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Updated on Wednesday, July 1 at 08:40 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Panders Ground Jay,©Tony Disley

2 Jul Least Tern not a plover fan [Len Medlock ]
1 Jul Fwd: crazy day on coast [Jeanne-Marie ]
30 Jun Least Terns NESTING in NH!!!!! [Steve Mirick ]
29 Jun Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 29, 2015 ["Mark Suomala" ]
29 Jun Hinsdale hirundines ["Hector Galbraith" ]
28 Jun Bank Swallows and Orchard Orioles breeding by the river/Nashua [Christine Sheridan ]
28 Jun back yard breeding birds []
28 Jun NH Coast storm birding - Not much to report! [Steve Mirick ]
28 Jun woodpeckers [Carolyn Payzant ]
28 Jun RE: Dixville Ridge; Fox Sparrows, etc. [Christian Martin ]
28 Jun Dixville Ridge; Fox Sparrows, etc. ["Robert Ridgely" ]
28 Jun RE: Arctic Tern - Hampton Harbor [Christian Martin ]
27 Jun Trask Brook high count [Dylan Jackson ]
27 Jun Arctic Tern - Hampton Harbor [Kyle Wilmarth ]
27 Jun bird entertainment [Jeanne-Marie ]
27 Jun Fox Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, Philadelphia Vireo ["'Aerart' via NHBirds" ]
27 Jun Caps Ridge Trail (Bicknell's Thrush, Gray Jay, BB Woodpecker, Boreal Chickadees) [Steve Mirick ]
27 Jun 3 Monroe Sandhill Cranes [Jim Sparrell ]
27 Jun North Conway and vicinity, 6/25-26 - breeding Ring-necked Duck, etc ["'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" ]
26 Jun Woodpecker at Hummingbird feeder and other notes [William Smith ]
25 Jun durham landing - green heron, dover mills - bald eagle [duane dotton ]
24 Jun green heron Nashua [Jeanne-Marie Maher ]
24 Jun Green Heron, Intervale NH, 6/23/15 ["Marnich, Debra - NRCS, Conway, NH" ]
24 Jun Pine Siskins, Hancock [Steven Smith ]
24 Jun Flooded Baker River-Spotted Sandpipers, 6/22 [Jody Williams ]
23 Jun Owls and Northern Lights [Dylan Jackson ]
23 Jun Re: Pine Siskin [David Lipsy ]
23 Jun Peregrine Falcons in Lancaster - 6/19 [Kyle Wilmarth ]
23 Jun Re: Pine Siskin [wendy chatel ]
23 Jun Fwd: Pine Siskin [paul dionne ]
23 Jun Re: Pine Siskin [Susan Fogleman ]
23 Jun Re: Pine Siskin [Bob Crowley ]
23 Jun Pine Siskin [jennmckown1 via NHBirds ]
22 Jun 06-19-15 Concord Area Bald Eagle Nest Report [David Lipsy ]
22 Jun Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 22, 2015 ["Mark Suomala" ]
22 Jun eastern kingbird red crown stripe [DAGForsyth via NHBirds ]
22 Jun Pittsburg Birding 6/18-6/21 [Lauren Kras ]
21 Jun Re: Catbird eating Suet ["Jim Berry" ]
20 Jun Catbird eating Suet [Bruce Boyer ]
20 Jun YB Flycatcher, Lempster [Dylan Jackson ]
20 Jun Re: Bird bathing ["Linda M. Charron" ]
19 Jun Re: Bird bathing [Catherine Fisher ]
19 Jun Hatch day for loons [Jim Sparrell ]
19 Jun Caps Ridge & Trudeau Road ["Mark Suomala" ]
19 Jun Bird bathing [Steve Mirick ]
19 Jun Eastern Phoebe Bathing - Interesting Behavior, Newton, NH [Paula McFarland ]
17 Jun Black Vulture, Hinsdale, 6/17 [mresch8702 via NHBirds ]
17 Jun ID Help [Cathy Pawelczyk ]
17 Jun Black Billed Cuckoo in Rochester [Kerri Breen ]
16 Jun Nashaway Program - 'Live Free or Fly Fish' [Jane Wing ]
16 Jun barn swallow nests [Sylvia Miskoe ]
16 Jun Elbow Pond in Woodstock, Ravine Road Warren, Saunders Hill Road Wentworth [Jody Williams ]
16 Jun Acadian Flycatcher singing at Hinsdale ["Hector Galbraith" ]
16 Jun Monroe Sandhill Cranes [Sandy Turner ]
15 Jun Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 15, 2015 ["Mark Suomala" ]
15 Jun Fun ID for me [Anne Licciardello ]
14 Jun Quincy Bog mid-day [Jody Williams ]
14 Jun woodcock in west Concord [Anne Hadshi ]
13 Jun 06-10-15 Newly Fledged B & W Warbler Feeding Photographs - Strafford, NH [David Lipsy ]
13 Jun Canaan Bird Banding [Dylan Jackson ]
13 Jun Bobolink, Peterborough [Bruce Boyer ]
13 Jun Old Mill Road, Lee ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]
12 Jun Threat to Migratory Bird Treaty Act [Steve Mirick ]
12 Jun N. Haverhill Merlin, Bedell Br. SP [Jody Williams ]
12 Jun Morse Preserve, Alton - Vesper Sparrow and shrubland birds [Lauren Kras ]
12 Jun Pix of MISSISSIPrimpingPreeningI Kite [Cliff Otto ]
12 Jun YB Cuckoo, Durham ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]
11 Jun Mississippi Kite...some may say ho-hum but... [Cliff Otto ]
11 Jun Red-tail and Broad-wingeds Dogfight in Lyme Thursday ["'Blake Allison' via NHBirds" ]
11 Jun Ruffed Grouse Encounter- Pine Siskins and Purple Finches [Gail Coffey ]
11 Jun Black-billed Cuckoo in Manchester ["Jane Hills" ]
10 Jun Fwd: Birdwatching, Indoors Edition [Dorothy Currier ]
10 Jun Black Vulture Walpole ["'Wendy Ward' via NHBirds" ]
10 Jun Black Tern and wigeon in the north country [raqbirds via NHBirds ]
10 Jun Reminder-***NH Audubon Seacoast Chapter Wednesday June 10, 2015 Program - Birding the Ho Chi Minh Trail*** [bikenbird via NHBirds ]
10 Jun Fish Crows, Durham ["Dorsey, Kurk" ]

Subject: Least Tern not a plover fan
From: Len Medlock <lenmedlock AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 2 Jul 2015 01:37:40 +0000 (UTC)
Stopped by after work to view the nesting Least Terns--wow! Not much traffic at 
the beach due to storm clouds, but the resident Piping Plover was not welcomed. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/lmedlock/18717162254/ 

And after giving chase, the tern went back to check on its nest:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lmedlock/19339688155/ 

Many thanks to Scott for learning about our terns and to Steve for location and 
advice for viewing. 


Len Medlock
Exeter, NH
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lmedlock/

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Subject: Fwd: crazy day on coast
From: Jeanne-Marie <jeannemariemaher AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2015 21:18:54 -0400
> From: Jeanne-Marie 
> Date: July 1, 2015 at 21:05:01 EDT
> To: nhbirds 
> Subject: crazy day on coast
> 
> Joan & Glen McKibben adopted me for a coastal trip between the thundershowers 
today. 

> Had a surprisingly (nearly) dry time of it (between cloud bursts).
> 
> With the help of tips from Scott Heron/"the unknown piping plover 
ranger"/Steve Mirick, we were able to get some up close views of the least tern 
defending territory from some marauding gulls/and guarding its turf (even got 
some photos with help of Glen which I'll download later). 

> 
> Other nice birds included a very large mass (well over a hundred but hard to 
count) of common terns in a feeding frenzy at the mouth of Hampton Harbor, 3 
lovely pale roseate terns who had joined in (adults) but flew off high into the 
next storm clouds, and 2 piping plovers . 

> At Yankee Fisherman a Bonaparte's gull, at Little Jack's a green Heron, 5 
greater yellowlegs and 2 lesser in breeding colors, many willet, 2 great 
egrets, snowy egret at Awcowmin , and then more rain sent us packing home 

> Many thanks to my kind Chauffeurs!
> 
> 
> Jeanne-Marie Maher
> Nashua NH
> 

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Subject: Least Terns NESTING in NH!!!!!
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jun 2015 20:43:00 -0400
Thanks to a tip by Scott Heron who had learned from the Piping Plover 
monitor....

Least Terns are now NESTING on Hampton Beach.  According to Keith & Fox, 
this is the first confirmed nesting in the State of NH since 1959!

The nest is inside the fenced off area, near an exclosed (caged) Piping 
Plover nest on the north side of Hampton Beach State park. The nest is 
(as always) easy to miss, but is visible from the trail to the beach at 
the end of Dover Ave.  It has two eggs in it.  Not sure how long they 
have been incubating.  Needless to say, it is going to be a mad house at 
Hampton Beach this weekend and hundreds of beach goers will walk right 
by the nest.  It remains to be seen how well they make out.

In any event, if you choose to visit them, parking is problematic unless 
you pay the $10 or more to park in the state park.  Or you may be able 
to find free parking along the street and walk in.  And, of course, keep 
outside the fence and maintain a proper distance if you visit.

Here are a couple of pictures from this morning......and a few 
photographs of "my" two Peregrine Falcon chicks from Haverhill, MA who 
both flew for the fist time today!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 29, 2015
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 18:45:46 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 29th, 2015.



2 MISSISSIPPI KITES were seen flying near Gonet Road in Newmarket on June 
25th.



3 SANDHILL CRANES were seen behind the cemetery on Plains Road in Monroe on 
June 27th.



An ARCTIC TERN, a ROSEATE TERN, 20 COMMON TERNS, 2 LAUGHING GULLS, 6 
BONAPARTE’S GULLS, a PIPING PLOVER, and a PURPLE MARTIN were all seen in 
Hampton Harbor on June 27th.



A LEAST BITTERN was reported from World End Pond in Salem on June 24th.



2 PEREGRINE FALCONS were seen in Lancaster on June 19th, and 1 was seen in 
North Conway on the 27th.



A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER, 7 BOREAL CHICKADEES, a GRAY JAY, and 5 BICKNELL’S 
THRUSHES were all reported from the Caps Ridge Trail off of Jefferson Notch 
Road in the White Mountains on June 27th.



A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER was reported from the Pondicherry National 
Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson on June 27th.



A SPRUCE GROUSE was seen on Mount Guyot in the White Mountains on June 25th.



A birder hiking in the Franconia ridge area of Crawford Notch reported 8 
BICKNELL’S THRUSHES, a PHILADELPHIA VIREO, a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW, and a 
FOX SPARROW all on June 27th.



5 FOX SPARROWS, 2 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES, several GRAY JAYS, and several BOREAL 
CHICKADEES were all reported from Dummer Pond Road in Dummer on June 26th.



A PALM WARBLER was reported from Crawford Notch on June 24th.



2 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were reported from the Cemetery Fields in Amherst on 
June 26th.



YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS and BLACK-BILLED CUCKOOS were both heard vocalizing at 
New Hampshire Audubon’s Dahl Sanctuary in North Conway on June 27th.



An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, and 2 CANADA WARBLERS were reported from New 
Hampshire Audubon’s Watts Sanctuary in Effingham on June 27th.



An estimated 40 BANK SWALLOWS and 6 NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS were seen 
foraging on the Connecticut River in Hinsdale on June 29th.



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org


Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Hinsdale hirundines
From: "Hector Galbraith" <hg2 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 12:01:49 -0400
About 170 mixed swallows feeding over the water at the Hinsdale Setbacks today. 
I would guess that they roosted overnight in the reedbed. Funnily, most (about 
70%) were trees but the remainder were banks. Seems odd to see this many bank 
swallows together in a flock this early. According to K&F, postbreeding 
flocking of tree swallow begins in mid July. Looks like it is happening about 2 
weeks early this year. 


Hector Galbraith, PhD
EcoSolutions
802 258 4836 (O)
802 222 1916 (C)

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Subject: Bank Swallows and Orchard Orioles breeding by the river/Nashua
From: Christine Sheridan <cmsbirds AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 21:45:12 -0400
Bank Swallows are still raising young in a heap of dirt piled up behind the
business and construction area off Bridge St.  There are 18 holes (a 19th
looks collapsed.)  So far their dirt pile has escaped the earth moving
going on.

There don't appear to be as many holes as usual in the bluff at the mouth
of the Nashua River--maybe the birds decided the loose dirt would be better
for burrowing...

There appear to be at least two Orchard Oriole families in the same area,
one on the south side of the Nashua, with a mature male.  This pair seems
to have nested in the same tree as in the  past couple of years.

A female and her second-year male mate are feeding fledglings on the south
side of the Nashua.

I've frequently seen the adult male and his mate make forays across the
river--seems that  they are enjoying visits to feeders for jelly!

Chris Sheridan
Nashua

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Subject: back yard breeding birds
From: rwoodward30 AT comcast.net
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 23:32:19 +0000 (UTC)
The prior post about woodpecker chicks leads me into my back yard list of 
breeding birds.  I wasn't conscious of how many species I had confirmed until 
I put this list together: 

  
17 May - Pine Siskin - at least 1 begging chick getting fed, who knows where 
they nested.  The last date for visiting the feeder was 14 June. 

  
22 May - Black-throated Green Warbler - a female pulled materials from the vine 
growing on a trellis, probably nested in a spruce grove next door. 

  
22 May - Black-capped Chickadee - a bird went into a nest box and stayed in to 
incubate, by early June they were feeding chicks in the nest. 

  
30 May - House Finch - absent for many years but back this year, begging chicks 
getting fed near the feeder. 

  
"sometime" in May: Mourning Dove - a scaly juvenile under the feeder sitting 
quietly, seeming not knowing what to do. 

  
American Robin - adult gathering food in the yard 
  
Northern Cardinal - feeding the first brood in the yard, chicks still present 
today.  Fledglings of probably a third brood are present into October. 

  
7 June - Red-shouldered Hawk - first I heard birds calling from Bela Brook out 
back, then from the yard I watched 3 birds circle together up high, most likely 
a family group. 

  
13 June - Chipping Sparrow - adults feeding chicks, an annual event here. 
  
14 June - White-breasted Nuthatch - adults feeding fledglings in the yard.  
Most of my nest boxes are ocupied by flying squirrels so they must have found a 
woodpecker nest nearby. 

  
16 June - Tufted Titmouse - adults feeding chicks in the yard. 
  
18 June - Wild Turkey - a hen, who was a regular visitor in the spring, 
appeared for the first time in a month or 2 with family in tow - a single small 
poult, probably a week old.  I had to go turn them back as they headed for 
Clinton Street and certain disaster. 

  
"sometime around this time" - Broad-winged Hawk - 2 birds calling in the woods 
out back close to each other, possibly fledglings from a nearby nest. 

  
20 June - Downy Woodpecker - I heard begging chicks calling from a nest on my 
neighbor's side, then the next day they fledged, at least 3 were in the yard 
getting fed by the female. 

  
26 June - Brown Creeper - an adult fed a persistently calling fledgling. 
  
27 June - Red-bellied Woodpecker - a female fed a fledgling in the yard and 
then continued on their way; who knows where they nested but a female was 
present at the feeder much of the winter and spring, on 8 March a male 
appeared, so they probably nested nearby. 

  
There are still a few more to come, like Pine Warbler and goldfinch. 
  
Rob Woodward 
Concord, NH 

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Subject: NH Coast storm birding - Not much to report!
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 19:04:10 -0400
Jane and I got out a bit late this morning during the storm, but I doubt 
it mattered.  The winds were more ENE and then NE rather than the 
predicted SE winds.  This is generally not good for blowing pelagic 
birds in to the coast line.  In addition, the rain and then heavy mist 
made for tough visibility.

The highlight was the (relatively) high number of terns in Hampton 
harbor blown into the harbor and finding shelter on the inner beach.  
But sadly, despite having about 5 times the number of terns that Kyle 
and Amanda had yesterday, we had NO ARCTICS.  They actually had two 
yesterday.

Common Tern - 110+ (all adults)
Roseate Tern - 25+ (all adults)
Laughing Gull - 2 (1 adult, 1 1st cycle)
Bonaparte's Gull - 6 (all 1st cycle)

In addition, there were a ton (perhaps 100 to 200) terns off Seabrook 
Beach by the Hampton harbor entrance.  But the heavy blowing mist was 
miserable and relentless and we didn't venture out into the rain to try 
to find anything rare.

Only about 20-30 minutes spent scanning offshore.  A single Wilson's 
Storm-Petrel was all we could find.

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: woodpeckers
From: Carolyn Payzant <carolynpayzant AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 14:36:50 -0400
Ours feeders have been a haven for baby woodpeckers.

Last week the Hairy's fed 2 fledging...this morning the Downey's brought in
3...and I just saw the Red Breasted is hauling away large amounts of suet.
I can hardly wait to see their young.  And oh, yes there was a baby
Cardinal in our Apple tree earlier in the week.

Carolyn Payzant
Powder Hill area
Bedford

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Subject: RE: Dixville Ridge; Fox Sparrows, etc.
From: Christian Martin <cmartin AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 16:41:58 +0000
Bob Ridgely is absolutely right that this is a beautiful (and underbirded) 
area, both at high elevation and in the low country around Pontook Reservoir, 
although anyone going there should expect to see lots of very early 
post-harvest habitat rather than acres of unbroken mature forest. For those 
thinking about a visit, there is a second way to access the ridge via the West 
Branch Clear Stream Road which starts on the sw side of Rte 26 between Errol 
and Dixville Notch. This creates the possibility of driving up one way and down 
the other, rather than repeating the entire route. 


- Chris

Chris Martin
Senior Biologist, NH Audubon
cmartin AT nhaudubon.org

84 Silk Farm Road, Concord, NH 03301
603/224-9909, ext. 317 (office)
603/226-0902 (fax)

www.nhaudubon.org

New Hampshire Audubon - Protecting New Hampshire's natural environment for 
wildlife and for people. 


________________________________
From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com  on behalf of Robert 
Ridgely  

Sent: Sunday, June 28, 2015 12:12 PM
To: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
Cc: 'Steve Mirick'
Subject: [NHBirds] Dixville Ridge; Fox Sparrows, etc.

Two years ago I was taken to what I’m going to call the Dixville Ridge by a 
scientist friend who was assisting in the oversight of the biological 
monitoring at the large wind turbine facility that had been constructed there. 
I have been back several times since, most recently on Thursday June 26th, 
finding it to be an interesting site for birds, especially as it provides 
relatively straightforward (road) access up into a boreal habitat that 
otherwise can be reached only after some pretty rigorous hiking. 


Access via the road is open: you do not need any permit to enter, though gates 
prevent you from driving too close to the turbine facilities themselves. Some 
sections are fairly steep, but with careful slow driving and a reasonably 
high-clearance vehicle it’s easy; I’ve done it my wife’s Subaru and my 
Toyota Venza. The region is extensively used by ATV riders, especially on 
weekends; they pose little or no problem; most of the time in this remote area 
you don’t see or hear anyone. Oftentimes it’s nice to see somebody, 
anybody: They do their thing, I do mine. Often the riders are curious, and then 
become interested as I tell them what I am looking for. I understand in winter 
it is also extensively used by snowmobilers, and I should emphasize that winter 
(and snow) comes early and lingers late here: there was still plenty of snow in 
late May when I went up last year. 


To reach the area, drive north of Rt. 16 past Gorham and Berlin, continuing on 
through Milan. About 6 miles further north you will see a side (dirt) road 
angling left, just before reaching Pontook Reservoir; the Dummer Pond Road. 
Take this and continue for some 19 miles, basically following the high tension 
lines. The company office and maintenance area is at Mile 6 (every mile is 
signposted) and you do not need to stop. Continue past the right turn to the 
Fish Pond Turbines just past Mile 9 (blocked by a gate anyway), and past the 
Kelsey/Owl Head Turbines at almost Mile 10. Just before the Mile 19 marker you 
will reach a gate that always seems to be locked. By this time you are already 
well into boreal habitat, habitat that begins in earnest just past Milepost 16 
as the road gets steeper. Going straight, the drive up takes 45 minutes to an 
hour. I usually stop for breakfast in a slightly more open area at about Mile 
18.5, at an elevation of (I think) about 3200 feet. There is of course much to 
see and stop for before then, but I’m usually anxious to get high as soon as 
possible, and then work my way back down more slowly. 


So what are the notable birds? For me the biggest attraction has to be the Fox 
Sparrows, a species that’s always been one of my favorites; this is where a 
small breeding population was discovered about five years ago, breeding for the 
first time as far south as New Hampshire. In reasonable weather (meaning not 
too much wind) in May-June-July you should be able to find singing birds 
readily. This last trip (26 Jun) there were at least 5 singing birds in various 
higher areas, some of them right along the road, others farther off. I don’t 
know of any other place in New Hampshire where you can drive to breeding Fox 
Sparrows. In addition to that gem I’ve found at least one pair of 
Bicknell’s Thrushes near Mile 18.5 every year; this year there appeared to be 
a pair of counter-singing birds. The spruce forest hereabouts harbors pairs and 
families of Gray Jays and also of Boreal Chickadees, though both species are 
thinly spread and you may have to really look for them (I’ve never missed). 
I’ve only encountered Black-backed Woodpecker once. Swainson’s Thrushes and 
Blackpoll Warblers are both common (this despite my no longer being able to 
hear the latter very well, very frustrating!) , as are various other 
high-elevation birds. I’m still looking for a Spruce Grouse, and I know 
they’re there as company workers describe what almost has to be this species 
on roadsides in the early morning (nonetheless I’ve gotten there early too, 
and all I ever seem to find are Ruffed Grouse, maybe not quite so “good” 
but for me always a pleasure to see). 


Actually getting inside the forest at higher elevations isn’t all that easy, 
but just above Mile 18 the Coos Trail does cross the road. It’s sign-posted, 
but the signs aren’t all that obvious. Try walking in on the north side and 
you get into beautiful habitat before it starts to drop off pretty steeply. 
I’ve never gone more than about a half mile, and there often is quite a bit 
of deadfall. Several territories of Yellow-bellied Flycatcher are here as are 
lots of other boreals. You can always dream of Spruce Grouse. 


There’s a wide range of habitats further down the mountain, back toward Rt. 
16. I’ve been most pleased by the density of Mourning Warblers in the often 
heavily logged terrain along the first 6-8 miles. One morning I counted no less 
than 11 singing males, stopping only the first one! There surely are many more. 


I hope more New Hampshire birders will give this beautiful, really quite 
spectacular, area a try. Just exercise due caution, and obviously don’t 
litter (or mess the turbine facilities): we’re fortunate to have open access, 
and that I suppose could change should anyone start causing problems for the 
company. 


Feel free to contact me directly if you need any more information. Good luck, 
and hope to see you up there! 


Robert S. Ridgely
North Sandwich


From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:nhbirds AT googlegroups.com]
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2015 4:51 PM
To: Digest recipients
Subject: [NHBirds] Digest for nhbirds AT googlegroups.com - 2 updates in 2 topics

nhbirds AT googlegroups.com

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Topic digest
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·         Woodpecker at Hummingbird feeder and other notes - 1 Update
·         durham landing - green heron, dover mills - bald eagle - 1 Update
Woodpecker at Hummingbird feeder and other notes 
 

William Smith : Jun 26 01:15PM -0400

About a month ago I posted about a male downy woodpecker at my hummingbird 
feeder. Thanks to Anne and Catherine for their reply and links, very helpful. 


The Downy continues sporadically and the hummingbirds, who abandoned the feeder 
initially, have returned and even will chase the Downy from the feeder. I’ve 
had a couple of face to face encounters from less than a foot away as the Downy 
will land on the windowsill where the feeder is and look in. Since this is over 
the kitchen sink we are often at the window and the woodpecker seems largely 
unfazed. This morning my wife saw the male at the feeder and what she thinks 
was a juvenile on the window sill. Apparently it’s part of the education 
process for the youngster. 


This morning a red bellied woodpecker (male I believe) showed up at our 
sunflower seed feeder. I have a regular red belly at the suet during the 
winter, this is a 1st yard bird for the summer. 


Yard birds seem to have had a very productive breeding season so far. Many 
white-breasted nuthatches, catbirds and robins eating my wild blueberries, and 
the titmice seem to have very large numbers. Apparently years of landscaping 
for the critters is paying off. 



Bill Smith

If we don't change the direction we are headed we will end up where we are 
going 


Back to top
durham landing - green heron, dover mills - bald eagle 
 

duane dotton : Jun 25 06:48PM -0400

six green herons at durham landing this evening.

also female wood duck, great blue heron, Northern flickers, and cormorants.

this week i have seen a bald eagle over the dover mills, three separate
times - this morning at 630 am, and Monday and Tuesday at 4pm.

- duane dotton

Back to top
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Subject: Dixville Ridge; Fox Sparrows, etc.
From: "Robert Ridgely" <bob AT RainforestTrust.org>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 12:12:17 -0400
Two years ago I was taken to what I’m going to call the Dixville Ridge by a 
scientist friend who was assisting in the oversight of the biological 
monitoring at the large wind turbine facility that had been constructed there. 
I have been back several times since, most recently on Thursday June 26th, 
finding it to be an interesting site for birds, especially as it provides 
relatively straightforward (road) access up into a boreal habitat that 
otherwise can be reached only after some pretty rigorous hiking. 


 

Access via the road is open: you do not need any permit to enter, though gates 
prevent you from driving too close to the turbine facilities themselves. Some 
sections are fairly steep, but with careful slow driving and a reasonably 
high-clearance vehicle it’s easy; I’ve done it my wife’s Subaru and my 
Toyota Venza. The region is extensively used by ATV riders, especially on 
weekends; they pose little or no problem; most of the time in this remote area 
you don’t see or hear anyone. Oftentimes it’s nice to see somebody, 
anybody: They do their thing, I do mine. Often the riders are curious, and then 
become interested as I tell them what I am looking for. I understand in winter 
it is also extensively used by snowmobilers, and I should emphasize that winter 
(and snow) comes early and lingers late here: there was still plenty of snow in 
late May when I went up last year. 


 

To reach the area, drive north of Rt. 16 past Gorham and Berlin, continuing on 
through Milan. About 6 miles further north you will see a side (dirt) road 
angling left, just before reaching Pontook Reservoir; the Dummer Pond Road. 
Take this and continue for some 19 miles, basically following the high tension 
lines. The company office and maintenance area is at Mile 6 (every mile is 
signposted) and you do not need to stop. Continue past the right turn to the 
Fish Pond Turbines just past Mile 9 (blocked by a gate anyway), and past the 
Kelsey/Owl Head Turbines at almost Mile 10. Just before the Mile 19 marker you 
will reach a gate that always seems to be locked. By this time you are already 
well into boreal habitat, habitat that begins in earnest just past Milepost 16 
as the road gets steeper. Going straight, the drive up takes 45 minutes to an 
hour. I usually stop for breakfast in a slightly more open area at about Mile 
18.5, at an elevation of (I think) about 3200 feet. There is of course much to 
see and stop for before then, but I’m usually anxious to get high as soon as 
possible, and then work my way back down more slowly. 


 

So what are the notable birds? For me the biggest attraction has to be the Fox 
Sparrows, a species that’s always been one of my favorites; this is where a 
small breeding population was discovered about five years ago, breeding for the 
first time as far south as New Hampshire. In reasonable weather (meaning not 
too much wind) in May-June-July you should be able to find singing birds 
readily. This last trip (26 Jun) there were at least 5 singing birds in various 
higher areas, some of them right along the road, others farther off. I don’t 
know of any other place in New Hampshire where you can drive to breeding Fox 
Sparrows. In addition to that gem I’ve found at least one pair of 
Bicknell’s Thrushes near Mile 18.5 every year; this year there appeared to be 
a pair of counter-singing birds. The spruce forest hereabouts harbors pairs and 
families of Gray Jays and also of Boreal Chickadees, though both species are 
thinly spread and you may have to really look for them (I’ve never missed). 
I’ve only encountered Black-backed Woodpecker once. Swainson’s Thrushes and 
Blackpoll Warblers are both common (this despite my no longer being able to 
hear the latter very well, very frustrating!) , as are various other 
high-elevation birds. I’m still looking for a Spruce Grouse, and I know 
they’re there as company workers describe what almost has to be this species 
on roadsides in the early morning (nonetheless I’ve gotten there early too, 
and all I ever seem to find are Ruffed Grouse, maybe not quite so “good” 
but for me always a pleasure to see). 


 

Actually getting inside the forest at higher elevations isn’t all that easy, 
but just above Mile 18 the Coos Trail does cross the road. It’s sign-posted, 
but the signs aren’t all that obvious. Try walking in on the north side and 
you get into beautiful habitat before it starts to drop off pretty steeply. 
I’ve never gone more than about a half mile, and there often is quite a bit 
of deadfall. Several territories of Yellow-bellied Flycatcher are here as are 
lots of other boreals. You can always dream of Spruce Grouse. 


 

There’s a wide range of habitats further down the mountain, back toward Rt. 
16. I’ve been most pleased by the density of Mourning Warblers in the often 
heavily logged terrain along the first 6-8 miles. One morning I counted no less 
than 11 singing males, stopping only the first one! There surely are many more. 


 

I hope more New Hampshire birders will give this beautiful, really quite 
spectacular, area a try. Just exercise due caution, and obviously don’t 
litter (or mess the turbine facilities): we’re fortunate to have open access, 
and that I suppose could change should anyone start causing problems for the 
company. 


 

Feel free to contact me directly if you need any more information. Good luck, 
and hope to see you up there! 


 

Robert S. Ridgely

North Sandwich

 

 

From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com [mailto:nhbirds AT googlegroups.com] 
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2015 4:51 PM
To: Digest recipients
Subject: [NHBirds] Digest for nhbirds AT googlegroups.com - 2 updates in 2 topics

 


nhbirds AT googlegroups.com 

 
 
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Topic digest 
View all topics 

·         Woodpecker at Hummingbird feeder and other notes - 1 Update 

·         durham landing - green heron, dover mills - bald eagle - 1 Update 

 
 
Woodpecker at Hummingbird feeder and other notes 



William Smith : Jun 26 01:15PM -0400 

About a month ago I posted about a male downy woodpecker at my hummingbird 
feeder. Thanks to Anne and Catherine for their reply and links, very helpful. 

 
The Downy continues sporadically and the hummingbirds, who abandoned the feeder 
initially, have returned and even will chase the Downy from the feeder. I’ve 
had a couple of face to face encounters from less than a foot away as the Downy 
will land on the windowsill where the feeder is and look in. Since this is over 
the kitchen sink we are often at the window and the woodpecker seems largely 
unfazed. This morning my wife saw the male at the feeder and what she thinks 
was a juvenile on the window sill. Apparently it’s part of the education 
process for the youngster. 

 
This morning a red bellied woodpecker (male I believe) showed up at our 
sunflower seed feeder. I have a regular red belly at the suet during the 
winter, this is a 1st yard bird for the summer. 

 
Yard birds seem to have had a very productive breeding season so far. Many 
white-breasted nuthatches, catbirds and robins eating my wild blueberries, and 
the titmice seem to have very large numbers. Apparently years of landscaping 
for the critters is paying off. 

 
 
Bill Smith
 
If we don't change the direction we are headed we will end up where we are 
going 


Back to top 

 
 
durham landing - green heron, dover mills - bald eagle 



duane dotton : Jun 25 06:48PM -0400 

six green herons at durham landing this evening.
 
also female wood duck, great blue heron, Northern flickers, and cormorants.
 
this week i have seen a bald eagle over the dover mills, three separate
times - this morning at 630 am, and Monday and Tuesday at 4pm.
 
- duane dotton

Back to top 


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Subject: RE: Arctic Tern - Hampton Harbor
From: Christian Martin <cmartin AT nhaudubon.org>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 12:30:54 +0000
The osprey with a transmitter that Kyle and Amanda saw in Hampton Harbor is 
almost certainly "Staddler," an adult male from a nest located east of Cross 
Beach Road in Seabrook. He was captured less than 6 weeks ago and fitted with a 
transmitter by Dr. Rob Bierregaard, Iain MacLeod, local Hampton resident Dave 
Weber, and me as part of the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center's Project 
OspreyTrack. 


More info about this bird and his movements available at:
http://www.nhnature.org/programs/project_ospreytrack/osprey_mapSTADDLER.php.

A more general description about this study of ospreys in the Seacoast area's 
salt marshes can be found in NHFG's Wildlife Journal magazine: 

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/pubs/documents/samples/ospreys.pdf

- Chris

Chris Martin
Senior Biologist, NH Audubon
cmartin AT nhaudubon.org

84 Silk Farm Road, Concord, NH 03301
603/224-9909, ext. 317 (office)
603/226-0902 (fax)

www.nhaudubon.org

New Hampshire Audubon - Protecting New Hampshire's natural environment for 
wildlife and for people. 


________________________________
From: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com  on behalf of Kyle 
Wilmarth  

Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2015 9:15 PM
To: nhbirds AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [NHBirds] Arctic Tern - Hampton Harbor

This afternoon Amanda and I took a paddle in Hampton Harbor and were very 
surprised to find an ARCTIC TERN among Common Terns roosting on the flats. The 
'blood red' bill was evident as were the short legs, especially when standing 
next to the Commons. 


A few photos can be found here: https://flic.kr/p/vhh4HM // 
https://flic.kr/p/ukm18R // https://flic.kr/p/vhtPwn 


Other highlights included:
Laughing Gull - 2
Bonaparte's Gull - 6, https://flic.kr/p/veF2WJ
Roseate Tern - 1
Common Tern - 20~
Purple Martin - flyover
Piping Plover - 1
Willet - 3
Osprey - with a transmitter on its back, carrying a nice fish


Amanda Altena & Kyle Wilmarth
Salem, NH

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Subject: Trask Brook high count
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 22:08:24 -0400
This afternoon I took a walk around the area at Trask Brook Road in Sunapee. I 
talked with the landowner yesterday and was given permission to walk anywhere 
out in the fields. So I did a walk around the outer perimeter of the fields. 
Though not a staggering number, I reached a new personal high count during my 
walk with 32 species. Highlights included a Green Heron flushed from the side 
of the brook. A pair of Northern Waterthrush on territory. A location first 
Canada Warbler. Not an amazing outing, but a notable one nonetheless. 

Also, while talking to the landowner yesterday, who is also the local 
veterinarian, he asked me for help IDing a bird. He pulled out a dead bird 
wrapped in paper towels and it sadly was a Black-billed Cuckoo that he said 
flew into his car just up Route 103 from Trask Brook where I've hear them in 
the past. Though sad to see a fallen Cuckoo, it was cool to help ID the bird 
for someone who had never seen one before. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Arctic Tern - Hampton Harbor
From: Kyle Wilmarth <kyle.wilmarth AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 21:15:00 -0400
This afternoon Amanda and I took a paddle in Hampton Harbor and were very
surprised to find an ARCTIC TERN among Common Terns roosting on the flats.
The 'blood red' bill was evident as were the short legs, especially when
standing next to the Commons.

A few photos can be found here: https://flic.kr/p/vhh4HM //
https://flic.kr/p/ukm18R // https://flic.kr/p/vhtPwn

Other highlights included:
Laughing Gull - 2
Bonaparte's Gull - 6, https://flic.kr/p/veF2WJ
Roseate Tern - 1
Common Tern - 20~
Purple Martin - flyover
Piping Plover - 1
Willet - 3
Osprey - with a transmitter on its back, carrying a nice fish


Amanda Altena & Kyle Wilmarth
Salem, NH

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Subject: bird entertainment
From: Jeanne-Marie <jeannemariemaher AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 20:02:01 -0400
Since being "winged" two weeks ago (broke right arm bicycling- should've been 
birding -safer), I've spent a lot of time around home, and enjoying the local 
birds. This evening in a simple neighborhood walk I came upon a large dark bird 
sitting in the middle of a small street, where I was strolling. It was overcast 
with poor lighting, so my initial thought was "wild turkey" - until it took off 
in flight circling low around the corner. When I too circled around, I found a 
turkey Vulture sitting on the roof of my neighbors front porch, having a dinner 
of road kill/squirrel. It was astonishing to see it so low/brazen in the 
suburban neighborhood. (I went home to grab my cell for a photo, but it had 
moved on for desert). 

Good Birding to all

Jeanne-Marie Maher
Nashua

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Subject: Fox Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, Philadelphia Vireo
From: "'Aerart' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 19:51:39 -0400
George Robbins did some hiking in the White Mountains with the Boy Scouts today 
and had the following: 


Fox Sparrow -- singing at the summit of Mount Lincoln at  5000 feet

White-crowned Sparrow -- heard singing near Greenleaf Hut, on the Old Bridal 
Path trail to Mount Lafayette, beside a small pond at about 4200 feet. 

Bird was not seen, but George knows White-crowned song (as heard in the east 
during migration), an example of which can be heard in this Xeno Canto 
recording from Quebec: 

http://www.xeno-canto.org/1396

((The Birds of New Hampshire by Keith and Fox lists no nesting season records 
for white-crown, BUT neither does it list any records, other than one 
historical Pittsburg record, for breeding Fox Sparrows -- which we now know are 
present on several high NH mountain locations ) 


Philadelphia Vireo - in the krumholtz at about 3500 feet on the Old Bridal Path 
to Mount Lafayette. 


Bicknell's Thrush - 8 heard calling, between 3500 and 5000 feet, from the Old 
Bridal Path, Franconia Ridge and Falling Waters Trails, on Lafayette, Lincoln 
and Little Haystack Mountains 


Lots of Dark-eyed Juncos on the peaks, 
and a Chipmunk! At 5200 feet on the summit of Lafayette.

George Robbins
Pittsfield, NH


Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Caps Ridge Trail (Bicknell's Thrush, Gray Jay, BB Woodpecker, Boreal Chickadees)
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 18:48:53 -0400
Jane and I decided to hike up in the White Mountains today.  We hiked up 
the Cap's Ridge Trail and along the Link Trail off the Jefferson Notch 
Road.  This is a relatively easy trail and perhaps the easiest hike to 
the higher elevations.  We hiked up to the rock overlook (about 1 hour 
hike) and then along the level Link Trail (another hour) which adds 
further possibilities of Bicknell's and is rarely used so we avoid some 
of the busy travel.

A beautiful cool morning.  Bird totals were about average, but a couple 
of species were low and nothing unusual.  Bird song seemed relatively 
quiet.  As usual, very quiet on our way back down the trail.  The 
earlier the better!  We managed to get all of the 4 target high altitude 
species (Boreal Chickadee, BB Woodpecker, Gray Jay, Bicknell's Thrush).

A couple of photos from today on my photo page.....scroll down for some 
recent photos of our Peregrine Falcons nesting in Haverhill, MA:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/

Comments:     Mostly sunny.  Cool start.  No wind at all.  On trailhead 
at 7 AM.  Count of birds out to stream crossing on Link Trail.
20 species

BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER  1     Appeared to be a female.  Not far up from 
parking lot.  Responded (and found) by playing tape.
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher  6     Low count.
GRAY JAY  1     Only a single bird.  But well fed at rock overlook.
Black-capped Chickadee  2
BOREAL CHICKADEE  7     My highest count for trail.  Scattered sightings 
of 1 and 2 birds.
Red-breasted Nuthatch  2
Winter Wren  2     Very low count.  I only heard 1.  Jane heard a 2nd.
Golden-crowned Kinglet  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1     Singing at rock overlook.
BICKNELL'S THRUSH  5     2+ at rock overlook including one close bird 
right near rock.  3 more along Link Trail.
Swainson's Thrush  18
American Redstart  2
Magnolia Warbler  5     Low count.
Blackpoll Warbler  20
Yellow-rumped Warbler  7
Black-throated Green Warbler  5
White-throated Sparrow  7
Dark-eyed Junco  6
Purple Finch  2
Pine Siskin  1

Steve & Jane Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: 3 Monroe Sandhill Cranes
From: Jim Sparrell <jimsparrell AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 16:19:34 -0400
Thanks to Sandy Turner's post we were able to locate the three continuing 
Sandhill cranes at the back of the fields just south of the cemetery on Plains 
Rd. A lovely, bucolic spot. 


Jim Sparrell 
Katie Towler
Portsmouth, NH

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Subject: North Conway and vicinity, 6/25-26 - breeding Ring-necked Duck, etc
From: "'Phil Brown' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 15:59:42 +0000 (UTC)
While and in between working in the Lakes to North Conway region on Thursday 
and Friday, I enjoyed a fine selection of breeding birds and quite a bit of 
breeding evidence. Most exciting was being able to confirm breeding on 
ring-necked duck at Pudding Pond in North Conway (East Side Road adjacent to 
TNC's Green Hills Preserve). I noticed several females there during mid-June 
last year as part of TNC's BioBlitz for this area and suspected breeding. 
Yesterday morning I accessed the pond across the railroad tracks and rather 
quickly noticed several broods - FOUR in all! Ducklings ranged from 1 to 5 in 
number and slightly older ducklings were in smaller broods, suggesting some 
mortality as they grow (probably snapping turtles and other predators). One or 
two of the larger chicks were diving with an adult female. The two adult males 
were fairly inconspicuous on the far northern end of the pond, far away from 
the females and young.17 individual ring-necked ducks in all from this small 
pond. 


Other locations I spent time were at several NH Audubon wildlife sanctuaries: 
Dahl in North Conway, Thompson in Sandwich, Hoyt in East Madison, and Watts in 
Effingham; as well as the fields along West Side Rd in North Conway. North 
Conway locations were particularly birdy, and I tallied around 80 species there 
before noon yesterday. I did check on three historic purple martin nesting 
locations yesterday and had no birds there, unfortunately. Following are some 
select highlights: 

Double-crested cormorant - 15 on 'the island' in Meredith Bay, mainly imm. - 
still looking for a nest in the now dead tree on this island, but no luck 
yetSharp-shinned hawk - carrying food and flying towards the Green Hills 
PreservePeregrine falcon - pursuing prey overhead heading towards the Green 
Hills PreserveYellow-billed cuckoo - 1 or 2 at the Dahl Sanctuary (one called 
first at 520 am from where I camped at the Saco River campground just next 
door)Black-billed cuckoo - 4 (2 at Dahl, 2 near farm fields along West Side 
Rd)Olive-sided flycatcher - 1 singing at Watts Sanctuary along Huntress Bridge 
RdWillow flycatcher - 3 off West Side Rd close to a few alder flycatchersBank 
swallow - just 3 across from the Dahl Sanctuary at a formerly large colonyBrown 
thrasher - 2 (1 at Pudding Pond, 1 off West Side Rd)Nashville warbler - 1 at 
Thompson Sanctuary, 2 feeding young at Watts SanctuaryNorthern parula - 1 at 
Hoyt SanctuaryCanada warbler - 2 at Watts SanctuaryPine siskin - 1 near Watts 
Sanctuary 

Phil BrownHancock, NH

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Subject: Woodpecker at Hummingbird feeder and other notes
From: William Smith <wmsmith03303 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 13:15:35 -0400
About a month ago I posted about a male downy woodpecker at my hummingbird 
feeder. Thanks to Anne and Catherine for their reply and links, very helpful. 


The Downy continues sporadically and the hummingbirds, who abandoned the feeder 
initially, have returned and even will chase the Downy from the feeder. I’ve 
had a couple of face to face encounters from less than a foot away as the Downy 
will land on the windowsill where the feeder is and look in. Since this is over 
the kitchen sink we are often at the window and the woodpecker seems largely 
unfazed. This morning my wife saw the male at the feeder and what she thinks 
was a juvenile on the window sill. Apparently it’s part of the education 
process for the youngster. 


This morning a red bellied woodpecker (male I believe) showed up at our 
sunflower seed feeder. I have a regular red belly at the suet during the 
winter, this is a 1st yard bird for the summer. 


Yard birds seem to have had a very productive breeding season so far. Many 
white-breasted nuthatches, catbirds and robins eating my wild blueberries, and 
the titmice seem to have very large numbers. Apparently years of landscaping 
for the critters is paying off. 



Bill Smith

If we don't change the direction we are headed we will end up where we are 
going 




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Subject: durham landing - green heron, dover mills - bald eagle
From: duane dotton <ddotton AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 18:48:34 -0400
six green herons at durham landing this evening.

also female wood duck, great blue heron, Northern flickers, and cormorants.

this week i have seen a bald eagle over the dover mills, three separate
times - this morning at 630 am, and Monday and Tuesday at 4pm.

- duane dotton

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Subject: green heron Nashua
From: Jeanne-Marie Maher <jeannemariemaher AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 09:26:35 -0400
While riding home from an apt yesterday (10) AM a green Heron flew up out of a 
tiny marsh along exit 8/sommerset parkway. Was a nice surprise. 


Jeanne-Marie Maher
Nashua NH



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Subject: Green Heron, Intervale NH, 6/23/15
From: "Marnich, Debra - NRCS, Conway, NH" <debra.marnich AT nh.usda.gov>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 12:58:26 +0000
A late post. Yesterday I had a uncommon sighting of an adult green heron 
hunting a small pond off of the Hurricane Mt. road in Interval. It was crouched 
in the tall grass along the pond and managed to get a frog while I was 
photographing it. Also a hen mallard with about 10 ducklings. The pond is very 
small and shallow, lots of weeds and grass, however proves to be a very 
productive wildlife habitat. 


Debra Marnich
Soil Conservationist
Natural Resources Conservation Service
73 Main Street, P.O. Box 533
Conway, NH 03818
PH (603)-447-2771 X101

[cid:image007.jpg AT 01CF240D.BBB77150]


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Subject: Pine Siskins, Hancock
From: Steven Smith <kwedun AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 08:32:33 -0400
There were 11 Pine Siskins at my feeder yesterday - this is the first summer 
that I have left my feeders up and so far it is worth it - I bring the feeders 
in every night and have only had one night time visit from a bear who got 
nothing. If I got a daytime bear raid, I would stop putting out my feeders 


Steve

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Subject: Flooded Baker River-Spotted Sandpipers, 6/22
From: Jody Williams <fisherwoods AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 06:54:17 -0400
Yesterday afternoon I saw two spotted sandpipers on the same debris in the 
Baker River. All the sandbars were under water from the heavy morning rain 
(1.1” in less than 90 minutes) which spiked the USGS stream gauge to over 4 
feet where yesterday it was at 1 foot. No hope for any sandpiper nest survival. 


Song Sparrows and Chipping Sparrows are feeding fledglings in the meadow so 
they survived. 

Still singing daily: Several Veerys, seems to be a good year for them, Wood 
Thrush and Hermit Thrush are sporadic. Scarlet Tanager every day for several 
weeks. Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireos, Ovenbirds, Indigo Bunting, American 
Redstart. 

Chestnut-sided Warblers have slowed down dramatically. 
Have not heard a Winter Wren at all, perhaps because of the dry spring when 
they migrated in. 


Aphrodite Fritillaries showed up in the last week. Dozens of European Skippers 
have emerged. Caught an Eastern Tailed Blue, Long Dash Skippers are daily. 

Watched one Monarch laying eggs last week. 

John R Williams

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Subject: Owls and Northern Lights
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:19:40 -0400
Since I was very young my dad would tell my siblings and I about how he had 
seen the northern lights (or Aurora borealis) in the past right from the 
parking lot of his business on Depot Rd in Sunapee. Whenever we talked about 
it, he always said he'd call me if he ever saw them again. Well last night I 
was a awoken to the sound of my phone ringing. It was my dad at 11:40pm. He's 
had recent health issues so initially was slightly panicked. I answered the 
phone immediately and was relieved when he told me in excitement that there 
were incredible northern lights in the sky. I quickly dressed and drove over to 
his shop, which is only about .5 miles away. I met him in the parking lot and 
we watched as incredible light displays fanned across the sky. It was the first 
time I had seen them. Though not as impressive as footage I've seen from near 
the arctic circle but still incredible. Fast, shooting, sometimes pulsating 
waves of light along with slowly shimmering bands dancing about the horizon. To 
tie this all into birds, as we watched a Barred Owl began to hoot in the woods 
between my fathers shop and Trask Brook Rd. In that silent time of night, the 
combination was truly incredible. It was also a memory of a moment with my dad 
and I that I will surely never forget (fitting being so close to Father's Day). 

In the past I've heard Aurora forecasts and have had them turn out to be busts 
but funny how there was no word of this event before hand and it ended up being 
an incredible show. 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee 

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Pine Siskin
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:14:32 -0400
I have had a few as regular visitors to my feeders. The other day I had what I 
thought could be a fledgling based on its fluffy feathering, but I did not see 
what would be an adult around. 


David Lipsy
Eagle Eye Photography
Concord, NH
Email: dlipsy AT comcast.net Website: 
http://davidlipsy.zenfolio.com/  

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/ 
 

Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/eagleeyephoto/portfolio 
 

Google+ : google.com/+DavidLipsyEagleEyePhotography 
 













> On Jun 23, 2015, at 9:08 AM, jennmckown1 via NHBirds 
 wrote: 

> 
> Very surprised to see a lone Pine Siskin at feeder this morning. Anyone else 
seeing siskins around? We have also had 4 pair of Rose Breasted Grosbeaks and I 
think 3 pair of Purple Finch visiting daily for weeks now. More than we've had 
in past few years. 

> 
> Jennifer McKown
> Brookfield, NH
> 
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Subject: Peregrine Falcons in Lancaster - 6/19
From: Kyle Wilmarth <kyle.wilmarth AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:01:08 -0400
On our way up to Pittsburg this past weekend Amanda and I made a pit stop
in Lancaster for lunch.  We were eating on the deck of a restaurant along
Israel River when we noticed a Peregrine Falcon come flying out behind a
building and snatch an unassuming Pigeon.  It plucked it a few times in
mid-air leaving feathers slowly falling down over us - good thing there was
an umbrella.  It circled a couple of times before heading south and just as
it went out of our sight another Peregrine came zipping by towards the bird
with the prey.  Both adult birds. All went unnoticed by the other people
next to us, besides maybe my swear-word ridden reaction...



Kyle Wilmarth
Salem, NH

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Subject: Re: Pine Siskin
From: wendy chatel <wendychatel AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 15:16:47 -0400
Here in Wolfeboro we had dozens of Pine Siskins at our feeders all spring
until a couple of weeks ago when they disappeared.  They have reappeared in
the last couple of days but only 3 or 4 at one time.  Also many pairs of
Purple Finch, 2 pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, several Red and
White-breasted Nuthatches, many many Goldfinches, and one male Indigo
Bunting from time to time.  3 Bluebird babies in one nest box and possible
tree sparrows in another.

Wendy Chatel
Wolfeboro

Wendy


On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 10:54 AM, paul dionne  wrote:

>
>
> We still have about a dozen Siskins in Derry, including some fuzzy babies.
> Paul Dionne,
> Derry
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> "Let there be songs to fill the air." Robert Hunter, Jerome Garcia
>
> On Jun 23, 2015, at 10:41 AM, Susan Fogleman 
> wrote:
>
> At least 20 continue at our feeders  (in addition to Purple Finches, 20+
> Goldfinches, several pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and the occasional
> appearance of a pair of Evening Grosbeaks).
>
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton
>
>
>
> On Jun 23, 2015, at 10:20 AM, Bob Crowley wrote:
>
>  I have 4 Siskins at the feeder this morning. They have been here for
> quite a few months along with several pairs of Purple Finches.
>
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
>
> On 6/23/2015 9:08 AM, jennmckown1 via NHBirds wrote:
>
> Very surprised to see a lone Pine Siskin at feeder this morning. Anyone
> else seeing siskins around? We have also had 4 pair of Rose Breasted
> Grosbeaks and I think 3 pair of Purple Finch visiting daily for weeks now.
> More than we've had in past few years.
>
> Jennifer McKown
> Brookfield, NH
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> --
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Subject: Fwd: Pine Siskin
From: paul dionne <gratefulpaul AT me.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 10:54:21 -0400

We still have about a dozen Siskins in Derry, including some fuzzy babies. 
Paul Dionne,
Derry 

Sent from my iPhone 

"Let there be songs to fill the air." Robert Hunter, Jerome Garcia 

On Jun 23, 2015, at 10:41 AM, Susan Fogleman  wrote:

At least 20 continue at our feeders (in addition to Purple Finches, 20+ 
Goldfinches, several pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and the occasional 
appearance of a pair of Evening Grosbeaks). 


Susan Fogleman
Campton 



> On Jun 23, 2015, at 10:20 AM, Bob Crowley wrote:
> 
> I have 4 Siskins at the feeder this morning. They have been here for quite a 
few months along with several pairs of Purple Finches. 

> 
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
> 
>> On 6/23/2015 9:08 AM, jennmckown1 via NHBirds wrote:
>> Very surprised to see a lone Pine Siskin at feeder this morning. Anyone else 
seeing siskins around? We have also had 4 pair of Rose Breasted Grosbeaks and I 
think 3 pair of Purple Finch visiting daily for weeks now. More than we've had 
in past few years. 

>> 
>> Jennifer McKown
>> Brookfield, NH
>> -- 
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> 
> -- 
> Bob Crowley, Chatham. NH
> 
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Subject: Re: Pine Siskin
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman AT roadrunner.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 10:41:45 -0400
At least 20 continue at our feeders (in addition to Purple Finches, 20+ 
Goldfinches, several pairs of Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and the occasional 
appearance of a pair of Evening Grosbeaks). 


Susan Fogleman
Campton 



On Jun 23, 2015, at 10:20 AM, Bob Crowley wrote:

> I have 4 Siskins at the feeder this morning. They have been here for quite a 
few months along with several pairs of Purple Finches. 

> 
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
> 
> On 6/23/2015 9:08 AM, jennmckown1 via NHBirds wrote:
>> Very surprised to see a lone Pine Siskin at feeder this morning. Anyone else 
seeing siskins around? We have also had 4 pair of Rose Breasted Grosbeaks and I 
think 3 pair of Purple Finch visiting daily for weeks now. More than we've had 
in past few years. 

>> 
>> Jennifer McKown
>> Brookfield, NH
>> -- 
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> 
> -- 
> Bob Crowley, Chatham. NH
> 
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Subject: Re: Pine Siskin
From: Bob Crowley <crbob AT fairpoint.net>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 10:20:20 -0400
I have 4 Siskins at the feeder this morning. They have been here for 
quite a few months along with several pairs of Purple Finches.

Bob Crowley
Chatham, NH

On 6/23/2015 9:08 AM, jennmckown1 via NHBirds wrote:
> Very surprised to see a lone Pine Siskin at feeder this morning. 
> Anyone else seeing siskins around? We have also had 4 pair of Rose 
> Breasted Grosbeaks and I think 3 pair of Purple Finch visiting daily 
> for weeks now. More than we've had in past few years.
>
> Jennifer McKown
> Brookfield, NH
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Subject: Pine Siskin
From: jennmckown1 via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 09:08:12 -0400
Very surprised to see a lone Pine Siskin at feeder this morning. Anyone else 
seeing siskins around? We have also had 4 pair of Rose Breasted Grosbeaks and I 
think 3 pair of Purple Finch visiting daily for weeks now. More than we've had 
in past few years. 


Jennifer McKown
Brookfield, NH

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Subject: 06-19-15 Concord Area Bald Eagle Nest Report
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 21:05:18 -0400
Hello all,

Please follow this link for a report and photos on the two Eaglets in the 
Concord Area Nest. 

They are developing some character. I love how one of them keep turning its 
head upside down while looking at it’s sibling. 


I hope you enjoy these.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/72157654873210716 
 


Sincerely,
David

David Lipsy
Eagle Eye Photography
Concord, NH
Email: dlipsy AT comcast.net Website: 
http://davidlipsy.zenfolio.com/  

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/ 
 

Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/eagleeyephoto/portfolio 
 

Google+ : google.com/+DavidLipsyEagleEyePhotography 
 













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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 22, 2015
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 20:47:21 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 22nd, 2015.



An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was heard singing along the Connecticut River in 
Hinsdale on June 16th.



A BLACK VULTURE was seen along the Connecticut River in Hinsdale on June 
17th.



A MISSISSIPPI KITE was seen flying near Gonet Road in Newmarket on June 
19th.



2 SANDHILL CRANES were seen behind the cemetery on Plains Road in Monroe on 
June 16th.



A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was reported from the Concord Airport on June 20th.



There were several reports of UPLAND SANDPIPERS during the past week at the 
Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth.



2 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS, and 4 CANADA WARBLERS were reported from Elbow Pond in 
Woodstock on June 16th.



A MOURNING WARBLER was seen along Ravine Camp Road in Woodstock on June 
16th, and 1 was seen along Base Station Road near Jefferson Notch Road on 
June 19th.



A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER was reported from Trudeau Road in Bethlehem on 
June 19th.



A BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER, 2 BOREAL CHICKADEES, and a BICKNELL’S THRUSH were 
all seen on the Caps Ridge Trail off of Jefferson Notch Road in the White 
Mountains on June 19th.



6 BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKRS, 2 SPRUCE GROUSE, 15 GRAY JAYS, 8 BOREAL 
CHICKADEES, 2 BICKNELL’S THRUSHES, 2 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS, 2 PHILADELPHIA 
VIREOS, 1 FOX SPARROW, 1 CAPE MAY WARBLER, 5 MOURNING WARBLERS, and 17 
BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS were reported from Pittsburg during the past week.



A female SPRUCE GROUSE with several young in tow, 4 BOREAL CHICKADEES, a RED 
CROSSBILL, and 2 CAPE MAY WARBLERS were all seen at the Mollidgewock Brook 
Road area of the Lake Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge on June 18th.



3 BICKNELL’S THRUSH, 3 GRAY JAYS, and a CAPE MAY WARBLER were reported from 
Sugarloaf Mountain Trail in Stark on June 20th.



2 EVENING GROSBEAKS, 2 BOREAL CHICKADEES, and a RUSTY BLACKBIRD were 
reported from Lake Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge on June 21st.



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org



Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: eastern kingbird red crown stripe
From: DAGForsyth via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 13:24:30 -0400
Seeing eastern kingbirds is very common, but seeing the red crown stripe is 
 not, at least for me. Anne and I spotted a kingbird chasing a hawk. 
Immediately  after perching, the red stripe was very visible. It started to 
disappear beneath  the bordering gray-black crown feathers, and was gone from 
visibility  within a few minutes.
pictures at https://www.flickr.com/photos/113232207 AT N06/
 
David Forsyth

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Subject: Pittsburg Birding 6/18-6/21
From: Lauren Kras <lauren.kras AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 12:07:03 -0400
From June 18th til June 21 a number of us (Colleen, Robert, and Robbie
Prieto, Kyle Wilmarth, Amanda Altena, Scott Heron, Jason Lambert, Ben
Griffith, Doc (the dog) and myself) were up in Pittsburg, NH for some
birding, oding, work (for some of us), and other random activities. The
dates of each person's time in Pittsburg differed (most arrived Friday
night or Saturday AM). It was a lot of fun to get up north with a group of
fun people and explore this area together. Unfortunately the weather was
not always cooperative but fortunately it was beautiful on Saturday 6/20
when we all got together to bird for the day. Over the four days there are
many checklists (still to be entered) but I figured it was easiest to just
send a complete list from the trip so I've compiled our sightings
(hopefully most/all of them) of Birds, Leps (butterflies and some moths),
Odes, and Mammals into this single report with notes on the locations of
the more "interesting" sightings. While no one saw everything, I think we
all had a lot of exciting sightings throughout the few days! If I'm
forgetting anything hopefully others will chime in! I also have
GPS coordinates for some of the birds - if you would like any of these,
please request them off the list. Finally, it's likely I'll be back in the
area the week of 6/29 so if anyone wants to meet up for some birding when
I'm not working, let me know.

Places visited included:
Magalloway Mtn - Kras 6/18
South Bay Bog - Kras 6/19
Smith Brook Bog - 6/19 and 6/20
East Inlet/Norton's Pool - 6/18-6/20
Scott Bog - 6/18-6/20
Magalloway Rd. - 6/18-6/20
Indian Stream Rd. - Prietos and others at different times
Day Rd. - Prietos
Deer Mountain Campground 6/18-6/21
Round Pond - Wilmarth and Altena 6/19 and 6/20
and probably many more locals that I'm forgetting here...

Here's a link to each of our flickr pages where we have posted and may be
posting more photos:
Lauren Kras - https://www.flickr.com/photos/lkras/
Ben Griffith - https://www.flickr.com/photos/bgriffith/
Jason Lambert - https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/
Scott Heron - https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron
Kyle Wilmarth - https://www.flickr.com/photos/kylewilmarth
Amanda Altena - https://www.flickr.com/photos/amandaaltena
Colleen Prieto - https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/
I've tried to include a few photos from each of us in the report

Now to the numerous lists...

*Birds:*
Canada Goose  - Including many with chicks
Mallard
Ruffed Grouse  9+ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lkras/19039128041 and
https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/18414593623/
SPRUCE GROUSE  1 (or possibly 2 - both seen by single individuals): 1 seen
well by myself along Magalloway Mountain Rd along the route to the
trailhead for Magalloway Mountain on 6/18 and the other was a possible bird
seen by Jason running away from him near the spruce grouse trail in the
woods.

Wild Turkey
Common Loon
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Northern Goshawk  1 Seen by a few observers flying over the Spruce Grouse
Trail - https://www.flickr.com/photos/bgriffith/18846433598/
Bald Eagle
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Wilson's Snipe  - mostly winnowing at night at East Inlet and at Deer
Mountain Campground
Northern Saw-whet Owl  1 bird calling during a small owling effort on the
night of the 18th
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER 6 - 1 bird at junction of East Inlet and Scott Bog
Rd. on 6/20 and 5 at South Bay Bog on 6/19
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/18845282158/ and
https://www.flickr.com/photos/amandaaltena/18844219690/

Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)
Pileated Woodpecker
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER  8 - 1 well along East Inlet Rd. 5 at South Bay Bog,
1 off Magalloway Rd. 1 bird seen by nearly all on Scott Bog Rd . -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/amandaaltena/19035055601

YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER - many along Scott Bog Rd., A few off East Inlet
Rd, and a few up Mt. Magalloway
Alder Flycatcher  lots everywhere
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Blue-headed Vireo
PHILADELPHIA VIREO  2 (1 scott bog rd, 1 east inlet rd) on Friday 6/19 -
none cooperative on Saturday
Red-eyed Vireo  lots

GRAY JAY  15+ many, many, many birds around - large family group at
Junction of East Inlet/Scott Bog Rd.,  A few at Deer Mountain Campground,
family group along Spruce Grouse Trail, another small family along to Smith
Brook Bog, and scattered others. many were young birds -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/19029930632/ and while the adults
were persistent (landing on us even without food!) they did occasionally
perch in natural habitats
https://www.flickr.com/photos/amandaaltena/18411267583

Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Tree Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
BOREAL CHICKADEE 8 over the weekend - very quiet for the most part likely
due to nesting season?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kylewilmarth/18844566790/ AND
https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/18412901464/i
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Winter Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Veery

BICKNELL'S THRUSH 2 up Magalloway Mountain on 6/18 near dusk
Swainson's Thrush  LOTS
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Gray Catbird
Cedar Waxwing
Ovenbird  Not many...
Northern Waterthrush
Black-and-white Warbler
Nashville Warbler  at least 30 individuals over the weekend

MOURNING WARBLER  at least 5 individuals along Magalloway Rd. others
scattered... most not cooperative. only 1 on 6/20 - most on 6/18
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart

CAPE MAY WARBLER  1 on trail up Magalloway Mountain - cooperative but no
camera
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler  TONS!

BAY-BREASTED WARBLER -- total of 17 for weekend --10+ singing in early
morning along East Inlet Rd. (on 6/19) and, 4 singing on trail up
Magalloway Mtn., 2 singing early morning along Scott Bog Rd.( 2 on 6/19, 1
on 6/20), 1 at Spruce Grouse Trail that was cooperative and many got to see
- one was very cooperative -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lkras/18849798429/

Blackburnian Warbler  a few around still singing - but really cool was this
one feeding on the ground at Scott Bog -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lkras/18415317633/
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler  - on Magalloway Mountain
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Palm Warbler (Yellow)  at least 3 at South Bay Bog
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler  many around
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow

FOX SPARROW - 1 up Magalloway Mountain
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored)
Scarlet Tanager
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Rusty Blackbird  2 at South Bay Bog
Common Grackle
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch  scattered birds
American Goldfinch

*Butterflies/Moths (thanks to Jason for the list):*
Viceroy - https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/18412703784/
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Canadian Tiger Swallowtail
Cabbage White
Mustard White
Clouded Sulfur
Silvery Blue - https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/18845263108/
Azure Sp.
Silver-bordered Fritillary
Northern Crescent
Harris's Checkerspot
American Lady
Common Ringlet
Dreamy Duskywing
Arctic Skipper
Peck's Skipper
Common Roadside Skipper -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/18846728789/
Polyphemus Moth
Lettered Habrosyne - www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/18410366804
many unidentified moths

*Odes** (thanks to Jason for the list)**:*
Superb Jewlwing - https://www.flickr.com/photos/bgriffith/18846354110/
Eastern Forktail
Harlequin Darner
Springtime Darner
Beaverpond Clubtail
Harpoon Clubtail
Dusky Clubtail - https://www.flickr.com/photos/bgriffith/19007905816/
Riffle Snaketail - https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/19036044811
Stream river cruiser - https://www.flickr.com/photos/bgriffith/19037207251/
Swift River Cruiser
American Emerald
Uhler's Sundragon
Baskettail sp.
Chalk-fronted Corporal
Four Spotted Skimmer

*Tiger Beetles:*
Twelve-spotted Tiger Beetle -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/19027401862/
Oblique-lined Tiger Beetle -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jlambert614/18410376154/

*Mammals (probably forgetting many here):*
Snowshoe Hare
Porcupine - https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/18847522310/
Red Squirrel
Woodchuck - https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/19038376091/
Deer
and of course MOOSE -
https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/18847532870/ and
https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottheron/19029873342/ and
https://www.flickr.com/photos/trespotatoes/18849069389/ and many many more
but somehow despite being up north the longest, I missed Moose for the trip
- go figure!

Lauren Kras
Greenland, NH

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Subject: Re: Catbird eating Suet
From: "Jim Berry" <jim.berry3 AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 10:28:00 -0400
same here, bruce.  we have seen catbirds carrying eating suet and carrying 
it to their young over the past week, and it was the first time we have ever 
seen them do that.     jim

Jim Berry
Ipswich, Mass.
jim.berry3 AT verizon.net


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Bruce Boyer" 
To: "NH.Birds" 
Sent: Saturday, June 20, 2015 6:16 PM
Subject: [NHBirds] Catbird eating Suet


>I saw a Gray Catbird feeding on my suet feeder. I've never seen this 
>before, but apparently it is not unusual.
>
> Bruce Boyer, Jaffrey
>
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Subject: Catbird eating Suet
From: Bruce Boyer <brumyster AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 18:16:48 -0400
I saw a Gray Catbird feeding on my suet feeder. I've never seen this before, 
but apparently it is not unusual. 


Bruce Boyer, Jaffrey

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Subject: YB Flycatcher, Lempster
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 17:50:40 -0400
Yesterday I received an email from Jack Swatt telling me of a walk he took out 
on the Ashuelot River Headwaters Trail in Lempster on the 18th. He said while 
out there he thought he had heard a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher in the same 
location as Pam Hunt had one in June of last year. So this morning I arrived at 
the trail at 6:40am and walked to the said location which is a spruce stand 
just before the bridge that crosses the Ashuelot River. When I arrived to the 
spot it was disappointingly quiet. Some birds were singing such as Canada, 
Blackburnian, Magnolia, Black-and-white and Nashville Warblers. A pit calling 
Alder Flycatcher in the marsh around the river got my initial attention but 
after IDing it I went back to looking for the YBFL. After ten minutes or so I 
went to a playback a few different times with no reaction from anything (except 
it seemed to upset a pair of WTSP that frantically called and moved around me 
as I played it). I probably waited for about 45 minutes and just when I started 
to try for a photo of a CAWA before I left I heard a distant and quiet 
"chebeck" from amongst all the other bird songs right around 8am. As I waited 
more the calls got closer and closer until it was right near the edge of the 
trail. I moved a short distance into the woods from the trail and had the bird 
singing right over my head where I photographed it and recorded its song in a 
short video: 


Song:
https://flic.kr/p/uUc2oQ

Photos:
https://flic.kr/p/uWMseX
https://flic.kr/p/uE4f4T
https://flic.kr/p/tZveHj
https://flic.kr/p/uWMWUT

I was very happy to be able to find this bird and confirm Jacks suspicion, so 
nice find Jack! It's also cool to find a returning bird (no sign of a second 
one today) here suggesting it may be breeding here (I think). 


Also, I didn't post about a sighting from last week because it was made on 
private property, but I briefly saw an Olive-sided Flycatcher flying about the 
tops of some spruce trees around Dodge Pond in Lempster. I returned there this 
morning and paddled the pond edge and did NOT find any sign of OSFLs around, 
but there is lots of suitable habitat down the outlet of the pond (Dodge 
Brook). 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee



Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Re: Bird bathing
From: "Linda M. Charron" <clinda912 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 12:33:06 -0400
I do enjoy watching the birds in my backyard birdbath. I think all 
birds love a bath. I raised canaries at one time and they had a special 
bath tub that I put in their cages every day. If I didn't get that tub 
in the cage soon enough they would take a bath in their water cup! Dad, 
Mom and baby canaries all took their turn in the tub! What a mess that 
makes in a caged birds area! But I new they needed their bath every 
day, so I planned for it. They would all sit and preen for an hour 
after bath time. It was their routine. 
Linda Charron
New Boston, NH

On Fri, 19 Jun 2015 22:05:21 -0400, Catherine Fisher  wrote:

       Steve,Your cowbird/starling bathing video is very much like a 
bathing frenzy my husband and I observed in our yard a few years ago in 
late-February/early March.  In our case it was dozens of juncos and 
gold finches using a hollowed slab of granite that was full of snow 
melt.  Space was limited and the birds were pretty much queuing up to 
get a spot; no sooner did one bird exit the pool than another jumped in 
to take its place.  I'd never seen anything like it, and though I now 
pay attention to that little pool each late winter as the snow melts, 
I've yet to see the scene repeated.  
Catherine Fisher
Lee

On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 5:42 PM, Steve Mirick  wrote:

       Always entertaining to watch birds bathe.  I find it funny how 
it seems to be contagious.  When one bird bathes, the others (even 
other species) need to follow.  Here is some video of Brown-headed 
Cowbirds and European Starlings I took earlier this year:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/16599308487/in/dateposted-public/

Mostly, I see common species bathing, but Jane and I were treated to a 
bathing Peregrine Falcon in a puddle at Hampton Beach SP several years 
ago:

http://home.comcast.net/~smirick//peregrinefalcon1.jpg

Apparently, it is an important method of maintaining feathers and will 
vary by species depending on their ability to walk/hop into water:


http://web.stanford.edu/group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Bathing_and_Dusting.html 


Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Linda Charron
New Boston, NH
 

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Subject: Re: Bird bathing
From: Catherine Fisher <catherineckx AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 22:05:21 -0400
Steve,
Your cowbird/starling bathing video is very much like a bathing frenzy my
husband and I observed in our yard a few years ago in late-February/early
March.  In our case it was dozens of juncos and gold finches using a
hollowed slab of granite that was full of snow melt.  Space was limited and
the birds were pretty much queuing up to get a spot; no sooner did one bird
exit the pool than another jumped in to take its place.  I'd never seen
anything like it, and though I now pay attention to that little pool each
late winter as the snow melts, I've yet to see the scene repeated.
Catherine Fisher
Lee

On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 5:42 PM, Steve Mirick  wrote:

> Always entertaining to watch birds bathe.  I find it funny how it seems to
> be contagious.  When one bird bathes, the others (even other species) need
> to follow.  Here is some video of Brown-headed Cowbirds and European
> Starlings I took earlier this year:
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/16599308487/in/dateposted-public/
>
> Mostly, I see common species bathing, but Jane and I were treated to a
> bathing Peregrine Falcon in a puddle at Hampton Beach SP several years ago:
>
> http://home.comcast.net/~smirick//peregrinefalcon1.jpg
>
> Apparently, it is an important method of maintaining feathers and will
> vary by species depending on their ability to walk/hop into water:
>
>
> 
http://web.stanford.edu/group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Bathing_and_Dusting.html 

>
> Steve Mirick
> Bradford, MA
>
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Subject: Hatch day for loons
From: Jim Sparrell <jimsparrell AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 22:00:53 -0400
I had the pleasure of sitting on shore in a loon sanctuary watching this
loon chick go in the water and take its first dive. Video is low quality
and rough and there are construction noises in the background. This is the
only time in about 5 hours of watching that I heard the parents calling
like this:

https://youtu.be/wcyRhrSby0E

Jim Sparrell
Portsmouth, NH

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Subject: Caps Ridge & Trudeau Road
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:56:45 -0400
Highlights from Caps Ridge Trail today:
Black-backed Woodpecker 1 seen and heard 
Boreal Chickadee 2 a pair at a cavity nest
Bicknell's Thrush 1

Also, Base Station Road
Mourning Warbler 1 male seen well

Highlights from Trudeau Road today:
Black-backed Woodpecker 1 heard only

Mark Suomala
www.marksbirdtours.com

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Subject: Bird bathing
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:42:40 -0400
Always entertaining to watch birds bathe.  I find it funny how it seems 
to be contagious.  When one bird bathes, the others (even other species) 
need to follow.  Here is some video of Brown-headed Cowbirds and 
European Starlings I took earlier this year:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40298884 AT N06/16599308487/in/dateposted-public/

Mostly, I see common species bathing, but Jane and I were treated to a 
bathing Peregrine Falcon in a puddle at Hampton Beach SP several years ago:

http://home.comcast.net/~smirick//peregrinefalcon1.jpg

Apparently, it is an important method of maintaining feathers and will 
vary by species depending on their ability to walk/hop into water:


http://web.stanford.edu/group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Bathing_and_Dusting.html 


Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: Eastern Phoebe Bathing - Interesting Behavior, Newton, NH
From: Paula McFarland <4birding AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 13:04:46 -0400
Hi,
A Phoebe just took a bath in my yard.  Instead of wading into the bird bath
and splashing around in the water (like most birds do), it stood on the
side of the bath, then plunged in the water.  It immediately flew off
without touching the bottom of the bath.  It came back and did this
repeatedly.  Perch, plunge, fly off.

I've never seen a Phoebe bathe before.  There is always more to learn about
birds.

Paula McFarland
Newton, NH

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Subject: Black Vulture, Hinsdale, 6/17
From: mresch8702 via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 21:34:45 -0400
This afternoon I saw 1 Black Vulture with 2 Turkey Vultures in Hinsdale right 
along the Connecticut River about a mile south of Brattleboro, VT. I first 
spotted the birds at 4:45 PM - thank goodness there was a wide shoulder so I 
could pull off. All three eventually made their way north up the river before 
disappearing out of view near the Rt 119 bridge over the river. The Black 
Vulture also spent a little time on the VT side of the river. 


A Black Vulture was seen in this general area on the 9th - maybe that was the 
same bird as mine today. 


There has been a vulture roost in Brattleboro off and on for the past several 
years, and twice before I've seen Black Vultures coming into or out of the 
roost. But each time they never went into NH airspace. So this was a first for 
my NH list. 



Mike Resch
www.statebirding.blogspot.com
Pepperell, MA

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Subject: ID Help
From: Cathy Pawelczyk <cap AT parera.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 14:40:07 -0400
Hi,
My neighbor spotted this bird this morning under his feeders here in 
Exeter.  Can anyone help with ID?
Thanks,
Cathy

	

	

	

	



Inline image 1


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Subject: Black Billed Cuckoo in Rochester
From: Kerri Breen <bufflehead444 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 08:04:22 -0400
Black Billed Cuckoo heard in Rochester yesterday near Salmon Falls
Rd/Riverlawn.   Called for about 10 mins...

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Subject: Nashaway Program - 'Live Free or Fly Fish'
From: Jane Wing <janewing29 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 16:16:31 -0400
*Wednesday June 17, 2015      7 - 9 pm*

Nashua Public Library Theatre Room


Live Free or Fly Fish

Presented by:  Jerry Bernier


 Join us and Jerry Bernier of Nashua, an avid fly fisherman and adventurer,
who has traveled the world in pursuit of his passion. Here is your chance
to take a trip around the world without leaving Nashua and perhaps add a
destination to your bucket list. For many years his fishing travels were to
remote sites in Alaska, Argentina, Chile, Labrador, Quebec, Alberta, and
the US. In recent years, he has taken pleasure trips to Africa, Iceland,
Tahiti, Japan, Greece, and Antarctica, and broadened his interest to
include taking many photographs on his “expeditions”. He will share some of
his more interesting stories and photographs of birds, animals, and fish
from these adventures. Guaranteed to be an entertaining program or your
money back!




All programs are *free and open to the public*. Programs are held in the
Theater Room of the Nashua Public Library on the *THIRD WED* of the month
at 7pm, except where otherwise noted. For more information, contact Program
Coordinator:

Richard Maloon 603-424-5621 richard.maloon AT att.net

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Subject: barn swallow nests
From: Sylvia Miskoe <sylviasmiskoe AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 15:25:35 -0400
I was in the barn this afternoon and the swallows were busy feeding.  I
could not see the nests but I could hear nestlings calling whenever the
adults came near.  Definitely 3 nests, perhaps four.  Hooray!

Sylvia Miskoe, Concord

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Subject: Elbow Pond in Woodstock, Ravine Road Warren, Saunders Hill Road Wentworth
From: Jody Williams <fisherwoods AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 12:34:37 -0400
This morning I spent a productive 90 minutes at Elbow Pond in Woodstock. The #1 
highlight for me was getting a photograph of a Rusty Blackbird with a beak full 
of insects (Stone Flies?)#2 highlight was running into Steve Smith and having a 
great conversation about the birds of the area and the day. He had a different 
Rusty Blackbird. At least 4 Canada Warblers, including one female, was a good 
find. Four thrush species singing was also a pleasant surprise ( Wood, Hermit, 
Swainson’s and Veery); I can’t recall ever finding Veery in this area. 


Heading back to Rumney: Drove in to the DOC lodge on Ravine Camp Road: Was 
surprised by a Mourning Warbler under the powerline in the brush; it obliged my 
pishing by popping up for about 30 seconds, and it was joined by a Magnolia and 
a Chestnut-sided. Black-throated Blues and Greens were singing in the 
background. 


Last stop was at Sanuder’s Hill Road in Wentworth for a quick scan and listen 
under the power lines. I was quickly rewarded with a Prairie Warbler singing 
away. Third time I have found one here in the last 5-6 years. 


John R Williams
Rumney

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Subject: Acadian Flycatcher singing at Hinsdale
From: "Hector Galbraith" <hg2 AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 09:56:31 -0400
This morning there was an acadian fly singing just north of the northern 
parking area at Hinsdale Setbacks. The loud explosive spitzah! song got my 
attention as I left my car. While the bird responded vigorously to the 
recording of its song on the Sibley App, it tended to keep to the canopy of the 
willow and maple trees and was difficult to see. Eventually I manged to get 
half-decent side-on views, seeing the grey-green crown, nape and mantle (much 
less brown-tinged than in willow and alder flys), the complete pale eyering 
(less white than in least fly), and the obviously long primary projection. The 
bird continued singing throughout about 20 minutes of observation. So far as I 
am aware, this is the first record of this species for the site.  


Hector Galbraith, PhD
EcoSolutions
802 258 4836 (O)
802 222 1916 (C)

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Subject: Monroe Sandhill Cranes
From: Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 07:36:38 -0400
Two Sandhill Cranes were seen behind the cemetery on Plains Rd, Monroe
Saturday June 13.  No young seen.

Sandy Turner
Lyman

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Subject: Rare Bird Alert, New Hampshire, June 15, 2015
From: "Mark Suomala" <mrsuomala AT marksbirdtours.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 22:14:37 -0400
This is New Hampshire Audubon's Rare Bird Alert for Monday, June 15th, 2015.



An adult BLACK TERN was seen on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg on June 
9th.



2 PARASITIC JAEGERS were seen off of Pulpit Rocks in Rye on June 9th.



A BLACK VULTURE was seen along the Connecticut River in Hinsdale on June 
9th. There was another sighting of possibly the same bird in Walpole on the 
10th.



A MISSISSIPPI KITE was seen flying near Gonet Road in Newmarket on June 
14th.



2 ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS, a CERULEAN WARBLER, and an EVENING GROSBEAK were all 
seen at Pawtuckaway State Park in Nottingham on June 7th.



An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was heard singing along Brindle Pond Road in Barnstead 
about a tenth of a mile from Peacham Road where you can see the pond, and 
easily hear the bird from the road. The bird was last reported on June 12th.



An UPLAND SANDPIPER was seen at the Pease International Tradeport in 
Portsmouth on June 14th, and a GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen there on the 
9th.



12 ROSEATE TERNS, 200 COMMON TERNS, and 15 GLOSSY IBIS were seen along the 
coast on June 9th.



A male NORTHERN SHOVELER was seen at the Exeter Wastewater Treatment 
Facility on June 8th, and 2 male AMERICAN WIGEONS were reported from along 
the Magalloway River in Errol on June 10th.



A SORA was reported from Old Mill Road in Lee on June 13th, and 1 was 
reported from Salem on the 14th.



2 FISH CROWS were reported from Durham on June 9th.



An OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was seen at Quincy Bog in Rumney, and 1 was seen 
at Dodge Pond in Lempster, both on June 14th.



A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was reported from Durham on June 12th.



75 CLIFF SWALLOWS were reported from the Cannon Mountain parking lot area on 
June 9th.



BICKNELL'S THRUSHES were reported from near the summits of Cannon Mountain 
during the past week.



This message is also available by phone recording: call (603) 224-9909 and 
press 4 as directed or ask to be transferred. If you have seen any 
interesting birds recently, you can leave a message at the end of the 
recording or send your sightings to the RBA via e-mail at: 
birdsetc AT nhaudubon.org. Please put either "bird sighting" or "Rare Bird 
Alert" in the subject line and be sure to include your mailing address and 
phone number. The RBA is also available on-line at the New Hampshire Audubon 
web site, www.nhaudubon.org


Thanks very much and good birding.

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Subject: Fun ID for me
From: Anne Licciardello <kerfuffles AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 20:28:31 -0400
I love thrushes. While hiking up the Falling Water trail to Little Haystack
Mountain on Sunday, I heard an obvious thrush, but what was it? Not a wood
or hermit thrush with their little flute songs, not a veery spiraling down.
Kind of like an upside down veery but less wooshy. Cornell Lab shows me it
was a singing Swainson's thrush.

I am a total wannabe when it comes to birding but it was so lovely to walk
along memorizing the pretty sound to look up later.

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Subject: Quincy Bog mid-day
From: Jody Williams <fisherwoods AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 17:53:41 -0400
I had just a little time at noon to look around at Quincy Bog in Rumney.
A singing Olive-sided Flycatcher was a nice surprise. Also watched a Chimney 
Swift hit the water surface. I didn’t notice a hatch but my eyes are not up 
there with the birds when it comes to edibles. 

A pair of Swamp Sparrows tending a nest was also a nice sight. 

At home in the meadow, a singing Black-throated Blue Warbler was a surprise at 
such a low elevation, (Around 500’). 




John R Williams
Rumney

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Subject: woodcock in west Concord
From: Anne Hadshi <annehadshi AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 08:24:53 -0400
I was excited to see my first ever woodcock right on my woody street where
I was taking a walk! beautiful bird - he was not happy to be seen and ran
away

Anne

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Subject: 06-10-15 Newly Fledged B & W Warbler Feeding Photographs - Strafford, NH
From: David Lipsy <dlipsy AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 20:45:56 -0400
Hello,

On 06-10 I captured a feeding sequence with a newly fledged Black & White 
Warbler. 

Along with a few shots of the fledgling and its father, I have a sequence of 
shots that span less than two seconds of the feeding of a caterpillar my the 
adult male to the fledgling. 


I hope you enjoy this.  It was truly fascinating to watch.

For the complete story and photographs, please follow this link.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/72157654528260681 
 


Thank you, and good birding!
David

David Lipsy
Eagle Eye Photography
Concord, NH
Email: dlipsy AT comcast.net Website: 
http://davidlipsy.zenfolio.com/  

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65293799 AT N04/sets/ 
 

Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/eagleeyephoto/portfolio 
 

Google+ : google.com/+DavidLipsyEagleEyePhotography 
 













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Subject: Canaan Bird Banding
From: Dylan Jackson <jacksonwrxt89 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 18:16:21 -0400
Today I went up to Canaan early in the morning to assist my former Plymouth 
State University professor, Dr. Leonard Reitsma, in his continued research on 
Canada Warblers in the Canaan area. We set out to one of his plots that's 
around the headwaters of the Mascoma River, but I can't say specifically where 
because honestly I had no idea where I was. Len told me that he had seven birds 
banded here already and was looking to get three more to make it an even ten. 
Our outing started well with a singing CAWA a short distance down the trail 
from where we started. We quickly set up our mist net and although it took some 
time, our first bird flew eventually into the net. This was an SY bird (second 
year) and was an exciting start to our day: 

https://flic.kr/p/uk7PGx
We made our way deeper in and crossed the river and worked back up the opposite 
side. After a little bit of a hike we came up on promising looking territory 
and used a playback to see if anything was around. Fortunately for us, an 
unbanded male CAWA flew in so we quickly got our mist net up and captured it 
almost immediately. This was an ASY (after second year) bird that we fitted 
with bands then released: 

https://flic.kr/p/tExmTm
Just after releasing this second bird we were discussing our next move when we 
heard the song of a familiar Thrush. I think at that moment we both dismissed 
it as a Hermit but after it sang a couple more times we both (almost 
simultaneously) realized we were hearing a Swainson's Thrush. I used a 
Swainson's playback and got the bird to land just above my head where I got 
these two shots: 

https://flic.kr/p/uB7AA9
https://flic.kr/p/uzefro
This was very cool sighting for us. A species that I've had very few encounters 
with since I did my tech work on Bicknell's Thrush in the Dixville area back in 
2011. 

Up the river from there we found another promising piece of habitat and again 
used a playback and drew in another unbanded CAWA. Like before we quickly set 
up the net and almost immediately captured our bird. This one was another ASY 
bird: 

https://flic.kr/p/uBMBfB
I was delighted that we were able to get Len's three birds so easily and to be 
able to find a Swainson's Thrush in the process. Having the opportunity to not 
only band birds but be a part of something so interesting is an awesome 
experience. Dr. Reitsma is also a great person and filled with knowledge (he 
even told me that female Purple Finches sing today, I had no idea!). He's 
leading a walk through at one of his CAWA plots at Bear Pond Wildlife Area in 
Canaan off of Switch Rd tomorrow and I highly recommend going if you can. All 
in all it was an incredible day and felt good to be back in the field! 


-Dylan Jackson
Sunapee

Sent from my iPhone

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Subject: Bobolink, Peterborough
From: Bruce Boyer <brumyster AT comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 11:51:05 -0400
Bobolink singing at Fremont Fields.

Bruce Boyer

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Subject: Old Mill Road, Lee
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Sat, 13 Jun 2015 13:12:09 +0000
Birders,

I checked out the restored marsh on Old Mill Road, Lee from 6-7 this morning. 
46 species, including one mystery, made it very productive. The mystery was 
calling from the cattails, sounding in pattern like the kiddick call of a 
Virginia Rail but in tone like a Sora. I've been going through Xeno-Canto 
trying to find something like it from either species with no success. I think 
tone is harder to change than pattern, and this species has been regular here, 
so I conclude that it was a Sora. 



Other birds present included --a pair of Kestrels harassing a Cooper's hawk

--a brood of 6 young Hooded Mergs and two adults

--4 Woodcock flushed

--several Bank Swallows

--Pileated calling

--Indigo Bunting, Scarlet Tanager, both Orioles (Boog and Brooks)

--Prairie and Blue-winged Warblers

--Thrasher and Towhee


Kurk Dorsey

Durham

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Subject: Threat to Migratory Bird Treaty Act
From: Steve Mirick <smirick AT comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 16:47:42 -0400
There is currently a potentially major threat to the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act.  This act is the fundamental law that protects birds in the 
United States.  It is under threat due to its inclusion in an 
appropriations bill that seeks to defund enforcement of the 
law.....effectively stripping it of any power.  The measure has passed 
the House of Representatives and is heading to the Senate. Bird 
conservation groups including the American Birding Association and 
National Audubon are against this change.  More information can be found 
here:


http://blog.aba.org/2015/06/what-birders-should-know-about-the-migratory-bird-treaty-act-threat.html 


and here:

https://www.audubon.org/news/against-bird-killer-amendment

and here:

http://www.onearth.org/earthwire/migratory-bird-treaty-act-gop-attack

And if you are interested in writing a letter to protest:

https://secure.audubon.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1939

Steve Mirick
Bradford, MA

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Subject: N. Haverhill Merlin, Bedell Br. SP
From: Jody Williams <fisherwoods AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 12:01:48 -0400
Along Rte 10 in North Haverhill, Just north of the garden store, there was a 
Merlin perched in a dead snag overlooking the corn fields. Judging by the form, 
I think it was a female. In the gray light, the color wasn’t easily seen, but 
all the front field marks were readily visible. 


Took a quick ride through Bedell Bridge SP: Wood Duck with 5 ducklings was 
nice, Willow and Least Flycatchers were calling. saw or heard 14 other species 
in 5 minutes. 


John R Williams
Rumney 

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Subject: Morse Preserve, Alton - Vesper Sparrow and shrubland birds
From: Lauren Kras <lauren.kras AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 09:33:36 -0400
Yesterday I explored the Forest Society's Morse Preserve with many of my
colleagues as part of our annual staff field day. While it was late in the
afternoon I was still very impressed with this preserve which offers great
views of the Belknap
Range, including Mount Major and Lake Winnipesaukee... and quality
maintained blueberry shrubland which is maintained providing over 60 acres
of continuous early successional habitat. I didn't have time to explore
very much but bird highlights included a Vesper Sparrow (possibly breeding
here? Not sure if this is a known location for this species in the state
but I don't believe that it is!), numerous Field Sparrows and Prairie
Warblers (nice to have them away from an airport or powerline!).

For directions and access check out
https://www.forestsociety.org/property/evelyn-h-albert-d-morse-sr-preserve

Here's my ebird checklist:

Turkey Vulture  1
Bald Eagle  1
Broad-winged Hawk  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  X
Alder Flycatcher  4
Eastern Phoebe  X
Great Crested Flycatcher  X
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Red-eyed Vireo  5
Blue Jay  X
Tree Swallow  X
Barn Swallow  X
Black-capped Chickadee  X
Veery  1
American Robin  X
Gray Catbird  X
Ovenbird  2
Northern Waterthrush  1
Black-and-white Warbler  3
Nashville Warbler  1
Common Yellowthroat  10 conservative count
American Redstart  5
Chestnut-sided Warbler  5
Prairie Warbler  5 conservative count - lots here
Eastern Towhee  4
Chipping Sparrow  X
Field Sparrow  6 conservative count
VESPER SPARROW  1 sang a few times
Song Sparrow  X
Scarlet Tanager  1
Indigo Bunting  1
Common Grackle  X
Baltimore Oriole  1
American Goldfinch  X

Lauren Kras
Greenland, NH

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Subject: Pix of MISSISSIPrimpingPreeningI Kite
From: Cliff Otto <bye.bye.nh.birdy AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 09:11:33 -0400
Here are three shots of thee Mississippi Kite I saw yesterday in Newmarket

http://ottoc.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v39/p1246904136-5.jpg

http://ottoc.zenfolio.com/img/s4/v62/p1246904129-5.jpg

http://ottoc.zenfolio.com/img/s1/v48/p1246904183-5.jpg

Cliff Otto
Manchester

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Subject: YB Cuckoo, Durham
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Fri, 12 Jun 2015 12:40:00 +0000
Birders,

I was just thinking this morning that the cuckoo wave at the end of May had 
petered out, to my surprise. Just now, a YB Cuckoo called in our woods; 
presumably it has been reading my mind, so I'd better be careful. 



Kurk Dorsey

Durham

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Subject: Mississippi Kite...some may say ho-hum but...
From: Cliff Otto <bye.bye.nh.birdy AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2015 17:00:41 -0400
But the number of birds on my life list that I have not yet photographed
has shrunk to 24 now that I found one on Gonet Drive in Newmarket. I didn't
find the nest but I did glimpse one circling in back of me and found it
perched atop a dead tree in back of the town's building at the corner of
Dame and Gonet, nicely preening (11:30 -11:45).

Cliff Otto
Manchester

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Subject: Red-tail and Broad-wingeds Dogfight in Lyme Thursday
From: "'Blake Allison' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2015 17:48:39 +0000 (UTC)
Apparently the two broad-winged hawks nesting in the woods adjacent to my house 
felt the red-tail had intruded into their space. They dove at it repeatedly 
until the interlloper flew off. 

Blake Allison
Lyme, NH 03768-3322


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Subject: Ruffed Grouse Encounter- Pine Siskins and Purple Finches
From: Gail Coffey <gcoffeywriter AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2015 10:22:28 -0400
I came across a Ruffed Grouse and her chicks right next to the road near my
house in Wilton.  The hen did her broken wing display and the chicks
scampered over a stone wall into woodland safety.

Have two pairs of Pine Siskins that remained from the winter flock showing
up at our thistle feeder and two pairs of Purple Finches appearing in the
yard over the last few weeks.

Love these warm days,

Gail Coffey
Wilton, NH

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Subject: Black-billed Cuckoo in Manchester
From: "Jane Hills" <jhbird AT myfairpoint.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Jun 2015 06:51:15 -0400
This morning at Dorrs Pond in north Manchester I heard a Black-billed Cuckoo
calling.  It was in the woods between the path around the pond and the
Daniel Webster Highway.

 

Other "city" species of note heard or seen at Dorrs: Eastern Wood Pewee,
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Baltimore Oriole, Scarlet Tanager, Eastern Kingbird,
Great Crested Flycatcher, Wood Thrush, Red-eyed and Warbling Vireos, and a
female Mallard with nine ducklings in tow.

 

Jane Hills

Manchester, NH

jhbird(at)myfairpoint(dot)net

 

"We are all environmentalists now, but we are not all planetists.  An
environmentalist realizes that nature has its pleasures and deserves
respect.  A planetist puts the earth ahead of the earthlings."  --William
Safire

 

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Subject: Fwd: Birdwatching, Indoors Edition
From: Dorothy Currier <dorocurr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 23:26:31 -0400

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Subject: Black Vulture Walpole
From: "'Wendy Ward' via NHBirds" <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 22:24:50 +0000 (UTC)
While at work in a crop field a Black Vulture flew over my head in with 4 
Turkey Vultures. My enthusiastic exclamation "Black Vulture!!!" was answered 
with "that's great Wendy, now get on the other end of that gully with the 
measuring tape. Clear view of the shorter tail and wings and the silvery 
primaries and black underside. It appeared a few times farther off - too far 
for a picture by the time I got my phone. 


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Subject: Black Tern and wigeon in the north country
From: raqbirds via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 16:07:27 -0400
An adult Black Tern on Second Connecticut Lake in Pittsburg on June 9 and two 
male American Wigeons along the Magalloway River in Errol on June 10 have been 
the highlights of a few days up north this week. 



75+ Cliff Swallows and similar species to others' reports on Cannon Mountain 
have added to the fun. 



Bob Quinn with a Merlin Wildlife Tours group 
Webstah, NH 

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Subject: Reminder-***NH Audubon Seacoast Chapter Wednesday June 10, 2015 Program - Birding the Ho Chi Minh Trail***
From: bikenbird via NHBirds <nhbirds AT googlegroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 02:09:14 -0400
    
         
             
                       
                                 
                                     
                                         
                                             
                                                 
 New Hampshire Audubon Seacoast Chapter 



                               
 Wednesday June 10, 2015 Program - 7:30 pm - Birding the Ho Chi Minh Trail 

                                                                  
                                                                 


                                 
                                                                       
 Join Seacoast Chapter members Jim Sparrell and Katie Towler for a visit to 
Vietnam, in which they search for the "very skulking" Chestnut-eared 
Laughingthrush and a new species first identified in 1999, the Black-crowned 
Barwing. For this second birding trip in the country, they traveled in the 
North Central Highlands. They went inland from Danang, where they had a variety 
of migrating and resident raptors and many other species along the Ho Chi Minh 
Trail not far from the Laotian border. 

                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
 Plus there will be an update on the Purple Martin special project by Dennis 
Skillman. 



                                 
                                                                     
                                  
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                               
                               
                                
 All are welcome to attend our Wednesday June 10, 2015 program which is free of 
charge at the Seacoast Science Center (wheelchair accessible), Odiorne Point 
State Park, 570 Ocean Boulevard, Rye NH (click here for Google maps: 
http://goo.gl/maps/mfnQT ) . Refreshments are at 7:00 PM. Meetings begin at 
7:30 PM. For more information see our web site at 
http://www.seacoastchapter.org/programs . Cancellations will be announced on 
http://www.seacoastchapter.org/programs and this Google group. 

 


                                Al Stewart, Jr                               
                           
                        
                      
                    
                  
                
         
      
    
 

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Subject: Fish Crows, Durham
From: "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey AT unh.edu>
Date: Wed, 10 Jun 2015 01:03:32 +0000
Birders,

At least two Fish Crows were calling near Morrill Hall on the UNH campus today; 
I also had the pleasure of showing my 8-year-old two ospreys over our house 
today--first I've seen from the yard this year. Also a Blue-winged Warbler 
still singing along Mill Road. 



Kurk Dorsey

Durham

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