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Updated on Wednesday, October 1 at 12:56 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-cheeked Cotinga,©BirdQuest

1 Oct Tomorrow Night: DVOC hosts Tony Croasdale with "Punk Birding" [Steve Kacir ]
30 Sep gone birdin' [Laura Berlik ]
30 Sep Great "Greenish" Heron :-) (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
30 Sep Urgent! Red Tail Hawk with injured eye [colleen snow ]
30 Sep Correction: Eared Grebe, not Horned Grebe [Greg Prelich ]
30 Sep Re: ebird thoughts [Dan Ceravolo ]
30 Sep Horned Grebes Barnegat Bay [Greg Prelich ]
30 Sep ebird thoughts [Sandra Keller ]
30 Sep Re: Screech owl [Judith Graber ]
30 Sep If birds could talk..... [Fred Vir ]
30 Sep Screech owl ["Albert, Steven" ]
29 Sep Re: allegation?: people are racist [mike hiotis ]
29 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (28 Sep 2014) 20 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
29 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (27 Sep 2014) 32 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
29 Sep Re: allegation: birding is racist [dave magpiong ]
29 Sep National Park Service - PEPC - Relocate Maintenance Facilities to More Sustainable Locations - Sandy Hook [Stuart and Wendy ]
29 Sep On ebird - thanks! [SandraKeller ]
29 Sep Re: grim news for sandy hook [Trina Anderson ]
29 Sep Re: grim news for sandy hook [Trina Anderson ]
29 Sep ebird question [SandraKeller ]
29 Sep LB Dows - the dredge - Gloucester [SandraKeller ]
29 Sep American Golden Plover near Assunpink [Bob Horton ]
29 Sep Re: grim news for sandy hook [Tom Brown ]
29 Sep Re: Grim news for Sandy Hook [Tom Brown ]
29 Sep Sparrows galore at Great Piece Meadows ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
29 Sep Grim news for Sandy Hook [Tom Brown ]
28 Sep Re: allegation: birding is racist [Peter Eschmann ]
28 Sep Western Kingbird today? [Bert Harris ]
28 Sep birding with Marc at Cape May; Zone-tailed hawk ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
28 Sep Allegation: birding is racist / response to Theodore Chase ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
27 Sep Re: allegation: birding is racist [Theodore Chase ]
27 Sep Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 9/26/14 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
27 Sep Negri-Nepote This Morning [Vince Capp ]
27 Sep Zone-tailed Hawk, Cape May County [Sam Galick ]
27 Sep Zone-tailed Hawk, Cape May [Bert Harris ]
27 Sep Wheelabrator - migrants - slow [SandraKeller ]
26 Sep Birdbase to ebird notes [Sandra Keller ]
26 Sep Cold Brook Reserve Today [Vince Capp ]
26 Sep Re: allegation: birding is racist [Diane C Louie ]
26 Sep Turkeys at the door ["B.G. Sloan" ]
25 Sep Thousands of horseshoe crabs to be released into Delaware Bay | NJ.com [Stuart and Wendy ]
25 Sep allegation: birding is racist ["Danusha V. Goska" ]
24 Sep Fwd: Sandy Hook [Fairfax Hutter ]
24 Sep Re: Sandy Hook [Laura Berlik ]
24 Sep Sandy Hook today: quiet and not birdy ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
24 Sep Negri Nepote sparrows ["Albert, Steven" ]
23 Sep Re: East Point - migration [Susan Treesh ]
23 Sep Grosbeak [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
23 Sep Glenhurst Meadows This Morning [Vince Capp ]
23 Sep East Point - migration [SandraKeller ]
23 Sep Golden-winged warbler - Cattus Island, Toms River [Alyssa Della Fave ]
22 Sep bears && bird feeders clarification [Cathy Blumig ]
22 Sep 5 Marbled Godwits at Island Beach 9-22-14 [Shawn Wainwright ]
23 Sep incredible Com. Raven numbers from Sept. 20 [Tom Bailey ]
22 Sep Big Gull vs Small Crow (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 Sep Sayreville/South Amboy/Morgan mudflats advisory ["bmknj16 ." ]
22 Sep Winter Finch Forecast 2014-2015 ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 Sep Cumberland migration [SandraKeller ]
22 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (21 Sep 2014) 235 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
22 Sep RAVENS [Glen Hart ]
22 Sep Bears & bird feeders [Cathy Blumig ]
22 Sep Sandy Hook yesterday (guided walk recap) ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
21 Sep Whiskered Tern NOT SEEN -- 21 Sep [Tom Reed ]
21 Sep Godwits, Island Beach SP [Larry-Zirlin ]
21 Sep Island Beach State Park Godwits and Pelicans [Joseph Palumbo ]
20 Sep Whiskered Tern recap -- 20 Sep [Tom Reed ]
20 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (20 Sep 2014) 150 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
20 Sep Whiskered Tern [SandraKeller ]
20 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co. [Catherine Busch ]
20 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co. [Peter Eschmann ]
20 Sep Re: Whiskered Tern [Rick Wright ]
20 Sep Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co. [Tom Reed ]
19 Sep Whiskered Tern [Peggy Cadigan ]
19 Sep Whiskered Tern recap -- 19 Sep [Tom Reed ]
19 Sep HSR: Raccoon Ridge (19 Sep 2014) 1143 Raptors ["Hawkcount.Org Reports" ]
19 Sep Marbled Godwit, Island Beach SP [Larry-Zirlin ]

Subject: Tomorrow Night: DVOC hosts Tony Croasdale with "Punk Birding"
From: Steve Kacir <setkacir AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 13:29:43 -0400
Hello Birders, 

The Delaware Valley Ornithological Club (DVOC) meets this Thursday Oct 2 at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The meeting features the program 
"Punk Birding" by Tony Croasdale, former lead singer of the punk band 
R.A.M.B.O., and the founder of the Ridin' Birdy and Bristleheads World Series 
of Birding Teams. 


All who have an interest are invited to attend; the program is free with no 
admission charged. Club meetings will begin at 7:30PM and are held at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 
19103. A pre-meeting dinner takes place at Asia on the Parkway, not far from 
the Academy. More details and directions to the Academy and Asia on the Parkway 
can be found on the DVOC website: http://www.dvoc.org/Main.htm 


Punk Birding: 

In this talk Tony Croasdale will share photos and videos from his 
unconventional approach to birding. He will show how a working class kid from 
Philadelphia came to visit 46 countries and observe over 2,000 species of bird 
by his mid thirties. From touring Southeast Asia in his anarchist punk rock 
band, performing field research in polar bear infested tundra, to peddling a 
bicycle for 24 hours and over 100 miles during the World Series of Birding, 
Tony will show you how to apply the 'do it yourself' ethic of punk to achieving 
your birding dreams. 

Tony Croasdale was born and raised in Philadelphia and began birding at 9. His 
passion for protecting wildlife brought led to discover politically charged 
music. As a singer in a punk rock band Tony toured the sates, Canada, Europe, 
Asia, and Australia birding wherever he went. He started working a field 
technician and performed field biology in Arctic Canada, Peru, Alaska, and 
locally. Tony returned to college in his 30s and did a semester abroad in 
Brazil. This led to organizing tours and leading a birding tour in Brazil. Tony 
received a degree in horticulture from Temple university. Tony is currently in 
a Biology MS program at St Joseph's University though a fellowship at the 
Wagner Free Institute teaching supplemental science in Philadelphia public 
schools. Tony currently works for the Philadelphia Water Department directing 
environmental education programs at Cobbs Creek Environmental Center. Tony has 
captained a World Series of Birding team 5 times using alternatively fueled 
vehicles and bicycle. His team won the Carbon Footprint Cup in 2010. 




We hope to see you there, 

Steve Kacir
DVOC Vice President
setkacirgmail.com
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: gone birdin'
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 20:45:26 -0400
Today my sister in law and I spent three hours at Plainsboro Preserve. There 
wasn't a lot of action. It started off so cloudy--several pileated woodpeckers, 
4 red-bellieds, the common crowd such as nuthatches, lots of geese going from 
pond to meadow and back again, that, coming from CA, only she could appreciate. 
Bird of the day was a juvenile red tailed hawk that buzzed us, then settled 
down for poses, flaunting a wide white "skirt." We came upon a group of some 
10-15 warblers but we couldn't agree on species. They were just so active! I 
think I saw pine warblers. She thinks she saw Magnolia warblers. Neither of us 
is sure. And it may even have been a mixed bag. Anyway it was the first time 
I've ever birded with another person and we had tons of fun. 

Laura Berlik
Princeton

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Great "Greenish" Heron :-) (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:51:36 -0400
Took this photo on Friday of a Great Blue Heron with a greenish tint. The
morning sun was reflecting off of a patch of green grass:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15199325500/

Speaking of green things with wings, I really like this photo of a Praying
Mantis staring at me from close range:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15313304916/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Urgent! Red Tail Hawk with injured eye
From: colleen snow <c.snow357 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 17:44:54 -0400
Hi All

There is a red-tailed hawk in Metuchen with an injured eye.  It is sitting
on a fence in residential neighborhood near the Dismal Swamp with a lot of
commotion going on all around it.  Of course it is too late to contact the
Raptor Trust today but I wondered if anyone else on the list might know
someone in this area who could take charge of the bird for the night?

Please call me on my cell if you may be able to help, 732-718-2245.

Thank You1

Colleen Snow
c.snow357 AT gmail.com
Middlesex, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Correction: Eared Grebe, not Horned Grebe
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:28:21 -0400
I'm sorry about the confusion, but I am told that the bird that I photographed 
today on Barnegat Bay is an Eared Grebe, not a Horned Grebe. To clarify 
further, we saw small grebes at two times this morning, on opposite sides of 
Barnegat Bay. The first one was seen on the western shore of the bay near 
Cattus Island, which I tentatively identified as a Horned Grebe based on its 
size and bill and whitish cheek patch. No photos were obtained of that bird, 
with only a brief binocular view from maybe 50 yards away before it flew 
further west. A second grebe was seen maybe 30 minutes later three miles 
distant on the opposite (eastern) shore of Barnegat Bay. Thanks to the photos I 
now realize that this second bird is an Eared Grebe. We admittedly didn't see 
both birds simultaneously, so its unclear if it was a single bird that moved or 
two separate birds. Thanks for the gentle correction, Sam. Mea culpa. 


Greg Prelich
http://birdquiz.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: ebird thoughts
From: Dan Ceravolo <dceravolo AT NETTELPARTNERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 12:17:14 -0400
I wish they made hotspots roll-up to each other.  Meaning you put in a list
for Edwin B. Forsythe NWR--East Pool, the sightings show in Edwin B.
Forsythe NWR, or list in at Cape Island -- CMPSP-- Hawkwatch and it rolls
to Cape Island --CMPSP or even Cape Island - CMP.  It would be great if
they allowed you to set the list as Cape May Point, and then have dropdowns
or check boxes to allow you to put them into specific locations (ie
meadows, sunset beach, higbee beach).  This would help in trying to locate
birds at hotspots, but not having to check each "sub-hotspot".

I was also thinking that ebird should allow you to do a check box for
"heard only" enabling you (or them) to sort by which species were heard
only and which were actually seen.

Finally the most important piece missing from ebird, is social interaction,
if you see something, I could message you or congratulate you, etc. Giving
the ability to share lists for viewing, but not as species that you've seen
yourself.  A change like this may negate the need for listservs like this,
but would make each local birding community, just that much stronger.

On Tue, Sep 30, 2014 at 11:02 AM, Sandra Keller 
wrote:

> That location button worked quite well. Had all the Red Bank
> lists together. Took me all of 20 minutes to figure out what was
> the river overlooks and what was the dredge and change the
> appropriate ones to the dredge.
>
> Red Bank covers that whole area. So I was just putting everything
> in under that. But now since the dredge has a hot spot too....!
>
> I usually like to put my sightings exact. Probably one of the few spots
> where I still "lump" is Forsythe NWR. There is no way I am going to
> go back and redo old data on that, but maybe start with a new trip there.
> South pool. East Pool. Etc. Thoughts?
>
> I am having enough trouble - not trouble but loads of time - just
> splitting apart
> a day in Birdbase from three or four locations. Say Barneget, Bridge to
> Nowhere,
> and a pond. All in one day. I keep extensive notes - just have to move
> from the
> comments section to the location column.
>
> Good birding all.
>
> --
> Sandra Keller
> Barrington, NJ
> sandrakeller AT verizon.net
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Horned Grebes Barnegat Bay
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:28:07 -0400
In another sign of the changing of the seasons, two first-of-season Horned 
Grebes were seen by our group on a birding-by-boat tour of Barnegat Bay this 
morning 
(https://www.flickr.com/photos/14037210 AT N06/15215020567/in/set-72157644064521655). 
In contrast, we had no Ospreys, no terns, and no swallows. 


Greg Prelich
http://birdquiz.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ebird thoughts
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:02:36 -0400
That location button worked quite well. Had all the Red Bank
lists together. Took me all of 20 minutes to figure out what was
the river overlooks and what was the dredge and change the
appropriate ones to the dredge.

Red Bank covers that whole area. So I was just putting everything
in under that. But now since the dredge has a hot spot too....!

I usually like to put my sightings exact. Probably one of the few spots
where I still "lump" is Forsythe NWR. There is no way I am going to
go back and redo old data on that, but maybe start with a new trip there.
South pool. East Pool. Etc. Thoughts?

I am having enough trouble - not trouble but loads of time - just 
splitting apart
a day in Birdbase from three or four locations. Say Barneget, Bridge to 
Nowhere,
and a pond. All in one day. I keep extensive notes - just have to move 
from the
comments section to the location column.

Good birding all.

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Screech owl
From: Judith Graber <judith.graber AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:16:47 -0400
I have also been hearing screech owls near (not at) my home in Hopewell
boro - most recency last nigh at about 10:00 - we've only been here 21/2
years and like you, have been hearing GHOs pretty regularly, but the
screech owls are new and very cool.

Judith
Hopewell NJ



On Tue, Sep 30, 2014 at 8:16 AM, Albert, Steven 
wrote:

> Insomnia suddenly had a benefit.  I got to hear a screech owl a short
> while back, for the very first time, at about 3 am.  And not in my yard,
> for those who might want to look up my address.  But I heard it clearly but
> very softly, somewhere "out there" in the darkness.
>
> I hear GHOs all the time, and I love the call.  But this was special.
>
> Steven
> Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
> Senior Program Manager
> EHS Management Consulting
> D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
> Internal: 100 3601
> Steven.Albert AT aecom.com
>
> AECOM
> 30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
> Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
> T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Judith Graber
207-441-3862

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: If birds could talk.....
From: Fred Vir <avtrader AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 00:02:57 -0400
In a way this listserve's constituency is birds.  They can only sing 
notes; not complaints or advice to birders.  Each year there are less 
birds and more birders; perhaps increasing the number of birders is some 
well meaning but simplistic chant we hear as a false panacea to 
avian-centric problems.

Neither the birds nor Richard Pough (great organizer and land 
conservationist) would likely put combating bird population loss in the 
US by addressing racial divides as high on any conservation action list 
or effective marketing strategy.  Certain organizers past and present, 
urged observant, outdoor-centric people to act pragmatically.  With 
substantial success, measured in millions of US acres and birds saved, 
they urged us to put our time, money and organizational efforts into 
preserving, purchasing and restoring land.

There are major problems facing wildlife; bird populations are 
dropping.  We all make decisions with our limited spare time-----its 
best to examine what likely matters for US birds and birding over the 
next 50 years rather than be pulled around by this or that alleged 
effective bird conservation effort.  Many of us are easily fooled by 
brain-wiring into thinking we are helping birds by, for example, 
birding.  Birding in itself does not help birds.  With the internets' 
bird alerts, blogs, newsletters and the superfluous number of mostly 
duplicate field guides the importance of ID skills are being given a 
much higher than deserved place in relationship to the future 
conservation of birds.  Connected is the groups that say we need to do 
get this group of society IDing birds or this race IDing birds or this 
age group IDing birds.  As in most cases specialization may lead to 
extinction.....but in this case it would be the birds.

This attempt at parsing the potential "community" with profile marketing 
may be happening with good intent; but there is a tinge of swelling the 
membership ranks, collecting dues, getting some publicity or expanding 
the pool of field guide purchasers. Regardless the message of preserving 
land and concomitantly birds is muddled, weakened or morphed into 
tangential messages. Initiatives that mention race, teaching or youth, 
and the possible synergism with birds, are somehow sacrosanct as you 
think------ "it just has to be great news for birds".  Then let it all 
get interpreted by the proliferate, amateur media of the net and you get 
this stream of articles with weak messages like this this race of 
birders forgot peoples names of this race.  How terrible! not. Unbiased 
people mix up peoples names. But prejudices do exist, however you knew 
that its NOT news; biases exist in all groups and most people: birders, 
basketball fans, circus clowns, teachers, boat owners, etc . Then the 
press converts the alleged prejudices and news with fluffy endings on 
how this bird group is going to solve the problem that was 
over-prioritized to begin with.

Time is moving; acres are being changed exponentially not linearly; 
these politically correct attempts at long term social-engineering takes 
generations and are prone to great inefficiencies, attrition and 
complexities. The average citizen only has so many hours of leisure---if 
everyone is led to believe that IDing this bird or that bird in 
milliseconds is the conservation goal we have a problem.  Likewise the 
importance of having the right number of 10 to 18 year olds vs over 50 
year olds, or the number of Australian-Americans vs Bosnian-Americans vs 
Kenyan-Americans on a field trip, is all not a direct conservation 
goal.  Labeling people in a discipline that is open to all with eyes and 
bins is counterproductive on many levels and its unnecessary.  Birds are 
stars as we know, showcasing them should be enough to swell the ranks 
with proper marketing.  Our spare hours are a limited and critical 
resource; its questionable to funnel them only into action or efforts 
that produces nothing of real substance to birds or the areas they must 
have to breed, migrate through and winter on.

The demographics and interests of todays' youth in America is filled 
with pitfalls for organizational mission statements that need decades to 
maybe, maybe, make an incremental difference to the actual number of 
birds.  Connected to this is the topic of "Are Birds the Right Taxon or 
Entity to Lead US Conservation in the 21st Century?"; related, "are 
birders the group to lead conservation in the 21st century?".

The process of direct land preservation has been and will be the 
simplest and most successful way to preserve birds and birding and 
perhaps indirectly our own progenies well-being.

Thanks,

Fred Virrazzi
Secaucus

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Screech owl
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 12:16:57 +0000
Insomnia suddenly had a benefit. I got to hear a screech owl a short while 
back, for the very first time, at about 3 am. And not in my yard, for those who 
might want to look up my address. But I heard it clearly but very softly, 
somewhere "out there" in the darkness. 


I hear GHOs all the time, and I love the call.  But this was special.

Steven
Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: allegation?: people are racist
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 23:55:28 -0400
Let us not drag our feathered friends into the fray to cure the world's
problems.My subject line says it all. I have taken a former poster on this
websites' advice and will stay out of this ......
this. A liguor belt has been strapped in place and has functioned
properly(allegedly).Good luck. Please send all answers to the other 5
billion or so folks who may want to be involved.....respectfully under the
influence,mh ....by the way my drink of choice this evening was? Johnny
Walker (Black label and Red Label).Can't dump it on me! Lighten up!

M.Hiotis
Martinsville NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (28 Sep 2014) 20 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 22:09:34 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 28, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       2             59             80
Bald Eagle                   0             38             51
Northern Harrier             2             13             15
Sharp-shinned Hawk           9            216            229
Cooper's Hawk                1              6             11
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              4              5
Broad-winged Hawk            1           3751           3812
Red-tailed Hawk              0             16             16
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             3             65             73
Merlin                       0              3              7
Peregrine Falcon             2             10             10
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              8              8

Total:                      20           4189           4317
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 10:00:00 
Observation end   time: 17:30:00 
Total observation time: 7.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Jim Thomson

Visitors:
Victor Motts (great seeing you, Victor).

Special late day visit by Denise Thomson, and Chris & Charlene
Asbjorn--thanks for coming up! 

Hikers - 15. 


Weather:
mostly clear, wind W/SW 1-5, temp 73-83 deg F.

Raptor Observations:
BE - ad & im seen, not counted.
RT - several seen, not counted.

JT's Bird of the Day was the big im. female Cooper's Hawk that passed on
the river side & gave a beautiful long look. 

Two late Peregrines added some spice to an otherwise lackluster, hot, &
buggy day for J. Thomson--many thanks to you for enduring the conditions &
conducting a solo watch.  

Non-raptor Observations:
Chimney Swifts - 4. 
Ravens - 4.
TVs & BVs.
Blue Jays, WB Nut, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Flicker.
Monarch - 1.
Buck Moths - many.
Canada Geese - a few flocks moving. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (27 Sep 2014) 32 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 22:09:17 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 27, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       2             57             78
Bald Eagle                   0             38             51
Northern Harrier             2             11             13
Sharp-shinned Hawk          15            207            220
Cooper's Hawk                0              5             10
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          1              4              5
Broad-winged Hawk            6           3750           3811
Red-tailed Hawk              0             16             16
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             3             62             70
Merlin                       0              3              7
Peregrine Falcon             1              8              8
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               2              8              8

Total:                      32           4169           4297
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:15:00 
Observation end   time: 18:30:00 
Total observation time: 10.25 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        David Dunbar, Jim Thomson, Rachel Rojcewicz, Scott Wood

Visitors:
Additional observers: Stephen Bagen, Maura Griffin, Larry Bailey.

Harold Deal & friends on their annual "Triple Header"--good to see you!

Fairfax Hutter, Jeff, & Fenner.

Hikers - 84. 

Special thanks to JT for his coverage through the morning. 


Weather:
fog in river valley early, clear skies w/ 0% cloud cover, wind N/NW 0-10,
temp 55-81 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
PG - adult  AT  2:25 soaring high with today's Red-shoulder.

Hikers far outnumbered the birds today.  Bird of the Day was the early imm.
Northern Harrier that gave observers an eyeful. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Raven.
TVs & BVs.

Red-eyed & Blue-headed Vireos.
Myrtle, Blk-thr Green, Blk-thr Blue, Magnolia, &
Blackpoll Warblers.

N. Flicker.
Wh-breasted Nuthatch.
RC Kinglet.
White-throated Sparrow - first of season.
American Goldfinches.
E. Phoebe.
Red-bellied Woodpecker.
Chimney Swifts - 2.
Cedar Waxwings - 76.
Blue Jays- flocks moving early. 

Tiger Swallowtail.
Monarchs - 3. 
Buck Moths.
Stinkbugs. 

Hognose Snake - one seen & photographed by F. Hutter along trail on hike to
Coon...nice find!
Timber Rattlesnake - one seen & photographed by father & son on their hike
to Coon...another nice find! 

========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: Re: allegation: birding is racist
From: dave magpiong <dave AT FLEDGINGBIRDERS.ORG>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 16:26:11 -0700
I've been seeing some of the discussion about the National
Geographic article on here. 

Perhaps some points could use clarification. (sorry for the length - not a
simple subject!)

First of all, the facts are the facts. If one objectively compares the birding
community to the rest of the US population, the demographics are significantly
disproportionate.  This is not an
appropriate forum to explore why because the truth is that there are a
multitude of reasons  which vary from
person to person. If you would like to discuss further, please feel free to 
contact me directly. 



The question I've often been asked is "why does it
matter?"

For years, my first answer was simply "birding is a lot
of fun and provides tremendous benefits for those that do it. Shouldn't we let 
everyone know about it and 

give them the chance to experience the wonderful things we, as birders, do
everyday?"  From there, people may
or may not become a "birder" or nature enthusiast but at least
they've been introduced to the possibility. Way too many people have no idea 
about amazing bird life that is around them all the time. I was one of them 
until around the age of 28 - and boy was I ticked off to realized what I'd been 
missing out on. 



Yet, I've come to understand the "bigger picture"
and realize just how detrimental the demographics of birding are for
conservation.  We have 100s of millions
of people (of all backgrounds) that are either not aware or not engaged in bird
conservation AT ANY LEVEL.  


Can we agree
that this is problematic?

Birds are beautiful, diverse, and omnipresent. Their power
of flight captivates our imagination. As we open people's eyes, minds, and
hearts to the wonderful world of birds, it does not take long before they
notice other aspects of nature - insects, herps, botany. This crescendo of 
nature 

appreciation is a virtual prerequisite for one's developing conservation ethic.

These are, from my limited perspective, just two of the many
reasons why it is important- no, make that critical - to engage new people of
all backgrounds in birding. 

On a more personal note, it seems that we should be careful
when minimizing the concerns, feelings, and experiences of others. It is that
sort of dismissive attitude that makes people feel unwelcomed - as the article
suggests. 

Case in point, Ms. Goska's interpretation of the National Geographic article 
was 

that it was an "accusation" that "birding is racist." Yet, Mr. Chase points out 
that the Nat Geo article 

does not say "birding is racist".  These differing opinions are the result of
two people with different life experiences and personal feelings - which is
understandable. 

Though Ms. Goska dismissed the feelings and
experiences of Dr. Lanham and Mrs. Guris as represented in the article, she 
quickly 

accused Mr. Chase of calling her a liar because he stated an observable fact
about the article.  Ms. Goska's conclusion is an inference (based
on her own experiences) from the exact same text from which Mr. Chase did not 
reach 

the same conclusion (based on his experiences). If we follow Ms. Goska's lead, 
we should summarily dismiss her feelings of being called a liar since it has 
not happened to any of us. However, that would not be fair/respectful to her - 
just as her dismissal of others' personal experience likely was to those in who 
opened their hearts in the article. 



With all this being said, I am friends with a great many
birders - none of whom I would consider racist in any way. A large number of 
these people are wonderful and welcoming to new birders (and on this list!). 


Unfortunately, I have also had communications (in person, phone, and online) 
with 

other birders who range from subtly racist to borderline white supremacist - 
and everywhere in between. Some of them have made incredibly disparaging 
comments about all types of other birders (race, religion, gender/sexual 
orientation, etc.) Of course, when one of "those lesser people" is on a "good 
bird" - the rude birders seem to forget about their biases - at least until 
they get on the good bird too. 


The fact remains that 100's of millions of Americans are A) missing out on the
joy and benefits of birding and B) not engaged with bird conservation. Is there 
an argument against changing that? 


Dave Magpi0ng

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: National Park Service - PEPC - Relocate Maintenance Facilities to More Sustainable Locations - Sandy Hook
From: Stuart and Wendy <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 19:23:22 -0400
Jerseybirders


To follow up on what Tom Brown sent out earlier today, below is a link to 
information about the meeting taking place next Wednesday evening at Sandy 
Hook. Written comments have to be submitted by Octber 22. So not too much time 
to get more info and submit your comments. 


http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=49465


Thank you,

Wendy Malmid
Monroe twp, NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: On ebird - thanks!
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 15:58:04 -0400
Thanks for all the responses! The data is there, just how to manipulate it.

Go into my observations, hit locations - that sorts everything by location,
then find Red Bank. And go through all my Red Bank lists to see what I need
to relocate to the National Park dredge spoils. No I didn't think of that.....

What I was thinking was somehow hit red bank in my locations and have it
list all my individual trips there. Or even do it from the map as I forget what 
I 

labelled some earlier private locations! Something for those ebird programmers 
to work on..... as they deal with everything else!

Once we all learn this and get our data in, it will be incredible what can be 
done 

with that data!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: grim news for sandy hook
From: Trina Anderson <laporello AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:20:10 -0400
I see my link is bad, so follow Tom's description. Along the way to the
comment page, you can also see links to maps of the affected area.

Trina Anderson

On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 11:31 AM, Tom Brown  wrote:

> If you click on the link in the article it takes you to the announcment
> from park service, towards the end of the announcement from park service is
> a hyperlink http://parkplanning.nps.gov/gate , it will take you to another
> page with a list of projects, scrollthrough the list to find the notice for
> sandy hook, click on that and it takes you to another page where the
> comment section is on the left side of page.
>
> http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=49465
>
> this above link should take you directly to the page (I tried this earlier
> from my laptop and it didn't work)
>
> cheers,
>
> tom brown
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: grim news for sandy hook
From: Trina Anderson <laporello AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:14:04 -0400
They don't make it easy to find the actual comment page, but hopefully this
link will save a few clicks.

http://parkplanning.nps.gov/commentForm.cfm?documentID=61398

Trina Anderson
Middletown

On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 11:31 AM, Tom Brown  wrote:

> If you click on the link in the article it takes you to the announcment
> from park service, towards the end of the announcement from park service is
> a hyperlink http://parkplanning.nps.gov/gate , it will take you to another
> page with a list of projects, scrollthrough the list to find the notice for
> sandy hook, click on that and it takes you to another page where the
> comment section is on the left side of page.
>
> http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=49465
>
> this above link should take you directly to the page (I tried this earlier
> from my laptop and it didn't work)
>
> cheers,
>
> tom brown
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ebird question
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:58:47 -0400
Hello,
   Am enjoying more and more. That's going to be my main listing
program probably. Once I get all my data from birdbase in! Anyway,
before I start accessing help files, how do I list all my trips from all
years for one location? It's not intuitive. I've been clicking stuff to no
avail. This comes up because for a couple years i was using Red Bank
for all my trips to that area. Now I need to look at every trip and see 
whether it was the dredge or red bank itself. Yes, I can do that by looking
at my observations. Thought it would be easier if i could just list 
Red bank trips.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: LB Dows - the dredge - Gloucester
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:15:31 -0400
Hello,
     Marilyn and I went chasing Annies LB Dows. Still there! Good bird for
Gloucester County. The east pool. The western edge. We got excellent looks
at the four we saw. All were juvenile. And the Stilt Sandpiper is still there.
Plus eastern Palm Warblers around. 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: American Golden Plover near Assunpink
From: Bob Horton <horton633 AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:48:11 -0400
This morning I saw two American Golden Plovers in the sod farm at the 
intersection of Herbert Road and Route 539 (Old York Road). The best place to 
park is where Sharon Road meets Route 539. The sod is being cut so the activity 
is making the birds move around a bit. There are also Killdeer and Horned Larks 
present in this field. 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: grim news for sandy hook
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:31:32 -0400
If you click on the link in the article it takes you to the announcment
from park service, towards the end of the announcement from park service is
a hyperlink http://parkplanning.nps.gov/gate , it will take you to another
page with a list of projects, scrollthrough the list to find the notice for
sandy hook, click on that and it takes you to another page where the
comment section is on the left side of page.

http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=49465

this above link should take you directly to the page (I tried this earlier
from my laptop and it didn't work)

cheers,

tom brown

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Grim news for Sandy Hook
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:26:41 -0400
If you click on the link in the article it takes you to the announcment
from park service, towards the end of the announcement from park service is
a hyperlink http://parkplanning.nps.gov/gate , it will take you to another
page with a list of projects, scrollthrough the list to find the notice for
sandy hook, click on that and it takes you to another page where the
comment section is on the left side of page.

http://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=49465

this above link should take you directly to the page (I tried this earlier
from my laptop and it didn't work)

cheers,

tom brown


On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 10:40 AM, Joseph J. Seneca 
wrote:

>  Hello Tom,
>   Grim indeed.  Having trouble getting access to the comment option on the
> Park Service's link.  Any advice appreciated in how to access after
> clicking on the link you provided. I will comment extensively - what a
> stupendously bad plan!
>
> best,  Joe Seneca
>
>
> _________________________________________
> Joseph J. Seneca
> University Professor
> Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Policy
> Rutgers University
> 33 Livingston Avenue
> Suite 300
> New Brunswick, NJ 08901
> 848-932-2818  (as of 5 Dec 2011)
>
> ------------------------------
> *From: *"Tom Brown" 
> *To: *JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> *Sent: *Monday, September 29, 2014 7:52:34 AM
> *Subject: *[JERSEYBI] Grim news for Sandy Hook
>
>
> Hi All,
>
> There are plans to build a large maintenance facility from the rusty barn
> north to racoon alley, it would involve a great amount of disruption, if
> not utter destruction of one of the most productive/important areas at
> Sandy Hook in terms of migrants and resident birds/wildlife.  I've sent a
> letter to several people in park service, NJ fish and wildlife (DEP), NJ
> division of USFWS, some local papers, and will be sending to others as
> well.
> The first one to make this public was the electronic NJ Patch:
>
>
> 
http://patch.com/new-jersey/middletown-nj/please-oppose-national-park-services-plan-build-new-maintenance-building#.VClGS-f0tJE 

>
> At the end of the article is a link to the Park Service's website where
> comments can be made.  I do admit the letter is a bit long, but hopefully
> is informative.
>
> cheers,
>
> Tom Brown
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sparrows galore at Great Piece Meadows
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 15:18:39 +0000
Good morning Jerseybirders,

This morning, I chose Great Piece Meadows on the north/west side of Route 80 
for my before-work birding. For those who haven't visited, it starts with a 
short woodsy section of about 1/10 of a mile followed by a long open rocky dirt 
road between grassy fields which runs north for at least a mile to the Passaic 
River. Phragmites and other grasses and low scrub abound, and there are a few 
deciduous trees which offer cover and food for arboreal species. Side trails go 
through the tall grasses (waterproof boots a must on a dewy morning). Today was 
sparrow day: there were dozens, more likely hundreds of Song and Swamp 
Sparrows, and a few White-throated and Savannahs thrown in. I saw one 
Lincoln's. The Song Sparrow numbers were startling; at one glance in one bush, 
I could observe six individuals without moving my binoculars. Many were 
singing. Most had very fresh, bright plumage and were really nice to look at; 
they seemed curious about me and often perched in the open. I did not see any 
other "designer" sparrows, but imagine that if I had had more than 90 minutes, 
they could have been spotted. 


Hundreds of Robins were also in flight overhead. In addition, two Kestrels flew 
over early in the morning, and a smattering of warblers were sometimes visible 
flying over the open spaces. A few came down, and I was able to identify 
Redstart, Black-throated Green (singing its spring song!), and Tennessee from 
individuals which foraged in the trees. A couple of Bobolink tink-tinked 
overhead and were visible for a few moments. I listened for Siskins but did not 
hear any. 


Good birding,

Marc J. Chelemer
Tenafly


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Grim news for Sandy Hook
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 07:52:34 -0400
Hi All,

There are plans to build a large maintenance facility from the rusty barn
north to racoon alley, it would involve a great amount of disruption, if
not utter destruction of one of the most productive/important areas at
Sandy Hook in terms of migrants and resident birds/wildlife.  I've sent a
letter to several people in park service, NJ fish and wildlife (DEP), NJ
division of USFWS, some local papers, and will be sending to others as well.
The first one to make this public was the electronic NJ Patch:


http://patch.com/new-jersey/middletown-nj/please-oppose-national-park-services-plan-build-new-maintenance-building#.VClGS-f0tJE 


At the end of the article is a link to the Park Service's website where
comments can be made.  I do admit the letter is a bit long, but hopefully
is informative.

cheers,

Tom Brown

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: allegation: birding is racist
From: Peter Eschmann <peteresch AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 14:44:01 -0400
> Having myself stepped in the pool of feelings a couple of years ago in an 
attempt to preserve the "open space" on our birding network. I rashly attempt 
again on this topic (where, possibly, feelings and opinions are starting to 
fly.) 


A starter lesson from Logic 101 goes like this. Arguing from the “universal” 
(all are this) to the particular (therefore one/many are this) is valid. The 
reverse is not valid: one/many are that; therefore all are that. Perhaps the 
Nat Geo article is a waste of words, not additive to our appreciation of the 
wonders we go out to see. I’ve not read that article, but that is not germane 
to this post. 


We each bring different levels of experience, study, free time, even eyesight 
to birding. Let’s share our discoveries. 


pete eschmann
barnegat nj
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Western Kingbird today?
From: Bert Harris <aramidopsis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 11:26:23 -0400
Hi all,

Has anyone seen the Brigantine Western Kingbird today?

Thanks!
Bert Harris, Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: birding with Marc at Cape May; Zone-tailed hawk
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 10:46:13 -0400
Yesterday Marc was kind enough to take me birding with him to Cape
May. We were at Higbee's dike and we saw the zone-tailed hawk at the
hawk watch. We also went to several mudflats in search of marbled
godwit and sandwich tern.

Here is a blog post describing the day, and also talking a lot about
how birders interact with each other:


http://save-send-delete.blogspot.com/2014/09/birding-with-marc-zone-tailed-hawk-at.html 


Danusha Goska
Paterson, NJ

-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Allegation: birding is racist / response to Theodore Chase
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 07:43:10 -0400
Theodore Chase wrote "The article does not state, or even imply, that
birding is racist. It just points out that minorities are very
under-represented among birders."

I'm the person who posted the link with the subject line and so Mr
Chase's post appears to be calling me a liar. I hope I can be allowed
this opportunity to respond. Also, Mr Chase's post misrepresents an
article about birding in National Geographic, a high-profile
publication. I hope I can clarify.

In brief: Yes, the article does argue that birding as an activity is
racist, and that birders as people are racist. No, it doesn't simply
state that minorities are under-represented.

Quotes below demonstrate that National Geographic described birders as
so racist that they can't tell black people apart, even though birders
are meant to be observant people. Birders are cliquish and, perhaps
without realizing it, exclude minorities; birders' exclusivity has
roots going back over a hundred years to anti-immigrant activism.
White people in general are seen as so threatening as to preclude
minorities from entering the woods. Birders have noticed a lack of
diversity but have not addressed this lack of diversity with any
success, again, perhaps because of their subconscious biases.

All this is stated in the article.

Further, the article is interesting for what it does not state. The
article doesn't look at any features of African American culture that
might have an impact on whether or not African Americans choose to
take up birding. The article leaves the reader with the impression
that white people alone are the deciding factor.

Here's the second paragraph of the article in question. "Yes, there
are only two of you at the bird festival," he wrote in the pages of
Orion magazine. "Yes, you're wearing a name tag and are six inches
taller than he is. Yes, you will be called by his name at least half a
dozen times by supposedly observant people who can distinguish gull
molts in a blizzard."

More: "Bird-watchers, of course, aren't the only environmentalists of
a feather who flock together, or whose passion for protecting the
environment could benefit from building more minority support."

More: Minorities are plagued by "concerns about how onlookers might
react to seeing a black or Hispanic man with binoculars wandering the
woods--or a suburban neighborhood--at dusk, dawn, or night. ("Nocturnal
birding is a no-no" is Lanham's Rule 4.) Conference speakers have also
cited lingering fears about racism in the U.S.--like whether it's safe
to go to areas where the Ku Klux Klan had been strong, or where
militias still thrive."

More: "there's the question of how welcoming and inclusive
bird-watching groups currently are...About 120 years ago, birding
organizations were anti-immigrant...There is an ingrown quality to lots
of the birding communities that they may not be aware of."

That "ingrown quality" that birders "nay not be aware of" results in
birders speaking in a superior way to minority birders who resent it
"They don't want to be viewed as needing to be educated, 'fixed,' or
deficient in skills or knowledge about birds."

The article opens with an account of birders so racist that they can't
tell black men apart. It closes with an account of birders so racist
they can't tell black women apart: "As Guris says, "There are not that
many of us, and birding is all about identification. You'd think if
they could identify thousands of birds, they could recognize us. There
were only two black birders [that weekend in Cape May], and we didn't
even look alike. They were only seeing the similarities."

Danusha Goska
Paterson, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: allegation: birding is racist
From: Theodore Chase <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 22:29:41 -0400
	The article does not state, or even imply, that birding is racist.   
It just points out that minorities are very under-represented among  
birders.
	I would say that we don't (at least I don't) know enough about what  
gets people started in birding, apart from the efforts of school  
teachers and people like Dave Magpiong who actively try to get young  
people involved.  I suspect that most birders are suburban - city  
dwellers don't have many birds to watch, and don't have much  
opportunity to put out a feeder, particularly in multi-unit  
buildings.  To the extent that birders start with feeder watching,  
there is a selection in favor of owners of single-family homes, with  
some shrubbery etc. around them.  And there are fewer minorities in  
this demographic than in society overall.
	But I think a lot of people start on their own, without the impetus  
of feeder watching.  For myself, I can remember my first  
identification, of Purple Grackles in Washington DC, when I was seven  
years old, with no family input.  But I was given the little Reed  
guide to birds at Christmas.  Peterson came later.
	Perhaps if we think about how we got started, we can better help  
others to get started.
		Ted Chase
		Franklin Twp

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E.B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 9/26/14
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 16:15:47 -0500
Briton Parker and I were able to get to Brig yesterday to enjoy a very
sunny day with lots of birds and butterflies. There were hundreds of
Egrets and Double-crested Cormorants throughout the Refuge. To see the
Photo Study and a list of the species seen, please click on the following
link:

http://www.howardsview.com/BrigSep26th_14/BrigSep26th_14.html

Regards,
Howard

Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Negri-Nepote This Morning
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 14:54:10 -0400
Hi Y'all.

Sparrow numbers and diversity are increasing here a bit as October draws
near. A (very) early morning walk along the edges yielded eight species if I
include the Towhees. Lincoln's, White-throats, Swamp, and several Savannahs
were among those tallied. Palm (both brown and yellow) and Myrtle Warblers
were well represented as well. A young Cooper's was calling and flying about
the whole time I was there, perhaps one of the local clan. There was also a
Solitary Sandpiper plying the last 100 gallons of Hannah's Pond for a meal. 

 The annual mowing is well underway both here and at Griggstown Grasslands
Preserve, where I stopped for an hour on the way home. By then it was
mid-morning and it was QUIET. 

 

Good birding,

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Zone-tailed Hawk, Cape May County
From: Sam Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 12:48:16 -0400
over the Cape May Hawkwatch at Cape May Point State Park around 10:50 AM. Last 
seen heading to Delaware from Coral Ave., where hawkwatchers at Cape Henlopen 
State Park watched it fly over around 11:30 AM. If/when accepted it will 
represent a first state record for New Jersey. 


Good birding!!

Sam

--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Zone-tailed Hawk, Cape May
From: Bert Harris <aramidopsis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 12:06:21 -0400
Hi all,

A Zone-tailed Hawk was seen a few times near the Cape May Point hawkwatch
platform around 11am today. More info here:
http://keekeekerr.com/textalerts/keekeekerr

Don't forget to take a closer look at those Turkey Vultures!
Bert Harris, Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Wheelabrator - migrants - slow
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 11:02:00 -0400
Hello,
 Another fast and furious morning! Started off with a bang. But ended really 
quick 

again. I think it's the birds just getting quiet soon and heading off deep into
the woods. Marilyn, Eric, and I hit here for a couple hours. Parula was the 
most 

numerous warbler. We had a few raptors perched. And hunting! I don't think that
was the reason it was quiet after 30 minutes. But could be wrong! Marilyn had 
a Connecticut Warbler a week ago was it! at Riverwinds. When it was quiet...
Eric had a Mourning Warbler there - when it was a quiet afternoon. Stuff is 
around! 


Moment of the morning. Eric found us a Cooper's Hawk. Perched a few feet off 
the ground 

behind a thick tree trunk. And a squirrel on the other side of the trunk. It 
was an 

"interesting" moment! 

Butterfly notes - 2 Monarchs as I walked out.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Birdbase to ebird notes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 20:24:56 -0400
The data transfer is coming along slowly. The foreign trips are a big
time consumer. I have to research any splits, figure out new names.
And am still wrong now and then. The poor compilers....

If anyone is also doing this, I have found that going through the NJ portal
for anything other than NJ won't work re finding hotspots. You need to use
the national site. Once I have a site for the first time - the NJ site 
works if everything
is in that general area. Like ASA wright nature center. Then you can 
just pick
the site out of your locations and easily change it by choosing another 
hotspot
nearby. If I had only known that for Kenya....

Most data so far is being entered. Just when I think it's safe to delete 
a few trips
from the excel chart before I import - something rare sticks out. Like 
the summer
trip to Forsythe. The usual stuff - oh, that was the Gargany! Keep that 
trip!
Etc. I was even thinking another Cape May county trip to split up into 
exact
locations. Maybe just delete this one. Sure - 1-1-97. Clay-colored Sparrow,
Sandhill Crane, King Eider, Lesser Black-backed Gull (Not too common 
back then!),
and let's not forget the Northern Lapwing!

I am still cleaning up records. Many Western Sandpipers at Forsythe in May.
No. Deleted those. This is going to be a great data source that I can 
use to see
first arrivals. Last. I think. I am still not sure of everything ebird 
can do. You know
me and my county listing! I highly recommend anyone who hasn't yet to 
just start.
Somehow, just start entering old trip reports. Give it a couple years. 
You will have
a great data set!

Good birding all.

This is quite fun.

-- 
Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
sandrakeller AT verizon.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cold Brook Reserve Today
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 15:54:52 -0400
Hi, all. 

 The 150 plus acres of feed corn is still standing here, so the place hasn't
really 'turned on' yet. I did manage to find a few fun birds early this
morning, though. Lincoln's, Song, Field,  and many Savannah Sparrows were
present. I also saw two juvenile Grasshopper Sparrows in the hedgerows along
with the others. Warblers were hard to find along the (now dry) stream
valley, but Black-throated Greens, a Tennessee, and many Palms were seen. In
contrast, Indigo Buntings are still pretty easy to come by here- as were
Phoebes. Two Kestrels and a juvenile Cooper's were making themselves visible
from time to time just overhead. 

 The Best Bird title was shared by two wrens today- a Marsh Wren and a
Winter Wren- the latter of which was foraging on the trail almost underfoot
when I spotted it. Or maybe it spotted me. 

 

Good birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: allegation: birding is racist
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 12:01:31 -0400
The government report shows the lack of diversity among birders in a number of 
demographic parameters. The NG article 

focused on the race parameter. My own observations are consistent with the 
report — there IS a lack of racial diversity among my 

birding field trips, group tours, society memberships, festival attendance, 
etc. etc. — but this true of so many aspects 

of my life, from hobbies to work place. From this, I do not draw the conclusion 
that birders are racist; instead, I see this as an opportunity: 

there are untapped reserves of potential birders — and hence, people who would 
share our interest in environmental conservation — 

out there. Drew’s comments and the government report should be read in the 
original. 


Diane Louie (the petite Asian birder you may see in the field)
Madison

On Sep 25, 2014, at 9:02 AM, Danusha V. Goska  wrote:

> This turned up in my facebook feed. Apparently an article in National
> Geographic alleges that birdwatching is racist.
> 
> This reminds me of a recent article alleging that birdwatching is sexist.
> 
> Nobody asked me, but I think both articles are off base.
> 
> Here are links to coverage of the National Geographic article, and the
> article itself.
> 
> 
http://www.frontpagemag.com/2014/dgreenfield/bird-watching-now-also-racist/#.VCQM9eRpsMM.facebook 

> 
> 
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/09/140923-bird-watching-diversity-environment-science/ 

> 
> Danusha Goska Paterson NJ
> 
> -- 
> Danusha V. Goska, PhD
> author, "Save Send Delete"
> http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Turkeys at the door
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 10:04:49 -0400
I was sitting at my computer and kept hearing this barely perceptible soft
"cluck" sound, like the sound a hen chicken makes to her chicks. I looked
down out of the home office window and could make out Wild Turkeys standing
on the sidewalk right by the front door, like they were waiting for someone
to come and let them in! I circled around back to the deck and managed this
quick photo as they walked into the woods:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15172999519/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Thousands of horseshoe crabs to be released into Delaware Bay | NJ.com
From: Stuart and Wendy <weluvowls AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 09:45:08 -0400
Jerseybirders

A link below to an event tomorrow involving a horseshoe crab release

Wendy Malmid
Monroe Twp, NJ
weluvowls AT comcast.net




http://www.nj.com/cape-may-county/index.ssf/2014/09/thousands_of_horseshoe_crabs_to_be_released_into_delaware_bay.html 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: allegation: birding is racist
From: "Danusha V. Goska" <dgoska AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 09:02:53 -0400
This turned up in my facebook feed. Apparently an article in National
Geographic alleges that birdwatching is racist.

This reminds me of a recent article alleging that birdwatching is sexist.

Nobody asked me, but I think both articles are off base.

Here are links to coverage of the National Geographic article, and the
article itself.


http://www.frontpagemag.com/2014/dgreenfield/bird-watching-now-also-racist/#.VCQM9eRpsMM.facebook 



http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/09/140923-bird-watching-diversity-environment-science/ 


Danusha Goska Paterson NJ

-- 
Danusha V. Goska, PhD
author, "Save Send Delete"
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fwd: Sandy Hook
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 20:22:02 -0400
Hello Laura,

Ive had quite a few migrating warblers last two weeks but its been very 
unpredictable but almost daily this week at home on the edge of Suburbia in 
Lawrenceville. Worried that they may be done soon. 


This fall I've learned that I HAVE to hear the Chickadees coming first. The 
warblers I've seen are moving around rapidly in small mixed flocks always 
heralded by the local Chickadees or Titmice. 


Sharyn Magee who leads many of our free Washington Crossing Audubon field trips 
heartily agrees, particularly at Baldpate. She says "Birds aren't dumb!" They 
know that the resident Chickadees have the inside track to local food sources 
and so tag along. 


So If I hear Chickadees out the window (and I'm leaving them open) I rush out 
with bins. They're so quick that I miss a lot and they zoom through so 
disappear almost as fast as they arrive. I can't decide where to look. My yard 
warblers have included many Magnolias, Northern Parulas, Black-throated Blues 
and Greens, many Redstarts, Black-and-whites, several Chestnut-sideds, one or 
two Tennessees, and Common Yellowthroats. Funny thing is it seems that all the 
bustle seems to get the local woodpeckers and distracting catbirds moving and 
vocalizing. I have yet to see many sparrows. 


My personal experience has been that I'm more likely to find them around 9 AM 
and again at 2 PM in woods or along wood edges near water sources. Perhaps 
because it's so dry? 


The Magnolias and Redstarts seem to frequent and enter the Poison Ivy and 
Virginia Creeper vines, the Parulas about 20' up in light-leaved ash or maple 
trees (lower than this spring), Black-throated Blues tall shrub or eye-level 
branches, Black-throated Greens high oak branches, Vireos fluttering in outer 
leaflets. 


Just my experience.

Fairfax Hutter
Lawrenceville


Sent from my LilyPad

> On Sep 24, 2014, at 6:43 PM, Laura Berlik  wrote:
> 
> I'm worried about the same result. I have an avid avianophile from California 
arriving Monday for 4 days and want to take her birding. We have pretty full 
itineraries so we will stay close home and only go out for about 2 hrs at a 
time. I'm thinking of the Plainsboro Preserve and the Trenton Marsh. There's a 
nearby golf course. We are also not too far from a sod farm. I'm thinking a mix 
of these. I haven't had much luck at the Institute Woods. Has anyone seen many 
migrating warblers in the Princeton/Mercer County area? 

> Laura Berlik
> Princeton
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Sandy Hook
From: Laura Berlik <lberlik AT PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 18:43:35 -0400
I'm worried about the same result. I have an avid avianophile from California 
arriving Monday for 4 days and want to take her birding. We have pretty full 
itineraries so we will stay close home and only go out for about 2 hrs at a 
time. I'm thinking of the Plainsboro Preserve and the Trenton Marsh. There's a 
nearby golf course. We are also not too far from a sod farm. I'm thinking a mix 
of these. I haven't had much luck at the Institute Woods. Has anyone seen many 
migrating warblers in the Princeton/Mercer County area? 

Laura Berlik
Princeton

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sandy Hook today: quiet and not birdy
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 20:09:12 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Ever have the experience of trying to share your enthusiasm for our collective 
hobby when the objects of our fascination just don't want to cooperate? I'm two 
for two on that count: 


Two Thursdays ago, I took a business acquaintance from Austin, TX to Glenhurst 
Meadows for a morning's stroll; he's been getting more interested in birding, 
and his children are too, so I thought to show him some northeast birding 
hospitality. Result: barely 20 species, and nary a single warbler or "designer" 
sparrow. The Pileated Woodpecker we saw was far and away the best bird. 


Today, I took a different acquaintance (from San Jose, CA) to Sandy Hook; my 
waxing eloquent about birding over the course of numerous conference calls got 
HIM interested as well. The easterly winds were a poor harbinger, but I thought 
perhaps the influx yesterday might have stuck. Nope. Everything must have left 
last evening. Five hours of birding yielded a mere 44 species, and very low 
numbers of everything (except of course Catbirds, Towhees, and Cedar Waxwings). 
Most interesting bird was a pale Dunlin at the False Hook, which I studied at 
length to be absolutely sure it didn't have a white rump. I think my friend 
enjoyed the visit anyway (California, like Texas, is totally brown with 
drought. Both visitors commented on how GREEN everything is here!), but I wish 
I could've shown him one of those legendary "warblers dripping off the trees" 
days. Some other time... 


I hope birding was good for others away from the shore, perhaps as a result of 
southbound migrants getting pushed inland when the winds shifted. 


Good birding!

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Negri Nepote sparrows
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 13:43:48 +0000
So, I thought the southern winds might hold those warblers at Negri Nepote. 
Nashville would be a lifer. Got there is morning and only saw a black and white 
and a RE vireo in those genre. The young Cooper's hawk flew in close and 
checked me out. Alas, I am a little too big. Heard a towhee and yellowthroat 
singing. But, far too many mimics everywhere to be anything but suspicious. 


But, there were sparrows! Just past the pond's blind: one or two Lincoln's with 
great views, Savannah, field and song, and one bobolink. Sort of associating 
with an active flock of goldfinches A couple of pics here: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/15154656790

Good birding

Steven


Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601 M 732.832.6195
Internal: 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600  F 732.369.0122

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: East Point - migration
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 19:27:51 -0400
Really hopping at Negri-Nepote this morning as well.  I was only able to 
spend an hour or so before work, but it was a situation where I could 
have just stayed in one spot and watched waves of birds moving through.  
Black-throated green was the bird of the day there, but I had parulas, 
Nashville, pine warblers. redstarts, one Cape May, my FOS yellow-rump, 
and big movements of chippies, flickers, phoebes.  Still active when I 
left at 8:10.  A raven was calling non-stop when I left, and I also had 
my first "winter" harrier float right overhead, apparently unaware of me.

Susan Treesh
Somerset


On 9/23/2014 12:48 PM, SandraKeller wrote:
> Was fast and furious! I started at my usual spot at 6:45am. Not light enough 
to 

> catch plumage details. Alas I would say 60 to 80 warblers passed me by before
> i could see enough. And then by 7:45 it was very slow again! Birds still 
there, not 

> moving high, moving low - a cedar tree group at a time. No luck with
> Connecticut! I still have a chance. No Golden-winged either. That might be it 
for that! 

> I did do some bushwacking for CT. When it got slow. Obviously no luck, but a
> RT Hummer working a field with white flowers was different! 15 species of 
warbler. 

> 7 Cape May, Common Yellowthroats and Redstarts the predominant as usual.
> A friend had loads of Black-throated Greens elsewhere. I had one. Probably 
many 

> more in those birds early! Picked up 2 needed common species. And one I 
didn't 

> think I would tick. Nighthawk! I came down early. Started at 6:00am on East 
Point Rd. 

> nothing. Then at first light, I hit that clearing in the woods in 
Heislerville. Success! 

>
> Winter Wren, Brown Creeper, Red-breasted Nuthatch. It felt like late fall!
>
> Good birding all. If anyone wants the ebird report, just email me. I have to 
get ready 

> for work now!
>
> Sandra Keller
>
> Sent from my iPad mini
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Grosbeak
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 15:53:30 -0400
Female Rose-Breasted Grosbeak on the feeder in yard
now. Only migrant today.

Karen
Ocean

Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Glenhurst Meadows This Morning
From: Vince Capp <vcapp AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 15:48:59 -0400
Hi, Y'all.

There was a very respectable showing of migrants here early this morning.
The areas up along Cory's Brook were once again the center of activity. The
one 'main' flurry there yielded 12 warbler species, and I wound up with 14
on the morning's walk. Cape May, Wilson's, Parulas, Nashville and Tennessee
Warblers were among those tallied. By 9:30 or so it got pretty quiet except
for a few isolated pockets of activity. Birds were in there alright, but you
had to work for them a little. I also saw two Lincoln's Sparrows, one of
which was actually pointed out to me by an Old Wood Rat I bumped into out
there. A few Swamp and Savannahs were also present. Oh, yeah- the weather
was OK, too!

 

Good birding!

Vince Capp

Bound Brook

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vincecapp/

 

 

 

 

 



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: East Point - migration
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 12:48:26 -0400
Was fast and furious! I started at my usual spot at 6:45am. Not light enough to
catch plumage details. Alas I would say 60 to 80 warblers passed me by before
i could see enough. And then by 7:45 it was very slow again! Birds still there, 
not 

moving high, moving low - a cedar tree group at a time. No luck with
Connecticut! I still have a chance. No Golden-winged either. That might be it 
for that! 

I did do some bushwacking for CT. When it got slow. Obviously no luck, but a 
RT Hummer working a field with white flowers was different! 15 species of 
warbler. 

7 Cape May, Common Yellowthroats and Redstarts the predominant as usual. 
A friend had loads of Black-throated Greens elsewhere. I had one. Probably many
more in those birds early! Picked up 2 needed common species. And one I didn't 
think I would tick. Nighthawk! I came down early. Started at 6:00am on East 
Point Rd. 

nothing. Then at first light, I hit that clearing in the woods in Heislerville. 
Success! 


Winter Wren, Brown Creeper, Red-breasted Nuthatch. It felt like late fall! 

Good birding all. If anyone wants the ebird report, just email me. I have to 
get ready 

for work now!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Golden-winged warbler - Cattus Island, Toms River
From: Alyssa Della Fave <Alyssam1978 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 10:54:46 -0400
Just trying to get the word out. Golden-winged Warbler at Cattus Island County 
Park in Toms River right now. On Maritime Forrest Loop on left side of 
maintenance building. 


- Alyssa Della Fave 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: bears && bird feeders clarification
From: Cathy Blumig <wolgast AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 22:42:32 -0400
Earlier today I made a post that included a statement about bears needing to
consume something like 35 Big Macs per day in order to put on sufficient
weight to make it through winter.  What I meant to say was that bears have
to consume so many calories that it would be like humans needing to eat
something like 35 Big Macs per day.  It would be nothing for a bear to eat
35 Big Macs in 5 minutes.  This virtually nonstop food gorging is called
hyperphagia and this unrelenting drive to fatten up, especially in the face
of a mast dearth, is what makes the possibility of bird seed, especially
sunflower seed, something bears would find very attractive.

 

Again, good birding and bear avoiding to all,

Cathy Blumig

Somerset, NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: 5 Marbled Godwits at Island Beach 9-22-14
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 20:45:05 -0400
Island Beach State Park in Berkeley hosted 16 *Brown Pelicans*, *Peregrine
Falcon*, 23* American Oystercatchers*, 500+ *Black-bellied Plovers*, 5 *Marbled
Godwits*, 3* Caspian Terns*, and 20+ *Royal Terns *September 22nd. Mostly
all scope views at Winter Anchorage except for many fly by Brown Pelicans
along the ocean at A-24.

And if you like Butterflies, Al Della Bella and I counted 55 Monarchs!


Shawn Wainwright
Toms River
ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: incredible Com. Raven numbers from Sept. 20
From: Tom Bailey <ammodramus AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 00:11:12 +0000
I'm sure everyone is aware of the dramatic increase in Com. Ravens in New 
Jersey but I was 

shocked to read on Jerseybirds the results from Sept. 20 at Raccoon Ridge in 
Warren County, 

an excellent hawkwatch site. See below - 


>> Non-raptor Observations:
>> RAVENS - single flock of 58(!!) moving downridge  AT  9:30. 


>> Bird of the Day goes to the Raven...today's flock of 58 is by far 
>> the largest flock of ravens any of us have ever witnessed at Coon.


Tom

Tom Bailey
Tabernacle, NJ
ammodramus AT comcast.net

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Big Gull vs Small Crow (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 19:11:22 -0400
Today I watched a prolonged face-off between a Great Black-backed Gull and
a Fish Crow. In the following photo the gull had staked its claim to a dead
fish and is staring down the much smaller crow. But the crow managed to
elude the gull a couple of times and retrieve some snacks:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/15321324161/

Photo taken along the Raritan River in Piscataway.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sayreville/South Amboy/Morgan mudflats advisory
From: "bmknj16 ." <bmknj17 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 17:50:30 -0400
Hey.

This Sunday, Raritan Bay Waterfront Park will be hosting a large community
event with vendors, music, etc., which will make birding the
Sayreville/South Amboy/Morgan mudflats difficult.  You're welcome.    ;  )

Oh, and weather permitting, I'll likely be displaying about 40 framed
wildlife photos (lots of 'em birds(!)) in the gazebo there.  Just
sayin'--all casual and incidental-like.

Thanks.
Brett Klaproth

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Winter Finch Forecast 2014-2015
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 17:11:41 -0400
Summary of the forecast:

"*GENERAL FORECAST:* This winter's theme is a "mixed bag" of finch
movements. For example, some species such as Purple Finch will go south
while White-winged Crossbills will likely stay in the boreal forest in
widely separated areas where spruces are laden with cones. Common Redpolls
should move into southern Canada and the northern states because birch seed
crops are thin to average across the north.  See individual finch forecasts
below for details."

Full report at: http://bit.ly/1sVe09J

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cumberland migration
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:57:42 -0400
I didn't get down there until late. Had a nice extended flock at the Peek 
Preserve. 

Love that spot! And being on the river there, good migration corridor. Anyway,
no Golden-winged Warbler - still missing that yet. Cape May and Blackburnian 
were a nice comparison in immature plumages. Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Late fall
is here.

I hit a couple other spots - Heislerville being the most productive. The east 
point 

area sees the hawks migrating on the proper conditions. Sure enough - raptors 
moving! 

By late afternoon, they are more inland, so I just birded the area and lumped 
everything 

under Heislerville WMA. Broad-winged Hawk was new. 

Still loads to chase! I will probably be down again Tues. AM. East Point for a 
flight. 

Still missing Connecticut! 

Loads if Green Darners around.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (21 Sep 2014) 235 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:09:44 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 21, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       2             55             76
Bald Eagle                   5             38             51
Northern Harrier             3              9             11
Sharp-shinned Hawk          27            192            205
Cooper's Hawk                0              5             10
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk          185           3744           3805
Red-tailed Hawk              0             16             16
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             8             59             67
Merlin                       1              3              7
Peregrine Falcon             1              7              7
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               3              6              6

Total:                     235           4137           4265
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:30:00 
Observation end   time: 18:00:00 
Total observation time: 9.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Jim Thomson, Maura Griffin, Scott Wood, Stephen Bagen

Visitors:
Additional observers - from Wildcat Ridge Mike and Nora (THANK YOU for the
delicious cookies!!); Rachel Rojciwecz and David Dunbar.

Photo club members Matt Fila, Michael Downey, Kate McGurk-May, Joe Lynch,
Ted Kletnick, and Brian Skuropacki--thanks for making the trek to Coon and
we hope you captured some nice images!  It was a pleasure.

The Asbjorn Clan: Dawn and Denise w/ visiting brother Bruce & friend Cindy
from Arizona--glad you were able to see some good stuff!  

Scout group of ~40.
Other hikers - 20. 

Thank you to JT for his extra a.m. efforts, and thanks to all for making
today another memorable one on the ridge--we didn't have huge #s but it was
a quality day topped off with the magnificent rattler.  


Weather:
heavy dense fog early, skies partly sunny most of day, wind S 2-8, temp
63-74 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 1:30I, 3:24A, 4:04I, 4:13(2A). 

PG - an adult (w/ tail feathers missing)  AT  3:33 that got higher & higher
before passing.  Late in day another adult (w/ intact tail) moved upridge
while circling--not counted. 

ML - last bird of the day--coming out of nowhere it blasted past the
lookout while taking a swipe at the owl decoy (so I'm told...I was
preoccupied with a cupcake and missed the bird...ouch).  

NH - the three today included a Gray Ghost, but it was the 3:54 richly
colored immature bird that flew low over the lookout & gave everyone superb
looks...wow.  More often than not this species steers clear of the
lookout...this immature harrier gets Bird of the Day.   

Non-raptor Observations:
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER -1 immature moving downridge  AT  12:53 (a Bird of the
Day contender--we often go an entire season w/out seeing one). 

Hummingbirds - 2.
Tree Swallows - another large flight today.
Chimny Swift - 1.
E. Phoebe - 1.
Myrtle Warbler - 1 (first of season).
Magnolia Warbler - 1. 
TVs & BVs. 
Wood Thrushes - about 8 together flushed on our hike out in the evening. 

Monarchs - 85.
Buck Moths - multiples flying around. 

Timber Rattlesnake - a GORGEOUS and briliantly colored yellow individual
seen late in day.  

Yellow Cards - 1 (will not name names but his initials are SW). 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 

Subject: RAVENS
From: Glen Hart <glen.hart AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 12:32:54 -0400
I have consistently seen one or two Common Ravens soaring around the cell 
towers near mile marker 138 on the west side of the Garden State Parkway over 
the past two weeks or so. Neat sighting...I have never seen them there in the 
past...hard not to notice, even with my attention firmly on the road ahead. 



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Cathy Blumig
Date:09/22/2014 12:00 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Bears & bird feeders
Greetings all: This is my semi-annual reminder to folks that bird seed can be a very attractive food item for bears as they try to pack on the pounds to get ready for winter. Those in the central and southern portions of our state may not think bears are an issue, but be aware that that there have been recent sightings of bear activity off Adam Station in North Brunswick, and that there is a radio-collared sow in Mercer County that produced cubs two years ago and is expected to give birth again this winter. This fall bird feeders could be extra attractive to bears because it appears, at least in central New Jersey, that there isn't much of a mast crop. Since bears need to ingest many calories (they need to consume the equivalent of something like 35 Big Macs per day) not having fat-rich acorns will likely drive them to seek out alternatives. Bird seed would likely be high on the list. I doubt folks will listen, but I suggest people consider not putting feeders out until mid-December when bear activity drops off to avoid inadvertently drawing a bear near your or a neighbor's home. Just a thought. Good birding and bear avoiding to all, Cathy Blumig Somerset, NJ List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi How to report NJ bird sightings: List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi How to report NJ bird sightings:
Subject: Bears & bird feeders
From: Cathy Blumig <wolgast AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 12:00:08 -0400
Greetings all:

This is my semi-annual reminder to folks that bird seed can be a very
attractive food item for bears as they try to pack on the pounds to get
ready for winter.  Those in the central and southern portions of our state
may not think bears are an issue, but be aware that that there have been
recent sightings of bear activity off Adam Station in North Brunswick, and
that there is a radio-collared sow in Mercer County that produced cubs two
years ago and is expected to give birth again this winter.    This fall bird
feeders could be extra attractive to bears because it appears, at least in
central New Jersey, that there isn't much of a mast crop.  Since bears need
to ingest many calories (they need to consume the equivalent of something
like 35 Big Macs per day) not having fat-rich acorns will likely drive them
to seek out alternatives.  Bird seed would likely be high on the list.  I
doubt folks will listen, but I suggest people consider not putting feeders
out until mid-December when bear activity drops off to avoid inadvertently
drawing a bear near your or a neighbor's home.   Just a thought.

 

Good birding and bear avoiding to all,

 

Cathy Blumig

Somerset, NJ


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Sandy Hook yesterday (guided walk recap)
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 15:16:53 +0000
Jerseybirders,

Tom Boyle led a group of about a dozen birders around Sandy Hook yesterday 
morning. The warm weather and southerly winds meant little migration movement, 
so it took some effort to roust up the birds we did see. Most of the migrants 
were onesies or twosies. A walk down Raccoon Alley and the Road to Nowhere 
turned up about 40 species, with dozens of Catbirds and Towhees providing most 
of the movement in the tangles. Tom identified a reportable Black-capped 
Chickadee. An early Great Cormorant was seen through 'scopes among the pilings 
out in the water west of Guardian Park. 


We then went up to the north end and covered The Locust Grove, the Bowl, the 
False Hook, the Salt Ponds, and the general area up there. Best birds were a 
very cooperative Philadelphia Vireo and an early White-throated Sparrow, plus 
several (some thought the same two, others thought two pairs) American 
Golden-Plovers in with Black-bellieds at the False Hook. I stayed behind at one 
point to chase down a male Wilson's Warbler and got exceptional views as it 
worked a sumac bush. 


Just as we arrived back at our cars around 12:30, Scott Barnes and Linda Mack 
walked up to let us know that a Lark Sparrow had been seen back where we had 
started. A few of us who went back were fortunate enough to see it (thanks, 
Paul Wolter, for spotting it first). Just as I was leaving and, of course, with 
no one else around to discuss field marks, I encountered a huge accipiter 
hunting near the old Visitor Center...easily the size of a Harrier if not 
larger, and it looked, when perched on a telephone pole, like it had a strong 
light-colored eyebrow stripe. After examining pictures of Cooper's Hawks and 
Goshawks after I got home, I think that the bird was too slimly proportioned 
and with breast streaking too fine and delicate to be the latter, despite the 
apparent eyestripe. So a big immature female Coop it must have been. 


All in all, there were 75 species seen or heard, although some of us missed 
individual birds. Thanks, Tom, for group leadership, invaluable knowledge for 
how to bird the Hook, and expert "pishing." We thank you for the guidance. 


Marc J. Chelemer
Tenafly


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern NOT SEEN -- 21 Sep
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 20:01:17 -0400
NJBIRDS/Jerseybirds:


It appears that the Whiskered Tern was NOT seen at Cape May Point today,
despite observers searching from dawn to dusk.

We'll have another update if it is found again.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Godwits, Island Beach SP
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 20:21:22 +0000
For those of you keeping score at home, at 1 PM, Shari & I saw 6 Marbled 
Godwits on the sand bar in front of the boat launch, along with oystercatchers, 
Black-bellied Plovers, and 4 Caspian Terns. 

At Spizzle Creek there were 4 pelicans flying by and 4 Yellow-crowned 
Night-Herons at the southern end of the trail (1 adult and 3 juveniles). 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
larry-zirlin at comcast.net 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Island Beach State Park Godwits and Pelicans
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2014 07:56:14 -0700
Thanks Larry Z.  There are now 3 Marbled Godwits, 2 Brown Pelicans and
assorted other shorebirds and terns at the Kayak/Canoe launch (winter
anchorage) area.  Look to the East where a Grassy island appears.  It is
currently high tide and still a bit foggy.  Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern recap -- 20 Sep
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 22:18:55 -0400
NJBIRDS/Jerseybirds:


The Whiskered Tern again showed reasonably well at Cape May Point through
at least 6:10 this evening (Saturday, 20 Sep).

It was fairly unpredictable through most of the day, with most reports
coming from the beachfront between Cape May Pt State Park and Coral Avenue,
often with a couple hours between sightings--particularly during the middle
of the day. It made only 1 or 2 appearances on Bunker Pond until about 5pm,
at which point it showed at least twice before vanishing just after 6pm.

Again, the best way to keep track of the tern is to monitor or subscribe to
"Keekeekerr," the local RBA text service. Recent entries can be found here:
http://keekeekerr.com/textalerts/keekeekerr . To send/receive alerts on
your phone, text "SUBSCRIBE keekeekerr" (no quotes) to the number 41411.

At this point, details about searching for the bird are likely covered
fairly well in previous messages. It will continue to be beneficial for
folks to fan out around Cape May Point, with observers stationed at the
Hawkwatch Platform, State Park beach, St. Mary's, and Coral Avenue.

Best of luck to those searching tomorrow.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (20 Sep 2014) 150 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 22:09:25 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 20, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       2             53             74
Bald Eagle                   4             33             46
Northern Harrier             1              6              8
Sharp-shinned Hawk          52            165            178
Cooper's Hawk                0              5             10
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk           68           3559           3620
Red-tailed Hawk              0             16             16
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel            23             51             59
Merlin                       0              2              6
Peregrine Falcon             0              6              6
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               0              3              3

Total:                     150           3902           4030
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:30:00 
Observation end   time: 18:00:00 
Total observation time: 9.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Brian Butler, Gidget Butler, Jim Thomson, Scott Wood

Visitors:
Additional observers: Dennis Doyle & Gretchen McKanry, Carl Krag w/ friends
Russell, Kathryn, & Don Bergin.

Mark Stephens, Dave Cory; the Drew University Biology class who were
entertained by the beautiful rat snake that made an appearance on the
lookout. 

Special appearance by Harry Butler...all the way from Australia.    

Hikers - 23. 

Thanks to all who visited Coon today--it was nice to see so many folks
(including the large group of Drew students) interested in the hawk
migration.


Weather:
overcast early to mostly to partly cloudy rest of day, wind S 4-15 w/
stronger gusts, temp 56-66 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
A slow BW day after yesterday's good flight.  Kestrels put on a good
show--some individuals displayed Merlin-like tendencies w/ lightning fast
passes at the owl decoy and an especially brave one diving at the Peregrine
seen today.

BE - 1:25A, 3:24I, 4:56I, 5:38I.
PG - an adult  AT  1:15 moving upridge and circling, giving nice looks--not
counted. 

Non-raptor Observations:
RAVENS - single flock of 58(!!) moving downridge  AT  9:30. 

TVs & BVs.
Cedar Waxwings.
Chimney Swifts - 2.
Tree Swallows - several large flocks.
DC Cormorants - 4. 
Nighthawk - 1. 

Monarchs - 34.
Black Rat Snake - 1.

Bird of the Day goes to the Raven...today's flock of 58 is by far the
largest flock of ravens any of us have ever witnessed at Coon. 
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: Whiskered Tern
From: SandraKeller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 14:00:53 -0400
Put on a show for Chris, myself, and many other! We had it roosting off
the Coral Ave. beach area. It was up and down the beach - a few jetties up,
a few down. Thank you everyone! That was definitely a group venture!
9:30 am or so? 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co.
From: Catherine Busch <busch.cm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 13:07:55 -0400
The best place to get updates is at the CMBO Hawkwatch.

Catherine Busch
On Sep 20, 2014 12:43 PM, "Peter Eschmann"  wrote:

> We have just arrived in Cape May, and we hope the whispering tern is
> accommodating all the birders. Has it been seen recently? It is now 1240 on
> Saturday morning thank you
> Peter
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Sep 20, 2014, at 8:28 AM, Tom Reed  wrote:
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> > The Whiskered Tern continues this morning (Day 9). Today's first report
> was
> > from the beach at Cape May Pt State Park around 8:00am.
> >
> >
> > good birding,
> > tr
> >
> >
> > --
> > Tom Reed
> > Cape May NJ
> > coturnicops at gmail dot com
> >
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co.
From: Peter Eschmann <peteresch AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 12:43:07 -0400
We have just arrived in Cape May, and we hope the whispering tern is 
accommodating all the birders. Has it been seen recently? It is now 1240 on 
Saturday morning thank you 

Peter

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2014, at 8:28 AM, Tom Reed  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> The Whiskered Tern continues this morning (Day 9). Today's first report was
> from the beach at Cape May Pt State Park around 8:00am.
> 
> 
> good birding,
> tr
> 
> 
> --
> Tom Reed
> Cape May NJ
> coturnicops at gmail dot com
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Whiskered Tern
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 10:41:38 -0400
Pallas's original description (1811) reads "Gula late alba," throat white
on the side.

But I'm certain that we owe the name "whiskered" to Temminck, who in 1820
-- supposing the species new -- called the bird "hirondelle-de-mer moustac"
and described the head markings as including "une large moustache." I
assume that the English name "whiskered tern" is simply a translation of
Temminck's French.

Best,
rick

On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 11:10 PM, Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT comcast.net>
wrote:

> With all the talk about the Whiskered Tern, I became curious as to how it
> got its name. This is the earliest description I could find:
> Whiskered Tern, Sterna Leucopareia
> “…in a line below the ear to the ear-coverts, a stripe of white, forming
> the whisker or moustache; back, wing-coverts, upper tail-coverts and
> tail-feathers, uniform dark grey…”
> The Naturalist’s Library-Ornithology, Vol. XIV
> Birds of Great Britain, Ireland,
> Part IV, Natatores
> Sir William Jardine
> 1843
> p. 281
>
>
> Peggy Cadigan
> Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
> 1bookworm AT comcast.net
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>



-- 
Rick Wright
Bloomfield, NJ

Review Editor, Birding 
Senior Leader, WINGS 
Birding New Jersey 
ABA Field Guide to Birds of New Jersey

 


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern continues, Cape May Co.
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 08:28:20 -0400
Hi all,

The Whiskered Tern continues this morning (Day 9). Today's first report was
from the beach at Cape May Pt State Park around 8:00am.


good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern
From: Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 23:10:45 -0400
With all the talk about the Whiskered Tern, I became curious as to how it got 
its name. This is the earliest description I could find: 

Whiskered Tern, Sterna Leucopareia
“…in a line below the ear to the ear-coverts, a stripe of white, forming the 
whisker or moustache; back, wing-coverts, upper tail-coverts and tail-feathers, 
uniform dark grey…” 

The Naturalist’s Library-Ornithology, Vol. XIV
Birds of Great Britain, Ireland,
Part IV, Natatores
Sir William Jardine
1843
p. 281


Peggy Cadigan
Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ
1bookworm AT comcast.net
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Whiskered Tern recap -- 19 Sep
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 22:51:00 -0400
NJBIRDS/Jerseybirds:


The Whiskered Tern continued at Cape May Point through 6:40 this evening
(Friday, 19 Sep).

A few items--

1) Its routine on Friday was almost the exact opposite of the previous two
days. The tern spent much of the morning at Cape May Point State Park,
alternating between Bunker Pond (first sighting at 7:22am) and the adjacent
beachfront. The bird became more elusive around midday and made more
infrequent visits to the pond through the PM hours (last visit 3:30pm?).
After a bit of searching this evening, it flew in from "the rips" and
joined a flock of Common Terns resting on the beach between Whilldin &
Coral Avenues. It was last seen flying off toward the east (6:40pm).

2) The best way to keep track of the bird is to monitor or subscribe to
"Keekeekerr," the local RBA text service. Recent entries can be found here:
http://keekeekerr.com/textalerts/keekeekerr. To send/receive alerts on your
phone, text "SUBSCRIBE keekeekerr" (no quotes) to the number 41411.

3) Otherwise, the best strategy is to start at Bunker Pond and the
Hawkwatch Platform. If the bird hasn't been making recent visits--and
nobody on the platform knows of its current whereabouts--then check the
beachfront, starting at the old bunker and continuing west and north around
the Point, searching for roosting tern flocks and birds feeding close to
shore.


good luck and good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Cape May NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: HSR: Raccoon Ridge (19 Sep 2014) 1143 Raptors
From: "Hawkcount.Org Reports" <reports AT HAWKCOUNT.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 21:09:11 -0400
Raccoon Ridge
Blairstown, New Jersey, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 19, 2014
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species            Day's Count    Month Total   Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture                0              0              0
Turkey Vulture               0              0              0
Osprey                       7             51             72
Bald Eagle                   4             29             42
Northern Harrier             1              5              7
Sharp-shinned Hawk          27            113            126
Cooper's Hawk                1              5             10
Northern Goshawk             0              0              0
Red-shouldered Hawk          0              3              4
Broad-winged Hawk         1095           3491           3552
Red-tailed Hawk              1             16             16
Rough-legged Hawk            0              0              0
Golden Eagle                 0              0              0
American Kestrel             4             28             36
Merlin                       1              2              6
Peregrine Falcon             1              6              6
Unknown Accipiter            0              0              0
Unknown Buteo                0              0              0
Unknown Falcon               0              0              0
Unknown Eagle                0              0              0
Unknown Raptor               1              3              3

Total:                    1143           3752           3880
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 09:00:00 
Observation end   time: 18:30:00 
Total observation time: 9.5 hours

Official Counter:        Brian Hardiman

Observers:        Matt Jardel, Megan Fedor, Patrick Keelen, Rachel Rojcewicz

Visitors:
Additional observers: Rally Bartholomew, Kevin Weinman.

Thank you to everyone for your awesome spotting on yet another gorgeous day
on Coon.  


Weather:
mostly sunny w/ 30%-60% cloud cover, wind E/SE 2-8, temp 52-64 deg F. 

Raptor Observations:
BE - 4:05A, 4:10I, 4:35(2I). Others floating around (including 4 circling
together), not counted. 
PG - 10:20, high flying to S.

Nice BW movement today with fairly consistent numbers per hour from 10:00
to 4:00.  

Bird of the Day was the spunky Sharpie, in late afternoon light, that made
several passes at the owl decoy while vocalizing.  It then perched nearby
before taking another swipe at the owl, and then perched again before
disappearing into the trees. 

Non-raptor Observations:
Ravens - 2.
TVs & BVs.
Tree Swallows.
Nighthawk - 1. 
Cedar Waxwings.
Cape May Warbler - 1.
Buck Moths.
MONARCHS - 106 (by far the highest count this season).
========================================================================
Report submitted by Brian Hardiman (hardimanbrian AT yahoo.com)

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Subject: Marbled Godwit, Island Beach SP
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 18:21:50 +0000
Today, from the kayak/canoe launch at the Winter Anchorage, I was able to see 
with my scope, 1 Marbled Godwit on the sand bar almost directly in front of the 
launch but pretty far off. This answers the question of whether or not you need 
a boat to see this large bird. If the tide is low, and the light is right (it 
was cloudy today) you can. There were also 8 pelicans, more than a dozen 
oystercatchers, Black-bellied Plovers and Semipalmated Plovers, Royal Terns,all 
seen well through the scope, plus a lot of smaller birds that were beyond the 
edge of conjecture. 



Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
larry-zirlin at comcast.net 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

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