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Updated on Thursday, June 30 at 09:04 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Barbet

30 Jun Re: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County [David Weber ]
30 Jun ebird data backup [Sandra Keller ]
30 Jun Re-post: EBFNWR - Partial Wildlife Drive Closure - June 30th [L Larson ]
30 Jun Brown-headed Nuthatch, Cape May County [Samuel Galick ]
29 Jun Re: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County [Brian Kushner ]
29 Jun Re: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County [Yong Kong ]
29 Jun (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County [Samuel Galick ]
29 Jun Record of Western red tailed hawk or Western x Eastern in NJ ? [Yong Kong ]
28 Jun Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch Round Valley Reservoir [Tom Bailey ]
28 Jun Red-breasted Nuthatch Round Valley Reservoir [Milton Collins ]
28 Jun black bellied whistling ducks - Salem County [Sandra Keller ]
27 Jun July 1918: Red-breasted Nuthatches at Cape May [Robert DeCandido PhD ]
27 Jun Ground-feeding Swallows? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
27 Jun Red-breasted Nuthatch Lord Stirling Park, Basking Ridge [Benjamin Barkley ]
26 Jun Galloway Township, Atlantic County Grasshopper Sparrow [Yong Kong ]
26 Jun Summer Tanager - yes ["Albert, Steven" ]
25 Jun breeding birds and ebird [Sandra Keller ]
25 Jun Summer tanager yes ["Albert, Steven" ]
25 Jun Fwd: Field Trip Pequannock Watershed Thursday. June 30th, 7:00 AM [Louis Bizzarro ]
24 Jun EBFNWR - Partial Wildlife Drive Closure - June 30th [Marc Virgilio ]
24 Jun Re: Summer Tanager [Daniel Brill ]
24 Jun Up and down birding today [Yong Kong ]
24 Jun Summer Tanager [Ernest Hahn ]
23 Jun Wawayanda State Park and Pequannock Watershed (part 3) [Louis Bizzarro ]
21 Jun Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township [Yong Kong ]
21 Jun Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township [jimmy lee ]
21 Jun Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township [leewah ]
21 Jun Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township [Louis Bizzarro ]
21 Jun Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township [Ben Barkley ]
21 Jun Assunpink Ruddy Ducks [Bob Dodelson ]
20 Jun 1876: Woodcock Hunting in Summer/NJ [Robert DeCandido ]
20 Jun Re: RFI ["Davis, Christina" ]
20 Jun Re: Assunpink Pileated and Bank Swallow [Jim Hayes ]
20 Jun List [Thomas Justesen ]
20 Jun Assunpink Pileated and Bank Swallow [Bob Dodelson ]
19 Jun Breeding birds in underbirded locations [Michael Britt ]
19 Jun RFI [Michael Britt ]
18 Jun Friday Notes and A Late Report [David Bernstein ]
17 Jun My Cumberland County Birding Report [Yong Kong ]
15 Jun Clay-colored Sparrow at Merrill Creek [Michael Turso ]
15 Jun Revisit- my failed search of Dickcissel in Gloucester County [Yong Kong ]
15 Jun Re: Bobolinks at Negri [Rabbi Ilene Schneider ]
15 Jun Bobolinks at Negri [Susan Treesh ]
14 Jun Laurel Run Park Dickcissel and my failed attempt to find one in Gloucester County [Yong Kong ]
14 Jun Re: Liberty State Park Lark Bunting - YES! [Larry Scacchetti ]
14 Jun Re: Dickcissel [Denise Bittle ]
14 Jun Dickcissel [Ernest Hahn ]
14 Jun Liberty State Park Lark Bunting - YES! [Michael Britt ]
14 Jun Yes today 6/14 (Re: Liberty State Park Lark Bunting [jimmy lee ]
14 Jun Pequannock Watershed (part 2) [Louis Bizzarro ]
14 Jun Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting [Beth Goldberg ]
13 Jun Thank you to those who commented on my Bird ID Request [Yong Kong ]
13 Jun Liberty State Park Lark Bunting [Michael Britt ]
13 Jun Lark Bunting, Hudson County [Samuel Galick ]
13 Jun How can I opt out of receiving emails from other list members?... [jason gulvas ]
12 Jun Bird flight over the home yard and ID request [Yong Kong ]
12 Jun Re: drones ["David A. La Puma" ]
12 Jun Re: drones [Theodore Chase Jr ]
12 Jun Laurel Run Park, Delran [Henry Burk ]
12 Jun drones follow-up [Greg Prelich ]
12 Jun Re: drones [Fairfax Hutter ]
12 Jun Re: drones [Harvey Tomlinson ]
11 Jun Quick Hunterdon notes [Susan Treesh ]
11 Jun Follow-up to MB's Holgate report [Yong Kong ]
11 Jun Dickcissels and horned larks at Laurel Run Park, Delran, NJ [Joseph Palumbo ]
11 Jun Dickcissels - Laurel Run Park - Burlington [Sandra Keller ]
11 Jun Dickcissels at Laurel Run Park continue ["John J. Collins" ]
11 Jun Holgate [Michael Britt ]
10 Jun Dickcissels [Joseph Palumbo ]
10 Jun Dickcissels at Laurel Run Park, Creek Road, Delran Township [Joseph Palumbo ]
10 Jun OT, but thought [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
9 Jun Unexpected trip to Delaware Bay salt marsh [Yong Kong ]
9 Jun drones [Greg Prelich ]
9 Jun Re: Edwin B. Forsythe NWR Wildlife Drive Reopen [Bill Elrick ]
9 Jun Edwin B. Forsythe NWR Wildlife Drive Reopen [Marc Virgilio ]
9 Jun south Jersey - Grasshopper Sparrow searching [Sandra Keller ]

Subject: Re: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County
From: David Weber <weberbirding AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 22:03:56 -0400
Hi everyone,

Just wanted to chime in with a few more details about this BBWD story.  I
just received a report of at least 11 BBWD in Woodstown on May 2nd, 2016,
with photos from Carolyn Howell, a member of the Salem County Nature Club.
Unfortunately, these were not reported to the public and on May 16th only 3
birds were found and widely reported.  They were last reported on May 29th.


Photos at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30474295

Good birding,

David Weber
eBird reviewer for Salem, Gloucester, Camden, and Cumberland Counties

On Wed, Jun 29, 2016 at 9:34 PM, Samuel Galick  wrote:

> An unprecedented amount of 12 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were
> discovered at Shunpike Pond this evening by Brian Moscatello. Some
> observers witnessed compulation among the birds which at this point raises
> even more questions! As far as I know they remained around the pond for the
> rest of the evening.
>
> Shunpike Pond is in West Cape May on Cape Island. I'd gather that this
> would pique the minds of many, and parking is a bit troublesome when
> multiple vehicles are involved. Please use your best judgement and safety
> when it comes to parking on the side of the road there. Being courteous to
> property owners on and adjacent to the property should be heavily
> considered for continued enjoyment for all.
>
> 38.949455,-74.935155
>
>
> This doubles the current high count in the state where previously six
> birds were recorded at Forsythe NWR in 2011 in late Jul/early August.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Sam
>
>
>
> --
> Sam Galick
> Cape May, NJ
> sam.galick AT gmail.com
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>



-- 


*David Jonas WeberCornell University, Class of 2016Natural Resources,
Applied Ecology*
*weberbirding AT gmail.com *


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: ebird data backup
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 19:58:07 -0400
Hello,
 It’s the end of the month. Time for me to backup my ebird data! I would 
suggest this to all who use ebird. 

There’s a link on your data home page. Just follow the instructions! 


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re-post: EBFNWR - Partial Wildlife Drive Closure - June 30th
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 10:11:24 -0400
Reminder — Brigantine Unit [Forsythe NWR] is partially closed today. 
(Birders still often use the old name).

Re-posting the message from Marc Virgilio:


> Begin forwarded message:
> 
> From: Marc Virgilio 
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] EBFNWR - Partial Wildlife Drive Closure - June 30th
> Date: June 24, 2016 at 7:43:34 PM EDT
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Reply-To: Marc Virgilio 
> 
> Hi Everyone,
> 
> In preparation for Phase 2 of construction, which is anticipated to begin in 
late July, our contractor will be conducting some soil borings at our East Dike 
Water Control Structure. This structure has been stressed by storm events and 
will be replaced as part of Phase 2. The soil borings will tell our contractor 
what the subsurface soil conditions are around the structure to understand the 
best approach for repairs. 

> 
> The work will occur on June 30th and take only one day. While work is 
underway, the Wildlife Drive will be closed beyond the Turtle Cove tower. The 
Drive before the tower will be open to two way traffic with a turnaround at 
Turtle Cove. 

> 
> We anticipate reopening the remainder of the Drive by 5pm. 
> 
> All trails will remain open during the work. If you have any questions please 
let me know. 

> 
> Marc
> Fish and Wildlife Biologist
> Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge
> 
 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Brown-headed Nuthatch, Cape May County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2016 08:27:34 -0400
Don Frieday reported:

Brown-headed Nuthatch in pines east of Coral Ave dune crossover in Cape May 
Point. It's been calling every couple minutes. 


And just now Glen Davis reported:

Brown-headed Nuthatch bouncing around Lincoln and Whilden currently Cape May 
Point. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County
From: Brian Kushner <bkushner2 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 22:31:05 -0400
Keep in mind Forsythe is closed the 30th tomorrow. 

> On Jun 29, 2016, at 10:25 PM, Yong Kong  wrote:
> 
> Just to follow up on Sam's fantastic share of bird-going-ons at Cape Island, 
for those who may be heading down, perhaps stop at Brig may also pay. 

> 
> I was pleasantly surprised to find some shorebirds at Brig today. For me, 
some bird-food for thought would be a bigger than usual black-bellied plover, 
and potential long-billed Dowitcher. 

> 
> Some photos of my day on my Flickr.
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/
> 
> Yong Kong
> Camden County
> 
> 
> -----Original Message----- From: Samuel Galick
> Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2016 9:34 PM
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County
> 
> An unprecedented amount of 12 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were discovered 
at Shunpike Pond this evening by Brian Moscatello. Some observers witnessed 
compulation among the birds which at this point raises even more questions! As 
far as I know they remained around the pond for the rest of the evening. 

> 
> Shunpike Pond is in West Cape May on Cape Island. I'd gather that this would 
pique the minds of many, and parking is a bit troublesome when multiple 
vehicles are involved. Please use your best judgement and safety when it comes 
to parking on the side of the road there. Being courteous to property owners on 
and adjacent to the property should be heavily considered for continued 
enjoyment for all. 

> 
> 38.949455,-74.935155
> 
> 
> This doubles the current high count in the state where previously six birds 
were recorded at Forsythe NWR in 2011 in late Jul/early August. 

> 
> Good birding,
> 
> Sam
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Sam Galick
> Cape May, NJ
> sam.galick AT gmail.com
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 
> 
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 22:25:33 -0400
Just to follow up on Sam's fantastic share of bird-going-ons at Cape Island, 
for those who may be heading down, perhaps stop at Brig may also pay.

I was pleasantly surprised to find some shorebirds at Brig today.  For me, 
some bird-food for thought would be a bigger than usual black-bellied 
plover, and potential long-billed Dowitcher.

Some photos of my day on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


-----Original Message----- 
From: Samuel Galick
Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2016 9:34 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County

An unprecedented amount of 12 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were discovered 
at Shunpike Pond this evening by Brian Moscatello. Some observers witnessed 
compulation among the birds which at this point raises even more questions! 
As far as I know they remained around the pond for the rest of the evening.

Shunpike Pond is in West Cape May on Cape Island. I'd gather that this would 
pique the minds of many, and parking is a bit troublesome when multiple 
vehicles are involved. Please use your best judgement and safety when it 
comes to parking on the side of the road there. Being courteous to property 
owners on and adjacent to the property should be heavily considered for 
continued enjoyment for all.

38.949455,-74.935155


This doubles the current high count in the state where previously six birds 
were recorded at Forsythe NWR in 2011 in late Jul/early August.

Good birding,

Sam



-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: (12) Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Cape May County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 21:34:56 -0400
An unprecedented amount of 12 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were discovered at 
Shunpike Pond this evening by Brian Moscatello. Some observers witnessed 
compulation among the birds which at this point raises even more questions! As 
far as I know they remained around the pond for the rest of the evening. 


Shunpike Pond is in West Cape May on Cape Island. I'd gather that this would 
pique the minds of many, and parking is a bit troublesome when multiple 
vehicles are involved. Please use your best judgement and safety when it comes 
to parking on the side of the road there. Being courteous to property owners on 
and adjacent to the property should be heavily considered for continued 
enjoyment for all. 


38.949455,-74.935155


This doubles the current high count in the state where previously six birds 
were recorded at Forsythe NWR in 2011 in late Jul/early August. 


Good birding,

Sam



-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Record of Western red tailed hawk or Western x Eastern in NJ ?
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016 13:02:18 -0400
Subject line speaks for itself to my question. Especially during the 
non-migration season for raptors like June ? Photos would be the best if so. 


Or in adjacent states as secondary information gathering.

Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch Round Valley Reservoir
From: Tom Bailey <ammodramus AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 23:54:55 +0000
To add to the RB Nuthatch early reports, two were reported at Palmyra Cove NP 
yesterday June 27. 


Tom

Tom Bailey
Tabernacle, NJ  08088
ammodramus at comcast.net


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


----- Original Message -----
From: "Milton Collins" 
To: "jerseybi" 
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2016 5:40:32 PM
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Red-breasted Nuthatch Round Valley Reservoir

Today at about 3 pm I noticed an odd looking nuthatch through the window of
Round Valley's park office. I grabbed my binoculars and discovered that it
was in fact a Red-breasted Nuthatch. Saw the black stripe through the eye
and the orange underparts. After a few minutes it flew off, but later at
around 3:30 pm I was able to relocate it along the edge of the woods on
Round Valley's exit road. At this point I got a very good close up view of
the bird, and it sang a bit for me with its nasal song. 

I've noticed a few reports of this species in NJ recently, interesting for
the summer. 

 

Milton Collins

Asbury, NJ



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch Round Valley Reservoir
From: Milton Collins <mec537 AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 17:40:32 -0400
Today at about 3 pm I noticed an odd looking nuthatch through the window of
Round Valley's park office. I grabbed my binoculars and discovered that it
was in fact a Red-breasted Nuthatch. Saw the black stripe through the eye
and the orange underparts. After a few minutes it flew off, but later at
around 3:30 pm I was able to relocate it along the edge of the woods on
Round Valley's exit road. At this point I got a very good close up view of
the bird, and it sang a bit for me with its nasal song. 

I've noticed a few reports of this species in NJ recently, interesting for
the summer. 

 

Milton Collins

Asbury, NJ



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: black bellied whistling ducks - Salem County
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 17:19:07 -0400
Hello,
     Marilyn and I went searching at Memorial lake this mid day for the ducks.
No success. I hope others birders will try. Please look for leg bands and 
report 

on the age of the birds also please. We are getting reports of young birds, but 
no 

pics to go with it. This would be great to confirm breeding in the county! Up 
to 

12 have been reported at the lake. 

Good birding all!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: July 1918: Red-breasted Nuthatches at Cape May
From: Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 16:09:59 -0400
From: The Auk 26: 423 (1919)

Early Occurrence of the Red-breasted Nuthatch in New Jersey.

On July 18, 1918, I saw a Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) in the Pitch 
Pines bordering Lily Lake, Cape May Point, N.J., at the southern most extremity 
of the state. When first seen it was some distance away and I suppose for a 
moment I had a straggling specimen of the Brown-headed species before me, which 
occurs regularly in southern Delaware, across the bay, but upon approaching I 
found it to be the Red-breasted species. I watched it at close quarters for 
fifteen minutes, but saw no other individuals. This is much the earliest record 
that I have for southern New Jersey or the Philadelphia district.--WITMER 
ST0NE, Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia. 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: Ground-feeding Swallows? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 15:42:56 -0400
Today I ran across some Northern Rough-winged Swallows that looked to be
feeding atypically on the ground as opposed to in-flight. They appeared to
be moving from goose-poop to goose-poop to pick off insects?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/27943864365/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch Lord Stirling Park, Basking Ridge
From: Benjamin Barkley <bejoba AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2016 11:53:25 -0400
Hi all,

This morning while walking into work I had a Red-breasted Nuthatch along 
Lord Stirling Road in Basking Ridge.  This species is relatively 
uncommon here from fall through early spring, but there are only two 
previous eBird records from Lord Stirling Park and the Great Swamp in 
June--both were in the early 2000s.  There have been several 
Red-breasted Nuthatches reported from Central Park and other sites in 
coastal New York recently, and a brief discussion on the New York State 
listserv mentioned how this early arrival of multiple Red-breasted 
Nuthatches mirrors June of 2007.  That year saw a nice irruption in the 
fall and winter.  Hard to say whether this single observation is just a 
random occurrence or a sign of cone failure up north and of exciting 
things to come.

Link to eBird checklist with audio...
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30412756

Good birding,
Ben Barkley

Naturalist
Environmental Education Center
Basking Ridge, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
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Subject: Galloway Township, Atlantic County Grasshopper Sparrow
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 06:03:31 -0400
Perhaps this is old news for this year but Keith Phillips and I heard a singing 
Grasshopper Sparrow at the Sahl’s Farther and Son Farm on Saturday morning. 


It was singing from a fallow field with purple vetch at the intersection of 
West Pestalozzi Avenue and West Cologne Port-Republic Road. This is the same 
location as last year for locally breeding grasshopper sparrow. 


Yong Kong
Camden County

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How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Summer Tanager - yes
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016 01:27:11 +0000
It doesn't always work out, but today it did. I went looking for the Summer 
Tanager at Phillips Park in Old Bridge. First visit to the park. I read the 
directions, and walked to the corner of the field where there was a path going 
into the woods. But it didn't look right , the path didn't seem to go in the 
correct direction. It took 45 minutes of hanging around to realize that the men 
behind me were playing Cricket, not soccer!! I needed the soccer fields! 
" AT &&&"!?'#%^*. 


10 minutes later I was in the right place and within a few minutes I heard the 
Summer tanager, faint, not close, and not to be seen. 


I met fellow birder, Kevin Cronin, from Sussex County. After more listening, we 
headed down the path to try to find the second tanager. 


This time we found it on the Blueberry Flats trail, as advertised. Singing 
loudly .... right there .... but unseen for almost 20 minutes. Then just a 
quick view. But greater success. 


OK, now back to the fields. I led. Big mistake. Turned right down the white 
trail. Wrong turn. We turned back and I hear Kevin saying softly, "It'll end 
well ". Wrong turn down the blue trail (really light sky blue - looks white). 
Again I hear Kevin saying that this will end well. I loved the optimism. 


Good birds along the way: GC flycatcher, Veery, BW warbler.

Back at the trailhead we heard the tanager, close this time! And, after a few 
minutes, great views from low branches!!! 


Wouldn't have thought it, but hooray for delays and getting lost.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/98494447 AT N06/27863786126

Good birding!

SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601  M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122



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Subject: breeding birds and ebird
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 19:03:57 -0400
Hello,
 I headed out today locally - Gloucester and Salem. Trying to confirm breeding 
birds. Now is the time! Please consider as 

everyone is out and about. The codes are useful to researchers. Probably only 
three more weeks or so for the breeding 

season. I had great looks at Louisiana Waterthrush, Ovenbirds, Acadian 
Flycatchers. They were all active. Woodpeckers are 

still kind of quiet and not seen much. Yet. 

Butterfly notes - I finally am getting a chance to relearn skippers. I hit a 
friend’s garden in Salem County. And yes, I need to relearn 

them! Its usually earlier in the season! Little Glassywing, Dun, Crossline, and 
Northern Broken-dash are all out. 


Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: Summer tanager yes
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 14:33:34 +0000
Right now at the trailhead s of soccer fields at Philips Park in Old Bridge.

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601  M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122



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Subject: Fwd: Field Trip Pequannock Watershed Thursday. June 30th, 7:00 AM
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2016 08:01:54 -0400
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: *Louis Bizzarro* 
Date: Friday, June 24, 2016
Subject: Field Trip Pequannock Watershed Thursday. June 30th, 7:00 AM
To: JERSEYBI AT lists.princeton.edu


Hello all,

We have decided to do a special field trip as 3 broods of Hooded Mergansers
were found (see pictures) a few weeks ago along with recent spots for
various other uncommon species in the watershed and NJ.

Fred V. and his conservation groups have arranged free, official entry
permits for all participants from the govt. "landowners".  See the new
article with various recent pictures of many species and all the details on
how to reserve a spot for the trip.

http://nationalbiodiversityparks.blogspot.com/

Good birding all,

Louis Bizzarro
Monroe Township


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Subject: EBFNWR - Partial Wildlife Drive Closure - June 30th
From: Marc Virgilio <marc_virgilio AT FWS.GOV>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 19:43:34 -0400
Hi Everyone,

In preparation for Phase 2 of construction, which is anticipated to begin in 
late July, our contractor will be conducting some soil borings at our East Dike 
Water Control Structure. This structure has been stressed by storm events and 
will be replaced as part of Phase 2. The soil borings will tell our contractor 
what the subsurface soil conditions are around the structure to understand the 
best approach for repairs. 


The work will occur on June 30th and take only one day. While work is underway, 
the Wildlife Drive will be closed beyond the Turtle Cove tower. The Drive 
before the tower will be open to two way traffic with a turnaround at Turtle 
Cove. 


We anticipate reopening the remainder of the Drive by 5pm. 

All trails will remain open during the work. If you have any questions please 
let me know. 


Marc
Fish and Wildlife Biologist
Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge


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Subject: Re: Summer Tanager
From: Daniel Brill <dbbrill AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 19:25:46 -0400
Independent observers found what was later confirmed to be two male Summer 
Tanagers at John A. Phillips Open Space Preserve in Old Bridge. One or both 
have been noted since June 19. A trail map is available from the Middlesex 
County Parks and Recreation website. As previously stated, one is near the 
trailhead (yellow or Nature Trail) just beyond the southeast corner of the 
soccer fields. The other is a +/- 1.2-mile hike out to the orange (Blueberry 
Flats) trail west of and within 500 feet of the Pine Glen spur. 


Dan Brill
South River


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Subject: Up and down birding today
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 15:13:23 -0400
Earlier in the week, received an invitation from a PA birder to join him and 
his two friends to go birding at the Hook today. How could I say no (I do not 
know any other anti social birder than yours truly). Motivation was to learn 
more about birds and birding from this fantastic birder/picture taker from PA. 


Purpose of the trip was to enjoy those Hook’s piping plovers. However, for 
me, watching plovers was only a secondary (that is what I thought when I 
accepted his invitation and even driving up the Parkway this morning to meet 
them). I was wrong, those plovers were way too cool to observe and how they 
behave. My friend estimated there may be 12 to 15 adults and 2 tow 3 chicks e 
have observed total. None had leg bands as far as we could tell. 


My second high light of the trip was watching these PA birders as to how it is 
done. What do I mean by that ? How to get a fantastic looks at these plovers 
and stay at distance as to not to bother or intrude onto their space. As 
fantastic birders they are, they arrived at sunrise at 6AM, and stayed low to 
the sand and waited for the plovers to come to them. 


My low was soon as we said our good bye, I was all turned around and got lost 
within the vicinity of Parkway in that summer traffic !! I was raging and the 
traffic did not let up even up to my neighborhood. Then at one red-light, I 
opened an email from a dear friend, who indicated recently diagnosed with an 
illness. All of sudden, all that massive traffic around me just disappeared, 
and I cried home rest of the miles. 


Some photos from my day on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Summer Tanager
From: Ernest Hahn <ernesthahn AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 11:00:47 -0400
Don't recall seeing this posted. I relocated a Summer Tanager at the John 
Phillips Preserve in Middlesex County this morning. Don't know who originally 
found the bird, my friend Chris Schmidt, let me know that bird was there. It 
was found in the back corner near the trail head, but moved off. Good luck 

Ernie Hahn
West Trenton


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Subject: Wawayanda State Park and Pequannock Watershed (part 3)
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:15:51 -0400
Hey all,

This past Saturday (June 18th), I branched off of my watershed campaign to
include a sizeable portion of Wawayanda State Park, a place I feel is the
most under-birded location in the state this time of season. I've wanted to
hike here for years as well, so the decision to visit Wawayanda was an easy
one.

For the trip, I was accompanied by Fred Virazzi, who had taken an interest
in my posts. Although we had a difficult time locating each other at first,
we eventually united and enjoyed both the habitat and birds together. Our
hike totaled nearly six hours, and covered multiple trails that included
Cherry Ridge, Cedar Swamp, Banker, Laurel Pond, Double Pond, and Red Dot.
When all was said and done, we ended up with 61 species, with a few of
those only seen by myself. Some of the highlights included:

2 Red-shouldered Hawk

1 Eastern Screech-Owl (trilling in the morning)

4 Pileated Woodpecker

3 Acadian Flycatcher

4 Least Flycatcher

3 Blue Headed Vireo

1 Red-breasted Nuthatch (Double Pond Trail)

1 Brown Creeper (Laurel Pond Trail)

2 Louisiana and Northern Waterthrush

25 Hooded Warbler

3 Worm-eating Warbler

1 Magnolia Warbler

1 Blackburnian Warbler

4 Black-throated Green Warbler

7 Black-throated Blue Warbler (great numbers for this one)

The rest of the checklist can be found here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30290596

In addition to these highlights, we had three "unconfirmed" species,
including Purple Finch, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and Golden-winged Warbler.
Purple Finch was a call heard by Fred only, Golden-winged was a distant
song heard by myself, and Yellow-rumped was glimpsed by both of us along
the Double Pond Trail. The Yellow-rumped is obviously the most interesting:
we got a brief look at a warbler that was not singing, that appeared to
have a patch of yellow below the wing. However, the lighting was not great,
and in the area shortly after was a Black-and-White Warbler that was
foraging like the bird we had seen earlier. We tentatively agreed that the
bird we saw was a B&W, but I still don't know how we both saw yellow on
it...

The biggest miss of all (not only for Wawayanda, but for the area in
general) has to be Canada Warbler. Both me and Fred could not believe that
CAWA was absent from some of the portions of the park that seemed to
boast pristine habitat for the species. Bill Boyle's book from many years
ago lists them as a fairly regular bird at both Wawayanda and the
watershed, and I have yet to hear or see one. I'm sure one is up there
somewhere, but the fact remains that there has been a significant decline
of this bird in the state. Very sad.

To end on a positive note, however, Wawayanda was a beautiful park that
boasted many good birds. It wasn't an overly difficult hike either, most of
the trails are flat with few steep inclines. Going forward, this will be a
staple birding and hiking location for myself during spring and summer. I'd
recommend it to anyone who has a pair of legs!

Now, back to the watershed:

Fred and I did a brief scan of birds along Clinton and Reservoir roads on
our way back down from Wawayanda that presented some nice looks at
warblers, but nothing new. The Red-breasted Nuthatch from last week at
Reservoir was still singing, which was nice. After I left, Fred went over
to Deerhaven and heard the calling Pied-billed Grebe that has been present
there.

Yesterday, I went back up by myself, hoping to get my 100th species. There
have been a couple recent reports of Alder Flycatcher being present at the
Holland Mountain cut, which I decided to return to. Thankfully. the ticks
were not as bad earlier in the morning (but still present). I got the
singing Cerulean that has been there since May, two male Golden-wings heard
and viewed, and four Rose-breasted Grosbeaks still singing like it was May
(RBGB is a bit of an uncommon bird at the watershed, I've found). Skunked
on Alder, unfortunately.

I also went on a grouse hike from the Van Orden section of P-1, which I
heard had good grouse habitat after you pass Hank's Pond on the east side.
Skunked again.

Still stuck at 99 species, I ran out of time yesterday and reluctantly
decided to head home. While riding down Route 23, still in watershed lands,
I got my 100th bird. It wasn't a goshawk or a grouse, it was a pair of the
elusive Rock Pigeon! They flew over my car as I was driving on the highway.
Go figure.

Despite breaking 100 in glorious fashion, I vowed to return this Saturday,
possibly for the last time this season, to take one final look for Alder,
Sapsucker (Fred has an undisclosed location in the watershed where birds
were breeding a couple years ago), and anything else that might be out
there. A bird I totally forgot about that remains mysteriously absent,
despite all that water up there, is Belted Kingfisher. There has to be one
up there somewhere...

Good birding all,

Louis Bizzarro
Monroe Township


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Subject: Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 21:04:30 -0400
I find this Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township with 
great interest.  To take a 180 turn, this report made to think about the RCW 
in VA. I am fully aware that RCW is not a migratory bird, but can not 
"dream" about at least one showing up in southern NJ (like the pine forest 
of Bellplain State Forest/Park), and us birders are just "listing" it as a 
Downey, and keep moving on to find "better" birds. Or it already showed up 
at least once and we all miss it.

As crow would fly, the distance from Big Woods Wildlife Management Area 
(WMA) in VA to Cape May County, NJ is less than 200 miles. Related links 
below.

http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=1141883&MLID=VA01&MLNM=Virginia


https://blog.wildlife.virginia.gov/2016/06/restoring-the-red-cockaded-woodpecker-in-Yellow-throated 

Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Townshipavirginia/

Yong Kong
Camden County



-----Original Message----- 
From: jimmy lee
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2016 4:33 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin 
Township

Hi  JBers,

Apologies for the terse email (from phone).

The third birder did see and photograph the warbler.

Also, present in the park is a male Orchard Oriole.

Congratulations and thank you to Ben Barkley for finding this bird and 
getting the info
out.

also, this is Colonial Park. you can google:


Rudolf W. van der Goot Rose Garden

156 Mettlers Road, Somerset, NJ 08873

Good birding.

Jimmy Lee




Jimmy Lee

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: leewah To: 
JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 19:07:56 -0000 
(UTC)Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, 
Franklin Township

Seen briefly by 2 birders at about 2:45 in same area. One additional birder 
still looking.

Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S® 5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Ben Barkley  
Date: 6/21/2016 1:09 PM (GMT-05:00) To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU 
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin 
Township

Hi all,

I am currently looking at a very vocal Yellow-throated Warbler in the pines 
and oaks of Colonial Park in Franklin Township.  At the parking lot for the 
Rose Garden head north through the pines towards the bathroom buildings.  It 
was near the bathrooms.

Good birding,Ben Barkley

NaturalistEnvironmental Education CenterBasking Ridge, NJ

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList 
archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 


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Subject: Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township
From: jimmy lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 20:33:13 +0000
Hi  JBers,

Apologies for the terse email (from phone).

The third birder did see and photograph the warbler.

Also, present in the park is a male Orchard Oriole.

Congratulations and thank you to Ben Barkley for finding this bird and getting 
the info 

out.

also, this is Colonial Park. you can google:


Rudolf W. van der Goot Rose Garden

156 Mettlers Road, Somerset, NJ 08873
 
Good birding.
 
Jimmy Lee




Jimmy Lee

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: leewah To: 
JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 19:07:56 -0000 (UTC)Subject: 
Re: [JERSEYBI] Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township 


 Seen briefly by 2 birders at about 2:45 in same area. One additional birder 
still looking. 


Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S® 5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Ben Barkley  
Date: 6/21/2016 1:09 PM (GMT-05:00) To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU Subject: 
[JERSEYBI] Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township 


Hi all,

I am currently looking at a very vocal Yellow-throated Warbler in the pines and 
oaks of Colonial Park in Franklin Township. At the parking lot for the Rose 
Garden head north through the pines towards the bathroom buildings. It was near 
the bathrooms. 


Good birding,Ben Barkley

NaturalistEnvironmental Education CenterBasking Ridge, NJ

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 




How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
or e-mail to 
njbrcreport AT gmail.comList help: jerseybi-request AT princeton.eduList archives: 
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi 



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township
From: leewah <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 15:07:56 -0400
    
Seen briefly by 2 birders at about 2:45 in same area. One additional birder 
still looking. 



Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S® 5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Ben Barkley  
Date: 6/21/2016  1:09 PM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU 
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township 


Hi all,

I am currently looking at a very vocal Yellow-throated Warbler in the pines and 
oaks of Colonial Park in Franklin Township.  At the parking lot for the Rose 
Garden head north through the pines towards the bathroom buildings.  It was 
near the bathrooms. 


Good birding,
Ben Barkley

Naturalist
Environmental Education Center
Basking Ridge, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: Re: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:19:17 -0400
Awesome find. I wonder if it is the same bird that hung around there for a
month two years ago?

Louis Bizzarro
Monroe Township

On Tuesday, June 21, 2016, Ben Barkley  wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I am currently looking at a very vocal Yellow-throated Warbler in the
> pines and oaks of Colonial Park in Franklin Township.  At the parking lot
> for the Rose Garden head north through the pines towards the bathroom
> buildings.  It was near the bathrooms.
>
> Good birding,
> Ben Barkley
>
> Naturalist
> Environmental Education Center
> Basking Ridge, NJ
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com 
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu 
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: Yellow-throated Warbler at Colonial Park, Franklin Township
From: Ben Barkley <bejoba AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:09:00 -0400
Hi all,

I am currently looking at a very vocal Yellow-throated Warbler in the pines and 
oaks of Colonial Park in Franklin Township. At the parking lot for the Rose 
Garden head north through the pines towards the bathroom buildings. It was near 
the bathrooms. 


Good birding,
Ben Barkley

Naturalist
Environmental Education Center
Basking Ridge, NJ


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Subject: Assunpink Ruddy Ducks
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 09:18:41 -0500
The breeding plumage Ruddy Ducks continue to keep close company on Lake 
Assunpink. 


If anyone has information on breeding Ruddy Ducks in NJ (other than Kearny 
Marsh and the Meadowlands) I would appreciate hearing from you 


Bob Dodelson


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Subject: 1876: Woodcock Hunting in Summer/NJ
From: Robert DeCandido <rdcny AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:41:16 -0400
WOODCOCK SWAMPERS IN JULY.
Hoboken, N. J., June 23d, 1876.

Editor Forest and Stream: 

There is a rumor circulating that a party of New York and Long Island sportsmen 
intend to visit our State of New Jersey on the 2nd and 3rd of July to shoot 
woodcock, and ''have the first crack at them.'' This unsportsmanlike, practice 
has been going on for some years, and all authorities around Pinebrook in 
Morris and Essex Counties are herewith notified and put on their guard for 
these pot-hunters. Several well known pigeon shots are said to be among them. 
Summer shooting is bad enough in itself, and should be abolished by all means, 
as it is no recreating, healthful sport to shoot half-grown weak birds get 
eaten up by flies and mosquitoes, tramp ten to fifteen miles at 99f in the 
shade, and after all this find your birds spoiled when you come home at night. 
Why not wait until the 1st or October! Many sportsmen say that if they have no 
summer shooting they will have no cock shooting at all. If these gentlemen 
would only leave the birds alone in summer they would stay around! 

 and induce many birds bred in the north to stay and tarry with them on their 
way to the south. It is a well known fact that most fall cocks are found where 
summer birds are left. Justice 


[The habit that some would-be sportsmen have of shooting before the season 
opens in order to get ahead of legitimate sportsmen is disgraceful in the 
extreme, and we are gratified to find that the different associations for the 
protection of game have made preparations this season to enforce the law upon 
the subject. We fully agree with our correspondent that summer woodcock 
shooting should be stopped altogether. ED.] 


Forest and Stream 6(21): 341 (Thursday, June 29th, 1876)
=====================================================
THE WOODCOCK SEASON.

THROUGH some error of the act, the woodcock season opened in this State [New 
Jersey] on July 3d instead of July 4th, as was evidently intended, and as it 
does in New Jersey. We are in receipt of a large number of communications from 
various parts of both States, from which we gather that woodcock are more 
abundant this season than they were last, while owing to the extended drought 
which has of late prevailed the birds have left their usual feeding grounds and 
retired to the recesses of the most impenetrable swamps, and small bags are the 
result. We have confirmation of this in the fact that several gentlemen who 
have penetrated to such places have found birds congregated in considerable 
numbers. With the first heavy rains they may be again found in their usual 
feeding grounds. It is a fact, worthy of notice, that very many young birds, 
still unable to fly, have been seen, and another argument in favor of 
abolishing summer shooting, or at least extending the close season. An! 

 other indication of abundance is the market price. Woodcock were retailing 
last week for 50 cents and 75 cents per pair, and the dealers report that they 
have not been so plentiful for years. Rhode Island is sending a large number of 
birds to this market. 


Sussex Co., New Jersey, has long been a favorite woodcock ground, but a severe 
hail storm which visited the county in the spring, particularly in the 
neighborhood of Newton, killed off many of the young birds. Mr. Theo. Morford, 
of Newton, and son, killed six on the morning of the 4th, all but one old 
birds. The Messrs. Woodruff, of the same place, got eighteen. One correspondent 
writes us follows from Hackensack: "The birds were quite numerous in our 
neighborhood until within a few days and yesterday, to the disappointment of 
many sportsmen, they had disappeared. My theory is, that the extreme heat and 
drought has driven them into the mountains. The reports from a number of 
sportsmen I have spoken with today all agree that the birds have recently moved 
into other regions. W. II." 


Another writes from Paterson: "I was out two hours on the 4th. Got six the 
first time and four yesterday. The villainous pot-hunters kill them all off 
about here in June. Lots of quail and partridges in Sussex." Mayor De Russy 
writes from New Brunswick: "Only killed nine cock on the 4th; since then have 
killed four or five. Birds scarce: ground all dried up." 


On, Monday evening of this week a woodcock, not having the fear of the skill of 
the Newark, N. J., sportsmen before his eyes, alighted on Pleasant avenue in 
the midst of that city, when it was discovered and brought to bay by our 
shooting friend Mr. Hobart. The bird, although fully grown was rather thin in 
flesh, in consequence it is supposed of having been chased up and frequently 
shot at before the season opened by the pop shooters of that city. Another 
woodcock was flushed recently near the centennial grounds, in the immediate 
vicinity of our Hunter's Camp. 


Forest and Stream 6(23): 376 (Thursday, July 13th, 1876)


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Subject: Re: RFI
From: "Davis, Christina" <Christina.Davis AT DEP.NJ.GOV>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 15:57:45 +0000
My understanding is that you do technically need a beach badge at SH Point.



Christina Davis
Endangered and Nongame Species Program
NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife
2201 County Route 631
Woodbine, NJ 08270

p.609.628.1919
f. 609.628.2734
________________________________
From: JerseyBirds  on behalf of Michael Britt 
 

Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2016 3:07:24 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: RFI

Jerseybirders,

Does one need a beach pass to park/bird at Stone Harbor Point between
Memorial and Labor?

Also, trying to find someone to show me the ropes at the Sedge
Islands/Island Beach State Park via kayak (I have my own)...thinking
Saturday, July 2nd weather permitting...please contact me off-list.

Thanks,
Mike Britt


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
> 

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Subject: Re: Assunpink Pileated and Bank Swallow
From: Jim Hayes <gargle57 AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 14:30:31 +0000
I had a couple of Bank Swallows over the lake back when the Fork-tailed 
Flycatcher was around. Forgot to mention them. Sorry. Jim Hayes, Wanaque, NJ 


> Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 08:26:44 -0500
> From: dodelson AT VERIZON.NET
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Assunpink Pileated and Bank Swallow
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> 
> This morning I was watching a pair of Ruddy Ducks (I wonder if they'll breed 
here) from the main boat launch at Lake Assunpink when I noticed several Bank 
Swallows flying overhead (this is an unusual bird for this location in my 
experience). I then drove towards the marsh on Imlaystown road as I have done 
hundreds of times in the past. This time I was greeted by a male Pileated 
Woodpecker on a dead snag right by the eastern side of the road (where the 
Virginia Rail was a couple of weeks ago) maybe 18 inches above the ground. It 
only stayed for 15 seconds before flying off. This is a rare woodpecker in 
Assunpiunk though I am sure it is resident here. Keenan Ennis and I had 1 bird 
in this spot about one year ago and David Bernstein and his dad had a bird here 
a couple of years ago. 

> 
> While at the marsh look for Eastern Kingbird, Eastern Bluebird, Green Heron, 
Red-bellied Woodpecker, Wood Duck (with young) and both vultures (often 
perched). 

> 
> BTW the only Red-headed Woodpecker I have seen at Assunpink was in this spot
> 
> Bob Dodelson
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 		 	   		  

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Subject: List
From: Thomas Justesen <b3tomm AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 09:28:19 -0400
Please take me off your list please


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Subject: Assunpink Pileated and Bank Swallow
From: Bob Dodelson <dodelson AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2016 08:26:44 -0500
This morning I was watching a pair of Ruddy Ducks (I wonder if they'll breed 
here) from the main boat launch at Lake Assunpink when I noticed several Bank 
Swallows flying overhead (this is an unusual bird for this location in my 
experience). I then drove towards the marsh on Imlaystown road as I have done 
hundreds of times in the past. This time I was greeted by a male Pileated 
Woodpecker on a dead snag right by the eastern side of the road (where the 
Virginia Rail was a couple of weeks ago) maybe 18 inches above the ground. It 
only stayed for 15 seconds before flying off. This is a rare woodpecker in 
Assunpiunk though I am sure it is resident here. Keenan Ennis and I had 1 bird 
in this spot about one year ago and David Bernstein and his dad had a bird here 
a couple of years ago. 


While at the marsh look for Eastern Kingbird, Eastern Bluebird, Green Heron, 
Red-bellied Woodpecker, Wood Duck (with young) and both vultures (often 
perched). 


BTW the only Red-headed Woodpecker I have seen at Assunpink was in this spot

Bob Dodelson


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Subject: Breeding birds in underbirded locations
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 16:37:38 -0400
Lou Bizzarro has the right idea. While the summer is "slow-down-time" for
most birders, cataloging breeders is one of the most important things you
can do as a citizen scientist, besides participating in an organized survey
like NJAS's Black Rail survey. Naturally if you're a ticker, you could care
less about such efforts.

Lou is covering the Pequannock Watershed (an underbirded, epic location),
I'm covering Kearny Marsh (an underbirded, epic location), Chris Takacs is
conducting a modern-day effort to find out what has changed in Bergen
County, etc.

I can tell you that since the change of the millenium, new breeders in
Hudson (maybe not the first time but now regular) include: Wild Turkey,
Red-tailed Hawk, American Oystercatcher, Warbling Vireo, Blue-gray
Gnatcatcher, Eastern Towhee, Chipping Sparrow (this year), Orchard Oriole,
Baltimore Oriole, etc. Some I either failed to mention or have no knowlege
of/yet to be discovered. While many serious birders agree that a new
breeding bird survey (atlas) is long overdue, there are questions as to
what organization will spearhead it and what the birder willingness is in
these modern times of listing...

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: RFI
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Jun 2016 15:07:24 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Does one need a beach pass to park/bird at Stone Harbor Point between
Memorial and Labor?

Also, trying to find someone to show me the ropes at the Sedge
Islands/Island Beach State Park via kayak (I have my own)...thinking
Saturday, July 2nd weather permitting...please contact me off-list.

Thanks,
Mike Britt


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Subject: Friday Notes and A Late Report
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2016 15:16:05 -0400
Afternoon Folks,

First the late report. Last Saturday was the Union County Bio Blitz held at 
Kawame Park. I received, yesterday, a report from a participant that a 
Yellow-headed Blackbird, a female type, was identified somewhere during the 
event. No other details are known by me and although Union County is my home 
turf, I know nothing about this park. If you do, perhaps it might be worth a 
look. 


Yesterday was my day to bird with my Dad. We started at Lake Musconetcong where 
our first notable sighting was Rob Fanning. We then saw the continuing 
Trumpeter Swan who seems to be enjoying his/her visit to the Morris and Sussex 
portions of this lake and the company of between fifty and ninety Mute Swan. 
While viewing the Swan, we saw/heard several Purple Martin and went off in 
search of their home. We found a lakeside property with three Martin houses and 
a very proud homeowner who has maintained these homes for her guests since 
1980! Wonderful to talk to her. 


Off to Sandbar Park in Hackettstown, where we surprised a Great Egret. We 
thought this notable given sightings of Egrets in the Western counties seem to 
come during late summer. 


On to New Jersey Audubon's Old Farm Sanctuary in Independence. At this small 
sanctuary, there are two Norway Spruce groves. One can be viewed from the 
parking area on Petersburg Road. It was here that we heard a Red-breasted 
Nuthatch, a great bird for June and probable breeder. We also had Pileated 
Woodpecker and a bear who was not pleased to see us and beat a hasty retreat. 
If you have not visited Old Farm Sanctuary or Cat Swamp Sanctuary nearby, you 
should. Both are wonderful places to hike/walk and bird. 


That's all I have. Good weekend birding!

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ

Sent from my iPad


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Subject: My Cumberland County Birding Report
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2016 17:45:15 -0400
As usual I mostly birded today in places that is not mentioned here in JBirds 
or little or no interest for others to visit. I will share one place. 


At the Millville Race Tract property (1400 McCafferity Road, at the 
intersection of Bogden Blvd.) near the soccer fields, I noticed active mowing 
has been going on. So I scan for grassland birds and listen, and hear a 
grasshopper sparrow. Then saw two in flight. There may have been three. 


It appears the mower has stopped mowing for the day only because work-week has 
ended, and may resume first thing on Monday. 


To me, the impact to this breeding habitat and the chick’s fledge season may 
be over. Classic definition of “sink-hole habiat”. Some photos from my day 
on my Flickr. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow at Merrill Creek
From: Michael Turso <mjt0328 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:45:52 -0400
Hi all,

I'm thinking of going for the CCSP at Merrill Creek tomorrow morning, but I'm 
reading that it is at a supposed "new" location about a mile away. Could 
someone tell me where this "new" location is? 


Thanks in advance,

- Mike Turso


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Subject: Revisit- my failed search of Dickcissel in Gloucester County
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 21:30:52 -0400
Thank you to three NJ birders who responded. One provided life history and the 
habitat requirement of Dickcissel. One provided video of the wheat field where 
the target birds have been observed. One provided written description of the 
habitat and that the field being scheduled to be harvested. 


I wrote a long report thanking these birders and my assessment on the habitat 
found at the Laurel Run Park Dickcissel habitat and within the vicinity of 
Commissioners Pike (County Route 581), Cedar Grove Road, Lincoln Road, and 
Ferrell Road in South Harrison Township, Gloucester County. 


But my computer crashed before I hit the send button. Perhaps that was a 
bird-god talking to me to shut up. So I will not repeat. I have no more plan to 
visit the South Harrison Township grassland. What a fantastic time visiting 
even if my only big catch was grasshopper sparrow. I am moving on. 


Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Re: Bobolinks at Negri
From: Rabbi Ilene Schneider <marltonbirder AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 14:07:24 -0400
Speaking of Bobolinks, does anyone know if they're still at Bright View
 Farm? The owner told me awhile ago they were going to have to mow some of
the grasslands to sell as hay. I haven't visited there since last year.

Ilene
Marlton


-- 
Rabbi Ilene Schneider, Ed.D.

CHANUKAH GUILT
UNLEAVENED DEAD
TALK DIRTY YIDDISH

rabbi.author AT yahoo.com
http://rabbiauthor.com
facebook.com/rabbi.author


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Subject: Bobolinks at Negri
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2016 11:40:48 -0400
I saw a Facebook comment about bobolinks at Negri-Nepote, so went there 
this morning to look for them.  I saw two males and one female.  At this 
time of year, can we assume they are breeding?  That would be the first 
time in the ten years of the preserve, I think (they've been passing 
through at migration since the beginning).  That would be great news, as 
bobolinks were one of the hoped-for breeding species when the place was 
created!  I hope visitors will continue to look for them.

Susan Treesh

Somerset



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Subject: Laurel Run Park Dickcissel and my failed attempt to find one in Gloucester County
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 21:13:29 -0400
Five stars to those who initially found the Laurel Run Park Dickcissel and to 
those who took the time to visit and report to JBirds. I have been following !! 


So the timing is right about reporting my failed attempt to find one in 
Gloucester County this year. 


I have been in search of Dickcissel within the vicinity of Commissioners Pike 
(County Route 581), Cedar Grove Road, Lincoln Road, and Ferrell Road in South 
Harrison Township, Gloucester County and had no luck. This place is only a 
stone throw from the 2014/2015 (?) reporting/sighting of Dickcissel along 
Lincoln Road where many have visited, including yours truly. 


My visits to this location have been brief and only have been limited to 
fast-n-furious lunch time birding. So, perhaps, about time that I am seeking 
help from other local birders to visit for purpose of confirmation that there 
are no breeding Dickcissel within that vicinity. 


I have not visited the Laurel Run Park Dickcissel and have no clue on the 
habitat setting that attracted this “Awesome Three”. 


Also, the reason for my request for others to visit is to confirm conclusion 
that the habiat there may not be to perfection ? Meaning the vegetation, forbs, 
etc. may not to tall enough, not dense enough, or the acreage is not large 
enough, etc. to support locally breeding Dickcissel . 


Yong Kong
Camden County






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Subject: Re: Liberty State Park Lark Bunting - YES!
From: Larry Scacchetti <larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 20:38:48 -0400
My original plan was to head down first thing in the morning. After spending 8 
hours of searching yesterday, I was quite determined. I ended up doing some 
work and headed down around noon. Upon arrival, Jimmy Lee and Julie Buechner 
where the only ones left. I decided to check the service road instead of 
waiting near the parking lot. 


I ended up watching a Willow Flycatcher bop around until it darted off and 
chased the Lark Bunting, which was perched on a dead snag. I went looking but 
couldn't relocate it. 


I joined up with Julie and Mike and we were lucky enough to to see the bird fly 
right over our heads and then a few minutes later out and down the road east 
towards the IC. 


Many other birders showed up and fanned out to search but to no avail. It's 
only my 2nd Lark Bunting out of range so I'm not to familiar with their 
vagrancy behavior, but this bird is not acting like any LARB I've ever seen. 


There is a lot of area to cover at the park and this bird seems to be utilizing 
a vast array of habitat. Good luck for anyone else searching for this bird. 


Good birding, 

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 14, 2016, at 3:47 PM, Michael Britt  wrote:
> 
> My plan for the rest of the week was to drive through LSP on my way home
> from work, to try for the Lark Bunting. Returning later in the evening was
> also an option. As I was making my way from Secaucus to Jersey City, an
> alert came in on NorthNJBirds from Larry Bird that the LARK BUNTING was
> perched on a low snag, at the end of the gated service road (right side)
> across from the Interpretive Center. It was subsequently chased off by a
> local Willow Flycatcher. Upon arrival to the IC lot, there were no other
> birders in sight. I headed straight for the service road and there was
> Larry and a young lady named Julie. We talked about the sighting for a bit
> and then decided to give the lot and road another shot. At this point the
> LARB flew across the road N-S, from the interior into a deciduous tree
> (next to a conifer) on the Sysco side of the road. The bird was perched out
> of view for a minute or so, then took off from the tree and headed east
> towards the IC, where it may have perched in a tree at the NW corner of the
> center or continued on...we didn't have the right angle to make that
> determination and failed to re-find.
> 
> It seems like the best approach, besides "divide and conquer" covering all
> known sightings locations is to just camp out along Freedom Way at the NW
> corner of the IC and wait for the bird to flyover. Sightings have occurred
> on the east side of Freedom Way (original sighting...just north of the IC
> lot), the shoulder and fence on the west side of Freedom Way (straight
> across from original sighting), on the fence along the back edge of the IC
> lot, the gated service road, and the IC area.
> 
> Good luck! It seems like you're best shot is when fewer people are around
> or away from the main group of birders...seemed to get skittish like the
> recent Harris's Sparrow in Mercer County.
> 
> P.S. Thank you Larry for your dedication and re-finding the bird today!
> 
> Mike Britt
> Bayonne
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Re: Dickcissel
From: Denise Bittle <djbittle AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 16:59:35 -0400
I've missed both two days in a row, but have only been able to get out mid-day. 
Got the Horned Lark in the meadow area on the street side the parking lot. 
Unfortunately, a landscaper was rolling out the mower to cut that area as I was 
leaving. 


D

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 14, 2016, at 3:57 PM, Ernest Hahn  wrote:
> 
> was present this morning at Laurel Run Park. I could only located the single 
male, singing in the center of the wheat field. If any beginning birders read 
this site and are in search of a Grasshopper Sparrow, this Park is as close to 
a sure thing as you can get. I believe that there are at least four breeding 
pairs present. 

> 
> Ernie Hahn, Ewing
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Dickcissel
From: Ernest Hahn <ernesthahn AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 15:57:39 -0400
was present this morning at Laurel Run Park. I could only located the single 
male, singing in the center of the wheat field. If any beginning birders read 
this site and are in search of a Grasshopper Sparrow, this Park is as close to 
a sure thing as you can get. I believe that there are at least four breeding 
pairs present. 


Ernie Hahn, Ewing


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Subject: Liberty State Park Lark Bunting - YES!
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 15:47:46 -0400
My plan for the rest of the week was to drive through LSP on my way home
from work, to try for the Lark Bunting. Returning later in the evening was
also an option. As I was making my way from Secaucus to Jersey City, an
alert came in on NorthNJBirds from Larry Bird that the LARK BUNTING was
perched on a low snag, at the end of the gated service road (right side)
across from the Interpretive Center. It was subsequently chased off by a
local Willow Flycatcher. Upon arrival to the IC lot, there were no other
birders in sight. I headed straight for the service road and there was
Larry and a young lady named Julie. We talked about the sighting for a bit
and then decided to give the lot and road another shot. At this point the
LARB flew across the road N-S, from the interior into a deciduous tree
(next to a conifer) on the Sysco side of the road. The bird was perched out
of view for a minute or so, then took off from the tree and headed east
towards the IC, where it may have perched in a tree at the NW corner of the
center or continued on...we didn't have the right angle to make that
determination and failed to re-find.

It seems like the best approach, besides "divide and conquer" covering all
known sightings locations is to just camp out along Freedom Way at the NW
corner of the IC and wait for the bird to flyover. Sightings have occurred
on the east side of Freedom Way (original sighting...just north of the IC
lot), the shoulder and fence on the west side of Freedom Way (straight
across from original sighting), on the fence along the back edge of the IC
lot, the gated service road, and the IC area.

Good luck! It seems like you're best shot is when fewer people are around
or away from the main group of birders...seemed to get skittish like the
recent Harris's Sparrow in Mercer County.

P.S. Thank you Larry for your dedication and re-finding the bird today!

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Yes today 6/14 (Re: Liberty State Park Lark Bunting
From: jimmy lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 19:29:31 +0000
Larry Bird & Mike Britt are reporting brief sightings of Lark Bunting around 
the 'service road' ('road closed'; near porta-potties). starting 2:01 on North 
Jersey text alert system. ( I was leaving about then after 2 hrs of searching 
the fence line). 


I trust Larry &/or Mike will post more when then have a chance.

I'm relaying this info now so folks can plan their afternoon/evening activities 
:-) 


Please post your sightings.

Probably will try tomorrow morning.

Good birding.

Jimmy


Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ

----- Original Message -----From: Michael Britt To: 
JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDUSent: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 00:06:58 -0000 (UTC)Subject: 
[JERSEYBI] Liberty State Park Lark Bunting 


To the best of my knowledge, the bird was only seen by three individualstoday 
(photographed by the last observer), all sightings were roughly fivehours 
apart, and within 100 yards. At least two applications of seed weremade along 
the fenceline by the IC lot. Park hours are 6AM-10PM but thegate typically 
opens slightly earlier. Best bet would be to get thereearly...hopefully it 
sticks. A great find by Simon Lane. 


Mike BrittBayonne, NJ

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Subject: Pequannock Watershed (part 2)
From: Louis Bizzarro <louis.bizzarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 10:57:45 -0400
Morning all,

So, as promised, I returned to the watershed this past Saturday (the 11th)
and looked to hit different spots that I missed during my first trip. When
I arrived, I actually decided to bird Stephens Road again (seeing as it was
quite productive last time). I took it all the way down to Clinton Road and
back, as well as up an adjacent trail that led to the fire tower. Nothing
overly interesting that I didn't already have last week.

From there, I hit a multitude of new spots, including Charlottesburg, La
Rue, Vernon Stockholm (Route 515), Holland Mountain, and Reservoir Roads. I
wanted to bird Cozy Lake Road as well, but the bridges on and leading to
the road are being worked on and it is currently out of commission. I also
did a quick lap to Deerhaven Lake on my way out which netted me some nice
new species. Some of the highlights of my trip included:

1 Pied-billed Grebe (called once from Deerhaven Lake)
1 Green Heron
1 Bald Eagle (new addition to Stephens Road)
1 Black-billed Cuckoo
1 Blue Headed Vireo
2 Common Raven (Deerhaven Lake)
4 Cliff Swallow (Charlattesburg Road)
2 Red-breasted Nuthatches (one was calling and seen off of 515, another was
heard only at Reservoir Road, both in Norway Spruce groves)
4 Brown Creeper
1 Winter Wren (bird in same spot as last week along Stephens Road)
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet (heard only in spruce grove along Route 515 where
Red-breasted Nuthatch was found)
1 Hermit Thrush
3 Golden-winged Warbler (heard only, all along Holland Mountain powerline
cut)
8 Hooded Warbler
10 Chestnut-sided Warbler
8 Blackburnian Warbler
6 Black-throated Green Warbler

The rest of my checklist can be found here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30180003

In all, I tallied 86 species (one more than last week), with 14 new species
recorded. Between the two trips, I am now firmly at 99 species, one short
of 100!

Some target birds that remain missing are:

Accipiters
Common Gallinule (Deerhaven resident)
Hooded Merganser
Ruffed Grouse
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Alder Flycatcher
Northern Parula
Canada Warbler

Some "non-target" birds that would still be good as they are uncommon to
the area are:

Bank Swallow
Osprey
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
Yellow-breasted Chat
Orchard Oriole
White-eyed Vireo

During the past two weeks, I have hit an extensive amount of spots within
(and just outside of) the watershed. For this coming weekend, I'm thinking
about branching out to either nearby Wawayanda or Sparta Mountain and
trying my luck there for some target, or unexpected, species. There are
also a couple of places in the watershed I'd like to re-bird, as there may
be some new species on the second go 'round. Gotta look for that 100th
bird...

A few quick notes to anyone who reads this and wants to give some of the
spots I hit a go:

Most of the spruce groves (and all of the ones I had good birds in) are
located right next to roads that receive a healthy amount of traffic during
the late morning and afternoon. To make matters worse, they also lack
trails and cleared spaces in order to enter them. I would strongly suggest
going to them early in the morning where traffic is at a minimum, and with
the understanding that* respectful* improvising is required to hear some of
the birds (good luck with actually looking at them, the spruce birds are
almost always at the top of the canopy). Also, the Holland Mountain
powerline cut that holds the GWWA's is so infested with ticks that I had to
end my trip there prematurely. If you don't like taking dozens of ticks off
of you, I would suggest either not going to this location or just trying
to listen from the road. Finally, a reminder that a permit must be acquired
from the Echo Lake office in order to access Pequannock Watershed lands.

Good birding all,

Louis Bizzarro
Monroe Township


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Subject: Upcoming Bergen County Audubon (BCAS) Meeting
From: Beth Goldberg <goldbug310 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 14 Jun 2016 06:40:12 -0400
Join BCAS on Wed., June 15, 2016 as we welcome member and volunteer,
Patrick Carney, who will give a presentation entitled “Wildlife
Photography”.  Come see his National Audubon Society award-winning photos
and his other great photos of birds and wildlife, from around the area and
various places that Patrick has traveled.  Programs are free and open to
the public.  Chapter business meeting begins at 7:30PM with program at
8:00.  Meetings held at Teaneck Creek Conservancy, 20 Puffin Way, Teaneck.

This will be our last meeting before our summer break.  Just a reminder
that tickets for BCAS' 75th anniversary dinner on Sept.22, 2016, may be
purchased at the meeting. Details on our webpage,
www.bergencountyaudubon.org


-- 
Beth Goldberg
Fair Lawn


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Subject: Thank you to those who commented on my Bird ID Request
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:24:36 -0400
Subject line above says it all. I think 5 birders responded, including one 
birder from PA and one birder from the country of spotted owl, that is the 
state of Washington !! 


Sunday when I was out sky-watching from the yard, I decided on naked-eye 
birding (meaning no use of bins or scope on purpose) to study locally common 
birds in flight and in distance. Also hoping for something rare. When I saw the 
bird No. 1341 in live action (at distance), I said to myself, “if that is not 
a barn swallow, I do not what is”, and never even reviewed the photos taken 
until later. 


When the photo was downloaded and one decided to think out-side-of the box, the 
photo no longer looked Barn with 100% confidence, and the remote possibility 
that the bird may be something else became even more reality. 


Thank you for bringing my bird-brain back down to the ground zero.

Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Liberty State Park Lark Bunting
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 20:06:58 -0400
To the best of my knowledge, the bird was only seen by three individuals
today (photographed by the last observer), all sightings were roughly five
hours apart, and within 100 yards. At least two applications of seed were
made along the fenceline by the IC lot. Park hours are 6AM-10PM but the
gate typically opens slightly earlier. Best bet would be to get there
early...hopefully it sticks. A great find by Simon Lane.

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ


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Subject: Lark Bunting, Hudson County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 07:44:44 -0400
Simon Lane reports:

Male Lark Bunting - Liberty SP - very distinctive. Hanging around road edges 
just N of IC parking area. Seen several times. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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Subject: How can I opt out of receiving emails from other list members?...
From: jason gulvas <000002a76e3321de-dmarc-request AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU>
Date: Mon, 13 Jun 2016 01:32:41 +0000
I would rather go to JERSEYBI home page and see reports there.  Thanks.
Jason Gulvas


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Subject: Bird flight over the home yard and ID request
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 20:45:26 -0400
After sea-watch yesterday, today was the sky-watch over the homeyard. The angry 
wind and the beautiful clear sky provided even more motivation. Seen a Coop 
three separate occasion so it must be a local breeder, perhaps even in my 
homewoods. 


Surprise of the day are the Un-id Raptor (?) that I am requesting help here on 
the ID, and a Great Blue Heron. On the Un-id bird, only poor distant photo and 
only a single view, but felt lucky to even snap one. Bird photo no. is 1341 and 
1341 Crop. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Re: drones
From: "David A. La Puma" <david.lapuma AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 18:41:52 -0400
From the southernmost county:

Cape May Point State Park has adopted a “no-drone” policy. 

http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/Drones-Jersey-Shore-Cape-May-Point-State-Park-LIghthouse--327969641.html 


Beyond that, though, the FAA rules are lacking with regards to wildlife 
disturbance: 


• Don't fly above 400 feet 
• Don't fly near people or stadiums
• Don't fly within five miles of an airport
• Don't let the drone out of your sight
• Don't interfere with manned aircraft
• Don't fly a drone that weighs more than 55 pounds

https://www.faa.gov/uas/publications/model_aircraft_operators/

This happened here in 2014 (from: 
http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2014/11/why_someone_can_fly_a_drone_over_your_house_in_nj_and_why_theres_nothing_you_can_do_about_it.html) 


"
The case of a Cape May man who allegedly downed a drone over his housebecame 
the talk of the nation for a few days in September. Russell Percenti, a 
32-year-old from Lower Township, was arrested and charged with possession of a 
weapon for an unlawful purpose and criminal mischief for the incident on Sept. 
26, authorities said. Percenti is accused of using a shotgun to blast a 
multicopter flying around his home on Seashore Drive, they added. 


“The charge speaks for itself,” said Robert Taylor, the Cape May County 
Prosecutor. “The evidence just seemed to indicate the user was photographing 
a friend’s house.” 


The operator of the drone was not charged, Taylor said.

“We don’t have a basis to charge by FAA regulations or anything,” the 
prosecutor added. 


The state Attorney General’s Office agreed, saying it has no regulations in 
place to charge in such situations. 


“There are not any AG directives or guidelines on drones — or shooting down 
drones,” said Peter Aseltine, the office spokesman. 


Percenti, who made bail shortly after the incident, could not be reached for 
comment. 


“

We're definitely entering into a new frontier with regards to drones. On one 
hand they can aid greatly in the study of wildlife, especially in remote 
locales. On the other, the potential to disturb wildlife, at least certain 
species, is absolutely real. 


Cheers

David 

________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Director, Cape May Bird Observatory
New Jersey Audubon
600 Route 47 North
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210	
p: 609.400.3833 (direct) or x922 (internal use)
c: 732.447.4894
f: 609.861.1651

w: http://birdcapemay.org
w: http://www.njadubon.org
Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

"Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men's blood" 
- Daniel Hudson Burnham

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 12, 2016, at 5:50 PM, Theodore Chase Jr  
wrote: 

> 
> 1. Probably most JB subscribers saw the NY Times article recently about 
training eagles in Holland to catch drones. It was also on CBS Morning News, 
actually showing an eagle catching a drone. It came down on the drone from 
above. Fort some reason they seemed to have an American Bald Eagle. 

> 2. I am reminded of a famous incident in California long ago: the first (and 
for all I know only) record of a White-tailed Tropic Bird in California was one 
which kept trying to copulate with a model airplane flying at a field above 
Newport Beach. It was written up as a Note in The Auk, which is probably the 
funniest straight0faced birding note ever published. 

>    Ted Chase
>    Franklin Twp., Somerset Co.
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Re: drones
From: Theodore Chase Jr <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 17:50:43 -0400
1. Probably most JB subscribers saw the NY Times article recently about 
training eagles in Holland to catch drones. It was also on CBS Morning News, 
actually showing an eagle catching a drone. It came down on the drone from 
above. Fort some reason they seemed to have an American Bald Eagle. 

2. I am reminded of a famous incident in California long ago: the first (and 
for all I know only) record of a White-tailed Tropic Bird in California was one 
which kept trying to copulate with a model airplane flying at a field above 
Newport Beach. It was written up as a Note in The Auk, which is probably the 
funniest straight0faced birding note ever published. 

	Ted Chase
	Franklin Twp., Somerset Co.


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Subject: Laurel Run Park, Delran
From: Henry Burk <hjburk AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 21:49:03 +0000
Dickcissels, Grasshopper Sparrow, and Horned Lark present this morning as 
previously reported. 


Hank Burk 
Cranford 



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Subject: drones follow-up
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 16:54:59 -0400
Based on my recent experiences with drones while birding, I did a bit of 
searching for rules governing the operation of drones in NJ and summarize the 
regulations that might be of interest to birders. Here is my current 
understanding. They are currently banned in all National Parks and apparently 
in all National Wildlife Refuges, so the shorebirds at Brig are safe. There are 
also state-specific and county-specific restrictions that are of interest to 
birders. Drones are prohibited from being flown in NJ State Parks. Close to 
home for me, Ocean County Parks only allows their operation in specifically 
designated areas and requires Special Use Permits. NJ DEP prohibits operation 
of drones on WMAs. This is interesting to me, because I have seen them being 
operated on both Great Bay Blvd WMA and in Collier's Mills WMA this month and 
didn't know if they were allowed. Now that I know, the question becomes how to 
deal with the next encounter. 




Greg Prelich

Manchester, NJ

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Subject: Re: drones
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 09:19:15 -0400
I will add that Mercer County Park Commission specifically bans their use on 
all County properties (Pole Farm and Baldpate for ex.) unless operator has 
special prior permission. Call the Rangers if you see one. 


Pardon if I've mentioned this before... but a Kestrel seemingly came out of 
nowhere to attack a drone only seconds after launch at a Pole Farm parking lot. 
Kestrels don't usually frequent that far corner, but he was on it immediately 
and relentlessly. The unsuspecting drone owners brought it down shortly 
thereafter. Had no clue it would trigger such a reaction. 


Fairfax Hutter
Lawrenceville

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 12, 2016, at 7:59 AM, Harvey Tomlinson  wrote:
> 
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> Greg Prelich posted some questions about flying drones in birding habitat
> and they are very good questions.
> I am a drone flyer and have been for many years now.
> I can't afford the larger drones available but I do have a nice collection
> of "toy" drones.
> Let me start by saying the smaller drones can do a lot of damage to the
> human body with their propellers.
> I have cuts and nicks from propeller run ins and never fly near pets or
> kids.
> I use to fly at Cape May County Park South but the local hummingbirds would
> attack the drone so I stopped flying there.
> Had these little ones come in contact w/ a propeller I'm sure it would have
> been devastating to them.
> The larger drones are truly dangerous to all...especially birds. A young
> flyer from NY lost his life after he was hit in the head by his own drone
> so imagine what might happen to a Hawk or Eagle going after one.
> Right now in New Jersey the only laws on the books are meant to keep Law
> Enforcement / Military from using them to spy on suspects, and private
> owners from flying near restricted airspace or airports. There are some
> other rules for advertising (banners ect) but w/ proper permits all bets
> are off.
> Legislation was sent to Gov Christie to help control drone flying but he
> pocket vetoed the bill with out comment.
> ( http://dronecenter.bard.edu/chris-christie-drones/ )
> Cape May Point State Park use to have signs up forbidding drone operation
> on Park lands but the sign is no longer up.
> At this time I do not know why.
> There may be other regulations I am not aware of but the bottom line is
> it's a free for all right now.
> The thought of a drone flying over Brig is just scary.
> The noise drones create will panic most birds and send them flying.
> The propellers, should they make contact, can kill!
> Responsible drones operators probably wouldn't fly at places like Brig but
> only because a bird strike could send their $1000 drone to a watery death.
> Drones are here to stay.
> We can only hope that strict regulations will be passed to help protect the
> creatures of the sky.
> Maybe we need to a least make a call to local law enforcement if we see a
> drone hazard.
> They may not be able to do anything but the flyer may think twice about
> coming back
> I'm thinking I may go back to flying kites and balsam wood gliders.
> Greg, Thanks for bringing up this topic.
> Good Birding,
> Harvey Tomlinson
> Del Haven
> 
> 
>> On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 6:06 PM, Greg Prelich  wrote:
>> 
>> In the past two weeks or so I've seen people flying drones over what I
>> consider to be quality birding habitat, in one case over a flock of
>> hundreds of Red Knots, and in another case over a field that contains
>> nesting Grasshopper Sparrows. I assume that we birders will be encountering
>> drone operators more and more frequently. I'm wondering about the legality
>> of flying drones in high quality birding locations or near sensitive
>> species.  What should be reported and what shouldn't?  For example, can
>> drones be flown over the Brig impoundments? In county parks or state parks?
>> Peeking into Osprey nests? Into Broad-winged Hawk kettles? During migration
>> over the Hawk Watch platform? I'd especially love to hear about current
>> policies from officials who manage key birding properties.
>> 
>> Greg Prelich
>> Manchester, NJ
>> 
>> 
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
>> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
>> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Subject: Re: drones
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 12 Jun 2016 07:59:12 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
Greg Prelich posted some questions about flying drones in birding habitat
and they are very good questions.
I am a drone flyer and have been for many years now.
I can't afford the larger drones available but I do have a nice collection
of "toy" drones.
Let me start by saying the smaller drones can do a lot of damage to the
human body with their propellers.
I have cuts and nicks from propeller run ins and never fly near pets or
kids.
I use to fly at Cape May County Park South but the local hummingbirds would
attack the drone so I stopped flying there.
Had these little ones come in contact w/ a propeller I'm sure it would have
been devastating to them.
The larger drones are truly dangerous to all...especially birds. A young
flyer from NY lost his life after he was hit in the head by his own drone
so imagine what might happen to a Hawk or Eagle going after one.
Right now in New Jersey the only laws on the books are meant to keep Law
Enforcement / Military from using them to spy on suspects, and private
owners from flying near restricted airspace or airports. There are some
other rules for advertising (banners ect) but w/ proper permits all bets
are off.
Legislation was sent to Gov Christie to help control drone flying but he
pocket vetoed the bill with out comment.
( http://dronecenter.bard.edu/chris-christie-drones/ )
Cape May Point State Park use to have signs up forbidding drone operation
on Park lands but the sign is no longer up.
At this time I do not know why.
There may be other regulations I am not aware of but the bottom line is
it's a free for all right now.
The thought of a drone flying over Brig is just scary.
The noise drones create will panic most birds and send them flying.
The propellers, should they make contact, can kill!
Responsible drones operators probably wouldn't fly at places like Brig but
only because a bird strike could send their $1000 drone to a watery death.
Drones are here to stay.
We can only hope that strict regulations will be passed to help protect the
creatures of the sky.
Maybe we need to a least make a call to local law enforcement if we see a
drone hazard.
They may not be able to do anything but the flyer may think twice about
coming back
I'm thinking I may go back to flying kites and balsam wood gliders.
Greg, Thanks for bringing up this topic.
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


On Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 6:06 PM, Greg Prelich  wrote:

> In the past two weeks or so I've seen people flying drones over what I
> consider to be quality birding habitat, in one case over a flock of
> hundreds of Red Knots, and in another case over a field that contains
> nesting Grasshopper Sparrows. I assume that we birders will be encountering
> drone operators more and more frequently. I'm wondering about the legality
> of flying drones in high quality birding locations or near sensitive
> species.  What should be reported and what shouldn't?  For example, can
> drones be flown over the Brig impoundments? In county parks or state parks?
> Peeking into Osprey nests? Into Broad-winged Hawk kettles? During migration
> over the Hawk Watch platform? I'd especially love to hear about current
> policies from officials who manage key birding properties.
>
> Greg Prelich
> Manchester, NJ
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: Quick Hunterdon notes
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 19:11:25 -0400
Hi Jerseybirders, I birded three Hunterdon spots today, Assicong Marsh, 
Hoffman Park, and Teetertown Ravine Natural area.  Assicong, which I 
only visited once before (for the purple gallinule)  seems low on 
water.  The trail from the parking lot has either not been maintained or 
the water level has dropped so low that the trail simply stops well 
before the edge of the water.  Judging from the couple of herons in the 
water, it's very shallow! Hoffman Park still had many singing birds, 
including yellow and prairie warblers, along with some distant 
bobolinks. There were two likely nesting black vultures there who flew 
up when I approached their probable nesting place and gave me the most 
woebegone looks I've ever seen (I know I'm anthropomorphizing, but 
honestly, they just drooped and seemed to be saying, "it's all over, 
we've lost again, our hopes for offspring are destroyed by this 
predator."  I hastened to walk away, felt like reassuring them.  I 
didn't have much time at Teetertown, mainly wanted to locate an 
alternate route to that very nice Crystal Springs natural area - but I 
definitely want to revisit it.  Great variety of habitats with a 
moderate amount of understory and abundant veeries and wood thrushes.

Good birding,

Susan Treesh
Somerset



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Subject: Follow-up to MB's Holgate report
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 16:06:20 -0400
Since birding reports have been bit-lacking lately on the display window of 
JBirds, please allow me to add a bit, since birding is supposed to be fun first 
before taking it so seriously. It was an awesome trip and gathering, for me 
that is, stand side by side with NJ’s two great seabird watchers/Identifiers. 


I did not realized the true impact of my pre-planned Friday night out with Mary 
to see the musical play, 1776, was going to cause a conflict with my other 
pre-planned trip to Holgate with MB and JS this morning. What is the solution ? 
Do both at all cost. After getting home around 12:40AM from the Playhouse 22 in 
East Brunswick, walked the dogs and forced myself to sleep around 2AM. Two 
hours later, alarm goes off and I found myself on Rt. 70 heading to Holgate, 
and I was running late. 


I missed one of the first Wilson’s Storm Petrel simply due to lack of 
knowledge on seabird birding. But the second one I had a great look but the 
bird was at great distance. Experience only can be gained during live view, and 
not by reading the field guides or internet surfing. 


What MB did not mentioned was that we called it quits at 10AM to get the hell 
out of the island ( I am not a summer time shore-beach fan). On my way home, I 
did the ultra-quick and fast-n-furious salt marsh birding where no smart 
birders would go to look for the snowy egrets ( I did visit known locations as 
well). 


Few photos of my day on my Flickr in case some may be interested.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Dickcissels and horned larks at Laurel Run Park, Delran, NJ
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 14:04:39 -0400
The 3 Dickcissels (2 male/1 female) were viewed and photographed by several
birders today as well as a pair of horned larks which were observed mating
on the dirt trail by the parking area.  Several grasshopper sparrows were
also present.  The park has a website on the internet with a map and
directions.  Joe Palumbo/Liz Bender


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Subject: Dickcissels - Laurel Run Park - Burlington
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 14:00:07 -0400
Hello,
    What a great find! And very knowledgable birders are in contact with the 
authorities re proper timing for mowing, etc. That area could be good for
endangered grassland birds for years to come with proper habitat management.
And no taping of the birds! Please. It does disturb them in the long haul. 
Many birders are hitting this area. The grasshopper sparrows and Dickcissels
are cooperating very nicely. Perching up while singing. A Grasshopper Sparrow
perched up for 5 minutes with a bug in its bill! Making sure it was safe to 
head 

to its nest and feed hungry young. I even managed a couple good pics!
I'll put into the ebird report later tonight. Walk to the RIGHT from the 
parking 

area. Counter clockwise. Fred L. and I encountered all three Dickcissels in the
fields down the hill. Dickcissels need emergent vegetation to sing from. And 
that's what they were doing. Just listen for the song and scan. 

Butterfly notes - Variegated Frits.

Good birding all.     

Sandra Keller

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Subject: Dickcissels at Laurel Run Park continue
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 13:58:28 -0400
I went to Laurel Run Park this afternoon and saw three DICKCISSELS. All were 
vocal. Two seen very well by walking right from parking area, past the left 
bend in the path and going down hill. At least 3 GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS seen in 
the area as well. The other DICKCISSEL was on the west side of the park. A 
HORNED LARK was in the grass right by the parking area. Thanks to Joseph 
Palumbo for posting this find! 


John J. Collins
Raritan NJ
Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Holgate
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 11 Jun 2016 12:13:47 -0400
I met up with Jon Stippick and Yong Bong at Holgate this morning, to do
some seawatching. Only tubenoses we could muster up were 2 WILSON'S STORM
PETRELS...a year-bird for us all.

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Dickcissels
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 16:30:10 -0400
The dickcissels reported were intially found by Ken Mitchell and reported
to me by Tom Bailey.  I have photos of the birds if anyone needs them.  The
horned lark was joined by another (female) which suggests the possiblity of
a breeding pair. Perhaps the dickcissels are also breeding as well. JP


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Subject: Dickcissels at Laurel Run Park, Creek Road, Delran Township
From: Joseph Palumbo <jpalumbo2014 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 12:23:53 -0400
There are currently 3 dickcissels at Laurel Run Park in Delran, Township.
From the parking lot, walk left along the dirt trail about 70 yards
(halfway to Anderson's farm).  All 3 birds are in this area, perching and
singing occasionally.  Also just photographed a horned lark on the grass
strip alongside the parking lot.  Joe Palumbo and Liz Bender


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Subject: OT, but thought
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 10 Jun 2016 15:11:05 +0000
this was an interesting article, although I do lament everything JCP&L does, I 
do give them Kudoes for this. 


Karen
Ocean


 
http://brick.shorebeat.com/2016/06/osprey-nest-saved-in-brick-with-some-help-from-jcpl/ 



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Subject: Unexpected trip to Delaware Bay salt marsh
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 21:53:05 -0400
By chance, totally unexpected trip to the Delaware Bay salt marsh, Cumberland 
County today. 


So why not look for more snowy egrets ? Which I certainly did !!! Surprise of 
the day was finding a mix flock of shorebirds. Sadly, those birds were distant 
for close study. 


Downside of birding solo is when viewing Black-bellied type plovers. Not 
convinced they area all Black-bellied. Even the age and plumage of these 
plovers were frustrating. Someone take me birding please. 


Some photos on my Flickr for those who may be interested.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564 AT N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: drones
From: Greg Prelich <gprelich AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 18:06:57 -0400
In the past two weeks or so I've seen people flying drones over what I consider 
to be quality birding habitat, in one case over a flock of hundreds of Red 
Knots, and in another case over a field that contains nesting Grasshopper 
Sparrows. I assume that we birders will be encountering drone operators more 
and more frequently. I'm wondering about the legality of flying drones in high 
quality birding locations or near sensitive species. What should be reported 
and what shouldn't? For example, can drones be flown over the Brig 
impoundments? In county parks or state parks? Peeking into Osprey nests? Into 
Broad-winged Hawk kettles? During migration over the Hawk Watch platform? I'd 
especially love to hear about current policies from officials who manage key 
birding properties. 


Greg Prelich
Manchester, NJ


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Subject: Re: Edwin B. Forsythe NWR Wildlife Drive Reopen
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 17:59:01 -0400
Does that mean it will be closed for migration in the fall 2016 and again
in the spring fall 2017?
On Jun 9, 2016 4:10 PM, "Marc Virgilio"  wrote:

> Hello Everyone,
>
> The Refuge is happy to announce that Phase 1 of construction is complete
> and the Wildlife Drive and adjoining trails are once again FULLY OPEN!
>
> Over 2000 feet of critically eroded shoreline has been repaired and
> stabilized to ensure our Wildlife Drive will continue to serve as a great
> place for both people and wildlife to visit.
>
> In the next week or so the restored areas will be seeded with native
> plants, with larger plants being added in the fall. This will be done
> without closing the Drive.
>
> Please use caution when moving past newly repaired areas and be sure to
> stay on the roadway. The road grade in these areas is a bit rougher than
> the rest of the Drive.
>
> Phase two of work, which will begin late this summer, will include a
> complete resurfacing of the Drive with crushed concrete to create a
> smoother, more wear-resistant surface.
>
> If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at:
> Marc_Virgilio AT fws.gov.
>
> Regards,
>
> Marc Virgilio
> Fish and Wildlife Biologist
> Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge
> U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
> PO Box 72, 800 Great Creek Road
> Oceanville, NJ 08231
> 609-748-1535 or 609-703-1710 (cell)
> http://www.fws.gov/refuge/edwin_b_forsythe
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Subject: Edwin B. Forsythe NWR Wildlife Drive Reopen
From: Marc Virgilio <marc_virgilio AT FWS.GOV>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 16:10:31 -0400
Hello Everyone,

The Refuge is happy to announce that Phase 1 of construction is complete and 
the Wildlife Drive and adjoining trails are once again FULLY OPEN! 


Over 2000 feet of critically eroded shoreline has been repaired and stabilized 
to ensure our Wildlife Drive will continue to serve as a great place for both 
people and wildlife to visit. 


In the next week or so the restored areas will be seeded with native plants, 
with larger plants being added in the fall. This will be done without closing 
the Drive. 


Please use caution when moving past newly repaired areas and be sure to stay on 
the roadway. The road grade in these areas is a bit rougher than the rest of 
the Drive. 


Phase two of work, which will begin late this summer, will include a complete 
resurfacing of the Drive with crushed concrete to create a smoother, more 
wear-resistant surface. 


If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at: 
Marc_Virgilio AT fws.gov. 


Regards,

Marc Virgilio
Fish and Wildlife Biologist
Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
PO Box 72, 800 Great Creek Road
Oceanville, NJ 08231
609-748-1535 or 609-703-1710 (cell)
http://www.fws.gov/refuge/edwin_b_forsythe


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Subject: south Jersey - Grasshopper Sparrow searching
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2016 15:19:41 -0400
Hello,
 No success! This is crazy..... The strong winds probably didn't help 
today..... 

But I do believe numbers are down. And I wonder why..... one spot we stopped
at in Gloucester County where Marilyn had some a week before was mowed. 
Our land use practices in Jersey are not conducive to grassland breeding. 
We hit Featherbed Lane in Salem County first. I was surprised we struck out.
Again, the wind. Hard to hear. Plus no sparrows in short flights! 
    A highlight today was an adult Tundra Swan! at Sunset Rd. - Mannington
Marsh - Salem county. We presume injured. But it looked fine and was eating. 
A June bird for Salem County! 

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

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