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Updated on Monday, May 25 at 11:05 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black-and Crimson Oriole,©Barry Kent Mackay

25 May Wildwood Overnight Pelagic Unofficial Results [Michael Britt ]
26 May Davidson Mill Pond County Park - North Brunswick ["Albert, Steven" ]
25 May Salem county notes [Sandra Keller ]
24 May Wilson's Phalarope at Brig [Larry-Zirlin ]
24 May Salem county - migration today [Sandra Keller ]
24 May RED KNOTS at Pierce's Point, Cape May Cty and WILSON'S PHALAROPES, Edwin Forsythe NWR, Atlantic Cty [Ken Walsh ]
23 May Shorebirds, Allentown Corp Park [Andrew Bobe ]
23 May Dredge - shorebirds - local notes - Gloucester County [Sandra Keller ]
23 May Garret Mountain ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
23 May Dunlin: Mercer County [Chris Brown ]
23 May Mississippi Kite [Arlene Oley ]
23 May Painted Bunting continues in Cape May [Jon Stippick ]
23 May BB Cuckoo pole farm mercer county [Bert Harris ]
23 May Beige-bellied red-bellied woodpecker [Laura Berlik ]
23 May Sun/Mon May 24-25 Cape May Overnight Pelagic Has Room & Forecast Looks Good [Paul Guris ]
23 May Overnight pelagic [Michael Britt ]
23 May Re: Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island might be on its way to NJ! [Larry Scacchetti ]
22 May Re: Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island might be on its way to NJ! [BRANDON REO ]
22 May Re: Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island gone [Yong Kong ]
22 May Delaware Water Gap/Old Mine Road - May 22 [Marty DeAngelo ]
22 May Many Least Sandpipers (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 May Neotropic Cormorant continues, Hunterdon County [Samuel Galick ]
22 May White-winged Dove, Cape May County [Samuel Galick ]
22 May Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island gone [Larry scacchetti ]
22 May Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Cape May County [Samuel Galick ]
22 May Introduction and 'possible' Kelp Gull at Sandy Hook [Cathy ]
21 May Hudson County Big Year Update [Michael Britt ]
21 May NJ Delaware Bay’s Red Knot and Laughing Gull Interspecific Competition [Yong Kong ]
21 May Mockingbird Singing at night ["James O'Brien" ]
21 May Lawrence's Warbler, Olive-Sided Flycatcher & Yellow-billed Cuckoos at SHWS [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
20 May Bobolinks and Blue Grosbeak Pole Farm [Fairfax Hutter ]
20 May yard birding [Sandra Keller ]
19 May 3 Common Nighthawks in Morris County [Ken Walsh ]
19 May Glassboro Woods - breeders - and migrants! [Sandra Keller ]
19 May Interested in Owls? Catch Justin Jaworski's "Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls" on May 21 [Steve Kacir ]
19 May Migration continues in the Princeton Institute Woods [Bert Harris ]
18 May Salem county big year birding [Sandra Keller ]
18 May Tree Swallows using Cliff Swallow nest (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 May Hawk Rise Sanctuary [ ]
18 May Re: Black Rail and birder etiquette ["Davis, Christina" ]
18 May Upcoming Bergen County Audubon Meeting [Beth Goldberg ]
17 May Bird in the hand - Pierce's Point, Delaware Bayshore [Diane C Louie ]
17 May Black Rail and birder etiquette [David La Puma ]
17 May Great Crested Flycatcher (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
17 May Yard [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
17 May Garret today [Bob Dodelson ]
17 May Gloucester county - migrants [Sandra Keller ]
17 May New Yard Birds ["Susie R." ]
16 May BirdsEye-Garrett Mountain Reservation (Park)--Barbour Pond-2015-5-16 [Bill Elrick ]
16 May Today at the Princeton Institute Woods [Michael Perlin ]
16 May Tinicum - warblers - Mourning [Sandra Keller ]
16 May Goose parents defend their young (photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
16 May Ruff reported in Staten Island [Roderick MacKenzie ]
15 May Golden-winged Warblers [Theodore Chase ]
15 May Garret Mountain Reservation Wilson Ave. [Christopher Takacs ]
15 May Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants - and Green Heron! [Sandra Keller ]
15 May Re: Glenhurst Brewster's & Golden-winged Warblers-A hybrid tale [mike hiotis ]
15 May BirdsEye-Garrett Mountain Reservation (Park)--Barbour Pond-2015-5-15 [Bill Elrick ]
15 May House finch with conjunctivitis [Jill Weislo ]
15 May GHM Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers - A Hybrid Tale (re-mail with photo link) [Robert Gallucci ]
15 May Re: GHM Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers - A Hybrid Tale [Robert Gallucci ]
15 May GHM Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers - A Hybrid Tale [Robert Gallucci ]
15 May Gobbling turkey ["B.G. Sloan" ]
15 May Re: Just the opposite of Sandra Keller's experience this early morning [Christopher Takacs ]
15 May Re: Just the opposite of Sandra Keller's experience this early morning [Sandra Keller ]
15 May Just the opposite of Sandra Keller's experience this early morning ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
15 May bird migration - my house [Sandra Keller ]
15 May House finch with conjunctivitis [Jill Weislo ]
15 May Yard Birds [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
14 May bird radar [Sandra Keller ]
15 May Backyard - afternoon surprise ["Albert, Steven" ]
14 May RT Hummingbirds - Male vs Female Size Comparison - Photos [Steve Byland ]
14 May William Warren Park/Oros Preserve May 14 [Scott Barnes ]
14 May Re: "Brewster's" Warbler at Glenhurst [Kirsten Abildskov ]
14 May red-headed woodpecker [Margaret ]
13 May Hummingbirds, Feeders and Photos [Steve Byland ]

Subject: Wildwood Overnight Pelagic Unofficial Results
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 22:53:31 -0400
This is "unofficial" but the Wildwood Overnight Pelagic avian highlights
were: BLACK-CAPPED PETREL, CORY'S SHEARWATER (multiple), GREAT SHEARWATER,
SOOTY SHEARWATER (multiple), AUDUBON'S SHEARWATER (2), LEACH'S STORM-PETREL
(multiple), RED PHALAROPE, SOUTH POLAR SKUA (2), & ARCTIC TERN (5). I will
elaborate on blog tomorrow...just a little taste of what you missed!!!


Link to incomplete blog post that has a few pics and videos:



https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2015/05/25/wildwood-overnight-pelagic-highlights-text-more-skua-vid-tomorrow/ 



Mike Britt

Bayonne

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Davidson Mill Pond County Park - North Brunswick
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015 00:35:19 +0000
I spent the last two mornings at this park. It's just a couple of miles from 
home, but I've never been there in 20-some years. Unfortunately the 
prothonotary warbler seen several weeks ago didn't wait for me! But, over the 
two mornings I tallied 38 species, I think all but one a breeder. Most 
interesting was a yellow-throated vireo that gave me a very good, but brief 
look, and some photogenic purple martins. And then there was an orchard oriole 
somewhere between immature and adult - nothing I've seen in a field guide: a 
more extensive black head, and a deep orange spot on the chest below the back 
chin: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/17915380499/

(Sorry about the bad image. There was a lot of glare (cloudy, and not long 
after dawn) and the bird was almost silhouetted.) 


Steven

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
Technical Practice Group Leader
EHS Management Consulting
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Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
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Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Salem county notes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2015 19:31:43 -0400
My big year is going well so far! I don't conduct these for big numbers - more 
to explore 

the habitats, figure out migration in the area, etc. I didn't know much at all 
about spring 

migration in the county. I was pleasantly surprised! Fort Mott on the Delaware 
River there 

definitely was a hot spot. Some good mornings there - and it wasn't a good 
spring for 

migrants! It's location and the various habitats there proved good for birds 
arriving. Those 

tall trees made it difficult come mid May - then I just stayed on the edges and 
did a lot 

of birding by ear. Areas around there - like Supawna Meadows - were also good. 
I didn't 

get much of a chance to bird areas to the east for migration. Gravelly Hill Rd. 
was super. 

Salem County has a lot of older forest - not just farmland and small tree lines 
as a lot 

of people assume! Migration in the county is basically over for me as I won't 
be down there 

for a week probably. I am missing a lot of migrants still - but that's what 
fall is for! Mourning 

Warbler will be tough now though.

I look forward to exploring for breeders the next couple of months. Mainly the 
woodlands, 

but some of the field areas will be covered. Marilyn and I were exploring one 
such area today 

with super results!

Shorebirds were good - got all the expected spring migrants. Rarities must come 
through, 

hard to spot! No good impoundment like Forsythe or Heislerville. Best area was 
that mud 

flat along Stow Neck Rd. Looking forward to the fall! Bayside has potential for 
rarer species 

in the county. From its location. And that island has a nice beach at low tide. 
I think.... 

Needs exploring. But its 1 hour 20 minutes from my house. Cape May Point is 1 
hour 

35 minutes! I'll get there a couple times.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Wilson's Phalarope at Brig
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 21:07:34 +0000
Just a note that one Wilson's Phalarope was still at Brig this morning, just 
past marker #4. I watched it for about 20 minutes, hoping to hand it off to 
another birder, but no one seemed to be interested. People were just blasting 
around the drive. The bird I saw was a male. I left when it flew off along with 
the 4 or 5 Semi Sands and the Willet that it was hanging out with. 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Salem county - migration today
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 12:55:28 -0400
Got a late start. More out than in this morning at my Fort Mott area spots.
That includes Supawna Meadows. I was hitting dense areas for thrushes and
Mourning Warbler. Alas, no Mourning Warbler! That's going to be a tough one 
come the fall. 

Surprise - Bobwhite! They do still exist in the county. 2 males well apart so 
am 

assuming 2 pairs. Supawna and the powerline cut area along Lehigh. Jeff K. 
said there was a small flock in this area. Sure enough! Thanks! 

Picked up other missing breeders. Finally broke the 200 mark - 201. Still 
thinking 

240 is possible. Still missing lots of stuff! Went searching farm pond edges 
for 

Phalarope. Nothing! 

Butterfly and dragonfly notes - yes. As in trying to relearn the dragonflies.
I am told that the juveniles can look different from either male or female 
adults. 

Joy. Many Zab skippers everywhere.

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: RED KNOTS at Pierce's Point, Cape May Cty and WILSON'S PHALAROPES, Edwin Forsythe NWR, Atlantic Cty
From: Ken Walsh <woodsretreat AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 May 2015 11:51:23 -0400
Hey everyone,

A quick post to this list on these two birds (plus one) that were my targets 
yesterday. 


A pair of WILSON'S PHALAROPES continues at least yesterday at Brig in the pool 
looking north on Wildlife Drive between goose markers #4 and 5. Absolutely 
beautiful female bird in full color foraging at close range. I was there at 
about 3pm yesterday. 


I then headed south to try for RED KNOTS at Cooks Beach where I struck out. The 
stewards who were there suggested I try Pierce's Point and they were right on! 
Thank you guys if you are reading this for being there for the birds at such a 
crucial time! Just before leaving, one of the stewards and I noticed a 
suspicious group of birds fly by south so I was hopeful. 


When I walked up to the rope at Pierce's Point and there they were at fairly 
close view, approx 350 of them by my estimation though I didn't get greedy to 
look around the corner in front of the houses - I suspect there might have been 
more. 350 were fine with me and I truly enjoyed the close views through my 
scope for about 45 min before moving on. I'm happy to say that the knots looked 
well fed. I arrived just after 5pm at Cook's and got to Pierce's at about 530pm 
if that helps others. 


I did venture to Cape May State Park to the hawk watch after fast Higbees and 
Rea Bean Farm stops and saw the SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER that had been 
previously reported. The group of birders there graciously pointed it out and 
eventually we got good, though far, views of the bird that one person 
speculated may be a different bird that the one seen on New England Rd (I 
struck out when I passed there earlier). I also struck out trying to locate a 
ROSEATE TERN that had been seen earlier. 


All and all a great afternoon to be out,
Ken Walsh 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Shorebirds, Allentown Corp Park
From: Andrew Bobe <cprincipalis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 21:11:18 -0400
Hello JBers,
Saw 5 spotted sandpipers and the dunlin. Also had a shorebird I couldn't
ID. Was slightly smaller than the spotteds. Had a very scalloped back,
yellow-greenish legs and a faintly marked breast (nothing as obvious as a
pectoral) and white belly.  Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Andrew Bobe
Hamilton, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Dredge - shorebirds - local notes - Gloucester County
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 20:22:57 -0400
Hello,
 The east pool is still looking great for shorebirds. I was hoping for a 
Phalarope. 

No luck! Forsythe can't be having all the fun here! Maybe one down in Salem 
County for my big year......
     Scattered migrants around. I only had a few hours after work today.
And thats the afternoon. Swainson's Thrush singing - Floodgates - always a 
treat for me. The east pool at the dredge had all the swallows and Purple 
Martin 

feeding at it. Except for Cliff.
 That Greater scaup at Red Bank might be a new late date for me. Jeff K. had 

earlier. I'll have to check my records. 

Migration notes - hopefully a final big push Sunday morning! I still need that 
Mourning 

Warbler.... Tinicum is sure getting many! Send one over here! 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Garret Mountain
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 19:36:33 -0400
18 sp of warblers today- no a lot of them, but a lot of diversity.... and a lot 
of thrushes..  veeries in every tree. 

 
C. Wyluda
Pennington

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Dunlin: Mercer County
From: Chris Brown <cbrown.birdman AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 16:25:49 -0400
Buenos tardes,

A Dunlin, found yesterday evening by Carol Miller, continues at Mercer
Corporate Park in Robbinsville. The bird has been feeding in the first
pond, along the entrance, but flew to the bank closest to
Robbinsville-Allentown Road.

Chris Brown

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mississippi Kite
From: Arlene Oley <arobirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 15:02:49 -0400
Okay you central Jersey Birders ~ I had a Mississippi Kite, likely 1st
summer,
in Kingston, NJ at around 1230 from the parking lot by the Kingston D&R
Canal
locks.  It put on a rather nice show for me, disappearing and reappearing
along
with being bothered by the local birds. For those who are county listers,
it was
right where Somerset, Middlesex and Mercer meet up. A very nice tri-county
bird
!

Good luck if you get out there.

Arlene

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Painted Bunting continues in Cape May
From: Jon Stippick <Jonstippick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 13:34:24 -0400
At Hidden Valley right now. Halfway down first field straight out of parking 
area on New England rd. 

Jon Stippick
Jonstippick at gmaildotcom 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: BB Cuckoo pole farm mercer county
From: Bert Harris <aramidopsis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 13:14:29 -0400
Just heard near grassland blind about 3/4 mi south of Blackwell parking lot on 
main gravel track. Bert Harris Princeton 


Sent from my iPhone

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Beige-bellied red-bellied woodpecker
From: Laura Berlik <Lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 13:06:14 -0400
We now have a male and female red-bellied wp coming to the yard. Before I ever 
saw them together we noticed a newcomer red-belly, with an oddly beige belly, 
considerably darker than any other RBWP that have come to our feeders, but 
otherwise unremarkable. He's made multiple visits. This is not the drab of an 
immature bird. I've noticed color variations in the nuthatches and I'm guessing 
that is the case here. I'd be interested in any other explanations. Thanks. 

Laura Berlik
Princeton

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sun/Mon May 24-25 Cape May Overnight Pelagic Has Room & Forecast Looks Good
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 12:46:32 -0400
We still have space on our overnight pelagic this weekend, leaving Sunday
night and returning Monday afternoon.  The offshore weather forecast is for
winds at 10-15 knots and seas at 2'-4', so it's looking decent.

We're really stoked to get out there because there is a massive 8-10 degree
temperature break just inside the edge of the Continental Shelf.  Take a
look at the sea surface temperature chart.  The tip of the Wilmington
Canyon, our destination, is at about 38-30' latitude.


http://marine.rutgers.edu/cool/sat_data/show/?file=../../regions/chess/sst/noaa/2015/img/150523.143.1024.n18.jpg 



Targets for this time of year include Northern Fulmar, Cory's Great, Manx,
and Sooty Shearwaters, Red and Red-necked Phalarope,  Leach's and Wilson's
Storm-Petrels, South Polar Skua, all 3 jaegers, and Arctic Tern.  It's also
a good time to look for cetaceans like Fin, Humpback, Minke, and Pilot
Whales, as well as Risso's, Common and Offshore Bottlenose Dolphin.

The trip details are:

   - Leave:  10:00 PM on Sun, May 24
   - Return:  Approx 4:00 PM on Mon, May 25
   - Cost:  $215
   - Boat:  Atlantic Star sailing out of Wildwood Crest


For more information or to sign up, email us at info AT paulagics.com or call
215-234-6805.  Hope to see you aboard!


-- 







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com paulagics.com
 AT gmail.com info AT paulagics.com
*

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Overnight pelagic
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 10:38:44 -0400
Jerseybirders,

The forecast looks absolutely fantastic for the Sunday into Monday
overnight pelagic, with seas forecasted at 2-4 feet. I'm hoping for Red
Phalarope, Arctic Tern, South Polar Skua, and an awesome shearwater show.
Can't wait!!!

Also, I finally hit "200" for the Big Year today:


https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2015/05/23/hudson-county-big-year-52315-finally-hit-200/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island might be on its way to NJ!
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 May 2015 10:36:29 -0400
The Little Egret in Nova Scotia was still present the day the LIEG in NY was 
found. Multiple birds in the NE. 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 22, 2015, at 9:58 PM, BRANDON REO  wrote:
> 
> Hello All,
> I left my house in Howell for Gardener's County Park NY this morning at 
3AM... Arrived on site just before sunrise. I met with what eventually amounted 
to about 15 birders. Most of us having scopes, we all scanned in virtually 
every direction. After four hours, we exchanged phone numbers then broke off 
into groups. Some stayed onsite. Others broke off and explored neighboring 
wetlands to try to relocate the bird. 

> 
> My friend, Robert Proniewych (an excellent local birder) and I traveled to 
the opposite site of the bay, to Captree Island. We scanned every possible 
vantage and after about three hours, gave up. 

> 
> We then went back to Gardeners... We, all remaining birders, discussed the 
details of the sighting of the day before.... The last sighting was about 6 PM. 
The bird was observed flying toward Captree - to the South. 

> 
> Some suggested that this very well may have been the same bird seen in Nova 
Scotia the week before. Some have suggested that the bird may be continuing 
travel to the south. 

> So, with a little luck, next stop, New Jersey! 
> 
> Keep your eyes on all the Snowys! 
> 
> Good Birding!
> Brandon Reo
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On May 22, 2015, at 8:00 PM, Yong Kong  wrote:
>> 
>> This Little Egret "invasion" to our area this spring, if I can call it that 
"rocked my stay home and flicker birding world". It got me to travel bit more 
ever since Harvey's bird. I practically blew off the warbler season this 
spring, and all I wanted to look at were egrets. Trip to Bellplain or Cape May 
this spring to see warblers was not even on the table. Even today, I 
practically passed over most of birds in my view and mostly focused on egrets. 
I was even motivated to drive to the Harris Casino AC Waterfront Walkway since 
that marsh across the Brig refuge is rarely birded area. 

>> 
>> Reason why I was looking for my own little egret is not to claim fame. I am 
a firm believer if there is one species of bird in a given region, there has to 
be more of the same species. But then rarities are different story but I wanted 
to test my theory anyway. Reason for my search of another one since Harvey's 
find. 

>> 
>> Then again,  NY's little egret proved my theory. So.......
>> 
>> For those who are interested, anyone can Google a fantastic research paper 
on Little Gull in North America:Notes on the Occurrence of the Little Egret 
(Egretta garzetta) in the Americas, with Reference to Other Palearctic Vagrants 
by 

>> William L. Murphy.
>> 
>> 
https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Notes+on+the+Occurrence+of+the+Little+Egret+(Egretta+garzetta)+in+the+Americas%2C+with+Reference+to+Other+Palearctic+Vagrants 

>> 
>> I can send a copy upon request.
>> 
>> Yong Kong
>> Camden County
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -----Original Message----- From: Larry scacchetti
>> Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 12:29 PM
>> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
>> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island gone
>> 
>> As some of you may know, a Little Egret was found this past Wednesday, the 
20th. After an extensive search today, it's been the consensus of numerous 
birders that the bird has moved on. This, being the first NY state record AND 
on NJs radar for quite some time now, this might be the opertune time to give 
those Snowy Egrets a once over, although the winds might suggest the bird 
taking a northbound movement into RI or MA. This bird exhibits the 2 long heads 
plumes usually diagnostic and very purple lores with little wispy plumes on the 
rump. I just figured I'd shoot everyone a heads up. Years ago, the Western 
Reef-Heron moved back and forth from BK to Sandy Hook area, this bird could 
easily do the same. 

>> 
>> Happy Memorial Day and Good birding,
>> 
>> Larry Scacchetti
>> Westwood, NJ
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings:  
>> 
>> ---
>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>> http://www.avast.com
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island might be on its way to NJ!
From: BRANDON REO <brwelding AT ICLOUD.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 21:58:02 -0400
Hello All,
I left my house in Howell for Gardener's County Park NY this morning at 3AM... 
Arrived on site just before sunrise. I met with what eventually amounted to 
about 15 birders. Most of us having scopes, we all scanned in virtually every 
direction. After four hours, we exchanged phone numbers then broke off into 
groups. Some stayed onsite. Others broke off and explored neighboring wetlands 
to try to relocate the bird. 


My friend, Robert Proniewych (an excellent local birder) and I traveled to the 
opposite site of the bay, to Captree Island. We scanned every possible vantage 
and after about three hours, gave up. 


We then went back to Gardeners... We, all remaining birders, discussed the 
details of the sighting of the day before.... The last sighting was about 6 PM. 
The bird was observed flying toward Captree - to the South. 


Some suggested that this very well may have been the same bird seen in Nova 
Scotia the week before. Some have suggested that the bird may be continuing 
travel to the south. 

So, with a little luck, next stop, New Jersey! 

Keep your eyes on all the Snowys! 

Good Birding!
Brandon Reo





> On May 22, 2015, at 8:00 PM, Yong Kong  wrote:
> 
> This Little Egret "invasion" to our area this spring, if I can call it that 
"rocked my stay home and flicker birding world". It got me to travel bit more 
ever since Harvey's bird. I practically blew off the warbler season this 
spring, and all I wanted to look at were egrets. Trip to Bellplain or Cape May 
this spring to see warblers was not even on the table. Even today, I 
practically passed over most of birds in my view and mostly focused on egrets. 
I was even motivated to drive to the Harris Casino AC Waterfront Walkway since 
that marsh across the Brig refuge is rarely birded area. 

> 
> Reason why I was looking for my own little egret is not to claim fame. I am a 
firm believer if there is one species of bird in a given region, there has to 
be more of the same species. But then rarities are different story but I wanted 
to test my theory anyway. Reason for my search of another one since Harvey's 
find. 

> 
> Then again,  NY's little egret proved my theory. So.......
> 
> For those who are interested, anyone can Google a fantastic research paper on 
Little Gull in North America:Notes on the Occurrence of the Little Egret 
(Egretta garzetta) in the Americas, with Reference to Other Palearctic Vagrants 
by 

> William L. Murphy.
> 
> 
https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Notes+on+the+Occurrence+of+the+Little+Egret+(Egretta+garzetta)+in+the+Americas%2C+with+Reference+to+Other+Palearctic+Vagrants 

> 
> I can send a copy upon request.
> 
> Yong Kong
> Camden County
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Larry scacchetti
> Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 12:29 PM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island gone
> 
> As some of you may know, a Little Egret was found this past Wednesday, the 
20th. After an extensive search today, it's been the consensus of numerous 
birders that the bird has moved on. This, being the first NY state record AND 
on NJs radar for quite some time now, this might be the opertune time to give 
those Snowy Egrets a once over, although the winds might suggest the bird 
taking a northbound movement into RI or MA. This bird exhibits the 2 long heads 
plumes usually diagnostic and very purple lores with little wispy plumes on the 
rump. I just figured I'd shoot everyone a heads up. Years ago, the Western 
Reef-Heron moved back and forth from BK to Sandy Hook area, this bird could 
easily do the same. 

> 
> Happy Memorial Day and Good birding,
> 
> Larry Scacchetti
> Westwood, NJ
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings:  
> 
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island gone
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 20:00:32 -0400
This Little Egret "invasion" to our area this spring, if I can call it that 
"rocked my stay home and flicker birding world". It got me to travel bit 
more ever since Harvey's bird. I practically blew off the warbler season 
this spring, and all I wanted to look at were egrets. Trip to Bellplain or 
Cape May this spring to see warblers was not even on the table. Even today, 
I practically passed over most of birds in my view and mostly focused on 
egrets. I was even motivated to drive to the Harris Casino AC Waterfront 
Walkway since that marsh across the Brig refuge is rarely birded area.

Reason why I was looking for my own little egret is not to claim fame. I am 
a firm believer if there is one species of bird in a given region, there has 
to be more of the same species. But then rarities are different story but I 
wanted to test my theory anyway. Reason for my search of another one since 
Harvey's find.

Then again,  NY's little egret proved my theory. So.......

For those who are interested, anyone can Google a fantastic research paper 
on Little Gull in North America:Notes on the Occurrence of the Little Egret 
(Egretta garzetta) in the Americas, with Reference to Other Palearctic 
Vagrants by
William L. Murphy.


https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Notes+on+the+Occurrence+of+the+Little+Egret+(Egretta+garzetta)+in+the+Americas%2C+with+Reference+to+Other+Palearctic+Vagrants 


I can send a copy upon request.

Yong Kong
Camden County




-----Original Message----- 
From: Larry scacchetti
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2015 12:29 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island gone

As some of you may know, a Little Egret was found this past Wednesday, the 
20th.  After an extensive search today, it's been the consensus of numerous 
birders that the bird has moved on.  This, being the first NY state record 
AND on NJs radar for quite some time now, this might be the opertune time to 
give those Snowy Egrets a once over, although the winds might suggest the 
bird taking a northbound movement into RI or MA.  This bird exhibits the 2 
long heads plumes usually diagnostic and very purple lores with little wispy 
plumes on the rump.  I just figured I'd shoot everyone a heads up.  Years 
ago, the Western Reef-Heron moved  back and forth from BK to Sandy Hook 
area, this bird could easily do the same.

Happy Memorial Day and Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings:  


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Delaware Water Gap/Old Mine Road - May 22
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 19:48:17 -0400
Went to the Delaware Water Gap for the first time today, and it lived up to
the hype. Although I didn't get the Goden-winged Warbler I was hoping for,
I DID get my lifer CERULEAN WARBLER - and a close up view, to boot. All
told I had 70 species but it should probably have been higher if I was a
better birder by ear alone. My whole list:

*Delaware Water Gap NRA--Delaware Water Gap (Entrance)*
1 Bald Eagle
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Warbling Vireo
2 Red-eyed Vireo
3 American Crow
1 Wood Thrush
6 American Robin
3 Gray Catbird
1 Yellow Warbler
1 Blackburnian Warbler
2 Pine Warbler
1 American Redstart
5 Common Grackle
3 Baltimore Oriole

*Dunnfield Creek Natural Area*
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
5 Red-eyed Vireo
1 Blue Jay
1 American Crow
1 Swainson's Thrush
2 Wood Thrush
2 American Robin
3 Gray Catbird
1 Northern Parula
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
1 Black-throated Green Warbler
4 Blackpoll Warbler
2 Black-and-white Warbler
1 American Redstart
1 Worm-eating Warbler
1 Ovenbird
1 Louisiana Waterthrush
2 Northern Cardinal
1 Common Grackle
1 Baltimore Oriole
1 Purple Finch

*Old Mine Road IBA*
29 Canada Goose
4 Mallard
1 Wild Turkey
1 Green Heron
3 Black Vulture
1 Turkey Vulture
1 Broad-winged Hawk
1 Killdeer
2 Mourning Dove
3 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
1 Barred Owl
1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 Belted Kingfisher
6 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
2 Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)
1 Pileated Woodpecker
7 Eastern Wood-Pewee
4 Eastern Phoebe
3 Great Crested Flycatcher
2 White-eyed Vireo
13 Red-eyed Vireo
3 Blue Jay
1 Fish Crow
1 Common Raven
1 Black-capped Chickadee
3 Tufted Titmouse
2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7 Veery
12 Wood Thrush
11 American Robin
32 Gray Catbird
3 Blue-winged Warbler
6 Northern Parula
12 Yellow Warbler
1 Cape May Warbler
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Prairie Warbler
4 Blackpoll Warbler
6 Cerulean Warbler (LIFER)
1 Black-and-white Warbler
28 American Redstart
3 Worm-eating Warbler
14 Ovenbird
5 Common Yellowthroat
1 Hooded Warbler
4 Canada Warbler
4 Eastern Towhee
5 Chipping Sparrow
4 Song Sparrow
3 Northern Cardinal
4 Indigo Bunting
14 Red-winged Blackbird
7 Common Grackle
10 Brown-headed Cowbird
8 Baltimore Oriole
1 House Finch
4 American Goldfinch

Marty DeAngelo
Haddonfield, NJ
martytdx AT yahoo.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Many Least Sandpipers (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 17:56:04 -0400
Today there was a very small stretch of riverbank on the Raritan River in
Piscataway (40 feet at most) that held at least 25-30 Least Sandpipers.
There was obviously some good food there! It was very entertaining to
watch. They were not timid. Here's my best photo of one of them:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17981392655/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Neotropic Cormorant continues, Hunterdon County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 15:48:35 -0400
The Neotropic Cormorant continues this morning in it's usually haunts
around Demott's Pond and Clinton Mill Pond in Clinton. Thanks to Frank
Sencher Sr. for the report.

Good birding,

Sam

-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: White-winged Dove, Cape May County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 14:55:53 -0400
Tom Reed reports: White-winged Dove flying northeast, just above tree tops
from Beanery/Bayshore Road.

Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Extralimital Little Egret in Long Island gone
From: Larry scacchetti <Larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 12:29:34 -0400
As some of you may know, a Little Egret was found this past Wednesday, the 
20th. After an extensive search today, it's been the consensus of numerous 
birders that the bird has moved on. This, being the first NY state record AND 
on NJs radar for quite some time now, this might be the opertune time to give 
those Snowy Egrets a once over, although the winds might suggest the bird 
taking a northbound movement into RI or MA. This bird exhibits the 2 long heads 
plumes usually diagnostic and very purple lores with little wispy plumes on the 
rump. I just figured I'd shoot everyone a heads up. Years ago, the Western 
Reef-Heron moved back and forth from BK to Sandy Hook area, this bird could 
easily do the same. 


Happy Memorial Day and Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Cape May County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 10:03:42 -0400
David LaPuma reports: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher flycatching on the north
side of of 586 New England Road on Cape Island; found by Deb Payson.

Good birding,

Sam

-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Introduction and 'possible' Kelp Gull at Sandy Hook
From: Cathy <0000015278c60ee8-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 12:10:43 +0000
Greetings Jersey Birders-
First a quick introduction.  I am new to NJ, by way of Colorado.  I am in 
your lovely state for a year or two while I complete an artist residency at the 
Hiram-Blauvelt Wildlife Art Museum in Oradell (never heard of it? Please check 
out their web site and stop in for a visit some time- it is free!).  I am 
(perhaps obviously) a wildlife artist.  Anyone interested in seeing my artwork 
there is a link below my signature.  I am also a birder :)  While relatively 
new to this sport (2 1/2 years) I am an avid learner (maybe even obsessive) and 
was fortunate in Colorado to be mentored by some really exceptional birders, as 
well as being able to travel quite a lot for 'work' of gathering reference 
photos for my art, so have a lot of hours in the field :).  

Onto the meat of the email: Last week, on May 14, I traveled to Sandy Hook with 
a non-birder friend.  While we were walking along the beach behind parking 
area D I noted what I  took at the time to be the smallest runt female GBBG I 
had ever seen!  I snapped off a handful of photos of her next to a regular 
sized GBBG, then the birds walked over a small dune, and then all birds flew 
off.  A few days ago I posted one of the photos to a North American Gull page 
on facebook and several very experienced gull IDers said that the bird was 
strongly suggestive of a young Kelp Gull, and that the size of the bird seems 
out of range for even the smallest GBBG.  The general thought is that the 
photos I have are not diagnostic, as I have no open wing or tail photos, but 
are strongly suggestive of Kelp Gull.  Of course now I am totally kicking 
myself, because I did note how small the bird was, but not the significance or 
I would have taken a lot more photos!  So mostly I am throwing this out there 
so that anyone that might be at Sandy Hook will keep an eye out for this bird 
and look over the dark-backed gulls a little more closely than you might have 
otherwise.  I have uploaded my photos to Flickr 
at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aphelionart/  I did return yesterday to 
look for the bird and walked roughly a mile both directions from parking area D 
and was not able to re-locate the bird, but with so much habitat it could well 
still be there.  The bird is either a first or second cycle individual 
(reminiscent of a second cycle GBBG, but I am told Kelp Gull mature faster and 
that it may be a 1st cycle), roughly the same size, or just slightly larger 
than a Herring Gull in size.  If I am correct there are no accepted records 
for Kelp Gull in NJ, so if the bird can be relocated and more diagnostic photos 
acquired it would be a first state record.   

 I look forward to meeting more of you NJ birders out in the field!  

Cathy Sheeterwww.cathysheeter.comOradell, NJ 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hudson County Big Year Update
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 20:56:56 -0400
I picked up RUDDY TURNSTONE and BLACK SKIMMER (#196) today...thanks to
Simon Lane. I also posted some pics from my North Myrtle Beach
vaca...coolest bird was an immature MAGNIFICENT FRIGATEBIRD.


https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2015/05/21/north-myrtle-beach-south-carolina/ 


Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: NJ Delaware Bay’s Red Knot and Laughing Gull Interspecific Competition
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 20:42:00 -0400
My utterly and extremely unscientific attempt to crunch the numbers of e-bird 
reports on Red Knots and Laughing Gulls at five Delaware Bay locations known to 
host large numbers of Red Knots during spring migration (i.e. Fortescue, Kimble 
Beach, Reeds Beach, Cooks Beach and Sunray/Norbury’s Landing) was exactly 
that, has no meaning. One reason being birders only reporting the numbers of 
Red Knots (in 2’s, 10’s,17’s,50’s, and 200’s, etc.) and then X 
numbers on the Laughing Gull. Obviously, I could not use these reports which 
may have skewed the Laughing Gull to the Red Knot ratio I trying to obtain 
staring from May 8 to May 21. 


Anyway, to those who may be interested, the ratio I came up is 1.06 (Laughing 
Gull) to 1 (Red Knot). Interestingly enough Sunray/Norbury’s Landing had the 
Laughing Gull to Red Knot ratio of 5.79 to 1. Red knots outnumbered the 
Laughing Gulls at other locations. Aerial survey done by researchers would 
probably provided more scientifically valid results. To those who have visited 
those locations, is this ratio make sense ? 


The hours spent today in trying to make some sense of e-bird reports, I 
probably could have driven up to Gardiner Park in Long Island to see the Little 
Egret in person rather than looking at the documentation e-bird photos that a 
very nice NJ birder sent me a link to. 


Yong Kong
Camden County




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mockingbird Singing at night
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 16:05:18 -0400
I got up last night at 2am and heard a mocker singing his little heart out. 
Listening for about 5 minutes there was one major difference between the day 
and night songs. The night song had longer notes and more pauses between calls. 
If I can, Ill try to make a recording to demonstrate this...It made me wonder 
if he's singing in his sleep? A quick search on google turned up a lot of 
complaining about the noise but to me it was stark and beautiful. 


I also took a quick video of the gbh rookery with some fierce nestling action.
https://youtu.be/aMOxFl47x4w

Regards,

James
Jackson, NJ
 		 	   		  
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Lawrence's Warbler, Olive-Sided Flycatcher & Yellow-billed Cuckoos at SHWS
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015 11:30:13 -0400
This morning, down by the Headquarters building on the Sanctuary, several
excellent birders on HQ staff visually id'd a Lawrence's Warbler singing a
Blue-winged song, and heard an Olive-sided Flycatcher.  Three Yellow-billed
Cuckoos have also been seen.  This is all down the road from HQ parking up
towards the SHWS driveway.  The picnic table there might make a good lunch
spot today!

Good birding!

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bobolinks and Blue Grosbeak Pole Farm
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 18:41:39 -0400
Quite a few Bobolinks (25+?) incl. some females perching at the Pole Farm Cold 
Soil aka red barn side now. Also just had a perching Blue Grosbeak and soaring 
Bald Eagle. Lots of Grasshopper Sparrows lately. 


Fairfax Hutter
Lawrenceville

Sent from my iPhone

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: yard birding
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 20 May 2015 08:42:32 -0400
Yet again, no migrants in my yard. Sitting out here on the porch eating 
breakfast. 


A few more Chimney Swift sightings. I don't recall this many Swifts from my 
yard 

before. Then again I am out here not just listening but scanning those trees! 

I am on 1999 entering old records into ebird. Sure were a lot of Bobwhites down 
in 

Salem County! I am still missing for my big year. As much as I enjoy finding my 

own birds - suggestions are welcome here. This is a rarity anymore. 

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: 3 Common Nighthawks in Morris County
From: Ken Walsh <woodsretreat AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 16:04:39 -0400
Hey all,

While helping my folks at their home in Morris Plains I heard a COMMON 
NIGHTHAWK call at low altitude at about 8:15PM. I ran out of the garage and 
looked up to see a nighthawk slowly soaring away. I glanced higher and saw two 
others with my binos. 


Always glad to be one of those people who walk around with my binos close by! 


Ken Walsh

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glassboro Woods - breeders - and migrants!
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 13:08:29 -0400
Hello,
    Chose Glassboro this morning for my power walk as wanted to see about the
breeders. And yes the breeders are all in. Some are very quiet! Like Scarlet
Tanager and Prothonotary, others are so active and vocal - like YB Cuckoo,
Worm-eating Warbler, and Wood Thrush, etc.
 Wasn't expecting migrants! But they were there - beating the storms we 
presume. 

Jeff K. had just texted me 2 minutes after I got there. He was getting migrant 
flocks 

down in Salem! My migrants were spread out. Nice to hear! Wish I had gotten 
there earlier! 


BBCuckoo - that could be a breeder, Blackpolls, Veery, Gray-cheeked Thrush, 
Wilson's 

Warbler, etc

Nature notes - Red-spotted Purples, Wood Satyrs, Dragonflies, Mountain Laurel 
just starting to bud.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Interested in Owls? Catch Justin Jaworski's "Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls" on May 21
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 11:22:59 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets on Thursday May 21 at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The meeting features Justin 
Jaworski and his program, "Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls." 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings begin at 7:30PM and are held at the Academy of 
Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 19103. A 
pre-meeting dinner takes place at Asia on the Parkway, not far from the 
Academy. More details and directions to the Academy and Asia on the Parkway can 
be found on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 



Understanding the Silent Flight of Owls:

Many owl species rely on specialized plumage to suppress the noise generated by 
their wings in flight, which enables them to sneak up on their prey in complete 
acoustic stealth. Now 80 years since these unique plumage attributes were 
identified, a satisfactory explanation for exactly how these attributes reduce 
noise remains elusive. In this talk, we will discuss recent research into how 
sound is produced and eliminated by owl wings, and how an understanding of the 
physics behind the owl's stealth can impact commercial and military 
applications ranging from aircraft to wind turbines to underwater vehicles. 


Justin Jaworski:

Justin W. Jaworski earned his doctorate (2009), masters, and bachelors 
degrees in mechanical engineering and materials science from Duke University. 
Before joining the mechanical engineering and mechanics faculty at Lehigh in 
2013, Jaworski was an NSF international research fellow at the University of 
Cambridge, where he was also college research associate of applied mathematics 
for Magdalene College. His research investigates natural and aerospace 
phenomena involving a dynamic interaction between fluid flows and structural 
movement, which occur in a wide range of topics ranging from chronic snoring to 
the stability of flexible wings and wind turbine blades to the silent flight of 
owls. 




We hope to see you at the meeting!

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Migration continues in the Princeton Institute Woods
From: Bert Harris <aramidopsis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 May 2015 10:42:09 -0400
Subject line says it all.

Here's the list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23530133

Good birding,
Bert Harris, Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Salem county big year birding
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 15:38:27 -0400
Was a bust today! One new species - Cedar Waxwing. Mourning Warbler was
preferred..... Marilyn and I spent the morning looking for migrants - not much 
at 

all! Didn't look like much on the radar down here. We hit some appropriate
looking breeding areas - for Louisiana Waterthrush, Kentucky, etc. Who knows?
Not much singing during the heat of the day.

Bobolinks displaying along Featherbed Lane. No Grasshopper Sparrow though....
Again, the heat of the day. 12 Snow Geese lingering. That's late and a lot.

Butterfly notes - Viceroy, Zabulon, and Least Skipper.

Insect notes - something that looked like a Strawberry fly drove us back into 
the car 

at Mad Horse Creek.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Tree Swallows using Cliff Swallow nest (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 14:21:08 -0400
I'd never heard of Tree Swallows taking over Cliff Swallow nests before,
but after reading up on this I guess it happens...

I was checking out a single Cliff Swallow nest on the downstream side of
the NJ Route 18 bridge in the Piscataway portion of Johnson Park. Heard the
noises of nestlings and thought "Cool, successful Cliff Swallow nest". I
took some documentation photos. When I got home and looked at the photos I
realized the birds were not Cliff Swallows. This Cliff Swallow nest is by
itself, not part of a colony. To the best of my knowledge this nest had
been unused for a couple of years.

Here's a photo of one of the Tree Swallows perched on the bridge near the
nest: https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301216/

And here's a grainy photo of a Tree Swallow on the Cliff Swallow nest in
the process of feeding nestlings:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17675301256/

Very interesting...makes me want to review my earlier Cliff Swallow
reports...I'm thinking if multiple birds are using a tightly knit colony
they most probably are not Tree Swallows? But if swallows are using a
single Cliff Swallow nest you can't be certain?

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hawk Rise Sanctuary
From: Clifford Miles <0000000e98604842-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 17:28:17 +0000
 The sanctuary was hopping with birds this noon.  I had about 3 dozen 
Bobolinks and as many Swainson's Thrushes (with 1 Gray-cheek), on my noon 
walk.  My species total is 47 so far today. 

Clifford MilesMountain Lakes, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Black Rail and birder etiquette
From: "Davis, Christina" <Christina.Davis AT DEP.NJ.GOV>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 16:45:47 +0000
Thank you to David LaPuma for this important reminder and members of the 
community for alerting us to this issue. If anyone observes harassment of this, 
or any other, Black Rail please contact me so we may pursue further action 
(note - this would not necessarily be law enforcement but would also include 
education). Some folks may not be aware of the dire straits Black Rail appear 
to be in in NJ and why playing tape is so stressful to this individual, so feel 
free to help spread the word by educating those that you see acting 
inappropriately. If you feel uncomfortable approaching someone, no problem, but 
please try and forward any identifying characteristics to me so we may try. 


This is a wonderful bird that has been calling quite frequently on its own, so 
there is even less of a reason to play tape. Enjoy with a mindful approach, 
please. 


Christina Davis,
Cape May Point, NJ

Please note new email address: Christina.Davis AT dep.nj.gov

Christina Davis
Endangered and Nongame Species Program
NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife
2201 County Route 631
Woodbine, NJ 08270

p.609.628.1919
f. 609.628.2734

________________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of David La Puma 
 

Sent: Sunday, May 17, 2015 9:47 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Black Rail and birder etiquette

Birders

It has been brought to my attention that several birders going out to hear the 
recently discovered Black Rail at Stipson Island Rd, Cape May County, have 
encountered other birders and photographers who are playing the Black Rail song 
in an attempt to lure it out into view and/or photographic range, even after 
the bird is already calling. I dont want to start a firefight here, but I do 
want to suggest that anyone trying for the bird please refrain from using 
playback. The bird is a State Endangered Species and has experienced sharp 
declines in New Jersey over the last three decades. The bird is easily 
accessible and as such draws many visitors which raises the risk of harassment 
when numerous individuals are attempting to tape the bird out over the course 
of the day, and over several days. This type of behavior is exactly why so many 
birders refuse to share such sightings publicly, which then results in less 
people having the opportunity to experience the bird. I know how ha! 

 rd it is to drive a great distance to try and see a bird and to be left empty 
handed hours laterbut sometimes thats exactly when we need to stop and remind 
ourselves that the needs of the bird come first. 


Thanks for considering this request.

David
________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Cape May, New Jersey

e: david AT woodcreeper.com 
c: 732.447.4894
w: http://www.woodcreeper.com 


Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldnt be done. - Amelia 
Earhart 




________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Cape May, New Jersey

e: david AT woodcreeper.com 
c: 732.447.4894
w: http://www.woodcreeper.com 

Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldnt be done. - Amelia 
Earhart 


________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Cape May, New Jersey

e: david AT woodcreeper.com
c: 732.447.4894
w: http://www.woodcreeper.com


Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldnt be done. - Amelia 
Earhart 



List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Upcoming Bergen County Audubon Meeting
From: Beth Goldberg <goldbug310 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 06:07:41 -0400
Join us on Weds, May 20th as we welcome  Annabelle Bower of the AmeriCorps
NJ Watershed Ambassador Program to answer the question "WATER We Doing to
Our Streams?"  Human activities are the number one cause of water
pollution, affecting wildlife as well as our drinking water, homes, and
more. Join us to hear about the impacts we have on our waterways,
especially the urbanized streams traveling through many of our communities.
Annabelle will demonstrate what a healthy stream looks like and the steps
you can take to improve stream health.  Business meeting begins at 7:30PM
followed by program at 8:00.  Meetings are free and open to all and held at
the Teaneck Creek Conservancy, 20 Puffin Way, Teaneck, NJ


-- 
Beth Goldberg
Fair Lawn

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bird in the hand - Pierce's Point, Delaware Bayshore
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 22:28:46 -0400
After dousing myself with Deep Woods Off, I returned from the parking lot and I 
gazed down the beach. 

The cluster of the people remained crouched behind the pier as they had been 
since 

I had arrived a half-hour ago. Get ready, she said. Suddenly, Boom! and a 
puff of smoke rose above the pier. 

Go, go, go! she shouted, as she sprinted from behind the yellow rope. I 
ducked under the rope and started running too, but I wasnt 

sure why. A few stronger, younger, and taller people passed in front. Others, 
laden with binoculars, impressive cameras, 

or spotting scopes ran beside me. We all swerved to avoid the scattered 
Horseshoe Crabs. On the other side of the pier 

was a long rolled up net with numerous shorebirds inside. We observers lined up 
on one side and the workers stooped on the other, reaching 

under the net to sort the birds: Red Knots and Ruddy Turnstones were keepers 
but Semi-Palmated Sandpipers were rejects. Semis 

exploded from upraised fists in every direction. Then, the harvest was over. 
The net was checked and a lonely Sandpiper was released. 

