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Updated on Sunday, April 26 at 09:54 PM EST
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Blue-footed Boobies,©BirdQuest

26 Apr Bar-tailed Godwit, Atlantic County [Sam Galick ]
26 Apr Forsythe - the White Pelican and the Bar-tailed Godwit [Sandra Keller ]
26 Apr Loantaka 3pm [Diane C Louie ]
26 Apr Sayreville/South Amboy Waterworks Pond least bittern ["bmknj16 ." ]
26 Apr East Brunswick ["Albert, Steven" ]
26 Apr Belleplain, Heislerville & Brig Weekend [Mike Mandracchia ]
26 Apr Bar-tailed Godwit at Brig [Greg Prelich ]
26 Apr In the yard..... [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
26 Apr Brown thrasher at feeder [J and B ]
26 Apr Hudson County Big Year Update [Michael Britt ]
26 Apr House Wrens - Photo [Steve Byland ]
26 Apr My 2nd Spring attempt trying to document breeding Broad-winged hawks in Winslow Township [Yong Kong ]
25 Apr Delaware Bay salt hay farm [Yong Kong ]
25 Apr FOY Prothonotary Warbler and Virginia Rail ["John J. Collins" ]
25 Apr Bull's Island [Sandra Mc ]
25 Apr Garret Mtn today. Nashville Warbler. [Bill Elrick ]
25 Apr Glassboro Woods [Sandra Keller ]
25 Apr Re: Amwell Grasslands [Gerald Kruth ]
25 Apr Cattle Egret, Mercer: No [Chris Brown ]
25 Apr Cattle Egret moved to Rosedale Lake last night [Fairfax Hutter ]
25 Apr American White Pelican [Joseph Palumbo ]
24 Apr Harvey T’s Hybrid LIEGE/SNEG comment seeking post to JBirds [Yong Kong ]
24 Apr First of year yard birds [Roger Bynum ]
24 Apr Purple Finches - Photo [Steve Byland ]
24 Apr Admin: list updates [L Larson ]
24 Apr tv and crow [Sandra Keller ]
24 Apr Overnight Cape May Pelagic Scheduled for May 24-25 [Paul Guris ]
24 Apr Cattle Egret continues at Willow Pond -- Vincent Nichnadowicz is looking at it now [Fairfax Hutter ]
24 Apr In the yard [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
24 Apr Cattle Egret at Willow Pond in Mercer Meadows Hopewell [Fairfax Hutter ]
23 Apr Salem County [Bob Horton ]
23 Apr Salem County big year notes [Sandra Keller ]
23 Apr rogers - green heron [Richard Moran ]
23 Apr Brigantine Avocets (9) [Bob Dodelson ]
23 Apr Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows... [Mike Anderson ]
23 Apr Palm Warbler - Photo [Steve Byland ]
22 Apr Chimney Swifts and Bald Eagle [Sandra Mc ]
22 Apr Some winter birds still here [Richard Wolfert ]
22 Apr Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows... ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 Apr Re: Last Junco? ["Susie R." ]
22 Apr Chimney Swifts have returned to Raritan ["John J. Collins" ]
22 Apr Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows... [Bill Elrick ]
22 Apr Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows... [Mike Anderson ]
22 Apr Re: Last Junco? [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
22 Apr No one commented to Harvey's Egret Hybrid? posting [Yong Kong ]
22 Apr Lakewood Pine Park ["James O'Brien" ]
22 Apr Highland Park Bald Eagle (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 Apr Last Junco? More WT Sparrows... ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 Apr Re: San Francisco notes from the field and a personal milestone [Denise Bittle ]
22 Apr ATB/SHWS Great Swamp field trip this morning [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
22 Apr Lake Assunpink Red-throated Loon [Bob Dodelson ]
22 Apr Migration in Princeton [Bert Harris ]
22 Apr Morgan Av. Mudflats Little Gull - yes ["Albert, Steven" ]
22 Apr Re: bg gnatcatchers [karen swaine ]
22 Apr San Francisco notes from the field and a personal milestone [Robert Gallucci ]
21 Apr Re: Amwell Grassland Directions ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Apr Amwell Grassland Directions [David Tattoni ]
21 Apr FOY Great Egret, FOY Greater Yellowlegs (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Apr Re: KESTRELS [Joe Yohannan ]
20 Apr Male Bluebird Takes Two Mates - Photos [Steve Byland ]
20 Apr Re: Kindly Requesting Update-No April Fool! Wild Northern Bob Whites return to NJ! [Cathy Blumig ]
20 Apr Amwell Grasslands [David Tattoni ]
20 Apr Three common yard-bird silhouette photos ["B.G. Sloan" ]
20 Apr Birding San Francisco Area - Update and Thanks! [Robert Gallucci ]
19 Apr Kindly Requesting Update-No April Fool! Wild Northern Bob Whites return to NJ! [Yong Kong ]
19 Apr No Subject ["Jennifer W. Hanson" ]
19 Apr Cattle Egret continues in Barnegat [Karmela ]
18 Apr Whimbrel & Caspian Tern today at Brigantine, later Cattle Egret in Barnegat [Mike Mandracchia ]
18 Apr Re: N. Bobwhite, Union County, Strange! [Cathy Blumig ]
18 Apr Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 4/18/15] ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
18 Apr N. Bobwhite, Union County, Strange! [Michael Auda ]
18 Apr Fw: post to jerseybirds [Linda Mack ]
18 Apr cattle egret con'ts @ meadowedge park [comcast ]
18 Apr Winslow Township, Camden Co. Raven [Yong Kong ]
18 Apr Glenhurst Meadows (Warren Green Acres) [Peter Capobianco ]
18 Apr Cattle Egret in Barnegat [Karmela ]

Subject: Bar-tailed Godwit, Atlantic County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 22:52:46 -0400
Multiple observers reported a Bar-tailed Godwit from the east pool of Forsythe 
NWR along the wildlife drive. It spent the afternoon resting in the marsh with 
other shorebirds, and feeding closer later on not to far away from the drive 
affording excellent looks. Marker 9 is the best vantage point. 


Congrats to Mason Sieges for the find.

Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Forsythe - the White Pelican and the Bar-tailed Godwit
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 20:15:10 -0400
Hello,
 Marilyn and I went chasing this afternoon. Pelican and Avocets being the goal. 

Nothing like a text alert to change our plans! We headed straight for the east 
pool. 

Excellent timing. Many of us were there watching it feed. Then the flight look. 

The wing pattern is always desired on these out of range Godwits. For those
chasing the Godwit - I would suggest waiting around the goose marker 9 sign 
along 

the south dike. It flew back and forth from that area - the east pool to the 
salt marsh on the 

south side of the south dike. This was its spot five years ago also. I am 
presuming the 

same bird. Thanks to the finder today! An April bird for me!
 The Pelican also cooperated. East pool, flight, SW pool. Scan all big white 
lumps. 

It moves. 
 No Avocets. And no White-faced Ibis in with the one Glossy Ibis flock we 
scanned. 


Nature notes - no butterflies. This cold weather has got to go! One Cabbage 
White at my 

house when Marilyn pulled up. 

Good chasing all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Loantaka 3pm
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 19:22:58 -0400
We did our usual turn around Kitchell Pond this afternoon. We observed a 
definite up-tick in specie numbers 

compared to prior Sundays. A Great Egret fished successfully while the Mute 
Swan made a half-hearted attempt 

to build a nest. A Belted Kingfisher, many Red-winged Blackbird males, 
Cowbirds, Yellow Warbler, and Robins, Robins, Robins were seen 

and heard. Palm Warbler and a Red tail Hawk were seen. A pair of Blue Winged 
Teal were found at the small pond along 

with a Spotted Sandpiper. On the way home, we were treated to a Snowy Egret in 
the development pond across the street on Woodland 

and a Turkey making its way up Prospect near Keep Street.

Diane Louie
Madison

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sayreville/South Amboy Waterworks Pond least bittern
From: "bmknj16 ." <bmknj17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 19:11:47 -0400
Had one (last summer and) today.  Lots of phragmites so would be a tough
find.

Surprisingly little else in the way of migrants each time I checked over
the past few weeks.

Brett Klaproth
https://www.flickr.com/photos/26398858 AT N02/

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: East Brunswick
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 23:03:07 +0000
Stayed in town as early errands necessitated short travel. Dallenbach Lake was 
pretty quiet, but I did find a PALM and a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. There was a 
pair of SPOTTED SANDPIPERS around the lakeshore. Abraham Shallit Park had a 
BLUE-HEADED VIREO. I realized suddenly that I hadn't seen one in decades! (I 
hate writing that last word). 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/17094795720/

That would have been a good ending, but I pulled into the driveway to a singing 
BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER over the house. FOY species and warbler for home. 


Now off to do some extralimital business and birding. Will probably miss the 
initial migrant rush that ought to finally come this week. 


Have fun. Good birding all.

Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
Technical Practice Group Leader
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601  M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
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Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122



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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Belleplain, Heislerville & Brig Weekend
From: Mike Mandracchia <mmandrake AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 18:59:18 -0400
JerseyBirders: This weekend I lead NJ Audubon's All Things Birds 
Program's annual go south to meet Spring Weekend in South Jersey. I 
would like to thank Associate Naturalists Barb Bassett and Hank Burk and 
our "Naturalist Emeritus" Pete Bacinski for their assistance.
 
Saturday morning we started out in Belleplain State Forest with overcast 
skies and temperatures in the mid 30's, conditions not very conducive 
for producing spring migrants but didn't seem to bother the Ovenbirds 
which seemed to be everywhere. We persevered and managed to locate 
Broad-winged Hawk, Wild Turkey, Pine Siskin, Wood Thrush, 2 species of 
Vireo (White-eyed & Yellow- Throated), Ruby-crowned Kinglet and 8 
species of Warblers (including Prothonotary, Yellow-throated & Louisiana 
Waterthrush). After lunch we, traveled over to Heislerville Wildlife 
Management Area and to several other locations near East Point, where 
the sun decided to finally make an appearance. The biggest surprise 
was finding a Red-throated Loon in the last impoundment along the dirt 
road.  Other birds included 7 species of ducks (including both Teals),  
a single Black-crowned Night-heron in the rookery, American Kestrel, 
both Yellowlegs, and 4 species of swallows (including 
Northern Rough-winged).  We ended the day with a total of 83 species.
 
Sunday, we moved up to the Edwin B. Forsythe Refuge (Brigantine), where 
although the day started out overcast, the temperature started at least 
10 degrees warmer than on Saturday and the birds were much more 
active.  We had a really great day of birding, starting with our early 
arriving participants being treated to an aerial battle between a Bald 
Eagle chasing an Osprey carrying a fish. After about two minutes of 
maneuvers, the Osprey finally dropped his prize and with the Eagle 
following it down in pursuit. The Osprey with its talons now free, 
turned and dove on the eagle.  Unfortunately,we never learned the final 
outcome, as the two combatants flew behind the tree line and out of 
sight. On our first trip around the dikes, we found a pair of Wood 
Ducks, 26 Blue-winged Teal, another Bald Eagle, a Northern Harrier, 
Chimney Swift and 4 species of Swallow (including Bank) at the Gull 
Pond. Then after turning onto the Main Dike, we came upon Karl Lukens 
who had located both the American White Pelican and 6 American 
Avocets. We enjoyed watching both species for several minutes before 
first the Pelican and then the Avocets took off, flying east and out of 
sight. On our second trip around, the Gull Pond yielded 2 
Caspian Terns, and a Wilson's Snipe.  Then lightning struck again just 
after we turn onto the Main Dike, we got the alert that a Bar-tailed 
Godwit had just been located further out on the South Dike.  We skipped 
the Pelican that had just been relocated and found a small group of 
birders that were already looking at the Bar-tailed Godwit. After very 
satisfying look at the Godwit, we continued around the dikes. We ended 
the day with a total of 86 species, including 10 species of 
ducks (including Pintail, Ring-necked & Hooded Merganser), 12 species of 
shorebirds (including Whimbrel & Least Sandpiper)and a pair of 
Bonaparte's Gulls in full alternate plumage.  For the two days we 
totaled 109 species. 
 
Next Sunday, I will be leading a trip in Jackson, starting at the Forest 
Research Education Center (FREC), which is right on the boundary between 
the Pinelands and Eastern Deciduous Forest.  Always an interesting 
birding location.
 
Good Birding
 
Mike Mandracchia
Jackson
 
 
 
 
 
Mike 
 
 
 
 
 
Next Sunday

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bar-tailed Godwit at Brig
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 18:57:45 -0400
I'm not sure why it hasn't been posted here yet, but a Bar-tailed Godwit was 
found at Brig today, seen by many in the East Pool. 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: In the yard.....
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 17:55:26 -0400
Baltimore Oriole on the fresh orange feeder, first Hummingbird of season on 
feeder, Catbird in my Evergreen tree looking in living room window, Chipping 
Sparrow on feeder, Thrasher on ground feeding,so, everthing is so far on 
schedule! 


Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Brown thrasher at feeder
From: J and B <aufderhar AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 20:45:52 +0000
This one has been perching on the suet feeder and foraging on the ground for a 
couple of days. 

  
I wonder if it's the same bird that spent part of the winter here two years 
ago! 

  
I don't use Flickr, but if anyone wants a picture I'll email one. 
  
Joan 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hudson County Big Year Update
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 15:16:58 -0400
Jerseybirders,

I picked up four species today, Louisiana Waterthrush undoubtedly the
highlight.

More details here:


https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2015/04/26/hudson-county-big-year-42615-am-edition/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: House Wrens - Photo
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 14:12:17 -0400
House Wrens have been showing up for the past few days and are now fighting 
over nest boxes - Photo at: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/16656868584/

Also around the yard today, Purple Finches, Pine Siskins and Palm Warblers

Steve Byland
Warren Township
sbbyland at aol.com 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: My 2nd Spring attempt trying to document breeding Broad-winged hawks in Winslow Township
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Apr 2015 14:11:59 -0400
Early morning hours of April 17, 2015, I observed an adult Broad-winged hawk on 
my lawn, peeking under the BBQ grill. This morning I decided to head out in my 
hood trying to document “possible” locally breeding Broad-winged hawks. 
While obsessing as the why so many palm warblers only prefer to forage in areas 
where remnants of Atlantic white-cedar and scattered pine stands that are 
remaining in the swamp, saw a Broad-winged hawk circling over the forest 
canopy. Amazing I even managed to get 1 photo as the view was thru the dense 
canopy cover The hawk even belched out the “high whistle pitch call” 


This spring is my 2nd year attempt for this effort. About this time last year, 
I flushed a perched Broad-winged hawk about the same location along an 
abandoned rail road bed. Then observed one adult on a few occasion during the 
summer months well past the spring migration and NJ safe egg dates. 


On other note, there must have been a big songbird flight last night. I saw and 
heard a total of close to 50 or more palm, yellow-rumped, black and white, and 
oven birds within the same vicinity. And one Blue-winged warbler at the 
powerline. Total Lucky shot of Broad-winged hawk in my flicker. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County




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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Delaware Bay salt hay farm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 20:46:35 -0400
Today, I visited a what used to be an active Delaware Bay salt hay farm. But no 
more due to Sandy storm damage, breached dikes. Also, the farmer previously 
told me he will no longer harvest salt hay anymore, as he is unable to maintain 
the dikes anymore, sea level rise and continue storm damage to his dikes, his 
words. 


The farmer also once told me stories of him sitting on a machine cutting hay 
and would see rails running. 


Last time I visited before the Sandy, it was a working salt hay farm. Today, 
incredible visit, thousands of shorbirds...fantastic shorebird habitat created 
“unintentionally” by Sandy Storm. There is very little signs of what used 
to be the hay field in the marsh, except the remnants of washed out dikes and 
the old access road to the fields. Flushed a rail as I was walking out out the 
marsh. 


Much thanks to Harvey T. and Mary DeLia and their encouragement, I started my 
own flicker, so that I no longer have to fill their mail boxes each night w/ my 
bird habitat and my yard photos. I think they got tire of it 


Any rate, perhaps now on, less words about my bird outings/experience, and more 
photos. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder

Yong Kong
Camden County









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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: FOY Prothonotary Warbler and Virginia Rail
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 20:44:36 -0400
I lead a birding trip for the Queens County Bird Club (NYC) to Lord Stirling
Park and the Great Swamp NWR today and saw a PROTHONOTARY WARBLER along the
Passaic from the fisherman's trail (about 100 yards from the bridge on Lord
Stirling Road).  So nice to see this species return to this area.  We also
heard (at least three times) a grunting VIRGINIA RAIL from the beginning of
the closed boardwalk in the same park.  Dozens of PALM and YELLOW-RUMPED
WARBLERS were present in the park and a few PINE WARBLERS too.  

At the Great Swamp I saw my FOY PURPLE MARTIN - a female that flew over us
near the overlook on Pleasant Plains Road.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)  

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bull's Island
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb AT EMBARQMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 17:48:28 -0400
Hi JerseyBirders: 

After running errands and driving back roads, I decided to stop at Bull's 
Island for a quick look around. Spent most of my time at the boat launch and 
was happy to see my FOS Black and White Warblers both male and female. Also had 
a high count for the season (6) Blue-gray Gnatcatchers along with many the 
typical woodland species. 


Sandy McNicol 
Kingwood Township 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Garret Mtn today. Nashville Warbler.
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 21:56:01 +0100
Hi NJ birders, I have been birding Garret all spring but it has been a very
dire spring with few birds and then it seems nothing staying overnight.
Today there was a little more migration than on recent days, so I have a
quick update.

4/25/2015
Green Heron 1
Black Vulture   3
Turkey Vulture 4
Sharp-shinned Hawk  2
Broad-winged Hawk 10
Wild Turkey 1
Great Horned Owl 3
Chimney Swift  10
Northern Flicker 34
Eastern Phoebe 2
Tree Swallow2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  6
Bank Swallow    1 yesterday
Barn Swallow 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  30
Carolina Wren  3
Winter Wren 2
House Wren 2
Brown Thrasher  2
Hermit Thrush14
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 25
Brown Creeper 2
Blue-headed Vireo  2
Nashville Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 10
Pine Warbler 5
Palm Warbler 4
Black-and-white Warbler 4
Common Yellowthroat   1
Eastern Towhee  6
Field Sparrow  1
Swamp Sparrow   8
Dark-eyed Junco   28

*Bill Elrick*
 

 


*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

 *Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glassboro Woods
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 16:26:06 -0400
Hello,
 Ovenbirds singing! Not too much else. This cold, cloudy weather is making the 

birds lay low until insects emerge. 12:30 maybe the sun came out - and had more
birds singing then in the morning when we arrived! That's when the butterflies 
start too. Sun. I was off getting coffee and missed the Blue-headed Vireo.....
A few early migrants around. Three Red-shouldered Hawks and a Broad-winged
were nice. Unexpected! With the weather.

Butterfly notes - a study in the forms of the Spring Azure today. Dave A. 
leading 

the South Jersey Butterfly Club trip here.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Amwell Grasslands
From: Gerald Kruth <gkruth12 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 13:46:17 -0400
I would add to David's note -- NESTBOXES WORK!  Want to see more birds?
Build more nestboxes, and monitor them!

Jerry Kruth
Pittsburgh and NJ

On Mon, Apr 20, 2015 at 7:52 PM, David Tattoni 
wrote:

> Hi Everyone,
>
>      At around 3pm when there was a break in the rain I decided to quickly
> stop by the Amwell Valley Grasslands. Along Orchard road there was a pair
> of kestrels bringing materials into their nest box which was a treat to
> see. Additionally there were a number of meadowlarks singing in the fields.
> Within a few weeks these fields will be full of bobolinks and other
> grassland species. If you haven't gone, it's definitely worth visiting.
>
> Happy Birding,
> David Tattoni
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cattle Egret, Mercer: No
From: Chris Brown <cbrown.birdman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 10:16:46 -0400
All,
I spent about three hours trying unsuccessfully to relocate the Cattle
Egret found yesterday at Willow Pond/Rosedale Park.

I searched much of northwestern Mercer county. Please post any further
sightings!

Chris Brown
Hamilton

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cattle Egret moved to Rosedale Lake last night
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 07:28:56 -0400
Several reported that around 7 pm Cattle Egret left Willow Pond and flew short 
distance to Rosedale Lake in Rosedale Park section of Hopewell Twp. 


Fairfax

Sent from my LilyPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: American White Pelican
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 04:09:31 -0700
Along with the 8 Avocets at Brig, there is an American White Pelican
visible from the East Dike road. Joe Palumbo

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Harvey T’s Hybrid LIEGE/SNEG comment seeking post to JBirds
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:42:21 -0400
To those who followed Harvey’s LIEGE/SNEG posting here in JBirds and on 
Harvey’s Flicker site response the last few days, as like I did, it was a 
fantastic learning experience. It was for me, no doubt, go thru all my guides, 
then Google search even more for ID tips...after reading Harvey’s Flicker 
response......such a desire to learn more about it. 


Thank you so much, King Harvey !!! I tried to re-find Harvey’s egret on 
Thursday and today, no luck. 


I would like to think I am ready for the # 1 bird to seek this come May and 
June. You gotta believe. 


http://ebird.org/content/nj/news/nj-next-10-birds/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: First of year yard birds
From: Roger Bynum <hawkstone5 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 19:54:24 -0400
Finally a male ruby-throated hummingbird visiting the feeder and 2 chimney 
swifts 


Roger and Diane Bynum 
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Purple Finches - Photo
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 19:49:30 -0400
I had a good number of Purple Finches at the feeders today along with a few 
Siskins in the tree tops. 


Photo at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/16637231854/

Huge numbers of Chipping Sparrows as well.

Steve Byland
Warren, Twp
sbbyland at aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Admin: list updates
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 16:47:38 -0400
Hi,

Long-time members may recall that the archives of Jerseybirds, De-Birds and 
NJBIRDS were removed due to space constraints on the servers at Princeton. I'm 
pleased to let you know that the archives (back to 2000) of all three lists 
have been restored. Thanks to Mike Britt for persistence in reminding me that 
this needed to be done, and to my colleagues in IT for doing it. 

 
To use the Archives, here are the links. If you have created a login/password 
for the list and log in, you can see the email addresses of the person who 
posted, but anyone, logged in or not, can use the search function to find 
information on older sightings and contents of older discussions. 


https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=njbirds
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=de-birds


Any questions or comments please get in touch.
Laurie Larson (co-listowner)
jerseybi-request AT lists.princeton.edu (or njbirds-request, de-birds-request)
Princeton

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: tv and crow
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 16:16:50 -0400
I watched a crow - I think Fish - harassing a TV. I never saw a TV twist and 
turn so much! 

They can act like a buteo when needed! I was driving and don't know the outcome 
of this. 



Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Overnight Cape May Pelagic Scheduled for May 24-25
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 14:51:06 -0400
Due to multiple requests we have scheduled an overnight pelagic trip out of
Cape May leaving the evening of Sun, May 24 and returning late afternoon of
Mon, May 25.  This was the classic time of year to run a pelagic out of New
Jersey back in the 80s due to the potential variety of birds.

Possible targets for this time of year include Northern Fulmar, Cory's
Great, Manx, and Sooty Shearwaters, Red and Red-necked Phalarope,  Leach's
and Wilson's Storm-Petrels, South Polar Skua, all 3 jaegers, and Arctic
Tern.  It's also a good time to look for cetaceans like Fin, Humpback,
Minke, and Pilot Whales, as well as Risso's, Common and Offshore Bottlenose
Dolphin.

The trip details are:

   - Leave:  10:00 PM on Sun, May 24
   - Return:  Approx 4:00 PM on Mon, May 25
   - Cost:  $215
   - Boat:  Atlantic Star or American Star, and we will be sailing out of
   Wildwood Crest or Cape May (TBD closer to the trip date)


The folks running the boat are experienced with our pelagic birding trips
and always bring their A game.  Either boat is approximately 100' long.  We
will be sleeping wherever there is room, which means benches or floor
inside the cabin or on the floor of the upper deck.  We'll have 5-6
leaders, headsets, and chum to help attract, spot, and identify the birds
and try to get everybody on them.

People will be allowed to board and select their sleeping space in the
order they sign up and pay.  Sign up early for the best selection of
sleeping spaces.

For more information or to sign up, email us at info AT paulagics.com or call
215-234-6805.  Hope to see you aboard!


-PAG

-- 







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
 AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
*

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cattle Egret continues at Willow Pond -- Vincent Nichnadowicz is looking at it now
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:26:15 -0400
Update: Cattle Egret continues at Willow Pond. Vincent Nichnadowicz is looking 
at it now. The Egret is now on opposite shore. Vincent says it now looks like a 
white garbage bag. 


When I first saw it was near shore along LHT trail and even walking on dam much 
closer. But people running, biking, and bringing dogs may have pushed it to 
opposite shore. 


Park at Hunt House lot at end of driveway off of Blackwell Rd. near Cold Soil 
Road in Lawrence Twp. (think Hunt House is actually in Hopewell Twp.) and take 
Lawrence-Hopewell bile path Trail behind Hunt House till trail wraps around 
Willow pond on your left. Hunt House parking lot shared by public and Mercer 
County park employees. Not a problem if just a few birders, but suppose it 
could be if a lot — which I doubt. 


Didn’t realize that these are so uncommon for Mercer Cty.


Fairfax





List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: In the yard
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:55:22 -0400
today was the male Baltimore Oriole. It was in splendid colors and sitting on 
the Sunflower ball feeder looking in kitchen window. 

Now for nectar and grape jelly and oranges.

Karen 
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cattle Egret at Willow Pond in Mercer Meadows Hopewell
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:19:04 -0400
[JERSEYBI] Cattle Egret at Willow Pond in Mercer Meadows on Hopewell/Lawrence 
border on LHT beyond Hunt House. Foraging along edge of pond. 


No cattle here but overall white and field marks: orange crest, blush on back 
and breast and orange bill and orangey legs/feet all look right. 


Fairfax Hutter
Lawrenceville

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Salem County
From: Bob Horton <HORTON633 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 23:21:17 -0400
Al Driscoll and I did a birding tour of Salem County today, with the highlights 
of our trip being two Common Moorhens and two pair of Sandhill Cranes in the 
Mannington Marsh near Salem Woodstown Road. We were also excited to see 14 
Wilson's Snipes near the end of Stow Neck Road. 

Bob Horton

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Salem County big year notes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 21:03:54 -0400
I was away for a week - was wondering what to expect when I returned. Not too 
much 

different! This funky weather still has birds late to arrive. For example, I am 
still waiting 

on my fos House Wren..... my house in Barrington is usually where I hear first! 


I went down to the Fort Mott area to see about migrants - not expecting much 
with 

the winds and early date. But there was stuff - not sure when came in though.
My earliest ever Northern Waterthrush! Wow. 4/26 being my earliest date before 
today. 

I usually think the 5/1 time frame. I don't understand, but there always seems 
to be 

an early bird or two - then a week later, the bulk of that species arrives. 
Interesting. 


But I was way to cold in that wind and cloud cover to go walking around much 
further. 

Yes, I am a wimp. I still would like a Ruff for my big year! So searching I 
went. And I 

still need it! I was hoping for a stray Avocet or a White-faced Ibis with the 
reports 

from the coast. No luck! 

Search for the rarities, the common birds will get ticked eventually. My 
philosophy 

for big years. Has worked so far! 

Nature notes - a few Spring Peepers called. Just a few! I am hoping for some 
sunshine 

Saturday. I will be butterflying in Glassboro Woods. Falcate Orange tip would 
be nice. 


WSB notes - Doug J. and I will do a limited run through Cumberland - trying to 
avoid 

the air show traffic. That could get interesting...... 

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: rogers - green heron
From: Richard Moran <RMORAN AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 19:07:01 -0400
I was at the Princeton Institute on Wednesday and thought i saw a Green Heron. 
Can anyone confirm if they have 

seen one there recently.

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Brigantine Avocets (9)
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 17:21:32 -0500
I didn't see anyone else posting about these birds so I thought I would mention 
that at 6:40AM I had nine Avocets fly into the area before the tower on the 
south dike where the terns and gulls roost on clumps of earth. I studied them 
for some 20 minutes before moving on. I also had a minimum of 3 dozen Whimbrel 
scattered througout 

Bob Dodelson

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows...
From: Mike Anderson <mike.anderson AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 17:48:10 -0400
Bernie,
During the NJ atlas project Junco was confirmed nesting at higher
elevations in Warren, Sussex and Passaic County where they would indeed be
seen in June. I just checked Randy Little's 27 year WSB Spreadsheet from
here at the sanctuary and Junco was not on the list.  They are usually gone
from Bernardsville by May 1.
Prairie Warbler and Black-throated Green were heard singing here yesterday
and today.
Best to all,
Mike

On Wed, Apr 22, 2015 at 9:01 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:

> Bill Elrick said: "Guys Juncos are until the first week in June!".
>
> Bill Boyle's "Birds of New Jersey" says "Dark-eyed Juncos begin moving
> north in late Februrary, with peak flights from late March to mid-April,
> and they are rare after early May." This is why I'm looking for "last
> Juncos" now. Hope this clarifies...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
>
> On Wed, Apr 22, 2015 at 7:37 PM, Bill Elrick  wrote:
>
> > Guys Juncos are until the first week in June!
> > On Apr 22, 2015 7:14 PM, "Mike Anderson" 
> > wrote:
> >
> > > There were 2 junco and 4 purple finch at the Hoffman center feeders
> > > earlier today. Chimney swifts are in Morristown over the green now.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Mike Anderson
> > >
> > >
> > > > On Apr 22, 2015, at 3:31 PM, "B.G. Sloan" 
> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > I haven't seen a Dark-eyed Junco since 11:00AM Saturday, April 18.
> Just
> > > > wondering if they are still around elsewhere in NJ?
> > > >
> > > > On the other hand, the White-throated Sparrow numbers have been on
> the
> > > > uptick here over the past few days...25-30 yesterday, with several
> > > singing
> > > > in the woods. I'm thinking the increase has to do with migrants
> passing
> > > > through?
> > > >
> > > > Bernie Sloan
> > > > Highland Park
> > > >
> > > > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > > > How to report NJ bird sightings:  >
> > >
> > > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> > >
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Mike Anderson
Sanctuary Director
New Jersey Audubon
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, NJ 07924
908 766 5787 x 14
njaudubon.org

Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Palm Warbler - Photo
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2015 17:48:26 -0400
Lots of new migrants in the yard today. Palm Warbler - Photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/17041446067/

Also, Pine Warbler, Towhee, Brown Thrasher, Gnatcatcher

Steve Byland
Warren, NJ
sbbyland AT AOL.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Chimney Swifts and Bald Eagle
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb AT EMBARQMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 22:27:49 -0400
Hi JBirders: 

I've been keeping an eye out for the Chimney Swifts return to Frenchtown and 
today was finally the day. 


I see other Jersey Bird reports from around the state that they were seen today 
in Morristown, Princeton area and Raritan Borough. 


Also had an Eagle calling and flying above the parking area by the Delaware 
River in Frenchtown. 


Sandy McNicol 
Kingwood Township 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Some winter birds still here
From: Richard Wolfert <rwolfert AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 22:10:10 -0400
Today’s eBird list. 

Apr 22, 2015
Home-East Brunswick, NJ
Stationary
0 miles
480 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: The three winter birds, a single Junco, a single pine siskins and at 
least half a dozen white throated sparrow still here. It appears that the 
purple finches have vacated the premises for points north. 

8 Mourning Dove
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
2 Blue Jay
1 Tufted Titmouse
6 American Robin
1 Chipping Sparrow
6 White-throated Sparrow
1 Dark-eyed Junco
3 Northern Cardinal
1 Pine Siskin
16 American Goldfinch
3 House Sparrow

Still hanging in there. 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows...
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 21:01:26 -0400
Bill Elrick said: "Guys Juncos are until the first week in June!".

Bill Boyle's "Birds of New Jersey" says "Dark-eyed Juncos begin moving
north in late Februrary, with peak flights from late March to mid-April,
and they are rare after early May." This is why I'm looking for "last
Juncos" now. Hope this clarifies...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Wed, Apr 22, 2015 at 7:37 PM, Bill Elrick  wrote:

> Guys Juncos are until the first week in June!
> On Apr 22, 2015 7:14 PM, "Mike Anderson" 
> wrote:
>
> > There were 2 junco and 4 purple finch at the Hoffman center feeders
> > earlier today. Chimney swifts are in Morristown over the green now.
> >
> >
> >
> > Mike Anderson
> >
> >
> > > On Apr 22, 2015, at 3:31 PM, "B.G. Sloan"  wrote:
> > >
> > > I haven't seen a Dark-eyed Junco since 11:00AM Saturday, April 18. Just
> > > wondering if they are still around elsewhere in NJ?
> > >
> > > On the other hand, the White-throated Sparrow numbers have been on the
> > > uptick here over the past few days...25-30 yesterday, with several
> > singing
> > > in the woods. I'm thinking the increase has to do with migrants passing
> > > through?
> > >
> > > Bernie Sloan
> > > Highland Park
> > >
> > > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> >
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Last Junco?
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 20:23:59 -0400
There was a lone Junco here on Sunday, but there are still WT Sparrows here
feeding.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

On Wed, Apr 22, 2015 at 7:14 PM, Gary or Karen Gentile 
wrote:

> My Juncos have been gone since last week but White-Throated Sparrows
> are still very abundant around yard.
> In the fog this morning throughout the woods, you could hear their
> beautiful song...... but not see the birds.
> My one feeder now has 5 Cowbirds on it....
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Chimney Swifts have returned to Raritan
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 20:09:01 -0400
I took a walk along the Raritan River in Raritan Borough this evening and
saw my first CHIMNEY SWIFTS of the season.  At least 10 were flying above
the river, joining the TREE, BARN and NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS in a
feast.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)  

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows...
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:37:48 -0400
Guys Juncos are until the first week in June!
On Apr 22, 2015 7:14 PM, "Mike Anderson" 
wrote:

> There were 2 junco and 4 purple finch at the Hoffman center feeders
> earlier today. Chimney swifts are in Morristown over the green now.
>
>
>
> Mike Anderson
>
>
> > On Apr 22, 2015, at 3:31 PM, "B.G. Sloan"  wrote:
> >
> > I haven't seen a Dark-eyed Junco since 11:00AM Saturday, April 18. Just
> > wondering if they are still around elsewhere in NJ?
> >
> > On the other hand, the White-throated Sparrow numbers have been on the
> > uptick here over the past few days...25-30 yesterday, with several
> singing
> > in the woods. I'm thinking the increase has to do with migrants passing
> > through?
> >
> > Bernie Sloan
> > Highland Park
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows...
From: Mike Anderson <mike.anderson AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:14:27 -0400
There were 2 junco and 4 purple finch at the Hoffman center feeders earlier 
today. Chimney swifts are in Morristown over the green now. 




Mike Anderson


> On Apr 22, 2015, at 3:31 PM, "B.G. Sloan"  wrote:
> 
> I haven't seen a Dark-eyed Junco since 11:00AM Saturday, April 18. Just
> wondering if they are still around elsewhere in NJ?
> 
> On the other hand, the White-throated Sparrow numbers have been on the
> uptick here over the past few days...25-30 yesterday, with several singing
> in the woods. I'm thinking the increase has to do with migrants passing
> through?
> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Last Junco?
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:14:15 -0400
My Juncos have been gone since last week but White-Throated Sparrows
are still very abundant around yard.
In the fog this morning throughout the woods, you could hear their beautiful 
song...... but not see the birds. 

My one feeder now has 5 Cowbirds on it....

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: No one commented to Harvey's Egret Hybrid? posting
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:13:05 -0400
As soon as I got home from work I went right to my lab top to see if there 
were any comments from JBirders regarding Harvey's flicker photos of Little 
Egret/Snowy Hybrid question and him seeking comments from "us".

I must say I was bit surprised (and disappointed) there we no response here 
in JB or even in his Flicker site.

I so wanted to learn about this Egret's true ID from here in JBirders. But 
obviously that is not going to happen here.

I can not comment since the question is over my head. Perhaps, this question 
has moved to NJ birders's Facebook, but  I can not go there since I have 
lost my password many years ago.

Yong Kong
Camden County

-----Original Message----- 
From: Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2015 5:31 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Egret Hybrid? White-faced Ibis

Hi Jersey Birders,
I photographed an Egret today at Brigantine's Gull Pond that I believe to
be a Little Egret/Snowy Hybrid.
I've been down this road before so I have been careful but this bird needs
some eyes on.
Because Little Egret can have yellow, orange, or red lores April-May the
diagnostic dark chalky gray lores will not help. But, the 2 long plumes
associated with LIGU are quite apparent.
The head is a bit too shaggy I believe for a "pure-bred" but there is
always a range within any species and this just may be a shaggy LIGU.
The bird flew off and while I was scanning for it I bumped into a
White-faced Ibis.
Photos of both on my Flickr page.
Thoughts would really be appreciated!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
God Birding
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lakewood Pine Park
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:05:15 -0400
After doing some research, that's its proper name even though the little blurb 
on the Lakewood website has it as just Pine Park. Anyway, its a great place to 
get some quick birding in and today had 2 surprises which were: 

1 louisiana waterthrush
1 blue headed vireo
Many chipping sparrows and pine warblers continue.
1 field sparrow
1 brown thrasher
1 adult coopers
1 juvy coopers
1 rth
3 blue-grey gnatcatcher nests, which are all constructed the same way: lichens 
and spiderweb! 


also heard the pileated wp and had 3 black vulture flyovers. I have a hunch 
common night hawks are around and will be on the lookout over the next few 
days. 


James
Jackson, NJ
 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Highland Park Bald Eagle (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 16:07:04 -0400
While out for a walk today I was treated to the spectacle of a pair of
American Crows SERIOUSLY harrassing a Bald Eagle. The eagle flew up WAY
high and the crows stayed in close pursuit, drifting in a downstream
direction above the Raritan River. The eagle wasn't an adult yet but did
have pale-ish tail feathers.

The following photo is heavily cropped because the birds were up so high.
No field marks are really visible. One of the crows is to the left of the
tree branch in the center of the photo. The eagle is to the right of the
tree branch. I include this photo just because it shows how *tiny* an
American Crow looks when next to an eagle. :-)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17049763328/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Last Junco? More WT Sparrows...
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 15:31:12 -0400
I haven't seen a Dark-eyed Junco since 11:00AM Saturday, April 18. Just
wondering if they are still around elsewhere in NJ?

On the other hand, the White-throated Sparrow numbers have been on the
uptick here over the past few days...25-30 yesterday, with several singing
in the woods. I'm thinking the increase has to do with migrants passing
through?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: San Francisco notes from the field and a personal milestone
From: Denise Bittle <djbittle AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 14:01:22 -0400
Very well said!

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 22, 2015, at 7:47 AM, "Robert Gallucci"  wrote:
> 
> Notes from the field: It's 4:30am and I am getting ready to head to the Marin 
Headlands for my annual sunrise over San Francisco before the final day of my 
conference begins. In all those other years birding was either nonexistent or 
only a small, but growing, interest. It had not yet become the consuming 
passion I enjoy today. How much difference a year can make. 

> 
> This year is especially exciting! Hopefully at some point this morning I will 
achieve a significant personal milestone, my 300th bird. I thought I had it the 
other day, but recalibrating my list showed me still off. A Common Murre took 
me to 299 and now I wait on the precipice. With any luck, a Wandering Tattler 
or Allen's Hummingbird will take me to 300! 

> 
> An interesting sidenote. On my first full day here, one that netted 80 
species and almost 20 life birds, I spoke with a birder friend about the 
incredible volume and diversity of species in San Francisco (and the outlying 
areas). This is truly a magical place, where massive islands of marbled godwit 
anchor to mudflat bottoms, while Black-necked Stilt and American Avocet feed on 
their periphery. I have truly seen things here that redefined my love and 
passion for birding. 

> 
> But as we spoke, I came to another realization. As great as San Francisco is, 
it is not New Jersey. It does not have the great canopies of woods filled with 
a diversity of warblers. It does not have the variety of raptors that regularly 
fill our skies in outstretched winged beauty. And while it has numbers of shore 
birds that flock together in magnificent islands, it does not have that magical 
thrill of the single species, lost in its path, that touches down to rest in 
our fair state, providing excitement in viewing that little matches. 

> 
> So while San Francisco is a great place to visit, and a greater one to bird 
in, I will stick with NJ and its version of magic - a version that is also 
spelled HOME. 

> 
> Good birding all
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ATB/SHWS Great Swamp field trip this morning
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 13:09:47 -0400
What amazing weather for the All Things Birds/Scherman Hoffman Great Swamp
NWR field trip this morning!  Highlights were 2 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers
mobbing a Cowbird, a lone tom Turkey partially displaying in the sun, a FOY
Yellow Warbler for all of us on the trip, a singing Ruby-crowned Kinglet, a
few bright Goldfinches, several pairs of Wood Ducks, tons of Yellow-rumped
Warblers, a few Palm Warblers, Field, Song and Swamp Sparrows,Catbirds,
Mockingbirds, many very showy Red-winged Blackbirds and a bevy of Tree
Swallows swooping right around us (and a couple of Barn as well).

Good birding,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lake Assunpink Red-throated Loon
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 11:23:47 -0500
Around 10AM today there was a winter plumage Red-throated Loon visible from the 
main boat launch parking area of Lake Assunpink. 

2 days ago there was a breeding plumage Common Loon in the area
There were 3 pair of Blue-winged Teal in the wet area behind the dam. When I 
first saw these birds several days ago there were only 2 pair 

Bob Dodelson

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Migration in Princeton
From: Bert Harris <aramidopsis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 10:35:47 -0400
Several new arrivals at the Institute Woods today:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22996301

Cheers,
Bert Harris, Princeton

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Morgan Av. Mudflats Little Gull - yes
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 13:26:59 +0000
Last evening after work, visit 7 or 8 this spring, I got to see a LITTLE GULL 
on the mudflats. Found it sitting on exposed sand fairly close to Cliff Ave. A 
single immature bird - darkish cap, bold black carpal bar, clearly smaller than 
the nearby (few) Bonaparte's gulls. 


Good birding!

Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
Technical Practice Group Leader
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: bg gnatcatchers
From: karen swaine <karmaya AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 09:23:07 -0400
friday morning 4/17 we had a bg gnatcatcher right ouside the k window - 
 i thought it was the first bg gnatcatcher ever in our garden but when i 
went got the journal to write it in, was surprised to see that we'd seen 
one here on almost the exact same day in 2001 (4/15) -- right on 
schedule!


karen, highland park




On Thu, Apr 16, 2015 at 08:13 AM, cwsg1 AT excite.com wrote:

> several this a.m.
>  
> C. Wyludanas
> Pennington
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings:

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: San Francisco notes from the field and a personal milestone
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2015 11:47:06 +0000
Notes from the field: It's 4:30am and I am getting ready to head to the Marin 
Headlands for my annual sunrise over San Francisco before the final day of my 
conference begins. In all those other years birding was either nonexistent or 
only a small, but growing, interest. It had not yet become the consuming 
passion I enjoy today. How much difference a year can make. 


This year is especially exciting! Hopefully at some point this morning I will 
achieve a significant personal milestone, my 300th bird. I thought I had it the 
other day, but recalibrating my list showed me still off. A Common Murre took 
me to 299 and now I wait on the precipice. With any luck, a Wandering Tattler 
or Allen's Hummingbird will take me to 300! 


An interesting sidenote. On my first full day here, one that netted 80 species 
and almost 20 life birds, I spoke with a birder friend about the incredible 
volume and diversity of species in San Francisco (and the outlying areas). This 
is truly a magical place, where massive islands of marbled godwit anchor to 
mudflat bottoms, while Black-necked Stilt and American Avocet feed on their 
periphery. I have truly seen things here that redefined my love and passion for 
birding. 


But as we spoke, I came to another realization. As great as San Francisco is, 
it is not New Jersey. It does not have the great canopies of woods filled with 
a diversity of warblers. It does not have the variety of raptors that regularly 
fill our skies in outstretched winged beauty. And while it has numbers of shore 
birds that flock together in magnificent islands, it does not have that magical 
thrill of the single species, lost in its path, that touches down to rest in 
our fair state, providing excitement in viewing that little matches. 


So while San Francisco is a great place to visit, and a greater one to bird in, 
I will stick with NJ and its version of magic - a version that is also spelled 
HOME. 


Good birding all


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Amwell Grassland Directions
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 23:21:05 -0400
Here's a blurb from New Jersey Audubon about the Amwell Grasslands:

http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionIBBA/IBBASiteGuide.aspx?sk=3054

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Tue, Apr 21, 2015 at 7:15 PM, David Tattoni 
wrote:

> Since I received a number emails requesting more information on how to get
> to and how to bird the Amwell Grasslands I thought I'd send out this
> information to everyone.
>
> If you are familiar with the sourland mountains, the Amwell Grasslands are
> about a 5-10 minute drive north. The Amwell Grasslands cover a very large
> area of farmland and preserved grassland in and around East Amwell NJ. As
> far as I'm aware there are no trails, so it's all roadside birding.
>
> The most productive spot (I find) is along Orchard Road in Ringoes NJ.
> (start at the intersection of Orchard and Linvale roads) The grasslands are
> private property, so you must bird from the road. The road is narrow, but
> traffic is scarce. In the 30 minutes I spent birding there yesterday, only
> 2 cars drove by me, so the road is relatively untraveled. That said, if you
> go be careful and alert, as the road is very narrow.
>
> From,
> David Tattoni
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Amwell Grassland Directions
From: David Tattoni <davidtattoni AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 19:15:40 -0400
Since I received a number emails requesting more information on how to get to 
and how to bird the Amwell Grasslands I thought I'd send out this information 
to everyone. 


If you are familiar with the sourland mountains, the Amwell Grasslands are 
about a 5-10 minute drive north. The Amwell Grasslands cover a very large area 
of farmland and preserved grassland in and around East Amwell NJ. As far as I'm 
aware there are no trails, so it's all roadside birding. 

 
The most productive spot (I find) is along Orchard Road in Ringoes NJ. (start 
at the intersection of Orchard and Linvale roads) The grasslands are private 
property, so you must bird from the road. The road is narrow, but traffic is 
scarce. In the 30 minutes I spent birding there yesterday, only 2 cars drove by 
me, so the road is relatively untraveled. That said, if you go be careful and 
alert, as the road is very narrow. 


From, 
David Tattoni

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: FOY Great Egret, FOY Greater Yellowlegs (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 17:34:46 -0400
Today I made a quick trip to Donaldson Park (Middlesex County) and found
two first-of-year (FOY) species at the park pond:

* Greater Yellowlegs:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17225746992/

* Great Egret:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17225746922/

Pretty cool!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: KESTRELS
From: Joe Yohannan <joe1265 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2015 11:15:00 -0400
FYI - The kestrels are still at the park in the field described. I was able to 
get plenty of good pics. 


> Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 21:25:55 -0400
> From: 00000122fd7e7d76-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] KESTRELS
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> 
> This morning I saw 10 Kestrels staged in trees in small field at Rancocas 
State Park in Westampton. I am not sure if this is rare. This afternoon the 
Kestrels were still in the field and I suspect they will be there in the 
morning. To get to the field take the entrance to the park on Beverly-Rancocas 
Road (Exit 45 on 295 toward Mount Holly). Go to the gate and park, and walk the 
paved road straight ahead, and turn left and go to the field on the left and 
you will see them in the trees. Please note that before 8 AM they were in the 
trees and after 8 they were flying around. 

> 
> Chris Liebner, Westampton
> 609-744-7026
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
 		 	   		  
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Male Bluebird Takes Two Mates - Photos
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2015 22:50:50 -0400
I have an interesting situation in my yard. A Male Eastern Bluebird apparently 
has taken two female mates that are using a single nest box. A similar 
situation occurred in the Great Swamp a few years ago - one time in over 400 
nestings. In my case, the females have rather different plumage around the 
head, which should make monitoring their activity fairly easy. The male courts 
and feeds both, although the females often engage in very violent struggles. 
All three birds are seen together regularly every day. Often. though, the 
females will sit next to each other rather than fight. There are now 5 eggs in 
the nest. The first 4 came on a regular basis, then a two day break, then a 
5th. Beginning yesterday (after the 5th egg), one female has started sitting on 
the eggs and will not budge. A few photos of the trio can be seen at: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/17218291621/

My dream shot will be one of both females on the box with food when the eggs 
hatch. 


Steve Byland
Warren Township
sbbyland at aol.com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Kindly Requesting Update-No April Fool! Wild Northern Bob Whites return to NJ!
From: Cathy Blumig <wolgast AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2015 21:43:16 -0400
My apologies for only responding to your message now; way too nutty on the
farm/in the apiary to regularly check messages.

As of Tuesday, April 14th, I have the following data:
-Four birds lost their transmitters ("Houdini" birds).
-Four were killed by hawks (I'm guessing Coop's because they have a
confirmed reputation for being committed quail killers, but that's only a
guess).
-One was killed by a weasel.
- Four are believed to have died from stress.

That's the latest information I have.

Good birding to all and BEE well,
Cathy Blumig
Somerset, NJ


-----Original Message-----
From: Yong Kong [mailto:yklitespeed AT comcast.net] 
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2015 7:41 PM
To: Cathy Blumig; JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Kindly Requesting Update-No April Fool! Wild Northern Bob Whites
return to NJ!

Hello, Cathy and JBirders !!!

Cathy, Probably too early,  and/but, perhaps there may be already some
preliminary baseline information as to status since the Northern Bobwhite
Quail release on the Haines property.

1.    Did all birds stay in the introduced area ?

2.     Did those originally related birds formed and stayed as a group ?

3.    Any mortality to date ?

On other note, saw one Common Raven along the powerline this morning (after
yesterday's reporting over my house and the street). This morning, it
appeared the raven was strictly using the powerline as the mode of travel
way.

Yong Kong
Camden County





-----Original Message-----
From: Cathy Blumig
Sent: Wednesday, April 1, 2015 4:18 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] No April Fool! Wild Northern Bob Whites return to NJ!

I'm so excited to share an article which appears in today's Philadelphia
Inquirer about the release of 80 Northern Bobwhite Quail on the Haines
property in Chatsworth, Burlington County. I feel like opening a bottle of
Champaign!  The release of these birds is still a long way from being an
established population, but what a fantastic first step.  Hip - Hip Hooray
for all the parties involved!



http://www.philly.com/philly/news/breaking/20150402_The_wild_quail_returns_t
o_New_Jersey.html



Good birding to all and may the Bobwhites thrive!

Cathy Blumig

Somerset, NJ


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings:  


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Amwell Grasslands
From: David Tattoni <davidtattoni AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2015 19:52:01 -0400
Hi Everyone, 

 At around 3pm when there was a break in the rain I decided to quickly stop by 
the Amwell Valley Grasslands. Along Orchard road there was a pair of kestrels 
bringing materials into their nest box which was a treat to see. Additionally 
there were a number of meadowlarks singing in the fields. Within a few weeks 
these fields will be full of bobolinks and other grassland species. If you 
haven't gone, it's definitely worth visiting. 


Happy Birding, 
David Tattoni

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Three common yard-bird silhouette photos
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2015 19:38:05 -0400
Three nice silhouettes of common birds against the evening sky:

Blue Jay:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16960135120/

European Starling...looks rather artsy:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17215833052/

Turkey Vulture:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17146160062/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Birding San Francisco Area - Update and Thanks!
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2015 12:45:36 +0000
Good morning Jersey Birders.

I have to thank the incredible response to my request for recommendations on 
places to bird in San Francisco. I will be compiling and sharing the list so 
that everyone can benefit from it. 


So, after waking at 3:00am to get to Cape May and buy a scope and new bins (SWA 
ATS 65 w 20/60 eyepiece and Zeiss Conquest 8x42), I headed home, packed and 
made it to Newark airport on time to catch the flight. By the time we landed, 
sorted out the car, got some food and checked into the hotel, it was 4:00am in 
my internal East Coast clock. Even drunk I did not stagger as I staggered to my 
room last night. Still, up and out by 9 to meet a birder friend and, with our 
willing but eye rolling girlfriends in tow, we were off. 


It was easily the most epic day of birding in my life. I cannot think of one 
that even comes close - and that includes Sanibel Island! The link to picture 
of an American Avocet, one of the most beautiful birds in the United States in 
my humble opinion, was just one of an uninterrupted string of awe-inspiring 
moments. In total, we saw over 70 species, cataloging 69 of them. An incredible 
twenty of them were life birds! For this newly obsessed student of all matters 
ornithological, it was pure magic. 


We stuck to a stretch along the San Francisco Bay, from San Mateo to San Jose. 
Within the relatively tiny area are an impressive number of parks and 
waterways, many renewed landfills that are giving back to the land what we so 
devastatingly took away. 


One a side note – We have all seen many, many Dark Eyed Junco. But the Dark 
Eyed Junco – Oregon subspecies, is a wonder of beauty. I will be posting more 
pictures as I can and will post a note when they are all up. I believe I got at 
least one shot of over 95% of the birds on the list below. 


OK, its brutally early in the AM here. Going to rest for a bit and hit the 
parks by the Golden Gate Bridge. Word has it there is a Wandering Tattler 
there. 


Good birding,
Rob
(516) 996-6200

American Avocet Link:
https://flic.kr/p/sdKioy

For those that may find themselves in the area, here is a list of our stops:
Palo Alto Baylands--Duck Pond
Charleston Slough/Coast Casey Forebay
Radio Rd.
Coyote Point County Park--Harbor and marsh
Personal Residence of our host
Byxbee Park

Here is the list
American Avocet
American Coot
American Wigeon
Anna's Hummingbird
Barn Swallow
Bewick's Wren
Black Phoebe
Black Turnstone
Black-bellied Plover
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Black-necked Stilt
Bonaparte's Gull
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Bushtit
Cackling Goose
California Gull
California Towhee
Canada Goose
Canvasback
Caspian Tern
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Clark's Grebe
Cliff Swallow
Common Gallinule
Common Raven
Dark-eyed Junco
Dunlin
Eurasian Collared-Dove
European Starling
Forster's Tern
Gadwall
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Greater Yellowlegs
Green-winged Teal
Herring Gull
Horned Grebe
House Finch
Least Sandpiper
Lesser Goldfinch
Mallard
Marbled Godwit
Northern Mockingbird
Northern Pintail
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Northern Shoveler
Oak Titmouse
Ring-billed Gull
Ruddy Duck
Savannah Sparrow
Semipalmated Plover
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Short-billed Dowitcher
Snowy Egret
Song Sparrow
Spotted Sandpiper
Spotted Towhee
Surf Scoter
Violet-green Swallow
Western Grebe
Western Gull
Western Sandpiper
Western Scrub-Jay
Whimbrel
White-crowned Sparrow
Willet

Link:
https://flic.kr/p/sdKioy

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Kindly Requesting Update-No April Fool! Wild Northern Bob Whites return to NJ!
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 19:40:58 -0400
Hello, Cathy and JBirders !!!

Cathy, Probably too early,  and/but, perhaps there may be already some 
preliminary baseline information as to status since the Northern Bobwhite 
Quail release on the Haines property.

1.    Did all birds stay in the introduced area ?

2.     Did those originally related birds formed and stayed as a group ?

3.    Any mortality to date ?

On other note, saw one Common Raven along the powerline this morning (after 
yesterday's reporting over my house and the street). This morning, it 
appeared the raven was strictly using the powerline as the mode of travel 
way.

Yong Kong
Camden County





-----Original Message----- 
From: Cathy Blumig
Sent: Wednesday, April 1, 2015 4:18 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] No April Fool! Wild Northern Bob Whites return to NJ!

I'm so excited to share an article which appears in today's Philadelphia
Inquirer about the release of 80 Northern Bobwhite Quail on the Haines
property in Chatsworth, Burlington County. I feel like opening a bottle of
Champaign!  The release of these birds is still a long way from being an
established population, but what a fantastic first step.  Hip - Hip Hooray
for all the parties involved!



http://www.philly.com/philly/news/breaking/20150402_The_wild_quail_returns_t
o_New_Jersey.html



Good birding to all and may the Bobwhites thrive!

Cathy Blumig

Somerset, NJ


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings:  


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: No Subject
From: "Jennifer W. Hanson" <ammodramus88 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 13:51:16 -0400
Hi Jersey birders,

I went wandering around the Pine Barrens with the usual suspects
yesterday. Some notes:

Hawkin Rd. (aka Bear Swamp-Red Lion Preserve) had PROTHONOTARY
WARBLER, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, lots of
BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHERS (including one working on a nest), PINE
WARBLER, PALM WARBLER and singing YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERs.

Atsion Lake had PRAIRIE WARBLER and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. For the
botanists, Pyxie was blooming.

Webb’s Mill bog looked like a swimming pool, so the beavers have
returned to that neck of the woods.

In any case, a mid-April day in the Pine Barrens with eight warbler
species on the day is a good day.

Best regards and good birding,

Jennifer W. Hanson
Plainsboro, New Jersey USA

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cattle Egret continues in Barnegat
From: Karmela <kmoneta AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2015 10:35:36 -0400
Thanks to a great find by Captain Alex, aka LighthouseSportfishing, lots of 
folks enjoyed the Cattle Egret yesterday. The Egret continues at Meadowedge 
park, Powell Lane and E Bay Ave in Barnegat. It can be found along the fencing 
surrounding the small pond in front. 


Karmela Moneta
Clinton Twp and Barnegat

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whimbrel & Caspian Tern today at Brigantine, later Cattle Egret in Barnegat
From: Mike Mandracchia <mmandrake AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 23:52:51 -0400
  JerseyBirders:  Today I lead a trip to the Edwin B. Forsythe Refuge 
(Brigantine) for NJ Audubon's All Things Birds Program.  I would like to 
thank Associate Naturalist Hank Burk and our new "Naturalist Emeritus" 
Pete Bacinski for their assistance.  It was a beautiful day to be down 
at the Refuge and the birds definitely were cooperative. Highlights 
included 4 Whimbrels, 2 Caspian Terns, 2 Short-billed Dowitchers, an 
American Kestrel and a Bald Eagle, we also heard but could not locate 
several Willets. Other notable species included a single Catbird and 
a calling White-eyed Vireo, good numbers of Purple Martins and Common 
Yellowthroats, 40+ Glossy Ibis, numerous Osprey - including one pair 
building their nest in a small tree out on the North Dike, and 6 
American Oystercatcher. We ended our trip with a total of 76 species.
 
Afterwards, a small group of trip participants who had to drive back 
north anyway, decided to make a short detour over to Meadowedge 
Park, Barnegat  hoping that the Cattle Egret that had been reported 
there earlier in the day was still there. We could not see the bird from 
the road and thought we might have missed it.  However, as we entered 
the park, we spotted something white partially blocked by the fence 
around the pond which turned out to be the Egret as we drove around the 
pond. 
 
Next weekend, Pete and I will be leading a two days of trips for NJ 
Audubon's All Things Birds Program, starting  Saturday Morning in 
Belleplain State Forest, then heading over Heislerville WMA; and then on 
Sunday, we will be back visiting the Edwin B. Forsythe Refuge 
(Brigantine). 
 
Good Birding
 
Mike Mandracchia
Jackson, NJ
 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: N. Bobwhite, Union County, Strange!
From: Cathy Blumig <wolgast AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 23:39:50 -0400
I know folks who raise them either for the pot or as fanciers even in urban 
situations (there is at least one poultry slaughter facility in Newark, for 
example). Some even keep them to train pointing dogs. And you are correct that 
bobwhites are non-migratory. It's certainly exciting to see such a bird, but 
its highly unlikely to be a wild bobwhite. 


Cathy Blumig
Somerset, NJ

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Michael 
Auda 

Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2015 9:09 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] N. Bobwhite, Union County, Strange!

Hi JerseyBirders,

I received a text from my father this evening (around 7:30 pm), telling me that 
he was watching an male NORTHERN BOBWHITE in our backyard!! Normally, I 
wouldn't have believed him, but he got 4 pictures (in the link at the bottom), 
showing just that, an male N Bobwhite. He also said it made some soft, 
clucking-ish vocalizations. 


Now, this is strange on several levels. First, we live in very suburban, 
residential Scotch Plains, NJ, (in Union County). Second, the bird had no bands 
or anything to indicate it was an escapee/etc., BUT it was acting a little 
strangely. It seemed in fine health (looked ok), but was just walking around 
our backyard. He also says it hunkered down in a shrub for the night. 


That leaves the question, where did this bird come from??? As I far I recalled, 
Bobwhite are extremely rare in NJ, and if there are any, they would be in 
Southern NJ/Pine Barrens. I know there is some plan to reintroduce them, but 
not anywhere near Scotch Plains! The only thing that I could come up with was 
that it was a disoriented migrant, but then again, I was under the impression 
that bobwhites were largely non-migratory. 


Photos are here:

https://plus.google.com/photos/116750435169618158004/albums/6139245479168602529?authkey=CN_4_p6F_9vtKg 



(As you can see, our house is by no means near farmland, just grass and
suburbia!)

Certainly in interesting bird, no matter where he came from. Theories are 
welcome! 


-Michael Auda
Scotch Plains, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 4/18/15]
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 22:26:16 -0500
It was high tide and very sunny at Brig when I arrived at 8:30AM this
morning. There were two hundred volunteers walking around the Refuge for
the semiannual clean-up...they all deserve a very big thank you! Also,
there were lots of  Snowy and Great Egrets today and a couple of American
Oystercatchers doing some really neat showing off. To see today's Photo
Study, please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigApril18_15/BrigApr18_15.html

Regards,
Howard


Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montvo), PA

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: N. Bobwhite, Union County, Strange!
From: Michael Auda <mikeauda7 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 21:08:32 -0400
Hi JerseyBirders,

I received a text from my father this evening (around 7:30 pm), telling me
that he was watching an male NORTHERN BOBWHITE in our backyard!! Normally,
I wouldn't have believed him, but he got 4 pictures (in the link at the
bottom), showing just that, an male N Bobwhite. He also said it made some
soft, clucking-ish vocalizations.

Now, this is strange on several levels. First, we live in very suburban,
residential Scotch Plains, NJ, (in Union County). Second, the bird had no
bands or anything to indicate it was an escapee/etc., BUT it was acting a
little strangely. It seemed in fine health (looked ok), but was just
walking around our backyard. He also says it hunkered down in a shrub for
the night.

That leaves the question, where did this bird come from??? As I far I
recalled, Bobwhite are extremely rare in NJ, and if there are any, they
would be in Southern NJ/Pine Barrens. I know there is some plan to
reintroduce them, but not anywhere near Scotch Plains! The only thing that
I could come up with was that it was a disoriented migrant, but then again,
I was under the impression that bobwhites were largely non-migratory.

Photos are here:

https://plus.google.com/photos/116750435169618158004/albums/6139245479168602529?authkey=CN_4_p6F_9vtKg 



(As you can see, our house is by no means near farmland, just grass and
suburbia!)

Certainly in interesting bird, no matter where he came from. Theories are
welcome!

-Michael Auda
Scotch Plains, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fw: post to jerseybirds
From: Linda Mack <LJ.MACK AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 21:02:32 -0400
JerseyBirders:

Please help us continue the fight to protect Sandy Hook by taking a few minutes 
to submit comments online. Last fall the NPS got our messages loud and clear; 
however, the maintenance facility construction did not go away. The NPS 
reassessed and their latest proposal grew from 2 to 7 SIte Options, including 1 
& 2 that were soundly rejected last fall (Tent City and Well Water Treatment 
Facility). See below for information and the link to submit comments. Thank you 
for your support. 


Linda Mack, Trustee 
Colette Buchanan, Second Vice President 
Monmouth County Audubon Society 
****************************************
Monmouth County Audubon Society: Relocated Maintenance Facilities to More 
Sustainable Locations – Sandy Hook 

April 26 – comment submission deadline
Online: 
http://parkplanning.nps.gov/document.cfm?parkID=237&projectID=49465&documentID=65031 



MCAS position – Site Option 6: Adaptive reuse of existing buildings 47, 65 
and 57 


Reuse of existing buildings

Reduced natural resource destruction in areas previously disturbed (existing 
gravel parking lots, storage areas) 


Smaller footprint for 7,500 square foot new building (directly behind building 
65) and best alternative to other locations 


Central location of 3 buildings provides better protection from flooding during 
coastal storm surges 


Separate location for each building reduces likelihood of catastrophic 
destruction of entire Maintenance Facilities 




Site Option 3 is not favored because it requires a massive and costly 
construction project that would concentrate all maintenance facilities at one 
location at the northern end of Sandy Hook (severe flooding during Sandy). 


 Site Option 4 calls for more new construction than Site Option 6, including 
the construction of an 11,500 square foot building and covered storage areas. 


Monmouth County Audubon strongly opposes Site Options 1, 2, 5 and 7. We are 
disappointed that the NPS continues to consider options to place expanded 
maintenance facilities within a maritime forest. Site Options 1, 5 and 7 would 
require destruction of maritime forest, construction of new structures and 
roads into an area that has been well-documented to be an important migratory 
stop and breeding location for forest birds. This option includes converting 
parts of the multi-use path and the closed section of Randolph Road into an 
access road for maintenance vehicles. Such action would deprive birders access 
to a prime birding area. MCAS strongly opposes the siting of any additional 
facilities in the Well Water Treatment Facility. 




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: cattle egret con'ts @ meadowedge park
From: comcast <drilbu35 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 15:49:25 -0400
Bird at the pond in front of the community center
Bay Ave, Barnegat

good birding
shari zirlin
larrry Zirlin

Whiting,NJ

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Winslow Township, Camden Co. Raven
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 13:27:19 -0400
Five stars to Matt Webster who has been texting me about the return of Winslow 
Township’s Raven for the 2nd year in a row and his reporting to Ebird. 


About 1:15PM while doing yard work, heard to Croak call, immediately dropped 
the blower and ran for the camera I had sitting inside of Mary’s T AT B. Managed 
to get several documentation photos of the Raven flying over my neck of the 
woods. 


I am grounded for the day as my time is w/ Mary and our dogs for the day.

Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glenhurst Meadows (Warren Green Acres)
From: Peter Capobianco <peter.capobianco AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 11:35:27 -0400
Glenhurst Meadows (Warren Green Acres), Somerset, US-NJ
Apr 18, 2015 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments:     I didn't manage to find the previously reported
Yellow-throated Warbler, but it was certainly a beautiful morning.  I just
moved here not too long ago so it was nice to bird a new place that looks
so promising.  It was also exciting to open the car door in the parking lot
to everything singing; spring is here!
40 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  3
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  1
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)  1
Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus)  1
Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)  1
Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus)  2
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon))  2
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  4
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  3
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)  1
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)  2
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)  2
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  4
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  8
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  7
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  2
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)  3
White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea)  5
Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)  1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  7
Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum)  1
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  2
Palm Warbler (Yellow) (Setophaga palmarum hypochrysea)  15     Conservative
estimate
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata)  25
 Conservative estimate
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)  1
Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla)  6
Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca)  1     In the brush on the south side of
the trail as it turns by the first pond
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  9
Swamp Sparrow (Melospiza georgiana)  3
White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis)  5
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  3
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  X
Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus)  1
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  2
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)  X
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  3

Peter Capobianco
New Providence, NJ
www.naturalescapesimagery.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cattle Egret in Barnegat
From: Karmela <kmoneta AT ATT.NET>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 08:06:20 -0400
Currently at Meadowedge Park, corner of Powell Lane and E Bay Ave, Barnegat. 

Karmela Moneta

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How to report NJ bird sightings: