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Updated on Sunday, May 1 at 04:41 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


African Citril,©Barry Kent Mackay

1 May fos black-crowned night heron [J and B ]
1 May 1st Annual Ocean County Big Day Bird Count May 14th [Shawn Wainwright ]
1 May Yard birding - Parula, Redstart [Sandra Keller ]
1 May Pinelands birding, Tuckerton, and fork-tailed flycatcher, 4-30-16 [Susan Treesh ]
1 May Bald Pate PS ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
1 May Bald Pate Sat 4/30/16 ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
1 May Fork-tailed Flycatcher location [Samuel Galick ]
1 May Forked-tailed Flycatcher: Assunpink WMA/Upper Freehold [vincent N ]
1 May Fork tail this morning ["Albert, Steven" ]
1 May Inappropriate Post [mike hiotis ]
1 May Re: Mad dash for "Larry's" Fork-tailed Flycatcher [L Larson ]
1 May Re: Mad dash for "Larry's" Fork-tailed Flycatcher [mike hiotis ]
30 Apr Mad dash for Fork-tailed Flycatcher [Larry scacchetti ]
30 Apr Fork-tailed Flycatcher still present ["John J. Collins" ]
30 Apr Man Down! NJAS Trip to Lord Stirling [David Bernstein ]
30 Apr Fork-tailed Flycatcher details, Monmouth County [Samuel Galick ]
30 Apr Fork-tailed Flycatcher, Monmouth County [Samuel Galick ]
30 Apr Newton Lake Park - Camden County [Sandra Keller ]
30 Apr Curlew Sandpiper, Cumberland County [Samuel Galick ]
30 Apr Backyard....... [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
29 Apr Transvestite Ruffs [Scott Barnes ]
29 Apr ruff - Heislerville - yes [Sandra Keller ]
29 Apr Garret Mountain Reservation 15 warbler day [Bill Elrick ]
29 Apr 4-29-2016 Cape May Coral Ave. Seawatch - Parasitic Jaeger [Yong Kong ]
28 Apr Cliff Swallows? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
28 Apr H'ville Ruff continues, Cumberland Co., NJ [Yong Kong ]
28 Apr Ruff continues, possible Curlew Sandpiper [Harvey Tomlinson ]
28 Apr Extra-limital. - SWAINSON'S WARBLER, Central Park NYC 4/28 (Thursday) [Dom ]
27 Apr Blue-headed Vireo - FOS - my yard! Plus Ruff thoughts [Sandra Keller ]
27 Apr Bank Swallow nest colony? (photo) ["B.G. Sloan" ]
27 Apr Free field trip to Petty's Island this Sat [Scott Barnes ]
27 Apr Hudson County Park, Bayonne [Michael Britt ]
27 Apr Ruff, Cumberland County [Samuel Galick ]
27 Apr Chickadee behavior ["Susie R." ]
27 Apr Garret Mountain Reservation,Least Flycatcher,Great Crested Flycatcher,Eastern Kingbird,Yellow-throated Vireo. [Bill Elrick ]
27 Apr Incredible Broad-winged Hawk Movement [Larry scacchetti ]
27 Apr Warbling Vireos [Jean Bickal ]
27 Apr Ruby-throated Hummingbird ["Susie R." ]
26 Apr Heislerville - shorebirds [Sandra Keller ]
26 Apr White-rumped Sandpiper - Heislerville [Harvey Tomlinson ]
26 Apr Good migration movement this morning at Duke Island Park ["John J. Collins" ]
26 Apr Garret Mountain Reservation 17 warblers in Garret today [Bill Elrick ]
26 Apr 2 rt hummers [J and B ]
26 Apr Spring arrivals at the Great Swamp, Morris Cty [Ken Walsh ]
26 Apr Rogers Refuge and Institute Woods [Winifred Hughes Spar ]
26 Apr Cerulean at Baldpate now Fiddlers Creek Trail [Fairfax Hutter ]
25 Apr Stephen R. Gregg aka Hudson County Park, Bayonnne [Michael Britt ]
25 Apr List of nest cams ["James O'Brien" ]
25 Apr Garret Mountain Reservation = Warbling Vireo, American Redstart,Rose-breasted Grosbeak 5 [Bill Elrick ]
25 Apr Glossy Ibis Feeding Frenzy [Dan Morley ]
25 Apr Prothonotary Warbler, Trenton Marsh [Andrew Bobe ]
25 Apr Princeton - Rogers Refuge/Institute Woods - Wilson's Snipe [jimmy lee ]
25 Apr Palmyra - migration and more breeders in today. [Sandra Keller ]
25 Apr Nice Morning at the Hook: [Peter Bacinski ]
25 Apr RT Hummer [Jean Bickal ]
25 Apr Horned Larks at Cold Brook Preserve, Oldwick, Hunterdon County [Lillian Shupe ]
25 Apr Quick visit to Halifax Road ["CHELEMER, MARC J" ]
25 Apr Also not hypothetical [Michael Perlin ]
24 Apr Re: Would you count the bird? [Jeffrey Climpson ]
24 Apr Would you count the bird/thoughts [Theodore Chase Jr ]
24 Apr Yard Birds...... [Gary or Karen Gentile ]
24 Apr Garret Mountain Reservation FOY Green Heron 1 [Bill Elrick ]
24 Apr Palmyra - new arrivals [Sandra Keller ]
24 Apr Gloucester Co.- Red-headed Woodpecker [Jon Stippick ]
24 Apr would you count the bird /thoughts ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
24 Apr Princeton Institute Woods 4/24/16 ["cwsg1 AT excite.com" ]
24 Apr Re: 1. Would you count the bird? [Diane C Louie ]
24 Apr 1. Would you count the bird? [Michael M ]
24 Apr Semipalmated Sandpiper-Bobwhite [Harvey Tomlinson ]
23 Apr Kearny Marsh this AM [Michael Britt ]
23 Apr Garret Mountain Reservation 14 or more Warbler day [Bill Elrick ]
23 Apr Re: Would you count the bird? [John Freiberg ]
23 Apr Re: Would you count the bird? [Michael Perlin ]
23 Apr Re: Would you count the bird? [Walter Gura ]
22 Apr Good flight today at Sandy Hook [Scott Barnes ]
22 Apr Would you count the bird? [Dom ]

Subject: fos black-crowned night heron
From: J and B <aufderhar AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 21:36:59 +0000
One appeared two days ago on the pond. I hope it stays. in the 9 years since 
I've lived here, they have dwindled from 17 at one time 

down to two or three last year. and I fear for their continuing existence. Last 
I knew the species was listed in NJ as threatened. 

  
There are swans on  eggs, geese on a nest, and 6 egrets spending every night 
roosting here...don't know about their nests. 

Joan 
Fair Haven 
  


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: 1st Annual Ocean County Big Day Bird Count May 14th
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 17:36:03 -0400
Hi everyone, I'm putting together a birding event that will take place over
all of Ocean County with 9 teams covering different areas. Each team will
have a section to bird in Ocean County.
This will be similar to the CBC but will include all of Ocean County
instead of just a little part. We will be meeting at Riverwood Park
Recreational Center in Toms River as a meeting spot to go over everyone's
lists like the CBC and have dinner which would be subs and some dessert as
well around 6pm. I have several birders already interested and taking part.
Depending on how many are willing to join us will determine how much to
give for dinner, 5 dollars.

Also working on getting checklists for everyone to use to hand them to me
at the end so I can tally up the total species along with how many of each
species.
You can start birding anytime after midnight. If you will be birding the
bay or ocean I suggest someone on your team has a scope.
So let me know if your interested and what team you would like to be on. If
you don't have much experience identifying birds, make sure someone on your
team does. Pick an area that you know well.
After that we can make meetup places with everyone on your team.

Let me know as soon as possible if you can join us! Any questions feel free
to send me a message.

Team 1 ( No more birders needed ) - Covering Seaside Heights, Seaside Park,
and Island Beach State Park - Shawn Wainwright, Al Della Bella, Skyler
Streich, Sarah Frazee, and Chris Licata.

Team 2 ( Birders needed ) - Covering Lavallette, Mantoloking, Bayhead,
Point Pleasant, Point Pleasant Beach, and Brick - Jessica Howland

Team 3 ( No more birders needed ) - Covering Silverton, Toms River and
Island Heights - Maureen Heatherington, Steven Weiss, Tom Johns, and 2
others

Team 4 ( No more birders needed ) - Covering Beachwood, Pine Beach, Ocean
Gate, Bayville, and Berkeley - Deidre Asbjorn, Jenn Stilwell, and Shannon
Mancini

Team 5 ( Birders needed ) - Covering Ocean Township, Forked River, Lacey,
and Waretown - Patrick B. Fream and Thomas Schiano

Team 6 ( Birders needed ) - Covering , Barnegat, Stafford, Surf City,
Harvey Cedars, and Barnegat Light - Eric Reuter, Lisa Deubel, and Marty
DeAngelo

Team 7 ( No more birders needed ) - Covering Little Egg Harbor, Tuckerton,
Long Beach Island, and Beach Haven - Donna Ortuso, Terry Lodge, Jamie
Harrison, Linda Woodfield, and Peter Mooney.

Team 8 ( Birders needed ) - Covering Lakewood, Whitesville, Lakehurst, and
Manchester - ?

Team 9 ( Birders needed ) - Covering Jackson Mills, Jackson, Cassville, New
Egypt, and Plumstead - Akira Kurosawa

Here is a map of Ocean County so you know your boundaries:
http://newjersey.hometownlocator.com/maps/countymap,cfips,029,c,ocean.cfm

Even if you can't make the event, go birding somewhere in Ocean County and
i will count it for the appropriate team. Just be sure to ebird it so i can
see it. And also you don't have to start at midnight, you can start
whenever you like, but it starts at midnight if you don't want to sleep
lol. I would start while it's still dark out and try for Owls and others.

Your checklist will be attached via email, there is room for tallying and
then a column for your total. Team leaders will be the one doing the
checklist so send me your email and i will send it too you. Bring these to
the meetup and I will collect them after I call out all the species, I just
need one from each team. When printing - after you click on the print
button, click on pages and only print pages 1 - 10, the others are not
needed. If you happen to see anything not on the list, then it should be a
rare species, just add those at the bottom.
Hope to see you there!

Some people will be bringing items needed for the event, if you would like
to bring something let me know, here's a list of who is bringing items and
items still needed. Thanks!

Eric Curtis Cummings - Subs - Please give $5 to Eric at the event
Jenn Stilwell - Bird themed Dessert
Deidre Asbjorn - Snacks to go with the subs
Lisa Deubel - Cole slaw
Shawn Wainwright - Coffee and napkins
Terry Lodge - Cups, soda, and water
Sarah Frazee - Soda and water
Al Della Bella - Paper plates, Coffee creamer, and sugar

Items still needed:
Plastic Cups
Styrofoam cups for the coffee
If i missed anything let me know lol.
Thanks to everyone taking part so far, should be a fun event!

PS I already know this is the same day as the WSOB but I also know many of
you aren't doing it as I have 25 birders already participating.

Let me know if you would like to join us! This will now be a yearly event
so hopefully some of you who can't make it this year can make it next year.

Good birding!
        Shawn Wainwright
        Toms River
        ShawnEagleEyes1 AT aol.com


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Yard birding - Parula, Redstart
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 17:35:41 -0400
Well, again, I get ready to head out but realize some migrants in my yard! So, 
no farm field birding in Gloucester. 

But picked up Parula and Redstart. There are some birds out there! 

I had heard the Fork-tailed was not seen this afternoon, so didn’t head up. 
If reported early Monday am, will head up. 


Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Pinelands birding, Tuckerton, and fork-tailed flycatcher, 4-30-16
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 15:07:42 -0400
Spent yesterday morning birding at the adjacent NJCF Franklin Parker and 
Michael Huber preserves with David Larsen and John Holinka; many birds 
were active in spite of the clouds.  A blue grosbeak was singing from a 
prominent perch not too far along the left-hand trail from the Speedwell 
Franklin Parker entrance.   A number of eastern kingbirds had arrived, 
and also had my first orchard oriole of the season. The resident prairie 
and pine warblers were sounding off, and I have never seen a place with 
so many towhees singing and foraging. This was my first trip to this 
particular preserve, and I had no idea it was so big.  Michael Huber 
Prairie Warbler preserve had even more of its eponymous prairie warblers 
singing - it's really impressive to be completely surrounded by prairie 
warbler songs ascending the scale one after another.  An invisible 
prothonotary warbler was singing at the stream where the red gate closes 
off the road, and an equally invisible hooded warbler was moving around 
a little further down the same road.

After that we went over to Great Bay Blvd. at Tuckerton, where there 
were tri-colored herons along with many snowy and great egrets.  Willets 
were very numerous, and there were black-bellied plovers in every 
variation of molt.  But the inlet had virtually no birds in it.

Just as I was getting ready to leave Tuckerton came the text about the 
fork-tail.  By fortunate coincidence, Assunpink was right on the route I 
was taking home, and it was quite easy to find my way to the bird and 
the group of birders enjoying it. What a great find!  By then the sun 
was mostly out, and the bird was showing quite well as it acrobatically 
maneuvered close to the ground.  An eastern kingbird nearby provided 
comparison.  I thought the bird looked smaller than the kingbird, but 
then when I got home, all the field guides showed it as bigger - but the 
Sibley guide, while giving the dimensions showing the fork-tailed fly as 
the bigger bird, nonetheless stated, "distinguished [from kingbird] by 
distinctive long black tail, smaller size ..."

Susan Treesh
Somerset



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Bald Pate PS
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 11:35:22 -0400
forget the wood thrushes- 5 (H)
 
C. Wyluda
Pennington NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Bald Pate Sat 4/30/16
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 11:34:03 -0400
8am- 1 pm sun, only visible from about 1:20-11;25 am

walked about 5.5 miles, blue trail, orange trail... most everything but the 
usual white trail except by the pond., 

 
this was not a great day weatherwise
 
warblers: ovenbird- about 30; hooded -6 (H); yellow-1; yellow rumped- 6; B&W 3, 
common yellow throat-9, prairie-1 (H), blue winged- 6 (H); (possibly saw a n. 
paraula and a BTG, but had very poor views, would not count on an official 
survey) 

 
white eyed vireo (H)- seen by an adjacent birder
phoebes- nesting
blue birds -2
rose breated grobeak- 2 (H); 1 seen (M)
scarlet tanager 2 (H);1 seen (M)
 
e towehees 40 (H); 1 seen (M)
blue gray gnatcatcher-2
gray catbird- 3
tree swallows-3
 
chipping sparrow, white throated sparrow, usual wood peckers, mourning dove, 
red tailed hawk, flyover 

great blue heron, house wren, red tailed hawk, gold finches
 
 


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher location
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 10:59:16 -0400
Current location of the Fork-tailed Flycatcher:

 https://goo.gl/maps/g4rKF89Xn232

40.212691, -74.528160

Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Forked-tailed Flycatcher: Assunpink WMA/Upper Freehold
From: vincent N <vfn7 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 14:48:57 +0000
The subject bird was still viewable at yesterday's spot as of 10:21am. Perhaps 
last night's rain kept it from leaving. Bird chance for viewing is when rain 
slows down or briefly abates. Bird is obviously hungry so a strategy might be 
to wait in your car during heavy rain then walk out into the field when the 
rain slows down. A scope is very helpful to keep your distance and not scare 
the bird. 

Vincent Nichnadowicz: Princeton Junction 		 	   		  

How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Fork tail this morning
From: "Albert, Steven" <Steven.Albert AT AECOM.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 12:03:06 +0000
Seen at Assunpink in the field. Just beyond the swale. Mostly low, on weeds. 
From 7:30-45 now back in the trees we think. Rain sucks 


SA

Steven L. Albert, CPEA, QEP
Senior Program Manager
EHS Management Consulting
D 732.564.3601  M 732.832.6195
Internal 100 3601
Steven.Albert AT aecom.com

AECOM
30 Knightsbridge Road, Suite 520
Piscataway, New Jersey 08854
T 732.564.3600 F 732.369.0122



How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Inappropriate Post
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 07:25:49 -0400
My apologies to all on this listserv for my last post.It was inappropriate
and not in the good spirit of birding.


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Re: Mad dash for "Larry's" Fork-tailed Flycatcher
From: L Larson <llarson2 AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 07:18:35 -0400
Mike and Larry,
Please let’s keep the personal messages to private e-mail if you want to 
continue. 

This isn’t appropriate for the list. 
thanks!

Laurie Larson 
“list mom” 
(or maybe Grandma would be more like it ;)
Princeton

> On May 1, 2016, at 7:08 AM, mike hiotis  wrote:
> 
> Those who know me can tell you I rarely chase birds. I woke up at 5 AM and
> decided to meander down to Assunpink for the above mentioned rarity.
> Luckily I tuned in to Jerseybirds to see Spook Scaccheti's last post re:
> his mad dash. Obviously that dash did not stop before he infringed on the
> bird's space as he describes in his own words. Now I am not going to tell
> you I know anything about bird psychology. What I will end this cant(a rant
> without satisfaction) on is, it gave me a good reason to bestow some
> frustration for those OTHER birders who would have liked a fair chance.
> Larry I am too fat to hide and I ain't bitchin', just  relaying a little
> friendly adrenaline. PS - If the bird does show up today I rescind none of
> this.Some folks are not made to go face to face with others in this
> world.It is no big deal if they were talking behind your back. This is not
> the first time someone, maybe someone less of a bag of wind than you
> Larry, finds little respect for the bird and other birders in your chasing
> prowess.
> 
> Mike Hiotis
> Martinsville NJ
> 
> 
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Mad dash for "Larry's" Fork-tailed Flycatcher
From: mike hiotis <mchhiotis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 May 2016 07:08:25 -0400
Those who know me can tell you I rarely chase birds. I woke up at 5 AM and
decided to meander down to Assunpink for the above mentioned rarity.
Luckily I tuned in to Jerseybirds to see Spook Scaccheti's last post re:
his mad dash. Obviously that dash did not stop before he infringed on the
bird's space as he describes in his own words. Now I am not going to tell
you I know anything about bird psychology. What I will end this cant(a rant
without satisfaction) on is, it gave me a good reason to bestow some
frustration for those OTHER birders who would have liked a fair chance.
Larry I am too fat to hide and I ain't bitchin', just  relaying a little
friendly adrenaline. PS - If the bird does show up today I rescind none of
this.Some folks are not made to go face to face with others in this
world.It is no big deal if they were talking behind your back. This is not
the first time someone, maybe someone less of a bag of wind than you
Larry, finds little respect for the bird and other birders in your chasing
prowess.

Mike Hiotis
Martinsville NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Mad dash for Fork-tailed Flycatcher
From: Larry scacchetti <Larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 23:13:24 -0400
I was enjoying a nice walk around the Ramapo Valley when I got the text alert 
about a Fork-tailed Flycatcher found by Michael Henderson. When I first saw it, 
it didn't register as FTFL, I thought it was a Scissor-tailed. Kennan Ennis 
called me and asked if I was going for the bird. Thats when it clicked and I 
was heading down 287, White-knuckled and full of adrenaline towards Assunpink. 
When I got there multiple birders were still on the bird as it hawked insects 
from low perches in the field. The bird was not bothered by all the people, 
even when fishermen walked right through the area the bird favored. It 
continued to hunt and Keenan and I snuck up behind some trees to get a closer 
look. 2 more fishermen walked through and the bird continued to hawk the ground 
and then to a treetop directly above us. Contrary to some bitching, we did not 
flush the bird once. Maybe next time instead of whining about it behind my 
back, say something then and there, pretty simple. N! 

 ot trying to start a fight, just saying. ANYWAY, the bird sallied a few times 
and then eventually flew out of the field and over the tree line, across the 
street, and out of sight. A few of us went to relocate it and one birder 
re-found it on the west side of Lake Assunpink near an outflow pipe. It hunted 
there for quite some time. Mike Turso called me to let me know he was on his 
way, so as to pay it forward, I stayed on the bird and waited for him to get 
there. Time was ticking and the bird got real flighty and was hawking insects 
along the lake shore as if it was getting ready to leave, even battling an 
Eastern Kingbird for perches. Mike showed up with his dad and ran down to our 
location. He saw the bird perched for about 3 seconds just enough time before 
it took off at 7:46 pm and flew due north over the lake, over the trees and out 
of sight...again. After several misses of this bird in NJ it was so amazing to 
finally chase one that stayed put long enough. If ! 

 that wasn't enough to make the day amazing, right as I got back to town, there 
was a contest on a Radio station and I called up just for the hell of it and 
won a free trip to Vegas for two. What a ridiculously amazing day!!!!! 


Photos of the bird can be seen here : 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/larrybird13/ 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
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Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher still present
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 18:27:58 -0400
As of 6:26 PM the Fork-tailed Flycatcher is still present at Assunpink.  

John J. Collins
Raritan NJ
Sent from my iPhone


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: Man Down! NJAS Trip to Lord Stirling
From: David Bernstein <jackstraw1963 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:38:32 -0400
Afternoon folks,

Alan Mart and I had a nice group of ten birders join us for an All Things Bird 
trek through Lord Stirling this morning. We walked in a large loop starting on 
the Fishermen's Trail, hitting the inactive beaver lodge, Lenape Meadow, Dance 
Floor and the remains of the Boondocks Boardwalk before heading back, a four 
mile plus hike. A new trail has replaced the boardwalk through prime Rail 
habitat but it isn't the same. 


We tallied sixty species. Highlights included Red-headed Woodpecker, multiple 
Solitary Sandpipers, Blue-headed, Warbling and Yellow-throated Vireos, 
displaying Rose-breasted Grosbeak and a pair of Thrasher. A little light in the 
Warbler Department but a Black-throated Green provided fine views. Trip 
concluded I'm told with Ruby-throated Hummingbird and Northern Oriole. 


Two and a half hours into the trip, I developed symptoms of a stomach virus 
that affected my son at two this morning. I beat a hasty retreat and Alan took 
over and finished the trip in fine fashion. 

I had a pair of calling Bald Eagle and Wood thrush on my way back to my car.

I'm now flat on my back and my wife is guarding the door in case I make any 
sudden moves. The Fork-tailed Flycatcher hurts, man. 


Good birding and good chasing.

David S. Bernstein
Berkeley Heights, NJ

Sent from my iPad


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher details, Monmouth County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 17:00:35 -0400
From Scott Barnes:

Fork-tailed Flycatcher showing well. It's in the field by the grassy swale 
where the Northern Shrike was. Take LEFT turn just before the Assunpink Lake 
boat launch, go up hill and park by big mulberry/maple trees. Walk south into 
field. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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Subject: Fork-tailed Flycatcher, Monmouth County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 16:31:11 -0400
Rob Fanning reports:

Michael Henderson just photographed Fork-tailed Flycatcher at Assunpink WMA.

I'll keep looking for details as to the specific location.

Good birding!

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
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Subject: Newton Lake Park - Camden County
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 11:55:17 -0400
Hello,
 The AWS - RNC had a walk here this morning. We did quite well considering the 
weather! No new migrants around. 

Still loads of Yellow-rumped Warblers around. Most of the breeders were back 
and putting on a show. Green Heron was 

my FOS, warbling vireos everywhere, etc. The swallow show there was its usual 
good self! The western pond being the 

best as usual. I wonder where all those Rough-winged Swallows breed?

Happy chasing all - I hear the Curlew has been refound along with the Ruff!

Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: Curlew Sandpiper, Cumberland County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 09:39:54 -0400
Multiple observers report a Curlew Sandpiper at Heislerville WMA along with the 
continuing Ruff. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
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Subject: Backyard.......
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2016 11:51:52 +0000
Between the raindrops and the cold yesterday the yard had:

1 Red-Breasted Grosbeak (male)
Yellow Warbler
House Wren
Brown Thrashers (2)
Catbirds (3)
Flicker
Cedar Waxwings (5)
Carolina Wrens (2)
WB Nuthatches
Redstart


Karen
Ocean


Sent from my iPad


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Subject: Transvestite Ruffs
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 21:46:19 -0400
Jerseybirders,

Thought some of you might find this article interesting, with the recent
appearance of Ruffs on both sides of Delaware Bay. Seems that some
female-plumage birds aren't always what they may appear to be.


http://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-world/animal-behaviour/in-the-world-of-ruffs-a-male-bird-thats-sneaky-and-well-endowed 


Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: ruff - Heislerville - yes
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 18:13:25 -0400
Hello,
 It seems to favor that east edge. Although it was flying around a lot when I 
first 

arrived. I would like to thank Tom J. and friends - they were very helpful 
getting me 

on the bird when we were on the south dike. And they amazingly followed the 
bird in 

flight to the west side. There's thousands of birds here.... it gets fun when 
they put 

up! Anyway, I went back to the east edge, only hitting from Matt's Landing. 
And it did reappear. And promptly disappeared.... and reappeared for good which
is when I put the alert out. Good luck everyone tomorrow! I will add more id 
points 

and hopefully a pic if came out into my ebird report. This is the plainest Ruff 
I have 

seen. Fall ones have more color!! Anyway, thanks again to the Cape May group.
It helped having them find originally and get me on it. Then I knew what to 
look 

for. I also had 2 White- rumped Sandpipers. 

I didn't think it would take long having more Semipalmated than Least 
Sandpipers 

here. Three days......

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation 15 warbler day
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 15:35:28 -0400
5.0 mile(s)
66 species

Oh how fickle the birding community are. Today I said it was a " good day "
and everyone thought I was nuts. There were 17 warbler species to be found,
( I missed Prairie and Northern water-thrush) plus all the other birds that
have been here for a few days already. The place was empty of birders for
most of the morning and when people arrived they found it difficult! OH
Garret Mtn what have you done.
 In all seriousness thought it was slower than usual but with patience
birds could be found. I am not sure what the forecast is for Saturday but I
am sure you will find Warbling vireo, Eastern Towhee and Orioles.

Bill

Wild Turkey  1
Common Loon  1

Black Vulture  2

Solitary Sandpiper  2

Pileated Woodpecker  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue-headed Vireo  4
Warbling Vireo  9

House Wren  3
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  14
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  9
Hermit Thrush  1
Wood Thrush  6     Actual count

Gray Catbird  12
Brown Thrasher  2

Ovenbird  2
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Blue-winged Warbler  2
Black-and-white Warbler  9
Nashville Warbler  2     Actual count
American Redstart  1
Northern Parula  4
Yellow Warbler  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Palm Warbler  2
Pine Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler  18
Black-throated Green Warbler  6     Actual count
Chipping Sparrow  14
White-throated Sparrow  32
Song Sparrow  2
Swamp Sparrow  6
Eastern Towhee  16
Scarlet Tanager  3

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1

Orchard Oriole  1
Baltimore Oriole  2

*Bill Elrick*





*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

*Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *


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Subject: 4-29-2016 Cape May Coral Ave. Seawatch - Parasitic Jaeger
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 15:06:19 -0400
Late Thursday afternoon at work I received a text from Mike Britt, an 
invitation to bird w/ him today. For me an invitation to bird w/ someone is 
extremely rare event, just as rare as that Ruff/Reeve recently reported at 
Heislerville impoundment. 


MB style, he showed up at my house at 4:45 AM. We ended our day at Cape May. 
Once again, he schooled me on birding, especially at the Cape May Coral Ave. 
Seawatch. 


I must admit I typically do not enjoy “Jaeger” seawatch when the birds are 
at great distance, as in most cases, all one can see is a tiny black 
triangular-shape-like bird flying around but drastically different in flight 
pattern, chasing “host birds”. I was a good company and acted like I was 
really enjoying the Jaeger show. Of course MB was all in with his eyes glued to 
his scope !!! 


I posted some very distant and poor quality photos, including cropped photos to 
share, in case, some may be interested what our day at Cape May was like. 


https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County

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Subject: Cliff Swallows? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 20:39:01 -0400
If anyone will be birding Johnson Park (Piscataway) in the near future I'd
appreciate it if you might take some time to check out the Cliff Swallow
nests on the upstream side of the Route 18 bridge over the Raritan River.
Today I saw swallows using at least one of the nests, but I can't be
certain they were Cliff Swallows. (Tree Swallows used a single Cliff
Swallow nest on the downstream side of the bridge last year). To view the
nests, walk the park road under the bridge to the upstream side and look
for the nests shown in this photo I took today:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/26430273080/

You have to look carefully because there are newly leafed trees blocking
the view from many angles. The birds I saw were using the single nest on
the left in my photo...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Subject: H'ville Ruff continues, Cumberland Co., NJ
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 20:15:45 -0400
First and most, five stars to Cameron Cox and Tom Johnson for finding this 
Ruff and posting video !!

After their shout-out, I came up with a perfect plan. The most anti-social 
birder that I am, I was not going to wait until Friday or Sat  to see this 
bird. So the plan was to arrive at sunrise this morning and check out the 
Ruff, and head over to Rt. 47 North ASAP, and not to be seen by arriving 
birders. I showed up around 7:10AM or so.

It took me more than an hour to find the Ruff. I was right on schedule to 
hit Rt 47 as planned, but there were two birders at the scene by then. 
Thanks to this very special bird, I came out of my shell and actually 
communicated these two NJ birders. Then a few more birders after.

Who knew, talking to other birders when I am out and about birding was not 
that painful at all !!!

On purpose, I posted some distant photos of the Ruff on my Flickr, just to 
share my experience with JBIrders here, And as a comparison study with the 
yellowlegs, including a photo of NJ birders with whom I really enjoyed 
discussing about this very special bird.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bigchainbirder/

Yong Kong
Camden County

-----Original Message----- 
From: Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 3:02 PM
To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Ruff continues, possible Curlew Sandpiper

Hi Jersey Birders,
Another wonderful morning at Heislerville with the Ruff found by Cameron
Cox yesterday highlighting the bill.
It seems to like the SW corner of the main pool but as w/ all shorebirds
they move around for no apparent reason.
Be aware there is a Killdeer along the dike in the SW corner who is sitting
on eggs.
Try to keep a distance once you find her as our presence on the dike is
keeping her from keeping her eggs warm.
Thanks.
When I first arrived this morning the flock in the SW corner took flight
splitting into 2 groups. I saw a brick red breasted bird w/ a white rump
mixed in the group.
I just started shooting and captured a poor quality but somewhat
interesting photo of what may be a male Curlew Sandpiper.
It is up on my Flickr page.
Notes I took are jotted down in the comments section on Flickr
I thought when I saw it in flight that's what it might be and I can't think
of anything that matches the photo but I could just be
"peep blind" and suffering from shorebird hysteria.
Another sighting would be needed to confirm Curlew, but if you think of any
alternatives I would very much like to hear them.
White-rumped Sandpipers were also present and I counted 3 birds.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Squatter's Rights at Heislerville


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Subject: Ruff continues, possible Curlew Sandpiper
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 15:02:58 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
Another wonderful morning at Heislerville with the Ruff found by Cameron
Cox yesterday highlighting the bill.
It seems to like the SW corner of the main pool but as w/ all shorebirds
they move around for no apparent reason.
Be aware there is a Killdeer along the dike in the SW corner who is sitting
on eggs.
Try to keep a distance once you find her as our presence on the dike is
keeping her from keeping her eggs warm.
Thanks.
When I first arrived this morning the flock in the SW corner took flight
splitting into 2 groups. I saw a brick red breasted bird w/ a white rump
mixed in the group.
I just started shooting and captured a poor quality but somewhat
interesting photo of what may be a male Curlew Sandpiper.
It is up on my Flickr page.
Notes I took are jotted down in the comments section on Flickr
I thought when I saw it in flight that's what it might be and I can't think
of anything that matches the photo but I could just be
"peep blind" and suffering from shorebird hysteria.
Another sighting would be needed to confirm Curlew, but if you think of any
alternatives I would very much like to hear them.
White-rumped Sandpipers were also present and I counted 3 birds.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Squatter's Rights at Heislerville


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Subject: Extra-limital. - SWAINSON'S WARBLER, Central Park NYC 4/28 (Thursday)
From: Dom <dom AT MONTEVIDEO.COM.UY>
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2016 12:47:40 -0400
J birders.
Thought this might be interesting for those not on the NY list servs, but
perhaps work in the city or happen to be nearby ... A Very co-operative
swainsons warbler is in Central Park.  See Toms note below for more info.

Bird is very cooperative. Crowds less so ;)

Dom

www.antbirder.blogspot.com

www.aventuraargentina.com

+ 1 646 429 2667

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: *Thomas Fiore* 
Date: Thursday, April 28, 2016
Subject: [nysbirds-l] SWAINSON'S WARBLER, Central Park NYC 4/28 (Thursday)
To: nysbirds-l 


Thursday, 28 April, 2016 -

Central Park, Manhattan, New York City (in the Strawberry Fields area of
the park) -

The SWAINSON'S WARBLER is & has been observed & well-photographed as well
as video'd & audio'd by at least 150 (+) observers so far this morning at a
well-known birding site within Central Park, which is easily reached from
the West 72 Street entrance, and many have found viewing to be good (with
some CAUTION as there is an active roadway with occasional vehicles & many
passers-by) from a point roughly 50-75 yards (meters) east down along the
park roadway from the aforementioned park entrance, looking into low &
dense barberry shrubberies that line the park road there, as well as
forming the SW edge to the Strawberry Fields area.  Alternatively (and a
safer place to stand) one may watch & listen - the warbler has been singing
thru 10:15 a.m. at intervals of every few minutes to as much as 5+ minutes
between songs) from just within the Strawberry Fields location and just
south-west of the "Imagine" mosaic tile that honors John Lennon and is
found on the pathway into the western entry point to Strawberry Fields.

This among the most heavily-walked areas (esp. by tourists and visitors) of
the entire Central Park, thus consideration of the general public is
requested - and great care if going onto the roadway to observe, which many
including myself have done - so far. all present have been very
considerate, and many passers-by including a few in vehicles, have asked
what the excitement is all about, & some of us have been explaining the
rarity of the sighting.

The Swainson's Warbler was seen at least briefly earlier in the morning,
out on a more-open perch, singing but has been behaving more typically of
the species over the last 2+ hours, skulking & enjoying the shaded
leaf-litter under the barberry shrubs & adjacent area on the southern -
southwestern edges of the area (Strawberry Fields area).  It may take some
patience & perhaps kneeling or even nearly-lying on ground or paved road to
view the bird well, if it does not come out & sing as it had early in the
day.

There have been 150+ observers, likely more, already and some have come
some distance to enjoy the bird.
....................
This may be about the 5th, perhaps 6th record, & is certain to be the most
strongly documented of the records for this park. (the one prior record of
the species in NYC that may have been even more potentially cooperative and
viewable was the occurrence in Forest Park Queens County NY some years agom
which was also stunningly early for that species in our region (far north
of typical range).

good luck, & thanks to all including those who originally spotted &/or
heard this warbler, recognizing it as a special sight.

Tom Fiore
Manhattan

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ARCHIVES:
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Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

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-- 
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www.aventuraargentina.com

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Subject: Blue-headed Vireo - FOS - my yard! Plus Ruff thoughts
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 19:11:33 -0400
I had some migrants in my yard as I returned from work. Sure enough, a thorough 
search did have me see a Blue-headed 

Vireo. Have had before in my yard. It’s like Ovenbird though. Rare for me!

Keep in mind you searchers if the Ruff doesn’t return to the shorebird pool 
that Thompson’s Beach Rd. has roosting 

shorebirds - and feeding birds. That was the first spot for Curlew down here if 
I am not mistaken. And Bivalve doesn’t 

get the coverage it deserves - everyone hits Heislerville! There have been Ruff 
at Bivalve - many years ago. 


Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: Bank Swallow nest colony? (photo)
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 18:07:49 -0400
Does this look like a Bank Swallow nest colony? Right along the Raritan
River in Piscataway. There were swallows nearby:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444 AT N07/26077833144/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Subject: Free field trip to Petty's Island this Sat
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 17:58:16 -0400
Jerseybirders,

We have a free field trip to this restricted access site on the Delaware
River April 30. No charge, but registration is required.

Spring Birding On the Delaware
Led by Lloyd Shaw, Associate Naturalist - NJ Audubon
Saturday, April 30
7:45 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Discover this hidden treasure in the Delaware River! Access is granted only
a few times a year to this urban oasis where a great variety of wading,
shore and woodland birds in addition to resident Bald Eagles can be seen.
Registration is REQUIRED for this trip. Details are given upon
registration. Email: kelly.wenzel AT njaudubon.org


Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: Hudson County Park, Bayonne
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 17:54:39 -0400
Jerseybirders,

I was thrilled to finally get a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO (county-bird #273
all-time), at the NW corner of the playground this afternoon. It's an
annual but uncommon/low density migrant in Hudson County. On top of that,
I've just been very unlucky with the species. To be honest, I don't think
I've ever had a migrant anywhere, think I've only had breeders in
traditional places like the Great Swamp. Can't be lucky with everything.

Even better, Susan Hill found and photographed a YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER in
a cherry tree here earlier today.

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Ruff, Cumberland County
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 16:55:22 -0400
Cameron Cox reports:

Dull Ruff (Ruff) SW corner of main pool at Heislerville WMA. Alternate plumaged 
Western Sandpiper present along the north side. 


Good birding,

Sam


-- 
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
sam.galick AT gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/

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Subject: Chickadee behavior
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 14:22:53 -0400
A pair of Black-capped Chickadees are apparently setting up house keeping
in my Schwegler nest box.  (This box attracts birds every year while my
other wood boxes sit empty.  I finally gave in and bought a predator-proof
bluebird box by Schwegler this year but too late for the first round of BB
nesting.)

Shortly after I noticed them visiting the Schwegler box, I also noticed
them visiting a hole in a tall rotten tree stump by my back door, a
terrible site to raise a brood.  I wondered if chickadees built multiple
nests before selecting one to inhabit.  Earlier this week, I looked in the
hole and realized this is not meant to be a nesting site but perhaps a site
where they are gathering food.  They visit the site together so I presume
there are no eggs in the regular nest yet.

Then I recalled I'd seen similar behavior a couple of years ago, when a
pair of chickadees were visiting a hole in a rotting birch limb.

Is my assumption that it's their grocery store correct or does this second
hole have an entirely different purpose that I'm not seeing?

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon


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Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation,Least Flycatcher,Great Crested Flycatcher,Eastern Kingbird,Yellow-throated Vireo.
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 13:11:54 -0400
Garret Mountain Reservation
85 species


Common Loon  2

Green Heron  1
Black Vulture  2

Bald Eagle  2
Broad-winged Hawk  60     actual count

Spotted Sandpiper  2
Solitary Sandpiper  2

Pileated Woodpecker  1
Least Flycatcher  1

Great Crested Flycatcher  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Yellow-throated Vireo  2
Blue-headed Vireo  14
Warbling Vireo  5

House Wren  3

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  16

Veery  1
Hermit Thrush  1
Wood Thrush  1

Gray Catbird  6

Ovenbird  3
Northern Waterthrush  1
Blue-winged Warbler  5
Black-and-white Warbler  16
Nashville Warbler  2
Northern Parula  3
Blackburnian Warbler  2
Yellow Warbler  4
Black-throated Blue Warbler  4
Palm Warbler  12
Pine Warbler  4
Yellow-rumped Warbler  40
Prairie Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  6     actual count

Scarlet Tanager  4

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  10
Indigo Bunting  1

Orchard Oriole  1
Baltimore Oriole  6

*Bill Elrick*





*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

*Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *


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Subject: Incredible Broad-winged Hawk Movement
From: Larry scacchetti <Larrybird4134 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 09:29:24 -0400
Yesterday afternoon, while at work in Mahwah, I witnessed quite an awe 
inspiring event. Just before the storm came, I was furring out cross bars on a 
guard rail when I heard Chimney Swifts overhead. Thinking to myself, "Cool, I 
haven't seen them yet this year." I looked up and to my surprise was a massive 
group of Broad-winged Hawks streaming in from the SW, ahead of the storm. I 
began to count the hawks while looking up and to the NE, when the birds just 
kept coming, I turned around and the group was even more impressive then I 
first thought. Large kettles came in from both sides and joined the stream, 
smaller ones broke off and rejoined further down the mountain. I thought, this 
would be amazing if all the sudden a Swallow-tailed Kite was mixed in. Maybe 15 
minutes later, after the majority of BWHAs had moved through, a black-and-white 
raptor appeared just over the tree line in the backyard. I got so pumped and 
immediately and started to think where my camera was. ! 

 As the bird got closer it revealed itself as an Osprey, then another, and 
another, and another, finally 8 Ospreys made their way through as single or 
double Broad-wings trickled through in the rain. The final tally of BWHAs, give 
or take a dozen, was 286 birds. I've been to NJ hawk watches, Texas, Florida, 
Arizona, Ive been to Veracruz for the River Of Raptors, other locations in 
Central America but for some reason, yesterday at work just blew my mind. I 
guess it seems more special when you're not expecting it. Unfortunately, my 
boss didn't seem to think so and we had a good "argument" over the whole thing. 
Good times. There was indeed Chimney Swifts up there as well, 7 of them, and a 
Ruby-throated Hummingbird came through in the middle of the downpour. 


Good birding,

Larry Scacchetti
Westwood, NJ


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Subject: Warbling Vireos
From: Jean Bickal <jbickal AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 09:09:29 -0400
Warbling Vireos were singing all along the Assunpink Creek in Trenton this
am.

Jean Bickal
Trenton, NJ



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Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
From: "Susie R." <njt456 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 27 Apr 2016 06:40:28 -0400
FOS just appeared at my feeder.  The earliest one I've ever had.

Susie R.
Tewksbury/Califon


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Subject: Heislerville - shorebirds
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 17:51:27 -0400
Hello,
 Doug J., Marilyn H. and I hit here after some WSB scouting at a spot in 
Millville. It was great! I needed a shorebird fix…. 

Maybe my favorite family. Anyway, not much to report - Harvey said it all. 
Needs to be checked regularly. The south impoundment 

we had an American Wigeon. That won’t linger…. 2 Gadwall. No shorebirds 
there. The main shorebird pool is the spot. And remember 

high tide is needed. This is an excellent time to study plumage! Theres still a 
Dow. there that looks big so to speak. It’s still in mainly 

winter plumage. I need a breeding plumage study or voice to call LB. Many more 
Least Sandpipers than Semipalms. That will 

change soon! We had no success tracking down White-rumped. We received 
Harvey’s text. It’s a big area! Coverage…. It’s going to 

be the spot for shorebirds this spring!

Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: White-rumped Sandpiper - Heislerville
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 17:00:58 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
Heislerville is now perfect for shorebirds. The water level is shallow
enough for most birds w/ plenty of flats along the edges.
Today I had 7 White-rumped Sandpipers there amongst the hundreds and
hundreds of Semipalmated Sandpipers, Semipalmated Plovers, Least
Sandpipers, Dunlin, SB Dowitchers, and both Yellowlegs.
The back impoundment looks to be tidal and can go from some shorebird
habitat to completely flooded. ( not sure what's going on w/ it ).
I found one Calidris that has me puzzled (no surprise there)
Pics of some up on Flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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Subject: Good migration movement this morning at Duke Island Park
From: "John J. Collins" <jjcbird AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 16:29:09 -0400
I spent about 90 minutes at Duke Island Park, Raritan/Bridgewater this
morning.  Obviously there had been a very good migrant movement last evening
as I had many "first of the season" birds including: GRAY CATBIRDS,
BALTIMORE ORIOLE, WARBLING and BLUE-HEADED VIREO, SOLITARY SANDPIPER,
BLACKBURNIAN, BLACK-THROATED BLUE and BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLERS.  Also
present were SPOTTED SANDPIPER (at Roberts Street) and an adult BALD EAGLE
(flying over the river).

In addition, I had 3 male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS at once at my feeders here
in Raritan this morning!  "My" CHIMNEY SWIFTS returned yesterday and were
present again today flying over my house.

John J. Collins
Raritan, NJ
jjcbird AT verizon.net
"God desires that all the world be pure in his sight.
The earth should not be injured.
The earth should not be destroyed."  (St. Hildegard of Bingen)
"I will sing to the Lord all my life;
I will sing praise to my God while I live." (Ps. 104:33)  


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Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation 17 warblers in Garret today
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 15:28:08 -0400
 Hi, Great migration today with 15 warblers that I saw as list below plus
Chestnut and Nashville reported
Garret Mountain Reservation
4.0 mile(s)
80 species


Wild Turkey  1

Green Heron  1

Sharp-shinned Hawk  2
Cooper's Hawk  1
Broad-winged Hawk  6

Killdeer  2
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Solitary Sandpiper  3

Chimney Swift  4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1

Pileated Woodpecker  1
Merlin  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Eastern Kingbird  3
Yellow-throated Vireo  3
Blue-headed Vireo  12
Warbling Vireo  4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow  4
Tree Swallow  1

House Wren  4
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  12
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  18
Veery  2
Hermit Thrush  2
Wood Thrush  2

Gray Catbird  6
Brown Thrasher  3

Ovenbird  2
Northern Waterthrush  2
Blue-winged Warbler  3
Black-and-white Warbler  15
Common Yellowthroat  1
American Redstart  2
Northern Parula  5
Blackburnian Warbler  1
Yellow Warbler  4
Black-throated Blue Warbler  4
Palm Warbler  8
Pine Warbler  4
Yellow-rumped Warbler  50
Prairie Warbler  1
Black-throated Green Warbler  5

White-throated Sparrow  45

Swamp Sparrow  12
Eastern Towhee  18
Scarlet Tanager  2

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  8

Orchard Oriole  1
Baltimore Oriole  3

*Bill Elrick*





*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

*Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *


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Subject: 2 rt hummers
From: J and B <aufderhar AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 18:11:28 +0000
They were first sighted about 5 days ago and have settled in to regular feeder 
visits. 

  
Joan 
Fair Haven 


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Subject: Spring arrivals at the Great Swamp, Morris Cty
From: Ken Walsh <woodsretreat AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 11:42:02 -0400
Hey everyone,

A good mix of new birds have hit the swamp around the Wildlife Observation 
Center. I had the following warblers this morning (all singing): 


1 Parula
3 Black-throated Green
1 Northern Waterthrush
1 Blue-winged
6 Palm
12 Yellow
4 Black & White
3 Ovenbird
1 Common Yellowthroat
Many Yellow-rumps

Plus:
4 Blue-headed Vireos - 3 were together within a few feet of each other at one 
point. 

1 Warbling Vireo
1 Wood Thrush
2 Eastern Kingbird

Always nice to have 10 warbler species this time of the year.  

Good birding,
Ken Walsh


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Subject: Rogers Refuge and Institute Woods
From: Winifred Hughes Spar <winifred.spar AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 11:34:43 -0400
Hi All,
Princeton is starting to heat up—new arrivals this morning included Northern 
Waterthrush, Parula, Black-throated Blue, Blue-winged, Black-and-white, and 
Yellow warblers, as well as Scarlet Tanager. The two Wilson’s Snipe continue 
in the marsh, visible from the main platform. There are lots of Common 
Yellowthroats, Ovenbirds, and Wood Thrushes. Bluebirds continue in boxes on the 
marsh and on the field along the Stony Brook. 

Happy birding,
Winnie Spar
Princeton
  
--
Winifred Hughes Spar
winifred.spar AT gmail.com




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Subject: Cerulean at Baldpate now Fiddlers Creek Trail
From: Fairfax Hutter <savoirfairfax AT EARTHLINK.NET>
Date: Tue, 26 Apr 2016 10:50:17 -0400
Cerulean Warbler at Baldpate now Fiddlers Creek Trail. Moving north along 
ridgetop. 


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Subject: Stephen R. Gregg aka Hudson County Park, Bayonnne
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 18:38:08 -0400
After reading Tom Fiore's post on the NY listserv and then a text from
David Bernstein, I felt compelled to get out this afternoon. It seems the
heavy touchdowns were localized. A remarkable note, as of today, I'm
actually two birds (142 vs. 140) ahead of where I was during my 2015 Hudson
County Big Year! Is it what I learned last year? The kayak? Definitely
both. It certainly wasn't because I got a good start in winter because
gulls and raptors were poor locally. No interest in doing a Big Year again,
it's just there haven't been any state birds to chase.

Stephen R. Gregg County Park, Hudson, New Jersey, US
Apr 25, 2016 1:46 PM - 4:31 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
52 species

Brant  30
Mallard  3
Bufflehead  4
Double-crested Cormorant  12
Great Egret  1
Snowy Egret  2
Osprey  1
Ring-billed Gull  24
Herring Gull  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  X
Mourning Dove  2
Chimney Swift  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-headed Woodpecker  1     Picnic area.
Red-bellied Woodpecker  2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
Downy Woodpecker  5
Northern Flicker  2
Blue-headed Vireo  8     Terrific count!
Fish Crow  1
Tree Swallow  5
House Wren  1     New arrival.
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  5
Hermit Thrush  16     Best count this spring.
American Robin  X
Brown Thrasher  1
Northern Mockingbird  3
European Starling  X
Ovenbird  2     My FOY.
Northern Waterthrush  1     Working pond edge.
Blue-winged Warbler  1     My FOY - singing male - seen first.
Black-and-white Warbler  20
Northern Parula  1     My FOY.
Yellow Warbler  5
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1     My FOY - male.
Palm Warbler  15
Pine Warbler  3
Yellow-rumped Warbler  40
Prairie Warbler  1     Male.
Chipping Sparrow  40
White-throated Sparrow  40
Savannah Sparrow  8
Song Sparrow  3
Swamp Sparrow  10
Eastern Towhee  6
Scarlet Tanager  1     My FOY - female.
Northern Cardinal  4
Red-winged Blackbird  5
Common Grackle  1
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Orchard Oriole  2     My FOY - both adult males - one still had some yellow
on flanks.
House Sparrow  X


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Subject: List of nest cams
From: "James O'Brien" <jphillipobrien AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 15:30:00 -0400
For those of you that cant get out as much as you'd like, here's a list of 
different cams (some in NJ, some not) that you can live vicariously through. 

Island Beach State Park Osprey:http://friendsofibsp.org/osprey-cam/
Duke Farm Eagle Cam:http://www.ustream.tv/channel/eagle-cam
Idaho kestrel cam:http://kestrel.peregrinefund.org/webcams
NYC peregrine falcons:http://falcons.55water.com
Cornell U red-tailed hawk 
cam:http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/16/Red-tailed_Hawks/ 

Enjoy!
JamesJackson, NJ 		 	   		  

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Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation = Warbling Vireo, American Redstart,Rose-breasted Grosbeak 5
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 15:18:01 -0400
Hi, Again this morning the birds seemed to be coming in from the west and
downhill. The tower has been quiet all spring.
So birds are scattered throughout the park . Redstart down Wilson.

Garret Mountain Reservation (Park), Passaic, New Jersey, US
Apr 25, 2016 7:00 AM - 11:00 AM
68 species


Common Loon  1
Broad-winged Hawk  1

Spotted Sandpiper  3

Chimney Swift  2

Eastern Phoebe  1
Eastern Kingbird  1
Blue-headed Vireo  14
Warbling Vireo  1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow  4
Tree Swallow  6

House Wren  3

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  8

Hermit Thrush  6

Gray Catbird  3
Brown Thrasher  4

Ovenbird  2
Northern Waterthrush  1
Blue-winged Warbler  1
Black-and-white Warbler  8
Common Yellowthroat  2
American Redstart  1
Northern Parula  1
Yellow Warbler  2
Palm Warbler  18
Pine Warbler  3
Yellow-rumped Warbler  45
Black-throated Green Warbler  2
Chipping Sparrow  23
White-throated Sparrow  56

Swamp Sparrow  8
Eastern Towhee  24

Rose-breasted Grosbeak  5

Orchard Oriole  1

*Bill Elrick*





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Subject: Glossy Ibis Feeding Frenzy
From: Dan Morley <morleydan AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 14:13:31 -0400
Sorry for the late post.Yesterday there were 25 to 30 Glossy Ibis 
feeding at East Creek off Jersey Avenue in Union Beach.A Clapper Rail 
was callingwhen I first arrived,a Great Egret feeding and a pair of 
Osprey on a nest platform.Just around the corner on Rose Laneis a pair 
of Bald Eagles nesting on the cell tower.

Dan

South Plainfield



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Subject: Prothonotary Warbler, Trenton Marsh
From: Andrew Bobe <cprincipalis AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:30:30 -0400
My first at the marsh, my first for Mercer County, and by far, my coolest marsh 
bird so far! 


It was right at the start of the trail at the lot off Sewell Ave, by the gate 
with the trash can and interpretive sign. But just 1 min after I found it, 2 
Mercer County parks trucks drove thru. Will post video soon. 


Andrew Bobe 
Hamilton 

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Subject: Princeton - Rogers Refuge/Institute Woods - Wilson's Snipe
From: jimmy lee <leewah AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 16:23:03 +0000
JBers,
 
A short walk this morning (9:30 - 11) produced mostly residents (few species).
The highlight was 2 Wilson's Snipe in the Rogers marsh (original observation 
deck). The birds 

were out far just enough so that a scope would have been nice but still 
discernible with the bins. 

 
Also nice was a new memorial signage to the late Lou Beck beloved local birder 
and naturalist and activist, past 

president of the Washington Crossing Audubon Society. Miss you Lou.
 
Also, an adult Bald Eagle near Lake Carnegie.
 
Good birding.
 
Jimmy
 
 



Jimmy Lee 

South Brunswick, NJ



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Subject: Palmyra - migration and more breeders in today.
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 11:24:43 -0400
I knew the south winds would have stuff in! Shame they didnt switch over Sat. 
night 

into Sunday morning. Basically, 2 to 3 times the number of breeders in. Same 
thing with 

the Palm Warblers. Picked up Towhee, Common Yellowthroats, Hummer, both
Orioles, etc. 5 Least Sandpipers in that SW corner of the main pit area. And 
the 

Solitary was gone. I love migration!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Subject: Nice Morning at the Hook:
From: Peter Bacinski <petebacinski AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 11:20:37 -0400
Dear Jerseybirders:

 

Southwest winds at Sandy Hook were a great draw for me to make a visit there
this morning and I was rewarded.  My best bird of the day was an Adult
Red-headed Woodpecker seen along the multi-use path (MUP) just south of
Randolph near the Boy Scout Camp.  I saw the bird briefly before it flew in
the direction of the rusty barn.  

 

Here are some of the 57 species tallied today:

 

Brant 150

Black Scoter pair in the bay

RB Merganser 1

Great Egret 2

Snowy Egret 1

Killdeer 1

American Oystercatcher 6

Greater Yellowlegs 3

Eastern Kingbird (FOY)

White-eyed Vireo (FOY)

House Wren 12+

BG Gnatcatcher 2

RC Kinglet 3

Hermit Thrush 4

Gray Catbird 3

Brown Thrasher 4

Cedar Waxing 25

Black-and-white Warbler 4

Palm Warbler 25+

Eastern Towhee 58 Calling birds

Chipping Sparrow 25

Field Sparrow 12

Savannah Sparrow 12

Swamp Sparrow 4

WT Sparrow 12

Boat-tailed Grackle 2

 

Good birding,

 

Pete

 

Pete Bacinski

Atlantic Highlands, NJ

 

Embrace Conservation

Aspire to Excellence

Always Smile and Say Thank you

 

All Things Birds-Pete Bacinski Facebook Page:

 
https://www.facebook.com/petebacinski

 

NJ.com Inside Jersey magazine for my Seen in New Jersey column

  http://www.nj.com/inside-jersey/

 

 



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Subject: RT Hummer
From: Jean Bickal <jbickal AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 09:50:39 -0400
A friend at work reported a male RT Hummingbird at her feeder in Jackson
Township on Sunday evening.

Jean Bickal
Trenton, NJ


-- 
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Subject: Horned Larks at Cold Brook Preserve, Oldwick, Hunterdon County
From: Lillian Shupe <lrshupe AT FRONTIERNET.NET>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 09:27:26 -0400
On Saturday, 4/23 had a pair of Horned Larks in the newly plowed fields not
far from the parking lot.

 

Also had northern rough winged swallows, barn swallows, lots of red-winged
black birds, a male Kestrel, field sparrows, bluebirds, song sparrows, black
vulture, turkey vulture and a red-tailed hawk in an air battle with two
crows

 

Lillian Shupe

Lower Mt Bethel Pa.



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Subject: Quick visit to Halifax Road
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496 AT ATT.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 13:24:27 +0000
Jerseybirders,

I had just an hour or so today and chose Halifax Road in Mahwah for some 
exploration. A nice flock of Yellow-rumped and Palm Warblers was actively 
moving through the trees, accompanied by RC Kinglets and BG Gnatcatchers. One 
Blue-winged Warbler sang frequently from the lower scrub, but there were no 
other Parulidae that I could see or hear. Yesterday's BTG and BTBs must have 
moved northward or were still quiet in the cool morning. There were also a 
couple of Blue-headed Vireos in the parking lot. Swamp, Field, Song, Chipping, 
and White-throated Sparrows were all singing as well. An Osprey was fishing and 
calling frequently; I wonder if it'll stay around. 


Just 37 species in the short time I had. As always, Halifax is a very nice spot 
if you've only got an hour, as there's fields, scrub, some tall trees, the 
river, a lake, and all at the foot of the Ramapo Mountains which acts as a 
migrant guidepath. 


Good birding,

Marc Chelemer


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Subject: Also not hypothetical
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 25 Apr 2016 07:42:56 -0400
Driving home yesterday late afternoon (south on Route 29 with the Delaware
river a block to the right), a magnificent Northern harrier zoomed over us,
like a bullet, from the river, into the trees and woods near the
Delaware-Raritan canal. We have seen harriers before at Mercer Meadows/Pole
Farm, but never in this  venue. An excellent coda for the weekend.

Best,
Michael Perlin
Trenton NJ


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Subject: Re: Would you count the bird?
From: Jeffrey Climpson <jkgreenwing AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 21:00:34 -0400
The white-faced ibis photo story reminded be of two real life experiences,
leads me to pose two "fun" hypotheticals (but unfortunately not fun for the
birds involved), and has prompted me to ask a question of any bird banders
out there in JerseyBirds land:

1)  First, the two real experiences I have had.  In each case, I counted
the bird as a lifer.  The first was over 35 years ago in Nova Scotia or
Newfoundland (I forget which).  My buddies and I were driving a backcountry
coastal road when we spotted something small moving a bit in the calm
lapping surf of a small cove, just feet from the beach.  We waded out and
realized it was a very sick or injured Leach's storm petrel.  It was "fun"
to see such a bird up close and personal and not darting over wavechop on a
pitching boat at 500 feet or more, but obviously it was not "fun" for the
storm petrel. I think we probably discussed a rescue option, but we were in
the sticks, etc., so we left it for nature to take its course, hoping
somehow the bird would make it.  The other example is the very sick roseate
tern spotted by others about (10?) years ago on a rock jetty in Cape May
that we were told about and may even have been on a rare bird alert.  We
went to see the bird, and sure enough, we saw it through our scopes, but it
was a pathetic sight. It clearly was experiencing convulsions of some form
or and probably no longer capable of free flight.  I think it was
speculated by observers that it may even have died later that day or the
next, if I remember right. Those two lifers were,of course, not enjoyable
like they should be.  To date, that roseate tern is the only one I've ever
seen.

2)  Now for the hypotheticals.  First, let's say you're in Texas looking
for a plain chachalaca, a lifer. You're driving along a backcountry road
when you catch a brief glimpse of something darting just in front of your
bumper.  You hear a sharp thump indicating that you hit the said
something.  You look in your rearview mirror and, lo and behold, there's a
dead plain chachalaca on the road.  Do you count it?  (I wouldn't.) What if
it's injured, but not dead?  (I would.) Second, let's say you're out west
in prime "Blue" (dusky or sooty, your choice) Grouse habitat.  You hear a
gunshot from a nearby hunter.  You turn your head in time to see the grouse
falling from flight but not yet hitting the ground.  Do you count it?  (I
wouldn't.)

Finally, here's a question I just gotta ask the bird banders who read
JerseyBirds.  Would you count a lifer that flew into your mist net?  I'm a
bit torn about it myself.  On the one hand, is it really that different
from drawing a lifer into view by whistling a screech owl call imitation?
On the other hand, at least the bird had a "choice" to check out the "owl,"
whereas flight into a mist net is merely a passive "act" on the bird's
part, if you follow what I'm saying.

Bonus comment:  I seem to recall hearing or reading about a birder who kept
a life list of world birds he had seen or heard in the movies or on TV.
Now that's existential!

Bonus bonus comment:  Don't you just love it when a movie or tv show
depicts a turkey vulture or a bald eagle vocalizing a red-tailed hawk
call?  It just makes me cringe, and then almost invariably takes me out of
the "experiential reality" of the film.

Ah, the quandaries and tangled thoughts, feelings, and travails of birders
everywhere, especially listers!

Good birding to all,

Jeff Climpson
Flemington, NJ

P.S.  For you World Series of Birding participants/listers out there, if
you need an easy drive-by occupied Cooper's Hawk nest while passing through
Hunterdon County on or near State Route 12 just west of Flemington (close
to the Hunterdon County library), contact me off-list.  I promise that
these birds are really real, not hypotheticals!


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Subject: Would you count the bird/thoughts
From: Theodore Chase Jr <chase_c AT AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 16:59:21 -0400
 Risking boring everyone who has seen too many of these posts, a thought I just 
had: 

 If you looked at the photo in question and could pick out the rare bird on 
your own, without being told which one, you should count it, if you saw the 
flock in real time. (Of course, someone did you the favor of telling you there 
is one there.) (For me the question doesnt arise, since I dont take photos.) 

 I think most people would have flexible standards depending on how rare the 
bird is for them: for a life bird, you would want to identify it unequivocally, 
even if, perhaps, through someone elses scope. For a county list you might be 
willing to accept someone elses identification. 

 The other issue raised in the initial posts was the apparent frequency of a 
species based on multiple reports of the same birds (Lapwings in Ocean County). 
I dont report to eBird if someone else on the same trip is reporting, only 
when I am birding independently. Even then, in a well-birded location, multiple 
observers will see, and perhaps reports, the same birds. I trust that the 
people who run eBird have ways of dealing with this. 

	Ted Chase
	Franklin Township, Somerset Co.


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Subject: Yard Birds......
From: Gary or Karen Gentile <kbbb99 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 19:50:16 +0000
Large flock of Cedar Waxwings yesterday blew through the yard feasting on the 
Evergreens and whatever in the Maple Trees. 

Larger flock of Cedar Waxwings today throughout the Maples and Evergreens and 
Junipers. 

FOS Catbirds arrived today.
White-throated Sparrows still here, although fewer in number.
Chipping Sparrows on time.
No Hummingbirds yet???
Brown Thrashers (2) still in yard.


Sent from my iPad


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Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation FOY Green Heron 1
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 15:44:33 -0400
Hi, Way down in numbers from yesterday, I am afraid Garret cannot seem to
keep most birds overnight, as it is so browsed by the deer and has very
little brush cover. The bad news is everyone seems quite happy to ignore
the problem and let the place die a slow death. It is quite funny looking a
birders the day after and them thinking that my post must have been fantasy.


Garret Mountain Reservation (Park), Passaic, New Jersey, US

65 species


Wood Duck  2

Wild Turkey  3
Double-crested Cormorant  10
Great Blue Heron  2
Green Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  9
Sharp-shinned Hawk  1
Broad-winged Hawk  2

Spotted Sandpiper  1

Chimney Swift  1

Pileated Woodpecker  1
Merlin  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue-headed Vireo  12

Northern Rough-winged Swallow  5
Tree Swallow  1
Barn Swallow  1

House Wren  2
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  14
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  12
Hermit Thrush  20

Gray Catbird  4
Brown Thrasher  5
Black-throated Blue 1
Louisiana Waterthrush  2
Black-and-white Warbler  8
Palm Warbler  10
Pine Warbler  5
Yellow-rumped Warbler  30
Black-throated Green Warbler  2

Field Sparrow  2
White-throated Sparrow  40
Song Sparrow  2
Swamp Sparrow  6
Eastern Towhee  11

Orchard Oriole  1

*Bill Elrick*





*belrick AT NYNJBirdingGuide.com * 

*Skype  AT  bilbander*

*NYNJBirdingGuide *


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Subject: Palmyra - new arrivals
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller AT VERIZON.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 14:07:15 -0400
Hello,
 The DVOC trip here this morning enjoyed some great birds! FOS stuff. Not many 
migrants around as to be expected with a couple nights 

of north winds. 2 Palm Warblers in their breeding finery are soon to be gone. 
They will be rare to scarce come May. Depending on where 

one birds! 2 Yellow-rumped Warblers, 2 Hermit Thrushes. 
 The main highlights were the FOS breeders in - Warbling Vireos - 3, House Wren 
- 7, Yellow Warbler - 7, Chimney Swift - 1, Indigo 

Bunting - 1, etc. All basically on time. 
 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers were taking the silk from the Tent Caterpillar 
enclosures for nest building. Fun to watch! American Goldfinches were 
everywhere. An eagle-eyed participant picked up on the Peregrine perched on the 
bridge beams as the one was on the eggs - that 

is not an easy find! 
 That pond at the SW corner has some edges and mud flats - good for shorebirds 
- today was a Killdeer and a Solitary Sandpiper. 

Baby Canada Geese around. They are cute……

Butterfly notes - they were just getting started when we left after noon. With 
the cold temps, not much flying. A fresh Mourning Cloak was 

nice. Second brood I presume.

Good birding all. 


Sandra Keller
Barrington, NJ
Sent from my iMac






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Subject: Gloucester Co.- Red-headed Woodpecker
From: Jon Stippick <Jonstippick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 12:45:23 -0400
An adult at the parking area of Piney Hollow Preserve. First reported by Glenn 
Mahler a few days ago. It was still hanging out this morning. This bird is not 
a resident here but suitable nesting habitat is near by. 

 Prothonotary Warblers were present in abundance. I had 5 individuals. New 
arrivals included Common Yellowthroats, White-eyed Vireo and Rough-winged 
Swallows. Baltimore Oriole in the yard too. 


Thank you Glenn!!!!

Jon Stippick 
Newfield, Gloucester County
Jonstippick at gmail dotcom 


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Subject: would you count the bird /thoughts
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 12:37:18 -0400
not an e-birder, but I believe there is a way to either put your name on your 
companion's list or otherwise report so that  

you do not get "double reports" of the same bird if you are birding together. 
That said, if there is a particular bird flying around 

(say a rarity) and 20 people see it withing a 2 mile radius on one day, I do 
not think most folks would think the data supports 

20 separate birds. Probably in most places less populated than NJ, a lot of 
birds go unseen and uncounted, so a few multiple 

reports are not death to a data set. Bring out the statisticians.
 
I personally have seen birds that I required a photo to review later to really 
confirm the ID- I am thinking of a canvas back in Cape May 

a few years ago- thought I knew what it was, but a photo confirmed it. Is your 
camera lens more powerful than your binos/scope? 

 
C. Wyluda
Pennington


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Subject: Princeton Institute Woods 4/24/16
From: "cwsg1 AT excite.com" <cwsg1@EXCITE.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 12:05:33 -0400
7:30-9:30 am
 
palm warbler
common yellow throated warbler (heard)
2-3 blue gray gnatcatchers
flicker
M/F downy wps
Amer. goldfinches (6) (eating dandelion seeds)
 Cooper's Hawk M
three active robin nests
 wood ducks 5- M-2/F-3
FOY gray catbird
house wren
Carlina wren
rough winged swallow-1
tree swallows +++
e. blue bird
 
other usual suspects
 
there is a very convincing (well to us humans) fake  purple martin on the 
martin house :( 

very dry in the "back streams" some dried up completely
 
PS- (yb sapsucker at my home....would they nest this far south? breeding maps 
seem to have NJ as "winter range") 

 
 
C. Wyluda
Pennington
 


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Subject: Re: 1. Would you count the bird?
From: Diane C Louie <dclouie AT OPTONLINE.NET>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 11:51:15 -0400
As a former surgical pathologist, I can say that seeing something underneath 
the microscope is different than recognizing or identifying it. 

And something else altogether from being able to defend the Name against the 
Skeptics: 

The treating physicians, the local pathologist whose diagnosis you are 
reversing, the 

malpractice attorneys, the surgeon waiting to saw off the limb…..

Did I identify that single cluster of tumor cells in the lymph node which means 
the patient will need chemotherapy? 

Was I correct in calling the tumor benign? Am I sure? Esteemed professor so - 
and - so called it malignant and he has 

been practicing longer than I’ve been alive. How dare I say I’m right and 
he’s wrong? 


Every evening of the tour, we go through the ritual. The guide speaks quickly, 
his voice droning. 

But I interrupt the flow. Wait, we saw that? Yes, he says. Yes, yes, says the 
nice lady who is not a birder, not really, just 

a gardener who’s tagging along with her husband, the real birder. Don’t you 
remember? 

Yes, says the single supplement, irritated. This morning, at the second stop. 
The semi-circle is nodding. I hesitate. 

I saw a leaf move. I saw a slightly bigger dot among many dots in the spotting 
scope trained on the horizon. I saw a shorebird 

in non breeding plumage moving around in a huge flock of sleeping shorebirds in 
non breeding plumage. 

They’ve moved on, they’ve turned the page in unison. I check off the box. 
It doesn’t matter. 


Diane Louie
Madison


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Subject: 1. Would you count the bird?
From: Michael M <mimorell47 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 10:08:18 -0400
What an interesting question/topic and responses.
,
After recently reading Kenn Kaufman's Kingbird Highway and Dan Koeppel's To
See Every Bird On Earth, I would agree that this is a personal question
without one correct/true response.

As someone who is more casual in the hobby, I'm more of a bird watcher than
a bird lister, so my response would be to ask myself "Did *I see *the
bird?"

I might also ask "Did I *experience *seeing the bird?" For example, I might
get a great look at a bird without knowing it's ID, then research and find
it in a guide. This happened to me when I saw my first Rose-breasted
Grosbeak. Now, if I only saw it as a blur, it's improbable that I could
identify it after the fact with the aid of a bird guide.

I can think of 2 species I've kept off my list because I was in a group,
someone pointed the bird out, and I turned to see a blur in the air- I
missed seeing the bird.

If I had the photograph, or was there, I'd list it on ebird for scientific
documentation, with my own personal notation about listing.

I've enjoyed reading the responses I've seen so far, especially Michael
Perlin's.

Michael Morell
Delaware County, PA


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Subject: Semipalmated Sandpiper-Bobwhite
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 07:14:17 -0400
Hi Jersey Birders,
Had the pleasure of birding w/ Yong K and Mary D yesterday at Heislerville.
Looking at eBird Yong Kong found the first Semipalmated Sandpiper for
Spring 2016 in NJ. (pics to follow)
Delaware reported some also yesterday from Bombay.
It's Yong's Birthday today so I am assuming the Semi was a birthday "gift"
There were a few Western, Least and Semi's there yesterday.
Conditions at Heislerville are looking up as I watched them open the sluice
gates earlier in the week to allow some water into the Main pool.
There were hundreds of birds there yesterday in the pouring rain.
Earlier I met Yong at Turkey Point and had 6 Bobwhite along Turkey Point
rd. Oddly they were almost at the end of the road.
Locals or transplants?
( https://www.flickr.com/photos/shearh2o/ )
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven


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Subject: Kearny Marsh this AM
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2016 17:34:00 -0400
Since most posts lately have been about the theoretical would you/would you
not, I figured I'd add to the few bird reports. Despite the chance of
precipitation, I decided to paddle Kearny Marsh this morning. I did
ultimately get pretty wet during the one stint of steady rain, so pulled
out an hour early. And I was completely wrong that songbirds were going to
s#ck. Waiting for Yong Kong to dust off his paddle and come join me:-P

Highlights were: 2 WOOD DUCK (foy - drakes), 4 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, 95 RUDDY
DUCK, LITTLE BLUE HERON (continuing), VIRGINIA RAIL (male sang once), 7
COMMON GALLINULES (most seen as well today), AMERICAN COOT, WILSON'S SNIPE
(2 on ballfield), & 6 CASPIAN TERNS (heard before seen - the group came in
from the south and foraged throughout the marsh - apparently at least one
of them was seen from Harrier Meadow later ), plus some additional FOYs.

P.S. If it was a flock of let's say 24 birds and you saw all 24 individuals
and only after the fact the one uncommon/rare bird was identified via
photo...I would count it...some of my "neocon" friends probably would not.
This is a normal thing on pelagic trips nowadays with these awesome
DSLRs...a semi-distant jaeger is photographed...then reviewed on the LCD
and identified "after the fact." However, if there is a flock of 10,000
Snow Geese...you or someone you're with photographs a portion of the flock
and it turns out there's a Ross's in there...unless you said in real-time
hmm there's a smaller bird in there...then do you really know that you saw
that individual? I don't think so in that case.

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Subject: Garret Mountain Reservation 14 or more Warbler day
From: Bill Elrick <belrick AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2016 14:56:27 -0400
Hi, It was a totally fantastic day, and its a weekend! There was also a
Hooded warbler and and a Magnolia saw by others so a 14 x warbler day.
It was dead up top at the tower at 7.00am but the birds were all the way
down the park from there. Good to see a lot of birders and everyone was
finding birds.

70 species


Wood Duck  2 sitting outside a probable nest hole.
American Black Duck  1

Wild Turkey  1
Common Loon  1

Osprey  1
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Killdeer  2
Spotted Sandpiper  1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  1

Blue-headed Vireo  12
Red-eyed Vireo  1     Saw well and HEARD constant call.

Common Raven  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  6
Tree Swallow  1

House Wren  9
Carolina Wren  2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  14
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  16
Veery  1     Seen well by number of people
Hermit Thrush  X

Gray Catbird  1
Brown Thrasher  4

Ovenbird  4
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Northern Waterthrush  2
Blue-winged Warbler  2
Black-and-white Warbler  24
Common Yellowthroat  3
Northern Parula  1
Yellow Warbler  2
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Palm Warbler  32
Pine Warbler  3
Yellow-rumped Warbler  50
Prairie Warbler  2
Black-throated Green Warbler  3
Dark-eyed Junco  5
White-throated Sparrow  50
Song Sparrow  4
Swamp Sparrow  6
Eastern Towhee  9

Orchard Oriole  1
Baltimore Oriole  1

*Bill Elrick*





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Subject: Re: Would you count the bird?
From: John Freiberg <johnfreiberg AT COMCAST.NET>
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2016 10:23:25 -0400
 ◦ There seems to be two issues here. Should the bird be counted by the 
individual that had seen the flock and can the sighting be entered into the 
ebird database. As for the first, that would be something each person would 
have to decide for them self. As for entering it in a database I can't think of 
any reason why that would be a problem. The purpose of ebird is to document 
where (and when) the birds are. Whether the photographer recognized the species 
at the time doesn't change that the bird was there. 



John Freiberg

> On Apr 22, 2016, at 1:00 PM, Larry-Zirlin  wrote:
> 
> Here's an existential question: 
> 
> 
> If you see a flock of ibises and one of them later, after examining a photo, 
turns out to be a White-faced Ibis, have you seen the bird? Can you count it? 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> This happened yesterday at Island Beach SP. While I was chatting on the beach 
of Barnegat Bay with Skyler Streich, we had a close fly-by of a flock of 
ibises. We both joked about finding the White-faced Ibis in the flock of what I 
estimated to be 25 birds, while Skyler lifted his camera and shot some photos. 
Last night, after examining his pictures, Skyler sent me an email with an 
attached picture: It turns out that there actually was a white-faced in the 
flock of 24 (good guess, on my part). I saw all 24 birds, but did I really see 
the rare one? 

> 
> When you fill out an eBird report, you're actually submitting a bird survey, 
so I can say, based on the evidence, that at around 8:30 yesterday there was a 
White-faced Ibis flying low over Barnegat Bay. But I don't have to, because 
Skyler already submitted his report and if I were to list it, it would actually 
make the bird seem, on the bar chart, a bit more common that it really is. 

> 
> If I had taken the picture, I probably would be inclined to count the bird; 
this seems absolutely irrational to me, but there is a sense of "capturing" the 
bird with the camera that I don't have looking at someone else's photo, even 
though I was right next to him what the event occurred. But this ibis I can't, 
in good conscience, list. 

> 
> Skyler's photo, BTW, can be seen on my blog. 
> 
> Larry Zirlin 
> Whiting, NJ 
> http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/ 
> 
> 
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Subject: Re: Would you count the bird?
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2016 09:16:10 -0400
Some thoughts on all this:

1.       In the past, I have posted about how the rigidity of some of the
self-imposed rules in this area of hobby life are structurally identical to
the self-imposed rules in the area of totally different hobbies  (my
favorite example, gleaned from 50+ years of being a Bob Dylan fan: does
hearing a song played at soundcheck “count” for a life list of Dylan songs
one has heard live?)

2.       I was in Honduras in February 2015 (with Wildside nature tours),
birding with, among others, Scott and Amy Weidensaul. One night, when we
got back to the lodge, I was showing one of our guides (the extraordinary
Glenn Crawford [for anyone who can ever go birding with him in the
neotropics, DO IT!] some of my pictures, and he stopped short. I had
captured a cocoa woodcreeper which had only been heard, not seen, on this
trip. I had seen one the year before in Belize so it wasn’t a lifer, but it
was a first for this trip. How did I capture the picture? Embarrassment: I
was aiming for another bird, my hand holding the camera was jarred by
someone else, and the focus wound up on the “wrong bird.” It never occurred
to me until this moment that maybe I shouldn’t count it b/c I wasn’t aware,
at the moment that I clicked on the camera, that that was the bird in front
of me.  To me, of course, it “counts.”

3.       Leading to the metaphysical question: Counts for what? Karmela’s
post – “I've looked through someone's scope as they pointed out the Curlew
Sandpiper. To me it appeared as a distant brown dot, indistinguishable from
the other dots. I couldn't count it, but that's my choice” – really
resonated with me, and with the moment that my attitude towards listing
changed. We were at Cape May last year, and someone (this was a walk with
Pete Dunne and Ken Carlson) had a super-scope and pointed out Parasitic
jaegers in the distance (these would have been lifers for me). I looked
through the scope and saw what could have been three smudges on the lens. I
had no idea what they were (I certainly believe, given the quality of the
walk leaders that that is what they were) and my existential thought was,
“Does this really matter?” the next day, Linda (my wife) and I were walking
at Higbee Beach and saw a bird we had seen dozens of times before (Ruby
crowned kinglet), performing for us on a low hanging branch. For several
minutes. The contrast between the two experiences (a never seen bird that
could have been dirt on a screen vs. a familiar bird in his habitat living
the kinglet life) was so stark that my entire attitude toward listing
changed dramatically.  I still keep lists when I go birding, I generally
know if it is a new lifer, but I have no idea what my running tally is
(though I can tell you every time a Cedar waxwing or yellow warbler has
stumbled into my back yard, certainly).  And I am a much happier birder
this way.

Time for my 2d cup of coffee. Thanks all for listening.

Good birding to all,

Michael Perlin

Trenton, NJ

On Sat, Apr 23, 2016 at 7:55 AM, Walter Gura  wrote:

> A personal list is just that: personal.
>  But I would have no problem listing it on eBird.  It may skew the bar
> chart but there is much other info that can be found there.  Lapwing may be
> charted as common in Ocean County but clicking on 'MAP' next to the bird.s
> name will show that the bird hasn't been seen since 3/29/13.  Clicking on
> the bird's name will show that there were only 3 birds total which were
> seen from January 2013 to March 2013.
>   eBird's algorithm has to account for abundances ranging from Robin to
> Lapwing.  Some will be skewed but they make it easy to look behind the
> chart itself.  (It's a shame that not all published statistics were so easy
> to investigate LOL)
> The link below is to eBirds help page on bar charts..
>
>
> http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1010553
>
> Walt gura
>  waltg19149 AT gmail.com
>  Phila., Pa.
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Re: Would you count the bird?
From: Walter Gura <waltg19149 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 2016 07:55:45 -0400
A personal list is just that: personal.
 But I would have no problem listing it on eBird.  It may skew the bar
chart but there is much other info that can be found there.  Lapwing may be
charted as common in Ocean County but clicking on 'MAP' next to the bird.s
name will show that the bird hasn't been seen since 3/29/13.  Clicking on
the bird's name will show that there were only 3 birds total which were
seen from January 2013 to March 2013.
  eBird's algorithm has to account for abundances ranging from Robin to
Lapwing.  Some will be skewed but they make it easy to look behind the
chart itself.  (It's a shame that not all published statistics were so easy
to investigate LOL)
The link below is to eBirds help page on bar charts..


http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1010553

Walt gura
 waltg19149 AT gmail.com
 Phila., Pa.


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
Subject: Good flight today at Sandy Hook
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes AT NJAUDUBON.ORG>
Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2016 21:44:37 -0400
Jerseybirds,

We got off to a good start for the spring season of "Half Day Fridays"
field trips at the hook. The most abundant species were Blue-gray
Gnatcatcher, Palm Warbler, Savannah and White-throated Sparrows. Other
spring firsts for many of the group included Ovenbird, Yellow, Prairie, and
Black-and-white Warblers.

There was also a good raptor flight this morning, with several Broad-winged
and Red-tailed Hawks, a few female Northern Harriers, and a slow but steady
stream of American Kestrels and Merlins heading north.

Our Half Day Friday trips continue through the end of May.

Good Birding,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
tel. 609-897-9400
scott.barnes AT njaudubon.org
www.njaudubon.org

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Subject: Would you count the bird?
From: Dom <dom AT MONTEVIDEO.COM.UY>
Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2016 21:12:59 -0400
I'd say you don't have to identify it to species. But you have to 'know'
you saw something at the time. Maybe a field mark that you could
study later via photograph. Or even just register that something didn't
look quite right.

For example, when I was guiding a lot in the neotropics, the bulk of birds
would be new to my clients, but I'd encourage them to note behavior,
foraging height, any field marks they could.
Many times I'd see clients choose to strike a bird from their personal list
if the group had seen it, but they hadn't seen anything distinct. Like
if they just saw it flush.

So whilst I disagree you have to be able to ID it, I guess I'd draw the
line at 'accidental' birds - the camera registered something but the humans
didn't register.

But, like everyone said, it's only birding ;)

Put it on your 'camera' list!

Cheers,  Dom.

Dominic Garcia-Hall

www.antbirder.blogspot.com

www.aventuraargentina.com

+ 1 646 429 2667



On Friday, April 22, 2016, Cailin <
0000025ed36331da-dmarc-request AT lists.princeton.edu

> 

wrote:

>
>
> To me, there is no question that it "counts." I frequently take pictures
> of flocks of shorebirds only to go back through them later to see what I
> actually saw.  I'm not sure I would have ever thought there was some sort
> of issue with this until you just brought it up. It was there, it was
> clearly in your field of vision because you pointed a camera at it and
> captured its presence.  To me, it is getting very picky to say you had to
> have identified it while you were actually in the field.
> Cailin O'ConnorPompton Lakes, NJ
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Larry-Zirlin 
> Date: 04/22/2016  1:00 PM  (GMT-05:00)
> To: JERSEYBI AT LISTS.PRINCETON.EDU
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Would you count the bird?
>
> Here's an existential question:
>
>
> If you see a flock of ibises and one of them later, after examining a
> photo, turns out to be a White-faced Ibis, have you seen the bird? Can you
> count it?
>
>
>
>
> This happened yesterday at Island Beach SP. While I was chatting on the
> beach of Barnegat Bay with Skyler Streich, we had a close fly-by of a flock
> of ibises. We both joked about finding the White-faced Ibis in the flock of
> what I estimated to be 25 birds, while Skyler lifted his camera and shot
> some photos. Last night, after examining his pictures, Skyler sent me an
> email with an attached picture: It turns out that there actually was a
> white-faced in the flock of 24 (good guess, on my part). I saw all 24
> birds, but did I really see the rare one?
>
> When you fill out an eBird report, you're actually submitting a bird
> survey, so I can say, based on the evidence, that at around 8:30 yesterday
> there was a White-faced Ibis flying low over Barnegat Bay. But I don't have
> to, because Skyler already submitted his report and if I were to list it,
> it would actually make the bird seem, on the bar chart, a bit more common
> that it really is.
>
> If I had taken the picture, I probably would be inclined to count the
> bird; this seems absolutely irrational to me, but there is a sense of
> "capturing" the bird with the camera that I don't have looking at someone
> else's photo, even though I was right next to him what the event occurred.
> But this ibis I can't, in good conscience, list.
>
> Skyler's photo, BTW, can be seen on my blog.
>
> Larry Zirlin
> Whiting, NJ
> http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to njbrcreport AT gmail.com
> List help:  jerseybi-request AT princeton.edu
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


-- 
www.antbirder.blogspot.com

www.aventuraargentina.com

+ 1 646 429 2667


How to report NJ bird sightings: see 
 

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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi