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Updated on Sunday, March 1 at 06:44 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Yellow-bellied Sapsucker,©Barry Kent Mackay

1 Mar Re: Nesting Bald Eagles ["James O'Brien" ]
1 Mar Perth Amboy Waterbirds [Kurtis Himmler ]
1 Mar Nesting Bald Eagles [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
1 Mar Re: Nesting Bald Eagle on Rt. 36! [Tom Brown ]
1 Mar Re: Nesting Bald Eagle on Rt. 36! [Tom Brown ]
1 Mar Re: Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds ["F. Arthur McMorris" ]
28 Feb Gyr strategy [Michael Britt ]
28 Feb Best raptor day ever from the truck 2/27/15 [Michael Britt ]
1 Mar Siskins [ ]
1 Mar Nesting Bald Eagle on Rt. 36! [Michael Britt ]
1 Mar check out these cruises [ ]
1 Mar Rough-legged hawk movement thru South and Central NJ [Yong Kong ]
1 Mar Red-winged blackbirds ["Susie R." ]
1 Mar Re: Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds [David Larsen ]
1 Mar Red-winged Blackbirds ["Susie R." ]
28 Feb Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds [Scott Barnes ]
28 Feb tripods and king eider aging [Sandra Keller ]
28 Feb Ocean County rarities and others 2-28-15 [Shawn Wainwright ]
28 Feb Somerset Sandhills - YES ["B.G. Sloan" ]
28 Feb Short-eared Owl - at Bridge to Nowhere. [Sandra Keller ]
28 Feb King Eiders - Barneget [Sandra Keller ]
28 Feb Lesser Black-backed Gull [Michael Britt ]
28 Feb Scoters, others at Bordentown Scenic Overlook [Chris Brown ]
28 Feb Redpolls ["Dr. Mark Kantrowitz" ]
28 Feb Nesting Bald Eagles at Kearny Point? [Michael Britt ]
28 Feb Gyrfalcon, Monmouth County [Sam Galick ]
28 Feb Sandy Hook B. Wax ["Raymond M. Soff Jr." ]
27 Feb Rarities around Ocean County 2-27-15 [Shawn Wainwright ]
27 Feb 40 or more horned grebes at Ventnor, Longport, Margate and Somers Point (JFK Park) back bays [Yong Kong ]
27 Feb Somers Point, Atlantic County, Semipalmated Plover [Yong Kong ]
27 Feb Rough-legged Hawks Negri-Nepote (Photo) [Steve Byland ]
27 Feb Rough-legged Hawks [Ernest Hahn ]
27 Feb Interesting Cardinal photo: Female or a juvenile? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
27 Feb Mergansers [Harvey Tomlinson ]
26 Feb Salem county - Rough legged Hawk [Sandra Keller ]
26 Feb Odd Couple :-) (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Feb Bohemian waxwings at Island Beach State Park [Greg Prelich ]
25 Feb Adult light morph Rough-legged Hawk,Railroad Ave. Elk Twp, Gloucester Co. [Yong Kong ]
25 Feb Beautiful Dozing Dove (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
25 Feb 3 Bohemian Waxwings in Lavallette 2-25-15 [Shawn Wainwright ]
25 Feb Loons [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
24 Feb Re: Red-breasted/Common Merganser debate [mike hiotis ]
24 Feb black-headed gull [Sarah Luca ]
23 Feb The Merganser debate continues [Shawn Wainwright ]
24 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate [Tom Bailey ]
23 Feb Merganser debate [Yong Kong ]
23 Feb tripods again [Sandra Keller ]
23 Feb Greenwald Park - Camden County - local notes [Sandra Keller ]
23 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate [Vince Capp ]
23 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate [Tom Johnson ]
23 Feb Re: Siskins ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
23 Feb Siskins [ ]
23 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate [Orion Weldon ]
23 Feb Forsythe has re-opened [Don Freiday ]
23 Feb Re: Drive by birding for elderly round-up ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
23 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser debate [Tom Bailey ]
23 Feb Mergansers are like Snowflakes [Harvey Tomlinson ]
23 Feb Re: Birds at the Feeder [Lisa Potash ]
22 Feb Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser debate [Phil Jeffrey ]
22 Feb Sort of OT Year Count (Big Year) 2015 [Michael Turso ]
22 Feb Re: BoWax [Phil Jeffrey ]
22 Feb Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser debate [Shawn Wainwright ]
22 Feb Re: Interesting Cardinal Behavior ["Raymond M. Soff Jr." ]
22 Feb Salem County - big year notes [Sandra Keller ]
23 Feb Peregrine at Wallkill, NY [ ]
22 Feb Re: BoWax [thomas smith ]
22 Feb Re: BoWax [David Larsen ]
22 Feb Rosedale Lake 2/20 and 2/21 ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
22 Feb BoWax [Michael Britt ]
22 Feb Re: Forsythe Closed Due to Ice [Brian Kushner ]
22 Feb Forsythe Closed Due to Ice [Don Freiday ]
22 Feb Re: Drive by birding for elderly round-up ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
22 Feb Laurel Hill and some thoughts [Michael Britt ]
22 Feb Drive by birding for elderly ["Robert AT rgallucci.com" ]
21 Feb RLHA in Cumberland and Salem Counties [Yong Kong ]
21 Feb Re: Sandy Hook Saturday (21 Feb) ["John J. Collins" ]

Subject: Re: Nesting Bald Eagles
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:13:20 -0500
At jakes landing they nest nearly cheek by jowl. I guess there's enough food 
for everyone over there. I also think that osprey are more successful fishers 
and it's easier for the Eagles to just bully them out of their catch. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 1, 2015, at 6:01 PM, Gary or Karen Gentile  wrote:
> 
> The irony in the messages of nesting Bald Eagles usurping Ospreys, such as 
nest on Rt. 36, is not lost on me. A couple of years ago when I mentioned that 
Eagles were taking over "my" Osprey nests on various lakes that my husband and 
I canoe and fish on, people on the list wanted to "run me out of town". I still 
stand by that statement and see fewer Ospreys and more Eagles competing for 
nests and fish areas. 

> I believe there will be a winner and a loser in this battle.
> 
> Karen
> Ocean
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Perth Amboy Waterbirds
From: Kurtis Himmler <saxhero823 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:01:59 -0500
Hi all, 

There were a ton of waterbirds in Perth Amboy in the river near Front St this 
morning. Highlights were an impressive 260+ Red-breasted Mergansers, 25 
Long-tailed Ducks, 4 Red-necked Grebes, and 9 Great Cormorants. The Eurasian 
Wigeon also continued at the northern end of the marina near Seabra's Armory. 


Good birding,
Kurtis Himmler
Piscataway, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nesting Bald Eagles
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:00:46 -0500
The irony in the messages of nesting Bald Eagles usurping Ospreys, such as nest 
on Rt. 36, is not lost on me. A couple of years ago when I mentioned that 
Eagles were taking over "my" Osprey nests on various lakes that my husband and 
I canoe and fish on, people on the list wanted to "run me out of town". I still 
stand by that statement and see fewer Ospreys and more Eagles competing for 
nests and fish areas. 

I believe there will be a winner and a loser in this battle.

Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Nesting Bald Eagle on Rt. 36!
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:29:36 -0500
Sorry hit send before signing off.

Tom Brown
Middletown

On Sunday, March 1, 2015, Tom Brown  wrote:

> Hi Mike and All,
>
> I've been watching this nest when I could since Monday, I live about 5
> mins from there. On Tuesday I observed one of the Eagles fly in and drop
> off what looked like a mallard, the bird on the nest/platform started
> tearing it up immediately. I have not seen a second bird up there since
> thurs (although it's possible she's hunkered down on the nest and not
> visible. That nest/cell tower platform has been used by ospreys for several
> years now.  I'll be keeping an eye out on the nest to see if breeding is
> confirmed, as an aside the platform is behind "sinsasations" but best
> viewable from an overspill lot for CVS on rte 36 diagonally across from the
> strip mall (no pun intended) where sinsations is located.
>
> On Sunday, March 1, 2015, Michael Britt  > wrote:
>
>> Jerseybirders,
>>
>> BALD EAGLES are apparently nesting on Rt. 36 in Hazlet. Mark French and I
>> were on our way back to the parkway from Sandy Hook, when Mark saw a large
>> bird fly in and perch on a tower. I still had my bins around my neck, so I
>> glassed the bird and it was an adult Bald. There was also a nest on the
>> tower and a local confirmed that it was previously discovered. This was by
>> Stryker's Bar. At this rate, Ospreys could start getting displaced from
>> some locations...
>>
>> Mike Britt
>> Bayonne
>>
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>>
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Nesting Bald Eagle on Rt. 36!
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:28:26 -0500
Hi Mike and All,

I've been watching this nest when I could since Monday, I live about 5 mins
from there. On Tuesday I observed one of the Eagles fly in and drop off
what looked like a mallard, the bird on the nest/platform started tearing
it up immediately. I have not seen a second bird up there since thurs
(although it's possible she's hunkered down on the nest and not visible.
That nest/cell tower platform has been used by ospreys for several years
now.  I'll be keeping an eye out on the nest to see if breeding is
confirmed, as an aside the platform is behind "sinsasations" but best
viewable from an overspill lot for CVS on rte 36 diagonally across from the
strip mall (no pun intended) where sinsations is located.