The workers assorted themselves into circles. Thanks to Mike Newhouse, I had 
banded passerines 

before so I wasnt intimidated when Jeannine Parvin, the database administrator 
for banded birds.org, recruited me to 

a team. Bins of Ruddy Turnstones were brought to us. Each team member had an 
assigned function: Scribe, bander, flag gluer, measurer, and weigher. 

Jeannine taught me to put a dab of solvent in between the flaps of the flag 
(green for US) which was then compressed to seal 

the flag shut on the upper leg. After a while, I relieved the weigher and 
learned how to stuff a Ruddy into a can (hint: turn it on its back and 

mind the wings and feet) and place it on the scale. We need more birds! More 
Red Knots! Jeannine brought me over to 

Dr. Niles, who was glueing nano transmitters on the backs of Red Knots. These 
would last for 3 months and signals would be 

detected from towers in the Delaware Bayshore area as well as Canada. Another 
team finished up collecting feather and blood samples 

to measure heavy metals and extract DNA for gender identification and 
population studies. The workers  volunteers, students, 

and field biologists from the US, Canada, and the UK  began to pack up. I 
checked my watch: 2 hours had passed 

since the spectacle had started. Time for me to head to my next Cape May Spring 
Weekend adventure. 


Diane Louie
Madison

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Black Rail and birder etiquette
From: David La Puma <david AT WOODCREEPER.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 21:47:49 -0400
Birders

It has been brought to my attention that several birders going out to hear the 
recently discovered Black Rail at Stipson Island Rd, Cape May County, have 
encountered other birders and photographers who are playing the Black Rail song 
in an attempt to lure it out into view and/or photographic range, even after 
the bird is already calling. I don’t want to start a firefight here, but I do 
want to suggest that anyone trying for the bird please refrain from using 
playback. The bird is a State Endangered Species and has experienced sharp 
declines in New Jersey over the last three decades. The bird is easily 
accessible and as such draws many visitors which raises the risk of harassment 
when numerous individuals are attempting to tape the bird out over the course 
of the day, and over several days. This type of behavior is exactly why so many 
birders refuse to share such sightings publicly, which then results in less 
people having the opportunity to experience the bird. I know how hard it is to 
drive a great distance to try and see a bird and to be left empty handed hours 
later…but sometimes that’s exactly when we need to stop and remind 
ourselves that the needs of the bird come first. 


Thanks for considering this request.

David
________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Cape May, New Jersey

e: david AT woodcreeper.com 
c: 732.447.4894
w: http://www.woodcreeper.com 


“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - Amelia 
Earhart 




________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Cape May, New Jersey

e: david AT woodcreeper.com 
c: 732.447.4894
w: http://www.woodcreeper.com 

“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - Amelia 
Earhart 


________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Cape May, New Jersey

e: david AT woodcreeper.com
c: 732.447.4894
w: http://www.woodcreeper.com


“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - Amelia 
Earhart 



List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Great Crested Flycatcher (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 20:01:29 -0400
My first photo of a Great Crested Flycatcher this spring. Even though it is
very late evening, the yellow chest still stands out, as does the "crest".
Photo shot from 100 feet away, from my deck, with my pocket mini-zoom
camera:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17608472078/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Yard
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 19:47:14 -0400
Blackpoll Warbler in yard today! First one ever in my yard.


Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Garret today
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 14:32:20 -0500
Since I have not seen any post about Garret today I thought I would talk about 
some birds we had today. 

I arrived at 6AM and birded until 12:30. Most of the time with Keenan Ennis, 
Evan Cutler and David Bernstein. We had about 20 warbler species, and heard of 
a couple of others (Bay breast & Nashville) that we missed. 

We had a wonderful encounter with a Yellow-billed Cuckoo that was on the ground 
by the waters edge near the gazebo first found by Evan. The bird was very 
confiding and several times flashed its tail showing off its white spots. When 
we first started at 6AM we heard a Black-billed Cuckoo near the castle. Behind 
the bathrooms and near the Elvis lot Keenan spotted an Olive-sided Flycatcher. 
We told some of our birding friends we met and they were able to relocate it. 
We had Least Fly (heard by David who doesn't miss a note), a Trails type (maybe 
Alder) and the last bird of the day for me was a calling Yellow-bellied Fly 
that Keenan heard and then saw coming down the hill to the path on Wilson Ave. 

We did really well with thrushes.
In addition to the regular 4 (Wood, Veery, Swainsons & Gray-cheeked) we had a 
credible candidate for Bicknells. Evan said it was the same bird (and in the 
same spot) that he and Bill Elrick had it yesterday 

On a non avian note we had great views of a bullfrog and water snake in Barbour 
pond 

Bob Dodelson

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Gloucester county - migrants
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 13:50:36 -0400
Hello,
 I had a couple hours this late morning. I was watching the bird radar all 
early morning 

while working. Had a couple areas of red.Tiny. Putting down along the Delaware 
River. 

Alas, trying to figure out where exactly is impossible with that small map. The 
dredge 

had migrants in the north woods area. Hard to track down late morning, but they 
were there. 

Nothing out of the ordinary - no Mourning Warbler! But stuff around.

 I trusted Dark Sky when I checked it and it said no precip for an hour. I made 
the trek 

to the east pool. Perfect for shorebirds! I didn't have my scope with me, so 
couldn't be 

sure with the peeps on the far edge, most stuff was at the north edge anyway. 
Again, 

nothing out of the ordinary, maybe next week!

Butterfly notes - Eastern Tiger Swallowtails flying.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: New Yard Birds
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2015 10:03:10 -0400
This morning brought Black-throated Blue warbler and Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: BirdsEye-Garrett Mountain Reservation (Park)--Barbour Pond-2015-5-16
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 19:23:36 -0400
Observer: bilbander
2015-05-16 05:50
Garrett Mountain Reservation (Park)--Barbour Pond
Protocol: Traveling
4 Miles
400 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? No
    1    Canada Goose
    2    Great Blue Heron
    1    Osprey
    3    Spotted Sandpiper
    3    Yellow-billed Cuckoo
    2    Black-billed Cuckoo
    1    Alder Flycatcher
    3    Least Flycatcher
    6    Great Crested Flycatcher
    5    Eastern Kingbird
    12    Red-eyed Vireo
    3    House Wren
    1    Carolina Wren
    4    Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    9    Veery
    3    Gray-cheeked Thrush
    1    Gray-cheeked/Bicknell's Thrush    "almost certainly a Bicknells,
it was small and was singing the sub song."
    30    Swainson's Thrush
    8    Wood Thrush
    X    American Robin
    35    Gray Catbird
    2    Brown Thrasher
    2    Northern Mockingbird
    X    European Starling
    21    Ovenbird
    2    Worm-eating Warbler
    1    Northern Waterthrush
    8    Black-and-white Warbler
    X    Common Yellowthroat
    24    American Redstart
    1    Cape May Warbler    male
    18    Northern Parula
    14    Magnolia Warbler
    3    Bay-breasted Warbler
    4    Blackburnian Warbler
    7    Yellow Warbler
    9    Chestnut-sided Warbler
    30    Blackpoll Warbler
    6    Black-throated Blue Warbler
    1    Pine Warbler
    2    Yellow-rumped Warbler
    12    Black-throated Green Warbler
    4    Canada Warbler
    3    Eastern Towhee
    X    Chipping Sparrow
    2    Song Sparrow
    14    White-throated Sparrow
    16    Scarlet Tanager
    X    Northern Cardinal
    24    Rose-breasted Grosbeak
    2    Indigo Bunting
    2    Orchard Oriole    female on nest
    26    Baltimore Oriole
    1    House Finch
    X    American Goldfinch
    40    House Sparrow

This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog (
http://birdseyebirding.com/)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Today at the Princeton Institute Woods
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 14:00:33 -0400
With a Wash Xg Audubon group, led by the always-terrific Brad Merritt. Not
as many species as a year ago (on almost exactly the same day), but
certainly more than worth the time we spent.

The list

Rose-breasted grosbeak (f-o-y) (2)
Baltimore oriole (f-o-y) (great views, both on the nest and on tree limbs)
Black-throated green (f-o-y)
American redstart
Blackpoll (f-o-y, at least in NJ)
Cedar waxwing
Barn swallow
Tree swallow
Rough-wing swallow
Purple martin
Red winged blackbird (dozens)
Yellow-rumped
Yellow
Common yellowthroat (a female, which was an f-o-y, at least, for me)
Hairy woodpecker
House wren
Scarlet tanager
Summer tanager
Wood thrush (H)
Northern parula  (NJ f-o-y)
Red-eyed vireo

Plus many multiples of...
Robin, blue jay, titmice, goldfinch, Canada geese, cardinal, catbird,
cowbird.

All the best to all,
Michael Perlin

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Tinicum - warblers - Mourning
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 13:27:03 -0400
Yes, that's PA, but just across the river. A below average migrant day, but had 
stuff. 

I checked the bird radar at 6:15am - showed stuff still up and putting down 
somewhere 

in Mercer County and across the river in PA. I need to run a Mercer County big 
year after 

I get done with Salem and Camden next year! 

Mourning Warbler very vocal. Which means there should be one across the river 
back in 

NJ..... Out of the past 2 weeks, I think only 3 days down in Salem County. 
Other 

commitments. Time to get working on the big year again!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Goose parents defend their young (photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 13:08:25 -0400
For some reason yesterday a domestic Greylag goose was stalking a Canada
Goose family. In this photo you can see the Greylag in a threatening pose,
and the parent Canada Geese are obviously agitated, and sheltering their
six youngsters:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17736351895/

It went on for about an hour, with the Greylag following the Canada Geese,
apparently after the young geese. There were several serious fights that
took place:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17736351815/

The parents eventually drove off the aggressor:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17736351745/ and
https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/17736351675/

The Greylag did not act aggressively to any other Canadas present...just
the pair with goslings.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Ruff reported in Staten Island
From: Roderick MacKenzie <birdsmac AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 16 May 2015 10:35:57 -0400
Ruff reported this morning on western edge of Staten Island...hoping this
guy moves a little more west.

Good birding all.

Rod MacKenzie
Demarest., Nj

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Golden-winged Warblers
From: Theodore Chase <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 22:54:10 -0400
	When I was young in Massachusetts (1950s), Golden-winged Warblers  
were not rare as a breeding species if you knew the habitat in which  
to look for them (young elm trees in a wettish meadow.  I've seen  
such in northern New Jersey, but not when I had a chance to check it  
out.  One may be the location cited by Mike Hiotis.)  A couple of  
years ago Manomet Bird Observatory's newsletter showed a photo of a  
Golden-winged Warbler they had banded there (eastern Massachusetts),  
as being now extremely rare there, probably a vagrant migrant.  I  
wrote to them about my experience, and received a reply from Trevor  
Lloyd-Evans stating that Golden-wings were now completely gone from  
Massachusetts.  Not due to hybridization, as Blue-wings do not occur  
there (or certainly didn't in the 1950s).  He speculated that there  
were now no 'pure' Golden-wings remaining east of Minnesota and  
Wisconsin.
	It appears that Golden-wings are declining anyway, and hybridization  
with Blue-wings is pushing this along - the average Golden-wing is  
not able to find a mate of his/her own species.  New Jersey Audubon  
is trying to keep a few pairs on power line cuts in extreme northern  
New Jersey.
		Ted Chase
		Franklin Township (Somerset Co.)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation Wilson Ave.
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 19:21:20 -0400
A note to all birding Wilson Ave at Garret this spring. There's been a
bunch of complaints  and police notified about the large groups walking and
birding Wilson Ave. Please keep your voices to a minimum especially in the
early hours. We have new residents and I guess they like to sleep.  Please
limit parking on Wilson ave. as well. Use the lots in the park if the spots
above are taken. Wilson Ave. is a road that continues through the gate,
it's a dirt road from there. The paved part of the road which turn is
actually a shared driveway for a few homes. Please stay off it. Do not park
at the gate, this can't be blocked.
People have complained about the birding on the hill of Wilson Ave. beyond
the gate. This is not park property. It belongs to the Water Commission and
they can take access away at any time. Please be respectful of these areas.
We don't want to lose access over a few loud voices.
And as it's always been, Garret has 2 R's and 1 T. It's NOT spelled Garrett

Thanks and good birding
Chris Takacs
Friends of Garret Mountain Reservation

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Greenwald Park - Camden county - migrants - and Green Heron!
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 19:00:44 -0400
A few warbler sp. around as I did my walk. North Jersey was the migrant hot 
spot 

today! Black-throated Green, Redstart, Black throated Blue.

And finally..... Green Heron - fos at three weeks late.... And I've been 
looking for 

that species!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Glenhurst Brewster's & Golden-winged Warblers-A hybrid tale
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 18:07:30 -0400
Robert I enjoyed reading your well-informed post.I have birded Glenhurst
for some time and have seen Blue-winged Warblers annually.At Glenhurst I
have seen a mushy Brewster's once(Spring) & a female Golden-winged (found
by Harvey Tomlinson once in the fall).This Golden-winged was assumed a
migrant in tow with a sizable flock of Warblers.I would therefore agree
with your assessment that the hybrids at Glenhurst may be the result of
"unpure' parents if  Glenhurst is in fact from whence they came.I do not
know the collective sightings records of
the Blue-winged/Golden-winged complex at this site.

I do agree with the Fish & Wildlife biologists quote, "Who are we to say,
from an evolutionary perspective, that Golden-winged & Blue-winged have not
found in hybridization the best possible mechanism for adapting to
environmental change?" The changes in their habitat are often a result of
succession at some sites.Problems can also exist on wintering grounds which
could render all we do to 'help' these individuals a mute point.Who knows
what kind of poisons are thrown around there. I would like to include some
casual observations from a former Blue-winged/Golden-winged shared site
from  Van Ness Rd. in Sussex County. This is the 2nd to the last right turn
before one reaches the Dingman's Ferry Bridge heading west:

A few years back Golden-winged and Blue-winged Warblers seemed to co-exist
here and bred successfully. I can only attest to seeing one Golden-winged
nest here each year.Hybrids began to pop up until the Golden-wingeds seemed
to disappear. The last few years I have heard of no reports of
Golden-winged here at all.I saw what Sibley calls a rare backcross hybrid
here 3 years ago(I was not impressed).Now one can say habitat has changed
naturally here and that may be the trigger that moves Golden-wingeds
along.But,there does not seem to be a burgeoning population of Brewster's
and Lawrence's replacing them(I am sure there is  plenty of eaches DNA in
the remaining population).The real point here is in my opinion since
hybridization began the population of all related individuals is down.So
the real test for the evolution of this phenomena in the two species is new
with regards to evolution. It may not be a successful response to the
pressures involved. I think one has to keep in mind whenever hybrids occur
the response could be positive or negative as to whether the resulting
group survives.What could occur is the loss of a species .I do not know if
our help should slow down or repair these processes only that the loss of
the Golden-winged Warbler will deserve a lament...

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: BirdsEye-Garrett Mountain Reservation (Park)--Barbour Pond-2015-5-15
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 16:13:33 -0400
Observer: bilbander
2015-05-15 05:30
Garrett Mountain Reservation (Park)--Barbour Pond
Protocol: Traveling
480 Minutes
Observers: 1
    X    Canada Goose
    3    Wood Duck
    X    Mallard
    X    Double-crested Cormorant
    4    Great Blue Heron
    3    Turkey Vulture
    3    Red-tailed Hawk
    2    Killdeer
    1    Solitary Sandpiper
    X    Mourning Dove
    1    Yellow-billed Cuckoo
    1    Common Nighthawk
    14    Chimney Swift
    2    Ruby-throated Hummingbird
    6    Red-bellied Woodpecker
    3    Downy Woodpecker
    2    Hairy Woodpecker
    3    Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)
    4    Eastern Wood-Pewee
    3    Least Flycatcher
    2    Eastern Phoebe
    6    Great Crested Flycatcher
    5    Eastern Kingbird
    1    Yellow-throated Vireo
    1    Blue-headed Vireo
    6    Warbling Vireo
    8    Red-eyed Vireo
    30    Blue Jay
    5    American Crow
    4    Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    2    Tree Swallow
    1    Barn Swallow
    3    White-breasted Nuthatch
    2    House Wren
    1    Carolina Wren
    2    Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    14    Veery
    2    Gray-cheeked Thrush
    22    Swainson's Thrush
    7    Wood Thrush
    X    American Robin
    14    Gray Catbird
    2    Brown Thrasher
    3    Northern Mockingbird
    X    European Starling
    5    Cedar Waxwing
    26    Ovenbird
    1    Worm-eating Warbler
    7    Black-and-white Warbler
    1    Tennessee Warbler
    2    Nashville Warbler
    29    Common Yellowthroat
    35    American Redstart
    26    Northern Parula
    18    Magnolia Warbler
    3    Bay-breasted Warbler
    4    Blackburnian Warbler
    6    Yellow Warbler
    16    Chestnut-sided Warbler
    27    Blackpoll Warbler
    8    Black-throated Blue Warbler
    2    Pine Warbler
    3    Yellow-rumped Warbler
    14    Black-throated Green Warbler
    3    Canada Warbler
    2    Eastern Towhee
    18    Chipping Sparrow
    2    Lincoln's Sparrow
    1    Swamp Sparrow
    1    White-throated Sparrow
    14    Scarlet Tanager
    6    Northern Cardinal
    26    Rose-breasted Grosbeak
    2    Indigo Bunting
    4    Red-winged Blackbird
    6    Common Grackle
    26    Brown-headed Cowbird
    2    Orchard Oriole
    14    Baltimore Oriole
    1    House Finch
    6    American Goldfinch
    38    House Sparrow

This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog (
http://birdseyebirding.com/)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: House finch with conjunctivitis
From: Jill Weislo <jillweislo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 12:17:47 -0400
Good morning all,

I finally bought a finch feeder and was so excited I had finches there within a 
few days. While I was photographing them I noticed a big red bump under the eye 
of one of them. After doing some research I believe it is conjunctivitis. I 
took down my feeders and washed them in a bleach solution but how long do I 
keep them down for ? If I put them back up right away won't they just become 
contaminated again when the bird lands on it? Any help is greatly appreciated! 


Best,
Jill
Union, NJ 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: GHM Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers - A Hybrid Tale (re-mail with photo link)
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 16:10:08 +0000
(Links to photo's below)

I do not think any bird I have seen has captivated me the way these birds have 
- and they are not even a pure-breed. 


Thinking about having both a Brewsters and a Lawrence at Glenhurst Meadows this 
year, I began to wonder why? Both are rare - eBird data has most observations 
of one or the other are one-off and unsupported. Both GHM birds are supported 
by multiple sightings. Additionally, over the past 10 years, only this year at 
GHM have both been observed. 


Without intending to cause nightmares of Mendel's Peas throwing you into a 
flashback tizzy, the Brewsters is one of the two hybrids created when a 
Golden-winged Warbler (GWWA) and Blue-winged Warbler (BWWA) Breed. The other 
hybrid is the Lawrence's Warbler. Both hybrids are stunningly beautiful with 
distinct and distinguished markings. Most birders are content to see the birds 
and leave it at that. 


But to this neophyte, the rest of the story is as interesting and fantastic as 
each of the individual four birds. BWWA and GWWA are the remaining two species 
in the genus Vermivora. The Bachman's Warbler, last sighted in the US 1988 and 
the third in the Genus, is most probably extinct (Bachman's was a Cuba migrant 
- one has to wonder if the opening of Cuba to US citizens might bring a renewed 
search for the species there*) 


There has been some debate over whether the BWWA and GWWA are one species. 
Mitochondrial DNA does not bear that out, but it seems to be an ongoing 
dispute. What is known is that the BWWA expanding its range, while the GWWA is 
not. 


The BWWA territory expansion is growing the species, but the GWWA is losing 
ground and is in steep decline. The population is down 66% since the 1960's 
with only 400,000 breeding individuals. Some attribute climate change and loss 
of habitat to the decline, but those are factors that impact all species. The 
real challenge to GWWA is their kissing cousins, the BWWA. Wherever the two 
species mix, they mate. The results are the hybrid Brewster's and Lawrence 
Warblers. In NJ, the GWWA was listed as an endangered species in 2012. 


Some have advocated managing habitat to favor the GWWA. Others favor letting 
the outcome play out as it may. As Tom Will, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
biologist in the migratory bird program says, 


Who are we to say, from an evolutionary perspective, that Golden-winged and 
Blue-winged warblers have not found in hybridization the best possible 
mechanism for adapting to environmental change? 


There is a great deal of value in that statement.

Both Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers are fertile hybrids. In fact, both can, 
and research indicates most will, back breed with either BWWA or GWWA. 


Brewster's are more common than Lawrence warblers due to the Lawrence being a 
result of two recessive genes. They are also easier to identify. In actuality, 
a true Lawrence is only the result of hybrid's breeding. Although the parents 
may look like pure BWWA or GWWA for a Lawrence to be the result of their 
pairing, they would need to have the hybrid genes. 


So a first generation Brewsters will always be the result of a pure BWWA / GWWA 
mating. It will exhibit a white body and no throat patch. When a Brewster's 
back breeds with either a BWWA or GWWA, the resulting brood may contain a 
Lawrence Warbler. However, it may also contain a Brewsters that, at a casual 
glance, looks like a Lawrence or a BWWA! 


As demonstrated in a Braddock Bay Bird Observatory article, the results of 
hybrids cross would be as follows: 



 * 9 offspring exhibiting both dominant traits (i.e. Brewsters Warblers, 
although they would come in 4 different genetic combinations: WWPP, WWPp, WwPP, 
and WwPp) 

  *
 * 3 offspring exhibiting the dominant throat patch trait (i.e. Blue-winged 
Warblers, in two different genetic combinations: wwPP and wwPp) 

  *
 * 3 offspring exhibiting the dominant body color trait (i.e. Golden-winged 
Warblers, in two different genetic combinations: WWpp and Wwpp) 

  *
 * 1 offspring exhibiting neither dominant trait (i.e. Lawrences Warbler: 
wwpp) 


When a first generation Brewsters Warbler back-crosses with a pure Blue-winged 
Warbler, 50% of the offspring will be Brewsters, 25% will be pure Blue-winged 
Warblers, and 25% will be impure (heterozygous) Blue-winged Warblers. Similar 
comments apply to a first-generation Brewsters crossing with a pure 
Golden-winged Warbler. Furthermore, impure Blue and Golden-winged can cross, 
as well as back-cross with their hybrids. 


The Glenhurst Meadows Hybrids. Recently we have seen both Brewter's and 
Lawrence Warblers at Glenhurst Meadows in Warren, NJ. eBird data from last year 
indicate a reasonable number of BWWA observed, and the area is conducive to 
breeding. However, it is very possible that the BWWA at GHM were not pure breed 
birds, but hybrids. In such a case, it is possible that their broods contained 
both Lawrence and Brewsters. I am not a scientist. This is my reasoning for 
both hybrids to appear at GHM this year. If such is the case, and the Brewsters 
backcrosses with a BWWA - then we should begin to see more hybrids each year. 


*There was a reported sighting of a female Bachman's in Cuba in 2002. My very 
preliminary research has not turned up any further sightings. 


Reference
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-winged_Warbler/id
http://www.esajournals.org/doi/full/10.1890/ES14-00320.1

https://braddockbaybirdobservatory.wordpress.com/2013/06/02/comparing-our-blue-winged-golden-winged-and-brewsters-warblers-warning-genetics-included/ 

http://aba.org/birding/v37n3p278.pdf
http://www.atlas-oiseaux.qc.ca/download/parkes_1951.pdf
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/Page.aspx?pid=2629#top
http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/species/fieldguide/view/Vermivora

http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/ensp/pdf/literature/gw-warbler_repro-success_spartamtn.pdf%20chrysoptera/ 


http://ebird.org/ebird/map/buwwar?neg=true&env.minX=-151.1872741938505&env.minY=-4.255560414471505&env.maxX=17.5627258061495&env.maxY=58.655758005938154&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=4&emo=9&yr=range&byr=2014&eyr=2014 


Photos:
All photos taken in NJ by me?

https://www.flickr.com/gp/124515830 AT N05/of5y49


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: GHM Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers - A Hybrid Tale
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 16:08:57 +0000
Here is the link to the photos: https://www.flickr.com/gp/124515830 AT N05/of5y49

Please accept my apology - I will also remail the original email

________________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Robert Gallucci 
 

Sent: Friday, May 15, 2015 12:00 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] GHM Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers - A Hybrid Tale

(Links to photo's below)

I do not think any bird I have seen has captivated me the way these birds have 
- and they are not even a pure-breed. 


Thinking about having both a Brewsters and a Lawrence at Glenhurst Meadows this 
year, I began to wonder why? Both are rare - eBird data has most observations 
of one or the other are one-off and unsupported. Both GHM birds are supported 
by multiple sightings. Additionally, over the past 10 years, only this year at 
GHM have both been observed. 


Without intending to cause nightmares of Mendel's Peas throwing you into a 
flashback tizzy, the Brewsters is one of the two hybrids created when a 
Golden-winged Warbler (GWWA) and Blue-winged Warbler (BWWA) Breed. The other 
hybrid is the Lawrence's Warbler. Both hybrids are stunningly beautiful with 
distinct and distinguished markings. Most birders are content to see the birds 
and leave it at that. 


But to this neophyte, the rest of the story is as interesting and fantastic as 
each of the individual four birds. BWWA and GWWA are the remaining two species 
in the genus Vermivora. The Bachman's Warbler, last sighted in the US 1988 and 
the third in the Genus, is most probably extinct (Bachman's was a Cuba migrant 
- one has to wonder if the opening of Cuba to US citizens might bring a renewed 
search for the species there*) 


There has been some debate over whether the BWWA and GWWA are one species. 
Mitochondrial DNA does not bear that out, but it seems to be an ongoing 
dispute. What is known is that the BWWA expanding its range, while the GWWA is 
not. 


The BWWA territory expansion is growing the species, but the GWWA is losing 
ground and is in steep decline. The population is down 66% since the 1960's 
with only 400,000 breeding individuals. Some attribute climate change and loss 
of habitat to the decline, but those are factors that impact all species. The 
real challenge to GWWA is their kissing cousins, the BWWA. Wherever the two 
species mix, they mate. The results are the hybrid Brewster's and Lawrence 
Warblers. In NJ, the GWWA was listed as an endangered species in 2012. 


Some have advocated managing habitat to favor the GWWA. Others favor letting 
the outcome play out as it may. As Tom Will, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
biologist in the migratory bird program says, 


Who are we to say, from an evolutionary perspective, that Golden-winged and 
Blue-winged warblers have not found in hybridization the best possible 
mechanism for adapting to environmental change? 


There is a great deal of value in that statement.

Both Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers are fertile hybrids. In fact, both can, 
and research indicates most will, back breed with either BWWA or GWWA. 


Brewster's are more common than Lawrence warblers due to the Lawrence being a 
result of two recessive genes. They are also easier to identify. In actuality, 
a true Lawrence is only the result of hybrid's breeding. Although the parents 
may look like pure BWWA or GWWA for a Lawrence to be the result of their 
pairing, they would need to have the hybrid genes. 


So a first generation Brewsters will always be the result of a pure BWWA / GWWA 
mating. It will exhibit a white body and no throat patch. When a Brewster's 
back breeds with either a BWWA or GWWA, the resulting brood may contain a 
Lawrence Warbler. However, it may also contain a Brewsters that, at a casual 
glance, looks like a Lawrence or a BWWA! 


As demonstrated in a Braddock Bay Bird Observatory article, the results of 
hybrids cross would be as follows: 



 * 9 offspring exhibiting both dominant traits (i.e. Brewsters Warblers, 
although they would come in 4 different genetic combinations: WWPP, WWPp, WwPP, 
and WwPp) 

  *
 * 3 offspring exhibiting the dominant throat patch trait (i.e. Blue-winged 
Warblers, in two different genetic combinations: wwPP and wwPp) 

  *
 * 3 offspring exhibiting the dominant body color trait (i.e. Golden-winged 
Warblers, in two different genetic combinations: WWpp and Wwpp) 

  *
 * 1 offspring exhibiting neither dominant trait (i.e. Lawrences Warbler: 
wwpp) 


When a first generation Brewsters Warbler back-crosses with a pure Blue-winged 
Warbler, 50% of the offspring will be Brewsters, 25% will be pure Blue-winged 
Warblers, and 25% will be impure (heterozygous) Blue-winged Warblers. Similar 
comments apply to a first-generation Brewsters crossing with a pure 
Golden-winged Warbler. Furthermore, impure Blue and Golden-winged can cross, 
as well as back-cross with their hybrids. 


The Glenhurst Meadows Hybrids. Recently we have seen both Brewter's and 
Lawrence Warblers at Glenhurst Meadows in Warren, NJ. eBird data from last year 
indicate a reasonable number of BWWA observed, and the area is conducive to 
breeding. However, it is very possible that the BWWA at GHM were not pure breed 
birds, but hybrids. In such a case, it is possible that their broods contained 
both Lawrence and Brewsters. I am not a scientist. This is my reasoning for 
both hybrids to appear at GHM this year. If such is the case, and the Brewsters 
backcrosses with a BWWA - then we should begin to see more hybrids each year. 


*There was a reported sighting of a female Bachman's in Cuba in 2002. My very 
preliminary research has not turned up any further sightings. 


Reference
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-winged_Warbler/id
http://www.esajournals.org/doi/full/10.1890/ES14-00320.1

https://braddockbaybirdobservatory.wordpress.com/2013/06/02/comparing-our-blue-winged-golden-winged-and-brewsters-warblers-warning-genetics-included/ 

http://aba.org/birding/v37n3p278.pdf
http://www.atlas-oiseaux.qc.ca/download/parkes_1951.pdf
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/Page.aspx?pid=2629#top
http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/species/fieldguide/view/Vermivora

http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/ensp/pdf/literature/gw-warbler_repro-success_spartamtn.pdf%20chrysoptera/ 


http://ebird.org/ebird/map/buwwar?neg=true&env.minX=-151.1872741938505&env.minY=-4.255560414471505&env.maxX=17.5627258061495&env.maxY=58.655758005938154&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=4&emo=9&yr=range&byr=2014&eyr=2014 


Photos:
All photos taken in NJ by me


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: GHM Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers - A Hybrid Tale
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 16:00:50 +0000
(Links to photo's below)

I do not think any bird I have seen has captivated me the way these birds have 
- and they are not even a pure-breed. 


Thinking about having both a Brewsters and a Lawrence at Glenhurst Meadows this 
year, I began to wonder why? Both are rare - eBird data has most observations 
of one or the other are one-off and unsupported. Both GHM birds are supported 
by multiple sightings. Additionally, over the past 10 years, only this year at 
GHM have both been observed. 


Without intending to cause nightmares of Mendel's Peas throwing you into a 
flashback tizzy, the Brewsters is one of the two hybrids created when a 
Golden-winged Warbler (GWWA) and Blue-winged Warbler (BWWA) Breed. The other 
hybrid is the Lawrence's Warbler. Both hybrids are stunningly beautiful with 
distinct and distinguished markings. Most birders are content to see the birds 
and leave it at that. 


But to this neophyte, the rest of the story is as interesting and fantastic as 
each of the individual four birds. BWWA and GWWA are the remaining two species 
in the genus Vermivora. The Bachman's Warbler, last sighted in the US 1988 and 
the third in the Genus, is most probably extinct (Bachman's was a Cuba migrant 
- one has to wonder if the opening of Cuba to US citizens might bring a renewed 
search for the species there*) 


There has been some debate over whether the BWWA and GWWA are one species. 
Mitochondrial DNA does not bear that out, but it seems to be an ongoing 
dispute. What is known is that the BWWA expanding its range, while the GWWA is 
not. 


The BWWA territory expansion is growing the species, but the GWWA is losing 
ground and is in steep decline. The population is down 66% since the 1960's 
with only 400,000 breeding individuals. Some attribute climate change and loss 
of habitat to the decline, but those are factors that impact all species. The 
real challenge to GWWA is their kissing cousins, the BWWA. Wherever the two 
species mix, they mate. The results are the hybrid Brewster's and Lawrence 
Warblers. In NJ, the GWWA was listed as an endangered species in 2012. 


Some have advocated managing habitat to favor the GWWA. Others favor letting 
the outcome play out as it may. As Tom Will, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
biologist in the migratory bird program says, 


Who are we to say, from an evolutionary perspective, that Golden-winged and 
Blue-winged warblers have not found in hybridization the best possible 
mechanism for adapting to environmental change? 


There is a great deal of value in that statement.

Both Brewster's and Lawrence Warblers are fertile hybrids. In fact, both can, 
and research indicates most will, back breed with either BWWA or GWWA. 


Brewster's are more common than Lawrence warblers due to the Lawrence being a 
result of two recessive genes. They are also easier to identify. In actuality, 
a true Lawrence is only the result of hybrid's breeding. Although the parents 
may look like pure BWWA or GWWA for a Lawrence to be the result of their 
pairing, they would need to have the hybrid genes. 


So a first generation Brewsters will always be the result of a pure BWWA / GWWA 
mating. It will exhibit a white body and no throat patch. When a Brewster's 
back breeds with either a BWWA or GWWA, the resulting brood may contain a 
Lawrence Warbler. However, it may also contain a Brewsters that, at a casual 
glance, looks like a Lawrence or a BWWA! 


As demonstrated in a Braddock Bay Bird Observatory article, the results of 
hybrids cross would be as follows: 



 * 9 offspring exhibiting both dominant traits (i.e. Brewsters Warblers, 
although they would come in 4 different genetic combinations: WWPP, WWPp, WwPP, 
and WwPp) 

  *
 * 3 offspring exhibiting the dominant throat patch trait (i.e. Blue-winged 
Warblers, in two different genetic combinations: wwPP and wwPp) 

  *
 * 3 offspring exhibiting the dominant body color trait (i.e. Golden-winged 
Warblers, in two different genetic combinations: WWpp and Wwpp) 

  *
 * 1 offspring exhibiting neither dominant trait (i.e. Lawrences Warbler: 
wwpp) 


When a first generation Brewsters Warbler back-crosses with a pure Blue-winged 
Warbler, 50% of the offspring will be Brewsters, 25% will be pure Blue-winged 
Warblers, and 25% will be impure (heterozygous) Blue-winged Warblers. Similar 
comments apply to a first-generation Brewsters crossing with a pure 
Golden-winged Warbler. Furthermore, impure Blue and Golden-winged can cross, 
as well as back-cross with their hybrids. 


The Glenhurst Meadows Hybrids. Recently we have seen both Brewter's and 
Lawrence Warblers at Glenhurst Meadows in Warren, NJ. eBird data from last year 
indicate a reasonable number of BWWA observed, and the area is conducive to 
breeding. However, it is very possible that the BWWA at GHM were not pure breed 
birds, but hybrids. In such a case, it is possible that their broods contained 
both Lawrence and Brewsters. I am not a scientist. This is my reasoning for 
both hybrids to appear at GHM this year. If such is the case, and the Brewsters 
backcrosses with a BWWA - then we should begin to see more hybrids each year. 


*There was a reported sighting of a female Bachman's in Cuba in 2002. My very 
preliminary research has not turned up any further sightings. 


Reference
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-winged_Warbler/id
http://www.esajournals.org/doi/full/10.1890/ES14-00320.1

https://braddockbaybirdobservatory.wordpress.com/2013/06/02/comparing-our-blue-winged-golden-winged-and-brewsters-warblers-warning-genetics-included/ 

http://aba.org/birding/v37n3p278.pdf
http://www.atlas-oiseaux.qc.ca/download/parkes_1951.pdf
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/Page.aspx?pid=2629#top
http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/species/fieldguide/view/Vermivora

http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/ensp/pdf/literature/gw-warbler_repro-success_spartamtn.pdf%20chrysoptera/ 


http://ebird.org/ebird/map/buwwar?neg=true&env.minX=-151.1872741938505&env.minY=-4.255560414471505&env.maxX=17.5627258061495&env.maxY=58.655758005938154&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=4&emo=9&yr=range&byr=2014&eyr=2014 


Photos:
All photos taken in NJ by me


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Gobbling turkey
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 11:12:56 -0400
For the past four or five days I'd hear a turkey gobble, starting at about
a half hour after dawn. He'd do it from the same approximate location for
20-30 minutes, then quit. I wouldn't hear him for the rest of the day.
Yesterday he apparently decided to get serious, gobbling away until late
afternoon. He was on the move, too, going back and forth in the woods.
Never got close enough for me to see him though.

I think the sound of a gobbling Wild Turkey is one of my favorite spring
nature sounds! With the windows open it makes for very cool background
"music".

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Just the opposite of Sandra Keller's experience this early morning
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 09:40:29 -0400
Had 15 species  of warbler doing point counts for a friend  in Losen  Slote
Creek Park in Bergen County in 90 minutes. Set off a few ebird filters for
high totals of some

Chris  Takacs
Lyndhurst
 On May 15, 2015 9:14 AM, "Sandra Keller"  wrote:

> The birds didn't stop in my neighborhood!
>
> Sandra Keller
>
> Sent from my iPad mini
>
> > On May 15, 2015, at 8:38 AM, CHELEMER, MARC J  wrote:
> >
> > Jerseybirders,
> >
> > Migration is a funny thing.  This morning, while out for an exercise
> walk with my wife from 6:15--7, I heard at least seven species of warblers,
> including the first Tennessee I've encountered all year, Scarlet Tanager,
> RE Vireo, Wood-Pewee, and  more, and all this in my lightly treed
> neighborhood.  So unlike Sandra Keller's post of 8:25, I was going to say
> just the opposite:  that last night must've been a big night, and that
> anyone who can get to a migrant trap--Chimney Rock, Glenhurst Meadows,
> Garret Mountain, Sandy Hook--should drive fast to finally encounter the
> waves of birds which must be there.
> >
> > I'll be keenly interested to read postings throughout the day.  As Yong
> Kong frequently muses, I must live vicariously today as I am not able to
> get into the field.
> >
> > Good birding everyone!
> >
> > Marc Chelemer
> > Tenafly
> >
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Just the opposite of Sandra Keller's experience this early morning
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 09:14:37 -0400
The birds didn't stop in my neighborhood! 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

> On May 15, 2015, at 8:38 AM, CHELEMER, MARC J  wrote:
> 
> Jerseybirders,
> 
> Migration is a funny thing. This morning, while out for an exercise walk with 
my wife from 6:15--7, I heard at least seven species of warblers, including the 
first Tennessee I've encountered all year, Scarlet Tanager, RE Vireo, 
Wood-Pewee, and more, and all this in my lightly treed neighborhood. So unlike 
Sandra Keller's post of 8:25, I was going to say just the opposite: that last 
night must've been a big night, and that anyone who can get to a migrant 
trap--Chimney Rock, Glenhurst Meadows, Garret Mountain, Sandy Hook--should 
drive fast to finally encounter the waves of birds which must be there. 

> 
> I'll be keenly interested to read postings throughout the day. As Yong Kong 
frequently muses, I must live vicariously today as I am not able to get into 
the field. 

> 
> Good birding everyone!
> 
> Marc Chelemer
> Tenafly 
> 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Just the opposite of Sandra Keller's experience this early morning
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 12:38:15 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Migration is a funny thing. This morning, while out for an exercise walk with 
my wife from 6:15--7, I heard at least seven species of warblers, including the 
first Tennessee I've encountered all year, Scarlet Tanager, RE Vireo, 
Wood-Pewee, and more, and all this in my lightly treed neighborhood. So unlike 
Sandra Keller's post of 8:25, I was going to say just the opposite: that last 
night must've been a big night, and that anyone who can get to a migrant 
trap--Chimney Rock, Glenhurst Meadows, Garret Mountain, Sandy Hook--should 
drive fast to finally encounter the waves of birds which must be there. 


I'll be keenly interested to read postings throughout the day. As Yong Kong 
frequently muses, I must live vicariously today as I am not able to get into 
the field. 


Good birding everyone!

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: bird migration - my house
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 08:24:50 -0400
Zilch. I have been listening and scanning off and on since 6:30.
More off alas. No migrants! Again, it's cloudy and cool. My yard is 
more productive with sunny edges. 

I checked the radar when I got up. Stuff coming off the bay hitting the 
bayshore. Good luck! Although sunny edges are probably good
down there also.

Wish I could get down to Fort Mott! 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: House finch with conjunctivitis
From: Jill Weislo <jillweislo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 07:25:21 -0400
Good morning all,

I finally bought a finch feeder and was so excited I had finches there
within a few days. While I was photographing them I noticed a big red bump
under the eye of one of them. After doing some research I believe it is
conjunctivitis. I took down my feeders and washed them in a bleach solution
but how long do I keep them down for ? If I put them back up right away
won't they just become contaminated again when the bird lands on it? Any
help is greatly appreciated!

Best,
Jill
Union, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Yard Birds
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 05:47:30 -0400
Yard birds yesterday were Yellow Warbler, Black and White Warbler, Mr and Mrs. 
Hummingbird, House Wrens ( nest building), Carolina Wrens, Nuthatch (WB), Brown 
Thrasher, Baltimore Oriole (female), at least 7 Catbirds, Downy and Hairy and 
Red-Bellied Woodpeckers, Robins, White-Crowned Sparrow, and the etc yard birds! 
Beautiful picture taking day! 

 
Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: bird radar
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 22:47:55 -0400
Is green over most of south Jersey. Those birds are moving on.
Hopefully we will get new ones in! I will be birding my yard. 
Haven't had too much this spring in my yard.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Backyard - afternoon surprise
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Fri, 15 May 2015 02:05:42 +0000
Had to work home today. So, I parked the laptop where I could watch the feeder, 
and had an open window to listen. Much like many places we've all visited, my 
backyard has been much quieter than last year. This morning was virtually 
silent and I all I got to see were the resident nuthatches, house finches, 
goldfinches and cardinals. Colorful to be sure, but (forgive me) boring. Then, 
at 2:45 PM (I checked), I suddenly realized that the wheezy, short phrased 
robin I heard wasn't a robin at all. I grabbed the bins and went outside and 
sure enough, there was a scarlet tanager singing away over my head. Another 
answered from nearby down the street. And then there was an American redstart 
and a red-eyed vireo up there, the catbird calling in the shrubs and two 
Baltimore orioles singing in the next yard's tree, and an ovenbird sang from 
back in the woods. The tanager and redstart were FOY and I love tanagers. 


By 3 PM they were gone and the yard was pretty quiet for the rest of the 
afternoon. 


2:45 in the afternoon?  Really?  Sweet!

Good birding.

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
Technical Practice Group Leader
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.




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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: RT Hummingbirds - Male vs Female Size Comparison - Photos
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 20:21:13 -0400
I'm always surprised by the size difference between male and female 
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. The females are so large, that I often struggle to 
fit the whole bird into the frame, after setting everything up for shots of 
males. In the photos linked below, you can see the difference in size in 
back-to-back shots taken at the same feeder without moving the camera (scroll 
down below main photo). 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/17468405340/

Steve Byland
Warren Township
sbbyland at aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: William Warren Park/Oros Preserve May 14
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 15:55:49 -0400
Jerseybirders,

I led a trip to these two parks in northern Middlesex County with help from
associate naturalist Hank Burk today. There were migrants about at both
locations, but not in overwhelming numbers (NW winds overnight).
Nevertheless, we had good looks at a very vociferous Worm-eating Warbler at
Warren Park. He was difficult to pick out, as the woods in the park
actually have sapling-sized trees and some understory, unlike so many other
places in NJ.

The pin oak woods at Oros Preserve always seem to "hold" at least a few
migrants that are singing and active through late morning. We had good
looks at Northern Waterthrush bobbing along the rocky stream bed, heard/saw
3 Canada Warblers, and got a quick but good look at a Lincoln's Sparrow.
The wooded edges of the pond are loaded with singing Warbling Vireos and
Orchard Orioles.

The last of my three May NJ Audubon field trips (fee-based) to these parks
is next week; details at the link.

http://community.njaudubon.org/ATB-Calendar?cid=15&ceid=3627&cerid=13456&cdt=5%2f21%2f2015 



Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
Editor, NJ Audubon eBird
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: "Brewster's" Warbler at Glenhurst
From: Kirsten Abildskov <kma1 AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 13:34:14 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Marc's post impelled Piper Weldy and I to go to Glenhurst Meadows 2 days in
a row, and
yesterday a detour on the way back from N Jersey was so rewarding.

It was overcast when we arrived around 6:30 and made our first
unsuccessful pass near where Marc initially sighted the bird. We strolled
some more and saw 2 blue grosbeaks. We made one last pass on the North
Trail west (where it intersects with the East/South trail near the berm)
around 7:15 before going home when we heard the distinctive buzzing
vocalization of a blue wing warbler.

We circled around (dodging some ATV enthusiasts) and watched the warbler
work the triangle on the intersection of the two trails for about 15
minutes. It ricocheted between the honeysuckle bushes in an approximately
60 foot area, alternating with an occasional perch in a tree. It provided
several opportunities to see a white breast, dark back, and yellow wing
bars.
When it came close to the East trail, keeping company with a magnolia and a
common yellow throated warbler, the flash of yellow cap and black line
through eye was visible. The Brewster's behavior would lend credence to
him trying to set up territory there.

Uncannily, it showed off a final silhouette just as the clouds dispersed
for a bright sunset and Jeff Ellerbush arrived to appreciate him too.

An extraordinary treat was when we mentioned to Jeff that we were
interested in seeing a night hawk, he "produced one" flying overhead while
we were in the parking lot just before dark! What a unique flight display
that bird has.

Heartfelt thanks to all you observant, generous, and instructive birders!

Kirsten Abildskov
North Brunswick



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: red-headed woodpecker
From: Margaret <m.bossett AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 14 May 2015 07:57:10 -0400
I love my daily updates on jersey birds. I am an intermediate birder at
best.  

However, I do suspect that this sighting is unusual especially considering
as I live near the beach with houses and a main road bordering our little
property.

I grew up in Kinnelon which was heavily wooded back then and have never seen
a red-headed until yesterday. 

My husband was lucky to get one quick shot of the bird right outside our
window before it flew, as I was absolutely going berserk in the background.
It is posted below.  Thank you all for your postings and knowledge.

 

Maggie Bossett

Sea Girt

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/icesailr/17448233490/in/dateposted-public/


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hummingbirds, Feeders and Photos
From: Steve Byland <stevebylandnaturephotography AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 13 May 2015 21:13:01 -0400
The Hummingbirds are hitting my feeders regularly now. People often ask how 
often to change the food in hummingbird feeders. You almost can't change it too 
often. Mine was just three days old and there was minimal activity at the 
feeder - maybe one visit per hour. I cleaned the feeder and put in new food. 
For the rest of the day, the birds came every five to ten minutes! I've seen 
this before - THEY PREFER FRESH FOOD! 


Photo at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_byland/17428964329/

Steve Byland
Warren, NJ
sbbyland at aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: