://birdseyebirding.com/)

--
Samuel Lewis
Exeter, NH
samlewis100 at Gmail.com

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Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk, Exeter
From: Samuel Lewis <samlewis100 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 19:16:51 -0400
We just had a beautiful red-shouldered hawk hunting right along Holland Way
in Exeter. It went from a dead snag to the top of a telephone pole, and
then dove to the ground to land on the top of an unsuspecting head. Alas,
the dinner guest got away. However, we had a front row view as it came up
from the roadside not 30ft from me and flew into the woods.

--
Samuel Lewis
Exeter, NH
samlewis100 at Gmail.com

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Subject: Swan I.D.?
From: Amy Kane <amykane AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 21:57:24 +0000 (UTC)
There is a swan in our backyard pond right now, a first!. It looks a bit young 
and lost and definitely not like the mute swans I see at Eel Pond all the time. 
It's beak is black and yellow. Photos here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskgXjGBb Can 
you help me I.D. it? 


Amy Kane 
North Hampton 

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Subject: Coastal Odds & Ends (AVOCET, Least Terns, Lesser Black-backed Gulls, etc.)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 17:27:15 -0400
Nice day today as it stayed cool enough and cloudy enough to keep the 
beach goers at bay.  And birds are changing!  Nice to see the changes in 
the seasons of birds.  Shorebird numbers are increasing and more 
juveniles are showing up along the coast.  Before you know it, winter 
will be here!  ;-)

Birding sans Jane.  Solo today....except for the company of Kyle & 
Amanda, Ben & Lauren, Scott Heron, Steve Bennett, JoAnn, Jim Sparrell, 
and Jason.  Some photos and highlights:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/

AMERICAN AVOCET - 1 adult in pools off Route 286 in Seabrook this 
morning.  Late yesterday afternoon, Kyle Wilmarth and Amanda Altena 
texted to report one or two Avocets flying south as they were kayaking 
in Hampton harbor.  It was thought that this bird continued south to 
Plum Island where one was seen late yesterday, but apparently not as 
this bird was present this morning in Seabrook. Unfortunately, it only 
stayed in the pools for about 10 minutes before flying north (so it is 
likely still in NH) toward Hampton harbor.  Despite a lot of people 
searching, it was not relocated today.  This would appear to be the 7th 
record for the state of New Hampshire and the first July record.

LEAST TERNS - Used to be an uncommon to rare species in NH, but not 
anymore!  I saw both adults with the chick yesterday (nearly ready to 
fledge), but didn't check today.  Today I had 3 Least Terns (one 
juvenile) in back of Little Jack's in Hampton and 3 more at Meadow Pond 
today.

LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL - Two 2nd summer birds on Jenness Beach in Rye 
with a boat load of other gulls.  An increasingly common year-round 
visitor; however, these are only my 3rd and 4th of the year.

BONAPARTE'S GULL - There appears to be an influx of adult Bonaparte's 
Gulls in the last couple of days, and today I had my first JUVENILES of 
the year.  Two on Eel Pond in Rye.  They were part of a flock of 24 
which appeared to be a migrating flock south along Route 1A in Rye.  I 
followed them until they settled on the pond and then on Jenness Beach.

PURPLE MARTIN - 20.  This is my personal high count (ever) in NH. All at 
the nesting area on Cross Beach Road in Seabrook.  Amazing how this 
little colony has exploded while the species in general is on the 
decline.  Here are a couple of photos.

HERONS/IBIS - I had two juvenile Glossy Ibis yesterday, but none today.  
White-faced appears to have moved on.  Egrets have been scattered, but 
not in big numbers.  I did not get the juvenile Little Blue Heron and I 
don't believe anyone has had it recently.

WILSON'S STORM-PETREL - 24.  Without a lot of effort.  16 off Little 
Boar's Head and another 8 or so south of Odiorne.  Starting to 
(finally)increase along the coast.

NORTHERN GANNET - One 1st summer bird off Pulpit Rocks in Rye.

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Nesting Ospreys in Bath plus falcons, no Monroe cranes today
From: Jeff MacQueen <jmacqueen AT sau88.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 14:48:12 -0400
I visited a few spots this morning in the subject line area. I started at
Long Pond in Benton, quiet for birds and windy. I then checked the Osprey
nest on the power line tower in Bath. I watched one adult bring a fish to
three large nestlings while the other adult remained perched on the tower.
While I was there, a Merlin harassed one of the Osprey parents and got
quite close to the nest before moving away. Four power line towers south
along the power line cut were a pair of American Kestrels.
   I then checked the hayfields of Monroe for the Sandhill Crane family
without luck today. I saw them earlier this year on the Vermont side. I
have gone several times every year for a while and I would say I have seen
"Oscar" and now his family about once for every three tries. There must be
some inaccessible hayfields in Monroe where they sometimes hang out,
because at least for me, they are never a sure thing.
   Lastly, I stopped at Bedell Bridge State Park on the way home. The only
noteworthy bird was a Red-bellied Woodpecker. Evidence of this
species' northward expansion is the fact that they are regular here now,
resident and I suspect breeding. I have had them every visit for a couple
of years now. Just a reminder to those who haven't visited this hotspot in
a while, there are now trails that make this great spot even more
accessible, check it out!     Jeff MacQueen, Orford

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Subject: Avocet in Seabrook
From: Steve <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 09:24:21 -0400
An American Avocet found by Kyle yesterday continues today in pools off Rt 286 
in Seabrook. NOW. 

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Subject: Old Mill Road, Lee
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Sun, 26 Jul 2015 12:17:42 +0000
Birders,

50 minutes at the mitigation area at Old Mill Road in Lee were very productive 
this morning, with 41 species found (I have no idea how many were lost). 



Highlights:  2 Solitary Sandpipers

--1 Wilson's Snipe

--a big family of Wood Ducks

--calling Virginia Rail

--Kestrel

--several woodpeckers

--calling Willow Flycatcher

--foraging Kingbirds

--2 Bank Swallows (only swallows there, oddly)

--Thrasher

--Field and Vesper (!) Sparrows singing

--Yellow-throated Vireo

--1 young Blue-winged Warbler

--and the last bird was a singing Indigo Bunting

--no ticks (yet--that might be what I've lost)


Kurk Dorsey

Durham

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Subject: Expert opinions needed
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 21:10:13 -0400
Yup, I'm going to by that guy right now and double post, but I didn't want to 
throw this at the end of my last one and have it go unnoticed. As I said the 
other day, I was birding Trask Brook Road in Sunapee and while walking around 
the "island" of brush and trees in the middle of the south field I saw a 
sparrow that immediately got my attention. In an area that is inundated with 
Song and Savannah Sparrows, I find this bird unique in how it was able to grab 
my attention so quickly. 

This bird seemed bulkier than both a SOSP or SASP. It was much grayer overall 
in appearance than the other species. It showed a less stout bill and less 
pronounced breast streaking than a SOSP. It showed a white eye-ring and white 
malars. It also didn't show any of the dark rufous crown and facial markings 
like that of a SOSP. 

All these signs point to Vesper Sparrow but I want to be sure before recording 
this species for this location because it'd be a Trask Brook, Sunapee, and 
Sullivan County first for me. I've spent a while looking at my photo of it and 
I can't convince myself it's not a Vesper. So that's why I'm turning to the 
birding community. If anyone can help me make a definitive ID on this bird Id 
greatly appreciate it. Sorry for the low quality, sometimes too much sun can be 
as much my enemy as not enough: 

Vesper Sparrow:
https://flic.kr/p/wcjuwh

Also for you're viewing pleasure. I got a pretty good photo of a pair of 
Bobolink. I was going for a picture of the male and didn't even see the female 
until later: 

https://flic.kr/p/wtf7yd

-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Horseshoe Pond Peregrine and more
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 20:57:34 -0400
As I posted earlier I went to Horseshoe Pond in Concord this morning for a few 
hours with my main target being a Peregrine Falcon. I arrived and parked 
outside the Grapponne Conference Center and walked down Commercial Street and 
up the railroad tracks to the prison fields and back. My walk to the tracks 
showed no sign of any Peregrines but my outing turned up some notable sightings 
still. 

Just north of the railroad bridge that goes over the pond I saw a small bird 
fly from the cornfield into the tree branches on the other side of the tracks. 
I was surprised to see it was a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH. Seemed very out of 
habitat and couldn't help but think that it may be an early migrant: 
https://flic.kr/p/wct3La 


Further up the tracks where they pass through the pond in the northwestern 
half, I heard the kiddicks of a VIRGINIA RAIL. I also had a flyby of a bird 
that I believe was an Orchard Oriole, right size, black and chestnut in color, 
but I didn't get a great look and didn't put it on my ebird checklist. Just up 
from that, where the woods are usually flooded on the west side of the tracks 
were two SOLITARY SANDPIPERS. 


Up further along the tracks where they meet the pond that's adjacent to the 
prison fields help many more notables. Near the pond I had three BLUE-GRAY 
GNATCATCHERS: https://flic.kr/p/wus1bH 

I also came across two GREEN HERONS that were flushed and perched in some very 
photogenic places (I need a better lens!): https://flic.kr/p/vx7KzP 

Also in this area were two WILLOW FLYCATCHERS (https://flic.kr/p/wtZLyD). 
Though not a rare bird by any means, they are very seldom in my area of the 
state and are nice to find when I bird other places. 


Finally, as I was making my way back to my car I saw a larger bird flying over 
Horseshoe Pond Place coming from the west. I was elated to see it was a 
PEREGRINE FALCON. It flew up and soared over high over the area for a few 
minutes moving south. When I first saw it fly in its back appeared slatey gray. 
From underneath it looked lighter with fine markings and didn't seem to have a 
heavily vertically streaked breast. That being said I didn't have great views 
because of its altitude and brightness of the background so I can't say for 
certain it was an adult. From my photo you can see it's missing a tail feather 
so perhaps it could be a molting adult, but I'm no expert: 
https://flic.kr/p/vwZfKj 


All in all, a surprisingly productive outing yielding 52 species. This spot 
continues to be one of my favorites after my first trip here two years ago to 
see a visiting Great Egret. Since then it's provided lots of cool birds for me 
like Peregrines, Glossy Ibis, 

Lark Sparrows, a Black-crowned Night-Heron and surely more surprises to come.

-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Alpha bins for sale
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 18:00:32 -0400
Oops, forget to say, my email address is hg2 AT myfairpoint.net and my phone 
number is 802 258 4836. 


Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Alpha binoculars for sale
From: "hg2 AT myfairpoint.net" <hg2@myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 17:57:58 -0400
Steve Mirick has kindly allowed me permission to post this non-birding item on 
NHBirds. Many thanks Steve. 


For sale: three pairs of high quality bins.

First, a pair of Swarovision 8x32. Mint condition except fora couple of scuffs 
on the bodywork optics perfect. A really nice pair of light mid-sized 
Binoculars. Price new is about $2,000. Selling for $1,600. 


Next a recently bought pair of Leica Ultravid plus 7x42. The latest in the 
Leica line and a terrific instrument. About 5 months old and in mint condition. 
Price new about $2,400, selling for $1,800, 


Last a pair of Zeiss FL 8x42. About 6 years old but in pristine optical 
condition. bodywork with some scuffs. $800. 


Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Black-backed Woodpecker at Pondicherry NWR in Jefferson
From: David Govatski <david.govatski AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 17:12:24 -0400
On Saturday 25 July 2015 I saw a female black-backed woodpecker near Little 
Cherry Pond in the Pondicherry National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson. It was 
around noon and there was not a lot of other bird activity then. 


David Govatski
Jefferson, NH

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Subject: Evening Grosbeak
From: Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 10:36:37 -0400
A gorgeous male Evening Grosbeak enjoyed a late breakfast at our feeder this
morning.... got on our 10.5-mile survey count.

Sandy and Mark Turner
Lyman

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Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 10:23:22 -0400
The 3 Sandhill Cranes in Monroe are 2 adults and the presumed colt from
last year.  There has been no sign of nesting this year, except a short
period when only
2 were seen.

Sandy Turner
Lyman

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Subject: Horseshoe Pond Peregrine YES
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Jul 2015 10:22:32 -0400
I plan on elaborating more on my outing this morning to Horseshoe Pond in 
Concord later today but I feel like I should get the word out to anyone looking 
that there just was a Peregrine Falcon soaring over the southern side of the 
pond. I believe an adult. It was quite high in the sky and I didn't get views 
of great detail. Have photos though. It moved on south towards the city. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Trask Brook 7/24
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 21:27:32 -0400
Today I did a morning and evening walk through of the Trask Brook Road area 
without a couple of interesting tid bits. The morning was fairly quiet overall. 
There was a pair of Yellow Warblers feeding a recently fledged juvenile near 
the bridge, an ultimate confirmation of my suspicion that there was a pair 
breeding in this spot. The Alder Flycatcher(s) at the bridge were particularly 
vocal making an assortment of different sounds including but not limited to 
their song, and their peet and rrea calls. 

In the evening outing I had about the same birds. Red-winged Blackbirds 
continue to grow in the area. Most of the birds were juveniles and seem to be 
congregating in the "island" in the middle of the southern field. I got a phone 
call while walking along the brook and OF COURSE as I began to speak a juvenile 
Green Heron flew out of the brook right next to me. Obviously I missed my photo 
opp and I was quite aggravated. On the 21st, Jack Swatt reported four GRHE 
here, which I'm assuming is the parents and juveniles. These sightings help 
substantiate my suspicion that they are breeding in the area. 

Another note is that it's been two days since my last Wilson's Snipe sighting 
here. I'm certain they're still around but have proved illusive as of late. 

I also came across a Sparrow in the "island" in the south field. This Sparrow 
caught my eye right away. It seemed larger than a Song with white malars and a 
white eye ring. This bird was grayer overall than a Song and had a finely 
streaked breast without a pronounced central spot. My immediate reaction was 
Vesper Sparrow. I have had no Vesper sightings here (or in Sunapee for that 
matter) and I did not get a response from a playback. I do have a photo that I 
will upload when I get the chance. When I do I'll post it and see if I can get 
some other opinions. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Least Tern Chick
From: "'Jenna Pettipas' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 21:34:03 +0000 (UTC)
Today at Hampton while helping to monitor the Plovers with Susan Wrisley, I got 
to see the Least Tern chick taking short flights.  It is getting off the 
ground and going a few feet distance. I got pics of one of its practice 
flights! 

7-24-15
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 Jenna 
Auburn, NH

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Subject: MID-SUMMER BIRDING IN CONCORD
From: Stephanie Parkinson <sparkinson AT sulloway.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 16:55:54 -0400
Saturday, July 25, 8:00 a.m. - Noon
In the heat of summer lots of our birds are finishing up nesting and thinking 
about winter in the tropics. We will look for nestlings as well as early fall 
migrants and you might be surprised at what we can find in the middle of the 
summer! We will walk several miles on roads and easy trails. Meet at the NH 
Audubon McLane Center in Concord at 8:00 AM. Contact Bob Quinn at 
raqbirds AT aol.com. 



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Subject: Peregrine and Grasshopper Sparrows, Fish Crows, Nashua area
From: Christine Sheridan <cmsbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:30:13 -0400
Yesterday was a good birding day, as Jeanne-Marie and I had seven (minimum)
Grasshopper Sparrows at Cemetery Field, including at least one fledgling,
along with many Savannahs, 12 or so Bobolinks, Barn and Tree Swallows, and
numerous Eastern Bluebirds among others.

In early evening, a Peregrine watch turned up three fledglings (up from 2
spotted yesterday.)  The  male bird was keeping an eye on them.  The female
was not around.  Yesterday she flew in along with one of the young; they
apparently had been hunting together, so perhaps there are more!

Driving home through the city with my windows open, I heard the "uh-uh"  of
Fish Crows, and spotted a family of four flying onto one of the downtown
buildings.

A few "documentation quality" shots of Peregrine and Grasshoppers:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/134841623 AT N02/

(I got locked out of my fLickr account and Yahoo steadfastly refuses to let
me back in, so I had to get a new account....)

Chris Sheridan,
Nashua

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Subject: Fish Crow, Durham
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 16:09:25 +0000
Birders,

There was a lone fish crow checking out dumpsters at the various gas stations 
on NH 108 in Durham today. One man's trash is another crow's treasure, i 
suppose. 



Kurk Dorsey

Durham

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Subject: Nashaway Chapter Field Trip - Ponemah Bog July 25
From: Jane Wing <janewing29 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 11:23:53 -0400
*Bird Migration *

*Rhodora Drive, Amherst, NH*



*Saturday, July 25   9 am*
Pam Hunt, New Hampshire Audubon Senior Biologist will lead a hike around
Ponemah Bog while discussing Bird Migration of the area.

Please contact Bog Steward, Jack Gleason at 673-3177 or
westonpond10 AT gmail.com with any questions.

Enjoy -

Jane Wing
Hollis, NH
Secretary, Nashaway Chapter

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Subject: Spotted a Spotted Sandpiper
From: keith chamberlin <henryrocks2010 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2015 00:02:34 -0400
Along the Squam River on the spill way behind Main St. Ashland.
There were two yesterday, courting each other and dancing along the spillway 
shaking their stuff.I taped this one earlier today.https://youtu.be/jq3VLzfkVvo 
We have seen them here for 5 years now, but this year the 2 of them seem more 
active. Keith Chamberlin and Kristine GozdenovichAshland NH 


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Subject: MS KITE at Piscassic St again today, flight photos
From: Joel Huntress <joelhuntress AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 20:18:35 -0400
Hi,

The Mississippi Kite was again in the dead tree in front of 18 Piscassic
St. I spoke with the homeowner today and he said he's been seeing it there
all summer. Gonet Dr. is one mile away as the Kite flies so it's possible
it is coming from that nesting site. I watched it for almost an hour
beginning at 6:05PM. When I left is was still there. Due to the number of
sightings here it's quite possible it's nesting very close by.

I took several photos and was lucky enough to capture it taking an insect
in flight. The photos can be seen here. I added today's photos to the
previous album of photos taken on the 16th.

https://flic.kr/s/aHskgeV7NW

Joel Huntress
Newmarket, NH

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Subject: RE: judging age of juvenile Bald Eagle
From: Christian Martin <cmartin AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 19:34:14 +0000
Jennifer –

If by 2nd year you mean hatched in 2014, then I believe you are correct. Many 
juvenile eagles that were hatched this season are now flying, but they would 
have very dark brown eyes (not light brown) and their primaries and secondaries 
would not be worn and tattered like your bird. Molting tail also not found in a 
juvenile just out of nests. By their 3rd year, both eye and beak would be 
showing some yellow color. So the eagle you photographed is not this season’s 
nestling from Lake Wentworth, although it could be one of the young from 2014 
back for a visit. 


- Chris


Chris Martin
Senior Biologist, NH Audubon
cmartin AT nhaudubon.org

84 Silk Farm Road, Concord, NH  03301
603/224-9909, x317 (office)
603/226-0902 (fax)

www.nhaudubon.org

New Hampshire Audubon – Protecting New Hampshire’s natural environment for 
wildlife and for people. 




From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com 
[mailto:nhbirds AT googlegroups.com] 

Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2015 2:43 PM
To: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [NHBirds] judging age of juvenile Bald Eagle

Still on learning curve for estimating age of Bald Eagle Juvenile. I'm guessing 
this may be a 2nd year bird? Thanks for the guidance. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/93835345 AT N07/19760744548/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/93835345 AT N07/19922546816/in/dateposted-public/

Taken at Lake Wentworth, Wolfeboro

Jennifer MCKown
Brookfield, NH
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Subject: judging age of juvenile Bald Eagle
From: jennmckown1 via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 14:43:11 -0400


Still on learning curve for estimating age of Bald Eagle Juvenile. I'm guessing 
this may be a 2nd year bird? Thanks for the guidance. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/93835345 AT N07/19760744548/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/93835345 AT N07/19922546816/in/dateposted-public/

Taken at Lake Wentworth, Wolfeboro

Jennifer MCKown
Brookfield, NH



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Subject: Sandhill Cranes
From: Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 14:36:39 -0400
We finally saw the 3 Sandhill Cranes on Plains Rd today at 9:45 AM.  They
were
behind the barn of the first farm on the left, in the tall grass.  Visible
from Plains Rd
a couple of hundred yards east.

Sandy and Mark Turner
Lyman

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Subject: a day at the beach
From: Jeanne-Marie <jeannemariemaher AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 07:43:31 -0400
Was fortunate to get a ride over to the coast yesterday and was able to locate 
the Little Blue Heron just north of Odiorne State Park on the westerly mud 
flats and sloughs (below the walkway) with a large group of snowy and great 
egrets. Was a bit like looking for where's Waldo. 


Jeanne-Marie

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Subject: Indigo bunting, Bedford
From: Cheryl Champy <woodstars AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 23:29:31 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
I was driving east on Route 101 in Bedford around 6:15pm and spotted an indigo 
bunting on the side of the road just before Hannafords. A nice surprise. 

Cheryl Champy
woodstars AT earthlink.net

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Subject: Peregrine Falcon Flyover - Concord, NH
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 20:47:55 -0400
Just now (8:25 PM) as I drove thru Concord on my way home I spotted a large 
Peregrine Falcon flying across the highway. 

It appeared to be coming from the direction of the Fort Eddy Road shopping 
area, about 100’ up on a Northwesterly heading, which would put it in an 
approximate line with the Page Belting Company building or the cliffs of the 
old quarry. 


David Lipsy
Eagle Eye Photography
Concord, NH
Email: dlipsy AT comcast.net Website: 
http://davidlipsy.zenfolio.com/  

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/ 
 

Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/eagleeyephoto/portfolio 
 

Google+ : google.com/+DavidLipsyEagleEyePhotography 
 













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Subject: Peregrine Falcon juvenile in Kingston
From: Scott Heron <smheron AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 11:34:53 -0400
Evy Nathan and I hit a couple spots this morning. One of which was Mill Rd
in Kingston which produced a young Peregrine Falcon. From the photos, I can
see a green band on its left leg. Unfortunately, the other band(s) and any
info is obscured. Someone might be able to pick out a letter or number from
the photo.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/19296160753

I wonder if this is one of the chicks from Haverhill or some other nearby
nest.

Over on Green Rd, there was a juvenile Field Sparrow foraging as well as a
father Towhee feeding his Cowbird fledgling (the apple of his eye no doubt).

Scott Heron
Kingston

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Subject: Rockingham Park Osprey, nesting success
From: Kyle Wilmarth <kyle.wilmarth AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 09:28:30 -0400
For the last few months I have loosely been keeping an eye on the pair of
Osprey that have built a nest on top of an old lighting structure in the
middle of the Rockingham Park parking lot in Salem.  Apparently I was
watching too loosely, because on Friday I stopped and saw 2 young birds
with an adult, which was nearly the same size as the young'ns on the nest.
Not sure how I missed them until now, but great to see they nested
successfully at this odd location!


Kyle Wilmarth
Salem, NH

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Subject: More Barred Owl mortality
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 07:19:29 -0400
It's truly been a dark week for owls in the Sunapee/George's Mill area. This 
morning there was a third road-kill Barred Owl on Route 11 near the Abbott 
Library in Sunapee. This is the third bird in a week. By far the most I've ever 
seen in such a short time frame. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Fwd: Photo of young Peregrine with a first catch, Nashua
From: Christine Sheridan <cmsbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 22:16:47 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Christine Sheridan 
Date: Tue, Jul 21, 2015 at 10:15 PM
Subject: Photo of young Peregrine with a first catch, Nashua

https://www.flickr.com/photos/134841623 AT N02/19876126416/in/dateposted-public/

Chris Sheridan
Nashua

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Subject: Nashua Peregrines have fledged, and a Ring-billed Gull...
From: Christine Sheridan <cmsbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 21:42:43 -0400
It's been a wild year with the Nashua Peregrines, with our territorial pair
taking an  unusual winter vacation, a rotating cast of aspirants to the
steeples, then  the return of "Rusty" and "Monster" in April, to cast out
the pretenders and then....

...as they like to do, disappear for the breeding season, only to reappear
on their hunting grounds with at least two fledglings in late July.

Much excitement this afternoon, as a husky young female returned from a
hunting foray with her own supper!  Much flying about and screeching! Many
thrills for the watchers--once again, we were unable to figure out just
where they nest, and had almost, but not quite written them off.  (Thanks
Jeanne-Marie for helping keep track of falcons this afternoon!)

Sure would be nice to get these chicks banded!  Anyone have any ideas where
the nest is?

Oh, and there was a Ring-billed Gull at Marketplace Plaza this afternoon!
First gull I've seen in Nashua for months. Something is going on down at
the dump, and it does not appear to be healthy for Gulls or Vultures.
Interesting how Crows have taken over patrolling the area for spilled
French Fries and dropped Donuts.

Chris Sheridan
Nashua

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Subject: Lake Sunapee area shorebirds
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 21:22:26 -0400
Throughout today around the Lake Sunapee area, I unintentionally got a fairly 
high count of shorebirds for an area where they can be hard to come by. I ended 
up finding four species with relatively no effort. 


1. WILSON'S SNIPE:
This morning at 6:00am at Trask Brook Road in Sunapee I had one WISN calling 
when I arrived. A return trip at 7:20pm yielded one WISN that I accidentally 
flushed up from the grass as I was walking through the field. 


2. SPOTTED SANDPIPER:
While running some errands after work around 6:00pm, I had a little time to 
kill so I stopped by the industrial area between Pinegrove Cemetery and Bald 
Mountain in Newport. In the sandpit area (right across from the drive-up 
scales) there's a small pond and one SPSA was foraging along the waters edge. 
SPSA have been very scarce around my area this year, at least from what I've 
seen. There are a few spots where I know they were breeding last year that are 
vacant this year. A little disconcerting. 


3. KILLDEER:
I had nine KILL foraging around a mudflat at Mount Sunapee State Park. It 
looked to be a mix of adult and juvenile birds. 


4. SOLITARY SANDPIPER:
I had my first post-breeding SOSA today at Mount Sunapee State Park alongside 
the KILL. 


Not a very staggering list of birds but like I said, finding more than one or 
two shorebird species in my neck in the woods in July has never been easy for 
me. I look forward to see what other shorebirds I'll be able to find up here as 
migration picks up. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Little Blue Heron, yes
From: Kyle Wilmarth <kyle.wilmarth AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 15:03:54 -0400
At 12PM today Amanda and I had the immature LITTLE BLUE HERON in the pools
south of Odiorne. It was in the northernmost pool which is partially
visible from the first parking lot south of the park entrance. It was just
beyond the fence with the wooden posts with 2 Snowy Egrets.

Amanda Altena & Kyle Wilmarth
Salem, NH

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Subject: Barred Owl mortality
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2015 08:36:00 -0400
I can't stand to see it but within a week I've seen two dead Barred Owls within 
a couple miles of each other on the side of Route 11 in Sunapee and New London. 
I cant tell by just driving by if they are adults or juveniles but it's still 
frustrating/sad to see. Barred's are always a cool sight and really our only 
regular Owl for my area. I doubt there's anyway to prevent this but I wish 
they'd figure out how a road works. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Green Heron
From: Phyllis <pyaffie AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 23:37:21 -0400
A first for us in the pond behind our home on Candia Rd. in Deerfield. We were 
able to watch him fishing (successfully) for about a half hour until he moved 
out of out sight range. 


Phyllis Yaffie
Deerfield, NH

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, 7/20/15
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 22:59:51 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, July 20th, 2015.



2 pairs of MISSISSIPPI KITES are nesting in Newmarket and there is currently 
at least 1 youngster. The KITES are most often seen flying near Gonet Road 
in Newmarket, but and 1 was reported from Piscasssic Street on July 14th, 
and again on the 16th.



3 juvenile PEREGRINE FALCONS were reported from Horseshoe Pond in Concord on 
July 16th.



2 SANDHILL CRANES were seen behind the cemetery on Plaines Road in Monroe on 
July 12th, and are probably still in the area.



An ICELAND GULL was seen at Jenness Beach in Rye on July 18th.



A pair of LEAST TERNS is nesting on the beach in Hampton Beach State Park, 
where they were seen with a chick on July 19th.



Birders on a Granite State Whale Watch cruise out of Rye Harbor on July 19th 
reported seeing: 6 CORY'S SHEARWATERS, 139 WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS, WHIMBREL, 
4 BLACK GUILLEMOTS, and a LAUGHING GULL.



An immature LITTLE BLUE HERON was seen in the salt marsh located on the west 
side of Route 1A and just south of Odiorne Point State Park in Rye, on July 
19th and 20th.



5 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS were seen in Hampton on July 18th, and 1 was 
seen in New Castle on the 17th.



6 PIPING PLOVERS were reported from Hampton Beach State Park on July 18th. 
If you visit the beach, please keep an eye out for these small sand-colored 
birds.



A PECTORAL SANDPIPER was seen at the Rochester Wastewater Treatment Plant on 
July 16th. The treatment plant is gated and the hours of operation are 
7:30-3:00 on weekdays. If you visit, please check in at the office and be 
out of the plant by 2:45 so that plant personnel do not have to ask birders 
to leave. Do not drive on the dikes and do not block the road. The Trails at 
Pickering Ponds, located east of the plant, are not gated, and are always 
open during daylight hours.



2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were seen at Cemetery Fields in Amherst on July 14th.



7 RED CROSSBILLS were reported from the Magalloway River Trail, part of the 
Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge in Wentworth’s Location, on July 18th.



2 families of SPRUCE GROUSE totaling 14 birds, and 4 GRAY JAYS were seen on 
the Davis Path by hikers en route to Mount Isolation in the White Mountains 
on July 17th.



2 BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS were reported from Jefferson on July 16th.



21 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES and 4 BOREAL CHICKADEES were reported from the 
Carter-Moriah trail in the White Mountains on July 18th.



7 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES and a BOREAL CHICKADEE were reported from Cannon 
Mountain in the White Mountains on July 19th.



2 AMERICAN PIPITS were seen on Mount Washington (where they nest) on July 
17th.



A pair of EVENING GROSBEAKS was reported from Lyman on July 13th.



A colony of 13 pairs of PURPLE MARTINS are nesting along Cross Beach Road in 
Seabrook and up to 40 individuals were observed on July 10th. At least 4 
PURPLE MARTINS were reported from Fun Spot in Laconia on July 18th.



A flock of 6 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS was seen in Springfield on July 18th.



A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was seen in Madison on July 17th.



There was an unconfirmed report of a GOLDEN EAGLE in Bartlett on July 13th.



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org


Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Quick coast run - no LBH, but shorebirds + ibis
From: Jon Woolf <jsw AT jwoolfden.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 22:32:36 -0400




Subject: Monarch Butterfly Program by Lincoln Brower in Lancaster
 and Jackson, NH Thursday and Friday Evening
From: David Govatski Gmail <david.govatski AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 16:15:03 -0400
The world’s leading expert on Monarch Butterflies, Professor Lincoln Brower 
of Virginia, will present two programs on Monarch Butterflies in New Hampshire: 

Thursday 23 July 2015 at 7 PM at Weeks State Park in Lancaster, NH sponsored by 
the Weeks State Park Association. 

Friday 24 July 2015 at 7 PM at the Betty Whitney Center in Jackson, NH 
sponsored by Tin Mountain Conservation Center, Upper Saco Valley Land Trust and 
the Friends of the Betty Whitney Center. 


In this program, Professor Brower will present a first-person account of his 
field expeditions and lab explorations, and describe the conservation issues 
that threaten the butterflies' unique migration and wintering. Along with 
narration, a collection of diverse images depicting the monarch will be 
presented. 

 
In 1977 Professor Brower made his first visit to the monarch butterflies' 
winter retreats, in the high volcanic mountains of central Mexico. Captivated 
by the extraordinary phenomenon of hundreds of millions of butterflies 
aggregating in the rugged fir forests, he began to explore new questions about 
the butterflies' migration and overwintering physiology, and these questions 
have taken him back to the overwintering sites on more than fifty expeditions. 
During his first expedition he also realized that the phenomenal migration and 
overwintering biology was threatened by logging in the winter roost areas, and 
he began conservation work with WWF-Mexico, government agencies in Mexico, the 
U.S. and Canada, and numerous other colleagues, and continues to the present 
day. 

 
Lincoln Pierson Brower is Distinguished Service Professor of Zoology, Emeritus 
at the University of Florida. Since 1997 he has been Research Professor of 
Biology at Sweet Briar College. He received his B.A. degree from Princeton 
University and his Ph.D. from Yale, and taught at Amherst College for many 
years before moving to the University of Florida. 

 
Professor Brower's research interests include the overwintering and migration 
biology of the monarch butterfly, insect chemical defense, ecological 
chemistry, insect mimicry, scientific film making, and the conservation of 
endangered biological phenomena. 

 
Professor Brower has authored and coauthored more than 200 scientific papers, 
eight films, and two edited books, and is currently writing his magnum opus on 
the monarch butterfly. Awards he has received include the Wilbur Cross Medal 
from Yale University, the Medal for Zoology from the Linnean Society of London, 
a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Animal Behavior Society, and the Royal 
Entomological Society of London Marsh Award. He has served as President of the 
Society for the Study of Evolution, the International Society of Chemical 
Ecology, and the Lepidopterists’ Society. 

 
He is collaborating with governmental and nongovernmental groups, and other 
scientists and private individuals, to protect and restore the overwintering 
forests of the monarch butterfly in Mexico. and to call attention to our 
disastrous Midwestern agriculture that is eliminating monarch habitat on an 
unprecedented scale. Because of the dramatic decline of the Monarch Butterfly, 
it is being considered for listing as an endangered species. 


David Govatski
Jefferson, NH

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Subject: Ammonoosuc Chapter Program on Moths in Bethlehem Wednesday 22 July 2015
From: David Govatski Gmail <david.govatski AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 15:50:20 -0400
Local moth expert Lucy Golden of Franconia will host an evening program and 
opportunity to observe Moths at the Rocks Estate in Bethlehem on Wednesday 
evening 22 July 2015. The program will start at 8 PM with an indoor session to 
learn about these night flyers followed by an outdoor session where we will 
observe moths in a natural setting, attracting them with lights and sugary 
solutions. This program is part of National Moth Week and is sponsored by the 
Ammonoosuc Chapter of NH Audubon and the Rocks Estate. The program is free and 
open to the public. The Rocks Estate is located on Christmas Tree Lane in 
Bethlehem. For more information contact David Govatski at 
David.Govatski AT gmail.com  For more information 
about National Moth Week go to: http://nationalmothweek.org 
 


David Govatski
Jefferson, NH
 

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Subject: Little Blue Heron - YES
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 10:59:06 -0400
Steve Bennett just texted me to report that the juvenile Little Blue 
Heron continues from the pools south of Odiorne Point State Park along 
Route 1A in Rye.

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: 7/18/15 High Country Report Part II / Carter Range
From: CK Borg <borealbirder AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 10:34:23 -0400
...conditions this past Saturday were anything but ideal nevertheless I was
already in the woods so I had to take what our mother offered.  That said,
high country hikers on Saturday were welcomed with intermittent light rain
early, a low cloud deck, and as the day progressed increasing winds
(~15-30mph).  As would be expected bird activity (and their detectability)
was governed by these conditions.  To that end, although I have no
comparative benchmark, I was quite pleased with my final tally of 21
Bicknell's Thrush from Mount Moriah to Carter Notch ~9 mi).  Given their
activity was greatest around dusk and dawn it makes me wonder about all the
birds I missed in between because, as you might guess, there is some ideal
habitat up that way.  Other specialists of note were only 4 Boreal
Chickadees... an equally astonishing, albeit low, number.  For those
interested in accessible Bicknell's Thrush you might consider a night at
Carter Notch Hut... there's nothing quite like waking to their song!

Peace,
C.K. Borg

Concord, NH

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Subject: Little Blue Heron in Rye
From: Jason Lambert <jlambert0614 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 23:25:00 -0400
This afternoon there was a juvenile Little Blue Heron in the marsh across
from the pull-off at the south end of Odiorne Point SP. It was loosely
associating with a group of Snowy Egrets.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/19658106278

Jason Lambert
Barnstead, NH

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Subject: Trask Brook this morning
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 22:05:32 -0400
This morning I woke up late (7:30am) and decided to take a late morning Trask 
Brook Road trip instead of something more distant. It was muggy and hot but the 
area still proved productive. I walked the whole brook from the forest to the 
road and had a new high of six Alder Flycatchers: https://flic.kr/p/vWdk7B At 
the bridge I ran into Mark Nelson, a Massachusetts border visiting the area. It 
was great to see another birder check out the area. While walking him and I 
flushed up a Green Heron from right near the bridge and it flew south, landing 
along the brook further downstream: 

https://flic.kr/p/wdGyMB

In conversation he mentioned that he wouldn't mind seeing a Wilson's Snipe. 
Knowing where they hang out I told him he could continue on up the road while 
me and my canine cohort worked through the grass on the northern side of the 
road. Within a minute or two one came shrieking up from the grass flying north. 
It was really cool to help him find that bird. 


As he was leaving I walked through the southern field and flushed up two more 
snipe, matching my high count of three. 


Soon after he left, I could hear the frantic calls of Barn Swallows toward the 
farm. I looked over and could see one of the continuing Merlin flying off with 
something in its talons, which I think may have been a BASW. I managed one 
distant picture before it disappeared to the northwest, in the direction of 
where I think they may be nesting. I'm saying this with no definitive knowledge 
of Merlin breeding timelines so I could be wrong about current nesting. Here's 
the photo: 

https://flic.kr/p/wdGqnR

I returned later around 6pm with some notable sightings. I was able to get some 
great Bobolink views and photos. Below are two photos. One is focused on a 
female with two males in the background and the other is the same with the 
focus opposite: 

https://flic.kr/p/vhorSd
https://flic.kr/p/weQCkH

The first Rose-breasted Grosbeak I've had here returned to the same tree giving 
me good views but crappy pictures. I didn't feel like uploading pictures of a 
bird hidden behind leaves so I didn't. 


I had two newcomers (I think) as well. Two Chimney Swift flew over in the 
western part of the area and then I had two juvenile Dark-eyed Junco fly in and 
perch briefly near the bridge before taking off into the woods. 


I had a very peculiar Common Yellowthroat at the bridge too. It looked to be a 
juvenile but it had a gray hood like a Mourning/Connecticut warbler and it 
showed two faint wing-bars. The colors were overall Yellowthroat so I'm 
assuming it's just a strange juvenile plumage. Unfortunately I wasn't able to 
get any photos before it dipped into the thick brush. 


Another unusual note was a Yellow-rumped Warbler. They are regular here singing 
in the nearby woods but this one was foraging about the riparian vegetation 
along the brook near the bridge. Can't help but wonder if it could be early 
migration behavior. On that note, there were more Red-winged Blackbirds here 
today than I've seen since the spring. I estimated 60 but there were surely 
more. Mostly juvenile birds too. I can't help but wonder if this is also an 
early sign of migration. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Cory's and storm-petrels
From: Rebecca <rsuomala2 AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 02:02:23 +0000 (UTC)
We did a whale watch today on the Granite State out of Rye Harbor. There was a 
lot more storm-petrel activity than the last time we went out a couple of weeks 
ago, and some birds were quite close, but pelagic diversity is still low. One 
Cory's Shearwater and almost 20 storm-petrels were inside the Isles of Shoals. 


Highlights:
Cory's Shearwater 6
Shearwater sp. 9
Wilson's Storm-Petrel 139
Whimbrel 1 - a couple of miles out past Isles of Shoals
Black Guillemot 4
Laughing Gull 1

Fog made whale spotting tough at first, but we did get good looks at a Finback 
(Crow - a regular in these waters but the first sighting this year), a Minke, 
and 3 Blue Sharks. 


Before the whale watch we stopped for my first visit to the Least Tern nest. I 
watched a fish delivery to the chick! Great! 


No sign of ibis at Little River Saltmarsh.

Becky Suomala, Chichester
Zeke Cornell, Bow

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Subject: Top of 1st, bottom of Osprey
From: Cliff Otto <bye.bye.nh.birdy AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 21:13:40 -0400
Had an Osprey fly directly overhead as I was sitting in the stands at
Northeast Delta Dental Stadium in Manchester this afternoon as I was
watching the Portland Sea Dogs playing the NH Fisher Cats.

Cliff Otto
Manchester

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Subject: Peregrine attacks gull - Concord
From: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net
Date: Mon, 20 Jul 2015 00:49:04 +0000 (UTC)
This morning I walked up the railroad tracks at Horseshoe Pond as far as the 
prison field.  As I crossed the causeway out to the cornfield, I heard loud 
shreiking coming from a gull as a Peregrine Falcon chased it, no doubt one of 
the juveniles mentioned by Chris Martin the other day.  Round and round they 
went over the pond until the falcon left it alone.   As Bob Quinn mentioned 
yesterday, many juveniles are around now.  I found some of 15 different 
species, including 1 mammal (see below).  Other highlights: 

  
Ring-billed Gull - the more interesting thing about this bird is that this is 
my first fall migrant of this species this year; they first show up in the 
second half of July.  Gulls migrate!  and exhibit seasonal patterns of 
distribution like any warbler, thrush or sparrow. 

  
Osprey - just rising up from the pond with a fish, heading west, undoubtedly 
going to the nest at Rossview Farm. 

  
Green Heron - heard in the back pond, west side. 
  
Northern Flicker - for once they outnumbered red-bellied 2 to 1. 
  
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4, a family group of 3 and a singleton; this is the 
breeding stronghold for this species in Concord. 

  
Mammals: 
Eastern Chipmunk 
Gray Squirrel 
Red Squirrel - several along the tracks far from evergreens, looks like they 
were going for the many ash seeds on the ground. 

Racoon - a mother and 2 cubs, sloshing through the wooded swamp above Horsehsoe 
on the west side, where water levels are much lower now.  Last year on July 6 
I had an adult otter and 3 cubs a little farther up the tracks, they crossed 
right in front of me.  If you think one otter is fun, try a whole family. 

  
Herps: 
Wood Frog 
Green Grog 
Bull Frog 
American Toad 
Painted Turtle 
Garter Snake 
  
Butterflies (getting out on thin ice here): 
Viceroy 
American Copper 
Sulphur (sp.) 
  
Dragonflies: 
No - not going there- and they can't make me! 
  
  
Rob Woodward 
Concord, NH 
  
  

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Subject: Nighthawks and Bittern in Springfield
From: raqbirds via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sun, 19 Jul 2015 15:43:27 -0400
As part of a coordinated Common Nighthawk watch on Saturday night in 
Grantham/Springfield we saw: 



A flock of six Common Nighthawks- somewhat puzzling because it is too early for 
migrants yet these birds were silent and did not exhibit any territorial nor 
breeding behaviors. 



American Bittern- one. 


American Woodcock- six coming in to roost in the same area the nighthawks 
lifted off from! 



Bob Quinn
Webster, NH


Jane Kolias
Concord, NH

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Subject: Enfield and Trask Brook Road
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 21:25:36 -0400
This morning I went up to Enfield/Hanover to wrap up my survey for Olive-sided 
Flycatchers (no OSFL's today unfortunately) and my first stop was along Lovejoy 
Brook Road in Enfield. The road quickly becomes a class VI road so I walk along 
the floodplain area that follows the road. I had a decent turnout with just 
over thirty birds including an active pair of Northern Waterthrush foraging on 
the road, a very curious female Black-throated Blue Warbler, and many 
vocalizing Alder Flycatchers. The notable find was made while walking along the 
road I heard the unmistakable, Jurassic Park Velociraptor sound of young Barred 
Owls. A short ways ahead sat two juvenile BAOWs in the trees above, flying 
short distances branch to branch. I took photos but there was very little light 
and they didn't come out great. One I took with the flash on came out 
frightening: 

https://flic.kr/p/ve6HAQ
The scary one:
https://flic.kr/p/wb7MG4

Later in the day I went to Trask Brook Road for about an hour. Nothing too 
incredible. The female Merlin flew over the area moving south and I flushed up 
the same Wilson's Snipe while walking through the grass three times! I promise 
it wasn't on purpose. I did have a good collection of butterflies and was able 
to photograph five species. 

Please correct my ID's as needed. I'm not very familiar with a lot of Butterfly 
species, especially Skippers: 


American Lady:
https://flic.kr/p/veGbhg

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail:
https://flic.kr/p/veG3gM

Baltimore Checkerspot:
https://flic.kr/p/veFTGH

Northern Broken-Dash(???):
https://flic.kr/p/wby1YV

Clouded Sulfur:
https://flic.kr/p/waUguw

-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Hampton/Seabrook/Exeter - Glossy Ibis, Black-crowned Night-Herons, shorebirds
From: Scott Heron <smheron AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 20:39:25 -0400
I poked around a bit today, primarily sticking to the Hampton/Seabrook area
and stopping by Exeter WTP. Shorebirds are trickling through as Steve
notes. Mostly Least/Semipalmated Sandpipers, but also Greater and Lesser
Yellowlegs as well as 15 Short-billed Dowitcher in the Seabrook marsh.

5 Black-crowned Night-Herons (4 adults, 1 juvenile) were hanging out at the
island on Island Path in Hampton.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/19802163492

1 Glossy Ibis (appeared to be juvenile) was trying to fit in with the many
mallards at Exeter WTP.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/19621232120

Other highlights, besides a pair of Miricks, included Least Tern and Piping
Plover chicks still going strong on Hampton Beach, the Cross Beach Martins
getting ready to fledge, plus a family of Wood Ducks at Exeter WTP.

Purple Martins:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/19625340939

Wood Ducks:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/19783085646


Scott Heron
Kingston

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Subject: NH Coast (Wilson's Storm-Petrels, ICELAND GULL)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 18:52:21 -0400
Jane and I hit the coast.  Nicely overcast and not that crowded as the 
beach-goers were scared off by the morning rains.  Nice to share birds 
and brunch today with Scott Heron and Kyle Wilmarth!

Not a lot of goodies, but the first JUVENILE gulls, egrets, and Common 
Terns of the fall were noted.  NO IBIS at all were seen today.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/

Select list
--------------------
Surf Scoter  1
White-winged Scoter  14     Oversummering flock off North Hampton State 
Beach.
Black Scoter  10     Oversummering flock off North Hampton State Beach.
Common Loon  6
Wilson's Storm-Petrel  19     12 off Little Boar's Head.
Great Blue Heron  3
Great Egret  14
Snowy Egret  18     Including 3 JUVENILES.  First of summer.
Green Heron  1     Juvenile.
Black-crowned Night-Heron  1     Adult at Seabrook roost.
Osprey  8     In Hampton/Seabrook area.  Including "Staddler" (satellite 
transmitter bird) at nest site off Cross Beach Road in Seabrook with 
single chick on nest.
Cooper's Hawk  1
Semipalmated Plover  22
Piping Plover  6     3 adults and 3 chicks on Hampton Beach.
Killdeer  3
Spotted Sandpiper  5
Greater Yellowlegs  8
Willet  10
Lesser Yellowlegs  20
Sanderling  3     Two in harbor and one migrating with peep.
Least Sandpiper  49     Adults.
Semipalmated Sandpiper  25     Adults.
peep sp.  267     191 MIGRATING south in numerous small flocks plus 76 
in harbor.  Least/Semipalmated Sandpipers.
Short-billed Dowitcher  16     Adults.
Bonaparte's Gull  2     Both 1st cycle.
Ring-billed Gull  4     JUVENILES.  First of summer.
ICELAND GULL  1     First cycle bird on Jenness Beach.  Worn plumage 
with feather problems on head.  Only my second ever summer record. In 
2011, a 1st cycle bird hung out in June and July in Hampton harbor.
Least Tern  3     Two adult with chick on Hampton Beach.
Roseate Tern  12     Likely more.  Many off of Hampton beach with other 
terns.
Common Tern  230     Ball park 200 around Hampton harbor entrance. 5 
JUVENILES.  First juveniles of summer.
Purple Martin  11     Cross Beach Road.  Includes 3 juveniles at yellow box.
Yellow Warbler  1     One in bush at Little Boar's Head.  Likely a 
"fall" migrant.

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: purple martins FunSpot
From: Matt Tarr <unhwildlifespecialist AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 18:13:34 -0400
Haven't heard much about martins at Fun Spot these days (maybe I missed posts) 
- but there were at least two pairs (probably more) there today in the house 
nearest the gazebo. 


Matt Tarr

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Subject: turkeys
From: Sylvia Miskoe <sylviasmiskoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 17:00:50 -0400
This morning there were 2 hen turkeys and one small chicken sized poult in
my back field.  They were scavenging a recently mowed section.
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord

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Subject: not a bird - west Concord
From: Anne Hadshi <annehadshi AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 12:17:51 -0400
As I was walking along Little Pond Road around noon today, a bobcat crossed
the road a few feet away from me, cool as cucumber, he did not even turn
his head to look at me. It was quite an experience for me, though.

Anne

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Subject: Spotted Sandpipers Ashland
From: Keith chamberlin <kchamberlin07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2015 09:56:50 -0400
Squam River Ashland.
There are presently 2 Spotted Sand Pipers along the spill way behind main St. I 
have not seen any since spring. They seem to be getting along quite well and 
are making a lot of noise as they run along the edges of the river. Peeping and 
Squeaking. 

Keith C.

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Subject: Trask Brook newcomers
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 21:10:54 -0400
I hope you folks aren't getting too tired of my Trask Brook posts, but I 
haven't done much adventurous birding (until my planned big day on the 31st on 
coastal Connecticut). However, the area around Trask Brook Road in Sunapee 
continues to be worth while. 

This morning I did an early morning outing before work. It started pretty 
normally with abundant Savannah Sparrows and Red-winged Blackbirds, but as I 
made my way towards the bridge I was delighted to see a female Belted 
Kingfisher perched on the wires overhanging the bridge. This is a new species 
for this location for me and I sat and watched it for a minute or two. It got 
interesting when it was joined at its perch by a Yellow Warbler and two 
Phoebes. Not you're typical line-up of wire perching birds. 

I walked to the bridge and the Kingfisher moved on to the north. The Alder 
Flycatcher(s) continue in the brookside vegetation where I believe they're 
breeding, this morning at least one of them was quite vocal. While looking to 
the south I saw a bird in flight from a fairly far distance but could tell it 
wasn't a normal Trask Brook bird even with the naked eye. Fortunately for me it 
slowly made its way towards me and perched on a nearby tree. It was a female 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, another personal Trask Brook first. 

These two newcomers bring my species total for the spot to 92. There are 94 
species listed for the area since it became an eBird hotspot and I've almost 
seen them all minus Jay Gambles Red-shouldered Hawk and Scott Herons Baltimore 
Orioles. Hoping I can get to 100 soon. 

One notable absence for the past few visits was a Wilson's Snipe. Though rarely 
reported around the state, I've been spoiled with having them be more or less a 
sure thing. I didn't hear or see any this morning so I went back tonight just 
after 8:00pm. Things were quieting down and a ten minute listen in the middle 
of the road yielded nothing. I went back to my car and starting making my slow 
crawl off the road. To my joy, I suddenly heard the ticking of a Wilson's only 
feet off the road in the grass towards the south. Guess I can breathe easy... 
For now. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Rochester WTP Pectoral Sandpiper
From: Dan Hubbard <danielhubbard AT peoplepc.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 20:59:59 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
There was one Pectoral Sandpiper at the Rochester Wastewater Treatment Plant 
yesterday. There were also 6 Least Sandpipers and 35 Killdeer among the usuals. 

Dan Hubbard, Rochester

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Subject: Black-crowned Night Heron - Great Island Common, New Castle
From: Colleen Prieto <3potatoes AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 20:17:54 -0400
Speaking of juvenile birds :-) 

We were watching gulls at Great Island Common in New Castle this evening, when 
we saw a juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron come flying in off the water. The 
bird hunted for a while in the tide pools - we watched until it flew down a bit 
and onto the rocks closer to Ft. Stark. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/19777869792/in/dateposted-public/ 
 


We spend many summer evenings at the Common watching birds (and woodchucks), 
and this is the first time we’ve seen a Night Heron there - checked eBird and 
there don’t seem to be any previous reports (lots in the general area, but 
none in this particular place). 


Happy birding!
Robert, Colleen, and Robbie
Nottingham, NH 

 

 

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Subject: Mount Washington birding (Ring-necked Ducks, American Pipits, WHITE MOUNTAIN ARCTICS)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 19:59:13 -0400
After some long work days, Jane and I decided to take today off and head 
north.  With the ideal weather conditions, we decided to take a drive up 
Mount Washington in search of the rare endemic White Mountain Arctic 
butterfly.  Success!  We birded along the way....

Fox Road, Madison
--------------------------
Yellow-throated Warbler - 0.  We spent almost an hour in the exact area 
where the two Yellow-throated Warblers were reported on July 11.  We 
didn't see or hear anything resembling a Yellow-throated Warbler in that 
time despite using tapes.  We did have a nice variety of birds, however, 
including 9 species of warbler including a young Blackburnian Warbler 
with a yellow throat.  We also had a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO here.  First 
heard by Jane, I played a tape and it flew over our heads and gave some 
nice sounding clucks.


Pudding Pond off North-South Road in North Conway
---------------------------------------------------------------------
RING-NECKED DUCK - 4.   Two females, each with a single (small and 
medium sized) duckling.  Great find by Phil Brown back in June of this 
nesting area.  Ring-necked Ducks are a rare nesting species of northern 
New Hampshire, so this was a nice find along the bustling road right 
near the shopping mecca of North Conway.  These were the first young 
Ring-necks I've had in the state.  The sad story here is the fact that 
there were only two ducklings.  On June 27th, 3 weeks ago, Phil had 4 
broods.  I am guessing these must be two different broods.  But as Phil 
alluded to in his post, there appears to be a high mortality in this 
marsh.  Possibly snapping turtles.  Let's hope some of Phil's birds fledged.


Mount Washington summit area
------------------------------------------
We spent about 2 hours at noon time near the summit at roughly 5,500' 
altitude.  Mostly around "Cow Pasture", "Nelson's Crag" and parts of 
Alpine Garden.  Not much bird life up here, but beautiful views.  Total 
birds and butterflies as follows:

AMERICAN PIPIT - 2 including one (old) juvenile along path near Nelson's 
Crag and Cow Pasture.  American Pipits are only known to nest in the 
eastern United States in the alpine zone of Mount Washington area and 
Mount Katahdin in Maine.  They were first discovered nesting in NH in 1991.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/19162118194/in/dateposted-public/
Dark-eyed Junco - 6 (2 juveniles)
White-throated Sparrow - 1

Butterflies
----------------
Canadian Swallowtail - 1
Red Admiral - 1
Fritillary sp. - 2
PINK-EDGED SULPHUR - 1 at parking lot for Cow Pasture.  A butterfly of 
the north, this is my first in many years.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/19596700210/in/dateposted-public/

MELISSA "WHITE MOUNTAIN" ARCTIC - 12 +/-.  This is a very rare 
subspecies of the Melissa Arctic butterfly and our target for the day.  
It is ONLY FOUND in the alpine zone near the summit of Mount Washington 
and toward Mount Jefferson at "Monticello's Lawn".  It is not rare IF 
you can get up Mount Washington and IF you get up there in July, and IF 
you get perfect weather!  It blends in perfectly with the lichen covered 
rocks of the barren landscape:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/19596699530/in/dateposted-public/


Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: tricky juvenile birds/plumages, rare birds of summer, "fall" migration, and my July 25 field trip
From: raqbirds via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Jul 2015 12:34:50 -0400
I am going to talk in generalities here, not about any of the recent specific 
posts. Though a number of these thoughts can easily apply to many current 
sightings. 



As I wrote in my post of a few days ago "It has begun". It... is the 
post-breeding wandering of recently fledged birds (and adults) as well as 
actual fall migration. Even though it still feels like summer to us there is a 
sense of fall urgency building up in the birds and if you look closely you can 
see this almost everywhere. Here are the key points. 




There are MORE birds around right now than at almost any other time of year. 
(Juveniles plus adults). Yet the woods are almost as quiet as mid-January. 



Almost all these juveniles are in relatively nondescript or odd looking 
plumages because the books don't illustrate them well if they illustrate them 
at all (hint- update your field guides whether paper or electronic and consider 
family specific resources). And many of the adults are molting and also look 
unlike what most birds, and our mental images, illustrate. 



Rare birds are just that- very unusual and therefor in need of excellent 
documentation AFTER you have eliminated the much more common/likely species 
which might be in a strange looking plumage right now, and can even SOUND 
different than it does in the spring. 


Fall migration has been underway for weeks therefor birds will increasingly 
turn up in what seems to be unusual places and behaving in unusual ways- for 
summer. 


Examples- Last night I helped with a Common Nighthawk watch in Ossipee. This is 
a breeding season project focused on nesting birds and we had gratifying 
results. But on my short walk to my site I saw juvenile Towhees, Pine Warbler, 
and a Chipping Sparrow. If you think you know what these species look like 
check out their juvenile plumages for some surprises. (If you want to know more 
about this fun project or have any nighthawk sightings beyond Concord, 
Franklin, or Ossipee write me or Becky Suomala at NH Audubon offline). 



Yesterday while guiding clients along the coast of Maine we spotted two very 
interesting looking small sandpipers, both showing noticeable orange-red 
coloration on their faces and throats. One bird in particular was very colorful 
and looked a little smaller so "Red-necked Stint" flashed through my mind. 
After the adrenaline settled down I followed my own advice and looked at them 
carefully asking "What common species might show these traits AT THIS TIME OF 
THE YEAR?" Timing, habitat, and behavior are often critical for identification 
purposes, especially for a rarity. A short study of these two birds revealed 
they were not rare but they were in plumages rarely seen by most birders and 
even though each was very different looking from the other they were the same 
species. OK, enough suspense- they were Sanderlings in remnant breeding 
plumage. Looking at their size/shape/structure/leg color and especially 
watching their classic behavior of playing tag with the waves clinched the ID. 
Plus it helps I have experience with this species in this plumage. 



Final thoughts- according to Fox and Keith (The Birds of NH) the earliest 
southbound migrant Sanderlings ever recorded along the NH coast were seen on 
July 8, 1967 so the date of July 17 is not out of the migratory period, though 
the peak of the Sanderling migration is late August through September so July 
sightings are unusual. BTW- Bob Fox and his wife Dana Duxbury-Fox both helped 
on the Ossipee nighthwak watch. So meeting other birders is another reason to 
join in some of the volunteer fun. Besides, have you ever seen the cute little 
fluff-balls that are baby nighthawks or been circled at eye level by a 
displaying male nighthawk? 



I could go on and on (the warblers already in my yard, the swallows migrating 
over the Broken Ground on July 12...) but if you want to learn more consider 
joining me on Saturday, July 25 at the McLane Center on Silk Farm Road in 
Concord, starting at 8 a.m. for a field session on what's happening now. 



Bob Quinn
Webster, NH 


ps And if you are going to join me make sure you look up juvenile Towhees 
before showing up! raq 







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