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Updated on Sunday, June 28 at 09:34 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Cutias,©BirdQuest

28 Jun Shearwaters at Cape May Pt, June 28 [Tom Reed ]
29 Jun Forsythe Refuge & Grasshopper Sparrow in Galloway Township - Sunday June 28 [Tom Bailey ]
28 Jun Laughing Gulls - Feasting on Blueberry, Atlantic County [Yong Kong ]
28 Jun Hawk fledge at Pine Park ["James O'Brien" ]
28 Jun (post didn't get through) [Frank and Clare Muscara ]
28 Jun Fwd: Sightings at Wallisch Homestead in West Milford [Frank and Clare Muscara ]
27 Jun NP dredge - breeders [Sandra Keller ]
27 Jun Bergen Big June [Christopher Takacs ]
26 Jun Bergen County Big June [Christopher Takacs ]
26 Jun Raritan River Osprey (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
26 Jun Re: Very late report of 4-17- 2015 possibly a hybrid Little x Snowy at Brig Refuge [Larry Scacchetti ]
25 Jun Re: Very late report of 4-17- 2015 possibly a hybrid Little x Snowy at Brig Refuge [Brian Kushner ]
25 Jun large hummingbird [Theodore Chase ]
25 Jun baby owls ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
25 Jun Very late report of 4-17- 2015 possibly a hybrid Little x Snowy at Brig Refuge [Yong Kong ]
25 Jun Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 6/24/15 ["Howard B. Eskin" ]
25 Jun Re: New Karlson & Rosselet book [Rick Wright ]
25 Jun New Karlson & Rosselet book [Michael Britt ]
25 Jun chukar partridge / garret mountain [Danusha Goska ]
25 Jun "Possible" Lincoln's Sparrow (follow-up) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
24 Jun Re: Fruit Loving Kingfishers [mike hiotis ]
24 Jun Fruit Loving Kingfisher? [David Bernstein ]
24 Jun PHOTO: Northern Rough-winged Swallow Adult and Two Fledglings Perched in a Tree ["B.G. Sloan" ]
24 Jun "Winter" birds at the feeder ["Susie R." ]
23 Jun Re: OT-Maine’s Little Egret [Larry Scacchetti ]
23 Jun OT-Maine’s Little Egret [Yong Kong ]
22 Jun Cedar waxwings fly catching bugs-Camden County, NJ [Yong Kong ]
22 Jun Request for help in planning a trip [Ernest Hahn ]
22 Jun Possible Lincoln's Sparrow in Middlesex County? ["B.G. Sloan" ]
22 Jun Bayonne Golf Club ["Albert, Steven" ]
22 Jun Very odd Red-tailed Hawk [Dan Ceravolo ]
22 Jun Re: Northern Bobwhite [Chase Schiefer ]
21 Jun Photo of a Mourning Dove "anting" ["B.G. Sloan" ]
21 Jun Yong Response to Mike B's Northern Bobwhite post [Yong Kong ]
21 Jun Northern Bobwhite [Michael Britt ]
20 Jun Avalon Seawatch [Michael Britt ]
20 Jun Old Mine Road, Saturday June 20 [Mike Mandracchia ]
20 Jun Eight Blue Jays -- & Cabbage White butterfly photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
20 Jun Re: Nesting Kestrels? [Dom ]
20 Jun Baby Bird ID consensus [Larry-Zirlin ]
19 Jun Nesting Kestrels? [Michael Britt ]
19 Jun More Juv. Bird ID study [Yong Kong ]
19 Jun Re: Baby Bird ID help. ["B.G. Sloan" ]
19 Jun Re: Baby Bird ID help. [Jim Hayes ]
19 Jun Baby Bird ID help. [Larry-Zirlin ]
19 Jun OT? article on learning to ID birds in NYTimes [Susan Garretsonfriedman ]
19 Jun Re: Assunpink Blue Grosbeak [michael hodanish ]
19 Jun Re: Assunpink Blue Grosbeak [Michael Perlin ]
19 Jun Curious Observation of Hummingbird Feeding [Jimmy Lee ]
19 Jun Assunpink Blue Grosbeak [Bob Dodelson ]
19 Jun ebird totals from different years [Sandra Keller ]
18 Jun Re: ebird question [John Beetham ]
18 Jun Re: ebird question [Michael Turso ]
18 Jun ebird question [Sandra Keller ]
18 Jun Birch Creek - Gloucester County [Sandra Keller ]
18 Jun Local river birding for breeders [Sandra Keller ]
18 Jun Annual Migration Routes [Robert Gallucci ]
18 Jun Mystery bird (two photos) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 Jun Red-winged Blackbird fledgling (hiding) - photo ["B.G. Sloan" ]
18 Jun Re: Red-tailed Hawk age? [Peggy Cadigan ]
18 Jun Red-tailed Hawk age? [Shayna Marchese ]
17 Jun Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Cape May County [Samuel Galick ]
17 Jun Harbor Heron survey [Nellie Tsipoura ]
17 Jun Hummingbirds ["Susie R." ]
17 Jun Re: new ebird app [Robert Gallucci ]
16 Jun Pine Island Quail story in Philly Inquirer [Cathy Blumig ]
16 Jun new ebird app [Sandra Keller ]
16 Jun crows woods - local notes [Sandra Keller ]
16 Jun Re: N. Odessa and Pestalozzi grassland, Galloway Township [jeanine apgar ]
15 Jun NY Times article - bird sound [Linda Mack ]
15 Jun Bald Eagles in Hudson County NJ [Patricia Hilliard ]
15 Jun Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting [Beth Goldberg ]
15 Jun Brigantine/Forsythe 6/14/2015 [Jimmy Lee ]
14 Jun N. Odessa and Pestalozzi grassland, Galloway Township [Yong Kong ]
14 Jun Hatfield Swamp Saturday [Diane C Louie ]
14 Jun Clinton Road: GWWA, Ceruleans, questions [Louis Bizzarro ]

Subject: Shearwaters at Cape May Pt, June 28
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 22:31:22 -0400
Hi all –

A remarkable "exit flight" of shearwaters occurred through the mouth of
Delaware Bay this morning, viewed by several observers at Cape May Point. A
count conducted from the Coral Ave dune crossover produced the following
from 5:30am-10:00am:

186 Great Shearwaters
19 Cory's Shearwaters
2 Manx Shearwaters
1 Sooty Shearwater

This was a significant, and perhaps unprecedented, event by local
standards. While summertime concentrations of (usually Cory's) shearwaters
have been known to occur within sight of land over a few days or weeks,
post-storm movements--birds exiting from bay to ocean--are rare and usually
involve just a handful of shearwaters.

Today's show belonged to Great Shearwater. Though reported from shore
annually, it is almost always seen in very small numbers. A quick search
through previous land-based records produced no totals higher than 25 (July
2009). This morning's movement was heaviest from 7-8am, when 120+ Greats
flew by-- some in groups of 15-24 individuals! It was also during this hour
that the two Manx Shearwaters moved through--one by itself, another with a
group of a dozen Greats. Cory's Shearwater did not play a big role in this
event, with most pushing through during the first 90 minutes after sunrise,
and almost always just one at a time.

As always, predicting these events makes for a fun and challenging game.
Saturday's gusty southeast winds, poor visibility, and persistent
storminess undoubtedly played a big part, and I imagine that the overnight
incoming tide (high tide was at daybreak today) also helped. But how far
these birds traveled to arrive in Delaware Bay, when they arrived, and how
far into the bay they flew/floated are questions that lack any real answers
(yet).

Some of the Great Shearwaters appeared to be in poor shape, and a few
observers watched one expire while it was floating on the bay in front of
us. Folks in the Bahamas have been monitoring a recent die-off of Great
Shearwaters, featured here:

http://rollingharbour.com/2015/06/24/shearwaters-on-abaco-sad-tales-from-the-sea/ 



and here:

http://blog.aba.org/2015/06/monitoring-a-shearwater-die-off-in-the-bahamas-and-how-you-can-help.html 


Please keep an eye out for weak or dead seabirds if spending time along the
coast this week.



good birding,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
coturnicops at gmail dot com

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Forsythe Refuge & Grasshopper Sparrow in Galloway Township - Sunday June 28
From: Tom Bailey <ammodramus AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 29 Jun 2015 00:20:10 +0000
I stopped by the location in Galloway Township, Atlantic County this morning 
where Yong Kong reported 

a Grasshopper Sparrow on May 29 & June 14. The bird is still there singing away 
in a fairly thin strip of 

grass planted with Xmas trees. At one point the Grasshopper Sparrow as well as 
a Field & Chipping Sparrow 

were perched up on tops of the small Xmas trees near each other singing away. 
The land I believe is owned by 

Sahl's Father & Son Farm. A singing Blue Grosbeak & a hen Turkey with several 
polts was nearby on Mannheim Rd. 

See Yong's post from June 14 for more info.

A quick drive through Forsythe NWR yielded an adult PB Grebe & a Caspian Tern 
seen from the Gull Pond Tower, a 

singing Willow Flycatcher and very cooperative & vocal Clapper Rails at Leeds 
Eco Trail boardwalk, a Least Tern 

at the northeast corner, and many Diamondback Terrapins on the road attempting 
to lay eggs. 


Tom

Tom Bailey
Tabernacle, NJ
ammodramus AT comcast.net

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Laughing Gulls - Feasting on Blueberry, Atlantic County
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 17:06:04 -0400
While out and about, I happened to come upon a flock of Laughing Gulls feasting 
on Blueberries. Actually found another flock at a different blueberry field as 
well. At the second field I so wanted to join in. But there were several No 
Trespassing signs. So I did not dare. 


Few photos on my Flicker.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County








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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hawk fledge at Pine Park
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 15:19:03 -0400
Their one and only chick fledged today. Looking at his head feathers, he's 
still a bit young but the parents will keep close watch. 

https://flic.kr/p/vjEMv4
https://flic.kr/p/vjELbk
https://flic.kr/p/viNYvb

The flocks are now full...bluebird, gnatcatchers, goldfinch, house finch, 
titmice, mockingbirds, thrashers, carolina wrens, waxwings, grackles and 
unfortunately a bumper crop of cowbirds were widespread. Also had a peewee, a 
family of great crested flycatchers and a juvenile red-shouldered hawk hunting 
in the marsh along the river. Herps seen were snapping turtle and black rat 
snake sunning by the pond. 


Good birding.

James
Jackson, NJ
 		 	   		  
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: (post didn't get through)
From: Frank and Clare Muscara <ctmuscara AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 14:34:54 -0400
 Sightings at Wallisch Homestead in West Milford
 June 28, 10am

     Well the trail was awfully wet, but we had boots. The raindrops were
falling but we had hats. The ticks were abundant. However the trip was
worthwhile. We saw common yellowthroat warbler, willow flycatcher, and blue
gray gnatcatcher on its nest. But the bird of the day was the yellow
breasted chat sitting in an oak sapling which was right on the trail.

 Best Regards,

 Frank and Clare

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fwd: Sightings at Wallisch Homestead in West Milford
From: Frank and Clare Muscara <ctmuscara AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 14:28:50 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Frank and Clare Muscara 
Date: Sun, Jun 28, 2015 at 1:24 PM
Subject: Sightings at Wallisch Homestead in West Milford
To: jerseybirds AT princeton.edu


     June 28, 10am

     Well the trail was awfully wet, but we had boots. The raindrops were
falling but we had hats. The ticks were abundant. However the trip was
worthwhile. We saw common yellowthroat warbler, willow flycatcher, and blue
gray gnatcatcher on its nest. But the bird of the day was the yellow
breasted chat sitting in an oak sapling which was right on the trail.

     Best Regards,
     Frank and Clare

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: NP dredge - breeders
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 16:56:48 -0400
Hello,
 Went out for a couple hours mid day during a lull in the rain. Nothing out of 
the 

ordinary. No early shorebirds back. The east pool will still be the spot - the 
west is 

entirely overgrown. Even in a drizzle and light rain, swallows were actively 
feeding 

over the east pool and the dredge area where theres vegetation. They were 
flying 

low. Nice views. 2 Chat. The one in the usual spot along the north dike area.
The other along the west dike area. The one on the north dike was showing 
nicely. 

That's different! Etc. Etc. My point being loads of breeders very active and 
visible. 


Butterfly notes - Red Admiral. Not flying until I flushed it on the north dike. 
Guess it was 

roosting on the dike. Waiting for sun and warmth!

Good birding all. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bergen Big June
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 07:32:10 -0400
I guess in my haste I neglected to give my total. I did make it to 100 for
the month of June. If I had stayed home instead of heading out west,
there's another 10 -15 birds to see in the county with a possibility  of
early shorebird or 2.

Good Birding
Chris Takacs
Lyndhurst

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bergen County Big June
From: Christopher Takacs <americanchris22 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 17:33:26 -0400
Decided to attempt 100 species in Bergen County for the month of June.
Early morning walks at Richard DeKorte  Park were productive. Least
Bittern, Least Tern, Yellow-crowned  Night - Heron, Black Skimmer, Laughing
Gull and Blue Grosbeak were seen in early hours. 2 rare and protected
nesters were seen too, 25 Savannah Sparrows and 2 Saltmarsh Sparrows were
seen in the district. Late migrants, Black - bellied Plover and
Semi-palmated Plover were seen in the first few days of June.
      A couple of weekend hikes to the Ramapos got us looks at Acadian
Flycatcher, Ovenbird, Redstart, Yellow-throated Vireo,  Worm-eating Warbler
and Louisiana Waterthrush.
      Peregrine  Falcon juvies were seen at local nest sights from afar and
a Male Kestrel was seen along Disposal Rd. Last bird was a Fish Crow seen
in Lyndhurst  Shop-Rite lot. They seem to have taken to nesting in some of
the large oaks around town.
  I know I left birds out there, probably  could have seen another 15 if I
pushed. No Owls.
   A fun time doing it and wonder how some of the Big County year folks did
this month.

Good Birding,
Chris Takacs
Lyndhurst

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Raritan River Osprey (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:23:39 -0400
Spent some time in Donaldson Park in Highland Park (Middlesex County)
today. Had the good fortune to observe and hear an Osprey perched on the
opposite side of the river from the boat launch ramp in the park! There may
well have been a second Osprey. Whenever my bird called, I would look up
and catch a fleeting glimpse of another bird.

In case someone is interested in looking for the Osprey, here is a
documentation photo showing the bird perched on a structure directly across
the Raritan River from the Donaldson Park boat ramp. The photo will give
you an idea of where to look:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18995516340/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Very late report of 4-17- 2015 possibly a hybrid Little x Snowy at Brig Refuge
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 00:09:16 -0400
I can see what you're talking about with the bill/head profile and the head 
plumes do seem a bit on the long side but nothing to far out of the range of 
SNEG. The plumes on the breast and rump also seem wispy enough for SNEG. I'd 
have to say Snowy. 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 25, 2015, at 11:31 PM, Brian Kushner  wrote:
> 
> Looks like a Snowy to me but I'm no expert.
> 
> 
> 
>> On 6/25/2015 11:05 PM, Yong Kong wrote:
>> I did not realized I had taken 3 photos of odd looking egret on 4-17-2015 at 
Brig until tonight. I was going thru old photos. I do not remember taking the 
photos. Based on one of the photo that shows rock jetty, it appears the bird 
was at the bayside of the Turtle Cove. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Reached out to an out-of-state expert birder who is very familiar with 
little egret as well as snowy. The birder stated very possibly a hybrid. The 
birder also stated “that head profile looks more like a Little than a 
Snowy”. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I do not believe this is the same bird as Harvey T.’s bird dated April 21, 
2015. As we all know he found another at Nummy’s Island on June 13, 2015. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> So that makes it Brig Refuge had 2 hybrids this April, and potentially total 
of 3 for south jersey. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Photos on my Flicker
>> 
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Yong Kong
>> 
>> Camden County
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ---
>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>> http://www.avast.com
>> 
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
> 
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Very late report of 4-17- 2015 possibly a hybrid Little x Snowy at Brig Refuge
From: Brian Kushner <bkushner2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:31:05 -0400
Looks like a Snowy to me but I'm no expert.



On 6/25/2015 11:05 PM, Yong Kong wrote:
> I did not realized I had taken 3 photos of odd looking egret on 4-17-2015 at 
Brig until tonight. I was going thru old photos. I do not remember taking the 
photos. Based on one of the photo that shows rock jetty, it appears the bird 
was at the bayside of the Turtle Cove. 

>
>
>
> Reached out to an out-of-state expert birder who is very familiar with little 
egret as well as snowy. The birder stated very possibly a hybrid. The birder 
also stated “that head profile looks more like a Little than a Snowy”. 

>
>
>
> I do not believe this is the same bird as Harvey T.’s bird dated April 21, 
2015. As we all know he found another at Nummy’s Island on June 13, 2015. 

>
>
>
> So that makes it Brig Refuge had 2 hybrids this April, and potentially total 
of 3 for south jersey. 

>
>
>
> Photos on my Flicker
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/
>
>
>
> Yong Kong
>
> Camden County
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> http://www.avast.com
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: large hummingbird
From: Theodore Chase <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:22:15 -0400
I looked at my hummingbird feeder this morning, and there was a Downy  
Woodpecker trying to get the sugar water.  I doubt his beak could get  
in the small holes for hummingbird bills, but perhaps he could extend  
his tongue into the sugar water.
	Ted Chase
	Franklin Twp, Somerset Co.

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: baby owls
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:12:59 -0400
calling this week in the late evening
 
C. Wyluda
Pennington

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Very late report of 4-17- 2015 possibly a hybrid Little x Snowy at Brig Refuge
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:05:25 -0400
I did not realized I had taken 3 photos of odd looking egret on 4-17-2015 at 
Brig until tonight. I was going thru old photos. I do not remember taking the 
photos. Based on one of the photo that shows rock jetty, it appears the bird 
was at the bayside of the Turtle Cove. 




Reached out to an out-of-state expert birder who is very familiar with little 
egret as well as snowy. The birder stated very possibly a hybrid. The birder 
also stated “that head profile looks more like a Little than a Snowy”. 




I do not believe this is the same bird as Harvey T.’s bird dated April 21, 
2015. As we all know he found another at Nummy’s Island on June 13, 2015. 




So that makes it Brig Refuge had 2 hybrids this April, and potentially total of 
3 for south jersey. 




Photos on my Flicker

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/



Yong Kong

Camden County















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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo Study Of Birds At E. B. Forsythe NWR (Brig), 6/24/15
From: "Howard B. Eskin" <hbeskin AT VOICENET.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 20:19:16 -0500
Briton Parker and I were able to get to Brig yesterday on a beautiful,
very bright sunny day. The tide was low most of the day and we saw lots of
birds (45 species). To see the Photo Study and a list of the species seen,
please click on the following link:

http://www.howardsview.com/Brig%20June%2024th,%202015/BrigJune24th_15.html

Regards,
Howard


Howard B. Eskin, Ph.D., P.E.
Harleysville (Montco), PA

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: New Karlson & Rosselet book
From: Rick Wright <birdaz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 20:17:46 -0400
My review is here, p. 27:

http://www.tucsonaudubon.org/images/stories/vflycatcher/VF_AMJ15.pdf

Rick Wright 
Bloomfield, NJ

Victor Emanuel Nature Tours : Nebraska

, 

and Birds and Art  in Catalonia
,
Provence
,
Burgundy
,
Brandenburg

, 

Tuscany , Venice and the Po
Delta

 


Birding New Jersey and the World 

ABA Field Guides to Birds of New Jersey

 

and
Birds of Arizona 

Review Editor, Birding 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: New Karlson & Rosselet book
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 20:02:00 -0400
Anybody have any personal reviews they would like to share on the new
"Peterson Reference Guide To Birding By Impression: A Different Approach to
Knowing and Identifying Birds."

Is it as rich as the seawatching guide by Behrens & Cox?

Is it a good complement to Kenn Kaufman's "Field Guide to Advanced Birding?"

Reply on or off-list.

TIA,
Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: chukar partridge / garret mountain
From: Danusha Goska <0000017c3756cdf6-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 23:02:17 +0000
I just saw a chukar partridge on Garret Mountain on the rocky area behind the 
stable. Strange experience as I know they don't belong here, and the bird 
actually approached me (within four feet) and never flew. I watched it for 
about ten - fifteen minutes and it never took flight. It approached me and 
walked away from me.  Danusha V. Goska, PhD. 

Author, "Save Send Delete."
http://www.amazon.com/Save-Send-Delete-Danusha-Goska/dp/1846949866

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: "Possible" Lincoln's Sparrow (follow-up)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2015 17:19:50 -0400
OK...so my ears must have been playing tricks on me when I posted about a
"possible" Lincoln's Sparrow on Monday. If you re-read my original post
you'll get the drift that I thought that Lincoln's Sparrow was rather
improbable, but the song sounded to me exactly like Lincoln's Sparrow songs
I have heard before. And the bird also had an alternate song that I had
never heard before.

So, I went back the next day to listen again, and perhaps record the song.
The bird was in the same spot, but singing a rather different song. When
another bird answered this song I thought "OK...one Lincoln's Sparrow
here/now is improbable, but the odds of hearing two are about zero". You
guessed it: Song Sparrow. I went to the Macaulay Library site and listened
to recordings. I hadn't realized how varied SOSP songs can be.

My Tuesday trip to Johnson Park wasn't a total loss though. While standing
on a footbridge I looked down and shot the best ever photo I have taken of
a Water Strider:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19088882052/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Fruit Loving Kingfishers
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 19:08:39 -0400
David I would not be surprised if a neighbor has a pond or landscape pool
for fish.I can relate a story in terms of  a Kingfisher escapade.

A few years back in the heat of July my wife called me because a friend who
owned a nursery on Rte. 202/206 had reported a 'Northern Shrike' eating her
fancy pond goldfish.Could I help being a birder?Now I don't chase but
mention a Shrike and my fat butt is on it's way.I arrived and she showed me
the body of water where the thefts occurred.Expensive multi-colored fish
were swimming about an 8 x 10 ft. pond up against the building. She showed
me her brainstorm idea of hiding around the corner of the building with a
crab net to 'catch' the bird in the act.I had suggested this could hurt the
bird but at this point in time she was beyond compassion.In about 5-10
minutes came the Kingfisher battle cry we recognize  before this species
takes the plunge. With that a Kingfisher set flight off a large garden
archway and slammed into the pond.A few seconds behind the nursery owner
wheeled around the corner having 2 hands on the net and swung it with
enough force  to slam into the water gathering lilies in the pond and
happily missing the hunter.I watched that Kingfisher fly away with a
gorgous 5 inch long calico Goldfish the owner claimed cost 20 dollars. I
then suggested she put thick netting over the pond and this could cure her
vandals success rate. I told her the bird was a Belted Kingfisher and not a
Shrike and she said, "What's the difference?" My reply was,"Do you have any
pet birds?"

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Fruit Loving Kingfisher?
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 17:14:03 -0400
Afternoon folks,

We have lived in our home in Berkeley Heights for 22 years and have had some 
remarkable birding experiences. This morning, I saw something that puzzled me. 


We have several popular Mulberry trees on the property. While watching the 
Baltimore Orioles gorge themselves, I had a Belted Kingfisher fly past me just 
above eye level directly into the tree, seemingly joining the food fest in 
progress. Now the bird may have exited the tree on the other side, I don't 
know. 


We live on a ridge. The nearest water, Passaic River, is a five minute car ride 
away. No other ponds or wet areas in my neighborhood. A very nice new yard 
bird. But why? 


Has anyone ever seen a Kingfisher eat fruit? I know the famous Mulberry tree at 
Assunpink has had some remarkable visitors over the years. 


Anyone see anything similar in the field? 

Good birding to all.

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ


Sent from my iPad

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: PHOTO: Northern Rough-winged Swallow Adult and Two Fledglings Perched in a Tree
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:40:13 -0400
Lots of Northern Rough-winged Swallow activity today along the Raritan
River. Fledglings are out and about, but still hitting up the parents for
food. There were a lot of birds lounging in a dead tree. I have one photo
showing six perched swallows, but this photo is the clearest of the bunch.
An adult keeping watch over two fledglings:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/19098812316/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: "Winter" birds at the feeder
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Jun 2015 08:47:51 -0400
Yesterday morning, I thought I had a female Purple Finch at my feeder until
it turned around and became a young Song Sparrow.

But this morning, there was a Junco at the same feeder.  It was gone,
however, by the time I came back with the camera.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: OT-Maine’s Little Egret
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 21:09:53 -0400
Thanks for the vote of confidence Yong, but I saw the LIEG in DE years ago. No 
need to waste gas/money on a trip to Maine. Still looking at every SNEG in NJ 
hoping one day. The best I have seen so far are Harvey's hybrid shots! 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 23, 2015, at 5:54 PM, Yong Kong  wrote:
> 
> Lately, everyday I come home from work, first thing I do open my lap and to 
see if a report of Larry S. and/or Brandon R. chasing that Maine’s Little 
Egret and follow-up photos and reports. 

> 
> Larry ? Brandon ? Any other NJ’s chasers ?
> 
> Yong Kong
> Camden County
> 
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: OT-Maine’s Little Egret
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:54:45 -0400
Lately, everyday I come home from work, first thing I do open my lap and to see 
if a report of Larry S. and/or Brandon R. chasing that Maine’s Little Egret 
and follow-up photos and reports. 


Larry ? Brandon ? Any other NJ’s chasers ?

Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Cedar waxwings fly catching bugs-Camden County, NJ
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 20:54:58 -0400
While inspecting my bird habiat around the yard and trying to come up w/ a 
solution as to how to get rid of Japanese Stilt grass (invasive species in NJ), 
a flock of Cedar Waxwings landed on the black walnut tree at the end of my 
driveway, as they typically have been this year, especially just before the 
sunset. 


I managed to get a few photos of cedar waxwings fly catching bugs. 6 photos on 
my flicker. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County



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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Request for help in planning a trip
From: Ernest Hahn <ernesthahn AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 19:40:18 -0400
I was wondering if any member of our group has ever traveled to Dauphin Island, 
AL? My wife and I are planning a trip for next April and were wondering if 
historically the second or third week would be better. Thank you very much for 
any insight you might provide. 


Ernie Hahn
Ewing, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Possible Lincoln's Sparrow in Middlesex County?
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:06:15 -0400
The Audubon online field guide says the following about Lincoln's Sparrows:

"Generally a skulker in dense low cover, this sparrow often goes unnoticed
during migration and winter -- especially in the East, where it is quite
uncommon. In the West, birders soon learn to find it by its hard chep
callnote in the bushes. Even where they are common, Lincoln's Sparrows tend
to be solitary, not joining flocks. The musical song of the males is heard
in summer in willow thickets of the North and the Mountain West."

The behavior of the bird I saw didn't seem quite right. This smallish
sparrow-like bird didn't skulk around. It sat on open branches a bit above
a small stream and sang a song. It did periodically fly down into
streamside vegetation.

The bird had two songs. The first sounded pretty much to me EXACTLY like
this recording from the Audubon online field guide. Go to
http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/lincolns-sparrow and then scroll
down to "Songs and Calls". Click on "Song #1".

After I listened for a while, the bird started an alternate song that went
kind of like this: "WHEEE (brief pause) tu-tu-tu-tu-tu-tu-tu-tu (brief
pause) WHEAT CHA!".

If anyone is curious about letting me know if I am right, go to the
Highland Park section of Johnson Park and stand on the wooden footbridge
above the creek that flows between the soccer and softball fields.
Hopefully you would hear the bird singing from there...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bayonne Golf Club
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 18:14:00 +0000
Jersey Birders -

After dropping a friend at the airport early this morning, I went over to the 
Golf Club to see if I could conjure up any of the rails that have been seen or 
heard over the past week (clapper seen, king heard - sounds like the same pair 
as last year). It was low tide, but no luck on the rails for me. Lots of mud 
flats, lots of Black-crowned night herons of various ages, and a surprising, 
very nice looking Greater scaup: 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/18868725609

Good birding.

Steven

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Senior Program Manager
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Very odd Red-tailed Hawk
From: Dan Ceravolo <dceravolo AT NETTELPARTNERS.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 12:36:17 -0400
Today I saw a very odd red-tailed hawk at Maple Ridge in Gloucester
County.  It had all the normal markings, like red tail, light underneath
with dark mark on leading edge, dark head, breast band, etc. The odd part
was that it had very bright and distinct white spots just like a juv Golden
Eagle, on the top of the wings,near the greater primary coverts. The spots
were clean white, not just lighter.  It was soaring, and I got to see these
spots very clearly for almost 10 mins as it soared back and forth.

Is it possible this is a hybrid of some sort? Maybe a very partial albino?
There was supposedly an albino here years ago, but I've never seen it.

I did not get pics as it was somewhat incidental and I had no camera. Has
anyone seen anything like this?  I will try to go back and get pics if
possible.

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Northern Bobwhite
From: Chase Schiefer <bachmans.ivory AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 01:22:12 -0400
About 5 or 6 years ago, I ran across a Bobwhite at Poricy park in Middletown 
(Monmouth County). The bird was a female and appeared fairly tame. It foraged 
just a few feet from me, at one point almost walking up my leg. 


Chase Schiefer
Bachmans Ivory
Http://chaseschiefer.500px.com

www.facebook.com/chaseschieferphotography 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bachmansivory/sets/



Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 21, 2015, at 10:14 AM, Michael Britt  wrote:
> 
> Jerseybirders,
> 
> My only Northern Bobwhite was a hen with chicks, that ran across the road
> at the Allee House fields at Bombay Hook, Delaware. I would like to tick
> the species for New Jersey but in good conscience. Has anyone seen evidence
> of breeding (female with chicks or other solid evidence) in recent years?
> If so, is there a good roadside, parking lot, or trail to stake them out?
> 
> Please respond to the list, as I'm sure others are interested and would
> like to know with all the recent talk about the restoration effort;)
> 
> Thanks,
> Mike Britt
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Photo of a Mourning Dove "anting"
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 20:24:02 -0400
From what I've read, many bird species do this. They get down on the ground
in a sunny spot where there are ants, spread their feathers, and then let
the ants pick off the birds' parasites. The birds seem to be in a
trance-like state while this is going on:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18849012540/

Photo taken from my deck...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Yong Response to Mike B's Northern Bobwhite post
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 18:51:28 -0400
If I was to chase a Northern Bob White in NJ and want to see a "true" 
establishment and reintroduction of this species in NJ, here is what I have 
in my little bird brain.

First, if one is to chase one today.

Check out the research paper below


https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Michael+T.+Lohr+bobwhite+quail+in+cumberland+county 


Or one can Google by Michael T. Lohr .... bobwhite coveys in Cumberland 
County (you can Google the article)


Then, I would';

1.    Outline the study area in Cumberland County on Google Earth (or Bing 
Map) using Paint program

2.    Narrow down the private farms that Bob Whites are supposed to be at 
(appropriate habitat, etc), if possible

3.    Take a trip down there at scout and drive around, hoping to run into a 
farmer and ask if his farm has quail

4.    If yes, ask for  permission to enter and check one out. My bet is most 
farmers will go for it.

Or we can rely on the experts and environmental conservation organizations 
who are in charge to make this happen.

1.  Stop going after the low hanging fruit, i.e. blame on habitat loss, 
natural succession, birders who love their mature trees(forest) to their 
death for love of birds,  land development, etc.

2. I could mention temporary ban of hunting this species of quail until they 
are recovered naturally with the help of habitat management. But we are not 
supposed to talked about subjects like this here since most of birders I 
have met over the years seems to be only interested in listing this species 
and move on.

As usual, my apologies in advance if I had offended just about every birder 
in NJ, once again.

Did I say us birders/conservationist/land preservationist are also killing 
this species as well as hunters, land development and developers, natural 
succession ?

Yong Kong
Camden County







-----Original Message----- 
From: Michael Britt
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2015 10:14 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Northern Bobwhite

Jerseybirders,

My only Northern Bobwhite was a hen with chicks, that ran across the road
at the Allee House fields at Bombay Hook, Delaware. I would like to tick
the species for New Jersey but in good conscience. Has anyone seen evidence
of breeding (female with chicks or other solid evidence) in recent years?
If so, is there a good roadside, parking lot, or trail to stake them out?

Please respond to the list, as I'm sure others are interested and would
like to know with all the recent talk about the restoration effort;)

Thanks,
Mike Britt

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings:  


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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Northern Bobwhite
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 21 Jun 2015 10:14:30 -0400
Jerseybirders,

My only Northern Bobwhite was a hen with chicks, that ran across the road
at the Allee House fields at Bombay Hook, Delaware. I would like to tick
the species for New Jersey but in good conscience. Has anyone seen evidence
of breeding (female with chicks or other solid evidence) in recent years?
If so, is there a good roadside, parking lot, or trail to stake them out?

Please respond to the list, as I'm sure others are interested and would
like to know with all the recent talk about the restoration effort;)

Thanks,
Mike Britt

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Avalon Seawatch
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 19:56:40 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Jon Stippick and I observed a CORY'S SHEARWATER and about a dozen WILSON'S
STORM-PETRELS from Avalon this AM.

More details here:

https://pelagicaddict.wordpress.com/2015/06/20/avalon-seawatch-3/

Mike Britt
Bayonne

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Old Mine Road, Saturday June 20
From: Mike Mandracchia <mmandrake AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 18:47:03 -0400
Jersey Birders:  Today, I led a trip for New Jersey Audubon's All Things 
Birds Program final Spring Trip along Old Mine Road. I would like to 
thank our "Naturalist Emeritus" Pete Bacinski for his assistance.

Heavy overcast skies and brief periods of light rain appeared to have 
kept bird activity down, except for Cedar Waxwings which seemed to be 
everywhere we stopped. However, we did manage to find most of the 
expected species. Highlights include two Bald Eagles, a pair of very 
cooperative Green Herons, and 4 Belted Kingfishers.  Unfortunately, our 
biggest surprise was not finding a single Cerulean Warbler for the 
trip.   

We totaled 65 species for the day including 9 species of warblers. 
 
Additionally, we had confirmed sightings of both Jimmy Lee and "Larus 
zirlini" (aka Larry). 
  
  My next scheduled trip for New Jersey Audubon's All Things Birds 
Program will be down to Brigantine (Edwin B. Forsythe NWR) on July 11, 
2015. Come join us as we kick off New Jersey Audubon's Summer Weekly 
Saturday Brigantine Trips searching for local breeders and 
early Southward migrating Shorebirds.
  
  Good Birding
   
  Mike Mandracchia
  Jackson

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Eight Blue Jays -- & Cabbage White butterfly photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 11:06:15 -0400
Set a personal yard bird record this morning. Eight Blue Jays in my ground
feeding area at the same time! None of them seemed like young birds, e.g.,
no begging behavior. For some reason we have had a LOT of Blue Jays around
here. Other than that, the yard has pretty slim pickings species-wise:
House Sparrows, Catbird, Mourning Doves, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Robin, and
the occasional Cardinal.

Also had a major (to me) butterfly photography accomplishment yesterday
This spring I set a goal of taking a decent photo of a Cabbage White
butterfly. Those small whitish butterflies that are constantly flitting
around and don't stand still for long. It's been quite a challenge,
especially considering my camera (I have to get within a few inches). I bet
I've taken at least 500 bad photos of this species! But yesterday I FINALLY
had success and got a photo I feel good about:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18781877290/

And I also managed to snap this interesting photo of a small spider hiding
in a flower, waiting for an unsuspecting insect to come along:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18780422680/

*Bernie Sloan*

*Highland Park*

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Nesting Kestrels?
From: Dom <dom AT MONTEVIDEO.COM.UY>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 09:51:56 -0400
Hi Mike,
There is also a nesting pair in Hoboken this season. I don't have access to
the roof they're on, but it looks like they're nesting in some kind of air
vent or chimney system on the roof of one of the big apartment blocks.
Interestingly, for the last 2 weeks I've seen the male much more frequently
than the female, (although some passing corvids forced her off the roof
last week, and the male came in to help with the defence - which included
an odd stiff-winged fluttering kind of distraction display - I'd never seen
that before). I wonder if that means she's incubating?
Cheers
Dom

www.antbirder.blogspot.com

www.aventuraargentina.com

+ 1 646 429 2667


On 19 June 2015 at 17:34, Michael Britt  wrote:

> Any pair of American Kestrels is noteworthy. This morning at 6:30AM, I
> observed a Kestrel carrying prey fairly high over Rt. 46 (N-S) in Fort Lee.
> It was heading towards Bergen Blvd...
>
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne, NJ
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Baby Bird ID consensus
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 02:52:04 +0000
Thanks to all who helped. The consensus is Red-winged Blackbird, and, given the 
location, I probably should have just guessed that but I think seeing it next 
to Barn Swallows turned it into a knuckle ball pitch for me. 


Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Nesting Kestrels?
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:34:13 -0400
Any pair of American Kestrels is noteworthy. This morning at 6:30AM, I
observed a Kestrel carrying prey fairly high over Rt. 46 (N-S) in Fort Lee.
It was heading towards Bergen Blvd...

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: More Juv. Bird ID study
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 19:05:59 -0400
Purpose of my post is to say thank you to Larry Zirlin for writing, and also to 
provide additional opportunity for us (well, may be not those are experts !!) 
to learn the ID of Juv birds. I posted 11 photos of a Juv bird for study and to 
ID on my flicker. This species has stumped me for 2 years in a row. Deep in 
side of my bird brain, I had a hunch. But I refused to believe it. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Baby Bird ID help.
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 18:24:10 -0400
Right now I'm agreeing with Jim Hayes. I posted directly to Larry Zirlin
and said "Red-winged Blackbird??". It reminded me of a photo I took the
other day:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18904320686/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 6:00 PM, Jim Hayes  wrote:

> Larry:It looks kind of like a fledging red-winged blackbird, judging by
> the wing color and the streaking on the breast. Just a guess.Jim Hayes,
> Wanaque, NJ
>
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> From: Larry-Zirlin 
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Baby Bird ID help.
> Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 21:04:18 +0000
>
> While driving down Great Bay Blvd is came across this chick on the road.
> At first, from a distance, I thought it would be a Barn Swallow, since
> there were 3 adults sitting in front of my car, but getting closer I saw
> that it was a bit bigger than the swallows, and with a honker like that, no
> swallow. Beyond that, I have no idea what this bird could be. Any
> suggestions would be appreciated:
> https://picasaweb.google.com/LZirlin/BabyBirdGreatBayBlvd
>
> Larry Zirlin
> Whiting, NJ
> http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/
>
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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Baby Bird ID help.
From: Jim Hayes <jehman55 AT JUNO.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 22:00:52 GMT
Larry:It looks kind of like a fledging red-winged blackbird, judging by the 
wing color and the streaking on the breast. Just a guess.Jim Hayes, Wanaque, NJ 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: Larry-Zirlin 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Baby Bird ID help.
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 21:04:18 +0000

While driving down Great Bay Blvd is came across this chick on the road. At 
first, from a distance, I thought it would be a Barn Swallow, since there were 
3 adults sitting in front of my car, but getting closer I saw that it was a bit 
bigger than the swallows, and with a honker like that, no swallow. Beyond that, 
I have no idea what this bird could be. Any suggestions would be appreciated: 

https://picasaweb.google.com/LZirlin/BabyBirdGreatBayBlvd 

Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Baby Bird ID help.
From: Larry-Zirlin <larry-zirlin AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 21:04:18 +0000
While driving down Great Bay Blvd is came across this chick on the road. At 
first, from a distance, I thought it would be a Barn Swallow, since there were 
3 adults sitting in front of my car, but getting closer I saw that it was a bit 
bigger than the swallows, and with a honker like that, no swallow. Beyond that, 
I have no idea what this bird could be. Any suggestions would be appreciated: 

https://picasaweb.google.com/LZirlin/BabyBirdGreatBayBlvd 

Larry Zirlin 
Whiting, NJ 
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: OT? article on learning to ID birds in NYTimes
From: Susan Garretsonfriedman <susan.garretsonfriedman AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 14:40:52 -0400
that I very much enjoyed, and though many here would:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/21/magazine/identification-please.html

Thanks,

*Susan*
Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary

New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924
908-766-5787

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Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Assunpink Blue Grosbeak
From: michael hodanish <luv2howl AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 13:34:10 -0400
Blue grosbeaks are also present at Colliers Mills WMA.  I observed a 
male yesterday afternoon at about 5pm walking along the dirt road.  They 
are present in the fields and treetops along the main dirt road (the one 
with large fields on both sides).  It is best to listen for them first, 
then track them down.  Grasshopper sparrows & indigo buntings are likely 
present as well, though haven't heard any sparrows singing for a few 
weeks now.



Michael Hodanish, President
Howling Woods Farm
Jackson, NJ
www.howlingwoods.org


On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 01:19 PM, Michael Perlin wrote:

> Thank you, Bob ! Tomorrow is the last Washington's Crossing Audubon 
> walk of
> the spring, at Assunpink. We'll be on the lookout!
> Best,
> Michael Perlin
> Trenton
>
> PS O-T: I am just back from Hong Kong where I had two remarkable 
> birding
> mornings. For those interested in birds in that area, e me for the 
> list;
> I've posted several pix on my home page on FB and on the Traveling 
> Birders
> forum there as well
>
> On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 9:20 AM, Bob Dodelson  wrote:
>
>> Several people have asked me about the location of Blue Grosbeaks in
>> Assunpink. I haven't had any in the WMA this year until this morning.
>> The bird was singing at the cul-de-sac of the dirt road that goes 
>> past the
>> large mulberry tree (accessed by the gravel and dirt road from 
>> Imlaystown
>> Rd a few yards from the main boat launch area of Lake Assunpink)
>> Brown Thrashers and White-eyed Vireos among others are also to be 
>> seen and
>> heard along this stretch
>> Bob Dodelson
>>
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>> How to report NJ bird sightings:
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings:

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Assunpink Blue Grosbeak
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 13:19:27 -0400
Thank you, Bob ! Tomorrow is the last Washington's Crossing Audubon walk of
the spring, at Assunpink. We'll be on the lookout!
Best,
Michael Perlin
Trenton

PS O-T: I am just back from Hong Kong where I had two remarkable birding
mornings. For those interested in birds in that area, e me for the list;
I've posted several pix on my home page on FB and on the Traveling Birders
forum there as well

On Fri, Jun 19, 2015 at 9:20 AM, Bob Dodelson  wrote:

> Several people have asked me about the location of Blue Grosbeaks in
> Assunpink. I haven't had any in the WMA this year until this morning.
> The bird was singing at the cul-de-sac of the dirt road that goes past the
> large mulberry tree (accessed by the gravel and dirt road from Imlaystown
> Rd a few yards from the main boat launch area of Lake Assunpink)
> Brown Thrashers and White-eyed Vireos among others are also to be seen and
> heard along this stretch
> Bob Dodelson
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Curious Observation of Hummingbird Feeding
From: Jimmy Lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:04:26 +0000
Hi Jerseybirders,
 
For the last 2 weeks I've had a female hummingbird coming to the feeder hanging 
from a hook 

stand attached to the deck railing.
 
This morning I moved the feeder to the patio table in order to get it closer 
for better observation. 

 
A female (presumably the same bird) came an zipped & hovered around the empty 
hook. It never went near 

the feeder that was 3 - 5 feet way (unobscured). This behavior reminded me of 
bees who couldn't find their hives when the hives were experimentally moved a 
short distance (IIRC). 

 
Addendum, 2 hrs later presumably the same bird came to the feeder directly.
 
Well, just one observation.
 
FWIW.
 
Good birding,
 
Jimmy



Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Assunpink Blue Grosbeak
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 08:20:35 -0500
Several people have asked me about the location of Blue Grosbeaks in Assunpink. 
I haven't had any in the WMA this year until this morning. 

The bird was singing at the cul-de-sac of the dirt road that goes past the 
large mulberry tree (accessed by the gravel and dirt road from Imlaystown Rd a 
few yards from the main boat launch area of Lake Assunpink) 

Brown Thrashers and White-eyed Vireos among others are also to be seen and 
heard along this stretch 

Bob Dodelson

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ebird totals from different years
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Jun 2015 09:09:31 -0400
Well that worked! 222 for Cumberland County in 2014. The end of the first week 
in June. 

More warblers. And other species than same time frame for Salem. It was a poor 
spring in south Jersey for migration this year. Heres hoping the fall is 
better! More shorebirds in Cumberland, 

but I hope to track some of them down this fall in Salem.

I was under summarize my observations. Lots can be done with that also! Like 
high counts for 

various places. It needs an overall county option though. The data is there - 
just how to 

retrieve it. 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: ebird question
From: John Beetham <john.beetham AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 19:41:06 -0400
Here's how I do it: Go to My eBird and click on this year's list for area
in question. Just under the title "_______ Year List" there should be a
dropdown menu with the current year displayed. You can use that menu to
bring up the lists for past years, one year at a time. To sort by date,
click on the "Date" column header.

John Beetham
Highland Park, NJ

On Thu, Jun 18, 2015 at 7:18 PM, Sandra Keller 
wrote:

> Hello,
>     Here’s a question - has anyone figured a way to list a big year from
> another year besides the current?
> I wanted a list of Cumberland birds in date order from 2014. To compare
> with what I have this year in Salem.
> Possible with ebird?
>
>     I do have all my data in Bird Brain also. I am sure that could do it.
> Plus I have charts, etc. Just curious if a way to do
> it with ebird. Thanks!
>
>
> Sandra Keller
> Barrington, NJ
> Sent from my iMac
>
>
>
>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: ebird question
From: Michael Turso <mjt0328 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 19:20:51 -0400
I've been wondering this for awhile too, it would be cool if you could do
this for different months as well.

- Mike Turso
  Bergen Co.

On Thursday, June 18, 2015, Sandra Keller  wrote:

> Hello,
>     Here’s a question - has anyone figured a way to list a big year from
> another year besides the current?
> I wanted a list of Cumberland birds in date order from 2014. To compare
> with what I have this year in Salem.
> Possible with ebird?
>
>     I do have all my data in Bird Brain also. I am sure that could do it.
> Plus I have charts, etc. Just curious if a way to do
> it with ebird. Thanks!
>
>
> Sandra Keller
> Barrington, NJ
> Sent from my iMac
>
>
>
>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: ebird question
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 19:18:56 -0400
Hello,
 Here’s a question - has anyone figured a way to list a big year from another 
year besides the current? 

I wanted a list of Cumberland birds in date order from 2014. To compare with 
what I have this year in Salem. 

Possible with ebird? 

 I do have all my data in Bird Brain also. I am sure that could do it. Plus I 
have charts, etc. Just curious if a way to do 

it with ebird. Thanks!


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac





List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Birch Creek - Gloucester County
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 18:59:09 -0400
That's Gloucester County for Birch Creek marsh! 

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Local river birding for breeders
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 18:50:23 -0400
Raining this morning, so out Marilyn and I go this afternoon. Gallinules are 
still not 

very visible. Another month they will be all over. Intriguing is Coot at Birch 
Creek marsh 

in Salem County. That's a very rare breeder in the state! We tried confirming 
breeding 

today, but too early. It's like with the Gallinules - too early. We will try 
again in a month. 

Try to see the young ones. 

Salem County was quiet. Fort Mott is picking up though with herons and egrets 
flying 

back and forth from Pea Patch Island to NJ to get food and feed their young.

Butterfly notes - not in this weather!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Annual Migration Routes
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 22:45:46 +0000
At first this may seem like a strange request, but I m trying to learn the time 
periods and regions for annual spring and fall migrations. 



Background: I own an executive events company and hold my regionally throughout 
the year. I am about to begin putting dates on my 2016 calendar and (here is 
where the obsession has finally taken over) would like to schedule the events 
so that I can take advantage of peak migration. 



Typically I am in Chicago, Minneapolis, San Fransisco, Orange County, Boston, 
Texas (Houston, Austin or Dallas) and New York. I can add or change venues, but 
they must be around major population centers. My goal is to build at least a 
week after each event to bird. 



I understand this is strange - but what is the purpose of work if not to allow 
us the opportunity to bird? 



Thanks in advance.


Rob

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Mystery bird (two photos)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 16:51:27 -0400
Saw this bird in a local wetland. I will plead ignorance here. It does not
look like anything I've seen before, but it could be something easily
explained by those with more experience.

Images are not good, but they were the best I could get. Mostly white bird
in center of photos. I was shooting in bright sunlight through a small
opening looking out into the marsh. Images were worse when I cropped them...

Frontal view:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184912/

Rear view:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18928184852/

Thanks in advance, and forgive me if this was a dumb posting about an
obvious bird. :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-winged Blackbird fledgling (hiding) - photo
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 15:04:44 -0400
I really like this photo of a Red-winged Blackbird fledgling hiding in its
native habitat (cattails). Donaldson Park, Middlesex County, NJ. The bird
could barely fly, but it knew how to hide:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18904320686/

I also like this photo of two very tiny Red-eared Slider turtles basking in
the sun:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/18902806795/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park, NJ

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: Red-tailed Hawk age?
From: Peggy Cadigan <1bookworm AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 15:03:39 -0400
I sent the photo to Jerry Liguori, author of "Hawks at a Distance." His reply: 
It is a fledgling...just has a bit of red in the tail like many juvenile 
do....hope this helps and feel free to share my comment 


Jerry
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 18, 2015, at 1:26 PM, Shayna Marchese  
wrote: 

> 
> I follow a Red-tailed Hawk nest that's on a signal bridge over NJ Transit 
tracks. The location is dangerous for obvious reasons but the hawks continue to 
nest there and seem to do all right, for the most part. However, today a dead 
hawk was found near the tracks. The parents have been accounted for and it 
doesn't look like a fledgling (pale front with not much belly band; the young 
ones are all quite dark); I wonder if anyone has thoughts on the age of the 
bird based on the tail feathers? 

> 
> Image here (cropped to the tail only): 
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/363/18742208039_648b835867_o.jpg 

> 
> Shayna Marchese
> Jersey City
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Red-tailed Hawk age?
From: Shayna Marchese <shayna.marchese AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2015 13:26:40 -0400
I follow a Red-tailed Hawk nest that's on a signal bridge over NJ Transit 
tracks. The location is dangerous for obvious reasons but the hawks continue to 
nest there and seem to do all right, for the most part. However, today a dead 
hawk was found near the tracks. The parents have been accounted for and it 
doesn't look like a fledgling (pale front with not much belly band; the young 
ones are all quite dark); I wonder if anyone has thoughts on the age of the 
bird based on the tail feathers? 


Image here (cropped to the tail only): 
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/363/18742208039_648b835867_o.jpg 


Shayna Marchese
Jersey City

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Cape May County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 22:28:10 -0400
A Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was reported to eBird from the Meadows this
morning flycatching by the plover pond. This evening a group of us at
Pierce's Point on the bayshore had a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher flycatching
insects on the beach towards the north tip. We left the bird all the way at
the south end by the parking lot resting on the over wash there around
7:50PM.

Photos can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

Good birding,

Sam

-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Harbor Heron survey
From: Nellie Tsipoura <nellie.tsipoura AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 17:15:22 -0400
New Jersey Audubon Citizen Science is looking for volunteers for our 
ongoing foraging/roosting heron and egret surveys.The survey will take 
place starting now until October 31^st at sites in the Hackensack 
Meadowlands, Raritan Bay, and surrounding wetlands.We are looking at the 
abundance and distribution of herons, egrets, and ibises that nest on 
islands of the NY/NJ Harbor (Harbor Herons) and use NJ wetlands to 
forage and roost.

Citizen Scientists will be assigned a survey site and asked to commit to 
at least 8 surveys over the course of the study period.We especially 
need concentrated efforts in August and September. Volunteers are asked 
to attend a training workshop to be held on June 20^th , from 10am to 
2pm at SHWS.

If you are interested in participating in this survey or for more 
information on this project, contact Laura Stern 
(citizen.science AT njaudubon.org ) 
or Nellie Tsipoura (Nellie.tsipoura AT njaudubon.org 
).

-- 
Nellie Tsipoura, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist, Director of Citizen Science
New Jersey Audubon Society
Scherman-Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, NJ 07924
Cell phone (732) 310-1348
FAX: 609-861-1651

E-mail: nellie.tsipoura AT njaudubon.org


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hummingbirds
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 13:04:41 -0400
I've always put up two feeders, one at each of the house, in order to try
to attempt to reduce the fighting over the food.

This year, only one feeder is active with what seems to be only one bird
feeding.  I was working in the garden yesterday where I would normally hear
hummers flying by regularly; yesterday, nothing.

Is it just my yard or are others noticing a lesser number of hummers?

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: new ebird app
From: Robert Gallucci <Robert AT RGALLUCCI.COM>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2015 00:05:44 +0000
Thanks Sandra. Just downloaded it as well. Functions exactly the same as 
Birdlog. Very nice 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 16, 2015, at 7:13 PM, Sandra Keller  wrote:
> 
> I just downloaded the new ebird app for entry in the field from smart phones 
and tablets. 

> It's the exact same thing as birdlog. But free. Ebird does want birders 
submitting data 

> from the field. It's more accurate that way. Alas, I thought there was a way 
to enter 

> breeding codes. I presume that is coming later. Right now I wait til I get 
home for that. 

> That can be done in the field from my tablet. Works ok. You just access the 
web site and 

> take it from there. The phone forget about accessing the web site on that 
tiny screen! 

> 
> Good birding all.
> 
> Sandra Keller
> 
> Sent from my iPad mini
> 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Pine Island Quail story in Philly Inquirer
From: Cathy Blumig <wolgast AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 19:24:08 -0400
Some of you may have already seen this, but in the event folks have not,
here's a link to a story in today's Philadelphia Inquirer about the quail
restoration efforts on the Haines property.  My apologies for sounding like
a broken record, but, once again, kudos to all for their efforts on this
important project.

 

Good birding to all,

Cathy Blumig

Somerset, NJ

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/20150616_Reintroduction_of_bobw
hite_quail_to_Pinelands_going_well.html

 


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: new ebird app
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 19:13:22 -0400
I just downloaded the new ebird app for entry in the field from smart phones 
and tablets. 

It's the exact same thing as birdlog. But free. Ebird does want birders 
submitting data 

from the field. It's more accurate that way. Alas, I thought there was a way to 
enter 

breeding codes. I presume that is coming later. Right now I wait til I get home 
for that. 

That can be done in the field from my tablet. Works ok. You just access the web 
site and 

take it from there. The phone forget about accessing the web site on that tiny 
screen! 


Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: crows woods - local notes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 12:44:19 -0400
Nothing like a walk in the heat of the day! I picked a woods. This gem of a 
spot is in Haddonfield 

Camden County. Wood thrushes singing, Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Hairy Woodpeckers.
Can get scattered migrants during the proper season also. I hope birds are this 
active 

Thursday - I'll be back down in Salem County.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Re: N. Odessa and Pestalozzi grassland, Galloway Township
From: jeanine apgar <jga-2 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 08:29:20 -0400
The Grasshopper Sparrow was very easy to find this morning, sitting on 
top of a small spruce tree. In the field on the other side of the road 
were singing Eastern Meadowlarks. In addition, an immature male Orchard 
Oriole was in the tree line at the corner of Indian Cabin and Cologne Ave.

Jeanine Apgar
Galloway

On 6/14/2015 4:18 PM, Yong Kong wrote:
> The highlight of my trip to Brig today was meeting a beginner birding couple 
who were trying out their recently purchased bins from Berlin Farmer’s market 
for $20 each. That couple brought me fond memories of birding at Brig back in 
the days with my ex- girlfriend Cheryl, with our brand new Nikon 8x25 and a 
Petersen field guide (no scope). Simpler birding times back then. Completely 
different birding experience as compare to the under-belly of birding that I 
did not know existed back than. That is listing, chasing, withholding 
found-bird location, good old boys club, etc. I think I was a happier birder 
back than when I had no clue Little egret can be found in our given the right 
timing. 

>
> Purpose of posting today is the Grasshopper sparrow I happen to luck out on 
5-29-2015 at the Intersection of N. Odessa and Pestalozzi, Galloway Township, 
NJ is still there and more of them this morning. They are found along the strip 
of grassland with Christmas trees. It seems a reliable location for those may 
want to take a detour to check out this grassland habitat before heading over 
to Brig or on the way home. Map of the area on my Flicker. 

>
> This morning I observed two male and one female Blue grosbeaks as well along 
Mannheim Avenue as well. 

>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/
>
> Yong Kong
> Camden County
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> How to report NJ bird sightings: 
>

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: NY Times article - bird sound
From: Linda Mack <LJ.MACK AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 21:51:30 -0400
JerseyBirders,

Today’s online edition has a terrific article: Birds of New York: A 
Soundscape 



http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/06/13/birds-of-new-york-a-soundscape/?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=opinion-c-col-right-region®ion=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region&_r=0 


Good birding,

Linda Mack,
Monmouth Beach, NJ

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Bald Eagles in Hudson County NJ
From: Patricia Hilliard <philliard288 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 14:59:53 -0400
Bald Eagles seen in Hudson County.  Best viewing point is from Kellogg
Street off Rt. 440 in Jersey City.  Immature are off the nest and adults
are fishing in upper Newark Bay.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bayonnebirder/sets/72157654199538458

--Pat Hilliard
from
Bayonne Nature Club
www.bayonnenatureclub.org

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting
From: Beth Goldberg <goldbug310 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 12:29:20 -0400
Join BCAS on Weds., June 17 as we explore "Sustainability in the Suburban
Backyard" with Elaine Silverstein, Professional Horticulturist and leader
of the local chapter of the Native Plant Society of NJ.  A professional
horticulturist certified in Sustainable Landscape Management, Elaine will
define “sustainability” and discuss why it’s important in the suburbs. 
She 

will touch on lawn care (reducing use of water and chemicals), composting,
recycling your leaves on your own property, and planting native plants.
Meetings are free and open to the public.  Chapter business meeting begins
at 7:30PM, with program at 8:00 and are held at Teaneck Creek Conservancy,
20 Puffin Way, Teaneck, NJ.


-- 
Beth Goldberg
Fair Lawn

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Brigantine/Forsythe 6/14/2015
From: Jimmy Lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 15 Jun 2015 00:19:05 +0000
All,
 
We took our out-of-state friends to Brig today. The deciding strategy was not 
to be walking around in the heat. 

It was a good strategy because they brought a sibling along who I hadn't 
expected. 

 
The birds were a bit slow (about 25 species) IMV due to the season. Most/all of 
the birds were the usual suspects. 

 
The highlights (my pov): Gull-billed Terns  2-3
Black-crowned Nightheron - 2 adults
Yellow-crowned Nightheron - 1 adult
 
Larus zirlini *
 
Painted Turtle on road
Diamond-back Terrapins - 6
 
No Wood Ducks or Yong Kong

* aka Larry
 
Good birding.
Jimmy


Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

 

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: N. Odessa and Pestalozzi grassland, Galloway Township
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 16:18:20 -0400
The highlight of my trip to Brig today was meeting a beginner birding couple 
who were trying out their recently purchased bins from Berlin Farmer’s market 
for $20 each. That couple brought me fond memories of birding at Brig back in 
the days with my ex- girlfriend Cheryl, with our brand new Nikon 8x25 and a 
Petersen field guide (no scope). Simpler birding times back then. Completely 
different birding experience as compare to the under-belly of birding that I 
did not know existed back than. That is listing, chasing, withholding 
found-bird location, good old boys club, etc. I think I was a happier birder 
back than when I had no clue Little egret can be found in our given the right 
timing. 


Purpose of posting today is the Grasshopper sparrow I happen to luck out on 
5-29-2015 at the Intersection of N. Odessa and Pestalozzi, Galloway Township, 
NJ is still there and more of them this morning. They are found along the strip 
of grassland with Christmas trees. It seems a reliable location for those may 
want to take a detour to check out this grassland habitat before heading over 
to Brig or on the way home. Map of the area on my Flicker. 


This morning I observed two male and one female Blue grosbeaks as well along 
Mannheim Avenue as well. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County






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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Hatfield Swamp Saturday
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 11:46:37 -0400
Dave Hall led another one of his traditional walks in Hatfield Swamp yesterday 
morning accompanied by 

the usual suspects (including Louise, Lena, and me), other friends of NJAS 
(Anita and Jeff), and a newbie, Karen, 

on which I got to practice my recruitment skills. While we waited for the 
assemblage in the 

S&S parking lot, Fish Crows and a Chimney Swift did a fly by. Right away, I 
spotted a Great Egret fishing by the Cranes Mill pond, 

an unusual sighting at this location per Dave who is an expert in these parts. 
The Tree Swallows are making 

good use of the many boxes that Dave et al. have diligently placed and 
maintained over the years. Many 

species were positively noisy: RE Vireo, Yellow Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, 
Indigo Bunting, YB Cuckoo, 

Song Sparrow, BG Gnatcatcher, Wood Thrush, Catbirds, Catbirds, Catbirds, 
Warbling Vireo, RB Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, 

Baltimore Oriole, Junco, Chickadee,  Goldfinch and Robin (many) were heard.  
The dense foliage precluded identifying some birds by sight  so much so that I 
suggested Dave re-name the trip as a birding 

by ear one. We did get spectacular sustained views of the male Indigo Bunting 
(twice in the same location), RT Hummer, Baltimore Oriole males, and an Oriole 
nestling/fledgling 

exactly where Nancy and Dennis said it would be. A RT Hawk and TVs soared 
overhead. I almost didnt recognize the dried up pond which is now a grassland 
inhabited 

by RW Blackbirds. We administered hospice care to a frog who was on its back on 
the side of the path: Lena right-sided it 

but it hadnt moved from its spot on our return trip, so after some debate, 
Dave (despite my pathology training, I was too timid to touch it without 
gloves) 

transported it to the next puddle. A definite highlight was the female RB 
Grosbeak defending the mulberry in its beak from 

a rather reckless and ambitious sparrow.

Diane Louie
Madiso

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How to report NJ bird sightings: 
Subject: Clinton Road: GWWA, Ceruleans, questions
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 14 Jun 2015 10:44:38 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,

This is my first post, but I've been looking at comments and information from 
here for years. I wanted to discuss a trip to Clinton Road that I went on 
yesterday. 


Firstly, a Golden-Winged Warbler is still present in the Paradise Road 
vicinity, just as one has been now for the past couple years. He was a good 
distance west from the road along the powerline cut, and was singing a 
three-syllable song that started with a Blue-Winged-esque "Bzzz". It took a 
little while, but he began to show himself and fly around, displaying his 
beautiful markings. This was a life bird for me, so I was thrilled to get great 
looks at the little guy. 


Afterwards, I birded Clinton Road mostly stop-and-go, with a few stops at the 
designated hiking areas. As expected, there was a great variety of species, 
with great looks at the nesting Blackburnian, Black-throated Green, and 
Magnolia Warblers being given. Unexpectedly, however, was the three Cerulean 
Warblers I had during the trip. The first one I had was heard singing just 
south of the P-7 parking area. I was able to pish him toward the road and got a 
clear view of him. This alone would've been a great highlight, but the 
Ceruleans weren't done yet. Nearing the end of my trip, I decided to take a 
quick walk up the trail at P-1 on my way back down the road. As I reached the 
hilltop where the trail cuts to the left, I heard the distinctive song from yet 
another bird. Shortly after, ANOTHER Cerulean started singing in the same 
vicinity. Once again, I was able to pish one of them down to a tree branch only 
about 10 feet above my head. The other one was not so cooperative. 


I was certainly not anticipating this species in general, let alone three of 
them. It made me remember Fred Virrazzi's post from a couple weeks ago that 
went into detail about Cerulean's and their behavior. The two that were singing 
at P-1 were in very close proximity, unusual for two males that are in the 
middle of nesting season. I wonder if the unseen bird at P-1 could have been a 
female, paired with the male that I saw. The unseen one did not sing as much or 
as boastfully. Could this be a possibility? Also, if there are any more 
seasoned birders that have been going to Clinton Road for years, what has your 
experience been with Ceruleans? I know very few get reported here, and they are 
tagged as a rare species for Clinton Road by ebird. Do they have extensive 
breeding history here, and are possibly expanding back into their former range? 


Whatever the case, I was very pleased to see them. I hope and pray they 
continue to expand and thrive. 


If anyone is interested, the rest of my observations for the day are posted on 
ebird. 


Good birding all!


-Louis Bizzarro

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