On Sunday, March 1, 2015, Michael Britt  wrote:

> Jerseybirders,
>
> BALD EAGLES are apparently nesting on Rt. 36 in Hazlet. Mark French and I
> were on our way back to the parkway from Sandy Hook, when Mark saw a large
> bird fly in and perch on a tower. I still had my bins around my neck, so I
> glassed the bird and it was an adult Bald. There was also a nest on the
> tower and a local confirmed that it was previously discovered. This was by
> Stryker's Bar. At this rate, Ospreys could start getting displaced from
> some locations...
>
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds
From: "F. Arthur McMorris" <mcmorris AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 14:52:24 -0500
Dave and Scott,

Did you take notice at the time of the length of the wingtips relative to the 
tail on the perched bird? 


Art

F. Arthur McMorris


> On Mar 1, 2015, at 8:21 AM, David Larsen  wrote:
> 
> Jersety Birders
> 
> Arghh! I believe saw this bird a week ago but was did not ID it correctly at 
the time. While leaving the Hook a saw a large falcon perched on a pole on the 
bay side just north of Kingman and Mills .It had a noticeably long pointed tail 
and was stocky. I knew it was too big to be a Merlin but did not look right for 
a Peregrine.I could not pick up on the moustache and the undersides we mostly 
free of streaking except for some roundish brown spots lower down on the 
undersides. I was looking through my windshield with binoculars.I should have 
parked and got my scope out. 

> 
> I know a week old weak ID is not worth much. Beating myself up is a useless 
exercise . To get something out of this I will let you all know perhaps 
yesterdays sighting was not a single flyby. Don't dismiss any large falcon as a 
Peregrine.Those who find rare birds look for them . I tried to turn that bird 
into a Peregrine and may have missed a Gyrfalcon. Lesson learned 

> 
> Dave Larsen
> Mount Laurel NJ
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Barnes" 
 

> To: 
> Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 9:54 PM
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds
> 
> 
>> Jerseybirders,
>> 
>> I co-led a NJ Audubon field trip today to Sandy Hook with Linda Mack. We
>> were amazed to watch a large, barrel-chested and powerful falcon appear
>> over the trees at the south end of Spermaceti Cove while driving. To our
>> amazement, the bird zoomed up to and perched on a utility pole opposite the
>> old Seagull's Nest restaurant. We pulled in to Lot D and were able to view
>> the bird for a few minutes in scopes before it flew off, disappearing over
>> the old visitor center.
>> 
>> Some notes taken after the observation:
>> "Large, powerful falcon seen flying along bayside at Spermaceti Cove;
>> luckily for us it paused, perching atop a utility pole where we able to
>> watch in scope for a couple of minutes before it flew off to the north,
>> disappearing over the old visitor's center. A bulky, heavy-bodied falcon
>> with very broad long wings. When it flew, I was able to observe a two-toned
>> underwing pattern (paler flight feathers with darker/contrasting underwing
>> coverts. Crown, nape, and upper mantle were dark gray, rest of upperparts
>> were dark brown. Sides of face were darkish and not sharply delineated,
>> with a more noticeable "spot" at the bottom of the indistinct "sideburns"
>> area. Chest was whitish with some minimal streaking, heavier blobby
>> streaking across belly, very thick yellow talons."
>> 
>> We also had close looks at the continuing Vesper Sparrow at the north end
>> of parking lot B, a Common Redpoll in a small flock of American Goldfinches
>> in the dunes to the ocean side of the Vesper Sparrow spot, and a calling
>> Common Raven.
>> 
>> I heard second-hand reports that the Bohemian Waxwing was seen early this
>> morning, and again mid-afternoon.
>> 
>> Good Birding,
>> 
>> Scott Barnes
>> All Things Birds Program Director
>> Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
>> Editor, NJ Audubon eBird
>> New Jersey Audubon
>> tel. 609-897-9400
>> scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
>> www.njaudubon.org
>> 
>> Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings:  
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Gyr strategy
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:43:24 -0500
Jerseybirders,

Kudos to Scott Barnes on a terrific find! I think I speak for us all, when
I say that we'd love a narrative;) The last documented Gyr in the state was
in 2005, down in Salem County. With that said, I predicted (Mark French and
Mike Hiotis can testify to this) that Sandy Hook was going to pull one in.
Reason being, this winter Sandy Hook reminds me (but in a larger scale) of
the Gilgo Beach area on Long Island, where Gyrs have wintered in the
past... a barrier beach complex...with loads of wintering waterfowl. It
makes sense that the ice conditions that have forced Bald Eagles south in
numbers would cause some Gyrs to move in response.

Considering the late 1989/early 1990 Gyr at the Hook...the bird could
easily bounce back and forth between NJ and NY like that bird did...it
doesn't care about political boundaries! I'm not troubled by the fact that
the bird has not been relocated (to my knowledge) this afternoon. In my
opinion, it wouldn't be a bad idea to station oneself by the large/mixed
diving duck flock, off E-lot for daybreak...

Mike Britt
Bayonne

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Best raptor day ever from the truck 2/27/15
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:21:40 -0500
Today I "incidentally" observed 14 BALD EAGLES, 3 ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS, &
AMERICAN KESTREL, from the truck.

More details here:


https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2015/02/27/best-incidental-raptor-day-ever-on-the-truck/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Siskins
From: Clifford Miles <0000000e98604842-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 19:42:45 +0000
Sorry about the last post.  Somehow jersybi got added to my send list.  What 
I really want to let people know, is that my goldfinches can't get to the niger 
feeder, because the siskins outnumber them 2 to 1 at least.  My last count was 
at least 25 siskins. 

Clifford MilesMountain Lakes, NJ 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nesting Bald Eagle on Rt. 36!
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 13:57:55 -0500
Jerseybirders,

BALD EAGLES are apparently nesting on Rt. 36 in Hazlet. Mark French and I
were on our way back to the parkway from Sandy Hook, when Mark saw a large
bird fly in and perch on a tower. I still had my bins around my neck, so I
glassed the bird and it was an adult Bald. There was also a nest on the
tower and a local confirmed that it was previously discovered. This was by
Stryker's Bar. At this rate, Ospreys could start getting displaced from
some locations...

Mike Britt
Bayonne

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: check out these cruises
From: Clifford Miles <0000000e98604842-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 18:52:41 +0000
Six Absolutely Insane Cruise Ship Pools

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Six Absolutely Insane Cruise Ship PoolsCruise-line swimming pools are getting 
more luxurious and exciting by the day. Whether you see swimming pools as a 
place to cool off, sun yourself, or enjoy a fruit... | 

|  |
| View on www.yahoo.com | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |



List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Rough-legged hawk movement thru South and Central NJ
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 13:33:50 -0500
Big shout-out to Mike Britt for “peaking” my interest in northward bound 
roughies in South and Central NJ. 


Cuz Mike’s text and email prediction on the narrow window of roughies 
movement during this time of the month, I finally decided to visit Mercer Sod 
Farm to see If those previously reported numbers have increased. Saturday was 
my first time visiting this winter. 


Between around 10 AM to 3 PM, I observed 7 light types and 1 dark type. No 
doubt light types are duplicates. At the back field on Warner Road, saw 3 light 
types perched, evenly spaced a part in one scope scan. So no way to tell exact 
no’s on the light type for the day. 


This morning, at Motts Creek Inn (viewed from the rear deck), in one single 
scan, I observed 3 light types and 1 dark type. Soon later, another dark type 
showed up out of no where and perched on top of an eastern red cedar tree in 
the middle of the marsh. Both dark type viewed w/ scope (in single scan) and 
several photos taken on one during its flight. Unlike the previously reported 
dark type w/ missing flight feathers, they both had all their flight feathers. 


Decided to bail heading north to Dock and Cedar Dock St. etc. due to predicted 
snow storm, so headed over to Brig. One more light type at Brig and photos 
taken. 


There still may be opportunity to enjoy rough-legged hawks in our area before 
the curtain comes down. 


Yong Kong
Camden County



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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-winged blackbirds
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 10:25:27 -0500
Thanks to all who responded.  They seem to be getting closer.

Only 3 of the next 10 days are supposed to be below freezing!  Mud season,
here we come.  :-)

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds
From: David Larsen <aythya AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 08:21:25 -0500
Jersety Birders

Arghh! I believe saw this bird a week ago but was did not ID it correctly at 
the time. While leaving the Hook a  saw a large falcon perched on a pole on 
the bay side just north of Kingman and Mills .It had a noticeably long 
pointed tail and was stocky. I knew it was too big to be a Merlin but did 
not look  right for a  Peregrine.I could not pick up on the moustache and 
the undersides we mostly free of streaking except for some roundish brown 
spots  lower down on the undersides. I was looking through my windshield 
with binoculars.I should have parked and got my scope out.

I know a week old weak ID is not worth much. Beating myself up is a useless 
exercise . To get something out of this I  will let you all know perhaps 
yesterdays sighting was not a single flyby. Don't dismiss any large falcon 
as a Peregrine.Those who find rare birds look for them . I tried to turn 
that bird into a Peregrine and may have missed a Gyrfalcon. Lesson learned

Dave Larsen
Mount Laurel NJ

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Scott Barnes" 
To: 
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 9:54 PM
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds


> Jerseybirders,
>
> I co-led a NJ Audubon field trip today to Sandy Hook with Linda Mack. We
> were amazed to watch a large, barrel-chested and powerful falcon appear
> over the trees at the south end of Spermaceti Cove while driving. To our
> amazement, the bird zoomed up to and perched on a utility pole opposite 
> the
> old Seagull's Nest restaurant. We pulled in to Lot D and were able to view
> the bird for a few minutes in scopes before it flew off, disappearing over
> the old visitor center.
>
> Some notes taken after the observation:
> "Large, powerful falcon seen flying along bayside at Spermaceti Cove;
> luckily for us it paused, perching atop a utility pole where we able to
> watch in scope for a couple of minutes before it flew off to the north,
> disappearing over the old visitor's center. A bulky, heavy-bodied falcon
> with very broad long wings. When it flew, I was able to observe a 
> two-toned
> underwing pattern (paler flight feathers with darker/contrasting underwing
> coverts. Crown, nape, and upper mantle were dark gray, rest of upperparts
> were dark brown. Sides of face were darkish and not sharply delineated,
> with a more noticeable "spot" at the bottom of the indistinct "sideburns"
> area. Chest was whitish with some minimal streaking, heavier blobby
> streaking across belly, very thick yellow talons."
>
> We also had close looks at the continuing Vesper Sparrow at the north end
> of parking lot B, a Common Redpoll in a small flock of American 
> Goldfinches
> in the dunes to the ocean side of the Vesper Sparrow spot, and a calling
> Common Raven.
>
> I heard second-hand reports that the Bohemian Waxwing was seen early this
> morning, and again mid-afternoon.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Scott Barnes
> All Things Birds Program Director
> Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
> Editor, NJ Audubon eBird
> New Jersey Audubon
> tel. 609-897-9400
> scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
> www.njaudubon.org
>
> Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings:  

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-winged Blackbirds
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 07:52:11 -0500
Has anyone seen any flocks of Red-winged Blackbirds yet?  It's March 1 and
so far I've not seen any.

I also realized a couple of days ago that the pair of Carolina Wrens that
have been here all winter aren't visiting the feeder and I don't hear them
anyplace around.  Hopefully, the local Sharpie didn't get them and rather
they have only moved on and will be replaced by another pair.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Gyrfalcon today at Sandy Hook; other birds
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 21:54:35 -0500
Jerseybirders,

I co-led a NJ Audubon field trip today to Sandy Hook with Linda Mack. We
were amazed to watch a large, barrel-chested and powerful falcon appear
over the trees at the south end of Spermaceti Cove while driving. To our
amazement, the bird zoomed up to and perched on a utility pole opposite the
old Seagull's Nest restaurant. We pulled in to Lot D and were able to view
the bird for a few minutes in scopes before it flew off, disappearing over
the old visitor center.

Some notes taken after the observation:
"Large, powerful falcon seen flying along bayside at Spermaceti Cove;
luckily for us it paused, perching atop a utility pole where we able to
watch in scope for a couple of minutes before it flew off to the north,
disappearing over the old visitor's center. A bulky, heavy-bodied falcon
with very broad long wings. When it flew, I was able to observe a two-toned
underwing pattern (paler flight feathers with darker/contrasting underwing
coverts. Crown, nape, and upper mantle were dark gray, rest of upperparts
were dark brown. Sides of face were darkish and not sharply delineated,
with a more noticeable "spot" at the bottom of the indistinct "sideburns"
area. Chest was whitish with some minimal streaking, heavier blobby
streaking across belly, very thick yellow talons."

We also had close looks at the continuing Vesper Sparrow at the north end
of parking lot B, a Common Redpoll in a small flock of American Goldfinches
in the dunes to the ocean side of the Vesper Sparrow spot, and a calling
Common Raven.

I heard second-hand reports that the Bohemian Waxwing was seen early this
morning, and again mid-afternoon.

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
Editor, NJ Audubon eBird
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: tripods and king eider aging
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 21:10:17 -0500
Hello again, 
    Think I have another post left for today.

The new tripod head worked fine. No clicking as I panned horizontally and it 
moved 

without me forcing it as I panned vertically. Not as quick as in my warm house, 
so the 

cold will slow it down. But I had other issues. It was old. And I've been 
forcing it the past 

couple years - as people emailed me last week I shouldn't!

The King Eider today was a first year male. I believe. Pyle states the swelling 
starts 

between Oct. and Dec. And this is late Feb. If anyone not on the trip got pics, 
I would 

love to see to study more! Thanks! That was a hard bird to get on and not 
everyone 

in my group saw it. The wave action at the tip made it difficult. Everyone got 
the 

female at least. 

Good birding all. Did I mention 6 Harbor Seals in the inlet area? That was 
neat! 


Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Ocean County rarities and others 2-28-15
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 20:55:25 -0500
Some great sightings today!

Juvenile Light Morph Rough-legged Hawk in the trees along Berkeley Twp.
marshes near Birch Ave.

Cattus Island County Park in Toms River hosted a Rusty Blackbird, also
there was a Fox Sparrow.

Barnegat Lighthouse State Park hosted Over 300 Common Eiders at the tip of
the jetty. 2 King Eiders in with the Common's. A female and a first-winter
male. Also there were 6 Harlequin Ducks,  Green-winged Teal, and a Lesser
Black-backed Gull.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10205043994613789&set=gm.905040602874230&type=1&theater 


Barnegat Light at 40 West 4th Street hosted a Red-necked Grebe and 4 Common
Goldeneyes.

Island Beach State Park hosted the continuing Bohemian Waxwing near Main
Office building.

Joni Cook's backyard in Point Pleasant hosted a male Baltimore Oriole.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1558300507774690&set=gm.904960062882284&type=1&theater 


Snow Goose continues at the Shoprite field in Bayville.

7th Ave. in Seaside Park ocean side hosted 8 American Pipits.

Riverfront Landing in Toms River hosted 12 Canvasbacks.

Edwin B. Forsythe NWR--Bridge to Nowhere in Stafford hosted 2 Short-eared
Owls, Bald Eagle, and a Northern Harrier.

Wilsons Snipe at Cedar Run Dock Rd in Stafford.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152575495717554&set=pcb.905082662870024&type=1&theater 



Thanks to all who reported!

Good birding!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Somerset Sandhills - YES
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 19:44:09 -0500
Saw my first-of-year Sandhill Cranes this afternoon!! Three of them
foraging in corn stubble. They were about a mile or two away from the
Somerset County Randolph Road corn field where people have seen Sandhills
in the past.

Best way I can describe the location: take Randolph Road to the
T-intersection with Weston Canal Road. Turn left on Weston Canal Road. In a
while there's an intersection at a stoplight with Schoolhouse Road. Keep
going straight on Weston Canal Road. In a while the main road turns to the
right and goes over bridges crossing the D&R Canal and what I think is the
Millstone River. After you cross the bridges you come to a cornfield on the
right side of the road. The birds were back in behind the house that sits
by the corn field. If you get to Manville you've gone too far.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Short-eared Owl - at Bridge to Nowhere.
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:40:10 -0500
2 - One was hunting continuously (almost) from 4:45 til 5:20. North side of the 
bridge. 


Nature notes - a Red Fox hunting on the ice.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: King Eiders - Barneget
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:19:13 -0500
Hello,
 A very good trip so far! Great weather - cold, but no winds. Loads of 
waterfowl 

close to the jetty. Over 300 Common Eider in a huge flock at the tip of the 
jetty. 2 

King Eiders in with the Common's. A female and a first-winter male - very hard 
to get 

everyone on that. That frontal shield was coming in. Seen by another birding 
couple 

also. Not sure if seen in the morning before we got there. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gull
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:23:10 -0500
I found an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull, at the Ocean Terminal this
afternoon.

More details here:

https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2015/02/28/99-is-260/

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Scoters, others at Bordentown Scenic Overlook
From: Chris Brown <cbrown.birdman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 14:21:12 -0500
JBirds,

Duck diversity is shockingly good at the Scenic Overlook on I295 South near
Bordentown this afternoon. Three White-winged Scoters and SURF SCOTER,
quite unusual for Mercer county, high numbers of Greater Scaup and
Red-breasted Mergansers were most unusual. Also uncommon are the single
Great Cormorant, Redhead and Common Loon.

Common Goldeneye numbers are building and this might be a good place to
check for Barrow's in the coming days.

Here's a photo of one of the White-wings. The other scoters (male and
female white-wing and immature/female surf) were far upriver. Redhead and
Common Loon were downriver, Great Corm was upriver near the thin greed
buoy.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/ceraymondbrown/UG14V2

Chris Brown

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Redpolls
From: "Dr. Mark Kantrowitz" <mark.kantrowitz AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 14:01:15 -0500
Haven't seen any recent posts regarding common redpolls;  6 visited my house
in Hillsdale this morning.

 

Mark Kantrowitz

Hillsdale


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nesting Bald Eagles at Kearny Point?
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:08:51 -0500
Ed Borowik and I observed an adult BALD EAGLE, perched in a tree at Kearny
Point. In a tree to the right of the bird was an eagle nest. We scoped it
but could not see an adult in it...we'll keep an eye on out.

This really is a perfect spot for a pair...it's at the confluence of the
Hackensack and Passaic Rivers...with the Meadowlands to the north and
Newark Bay to the south...plus the area is very "wild" in the sense that
it's surrounded by industry.

Anyone have anymore intel on this? To my knowledge, it would be the first
nest in Hudson County. Best vantage point is from the walkway behind
Society Hill, Jersey City, at the foot of Kellogg St.

Thanks,
Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Gyrfalcon, Monmouth County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:23:26 -0500
Scott Barnes reports: Gyrfalcon last seen flying north over lot e, Sandy Hook. 
Looked like subadult gray morph. 


Good birding,

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sandy Hook B. Wax
From: "Raymond M. Soff Jr." <clarksnutcracker AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2015 09:59:36 -0500
Dear NewJerseyBird Community,
 
Has anyone tried for the Bohemian Waxwing at Sandy Hook yesterday or today 
(Sat. 2/28)? 

 
Thank you.
 
Sincerely, 
Ray Soff
Saddle Brook, NJ 
 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Rarities around Ocean County 2-27-15
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 21:59:58 -0500
Red-necked Grebe in near breeding plumage was seen at Barnegat Lighthouse
State Park

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152620525181402&set=gm.904342716277352&type=1&theater 


Red-necked Grebe was found at Island Beach State Park in Berkeley
Red-necked Grebe continues at Manasquan Inlet in Point Pleasant

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204474881644406&set=gm.904368472941443&type=1&theater 


Pine Warbler continues in Larry Zirlin's backyard in Manchester
Bohemian Waxwing continues around A-3 at Island Beach State Park


Good birding!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: 40 or more horned grebes at Ventnor, Longport, Margate and Somers Point (JFK Park) back bays
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 21:16:09 -0500
What I meant to write was total of approximately 40 or more horned grebes that 
I saw entire day at Ventnor, Longport, Margate and Somers Point (JFK Park) back 
bays. 


I should count birds...some day I will.

Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Somers Point, Atlantic County, Semipalmated Plover
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 21:05:47 -0500
I was lucky enough to see the plover today at Somers Point Beach Park, right by 
the pier that takes you out to the bay. I can send photos upon request. 


Reason for my post is I did not think anything special of this plover, this 
time of the year, until I checked the ebird. I do not track bird’s movement 
or keep a list. Also, the bay was hosting over 40 or more horned grebes. 


The plover was to the left of the pier...along the beach...as you walk out to 
the end. Timing of the tide may required. I think my time was low 
tide..tish...about 3PM this afternoon. 


https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=somers+point+municipal+beach+park

Ventnor, Longport, Margate and Somers Point (JFK Park) back bays looked so 
promising for waterfowls today due to open water but diversity was low. 
Tomorrow may be different. Please post your findings if you visit. 


Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Rough-legged Hawks Negri-Nepote (Photo)
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:58:38 -0500
There were about half a dozen Rough-legged Hawks at Negri-Nepote, including two 
dark morphs. Photo at: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/16046096113/

Also present was a Gray Catbird about 100 yards from the parking area.

Steve Byland
Warren Township

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Rough-legged Hawks
From: Ernest Hahn <ernesthahn AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:09:59 -0500
Stopped by the Negri Nepote Grasslands today at 9:00 AM and was rewarded with 
not just one dark morph rough-legged hawk but two! One was landed out on the 
snow covered Ag field and the other flew in to join it. They are extremely 
jumpy, even though I was over 300 yards away, as soon as I tried to walk closer 
for a photo they took off. 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Interesting Cardinal photo: Female or a juvenile?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:27:17 -0500
Is this a female Northern Cardinal, or a juvenile? I'm leaning towards
adult female:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16018800784/

Thanks in advance!

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mergansers
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 09:44:50 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
As with all bird ID challenges I always seem to learn new things regardless
of the ID outcome.
I'm sure some of you knew this but a female Red-breasted Merganser will
have white eye-arcs where 1st year males will have a black circle around
the eye.
I don't see either of these features on Frank's bird.
Kudos to Frank for a wonderful photo and the courage to ask a question !
You may get a *hybrid* of an answer but if you learned something new it's
All Good!
Good Birding
Harvey Tomlinson
https://www.flickr.com/account/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Salem county - Rough legged Hawk
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 19:10:54 -0500
Hello,
    Marilyn had the one Yong found before I got started today. Railroad Ave. in
Gloucester County. I gave it 15 minutes as I drove down to Salem County.
No success with the Rough legged there, but Marilyn and I went scanning fields
in Salem with success at Featherbed Lane. The WMA - north side. I will be 
interested to see how many others I see in the county now. They are moving.
Griers Lane - Johnson Sod had many Horned Larks. No Longspur though.
The eastern end is Salem County there. That Glassboro Rd. field area had a 
Snow Bunting feeding with the Larks. Still no Longspur there either! Nice 
number 

of Pipits off to themselves somewhat. 

    Big years mean go after the rare and unusual birds. The rest will happen.
Of late, I consider Woodcock a bird I need to chase. We did - hit a spot going 
home. 

One guess what the result was.....

Nature notes - most water still frozen solid. That area at the Pedricktown - 
Beaver creek 

has some open water. The birds are keeping it open. 4 Common Goldeneyes. All
hens! And the Ring necked Ducks there were all drakes. Ah, staging areas!

Good birding all. I am down to CMBO Friday to get a new tripod head. The fix 
just 

doesn't cut it in the cold! 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Odd Couple :-) (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:38:39 -0500
Male Red-bellied Woodpecker and female Northern Cardinal:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16453485778/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bohemian waxwings at Island Beach State Park
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:42:48 -0500
Kevin Knutsen and I are at Island Beach State Park lot number three. There is a 
Bohemian waxwing mixed in with Robins and Cedar Waxwings. Kevin found the bird. 


Greg P. 
http://birdquiz.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Adult light morph Rough-legged Hawk,Railroad Ave. Elk Twp, Gloucester Co.
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 19:05:15 -0500
Roughies may be arriving here in South NJ. Lesson learn today , visit places 
even if considered marginal winter foraging habitat for this winter visitor in 
NJ. 


Decided to visit Elk Township recreational field at noon for lunch break and 
stare at the sky hoping for a “remote chance” of a fly by Roughie, as I did 
along the powerline easement at home last week. 


Homerun today !! An adult light morph was hunting over a X-mass tree farm 
field. This X-mass tree farm is special in that they do not mow between the 
rows, so, in essence, the field looks like a early successional field, unlike 
those “standard” clean-maintained x-mass tree farm field we are used to 
seeing. It could be the same bird Frank Lenik saw about 12 miles south on the 
24th. 


Copy and Paste onto Google Earth for correct location. 39 40 14.99 N 75 08 
33.71 W 


I can send documentation photos of the roughie with x-mass tree field in the 
background upon request. 


A few winters ago, I visited blueberry cultivated fields in Hammonton, Atlantic 
County, just to (out of curiosity) see if I would find a Rough-legged Hawk 
hunting over b’berry fields. No luck except during my 5th or 6th visit, I did 
see one high-flying in the sky, that it appeared to be a “fly-by” and not 
attracted to clean-n-maintained b’berry fields ( what I mean by that is clean 
farming practice). 


Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Beautiful Dozing Dove (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:43:44 -0500
This Mourning Dove was napping in the warm-ish afternoon Jersey sunlight
today. Feathers are puffed up to keep in the warmth. Love the blue eyelids
closed in sleep! And I'd never noticed the blue-ish belly feathers before:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/16645926201/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: 3 Bohemian Waxwings in Lavallette 2-25-15
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 16:22:29 -0500
Bev Sully reports 3 Bohemian Waxwings in her yard in Lavallette earlier
today. She said they flew off though. She will let me know if they return.

Here's a pic of one she posted in my group, Birding in Ocean County on
Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10206189503325787&set=gm.903336259711331&type=1&theater 


Good birding!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Loons
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 07:54:03 -0500
There were several Common Loons and Mergansers and Brant in the Manasquan Inlet 
yesterday. 



Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-breasted/Common Merganser debate
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 18:07:35 -0500
I am so bad at bird photo ID I have to chime in here. This is a Common
Merganser.It is obvious the plumage leans there.The bill is by no means out
of the range of young Common.The head shape may be due to the bird's
"attitude" in this photo.It would be nice to have more of this individual
in a different 'pose'.I think it would still lean toward Common.The head
and face coloration may just be a light(paler) individual.Fini...

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: black-headed gull
From: Sarah Luca <sluca AT DTCC.EDU>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 13:32:24 +0000
Sorry for the late post of this sighting, I didn't have email access until
today.  I was in Cape May Point on Saturday and was very excited to
discover a black-headed gull on the beach standing by the partially frozen
water's edge with some other gulls.  I'm not sure if the bird will still be
there, but if you'd like to go look for it, it was on the section of beach
accessed by some stairs off of Cape Ave.

Happy birding,

Sarah Luca
Wilmington, DE


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: The Merganser debate continues
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 22:45:56 -0500
To everyone that took part in trying to figure out Frank's Merganser, thank
you! Lots of interesting info! Seems even the experts results are mixed on
this one. So after all the emails and Facebook messages and those that
didn't want to take part in the discussion but gave there 2 cents anyway
lol.

Here are the results:
21 say it is a Red-breasted Merganser
11 say it is a Common Merganser
4 say it's a hybrid ( traits of both species )
2 said to just leave it as a Merganser species
2 said possible Goosander which is the European version of Common
Merganser

Here is a nice comparison photo from Dave Blinder:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidraymond/16604291436/
Left photo - European Goosander, 2nd from Left - Common Merganser by Frank
Giardina, 3rd from Left - Mystery Bird by Frank Giardina, 4th from Right -
Red-breasted Merganser reference photo.

Does anyone wish to change what they thought it was now?

Good birding and iding!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate
From: Tom Bailey <ammodramus AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2015 02:42:47 +0000
I don't think it's a hybrid at all Tom. This look's like a typical Red-breasted
Merganser to me (which can be very variable in plumage). The light colored eye 
makes 

me suspect a first winter male though I don't see any hints of molt into 
first-summer 

male plumage yet so it could be a female as well. In addition, the structure of 
the 

skull is different in the two species which is noticeable in the head shape of 
the 

two birds in the photo.

Tom

Tom Bailey
Tabernacle, NJ
ammodramus at comcast.net

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Johnson" 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2015 3:02:14 PM
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate

Jerseybirders,
I wonder if the merganser in question could be a hybrid. Plumage (rather
dark head offset by pale neck/ white throat) is rather Common-like, though
the color of the head does seem to be somewhat paler than the Common next
to it, and the shape of the crest is more like a Red-breasted Merganser.
Additionally, the bill seems slightly upswept and thinner, especially at
the base.
Where is the location where these mergansers were seen?
Thanks,
Tom

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Merganser debate
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:48:46 -0500
Much thank you to Harvey T. and Shawn Wainwright for the interesting Merganser 
discussion. What a refreshing and uplifting post !! 


I do not have much to contribute in the id department except my own initial ID 
was same as Tom Bailey’s. Never even gave a thought about the hybrid option. 
I am fortunate enough that two Jbirders keeps me in the loop on the 
Id/discussion of birds in our area including this recent merganser discussion 
(behind the scene), and always in the opinion that their insightful discussion 
should be share openly here in JBirds. 


There is one other Jersey birder that, unfortunately, I only get the 
opportunity to bird w/ her once a year. She once told me the difference between 
UK birders and us US birders. She referenced that UK birders study birds in 
detail rather then just quick id as us US birders typically do. 


Harvey !! you are a UK birder !! I have Madge and Burn field guide open along 
w/ other books. I hope this merganser discussion will continue here in open in 
JBirds such that I too could become a UK birder. 


Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: tripods again
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 17:39:41 -0500
I gave the tripod to my father who likes to fix things. He had it for a few 
days. It’s a lot better than it was! 

Not like new, but at least it turns now without me forcing it. I haven’t 
tried it in the bitter cold yet. 

For those who also are having trouble - I think it’s a combination of the 
cold and the age of the tripod. 

They do get worn. He used white grease - mentioned something about a plastic 
piece and the turning 

mechanism in a groove in the plastic. You need the right grease for the 
plastic. Don’t ask me any 

questions, I have no mechanical ability! I’ll try and remember to post 
something on Thursday about 

how it worked - that will be my next day out far afield.

Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac





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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Greenwald Park - Camden County - local notes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:06:29 -0500
Hello,
    I went to explore - not realizing how treacherous the walking would be with
the ice covered snow and paths slick as ice. I didn't get far! Had 4 of the 
Common Mergs that are here. The main bridge area. By the parking lot.
Also a Great Blue Heron. And a Belted Kingfisher. Stuff around! But I will wait
til this melts before attempting again. Be careful local birders.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:38:14 -0500
Hi, all.
 Tom pretty much summed up my thoughts on this curious Merganser. Though it
largely shows the plumage characteristics of a Common- as Tom and others
have pointed out, I am having a head time reconciling that with the bird's
structure- particularly the bill. In addition to the bill being noticeably
shallower at the base, thinner and more upswept- it's also a different shade
of orange than that of the Common it is pictured with. The density of the
head color, as well as the crest also seem like they borrow traits from both
species as well. 

 My two cents.....

Vince Capp
Bound Brook


-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Tom
Johnson
Sent: Monday, February 23, 2015 3:02 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate

Jerseybirders,
I wonder if the merganser in question could be a hybrid. Plumage (rather
dark head offset by pale neck/ white throat) is rather Common-like, though
the color of the head does seem to be somewhat paler than the Common next to
it, and the shape of the crest is more like a Red-breasted Merganser.
Additionally, the bill seems slightly upswept and thinner, especially at the
base.
Where is the location where these mergansers were seen?
Thanks,
Tom

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate
From: Tom Johnson <tbj4 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:02:14 -0500
Jerseybirders,
I wonder if the merganser in question could be a hybrid. Plumage (rather
dark head offset by pale neck/ white throat) is rather Common-like, though
the color of the head does seem to be somewhat paler than the Common next
to it, and the shape of the crest is more like a Red-breasted Merganser.
Additionally, the bill seems slightly upswept and thinner, especially at
the base.
Where is the location where these mergansers were seen?
Thanks,
Tom

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Siskins
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 12:55:10 -0700
Would you mind send them to my feeders when they are done. I am waiting 
hopelessly as everything but Siskins show up..... 


-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Clifford 
Miles 

Sent: Monday, February 23, 2015 2:31 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Siskins

 Here I sit at work while my son e-mails me photos of about a dozen Pine 
Siskins at my feeder.  I've been waiting for them to show up, and it figures 
that Rick gets to see them first. 

Cliff MilesMountain Lakes, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Siskins
From: Clifford Miles <0000000e98604842-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 19:31:08 +0000
 Here I sit at work while my son e-mails me photos of about a dozen Pine 
Siskins at my feeder.  I've been waiting for them to show up, and it figures 
that Rick gets to see them first. 

Cliff MilesMountain Lakes, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser Debate
From: Orion Weldon <orionnaturenerd AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 11:11:41 -0500
Hello, thanks for the question. Bird I.D. debates are the best!


I always love how absolute everyone gets in tone with identification
assertions. I have been humbled waaay too many times to let myself do that
again.


The bird in question (merganser on the left) doesn’t give me any indication
of a Red-breaster Merganser. Every feature seemingly fits squarely into a
juvenile Common Merganser I.D. This goes for everything from iris color
(yellow, which is age-related. Mature birds have a dark eye, and
Red-breasted has some spectrum shade of red depending on age), to the pale
loral line, and the paler read of the head, etc..


When you couple that with the demarcation line across the neck, with the
thicker bill-base, black tip to the bill, and sloped ‘stop’ of the
forehead. There doesn't seem to be anything that indicates Red-breasted
Merganser.


I think people are simply being thrown off by the contrast between the two
birds.


What I personally think is more interesting, is how the bird on the right
has an adult looking head (eye color, dark red head coloring, more defined
cresting), but seemingly has retained juvenile flight feathers that haven’t
molted yet.


Cheers,


Orion

-- 
Orion Z. Weldon
Ecologist/Outdoor Enthusiast/Dancer/Photographer
832.693.4445
"There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way in
which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before."  ~Robert
Lynd, The Blue Lion

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Forsythe has re-opened
From: Don Freiday <peregrine43 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 10:34:52 -0500
Hi all,
 
Edwin B. Forsythe NWR has re-opened, including the Wildlife Drive and all 
trails in Galloway. 

 
Don Freiday
Cape May, NJ
 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Drive by birding for elderly round-up
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 08:30:25 -0700
A few people had asked for an update on how yesterdays excursion with my
Dad went. Simply put - outstanding! We ended up finishing the day at
Sayreville Marsh (much thanks PAT) and were treated to a spectacular view
of a juvenile Bald eagle flying off into the setting sun. Here is the
narrative and a link to some shots from the day.

A Day Birding with Dad

There is much to be said about hope and expectations. They are the clouds
that fill the sky of our dreams with interest and fancy.

Dad had been visiting for a week and had been cooped up in the house due
to the Polar Vortex in NJ for most of it. A man who lives to be outside in
the sun, you could see the indoor light was sucking the energy out of him.
When, in an anomalous atmospheric break, the weather report forecast a 40
day, we knew we would have to get out and enjoy it.

Confronted by still icy conditions and limited mobility, we knew we could
not wander or walk any distance. A quick email to the birding community
resulted in a list of places that were accessible by car or observation
deck.  The top spot was local -  the Great Swamp. Off we went.

The Swamp turned out to be somewhat of a bust. There were few birds that
were not already on my feeders and the views were mid-winter barren. The
notable exceptions being a fly-by by a Kestral and a stunning short view
of a Bluebird in deep royal blue plumage.

Looking at the list, most of the normally reliable places would be iced
over. There was one however, along the Raritan Canal in Sayreville, that
was reported to have open water.

Already late in the day we made the 45-minute drive to the Sayreville
Marsh, arriving just as twilights orange tinged blanket began its spread
over the water. With outside temperatures beginning to plummet, we scanned
the waterfront. What a great bounty lay before us.

Double Breasted Cormorant and Great Blue Heron perched in sentinel silence
against the coming eve. Greater Black Back and Ring-billed Gull floated
and flew in and out of the water in typical melee fashion.  Ducks
abounded; there were Canvasback, Mallard, Ring-billed and a hat trick of
Mergansers (Common, Hooded and Red-breasted).

But the highlight of the day, the thing that made my dad  so glad he had
come out, was the Juvenile Bald Eagle that appeared seemingly from nowhere
and flew out into the dwindling light of the sunsets glow, fading ever
smaller until it disappeared. The day followed quickly, and we packed our
gear, turned up the heat in the car and headed home.



Pictures
https://flic.kr/s/aHsk88MeWU

All the best,
Rob

On 2/22/15, 1:11 PM, "Robert AT rgallucci.com"  wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>Thank you all for the input. Great suggestions! Here is a round-up of all
>the suggestions.
>
>1st Place was Pleasant Plains Road in the Great Swamp. This was the
>overwhelming number one choice
>2nd Route 206 / Duke Farms / South Branch Raritan River
>3rd Merrill Creek Reservoir
>
>Then:
>Round Valley Reservoir / Boat Launch
>Alpha Grasslands
>Spruce Run Reservoir
>Mercer SOD Farm in Columbus
>Bay in Laurence Harbor
>
>We are going to start with Pleasant Plains Road and then probably hit
>wither Merrill or Alpha. I will post the results.
>
>Thanks again.
>
>Rob
>
>
>On 2/22/15, 8:16 AM, "Robert AT rgallucci.com"  wrote:
>
>>Hi all,
>>
>>My father is visiting and loves to bird but doesn't have the mobility to
>>go into the woods or any trekking.
>>
>>I was looking for some suggestions on places that we can drive through so
>>that he'd be able to see some raptors are waterbirds. Forsythe is a
>>little too far. We are in the Somerset area.
>>
>>Thanks in advance. Good birding.
>>
>>Rob
>>
>>
>>Sent from my iPhone
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser debate
From: Tom Bailey <ammodramus AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 14:27:03 +0000
I'd have to disagree. The bird on the left is a Red-br. Merganser. The one on 
the right is a Common Merganser. 


Tom

Tom Bailey
Tabernacle, NJ
ammodramus at comcast.net

----- Original Message -----
From: "Phil Jeffrey" 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2015 10:47:16 PM
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser debate

They're both Common Mergansers - you won't find Red-breasted with that sort
of sharp head-breast demarcation, nor if you ever got the two species to
swim that close would you see such a similarity in size or head color.
Also think you'd be hard-pressed to find a Red-breasted Merg with a black
end of the bill (nail isn't necessarily black).  I'm wondering if
difference in eye color is age-related.

Phil Jeffrey
Ewing


On Sun, Feb 22, 2015 at 10:11 PM, Shawn Wainwright <
shawneagleeyes1 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi all, I just want to end the debate that is going on in my Facebook group
> Birding in Ocean County. This is the photo in question:
>
> 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244 AT N06/16398548977/in/set-72157648627530994 

> Please let me know what you think so I can relay the answer. Myself and
> others know what it is, but just wondering what some of the experts here
> think. ( In case I'm wrong lol ) I'm going with that this is a Red-breasted
> in the front and the other a Common. Thanks for your input!
>
> Shawn Wainwright
> Toms River
> ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
"If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge"
- Henry Spencer

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mergansers are like Snowflakes
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 07:46:46 -0500
Hi Jersey Birders,
The subject line is the title of a picture I posted to Flickr regarding
male Red-breasted Merganser's shouldered patches.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/16367696809/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/16379167857/
I have noticed that male RBME have different shoulder patch patterns from
one bird to the next.
I have looked a numerous photos and so far each one is different. Some of
the patch patterns are ornate and complex while others take a minimalist
approach.
I haven't seen mention of this fact anywhere in the literature, but
Natural Selection went thru a lot of trouble to make this happen so there
must be a good reason.
If no two patterns are the same a good "recognition " software could track
males without the need for banding provided a good
digital photo is available.
Challenge 1 is to see if you can find a repeated pattern in the photo pools
and
Challenge 2 is why are they different. What does it do for the species?
As to Shawn's photo quiz has anyone traveled down the rabbit hole and
looked into
Gooseander...the European version of Common Merg.
I have not seen the facebook thread only the JerseyBird thread.
The pics I looked at for Gooseander show a yellow iris more often than not
just for starters.
Good Ducking
Harvey Tomlinson
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Birds at the Feeder
From: Lisa Potash <lisapotash6 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 00:29:53 -0500
Hello Jerseybirders,

Today I spent 3 hours watching a Juv Sharp-shinned Hawk in the backyard. What I 
like most about bird watching, is observing bird behavior. It is amazing to 
watch behavior from the ordinary to the extraordinary. 


At about 8:30 am I noticed the Juv. Sharpie perched on a med-high branch, and 
got a little video before it flew. Then, I noticed it had taken a bird. I only 
saw this because of the video - it happened so fast I missed it. 


At this point it got a bit ugly in that the poor bird hadn't been killed 
yet....it was trying to defend itself and I had to look away until the deed was 
done. Upon going through the photos I was able to tell that the victim was a 
female House Finch. 


It got a little easier to watch again, because this young Sharp-shinned hawk 
working on it's meal, "the how," not wasting anything but still very alert and 
constantly looking around,was something to see. 


Once the hawk was finished, it cleaned-up quite well and even used the snow on 
the branch to clean its bill. Satiated, the sharpie moved to another branch or 
two, and seemed to enjoy the sunshine. Quite a long time passed while the 
backyard birds began hitting the feeders again. Some Tufted Titmice, Cardinals, 
and the RB Nuthatch all got surprisingly close to the Hawk and letting the yard 
know of the predator. 


No sign of the Rufous Screech Owl basking from the box, while the sun was out. 
I think the backyard birds would not have known what to do then! ( I will be 
posting a 4 wk update this week on screech) 


The Sharpie would stretch its wings behind, stretch and clench it's talons, 
ruffle, preen, eliminate, and generally not pay attention to the yard birds, 
until it decided to take off and land on top of the feeding station. That was 
like adding insult to injury, like "I'm in charge here." Soon after the bird 
took off to the property below. All in all, quite a morning! 



Links to pictures/video if interested:

video of sharpie just before prey 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/16432875118/

video of sharpie with prey
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/16000297623/in/photostream/

stretch
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/16000295733/in/photostream/

red breasted nuthatch on alert
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/16620058915/in/photostream/

cleaning up
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/15997871724/in/photostream/

perched on the feeders
https://www.flickr.com/photos/95291506 AT N07/16618934741/

Good Birding,
Lisa Potash
Oakland

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser debate
From: Phil Jeffrey <phil.jeffrey AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 22:47:16 -0500
They're both Common Mergansers - you won't find Red-breasted with that sort
of sharp head-breast demarcation, nor if you ever got the two species to
swim that close would you see such a similarity in size or head color.
Also think you'd be hard-pressed to find a Red-breasted Merg with a black
end of the bill (nail isn't necessarily black).  I'm wondering if
difference in eye color is age-related.

Phil Jeffrey
Ewing


On Sun, Feb 22, 2015 at 10:11 PM, Shawn Wainwright <
shawneagleeyes1 AT gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi all, I just want to end the debate that is going on in my Facebook group
> Birding in Ocean County. This is the photo in question:
>
> 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244 AT N06/16398548977/in/set-72157648627530994 

> Please let me know what you think so I can relay the answer. Myself and
> others know what it is, but just wondering what some of the experts here
> think. ( In case I'm wrong lol ) I'm going with that this is a Red-breasted
> in the front and the other a Common. Thanks for your input!
>
> Shawn Wainwright
> Toms River
> ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
"If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge"
- Henry Spencer

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sort of OT Year Count (Big Year) 2015
From: Michael Turso <mjt0328 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 22:41:49 -0500
Hi all!

So after managing to find 305 species of birds in New Jersey alone in 2013, I 
decided to expand my horizons a little and go for the ABA area. For those of 
you who don't know, I'm 16 years old and am currently in school, so I'm a bit 
limited to where and when I can go birding. I don't get my license until the 
end of March, so until then, my parents or friends are driving me places (and 
believe me, they've been very, very good to me about my hobby). 

Anyways, my sort of big year, I call it a year species count since I'm not 
exactly racing to Alaska or anything, started out in Cape May County. January 
1st at around noon we arrived at Avalon Seawatch and 8th Street Jetty where I 
got my first eleven species. We birded the extensive marshes on the way to 
Stone Harbor Point and I picked up another eleven species. Despite Stone Harbor 
Point being close to dead, I did end up seeing seven more species. However the 
great birding came at the end. We arrived at Jakes Landing at around 4:30 PM, 
with sights set on Short-eared Owls. While awaiting dusk, as my dad took a 
well-needed nap in the car, I birded the area around Jakes Landing. I ended up 
picking out nine more species including Clapper Rail, Pied-billed Grebe, Ruddy 
Duck, and Wilson's Snipe. After this, and my dad's awakening to see the Bald 
Eagles all around (he's obsessed with raptors and raptors alone), we waited it 
out at dusk for the owls. Although we managed to spot a h! 

 uge flock of Snow Geese and two other new species, the Short-eared Owls just 
didn't come, and the frigid temperatures made it hard to bare, so we called it 
quits. However, miraculously we rolled down the windows on the way out to hear 
two Great-horned Owls to close off our 41 species day. Not a bad start I'd say. 
Day two was spent at Cape May Point State Park in the morning where I got 
twenty two new species including Northern Gannet and more Eastern Bluebirds 
than I could count. Then, it was off to The Meadows to see the Redheads. We 
found both the drake and the hen, and additonally found a Cackling Goose in the 
goose flock and three other new species. We headed up to Cox Hill Creek to 
chase the Black-headed Gulll, but we did not find it sadly. However, there was 
Lesser Black-backed Gull present which added one more species to the list. A 
trip to Rea Farm yielded five more woodland species. The following morning, 
January 3rd, was dedicated to Barnegat Light, wherer I got e! 

 ight more species including Harlequin Duck and Common Eider, but the King 
Eider was not spotted sadly. However, January 3rd was mainly dedicated to my 
nemesis bird that I had missed three times by a single day, Pink-footed Goose. 
After hours of searching Wall Township, we came up with nothing. One again 
missed by a day...and alas the Pink-footed Goose remains my nemesis bird. We 
did manage to pick up a Hermit Thrush, though. This ended the trip with 83 
species, which to me seemed like a pretty solid start. 

On January 4th, I decided to have a little "clean up" day, meaning I'd get the 
common birds I didn't get down in Cape May. I headed to my favorite local 
hotspot, The Celery Farm. I got eight more species, including a Red-shouldered 
Hawk, which was excellent. 

After learning of a Marbled Godwit at DeKorte Park, I headed down there after 
school. Alongside the godwit, I also managed four other newbies. Thus bringing 
my total to 98, closer to the triple digits than I had imagined (just as 
reference, in 2013 I was at around 54 on February 4th). The month after was 
busy for me, so birding was tough. One more trip to The Celery Farm yielded two 
Rusty Blackbirds and two Purple Finches, bringing me to 100. I was beyond 
ecstatic! That same day, January 25th, I also saw my FOY Swamp Sparrow and 
Pileated Woodpecker in Mahwah, adding two more to the list. 

To kick off February, I hit Sandy Hook on the first and yielded nine new 
species including Iceland and Glaucous Gulls, White-winged Scoter, and Snow 
Bunting. The next weekend was strictly rarity chasing. I planned to go after 
the Gyrfalcon in Walkill, the Painted Bunting in Andover, and the Barrow's 
Goldeneye and Harris's Sparrow in Easton. However, since the Gyrfalcon hadn't 
been spotted the previous day, we decided it wasn't worth it. I came to regret 
this later. But, upon arriving on scene in Andover, the Painted Bunting was 
showing in the thickery across the yard. After waiting awhile, it popped up and 
provided great views. When we got to the Harris's Sparrow location in Easton, 
my mom decided to wait in the car. So I went into the backyard to find two 
other young birders and an adult eagerly waiting for the sparrow. The homeowner 
was extremely welcoming, and I can't thank her enough! After just about 25 
minutes, the sparrow showed up at the feeder near us and provided g! 

 reat views. After a little more chatting, it was off to the Barrow's! After a 
lot of searching, we were unable to find the Barrow's, but three drake Redheads 
were a nice treat. Enticed by the report of a Snowy Owl on Disposal Rd, my mom 
wanted to try for it. So we went, but were unable to relocate it. However, we 
did spot a Rough-legged Hawk, a Red-shouldered Hawk, and a Merlin, bringing my 
total up to 116! 

With a long weekend, I had to take advantage. However, I only got to bird one 
day and that was Friday as the following days were just too cold even for me. 
But that day was spent well, we chased the Gyrfalcon. As we showed up, a single 
gentleman was on it, and somehow the crowd on the known location road wasn't 
(?). But it didn't take long for them to find us looking at it, and the crown 
slowly migrated to us and got some great views of the bird. I wanted another 
swing at Short-eared Owls, so we went to Shawangunk for the evening. But with 
plans at 6:00, and an hour drive back, we couldn't stay long enough for them to 
come out, and of course they came out just five minutes after we left. My luck 
with owls is very slim by the way, those Great Horns shocked me as owls always 
seem to allude me. On Sunday the 16th, I decided to watch my feeder for 
siskins. And it was worth it! A Pine Siskin showed up at the finch feeder. 
(Today I counted 7!) This afternoon I went back to Disposa! 

 l to get my long overdue American Kestrel, and found at least one along with a 
Peregrine Falcon. 

Right now, my total stands at 120. Not bad for a 16 year old with no license I 
think! Some birds I would still like to find before the end of winter are 
Ring-necked Pheasant, most of our owls except for Great-horned, Black-crowned 
Night-Heron, Red-necked Grebe, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Red-headed Woodpecker, 
Brown Creeper, Red-breasted Nuthatch, American Pipit, Horned Lark, Lapland 
Longspur, and Razorbill. If anyone has any suggestions on places to look for 
these species, I'd love to know! (Excluding owls--never post about roosting 
sights for owls, I'll get them eventually!). I plan to update on my year count 
(I don't like to call it a big year) once a month from here on out. 


Thanks for reading, and good birding to all!
- Michael Turso
  Bergen County, NJ
  mjt0328 AT gmail.com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: BoWax
From: Phil Jeffrey <phil.jeffrey AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 22:14:35 -0500
The Bohemian was seen again exiting southward with Robins approximately
from the Nike Radar (not missile) site something in the vicinity of 2:30 -
I don't know the name of the birder who mentioned it to me and I did not
see the bird so I didn't mark the time accurately.  It was in the company
of Robins.  Flocks got a little scrambled after that courtesy of a hunting
adult Cooper's and I ran out of time.  I had Cedar Waxwings to the north at
Fort Hancock, fly-bys at the Scout Camp, and there were a decent number in
small groups at the Radar site but widely dispersed amongst the myriad
Robins.

Phil Jeffrey
Ewing


On Sun, Feb 22, 2015 at 8:33 PM, thomas smith  wrote:

> We went to the scout camp today several times over the span of a few hours
> but did not find any waxwings there whatsoever.  The only waxwings we found
> today on the Hook were five cedars north of E lot.  The vesper sparrow is
> still in B lot, however.
>
>
>   - Tom/Hal Smith
>      Madison, NJ
>      tsmzth AT optonline.net
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 22, 2015 at 04:59 PM, Michael Britt wrote:
>
>  Was Sandy Hook closed today? Nobody birding there? Or BoWax not seen?
>>
>> Mike Britt
>> Bayonne
>>
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings:
>>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
"If you lie to the compiler, it will get its revenge"
- Henry Spencer

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-breasted Merganser and Common Merganser debate
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 22:11:05 -0500
Hi all, I just want to end the debate that is going on in my Facebook group
Birding in Ocean County. This is the photo in question:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244 AT N06/16398548977/in/set-72157648627530994
Please let me know what you think so I can relay the answer. Myself and
others know what it is, but just wondering what some of the experts here
think. ( In case I'm wrong lol ) I'm going with that this is a Red-breasted
in the front and the other a Common. Thanks for your input!

Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Interesting Cardinal Behavior
From: "Raymond M. Soff Jr." <clarksnutcracker AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 22:08:03 -0500
That may be true. In order to avoid squirrels, I had to put only Nyger seed on 
the ground while sunflower seed was in a feeder against the house while blocked 
by Nyger seed bags. This morning the Fox Sparrows, Song Sparrow, House 
Sparrows, and juncos ate the Nyger seed. The male cardinal picked at it a bit, 
also, but waited for Sunflower and Safflower seeds to fall to the ground. All 
of these individuals chose the seed over suet cakes positioned in the open. As 
a side note: the Eastern Grey Squirrel enjoys Safflower seed. 

 
> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 2015 13:07:11 -0500
> From: sandra.adcock609 AT GMAIL.COM
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Cardinal Behavior
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> 
> Along with some of the other people who seem be focusing on their feeders
> with this cold weather, I too witnessed some interesting behavior recently
> at my feeders.  The cardinals have been eating from the thistle feeder,
> which I never knew they would be interested in.  I suppose hungry birds
> will eat anything in the cold!
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Salem County - big year notes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 21:06:47 -0500
The latest round of snow did push many more larks to the road edges.
More Horned Larks along Featherbed Lane than last time. Still no 
Longspur though! I still have time through March. 

Marilyn and I had a nice afternoon down here today. We were trying again
for Woodcock on a road edge.  Of course none!  A smaller bird with a shorter
bill was unexpected - a Virginia Rail crossed the road in front of us! The
Mannington Marsh - Marshalltown Rd. area. Loads of passerines on the
road edges - except White-crowned Sparrow. Where did they all go? 
Water bodies are still mainly frozen and with the forecast this week, will
continue to be frozen. 

We ended the day at Money Island Rd. My favorite spot in the county for 
Great Horned Owl. We had 4 calling. No Rough-legged Hawks though.
Again, I have through March with that. 

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Peregrine at Wallkill, NY
From: Clifford Miles <0000000e98604842-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 01:40:37 +0000
I spent another day fruitlessly searching for the Gyrfalcon at Blue Chip Farm. 
 I did however get a few god photos of a Peregrine there.  Anybody know where 
a bird with a green band on its left leg originated? 

Clifford MilesMountain Lakes, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: BoWax
From: thomas smith <tsmzth AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 20:33:18 -0500
We went to the scout camp today several times over the span of a few 
hours but did not find any waxwings there whatsoever.  The only waxwings 
we found today on the Hook were five cedars north of E lot.  The vesper 
sparrow is still in B lot, however.


  - Tom/Hal Smith
     Madison, NJ
     tsmzth AT optonline.net


On Sun, Feb 22, 2015 at 04:59 PM, Michael Britt wrote:

> Was Sandy Hook closed today? Nobody birding there? Or BoWax not seen?
>
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings:

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: BoWax
From: David Larsen <aythya AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 20:24:54 -0500
It was seen briefly this morning  at 10:15 near the flag pole at the scout
camp. As far as I know not seen again. Vesper sparrow continues at north end
of B lot . Rough Legged Hawk seen at Spermaceti Cove.

Dave Larsen
Mount Laurel


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Michael Britt" 
To: 
Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2015 4:59 PM
Subject: [JERSEYBI] BoWax


> Was Sandy Hook closed today? Nobody birding there? Or BoWax not seen?
>
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Rosedale Lake 2/20 and 2/21
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 19:35:26 -0500
stopped by this lake briefly 2/20 when it started snowing in earnest about 
12:30 - saw the canvasback, common mergansers, n. shoveler, 2 mute swans 

 
stopped by 2/21 at sunset (5:30 ish) ...unreasonable amount of CAGOs ..a few 
common merganser pairs and a bald eagle 

also saw 2 rough legged hawks along Federal City Road
 
C. Wyluda
Hopewell Twp.
 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: BoWax
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 16:59:32 -0500
Was Sandy Hook closed today? Nobody birding there? Or BoWax not seen?

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Forsythe Closed Due to Ice
From: Brian Kushner <bkushner2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 18:26:40 -0500
How come Forsythe doesn't plow their wildlife drive as other places do?


On 2/22/2015 5:54 PM, Don Freiday wrote:
> Hi all,
>   
> Due to slush-turned-to-ice, Edwin B. Forsythe NWR will be closed for at least 
tomorrow, February 23. 2015. Please check the refuge Facebook page 
https://www.facebook.com/ForsytheNWR?ref=hl or call the refuge at 609-652-665 
x17 for updates. 

>   
> Don Freiday
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Don Freiday,
> Cape May, NJ
>   		 	   		
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Forsythe Closed Due to Ice
From: Don Freiday <peregrine43 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 17:54:01 -0500
Hi all,
 
Due to slush-turned-to-ice, Edwin B. Forsythe NWR will be closed for at least 
tomorrow, February 23. 2015. Please check the refuge Facebook page 
https://www.facebook.com/ForsytheNWR?ref=hl or call the refuge at 609-652-665 
x17 for updates. 

 
Don Freiday

---------------------------------------------------------------

Don Freiday,
Cape May, NJ
 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Drive by birding for elderly round-up
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 11:11:23 -0700
Hi all,

Thank you all for the input. Great suggestions! Here is a round-up of all
the suggestions.

1st Place was Pleasant Plains Road in the Great Swamp. This was the
overwhelming number one choice
2nd Route 206 / Duke Farms / South Branch Raritan River
3rd Merrill Creek Reservoir

Then:
Round Valley Reservoir / Boat Launch
Alpha Grasslands
Spruce Run Reservoir
Mercer SOD Farm in Columbus
Bay in Laurence Harbor

We are going to start with Pleasant Plains Road and then probably hit
wither Merrill or Alpha. I will post the results.

Thanks again.

Rob


On 2/22/15, 8:16 AM, "Robert AT rgallucci.com"  wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>My father is visiting and loves to bird but doesn't have the mobility to
>go into the woods or any trekking.
>
>I was looking for some suggestions on places that we can drive through so
>that he'd be able to see some raptors are waterbirds. Forsythe is a
>little too far. We are in the Somerset area.
>
>Thanks in advance. Good birding.
>
>Rob
>
>
>Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Laurel Hill and some thoughts
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 09:27:53 -0500
Jerseybirders,

A few folks went to Laurel Hill yesterday and others have asked how to bird
there. What you are looking at from the river bank is the Hackensack River
and Saw Mill Creek Marsh (both W); 1-E landfill (W of the NJTP); the
DeKorte area (NW of the NJTP); and Kearny East (S of the NJTP). Behind the
big rock itself (SE) is the old Malanka Landfill and so-called Riverbend
Marsh...these two areas are accessible on foot for the bold, as is the top
of the rock for the daring...there is an easy 5-minute hiking trail that
goes up the backside...however it's under the NJTP (via the maintenance
road at the south end)...if you get caught you will probably get kicked out
but it's worth the effort, as the 360 from up top is breathtaking and an
awesome vantage point. Just be careful! I will be trying for my "2nd county
Golden Eagle" for my Big Year this fall;)

Keep in mind that the tide, ice conditions, and predator activity are
influencing where the waterbirds are. Birds can and do float upstream,
downstream, and into the many tidal creeks. Patience is in order. You can
view part of the river downstream from the old swing bridge and an
expansive viewpoint of the so-called "S-bend" in the river (also south of
the old swing bridge) can be seen from the top of the Malanka Landfill or
the north dike at Kearny East (accessed from Rt. 7).

On a separate note, it will be very interesting to see how "the weather"
affects migration. Rough-legged Hawks were still moving south (mid-Feb),
when they are normally moving north in force. Yong Kong wanted to know why
the large number of Roughlegs hit the breaks in central Jersey...I am of
the opinion it was because of the date...had the event happened in
January...things would have likely been different (better) for south
Jersey. American Woodcock usually arrives in the Bayonne/JC area on Feb
19/20. I guess we'll have to get out in the field and see what happens
this...dare I say spring...

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Drive by birding for elderly
From: "Robert AT rgallucci.com" <Robert@RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 06:16:30 -0700
Hi all,

My father is visiting and loves to bird but doesn't have the mobility to go 
into the woods or any trekking. 


I was looking for some suggestions on places that we can drive through so that 
he'd be able to see some raptors are waterbirds. Forsythe is a little too far. 
We are in the Somerset area. 


Thanks in advance. Good birding.

Rob


Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: RLHA in Cumberland and Salem Counties
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 22:41:47 -0500
I consider myself as a marginal habitat seeking birder, meaning I am always 
pulled to locations where certain birds should be there based on habitat 
setting (even if the acreage is not there) but I am unable to find birds, or 
locations that are under-birded or rarely reported.

I had my luck/share of RLHA along the coastal habitats in Ocean, Cape May 
and Atlantic Counties this year (total of 7 or 8 ? ). So my Cumberland 
County was my next interest for RLHA influx.  Today was my 2nd trip to 
Cumberland Co. this winter, mostly near Fairfield/Downe Township area.  No 
RLHA.

Based on quick look on ebird Chart,  2 reports in Salem, 3 in Cumberland, 
and 7 in Cape May County (including my own sighing of light morph yester day 
that is not on eBIrd). Compare that to long list from Corbin City/Tuckahoe 
McNamara WMA,  Motts Creek and Brig, I do not know how to draw conclusion on 
this years RLHA influx (or lack there of) in Cumberland and Salem Counties.

Cumberland/Salem underbirded as some stated before ? With the recent 
snow/cold and the RLHA influx from New England, I would have expected to see 
more reports even with that reputation.

If there are birders who do not use eBird or write to JBirds that have 
observed RLHA in Cumberland and Salem Counties, I would be very interested.

Yong Kong
Camden County



-----Original Message----- 
From: Michael Britt
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 7:42 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Middlesex County Raptors and Waterbirds

John,

Glad you were successful. The so-called "Raritan Estuary" is the central
Jersey version of the Hackensack Meadowlands. Like the Hackensack Meadows,
some years Roughlegs are MIA or hard to come by but during flight years,
they are "fairly common." Based on my report and yours, at least ten
Rough-legged Hawks have been in the estuary in recent days (five light,
five dark). This area is historically good for Roughlegs (according to
Steve Byland, Gary Himber, Bruce McWhorter, Ted Proctor). Taking a look at
the eBird bar charts, the RLHA influx from New England passed through
northern NJ and apparently dead-ended in central NJ. Too bad for south
Jersey folks, who have birds but not in any (posted) significant
concentrations.

Looking at the satellite map, Cheesequake Marsh, The Weedy Pit, and the
Sayreville Marsh/Raritan Center marsh complex are all a decent distance
from one another. However, this species is highly mobile and can easily hop
from one area to another. The point being, surveying the areas in quick
succession (hitting one right after the other) is the key to getting a true
count, for the areas covered.

As for a vantage point on Edgeboro Road, keep going until the road gets
really rough (past the landfill entrance...just past the pine stand on the
left) and you will find ample places to pull off and effectively scan;)

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Sandy Hook Saturday (21 Feb)
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 21 Feb 2015 22:28:30 -0500
In addition to all these great birds Carol and I saw another dark-morph
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK being harassed by a PEREGRINE FALCON while having lunch at
Bahrs Landing Restaurant after we left your group.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)  


-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Scott
Barnes
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2015 9:56 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Sandy Hook Saturday (21 Feb)

Sorry, last message got cut off.

Jerseybirders,

We had a very productive and enjoyable NJ Audubon field trip today at Sandy
Hook. We started off with the continuing VESPER SPARROW that was feeding
with Song and American Tree Sparrows in bare grass at the north end of
B-lot. At the campground, we were able to get excellent views of the
continuing BOHEMIAN WAXWING after a relatively short wait.

The ocean side from B-lot up to north beach continues to host amazing
numbers of sea ducks. Estimates below are based on combined efforts of NJ
Audubon associate naturalist Tom Brown (birding independently) and my group:

Greater Scaup- 22,000
Surf Scoter- 8,000
White-winged Scoter- 1,500
Black Scoter- 55,000
scoter species- 20,000
Long-tailed Duck-3,000

That's over 100,000 birds! The scoters have been present most of the winter,
but the big scaup flocks (traditional wintering hotspot has long been
Raritan/Sandy Hook Bays & the Navesink/Shrewsbury River complex) have been
pushed out to ocean by extensive ice coverage.

Other interesting birds today included a Red-necked Grebe off F-lot, a
Rough-legged Hawk hover-hunting over the north end of Spermaceti Cove, the
wintering Ruddy Turnstone (locally rare this time of year), a large alcid
sp., and flocks of Horned Larks and Snow Buntings.

Many thanks to all who participated, and for great help from NJ Audubon
associate naturalists Linda Mack, Rob Fanning, Hank Burke, Alan Mart, and
Joe Demko.

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
Editor, NJ Audubon eBird
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.

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