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Updated on Monday, December 22 at 12:06 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Fox Sparrow,©Barry Kent Mackay

21 Dec Results of offshore fishing / birding pelagic, OCEAN COUNTY [Larry scacchetti ]
21 Dec Moorestown CBC results [Sandra Keller ]
21 Dec Turkey Swamp County Park (Monmouth County) 12/21/14 [Susan Treesh ]
21 Dec Harlequin Duck [Harvey Tomlinson ]
21 Dec Mehrhof Pond Then and Now [Diane C Louie ]
21 Dec Winter Birding in East Brunswick ["Albert, Steven" ]
20 Dec Re: Winterberry Holly [Mike Anderson ]
20 Dec Fwd: Fwd: Hatfield Swamp Scatology [Diane C Louie ]
20 Dec Re: Winterberry Holly [Susan Treesh ]
20 Dec Winterberry Holly ["Susie R." ]
19 Dec The Loss of a Good Man - Jim Zamos [mike hiotis ]
19 Dec Fwd: Hatfield Swamp Scatology [Diane C Louie ]
19 Dec Greater White-fronted Goose, Monroe Twp [Larry-Zirlin ]
19 Dec Re: Bird Feeders Redux (consolidated responses) [Mike Anderson ]
19 Dec Bird Feeders Redux (consolidated responses) ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
19 Dec Lake Etra White-fronted geese [Joseph Palumbo ]
19 Dec Hatfield Swamp Scatology [Diane C Louie ]
19 Dec Late Chipping Sparrow [Harvey Tomlinson ]
18 Dec Pink-footed Goose etc. in Monroe Township ["John J. Collins" ]
17 Dec Pink-footed Goose - Etra Lake, Hightstown [Todd Frantz ]
16 Dec Re: NJBRC Annual Report [Larry Scacchetti ]
16 Dec Re: NJBRC Annual Report [Mike Anderson ]
16 Dec Lower Hudson CBC [Michael Britt ]
16 Dec wsb and ebird [Sandra Keller ]
16 Dec Re: NJBRC Annual Report [mike hiotis ]
16 Dec ebird again [Sandra Keller ]
16 Dec Pink-footed Goose at Wall now ["John J. Collins" ]
16 Dec NJBRC Annual Report [Bill Boyle ]
16 Dec another ebird question [Sandra Keller ]
15 Dec RHWP [Richard Moran ]
15 Dec Egyptian Goose clarification (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
15 Dec Geese for lunch ["Albert, Steven" ]
15 Dec Annual DVOC Members' Photo Night this week! Thursday December 18th [Steve Kacir ]
15 Dec Lake Etra Pink-footed goose [Joseph Palumbo ]
15 Dec Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 12/14/14 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
15 Dec Egyptian Goose at Spring Lake, Monmouth County [Betty Mueller ]
15 Dec Blue Goose at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge [Carol Anne Pagliotti ]
15 Dec Island Beach CBC results [vincent N ]
14 Dec Re: Zebra Finch Sighting [Karl Lukens ]
14 Dec Re: Zebra Finch Sighting [Rick Wright ]
14 Dec Re: Zebra Finch Sighting [Diane C Louie ]
14 Dec Re: Zebra Finch Sighting [Rick Wright ]
14 Dec Zebra Finch Sighting [Susan Mazza ]
14 Dec Princeton CBC - Plainsboro Region [David Tattoni ]
14 Dec Pink-Footed Goose [Wendy and Stuart Malmid ]
14 Dec Mystery Warbler. Orange -Crowned [Harvey Tomlinson ]
14 Dec Juvenile Cooper's Hawk (Photo) [Steve Byland ]
14 Dec Egyptian Goose on the loose (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
14 Dec FYI for those birding the Rutgers preserve ["B.G. Sloan" ]
14 Dec Barnacle Goose and other geese [Wendy and Stuart Malmid ]
14 Dec Pink-footed Goose [Jim Schill ]
14 Dec Pink-footed and Barnacle geese together in Monroe township [Joseph Palumbo ]
14 Dec Possible MacGillivray's Warbler [Harvey Tomlinson ]
13 Dec Greater/Lesser Scaup [David Bernstein ]
13 Dec Northern Goshawk at Liberty State Park [Michael Britt ]
13 Dec Re: Pink-footed [Josh Emm ]
13 Dec Re: Assunpink Swans - Yes; Redpoll - No ["James O'Brien" ]
13 Dec Assunpink Swans - Yes; Redpoll - No ["Hopkins,Jeffrey A." ]
13 Dec Barnacle Goose [Wendy and Stuart Malmid ]
13 Dec Etra lake - no Barnacle [Sandra Keller ]
13 Dec Barnacle Goose [Joseph Palumbo ]
13 Dec Pink-footed [Sandra Keller ]
13 Dec Barnacle Goose - Etra Lake, Hightstown [Todd Frantz ]
13 Dec Barnacle Goose - etra lake mercer co [Todd Frantz ]
13 Dec Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting [Beth Goldberg ]
13 Dec Geese [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
12 Dec Extralimital: Winter Raptor Trip (26 Rough-legged Hawks) [Michael Britt ]
12 Dec Monmouth Beach ocean scan [mike hiotis ]
12 Dec American Black Duck (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
12 Dec Island Beach CBC [vincent N ]
12 Dec Island Beach CBC [vincent N ]
12 Dec Wall Township Pink-footed Goose [Joseph Palumbo ]
12 Dec Sandy Hook Bay spill is diesel fuel that could threaten wildlife, park officials say [Cynthia Allen ]
12 Dec Coast Guard investigating oil spill in Sandy Hook Bay | NJ.com [Fairfax Hutter ]
12 Dec some Assunpink birds [Bob Dodelson ]
12 Dec Where were all the Gulls [Harvey Tomlinson ]

Subject: Results of offshore fishing / birding pelagic, OCEAN COUNTY
From: Larry scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 23:36:51 -0500
I think this was the first time I've spent any time offshore from Ocean County. 
Today Alyssa Della Fave, Marc Chelemer and I embarked on a final attempt to 
find any offshore winter birds for 2014. We left Brielle at 9:30 pm, Saturday 
night, and headed out to our destination, approximately 70 miles due east of 
the Manasquan Inlet. The Captain confirmed it was in fact NJ and Ocean County 
waters but did not divulge any coordinates due to their "secret" fishing 
locales. We reached the fishing zone at 3:30 am and were greeted by a small pod 
of Common Dolphin feeding on the squid that were attracted to the lights. As 
time went by and the sun slowly peeked the horizon, the gull activity slowly 
increased as did the visibility. Just about 6:00 am there was a dark morph 
Northern Fulmar that came in from the north and skirted the edge of the gull 
flock. It made a quick pass and turned east and was as gone as quickly as it 
appeared. The sun rose and the birding was in full force! 

 . As we all scanned for more Fulmars and the chance for an NJ Puffin, Alyssa 
spotted off in the distance a bird with stiff choppy wingbeats. The distance 
and lighting, the bird screamed Fulmar, as I began to shoot, photographs proved 
the bird to be a Manx Shearwater. As the day went on Dovekie's and smaller 
groups of larger alcids steamed by. The days total count for Dovekie was 338. 
This was all mainly from one side of the boat. Razorbills were the next highest 
alcid to cruise through with a total of 11, and Common Murre coming in a close 
3rd with 10 birds. In one line of Common Murre's was a Thick-billed Murre, a 
distant photo of the line showed the all dark hood and nape, helping to 
distinguish it from Common. A 2nd Thick-billed Murre provided a fantastic look 
as it sat on the water within 30 feet from the boat. Alyssa got some nice shots 
of that bird, https://www.flickr.com/photos/lyssea 


Unfortunately no Puffins made an appearance, but other birds of the day were 4 
Red-throated Loons, 2 Common Loons, 15 Northern Gannets, 17 Black-legged 
Kittiwakes, and a loose count of Herring and Great Black-backed Gulls. Good 
times were had by all, Good friends, good birds, good fish, and a trip to 
remember. 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Moorestown CBC results
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 20:18:58 -0500
Hello,
      I don't have all the reports in - but we stand at 100 right now.
That's actually a tad low. We will hopefully pick up more a few more
species - like Brown Thrasher - when I get all the reports.

      Good weather is great to bird in, but sometimes the bird numbers
and species are low! I have always theorized that the birds don't have to
feed quickly. No storms coming. Etc. And no snow to push them to the
edges of roads and fields. Of course if it had been snowing, I would not
have risked driving out in it!

I had 4 Red-tailed Hawks and 6 Turkey Vultures in the air in my area.
No Cooper's, no Sharpie, no falcons..... No eagles. Very strange.

Highlights - a SHORT-EARED OWL was found at Amico Island by another
group! Haven't seen on this count since 1965. Wow. One was seen on
the Gloucester count yesterday also. I do believe they are moving through
so time to check some inland spots. A REDPOLL was found in another area.
No, I have no location details. They move a lot anyway. A LONG-TAILED
DUCK was on the Delaware River I believe in Camden County. A lingering
LINCOLN'S SPARROW was found. Several teams had RED-BREASTED MERGS -
not an easy species to see on our count - usually every other year and
in low numbers.

Good birding all. I look forward to hearing about other counts from today!

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Turkey Swamp County Park (Monmouth County) 12/21/14
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 17:17:08 -0500
Birded the lake and the northern half of Turkey Swamp with Mike 
Blasenheim and David Larsen for a few hours today.  A large flock of 
hooded mergansers shared the lake (much of it covered with a thin skim 
of ice) with Canada geese and mallards; these were the only waterfowl 
seen.  Landbirds were present, but only in roving mixed flocks; these 
had some variety, including the expected Carolina chickadees, 
white-breasted nuthatches, and titmice along with a brown creeper, both 
kinglets, downy and hairy woodpeckers, Carolina wrens, a hermit thrush 
or two, and plenty of white-throated sparrows, song sparrows, and 
juncos, plus robins, a pair of cardinals, and a red-bellied woodpecker. 
These birds were present in various tight flocks that were moving 
through the woods, particularly closer to the clear-flowing waters of 
the Manasquan River.

I did not realize until later that there was an adjacent Turkey Swamp 
WMA.  I assume these two places have roughly the same birdlife, or are 
they more distinct?  Is anyone familiar with both of these places?

Susan Treesh
Somerset



List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Harlequin Duck
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 17:12:58 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
Watched a female type Harlequin Duck float past the Stone Harbor Point
jetty this afternoon.
She was headed south but looked as if she was turning back.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/15886834908/
Purple sandpipers were working the jetty, and the number of Ipswich
Savannah sparrows out on the flats are impressive.
In just a short walk I counted 15 birds.
This past Dec 5th I had a great day at the point and photographed (poorly
mind you)a small dark rail that I flushed in the salt marsh.
I almost stepped on it before it took off. I have been waffling back and
forth between Sora and Black Rail both of which would be very unusual for
Dec.
Is it something I haven't thought of?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/16063560475/
Good Birding
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mehrhof Pond Then and Now
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 15:33:47 -0500
Yesterday I joined the 9am shift for Dave Halls tour of the BCUA aka Merhhof 
Pond in Little 

Ferry as part of his CBC weekend marathon. Last Saturday was the scouting trip 
and 

we were psyched to see the same birds and more. We were not disappointed. In 
contrast to last week, in which 

it was sunny, in the 40s and with a light wind, yesterday was 10 degrees 
colder, grey, and still. The cold seemed 

to have brought in more waterfowl, especially Ruddies (>1000) and Canada Geese. 
Like last week, we were able 

to find Great Cormorant drying off on the solar panels next to their DC 
cousins. There also seemed to be more 

GB Herons (~10)  although perhaps we were more systematic about finding them  
and there definitely were 

more Common Mergansers. Again, there were rafts of Lesser Scaup, GW Teal, 
Shovelers, and Hooded Mergansers 

here and there along with few Bufflehead and Gadwalls. This time I was able to 
find a couple of Pintails which are nowadays unusual at this 

site per Dave. Coots were plentiful in the heated waters of the stream under 
the bridge but as before, we could 

not find any BC Night Herons. However, Dave sighted the (same?) Palm Warbler in 
the brambles on the bank and he 

was happy. Lonely Road was anything but: Chickadees, Goldfinches, Downies, 
White-Throated, Song, and Tree Sparrows 

and a seriously delayed Hermit Thrush were easily sighted. Dave and Dan were 
able to see Yellow-rumps. 

In the trees on the edges of the property we could find Juncos, RW Blackbirds 
admixed with large flocks of 

Starlings, and a few House Finches. Ian The "Raptor Whisperer was not with us 
this time so we did not see nearly as many RT Hawks as last week, but we had an 
immature 

Bald Eagle early in the shift and a Coopers was seen a couple of times. Since 
my job was to be the scoper, I diligently 

scanned the mudflats for shorebirds but could find not a one. We saw Crows but 
no Ravens. The birding was so good, 

we continued through the lunch hour. I finally peeled off when the group took a 
break at 2pm. When I got home, the hand warmers were 

still doing their job so I tucked them into my socks. At bedtime, the jumbo 
hand warmer I used for my right (dominant) 

hand was still quite warm, so I slept with it in my pj pocket.

Diane Louie
Madisonb

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Winter Birding in East Brunswick
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 11:19:29 +0000
On behalf of the East Brunswick Environmental Commission and the Friends of the 
EB Environmental Commission, I led a group of hardy souls around town 
yesterday. It was dark and cold with occasional flurries - raw, my dad used to 
say. We visited Dallenback Park, Edgeboro Landfill, Duhernal and Farrington 
Lakes and tallied 32 species. Highlights were a brown creeper, bluebirds 
(always nice on such an almost winter day), a possible Cackling goose, hooded 
mergansers, ruddy and ring-necked ducks and most especially a pair of adult 
bald eagles who put on quite a show for the group at the pond on the south side 
of the landfill: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/15447711674/

Thanks to Kirsten who kept the list!

We'll do it again in the spring.

Good birding.

Steven Albert
Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Winterberry Holly
From: Mike Anderson <mike.anderson AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 19:13:14 -0500
No blue birds at Canoe brook Reservoir or South Mountain Reservation today. 
Also no winterberry on our route. Only one robin for the day. There were 
hundreds of Robins at the sanctuary yesterday feeding on The American Holly 
berries. 

Mike



Mike Anderson


> On Dec 20, 2014, at 3:07 PM, Susan Treesh  wrote:
> 
> Susie, that is interesting, as I had an unusual number of bluebirds in my 
yard today, a dozen where I have hardly had any in years. I wonder if CBCs held 
today will report big numbers! 

> 
> Susan Treesh
> Somerset
> 
>> On 12/20/2014 1:45 PM, Susie R. wrote:
>> Yesterday I was thrilled to see Eastern Bluebirds in my Winterberry Holly.
>> Unfortunately, the birds stayed only for a few minutes before moving off to
>> wild winterberry and spending quite sometime in those shrubs.  A couple of
>> birds eventually returned to the shrub in the yard, which is heavy with
>> fruit, but again didn't stay for long.
>> 
>> I mentioned the above to my son this morning and he told me that he had
>> very recently read that the wild winterberry ripens a couple of weeks
>> before the cultivated plants.  This seems to explain why the Bluebirds
>> stripped the wild berries yesterday and left the cultivated berries alone.
>> Hopefully, when the berries do get ripe, the Bluebirds will get them before
>> the Robins do.
>> 
>> Susie R.
>> Tewksbury/Califon
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fwd: Fwd: Hatfield Swamp Scatology
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 16:32:46 -0500
Margaret graciously permits me to share her fabulous photos from the Hatfield 
Swamp trip. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/28994447 AT N05/16025687656/

Diane



Begin forwarded message:

> From: "Laura B. Berlik" 
> Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: Hatfield Swamp Scatology
> Date: December 19, 2014 at 6:57:57 PM EST
> To: Diane C Louie 
> 
> any pictures of the merlin?
> 
> On Dec 19, 2014, at 5:07 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
> 
> Correction and additional detail for my post.
> 
> Diane
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
> 
>> From: David Hall 
>> Subject: Re: Hatfield Swamp Scatology
>> Date: December 19, 2014 at 10:50:48 AM EST
>> To: Diane C Louie 
>> 
>> After further review of photos taken during the trip, the Peregrine Falcon
>> has mutated into a Merlin, and the prey being consumed turned out to be an
>> Eastern Bluebird!
>> 
>> Dave
>> 
>> 
>> On 12/19/14 8:31 AM, "Diane C Louie"  wrote:
>> 
>>> Dave Hall led another of his NJAS trips to Hatfield Swamp yesterday 
morning. 

>>> The regulars
>>> attended, including Louise and Dan the Valet.   We watched a Peregrine
>>> Falcon eviscerate
>>> a bird for breakfast in a tree overlooking the pond at Cranes Mill.  As we
>>> entered the woods,
>>> we encountered Sam Korengut who was in search of owls. He taught us to 
follow 

>>> the tell-tale
>>> white wash and pellets.  Success!  We sighted not one, but two Barred Owls.
>>> Overall,
>>> small birds were in rather short supply  probably because of the raptors 
out 

>>> and about  but
>>> we did find a flock of 9 Rusty Blackbirds, plenty of Downies and Juncos, 
along 

>>> with the usual
>>> Chickadees, Titmice, and Goldfinches.  Sparrows were sparse although we did
>>> find a Tree.
>>> We trekked so deep into the woods owling that we went into overtime. When 
we 

>>> finally
>>> exited at Cranes Mill more than 3 hours later, the Peregrine was still in 
the 

>>> same tree.
>>> 
>>> Diane Louie
>>> Madison
>> 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Winterberry Holly
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 15:07:27 -0500
Susie, that is interesting, as I had an unusual number of bluebirds in 
my yard today, a dozen where I have hardly had any in years.  I wonder 
if CBCs held today will report big numbers!

Susan Treesh
Somerset

On 12/20/2014 1:45 PM, Susie R. wrote:
> Yesterday I was thrilled to see Eastern Bluebirds in my Winterberry Holly.
> Unfortunately, the birds stayed only for a few minutes before moving off to
> wild winterberry and spending quite sometime in those shrubs.  A couple of
> birds eventually returned to the shrub in the yard, which is heavy with
> fruit, but again didn't stay for long.
>
> I mentioned the above to my son this morning and he told me that he had
> very recently read that the wild winterberry ripens a couple of weeks
> before the cultivated plants.  This seems to explain why the Bluebirds
> stripped the wild berries yesterday and left the cultivated berries alone.
> Hopefully, when the berries do get ripe, the Bluebirds will get them before
> the Robins do.
>
> Susie R.
> Tewksbury/Califon
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Winterberry Holly
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 13:45:13 -0500
Yesterday I was thrilled to see Eastern Bluebirds in my Winterberry Holly.
Unfortunately, the birds stayed only for a few minutes before moving off to
wild winterberry and spending quite sometime in those shrubs.  A couple of
birds eventually returned to the shrub in the yard, which is heavy with
fruit, but again didn't stay for long.

I mentioned the above to my son this morning and he told me that he had
very recently read that the wild winterberry ripens a couple of weeks
before the cultivated plants.  This seems to explain why the Bluebirds
stripped the wild berries yesterday and left the cultivated berries alone.
Hopefully, when the berries do get ripe, the Bluebirds will get them before
the Robins do.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: The Loss of a Good Man - Jim Zamos
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 22:04:20 -0500
This afternoon I received one of those phone calls.You know, the terrible
news type. Mike Britt  called to inform me of the passing of Jim. Many of
those in the younger birding community may not have had the good fortune to
know him.He was one of those birders who made all birders look good.From
his eagerness and acute senses to his never give up attitude Jim always had
a reason to be positive.I can remember so many times after meeting Jim in
the field when I turned to walk away my day seemed a little bit brighter. I
do not know the exact numbers of birds Jim amassed in North America and New
Jersey(well over 400 species in NJ) he always enjoyed the comraderie  of
the trip.I still regret not joining him on a chase to see a Brown Shrike in
California.He spent 3 days there without luck and the last day he was still
in the field hours before his planes departure time.Ofcourse he and a young
birder happened upon the bird in the pouring rain in the final minutes to
spare.I will miss Jim though his karma will always be a part of me and I am
a better person for it.May a good birder rest in peace.Sincerely.....

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fwd: Hatfield Swamp Scatology
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 17:07:04 -0500
Correction and additional detail for my post.

Diane

Begin forwarded message:

> From: David Hall 
> Subject: Re: Hatfield Swamp Scatology
> Date: December 19, 2014 at 10:50:48 AM EST
> To: Diane C Louie 
> 
> After further review of photos taken during the trip, the Peregrine Falcon
> has mutated into a Merlin, and the prey being consumed turned out to be an
> Eastern Bluebird!
> 
> Dave
> 
> 
> On 12/19/14 8:31 AM, "Diane C Louie"  wrote:
> 
>> Dave Hall led another of his NJAS trips to Hatfield Swamp yesterday morning.
>> The regulars
>> attended, including Louise and Dan the Valet.   We watched a Peregrine
>> Falcon eviscerate
>> a bird for breakfast in a tree overlooking the pond at Cranes Mill.  As we
>> entered the woods,
>> we encountered Sam Korengut who was in search of owls. He taught us to 
follow 

>> the tell-tale
>> white wash and pellets.  Success!  We sighted not one, but two Barred Owls.
>> Overall,
>> small birds were in rather short supply  probably because of the raptors 
out 

>> and about  but
>> we did find a flock of 9 Rusty Blackbirds, plenty of Downies and Juncos, 
along 

>> with the usual
>> Chickadees, Titmice, and Goldfinches.  Sparrows were sparse although we did
>> find a Tree.
>> We trekked so deep into the woods owling that we went into overtime. When we 

>> finally
>> exited at Cranes Mill more than 3 hours later, the Peregrine was still in 
the 

>> same tree.
>> 
>> Diane Louie
>> Madison
> 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Greater White-fronted Goose, Monroe Twp
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 17:46:50 +0000
After missing the Greater White-fronted Geese twice in the last two days at 
Lake Etra, it seems obvious to me that you have to get there earlier than the 9 
AM I've been managing. by 9:30 the lake was virtually empty of geese. 

However, after striking out today, I drove over to the field on Wykoff 
Mills-Applegarth Road and there found one Greater White-fronted as I scanned 
the thousands of Canada Geese, along with 3 Snow Geese. An immature eagle kept 
shuffling the deck which only added to the fun. 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

Larry 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Bird Feeders Redux (consolidated responses)
From: Mike Anderson <mike.anderson AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 11:20:59 -0500
With all those feeders and seed on the ground, you're going to attract
rodents. In an effort to try to manage the rodents you might consider
putting up a screech owl box: 1) facing southwest 2) which can be viewed
from more than one window in the house 3) offer a commanding view of the
feeders strategically placed between the owl box and your house. My
youngest , Jesserose, has become quite good at whistling to the screech
owl; Robin taught her. Some years we have screech owls in the box and some
years we have squirrels. Putting a box up doesn't mean you're guaranteed to
have a resident screech owl, but If you don't have a nest box you're less
likely to have a yard screech owl.   Best to all,
Mike

On Fri, Dec 19, 2014 at 10:03 AM, Robert AT rgallucci.com  wrote:

> Last month I put out a request for bird feeder recommendations. I thought
> that others might find benefit in the responses. I have included them in
> their entirety, removing the names of the respondents for privacy purposes.
>
> I have also included a link to the Cornell site with an excellent article
> on feeding and a passionate and fascinating comments section regarding
> House Sparrow's. There are clearly extremely strong opinions for and
> against around the country.
>
> Finally, I have included Marc Chelemer's House Sparrow management strategy
> for your review and a link to a site that offers great insight and
> instructions on using a Magic Halo to discourage HOSP.
>
> Birdfeeder Recommendations
>
> I usually manipulate commercial mixes to arrive at the mix I want based on
> the species I hope to attract (or eliminate).  Black oil sunflower is
> always the best base, but as you have experiences, using it alone can
> sometimes produce lackluster results.  I usually mix in something with
> berries, peanuts, and/or safflower to increase diversity.  I like the
> "Supreme Blend" from Wild Birds Unlimited (a chain store you may have near
> you).  Their "Choice Bland" is pretty good too, but has a slightly
> different mix of seeds.
>
> Using different feeds in different feeders can be good, but the
> determining factor should be the birds.  If you have large birds at one
> feeder you may want to consider catering another feeder to small species,
> again to increase diversity.  In my yard I have a large tube feeder with a
> tray that allows blackbirds and jays to land.  I put peanuts in it because
> the Jays and medium-sized woodpeckers will use it.  Elsewhere I have a
> small tube with sunflower hearts that is devoted to smaller birds.  With
> the larger birds elsewhere the small guys remain unmolested.  This also
> might answer the question of how far apart feeders should be.
>
> Avoid anything with millet to minimize House Sparrows (and doves).
>
> I have had mixed results with fruit.  As a general rule-- Try it and see
> what happens!  Fruit can just be spiked onto a block of wood with a nail.
> If you get good results, THEN spend your money on a fruit feeder.
>
> Suet is a must in my opinion, especially if you want to encourage
> woodpeckers and the like.  Starling, grackles, and House Sparrows can be a
> problem at time, not to mention squirrels, but I have had reasonable
> success with upside-down feeders to minimize the species (though never
> eliminate).
>
> ---
>
> I purchase 3 types of seed.
>
> Nyger (Thistle) for Goldfinches & Pine Siskins.
> Black Oil Sunflower for finches, Chickadees, Titmice, Cardinals etc
> Mix (Scratch) seed for sparrows, Mourning Doves, blackbirds etc.
>
> I don't mix any of my seeds.
>
> Nyger should always be put in a special Nyger feeder and hung up off the
> ground.
> Black Oil Sunflower should always be put in a tube feeder and hung up off
> the ground.
> Mix (Scratch) seed I throw on the ground.
>
> I try to keep my feeders a good 10' apart if possible.
>
> I buy my Mix (Scratch) seed at Tractor Supply. Sunflower & Nyger seed I
> buy wherever it's cheapest. In general I don't want mix seed with a lot of
> sunflower seed or Sorghum seed in it. The more Millet seed in it the
> better. Sparrows & doves love millet seed. I never buy the Mix seed if it
> has cracked corn in it.
>
> If you don't want House Sparrows then don't put out any Mix seed. They
> don't eat Nyger and in general won't eat sunflower seed. By not putting out
> mix seed though, you'll lose your WT Sparrows, Juncos, Doves etc.
>
> I never put out oranges or apples.
>
> I do put out beef suet for woodpeckers.
>
> I live in a rural setting and at one time can have 75+ WT Sparrows, 50+
> Juncos,
> 15+ Mourning Doves, 10+ Cardinals, and smaller numbers of Blue Jays,
> 15+ Titmice,
> Chickadees, WB & RB Nuthatches, 4 species of woodpeckers, etc. Thankfully
> I rarely have a Starling or two and never get House Sparrows here. All seem
> to enjoy the seed I put out and little is wasted.
>
> I do make a special mix of peanut butter, vegetable shortening, oats, &
> cornmeal that the birds relish, especially in very cold weather. I have had
> up to 13 E. Bluebirds and even a Hermit Thrush eating this.
>
> ---
>
> Get an upside-down suet feeder. Keep suet ingredients to a minimum. For
> seed, a good blend without corn is preferable. We get ours from a local
> feed store and they will mix whatever we want. Orange slices and jam are a
> good choice for rarities. Clean and put your hummingbird feeder back out
> with a heated bulb on it. Enjoy!
>
> ---
>
> Sounds like you have a good plan. I've done lots of testing for feed
> companies and I find that variety is important and sometimes you get a
> batch of seed that the birds just won't eat, when they devoured it
> previously. The brands you mentioned are probably among the best, but also
> expensive. The best "bargain" brand I know of is the mix from Costco -
> about half the price of most other blends of the same quality. Red millet
> doesn't go over very well on the east coast, but it among the most popular
> seeds out west. White millet is a great filler for the sparrows and doves.
> I shoot for a feeder company (Duncraft) so I have hundreds of feeders. I
> find that a mix of feeders is also a plus. Many birds prefer platform
> feeders (Cardinals, sparrows, juncos, doves) while others prefer something
> that hangs. You didn't mention Safflower or Sunflower hearts which can draw
> some of the oddballs like Purple Finches and Grosbeaks.
> Almost everything likes suet. I have a traditional hanging cage feeder and
> also like to make a 50-50 mix of suet and peanut butter that I stuff in a
> hole in a log. I get tons of woodpeckers and wrens at this setup (see
> below);
>
> 
http://stevebyland.blogspot.com/2014/10/make-suet-log-for-better-photographs.html 

> Dried mealworms are also a great attractant - I get a huge flock of
> Bluebirds at my mealworm feeder. It took a while for them to find it, but
> more show up as the season goes along.
> My best advice is to make sure that the feeders are never empty for too
> long so that the birds don't move on to better spots.
>
> ---
>
> Cornell Article on Feeders:
> 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/citsci/take-action/2014/11/dos-and-donts-of-feeder-placement/?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+eNews&utm_campaign=fdd1ecaf95-Cornell_Lab_eNews_2014_12_04&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-fdd1ecaf95-305643113 

>
> ---
>
> Marc Chelemer's House Finch Management Strategy
> Back to a post I wrote sometime last year about House Sparrows:  I can
> report after one morning's observations that the suggestion, made by
> several readers to this ListServ, to hang fishing line weighted with
> sinkers at 12, 3, 6, and 9 o'clock a little ways away from the feeder perch
> itself seems to work.  On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, I had my feeder
> up (black-oil sunflower seeds).  Once the House Sparrows woke up and
> swarmed, that was it for the nuthatches, chickadees, and Purple Finch (the
> titmice were occasionally cheeky enough to muscle their way in).  Feeling
> entirely ungenerous towards the non-natives, I simply took the feeder down
> those days.  Saturday night, I rigged up the fishing lines and weights and
> Hey Presto!  For all of Sunday morning, I saw not one House Sparrow at the
> feeder, but the other winter birds visited regularly, sharing the seed
> equanimically.  I am going to try the same technique on the nyger seed
> feeder this week and will report further.
>
> Magic Halo Website: http://www.sialis.org/halo.htm
>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Mike Anderson
Sanctuary Director
New Jersey Audubon
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, NJ 07924
908 766 5787 x 14
njaudubon.org

Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bird Feeders Redux (consolidated responses)
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 08:03:13 -0700
Last month I put out a request for bird feeder recommendations. I thought that 
others might find benefit in the responses. I have included them in their 
entirety, removing the names of the respondents for privacy purposes. 


I have also included a link to the Cornell site with an excellent article on 
feeding and a passionate and fascinating comments section regarding House 
Sparrow's. There are clearly extremely strong opinions for and against around 
the country. 


Finally, I have included Marc Chelemer's House Sparrow management strategy for 
your review and a link to a site that offers great insight and instructions on 
using a Magic Halo to discourage HOSP. 


Birdfeeder Recommendations

I usually manipulate commercial mixes to arrive at the mix I want based on the 
species I hope to attract (or eliminate). Black oil sunflower is always the 
best base, but as you have experiences, using it alone can sometimes produce 
lackluster results. I usually mix in something with berries, peanuts, and/or 
safflower to increase diversity. I like the "Supreme Blend" from Wild Birds 
Unlimited (a chain store you may have near you). Their "Choice Bland" is pretty 
good too, but has a slightly different mix of seeds. 


Using different feeds in different feeders can be good, but the determining 
factor should be the birds. If you have large birds at one feeder you may want 
to consider catering another feeder to small species, again to increase 
diversity. In my yard I have a large tube feeder with a tray that allows 
blackbirds and jays to land. I put peanuts in it because the Jays and 
medium-sized woodpeckers will use it. Elsewhere I have a small tube with 
sunflower hearts that is devoted to smaller birds. With the larger birds 
elsewhere the small guys remain unmolested. This also might answer the question 
of how far apart feeders should be. 


Avoid anything with millet to minimize House Sparrows (and doves).

I have had mixed results with fruit. As a general rule-- Try it and see what 
happens! Fruit can just be spiked onto a block of wood with a nail. If you get 
good results, THEN spend your money on a fruit feeder. 


Suet is a must in my opinion, especially if you want to encourage woodpeckers 
and the like. Starling, grackles, and House Sparrows can be a problem at time, 
not to mention squirrels, but I have had reasonable success with upside-down 
feeders to minimize the species (though never eliminate). 


---

I purchase 3 types of seed.

Nyger (Thistle) for Goldfinches & Pine Siskins.
Black Oil Sunflower for finches, Chickadees, Titmice, Cardinals etc
Mix (Scratch) seed for sparrows, Mourning Doves, blackbirds etc.

I don't mix any of my seeds.

Nyger should always be put in a special Nyger feeder and hung up off the 
ground. 

Black Oil Sunflower should always be put in a tube feeder and hung up off the 
ground. 

Mix (Scratch) seed I throw on the ground.

I try to keep my feeders a good 10' apart if possible.

I buy my Mix (Scratch) seed at Tractor Supply. Sunflower & Nyger seed I buy 
wherever it's cheapest. In general I don't want mix seed with a lot of 
sunflower seed or Sorghum seed in it. The more Millet seed in it the better. 
Sparrows & doves love millet seed. I never buy the Mix seed if it has cracked 
corn in it. 


If you don't want House Sparrows then don't put out any Mix seed. They don't 
eat Nyger and in general won't eat sunflower seed. By not putting out mix seed 
though, you'll lose your WT Sparrows, Juncos, Doves etc. 


I never put out oranges or apples.

I do put out beef suet for woodpeckers.

I live in a rural setting and at one time can have 75+ WT Sparrows, 50+ Juncos,
15+ Mourning Doves, 10+ Cardinals, and smaller numbers of Blue Jays,
15+ Titmice,
Chickadees, WB & RB Nuthatches, 4 species of woodpeckers, etc. Thankfully I 
rarely have a Starling or two and never get House Sparrows here. All seem to 
enjoy the seed I put out and little is wasted. 


I do make a special mix of peanut butter, vegetable shortening, oats, & 
cornmeal that the birds relish, especially in very cold weather. I have had up 
to 13 E. Bluebirds and even a Hermit Thrush eating this. 


---

Get an upside-down suet feeder. Keep suet ingredients to a minimum. For seed, a 
good blend without corn is preferable. We get ours from a local feed store and 
they will mix whatever we want. Orange slices and jam are a good choice for 
rarities. Clean and put your hummingbird feeder back out with a heated bulb on 
it. Enjoy! 


---

Sounds like you have a good plan. I've done lots of testing for feed companies 
and I find that variety is important and sometimes you get a batch of seed that 
the birds just won't eat, when they devoured it previously. The brands you 
mentioned are probably among the best, but also expensive. The best "bargain" 
brand I know of is the mix from Costco - about half the price of most other 
blends of the same quality. Red millet doesn't go over very well on the east 
coast, but it among the most popular seeds out west. White millet is a great 
filler for the sparrows and doves. 

I shoot for a feeder company (Duncraft) so I have hundreds of feeders. I find 
that a mix of feeders is also a plus. Many birds prefer platform feeders 
(Cardinals, sparrows, juncos, doves) while others prefer something that hangs. 
You didn't mention Safflower or Sunflower hearts which can draw some of the 
oddballs like Purple Finches and Grosbeaks. 

Almost everything likes suet. I have a traditional hanging cage feeder and also 
like to make a 50-50 mix of suet and peanut butter that I stuff in a hole in a 
log. I get tons of woodpeckers and wrens at this setup (see below); 


http://stevebyland.blogspot.com/2014/10/make-suet-log-for-better-photographs.html 

Dried mealworms are also a great attractant - I get a huge flock of Bluebirds 
at my mealworm feeder. It took a while for them to find it, but more show up as 
the season goes along. 

My best advice is to make sure that the feeders are never empty for too long so 
that the birds don't move on to better spots. 


---

Cornell Article on Feeders: 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/citsci/take-action/2014/11/dos-and-donts-of-feeder-placement/?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+eNews&utm_campaign=fdd1ecaf95-Cornell_Lab_eNews_2014_12_04&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-fdd1ecaf95-305643113 


---

Marc Chelemer's House Finch Management Strategy
Back to a post I wrote sometime last year about House Sparrows: I can report 
after one morning's observations that the suggestion, made by several readers 
to this ListServ, to hang fishing line weighted with sinkers at 12, 3, 6, and 9 
o'clock a little ways away from the feeder perch itself seems to work. On 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, I had my feeder up (black-oil sunflower seeds). 
Once the House Sparrows woke up and swarmed, that was it for the nuthatches, 
chickadees, and Purple Finch (the titmice were occasionally cheeky enough to 
muscle their way in). Feeling entirely ungenerous towards the non-natives, I 
simply took the feeder down those days. Saturday night, I rigged up the fishing 
lines and weights and Hey Presto! For all of Sunday morning, I saw not one 
House Sparrow at the feeder, but the other winter birds visited regularly, 
sharing the seed equanimically. I am going to try the same technique on the 
nyger seed feeder this week and will report further. 


Magic Halo Website: http://www.sialis.org/halo.htm


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lake Etra White-fronted geese
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 05:34:38 -0800
There are currently 4 White-fronted geese on Lake Etra.  1 in the middle of
the lake and 3 close to the shore line near the restroom parking lot. Joe
Palumbo and Liz Bender

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hatfield Swamp Scatology
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 08:31:30 -0500
Dave Hall led another of his NJAS trips to Hatfield Swamp yesterday morning. 
The regulars 

attended, including Louise and Dan the Valet. We watched a Peregrine Falcon 
eviscerate 

a bird for breakfast in a tree overlooking the pond at Cranes Mill. As we 
entered the woods, 

we encountered Sam Korengut who was in search of owls. He taught us to follow 
the tell-tale 

white wash and pellets. Success! We sighted not one, but two Barred Owls. 
Overall, 

small birds were in rather short supply  probably because of the raptors out 
and about  but 

we did find a flock of 9 Rusty Blackbirds, plenty of Downies and Juncos, along 
with the usual 

Chickadees, Titmice, and Goldfinches. Sparrows were sparse although we did find 
a Tree. 

We trekked so deep into the woods owling that we went into overtime. When we 
finally 

exited at Cranes Mill more than 3 hours later, the Peregrine was still in the 
same tree. 


Diane Louie
Madison

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Late Chipping Sparrow
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 07:59:43 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
I had a Chipping sparrow come into my Basking Ridge feeders yesterday.
This is more of late December curiosity than a rarity, but the other
curiosity is it's still sporting it's breeding plumage.
Congratulations to all the Christmas count teams. I am always amazed at
what can be found in NJ in December.
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pink-footed Goose etc. in Monroe Township
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:25:35 -0500
I went to Etra Lake in Twin Rivers (Mercer County) this morning at the crack
of dawn in hopes of finding any unusual species of waterfowl that have been
reported recently.  There were three GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE present
among the hundreds of CANADA GEESE.  No other rarities however.  

Next I drove to Wyckoffs Mills Applegarth Rd. in nearby Monroe Township
(Middlesex County).  There I found a PINK-FOOTED GOOSE, 2 GREATER
WHITE-FRONTED GEESE, 4 SNOW GEESE (one of which was a "Blue Goose"), and at
least 1 CACKLING GOOSE.  Alas, no Barnacle Goose.  It is very difficult to
sift through the thousands of Canada Geese that are present at this location
to try and find these rarities.  The flock is so thick and the terrain is
full of dips that the birds walk down into and disappear into.  When the
geese wander into the corn stubble they become impossible to track as the
stubble is cut very high.  Good luck to anyone who searches in this area.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)  

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pink-footed Goose - Etra Lake, Hightstown
From: Todd Frantz <tfrantz75 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 08:52:04 -0500
The subject goose was present at Etra Lake in Hightstown this morning around 
7:30. It was among the Canada Geese in the center of the lake. The three 
Greater White-Fronted Geese were also present. 


Todd Frantz
Hightstown, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: NJBRC Annual Report
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 23:05:23 -0500
I also want to give a special shout out to Sam Galick!  I love him!

Larry

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 16, 2014, at 10:22 PM, Mike Anderson  
wrote: 

> 
> Well said Mike.
> My thanks also to Bill, Laurie, Jennifer and all the members on the records 
committee. 

> Best to all
> Mike
> 
> 
> Mike Anderson
> 
> 
>> On Dec 16, 2014, at 7:08 PM, mike hiotis  wrote:
>> 
>> Bill thanks for the post and may I take the time to say thanks to
>> you,Laurie Larson and Jennifer Hanson for all the hard work.And a hats off
>> to the entire records committee while I'm at it.
>> 
>> Mike Hiotis
>> Martinsville NJ
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: NJBRC Annual Report
From: Mike Anderson <mike.anderson AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:22:45 -0500
Well said Mike.
My thanks also to Bill, Laurie, Jennifer and all the members on the records 
committee. 

Best to all
Mike


Mike Anderson


> On Dec 16, 2014, at 7:08 PM, mike hiotis  wrote:
> 
> Bill thanks for the post and may I take the time to say thanks to
> you,Laurie Larson and Jennifer Hanson for all the hard work.And a hats off
> to the entire records committee while I'm at it.
> 
> Mike Hiotis
> Martinsville NJ
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lower Hudson CBC
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 19:47:42 -0500
Jerseybirders,

The "Jersey portion" of the Lower Hudson CBC tallied 94 species. "Relative"
highlights were: Wild Turkey, Ring-necked Pheasant, American Bittern, 3
Great Egret, 3 Black-crowned Night Heron, Rough-legged Hawk, Barn Owl, 2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, 3 Hairy Woodpeckers, 8 American Kestrels!, Common
Raven, 56 Horned Larks, 2 Marsh Wrens, 3 Hermit Thrush, Gray Catbird,
Orange-crowned Warbler, 2 Eastern Towhee, 13 White-crowned Sparrows,
Eastern Meadowlark, Rusty Blackbird, 5 Purple Finch, & 2 Pine Siskins.

Full list can be viewed here:


http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/12/16/lower-hudson-christmas-bird-count/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: wsb and ebird
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 19:43:55 -0500
OK - the day has been imported. I haven't fixed the location yet.
After careful consideration over dinner and looking at the list - I will
keep most birds under Gloucester county. A few will be deleted and
re - entered under the exact hotspots. The Skimmer. And I forgot we
had Gray-cheeked Thrush at Glassboro Woods that morning. That's a
good spring bird. Etc. I miss Sarah's ears!
And I will put everything in under historical as I don't have time and
distance info. Except for start and stop times that day. I will do this all
on Wed.

It's actually quite easy using ebird - for those still hesitant. My main
concern now is old records. Figuring out what to do. I do recommend
as a way to keep your lists. Just remember - this is public!!!

And I did some birding today. Geese - nothing unusual but looking for
stuff around where my area is on 12/21. I hope the weather cooperates!
And I received yet another ebird needs alert for Cumberland. That Woodcock
is going to kill me! I have one more chance 12/28 during the Cumberland 
CBC....

Good birding all.

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: NJBRC Annual Report
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 19:08:05 -0500
Bill thanks for the post and may I take the time to say thanks to
you,Laurie Larson and Jennifer Hanson for all the hard work.And a hats off
to the entire records committee while I'm at it.

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ebird again
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 13:26:47 -0500
Thanks all! I have heard before about county lists. Too vague. I am not 
currently 

using them except for big day and private property and certain sensitive 
species. 

It's the private property - private houses, etc. - yes I have permission - that 
it is 

mainly used for. I for one like to know what's around, but putting some species 

in - even under private property - can be disturbing to either the people or 
the bird. 

I have absolutely no issue with a county or state reviewer invalidating any 
county 

lists I have! I am putting them in for me. It's the old records that I am 
having a hard 

time splitting up! Now I usually enter with bird log in the field. Panama will 
be 

challenging there, but do-able. I do want the bar graphs and species accounts 
to 

be accurate.

My thoughts now are to put in the Gloucester wsb run. I will omit the Skimmer 
and 

add it under the trip comments. And put it in under Red Bank. It might not
be accepted - it's an exceedingly rare county bird, and we all know by now
my pic taking abilities. Yes, I knew it was rare at the time and tried for some 
digiscope 

shots. 

Ebird is great! i think ebird needs to work with birders - which they have - 
county listing 

is a newer feature I believe. But birders need to work with ebird also. Use 
exact locations 

when not a problem. We don't want to disturb birds or people. 


Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pink-footed Goose at Wall now
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 12:30:02 -0500
Carol Resch and I just saw the PINK-FOOTED GOOSE in Wall on 18th Ave. in the 
pond across from the Wall High School athletic fields. 


John J. Collins
Raritan NJ
Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: NJBRC Annual Report
From: Bill Boyle <njsawwhet AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 11:21:56 -0500
Jersey Birders,

 

I have added the New Jersey Bird Records Committee 2014 Annual Report,
covering the year 2013, to the Committee web site. Also updated there are
the New Jersey State List and the NJBRC Review List. The Summary of Results,
first half of 2014, from the Committee meeting November 2, 2014 was recently
posted. An update of the Accepted Records List will be posted soon.

 

All of these items can be found at www.njbrc.net

 

 

Bill Boyle, Secretary

NJ Bird Records Committee


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: another ebird question
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:23:24 -0500
Just finishing up that 1/2 year stuff that I did earlier that got corrupted.
Just doing one month at a time now! And only adding half the trips.

Anyway - the question - I am tired of breaking up Cape May into various
little hot spots. When I entered everything into Birdbase - it was for 
the day
under county. And I was just getting ready to enter it as such... Good 
way to start
the year - Cape May County. Here again, Lapland Longspur, King Eider, 
Sandhill
Crane. I will probably split them out. But for future trips - like big 
days - if I enter
a Gloucester County run say - I am thinking 5/14/11 - Gloucester county 
big day -
the Black Skimmer we all had at Red Bank. I enter my complete list under 
county for
just a big day run. And then enter the Skimmer again for Red Bank - is 
that allowed?
Same bird entered twice?

I had started using ebird in March of 2011, but some trips not entered. 
Like a big day
run. Didn't know how to do it. And I didn't enter Florida from April of 
2013.....

Thanks for any advice!

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: RHWP
From: Richard Moran <rmoran AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 21:12:54 -0500
Went to ernest l. oros wildlife preserve today to see if the red headed 
woodpeckers were back (since they were there last winter) - saw none. But i did 
get to see a belted kingfisher, a red tailed hawk and 2 great blue herons. 

On a side note had a brown headed cowbird at my feeder - are they still around 
in the winter or do most migrate 


rich moran

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Egyptian Goose clarification (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 16:41:54 -0500
Just wanted to emphasize that I know that Egyptian Goose is non-native and
not listable. The point of my previous posting was that this particular
Egyptian Goose was behaving like a wild bird, rather than a domestic
escapee. It was hanging with a flock of wild Mallards along a river. It was
very skittish and swam away before I could ever get close. Just made me
think that this bird might have been bred and raised in the wild:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16019229011/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Geese for lunch
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 19:47:39 +0000
Took a ride to see the geese at lunch time. Well, maybe a long lunch.

I and others found the Barnacle Goose at Wyckoff Mills Applegarth Road in the 
big flock, around noonish. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/15842813660/

The geese were pretty far off and the light was wrong and many were hidden 
behind the rise. Could not find the greater white-fronted or the pink foot in 
that crowd. Then Joe Palumbo messaged about the Pink-footed goose on Lake Etra 
- all of three miles away. I still had a few minutes to look before I had to 
get on a conference call. Here the light was pretty good. We had to wait for 
the bird to pick it's head up but then it gave some good looks. Thank you Joe. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/15410441303/

Then back to  work.  Good birding all.

Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Annual DVOC Members' Photo Night this week! Thursday December 18th
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 14:27:05 -0500
Happy Holidays, Birders!

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets on Thursday 18 Dec 2014. 
This meeting will be the annual DVOC Members' Photo Night and Contest, which is 
always a popular and very fun evening for the club. Join us for an evening of 
members sharing their favorite photos with the club and the birding community. 
The heart of this event is club members sharing their photos, and all of us 
getting to enjoy seeing what everyone's been up to. 


To spice things up, the DVOC holds an annual photo contest as well. This year, 
the photo submissions were organized by Paul Guris and the contest was judged 
by Andy Curtis, Anita Guris and Steve Kacir. Find out whose photos the judges 
have chosen for the Peregrine Award for Photographic Achievement and the Avocet 
Award for Artistic Achievement as well as winners for first, second and third 
place in the following photo categories: Birds, Fauna, Flora, Scenery and 
Birders. 

 
All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings will begin at 7:30PM and are held at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 
19103. A pre-meeting dinner takes place at Asia on the Parkway, not far from 
the Academy. More details and directions to the Academy and Asia on the Parkway 
can be found on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 


More information about the 2014 DVOC Photo Contest can be found here:

http://dvoc.org/MeetingsPrograms/MeetingsPrograms2014/Resources/2014DVOCPhotoContest.pdf 


Please considering donating to help keep this entertaining event alive. It's 
never too late to donate in support of the DVOC Photo Contest, and donations as 
low as $1 or $5 still make a significant difference in funding the contest and 
will help make the photo night an exciting social experience for the club. You 
can donate in support of the photo contest online at: 

http://dvoc.org/MeetingsPrograms/MeetingsPrograms2014/Programs2014.htm

Donations can also be made by sending DVOC Treasurer Bert Filemyr a check 
payable to DVOC: 


DVOC Treasurer
c/o 1314 Lenore Road
Meadowbrook, PA 19046


We hope to see you at the members photo night and on into the New Year! 

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lake Etra Pink-footed goose
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 09:07:19 -0800
The Pink-footed goose is present at Lake Etra (1200 hours).  It is at the
western end of the lake.  Joe Palumbo

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 12/14/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 09:05:44 -0600
Briton Parker, Congressman Jim Greenwood and I were able to get to Brig
yesterday to try to photograph birds. Unfortunately, the weatherman lied
again, and we had an overcast, gray, dreary day the entire day. We did see
lots of birds but because of the poor light the picture-taking was very
difficult. There were more than a thousand Snow Geese and several hundred
Ruddy Ducks throughout the Refuge. To see the Photo Study and a list of
the species seen, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigDec14_14/BrigDec14_14.html

Regards,
Howard

Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Egyptian Goose at Spring Lake, Monmouth County
From: Betty Mueller <seagull1013 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 01:57:40 -0500
Yesterday, Sunday Dec. 14, at 5 p.m. there were 2 Egyptian geese beside Spring 
Lake directly across from St. Catharine’s church. I was standing 5 ft. away 
from them, and I will post photos as soon as my camera battery is charged. 


I had driven to the area near Wall High School in search of the Pink-footed 
goose but did not find it. I then drove to Spring Lake. I was standing by the 
lake taking photos of the bridge when I glanced down at the grass in front of 
me and there stood the pair, 5 ft. away from me. Being new at birding, I 
thought they must be Pink-footed geese which I’ve been reading about for the 
past several days. However, when I arrived home I googled “geese with pink 
legs” and knew immediately they were Egyptian geese because of the brown 
patches around their eyes and collar around neck. 


Is this a rare siting?  

Regards,
Betty Lois Mueller
Manchester

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Blue Goose at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge
From: Carol Anne Pagliotti <capagliotti AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 01:04:52 -0500
Oh it was one of those days; we got a late start, it was overcast, we
arrived at high tide. So we just assumed today would be a bust. Although we
did remember our binoculars, which definitely put today square in the win
column before ever leaving the driveway since the last two weekends we left
home without them. (Who lets us out of the house in the morning?)

We were happily wrong about today being a bust, we saw a Bald Eagle in what
looked like a nest, I finally saw a Hooded Merganser, and in addition to the
hundreds, maybe thousands, of Snow Geese we also saw a rare color variant of
the Snow Goose  a Blue Goose. We had five first sightings today: Snow
Geese, the Blue Goose (which I know is a color variant of the Snow Geese but
Im counting it as a first sighting anyway), Hooded Mergansers, Dunlin, and
what I think was an adult non-breeding Horned Grebe in its winter plumage.

Photo of the Blue Goose
https://www.flickr.com/photos/soapboxgirl/15403202724/


  ~ Carol Anne Pagliotti
     Washington Township, Gloucester County

-- 
Soapboxville
My Place to Think, Write & Rant
http://www.soapboxville.com
Twitter:  AT NJdreaming


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Island Beach CBC results
From: vincent N <vfn7 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 02:19:51 +0000
Twenty birders joined by two guests counted 87 species by land at Island Beach 
State Park and by boat in the Barnegat Bay and Atlantic Ocean under fairly mild 
weather conditions. Highlights were: Little Gull, Northern Fulmar, Glaucous 
Gull, multiple Snowy Owls, multiple Lapland Longspurs and multiple Common 
Eiders. Very large numbers of all scoters and assorted common species of gulls 
were counted at sea. 

Vincent Nichnadowicz: Princeton Junction

                    		 	   		  
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Zebra Finch Sighting
From: Karl Lukens <jklukens AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 19:33:38 -0500
Remember seeing Zebra Finch at Hawk Watch in 2005. Stunning bird. Did not 
list in Ebird. I only list countable birds there.

http://home.comcast.net/~jklukens/GoodBirds2005/Pages2005/ZebraFinch9-12-05.htm

Karl Lukens
Cape May NJ

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rick Wright" 
To: 
Sent: Sunday, December 14, 2014 6:33 PM
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Zebra Finch Sighting


Nope. Here's the list of species covered by the MBTA:
http://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/RegulationsPolicies/mbta/mbtandx.html

On Sun, Dec 14, 2014 at 6:18 PM, Diane C Louie 
wrote:
>
> Agree with Rick, thanks for posting.
>
> In any case, technically per the ABA rules, you couldn’t have included it
> in your list,
> as the Zebra Finch was dead.
>
> https://www.aba.org/bigday/rules.pdf
>
> Forgive me, I was a practicing pathologist: Do the federal rules against
> handling (and, in my case,
> studying) wild birds apply to escaped pets?
>
> Diane Louie
> Madison
>
>
> On Dec 14, 2014, at 5:16 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:
>
> > Susan,
> > I saw my first "free-range" zebra finch here in Bloomfield earlier this
> > fall; for all their poorly curated abundance in pet stores, schoolrooms,
> > and houses with no window screens, they seem to escape very rarely, or,
> > probably more likely, not to survive long once they do. I never saw my
> > neighborhood bird again, and assume it fell victim to a red fox or
> > sharp-shinned hawk.
> > It's great that you noticed and that you posted this sighting: we can
> never
> > know which introduced species will become established next, and we know
> far
> > too little about the earliest stages of most of the "successful"
> > colonizations by pets and poultry.
> > Best wishes,
> > rick
> >
> > On Sun, Dec 14, 2014 at 4:56 PM, Susan Mazza 
> wrote:
> >>
> >> All,
> >>
> >> This is my first time posting here so forgive me if I get something
> wrong.
> >>
> >> My sister found a dead bird in the backyard this morning. She always
> calls
> >> me to do the funeral services ☺️ When I asked what kind of bird it was
> she
> >> said it was some kind of sparrow. Taking my shovel in hand for a
> backyard
> >> funeral, being a birdwatcher, I first looked at the bird to get a rare
> >> close-up look at it. It dawned on me that this was not any ordinary
> >> sparrow. I wrapped it in paper towels and got my birdwatcher's book out
> to
> >> identify it. My heart skipped a beat when I realized it was a Zebra
> Finch!
> >> Knowing that these birds are only found in Australia and other
> "down-under"
> >> countries, I was ready to claim a rare bird sighting and become famous
> >> amongst the bird community. Then it dawned on me...these birds are sold
> as
> >> pets at many pet stores in my area. This one is probably an escaped
> captive
> >> pet who had the misfortune to be outside in this cold weather too long.
> >>
> >> So there goes my brush with fame...
> >>
> >> http://www.finchinfo.com/birds/finches/species/zebra_finch.php
> >>
> >> Susan Mazza
> >> Long Branch, NJ
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPad
> >> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> >> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Rick Wright
> > Bloomfield, NJ
> >
> > Review Editor, Birding 
> > Senior Leader, WINGS 
> > Birding New Jersey 
> > ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> > <
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> >
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>


-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Zebra Finch Sighting
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 18:33:59 -0500
Nope. Here's the list of species covered by the MBTA:
http://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/RegulationsPolicies/mbta/mbtandx.html

On Sun, Dec 14, 2014 at 6:18 PM, Diane C Louie 
wrote:
>
> Agree with Rick, thanks for posting.
>
> In any case, technically per the ABA rules, you couldn’t have included it
> in your list,
> as the Zebra Finch was dead.
>
> https://www.aba.org/bigday/rules.pdf
>
> Forgive me, I was a practicing pathologist: Do the federal rules against
> handling (and, in my case,
> studying) wild birds apply to escaped pets?
>
> Diane Louie
> Madison
>
>
> On Dec 14, 2014, at 5:16 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:
>
> > Susan,
> > I saw my first "free-range" zebra finch here in Bloomfield earlier this
> > fall; for all their poorly curated abundance in pet stores, schoolrooms,
> > and houses with no window screens, they seem to escape very rarely, or,
> > probably more likely, not to survive long once they do. I never saw my
> > neighborhood bird again, and assume it fell victim to a red fox or
> > sharp-shinned hawk.
> > It's great that you noticed and that you posted this sighting: we can
> never
> > know which introduced species will become established next, and we know
> far
> > too little about the earliest stages of most of the "successful"
> > colonizations by pets and poultry.
> > Best wishes,
> > rick
> >
> > On Sun, Dec 14, 2014 at 4:56 PM, Susan Mazza 
> wrote:
> >>
> >> All,
> >>
> >> This is my first time posting here so forgive me if I get something
> wrong.
> >>
> >> My sister found a dead bird in the backyard this morning. She always
> calls
> >> me to do the funeral services ☺️ When I asked what kind of bird it was
> she
> >> said it was some kind of sparrow. Taking my shovel in hand for a
> backyard
> >> funeral, being a birdwatcher, I first looked at the bird to get a rare
> >> close-up look at it. It dawned on me that this was not any ordinary
> >> sparrow. I wrapped it in paper towels and got my birdwatcher's book out
> to
> >> identify it. My heart skipped a beat when I realized it was a Zebra
> Finch!
> >> Knowing that these birds are only found in Australia and other
> "down-under"
> >> countries, I was ready to claim a rare bird sighting and become famous
> >> amongst the bird community. Then it dawned on me...these birds are sold
> as
> >> pets at many pet stores in my area. This one is probably an escaped
> captive
> >> pet who had the misfortune to be outside in this cold weather too long.
> >>
> >> So there goes my brush with fame...
> >>
> >> http://www.finchinfo.com/birds/finches/species/zebra_finch.php
> >>
> >> Susan Mazza
> >> Long Branch, NJ
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPad
> >> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> >> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Rick Wright
> > Bloomfield, NJ
> >
> > Review Editor, Birding 
> > Senior Leader, WINGS 
> > Birding New Jersey 
> > ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> > <
> 
http://www.amazon.com/American-Birding-Association-Field-Jersey/dp/1935622420/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401460984&sr=8-1&keywords=aba+field+guide+birds+new+jersey 

> >
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>


-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Zebra Finch Sighting
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 18:18:00 -0500
Agree with Rick, thanks for posting.

In any case, technically per the ABA rules, you couldn’t have included it in 
your list, 

as the Zebra Finch was dead.

https://www.aba.org/bigday/rules.pdf

Forgive me, I was a practicing pathologist: Do the federal rules against 
handling (and, in my case, 

studying) wild birds apply to escaped pets?

Diane Louie
Madison


On Dec 14, 2014, at 5:16 PM, Rick Wright  wrote:

> Susan,
> I saw my first "free-range" zebra finch here in Bloomfield earlier this
> fall; for all their poorly curated abundance in pet stores, schoolrooms,
> and houses with no window screens, they seem to escape very rarely, or,
> probably more likely, not to survive long once they do. I never saw my
> neighborhood bird again, and assume it fell victim to a red fox or
> sharp-shinned hawk.
> It's great that you noticed and that you posted this sighting: we can never
> know which introduced species will become established next, and we know far
> too little about the earliest stages of most of the "successful"
> colonizations by pets and poultry.
> Best wishes,
> rick
> 
> On Sun, Dec 14, 2014 at 4:56 PM, Susan Mazza  wrote:
>> 
>> All,
>> 
>> This is my first time posting here so forgive me if I get something wrong.
>> 
>> My sister found a dead bird in the backyard this morning. She always calls
>> me to do the funeral services ☺️ When I asked what kind of bird it was 
she 

>> said it was some kind of sparrow. Taking my shovel in hand for a backyard
>> funeral, being a birdwatcher, I first looked at the bird to get a rare
>> close-up look at it. It dawned on me that this was not any ordinary
>> sparrow. I wrapped it in paper towels and got my birdwatcher's book out to
>> identify it. My heart skipped a beat when I realized it was a Zebra Finch!
>> Knowing that these birds are only found in Australia and other "down-under"
>> countries, I was ready to claim a rare bird sighting and become famous
>> amongst the bird community. Then it dawned on me...these birds are sold as
>> pets at many pet stores in my area. This one is probably an escaped captive
>> pet who had the misfortune to be outside in this cold weather too long.
>> 
>> So there goes my brush with fame...
>> 
>> http://www.finchinfo.com/birds/finches/species/zebra_finch.php
>> 
>> Susan Mazza
>> Long Branch, NJ
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Rick Wright
> Bloomfield, NJ
> 
> Review Editor, Birding 
> Senior Leader, WINGS 
> Birding New Jersey 
> ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey
> 
 

> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Zebra Finch Sighting
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 17:16:53 -0500
Susan,
I saw my first "free-range" zebra finch here in Bloomfield earlier this
fall; for all their poorly curated abundance in pet stores, schoolrooms,
and houses with no window screens, they seem to escape very rarely, or,
probably more likely, not to survive long once they do. I never saw my
neighborhood bird again, and assume it fell victim to a red fox or
sharp-shinned hawk.
It's great that you noticed and that you posted this sighting: we can never
know which introduced species will become established next, and we know far
too little about the earliest stages of most of the "successful"
colonizations by pets and poultry.
Best wishes,
rick

On Sun, Dec 14, 2014 at 4:56 PM, Susan Mazza  wrote:
>
> All,
>
> This is my first time posting here so forgive me if I get something wrong.
>
> My sister found a dead bird in the backyard this morning. She always calls
> me to do the funeral services ☺️ When I asked what kind of bird it was 
she 

> said it was some kind of sparrow. Taking my shovel in hand for a backyard
> funeral, being a birdwatcher, I first looked at the bird to get a rare
> close-up look at it. It dawned on me that this was not any ordinary
> sparrow. I wrapped it in paper towels and got my birdwatcher's book out to
> identify it. My heart skipped a beat when I realized it was a Zebra Finch!
> Knowing that these birds are only found in Australia and other "down-under"
> countries, I was ready to claim a rare bird sighting and become famous
> amongst the bird community. Then it dawned on me...these birds are sold as
> pets at many pet stores in my area. This one is probably an escaped captive
> pet who had the misfortune to be outside in this cold weather too long.
>
> So there goes my brush with fame...
>
> http://www.finchinfo.com/birds/finches/species/zebra_finch.php
>
> Susan Mazza
> Long Branch, NJ
>
> Sent from my iPad
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>


-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Zebra Finch Sighting
From: Susan Mazza <thumpersma AT ICLOUD.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 16:56:30 -0500
All,

This is my first time posting here so forgive me if I get something wrong. 

My sister found a dead bird in the backyard this morning. She always calls me 
to do the funeral services ☺️ When I asked what kind of bird it was she 
said it was some kind of sparrow. Taking my shovel in hand for a backyard 
funeral, being a birdwatcher, I first looked at the bird to get a rare close-up 
look at it. It dawned on me that this was not any ordinary sparrow. I wrapped 
it in paper towels and got my birdwatcher's book out to identify it. My heart 
skipped a beat when I realized it was a Zebra Finch! Knowing that these birds 
are only found in Australia and other "down-under" countries, I was ready to 
claim a rare bird sighting and become famous amongst the bird community. Then 
it dawned on me...these birds are sold as pets at many pet stores in my area. 
This one is probably an escaped captive pet who had the misfortune to be 
outside in this cold weather too long. 


So there goes my brush with fame...

http://www.finchinfo.com/birds/finches/species/zebra_finch.php

Susan Mazza
Long Branch, NJ

Sent from my iPad
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Princeton CBC - Plainsboro Region
From: David Tattoni <davidtattoni AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 16:55:02 -0500
Hi Everyone, 
Myself and 5 other birders covered the Plainsboro Preserve and surrounding area 
as part of the Princeton CBC. Numbers were low today. There were only 3,000 
canada geese on the lake, compared to the 12,000+ we had a year ago. The only 
duck on the lake was a lone ruddy. This was very strange, as the lake usually 
attracts a wide variety of waterfowl. We had a few fly over common mergansers. 
3 pied billed grebes were in the back cove. A cackling goose was present in the 
flock of geese on the lake. It was much smaller, and had a noticeably shorter 
bill. We observed it for at least 20 minutes, getting very good views, and all 
agreed on cackling. We found a snipe in the vernal marshes on the right side of 
the lake. A female northern harrier was hunting in the fields along Scott's 
Corner Road. 

Overall a very nice day to be birding. I hope others enjoyed the first weekend 
of the CBC as well. 

From, 
David Tattoni

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pink-Footed Goose
From: Wendy and Stuart Malmid <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 16:38:20 -0500
Jerseybirders

Stuart went back to Wyckoff Mills Rd mid-afternoon. Steve Glynn was already 
there and soon after Steve located the Pink-Footed Goose and Stuart saw it I 
arrived later and eventually saw it after it had disappeared again. In the 
meantime, we observed the 3 Greater White-Fronted Geese again. In different and 
better lighting their bills were not yellow but pale pinkish in hue. I stand 
corrected on the bill color. So the Greater White-Fronted Geese would be of the 
Taiga race according to Sibley. The Barnacle Goose was also still present. A 
large flock of Horned Larks were a flyby. 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mystery Warbler. Orange -Crowned
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 16:26:29 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
As an FYI the mystery warbler has been declared an Orange-crowned.
Thanks to all who took a peek
Good Birding
Harvey Tomlinson

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Juvenile Cooper's Hawk (Photo)
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 13:52:55 -0500
I found a nice Juvenile Female Cooper's Hawk sitting in the Dogwood Tree in my 
front yard this afternoon (watching the songbirds in the bushes). Photo at: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/16020719272/

Meanwhile, in the backyard, there are two dozen Vultures and a pair of 
Red-tailed Hawks fighting over an old Raccoon carcass. . . 


Steve Byland
Warren, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Egyptian Goose on the loose (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 13:20:57 -0500
Egyptian Goose on the loose. Running with a flock of Mallards along the
Raritan River, Middlesex County, NJ. Very striking bird with an odd
call...sounds like the Aflac duck with a bad cough. :-)

Here's a photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16019229011/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: FYI for those birding the Rutgers preserve
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 13:01:30 -0500
There will be a controlled deer hunt in the Rutgers University Ecological
Preserve from December 22 through January 18. From the wording of the sign
(see photo) it looks like it won't be a problem for birders as long as they
stay on marked trails.

This sign was posted along a trail right behind where I live:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16020987925/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Barnacle Goose and other geese
From: Wendy and Stuart Malmid <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 11:41:52 -0500
Jerseybirders

We were at Wyckoff Mills and Applegarth Road in Monroe Twp for about an hour 
and a half this morning and were not able to refind the Pink-Footed Goose. We 
did see the Barnacle Goose as well as 3 adult Greater White-fronted Geese of 
the Greenland race. There was also one dark adult Snow Goose. 



Good birding

Wendy and Stuart Malmid
Monroe Twp, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pink-footed Goose
From: Jim Schill <sschliv AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 10:00:16 -0500
Pink-footed Goose continues on private residence field across from Wall High 
School Athletic Field Complex. Closest Google Map address is: 2821–2855 18th 
Ave 

Belmar, NJ  07719

Jim Schill
sschliv AT gmail.com
Medford, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pink-footed and Barnacle geese together in Monroe township
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 06:14:20 -0800
Mary Delia just informed me that a Pink-footed goose is now with the
Barnacle goose in Monroe township.  They are at the previous location of
Wyckhoff Mills/Applegarth road about .25 miles from the Taverna Ouzo
restaurant.  Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender in Cape May CC

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Possible MacGillivray's Warbler
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 06:37:13 -0500
H Jersey Birders,
Yesterday I photographed a warbler at Cox Hall Creek that I believe may
be a young female type MacGillivray's warbler.
I sent feelers out last night but this is a warbler
a lot of us have no experience with. Myself included.
Tennessee is ruled out by the bright yellow undertail coverts and eye-ring
ect. Nashville is ruled out by the complete gray hood, broken eye-ring,
whiteish throat, ect...
That leaves Orange-crowned warbler and MacGillivray's.
OCWA's chip call is sounds soft to me...when it chips. This bird's call was
loud, sharp, and seemed clipped at the end. It called frequently, something
I don't remember OCWA doing. If the throat wasn't white I would
default to Orestera
Orange-crowned Warbler, but I just don't know.
I have posted pics to Flickr that are less than stellar, but show some good
field marks.
Notes about the warbler are also on Flickr.
Today is the Cape May Christmas count so if you have a strong opinion
please email me at Shearh2os at aol.com. After helping with a count area
this morning I hope to go searching for this bird.
Posting a mis-ID for OCWA is better than potentially missing a
MacGillivray's.
Thanks,
Good Christmas Counting
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven
https://www.flickr.com/account/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Greater/Lesser Scaup
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 18:21:41 -0500
Hi all,

While birding the Elizabeth waterfront yesterday, I came upon eight Scaup in 
repose. Heads were not visible at all. Entered my sighting in eBird as 
above-Greater/Lesser Scaup. 


I've been wondering though. Is there a way to tell Scaup apart when the head is 
not visible? 


Many thanks and good birding.

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Northern Goshawk at Liberty State Park
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 16:42:46 -0500
While doing some scouting for the Lower Hudson CBC, I observed an immature
NORTHERN GOSHAWK at Liberty State Park this afternoon.

More details here:


http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/12/13/hudson-county-bird-258-northern-goshawk/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Pink-footed
From: Josh Emm <apistopanchax AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 14:53:13 -0500
The bird is currently on the north side of 18th ave. across from the Wall High 
School Athletic Field Complex with the Ross's Goose. 

Thank you all for the updates

Josh Emm
Havre de Grace, MD

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 13, 2014, at 9:29 AM, Sandra Keller  wrote:
> 
> The goose is here now. In a field off of Campbell Rd. in with Canadas.
> Found by a fellow Jersey birder! More later.
> 
> Sandra Keller
> 
> Sent from my iPad mini
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Assunpink Swans - Yes; Redpoll - No
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 14:23:06 -0500
I was there yesterday and couldn't find the redpoll either. Did have 2 juvenile 
bald eagles, 1 adult Rth, one pheasant, two juvy coopers, a flock of bluebirds, 
a small flock of field sparrows and a mangy, bedraggled fox. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 13, 2014, at 2:15 PM, Hopkins,Jeffrey A.  
wrote: 

> 
> The three trumpeter swans were at Assunpink NWR this AM at around 7:30 near a 
pull-out where the dirt road heading west from the model airplane field makes a 
right turn away from the lake. At one point they called as they flew around. 
Sweet! 

> 
> The house finch flock was fairly close to that location, but in about an hour 
of trying Marc Chelemer and I didn't find a bird that we would definitively 
call a redpoll. We had a couple possible sightings but the flock never sat 
still long enough for us to be certain. We also had a couple golden-crowned 
kinglets, a hairy woodpecker, and a probable red-breasted nuthatch. I left him 
still searching for the redpoll at about 9. 

> 
> I also made a stop by Etra Lake on the way home but didn't find the barnacle 
goose. It apparently moved to the other location before I arrived. 

> 
> Good birding,
> 
> Jeff Hopkins
> Whitehall, PA
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Assunpink Swans - Yes; Redpoll - No
From: "Hopkins,Jeffrey A." <HOPKINJA AT AIRPRODUCTS.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 19:15:45 +0000
The three trumpeter swans were at Assunpink NWR this AM at around 7:30 near a 
pull-out where the dirt road heading west from the model airplane field makes a 
right turn away from the lake. At one point they called as they flew around. 
Sweet! 


The house finch flock was fairly close to that location, but in about an hour 
of trying Marc Chelemer and I didn't find a bird that we would definitively 
call a redpoll. We had a couple possible sightings but the flock never sat 
still long enough for us to be certain. We also had a couple golden-crowned 
kinglets, a hairy woodpecker, and a probable red-breasted nuthatch. I left him 
still searching for the redpoll at about 9. 


I also made a stop by Etra Lake on the way home but didn't find the barnacle 
goose. It apparently moved to the other location before I arrived. 


Good birding,

Jeff Hopkins
Whitehall, PA


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Barnacle Goose
From: Wendy and Stuart Malmid <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 13:15:04 -0500
As of 1:00 the Barnacle Goose continued at the previously reported location. It 
is only one tenth of a mile from the turnoff at Wyckoff Hills Applegarth Road 
in large field of corn stubble. 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Etra lake - no Barnacle
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 12:09:46 -0500
Hello, 
 Marilyn Henry and I hit Etra Lake for the Barnacle on our way home. A quick 
look 

through 2,000?? or so geese led to no luck. We didn't have much time though.
The variation in Canada Geese plumage deserves more time. Someday next year.
We are passing many retention ponds, etc. as we drive home. Loads of geese in 
them. 

One reason why the rare geese stop here after migration and don't seem to make 
Salem 

County? I'll be looking hard next year in Salem for my big year in that county! 


Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Barnacle Goose
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 08:53:40 -0800
The Barnacle Goose is now present in a field on Wyckoff Mills-Applegarth
Road in Monroe T ownship.  The field is roughly .5 miles from the
restaurant Taverna Ouzo. Thanks to Mary Delia for putting us onto the
bird.  Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pink-footed
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 09:29:03 -0500
The goose is here now. In a field off of Campbell Rd. in with Canadas.
Found by a fellow Jersey birder! More later.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Barnacle Goose - Etra Lake, Hightstown
From: Todd Frantz <tfrantz75 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 08:22:34 -0500
This morning there was a Barnacle Goose at Etra Lake in Hightstown from 7:30 
until at least 8 am. The bird was swimming among the hundreds of Canadas in the 
northeast end of the lake. The bird swam back into a cove and out of sight 
around 8am. 


There was also a blue phase Snow Goose, several Ring-necked Ducks, Hooded Mergs 
and a pair of Gadwall. 


Good Birding!

Todd Frantz
Hightstown, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Barnacle Goose - etra lake mercer co
From: Todd Frantz <tfrantz75 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:46:48 -0500
Currently being seen, more to follow

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting
From: Beth Goldberg <goldbug310 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:14:09 -0500
Join us on Weds., December 17th for our annual Holiday Party and
Conservation Award Presentation.  We will be presenting our Harold Feinberg
Conservation Award to Lori Charkey and the late Mark Becker (Bergen SWAN)
to honor and recognize their tireless efforts to save and preserve local
watershed lands.  This will be a relaxed evening to recap another wonderful
year and celebrate the holiday season with your BCAS friends.  Bring light
refreshments to share if you like. Brief business meeting begins at 7:30PM
followed by our presentation.  Meetings are free and open to the public and
held at Teaneck Creek Conservancy, 20 Puffin Way, Teaneck, NJ

-- 
Beth Goldberg
Fair Lawn

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Geese
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2014 07:10:53 -0500
Has anyone noted whether the Goose at Wreck Pond or the Goose in
Wall Twp. was seen today, Sat., the thirteenth? Thanks!

Karen
Ocean


Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Extralimital: Winter Raptor Trip (26 Rough-legged Hawks)
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 16:00:07 -0500
Jerseybirders,

I ran my Roughleg Route today and tallied 26 birds. Every February, I run
this exact route for New Jersey Audubon's, All Things Birds program. Most
of the trip actually takes place in southern upstate New York but if you
want to see loads of Roughlegs, this is the place to be.

More details here:

http://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2014/12/12/my-roughleg-route/

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Monmouth Beach ocean scan
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 17:20:21 -0500
I parked along Central Ave. off Rte 36 S across from the stone sea
wall(south end) to scan the ocean.I was easily pleased with the birds
there.Black and Surf Scoters in modest numbers.Both Common and Red-throated
Loons at 40-50+/- ea. A small contingent of 14 Common Eiders was close to
shore included a few 1st winter males.An adult Black-legged Kittiwake was
kind enough to fly over the Eiders so I got a nice look at its'
silvery-white primaries with solid black ends.This bird flew north through
the large Gull flock.What is an ocean scan without an sp.? I had 5 distant
birds flying briskly in a group headed north I would have labeled large
Alcid sp. Ofcourse to use a quote from Pete Bacinski, "These birds were at
the limit of conjecture"

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: American Black Duck (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 16:06:46 -0500
A couple of weeks ago I posted some photos of what I thought might be an
American Black Duck. Consensus is that the absence of white edging on the
blue speculum in this photo pretty much nails it as a female Black Duck:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15707539300/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Island Beach CBC
From: vincent N <vfn7 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 17:37:45 +0000
Registration is now closed. Sunday's weather looks. Best of luck to the Sandy 
Hook CBC. 

Vincent Nichnadowicz: Pfrinceton Jct. 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Island Beach CBC
From: vincent N <vfn7 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 17:35:29 +0000
Registration is now closed. Sunday's weather looks good. Best of luck to the 
Sandy Hook CBC. 

Vincent Nichnadowicz: Princeton Jct. 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Wall Township Pink-footed Goose
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 08:25:23 -0800
The Pink-footed goose is still present on 18th street in the field directly
across from the Wall HS athletic fields.  It is mixed in with a large flock
of Canada Geese.  Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sandy Hook Bay spill is diesel fuel that could threaten wildlife, park officials say
From: Cynthia Allen <cynthiaja AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 11:02:04 -0500
http://www.nj.com/monmouth/index.ssf/2014/12/sandy_hook_bay_spill_is_diesel_fuel_and_could_threaten_wildlife_park_officials_say.html#incart_river 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Coast Guard investigating oil spill in Sandy Hook Bay | NJ.com
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 10:31:59 -0500
FYI... no idea status now.


http://www.nj.com/monmouth/index.ssf/2014/12/coast_guard_investigating_oil_spill_in_sandy_hook_bay.html#incart_river 



Sent from my LilyPad
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: some Assunpink birds
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 08:52:12 -0600
Around 8AM today the 3 Trumpeter Swans were 30 yards offshore at the eastern 
end of the lake (their favored location last winter) providing excellent 
opportunities to study them in detail. Just go down the gravel road by the old 
boarded up administration building and park by the model airplane field and 
walk down to the water. 

Common Mergansers are back (my first sighting this fall) just in time for 
Sundays Xmas count. Duck variety has been lagging this fall (I've only had 9 
species to date). 

Other birds seen today were Common Redpoll (with House Finch flock), 
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (not seen for several weeks) and White-crowned Sparrow 

Bob Dodelson
(No Evening Grosbeaks yet)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Where were all the Gulls
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2014 06:59:27 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
Thanks to all who responded to my missing Gull question.
What a story. Wow!
The explosion of Laughing Gulls over the past 30+ years along the Delaware
Bayshore begs the question what impact did the gull explosion have to the
declining population of horseshoe crabs and down stream to the Red Knots.
Not to minimize the over harvesting issue, or other environmental insults,
the huge pulse of LAGU populations has to have impacted the delicate
balance seen along the Bayshore.
The competition the Gulls present to the Red Knots is all too evident in
May.
Kudos to the researchers and volunteers who are/ have been tackling this
issue.
I for one have a new appreciation for the 'tongue in cheek" Cape May LAGU
Award!
Good Birding
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven

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