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Updated on Friday, February 12 at 08:40 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Evening Grosbeak,©Barry Kent Mackay

12 Feb Brig Island Dowitcher [Yong Kong ]
12 Feb Re: Warren County Birding ["Susie R." ]
12 Feb Warren County Birding [David Bernstein ]
12 Feb Re: Eastern Phoebe [Christopher Takacs ]
12 Feb Re: Eastern Phoebe [Larry-Zirlin ]
12 Feb Re: Eastern Phoebe [Michael Perlin ]
12 Feb Eastern Phoebe [Ernest Hahn ]
12 Feb Pa - Philadelphia - Barnacle Geese [Sandra Keller ]
12 Feb Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!! [Paul Guris ]
12 Feb Warblers at sewage plant [Louis Bizzarro ]
11 Feb Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!! [Marty DeAngelo ]
11 Feb Eastern Bluebird -- and Common Raven (again) - Highland Park ["B.G. Sloan" ]
11 Feb Jimmy Lee's Owl [Michael Britt ]
11 Feb New source of aerial photos [Yong Kong ]
10 Feb Pics, razorbills, avocets - didn't try [Sandra Keller ]
10 Feb Sandhill Cranes continue in New Egypt [Larry-Zirlin ]
10 Feb picture access question [Sandra Keller ]
10 Feb leucistic Redtail Middlesex County College on 2/5 [Tina Pirro ]
9 Feb Unseasonal Baltimore Oriole, Atlantic Cnty [Mike Danzenbaker ]
9 Feb Merganser love with a graffiti backdrop (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
9 Feb Sandhill Cranes, New Egypt [Larry-Zirlin ]
9 Feb Re: leucistic Redtail ["Albert, Steven" ]
9 Feb Re: leucistic Redtail [karen swaine ]
9 Feb Assunpink Common Loon [Bob Dodelson ]
9 Feb Re: What I got out of the recent Owl discussion [mike hiotis ]
8 Feb Re: Owl report suggestion [L Larson ]
8 Feb Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!! [Paul Guris ]
8 Feb Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!! [Marty DeAngelo ]
8 Feb Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!! [Paul Guris ]
8 Feb What I got out of the recent owl discussion [Yong Kong ]
8 Feb Re: New Egypt Cranes (3) [Larry-Zirlin ]
8 Feb Re: New Egypt Cranes (3) [Michael Hodanish ]
8 Feb Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique? ["Hopkins,Jeffrey A." ]
8 Feb Owl report suggestion ["Buckingham, Stephen R." ]
8 Feb New Egypt Cranes (3) [Bob Dodelson ]
8 Feb Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique? ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
8 Feb Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique? [Karenne Snow ]
8 Feb Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique? [Linda Widdop ]
8 Feb Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique? [jimmy lee ]
8 Feb Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection (Moving on to the important question) [Robert Gallucci ]
8 Feb Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection (Moving on to the important question) [L Larson ]
8 Feb Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection (Moving on to the important question) [Robert Gallucci ]
8 Feb STP Question, is Trenton unique? [Ernest Hahn ]
8 Feb Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection [Phil Jeffrey ]
8 Feb Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection [Michael Perlin ]
7 Feb Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection [Louis Bizzarro ]
7 Feb Owl report and a need for a little self reflection [David La Puma ]
7 Feb Crested Caracara, Holmdel [Andrew Bobe ]
8 Feb Forsythe Snow Geese show ["Albert, Steven" ]
7 Feb NJ Young Birders Club trip to Barnegat Lighthouse SP [Scott Barnes ]
7 Feb Admin: Owl locations [L Larson ]
8 Feb Re: TRENTON SEWER LOCATION [jimmy lee ]
7 Feb Re: TRENTON SEWER LOCATION [J Hummel ]
7 Feb Northern Saw-whet Owls at Allamuchy Mountain State Park [John Parke ]
7 Feb Re: TRENTON SEWER LOCATION [Michael Perlin ]
7 Feb TRENTON SEWER LOCATION [Richard Moran ]
7 Feb Trenton Sewer Utility 2/7--5 species of warblers [Larry-Zirlin ]
7 Feb White fronted geese [Sandra Keller ]
7 Feb waterfowl - Mannington marsh - Salem county [Sandra Keller ]
6 Feb Correction - Not Prairie- I am ID'ing as Tundra Peregrine (Falco peregrinus tundrius) [Yong Kong ]
6 Feb North Shore and Trenton Sewage Plant [Phil Jeffrey ]
6 Feb Motts Creek Prairie and Barnegat Loon ID request [Yong Kong ]
6 Feb Northern North Shore today-WEGR continues [Scott Barnes ]
6 Feb NJAS All Things Birds Trip today [Thomas Smith ]
6 Feb eagle festival and ducks [Sandra Keller ]
6 Feb Columbia Lake, Warren County [Lillian Shupe ]
6 Feb Sandhill Crane in New Egypt [Michael Hodanish ]
6 Feb Monmouth County Audubon Meeting February 10th [Wendy and Stuart Malmid ]
6 Feb Ocean Twp. Western Tanager - No [Michael Britt ]
6 Feb Lark Sparrow at Beach Plum Farm [Rod ]
6 Feb Pine Siskins in Chatsworth [Joseph Palumbo ]
6 Feb Re: Possible Common Ground-Dove? (photo) [John Freiberg ]
5 Feb Re: Possible Common Ground-Dove? (photo) ["David A. La Puma" ]
5 Feb NJ Young Birders Club Field trip to Barnegat Light Sunday [Scott Barnes ]
5 Feb Possible Common Ground-Dove? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
5 Feb Abort! Abort! Mayday mayday!...Nice recovery ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]

Subject: Brig Island Dowitcher
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 20:37:51 -0500
Five stars to Marc Chelmer for inviting me to tag along with him on his outing 
today. One of few birders I know that happen to be near by home always let’s 
me of his plans and lets me tag along. 


As I have done before I watched the “Machine” find birds every which way he 
pointed his bins and the scope. While we were at the Brig Island, he spotted a 
Dowitcher. 


Some poor photos (bird was at distant) on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County

---
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Subject: Re: Warren County Birding
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 17:33:00 -0500
Take a look at this picture from the Lebanon Township FB page:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/LEBTWP/

I've had pileateds eat spicebush berries in the past but not winterberry.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

On Fri, Feb 12, 2016 at 5:21 PM, David Bernstein 
wrote:

> Afternoon folks,
>
> My son had an unexpected day off from school today. Day off means
> adventure. But where? We narrowed our choices down to Long Beach Island or
> the Delaware Water Gap. We decided to attempt to replicate our successful
> Ruffed Grouse hunt from last Fall in the Delaware Water Gap.
>
> The Old Mine Road was quiet today. We saw lots of geese in the river but
> no ducks. We did enjoy a pair of Bald Eagle south of Poxono sharing a fish.
> Plenty of robin feeding on roadside rose hips and barberry.
>
> Unfortunately, our search for grouse came up empty. We hiked quite a bit
> in the Crater Lake area. At least three miles of walking. Four Raven. Some
> Turkey. Lots of bracing, fresh air, devoid of sound.
>
> We did have a consolation prize. As we drove down the mountain towards
> Millbrook, my son let out a glorious shout, DAD! STOP! BACK UP!!  Doing as
> I was told, I pulled up even with a Pileated Woodpecker at eye level ten
> feet away hanging upside down in a tall shrub eating berries. Looked like
> winterberry. I've seen many Pileateds but never observed one eating
> berries. A beautiful sight.
>
> So, no grouse but a great day nonetheless.
>
> Good frigid birding to all.
>
> David S. Bernstein
> Berkeley Heights, NJ
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Warren County Birding
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 17:21:19 -0500
Afternoon folks,

My son had an unexpected day off from school today. Day off means adventure. 
But where? We narrowed our choices down to Long Beach Island or the Delaware 
Water Gap. We decided to attempt to replicate our successful Ruffed Grouse hunt 
from last Fall in the Delaware Water Gap. 


The Old Mine Road was quiet today. We saw lots of geese in the river but no 
ducks. We did enjoy a pair of Bald Eagle south of Poxono sharing a fish. Plenty 
of robin feeding on roadside rose hips and barberry. 


Unfortunately, our search for grouse came up empty. We hiked quite a bit in the 
Crater Lake area. At least three miles of walking. Four Raven. Some Turkey. 
Lots of bracing, fresh air, devoid of sound. 


We did have a consolation prize. As we drove down the mountain towards 
Millbrook, my son let out a glorious shout, DAD! STOP! BACK UP!! Doing as I was 
told, I pulled up even with a Pileated Woodpecker at eye level ten feet away 
hanging upside down in a tall shrub eating berries. Looked like winterberry. 
I've seen many Pileateds but never observed one eating berries. A beautiful 
sight. 


So, no grouse but a great day nonetheless.

Good frigid birding to all.

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ



Sent from my iPad


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Eastern Phoebe
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 16:23:21 -0500
Spent a half hour at Trenton sewer. Saw the phoebe, yellow rumps, a nice
yellow palm warbler, brown creeper and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Phoebe and
warblers were feeding in the first tank. I heard a warbler call note
different  from rump or palm from the pines. So one of the others could be
around. Birds were on the tank side in the sun, not the fence side near
road.

Chris Takacs
Lyndhurst
On Feb 12, 2016 3:03 PM, "Ernest Hahn"  wrote:

> how odd is a Phoebe this time of year?  I made a quick stop at the Trenton
> TP on the way home from a "Razorbill absent" trip to Shark River inlet.  A
> few Yellow-rumps and a tail pumping Phoebe.
>
> Ernie Hahn
> West Trenton
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Eastern Phoebe
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 20:21:41 +0000
Ernie, 
Unusual, but not that odd. I've seen them in winter at Double Trouble and the 
Bridge to Nowhere. Some hang around, eating what I do not know. eBird doesn't 
even list them as "rare." 

Now: Yellow-throated Warbler in Trenton: THAT'S odd. 

Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 
----- Original Message -----

From: "Ernest Hahn"  
To: "jerseybi"  
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2016 3:03:44 PM 
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Eastern Phoebe 

how odd is a Phoebe this time of year? I made a quick stop at the Trenton TP on 
the way home from a "Razorbill absent" trip to Shark River inlet. A few 
Yellow-rumps and a tail pumping Phoebe. 


Ernie Hahn 
West Trenton 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com 
List help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu 
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Eastern Phoebe
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:14:10 -0500
Ernie, A couple of weeks ago, i breathlessly reported an OMG Eastern
kingbird, and cooler heads suggested it might have been the Eastern Phoebe.
I live in Glen Afton in Trenton (a block from the Delaware river), which
is, what, 6 miles from the Trenton Sewage facility? So, maybe..

best,
Michael

On Fri, Feb 12, 2016 at 3:03 PM, Ernest Hahn  wrote:

> how odd is a Phoebe this time of year?  I made a quick stop at the Trenton
> TP on the way home from a "Razorbill absent" trip to Shark River inlet.  A
> few Yellow-rumps and a tail pumping Phoebe.
>
> Ernie Hahn
> West Trenton
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Eastern Phoebe
From: Ernest Hahn <ernesthahn AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:03:44 -0500
how odd is a Phoebe this time of year? I made a quick stop at the Trenton TP on 
the way home from a "Razorbill absent" trip to Shark River inlet. A few 
Yellow-rumps and a tail pumping Phoebe. 


Ernie Hahn
West Trenton


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Pa - Philadelphia - Barnacle Geese
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 14:04:02 -0500
Hello,
    2 Barnacle Geese were found at FDR park today. For those who keep a 
Philly list or need as a life bird. Excellent looks when I saw them. They are
moving around a lot. I don't believe they will stick through this weekend
with the cold coming. I could be wrong! 

Thanks again to Annie and Todd for getting me on the birds. I do not know
Philly....


Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!!
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 13:49:35 -0500
We believe that the bird is at the very dark end of Kumlien's.  I am
writing up an explanation with photos and links to the incredibly excellent
Howell & Mactavish article on these birds.  The upshot is that in terms of
wingtip darkness and pattern, there is a continuous gradation from
virtually unmarked wingtips in some Kumliens to Thayer's.

If you feel like digging in, the article is available here:


http://www.gull-research.org/papers/papers4/Identification%20and%20Variation%20of%20Winter%20Adult%20Kumlien's%20Gulls.pdf 



-PAG


On Thu, Feb 11, 2016 at 9:21 PM, Marty DeAngelo  wrote:

> Has there been any more discussion/direction on the ID of the
> Thayer's/Kumlien's Gull? Or is this destined to be one of those "will never
> be sure" birds?
>
> Marty DeAngelo
>
>
> On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 9:31 PM, Paul Guris 
> wrote:
>
>> Our pelagic out of Cape May on Sat, Feb 6 was a resounding success with
>> the
>> best bird of the trip being, hands down, a GREAT SKUA.  The last accepted
>> record for New Jersey was in 2000.
>>
>> This was not the only highlight, though.  We had a gull that looked pretty
>> good for THAYER'S GULL but due to review of the photos and not having
>> every
>> mark lining up (as one wants for an East Coast Thayer's), we are leaving
>> this one unidentified.  Alcids put on a good showing with nearly 200
>> DOVEKIES, over 20 ATLANTIC PUFFINS, flocks of flyby RAZORBILLS, and a
>> cooperative COMMON MURRE on the way back in.  We also had over a dozen
>> NORTHERN FULMARS including one dark morph birds.  The NORTHERN GANNET and
>> BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE show at the back of the boat was astounding,
>> causing
>> photographers to fill cards and wonder how they heck they were going to
>> sort all of those shots when they got home.  On top of all that, the
>> weather was very pleasant for a February NJ boat trip sailing 60 miles off
>> of the coast, where the water was over 50 degrees!
>>
>> Not everything was wine and roses, however.  Although some of our leaders
>> were able to identify a few whales, none were particularly cooperative.
>> It
>> took us longer to find the Dovekies than I expected hence what I thought
>> was a low number for the conditions. (Yes, I deem nearly 200 as "low" in
>> these conditions.)  And one of our leaders (no names mentioned but let's
>> just call him M. Lanzone ... or better yet Mike L.) made an ill fated
>> attempt to listen for whales by dropping the wireless microphone
>> overboard.  Still, it was one heck of a day.
>>
>> Here are the final tallies of what was seen beyond the Cape May jetties.
>>
>> Surf Scoter 14
>> White-winged Scoter 13
>> Black Scoter 3
>> Surf/Black Scoter 32
>> Red-throated Loon 23
>> Common Loon 59
>> Northern Fulmar 15
>> Northern Gannet 85
>> Great Skua 1
>> Dovekie 195
>> Common Murre 1
>> Razorbill 109
>> Atlantic Puffin 21
>> Black-legged Kittiwake 12
>> Bonaparte's Gull 5
>> Ring-billed Gull 14
>> Herring Gull 50
>> Lesser Black-backed Gull 1
>> Iceland (Kumliens) Gull  poss kumlien X thayer 1  (TBD)
>> Great Black-backed Gull 65
>>
>> Fin Whale 2
>> Minke Whale 1
>>
>>
>> Although our winter schedule is over, we'll be starting back up in May
>> with
>> trips out of Cape May, Lewes, Brooklyn, and 3 trips in the Outer Banks
>> over
>> Memorial Day weekend aboard the famed Country Girl!  Hopefully we'll see
>> some of you aboard at a great time of year to be at sea.
>>
>>
>> -PAG
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
>> 18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com 
>> paulagics.com
>>  AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
>> *
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
>> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>
>
>


-- 







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
 AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
*


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Warblers at sewage plant
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 11:11:54 -0500
They survived Jonas, but will the brutal arctic air do them in?

Louis Bizzarro

Monroe Township


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!!
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 21:21:41 -0500
Has there been any more discussion/direction on the ID of the
Thayer's/Kumlien's Gull? Or is this destined to be one of those "will never
be sure" birds?

Marty DeAngelo


On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 9:31 PM, Paul Guris  wrote:

> Our pelagic out of Cape May on Sat, Feb 6 was a resounding success with the
> best bird of the trip being, hands down, a GREAT SKUA.  The last accepted
> record for New Jersey was in 2000.
>
> This was not the only highlight, though.  We had a gull that looked pretty
> good for THAYER'S GULL but due to review of the photos and not having every
> mark lining up (as one wants for an East Coast Thayer's), we are leaving
> this one unidentified.  Alcids put on a good showing with nearly 200
> DOVEKIES, over 20 ATLANTIC PUFFINS, flocks of flyby RAZORBILLS, and a
> cooperative COMMON MURRE on the way back in.  We also had over a dozen
> NORTHERN FULMARS including one dark morph birds.  The NORTHERN GANNET and
> BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE show at the back of the boat was astounding, causing
> photographers to fill cards and wonder how they heck they were going to
> sort all of those shots when they got home.  On top of all that, the
> weather was very pleasant for a February NJ boat trip sailing 60 miles off
> of the coast, where the water was over 50 degrees!
>
> Not everything was wine and roses, however.  Although some of our leaders
> were able to identify a few whales, none were particularly cooperative.  It
> took us longer to find the Dovekies than I expected hence what I thought
> was a low number for the conditions. (Yes, I deem nearly 200 as "low" in
> these conditions.)  And one of our leaders (no names mentioned but let's
> just call him M. Lanzone ... or better yet Mike L.) made an ill fated
> attempt to listen for whales by dropping the wireless microphone
> overboard.  Still, it was one heck of a day.
>
> Here are the final tallies of what was seen beyond the Cape May jetties.
>
> Surf Scoter 14
> White-winged Scoter 13
> Black Scoter 3
> Surf/Black Scoter 32
> Red-throated Loon 23
> Common Loon 59
> Northern Fulmar 15
> Northern Gannet 85
> Great Skua 1
> Dovekie 195
> Common Murre 1
> Razorbill 109
> Atlantic Puffin 21
> Black-legged Kittiwake 12
> Bonaparte's Gull 5
> Ring-billed Gull 14
> Herring Gull 50
> Lesser Black-backed Gull 1
> Iceland (Kumliens) Gull  poss kumlien X thayer 1  (TBD)
> Great Black-backed Gull 65
>
> Fin Whale 2
> Minke Whale 1
>
>
> Although our winter schedule is over, we'll be starting back up in May with
> trips out of Cape May, Lewes, Brooklyn, and 3 trips in the Outer Banks over
> Memorial Day weekend aboard the famed Country Girl!  Hopefully we'll see
> some of you aboard at a great time of year to be at sea.
>
>
> -PAG
>
> --
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
> 18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
>  AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
> *
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Eastern Bluebird -- and Common Raven (again) - Highland Park
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:13:25 -0500
Yesterday afternoon I heard an Eastern Bluebird vocalizing off-and-on for
about a half hour. They are pretty uncommon in my immediate neighborhood.

Coming home late this morning I heard (and then spotted) a Common Raven
flying parallel to Cedar Lane near the entrance to the Forest Glen
apartments. Pretty close to the spot where I saw/heard one on January 29...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Subject: Jimmy Lee's Owl
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:05:30 -0500
I arrived at the Ocean Terminal a few minutes after 5PM, to find Simon Lane
and a semi-defrosted Bob Dodelson already present. The SNOWY OWL was
pointed out on the mound with the "green box," atop the Bayonne Golf Club.
After these two gents left, the bird took off with just two or three flaps
and glided about 100 yards to a mound further east but still west of the
clubhouse. I've always been amazed by Snowy Owl's gliding ability and
flight mastery in general. While windy conditions are not the best time to
look for most owls, it's the coolest time to watch a Snowy in action!

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: New source of aerial photos
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:05:06 +0000
In case there are other birders like me who enjoys looking at aerial 
photographs in terms of habitat analysis, as well as looking for new 
habiat/places to bird, the link below is a great one. It does not cover Cape 
May County, but it does cover most of central and N. Jersey including Barnegat 
and Sandy Hook area. 


You can even see birders (?) along the beach at Barnegat. You can set up a free 
account to view. 


http://us.nearmap.com/ 

Yong Kong 
Camden County 


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Subject: Pics, razorbills, avocets - didn't try
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 18:42:27 -0500
Hello,
 Real quick here - thanks for all the responses! Everyone is saying the same, 

I will try when I return home. About downloading my pics from Flickr. So I was
just right clicking on the pic...... I knew there had to be a way! 
    I didn't have time to get down to Absecon. one hour and 25 minutes from the
Allenhurst boardwalk is not my idea of fun. Even for a month bird! I believe 
they 

will move if they haven't already with this deep freeze coming.
 2 Razorbills - very nice looks at them. Or one mainly. It was actively feeding 

100 ft?? or so off the inlet mouth at Shark River. Alcids are not a very well 
"known" 

bird for me, so I enjoyed the study. A submarine look on the water. Compared 
with 

the loons. And the loon and Gannet show! Wow! A feeding frenzy was going on
there. I checked all the loons that I could. Couldn't find anything different.
No Western Grebe either. There was a lot of stuff well out on the ocean 
though..... 


Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Sandhill Cranes continue in New Egypt
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 17:20:01 +0000
3 Sandhill Cranes continue in the field next to the cattle pasture in New 
Egypt. Look around the machinery. A heads up: a large white longhorn was loose 
in the driveway--it didn't seem to mind my presence, but, then, I gave it a 
wide berth. 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 


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Subject: picture access question
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 09:56:32 -0500
Hello,
 Did my 30 minutes a day - a little longer today! - of entering old data into 
ebird - it’s coming along well. Am probably half way there. 

Mainly I take in date order, but now and then try and enter a missing county 
record. Like I just did. And in my notes was written that I took 

a pick and put up on Flickr. And I managed to find it on Flickr. Question - how 
do I get that pic back out of Flickr and into iPhoto? 

I embedded the pic old style into the ebird record. It was a Snowy Owl at Stone 
Harbor Point. But would like for my personal records. 

iphoto and Bird Brain it is now. Flickr and I have noticed other sites don’t 
let you copy the image. Which is logical. 


Thanks! I am off to see if those Avocets are still around and to try and find a 
Razorbill. Hopefully a Razorbill comes early on…. 

I might only go as far north as the spot where the Sandy Hook group had on Sat. 


Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: leucistic Redtail Middlesex County College on 2/5
From: Tina Pirro <kmpirro AT MSN.COM>
Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 14:48:11 +0300

My 16 year old daughter goes to the Middlesex County STEM  HS which is on the 
campus of the college. Last Friday the college was closed, so the HS could not 
use the college gym.  So for gym class they walked around the campus and my 
daughter saw a  leucistic Redtail. I assume it could be the same one around 
that is seen at Johnson park?  

Tina Pirro
Metuchen 


Sent from myMail for iOS



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Subject: Unseasonal Baltimore Oriole, Atlantic Cnty
From: Mike Danzenbaker <jmdanz77 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 19:03:30 -0500
Late today, noted a Baltimore Oriole feeding on bittersweet berries in
Linwood.

Mike Danzenbaker
Mtn View, CA


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Subject: Merganser love with a graffiti backdrop (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 16:00:35 -0500
Five male Common Mergansers try to impress a single female (second from
left) in front of a graffiti backdrop. Raritan River, Middlesex County:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24296089563/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Subject: Sandhill Cranes, New Egypt
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 18:46:09 +0000
Three Sandhill Cranes were feeding in the field to the right of the cattle 
pasture on Brynmore/Big Woods Road today between 12:30 and 1 while I was there. 
Same place Bob Dodelson saw them yesterday. Good to have these big birds back 
in the county. 


There was also a huge flock of Snow Geese in the same field. 

Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 


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Subject: Re: leucistic Redtail
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 18:06:21 +0000
After I saw it last month, I looked up how long red-tails live. Wikipedia says 
25 years or more in the wild. So, I bet it absolutely is the same bird. 


SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com
 
AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

 Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.


-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of karen 
swaine 

Sent: Tuesday, February 09, 2016 12:56 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] leucistic Redtail

a very late response -- we first saw the bird years ago about 1000 feet from 
our house...  we were totally confused and asked an excellent birder if we 
could possibly be seeing a Gyrfalcon - ha!  when we saw it fly off and saw the 
wings, we realized it was a hawk. but it had been sitting for at least 30 
minutes on a limb next to the RR tracks in back of our house in highland park 
that first time... we set up our scope and watched it for a ong time.. a 
gorgeous bird.   after that occasion we'd see it faily regularly - soaring 
overhead in the area - johnson park, parker at stonegate home, etc..  and 
then, when it seemed to be starting a nest in a large pine tree next to the 
entrance to "the Castle" on river road.. it flew to the same spot over and 
over, but nothing came of it.. the possible mate that we also saw (smaller, 
which make us think the leucistic bird was a female) disappeared.. the next 
never came to fruition... 



wo isn't it likely that the leucistic redtail that's always reported in the 
area is our very "own" (haha) bird that we first reported all those years ago 
on this list. i bet yes... 



good birding,
karen swaine, highland park





On Wed, Jan 06, 2016 at 01:43 PM, Albert, Steven wrote:

> I commute past that spot and I hadn't seen that bird for  a few years. 
> And that seems to be the only spot where it's ever seen.   I thought 
> it had finally passed away.
>
> Anyhow, I had my camera today, so after reading Tom's post, I drove 
> over from the office.  I cruised around, but didn't see it perched 
> anywhere.  But as I gave up and headed back to the office, coming up 
> the ramp to 18 North from River Road, I saw it soaring with a typical 
> red tail up ahead, over the Ecological Preserve and towards Livingston 
> Campus.  I pulled over, jumped out, ran off a few pictures and when 
> the birds soared out of site to the east I got back in the car to 
> follow.  But  .....
>
> ... couldn't find my keys! Not in the ignition or in my pockets.  Took 
> me 15 or 20 minutes of crawling around inside and outside the car at 
> the edge of the pavement to finally find them stuck in the rear door
> handle.   I would love to know how that happened.  So much for 
> following the bird.
>
> I'll post any pics that look decent or halfway decent tonight.  They 
> pulled my photo software from my work computer!
>
> Thanks Tom, for the post.
>
> SA
>
>
> Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
> Senior Program Manager
> EHS Management Consulting
> D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
> Internal: 100 3601
> Steven.Albert AT aecom.com
>  
> AECOM
> 30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
> Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
> T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122
>
> P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of 
> Susan Treesh
> Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:14 PM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] leucistic Redtail
>
> Has anyone ever gotten a picture of this bird?  It really should be 
> added to the NJ Audubon picture collection.  It is so beautiful!
>
> Susan Treesh
> Somerset, NJ
>
> On 1/6/2016 12:03 PM, Tom Ostrand wrote:
>> The leucistic Redtailed Hawk in Piscataway was perched on the west 
>> side of Route 18 just south of the Busch campus exit (a little north 
>> of River Road) at 11:50am today (10 minutes ago).  Pure white and 
>> beautiful with the sun on it.
>>
>> Tom Ostrand
>> Metuchen
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
>>
>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List archives: 
>> https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>
>>
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see or e-mail to 
> njbrcreport AT gmail.com List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List 
> archives:
> https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see or e-mail to 
> njbrcreport AT gmail.com List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List 
> archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: leucistic Redtail
From: karen swaine <karmaya AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 12:56:10 -0500
a very late response -- we first saw the bird years ago about 1000 feet 
from our house...  we were totally confused and asked an excellent 
birder if we could possibly be seeing a Gyrfalcon - ha!  when we saw it 
fly off and saw the wings, we realized it was a hawk. but it had been 
sitting for at least 30 minutes on a limb next to the RR tracks in back 
of our house in highland park that first time... we set up our scope and 
watched it for a ong time.. a gorgeous bird.   after that occasion we'd 
see it faily regularly - soaring overhead in the area - johnson park, 
parker at stonegate home, etc..  and then, when it seemed to be starting 
a nest in a large pine tree next to the entrance to "the Castle" on 
river road.. it flew to the same spot over and over, but nothing came of 
it.. the possible mate that we also saw (smaller, which make us think 
the leucistic bird was a female) disappeared.. the next never came to 
fruition...


wo isn't it likely that the leucistic redtail that's always reported in 
the area is our very "own" (haha) bird that we first reported all those 
years ago on this list. i bet yes...


good birding,
karen swaine, highland park





On Wed, Jan 06, 2016 at 01:43 PM, Albert, Steven wrote:

> I commute past that spot and I hadn't seen that bird for  a few years. 
> And that seems to be the only spot where it's ever seen.   I thought 
> it had finally passed away.
>
> Anyhow, I had my camera today, so after reading Tom's post, I drove 
> over from the office.  I cruised around, but didn't see it perched 
> anywhere.  But as I gave up and headed back to the office, coming up 
> the ramp to 18 North from River Road, I saw it soaring with a typical 
> red tail up ahead, over the Ecological Preserve and towards Livingston 
> Campus.  I pulled over, jumped out, ran off a few pictures and when 
> the birds soared out of site to the east I got back in the car to 
> follow.  But  .....
>
> ... couldn't find my keys! Not in the ignition or in my pockets.  Took 
> me 15 or 20 minutes of crawling around inside and outside the car at 
> the edge of the pavement to finally find them stuck in the rear door 
> handle.   I would love to know how that happened.  So much for 
> following the bird.
>
> I'll post any pics that look decent or halfway decent tonight.  They 
> pulled my photo software from my work computer!
>
> Thanks Tom, for the post.
>
> SA
>
>
> Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
> Senior Program Manager
> EHS Management Consulting
> D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
> Internal: 100 3601
> Steven.Albert AT aecom.com
>  
> AECOM
> 30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
> Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
> T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122
>
>  Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of 
> Susan Treesh
> Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:14 PM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] leucistic Redtail
>
> Has anyone ever gotten a picture of this bird?  It really should be 
> added to the NJ Audubon picture collection.  It is so beautiful!
>
> Susan Treesh
> Somerset, NJ
>
> On 1/6/2016 12:03 PM, Tom Ostrand wrote:
>> The leucistic Redtailed Hawk in Piscataway was perched on the west 
>> side of Route 18 just south of the Busch campus exit (a little north 
>> of River Road) at 11:50am today (10 minutes ago).  Pure white and 
>> beautiful with the sun on it.
>>
>> Tom Ostrand
>> Metuchen
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
>>
>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List archives: 
>> https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>
>>
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see or e-mail to 
> njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List archives: 
> https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see or e-mail to 
> njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: Assunpink Common Loon
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 08:02:30 -0600
A Common Loon was visible from the main boat launch area on Lake Assunpink this 
morning close to the island. This bird is annual here but I don't remember ever 
seeing it in February. Its usually March or April 


Other waterfowl today included Black Duck, Ring-neck Duck, Hooded Merganser and 
a growing number of Common Mergansers (at least 11 ) 

Bob Dodelson


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Subject: Re: What I got out of the recent Owl discussion
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 9 Feb 2016 06:35:04 -0500
I do not know John but a few good people have stood up for him. He made a
mistake, let's all crap in our pants. I do have some thoughts as he stated
at the end of his post a roost has been present at this site for seven
years (as far as he is aware).Common sense would dictate this is without
the general public's common knowledge. It seems to me he spoke to another
birder re: the history of the roost site. If so that birder did a weak job
relating to him not to post directions on a website....at the very least. I
do not believe he is the only one involved nor do I believe he should be
the recipient of disparaging emails(many with unidentified
senders)ofcourse. This site area was not found in the last seven years as
I was aware of of it well before. It remains to be seen if Owls use the
area in the future. This IS the lesson to be learned in this matter, ie;
improving dozens of birders life lists probably strains the survival
chances of many a good bird.This is the precise reason annual chasing of
certain species should be done so with some form of respect for the
animal's welfare. Len Soucy once told me and I quote, " If you find an Owl
in the field take a brief good look, consider yourself lucky and move on."
 Sincerely...

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ


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Subject: Re: Owl report suggestion
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 22:32:59 -0500
Steve,
The owl report was taken down immediately from the Jerseybirds archives on the 
Princeton listserv server. 


However, it is not possible to recall email from inboxes once its sent. The 
message was sent to 800 or so list members, and to an inbox at the ABA and 
other mirror sites who posted it on their web pages. We do not control whats 
done at ABA or by anyone else who got the message. I dont know whether its 
possible to have ABA remove a message from their Birding News page but Ill 
write and ask. Its pretty certain that not all copies everywhere can be found 
and eliminated. 


The original poster apologized, learned a lesson, and Ive asked him not to 
leave the list as he originally planned to do. He was berated by some list 
members, and approached by others who ironically wanted better directions. The 
listowners do have procedures for handling such problems and it is overkill for 
everyone to write off-list to the person who made the mistake. 


We are working on an update to the list guidelines that will be posted soon, 
and sent to all new members. We hope this document will help clarify the 
policy. 

 
Thanks to everyone for their concern and questions. 

Laurie Larson 
co-listowner, Jerseybirds.

> On Feb 8, 2016, at 3:34 PM, Buckingham, Stephen R. 
 wrote: 

> 
> Hi all. I don't post very often to this list, but felt I had to chime in on 
the owl issue with a suggestion. As other have observed, we all make honest 
mistakes, so I see no benefit in berating an inexperienced and now remorseful 
poster. He has learned a lesson I am sure he will never forget. HOWEVER, why is 
his posting still being published on the birding news website? Shouldn't it 
have been taken down immediately and removed from the archives, in the same way 
that spam and offensive emails are? Please act on this without further delay, 
so as to mitigate the issue. 

> 
> Steve Buckingham


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Subject: Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!!
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 21:52:38 -0500
FYI, "Kumlien's" is our Iceland Gull so maybe not a lifer for you?  I'll be
creating a page on our website on ID of Thayer's vs. all of the range of
"Kumlien's" Iceland Gulls.  Your head will explode.  Or you just may flip
off the screen and close your browser!  It really is a special brand of
masochism.


-PAG


On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 9:45 PM, Marty DeAngelo  wrote:

> So, no one can make the definitive(ish) call on Kumlien's vs. Thayer's
> gull? Either one would be a lifer for me, but it would be nice to be able
> to have one of them on my list.
>
> Thanks again for a fantastic trip!
>
> Marty DeAngelo
>
> On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 9:31 PM, Paul Guris 
> wrote:
>
>> Our pelagic out of Cape May on Sat, Feb 6 was a resounding success with
>> the
>> best bird of the trip being, hands down, a GREAT SKUA.  The last accepted
>> record for New Jersey was in 2000.
>>
>> This was not the only highlight, though.  We had a gull that looked pretty
>> good for THAYER'S GULL but due to review of the photos and not having
>> every
>> mark lining up (as one wants for an East Coast Thayer's), we are leaving
>> this one unidentified.  Alcids put on a good showing with nearly 200
>> DOVEKIES, over 20 ATLANTIC PUFFINS, flocks of flyby RAZORBILLS, and a
>> cooperative COMMON MURRE on the way back in.  We also had over a dozen
>> NORTHERN FULMARS including one dark morph birds.  The NORTHERN GANNET and
>> BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE show at the back of the boat was astounding,
>> causing
>> photographers to fill cards and wonder how they heck they were going to
>> sort all of those shots when they got home.  On top of all that, the
>> weather was very pleasant for a February NJ boat trip sailing 60 miles off
>> of the coast, where the water was over 50 degrees!
>>
>> Not everything was wine and roses, however.  Although some of our leaders
>> were able to identify a few whales, none were particularly cooperative.
>> It
>> took us longer to find the Dovekies than I expected hence what I thought
>> was a low number for the conditions. (Yes, I deem nearly 200 as "low" in
>> these conditions.)  And one of our leaders (no names mentioned but let's
>> just call him M. Lanzone ... or better yet Mike L.) made an ill fated
>> attempt to listen for whales by dropping the wireless microphone
>> overboard.  Still, it was one heck of a day.
>>
>> Here are the final tallies of what was seen beyond the Cape May jetties.
>>
>> Surf Scoter 14
>> White-winged Scoter 13
>> Black Scoter 3
>> Surf/Black Scoter 32
>> Red-throated Loon 23
>> Common Loon 59
>> Northern Fulmar 15
>> Northern Gannet 85
>> Great Skua 1
>> Dovekie 195
>> Common Murre 1
>> Razorbill 109
>> Atlantic Puffin 21
>> Black-legged Kittiwake 12
>> Bonaparte's Gull 5
>> Ring-billed Gull 14
>> Herring Gull 50
>> Lesser Black-backed Gull 1
>> Iceland (Kumliens) Gull  poss kumlien X thayer 1  (TBD)
>> Great Black-backed Gull 65
>>
>> Fin Whale 2
>> Minke Whale 1
>>
>>
>> Although our winter schedule is over, we'll be starting back up in May
>> with
>> trips out of Cape May, Lewes, Brooklyn, and 3 trips in the Outer Banks
>> over
>> Memorial Day weekend aboard the famed Country Girl!  Hopefully we'll see
>> some of you aboard at a great time of year to be at sea.
>>
>>
>> -PAG
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
>> 18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com 
>> paulagics.com
>>  AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
>> *
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
>> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>>
>
>


-- 







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
 AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
*


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Subject: Re: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!!
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 21:45:21 -0500
So, no one can make the definitive(ish) call on Kumlien's vs. Thayer's
gull? Either one would be a lifer for me, but it would be nice to be able
to have one of them on my list.

Thanks again for a fantastic trip!

Marty DeAngelo

On Mon, Feb 8, 2016 at 9:31 PM, Paul Guris  wrote:

> Our pelagic out of Cape May on Sat, Feb 6 was a resounding success with the
> best bird of the trip being, hands down, a GREAT SKUA.  The last accepted
> record for New Jersey was in 2000.
>
> This was not the only highlight, though.  We had a gull that looked pretty
> good for THAYER'S GULL but due to review of the photos and not having every
> mark lining up (as one wants for an East Coast Thayer's), we are leaving
> this one unidentified.  Alcids put on a good showing with nearly 200
> DOVEKIES, over 20 ATLANTIC PUFFINS, flocks of flyby RAZORBILLS, and a
> cooperative COMMON MURRE on the way back in.  We also had over a dozen
> NORTHERN FULMARS including one dark morph birds.  The NORTHERN GANNET and
> BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE show at the back of the boat was astounding, causing
> photographers to fill cards and wonder how they heck they were going to
> sort all of those shots when they got home.  On top of all that, the
> weather was very pleasant for a February NJ boat trip sailing 60 miles off
> of the coast, where the water was over 50 degrees!
>
> Not everything was wine and roses, however.  Although some of our leaders
> were able to identify a few whales, none were particularly cooperative.  It
> took us longer to find the Dovekies than I expected hence what I thought
> was a low number for the conditions. (Yes, I deem nearly 200 as "low" in
> these conditions.)  And one of our leaders (no names mentioned but let's
> just call him M. Lanzone ... or better yet Mike L.) made an ill fated
> attempt to listen for whales by dropping the wireless microphone
> overboard.  Still, it was one heck of a day.
>
> Here are the final tallies of what was seen beyond the Cape May jetties.
>
> Surf Scoter 14
> White-winged Scoter 13
> Black Scoter 3
> Surf/Black Scoter 32
> Red-throated Loon 23
> Common Loon 59
> Northern Fulmar 15
> Northern Gannet 85
> Great Skua 1
> Dovekie 195
> Common Murre 1
> Razorbill 109
> Atlantic Puffin 21
> Black-legged Kittiwake 12
> Bonaparte's Gull 5
> Ring-billed Gull 14
> Herring Gull 50
> Lesser Black-backed Gull 1
> Iceland (Kumliens) Gull  poss kumlien X thayer 1  (TBD)
> Great Black-backed Gull 65
>
> Fin Whale 2
> Minke Whale 1
>
>
> Although our winter schedule is over, we'll be starting back up in May with
> trips out of Cape May, Lewes, Brooklyn, and 3 trips in the Outer Banks over
> Memorial Day weekend aboard the famed Country Girl!  Hopefully we'll see
> some of you aboard at a great time of year to be at sea.
>
>
> -PAG
>
> --
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
> 18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
>  AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
> *
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Feb 6 Cape May Pelagic Results - SKUUUUUAAAAA!!!
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 21:31:40 -0500
Our pelagic out of Cape May on Sat, Feb 6 was a resounding success with the
best bird of the trip being, hands down, a GREAT SKUA.  The last accepted
record for New Jersey was in 2000.

This was not the only highlight, though.  We had a gull that looked pretty
good for THAYER'S GULL but due to review of the photos and not having every
mark lining up (as one wants for an East Coast Thayer's), we are leaving
this one unidentified.  Alcids put on a good showing with nearly 200
DOVEKIES, over 20 ATLANTIC PUFFINS, flocks of flyby RAZORBILLS, and a
cooperative COMMON MURRE on the way back in.  We also had over a dozen
NORTHERN FULMARS including one dark morph birds.  The NORTHERN GANNET and
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE show at the back of the boat was astounding, causing
photographers to fill cards and wonder how they heck they were going to
sort all of those shots when they got home.  On top of all that, the
weather was very pleasant for a February NJ boat trip sailing 60 miles off
of the coast, where the water was over 50 degrees!

Not everything was wine and roses, however.  Although some of our leaders
were able to identify a few whales, none were particularly cooperative.  It
took us longer to find the Dovekies than I expected hence what I thought
was a low number for the conditions. (Yes, I deem nearly 200 as "low" in
these conditions.)  And one of our leaders (no names mentioned but let's
just call him M. Lanzone ... or better yet Mike L.) made an ill fated
attempt to listen for whales by dropping the wireless microphone
overboard.  Still, it was one heck of a day.

Here are the final tallies of what was seen beyond the Cape May jetties.

Surf Scoter 14
White-winged Scoter 13
Black Scoter 3
Surf/Black Scoter 32
Red-throated Loon 23
Common Loon 59
Northern Fulmar 15
Northern Gannet 85
Great Skua 1
Dovekie 195
Common Murre 1
Razorbill 109
Atlantic Puffin 21
Black-legged Kittiwake 12
Bonaparte's Gull 5
Ring-billed Gull 14
Herring Gull 50
Lesser Black-backed Gull 1
Iceland (Kumliens) Gull  poss kumlien X thayer 1  (TBD)
Great Black-backed Gull 65

Fin Whale 2
Minke Whale 1


Although our winter schedule is over, we'll be starting back up in May with
trips out of Cape May, Lewes, Brooklyn, and 3 trips in the Outer Banks over
Memorial Day weekend aboard the famed Country Girl!  Hopefully we'll see
some of you aboard at a great time of year to be at sea.


-PAG

-- 







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
 AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
*


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: What I got out of the recent owl discussion
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 18:05:37 -0500
I am hoping I can get my point across the JBirds listserve w/o any miss 
understanding. When I read “that” post, I had no plan or intention of 
visiting, while, it seems others assumed that others will. My Mary once told me 
when you assume, you are going to make a jack*** out of yourself. I also like 
to believe many others here also have no intention of visiting. So, in my 
opinion, babe sitting this bird or two may not be the best possible solution as 
it may only add more fuel to the fire. 


Am I the only odd birder to notice the fantastic habiat description described ?

Young conifer stand that is growing in a forest canopy gap, stand of young 
conifers ,and the canopy opening in the forest that surrounds the Lake. To me, 
that description was screaming riparian habitat that has above vegetation 
community. 


I have posted this link below. If one is to put some effort into how to use the 
website below, one may find so many similar habitat around the corner from 
their house, so travel to “ that” location may not be necessary. My biggest 
tip for the link below would be to use infra-red aerial photograph option as 
conifer stands shows up red as compare to deciduous stands shows up gray color. 
Also, historic aerial photo option to gage the how old the forest you are 
reviewing. Also, stream and wetland layer if one is looking for birds in 
riparian habiat. 



http://njwebmap.state.nj.us/NJGeoWeb/WebPages/Map/FundyViewer.aspx?THEME=Sapphire&UH=True&RIDZ=635548758281248178 


As a consolation prize if one is looking for this little owl on your own at 
your own patch, one may find more hermit thrush than any winter chasing 
reported birds here or eBird. 


My post tonight reminds me of one e-mail I received from a Jbirder lady a 
several years ago, that she asked that I should try to find birds on my own at 
other places rather than just reading the JBirds and visiting reported 
locations. 


Yong Kong
Camden County



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Subject: Re: New Egypt Cranes (3)
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 22:48:37 +0000
Michael 
Now I'm getting frustrated...I was there from 3:15 to 3:45. I guess I little 
more patience was required. 


Larry 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 
----- Original Message -----

From: "Michael Hodanish"  
To: "jerseybi"  
Sent: Monday, February 8, 2016 5:08:00 PM 
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] New Egypt Cranes (3) 

The cranes were in the same location (140 Brynmore) again at 4:00pm. They flew 
in from the southwest as I was scanning the area. 


Michael Hodanish 
Howling Woods Farm 
Jackson, NJ 




-----Original Message----- 
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Bob 
Dodelson 

Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 2:50 PM 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU 
Subject: [JERSEYBI] New Egypt Cranes (3) 

At 1:15 PM today I had 3 Sandhill Cranes viewed from road at 140 Brynmore. The 
birds were in the field by some machinery with the transom in view at the very 
end of the driveway 


Bob Dodelson 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com 
List help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com 
List help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu 
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: New Egypt Cranes (3)
From: Michael Hodanish <luv2howl AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 17:08:00 -0500
The cranes were in the same location (140 Brynmore) again at 4:00pm. They flew 
in from the southwest as I was scanning the area. 


Michael Hodanish
Howling Woods Farm
Jackson, NJ




-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Bob 
Dodelson 

Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 2:50 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] New Egypt Cranes (3)

At 1:15 PM today I had 3 Sandhill Cranes viewed from road at 140 Brynmore. The 
birds were in the field by some machinery with the transom in view at the very 
end of the driveway 


Bob Dodelson


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique?
From: "Hopkins,Jeffrey A." <HOPKINJA AT AIRPRODUCTS.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 22:01:05 +0000
Sounds like Trenton is a lot more welcoming than here in Allentown, PA.

The sewage treatment plant here used to have no problem with people peering I 
through the fence to look at the gulls, not to mention go walking along the 
Lehigh River beside the plant for swallows and other passerines. Sometime in 
the last few years they decided to change the policy and not only add security 
and surveillance to prevent people from looking through the fence, but they 
even made the empty dirt lot next to the plant a no trespassing zone. So if you 
wanted to walk along the river, there's no place to park. 


No justification given (nor asked for as far as I know).

Jeff Hopkins
Whitehall , PA




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Subject: Owl report suggestion
From: "Buckingham, Stephen R." <SBuckingham AT LOWENSTEIN.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 20:34:51 +0000
Hi all. I don't post very often to this list, but felt I had to chime in on the 
owl issue with a suggestion. As other have observed, we all make honest 
mistakes, so I see no benefit in berating an inexperienced and now remorseful 
poster. He has learned a lesson I am sure he will never forget. HOWEVER, why is 
his posting still being published on the birding news website? Shouldn't it 
have been taken down immediately and removed from the archives, in the same way 
that spam and offensive emails are? Please act on this without further delay, 
so as to mitigate the issue. 


Steve Buckingham
Montclair

________________________________

This message contains confidential information, intended only for the person(s) 
named above, which may also be privileged. Any use, distribution, copying or 
disclosure by any other person is strictly prohibited. In such case, you should 
delete this message and kindly notify the sender via reply e-mail. Please 
advise immediately if you or your employer does not consent to Internet e-mail 
for messages of this kind. 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: New Egypt Cranes (3)
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 13:49:31 -0600
At 1:15 PM today I had 3 Sandhill Cranes viewed from road at 140 Brynmore. The 
birds were in the field by some machinery with the transom in view at the very 
end of the driveway 


Bob Dodelson


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique?
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 18:06:09 +0000
JBers and amateur sleuths:



Actually, e-Bird might allow some searching on sewage treatment plants.



From the "Explore Data" link on the first page, one can then click on the 
"Explore Hotspots" feature. In the window where one is to type in the name of 
the hotspot, just typing in the word "Treatment" yields an amazingly long list 
of possible locations. One can then pick a location, and restrict the period of 
time to, say, last 10 years and a specific month (for some reason, when you're 
searching hotspots, you have to pick a single month, whereas when you're 
searching on a species, you can pick a range of months. Idiosyncracy of e-Bird) 
and get the species list. 




I picked two at random and found that

1) The Archie Elledge Treatment Plant in Forsythe, NC happens to have hosted an 
Orange-crowned Warbler as recently as Saturday. 


2) No one has ever recorded a warbler of any kind at the Charleston (Coles 
County), IL Sewage Treatment facility between December 1 and February 28 




Jimmy is right that it would take a more sophisticated code-writer to search 
over EVERY "treatment" plant in the US for parulidae, but my guess that a 
half-hour's worth of work would yield an interesting picture of over-wintering 
warblers in "northern" wastewater treatment facilities around the USA. 




Good information gathering!



Marc Chelemer

Tenafly



-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT lists.princeton.edu] On Behalf Of Karenne 
Snow 

Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 12:15 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT lists.princeton.edu
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] STP Question, is Trenton unique?



Thanks Jimmy Lee and Ernie,



These are the kind of conversations that keep me hooked on the JerseyBirds

list!



Of course, now I have another project to spend some time on...like the

article said "who'd a thought?"



Karenne

Medford NJ

On Feb 8, 2016 10:55 AM, "jimmy lee" 
> wrote: 




> Hi JBers,

>

> I have the same as Ernie. So I googled sewage treatment plants winter

> birds. It turned up a couple of hits ( I only looked at the first 2 or so).

>

> The following link was the second hit and is vaguely familiar to me as the

> case may have been alluded to here on the list; and I'm sure there are

> folks who actually birded there. Also the article mentions briefly 2

> similar cases

> in Virginia and Connecticut.

>

> 
http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/greenliving/Swallows-and-sewage-water-Whod-have-thought.html 


>

> For me the Trenton situation was and is more than ticking off a couple of

> warbler species. I wanted to learn orange-crowned warbler better without

> having to go back to Alaska. It and Nashville warbler are species I don't

> see every year. Plus as Ernie (and others) have posed, what is it about the

> sewer plant that is keeping these warblers? the microclimate (which is what

> in this case - the slopeside and its orientation to the sun, the warm

> temperatures from the water, the supply of 'midges' (I'm guessing that is

> what the insects are).

>

> We assume this is what is keeping the warblers here. While I have looked

> occasionally I have not seen the

> warblers near the pools and I don't remember anyone reporting seeing them

> eating the emerging midges. Anyone see this?

>

> It would be great to know the historical occurrences of wintering warblers

> here. This would a great (fun, interesting) situation where birders could

> provide data towards providing answers to some ecological questions. Again

> I don't remember any reports of the historical occurrences here.

>

> I'm not optimistic that googling will provide more info on the original

> question. May be ebird (but probably not at a level of querying available

> to amateurs)?

>

> May be someone can post the question to a national listserv. If it helps,

> you have my permission to cut and past my post. I'd bet there are birders

> out there who have had similar observations.

> Thanks for reading if you got this far. :-)

>

> Good birding.

>

> Regards,

>

> Jimmy Lee

>

>

> Jimmy Lee

>

> South Brunswick, NJ

>

> ----- Original Message -----From: Ernest Hahn 
>To: 


> JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: 
Mon, 08 Feb 2016 14:53:40 -0000 


> (UTC)Subject: [JERSEYBI] STP Question, is Trenton unique?

>

> Just curious, has any one visited other Sewage Treatment Plants this time

> of year to determine it they also hold warblers through the winter? They

> would all have open water and still produce insects if it remains warm

> enough or is Trenton unique because of the large, earthen and concrete

> retaining walls (with a southern exposure, and a strip of cover), providing

> a micro climate, in close proximity to the treatment ponds?

>

> Ernie HahnWest Trenton

>

> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <

> 
www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>or 
e-mail to 


> njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: 
jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList 


> archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

>

>

> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <

> 
www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/> 


> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com

> List help: 
jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu 


> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

>





How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 


or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com

List help: 
jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique?
From: Karenne Snow <njwren46 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 12:14:34 -0500
Thanks Jimmy Lee and Ernie,

These are the kind of conversations that keep me hooked on the JerseyBirds
list!

Of course, now I have another project to spend some time on...like the
article said "who'd a thought?"

Karenne
Medford NJ
On Feb 8, 2016 10:55 AM, "jimmy lee"  wrote:

> Hi JBers,
>
> I have the same as Ernie. So I googled sewage treatment plants winter
> birds. It turned up a couple of hits ( I only looked at the first 2 or so).
>
> The following link was the second hit and is vaguely familiar to me as the
> case may have been alluded to here on the list; and I'm sure there are
> folks who actually birded there. Also the article mentions briefly 2
> similar cases
> in Virginia and Connecticut.
>
> 
http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/greenliving/Swallows-and-sewage-water-Whod-have-thought.html 

>
> For me the Trenton situation was and is more than ticking off a couple of
> warbler species. I wanted to learn orange-crowned warbler better without
> having to go back to Alaska. It and Nashville warbler are species I don't
> see every year. Plus as Ernie (and others) have posed, what is it about the
> sewer plant that is keeping these warblers? the microclimate (which is what
> in this case - the slopeside and its orientation to the sun, the warm
> temperatures from the water, the supply of 'midges' (I'm guessing that is
> what the insects are).
>
> We assume this is what is keeping the warblers here. While I have looked
> occasionally I have not seen the
> warblers near the pools and I don't remember anyone reporting seeing them
> eating the emerging midges. Anyone see this?
>
> It would be great to know the historical occurrences of wintering warblers
> here. This would a great (fun, interesting) situation where birders could
> provide data towards providing answers to some ecological questions. Again
> I don't remember any reports of the historical occurrences here.
>
> I'm not optimistic that googling will provide more info on the original
> question. May be ebird (but probably not at a level of querying available
> to amateurs)?
>
> May be someone can post the question to a national listserv. If it helps,
> you have my permission to cut and past my post. I'd bet there are birders
> out there who have had similar observations.
> Thanks for reading if you got this far. :-)
>
> Good birding.
>
> Regards,
>
> Jimmy Lee
>
>
> Jimmy Lee
>
> South Brunswick, NJ
>
> ----- Original Message -----From: Ernest Hahn To:
> JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Mon, 08 Feb 2016 14:53:40 -0000
> (UTC)Subject: [JERSEYBI] STP Question, is Trenton unique?
>
> Just curious, has any one visited other Sewage Treatment Plants this time
> of year to determine it they also hold warblers through the winter? They
> would all have open water and still produce insects if it remains warm
> enough or is Trenton unique because of the large, earthen and concrete
> retaining walls (with a southern exposure, and a strip of cover), providing
> a micro climate, in close proximity to the treatment ponds?
>
> Ernie HahnWest Trenton
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>or e-mail to
> njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList
> archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique?
From: Linda Widdop <linda AT TECHIMPACT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 17:04:53 +0000
Hi JBers - Phila Water Treatment plant near Betsy Ross Bridge is famous for 
wintering Northern Rough-winged Swallows. In addition, other swallows have been 
reported as well as Orange-crowned and Palm Warblers. And, it is close to NJ. 


Thanks,
Linda Widdop
Montgomery County PA/Villas NJ
I blog at:  www.phillybirdnerd.net
Flickr Photostream:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/58719725 AT N04/

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of jimmy lee
Sent: Monday, February 8, 2016 10:55 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] STP Question, is Trenton unique?

Hi JBers,
 
I have the same as Ernie. So I googled sewage treatment plants winter birds. It 
turned up a couple of hits ( I only looked at the first 2 or so). 

 
The following link was the second hit and is vaguely familiar to me as the case 
may have been alluded to here on the list; and I'm sure there are folks who 
actually birded there. Also the article mentions briefly 2 similar cases in 
Virginia and Connecticut. 


http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/greenliving/Swallows-and-sewage-water-Whod-have-thought.html 

 
For me the Trenton situation was and is more than ticking off a couple of 
warbler species. I wanted to learn orange-crowned warbler better without having 
to go back to Alaska. It and Nashville warbler are species I don't see every 
year. Plus as Ernie (and others) have posed, what is it about the sewer plant 
that is keeping these warblers? the microclimate (which is what in this case - 
the slopeside and its orientation to the sun, the warm temperatures from the 
water, the supply of 'midges' (I'm guessing that is what the insects are). 

 
We assume this is what is keeping the warblers here. While I have looked 
occasionally I have not seen the warblers near the pools and I don't remember 
anyone reporting seeing them eating the emerging midges. Anyone see this? 

 
It would be great to know the historical occurrences of wintering warblers 
here. This would a great (fun, interesting) situation where birders could 
provide data towards providing answers to some ecological questions. Again I 
don't remember any reports of the historical occurrences here. 

 
I'm not optimistic that googling will provide more info on the original 
question. May be ebird (but probably not at a level of querying available to 
amateurs)? 

 
May be someone can post the question to a national listserv. If it helps, you 
have my permission to cut and past my post. I'd bet there are birders out there 
who have had similar observations. 

Thanks for reading if you got this far. :-)
 
Good birding.
 
Regards,
 
Jimmy Lee


Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: Ernest Hahn To: 
JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Mon, 08 Feb 2016 14:53:40 -0000 (UTC)Subject: 
[JERSEYBI] STP Question, is Trenton unique? 


Just curious, has any one visited other Sewage Treatment Plants this time of 
year to determine it they also hold warblers through the winter? They would all 
have open water and still produce insects if it remains warm enough or is 
Trenton unique because of the large, earthen and concrete retaining walls (with 
a southern exposure, and a strip of cover), providing a micro climate, in close 
proximity to the treatment ponds? 


Ernie HahnWest Trenton

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu List archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: STP Question, is Trenton unique?
From: jimmy lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 15:55:28 +0000
Hi JBers,
 
I have the same as Ernie. So I googled sewage treatment plants winter birds. It 
turned up a couple of hits ( I only looked at the first 2 or so). 

 
The following link was the second hit and is vaguely familiar to me as the case 
may have been alluded to here on the list; and I'm sure there are folks who 
actually birded there. Also the article mentions briefly 2 similar cases 

in Virginia and Connecticut.

http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/greenliving/Swallows-and-sewage-water-Whod-have-thought.html 

 
For me the Trenton situation was and is more than ticking off a couple of 
warbler species. I wanted to learn orange-crowned warbler better without having 
to go back to Alaska. It and Nashville warbler are species I don't see every 
year. Plus as Ernie (and others) have posed, what is it about the sewer plant 
that is keeping these warblers? the microclimate (which is what in this case - 
the slopeside and its orientation to the sun, the warm temperatures from the 
water, the supply of 'midges' (I'm guessing that is what the insects are). 

 
We assume this is what is keeping the warblers here. While I have looked 
occasionally I have not seen the 

warblers near the pools and I don't remember anyone reporting seeing them 
eating the emerging midges. Anyone see this? 

 
It would be great to know the historical occurrences of wintering warblers 
here. This would a great (fun, interesting) situation where birders could 
provide data towards providing answers to some ecological questions. Again I 
don't remember any reports of the historical occurrences here. 

 
I'm not optimistic that googling will provide more info on the original 
question. May be ebird (but probably not at a level of querying available to 
amateurs)? 

 
May be someone can post the question to a national listserv. If it helps, you 
have my permission to cut and past my post. I'd bet there are birders out there 
who have had similar observations. 

Thanks for reading if you got this far. :-)
 
Good birding.
 
Regards,
 
Jimmy Lee


Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: Ernest Hahn To: 
JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Mon, 08 Feb 2016 14:53:40 -0000 (UTC)Subject: 
[JERSEYBI] STP Question, is Trenton unique? 


Just curious, has any one visited other Sewage Treatment Plants this time of 
year to determine it they also hold warblers through the winter? They would all 
have open water and still produce insects if it remains warm enough or is 
Trenton unique because of the large, earthen and concrete retaining walls (with 
a southern exposure, and a strip of cover), providing a micro climate, in close 
proximity to the treatment ponds? 


Ernie HahnWest Trenton

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection (Moving on to the important question)
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 15:53:31 +0000
I believe scheduling would be the most difficult part Laurie (well except maybe 
other than getting people to actually act instead of complain) 


My schedule is open the week of the 15th. I will rearrange work if needed to 
take a shifts. Better birders than me can suggest peak times but I would think 
weekends, mornings and evenings would need coverage. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 8, 2016, at 10:36 AM, L Larson  wrote:
> 
> I think thats a cool idea, Robert. Thank you for the constructive 
suggestion. 

> 
> I cant walk or stand long enough to take a shift, but if nobody else 
volunteers I could do some computer support like scheduling, in my copious 
free time. Let me know if I can help. 

> 
> Laurie
> llarson2 AT mac.com 
> 
> 
>> On Feb 8, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Robert Gallucci  wrote:
>> 
>> My apologies, and at the risk of being on the wrong side of the issue, let 
he who is without any fault cast the first stone. This was not a seasoned 
birder who would know better. It was an honest mistake. 

>> 
>> Moving on...... if the question is, as it should be, protection of the owls, 
then I am sure we, as a community of concerned birders and naturalists, can 
figure out a way of having someone at the site for the next few weeks, 
especially during peak times, to protect the birds. 

>> 
>> I have seen this done with great success in Florida where a screech owl was 
nesting next to a very public walkway. In that case it was in a nature preserve 
and they used paid employees to sit on the path. We can do it as volunteers. 

>> 
>> I am in Seattle all week this week but would be happy to take a shift next 
week. Who wants to coordinate it? 

>> 
>> Rob Gallucci
>> 516-996-6200


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection (Moving on to the important question)
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 10:36:39 -0500
I think thats a cool idea, Robert. Thank you for the constructive suggestion. 

I cant walk or stand long enough to take a shift, but if nobody else 
volunteers I could do some computer support like scheduling, in my copious 
free time. Let me know if I can help. 


Laurie
llarson2 AT mac.com 


> On Feb 8, 2016, at 10:22 AM, Robert Gallucci  wrote:
> 
> My apologies, and at the risk of being on the wrong side of the issue, let he 
who is without any fault cast the first stone. This was not a seasoned birder 
who would know better. It was an honest mistake. 

> 
> Moving on...... if the question is, as it should be, protection of the owls, 
then I am sure we, as a community of concerned birders and naturalists, can 
figure out a way of having someone at the site for the next few weeks, 
especially during peak times, to protect the birds. 

> 
> I have seen this done with great success in Florida where a screech owl was 
nesting next to a very public walkway. In that case it was in a nature preserve 
and they used paid employees to sit on the path. We can do it as volunteers. 

> 
> I am in Seattle all week this week but would be happy to take a shift next 
week. Who wants to coordinate it? 

> 
> Rob Gallucci
> 516-996-6200 
 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection (Moving on to the important question)
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 15:22:23 +0000
My apologies, and at the risk of being on the wrong side of the issue, let he 
who is without any fault cast the first stone. This was not a seasoned birder 
who would know better. It was an honest mistake. 


Moving on...... if the question is, as it should be, protection of the owls, 
then I am sure we, as a community of concerned birders and naturalists, can 
figure out a way of having someone at the site for the next few weeks, 
especially during peak times, to protect the birds. 


I have seen this done with great success in Florida where a screech owl was 
nesting next to a very public walkway. In that case it was in a nature preserve 
and they used paid employees to sit on the path. We can do it as volunteers. 


I am in Seattle all week this week but would be happy to take a shift next 
week. Who wants to coordinate it? 


Rob Gallucci
516-996-6200 

________________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Phil Jeffrey 
 

Sent: Monday, February 8, 2016 9:47 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Owl report and a need for a little self reflection

Alternatively the outcome might be viewed as taking responsibility for
one's actions.

If someone can't be bothered to read list rules then one can't be too
affronted when they get called on it offline or online.

"Honest mistake" defenses are strange beasts - sure, there's a lack of
actual intent, but it doesn't change the outcome for the owls.  Owl issues
have been bouncing around lists for many years - my own list (about the
same membership as this one) has pretty strict rules and people have been
removed from it over owl postings.  Many other birding lists are the same.
If someone wants to be excessively naive or willfully ignorant about the
potential impact on the owls, or the availability of this information to
people that we have no influence over, that's their own decision, but that
doesn't mean the outcome for the owls will be less negative (long-term
roost disruption, potential severe downside to survival).

My sympathy for the original poster is limited.  My sympathy for the owls
is much more extensive - it's a life-or-death affair for them as the
weather hardens this week.

Phil Jeffrey
Princeton and Ewing, NJ

On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 10:18 PM, David La Puma 
wrote:

> Folks,
>
> John is a colleague and friend, and someone who was not aware of the rules
> about reporting owls to the list. Self policing is effective if its
> constructive and not belligerent, and some of the private messages that
> John received following his post are downright threatening. I know many of
> you on this list and I can vouch that the vast majority are helpful,
> nurturing, birders who like to share with each other and in-fact, see
> sharing as an important and gratifying part of the activity of birding. The
> last thing we want to do is berate someone for making a mistake; this is
> vastly different than someone acting irresponsibly at an owl roost, fully
> aware of their behavior. Weve all screwed up once (some, including myself,
> many more than once!).
>
> Good Birding,
>
> David
>
>
--
"If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge"
- Henry Spencer


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: STP Question, is Trenton unique?
From: Ernest Hahn <ernesthahn AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 09:53:40 -0500
Just curious, has any one visited other Sewage Treatment Plants this time of 
year to determine it they also hold warblers through the winter? They would all 
have open water and still produce insects if it remains warm enough or is 
Trenton unique because of the large, earthen and concrete retaining walls (with 
a southern exposure, and a strip of cover), providing a micro climate, in close 
proximity to the treatment ponds? 


Ernie Hahn
West Trenton


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection
From: Phil Jeffrey <phil.jeffrey AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 09:47:02 -0500
Alternatively the outcome might be viewed as taking responsibility for
one's actions.

If someone can't be bothered to read list rules then one can't be too
affronted when they get called on it offline or online.

"Honest mistake" defenses are strange beasts - sure, there's a lack of
actual intent, but it doesn't change the outcome for the owls.  Owl issues
have been bouncing around lists for many years - my own list (about the
same membership as this one) has pretty strict rules and people have been
removed from it over owl postings.  Many other birding lists are the same.
If someone wants to be excessively naive or willfully ignorant about the
potential impact on the owls, or the availability of this information to
people that we have no influence over, that's their own decision, but that
doesn't mean the outcome for the owls will be less negative (long-term
roost disruption, potential severe downside to survival).

My sympathy for the original poster is limited.  My sympathy for the owls
is much more extensive - it's a life-or-death affair for them as the
weather hardens this week.

Phil Jeffrey
Princeton and Ewing, NJ

On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 10:18 PM, David La Puma 
wrote:

> Folks,
>
> John is a colleague and friend, and someone who was not aware of the rules
> about reporting owls to the list. Self policing is effective if it’s
> constructive and not belligerent, and some of the private messages that
> John received following his post are downright threatening. I know many of
> you on this list and I can vouch that the vast majority are helpful,
> nurturing, birders who like to share with each other and in-fact, see
> sharing as an important and gratifying part of the activity of birding. The
> last thing we want to do is berate someone for making a mistake; this is
> vastly different than someone acting irresponsibly at an owl roost, fully
> aware of their behavior. We’ve all screwed up once (some, including myself,
> many more than once!).
>
> Good Birding,
>
> David
>
>
-- 
"If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge"
- Henry Spencer


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 07:13:11 -0500
I was once bullied off a Bob Dylan forum on Facebook b/c I suggested that
his set lists weren't as interesting as they used to be. I have received
vicious emails from people when I said that I like Anna Netrebko's version
of a certain operatic aria more than Maria Callas's version. Structurally,
it is exactly the same bundle of neurons that drives those emails and
bullying behaviors as were apparently sent to the person who posted about
the owls.

His post was in error. Right. it was clearly an honest mistake. (I make
those hourly, and am going to go way out on a limb and suggest that those
who write vicious emails do probably make them more often). i realize that,
once something is on Google, it is there forever. So we can hope that there
is no fallout to the owls [once in Oregon, I was fortunate enough to see a
great gray owl on a tree on a ranch. the ranch owner had put crime scene
tape (!) around a huge perimeter to keep wandering campers out; I thought
that was inspired [I was there by invite]). But, again, there is no reason
for hobbyists --and that is what we are -- to do this. Except for the fact
that 1%, alas, always will.

Oh, and by the way? I thought Mays was better than Mantle. And Magic better
than Bird.

Best,
Michael Perlin

On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 11:07 PM, Robert Dube  wrote:

>      Some super serious birders really crack me up. Hollywood could
> probably make a movie similar to Best in Show or its a Mad Mad Mad Mad
> World. Could be a hit and bring more people into the hobby.
>
> Robert H. Dube Jr
> 08055 + 08260
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: "Louis Bizzarro" 
> Sent: ‎07/‎02/‎2016 10:38 PM
> To: "JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU" 
> Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Owl report and a need for a little self reflection
>
> David,
>
> The situation you just described, along with Yong Kong claiming to receive
> nasty private messages, makes me seriously question the character of some
> of the individuals belonging to this message board.
>
> Louis Bizzarro
>
> Monroe Township
>
> On Sunday, February 7, 2016, David La Puma  wrote:
>
> > Folks,
> >
> > John is a colleague and friend, and someone who was not aware of the
> rules
> > about reporting owls to the list. Self policing is effective if it’s
> > constructive and not belligerent, and some of the private messages that
> > John received following his post are downright threatening. I know many
> of
> > you on this list and I can vouch that the vast majority are helpful,
> > nurturing, birders who like to share with each other and in-fact, see
> > sharing as an important and gratifying part of the activity of birding.
> The
> > last thing we want to do is berate someone for making a mistake; this is
> > vastly different than someone acting irresponsibly at an owl roost, fully
> > aware of their behavior. We’ve all screwed up once (some, including
> myself,
> > many more than once!).
> >
> > Good Birding,
> >
> > David
> > ________________________
> > David A. La Puma, PhD
> > Cape May, New Jersey
> >
> > e: david AT woodcreeper.com 
> > c: 732.447.4894
> > w: http://www.woodcreeper.com
> >
> >
> > “Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - 
Amelia 

> > Earhart
> >
> >
> >
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> > www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> > or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com 
> > List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu 
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> >
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 22:36:55 -0500
David,

The situation you just described, along with Yong Kong claiming to receive
nasty private messages, makes me seriously question the character of some
of the individuals belonging to this message board.

Louis Bizzarro

Monroe Township

On Sunday, February 7, 2016, David La Puma  wrote:

> Folks,
>
> John is a colleague and friend, and someone who was not aware of the rules
> about reporting owls to the list. Self policing is effective if it’s
> constructive and not belligerent, and some of the private messages that
> John received following his post are downright threatening. I know many of
> you on this list and I can vouch that the vast majority are helpful,
> nurturing, birders who like to share with each other and in-fact, see
> sharing as an important and gratifying part of the activity of birding. The
> last thing we want to do is berate someone for making a mistake; this is
> vastly different than someone acting irresponsibly at an owl roost, fully
> aware of their behavior. We’ve all screwed up once (some, including myself,
> many more than once!).
>
> Good Birding,
>
> David
> ________________________
> David A. La Puma, PhD
> Cape May, New Jersey
>
> e: david AT woodcreeper.com 
> c: 732.447.4894
> w: http://www.woodcreeper.com
>
>
> “Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - 
Amelia 

> Earhart
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com 
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Owl report and a need for a little self reflection
From: David La Puma <david AT WOODCREEPER.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 22:18:54 -0500
Folks, 

John is a colleague and friend, and someone who was not aware of the rules 
about reporting owls to the list. Self policing is effective if it’s 
constructive and not belligerent, and some of the private messages that John 
received following his post are downright threatening. I know many of you on 
this list and I can vouch that the vast majority are helpful, nurturing, 
birders who like to share with each other and in-fact, see sharing as an 
important and gratifying part of the activity of birding. The last thing we 
want to do is berate someone for making a mistake; this is vastly different 
than someone acting irresponsibly at an owl roost, fully aware of their 
behavior. We’ve all screwed up once (some, including myself, many more than 
once!). 


Good Birding,

David
________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Cape May, New Jersey

e: david AT woodcreeper.com
c: 732.447.4894
w: http://www.woodcreeper.com


“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - Amelia 
Earhart 




How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Crested Caracara, Holmdel
From: Andrew Bobe <cprincipalis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 22:16:52 -0500
Not my sighting, but I just saw on ebird that a caracara was seen today in 
Holmdel, Monmouth County, on Crawfords Corner-Everett Rd. near the intersection 
of Front St. Photos were attached. 


Andrew Bobe 
Hamilton 

Sent from my iPhone


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List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Forsythe Snow Geese show
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 03:08:28 +0000
Jersey Birders -

This week, some home issues have given me more opportunities to get out and 
bird, but perversely, less time whenever I do get to go out! That rushing can 
cause some tunnel vision. To wit, I went early this week to Manasquan Inlet 
looking for the Razorbill (no luck) and missed the two Harlequins sitting right 
out in the sun at the end of the north jetty that Bob Dodleson saw right after 
I left. Then up to Shark River Inlet where I again missed the Razorbill and 
also the Pacific Loon that must have been right in front of me. Then, Friday I 
couldn't get out of the neighborhood to meet up with Marc Chelemer (who did get 
through the snow driving from Bergen County) at Sayreville Marsh. 


But, a Saturday morning walk at Barnegat along the jetty and the sand started a 
nice end to a frustrating birding week. It was sunny, warm, the sea was pretty 
calm. And so I got my annual Harlequin and Common Eider fix, all three Scoters, 
lots of Red-throated and Common Loons, gulls (no white-wings on those that were 
close), lots of Long-tails, NO mergansers (I've never had no Red-breasted mergs 
here in winter), Ruddy Turnstones and a single Purple sandpiper, in the sun 
where he/she let me get some non-pixilated, in-focus photographs. A lovely end 
to a crazy week. 


Today, I got to Forsythe. I didn't see anything rare or unexpected. There was a 
good looking Sharp-shinned hawk near Gull tower and a variety of ducks. No 
swans. But the Snow goose show was great. First time I've seen them close to 
the dike road. Today the thousand(s?) were in the water and on the ground on 
both sides of the north dike road. Several dark morphs in the mix. Didn't see 
any no no-grin Ross' geese in with those I saw. What could be bad, sitting my 
warm car surrounded by these beauties? I've posted a few of the many photos I 
shot here: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/24258208564


SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.




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Subject: NJ Young Birders Club trip to Barnegat Lighthouse SP
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 22:08:03 -0500
Jerseybirders,

We had a great day today at Barnegat Inlet/Lighthouse on the New Jersey
Young Birders Club field trip: warm, windless weather, cooperative birds, a
great group of young birders and their supportive parents, and some
excellent leaders.

Two groups of Harlequin Ducks were present-one flock was about half way out
the jetty and another was around the tip of the south jetty and the old 8th
St jetty, where about a dozen or so Common Eiders (one adult male included)
were hanging out. The usual composition of Dunlin, Ruddy Turnstones, and
Purple Sandpipers were in evidence, and four Great Cormorants already
sporting some breeding plumage were atop the north jetty tower. A bonus was
a hen King Eider hanging around a mixed-scoter flock off the half-submerged
section of the north jetty.

Thanks to Barbara Basset, Richard Crossley, Linda Mack, and Margeaux Maerz
for co-leading the trip today. The next NJ Young Birders Club field trip is
to Mannington Marsh, Salem Co. for Tundra Swans, waterfowl, eagles, and
perhaps a Sandhill Crane or two on March 5. These trips are free, but we
ask that you pre-register. More info about the NJYBC can be found here:
http://njyoungbirders.weebly.com/

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: Admin: Owl locations
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 21:27:50 -0500
Jersey birders,

Please be reminded of the long-standing policy prohibiting posting locations of 
wintering owl roosts, and owl and endangered species nest locations. (The only 
exceptions would be Snowy Owls IF they can be viewed at a distance without 
disturbance). 


It cannot be stressed too strongly that this kind of post is a violation of 
common sense as well as birding ethics, as the killing of an owl by a dog a few 
years ago made obvious. The recent Saw-whet post will be removed from the 
archives, but we can’t remove it from the ABA website or other mirrors, and 
it is certain to endanger the owls currently using the site. 


Please censor yourself so that we don’t have to institute a policy of 
inspecting and censoring ALL posts before they go out on the listserv mailing 
list. 


Thanks,
Laurie Larson
co-listowner, Jerseybirds
jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu


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Subject: Re: TRENTON SEWER LOCATION
From: jimmy lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2016 01:52:35 +0000
JBers,
 
As I read Michael's post, I would correct it to say that as you down the ramp 
(29 south) at the bottom 

of the ramp turn right into the waterfront park (Trenton Marine terminal - a 
simple parking area, a bit of 'lawn and then the river). Park here and walk 
directly across the street. The entrance into the birding area is here (sign 
Trenton Sewer Utility). 

 
Bird along the road up to around the gate (in the fence). In my experience one 
could just stand near the gate and watch the slope/fence/vegetation and see the 
desired birds. The birds seem to go back and forth so if you have time the 
birds can be seen just by standing here. 

 
There is some vehicular (cars and trucks) traffic so be careful and thoughtful. 

 
I have seen some ducks in the 'ponds' from outside of the gate.
 
As I understand it, the area inside the gate is off limits to birders.
 
Good birding.
 
Jimmy Lee
 
 


Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: J Hummel To: 
JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Mon, 08 Feb 2016 01:34:36 -0000 (UTC)Subject: 
Re: [JERSEYBI] TRENTON SEWER LOCATION 


There is also a sign that says "Trenton Sewage Treatment" or somethingsimilar 
on the right at the entrance to the road where the ponds and thepine trees are, 
(the narrow road referred to by Michael above). The bestviewing is up this road 
across from the drive leading into the sewageponds area. Every so often a cloud 
of midges emerges from the ponds andout of this opening and drifts across the 
road to the pines. This isundoubtedly what is nourishing the warblers. 




On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 4:12 PM, Michael Perlin  wrote:

> It took me (a Trenton guy) two trips. I come south on 29, just where it> 
becomes 195. There is an exit to the right that says (Lamberton St/Duck> 
island). Take that exit. At the bottom of the ramp, your inclination is to> go 
straight/right. Instead, there is a parking lot immediately on your> left. park 
there. When u get out of the lot cross over the road that u had> just driven on 
and walk straight down a relatively narrow road . there will> be a grouping of 
pine trees on your right and the highway will be on your> left just above a 
retaining wall. Walk til you see the first intersecting> road coming from the 
right. When i was there the other day, the birds were> all just after that 
intersection in the brambles above the wall to your> left.>> of course, being 
birds, they do move 9smiling)>> Good luck!> Michael Perlin>> On Sun, Feb 7, 
2016 at 4:03 PM, Richard Moran  wrote:>> > COMING NORTH ON 
129 I TURNED ONTO LAMBERTON STREET. AT THE STOP SIGN I> > TURNED RIGHT AND WENT 
TO THE 2ND PARKING LOT ON THE LEFT.> >> > IS THAT THE CORRECT PLACE TO LOOK FOR 
THE BIRDS?? I HAVE BEEN THERE 3> > TIMES AND DIDN'T KNOW WHERE TO GO. ANY HELP 
WILL BE APPRECIATED> >> >> > How to report NJ bird sightings: see <> > 
www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>> > or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.com> > List help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu> > List 
archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi> >>>> How to 
report NJ bird sightings: see <> 
www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>> or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.com> List help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu> List 
archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi> 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



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Subject: Re: TRENTON SEWER LOCATION
From: J Hummel <juanita.hummel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 20:34:36 -0500
There is also a sign that says "Trenton Sewage Treatment" or something
similar on the right at the entrance to the road where the ponds and the
pine trees are, (the narrow road referred to by Michael above).  The best
viewing is up this road across from the drive  leading into the sewage
ponds area.  Every so often a cloud of midges emerges from the ponds  and
out of this opening and drifts across the road to the pines.  This is
undoubtedly what is nourishing the warblers.



On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 4:12 PM, Michael Perlin  wrote:

> It took me (a Trenton guy) two trips. I come south on 29, just where it
> becomes 195. There is an exit to the right that says (Lamberton St/Duck
> island). Take that exit. At the bottom of the ramp, your inclination is to
> go straight/right. Instead, there is a parking lot immediately on your
> left. park there. When u get out of the lot cross over the road that u had
> just driven on and walk straight down a relatively narrow road . there will
> be a grouping of pine trees on your right and the highway will be on your
> left just above a retaining wall. Walk til you see the first intersecting
> road coming from the right. When i was there the other day, the birds were
> all just after that intersection in the brambles above the wall to your
> left.
>
> of course, being birds, they do move 9smiling)
>
> Good luck!
> Michael Perlin
>
> On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 4:03 PM, Richard Moran  wrote:
>
> > COMING NORTH ON 129 I TURNED ONTO LAMBERTON STREET. AT THE STOP SIGN I
> > TURNED RIGHT AND WENT TO THE 2ND PARKING LOT ON THE LEFT.
> >
> > IS THAT THE CORRECT PLACE TO LOOK FOR THE BIRDS??  I HAVE BEEN THERE 3
> > TIMES AND DIDN'T KNOW WHERE TO GO. ANY HELP WILL BE APPRECIATED
> >
> >
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> > www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> > or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> > List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> >
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owls at Allamuchy Mountain State Park
From: John Parke <john.parke AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 16:20:35 -0500
Hi All

While hiking today at Allamuchy Mountain State Park I cam across 2 Northern 
Saw-whet Owls. They were in the young conifer stand that is growing in a forest 
canopy gap at the northern corner of Deer Park Pond. You can't miss the stand 
-it is the only stand of young conifers (firs and hemlock) growing together in 
abundance because of the canopy opening in the forest that surrounds the lake. 
The stand is easily accessible since a trail goes right past it (Lake View 
Trail -blue blazes). 
http://www.state.nj.us/dep/parksandforests/parks/allamuch_deer_park.html 


Note: Northern Saw-whets have been wintering here at this location each year 
for at least the last 7 years as far as i am aware. 


Enjoy!


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Subject: Re: TRENTON SEWER LOCATION
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 16:12:59 -0500
It took me (a Trenton guy) two trips. I come south on 29, just where it
becomes 195. There is an exit to the right that says (Lamberton St/Duck
island). Take that exit. At the bottom of the ramp, your inclination is to
go straight/right. Instead, there is a parking lot immediately on your
left. park there. When u get out of the lot cross over the road that u had
just driven on and walk straight down a relatively narrow road . there will
be a grouping of pine trees on your right and the highway will be on your
left just above a retaining wall. Walk til you see the first intersecting
road coming from the right. When i was there the other day, the birds were
all just after that intersection in the brambles above the wall to your
left.

of course, being birds, they do move 9smiling)

Good luck!
Michael Perlin

On Sun, Feb 7, 2016 at 4:03 PM, Richard Moran  wrote:

> COMING NORTH ON 129 I TURNED ONTO LAMBERTON STREET. AT THE STOP SIGN I
> TURNED RIGHT AND WENT TO THE 2ND PARKING LOT ON THE LEFT.
>
> IS THAT THE CORRECT PLACE TO LOOK FOR THE BIRDS??  I HAVE BEEN THERE 3
> TIMES AND DIDN'T KNOW WHERE TO GO. ANY HELP WILL BE APPRECIATED
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: TRENTON SEWER LOCATION
From: Richard Moran <rmoran AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 16:03:28 -0500
COMING NORTH ON 129 I TURNED ONTO LAMBERTON STREET. AT THE STOP SIGN I TURNED 
RIGHT AND WENT TO THE 2ND PARKING LOT ON THE LEFT. 


IS THAT THE CORRECT PLACE TO LOOK FOR THE BIRDS?? I HAVE BEEN THERE 3 TIMES AND 
DIDN'T KNOW WHERE TO GO. ANY HELP WILL BE APPRECIATED 



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Subject: Trenton Sewer Utility 2/7--5 species of warblers
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 20:33:41 +0000
I could no longer resist going to this hotbed of winter warblers, so after a 
couple of wrong turns, I found the facility and was not disappointed. the 
Yellow-throated Warbler was giving spectacular views, sitting for long periods 
in a bare tree's branches and the Nashville Warbler was almost as cooperative, 
although low down in the tangles. A Palm Warbler was a little harder to see but 
eventually made itself known, and a few Pine Warblers were also present (I 
think PIWA is more overlooked than rare 'round here), as well a lots of 
yellow-rumps. 4 Brown Creepers (a personal favorite) were present as well as 
both kinglets. I missed the Orange-crowned Warbler, which I notice was seen 
after I left. Just gives me a reason to go back. 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 


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Subject: White fronted geese
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 15:07:13 -0500
The four were still here, Marilyn and I saw again, but the whole flock was 
flushed 

by a drone! My first experience with that. Any laws against this yet?? 

I don't know whether the geese will return. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: waterfowl - Mannington marsh - Salem county
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2016 14:10:09 -0500
Hello,
 As I await Marilyn's arrival - she will be chasing the White fronted Geese, I 
am 

writing this. Finally, a spot in the south of the state with loads of 
waterfowl. 

Mannington Marsh. Eagles are flying. Very nice. Pintails and Common Mergs 
staging. Tundra Swans and Sandhill Cranes calling. And rare geese.
There was a Cackling Goose in flight. But in the area. Maybe the one Jeff K. 
had 

earlier in the month. And 4 White fronted Geese. They were on the east side
of the Kings Highway causeway. In and out of the reeds about middle of the way 
in. 

I will be curious to see if they stick. 
 The raptor survey this morning was average. Merlin was nice. Harriers, Bald 
Eagles, 

and RT Hawks. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Correction - Not Prairie- I am ID'ing as Tundra Peregrine (Falco peregrinus tundrius)
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 22:57:16 -0500
Sorry folks on the ID error on my prior post.

When I got home, I was in such a hurry to watch Boardwalk Empire with Mary.

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Subject: North Shore and Trenton Sewage Plant
From: Phil Jeffrey <phil.jeffrey AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 22:26:44 -0500
I did a fairly dilettante run up the NJ north shore from Point Pleasant to
Sandy Hook, dipped on Rough-legged Hawk in Sayreville and ended the day at
the warbler show in Trenton.

Notables:
Two immature male Harlequins at Point Pleasant, in the inlet.
One Razorbill quite a ways out from Shark River inlet, seen from south jetty
Male Eurasian Wigeon seen amongst large numbers of dabbling ducks from
Marconi Ave at west end of the Shark River estuary.  A Redhead pair here
also.
No Western Grebe at Monmouth Beach but a southbound flock of ~50 Snow
Bunting
Common Raven seen briefly and heard from North Beach lot at Sandy Hook,
which then flew over the bay toward Staten Island - recent reports from
there, so one wonders just how far Ravens forage in the average day.
Yellow-throated Warbler seen along with Palm, Pine, Yellow-rumped
(Orange-crowned, Nashville seen by others), both Kinglets, Brown Creeper at
Trenton Sewage Works.  Unlike previous visits the Yellow-throated was quite
cooperative.

Cumulative list:
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Horned Grebe
Northern Gannet
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Canada Goose
Brant
Mute Swan
Gadwall
Eurasian Wigeon
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Redhead
Greater Scaup
Harlequin Duck
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Northern Harrier
Red-tailed Hawk
Sanderling
Purple Sandpiper
Bonaparte's Gull
Razorbill
Common Raven
Horned Lark
Black-capped Chickadee
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Palm Warbler
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Snow Bunting
Northern Cardinal
Common Grackle
House Finch

Phil Jeffrey
Ewing


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Subject: Motts Creek Prairie and Barnegat Loon ID request
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 20:48:41 -0500
This morning at Motts Creek Road I was fortunate to refind the Prairie falcon 
that I initially found at Brig Refuge (by the Gull Pond tower) while back. I am 
assuming it is the same falcon that two expert birds gave me the confirmed ID. 
This falcon must be spending the winter in the area. For those who have not 
have had the opportunity to enjoy this falcon it appears there may be a chance 
still. 


My plan for the day was head over to the Barnegat Light jetty. I eventually 
made my way to the Jetty around 3:45P PM or so. By the time I was almost to the 
end of the jetty there were no birders with bins/scope, but only about 5 
picture takers/birds w/ monster lens. They were all on their knees or on their 
bottom to as to not to spook the birds that were so close to the rocks/jetty. I 
always try to practice one thing in birding, that is do not ruins fellow 
birders day. 


Let me explain. As I was walking towards the end of the jetty and as I came up 
on these picture takers already in position. I knew I was not going to make it 
to the end. I was not about to ruin their opportunity to take pictures. There 
was one lady picture taker that stopped me on my tracks as she was taking 
photos of purple sandpipers on the rocks that was on my path. I waited until 
she was done. I made a few more steps forward then realized the place was not 
for me as it was their opportunity. So I turned back. 


No regrets. Share the Space I said as I walking back to the parking lot. 
Personal lesson learned is “ when you do good things to people, good things 
happen to you”. There was a very cool looking (odd looking) loon waiting for 
me at the channel, by the over-flow parking lot, where folks park after 4 PM 
when the park gate is closed. 


For those who may be interested in retracing my birding steps, some photos from 
today are on my Flickr. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County



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Subject: Northern North Shore today-WEGR continues
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 20:07:32 -0500
Jerseybirders,

The highlight of today's NJ Audubon All Things Birds field trip was
relocating the Western Grebe (WEGR) off the Allenhurst Boardwalk around 2
pm. Small numbers (2-4) of Razorbills were visible with some patient
scanning off Seven Presidents Park, Pullman Ave, Marine St in Deal, and
Allenhurst.

Other highlights included good studies of various ages and plumages of all
three scoter species, a Red-necked Grebe, a cooperative Merlin viewed
through scopes, and diving Northern Gannets. Very little waterfowl on Lake
Takanasee, but the number of scoters, Long-tailed Ducks, and loons on the
ocean made for an enjoyable day afield.

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: NJAS All Things Birds Trip today
From: Thomas Smith <mrtpjsmith AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 18:49:59 -0500
I normally don't post on this list, but I do want to give a shout out to
David Bernstein for leading a wonderful trip today to Bayonne and Jersey
City.  Although I grew up in West New York, I never thought of Hudson
county as a birding spot.

Today we had a very close flock of Canvasbacks in Newark Bay, some Horned
Grebes, and Goldeneyes at Liberty State Park along with Horned Larks.  Best
was a nesting pair of Bald Eagles in Jersey City with both birds on the
nest!  Shows what can happen when pesticides are banned.

Tom Smith
Hightstown, NJ


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Subject: eagle festival and ducks
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 18:49:11 -0500
Hello,
 I wanted to thank all for stopping by and saying hello at the Eagle Festival! 
It was a great day! 

I also wanted to mention that I hit Heislerville beforehand. That was my best 
spot for waterfowl. 

There just isn’t much around still. And I stopped at Malaga Lake on the way 
home. Devoid of waterfowl. 


Good birding all. I am a raptor census route tomorrow in Salem. Will hit 
Cannington when done. 



Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: Columbia Lake, Warren County
From: Lillian Shupe <lrshupe AT FRONTIERNET.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 18:32:47 -0500
Finally found some waterfowl

 

American Black Ducks

Hooded Mergansers

Common Mergansers

Ring Billed Gulls

Herring Gulls

Mallards 

Canada  geese

 

plus has a Yellow Rumped Warbler 

 

The other day I had a large flock of common goldeneyes in the Delaware River
near Belvidere

 

Lillian Shupe

Lower Mt Bethel Pa.

 

 



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Subject: Sandhill Crane in New Egypt
From: Michael Hodanish <luv2howl AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 16:32:41 -0500
Single sandhill crane at the cattle farm next to Lone Silo Farm in New
Egypt, today around 1pm.  Captured on poor quality photo with a phone before
the bird walked off.

http://www.howlingwoods.org/gallery/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=10001&
pos=0

Michael Hodanish, President
Howling Woods Farm
Jackson, NJ




-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Rod
Sent: Saturday, February 06, 2016 10:33 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Lark Sparrow at Beach Plum Farm

I refound the Lark Sparrow this morning in the back field feeding on ground
near brush pile

Good birding

Rod MacKenzie 

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Monmouth County Audubon Meeting February 10th
From: Wendy and Stuart Malmid <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 13:18:49 -0500
Jerseybirders


Join Paul Guris when he presents his program "Winter Pelagics in the 
Mid-Atlantic:Putting the Brr in Birding" at the next meeting of Monmouth County 
Audubon Society on Wednesday February 10 at 8PM. Meetings are held at the 
Knights of Columbus Hall at 200 Fair Haven Road in Fair Haven. The public is 
welcome and admission is free. 


While the idea of venturing out on the ocean in the winter is a daunting 
prospect for some, winter can be one of the most rewarding times to look for 
seabirds and other marine life in the Mid-Atlantic. Dovekies,puffins,murres, 
razorbills, gannets, 

kittiwakes, loons, ducks, cormorants and gulls can all be found, many quite 
reliably. Some of these species are much more common in our area than people 
realize. Interesting discoveries continue to help find these birds on a more 
regular basis. 

Paul Guris's program is an introduction to what one can expect on a pelagic 
boat trip, including birds that can be found and 

interesting information about them.

Paul Guris has been birding the Delaware Valley area for over 40 years. His 
first boat trip took place during his mother's third trimester, so his love of 
seabirds comes naturally. He is a current member of the NJ Bird Records 
Committee, a past president of the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club, the 
former captain of the now retired Nikon/DVOC World Series of Birding team and 
the owner/operator of See Life Paulagics, a pelagics tour company specializing 
in trips in the Mid-Atlantic region. 


For directions to the meeting place and information about Monmouth County 
Audubon Society go to 

www.monmouthaudubon.org  or like us at facebook.com/Monmouthaudubon


Wendy Malmid
Program Chairperson
MCAS
PO Box 542
Red Bank, NJ 07701


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Subject: Ocean Twp. Western Tanager - No
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 11:49:14 -0500
Mark French and I struck out with the Waretown Western Tanager from
719-947AM. Several species were in active migration this morning. In the
70s and 80s on the Garden State Parkway (as well as the Waretown
neighborhood), we observed migrant flocks of Herring Gulls in V-formation.
Perhaps the gullers want to check concentration points later in the day
today. Also, not sure if Eileen needs it for her yard list but an adult
female NORTHER HARRIER moved SW-NE. Along with the Rough-legged Hawk Don
Freiday had along the Avalon causeway, there's definitely some migration
happening today...

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Lark Sparrow at Beach Plum Farm
From: Rod <birdsmac AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 10:32:49 -0500
I refound the Lark Sparrow this morning in the back field feeding on ground 
near brush pile 


Good birding

Rod MacKenzie 

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Pine Siskins in Chatsworth
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 06:48:36 -0500
There are 2 pine siskins that have been visiting my thistle feeder for the
past two weeks.  Siskins have also been reported in the Chatsworth area,
primarily at the Parker preserve.
Pine warblers are also present at Parker.  Joe Palumbo


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Subject: Re: Possible Common Ground-Dove? (photo)
From: John Freiberg <johnfreiberg AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 6 Feb 2016 05:52:00 -0500
I think that the dove on the right appears larger because it's being viewed 
from the side where the protruding chest is visible, whereas the other dove is 
seen from the back and appears to be slimmer. 


John Freiberg

> On Feb 5, 2016, at 9:09 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> 
> Had a small short-tailed dove at my ground feeding area today. In this
> photo there is a House Sparrow and a Mourning Dove as well as the other
> bird. The possible Ground-Dove (lower left) is closer in size to the HOSP
> than the Mourning Dove. Just wondering what others might think? I'm not
> claiming Common Ground-Dove. I'm just curious.
> 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24216488983/
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Re: Possible Common Ground-Dove? (photo)
From: "David A. La Puma" <david.lapuma AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 23:37:30 -0500
Based on back and wing pattern, body feather color, and stubbiness of the tail 
(Common GD would show a longer squared tail) this looks like a tailless 
mourning dove. This can happen due to molt or a failed predation attempt. 


Cheers

David 

________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Director, Cape May Bird Observatory
New Jersey Audubon
600 Route 47 North
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210	
p: 609.861.0700 ext 22
c: 732.447.4894
f: 609.861.1651

w: http://birdcapemay.org
w: http://www.njadubon.org
Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

"Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men's blood" 
- Daniel Hudson Burnham

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 5, 2016, at 9:09 PM, B.G. Sloan  wrote:
> 
> Had a small short-tailed dove at my ground feeding area today. In this
> photo there is a House Sparrow and a Mourning Dove as well as the other
> bird. The possible Ground-Dove (lower left) is closer in size to the HOSP
> than the Mourning Dove. Just wondering what others might think? I'm not
> claiming Common Ground-Dove. I'm just curious.
> 
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24216488983/
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: NJ Young Birders Club Field trip to Barnegat Light Sunday
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 21:46:41 -0500
Jerseybirders,

The NJ Young Birders Club has a field trip scheduled this Sunday at
Barnegat Lighthouse State Park, looking for Harlequin Ducks, eiders, other
sea ducks, waterbirds, and gulls. The trip is free and for young birders
between the ages of 11-17 and parents/guardian. Trip is from 10 am to 1
pm.  For more info see the club's website: http://njyoungbirders.weebly.com/

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: Possible Common Ground-Dove? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 21:09:56 -0500
Had a small short-tailed dove at my ground feeding area today. In this
photo there is a House Sparrow and a Mourning Dove as well as the other
bird. The possible Ground-Dove (lower left) is closer in size to the HOSP
than the Mourning Dove. Just wondering what others might think? I'm not
claiming Common Ground-Dove. I'm just curious.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/24216488983/

Thanks!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Subject: Abort! Abort! Mayday mayday!...Nice recovery
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 2016 22:08:17 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Those words, spoken by the late Robin Williams as the Genie in Disney's 
"Aladdin" film, represented my day today. 


I had agreed to meet a friend in Sayreville at sunrise to try Mike Britt's 
suggestion of scanning the Ken-Buc landfill and Raritan marshes from the south 
side to look for the previously reported Rough-legged Hawk. As I drove past 
Newark Airport, the snow was falling very lightly and I could see the runway 
lights all the way down their two mile or so length, so I thought, "Well, it 
WAS snowing, but now it's letting up." Wrong. By the time I got to Major Drive 
in Sayreville, it was snowing heavily and the wind was up. Scanning from the 
gazebo at Buchanan Park yielded an intrepid Harrier, trying to hunt even in the 
heavily falling snow, and one glum looking Great Blue Heron huddled on the 
shore. But after the snow started coming in the gazebo horizontally, I aborted 
the morning and headed for work. 


That left me with a little time for birding in the afternoon, and I timed my 
quick outing at Round Valley Reservoir for the hour when Frank Sencher, 
yesterday, had observed three Iceland Gulls. It didn't look promising to me 
until, coincidentally, Frank pulled up. We walked out to look at the gull raft 
together. Sure enough, Frank's remarkable acumen allowed him to find an adult 
Iceland within about a minute, and I was able to see the all-white primaries 
until an eagle put it and the whole flock up. In the short time I had left, I 
could not re-find it either at that or another viewing point. 


There might have been a Red-breasted Nuthatch calling at the scuba lot; I heard 
the quiet "yank yank yank," high pitched and nasal, but could not find the 
soundmaker high in the thick evergreens. A good reason to return... 


I thank Frank very much for helping me find my FOY Iceland Gull.

Good birding over the weekend, however far your travels take you,

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly


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