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Updated on Sunday, September 14 at 10:47 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Gallicolumba jobiensis

14 Sep Re: suggestion for Audubon trips [Peggy Cadigan ]
14 Sep suggestion for Audubon trips ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
14 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (14 Sep 2014) 809 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
14 Sep Nighthawks [SandraKeller ]
14 Sep Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 9/14/14 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
14 Sep Whiskered Tern....check! [Shawn Wainwright ]
14 Sep Re: Wilmington Canyon Pelagic; personal recap [Jon Stippick ]
14 Sep Wilmington Canyon Pelagic; personal recap [Jon Stippick ]
14 Sep Loantaka 1pm [Diane C Louie ]
14 Sep RT hummingbird vs. Tufted Titmouse [Marcia Ian ]
14 Sep Philadelphia Vireo, Glenhurst Meadows [Vince Capp ]
14 Sep All Things Birds Forsythe (Brigantine) NWR Field Trip and Cape May Adventure September 13: [Peter Bacinski ]
14 Sep Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting [Beth Goldberg ]
14 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
14 Sep Avocets in Barnegat [Karmela ]
14 Sep Bird radar [SandraKeller ]
13 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern still around? [Michael Hodanish ]
13 Sep 9/12 - Great day! Whiskered Tern, Godwits and a Dickcissel [Matt Webster ]
13 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern still around? [Jimmy Lee ]
13 Sep Chimney swift roost Ridgewood [Bill Elrick ]
13 Sep Whiskered Tern still around? [Jim Hayes ]
13 Sep Sod farms - Cumberland - zero [SandraKeller ]
13 Sep Thrush and vireo invasion this morning. ["Susie R." ]
13 Sep Re: OT: birding cross country [Diane C Louie ]
13 Sep Whiskered, Black tern and Coomon Moorhen in Cape May [Joseph Palumbo ]
13 Sep Re: OT: birding cross country [Diane C Louie ]
13 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Bert Harris ]
13 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
12 Sep terns and gulls [SandraKeller ]
12 Sep OT: birding cross country [Diane C Louie ]
12 Sep Re: grackle eyes and eagles [Diane C Louie ]
12 Sep RFI - Nighthawks [Ellen DeCarlo ]
12 Sep Whiskered Tern still present [Matt Webster ]
12 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
12 Sep Whiskered Tern, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
12 Sep Golden Plover @ Johnson's Sod Farm ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
11 Sep nighthawk watch - newton Lake park - no [SandraKeller ]
11 Sep ebird [Laura Berlik ]
11 Sep Re: wood thrushes [Rick Wright ]
11 Sep wood thrushes [Laura Berlik ]
10 Sep Common Nighthawks in Raritan ["John J. Collins" ]
10 Sep Great Sedge Island--Common Eider, Marbled Godwits [Larry-Zirlin ]
10 Sep Glenhurst Deer Management last season [mike hiotis ]
10 Sep Re: Deer Management at Glenhurst? ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
10 Sep DOS September Meeting - Jeffrey Gordon Speaker - Wednesday 9/17 [Bill Stewart ]
10 Sep Re: Deer Management at Glenhurst? [Vince Capp ]
10 Sep Deer Management at Glenhurst? [William Dix ]
10 Sep Ring-billed gull leg band [Bill Elrick ]
10 Sep listowner reminder - posting etiquette [Tom Bailey ]
10 Sep bird-related publishing project / request for help ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
10 Sep Floodgates - terns [SandraKeller ]
9 Sep Buff-breasteds Whitesbog [Greg Prelich ]
9 Sep Labor Day Marks The Start Of The Season For Monarch Monitoring Project « CBS Philly [Stuart and Wendy ]
9 Sep Re: Red-eyed Vireo on the feeder - maybe not [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
9 Sep Red-eyed Vireo on the feeder - maybe not ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
9 Sep Re: sod farms ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
9 Sep Re: sod farms [C J BRINE ]
9 Sep Audubon report on birds and climate change [Greg Prelich ]
8 Sep Eagles and OT: I digress [Diane C Louie ]
8 Sep sod farms [Laura Berlik ]
9 Sep Shorebirds: Gordon Road and Herbert Road, Mercer and Monmouth Counties [vincent N ]
8 Sep grackle eyes and eagles [Laura Berlik ]
8 Sep Re: Misadventures in ID'ing birds (photo) :-) [Diane C Louie ]
8 Sep Griggstown Grassland Preserve- a few migrants [Vince Capp ]
8 Sep Two turkey families as yard birds! ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Sep Cumberland - post breeding dispersal [Sandra Keller ]
8 Sep Misadventures in ID'ing birds (photo) :-) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
8 Sep White-winged Dove, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
7 Sep Plainsboro and Princeton [judson hamlin ]
7 Sep SHWS Free Digiscoping workshop with Swarovski's Clay Taylor [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
7 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (07 Sep 2014) 50 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
7 Sep Baird's, Buff-breasted, Pecs and more at the Cape May Meadows [Joseph Palumbo ]
7 Sep Johnson Sod Farm Area [Steve Smith ]
7 Sep Admin: Re: OT: Request to hunt on your property [L Larson ]
7 Sep Adult Eagle Pair over Cherry Hill [Denise Bittle ]
7 Sep Palmyra - Olive-Sided search - no [SandraKeller ]

Subject: Re: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 23:20:34 -0400
Danusha, I think this is a splendid idea. I am a new birder and this system 
would make it much easier to facilitate conversation. 


Peggy Cadigan
#2.5 on your scale
Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
1bookworm AT comcast.net

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 14, 2014, at 10:18 PM, "Danusha V. Goska"  wrote:
> 
> I want to make a suggestion re: Audubon birdwatching trips. 
> Danusha V. Goska, PhD
> author, "Save Send Delete"
> 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: suggestion for Audubon trips
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 22:18:04 -0400
I want to make a suggestion re: Audubon birdwatching trips. I think
this suggestion might make the trips even better for participants.
Newcomers might have a warmer, more inclusive, more enjoyable
experience.

I've been on a couple of these trips and something has been lacking
for me: facilitated interaction between those in the group.

Leaders are great and charming, but much interaction is between group
members and leaders. I have felt awkward making contact with group
members because I don't know them and I don't know what kind of
comment would work for them.

During today's Audubon trip to Skylands, I thought it would be great
if we had been offered the option of nametags with identifications as
described below.

Why I think these optional nametags would be a good idea

Nametags provide the person's name, so you can address him or her.

Nametags encourage us to talk to each other.

Three key pieces of info that would fit easily on a nametag help us to
know what to say to each other.

An example of how this would work. During today's Audubon trip to
Skylands, at many points in the walk, clumps of participants were
standing around together, beyond earshot of the guide.

We could have helped each other, but we didn't talk to each other.

I saw some bluebirds in the apple trees. The sun was behind the
bluebirds, so their color was not apparent. I wanted to say to the
folks standing next to me, "You can recognize bluebirds by their
hunched silhouette, even when you can't see their color," but I
thought, I shouldn't say this, because these folks might be experts ...

Later, though, one of the people who had been standing next to me
said, "Is a bluebird the same thing as a blue jay?"

So, yeah, I should have passed birding knowledge on to him, but I let
the chance pass me by, because I didn't know his level.

Also, I wanted to ask folks if they had ever seen a barn owl at
Skylands, and I wanted to ask what the likely fate of the late wood
duck ducklings would be (they are still ducklings, this late in the
summer), but I didn't know which members of the group had what level
of knowledge.

So I'd like to suggest OPTIONAL nametags with three pieces of info on them:

Name

Two boxes with the option of checking one or the other or neither:
"Ask me questions" or "Tell me stuff."

Then five numbers, with the option of circling one. The numbers would
communicate:

Bird watching level between one and five (obviously not all these
words would fit on a nametag, but numbers one through five would)

One: I've heard of birdwatching and I may buy binoculars and a field
guide soon.

Two: I've been birdwatching casually for about a year and I can
identify a dozen or more common birds near my home/work without aid of
a field guide

Three: I've been birdwatching for more than a year and I know about a
hundred birds

Four: I've been birdwatching for years. I can identify most birds I
see by sight, behavior, or call.

Five: I can identify eighty percent or more of the birds I see in any
habitat without a field guide by sight, behavior, or call. I lead
trips, give talks, publish, maintain nesting boxes.

Danusha in Paterson, NJ

-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (14 Sep 2014) 809 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:09:45 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 14, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                      13             19             40
Bald Eagle                   7             15             28
Northern Harrier             0              0              2
Sharp-shinned Hawk          22             38             51
Cooper's Hawk                2              4              9
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          3              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk          751            769            830
Red-tailed Hawk              5             10             10
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             5             13             21
Merlin                       1              1              5
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                     809            872           1000
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00 
Observation end   time: 18:00:00 
Total observation time: 10 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Andy Fedor, Brian Butler, Jim Thomson, Megan Fedor

Visitors:
Additional observers - Denise Thomson, Victor Motts, Kevin Weinman, Larry
Bailey, Fairfax Hutter, Scott Wood, Gidget Butler, Fenner Hutter.  

Hikers - 23 plus A.T. SOBO "Magellen". 

Thank you to all for your spotting and company on this very pleasant day on
the ridge.  Nice to see V. Motts back on Coon after a long absence...come
back soon!  




Weather:
mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies, wind NW 5-14 dropping off to mostly
calm in afternoon, 48-70 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 9:58A, 10:19A, 11:08I, 12:21A, 12:38I, 3:35(2I). 

Had some beautiful looks at eagles, ospreys & broad-wings, but Bird of the
Day goes to the imm. Red-tail that kited only 20 feet over the owl decoy
while screaming.

Non-raptor Observations:
Hummingbirds - 8.
Ravens - 2.
Tree Swallows - two large flocks.
Chimney Swifts - 3. 
DC Cormorants - 3.
BVs & TVs.
Kingfisher - 1. 
Monarchs - 12.

========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Nighthawks
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 21:21:07 -0400
21 at dusk over the dredge - Gloucester County. Yes! Started at 7:00. We left 
at 7:30 

when we couldn't see much anymore. I am still wondering if many more as 
impossible 

to know if we were seeing new birds or the same ones circling. We counted 21 in 
one 

scan. 7:15? 

1 White-rumped in the east pool. 3 Pecs. The swallow show was great. Raptors
hunting. Harrier and Cooper's going at each other! 

9 Blue-winged Teal, Shovelers, Green-winged Teal - east pool.

The dike to most of the east pool is clear. Making for easy walking! 

Observers - myself, Marilyn, Doug W., and a mutual friend who had to leave 
before 

the Nighthawk show began! He's going to try and get there again sometime this 
week.

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 9/14/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 19:45:50 -0500
Congressman Jim Greenwood and I went to Brig today. The tide was coming in
and it was sunny and there were birds and no Greenhead Flies...not so bad!
To see today's Photo Study and a list of the species seen, please click on
the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigSep14_14/BrigSep14_14.html

Regards,
Howard


Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D, P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern....check!
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 20:41:54 -0400
Whiskered Tern......check! In Cape May 9-14-14. It was great to see so many
people I hav'nt seen in a while too! Waited about a half hour on the beach
with the huge crowd of people, then some people made the sacrifice and left
and then it flew right in and landed in front of us, stayed for 15 minutes
then flew over to bunker pond to feed. Also got some Royal Terns, Black
Tern, 2 Bald Eagles, American Kestrel, Merlin, lots of Sharp-shinned Hawks
and several Palm Warblers in the dunes. Some nice butterflies too including
a Cloudless Sulphur, tagged Monarchs, Viceroy, and many others in the
trails. Great day out there! Pictures and a full list coming when I get
time. Many thanks to Jane Aguilu for driving.

Great birding!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Wilmington Canyon Pelagic; personal recap
From: Jon Stippick <Jonstippick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 20:31:59 -0400
Here's my list

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19826903

Jon Stippick
Newfield NJ
jonstippick at gmaildotcom

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Wilmington Canyon Pelagic; personal recap
From: Jon Stippick <Jonstippick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 20:21:19 -0400
We had great birds on the trip and some rough seas. This was my 5th pelagic 
trip and the 1st time I came close to adding to the chum. Many folks 
contributed copiously. The action started well before sunrise with an American 
Golden Plover calling over head. There were also several warblers flying over 
calling, Blackpolls were the only ones ID'ed. We noticed a white object 
floating on the water occasionally catching the light from the boat. Someone 
got a spotlight on it and revealed a Bridled Tern. 

 Once we got some light we scanned through the Wilson's Storm Petrels for the 
rarer long-winged petrels. No Band-rumped or Leach's were positively ID'ed 
through out the day. Many of us had a candidate here or there but between the 
bouncing ship and the choppy water none could be confirmed. Wilson's were 
present throughout offshore portion of the trip. 

 It didn't take long for Cory's Shearwaters to appear. We had many of these 
birds throughout the trip including 1 Scopoli's. Groups of 2, 3, and even up to 
4 birds gave some excellent views. Watching shearwaters fly is something I 
never get tired of. I spent a long time watching and allowing their flight 
style to I mprint on my mind. On the ride back I was at the back of the boat 
alone admiring a close shearwater following the boat and criss-crossing the 
wake. I wasn't paying much attention to plumage until a crowd rushed back to 
see the Great Shearwater that I assumed was a Cory's. I'm being quite hard on 
myself for not ID'ing this bird sooner. I should've known when I thought "Huh, 
this Cory's has a very white neck and dark back" oh well, lesson learned. 

 Along the way we were also treated to an incredible look at an immature 
Long-tailed Jaeger. This bird was in sight for several minutes and at one point 
flew directly over the back of the boat showing it's plumage very well. This 
was the highlight of the trip for me. I also made the most of this opportunity 
to let the birds flight style and giss imprint on my mind. 

 Other highlights were rapid flybys of Audubon's Shearwaters, one of which came 
right past the boat and showed very well for us. A single Manx Shearwater 
blitzed passed on our ride back to land. I saw it twice with naked eye only, 
once crossing the wake and once arcing above horizon. The only lifer I aqiured 
on the trip and the most anti-climatic lifer ever. I was on a special mission 
on the return trip to spot one of these and stared through my bins nonstop once 
we reached Manx country but the naked eye sighting will have to do, for now. 
Another notable sighting was the second Bridled Tern perched on floating 
debris. Those who were on the bird early got to see this bird extremely well 
until it took off and flew into the distance. I was surprised that we only got 
one brief look a Red-necked Phalarope, we had several last year, but it was 
exciting to watch it harassing a Cory's Shearwater in flight. 

 Other far offshore birds included Osprey, Great Blue Heron and Herring Gull.
All in all, a rough but successful trip. A huge thank you to Paul and his 
excellent crew. The leaders,as always, were incredibly helpful. Tom Johnson did 
a great job as commentator, we need him on the microphone on every trip! It was 
also great to catch up with birding friends. Looking forward to next time. 


Jon Stippick
Newfield, NJ
jonstippick at gmaildotcom

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Loantaka 1pm
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 20:00:30 -0400
After some debate and consideration of alternatives, we fell back to the 
regular: a turn around Kitchell Pond. 

It’s not ideal habitat (ball field, phrag, and deer heaven with no understory), 

but it’s close by to our house in Madison and reliably has the usual suspects. 
Plus I wasn’t going to be seeing the Whiskered Tern anyhow. 

Our biggest decision at Loantaka is, Should we go clockwise or 
counterclockwise? Today we went counterclockwise. 


Besides Great Egret, GBH, Kingfisher (male sans belt), Swallow spp, soaring Red 
- tailed, duckage (Mallards, no more 

Wood Ducks for weeks), TVs, and a Common Yellowthroat,
we watched for several minutes as a female Cardinal seemingly instructed a male 
fledgling how to search for food. 

Throughout the lesson, she made sharp chip notes and the fledgling made steady, 
high-pitched begging noises 

as she flew about with the fledgling following. Finally, they settled 
underneath a bush. He begged piteously, flapping 

his wings rapidly, and she pecked at the ground around her and brought her beak 
to his, again and again — although 

it was not clear if she was actually feeding him anything. I was surprised to 
see a Cardinal fledgling this late, in mid-September. 


Diane Louie
Madison

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: RT hummingbird vs. Tufted Titmouse
From: Marcia Ian <gnudle AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 18:54:02 -0400
Yesterday I observed a ruby throated hummingbird visit a honeysuckle blossom, 
then it wanted to perch awhile. But a tufted titmouse spotted it and proceeded 
to harass it, chasing it from branch to branch, tree to tree, including one 
tree that is completely dead (next door neighbor’s), until finally the hummer 
gave up and left the vicinity. What was up with that? There was neither food 
nor nest or anything to compete for. It was as if the tt didn't like the look 
of the other guy. 


Marcia
NJ
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Philadelphia Vireo, Glenhurst Meadows
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 14:22:02 -0400
Hi, y'all.

I had a nice, if short-lived blitz of 'little birds' along the driveway and
around the parking area when I arrived at 7:45 this morning. Cape May, Black
and White, Redstarts, and Magnolias were seen. As a very nice bonus a
Philadelphia Vireo was in the mix as well. A Pee-wee and an UI Empid were
also in the area. Once that died down, it got quiet and stayed that way for
the rest of my loop up and around the property. The only notable exception
was a Wilson's Warbler up along the river- by the Red-headed Woodpeckers
territory. The Wilson's was in the company of two other olive/yellow
warblers that I didn't see well enough to ID. And no, they weren't
Yellowthroats. If there were any shorebirds in the ponds- I didn't see them.


 I managed to grab a photo of the Philly and though not award-winning, it
does show the bird's key features well enough to prove useful, I think. 

 It can be viewed here:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

Good birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: All Things Birds Forsythe (Brigantine) NWR Field Trip and Cape May Adventure September 13:
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 10:08:34 -0400
Dear Jersey Birders:

 

Our field trip to Brig faced an ominous weather forecast, high tide, strong
easterly winds holding the water in the refuge and water levels that would
make Noah proud.  That said, looking for shorebirds was easy as there was
nowhere for them to sit other than on top of rocks or on the dike.  Alas,
shorebird pickings were lean as we found a few Western Sandpipers in the
peep flocks, but little else.  Five Caspian Terns, two Royal Terns, a Juv.
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, three Saltmarsh and eight Seaside Sparrows were
the highlights, with over sixty species tallied.  As we completed the loop
of the refuge, I proposed to the group instead of looking for the ark here
at the refuge on a second time around, we move the entire operation to Cape
May Point in search of a great bird, the Whiskered Tern.  They all agreed
and we set off without eating lunch in hopes of getting there before the
monsoon.

 

We arrived pre-rain, found myriads of birders on the platform and had what I
like, a walk up to rarity.  The Whiskered Tern was quickly pointed out to us
along with the Black Tern and we had a bunch of happy field trip
participants with life bird smiles all around.  For me it was a state bird.
We then took the starving group to the Westside Market on Broadway and after
lunch to Lighthouse Pond where we found the Common Gallinule (which I
thought maybe extinct in NJ) and a few Blue-winged Teal and headed home in
the rain smiling.

 

I want to thank associate Naturalists Mike Mandracchia and Hank Burk for
their excellent assistance on today's adventure.

 

Good birding,

 

Pete Bacinski-All Things Birds

NJ Audubon

 

 

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds Blog:

http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionCenters/SectionAllThingsBirds/AllThingsBirds
Blog.aspx

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/AllThingsBirds

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting
From: Beth Goldberg <goldbug310 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 08:30:37 -0400
Join BCAS for a special meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 17 to help celebrate
the launch of the new free eBook *Bald Eagles in the Meadowlands and
Beyond.  *BCAS is pleased to present a free talk and reception at
the Meadowlands Environment Center at DeKorte Park, Lyndhurst.   The
crowd-sourced eBook, sponsored by the N.J. Meadowlands Commission and
Conserve Wildlife Foundation, features amazing images by 19 mostly local
nature photographers, as well as chapters on the Bald Eagle’s amazing
recovery in the region, the state and nationwide. Presentation by the
NJMC’s Jim Wright and CWF’s David Wheeler. All contributors to the book are
being invited to attend this special event. (Free, open to the
public. Chapter Meeting 7:30pm. Program 8-9:30 pm.)

Beth Goldberg
Fair Lawn


--

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 08:17:16 -0400
The Whiskered Tern is back on Bunker Pond in Cape May Point State Park.

Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Avocets in Barnegat
From: Karmela <kmoneta AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 07:45:26 -0400
Hello, I just spotted 2 Avocets at the Forsythe impound on Bayshore Drive in 
Barnegat. 


Karmela Moneta
Barnegat, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bird radar
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 05:49:07 -0400
I am working this morning, so taking the time to look at the radar every half 
hour. 

It's quiet over the Delaware River. Birds were up at 9:30 pm or so. I forget 
when I 

last checked. I have always wondered whether the birds stop at midnight. Keep 
going 

until dawn. No idea. I am presuming the Delaware River birds stopped. Unless of 
course, 

they just moved out of the area and nothing new in. 

Now Cape May Point still had blue over them! Birds always seem to be moving
down there. 5:00 and still dark. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern still around?
From: Michael Hodanish <luv2howl AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:06:24 -0400
Was present on the beach adjacent to Bunker pond Saturday evening, in
company of 3 dozen other terns & a few gulls, at about 6:30-45 PM


Michael Hodanish, President
Howling Woods Farm
Jackson, NJ
www.howlingwoods.org




-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Jim
Hayes
Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2014 6:36 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Whiskered Tern still around?

Has THE TERN been seen since this morning's report? Was planning on going to
Delaware tomorrow. If the answer is yes, then I'll change my plans. Jim
HayesWanaque, NJ
____________________________________________________________
The #1 Worst Carb Ever?
Click to Learn #1 Carb that Kills Your Blood Sugar (Don't Eat
This!)
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: 9/12 - Great day! Whiskered Tern, Godwits and a Dickcissel
From: Matt Webster <mattweb100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 20:40:09 -0400
It was great to get out yesterday for a full day with the gang!

Full details and butterfly notes on my blog: http://birdermatt.blogspot.com/

CMPSP

WHISKERED TERN!
Black Terns
Tennessee Warbler

EB FORSYTHE NWR

3 Marbled Godwits
Dickcissel
Tricolored Heron
Saltmarsh Sparrow

Matt Webster
Cedarbrook, NJ
mattweb100 AT gmail.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern still around?
From: Jimmy Lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 23:53:11 +0000
Yes. also Black Tern (both at Bunker Pond) and Common Moorhen (at Lighthouse 
Pond). 

see http://keekeekerr.com/textalerts/keekeekerr.
 
HTH.
 
Good birding.
 
Jimmy Lee
 



Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: Jim Hayes To: 
JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:35:36 -0000 (UTC)Subject: 
[JERSEYBI] Whiskered Tern still around? 


Has THE TERN been seen since this morning's report? Was planning on going to 
Delaware tomorrow. If the answer is yes, then I'll change my plans. Jim 
HayesWanaque, NJ____________________________________________________________The 
#1 Worst Carb Ever?Click to Learn #1 Carb that Kills Your Blood Sugar 
(Don't Eat 
This!)http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5414c6f036fb546f06b69st03duc 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybiHow to report 
NJ bird sightings:  


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Chimney swift roost Ridgewood
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 19:35:10 -0400
Hi I went looking for the Chimney Swift roost in Ridgewood last week and
found it was not there. tonight i found a 1,000 or more going to roost in
downtown Ridgewood near the churches beside the bus station. I did not
however have much time so only saw them for around 10min at 6.05pm

*Bill Elrick*
 

 


*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

 *Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern still around?
From: Jim Hayes <jehman55 AT JUNO.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 22:35:36 GMT
Has THE TERN been seen since this morning's report? Was planning on going to 
Delaware tomorrow. If the answer is yes, then I'll change my plans. Jim 
HayesWanaque, NJ 

____________________________________________________________
The #1 Worst Carb Ever?
Click to Learn #1 Carb that Kills Your Blood Sugar (Don't Eat 
This!) 

http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5414c6f036fb546f06b69st03duc

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sod farms - Cumberland - zero
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 14:16:50 -0400
Took a run through on my way home from Supawna Meadows. 
Dead, literally. Starlings and Horned Larks. A few other locales 
had some Killdeer and Semipalm Plovers. Hundreds of Tree Swallows
around. I didn't scan well for anything else. Like Cliff. 

Glad to hear the Tern is still around! 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Thrush and vireo invasion this morning.
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 11:13:28 -0400
There are Wood Thrushes galore in the dogwood and spice bush this morning.
Also at least one other thrush, which I can't see well enough to ID, but
I'm leaning toward Swainsons.

Bot Red-eyed and Philadelphia vireos are enjoying the spice bush also.

American Redstart and Common Yellowthroat are gleaning bugs from the trees.

Gloomy days tend to bring some nice birds to my yard.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: OT: birding cross country
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 11:12:01 -0400
how could i forget: fat birder is a great central resource for links to local 
sites — wherever you go. 

here’s the one for NA.  happy surfing.

http://fatbirder.com/links_geo/america_north

diane louie
madison



On Sep 13, 2014, at 10:38 AM, Laura B. Berlik  wrote:

> 
> 
> 
> On Sep 13, 2014, at 8:01 AM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
> 
> You could cobble together your own itinerary cross country using touring 
companies' 

> local itineraries and bird lists. I have a Reader’s Digest book, Where the 
Birds Are: A Travel Guide to Over 1,000 

> Parks, Preserves, and Sanctuaries. And the ABA guide by Jerry Cooper, 
Birdfinder: A Birder’s Guide to Planning 

> North Amercian Trips was one of my first references as a beginner.
> 
> Diane Louie
> Madison
> 
>> 
>> On Sep 12, 2014, at 8:19 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
>> 
>> Of course, books have been written about birding cross country (Kingbird 
Highway being my favorite). 

>> In terms of daily sightings, check out Dorian Anderson’s blog. He is birding 
by bike in his Big Year attempt. 

>> For more high maintenance folks like myself, VENT provides itineraries and 
bird lists for its tours, including 

>> its popular Birding by (Amtrak) train. Birding Pal has been recommended as a 
source for local guides and fellow 

>> birders.
>> 
>> http://blog.aba.org/2014/02/a-biking-big-year-with-dorian-anderson.html
>> 
>> http://www.ventbird.com/birding-tour/birding-across-america-by-train
>> 
>> http://www.birdingpal.org
>> 
>> Diane Louie
>> Madison
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Sep 12, 2014, at 8:03 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
>> 
>>> Laura,
>>> 
>>> According to Peter Pyle’s Identification Guide to NA Birds, under Common 
Grackle: 

>>> 
>>> “HY/SY (Aug-Jul):….iris brownish to brownish yellow, through Oct-Feb.”
>>> “AHY (Jan-Dec): iris yellow.”
>>> 
>>> HY = Hatching Year, a bird in its first basic plumage in its first calendar 
year 

>>> SY = Second Year, a bird in its second calendar year
>>> AHY = After Hatching Year, a bird in at least its second calendar year
>>> 
>>> Sounds like your “dark-eyed babe” is HY.
>>> 
>>> Diane Louie
>>> Madison
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Sep 8, 2014, at 9:31 PM, Laura Berlik  wrote:
>>> 
>>>> Can anyone tell me how long before a juvenile grackle gets his yellow 
eyes? Today the dark-eyed babe visited my feeders with two adults, presumably 
the parents. 

>>>> A couple of days ago I spotted a bald eagle high in the trees, posing 
profile, frowning, in the perfect spot with the sun shining on him, framed on a 
branch with few leaves. Stunning. I have a couple of really good photos. I was 
too busy with the binocs to bother, but my son ran for his camera and he took 
them. A few moments later a turkey crossed the road--made us all ponder the 
decision to make the eagle, not the turkey, the national bird. 

>>>> Also in the Institute Woods I saw a pair of pileated woodpeckers. They 
looked huge, flying in. Both landed on same tree, but I could only appreciate 
full view of one. 

>>>> Here, inland, how long can I expect to see migrating birds? I am sorry to 
ask questions that proper research could answer. I admit to my hope of learning 
from the collective wisdom. 

>>>> Who do I contact if I have a question about whether a question is 
appropriate? For instance, I want to know of any sources for birding my way 
through other states on a cross-country trip next year. I hope it's OK to ask. 

>>>> Laura Berlik
>>>> Princeton
>>>> 
>>>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered, Black tern and Coomon Moorhen in Cape May
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 06:51:41 -0700
The Whiskered tern continues at Bunker Pond along with Black tern and a
Coomon Moorhen is present in Lighthouse pond. Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: OT: birding cross country
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 08:01:25 -0400
You could cobble together your own itinerary cross country using touring 
companies' 

local itineraries and bird lists. I have a Reader’s Digest book, Where the 
Birds Are: A Travel Guide to Over 1,000 

Parks, Preserves, and Sanctuaries. And the ABA guide by Jerry Cooper, 
Birdfinder: A Birder’s Guide to Planning 

North Amercian Trips was one of my first references as a beginner.

Diane Louie
Madison

> 
> On Sep 12, 2014, at 8:19 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
> 
> Of course, books have been written about birding cross country (Kingbird 
Highway being my favorite). 

> In terms of daily sightings, check out Dorian Anderson’s blog. He is birding 
by bike in his Big Year attempt. 

> For more high maintenance folks like myself, VENT provides itineraries and 
bird lists for its tours, including 

> its popular Birding by (Amtrak) train. Birding Pal has been recommended as a 
source for local guides and fellow 

> birders.
> 
> http://blog.aba.org/2014/02/a-biking-big-year-with-dorian-anderson.html
> 
> http://www.ventbird.com/birding-tour/birding-across-america-by-train
> 
> http://www.birdingpal.org
> 
> Diane Louie
> Madison
> 
> 
> 
> On Sep 12, 2014, at 8:03 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:
> 
>> Laura,
>> 
>> According to Peter Pyle’s Identification Guide to NA Birds, under Common 
Grackle: 

>> 
>> “HY/SY (Aug-Jul):….iris brownish to brownish yellow, through Oct-Feb.”
>> “AHY (Jan-Dec): iris yellow.”
>> 
>> HY = Hatching Year, a bird in its first basic plumage in its first calendar 
year 

>> SY = Second Year, a bird in its second calendar year
>> AHY = After Hatching Year, a bird in at least its second calendar year
>> 
>> Sounds like your “dark-eyed babe” is HY.
>> 
>> Diane Louie
>> Madison
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Sep 8, 2014, at 9:31 PM, Laura Berlik  wrote:
>> 
>>> Can anyone tell me how long before a juvenile grackle gets his yellow eyes? 
Today the dark-eyed babe visited my feeders with two adults, presumably the 
parents. 

>>> A couple of days ago I spotted a bald eagle high in the trees, posing 
profile, frowning, in the perfect spot with the sun shining on him, framed on a 
branch with few leaves. Stunning. I have a couple of really good photos. I was 
too busy with the binocs to bother, but my son ran for his camera and he took 
them. A few moments later a turkey crossed the road--made us all ponder the 
decision to make the eagle, not the turkey, the national bird. 

>>> Also in the Institute Woods I saw a pair of pileated woodpeckers. They 
looked huge, flying in. Both landed on same tree, but I could only appreciate 
full view of one. 

>>> Here, inland, how long can I expect to see migrating birds? I am sorry to 
ask questions that proper research could answer. I admit to my hope of learning 
from the collective wisdom. 

>>> Who do I contact if I have a question about whether a question is 
appropriate? For instance, I want to know of any sources for birding my way 
through other states on a cross-country trip next year. I hope it's OK to ask. 

>>> Laura Berlik
>>> Princeton
>>> 
>>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>> 
> 
> 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Bert Harris <aramidopsis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 07:53:36 -0400
And for anyone not aware, updates of the tern's whereabouts are being
posted on keekeekerr http://www.keekeekerr.com/textalerts/keekeekerr.

Cheers,
Bert Harris, Princeton

On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 7:23 AM, Sam Galick  wrote:

> The Whiskered Tern continues this morning flying around Bunker Pond in
> Cape May Point State Park.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Sam
>
> --
> Sam Galick
> Cape May, NJ
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2014 07:23:35 -0400
The Whiskered Tern continues this morning flying around Bunker Pond in Cape May 
Point State Park. 


Good birding!

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: terns and gulls
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 22:25:05 -0400
Good luck all - to those chasing the Whiskered Tern Sat! Marilyn and I headed
down this late afternoon. Wow! As an added bonus - adult Little Gull called 
out! 

I love Cape May! I actually have Little Gull for Sept. 9/17 - I forget the year 
already 

and just looked it up! Interesting. The 9/17 was Cape May also. St. Mary's 
jetty. 

We did not see the Black Tern.

Good chasing all!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: OT: birding cross country
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 20:19:48 -0400
Of course, books have been written about birding cross country (Kingbird 
Highway being my favorite). 

In terms of daily sightings, check out Dorian Anderson’s blog. He is birding by 
bike in his Big Year attempt. 

For more high maintenance folks like myself, VENT provides itineraries and bird 
lists for its tours, including 

its popular Birding by (Amtrak) train. Birding Pal has been recommended as a 
source for local guides and fellow 

birders.

http://blog.aba.org/2014/02/a-biking-big-year-with-dorian-anderson.html

http://www.ventbird.com/birding-tour/birding-across-america-by-train

http://www.birdingpal.org

Diane Louie
Madison



On Sep 12, 2014, at 8:03 PM, Diane C Louie  wrote:

> Laura,
> 
> According to Peter Pyle’s Identification Guide to NA Birds, under Common 
Grackle: 

> 
> “HY/SY (Aug-Jul):….iris brownish to brownish yellow, through Oct-Feb.”
> “AHY (Jan-Dec): iris yellow.”
> 
> HY = Hatching Year, a bird in its first basic plumage in its first calendar 
year 

> SY = Second Year, a bird in its second calendar year
> AHY = After Hatching Year, a bird in at least its second calendar year
> 
> Sounds like your “dark-eyed babe” is HY.
> 
> Diane Louie
> Madison
> 
> 
> 
> On Sep 8, 2014, at 9:31 PM, Laura Berlik  wrote:
> 
>> Can anyone tell me how long before a juvenile grackle gets his yellow eyes? 
Today the dark-eyed babe visited my feeders with two adults, presumably the 
parents. 

>> A couple of days ago I spotted a bald eagle high in the trees, posing 
profile, frowning, in the perfect spot with the sun shining on him, framed on a 
branch with few leaves. Stunning. I have a couple of really good photos. I was 
too busy with the binocs to bother, but my son ran for his camera and he took 
them. A few moments later a turkey crossed the road--made us all ponder the 
decision to make the eagle, not the turkey, the national bird. 

>> Also in the Institute Woods I saw a pair of pileated woodpeckers. They 
looked huge, flying in. Both landed on same tree, but I could only appreciate 
full view of one. 

>> Here, inland, how long can I expect to see migrating birds? I am sorry to 
ask questions that proper research could answer. I admit to my hope of learning 
from the collective wisdom. 

>> Who do I contact if I have a question about whether a question is 
appropriate? For instance, I want to know of any sources for birding my way 
through other states on a cross-country trip next year. I hope it's OK to ask. 

>> Laura Berlik
>> Princeton
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: grackle eyes and eagles
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 20:03:16 -0400
Laura,

According to Peter Pyle’s Identification Guide to NA Birds, under Common 
Grackle: 


“HY/SY (Aug-Jul):….iris brownish to brownish yellow, through Oct-Feb.”
“AHY (Jan-Dec): iris yellow.”

HY = Hatching Year, a bird in its first basic plumage in its first calendar 
year 

SY = Second Year, a bird in its second calendar year
AHY = After Hatching Year, a bird in at least its second calendar year

Sounds like your “dark-eyed babe” is HY.

Diane Louie
Madison



On Sep 8, 2014, at 9:31 PM, Laura Berlik  wrote:

> Can anyone tell me how long before a juvenile grackle gets his yellow eyes? 
Today the dark-eyed babe visited my feeders with two adults, presumably the 
parents. 

> A couple of days ago I spotted a bald eagle high in the trees, posing 
profile, frowning, in the perfect spot with the sun shining on him, framed on a 
branch with few leaves. Stunning. I have a couple of really good photos. I was 
too busy with the binocs to bother, but my son ran for his camera and he took 
them. A few moments later a turkey crossed the road--made us all ponder the 
decision to make the eagle, not the turkey, the national bird. 

> Also in the Institute Woods I saw a pair of pileated woodpeckers. They looked 
huge, flying in. Both landed on same tree, but I could only appreciate full 
view of one. 

> Here, inland, how long can I expect to see migrating birds? I am sorry to ask 
questions that proper research could answer. I admit to my hope of learning 
from the collective wisdom. 

> Who do I contact if I have a question about whether a question is 
appropriate? For instance, I want to know of any sources for birding my way 
through other states on a cross-country trip next year. I hope it's OK to ask. 

> Laura Berlik
> Princeton
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: RFI - Nighthawks
From: Ellen DeCarlo <ellendecarlo1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 14:32:41 -0400
Hello All,

I wanted to get out this evening in search of Nighthawks, which would be a
lifer for us.  Since I keep reading about sightings, I'm wondering if
anyone can supply "reliable" locations either in or nearby to Hunterdon
County?  Any help is appreciated.

But now I'm reading Whiskered Tern?? May have to be traveling to Cape May
tomorrow.


Ellen DeCarlo

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern still present
From: Matt Webster <mattweb100 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:12:47 -0400
The Whiskered tern is still present at bunker pond as of 1:12pm

Matt Webster
Cedarbrook, NJ
Mattweb100 AT gmail.com
Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 13:11:08 -0400
The Whiskered Tern is back on Bunker Pond at Cape May Point State Park. It was 
seen yesterday in the company of a Black Tern. 


Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 12:42:56 -0400
KEEKEEKERR - LZemaitis:
Whiskered Tern flying with Black Tern at Bunker Pond. Just flew towards Coral 
Ave 


More info will be posted when available.

Good birding!!

Sam


--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Golden Plover @ Johnson's Sod Farm
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 06:46:01 -0700
We re-routed our drive to Myrtle Beach today to swing by Johnson's Sod Farm. 
I'm chastising myself for not making the ride a couple of days ago. 


Following some Killdeer we turned into Helena Chemical / farm and asked in the 
office if we could walk around birding. Gracious people; said yes, feel free. 
Ended up with one Golden Plover (lifer) and about two dozen killdeer. 


We will try to swing by on the drive back from SC Sunday night. 

Good birding. 
Rob 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: nighthawk watch - newton Lake park - no
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 20:24:39 -0400
Such a great vista of sky. I had Tree Swallows and bats later, but no 
Nighthawks. 

There's too much traffic for me to make an evening watch in Gloucester county.
I would need to be down there before rush hour. 

Fellow birders have mentioned that Nighthawks move before a front at times.
No luck here, but I still want to do a river watch survey some night.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ebird
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:33:45 -0400
I should have mentioned that it was through ebird that I thought the wood 
thrushes should be gone or about to be by now. 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: wood thrushes
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:22:24 -0400
Here's a neat way to answer all such questions:


http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?cmd=decisionPage&getLocations=hotspots&hotspots=L242133&bYear=1900&eYear=2014&bMonth=9&eMonth=9&reportType=location& 


On Thu, Sep 11, 2014 at 9:17 AM, Laura Berlik  wrote:

> After reading the alarming prospects for birds facing global warming,
> followed by an academic article
> 
http://davidhaskell.wordpress.com/2012/07/26/tracking-migration-a-window-into-the-lives-of-wood-thrushes 

> reporting the consistency of wood thrush spring migration dates, I have to
> ask.
> Aren't they supposed to be leaving or gone by now?
>
> They are wood thrushes for certain. Wednesday night I found at least 4 of
> them merrily splashing in a forest mud puddle with no sign of luggage in
> sight (joke).  They were deep in the Institute Woods, Mercer County, right
> about 7 PM.
>
> Laura Berlik
> Princeton
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: wood thrushes
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 09:17:43 -0400
After reading the alarming prospects for birds facing global warming, followed 
by an academic article 
http://davidhaskell.wordpress.com/2012/07/26/tracking-migration-a-window-into-the-lives-of-wood-thrushes 

reporting the consistency of wood thrush spring migration dates, I have to ask.
Aren't they supposed to be leaving or gone by now?

They are wood thrushes for certain. Wednesday night I found at least 4 of them 
merrily splashing in a forest mud puddle with no sign of luggage in sight 
(joke). They were deep in the Institute Woods, Mercer County, right about 7 PM. 


Laura Berlik
Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Common Nighthawks in Raritan
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 19:28:11 -0400
I just saw 4 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS fly over my house here in Raritan Borough. Also, 
for the third time since I've lived here, a BELTED KINGFISHER flew over headed 
south. I'm at least 3/4 mile from the Raritan River so I guess this was a 
migrant? 


John J. Collins
Raritan NJ
Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Great Sedge Island--Common Eider, Marbled Godwits
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 22:01:46 +0000
Greg Prelich and I did another of our canoe expeditions out to Great Sedge 
Island off Island Beach SP today. We started out at high tide and in gloomy 
weather and weren't finding much until we came around to the inlet where we had 
a bonanza of birds including a Common Eider waddling off the sand bar into the 
water, a Marbled Godwit feeding with a Willet in a shallow, dozens of 
oystercatchers, skimmers, and pelicans, 4 species of terns, plus one Black 
Tern. 


Later, as we were coming back to the boat launch near low tide, some flats were 
just getting exposed. In an instant 7 more Marbled Godwits appeared, large 
cinnamon colored birds with bi-colroed bills. We watched them from a hummock 
nearby for about 15 minutes. First one flew off, then 5, then after a bit, the 
last one. In theory, at low tide, this sand bar could be seen with a scope from 
the boat launch, but viewing conditions would have to be perfect. Better to be 
on the water. 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
larry-zirlin at comcast.net 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glenhurst Deer Management last season
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:56:34 -0400
The township posted the duration of the deer cull from Sept.14,2013 -
Feb.15, 2014 . It was active
Mon., Fri. and Sat. Wear orange if you feel more comfortable but these are
professional cullers in here and do not mind birders or whomever.When
walking if one does find a deer stand or feeding station try to steer clear
of it on Mon, Fri. and Sat..Be prepared for gun fire on these days.The
orange signs and appropriate posts will be easily visible if and when it
starts.These dates are from last Fall-Winter....

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ
mchhiotis AT gmail.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Deer Management at Glenhurst?
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 13:45:00 -0700
I live in the town over, Green Brook, which is the same school district. I
have a query into the town. As soon as I hear back I will post to the
list. 

Vince, got to GHM at around 1:30 today. Got a great picture of a Palm
right at Sparrow Corner.

Rob

On 9/10/14, 4:37 PM, "Vince Capp"  wrote:

>Bill, et al.-
> I was there early this morning and did not see anything posted regarding
>hunting days/dates. Warren Township usually posts that information
>conspicuously in the parking area. I do know that fall bow begins in this
>zone on September 13th, but I do not know if the Township's dates coincide
>with the State's. I will try to find out what's happening and inform the
>List Members. If anybody out there does know the program/dates, please
>feel
>free to chime in- there are many readers who would benefit from having the
>information.
> It was kind of quiet in there this morning, but I did discover that a
>handful of Palm Warblers and at least 3 Savannah Sparrows are once again
>using the Community Gardens next door- over at Wagner's Arboretum. That
>means Sparrow Season is getting close!!
>
>Good Birding!
>Vince Capp
>Bound Brook
>
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/
>
>
>  
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of
>William
>Dix
>Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2014 3:07 PM
>To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
>Subject: [JERSEYBI] Deer Management at Glenhurst?
>
>Does anyone know when, or if, the Warren Township Deer Management program
>will begin this season at Glenhurst?  Will this preclude birding the site
>on
>certain days during the fall and winter?
>
>Bill Dix   
>Princeton, NJ
>williamdix AT msn.com
>
>http://billdix.smugmug.com
>
> 		 	   		  
>List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
>
>---
>This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus
>protection is active.
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>How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: DOS September Meeting - Jeffrey Gordon Speaker - Wednesday 9/17
From: Bill Stewart <bstewart AT ABA.ORG>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 16:44:15 -0400
Subject: DOS September Meeting - Jeffrey Gordon Speaker - Wednesday 9/17

Good Afternoon JerseyBirders,

The Delmarva Ornithological Society is excited to kickoff their new program 
year next Wednesday the 17th featuring guest speaker Jeffrey Gordon, President 
of the American Birding Association. Plan to spend the evening catching up with 
old friends, welcoming new members and being thoroughly entertained by one of 
North America's most passionate and accomplished birders and a DOS Honorary 
Member. 


Jeff's presentation "Birding Together: How Birding Can Save Your Life and 
Maybe, Just Maybe, Save the World", can be best described in his own words - 


"Alvaro Jaramillo has said that if golf is a good walk spoiled, then birding is 
a good walk perfected. It's such a simple, compelling, positive message. But 
that positivity is something that birders as a community have relatively rarely 
managed to convey. Why is it that with as great a "product" to sell as the 
redemptive power of a passionate curiosity about nature and belonging to 
community of of some of the most interesting, caring people anywhere, we've 
made so little traction with the wider public? I welcome you to join me for a 
celebration of the power of birding to heal and transform, not only our own 
lives but even our world." 


We hope to see many of you there - the meeting is open to the public so grab a 
birding buddy or two and plan on attending next Wednesday night, the 17th! 


Delmarva Ornithological Society
September 17th Meeting: - 7:00 PM Social 1/2 hour (IWe welcome you to bring 
some refreshments to share for our Social 1/2 hour) 


Meeting begins at 7:30 PM

Ashland Nature Center - Hockessin, DE AS OF THIS WRITING, THE ASHLAND COVERED 
BRIDGE IS CLOSED, please explore alternative routes such as Brackenville Rd or 
Barley Mill Rd. 



Good birding,

Bill Stewart
DOS VP/Program Chair



List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Deer Management at Glenhurst?
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 16:37:10 -0400
Bill, et al.-
 I was there early this morning and did not see anything posted regarding
hunting days/dates. Warren Township usually posts that information
conspicuously in the parking area. I do know that fall bow begins in this
zone on September 13th, but I do not know if the Township's dates coincide
with the State's. I will try to find out what's happening and inform the
List Members. If anybody out there does know the program/dates, please feel
free to chime in- there are many readers who would benefit from having the
information.
 It was kind of quiet in there this morning, but I did discover that a
handful of Palm Warblers and at least 3 Savannah Sparrows are once again
using the Community Gardens next door- over at Wagner's Arboretum. That
means Sparrow Season is getting close!!

Good Birding!
Vince Capp
Bound Brook

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/


  



-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of William
Dix
Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2014 3:07 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Deer Management at Glenhurst?

Does anyone know when, or if, the Warren Township Deer Management program
will begin this season at Glenhurst?  Will this preclude birding the site on
certain days during the fall and winter?

Bill Dix   
Princeton, NJ
williamdix AT msn.com

http://billdix.smugmug.com

 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 


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is active. 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Deer Management at Glenhurst?
From: William Dix <williamdix AT MSN.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 15:07:08 -0400
Does anyone know when, or if, the Warren Township Deer Management program will 
begin this season at Glenhurst? Will this preclude birding the site on certain 
days during the fall and winter? 


Bill Dix   
Princeton, NJ
williamdix AT msn.com

http://billdix.smugmug.com

 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Ring-billed gull leg band
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 14:41:13 -0400
Hi birders, I saw a ring-billed gull today in a location in Garfield that I
have reported a banded bird before during the winter. I believe this is the
same bird that had come down from Newfoundland.  I actually stopped to look
for a banded bird I noticed that there was a couple last week but saw 4
today and one was this marked bird. I would think this is valuable report
because it is pretty rapid movement for a breeding bird to be down here
already.
The reason I am sending a message is i have saw a couple of other down near
Manasquan and wanted everyone to keep an eye open incase the marked birds
are there already

*Bill Elrick*
 

 


*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

 *Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: listowner reminder - posting etiquette
From: Tom Bailey <ammodramus AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:42:02 +0000
Folks,

This is a reminder that all posts to the list should include - at a minimum - 
your name, town, 

and email address. See mine below as an example.

Also, if the location you're reporting sightings from is not well known to the 
general birding 

community in New Jersey, please let us know where it is (town or township and 
the county). There 

are many subscribers to this list and everyone might not know the location you 
are reporting your 

sightings from. 

Thanks in advance,

Tom

Tom Bailey
Tabernacle, NJ
ammodramus AT comcast.net
co-listowner jerseybirds mailing list

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: bird-related publishing project / request for help
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 12:47:54 -0400
Dear Friends,

I'm a published and prize-winning writer and I have a bird-related
publishing project I'd dearly love to see get off the ground. I have a
beautiful, incredibly talented illustrator signed on and a prominent
ornithologist as science adviser. All I need now is a publisher.

I sent the proposal to the publisher that seemed to me to be the most
likely. I had no contacts there and I sent it to their general address
and I have received no reply. I'm all too familiar with that. Unless
you have a contact person, generally, your submissions are ignored.

If anyone reading this has any contacts in publishing and can provide
me with a contact person I'd be really grateful.

I am convinced that this project would attract folks who normally give
only passing attention to birds and nature.

thanks if you can help

Danusha in Paterson, NJ

-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Floodgates - terns
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 11:45:31 -0400
Hello,
 Well, thought it would happen In August - but finally hit over 100 Caspian 
Terns. 

126 to be exact. Timing was perfect! The tide was coming in, but left just 
enough 

of the jetty showing for them to perch all along it. 10:55 and it took me 3 
minutes 

to count them! I am sure more because I was only counting the birds on the 
jetty. 


Not too much else. Had Forster's and Caspian hunting close around 9:30. Lower
tide then. Broad-winged Hawk flew over. Heading east. No Mourning Warbler!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Buff-breasteds Whitesbog
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 14:22:48 -0400
There are two Buff-breasted Sandpipers in the second bog  now at Whitesbog. 

GP
http://birdquiz.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Labor Day Marks The Start Of The Season For Monarch Monitoring Project « CBS Philly
From: Stuart and Wendy <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 14:18:55 -0400
Jerseybirders

I am aware that this article and podcast is not about birds but hope it will be 
accepted for distribution on the listserv. The article and accompanying podcast 
interview with Mark Garland is excellent. See the link below. 


good birding and butterflying,

Wendy Malmid
Monroe Twp, NJ


http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2014/09/07/labor-day-marks-the-start-of-the-season-for-monarch-monitoring-project/ 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-eyed Vireo on the feeder - maybe not
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 12:49:16 -0400
I have heard,  and hear of, Jays doing Redtails.  I assumed it was a ploy
to get the other birds off the feeders so they could get them to
themselves.  But I don't know what advantage a REVI appearance would be to
a Jay, so maybe I was wrong on the reason... very interesting!

Thanks,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

Connect with us: [image: Facebook]

[image: 

Blogger] [image:
Flickr] [image: Twitter]
[image: YouTube]


Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897

On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 11:40 AM, Robert AT rgallucci.com 
wrote:

> This is the only place I could share this story where the people would
> understand. Not sure if I am getting better at my calls or if this is truly
> a first.
>
> I am working at my desk when I hear the unmistakable “look up…see
> me?..over hear..this way..do you hear me?…higher still” from my deck. I
> have never had a REVI show up at my feeders, nor had I heard of them
> showing up an anyones feeders, and got excited at the thought of a great
> view.
>
> Not to happen. The only bird on the deck was a blue-jay with a perfect
> imitation of the REVI call, which he sang incessantly. Actually in many
> ways that is more fascinating to me. I wonder how long he needed to be in
> proximity of the vireo’s call before he mimicked it.
>
> Back to work.
>
> Good birding.
> Rob
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-eyed Vireo on the feeder - maybe not
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 08:40:12 -0700
This is the only place I could share this story where the people would 
understand. Not sure if I am getting better at my calls or if this is truly a 
first. 


I am working at my desk when I hear the unmistakable “look up…see me?..over 
hear..this way..do you hear me?…higher still” from my deck. I have never had a 
REVI show up at my feeders, nor had I heard of them showing up an anyones 
feeders, and got excited at the thought of a great view. 


Not to happen. The only bird on the deck was a blue-jay with a perfect 
imitation of the REVI call, which he sang incessantly. Actually in many ways 
that is more fascinating to me. I wonder how long he needed to be in proximity 
of the vireo’s call before he mimicked it. 


Back to work.

Good birding.
Rob

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: sod farms
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 05:32:42 -0700
Charles,

Thank you for this information. I have been waiting to see a reply to
Lauraąs email since it posted yesterday.

I tried to go to the Selody farm the other day but my GPS brought me to
Somerset by the D&R Canal. We did find a very small Sod Farm on the
Manville Causeway which had about a dozen Killdeer, but I suspect we were
not at the correct place. Asking around I was told that Selody has many
parcels. 

Could you possibly give me directions to the Skillman tract. Thanks so
much. This is Golden Plover week (I hope)

Rob



On 9/9/14, 8:06 AM, "C J BRINE"  wrote:

>Laura,
>
>The "sodpiper quality" of the various sod farms tends to be quite
>variable 
>year to year. Some seem to have more of an attractive quality than others
>over the years. But, there is no real, serious criteria to predict this
>in any 
>particular year.  Any certainly, there is no way to predict exactly when
>one
>will be superior to others, both yearly and within any one year. Add to
>that,
>the soil conditions: plowed/not plowed, fertilized or not, wet or dry
>definitely
>effect attractiveness to the birds.
>
>That being said, over the 30yrs. I have birded NJ, the Reed Sod Farm
>(multiple
>sites, around Allentown, NJ) have been a very good , local place to
>expect to
>see the special sodpipers over the Fall migration period. Clearly, the
>Salem County
>locations: Johnson Farm, Coomb's Sod Farm, East Coast Sod Farm, etc. are
>also prime
>locations.
>
>But, 2 years ago for example, the Selody Sod Farm in Skillman was a
>spectacular place
>to see these birds, perhaps the best in many ways especially for
>Princeton area folks!
>Also, Salem County is a large area and includes at least 19 substantial
>sod fields as I can
>attest to during my recent 3 day surveillance sessions which involved
>>100 miles of driving
>each day as I covered all of these via multiple loops.  Reed Sod Farm has
>at least 6 different
>field sites.
>
>I hope my observations are helpful in answering your question and giving
>some direction for you.
>
>Charles J. Brine
>Princeton, NJ
>
>
>On Monday, September 8, 2014 9:56 PM, Laura Berlik
> wrote:
> 
>
>
>Is just any ole sod farm a good place to bird?  Or do the ones that are
>frequently mentioned in a class by themselves? Thanks.
>Laura Berlik
>Princeton
>
>List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
>List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: sod farms
From: C J BRINE <brinec11 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 05:06:31 -0700
Laura,

The "sodpiper quality" of the various sod farms tends to be quite variable 
year to year. Some seem to have more of an attractive quality than others
over the years. But, there is no real, serious criteria to predict this in any 
particular year.  Any certainly, there is no way to predict exactly when one
will be superior to others, both yearly and within any one year. Add to that,
the soil conditions: plowed/not plowed, fertilized or not, wet or dry 
definitely 

effect attractiveness to the birds. 

That being said, over the 30yrs. I have birded NJ, the Reed Sod Farm (multiple
sites, around Allentown, NJ) have been a very good , local place to expect to
see the special sodpipers over the Fall migration period. Clearly, the Salem 
County 

locations: Johnson Farm, Coomb's Sod Farm, East Coast Sod Farm, etc. are also 
prime 

locations.

But, 2 years ago for example, the Selody Sod Farm in Skillman was a spectacular 
place 

to see these birds, perhaps the best in many ways especially for Princeton area 
folks! 

Also, Salem County is a large area and includes at least 19 substantial sod 
fields as I can 

attest to during my recent 3 day surveillance sessions which involved >100 
miles of driving 

each day as I covered all of these via multiple loops. Reed Sod Farm has at 
least 6 different 

field sites.

I hope my observations are helpful in answering your question and giving some 
direction for you. 


Charles J. Brine
Princeton, NJ


On Monday, September 8, 2014 9:56 PM, Laura Berlik  
wrote: 

 


Is just any ole sod farm a good place to bird? Or do the ones that are 
frequently mentioned in a class by themselves? Thanks. 

Laura Berlik
Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Audubon report on birds and climate change
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 07:07:42 -0400
NJ Birders will probably be interested in a report that was issued today by the 
National Audubon Society analyzing the effect of climate change on 314 species 
of birds in North America. You can find the report and analysis here: 
http://climate.audubon.org/ 


Greg Prelich
http://birdquiz.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Eagles and OT: I digress
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 22:03:02 -0400
In the course of going through the Birding journal archives on the ABA site, I 
found this article by Jerry Ligouri 

on identifying juvenile Golden Eagles (in flight). Seems to me if we had only 
the information from her photo, Jackie's question 

was a reasonable one.

https://www.aba.org/birding/v36n3p278.pdf

This reminds me: Back in the day when I practiced pathology, we used to beg the 
clinicians to provide a pertinent 

history on the requisition form. Plenty of times they left it off so as not to 
“bias” us. Unfortunately, the history was so important 

in making an accurate diagnosis. Without that context, it was much more 
difficult to whittle down the possibilities 

(differential diagnosis) and be conclusive.  

Birding has replaced pathology for me. The identification process is quite 
similar IMO for birds vs. tumors. In some ways, 

birding is harder because….birds fly! I might have only a few seconds to see a 
bird and fix the field marks 

in my mind before it moves. A pathologist can stare at a tumor under the 
microscope for hours, show it around 

for consultation -- plus there’s always another test to perform to buy more 
time. 


In medicine, we were concerned about accuracy because the health of patients 
was at stake. 

In birding, we have no such excuse for the “pimping” and bullying
that is still so pervasive in medical training.


Diane Louie
Madison



Hello all,
I'm pretty sure the eagle we saw today is just a juvenile bald eagle, but 
I can't help but wonder if it may have been a golden. anyone want to take a 
look 

and tell me what they think? It can be seen on my flickr page. 

Jackie
https://www.flickr.com/photos/123890109 AT N05/



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: sod farms
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 21:56:02 -0400
Is just any ole sod farm a good place to bird? Or do the ones that are 
frequently mentioned in a class by themselves? Thanks. 

Laura Berlik
Princeton

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Shorebirds: Gordon Road and Herbert Road, Mercer and Monmouth Counties
From: vincent N <vfn7 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 01:47:23 +0000
Spent time today with my good friend Larry Scacchetti looking for birds on the 
Reed sod farms. Best spots were the edges of sod and dirt as well as freshly 
harrowed soil. Most amazing was how quickly we came upon groups of Killdeer, 
American Golden Plover and Buff-breasted Plover that would suddenly disappear 
an hour later! This birding was in the middle of the cloudy, cool day with 
Northern winds probably helping the birds to continue south. 

Vincent Nichnadowicz: Princeton Junction 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: grackle eyes and eagles
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 21:31:52 -0400
Can anyone tell me how long before a juvenile grackle gets his yellow eyes? 
Today the dark-eyed babe visited my feeders with two adults, presumably the 
parents. 

A couple of days ago I spotted a bald eagle high in the trees, posing profile, 
frowning, in the perfect spot with the sun shining on him, framed on a branch 
with few leaves. Stunning. I have a couple of really good photos. I was too 
busy with the binocs to bother, but my son ran for his camera and he took them. 
A few moments later a turkey crossed the road--made us all ponder the decision 
to make the eagle, not the turkey, the national bird. 

Also in the Institute Woods I saw a pair of pileated woodpeckers. They looked 
huge, flying in. Both landed on same tree, but I could only appreciate full 
view of one. 

Here, inland, how long can I expect to see migrating birds? I am sorry to ask 
questions that proper research could answer. I admit to my hope of learning 
from the collective wisdom. 

Who do I contact if I have a question about whether a question is appropriate? 
For instance, I want to know of any sources for birding my way through other 
states on a cross-country trip next year. I hope it's OK to ask. 

Laura Berlik
Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Misadventures in ID'ing birds (photo) :-)
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 19:34:45 -0400
Love it!  

Sometimes the opposite does occur: Several years ago I identified a Snowy Owl 
at Barnegat that had 

been dismissed by others — who were far more experienced birders than I — as a 
piece 

of trash, possibly a bleach bottle or a white plastic bag. I watched it long 
enough to see it turn its head which clinched 

the I.D.

Zen mind, beginner’s mind….

Diane Louie
Madison

On Sep 8, 2014, at 4:07 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> There have been several posts over the past couple of weeks about how all
> of us make mistakes in identifying birds, no matter how experienced we are.
> I thought I'd share one such recent misadventure...
> 
> Last week I was walking along the Raritan River in Highland Park when I
> spotted what looked (to my naked eye) like a Brown Pelican floating on the
> surface of the river at some distance away. Shape looked right (to my naked
> eye). Color looked right (to my naked eye). I took what I thought would be
> a documentation photo with my 20x zoom point-and-shoot camera.
> 
> All the way walking home I thought "possible Brown Pelican!". When I got
> home I checked Bill Boyle's "Birds of New Jersey" and realized that an
> inland Brown Pelican would be rare in NJ. But I kept thinking "I have a
> documentation photo!".
> 
> Much to my chagrin when I uploaded the "documentation photo" it showed a
> mangled upside-down grocery shopping cart in the vague outline of a
> pelican. It looked to me like it was floating on the surface because the
> tide was going out and the water was shallow, but not showing tidal
> mudflats yet. Here's my "documentation photo":
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/14994290498/
> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Griggstown Grassland Preserve- a few migrants
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 17:04:30 -0400
Hi, all.

I had a few modest pockets of migrant birds here early this morning. The
activity was mainly along the western and southern margins of the property,
and ended as soon as the clouds and blustery winds rolled in at about 9 AM.
I saw a few Redstarts, Black and White, Magnolia, Chestnut-sided,
Yellowthroats, and my FOS Palm Warbler- an early date for me. Bobolinks were
fairly constant fly-bys all morning. I also saw my FOS Merlin- a low
patrolling bird, as well as a juvenile Cooper's and a Kestrel. A few Empids
were also present. 

 

Good birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Two turkey families as yard birds!
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 16:40:54 -0400
I've now figured out that I have two Wild Turkey families as yard birds.
One hen always comes from the west with four poults. The other hen always
comes from the east with three poults. The family from the east is way way
more skittish than the family from the west. The hen from the east also
gives constant soft "clucks" to keep her poults very close, while the hen
from the west is less protective.

This means that I'm pretty sure that I've had 14 distinct individual Wild
Turkeys as yard birds over the past several weeks.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cumberland - post breeding dispersal
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 16:18:18 -0400
Hello,
     1 new bird today - Tennessee Warbler. No flight this morning.
Just found a flock or two. Cerulean and Mourning Warbler are
misses. I won't have a chance to get down there again til
next Monday probably.
     Herons, egrets, and Laughing Gulls were just everywhere. I spent
time searching through flocks in roads, parking areas, jetties.
Looks like a good year for Laughing Gull with all the juveniles around!
No success with LBBG let alone a Franklin's......
      Still looking for Little Blue! Bivalve water levels were high - 
even at
low tide. A few dows flying overhead. Looking for mud. Did they call??
No. Of course not! I still need LB Dow. Etc. The Royal Terns are still
hanging around Bivalve - High St.
     Tern notes - I have been noticing Forster's with - I can't figure 
it out -
a shadow or something - maybe created by missing feathers from molt.
Something. I don't know. This is creating what appears to be the start of
a carpal bar on the wing - it's not. Quite interesting. And I am still 
missing
Common Tern! I will read up on molts more from my tern book. Although
I did that for a trip report I wrote and came up blank.

Good birding all.

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Misadventures in ID'ing birds (photo) :-)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 16:07:50 -0400
There have been several posts over the past couple of weeks about how all
of us make mistakes in identifying birds, no matter how experienced we are.
I thought I'd share one such recent misadventure...

Last week I was walking along the Raritan River in Highland Park when I
spotted what looked (to my naked eye) like a Brown Pelican floating on the
surface of the river at some distance away. Shape looked right (to my naked
eye). Color looked right (to my naked eye). I took what I thought would be
a documentation photo with my 20x zoom point-and-shoot camera.

All the way walking home I thought "possible Brown Pelican!". When I got
home I checked Bill Boyle's "Birds of New Jersey" and realized that an
inland Brown Pelican would be rare in NJ. But I kept thinking "I have a
documentation photo!".

Much to my chagrin when I uploaded the "documentation photo" it showed a
mangled upside-down grocery shopping cart in the vague outline of a
pelican. It looked to me like it was floating on the surface because the
tide was going out and the water was shallow, but not showing tidal
mudflats yet. Here's my "documentation photo":

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/14994290498/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: White-winged Dove, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 07:59:17 -0400
Just posted to the textserv:

KEEKEEKERR - WWDO (White-winged Dove) on wire New England, W of Bayshore, flew 
North at 710 AM. 


This is along the road to Higbees Beach WMA on Cape Island.

Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Plainsboro and Princeton
From: judson hamlin <jhhamlin AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 22:11:51 -0400
Got a few hours out in the field today and hit these two spots. I was expecting 
greater action at both sites. Plainsboro was dead but Institute Woods had some 
migrants in pockets. I had the place to myself and found a few Red Eyes Vireos 
and a single cooperative Canada Warbler. The most common migrants were 
Flickers. Probably two dozen or so in quick succession. The best bird show was 
the group of four Pileated Woodpeckers on one of the cross trails between the 
pond (or what is left of it) and the broad sewer/gas line that provided 
outstanding looks for twenty minutes. 

Returning home, I had my first dozen Nighthawks of the year over our house.

Juds0n ham1in
Metuchen 

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: SHWS Free Digiscoping workshop with Swarovski's Clay Taylor
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 21:09:26 -0400
This Wednesday night, 7-8:30 at Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Refuge.  He will
also be in the store/welcome center for informal demos all day Thursday.
 Details here:

https://community.njaudubon.org/combined-calendar?cgid=1&ceid=3191&cerid=0&cdt=9%2f10%2f2014 


(Cut and paste into your browser, the link will probably show up on two
links so not work from the email.)

Thanks,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

Connect with us: [image: Facebook]

[image: 

Blogger] [image:
Flickr] [image: Twitter]
[image: YouTube]


Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (07 Sep 2014) 50 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 20:09:02 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 07, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       2              6             27
Bald Eagle                   7              8             21
Northern Harrier             0              0              2
Sharp-shinned Hawk          16             16             29
Cooper's Hawk                2              2              7
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              0              1
Broad-winged Hawk           11             18             79
Red-tailed Hawk              5              5              5
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             7              8             16
Merlin                       0              0              4
Peregrine Falcon             0              0              0
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              0              0

Total:                      50             63            191
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:15:00 
Observation end   time: 15:30:00 
Total observation time: 7.25 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Brian Butler, Denise Thomson, Jim Thomson

Visitors:
Becky and Sam Cory, Dave Cory and Joan Flanagan.
Welcome back Andy the trail runner, good to see you after a year's absence.
 
Hikers-12 plus AMC hiking group of about 20.
A.T. SOBO The Lone Ranger.

Hi to S&M and SW up in ME.


Weather:
Mostly clear skies with a few clouds, wind NNW 5-12 in am and N 0-7 in pm,
57-76 degrees F.  

Raptor Observations:
BE-10:05A, 10:10I, 10:43I, 10:48I, 10:50I, 11:58A, 12:40A.  

Bird Of The Day was the adult Bald Eagle that passed us close at eye level
on the river side...WOW! 

Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens-3
TVs and BVs.
Monarchs-4
Palm Warbler-1st of the season.

========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: Baird's, Buff-breasted, Pecs and more at the Cape May Meadows
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:46:53 -0700
There was a Baird's, Buff-breasted and 4 Pectoral sandpipers on the north
side dike (across from the observation tower) today at the Nature
Conservancy Cape May Meadows.  Bill Boyle informed me that stilt sandpipers
were also present but were not observed by our party.  2 White-rumped
sandpipers were present among the peep. Higbee Beach had a fair flight this
morning with Parula, Tennessee, B&W, Black-throated Blue, Canada, Redstart
and many Bobolink.  There were several reports of Veery as well.  Joe
Palumbo and Liz Bender

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Johnson Sod Farm Area
From: Steve Smith <SSmith AT HYDROSERVICE.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 18:13:25 -0400
A very good 2 and a half hour visit to the Johnson Sod Farm and surrounds from 
8:30 to 11:00 this morning. Killdeer and Larks were plentiful in the plowed 
fields with totals of 111 and 26 tallied for the morning. Griers Lane was the 
magic spot for the day with two Uppies flushed from a weedy strip between two 
fields, flew straight overhead calling all of the time, and headed NE and out 
of sight. Further down on the main sod closer to Route 77 were 6 Buffies being 
scoped by two cars of birders. Four Kestrels were noted in the general area and 
birds were scattered when a gray ghost sailed across the fields. A drive over 
to Shirley Rd. produced a flock of 19 plovers with several Goldens mixed in 
with the predominantly Black-bellied group. The rains last night filled several 
temporary flooded areas in the neighboring fields producing a total of 3 
Pectorals, 6 Least, 4 Solitary, 2 Semi-palm Plovers, and 7 L Yellowlegs. 25 
Bobolinks and a seemingly out-of-place hummer rounded out the morning. 


Steve Smith

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Admin: Re: OT: Request to hunt on your property
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 15:20:06 -0400
Hunting is off topic for this list and the list admins have pointed this out to 
Mike. Just labeling it "OT" is not an excuse for posting an off-topic message. 
Please use this list for birds and birding in New Jersey. 


If you want to comment on this please use private email.  Thanks,
Laurie, Tyler, and Tom


> On Sep 7, 2014, at 2:03 PM, Michael Britt  wrote:
> 
> North Jersey Birders,
> 
> If you would kindly allow me to hunt deer on your property (crossbow
> only...no loud guns), please contact me off-list.
> 
> P.S. I would of course share the meat and honor whatever guidelines you set
> forth.
> 
> Thanks,
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne, NJ
> 
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Adult Eagle Pair over Cherry Hill
From: Denise Bittle <djbittle AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 19:16:45 +0000
I was working in the yard on this fine day doing weeding that had been put off 
for far too long and took a look skyward. What I thought at first was a single 
and then a pair of red tails turned out to be a pair of adult bald eagles! They 
were initially soaring south, then circled counter-clockwise on a thermal. With 
just a single wing-beat, one spun off to the north and the other continued 
south. Earlier I was lamenting that the hummers had dwindled to just two from a 
record high of 6-8, so if that's my consolation for the change in seasons, I'll 
gladly take it! 


Good Birding,
Denise Bittle 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Palmyra - Olive-Sided search - no
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Sep 2014 14:49:15 -0400
Hello,
 I spent a couple hours searching for it. No success. A mid day search. I was 

busy this morning. But met other birders there who were there since the morning
and they didn't have it either. Not too much else warbler wise. Time of day. 
But the 

Green Heron show was nice! 5 in the main pit, 1 in the frog pond, and 2 back in
the canal area. 

Nature notes - many species of butterflies and dragonflies! I keep forgetting
how good that place is for everything! No luck with a Giant Swallowtail though.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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