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Updated on Saturday, July 30 at 08:16 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Ural Owl,©BirdQuest

30 Jul rt. 526 Reed sod farm [Bob Dodelson ]
31 Jul Eastern Mercer County Sod Farms [vincent N ]
30 Jul Re: Rain Events ["B.G. Sloan" ]
30 Jul Re: Rain Events [Susan Treesh ]
30 Jul Re: Rain Events [Laurie Larson ]
30 Jul Rain Events [David Bernstein ]
30 Jul How to bird after drenching rains ... in July [Susan Treesh ]
30 Jul Great Sedge Island [Michael Britt ]
30 Jul Sedge Island Trip, LBI State Park [Yong Kong ]
30 Jul Curlew Sandpiper [Harvey Tomlinson ]
29 Jul Forsythe nwr - terns [Sandra Keller ]
29 Jul EBFNWR Wildlife Drive to Remain Open [Marc Virgilio ]
29 Jul Pine Park Purple Martins ["James O'Brien" ]
28 Jul Yong Comment - Bob Dodelson's Herbert Road post on 7-28-2016 [Yong Kong ]
28 Jul Ruff in NJ Meadowlands [Christopher Takacs ]
28 Jul Blue Grosbeak [Bob Dodelson ]
28 Jul Re: Rejected posting to JERSEYBI@LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU [Bob Dodelson ]
28 Jul Bobolinks and yardbirds [Sandra Mc ]
24 Jul birding in late July [Sandra Keller ]
24 Jul Brig - Saturday, July 23 [Mike Mandracchia ]
23 Jul Ruff at DeKorte [Christopher Takacs ]
23 Jul Ruff, Bergen County [Samuel Galick ]
21 Jul Great bay blvd. - brown pelicans [Sandra Keller ]
20 Jul Sep 10-11 Cape May Overnight Pelagic [Paul Guris ]
20 Jul Deerhaven Lake, Gallinules, and closing comments on Pequannock Watershed (part 5) [Louis Bizzarro ]
19 Jul Black Crowned Night Heron [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
18 Jul DeKorte Shorebirds [Christopher Takacs ]
18 Jul Fwd: Brown Booby still at Merrill Creek [Susan Garretson Friedman ]
18 Jul Wildlife Drive Closures Begin August 1st [Marc Virgilio ]
17 Jul 7 Brown Pelicans at 7 Bridges road, Tuckerton [Chemguy NJ ]
17 Jul Waterfowl ["Susie R." ]
17 Jul Bank Swallow flight today [Michael Britt ]
17 Jul Clapper rail chicks and Virginia rail at Brig [Chemguy NJ ]
16 Jul Merrill Creek Reservoir: Brown Booby - Yes [Anders Peltomaa ]
16 Jul Cumberland shorebirding and a bay watch [Sandra Keller ]
16 Jul Re: 2016 Top Year for Threatened and Endangered Bird Nesting Sites on Holgate [Jim Wright ]
16 Jul Brown booby seen today [Susan Treesh ]
16 Jul Caspian Tern - Hyper Humus WMA (Sussex) [Dave Blinder ]
16 Jul No Subject [Anders Peltomaa ]
16 Jul Juv Little Blue Heron [F T Muscara ]
15 Jul Comparison of Downy to Hairy Woodpeckers (Video) [Steve Byland ]
15 Jul Birding at Brig today [Yong Kong ]
15 Jul Least Bittern [Michael Britt ]
15 Jul least terns and whistling ducks [Sandra Keller ]
15 Jul White Ibis, Atlantic County [Samuel Galick ]
15 Jul Re: More on the Warren County Booby [Pete Leland ]
15 Jul (2) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Salem County [Samuel Galick ]
15 Jul 2016 Top Year for Threatened and Endangered Bird Nesting Sites on Holgate [Stuart and Wendy ]
14 Jul More on the Warren County Booby [Larry scacchetti ]
14 Jul Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks [Bill Boyle ]
14 Jul (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks continue, Cape May County [Samuel Galick ]
14 Jul White Ibis - Great Bay Blvd [Ryan Risher ]
13 Jul Raptor feather ID request – Homewoods [Yong Kong ]
13 Jul Brown Booby continues at Merrill Creek [Larry scacchetti ]
13 Jul King and Clapper Rails in Bayonne with 11 Dowitchers [Patricia Hilliard ]
13 Jul Tantilizing Egret [Harvey Tomlinson ]
13 Jul Brown Booby at Merrill Creek [Karmela Moneta ]
12 Jul Kingfishers [Landis Eaton ]
12 Jul Mississippi Kites Nesting in New Jersey [Yong Kong ]
12 Jul Brown Booby, Warren County [Samuel Galick ]
12 Jul Mississippi Kites Nesting in New Jersey [Bill Boyle ]
11 Jul Ruff and Phalarope at Brig ["Marshwren AT comcast.net" ]
11 Jul Baby Bluebird - Video [Steve Byland ]
11 Jul A Red-necked Phalarope chase - failed [Sandra Keller ]
10 Jul Red-necked phalarope at Forsythe today ["Albert, Steven" ]
10 Jul Brig - Saturday, July 9 [Mike Mandracchia ]
10 Jul Seeking long-billed dowitcher photo(s) from Brig on 7-9-2016 [Yong Kong ]
10 Jul Slightly OT:, where did all our wintering juncos go? [Michael Perlin ]
10 Jul Red necked pharalope YES ["Albert, Steven" ]
9 Jul Rainy accidental chase day [Larry scacchetti ]
9 Jul Least Terns [David Bernstein ]
9 Jul Re: Ad. Franklins gull @ Port Liberte / LSP - Hudson Cty [Dom ]
9 Jul Cumberland - shorebird areas - nothing [Sandra Keller ]
9 Jul Least Tern and Franklin's Gull [Michael Britt ]
9 Jul Juv Goldeneye DeKorte [F T Muscara ]
9 Jul Ad. Franklins gull @ Port Liberte / LSP - Hudson Cty [Dom ]

Subject: rt. 526 Reed sod farm
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 20:15:19 -0500
There is a little know branch of the Reed sod farm complex along route 526. If 
you leave Allentown and head towards route 539 on rt 526 you can turn into this 
farm on the right. 


This morning before the rains started this was the only place with shorebirds. 
20 plus Killdeer and 8 to 9 Least Sandpipers. Herbert Rd, Gordon Rd and the 
route 539 farms were shorebird-free 


Last year this spot was particularly good for Bairds Sandpiper. I believe Mary 
Dilea found the first one after a rainstorm in mid August 


Bob Dodelson


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Subject: Eastern Mercer County Sod Farms
From: vincent N <vfn7 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2016 00:50:32 +0000
From 7:30pm to dusk I checked the local remaining sod farms in the vicinity of 
Herbert, Old York and Gordon roads. None of the area is experiencing any road 
flooding. Unfortunately, no shorebirds were seen. Gordon Road fields were the 
only ones with ponding water. The other sod fields have been partly harvested 
so they may be worth checking tomorrow morning. 


Vincent Nichnadowicz: Princeton Junction


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Subject: Re: Rain Events
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 20:47:26 -0400
Had an interesting rain event today. After maybe six hours of continuous
rain this afternoon (sometimes heavy) the rain tapered off. Sitting out on
my deck (which looks out on the Rutgers Preserve) I heard a Common Raven
croaking in the Rutgers Preserve. First time since this winter/spring! :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Sat, Jul 30, 2016 at 7:49 PM, Susan Treesh  wrote:

> Thanks, David and Laurie - Well, without taking undue risks tonight, it
> should be possible to venture out tomorrow and see if anything is around. I
> think flooded fields may pay off as well as reservoirs.  And I'll try to
> make a quick stop at Negri!
>
> I would be interested in seeing reports from Brig tomorrow. There was an
> NJAS trip there today, so it should be possible to compare.
>
> Susan Treesh
>
> Somerset
>
>
>
> On 7/30/2016 7:20 PM, Laurie Larson wrote:
>
>> I understand from social media that the Princeton/Plainsboro area has had
>> 5" this afternoon and it is still raining. At least three water rescues in
>> Princeton and many roads closed. Please do not endanger yourself or
>> first-responders by taking risks in this situation.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Laurie
>> Princeton
>>
>> On Jul 30, 2016, at 7:07 PM, David Bernstein 
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Susan, All,
>>>
>>> Although the rain we are enjoying is not a tropical system, the
>>> possibilities of finding and enjoying "knock downs" from this event are
>>> high. If I have learned one thing from relentlessly birding Hunterdon
>>> County in the past five years, it is this. A rain event is your friend.
>>>
>>>  From Ibis, Little blue Heron, Terns, the odd gull to shorebirds of all
>>> types making the trek south, it is worth the time venturing out pre and
>>> post storm. I can cite dozens of examples of how this strategy has paid
>>> enormous dividends in the area I know and love. One of my favorite examples
>>> is from last September 10 when David Harrison, in advance of a nasty
>>> thunder storm checked the boat launch at Spruce to find two striking
>>> American Golden Plovers who favored many of us with fine views while the
>>> thunder boomed and the rain poured down.
>>>
>>> I bet something interesting is just waiting to be seen right now at
>>> Hannah's Pond at Negri. Right Susan? Donna Schulman?
>>>
>>> Anyhow, it's wise to check any puddle or nearby body of water. You just
>>> might find that Sharp tailed Sandpiper that Bob Dodelson, and the rest of
>>> us are looking for.
>>>
>>> Good birding!
>>>
>>> David S. Bernstein
>>> Berkeley Heights, NJ
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>
>>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
>>> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
>>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
>> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>
>>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Rain Events
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 19:49:16 -0400
Thanks, David and Laurie - Well, without taking undue risks tonight, it 
should be possible to venture out tomorrow and see if anything is 
around. I think flooded fields may pay off as well as reservoirs.  And 
I'll try to make a quick stop at Negri!

I would be interested in seeing reports from Brig tomorrow. There was an 
NJAS trip there today, so it should be possible to compare.

Susan Treesh

Somerset


On 7/30/2016 7:20 PM, Laurie Larson wrote:
> I understand from social media that the Princeton/Plainsboro area has had 5" 
this afternoon and it is still raining. At least three water rescues in 
Princeton and many roads closed. Please do not endanger yourself or 
first-responders by taking risks in this situation. 

>
> Thanks,
> Laurie
> Princeton
>
>> On Jul 30, 2016, at 7:07 PM, David Bernstein  
wrote: 

>>
>> Susan, All,
>>
>> Although the rain we are enjoying is not a tropical system, the 
possibilities of finding and enjoying "knock downs" from this event are high. 
If I have learned one thing from relentlessly birding Hunterdon County in the 
past five years, it is this. A rain event is your friend. 

>>
>> From Ibis, Little blue Heron, Terns, the odd gull to shorebirds of all types 
making the trek south, it is worth the time venturing out pre and post storm. I 
can cite dozens of examples of how this strategy has paid enormous dividends in 
the area I know and love. One of my favorite examples is from last September 10 
when David Harrison, in advance of a nasty thunder storm checked the boat 
launch at Spruce to find two striking American Golden Plovers who favored many 
of us with fine views while the thunder boomed and the rain poured down. 

>>
>> I bet something interesting is just waiting to be seen right now at Hannah's 
Pond at Negri. Right Susan? Donna Schulman? 

>>
>> Anyhow, it's wise to check any puddle or nearby body of water. You just 
might find that Sharp tailed Sandpiper that Bob Dodelson, and the rest of us 
are looking for. 

>>
>> Good birding!
>>
>> David S. Bernstein
>> Berkeley Heights, NJ
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Rain Events
From: Laurie Larson <llarson2 AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 23:20:20 +0000
I understand from social media that the Princeton/Plainsboro area has had 5" 
this afternoon and it is still raining. At least three water rescues in 
Princeton and many roads closed. Please do not endanger yourself or 
first-responders by taking risks in this situation. 


Thanks,
Laurie
Princeton

> On Jul 30, 2016, at 7:07 PM, David Bernstein  wrote:
> 
> Susan, All,
> 
> Although the rain we are enjoying is not a tropical system, the possibilities 
of finding and enjoying "knock downs" from this event are high. If I have 
learned one thing from relentlessly birding Hunterdon County in the past five 
years, it is this. A rain event is your friend. 

> 
> From Ibis, Little blue Heron, Terns, the odd gull to shorebirds of all types 
making the trek south, it is worth the time venturing out pre and post storm. I 
can cite dozens of examples of how this strategy has paid enormous dividends in 
the area I know and love. One of my favorite examples is from last September 10 
when David Harrison, in advance of a nasty thunder storm checked the boat 
launch at Spruce to find two striking American Golden Plovers who favored many 
of us with fine views while the thunder boomed and the rain poured down. 

> 
> I bet something interesting is just waiting to be seen right now at Hannah's 
Pond at Negri. Right Susan? Donna Schulman? 

> 
> Anyhow, it's wise to check any puddle or nearby body of water. You just might 
find that Sharp tailed Sandpiper that Bob Dodelson, and the rest of us are 
looking for. 

> 
> Good birding!
> 
> David S. Bernstein
> Berkeley Heights, NJ
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Rain Events
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 19:07:14 -0400
Susan, All,

Although the rain we are enjoying is not a tropical system, the possibilities 
of finding and enjoying "knock downs" from this event are high. If I have 
learned one thing from relentlessly birding Hunterdon County in the past five 
years, it is this. A rain event is your friend. 


From Ibis, Little blue Heron, Terns, the odd gull to shorebirds of all types 
making the trek south, it is worth the time venturing out pre and post storm. I 
can cite dozens of examples of how this strategy has paid enormous dividends in 
the area I know and love. One of my favorite examples is from last September 10 
when David Harrison, in advance of a nasty thunder storm checked the boat 
launch at Spruce to find two striking American Golden Plovers who favored many 
of us with fine views while the thunder boomed and the rain poured down. 


I bet something interesting is just waiting to be seen right now at Hannah's 
Pond at Negri. Right Susan? Donna Schulman? 


Anyhow, it's wise to check any puddle or nearby body of water. You just might 
find that Sharp tailed Sandpiper that Bob Dodelson, and the rest of us are 
looking for. 


Good birding!

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ

Sent from my iPad


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: How to bird after drenching rains ... in July
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 16:56:27 -0400
Hi Jerseybirders -

We are really getting some exceptional rainstorms here in Central Jersey 
right now, and I would be interested in seeing a discussion of  how to 
bird after such storms.  This isn't a tropical system, so those 
guidelines (checking inland reservoirs, etc.) would not necessarily 
apply.  And it's July, not yet August, so would there be much to expect 
in the way of grasspipers?  I assume southward bound migrating 
passerines come down in storms like this just as they do in spring - but 
it's not nighttime (and this storm extends way north).

I am expecting a LOT of flooded fields around here, so am laying plans 
to check those tomorrow. But maybe it should be immediately after a 
storm? I'd love to see a discussion from the many experts on this list 
on their thoughts on how to bird after a July storm system.  I think 
many on the whole list would be interested.

Susan Treesh

Somerset



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Great Sedge Island
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 16:05:27 -0400
Yong Kong and I yaked the Great Sedge Island this AM. Best bird was the RED
KNOT found by Alex Bernzweig's friend.

More details, full checklist, and two pics here:

https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2016/07/30/12-a-sandwich/

Mike Britt
Bayonne


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Sedge Island Trip, LBI State Park
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 15:39:25 -0400
Thank you Harvey !!! You inspired me to express more interest in birds and 
think outside of the box on bird ID, otherwise, I would spend more time at home 
backyard woods trying to improve bird habiat, either by girdling tress or 
transplant native species, or even plant an acorn or black cherry seeds hoping 
someday those seeds would turn into mighty oaks or mature cherry trees with 
full of fruit. 


No use talking about my “walk up” Curlew the other day. Reason ? I so want 
to share the location/visit with other birders but, unfortunately, it is 
private land. 


But I will talk about my Sedge Island Trip at LBI State Park today. Mike B. 
invited me and gave me a personal birding tour of this fantastic place. Second 
high-light of the trip was eavesdropping on his conversation with two Jbirders 
who were on a double-seat kayak. Combined birding knowledge between these three 
birders was beyond my imagination. 


Inspired by Mike’s invitation to be my personal bird-guide for the day, I 
would like to offer to loan my two kayaks to those Jbirders who have no access 
to a Kayak and would like visit Sedge Island. If you do not have a carrier, any 
open bed pick-up truck should be enough to haul both 8 ft. and 9.5 ft. kayaks. 
The 8fter itself may be able to fit inside of a full size SUV. Just need to 
make an arrangement for pick up from my house. 


Some photos from today’s trip on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Curlew Sandpiper
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Jul 2016 05:53:00 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
Yong will probably have my head for posting this but the guy works harder
than anyone I know to find birds and yesterday he hit Gold. I'm not sure
why he didn't post, maybe because us mere mortals cannot access the
property as it's private, but he found and photographed a Beautiful Male
Curlew sandpiper in full breeding plumage. His pics are superb leaving no
doubt what so ever as to the ID.
Hopefully tonight he'll put them up to Flickr.
Please don't ask him about the location because it is on private property,
but birds fly and this mud flat is tidal.
This is NOT the bird that was at Heislerville most of May. Can't imagine
how good Heislerville might be in the fall if it was pulled down but at
least Brig is open a while longer.
I had an interesting bird at Stone Harbor yesterday ( Wetlands Institute at
the end of the path to the channel).
Unfortunately it was very distant and I was shooting into the sun. What
drew my attention to it was it's feeding habit. It was "picking" as it
moved along the mud flat.
I posted it to my Flickr w/ a few notes I recorded on my iPhone.
The pic is Heavily cropped and run thru filters. There are a lot of
"artifacts" as a result.
KUDOS again to Yong!
His lunch time bird blitz's are going to yield another goodie no doubt.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
Good Fall Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del haven


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Forsythe nwr - terns
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 19:47:39 -0400
Hello,
 I hit here for a few hours this afternoon. Figuring this was my last shot 
before it 

closed! Well, turns out its remaining open for a bit! I hope through next 
weekend. 

I would love to get back at medium tide - see some exposed mud. Shorebirds 
around 

this afternoon, but mainly roosting. It was high tide and not much area for 
feeding! 

 The star of the afternoon was the terns. Especially the Least - 47. Wow! 
That's 

not my highest number for a single location. That belongs to the Meadows in
Cape May Point! Anyway, 13 were together at that NE corner of the place.
Feeding at that pipe where water was flowing in. So close! You photographers 
out 

there would have loved that! I was enjoying a study in how the Least Tern size 
seems to change as it changes the angle of it wings. And change they did! A 
Tern 

on caffeine is the Least! Fun to watch. I can go back and forth with them - at 
first 

they seem fairly big, long winged, etc. And then the wings get angled back and 
I think 

I am looking at something different! Thats how much the wing determines things 
on 

that species. All the terns adjust their wing angle - it just seems to make a 
huge 

impression with the Least for some reason.
 Also in that area - 2 Common Terns and 2 Royal Terns. Plus the usual. Forsters 

Terns are around in a variety and stage of various plumages. A nice study.

Nature notes - Swamp Rose Mallow is in full bloom. Check out the Gull Pond area 

for a great look!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: EBFNWR Wildlife Drive to Remain Open
From: Marc Virgilio <marc_virgilio AT FWS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 15:42:47 -0400
Hi Everyone,

Due to unexpected delays, repairs to the Wildlife Drive will NOT begin on 
Monday August 1st. The Drive and adjacent trails will remain FULLY OPEN until 
further notice. 


Please continue checking our website and Facebook page regularly as 
construction may begin with short notice. We will post updated closure 
information as soon as it is known. 


If you have any questions, please contact me at Marc_Virgilio AT fws.gov or call 
our Visitor Center at 609-652-1665. 


Marc Virgilio


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Pine Park Purple Martins
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2016 03:06:03 +0000
Quite a crop this year...I counted at least 12 young and 2 adults. Parents were 
taking turns feeding them on the wing. Watched also as they drove off a crow 
and kingbird! 


https://flic.kr/p/Ka457d


[https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8847/28325788640_7d20c7cfee_b.jpg][https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8847/28325788640_7d20c7cfee_b.jpg] 


Also seen were 1 brown thrasher, 12 chipping sparrows, 12 goldfinch, 12 
housefinch, 12 cedar waxwing, 5 wood duck 


https://flic.kr/p/KqKjdS

1 great egret, 1 rth, 1 tv, 1 eastern pewee, a family of flickers and at least 
12 chimney swifts feeding low on the ballfields. Great birding in the heat! 



[https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8777/28503388042_9c35d2c175_b.jpg][https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8777/28503388042_9c35d2c175_b.jpg] 




How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Yong Comment - Bob Dodelson's Herbert Road post on 7-28-2016
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 19:29:59 -0400
I have been feeling a bit of funk lately, but Bob D. kind of took me out of 
it. So, I will contribute to JBirds as my way of saying thank you to Bob.

I too recently started my fast-n-furious lunch time shorebird search around 
the Johnson sod farm. Last week was just two Least. Today, action picked up 
a bit by observing several semipalmated plovers and many more Least. They 
were all observed on bare dirt where sod had been recently scraped off.

Negative aspects of my fast-n-furious lunch time shorebird search is once I 
am uncertain of ID of a bird, I just have to move on as I do not have the 
time to study the bird. Today was that case. Found an interesting bird 
standing next to a Killdeer but had to move on. I was lucky in that I even 
managed to take one photo before my hand moved to put the truck into the "D" 
for Drive for back to work.

Some photos on my Flicker.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County

-----Original Message----- 
From: Bob Dodelson
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 9:05 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Rejected posting to JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU

On 07/28/16, LISTSERV AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU wrote:

Your posting to the JERSEYBI list has been rejected because it only contains
material in a format disallowed by the list configuration. The list is
configured to remove unwanted material and process the remaining text. 
However,
in this case, there would be nothing left after removing the disallowed
material. You may want to resend your message in plain text, which is always
allowed.





I have seen a pair separately over the past few days across from 59 Herbert 
Road. There is a little pull off near the "Preserved Farmland" sign and the 
bird (a male today) worked the field before flying across the road.

I have been checking the sod farms along Herbert Road and route 539 for 
several weeks now with little to show for it except for an occasional 
Killdeer.

I'm hoping that 2016 will surpass the fall of 2015 when I saw 17 shorebird 
species (and I know I missed at least one other.. a Stilt Sandpiper that 
Rick Wright found).

Please help me find a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper or other "mega" tick in the 
coming weeks

Bob Dodelson


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Subject: Ruff in NJ Meadowlands
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 16:24:12 -0400
The NJ Meadowlands Ruff was relocated this afternoon. New Jersey Sports &
Exposition Authority and Bergen County Audubon Society will hold an open
walk in Harrier Meadow to see the Ruff Friday July 29 from 8 am to 11 am.
The walk is limited to viewing of the rare shorebird. This will not be a
regular Harrier Meadow walk. Mosquitoes and flies can be horrible here this
time of year so please wear appropriate clothing and bug spray. There is no
guarantee that the bird will be seen. We will scout the area prior to the
walk to locate the bird so we don't spook it. Scopes may be needed to view
the Ruff. Heavy rain will cancel the event. We will hold the walk if the
rain is on and off.

View more details https://www.facebook.com/events/1777661602498596/

Thanks, Chris Takacs
Lyndhurst


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Subject: Blue Grosbeak
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 08:07:43 -0500
The bird I saw today was an adult Blue Grosbeak

Sorry for the confusion

Bob Dodelson


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Subject: Re: Rejected posting to JERSEYBI@LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 08:05:52 -0500
 
 
 
On 07/28/16, LISTSERV AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU wrote:
 
Your posting to the JERSEYBI list has been rejected because it only contains
material in a format disallowed by the list configuration. The list is
configured to remove unwanted material and process the remaining text. However,
in this case, there would be nothing left after removing the disallowed
material. You may want to resend your message in plain text, which is always
allowed.





I have seen a pair separately over the past few days across from 59 Herbert 
Road. There is a little pull off near the "Preserved Farmland" sign and the 
bird (a male today) worked the field before flying across the road. 


I have been checking the sod farms along Herbert Road and route 539 for several 
weeks now with little to show for it except for an occasional Killdeer. 


I'm hoping that 2016 will surpass the fall of 2015 when I saw 17 shorebird 
species (and I know I missed at least one other.. a Stilt Sandpiper that Rick 
Wright found). 


Please help me find a Sharp-tailed Sandpiper or other "mega" tick in the coming 
weeks 


Bob Dodelson


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Bobolinks and yardbirds
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb AT EMBARQMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 00:05:50 -0400
Hello JBirders: 

Ran into a local farmer who has Boblinks nesting on his property. He said he 
had a great year for them and that they were everywhere in his fields. He 
practices the delay mowing of the hay fields and has seen a steady increase in 
the birds. He was very surprised that they were everywhere two nights ago and 
yesterday not one was seen. 


This late spring early summer, I was listening for Indigo Bunting and not 
hearing its call. I was getting concerned that maybe this year I wouldn't have 
one in the yard. Well one finally did arrive and has been calling non-stop each 
day. Besides the House Wrens and Fish Crow, it had been, for weeks, the only 
bird calling regularly. This year I finally saw the female. 


The past few days have brought some new birds. Just yesterday, a Towhee started 
calling again in the back woods after a long silence. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, 
Cedar Waxwings and Goldfinch are around. A small fallout of Robins early this 
morning. 


Sandy McNicol 
Kingwood Township 


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Subject: birding in late July
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 17:20:39 -0400
Hello,
 Without a local shorebird spot. It's swallow flocks. Everything but Martins 
and 

Cliff Swallow I had this afternoon. Plus one never knows what one will see.
I had a Summer Tanager at Chestnut Branch Park in Gloucester County. I am
assuming a post breeding wanderer, doesn't seem like quite the proper habitat
for breeding. But who knows? Birds can adapt somewhat.

Butterfly notes - Pecks and Sachem Skippers and Tiger Swallowtails are easy to
spot now.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Brig - Saturday, July 23
From: Mike Mandracchia <mmandrake AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Jul 2016 09:55:56 -0400
Dear Jersey Birders:  Yesterday, I led New Jersey Audubon's All Things 
Birds Program's Trip to the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge 
(Brig). I like to thank Pete Bascinski for his assistance. Although it 
was a hot day, a dry southerly breeze kept wildlife drive out in the 
marsh fairly comfortable while suppressing
the Greenhead Fly activity to a tolerable level. 
 
The "Fall" Shorebird migration is in full swing with 13 species for the 
Day, with increasing numbers of Semipalmated Sandpipers and Dowitchers 
of both species present.   We had a total of 73 species for the two 
trips around the Dikes. Eastern Willet numbers are way down and we only 
had a single Black-bellied Plover
Highlights for the Day included a pair of Bobolinks on the South Dike, a 
hunting Peregrine Falcon over the Gull Pond, three Little Blue Herons 
and a Western Sandpiper in almost its full breeding plumage. 
   
Pete and my next trip for NJ Audubon to Brig is in two weeks, Saturday, 
August 6.

  Good Birding

  Mike Mandracchia
  Jackson


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Subject: Ruff at DeKorte
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 21:42:24 -0400
The Ruff was relocated as the tide in the shorebird pool dropped exposing
some edge and mudflat. I was seen from the Marsh Discovery Trail this
evening at 7:50 pm looking east towards the Harmon Cove Towers in Secaucus.
The bird was actively feeding along the railroad track edge of the park.
Scope views were all we had at this time. DeKorte will open it's gates
approximately 7 am Sunday. The water level in the impoundment should still
be up at 7 am and will drop throughout the morning exposing lots of
mudflats.

Good Luck, Good Birding,

 Chris Takacs
Lyndhurst


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Subject: Ruff, Bergen County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Jul 2016 09:33:48 -0400
David Bernstein reports:

Ruff in partial breeding plumage at DeKorte. Marsh Discovery Trail looking back 
towards parking area. 


https://goo.gl/maps/GQc6cSgXLKE2

Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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Subject: Great bay blvd. - brown pelicans
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 18:31:56 -0400
Hello,
 Marilyn and I had a little change of pace. Thought about Forsythe, but wanted 

to see about Pelicans.... Seven bridges Rd. is one of the best spots I know of 
to see. 

And we had 8! At the end. They were feeding out in the inlet. A pleasant 
surprise 

was Salt marsh Sparrow. Those skulkers were being visible. I find that they 
will pish 

up, and sure enough, I see 2 dive into the reeds at the end of the road, I 
pish, they 

appear! No seaside sparrows though. Interesting. Since I don't usually bird 
here 

in July, can't say if that is normal for Seaside.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Sep 10-11 Cape May Overnight Pelagic
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 21:29:28 -0400
We are running a trip out of Cape May to the deep (over 6,00') waters beyond 
the edge of the Continental Shelf. The trip will leave at 10:30 PM and return 
at approximately 4:30 PM the next day. The cost is $215 per person. We still 
have a lot of spaces to fill on this one! 


Past trips of ours in the Mid-Atlantic region at this time of year have found 
great birds like FEA'S PETREL (once), HERALD/TRINDADE PETREL (once), 
BLACK-CAPPEP PETREL (several times), BAND-RUMPED and LEACH'S STORM-PETRELS 
(most trips, usually in small numbers), WHITE-FACED STORM-PETREL (multiple 
trips), SOUTH POLAR SKUA (multiple trips), LONG-TAILED JAEGER (multiple trips), 
SABINE'S GULL (once), BRIDLED TERM (multiple trips), and more regular species 
like CORY'S, GREAT, and AUDUBON'S SHEARWATERS, WILSON'S STORM-PETREL, and 
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE. We've also found good cetaceans in these deep waters such 
as CUVIER'S BEAKED WHALE, PILOT WHALE, RISSO'S DOLPHIN, and even STRIPED 
DOLPHIN. 


We will be aboard the approximately 100' long ATLANTIC STAR. Our plan is to 
head out to the deep waters beyond the edge of the Continental Shelf in the 
dark and set out a chum slick. We will spend some time at first light scanning 
the storm-petrel flock since this has been our best method for finding 
Band-rumped and Leach's Storm-Petrels. When we feel we've covered the slick 
well, we'll work other areas until we head for home. We expect to spend most of 
our time in New Jersey waters though, depending upon the water conditions, we 
may spend much of our offshore time in waters also counted for Delaware. 


Sleeping conditions are roughly camping style, and the choice of sleeping space 
will be determined by the order people signed up. People who sign up early get 
first pick of where they wish to sleep. Sleeping bags and ground pads are the 
way to go, and people will be sleeping on benches, the cabin floor, and on the 
upper deck. We will limit the number of participants so as not to overcrowd the 
boat. 


See Life Paulagics always provides friendly, helpful, and approachable leaders 
for all of our trips. We use radios to get the word of any sightings around the 
boat quickly. It is important to us to get the participants on the birds and 
make sure they are comfortable with the IDs, not just create a good trip list. 


Be sure to check out our web site for information on how to sign up, and to 
review our policies. If you have any questions or need more information, please 
feel free to contact us by e-mail or phone. 


Hope to see you aboard!

-- 
Paul A. Guris
See Life Paulagics
PO Box 161
Green Lane, PA  18054
215-234-6805
www.paulagics.com
paulagics.com AT gmail.com
info AT paulagics.com


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Subject: Deerhaven Lake, Gallinules, and closing comments on Pequannock Watershed (part 5)
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 12:39:15 -0400
Hello jerseybirders,

On Friday, July 15th, I joined Jonathan Klizas and Roger Johnson in an
excursion to find the nesting Gallinules at Deerhaven Lake. Jonathan, who
many of you know from his MocosocoBirds website/blog, was the man who
originally found Gallinule at the lake in 2013, and confirmed nesting of
the species last year when a pair of birds with two young were observed. I
was hoping his streak of good luck would continue with me tagging along.

The three of us took Jonathan's classic route to the spot where the
Gallinules are always present. Some considerable bushwhacking was required
in order to reach this particular part of the lake shore, but we were up to
the task. Once we arrived, a small break in the vegetation allowed Jonathan
to set up his scope, and we began scanning. It didn't take too long before
Jonathan said the words I wanted to hear: "I've got a Gallinule!". An adult
bird was swimming and wading in a dry section of phrags about 100-150 yards
across the water from us. With my binoculars, it was a small speck, almost
unidentifiable, but Jonathan's scope view was considerably better, showing
the bird's bright orange bill and striped sides. Once the Gallinule went
out of sight, we advanced along the shoreline in an attempt to relocate it.
Not only was the original bird re-found, but also a second adult bird and a
smaller chick, along with a Pied-billed Grebe. Unfortunately, no Grebe
chicks were discovered.

A heavily cropped photo of two Gallinules (including the chick) can be
found on Jonathan's website here:

https://mocosocobirds.com/

After watching the birds for a while, we headed back to the cars and birded
the western section of Deerhaven off of Green Pond Road. There wasn't too
much area on this side, and nothing overly interesting presented itself, so
we decided to call it a day early with the impending heat approaching. It
was a great day with two excellent birders and a fulfilling way to end the
nesting season.

So, with that, my 2016 Pequannock Watershed and Wawayanda breeding bird
survey has come to an end. I ended up with 109 species of birds that ranged
from possible to confirmed for nesting, not including Great Horned Owl and
American Woodcock which were confirmed by Fred Virrazzi. I have been vocal
about my "misses", but I'd like to take some time to appreciate all of the
birds that I saw and heard during my trips. They ranged from the most
common of avian creatures that I could get literally by looking out my
window, but also some of the rarest nesters in NJ, a few of them being
threatened species. I fear that many of the birds I found will become rarer
and rarer as time goes on, with a handful (Golden-crowned Kinglet,
Golden-winged Warbler, Canada Warbler, Winter Wren) no longer being nesting
birds in the state by the time I reach my 40's and 50's. Many species of
birds, however, appear to be doing quite well, such as Scarlet Tanager,
Red-eyed Vireo, Veery, Ovenbird, American Redstart, Gray Catbird, and
others. I was also encouraged at the number of Wood Thrushes I heard and
saw, as well as the budding population of Cerulean Warblers that are now
present along Clinton Road. Hopefully, they will continue to thrive in the
years to come.

A quick note, as I've gotten some messages about it: throughout the
duration of my survey, I kept a general "Pequannock/surrounding areas"
eBird list for birds I found in the watershed. I started it because my
first two trips were very expansive and netted me almost 100 species, so I
was lazy and decided to lump them into the same checklist. After the
initial surge, I only added species to this list if they were new for the
location. The Pequannock Watershed is quite vast, spanning three NJ
counties, but the specific checklist was placed in the middle of the
watershed in Passaic County.  I apologize for confusing or irritating
anyone who is a stickler for county birding.

In closing, I'd like to say to everyone who helped and encouraged me
throughout my efforts: Thank you! Your support was much appreciated. I had
a great time doing this (although, admittedly, I had some rough patches!),
and it was made even better by the fact that others were enjoying my
reports. Next year I will absolutely do something similar, perhaps this
time with the Delaware Water Gap, Mahlon Dickerson/Sparta Mountain, or
Stokes/High Point. Can't wait for that.

Good birding everyone,

Louis Bizzarro
Monroe Township


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Subject: Black Crowned Night Heron
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Jul 2016 16:20:44 +0000
A Black Crowned Night Heron was on Sunset Lake in Asbury Park on Sunday.
There has been a BCNH on the lake for years, but it is always nice to see that 
it still is there, and that the off spring continues. 


Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad


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Subject: DeKorte Shorebirds
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 20:57:59 -0400
It looks like the tides will favor shorebird viewing at DeKorte for the
next few days. The Marsh Discovery Trail has a tidal element to it for now.
It seems to follow about 3-4 hours after low tide on the Berry's Creek or
Hackensack River tide chart. For example low tide was 3pm today and at 7pm
the trail still held many shorebirds as there was still exposed mud and a
lot of edge area for them. I had 25 Short-billed Dowitchers, 60+ assorted
Yellowlegs, 300+ Semi-palmated Sandpipers, 40 Least Sandpipers and a
Solitary Sandpiper.
Tuesday's low tide is 3:45 am so daybreak through 9 am should hold
sandpipers along Marsh Discovery Trail in the Shorebird pools. 12 hours
later in the evening should be good as well. 6-7am should still have
mudflat in the Teal Pool near the Amvets Carillon, but that will disappear
fast. Everyday the low tide will be approximately 45 minutes later so
Wednesday and Thursday should still be good in the morning.
This weekend with Low Tide at 6:30 am or so on Saturday should have lots of
mudflat in the Saw Mill and Teal Pool.
Among other sightings today were 5 Least Bitterns in the am, 15 Forster's
Terns feeding young, Swallows on the move and nice numbers of Snowy and
Great Egrets.
I will try to keep the shorebirds up to date at DeKorte and The Meadowlands
through the NJ Meadowlands Nature Group on Facebook.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/915932508467477/

Good Birding
Chris Takacs
Lyndhurst


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Subject: Fwd: Brown Booby still at Merrill Creek
From: Susan Garretson Friedman <susangarretsonfriedman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 18:43:16 -0400
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Susan Garretson Friedman 
> Date: July 18, 2016 at 6:01:24 PM EDT
> To: JerseyBirds AT princeton.edu
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Brown Booby still at Merrill Creek
> 
> Right now, along with a lovely post-storm rainbow.
> 
> Susan GF
> In Washington,NJ
> 
> Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Wildlife Drive Closures Begin August 1st
From: Marc Virgilio <marc_virgilio AT FWS.GOV>
Date: Mon, 18 Jul 2016 18:00:01 -0400
The Refuge and our contractors have finalized dates for the final round of 
construction to make the Wildlife Drive more resilient to future storms. Work 
is scheduled to begin on August 1st to rebuild Long Dike, which bisects the 
West Pool, and replace the failing Water Control Structure at the northeast 
corner of East Dike. The entire Drive will also be regraded and surfaced with 
recycled crushed concrete to create a more wear resistant surface. Work is 
anticipated to continue through September of 2016. 


Beginning August 1st and until further notice: 

The Wildlife Drive, Songbird, and Jen’s Trails will be OPEN on weekends to 
two-way traffic. Visitors will U-turn at the Turtle Cove observation platform 
on the South Dike and exit the way they entered. 


The Wildlife Drive, Songbird, and Jen’s Trails will be CLOSED on weekdays 
until approximately 4:30pm and then OPEN until sunset. 

When the Drive is open, the construction zones will be fenced and off limits to 
visitors. Please refrain from entering any work areas even when construction 
workers are not present. 


Please check our website and Facebook page regularly for updates as to the 
current status of the drive. We will post regular updates and any closure 
changes as soon as they are known. 


If you have any questions, please contact Wildlife Biologist Marc Virgilio at 
Marc_Virgilio AT fws.gov. 



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Subject: 7 Brown Pelicans at 7 Bridges road, Tuckerton
From: Chemguy NJ <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 14:16:20 -0400
Great photo op of 7 Brown Pelicans sitting on pilings at the Cape Horn
marina on 7 Bridges road.  Both adult and immature birds present.  Joe
Palumbo/Liz Bender/Nancy Fritz


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Subject: Waterfowl
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 12:58:46 -0400
4 young Wood Ducks on the "pond" on Vernoy Road outside of Califon and
19-20 Common Mergansers on the South Branch, just downstream from the
bridge on Vernoy Road.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon


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Subject: Bank Swallow flight today
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 11:33:15 -0400
I tallied 12 BANK SWALLOWS at Kearny Marsh this AM. They were moving NE-SW
across the marsh in small groups and I probably could've tallied more had I
remained stationed out in the open lake.

Twenty-six LEAST TERNS were on the radio station's railing at Kearny East.

A half-grown COYOTE was patrolling Keegan Landfill but unfortunately it had
a nasty case of mange.

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Clapper rail chicks and Virginia rail at Brig
From: Chemguy NJ <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 11:32:30 -0400
At 0800 this morning along the south dike (south side) approx 100 yards
from the beginning of the road at semi-high tide, there were an adult
clapper rail with 3 young feeding out in the open and an adult Virginia
rail close by also plainly visible.  No white ibis nor avocets.  Very
little breeze and a plethora of greenheads.  I will load photos on my
computer and email to those who might be interested. Photos of the rails -
not the greenheads.  Joe Palumbo/Liz Bender/Nancy Fritz


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Subject: Merrill Creek Reservoir: Brown Booby - Yes
From: Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 21:07:21 -0400
Hi all,
First, apologies for my errant email earlier today when I tried to
re-subscribe to the list.

My friend James Muchmore and I ventured out in the afternoon and we were
happy to find the Brown Booby continuing at the reservoir.

good birding,

Anders Peltomaa
Mannahatta


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Subject: Cumberland shorebirding and a bay watch
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 16:59:05 -0400
Hello,
     Marilyn and I had a low tide afternoon around Cumberland. No White Ibis
or Avocets down here! The best shorebirding was at Bivalve. We scanned
from High Street. Not much variety. Yet. Heislerville Cove was flooded when
we got there. And the impoundments are flooded. The north impoundment
was a treat - seeing baby night-herons and corms. We watched one young
night-heron taking its first flight. It didn't get far!
     Moore's Beach is one of the best spots for tracking down county rarities.
We did have 2 Black Scoters - in the cove area to the north. We always get
something lingering down here. 
 We started at a small park along Rt. 49. Just checking for Whistling-ducks! 

No luck! But we will keep checking the park lakes around!

Butterfly notes - surprisingly slow. Probably the clouds.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Re: 2016 Top Year for Threatened and Endangered Bird Nesting Sites on Holgate
From: Jim Wright <wrightjamesb AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 16:27:10 -0400
Wei

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 15, 2016, at 11:46 AM, David La Puma  wrote:
> 
> Thanks for forwarding this, Wendy! Truly a wonderful success story, and 
another reminder of the importance of natural disturbance to create and 
maintain habitat for biodiversity. Not to undermine the destruction and loss 
caused by Superstorm Sandy, but only to point out that so many of our natural 
disturbance processes (fire, seasonal flooding, beaver dams, etc.) have been 
mitigated or halted by humans, leading to knock-on negative effects to the 
nature we so value. 

> 
> Always nice to see some positive news coming out about our endangered and 
threatened species. Kudos to all those involved in the study and protection of 
them! 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> David 
> 
> ________________________
> David A. La Puma, PhD
> Cape May, New Jersey
> 
> e: david AT woodcreeper.com
> c: 732.447.4894
> w: http://www.woodcreeper.com
> 
> 
> “Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - 
Amelia Earhart 

> 
>> On Jul 15, 2016, at 11:33 AM, Stuart and Wendy  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Jerseybirders
>> 
>> Below is an article of interest from The Sandpiper newspaper
>> 
>> Wendy Malmid
>> MonroeTwp, NJ
>> 
>> 
>> This Year Is Tops for Threatened and Endangered Bird Nesting Sites on 
Holgate 

>> Jul 14, 2016
>> 
>> 
>> The overwash areas of Holgate have been very good to piping plovers this 
year and to other beach nesting birds, including least terns and American 
oystercatchers. 

>> 
>> “If there is one thing to take away from our conversation is that 
Hurricane Sandy was not a bad thing for plovers,” said Paul Castelli, lead 
wildlife biologist at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, which 
owns and manages the wilderness areas of Holgate and Little Beach in Little Egg 
Inlet. 

>> 
>> Beach-nesting birds prefer areas that are sparsely vegetated and flat so 
they can better see predators approaching and their fledglings can negotiate 
their way to the surf for their first meals of organisms living in the surf 
zone. 

>> 
>> What Superstorm Sandy did in October 2012 was send a series of waves right 
over much of the Holgate wilderness area, flattening dunes and killing 
vegetation. It was a loss for some nesting birds, but a boon for beach nesters. 

>> 
>> So far this year, volunteers and scientists have counted 77 piping plovers 
on Holgate and Little Beach –mostly on Holgate – and 55 piping plover nests 
that have fledged over 30 chicks. In addition there have been 51 American 
oystercatcher nests and 427 adult least terns with 155 chicks. 

>> 
>> “It’s been very busy down there,” said Castelli. “These are the 
largest numbers of beach-nesting birds we’ve ever seen, or at least in recent 
years. It’s a combination of over-wash areas (for nesting) and good habitat 
management and protection.” 

>> 
>> Castelli said last year was also a good year contributing to plover numbers, 
but the species is still considered in decline in New Jersey and is on both the 
federal and state endangered list and needing protection. In 2015, there were 
24 nesting pairs, double the number that nested in 2014. Now it has doubled 
again. 

>> 
>> Least terns are also on both lists, and the American Oystercatcher is a 
species of concern in New Jersey. Foxes and raccoons are the worse predators of 
nests, but those have been kept under control, and the practice of enclosing 
nests to keep predators out while allowing birds in and out has been carried 
out by volunteers. 

>> 
>> “Mostly it’s the sheer numbers of people that we need to protect them 
from,” said Castelli. “I know it’s controversial to close beaches to 
people, but it really pays off, especially in years like this.” 

>> 
>> This year, Jonathan Cohen and an intern Michelle Stantial from the State 
University of New York, Syracuse, College of Environmental Sciences and 
Forestry, have been banding the birds. 

>> 
>> “This makes it easier to better calculate which birds are successful at 
breeding, which birds are re-nesting and which birds are leaving to go to Cape 
May or somewhere else to nest. It’s a big deal to get a handle on the 
behavior of an endangered species,” said Castelli. “Banding is only done by 
individuals that are trained and have a high level of competency,” he added. 

>> 
>> Plovers and other shorebirds are just starting to migrate south, a process 
that goes on for about two months. Ones that are landing to rest and fuel up at 
Holgate today may have come from as far away as Canada’s shores. 

>> 
>> The Edwin B. Forsythe Wildlife Management Area is run under the auspices of 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This year the service joined with the 
nonprofit Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey and its state coordinator 
and manager for the beach nesting birds project, Todd Pover. 

>> 
>> According to Pover, piping plovers have very strong site fidelity, so adults 
tend to come back to the same site year after year, often to the same patch of 
beach. The young will return to the same patch of beach but have to lay claim 
to their own territory as existing pairs fight for theirs. This territorial 
fight may be why a single nesting pair of plovers has staked a claim on the tip 
of Island Beach State Park, closing that area to fishermen through the summer. 

>> 
>> Pover hires seasonal workers to inform tourists on why the Holgate 
Wilderness Area is closed during the summer and the importance of the 
wilderness beach to beach-nesting birds. The Holgate Wilderness Area can be 
visited when volunteers are there for one-hour guided walks that start at the 
Holgate bulkhead. Be prepared for walking, wear appropriate clothing, and bring 
water, sunscreen and insect repellent. Loaner binoculars and pamphlets are 
provided. 

>> 
>> The shorebird tour is held Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10 to 11 a.m. thru 
Sept. 1. The Ever-Shifting Sands tour is held on Thursdays from 10 to 11 a.m., 
and a Wilderness Walk is held on Fridays, Beachcombing held on Sundays, same 
time. If guides are not available, then the tours are canceled. 

>> 
>> For more information, call 609-652-1665.
>> 
>> — Pat Johnson
>> 
>> 
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Brown booby seen today
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 14:50:28 -0400
Jerseybirders, just passing along that ebird reports still have the 
brown booby as present at Merrill today.  I wasn't there myself, but saw 
the reports just on ebird, so I am passing it along to the list.

Susan Treesh

Somerset



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Subject: Caspian Tern - Hyper Humus WMA (Sussex)
From: Dave Blinder <daveblinderphotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 13:43:23 -0400
Apologize for delayed report, my ebird mobile did not transmit at time of
sighting 10:00AM this morning.

Large white tern w/ obvious bright red bill was actively fishing, and
locally make 2 swoops directly overhead.  My experience with Caspian is
limited but I referenced Cornell's photos mobily and felt comfortable with
the ID.

Per the Sussex bird club's map, the bird was working both Pond #1 and Pond
#2 at the time.  I was photographing insects and had no gear to image a
bird in flight (of course!).

Hyper Humus WMA map here if reference needed -
https://theboydswebsite.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/hyper2x3.jpg


*Dave Blinder*
Denville, NJ
http://daveblinder.com
http://facebook.com/daveblinderphotography
http://youtube.com/daveblinder1


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Subject: No Subject
From: Anders Peltomaa <anders.peltomaa AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 12:17:02 -0400
Set mail


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Subject: Juv Little Blue Heron
From: F T Muscara <ctmuscara AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 Jul 2016 09:40:49 -0400
Today at 7:30 am to 9:30 am at Oldham Pond in North Haledon NJ from High
Mountain Rd,. there was a juvenile little blue heron.


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Subject: Comparison of Downy to Hairy Woodpeckers (Video)
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 22:17:42 -0400
I got a nice video of Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers side-by-side on my feeders 
this afternoon. I even got a Red-bellied Woodpecker at the end for a final 
comparison of size. 


High-def 4k video can be seen at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/28301026606/

Steve Byland
Warren Township
sbbyland at aol.com


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Subject: Birding at Brig today
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 19:40:44 -0400
Homewoods red-shouldered hawk was so vocal this morning in the backyards woods 
and even til noon. Also, saw one of the most coolest box turtle I have ever 
seen, in my own backyard lawn. I had no interest. 


Reason ? My bird brain and heart was at Kimble Beach hoping refind HT’s egret 
and move onto Goshen Landing Road and end at Jakes Landing, but that did not 
happened as well, afraid of shore traffic. 


So I head over to Brig in search of shorebirds. While driving home, I came to a 
realization that it does not matter how many cool and rare shorebirds I do 
find, I am never going to be happy and the trip will be a failed one. I was 
never this kind of birder until recently. I need a wake up call. I miss my old 
birding days in search of birds at homewoods and home patch. 


My high light is a North Jersey Birder who made an extra effort to stop and 
talked to me. Thank you Bruce !!!. Some photos from my trip in my Flicker. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: Least Bittern
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 15:31:01 -0400
Jerseybirders,

It looks like I just resurrected my blog...I know some of you will be very
happy. My re-launch post is on Least Bittern.

https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2016/07/15/least-bittern-learnings/

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: least terns and whistling ducks
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 14:19:06 -0400
Hello,
    I wonder how many Whistling ducks in the state?? They have to be breeding
somewhere around the area. And what about Cumberland? I had 2 today at
Memorial Lake, Salem. A little fuzzball next to one would be nice to see!

   2 Least Terns at Floodgates. Thats my spot for many hard to get species
in Gloucester. That could be my earliest for the county. I did a quick check
in ebird of my sightings. Although not all my sightings in yet..... Getting 
there! 

This is my spot for Black Tern also. Although Piney Hollow needs some 
exploring. 

I have hardly touched that area. I like old flooded Cranberry Bogs. I still 
need that 

Little Blue for the county, Jon! 

Anyway, scope needed for floodgates. With a zoom preferably. That jetty wall is
far. Sometimes I get the birds hunting in the cove though. Thats more a low 
tide 

thing though.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: White Ibis, Atlantic County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 14:11:18 -0400
On my lunch break I found a sub-adult White Ibis preening with a flock of 
Glossy Ibis in the first quarter mile of Wildlife Drive next to goose marker 4. 
About a 100 yards east of the Ibis were three American Avocets sleeping and 
preening. I left and Jesse Amesbury watched the White Ibis leave with two 
Glossy Ibis heading south and out of sight. Later on along the dogleg I came 
upon three American Avocets sleeping and preening once again. Both groups were 
brightly colored males, but I'm unsure if they are the same birds due to their 
sedentary behavior during both observations. 


Tom Johnson had four American Avocets fly by the TNC Meadows on Cape Island 
early this morning. Lastly, as I was leaving Forsythe NWR there was an adult 
Pied-billed Grebe floating next to the bridge as you exit. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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Subject: Re: More on the Warren County Booby
From: Pete Leland <pete174.pl AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 14:04:57 -0400
Have there been any reports of the brown booby today. I would like to try to 
bring my father up that way. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 14, 2016, at 7:51 PM, Larry scacchetti  
wrote: 

> 
> I went back today to watch the Brown Booby more intently and to allot more 
time for myself. I brought my kayak to get out onto the lake. I arrived around 
noon and was greeted my friends where we all discussed the bird for a bit. I 
headed out and gave the bird a wide berth. I let the current drift me into 
position. I was able to watch the bird, who was not burdened by my presence. 
She was more interested in the local eagle that circled overhead a bit. I 
headed back in and watched for another hour or so as to get a better feel for 
her pattern. Every hour she would get up and circle the lake a few times and 
return for another hour. Back out i headed and sat much further back. Almost 
right on time, she lifted off and began her route. She came so close and low to 
me, I could have given her a high five. She did about 2-3 loops around me and 
even over my head about 5 ft. She sat on the water within 50 ft. to me. I 
paddled up slowly and was able to watch her as she p! 

 re!
> ened and washed herself in to clear water. She then took off and circled the 
lakeland back to the ledge where she missed and hit the water. She gained 
composure and did 1 final loop as she circled back over me and to the ledge 
just in time to hunker down for an incredible thunderstorm that loomed over the 
tree-line. It was time to call it a day. The booby show was one for the books. 
I've seen them in the caribbean and in southern California and Baja, not to 
mention the 5 or 6 I've seen in NJ, but nothing compared to today, being so low 
to the water and having such an incredible view of the bird from every angle 
and in such an intimate way. The day would have been perfect if the hour ride 
home didn't take 4 hours!!!!!! So much traffic due to floods, crashes, rush 
hour and fallen trees. 

> 
> Anyone interested in the photos from today, they can be seen here :
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13/
> 
> Good birding,
> 
> Larry Scacchetti
> Westwood, NJ
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: (2) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Salem County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 14:02:12 -0400
Sandra Keller reports:

Two Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks at Memorial Lake, Woodstown, Salem County. 
The dam end along Mill St. They are down in the dam area. 


Location: 39.643640, -75.330232

The group of 12 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks on Cape Island were last seen at 
the TNC Meadows yesterday evening. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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Subject: 2016 Top Year for Threatened and Endangered Bird Nesting Sites on Holgate
From: Stuart and Wendy <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 11:33:58 -0400
Jerseybirders

Below is an article of interest from The Sandpiper newspaper

Wendy Malmid
MonroeTwp, NJ


This Year Is Tops for Threatened and Endangered Bird Nesting Sites on Holgate
Jul 14, 2016


The overwash areas of Holgate have been very good to piping plovers this year 
and to other beach nesting birds, including least terns and American 
oystercatchers. 


“If there is one thing to take away from our conversation is that Hurricane 
Sandy was not a bad thing for plovers,” said Paul Castelli, lead wildlife 
biologist at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, which owns and 
manages the wilderness areas of Holgate and Little Beach in Little Egg Inlet. 


Beach-nesting birds prefer areas that are sparsely vegetated and flat so they 
can better see predators approaching and their fledglings can negotiate their 
way to the surf for their first meals of organisms living in the surf zone. 


What Superstorm Sandy did in October 2012 was send a series of waves right over 
much of the Holgate wilderness area, flattening dunes and killing vegetation. 
It was a loss for some nesting birds, but a boon for beach nesters. 


So far this year, volunteers and scientists have counted 77 piping plovers on 
Holgate and Little Beach –mostly on Holgate – and 55 piping plover nests 
that have fledged over 30 chicks. In addition there have been 51 American 
oystercatcher nests and 427 adult least terns with 155 chicks. 


“It’s been very busy down there,” said Castelli. “These are the largest 
numbers of beach-nesting birds we’ve ever seen, or at least in recent years. 
It’s a combination of over-wash areas (for nesting) and good habitat 
management and protection.” 


Castelli said last year was also a good year contributing to plover numbers, 
but the species is still considered in decline in New Jersey and is on both the 
federal and state endangered list and needing protection. In 2015, there were 
24 nesting pairs, double the number that nested in 2014. Now it has doubled 
again. 


Least terns are also on both lists, and the American Oystercatcher is a species 
of concern in New Jersey. Foxes and raccoons are the worse predators of nests, 
but those have been kept under control, and the practice of enclosing nests to 
keep predators out while allowing birds in and out has been carried out by 
volunteers. 


“Mostly it’s the sheer numbers of people that we need to protect them 
from,” said Castelli. “I know it’s controversial to close beaches to 
people, but it really pays off, especially in years like this.” 


This year, Jonathan Cohen and an intern Michelle Stantial from the State 
University of New York, Syracuse, College of Environmental Sciences and 
Forestry, have been banding the birds. 


“This makes it easier to better calculate which birds are successful at 
breeding, which birds are re-nesting and which birds are leaving to go to Cape 
May or somewhere else to nest. It’s a big deal to get a handle on the 
behavior of an endangered species,” said Castelli. “Banding is only done by 
individuals that are trained and have a high level of competency,” he added. 


Plovers and other shorebirds are just starting to migrate south, a process that 
goes on for about two months. Ones that are landing to rest and fuel up at 
Holgate today may have come from as far away as Canada’s shores. 


The Edwin B. Forsythe Wildlife Management Area is run under the auspices of the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This year the service joined with the nonprofit 
Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey and its state coordinator and 
manager for the beach nesting birds project, Todd Pover. 


According to Pover, piping plovers have very strong site fidelity, so adults 
tend to come back to the same site year after year, often to the same patch of 
beach. The young will return to the same patch of beach but have to lay claim 
to their own territory as existing pairs fight for theirs. This territorial 
fight may be why a single nesting pair of plovers has staked a claim on the tip 
of Island Beach State Park, closing that area to fishermen through the summer. 


Pover hires seasonal workers to inform tourists on why the Holgate Wilderness 
Area is closed during the summer and the importance of the wilderness beach to 
beach-nesting birds. The Holgate Wilderness Area can be visited when volunteers 
are there for one-hour guided walks that start at the Holgate bulkhead. Be 
prepared for walking, wear appropriate clothing, and bring water, sunscreen and 
insect repellent. Loaner binoculars and pamphlets are provided. 


The shorebird tour is held Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10 to 11 a.m. thru 
Sept. 1. The Ever-Shifting Sands tour is held on Thursdays from 10 to 11 a.m., 
and a Wilderness Walk is held on Fridays, Beachcombing held on Sundays, same 
time. If guides are not available, then the tours are canceled. 


For more information, call 609-652-1665.

— Pat Johnson


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Subject: More on the Warren County Booby
From: Larry scacchetti <Larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 19:51:15 -0400
I went back today to watch the Brown Booby more intently and to allot more time 
for myself. I brought my kayak to get out onto the lake. I arrived around noon 
and was greeted my friends where we all discussed the bird for a bit. I headed 
out and gave the bird a wide berth. I let the current drift me into position. I 
was able to watch the bird, who was not burdened by my presence. She was more 
interested in the local eagle that circled overhead a bit. I headed back in and 
watched for another hour or so as to get a better feel for her pattern. Every 
hour she would get up and circle the lake a few times and return for another 
hour. Back out i headed and sat much further back. Almost right on time, she 
lifted off and began her route. She came so close and low to me, I could have 
given her a high five. She did about 2-3 loops around me and even over my head 
about 5 ft. She sat on the water within 50 ft. to me. I paddled up slowly and 
was able to watch her as she pre! 

 ened and washed herself in to clear water. She then took off and circled the 
lakeland back to the ledge where she missed and hit the water. She gained 
composure and did 1 final loop as she circled back over me and to the ledge 
just in time to hunker down for an incredible thunderstorm that loomed over the 
tree-line. It was time to call it a day. The booby show was one for the books. 
I've seen them in the caribbean and in southern California and Baja, not to 
mention the 5 or 6 I've seen in NJ, but nothing compared to today, being so low 
to the water and having such an incredible view of the bird from every angle 
and in such an intimate way. The day would have been perfect if the hour ride 
home didn't take 4 hours!!!!!! So much traffic due to floods, crashes, rush 
hour and fallen trees. 


Anyone interested in the photos from today, they can be seen here :

https://www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13/

Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ


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Subject: Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks
From: Bill Boyle <njsawwhet AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 13:00:26 -0400
About an hour after my sighting of 12 Black-bellied Whistling Ducks at
Shunpike Pond this morning, Bernie Master had a flock of 14 fly over the
South Cape May Meadows heading toward the State Park.

 

Bill Boyle

Cape May, NJ



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Subject: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks continue, Cape May County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 12:05:12 -0400
The original Whistling-Duck was seen once again on Shunpike Pond at 8 AM
yesterday

The flock of 11 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks landed in the Meadows along
the west path yesterday evening at 5 PM.

This morning, they all joined forces and were seen together on Shunpike
Pond at 8 AM

Location: 40.741319, -75.108284

Thanks for Dustin Welch & Bill Boyle for their reports.

Good birding,

Sam

-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/


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Subject: White Ibis - Great Bay Blvd
From: Ryan Risher <rrisher2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 11:14:02 -0400
Juvenile was soaring with GLIBs just before second light if you're headed east 
towards Rutgers Field Station. 


Ryan

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Subject: Raptor feather ID request – Homewoods
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 19:17:25 -0400
Since I saw the sky rocketed viewer numbers on HT’s Flicker about his 
Tantalizing Egret post, I figure I may get some response as well. 


After work today, while taking the dogs for walk came upon a raptor feather at 
homewoods trail, about 300 feet from the house. It sure looks like “how I 
describe red-shouldered hawk’s flight feather as Nascar black and white 
checkered flag” to my Mary. I waked the same trail this morning and the 
feather was not there, so owl feather is being ruled out immediately, among 
other feathers I saw on this feather. 


Actually I was kind of surprised I even found it on right in the middle of the 
homewoods trail. Reason ? I was so caught up and thinking about Harvey’s 
post. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: Brown Booby continues at Merrill Creek
From: Larry scacchetti <Larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 16:37:15 -0400
Kellie Muratore and I headed over to Merrill Creek this late morning to see the 
Brown Booby. We also brought her 3 year old son who, for three years old, is 
killing it with his ID skills. He can already ID around 50 different birds and 
even knows some of the calls. I taught him what a Brown Booby was before we 
left and showed him photos and told him where they're from. The entire ride I 
kept asking him what we were going to see and where it was from and he could 
answer it correctly. Upon arrival the bird was out in the middle of the 
reservoir with a group of cormorants. Within 10 minutes, it took flight and and 
landed on the NE corner of the I/O Tower. Jonathan Klizas and I were trying to 
assess age. It's for sure a female due to the all yellow facial skin and in the 
field we decided it was an adult. After reviewing photos of the bird later, she 
seems to have a very slight bit of brown smudging near the bottom of the belly. 
This might indicate a Sub-adult thats dam! 

 n near adulthood. While the bird was sitting on the ledge, she preened and 
mostly looked around, but the high point was to actually hear her call. It was 
pretty neat. Warren County's last Brown Booby, which was the county's first, 
was at Whites Lake during the week of July 29, 2012. We thought it'd be a great 
coincidence if this was a returning bird 4 years later but due to the age it 
seems that its 2 separate birds. Still a pretty odd circumstance. 


Photos of the bird can be seen here :

https://www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13/

Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ


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Subject: King and Clapper Rails in Bayonne with 11 Dowitchers
From: Patricia Hilliard <philliard288 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 13:07:20 -0400
We've seen a female King Rail off Lefante Walk along with a male Clapper
Rail.  We've also seen 11 Dowitchers, 9 Black-crowned Night Herons and 2
Black Skimmers.  Seen from the big green bridge out Lefante Walk.

Bayonne NJ off Lefante Walk, South Cove Shopping Mall off Rt. 440.

-- Patricia Hilliard
Bayonne Nature Club
www.bayonnenatureclub.org


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Subject: Tantilizing Egret
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 06:50:27 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
On Sunday morning I went out to Kimbles Beach to see what I could see.
I found an odd Egret feeding out in the surf.
It was distant but even thru bins I could see it had blueish lores, a long
gular ( I believe that's what it's called ). The feathered area that runs
down the lower mandible.
The legs are black so I mentally eliminated an imm Snowy
It was feeding by itself.
Unfortunately when birding a beach area beach goers can keep birds on the
move and a couple sent this bird south before I could get closer.
I put the pic up on Flickr more as a curiosity than an ID request.
I have gotten some private emails asking me why it's not a Little Egret
which was unexpected.
 I didn't think the pic was even close to being good enough to solicit
thoughts on Little Egret even though admittedly I had some doubt it was a
Snowy.
I have checked Kimbles since to no avail.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/27601513273/in/dateposted-public/
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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Subject: Brown Booby at Merrill Creek
From: Karmela Moneta <kmoneta AT ATT.NET>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 00:44:19 +0000
I was doing food shopping when the alert came in. A post from Frank Sencher Jr 
that a Brown Booby was photographed at Merrill Creek by MacManis the past two 
evenings. It didn't take long to stop everything, check out, run home and dump 
the packages on my husband, grab my camera and run out the door yelling, Brown 
Booby!  I was warmly greeted by all my birding friends who already had the 
Booby in their scope. It was best seen from the Scott's Mountain Hawk watch 
parking lot off Fox Farm Rd in Harmony. The Booby was in the center of the 
reservoir near a group of Cormorants when I got there around 4:40 PM, it kept 
moving further back as the group watched. Around 6:00 it flew to the tower near 
the parking lot and sat on the ledge. It was difficult to see unless you walked 
down the path along the water on the south side of the parking lot. What a nice 
way to spend an evening with friends with what will now be called the Merrill 
Creek Brown Booby of 2016. 

Below is a photo of that bird on the ledge.Brown Booby in NJ

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Brown Booby in NJ |
|  |
| View on www.flickr.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |


Karmela MonetaClinton Township


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Subject: Kingfishers
From: Landis Eaton <hensfoot1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 20:33:34 -0400
I have noticed that kingfishers are missing from some of their usual
places. Has anyone else missed them this year?
Landy Eaton
Princeton


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Subject: Mississippi Kites Nesting in New Jersey
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 18:15:23 -0400
Thank you to Bill B. (and many others who reported to JBirds/Ebird, 
especially the photos !!!) about this fantastic news !!!

I never found the right moment to visit the Waretown location or see those 
Mississippi Kites in live action , but that does not mean I was not 
interested. I studied the historic aerials ( especially the infra-red 
aerials where a mature pitch pine tree would show up as a red dot ), on 
several times in case I do make it,  trying to determine where this possible 
nest site would be, however, only in front of my laptop, as an arm chair 
birder that I am. But it can only take you so far and, of course it would 
never replace "live birding".

I do recall 17 birds found at Belleplain State Forest in 2013 well. How ? 
That same week after my visit to Belleplain State Forest, I cam home and 
girdled three of my tallest pitch pines in my back yard, in my feeble 
attempt to provide potential perching post for "my wish Camden County's 
first Mississippi Kite ".

Yong Kong
Camden County


-----Original Message----- 
From: Bill Boyle
Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2016 10:43 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Mississippi Kites Nesting in New Jersey

After many years of anticipation by the state's birders, Mississippi Kites
have finally been confirmed nesting in New Jersey.  More details can be
found at the New Jersey Bird Records Committee web site, www.njbrc.com.
Under "Recent Posts," click on "Mississippi Kites Nesting in New Jersey."



Many birders have visited Waretown during the summers of 2015 and 2016
looking for these birds, which can often be seen flying around the wooded
area west of Elizabeth Avenue. The actual nest is on private property and
birders are discouraged from trying to locate the nest and/or intrude on the
privacy of the homeowners in the neighborhood. The last thing we want is for
the homeowner to get so upset as to harass the nesting birds or have the
nest removed.



Bill Boyle

Cape May, NJ
Secretary, NJ Bird Records Committee



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Subject: Brown Booby, Warren County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 14:33:19 -0400
Frank Sencher reports:

I was just sent photographs of a Brown Booby at Merrill Creek Reservoir. It has 
been seen the past two evenings around 6;30 PM. The photographs were taken by 
Jill McManus. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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Subject: Mississippi Kites Nesting in New Jersey
From: Bill Boyle <njsawwhet AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2016 10:43:09 -0400
After many years of anticipation by the state's birders, Mississippi Kites
have finally been confirmed nesting in New Jersey.  More details can be
found at the New Jersey Bird Records Committee web site, www.njbrc.com.
Under "Recent Posts," click on "Mississippi Kites Nesting in New Jersey." 

 

Many birders have visited Waretown during the summers of 2015 and 2016
looking for these birds, which can often be seen flying around the wooded
area west of Elizabeth Avenue. The actual nest is on private property and
birders are discouraged from trying to locate the nest and/or intrude on the
privacy of the homeowners in the neighborhood. The last thing we want is for
the homeowner to get so upset as to harass the nesting birds or have the
nest removed.

 

Bill Boyle

Cape May, NJ
Secretary, NJ Bird Records Committee



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Subject: Ruff and Phalarope at Brig
From: "Marshwren AT comcast.net" <marshwren@COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 16:53:28 -0400
Both the red-necked phalarope and the ruff are being seen in the pool at the 
dog leg/peregrine access way at 4:45 pm. 


Donald DesJardin found the ruff around noon today near the goose marker 15. My 
son Ray just relocated the ruff. 


Edna Duffy
Secaucus, NJ

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Subject: Baby Bluebird - Video
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 15:46:48 -0400
The Bluebirds in my yard are well into their second brood. The babies hatched 
about two weeks ago and should fledge this week. I made a box with a lid that 
lifts off easily to check the birds (which should be done about once a week 
with Bluebirds). I strapped my video camera to the ladder before I removed the 
top for a quick video. It's not a barn-burner in terms of excitement - the 
babies didn't wake up and their mother took the chance to take a quick dip in 
the stream. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/28143972902/

Steve Byland
Warren Township
sbbyland at aol.com


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Subject: A Red-necked Phalarope chase - failed
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 11 Jul 2016 12:51:54 -0400
Hello,
 Marilyn and I went chasing the Red-necked this morning. Nothing! That front 

that came through might have pushed it on. Or not! Shorebirds were starting to 
move 

as the tide was coming in as we had to leave. I look forward to reports from 
this afternoon. 

Not much shorebird wise for us today. The tern show was good! 
 We did have an adult White-faced Ibis in with Glossy Ibis. The NW corner of 
the 

NW pool. It flew off to the north. All Ibis should be scanned for White-faced 
while 

there.

Butterfly notes - Seaside Skippers everywhere. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Red-necked phalarope at Forsythe today
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 23:01:29 +0000
Jersey Birders -
I spent the weekend in Lavalette with friends. But, up at three AM, couldn't 
get back to sleep, But being an hour closer to Forsythe than from home, I snuck 
out in the pre-dawn darkness and drove the 50 miles on an empty GSP. I got to 
see the Red-necked phalarope soon after dawn. As many have said, a beautiful 
little bird. I almost missed it. But it was right where advertised, in the 
pool, just past marker 14 on the north dike. Great views of a new addition to 
my life list. I put some photos of the bird wading and in flight on my Flickr 
page here: 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/28123222892
And, while I felt bad about virtually rushing through the refuge, I got back 
before anyone was down for breakfast! And I caught up my sleep on the beach. 
Great day. 

SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager, EHS Management
D +1-732-564-3601
M +1-732-832-6195
steven.albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road
Suite 520
Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
T +1-732-564-3600
aecom.com

Built to deliver a better world

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Subject: Brig - Saturday, July 9
From: Mike Mandracchia <mmandrake AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 13:42:15 -0400
  Dear Jersey Birders:  Yesterday, I led New Jersey Audubon's All Things 
Birds Program's Trip to the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge 
(Brig).  It was a surprising cool, wet day in July but at least the 
Greenhead  Flies were not much of a problem. These conditions may have 
also played a role in our groups ability to get some great looks at 
close singing Marsh Wrens, Common Yellowthroats and Seaside Sparrows. 
The "Fall" Shorebird migration has definitely, started with 13 species 
for the Day.

We had a total of 80 species for the two trips around the Dikes. 
Highlights for the Day included the continuing Red-necked Phalarope, an 
early Long-billed Dowitcher and a Little Blue Heron. 
 
However, the most interesting bird of the day was one distant shorebird 
that several of us were able to get on during the only heavy rain shower 
of the day.  My initial impression was a Ruff, possibly the one that had 
been reported from the same area the day before.  However, given the 
rainy conditions it was just too far for us using binoculars to make out 
much detail on a very "ratty looking", wet bird. The rain shower was 
quickly easing up so we tried getting out of the car to scope the 
bird. Unfortunately, something startled the Shorebirds and they all took 
off as we were grabbing our scopes. We were never able to relocate the 
bird. An incoming tide seems to be the key to finding these interesting 
birds on the North Dike. 
 
My next trip for NJ Audubon to Brig is in two weeks, Saturday, July 23.

Good Birding

Mike Mandracchia
Jackson


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Subject: Seeking long-billed dowitcher photo(s) from Brig on 7-9-2016
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 13:14:04 -0400
The subject line above says it all for my continue desire to learn on shorebird 
ID. Yesterday, Keith Phillips and I finally made the trip to Brig to see the 
Red-necked Phalarope that I nick-named Miss Brigantine. I felt so humbled 
seeing and saying Hello to NJ’s big hitter birders. Thank you to Lisa for a 
nice conversation about birding and family. 


Today’s birding plan was head back to look for the reported long-billed and 
to punish myself in search of Ruff. But while walking the dogs in the morning, 
heard a bird call in the homewoods that I heard several, if not many times 
since this spring. Earlier in the spring, did not dare to report to JBirds that 
I may have a breeding red-shouldered hawk in my homewoods, based on the calls. 
Reason ? As it happened before, I would most likely receive a response email 
stating that what I was hearing is a blue jay. 


This year’s homewoods red-shouldered was very elusive and visual confirmation 
was not happening, until this morning. I also had ID doubts as I failed 
miserably on the red-shouldered ID quiz on HT’s Flicker. Brig trip was shut 
down quickly as my visual search for red-shouldered became more important. 


Few hours later, the red-shouldered eventually landed on tops of trees in the 
back yard began calling, less than 100 feet. Ran out the door w/ the camera 
with all my fingers crossed that I would manage a documentation photo,once for 
all. It cooperated and soared over the homewoods and the neighbor’s farm 
field. It appeared the hawk was agitated by a turkey vulture. 


Doc photos of  the homewoods red-shouldered on my Flicker. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: Slightly OT:, where did all our wintering juncos go?
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 11:34:18 -0400
We are in Newfoundland for a week vacation. Waking back to our guest house
from breakfast, we noticed some familiar friends... it is ,55 degrees here
so no wonder they departed nj for cooler climes. Just wish I knew if they
were the same ones w saw on Morningside drive all winter. OK. I know they
are not but it s a nice thought.

Michael Perlin, who will be in a puffin and whale watch boat trip in a few
days..


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Subject: Red necked pharalope YES
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 11:07:20 +0000
Currently between #14 and 15 at Forsythe where it's been seen.

SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601  M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122



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Subject: Rainy accidental chase day
From: Larry scacchetti <Larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 21:35:25 -0400
Ended up staying in and falling asleep at 8 pm last night, crazy Friday night 
right? I awoke at 3 am and unable to sleep. I decided to head south to look for 
Pine Snakes and Timber Rattlesnakes, but when the weather turned sour right off 
the bat, I decided to head to Forsythe to salvage the day. Tide was high and 
the birds were mainly in the air. A lot was moving around which kept things 
interesting. Target birds were the Phalarope, Ruff, White-faced Ibis and 
Hudwit. Only the Phalarope was attainable close to shore along the north dike. 
Not complaining, it was a gorgeous bird! As I watched the phalarope, an alert 
came through that Dominic Hall found an adult Franklin's Gull at Liberty State 
Park. Being that it was on the way home, I figured why not. I headed north 
through a deluge along the turn pike only to reach Liberty State Park with just 
an overcast. I entered the first lot and scanned the LAGU's along the sand 
spit, only to realized the FRGU was about a mile! 

 south along the flats. I walked along the boardwalk to the beach and was 
rewarded with point blank views of the bird. It flew and headed north over my 
head and landed along the beach. As I walked north, I was't paying attention 
and the bird disappeared. I left the area and walked back towards the parking 
lot. As I passed the muddy cove, I relocated the bird at 4:55 pm. Both myself 
and Don DesJardins watched the bird from different angles and at 5:15 pm the 
bird took flight and headed NW high over the golf course. I'm wondering if it 
might show up somewhere in the meadowlands or in Secaucus somewhere in the 
morning. Great find by Dominic and in such an even rarer location in NJ. 


Photos of the birds can be seen here :

https://www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13/

Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ


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Subject: Least Terns
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 20:02:46 -0400
Evening folks,

Mike Britt mentioned Least Terns in an earlier post and in particular, one 
individual heading towards the Elizabeth Seaport. If you have a hankering to 
view Least Tern in an urban environment, head on over to Marciate-Jackson 
Millet Park on Slater Drive in Elizabeth. The Least Terns roost on the rock 
piles in the channel. On Friday there were five. 


Good birding!

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ

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Subject: Re: Ad. Franklins gull @ Port Liberte / LSP - Hudson Cty
From: Dom <dom AT MONTEVIDEO.COM.UY>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 16:56:02 -0400
Couple of pics of the LSP Franklin's gull on my blog if anyone's
interested: antbirder.blogspot.com 

I think Shayna Marchese is out there getting much better pictures right
now... ;)

Cheers
Dom

On 9 July 2016 at 13:30, Dom  wrote:

> I just found an adult Franklins Gull amid a flock of 30 LAGUs - on the
> beach between Port Lib apartments and the Liberty State Park boat launch.
> Birds moving around as tide peaks.
>
> Good birding
> Dom
>
> www.antbirder.blogspot.com
>
> www.aventuraargentina.com
>
> + 1 646 429 2667
>


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Subject: Cumberland - shorebird areas - nothing
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 16:45:22 -0400
As in what I hit this afternoon was high tide. Need low. Heislerville is 
flooded 

so the cove is the only spot now. Still some exposed sand in the main 
impoundment. 

Just gulls and terns which leads me to think the shorebirds are roosting 
elsewhere. 

Ditto for Bivalve. Spent some time at East Point scanning for Storm 
petrel....... 

I'll be down Stone Harbor on Wed! Maybe then.....

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

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Subject: Least Tern and Franklin's Gull
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 14:40:11 -0400
At 7:57AM, a LEAST TERN flew W-E across the NJTP, before exit 13A. It was
carrying a fish and since it came from the direction of Newark Airport, it
probably caught the fish in the "outer periphery ditch," where I've seen
them hunting in the past. According to Ed Borowik, they used to nest on the
airport but that particular site was paved over to expand a parking lot.
Least Terns also forage in Kearny Marsh and Kearny East every summer. Since
the bird flew towards the Elizabeth seaport, they are probably nesting on a
gravel rooftop or in some suitable fenced off site in the port. Based on
foraging birds in summer, the species have persisted in the area since more
"historical times."

I got to LSP within fourteen minutes of Dominic Garcia-Hall texting out the
adult FRANKLIN'S GULL on the Caven Point beach. There's a hump on the beach
that you can't see behind from the boat launch lot and that's where Dom
found the bird...this requires a walk from the Port Lib side of the cove,
since it's a rather distant look if you go to one of the lots further east,
which will give you the angle needed to see the backside (of the hump). In
any event, the incoming tide pushed the birds to the stretch of beach
straight across from the boatlaunch, where the American Oystercatchers are
nesting. The bird showed classic field marks, which will be in my eBird
report. Dom got some doc shots and Ray Duffy was attempting to digiscope
it. As expected on the weekend, there was lots of human activity. The birds
were flushed several times by kayakers who paddled by them and then landed
on the beach flushing the birds again. I left Ray with the bird still in
sight; good luck if you go. Struck out with this species during my Big Year
last year, which featured an epic statewide flight. I'll gladly take one
now though, as it's a statee;)

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Juv Goldeneye DeKorte
From: F T Muscara <ctmuscara AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 14:26:52 -0400
2pm today on the Transco trail with geese was a Juv Common Goldeneye.

Good birding,
Frank and Clare


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Subject: Ad. Franklins gull @ Port Liberte / LSP - Hudson Cty
From: Dom <dom AT MONTEVIDEO.COM.UY>
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2016 13:30:54 -0400
I just found an adult Franklins Gull amid a flock of 30 or LAGUs - on the
beach between Port Lib apartments and the Liberty State Park boat launch.
Birds moving around as tide peaks.

Good birding
Dom

www.antbirder.blogspot.com

www.aventuraargentina.com

+ 1 646 429 2667


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi