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Updated on Sunday, April 2 at 10:10 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hartlaubs Turacao,©Tony Disley

2 Apr Point Lepreau Report - Saturday, April 1st [Jim Wilson ]
3 Apr Coltsfoot [The Gorhams ]
2 Apr Birding Around Saint John Central [Suzanne Bonnell ]
2 Apr Tufted Duck in Sackville [Popma ]
2 Apr Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April 2, 2017 (Sunday) [Nelson Poirier ]
1 Apr Tufted Duck in Sackville [Louise Nichols ]
30 Mar Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider [stuart wells ]
1 Apr Great Horned Owl revisits [Popma ]
30 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE March 30, 2017 (Thursday) [Nelson Poirier ]
1 Apr Report from Saint John [Lark ]
30 Mar Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider [David Christie ]
31 Mar Point Lepreau Report [Todd Watts ]
1 Apr FOX SPARROW [Barb Curlew ]
29 Mar Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider [Pamela Watters ]
29 Mar Point Lepreau Report [Todd Watts ]
31 Mar SJ Naturalists Club Warbler Workshop [Harry Scarth ]
31 Mar MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND REPORT [Ralph Eldridge ]
30 Mar White Head & Ferry birds, inc. COMMON MERGANSER [Roger Burrows ]
1 Apr Fw: NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – April 1, 2017 (Saturday) [Nelson Poirier ]
30 Mar Peregrin [Irene Doyle ]
30 Mar Point Lepreau Report [Todd Watts ]
31 Mar Club Nature Sud-Est- Observation d'oiseaux- 31 mars 2017 [Rose Alma Mallet ]
1 Apr Fundy Park, Riverside- Albert, Moncton [Mark & Karen Miller ]
29 Mar Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider [Jim Wilson ]
31 Mar White Head birds, inc. HOODED MERGANSER [Roger Burrows ]
29 Mar Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider [Ralph Eldridge ]
29 Mar Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider [Roger Leblanc ]
31 Mar ducks arriving [Popma ]
29 Mar Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider [P&K Rustics ]
1 Apr MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND REPORT [Ralph Eldridge ]
29 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 29, 2017 (Wednesday) [Nelson Poirier ]
29 Mar Fwd: Hampton Nature Club - April 4th - Guest Speaker Vanessa Roy-McDougall Nature NB [Karen Miller ]
28 Mar Point Lepreau Report [Todd Watts ]
28 Mar MISSING CONTACTS [Nelson Poirier ]
28 Mar Fw: [Nelson Poirier ]
27 Mar Point Lepreau Report [Todd Watts ]
27 Mar RING BILLED GULL [Margaret Gallant Doyle ]
27 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 27, 2017 (Monday) [Nelson Poirier ]
26 Mar Point Lepreau Report Yesterday, March 25th [Jim Wilson ]
26 Mar test [Benoit Lanteigne ]
26 Mar Point Lepreau - 26 March 2017 [Richard Blacquiere ]
26 Mar White Head Island birds, inc. KILLDEER & SNOW BUNTING [Roger Burrows ]
26 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 26, 2017 (Sunday) [Nelson Poirier ]
26 Mar Song Sparrow [jane LeBlanc ]
25 Mar Feeder Activity [Nev Garrity ]
21 Mar Sortie d'observation d'oiseaux le mardi 21 mars 2017 [Denise Godin ]
24 Mar MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND [Ralph Eldridge ]
21 Mar Re: King Eider at Point Lepreau [Roger Burrows ]
24 Mar White Head & Grand Manan birds, inc. HORNED GREBE, ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK & GLAUCOUS GULL [Roger Burrows ]
21 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE March 21, 2017 (Tuesday) [Nelson Poirier ]
25 Mar Belted Kingfisher [Joanne savage ]
21 Mar Re: King Eider at Point Lepreau [Joanne savage ]
25 Mar Re: Belted Kingfisher [Joanne savage ]
21 Mar King Eider at Point Lepreau [Jim Wilson ]
25 Mar King Eider in Bas Cape-Pele - March 25, 2017 [Gilles Belliveau ]
23 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 23, 2017 ( Thursday ) [Nelson Poirier ]
21 Mar Spring Training Camp for Botanists [Gart ]
24 Mar Female King Eider and Purple Sandpipers - PLBO [G Taylor ]
25 Mar Chipmunk []
21 Mar Bald Eagle at Fredericton [Christopher Adam ]
25 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – March 25, 2017 (Saturday) [Nelson Poirier ]
24 Mar NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE MARCH 24 (FRIDAY) [Nelson Poirier ]
19 Mar Re: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Bihoreau violace) at Grand Manan Today [Jennifer Pierce ]
19 Mar White Head Feeder birds [Roger Burrows ]
19 Mar Fw: Sortie d'observation d'oiseaux le samedi 18 mars 2017 [Denise Godin ]
19 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 19, 2017 (Sunday) [Nelson Poirier ]
17 Mar Re: flora/fauna photos needed for youth trading cards [Fred Schueler ]
17 Mar NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE...FRIDAY MARCH 17 [Nelson Poirier ]
18 Mar Birds at Point Lepreau on Thursday, March 16th [Jim Wilson ]
15 Mar White Head & Grand Manan birds, inc. NORTHERN SHRIKE [Roger Burrows ]
14 Mar Volunteer at the PLBO March 15 - May 9. [PLBO ]
16 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 16, 2017 ( Thursday ) [Nelson Poirier ]
15 Mar Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 15, 2017 (Wednesday) [Nelson Poirier ]
17 Mar Fwd: upcoming guest speakers [Karen Miller ]
18 Mar Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Bihoreau violace) at Grand Manan Today [Jim Wilson ]
14 Mar Upcoming Saint John Naturalists Club Events [Harry Scarth ]

Subject: Point Lepreau Report - Saturday, April 1st
From: Jim Wilson <jgw AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 23:59:47 -0300
Rick Peacock and I spent four hours at the Point Lepreau Bird Observatory
yesterday between 7:30 AM and 11:30. The first order of business was to look
for the female KING EIDER which for Rick was a new life bird. She was
feeding, just off the Point.

 

COMMON EIDERS were on the move and were not stopping to feed as the tide
neared low. We counted 274 passing the Point headed east, in many small
flocks.

 

BLACK SCOTERS were also migrating but most seemed to want to bunch up just
off the Point and feed. A considerable flock built up while we were there
with some birds swimming right into the small cove just to the left of the
building and hanging out just off the rocks. I don't recall seeing this
species so close to shore at Point Lepreau before. Unfortunately the light
was rather poor for photos, but the birds provided some nice looks. Every so
often a trickle of scoters would peel off and fly east up the Bay but the
majority seemed in no particular hurry to continue their migration. We
totaled only about 100 birds that actually left the Point as migrants.

 

Other species noted were a few SURF and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, 74 CANADA
GEESE, 7 BRANT, 1 GREAT CORMORANT, a THICK-BILLED MURRE feeding offshore and
a possible total of 14 HARLEQUINS either feeding (9 noted together) or
flying past the Point. We also saw several RED-THROATED LOONS, a GANNET and
several RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS and LONG-TAILED DUCKS. A HORNED GREBE was
showing transition to breeding plumage.

 

No woodcock in the alders but we did find a single RUFFED GROUSE.

 

A single SONG SPARROW was at the seed out front and we saw two SNOW BUNTINGS
as we drove in the road to the observatory at dawn.

 

On our drive home Rick and I were fortunate to find a handsome male SPRUCE
GROUSE picking up grit in the roadside between Point Lepreau and Dipper
Harbour.

 

A report from the south,

 

Jim Wilson


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Subject: Coltsfoot
From: The Gorhams <the_gorhams AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2017 01:21:13 +0000
Coltsfoot are in bloom. Allen and I were on the Norton Shore road this 
afternoon and counted 20 blossoms. 


Allen and Janet Gorham
5 Pancake Hill Road
Kingston Peninsula 

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Subject: Birding Around Saint John Central
From: Suzanne Bonnell <bonnbed AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 19:56:57 -0300
The Nature Saint John Club recently added a revision of BIRDING AROUND SAINT 
JOHN to its web page and today I completed the section called Saint John 
Central. Temperatures hovered around -2 from 9 AM to my 12 PM finish. 

A total of 26 birds were seen including: Wood Duck, Canada Goose, American 
Black, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, American Widgeon, Ring-necked 
Duck, Mallard, Gadwell,Bufflehead, Common Loon, Ring-billed Gull, Great 
Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, Iceland Gull, Rock Pigeon, Mourning Dove, 
Hairy Woodpecker, American Crow, Black-capped Chickadee, Red-breasted Nuthatch, 
American Robin, European Starling, Cedar Waxwing, Northern cardinal and Common 
Grackle. 


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Subject: Tufted Duck in Sackville
From: Popma <popma AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 10:50:25 -0300
The female TUFTED DUCK which Louise Nichols reported yesterday in the Middle 
Sackville sewage lagoon off Donald Harper Lane was still present this morning 
in the snow flurries at 10 am. She is very lovely, although a scope is helpful 
to see the details. She was all alone...hope she finds a mate. 


The PINTAIL, SHOVELERS, BLACK DUCKS and GREEN-WINGED TEAL were still present. 
There was a COMMON GOLDENEYE in the Industrial Park sewage lagoon and GADWALL 
in the Sackville Waterfowl Park. Although not all the ice has melted, there is 
still lots of open water in all these 3 sites. 


Kathy P
Sackville

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April 2, 2017 (Sunday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 2 Apr 2017 07:15:09 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, updated for April 2, 2017 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca Please advise if any errors are noted in wording 
or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com. 


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt AT mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Nice to see the ducks arriving to open water areas. Louise Nichols had a 
nice start on Saturday at the lagoon off Donald Harper Road in Middle 
Sackville, including a female TUFTED DUCK [Fuligule morillon], along with 
MALLARDS [Canard colvert], AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS [Canard noir], GREEN-WINGED 
TEAL [Sarcelle d'hiver] and NORTHERN SHOVELERS [Canard souchet]. The Sackville 
Waterfowl Park had some open water but all Louise could see there were Mallard 
ducks. On the other side of the Trans-Canada Highway, in the Tantramar Wetlands 
Centre pond by the Tantramar Regional High School was more variety, with HOODED 
MERGANSER [Harle couronné], AMERICAN WIGEON [Canard d’Amérique], Mallards, 
Black Ducks, and GADWALL [Canard chipeau]. 


** Dave Miller had the first PURPLE FINCHES [Roselin pourpré] coming to his 
Salisbury feeder on Saturday, with 3 bright males and one female. 


** Brian Stone rarely misses a SOLAR HALO, and didn’t miss one that occurred 
on Saturday. 


** The CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amérique] coming to fruit trays at our Moncton 
feeder swelled to approximately a dozen on Saturday and, as can be seen in the 
photo, they have to be on the watch for some very territorial male AMERICAN 
ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] that are not amused at their presence. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton



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Subject: Tufted Duck in Sackville
From: Louise Nichols <nicholsl AT EASTLINK.CA>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 16:30:32 -0300
A female Tufted Duck was present this afternoon on the lagoon in Middle 
Sackville. 


She was alone with no other Scaups present.

Other ducks on the lagoon were Mallards, Black Ducks, Green-winged Teal, 
Northern Shoveler and Gadwall. 


Louise Nichols

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Subject: Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider
From: stuart wells <sgw1 AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 16:40:17 -0300
Gunners who hunt eider along the shore of the Bay of Fundy during the 
February sea duck season have told me that seals will often take birds 
they've shot before they've had a chance to retrieve them.

-----Original Message----- 
From: David Christie
Sent: Thursday, March 30, 2017 12:11 PM
To: NATURENB AT LISTSERV.UNB.CA
Subject: Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider

This discussion brought back memories, of perhaps 15 years ago, when Mary 
Majka and I were walking along the shore at Whale Cove, Grand Manan. A 
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT [Cormoran à aigrettes] was actively fishing and a 
few times after it had surfaced, a SEAL [phoque sp.] would vigorously break 
the water right beside it. Our interpretation was that the seal was trying 
to scare the bird, causing it to drop its food. Sometimes the startled 
cormorant would dive and re-surface at some distance; or it would rear up 
and run along the surface. We were not able to see whether the seal was 
successful in stealing a fish. Sometimes, the cormorant was obviously having 
trouble with fish that were large and difficult to swallow.

David


On Mar 29, 2017, at 9:16 PM, Jim Wilson  wrote:

> Very interesting. I have often seen Harbour Seals breaching off Point 
> Lepreau or at other places along the coast but always assumed they were 
> involved in mating behaviour or some other interactions between individual 
> animals. I've never noticed eiders or other seabirds being the apparent 
> target. If seals feed on birds one would think we'd see it happen much 
> more often.
>
> I wonder if the eider brought up some food item from the bottom that the 
> seal was interested in. I've frequently seen eiders at Point Lepreau bring 
> up what appeared to be small sea urchins or small sea stars and eat them 
> on the surface. In fact the female King Eider had quite a time with a sea 
> star last week as I watched through the scope. She had to break off the 
> arms one by one and eat them as separate items before swallowing the 
> remainder.
>
> I've always wondered if our seals ever take birds but have seen no 
> definite evidence. I just assumed they didn't like warm-blooded meals or 
> feathers in their dinner.... :)\

David Christie,
Mary's Point, NB, Canada





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Subject: Great Horned Owl revisits
From: Popma <popma AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 21:05:05 -0300
Last November 24 I reported a GREAT HORNED OWL spending the day in a large 
spruce in our garden. Today we were treated again to the same thing, same tree. 
I couldn't tell if it was a the same individual or not but it sure got the 
attention of the local crows. 


There is no nest, and we haven't heard it vocalizing in the neighbourhood, but 
it does seem to like the spot as a roosting place. 


Kathy P
Sackville

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE March 30, 2017 (Thursday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 11:54:04 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE - March 30, 2017 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca Please advise if any errors are noted in wording 
or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by : Louise Richard richlou AT nbnet.nb.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
** Louise and Maurice Richard have been regularly seeing a NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD 
[Moqueur polyglotte] around their home bordering Jones Lake since December. A 
Northern Mockingbird has wintered in that area in previous winters. They have 
not heard it vocalizing as yet, so they’re not sure whether it’s a male or 
female. They are also noting a flock of approximately 80 WAXWINGS foraging on 
clinging apples on trees on the northern side of Jones Lake. 


** There has been some recent chatter about the AMERICAN GOLDFINCH 
[Chardonneret jaune] male spotted with some bright yellow preparing for their 
seasonal moult to breeding plumage. A photo of one is attached. At our own 
feeder yard we are not seeing any new arrivals yet other than RED-WINGED 
BLACKBIRDS [Carouge à épaulettes], COMMON GRACKLES [Quiscale bronzé] and a 
few AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d’Amérique] that may or may not be migrants. 
Approximately a dozen AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] show no signs 
of leaving. They’re feeding very heavily. Two SONG SPARROWS [Bruant chanteur] 
with us all winter are still patrons and at least 1 breaks into song when the 
weather is appropriate. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton


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Subject: Report from Saint John
From: Lark <_lark_ AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 20:26:11 +0000
April 1, 2017-3 to 4 temps and cloudy todayAmerican Robins on both sides of Red 
Head Rd pretty much the whole way.Saw a pair of Gray Jays on the MacDonald Lake 
Rd in Garnet Settlement.Came across several flocks of Evening Grosbeak with 
about a dozen to a flock at Ben Lomond, Garnet Settlement and Taylor Lake Rd.A 
beautiful Red Tailed Hawk was on the Irving refinery side of Loch Lomond RdSaw 
my first 2 Song Sparrows just before Mispec Park.3 Ringed neck Ducks were on 
First Lake off Loch Lomond RdGadwall , Wigeons and Canada Geese have arrived. 
Canada Geese are all over the city on lawns the geese plus the Gadwall and 
Wigeon are back at the end of Hanover St.Several Common Merganser and Canada 
geese were observed at Silver Falls. 

Lark DoyleExcited for spring!

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Subject: Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider
From: David Christie <maryspt AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 12:11:08 -0300
This discussion brought back memories, of perhaps 15 years ago, when Mary Majka 
and I were walking along the shore at Whale Cove, Grand Manan. A DOUBLE-CRESTED 
CORMORANT [Cormoran à aigrettes] was actively fishing and a few times after it 
had surfaced, a SEAL [phoque sp.] would vigorously break the water right beside 
it. Our interpretation was that the seal was trying to scare the bird, causing 
it to drop its food. Sometimes the startled cormorant would dive and re-surface 
at some distance; or it would rear up and run along the surface. We were not 
able to see whether the seal was successful in stealing a fish. Sometimes, the 
cormorant was obviously having trouble with fish that were large and difficult 
to swallow. 


David


On Mar 29, 2017, at 9:16 PM, Jim Wilson  wrote:

> Very interesting. I have often seen Harbour Seals breaching off Point Lepreau 
or at other places along the coast but always assumed they were involved in 
mating behaviour or some other interactions between individual animals. I've 
never noticed eiders or other seabirds being the apparent target. If seals feed 
on birds one would think we'd see it happen much more often. 

> 
> I wonder if the eider brought up some food item from the bottom that the seal 
was interested in. I've frequently seen eiders at Point Lepreau bring up what 
appeared to be small sea urchins or small sea stars and eat them on the 
surface. In fact the female King Eider had quite a time with a sea star last 
week as I watched through the scope. She had to break off the arms one by one 
and eat them as separate items before swallowing the remainder. 

> 
> I've always wondered if our seals ever take birds but have seen no definite 
evidence. I just assumed they didn't like warm-blooded meals or feathers in 
their dinner.... :)\ 


David Christie,
Mary's Point, NB, Canada





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Subject: Point Lepreau Report
From: Todd Watts <buteobuz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 18:13:26 -0300
March 31, 2017

Morning Observers: Todd Watts, Jim Bell and Gail Taylor Afternoon: Todd Watts 
and James Kelly 


Once again, sea-bird movement was very light with 385 birds heading east and 64 
west. The King Eider continues. Diversity was fairly good with most of the 
expected species. 


Land-birds picked up a little even though the point remains largely frozen. 
Birds arriving from the direction of Grand Manan included 7 American Robin, 1 
Common Grackle, 7 Killdeer and a group of 20 birds that were likely robins. One 
Song Sparrow was seen in front of the PLBO along with a Savannah Sparrow back 
towards the lighthouse. 


The only raptor was an immature Bald Eagle which made a brief visit.

This project is supported with funds provided by the Environmental Damages Fund 
of Environment Canada. 


Todd Watts
Offical Counter
Point Lepreau Observatory 
Saint John Naturalists’ Club 


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Subject: FOX SPARROW
From: Barb Curlew <bcurlew AT XPLORNET.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 15:11:48 -0300
We just saw our first Fox Sparrow of the year. It is under our feeders.

 

Regards,

 

Barb Curlew

80 Long Marsh Lane

Waterside, NB  E4H 4L7

 


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Subject: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider
From: Pamela Watters <watterspj3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 19:27:28 -0300
We visited Rivière-du-Portage (la Cedrière) on Saturday to see what might
be around (this is one of the first areas of open water driving along the
north shore of Miramichi Bay from Miramichi).

It was quite windy and cold, and we only saw a few small groups of Common
Eider.

Separate from the groups of eiders, we noted a lot of action and splashing
going on, and we realized that a Harbour Seal was aggressively pursuing a
male Common Eider. The seal was lunging at the eider, and the eider was
doing some flapping of his wings to evade the seal, but didn't fly away.
The seal seemed to take short breaks, and then continue to grab at the
eider. We watched the skirmish for a few minutes - I don't think the
outcome was good for the eider.

Have others seen this sort of behavior from seals?

Pam Watters & Phil Riebel
Miramichi

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Subject: Point Lepreau Report
From: Todd Watts <buteobuz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 17:08:28 -0300
March 29, 2017

Cloudy throughout the day with snow falling during much of the morning. Winds 
were light and out of the north. Seas were calm. Visibility ranged from poor to 
excellent. 


Observers: Todd Watts and James Kelly (morning counts only)

Sea-bird migration was very light with 426 sea-ducks heading east and 112 west. 
Black Scoter and Common Eider were the most abundant. 67 of the birds heading 
east were Red-throated Loon. The female King Eider continues to feed just off 
the point and was visible throughout the day. 

Land-birds were scarce. The only non-raptor species detected were American 
Crow, Downy Woodpecker, Black-capped Chickadee, Golden-crowned Kinglet and 
Red-breasted Nuthatch. 


A female Northern Harrier hunted at the point. She came in quite close to the 
observatory several times providing outstanding viewing. At one point, she sat 
down about 5 meters from the front window. It was almost better than a hawk 
watch :) 


This project is supported with funds provided by the Environmental Damages Fund 
of Environment Canada. 


Todd Watts
Offical Counter
Point Lepreau Observatory 
Saint John Naturalists’ Club 

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Subject: SJ Naturalists Club Warbler Workshop
From: Harry Scarth <hhcs AT BELLALIANT.NET>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 09:52:29 -0300
It is springtime and that means our warblers are returning! Join Hank Scarth as 
he presents Jim Wilson’s Workshop: "North American Wood Warblers - Spring" at 
the Rockwood Park Interpretation Centre beginning at 6:30 PM on Thursday, May 
4. The workshop is designed to introduce you to these “butterflies of the 
bird world" including tips and tricks on how to find them and how to identify 
them visually and by ear. As seating is limited, preregistration is mandatory. 
Joanne Savage will take pre-registrations from April 10 until May 3, so please 
email her at davidsavage AT rogers.com or call her at 847-4245. 



Hank Scarth
 Rothesay, NB














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Subject: MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND REPORT
From: Ralph Eldridge <LIGHTRAE1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 21:36:16 -0300
SPRONG!!!! Has spring actually arrived? Or is this just another blip?

The day certainly seemed as if the migration has finally started in earnest.
Multiple flocks of CANADA GEESE (mostly in the 20 to 30 range);
5 WOODCOCK (possibly 7);
ROBINS by the lawn-full (well, over 30);
Around a dozen FOX SPARROWS (digging the island apart);
SONG SPARROWS (by the score); 
The first wave of SAVANNAH SPARROWS (with at least 10 IPSWICH type);
JUNCOS, galore;
A sprinkling of RED WING BLACKBIRDS (definitely 5 on the island);
One lonely GRACKLE;
3 KILLDEER (fly-by);
17 COMMON LOONS (all feeding near shore);
9 RED THROATED LOONS (all fly-bys except one);
38 HARLEQUIN DUCKS;
4 RED BREASTED MERGANSERS (acting like pairs);
17 COMMON EIDERS(mixed genders and the 1st group that seem to be migrants);
9 LONG TAILED DUCKS (set down briefly then headed up the bay towards Grand 
Manan); 

GREAT BLACK BACKED GULLS (perhaps 50 scattered throughout the day);
HERRING GULLS (outnumbered Blk. Backs by 3:1)
ICELAND GULLS (represented by about 12 individuals);
A couple dozen CORMORANTS (all were GREATs except for 1 DOUBLE CREASTED);
2 PEREGRINE FALCONS (the 4th & 5th of the year).

BIRD OF THE DAY: RAZORBILL. 
They have been rafting in varying concentrations off-and-on for a couple weeks 
but this afternoon they showed signs of coming ashore. 

As the evening crept by and 8PM was fast approaching, the ALCIDS started 
wheeling but rather half heartedly. It looked like a typical recognizance 
flight leading up to a mass landing in days to come. 

At 5 minutes to 8 the first adventurous Razorbill touched down and opened the 
gates. By 8:10 there were several thousand Razorbills on the rocks. 


(I'm sure that COMMON MURRES landed, too, (they were on the water) but I didn't 
go into the colony to confirm that. 


GRAY SEALS are building up. Counted 103 on Gull Rock this morning, including at 
least 9 pups. 

HARBOUR SEALS aren't very numerous but they tend to peak closer to their 
pupping season, come June. 


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Subject: White Head & Ferry birds, inc. COMMON MERGANSER
From: Roger Burrows <rtburrows AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:07:05 -0300
March 30

White Head Feeders    10:15-11:45
7 Mourning Doves, 3 American Robins, Dark-eyed Junco

White Head: Marsh & Flats    13:45-13:50
29 American Black Ducks

White Head Ferry (north side only)    14:00-14:25
Common Loon, 26 Common Eiders, male Surf Scoter, 3 Long-tailed Ducks

Whale Cove    14:55-15:05
2 American Black Ducks, 4 Red-breasted Mergansers, Iceland Gull

White Head Ferry    15:30-16:00
6 Common Loons, Red-necked Grebe, Double-crested Cormorant, ca. 100 Brants,
11 Common Eiders, male Black, 12 Surf & 19 White-winged Scoters, male
Long-tailed Duck, 6 Red-breasted Mergansers, first of spring 2 COMMON
MERGANSERS flying over, 3 Black Guillemots

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – April 1, 2017 (Saturday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 18:29:26 -0300
 NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – April 1, 2017 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 




Please advise editor at nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labelling. 




For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 




Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Transcript by: Catherine Clements

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca 





**While the Nature Sud-Est group were out for their bird outing on Friday, 
Carmella Melanson got some great photos of a MINK [Vison] that dove for a fish 
and even posed for a brief photo op. A real photo coup for the 
always-on-the-move Mink. 




**Scott Makepeace and Kevin Craig have been erecting BARRED OWL [Chouette 
rayée] nest boxes and monitoring them for some years now. Scott comments he 
checked a box on Thursday night to find one egg on the nest, and on Wednesday 
night had a female in another nest box. This would indicate Barred Owl nesting 
is getting under way at the moment in New Brunswick. 




**As a follow-up to Beth MacDonald’s recent WHIMBREL [Courlis corlieu] 
presentation and satellite-following work, Beth advises one of the monitored 
birds, named “Lamèque”, is now moving north, heading towards Texas. Check 
the URL http://www.seaturtle.org/tracking/?project_id=1201&dyn=1490222813 






**Mitch Doucet was able to get nice observations and photo of the NORTHERN 
MOCKINGBIRD [Moqueur polyglotte] in the area of 27 and 29 Hillcrest Avenue on 
Friday morning. It has been dropping by that area to fruit trees since 
December. 




**Brian Stone and Danny Sullivan made a birding run along the coast in the 
Shediac-Cap-Pelé-Saint Thomas area on Friday to capture several nice photo 
ops. COMMON GOLDENEYES [Garrot à oeil d'or] were at the Marina de la Brèche 
(a small wharf), a handsome adult BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] on 
sentry at the Aboujagane River, WIGEONS [Canard d'Amérique] and BARROW'S 
GOLDENEYE [Garrot d'Islande] and CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada] from the Cap 
Brûlé lagoon look-off. Some PUSSY WILLOW [Saule à chatons] shrubs had opened 
their buds to expose their white insulation. These are not actually blooming, 
as they will soon become big yellow blooms to indicate they are male, or green 
blooms to indicate they are female, all occurring on separate male and female 
bushes. The male pollen blooms will be very welcome to early emerging 
pollinators. RUFFED GROUSE [Gélinotte huppée] and SCOTER [Macreuse] and EIDER 
[Eider] were all at the Saint-Thomas wharf. Note the nice photo of the 
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER [Macreuse brune] to show the signature white ornamentation 
around the eye, and the white secondaries on the wing, to separate them from 
the other two Scoters. 




**The group of CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amérique] has finally found my fruit 
trays the past four days and they are sure enjoying it for the brief moments 
they peacefully can. Two male ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] have joined the 
previously present female Robins, and are bullying the Waxwings non-stop. 
There’s lots for both, but the male Robins don’t seem to see it that way. 




**Immature/sub-adult BALD EAGLES­ [Pygargue à tête blanche] can be sometimes 
hard to be sure what year of development they are in. The attached Bald Eagle 
photo, taken recently at the Tantramar Marsh, shows the variability in the 
moult of this species. Dave Christie feels it is nearly two years old, in what 
is called “Basic I” plumage (aka “White-belly I”), and from now on 
through the summer will be moulting into “Basic II” plumage. Dave comments 
a young-of-the-year bird would not have that much white on the belly yet, or as 
extensive white around the eye. He also comments the eye seems to be getting a 
bit of colour, to suggest a past young-of-the-year bird. 




nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton



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Subject: Peregrin
From: Irene Doyle <snobunting AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 13:23:04 +0000
Hi

A birding friend saw and photographed an adult male Peregrin Falcon on the Van 
Horne (Campbellton/Cross Point) bridge yesterday [😊] as he said 


Yaaayyyy Spring is in the air [😉]



Irene


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Subject: Point Lepreau Report
From: Todd Watts <buteobuz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:06:15 -0300
March 30, 2017

Sunny skies with scattered clouds. Winds were fairly strong out of the NW. 
Visibility was excellent. 


Observers: Todd Watts and Ian Stead (morning only)

Sea-bird movements were very light with 244 heading east and 34 west. Diversity 
was a bit low today as well. The female King Eider continues to spend her days 
close to shore. Purple Sandpiper are numerous with flocks containing up to 90 
individuals. 


Land-birds were scarce. However, 3 Snow Bunting were observed. Two of them 
perched on the top of a utility pole, which seemed unusual for this open 
country species. The only other land-bird (non-raptor) sighting of the 
slightest interest was 4 European Starlings arriving from the direction of 
Grand Manan. 


A female Northern Harrier hunted at the point.

This project is supported with funds provided by the Environmental Damages Fund 
of Environment Canada. 


Todd Watts
Offical Counter
Point Lepreau Observatory 
Saint John Naturalists’ Club 


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Subject: Club Nature Sud-Est- Observation d'oiseaux- 31 mars 2017
From: Rose Alma Mallet <malletra AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 19:58:06 -0300
 
        Club Nature Sud-Est-Observation d'oiseaux - 31 mars 2017

 Les Ami.e.s de la Nature du Sud-Est ont commenc une nouvelle tradition: une 
sortie d'observation d'oiseaux tous les jeudis. 

        On se rencontre au Gros Homard  Shdiac  8h30.

 Les Ami.e.s de la Nature Sud-Est started a new tradition :Birding every 
Thursday at 8:30. WE meet at the Big Lobster in Shdiac. 

        Everyone is welcome.

 Vendredi, le 31 mars, 6 membres du club dont Carmella Melanson, Normand 
Belliveau, Ccile Lger ,Rjean Laforge, Rose-Alma Mallet et Jean-Claude Gagnon 
ont observ 38 espces d'oiseaux du Gros Homard  Shdiac au Cap Tourmentin et 
 Upper Cape. Voici les espces observes entre 8h30 et 16h00 : 


        Au Gros Homard  Shdiac
        Bernache du Canada 1/Canada Goose
        Eider  duvet 2/ Common Eider
        Grand Harle 3/ Common Merganser
        Pigeon biset 15/Rock Dove
        Goland  bec cercl 1/Ring-billed Gull
        Goland argent 20/ Herring Gull
        Corneille d'Amrique 22/Am.Crow
        Pygarque  tte blanche 1/ Bald Eagle

         Pointe -du-Chne
        Macreuse  front blanc 3/Surf Scoter
        Macreuse  bec jaune 80+/Black Scoter
        Garrot  oeil d'or 12/ Goldeneye
        Harelde Kakawi 20/Long-tailed Duck
        Harle hupp 8/Red-breasted Merganser
        Eider  duvet 8/Common Eider
        Goland brun 1/Lesser Black-backed
        Goland marin 40+/Greater Black-backed
        Goland argent 30/Herring Gull
        Goland  bec cercl 8/Ring-billed Gull
        Jaseur boral 40+/Bohemian Waxwing

        Cap-Brl et lagune
        Canard noir 7/ Black Duck
        Canard colvert 1/ Mallard Duck
        Garrot d'Islande 42/ Barrow's Goldeneye
        Corneille d' Amrique 25/ Am. Crow
        Goland arctique 36/Iceland Gull
        Goland argent 8/ Herring Gull
        Goland  bec cercl 12/Ring-billed Gull
        Faisan de Colchide 1/ Ring-necked Pheasant
        Etourneau sansonnet 3/ Eu. Starling
        Chardonneret jaune 4/Goldfinch

        Grand Barachois
        Bernache du Canada 12/Canada Goose

        Shemogue
        Msange  tte noire 10/Black-capped chickadee

        Johnston Pt.
        Geai bleu 2/Blue Jay
        Msange  tte brune 1/Boreal Chickadee

        Amos Pt.
        Pic flamboyant 1/ No.Flicker
        Pic chevelu 2/ Hairy Woodpecker
        Pic mineur 1/ Downy Woodpecker
        Junco ardois 3/Dark-eyed Junco
        Quiscale bronz 1/Common Crackle
        Roitelet  couronne dore 1/ Golden-crowned Kinglet

        Ch.Blacklock 
        Buse  gueue rousse 1/Red-tailed Hawk

         Cap Tourmentin
        Tourterelle triste 32/ Mourning Dove

        Upper Cape
        Bruant chanteur 1/Song Sparrow
        Bruant hudsonien 4/Am. Tree Sparrow

 Nous avons observ un Grand duc sur son nid. Nous avons t impressionn par 
un magnifique Vison qui a attrap et mang un poisson devant nous. Il n'y avait 
que 5 Buse  gueue rousse sur notre parcourt./ We saw a Great Horned owl on his 
nest. We saw a Mink catch a fish in front of us. We only counted 5 Red-tailled 
hawk on our route. 




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Subject: Fundy Park, Riverside- Albert, Moncton
From: Mark & Karen Miller <markaren AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 20:30:15 -0300
Good evening everyone

Joanne Savage and I traveled from Quispamsis to Fundy Park, Alma, Cape Enrage,
R-Albert, Moncton, Salisbury and home today. We left home around 8:30 am and 
got 

home about 7:30 pm.

We tallied 50 species, including our own backyards before we left.

Here's the list:

Evening grosbeak
Crow
Cardinal
Song sparrow
Mourning dove
Black capped chickadee
Cedar waxwing
Red breasted nuthatch
Junco
A goldfinch

Robin
FOX SPARROW
Downy woodpecker
Starling
Bohemian waxwing
Purple finch
A tree sparrow
Hairy woodpecker
White breasted nuthatch
Rock pigeon

Herring gull
Blue jay
Iceland gull
Canada goose (1000+)
Mallard
Black duck
Common goldeneye
GBB gull
HOODED MERGANSER
Grackle

Raven
Bald eagle
BOREAL CHICKADEE
Siskin
Red tailed hawk
Red winged blackbird
Common eider
Common merganser
Gadwall
Lesser scaup

NORTHERN HARRIER
KILLDEER
Great cormorant
Black scoter
RED CROSSBILL
Golden crowned kinglet
RN pheasant
BH COWBIRD
Merlin
Ring billed gull

Happy spring birding!

Karen Miller
Quispamsis

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Subject: Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider
From: Jim Wilson <jgw AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 21:16:07 -0300
Hi Roger & Pam,

Very interesting. I have often seen Harbour Seals breaching off Point Lepreau 
or at other places along the coast but always assumed they were involved in 
mating behaviour or some other interactions between individual animals. I've 
never noticed eiders or other seabirds being the apparent target. If seals feed 
on birds one would think we'd see it happen much more often. 


I wonder if the eider brought up some food item from the bottom that the seal 
was interested in. I've frequently seen eiders at Point Lepreau bring up what 
appeared to be small sea urchins or small sea stars and eat them on the 
surface. In fact the female King Eider had quite a time with a sea star last 
week as I watched through the scope. She had to break off the arms one by one 
and eat them as separate items before swallowing the remainder. 


I've always wondered if our seals ever take birds but have seen no definite 
evidence. I just assumed they didn't like warm-blooded meals or feathers in 
their dinner.... :) 


Jim Wilson 

-----Original Message-----
From: NatureNB [mailto:NATURENB AT LISTSERV.UNB.CA] On Behalf Of Roger Leblanc
Sent: March-29-17 8:24 PM
To: NATURENB AT LISTSERV.UNB.CA
Subject: Re: [NATURENB] Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider

Hello Pamela and all,

Actually a couple of years ago while doing a survey session at Pointe Lepreau I 
did see something like this. The distance was such that I was never 100% sure 
but I did see something lunge out of the water and clearly try to catch an 
eider. This one was luckier and managed to get away but as I had noted seals 
around I always had the strong feeling that's what it was. Asked around at that 
time and no one reported witnessing such an attack but the research I did told 
me it was not out of the possible. Lucky you😊. 


Roger Leblanc
Moncton

Envoyé de mon iPhone

> Le 29 mars 2017 à 19:27, Pamela Watters  a écrit :
> 
> We visited Rivière-du-Portage (la Cedrière) on Saturday to see what 
> might be around (this is one of the first areas of open water driving 
> along the north shore of Miramichi Bay from Miramichi).
> 
> It was quite windy and cold, and we only saw a few small groups of 
> Common Eider.
> 
> Separate from the groups of eiders, we noted a lot of action and 
> splashing going on, and we realized that a Harbour Seal was 
> aggressively pursuing a male Common Eider. The seal was lunging at the 
> eider, and the eider was doing some flapping of his wings to evade the seal, 
but didn't fly away. 

> The seal seemed to take short breaks, and then continue to grab at the 
> eider. We watched the skirmish for a few minutes - I don't think the 
> outcome was good for the eider.
> 
> Have others seen this sort of behavior from seals?
> 
> Pam Watters & Phil Riebel
> Miramichi
> 
> NatureNB guidelines  http://users.xplornet.com/~maryspt/NNB/nnbe.html
> Foire aux questions de NatureNB  
> http://users.xplornet.com/~maryspt/NNB/nnbf.html

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-----
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Version: 2016.0.8007 / Virus Database: 4769/14204 - Release Date: 03/29/17

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Subject: White Head birds, inc. HOODED MERGANSER
From: Roger Burrows <rtburrows AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 15:10:58 -0300
March 31

White Head Feeders    08:45-09:30 & 11:00-11:30
female Ring-necked Pheasant, 2 Mourning Doves, 2 American Robins, Dark-eyed
Junco, Song Sparrow, Common Grackle

White Head: Village & Long Point Road    09:35-10:20
Double-crested Cormorant, 75 Canada Geese flying in, Common Eider,
Red-breasted Merganser, HOODED MERGANSER pair flying over, 2 Black
Guillemots, 32 American Robins, 2 Song Sparrows, Common Grackle

White Head: Marsh & Flats    10:25-10:55
ca. 565 Brants, 11 Canada Geese, 78 American Black Ducks, Green-winged Teal
pair

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider
From: Ralph Eldridge <LIGHTRAE1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 21:05:57 -0300
It's rarely observed or reported but it might be more common than the few 
reports would seem to indicate. 

Here's a link to one incident. 
http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1898/1051-1733%282004%29085%3C0031%3AHSPVPO%3E2.0.CO%3B2?prevSearch=& 


I have personally witnessed Gray Seals attack a Herring Gull and an Eider and 
Alcids are very wary of them if they get too close. 


I've been told that Harbour Seals were known to sometimes take young Eiders 
around The Wolves (Wolf Islands). 


It seems to me that predators in general are opportunistic and most have no 
particular qualms about taking a nontypical meal. 

Often the predators are young & inexperienced or old & weak. Maybe food isn't 
very plentiful or maybe it's simple opportunity. 


In the wild, I've seen an Osprey catch a Garter Snake that was sunning; a Toad 
eat a Garter Snake which minutes earlier tried to eat the toad; a Rusty 
Blackbird kill an consume a Yellow Rumped Warbler and a Leopard Frog that died 
while trying to swallow a Stickleback. Terns, like other gulls, will gorge on 
Flying Ants but I've seen Arctic Terns search the ground and catch Earth Worms 
and Slugs. Once I watched a Baltimore Oriole consume a Monarch Butterfly (with 
no hesitation or apparent harmful effect). 

So Harbour Seal versus Eider seems perfectly plausible to me.

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Subject: Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider
From: Roger Leblanc <parus AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 20:24:10 -0300
Hello Pamela and all,

Actually a couple of years ago while doing a survey session at Pointe Lepreau I 
did see something like this. The distance was such that I was never 100% sure 
but I did see something lunge out of the water and clearly try to catch an 
eider. This one was luckier and managed to get away but as I had noted seals 
around I always had the strong feeling that's what it was. Asked around at that 
time and no one reported witnessing such an attack but the research I did told 
me it was not out of the possible. Lucky you😊. 


Roger Leblanc
Moncton

Envoyé de mon iPhone

> Le 29 mars 2017 à 19:27, Pamela Watters  a écrit :
> 
> We visited Rivière-du-Portage (la Cedrière) on Saturday to see what might
> be around (this is one of the first areas of open water driving along the
> north shore of Miramichi Bay from Miramichi).
> 
> It was quite windy and cold, and we only saw a few small groups of Common
> Eider.
> 
> Separate from the groups of eiders, we noted a lot of action and splashing
> going on, and we realized that a Harbour Seal was aggressively pursuing a
> male Common Eider. The seal was lunging at the eider, and the eider was
> doing some flapping of his wings to evade the seal, but didn't fly away.
> The seal seemed to take short breaks, and then continue to grab at the
> eider. We watched the skirmish for a few minutes - I don't think the
> outcome was good for the eider.
> 
> Have others seen this sort of behavior from seals?
> 
> Pam Watters & Phil Riebel
> Miramichi
> 
> NatureNB guidelines  http://users.xplornet.com/~maryspt/NNB/nnbe.html
> Foire aux questions de NatureNB 
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Subject: ducks arriving
From: Popma <popma AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 11:32:29 -0300
Only nature lovers will understand when they hear how excited I was this 
morning at the sight of the sewage lagoons being ice-free at last...joining the 
winter resident MALLARDS were new arrivals: PINTAIL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, BLACK 
DUCK and NORTHERN SHOVELER. I was a little surprised not to find Ring-Necks 
among them as according to my spring records they are usually one of the first 
returnees. 


Kathy P
Sackville

Sent from my iPad
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Subject: Re: Harbour Seal pursuing Common Eider
From: P&K Rustics <paul66jmartin AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 21:23:33 -0300
Well in the Antarctic Seals will eat Penquins , and I think it is likely an
opportunity type of meal, most times birds don't get to close to seals but
if the Eider is wounded and can't fly well then it isn't far fetched it
would become the seals meal.

On Wed, Mar 29, 2017 at 7:27 PM, Pamela Watters 
wrote:

> We visited Rivière-du-Portage (la Cedrière) on Saturday to see what might
> be around (this is one of the first areas of open water driving along the
> north shore of Miramichi Bay from Miramichi).
>
> It was quite windy and cold, and we only saw a few small groups of Common
> Eider.
>
> Separate from the groups of eiders, we noted a lot of action and splashing
> going on, and we realized that a Harbour Seal was aggressively pursuing a
> male Common Eider. The seal was lunging at the eider, and the eider was
> doing some flapping of his wings to evade the seal, but didn't fly away.
> The seal seemed to take short breaks, and then continue to grab at the
> eider. We watched the skirmish for a few minutes - I don't think the
> outcome was good for the eider.
>
> Have others seen this sort of behavior from seals?
>
> Pam Watters & Phil Riebel
> Miramichi
>
> NatureNB guidelines  http://users.xplornet.com/~maryspt/NNB/nnbe.html
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> maryspt/NNB/nnbf.html
>

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Subject: MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND REPORT
From: Ralph Eldridge <LIGHTRAE1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2017 20:11:15 -0300
Continued low temperatures, a raw North East wind of over 20 knots and an 
overcast sky combined to make a day that was uninviting to be outside. So aside 
from a couple brief excursions into the out-of-doors I did my observing from 
the comfort of the house. 

Bird wise there doesn't seem to be a lot of change since yesterday. The number 
of FOX & SAVANNAH SPARROWS seems to have increased a bit. I'm still seeing lots 
of IPSWICH type Savannahs and today there are two extremely light red Fox 
Sparrows. 


Yesterday's lawn full of ROBINS has disappeared and I've only seen 1 all day.

COMMON MURRES did arrive last night and quite a few remained throughout the day 
while the RAZORBILLS departed. 

 
Today, the Razorbills came in fairly early, landing about 3 PM.
 
I'm not surprised by the total lack of PUFFINS. It is early for them. 

An arrival pattern has developed in step with the Razorbill population growth.
In the early days of Razorbill colonization on MSI they followed the cycles of 
the much larger Puffin colony. 

They would raft and come ashore in a single mixed flock, around mid-April, 
according to the Puffin's timing. 

Gradually the Razorbill's arrival around the island became earlier and earlier 
but the actual island landing still didn't occur until the majority of the 
Puffins had arrived. (During this time the Murres were on their rapid growth 
and joined the other Alcids for the mass landing on the island.) 

In the recent few years the 1st mass landings have been in March and comprised 
entirely of Razorbills and Murres. 

Typically, they will only stay for a few days and then pretty much disappear 
for a variable period. When they return, all 3 Alcid species (Puffin, Razorbill 
& Murre) make nightly mass landings as a single mixed flock. 


Although we refer to THE colony, different parts of the island host separate 
colonies which follow their own schedules. The most distinct colony is the 
North East section ( area on your right when you land on the island). The birds 
that belong to that section are routinely up to a week later coming ashore than 
the rest of the island. Also, It's only recently that Razorbills started to 
nest there and they still wait until the Puffins arrive and they all land 
together; the same scenario as we saw with the main colony. 


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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 29, 2017 (Wednesday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 09:30:11 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 29, 2017 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


Please advise editor at nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 



Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Johnson johnson2 AT xplornet.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca. 



**Gordon Rattray paid a visit to the Hillsborough waste water facility last 
Thursday to find 40 CANADA GEESE there. He revisited on Monday with much more 
activity with 60 CANADA GEESE, a pair of WOOD DUCKS, a pair of BLACK DUCKS, a 
pair of MALLARD ducks, 1 RING-NECKED duck male, along with some probably newly 
arrived RING-BILLED gulls and 3 overwintering juvenile ICELAND gulls. 



**Dan Hicks shares a photo of a daily visitor to their Irishtown Rd. yard not 
far from the Tankville School, a very healthy looking RED FOX. They also had a 
herd of 8 WHITE-TAILED DEER in their front yard on Saturday. Their tracks were 
still in the snow in their yard on Tuesday when I dropped Dan's swallow box 
off. 

Dan also comments he is looking forward to the arrival of HOODED MERGANSERS to 
a pond on their property soon. 


nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca 
Nelson Poirier 
Nature Moncton

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Subject: Fwd: Hampton Nature Club - April 4th - Guest Speaker Vanessa Roy-McDougall Nature NB
From: Karen Miller <markaren AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 07:14:43 -0300

-------- Original message --------
From: P&K Rustics
Date:03-28-2017 10:21 PM (GMT-04:00)

Subject: Hampton Nature Club - April 4th - Guest Speaker Vanessa Roy-McDougall 
Nature NB 


Well the weather won't hold us back next Tuesday, as we celebrate our 2nd 
meeting of the Hampton Nature Club , and we are excited to have Vanessa Roy 
coming to speak to us about Nature NB, so come Join Vanessa Roy-McDougall, 
Executive Director of Nature NB, as she highlights the important and broad 
range of work being done in the province to conserve New Brunswick's natural 
history. From NatureKids clubs to species at risk, Nature NB has a long history 
of being a voice for nature in NB. Learn about Nature NB's programs and the 
benefits of becoming a member. 




All are welcome and membership is free. We have a facebook page and will 
continue to try to have many field trips exploring and experiencing the 
bountiful natural wonder in which Hampton sits in the middle of. 




Hope to see you next Tuesday, 7pm at St Paul's Anglican Church in Hampton, 486 
Kennebecasis River Rd, Hampton, NB E5N 6L2. 




Paul Martin 

Hampton Nature Club

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Subject: Point Lepreau Report
From: Todd Watts <buteobuz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 19:41:59 -0300
March 28, 2017

Cloudy skies throughout the day with light freezing rain during the AM. Winds 
were fairly strong out of the SE. Visibility was generally good. 


Observer: Todd Watts

Counts started at 7:30AM (snow delayed my arrival). Sea-bird migration was 
barely noticeable with a total of 316 moving east today and 212 west. Black 
Scoter and Red-throated Loons were the most active. All of the usual species 
were observed with the exception of Red-necked Grebe. A single Northern Gannet 
(an adult) was observed during a break. The female King Eider was observed 
throughout the day. She looks like a lonely soul. The other eiders seem to shun 
her. This year’s bird looks different than last year’s suggesting the 
possibility that it is not the same individual (this could also be do to molt). 


The weather kept me indoors, so land-birding was not good. However, a single 
Song Sparrow was heard and an American Robin wandered around the point looking 
rather desperate. 


No raptors today.

This project is supported with funds provided by the Environmental Damages Fund 
of Environment Canada. 


Todd Watts
Offical Counter
Point Lepreau Observatory 
Saint John Naturalists’ Club 

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Subject: MISSING CONTACTS
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 16:16:57 -0300
It appears like some contact names for the membership email mail out have gone 
missing from the list. If you did not receive today’s message please shoot me 
an email (just reply to this message) that you did nor receive it and I can 
quickly add it. I have a back-up list but it’s going to take a while to sort 
out who is missing. In the meantime, you can always get it from the BlogSpot at 

http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca/

Nelson

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Subject: Fw:
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 28 Mar 2017 15:49:22 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE  March 28, 2017 (Tuesday) 

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca Please advise if any errors are noted in wording 
or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by : Louise Richard richlou AT nbnet.nb.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
** Another BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tote blanche] nest reporting in. Mac Wilmot 
noted an adult deep in the bowl of the Mud Creek Bald Eagle Nest that has been 
used some years and some not. The nest is in a White Pine Tree as most are, at 
the junction of Mud Creek and the Petitcodiac River in Lower Coverdale on the 
Bissett property. 


** Elaine Gallant spotted a flock of approximately 30 COMMON REDPOLLS [Sizerin 
flammé] in the swamp area near Parlee Beach on Monday. She suspects it’s the 
same group that she has seen in the area periodically over the winter but not 
coming to her feeder yard, but some nice bonus birds at Elaine’s feeder yard 
are a NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic flamboyant], both a WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH 
[Sittelle à poi trine blanche] and a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poi 
trine rousse], as well as a BROWN CREEPER [Grimpereau brun] that is making 
periodic visits. 


** Jean-Paul LeBlanc photographed a first winter ICELAND GULL [Goéland 
arctique] at the Bouctouche lagoon on Monday. Note the base of the bill is 
paling to suggest it is moulting out of that plumage, but the eye is still 
dark. 


** Danny Sullivan became very serious about building some Swallow Boxes after 
the Nature Moncton Nest Box workshop on March 18th. The photo says it all ! 


** All 51 nest boxes reserved at the workshop are now assigned to folks with 
the number of boxes assigned to landlords who will be reporting on results. 


** I made a late day visit to the Tantramar Marsh on Monday afternoon. Skies 
were getting very dark and snow starting but there was lots of action. I went 
around the Anderson Marsh Rd down the High Marsh Rd and out the Coles Island 
Rd. The Anderson Marsh Rd had a few innocent drift spots, the High Marsh Rd was 
excellent, and the Coles Island Rd was very good at the start but rough towards 
the former CBC towers. The ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS [Buse pattue] and RED-TAILED 
HAWKS [Buse à queue rousse] seemed about the same number as were there in the 
winter. I expected to see more NORTHERN HARRIERS [Busard Saint-Martin], but did 
not. These best items of interest were on the Coles Island Rd. Two Eagles were 
on a double high pylon sizing each other up, it turned out to be the GOLDEN 
EAGLE [Aigle royal] and an adult BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tote blanche] 
exchanging thoughts; sure wish I could have been aware of their discussion as 
they starred each other down. About half way along the Coles Island Rd is a new 
RAVEN’s nest [Grand corbeau] near the summit of one of the large pylons. A 
group of RING-NECKED PHEASANTS [Faisan de Colchide] were around the farm at the 
end of the Anderson Marsh Rd that all seemed to be dark brown variants. For a 
fast impromptu visit, it was very rewarding to see that darn Golden Eagle after 
so many visits this winter ! Note the golden nape and legs appearing feathered 
to the digits; I was wishing it would have been a brighter day and no snow for 
better photos, but maybe that’s why everyone was out. No Snowy Owls or 
Short-eared Owls were seen. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton


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Subject: Point Lepreau Report
From: Todd Watts <buteobuz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 17:55:35 -0300
March 27, 2017

Cloudy skies with calm seas this morning. The air was near calm at the start 
with winds soon building to beaufort 3. Visibility was good until falling snow 
reduced it to as little as one kilometre during the afternoon. 


Observers: Todd Watts

No noticeable seabird migration was observed today. Ducks moving east totalled 
114 for the day. The total moving west was 111. The female King Eider remained 
off the point through the entire day. As many as 13 Harlequin Ducks were also 
present throughout the day. Other sea-ducks observed included all three scoter, 
both loons, both grebes, both cormorant, Long-tailed Duck, Common Eider, 
Red-breasted Merganser, Black Guillemot, Razorbill, Brant, Bufflehead and 
American Black Duck. Also seen were an Iceland Gull, a single Black-legged 
Kittiwake and several flocks of Purple Sandpiper. The largest flock of 
sandpiper contained approximately 60 individuals. These birds often appeared 
rather skittish suggesting the presence of a raptor, which turned out to be a 
male Northern Harrier. This bird was observed several times and it made two 
close passes coming within 4 or 5 meters of the observatory’s front window. 


Birds on land were, for the most part, nowhere to be seen or heard. However, an 
American Woodcock was displaying at the point near sunrise. No sparrows of any 
type. 


Todd Watts
Dedicated Observer
Point Lepreau Observatory 
Saint John Naturalists’ Club
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Subject: RING BILLED GULL
From: Margaret Gallant Doyle <judo AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:23:40 -0300
Hello 

 

Last Friday I saw my first RING BILLED GULL         at the sewage lagoon
area in Campbellton

Only one and yesterday afternoon there was still only one at the same place 

First one of the spring 

 

 

No birds around I will be happy to see something new at my feeders 

 

A report from the North

 

Margaret Doyle


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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 27, 2017 (Monday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 27 Mar 2017 12:48:04 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 27, 2017 (Monday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca Please advise if any errors are noted in wording 
or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt AT mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Mike Plourde got an excellent photo on his trail camera of a LONG-TAILED 
WEASEL [Belette à longue queue] in Irishtown on March 14. It can be viewed at 
the 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hpo284q4vn18k5e/EK000115.AVI?dl=0
. Mike comments that Long-tailed Weasels are at the northern limit of their 
range in this area. 


** Richard Léger saw his first GREAT BLUE HERON [Grand Héron] of the season 
at the Pointe-du-Chêne wharf on Sunday. It may or may not have been the one 
that Brian Stone and I saw in the creek before the wharf. 


** Brian Stone and I made a quick afternoon run to Shediac and Cap-Pelé on 
Sunday afternoon. The KING EIDER [Eider à tête grise] that Gilles Belliveau 
had seen on Saturday at the rue Niles wharf in Cap-Pelé was the target. The 
ice had come in on shore and we were able to see COMMON EIDERS [Eider à duvet] 
in the scope, far out, but were not able to pick out the King Eider, although 
it may well have been there. Nice consolation prizes were several seals, all 
suspected to be GRAY SEALS [Phoque grise], on the ice off Pointe-du-Chêne 
wharf, with GREATER SCAUP [Fuligule milouinan], BLACK SCOTERS [Macreuse noire] 
and LONG-TAILED DUCKS in the open water. Our first GREAT BLUE HERON [Grand 
Héron] of the season was in the creek by the road to the wharf. Note the 
ornate plumes on the head, neck and back of the breeding adult. A group of 8 
adult RING-BILLED GULLS [Goéland à bec cerclé] were on the ice on the inside 
of the wharf, very likely having recently arrived from the south. 


** We had a good number of AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] earlier in 
the winter at our Moncton feeders, then the numbers suddenly dropped. They are 
now returning and I’m noting, as I suspect others are, the moth-eaten look of 
the returning bright yellow plumage of the males beginning their seasonal 
change. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


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Subject: Point Lepreau Report Yesterday, March 25th
From: Jim Wilson <jgw AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 23:01:15 -0300
James Kelley and I did a migration count yesterday morning at the Point
Lepreau Bird Observatory, ending at 11:15 AM. Although it was a lovely sunny
morning with little wind, seabird and land bird migration was practically
non-existent.

 

We may have seen 100-200 BLACK SCOTERS, a handful of SURF and a trickle of
RED-THROATED LOONS headed up the Bay but it was surprisingly quiet.

 

I have made three visits to the PLBO since we started spring observations on
March 16th and am struck by a lack of COMMON EIDERS. In the past we usually
got a pulse of eider migration during the final days of March but thus far
there have been very few, even very few local eiders that trade back and
forth past the Point. So one must assume there are a large number of eiders
somewhere to the south of us.

 

I did find a single mute SONG SPARROW in the alders near the tip of the
Point but no Ipswich or Fox Sparrows nor any other land birds including
woodcock. All the ground in the alders was still solidly frozen so there are
no feeding opportunities for woodcock yet this year. Normally there is
thawed ground in the damp alders and one can often find several woodcock in
late March.

 

On my way home I found three ROBINS on lawns at Maces Bay that acted like
early migrants, hopping in the lawn in the sun and peering intently at the
ground like first arrivals often do. With the large numbers of wintering
Robins this year it's hard to be sure but I called them migrants. It's time!

 

No raptors or other land birds at the Point. The female KING EIDER was
feeding off the Point shortly after I arrived at 7:20 AM. She eventually
disappeared but was later photographed by Jennifer Day-Elgee who made a
special trip to look for it. Congratulations to Jennifer on a life bird!

 

**********

 

Todd Watts will begin a six-week engagement at the PLBO tomorrow, doing both
a morning and afternoon session daily, each weekday until May 7th. He will
post a daily short report on migration activity there.

 

Jim Wilson   

 


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Subject: test
From: Benoit Lanteigne <benben AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 22:28:48 -0300
Je fais un test pour voir si mon problème d’envoi de messages est réglé.

Rosita Lanteigne

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Subject: Point Lepreau - 26 March 2017
From: Richard Blacquiere <jblacqui AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:11:55 -0300
I did a 4 hour watch at the Point Lepreau bird Observatory this morning. It
was a sunny, but with a cool northerly breeze. Starting at -5 C, the
temperature didn't quite make it above zero during my stay. Visibility was
excellent over a fairly calm sea.

A rather meagre passage of ducks during the count. I don't have the exact
numbers at hand but the most numerous was Black Scoter with only about 75
(mostly males) making their way east. Probably less than a  dozen Common
Eider made it into the count. Only a few Surf Scoter and Long-tailed Ducks
were seen. 

Other waterbirds (all small numbers) noted: Razorbill, Guillemot, Great
Cormorant, and both Loons. The female King Eider was still there today.
Also, 7 or 8 Harlequins, males and females, around at various times.  

There seemed to be 2 flocks of Purple Sandpipers present, one containing 10
birds, the other about 80. They appeared when the tide was almost high, and
spent some time roosting on the rocks in front of the Observatory.

Apart from a few Black-capped Chickadees and Crows, there were no land birds
anywhere near the Point. A single Flicker flew up from the side of the road
as I was driving out after the watch ended.

No raptors seen today.

  
    
Richard Blacquiere
Hampton, NB

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Subject: White Head Island birds, inc. KILLDEER & SNOW BUNTING
From: Roger Burrows <rtburrows AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 20:11:11 -0300
March 25

White Head Feeders    08:50-12:10 & 18:00-18:30
2 female Ring-necked Pheasants, 4 Mourning Doves, Downy Woodpecker, 2
Dark-eyed Juncos

March 26

I walked around White Head Island this morning: my totals were 3 Common
Loons, Red-necked Grebe, Double-crested Cormorant, ca. 1250 Brants, 5
Canada Geese, 107 American Black Ducks, 4 Mallards, 19 Common Eiders, 24
Harlequin Ducks, 3 Buffleheads, 17+ Common Goldeneyes, 8 Red-breasted
Mergansers, adult & Immatrure Bald Eagles, first of spring KILLDEER (Long
Point Beach), 6 Mourning Doves, 68 American Robins, 4 SNOW BUNTINGS &
Dark-eyed Junco

White Head Feeders    12:30-13:00 & 15:15-15:45
female Ring-necked Pheasant, 4 Mourning Doves

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 26, 2017 (Sunday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 18:30:08 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 26, 2017 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca Please advise if any errors are noted in wording 
or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt AT mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Bryna Inman, who works at Fundy National Park, spotted a YELLOW-HEADED 
BLACKBIRD [Carouge à tête jaune] in the area of the former clubhouse, now 
known as “The Salt and Fir”, near the golf course at the park on Tuesday. 
She was alerted to it by its loud vocalization. This bird may still be in the 
area, or may be checking some nearby bird feeders with blackbird kin today, so 
be on the alert. 


** Dave Christie comments that he saw a SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d'Amérique] on 
Friday that was in the process of making the seasonal pelage shift from winter 
white to summer brown, being a blend of both at the moment. It was along the 
trail to the beach at Mary's Point. 


** Maurice Richard spotted two male HOODED MERGANSERS [Harle couronné] on the 
Kouchibouguac River on Thursday, also a BELTED KINGFISHER [Martin-pêcheur 
d'Amérique] was back and fishing the river. A BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête 
blanche] cruises the river around their cabin a few times every day, and a 
BEAVER [Castor] is at work nearby. GRAY JAYS [Mésangeai du Canada] and 
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] were also about. 


** Things appear to be in progress at Moncton’s PEREGRINE FALCON [Faucon 
pèlerin] centre at the summit of Assumption Place. An adult was in the nest 
box, checking the incredible vista from the nest in the pleasant sunshine of 
Saturday morning. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton



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Subject: Song Sparrow
From: jane LeBlanc <perkyleb2309 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 10:55:39 -0300
I had my first Song Sparrow here yesterday, March 25th.
Also, our resident Bald Eagle is on the nest in the marsh.
I've also seen and heard several small flocks of Canada Geese around.
Jane LeBlanc
St. Martins

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Subject: Feeder Activity
From: Nev Garrity <nev.garrity AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 18:54:46 -0300
I had my first Red winged Blackbirds at at the feeder yesterday when five
males took advantage of the cracked corn on the snow.  It won't be long
before large numbers of Red wings and Grackles will be vocalizing in the
trees which I really enjoy hearing.

Nev Garrity
Sackville NB

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Subject: Sortie d'observation d'oiseaux le mardi 21 mars 2017
From: Denise Godin <000000a06363d504-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UNB.CA>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 23:46:03 +0000
Bonsoir à tous, 
En ce beau mardi 21 mars, Rosemonde Duguay, Corinne DeGrâce, Jolande St-Pierre 
et Denise Godin sont parties de Inkerman à 8 h 30, beau soleil, -6 degrés 
Celsius.À Inkerman : Grand Corbeau, Étourneau sansonnet, Corneille 
d'Amérique, Garrot d'Islande, Garrot à oeil d'or, Grand Harle, Goéland 
marin;À Four Roads : Mésange à tête noire, Bruant des neiges, Harelde 
kakawi, Guillemot à miroir, Eider à duvet, Goéland argenté, Geai 
bleu;Chemin Nardini : Goéland arctique, Tourterelle triste, Pigeon biset;Rue 
des Arbres, Le Goulet : Sittelle à poitrine rousse, Pic mineur, Pic chevelu, 
Sizerin flammé (2)Au quai de Le Goulet : Alouette hausse-col (2);À 
Sainte-Marie-St-Raphaël : Grand Pic;Chemin Grand Ruisseau, Pigeon Hill : 
Mésange à tête brune, Roitelet à couronne dorée;À Petit-Gaspereau ; 
Canard noir, Canard colvert;Lagune de Tracadie ; Pygargue à tête blanche.Un 
total de 28 espèces. Terminé la sortie à 16 h. 

Denise Godin pour le groupeBertrand



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Subject: MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND
From: Ralph Eldridge <LIGHTRAE1 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 20:40:20 -0300
Spring? I don't believe it, in spite of the few avian speculators that seem to 
be moving north. 


On Tuesday we saw a minor pulse of two or three dozen SONG SPARROWS, a couple 
JUNCOS, two ROBINS and one STARLING. Hardly startling numbers but a big jump 
from the five or six Song Sparrows and one Robin that we had been seeing for 
some time. 


PURPLE SANDPIPERS are holding at around 60 and our 2 RAVENS continue daily.

Gulls have been low in recent days but that's no surprise because they cycle 
frequently, according to their foraging and the weather. 

I have noticed, though, that a few HERRING GULLS have started hanging out at 
favorite perching rocks within the seabird colony. I'd speculate that they are 
anticipating the ALCID'S return and those food opportunities. 


Those aforementioned Alcids (RAZORBILLS & MURRES) have been rafting off the 
island frequently but are not yet doing it every evening. This will certainly 
be a year to watch closely. Will things normalize or will breeding success 
continue its downturn? 


HARLEQUIN DUCKS have been hovering around 60 most days although there have 
seemed more at times. I suspect that my impressions were right because this is 
the time (just before departure to their breeding grounds) when we see a 
significant jump in numbers here. Presumably, the increase is the first step in 
the spring migration, with greatly elevated displaying, courting and 
aggression. 


BIRD OF THE DAY: 
There were up to 56 Harlequins hanging out at our boat ramp for most all of 
this morning and well into the ebb tide early this afternoon. 

Lots of preening, courting and aggression on display with a surprising amount 
of the aggression displayed by a handful of females. 


The GRAY SEALS are slowly increasing but I've only seen a couple of pups. I'm 
not too surprised, considering the particularly violent sea conditions which 
we've had recently. All the local haul-outs would have been more or less 
unusable for days on end. 


BIRD OF THE WEEK:
Yesterday, at about mid-day, under bright sunshine, gale force wind and 
sub-freezing temperatures, I watched a WOODCOCK fly in and land on the frozen 
lawn beside the lighthouse. It found its bill defeated by the solid soil. It 
made several short flights to test other areas with the same failure to 
penetrate. 

The last I saw, the poor bugger was exploring among the boulders and burrows of 
the PUFFIN colony. There's a chance that he found unfrozen ground in sheltered 
niches. Even so, finding food sufficient to survive the current weather would 
be a definite challenge. 

I can only imagine how desperate that bird must have been to find food. It's 
small wonder that there's talk of exceptionally high mortality among the 
species. 

An elevated number of dead and dying Woodcocks have been reported in New 
England. This last big storm and cold snap, piled onto the previous severe cold 
will certainly take a toll. 


Small numbers of COMMON LOONS, RED THROATED LOONS, CANADA GEESE, BRANT, GREAT 
CORMORANTS & LONG TAILED DUCKS pass daily, rarely more than 1-2 at a time. 


Almost completely absent since I arrived on the 9th have been EAGLES. I've only 
seen one brief fly-by whereas I expect to see at least one pretty much every 
decent day. 

True, the weather hasn't been so good but certainly not so bad as to stop the 
off-shore hunting trips. I wonder if the "local" Eagles have found a closer, 
easier or larger food source that's holding them more to the mainland. 


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Subject: Re: King Eider at Point Lepreau
From: Roger Burrows <rtburrows AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 13:16:57 -0300
I wonder if this is the female King Eider that has been a regular winter
resident on the White Head Ferry run for the last three years.  It has
arrived sometime in late November or early December each winter and has
been seen intermittently on the White Head Ferry run until early March when
it disappears.  It's only a short flight from White Head to Point Lepreau
which would be the first landfall for a bird drifting north to breed.

Roger Burrows
White Head

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017 at 9:21 AM, Jim Wilson  wrote:

> Am looking at a female KING EIDER feeding off the tip of Point Lepreau.
> Last spring it or another female King spent nearly a month here, from late
> March to late April. Could it be the same bird? It certainly looks and acts
> like it might be.
>
> Jim Wilson
>
>
> Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
>
>
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> maryspt/NNB/nnbf.html
>

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Subject: White Head & Grand Manan birds, inc. HORNED GREBE, ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK & GLAUCOUS GULL
From: Roger Burrows <rtburrows AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 20:36:31 -0300
March 22

White Head Feeders    all day
female Ring-necked Pheasant, Dark-eyed Junco

March 23

White Head Feeders    13:20-16:20
20 Mourning Doves, 4 Dark-eyed Juncos, Song Sparrow

March 24

White Head Ferry (south side only)    10:30-10:55
4 Common Loons, 5 Red-necked Grebes, Double-crested & 3 Great Cormorants, 5
Brants, Common Eider, 23 White-winged Scoters, 2 Long-tailed Ducks, 3
Red-breasted Mergansers

Long Reach, Castalia--North Head    12:20
light morph ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK perched

Ingalls Head    14:10-14:25
3 Common Loons, Red-necked Grebe, Common Eider, 3 Long-tailed Ducks,
Red-breasted Merganser

White Head Ferry    14:30-15:00
Common Loon, Red-necked Grebe, HORNED GREBE (off White Head), Great &
Double-crested Cormorants, 9 Common Eiders, 6 Surf, 6 White-winged & 6
Black Scoters, Black Guillemot, adult GLAUCOUS GULL

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE March 21, 2017 (Tuesday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 11:24:52 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE - March 21, 2017 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca Please advise if any errors are noted in wording 
or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by : Louise Richard richlou AT nbnet.nb.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
** Nature Moncton member Irene Doucet wrote up an excellent article she called 
“Transported by Nature” that has been published by Bird Studies Canada. It 
is beautifully done ! Check out the attached URL to read Irene’s piece. 


http://www.birdscanada.org/news/transported-by-nature?platform=hootsuite

** The March Nature Moncton meeting is on tonight, Tuesday night, at 7 pm at 
the Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge across from Cabela’s with presenter Beth 
MacDonald on the Whimbrel as previously distributed. For those who reserved 
Swallow Nest Boxes and were not able to get to the Saturday workshop, they can 
be picked up from the tailgate of a grey Ford F150 at the start of the meeting. 
Make sure I know the number on the boxes to put it with the owner’s name to 
maintain success records. 


** Our family paid a visit to Resurgo Place at 20 Mountain Rd in Moncton 
recently, the rebuilt and renamed Moncton Museum. For those who have not 
visited this spot, I cannot recommend it highly enough. The exhibits are 
extremely well done, and is captivating for children as it is for adults. Some 
exhibits are particularly designed for children of all ages and are blended in 
with exhibits that will be very revealing and interesting to adults and younger 
people alike. The staff are extremely well trained to explain more on the 
exhibits. If you have not visited Resurgo Place, put it on your list. The 
advertisement for Resurgo Place has been very underwhelming. I hope that 
changes so that more people realize that it’s there. 


nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton


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Subject: Belted Kingfisher
From: Joanne savage <davidsavage AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 18:41:26 -0300
A Belted Kingfisher noted on the wires overlooking the brook
between the garage and Stockfarm Rd. in Hammond River.

Joanne Savage
Quispamsis

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Subject: Re: King Eider at Point Lepreau
From: Joanne savage <davidsavage AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 16:33:40 -0300
Karen Miller, Dave Putt and I found a female King Eider in Pocologan on 
February 18/2017. 

She was with a small group of m & f Common Eider. A female Common picked on 
her. 


Joanne Savage
Quispamsis

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Subject: Re: Belted Kingfisher
From: Joanne savage <davidsavage AT ROGERS.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 20:53:25 -0300
I intended to sign this message as:

Joanne Savage/ Karen Miller
Quispamsis

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Subject: King Eider at Point Lepreau
From: Jim Wilson <jgw AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 09:21:20 -0300
Am looking at a female KING EIDER feeding off the tip of Point Lepreau.  Last 
spring it or another female King spent nearly a month here, from late March to 
late April. Could it be the same bird? It certainly looks and acts like it 
might be. 


Jim Wilson 


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


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Subject: King Eider in Bas Cape-Pele - March 25, 2017
From: Gilles Belliveau <gilles.belliveau AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 14:16:13 +0000
I'm currently looking at an adult male King Eider at the wharf at the end
of Niles Street in Bas Cap-Pele.  The bird is whit one of several small
groups of Common Eiders about 100-300m out from the wharf.

Gilles Belliveau

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 23, 2017 ( Thursday )
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 23 Mar 2017 07:53:42 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 23, 2017 ( Thursday ) 

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor, nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com . 




 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone AT gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)



** Many thanks to Beth MacDonald from the Canadian Wildlife Service for coming 
to Nature Moncton on Tuesday evening. Beth went over their recent investigation 
of WHIMBRELS [Courlis corlieu] in blueberry fields along the Acadian Peninsula 
that provided many insights into the life of this bird species such as where 
they spend their time, what they feed on, and their remarkable migration which 
we are just beginning to learn about thanks to new technologies. Fortunately 
their impact on the blueberry crop appears to be minimal, but the research is 
ongoing. They were able to track the migration map of the Whimbrels that they 
were able to equip with monitoring devices. The URL showing that route is 
http://www.seaturtle.org/tracking/?project_id=1201&dyn=1490222813 



** Georges Brun got more nice action shots of a female NORTHERN HARRIER [Busard 
Saint-Martin] capturing prey on the marsh near the bend of the Petitcodiac 
River on Sunday. Note the banded, open tail pattern and the signature white 
rump in the flight shot from the rear. He also got a pattern in the snow of a 
bird taking prey. This is called a "sitzmark" in the track trail guides. 



** An interesting note from Rheal Vienneau who is closely following the MONARCH 
BUTTERFLY [Monarque] migration out of Mexico at the moment. He reports that the 
population east of the Rocky Mountains are leaving the Mexico wintering grounds 
at the moment and that the conditions in the southern U.S. are favorable for 
milkweed growth and egg deposition for them. This augurs well so far for 
Monarch butterflies here in the Maritimes, hopefully by early July. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

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Subject: Spring Training Camp for Botanists
From: Gart <gart.bishop AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 07:20:15 -0300
CONNELL MEMORIAL HERBARIUM PLANT IDENTIFICATION WORKSHOP

                   

Spring has sprung, plants will soon be poking up. Get prepared to be able to
identify these spring arrivals.  Learn the methods for identifying our
native plants? We will be working with dried, pressed  specimens, but we
have LOTS of material to work so bring your curiosity and join fellow plant
enthusiasts on Wednesday , March 22  in room 27 (next to Biology office)of
Loring Bailey Hall at UNB in Fredericton -- beginners and experts welcome.
No costs involved and each session is a new one --- this is not a course.

We meet on the 3rd WEDNESDAY of each month from 11:00 - 3:00. Here are the
dates of our planned sessions for 2017: April 19, May 17,June 21,July 19,
Aug 16, Sept20, Oct  18, Nov.15, Dec 20.

Use our  website and database http://unbherbarium.ca/   where you can
research  information on plants in our collection of over 50,000 specimens.
Many of the specimens have a scanned image available. The site may call for
a password - you can IGNORE this. If you have a problem with the
website/data base PLEASE report it as it is a work in progress and feedback
is greatly appreciated.

For further information contact Elizabeth Mills -- emills52 AT gmail.com, Gart
Bishop -- gart.bishop AT gmail.com



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Subject: Female King Eider and Purple Sandpipers - PLBO
From: G Taylor <gftaylor AT ZOHO.COM>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 14:54:53 -0300
POINT LEPREAU BIRD OBSERVATORY (PLBO) -- 8 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. March 24th 





Good afternoon Folks!





Shortly after I arrived at the observatory this morning, I spotted the female 
KING EIDER in the water in front of the PLBO, and she was around all morning, 
and I spotted her again just after 10 a.m. 




At 11 am this morning a flock of about 75-100 PURPLE SANDPIPERS flew in from 
the West, and landed on the rocks in front of the observatory. They stayed for 
about 10 minutes and flew West along the shoreline. 




Otherwise a quiet day, but other species noted were 2 Razorbills, Black and 
White-winged Scoters, Common Loons, Common Eiders, Herring Gulls, 3 male and 1 
female Harlequin ducks hanging out front along the shore, Crows were the only 
land birds recorded, and no raptors were seen nor heard this morning. I also 
spotted a seal bobbing up and down in the water nearby. 




Have an awesome weekend everyone.





Gail Taylor

St. George, NB 





Sent using Zoho Mail






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Subject: Chipmunk
From: fundyhiking AT XPLORNET.CA
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 11:04:05 -0400
Had a Chipmunk scurrying around the freshly fallen snow this morning.
Lots of bird activity and resident yard deer. 

Ted Sears 

St. Martins

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Subject: Bald Eagle at Fredericton
From: Christopher Adam <cadam AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2017 18:13:26 -0300
I watched an adult Bald Eagle soaring over the UNB campus, Fredericton, this 
afternoon. It was being closely followed by a crow. What a sight! 


Christopher Adam
65 Nottingham St.
Fredericton, NB
http://forestprotectiontbmavengers.wordpress.com/
https://chrisforestprotectionstearmans.wordpress.com/




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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – March 25, 2017 (Saturday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 14:22:31 -0300
NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – March 25, 2017 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 




Please advise editor at nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labelling. 




For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 




Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Transcript by: Catherine Clements

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca 





**A good morning for Dave Miller on the Taylor Road near Salisbury. The 
BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS [Pic à dos noir] were out in good form; Dave saw four 
of them on Thursday morning, and they were calling and drumming often, until a 
NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] flew in, and everything went very quiet. 
He heard many DOWNY [Pic mineur], HAIRY [Pic chevelu], and PILEATED WOODPECKERS 
[Grand Pic], and also saw two GRAY JAYS [Mésangeai du Canada], getting some 
nice photos. 




**Rhéal Vienneau reports a busy feeder yard at his Dieppe site on Friday 
morning, with a dozen-plus RING-NECKED PHEASANTS [Faisan de Colchide], pairs of 
DOWNY [Pic mineur] and HAIRY WOODPECKERS [Pic chevelu], two BLUE JAYS [Geai 
bleu], a half-dozen BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire], and the 
resident CHIPMUNK [Suisse] out and about. 




**Dave Christie comments on some of the spring arrivals in the Mary’s 
Point-Harvey area that seem to have come to a bit of a standstill, but that is 
very likely to promptly change. John Inman has had lots of RED-WINGED 
BLACKBIRDS [Carouge à epaulettes] and COMMON GRACKLES [Quiscale bronzé] for 
10 days plus now; however, it was nice to have a RUSTY BLACKBIRD [Quiscale 
rouilleux] come by his feeder yard on Friday. This is always special, as this 
species seems to be becoming more and more uncommonly seen. A few SONG SPARROWS 
[Bruant chanteur] arrived for both John and Dave, but seemed to stay only one 
day. They both had noted flocks of CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada] in the 
area, but they seem to be relatively small flocks so far. Some come up the bay, 
and are noted to veer off and head up the Shepody River, assumedly to the 
dykelands there. 




**The female BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] at the Crowley Farm Road 
nest appears very much as it has the past 10 days, with the Eagle deep in the 
bowl of the nest, presumably incubating. The head comes up every now and then 
for a surveillance view, then will disappear into the nest for a time. Anna 
Tucker took a photo of it on Thursday. 




**Danny and Annette Sullivan and Brian Stone took a walk into Mapleton Park on 
Friday to enjoy the BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire] coming 
for hand-fed tidbits, as well as a handsome PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand Pic] 
moving about. Brian closely looked at his photos of the WOOD DUCK [Canard 
branchu] pair still there, to compare photos of the male there now with the one 
that had been there previously. Brian did note a difference in the bill of the 
two birds, and did a composite photo to compare them that does show some 
differences that may indicate they are indeed two different birds, unless 
natural changes did occur. Brian is always quick to pick up on SUN HALOS [Halo 
solaire]. 




**I placed some LILAC [Lilas] branches in a vase of water a few weeks ago. The 
first sprigs of blooming lilac started to burst forth in the past few days, to 
make that spring feeling come just a bit early. NORTHERN CATALPA [Catalpa 
remarquable] branches have also burst into leaf. 





nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca



Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton



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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE MARCH 24 (FRIDAY)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2017 13:52:53 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 24, 2017 (Friday) 



To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 




Please advise editor at nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 




Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl AT eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca. 




** Georges Brun captured a photo of a GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL [Goéland marin] 
wrestling with a good-sized Eel as prey with another Great Black-backed gull 
and ICELAND GULL [Goéland arctique] looking on. The Great Black-backed Gulls 
appear to be going out of 1st winter plumage into their next molt. On Thursday, 
Georges spotted a PEREGRINE FALCON [Faucon pèlerin] within the nest at the 
summit of Assumption Place. Also he noted a group of a dozen CANADA GEESE 
[Bernache du Canada] arrive at the bend of the Petitcodiac River on Thursday 
evening to join some MALLARD DUCKS [Canard colvert]. 




** There was a sudden arrival of a dozen BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu] to our Moncton 
feeder yard on Friday morning. Also approximately 40 CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur 
d'Amérique] arrived. It created quite a commotion as the overwintering female 
AMERICAN ROBIN [Merle d'Amérique] wanted none of it and spent every moment 
chasing the too-many-to-keep-track-of Cedar Waxwings, but she put the Blue Jays 
in an uproar. There were only a few Blue Jays during the winter, so not sure if 
the Jays are overwintering birds that just moved in or are actually new 
migrants. I suspect the Cedar Waxwings are overwintering birds as it would seem 
very early for spring migration for that normally late-arriving species. 




** This week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is added to this edition, courtesy of Curt 
Nason. 




This Week’s Sky at a Glance, March 25 – April 1

What is the sign of spring for you? The first robin? For stargazers, spring is 
here when Leo the Lion clears the eastern horizon in twilight. Not only is it a 
sign of spring, it is a sign of the zodiac; one of the constellations that the 
Sun appears to travel through as our planet makes its annual orbit. A few 
thousand years ago the Sun passed in front of the stars of Leo at the height of 
summer, when the Nile River would rise and eventually flood its banks. Lions 
would bask at the riverside to escape the heat, and it doesn’t require a huge 
leap of imagination to see a lion in the stars of this area. 


The constellation is composed of two prominent star patterns. A backwards 
question mark forms the lion’s neck and mane, with Leo’s brightest star 
marking the lion’s heart as the dot under the question mark. Eastward, to the 
left, is a triangle of stars representing its haunches and tail. The star at 
its heart is called Regulus, which means Little King. The Sun passes half its 
diameter below Regulus on August 22, more than a month later than it did when 
the constellation was named. Algieba, the bright star above Regulus, is 
actually two colourful stars when observed through a telescope. 


In mythology Leo represents the Lion of Nemea, a beast with a hide impenetrable 
to anything but its own claws. Hercules was sent to kill the lion as the first 
of his twelve labours. After strangling it, he skinned the beast with its claws 
and used the pelt as a shield. If you look at the constellation backwards you 
might see a mouse, with the triangle as a mouse’s head and the backwards 
question mark as its tail, but having Hercules battle a mouse would not befit 
his legendary status. 

  
This Week in the Solar System

Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:12 am and sunset will occur at 7:38 pm, 
giving 12 hours, 26 minutes of daylight (7:17 am and 7:43 pm in Saint John). 
Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 6:58 am and set at 7:48 pm, giving 12 hours, 
50 minutes of daylight (7:04 am and 7:52 pm in Saint John). 

 
The Moon is new on Monday and on Tuesday evening a very slim crescent might be 
seen with binoculars above the sunset point. Mercury is at its best evening 
viewing over the next two weeks, reaching its greatest elongation from the Sun 
on April 1 when it sets 1 hour 45 minutes after sunset. Mars will be 15 degrees 
to its upper left. Jupiter rises in twilight this week. Use binoculars or a 
scope to watch its moon Ganymede disappear into the planet’s shadow around 
9:40 Monday evening, and at 10:14 its moon Io will slowly emerge from behind 
the planet. Venus is at inferior conjunction this weekend and it can be seen 
before sunrise in the east. Look for Saturn above the spout of the Sagittarius 
Teapot. 


The Saint John Astronomy Club meets at 7 pm on April 1 at the Rockwood Park 
Interpretation Centre. All are welcome. 

 
Questions? Contact Curt Nason at nasonc AT nbnet.nb.ca.





nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton



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Subject: Re: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Bihoreau violace) at Grand Manan Today
From: Jennifer Pierce <smokeyjosie AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 21:58:40 -0300
Unfortunately I found the YCNH dead this afternoon around 1 p.m.  It was at
the same location it was originally seen last night.  I scoured that area
last night and this morning - it definitely was not there at 10 when I
left.  I saw it flying about 1 km up the road from there around 930.  Sad
news but I wanted to get the word out in case anybody was thinking of
coming over to look for it

Jennifer Pierce
Grand Manan, NB.

On Sat, Mar 18, 2017 at 9:06 PM, Stuart Tingley  wrote:

> It seems that there were a few birds displaced by the storm(s) earlier in
> the week resulting in several early herons in the region including Ralph's
> Black-crowned Night-Heron at Machias Seal Island on Thursday, a very early
> Great Blue Heron in Saint-Pierre et Miquelon yesterday and a Great Egret on
> a fishing boat off the south coast of Newfoundland on Thursday. Probably
> also a result of the same system was a female Ruff (Reeve) that appeared at
> Renews, Newfoundland, on Thursday.
>
> Happy Spring Birding,
>
> Stu Tingley
>
> On Sat, Mar 18, 2017 at 8:44 PM, Jim Wilson  wrote:
>
> > Jennifer Pierce just sent me a photograph of an adult YELLOW-CROWNED
> > NIGHT-HERON perched on a roadside snowbank at Grand Manan today. The
> > picture
> > was taken by a non-birder at Deep Cove and sent to her for an ID.
> >
> >
> >
> > Jennifer was searching for the heron when she texted me the image. At
> that
> > point she hadn't relocated it as far as I know.
> >
> >
> >
> > While looking for the heron she mentioned she had seen her sixth, seventh
> > and eighth AMERICAN WOODCOCK of the spring. Obviously there has been a
> good
> > movement of these birds during the last day or two.
> >
> >
> >
> > For birders near the coast this is an excellent time to be looking for
> > woodcock. Much of the inland areas of southern NB are presently
> > snow-covered
> > so woodcock tend to stick to coastal areas until inland areas are more
> > clear
> > of snow. This concentrates them and they can often be found near the
> coast
> > on bare areas of sunlit ground along roadsides, in shallow ditches with
> > running water or near homes where the sun melts flower gardens facing
> east
> > or south-east or on lawns with septic systems that warm the ground and
> melt
> > the snow early. Woodcock seek earthworms in sunny places like that and
> can
> > often make great photo subjects as they can be quite tame if you remain
> in
> > your vehicle.
> >
> >
> >
> > Spring is on the way!
> >
> >
> >
> > Jim Wilson
> >
> >
> > NatureNB guidelines  http://users.xplornet.com/~maryspt/NNB/nnbe.html
> > Foire aux questions de NatureNB  http://users.xplornet.com/~
> > maryspt/NNB/nnbf.html
> >
>
> NatureNB guidelines  http://users.xplornet.com/~maryspt/NNB/nnbe.html
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> maryspt/NNB/nnbf.html
>

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Subject: White Head Feeder birds
From: Roger Burrows <rtburrows AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 14:33:56 -0300
March 18

White Head Feeders    08:45-11:15 & 12:30-13:00
2 female Ring-necked Pheasants, 23 Mourning Doves, female Downy Woodpecker,
American Robin, 3 Dark-eyed Juncos

March 19

White Head Feeders    10:45-11:00 & 12:00-14:00
2 female Ring-necked Pheasants, 12 Mourning Doves, male Downy Woodpecker, 2
American Tree Sparrows, 4 Dark-eyed Juncos, Song Sparrow

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Fw: Sortie d'observation d'oiseaux le samedi 18 mars 2017
From: Denise Godin <000000a06363d504-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UNB.CA>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 13:16:34 +0000
Bonjour à tous,
Dans mon rapport du 18 mars, j'ai fait une erreur, j'ai indiqué un roitelet à 
couronne rubis et c'est bien un roitelet à couronne dorée que nous avons 
observé. Toutes mes excuses pour cet inconvénient! Je suppose que j'ai trop 
hâte au printemps pour observer les nouveaux arrivants. Je vous souhaite une 
très belle journée! 

Denise GodinBertrand

 On Saturday, March 18, 2017 7:08 PM, Denise Godin  wrote: 

 

 Bonjour à tous, 
Ce matin, à 8 h, Michel Roy, Jolande St-Pierre, Corinne Degrâce et Denise 
Godin sont partis d' Alderwood pour la sortie hebdomadaire d'observation 
d'oiseaux. Un beau soleil, -8 degrés et aucun vent, c'est la journée idéale 
pour l'observation.À Alderwood : Corneille d'Amérique, Geai bleu, Étourneau 
sansonnet;À Sheila : Pigeon biset;À Val Comeau : Mésange à tête noire, 
Harle huppé, Garrot d'Islande, Goéland arctique, Harelde kakawi, Eider à 
duvet, Goéland marin, Garrot à oeil d'or, Goéland argenté;À La Cèdrière 
: Macreuse noire, Grand Corbeau;À Bay Shore : Mésangeai du Canada, 
Tourterelle triste;À Whishard Point : Sittelle à poitrine rousse;À Covedell 
Road : Pic mineur;À Sheila : Pygargue à tête blanche 
(adulte);Pointe-à-Bouleau : Grand Harle, Bruant des neiges;Rue Isabelle, 
Tracadie : Chardonneret jaune;Lagune de Tracadie : Canard noir, Canard colvert, 
Roitelet à couronne rubis;Petit-Gaspereau : Martin-pêcheur, Pic chevelu.Total 
de nos observations : 28. Très belle journée, avec les macreuses noires, on 
observe des signes de migration.Si vous êtes intéressé à vous joindre à 
nous le samedi, n'hésitez pas à nous contacter le vendredi soir, soit Jolande 
au 395-4734 ou Denise Godin au 727-6305. Tous sont les bienvenus. 

Denise GodinBertrand

   

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 19, 2017 (Sunday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 10:15:19 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 19, 2017 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca Please advise if any errors are noted in wording 
or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt AT mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Late Saturday afternoon, Mitch and Irene Doucet paid a visit to the 
Chisholm’s yard at 67 DesRoches Street in Bouctouche to see the BOREAL 
CHICKADEE [Mésange à tête brune] feeding on suet in an orange bag. One can 
go down the right side of the driveway and look over the fence into the feeder 
area without disturbing the Chisholms. 


** Fishing season opened on the Kouchibouguac River on Saturdayfor a 
Kingfisher. Louise and Maurice Richard saw a BELTED KINGFISHER [Martin-pêcheur 
d'Amérique] actively fishing near their camp in Acadieville. A MINK [Vison] 
was also bouncing about. A pair of AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS [Canard noir] were on 
the river, a PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand pic] was actively drumming and 
vocalizing, and a SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d'Amérique] was moving about during 
the day. 


** A big thank-you to Roger LeBlanc and Fred Richards for a great presentation 
on Saturday. Roger went over our New Brunswick swallows, zeroing in on the TREE 
SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] and how best to arrange nest boxes to have better 
chances of being a swallow landlord, as well as of a potential EASTERN BLUEBIRD 
[Merlebleu de l'Est] or BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE [Mésange à tête noire]. Roger 
discussed the life and times of each swallow species, to appreciate them even 
more. 


Fred brought in the 50 excellent nest boxes he had constructed, and he 
assembled a 51st at the presentation. Fred’s plan is attached as a pdf file. 
The boxes were distributed to those who had reserved them. Some who had 
reserved boxes could not make the workshop; their boxes are waiting for them in 
the back of my truck, to get to their new owners at Tuesday night’s meeting, 
or to be picked up at my home. 


Many thanks go to Fred Richards and Roger LeBlanc for all their effort. All the 
boxes are numbered and stamped with the Nature Moncton logo. Success will be 
monitored as an ongoing project. Fred has already offered to repeat the effort 
next year. Resident photographer Brian Stone captured some of the action. 


** The Nature Moncton meeting will take place this coming Tuesday evening, 
March 21 at 7 p.m., at the Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge. Presenter for the first 
half of the meeting will be Beth MacDonald, from the Canadian Wildlife Service, 
speaking about the WHIMBREL [Courlis corlieu], especially on the Acadian 
Peninsula. The write-up is attached below. 


The second half of the meeting is devoted to sightings by members. Please bring 
any photos on flash drives to share with the members, as well as oral reports 
of anything going on in the area. 


March 21, 2017 at 7:00 pm

Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge

Presenter:  Beth MacDonald

“Whimbrel: The blueberry bird of the Acadian Peninsula”

Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus hudsonicus) use the Acadian Peninsula in New 
Brunswick as a stopover site during migration in late summer and early fall. 
During this period, they spend much of their time in commercial blueberry 
fields which makes them a concern to berry growers who fear that too many of 
their berries are being consumed by birds. To better understand this issue, the 
Canadian Wildlife Service, in collaboration with Mount Allison University and 
the Center for Conservation Biology, initiated a study in the summer of 2014 to 
document habitat use, diet, behaviour and migratory connectivity of Whimbrel 
during stopover on the Acadian Peninsula. This presentation will briefly 
discuss what we know about Whimbrel populations in North America and outline 
the main results of the Acadian Peninsula research project. 




nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

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Subject: Re: flora/fauna photos needed for youth trading cards
From: Fred Schueler <bckcdb AT ISTAR.CA>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 11:29:33 -0400
On 3/17/2017 10:13 AM, Melissa Fulton wrote:
> The Young Naturalists Club of NS is making species at risk trading cards
> for youth in partnership with Nature Canada and Nature NB and we are
> looking for images for these cards.

* this list is sadly deficient in Molluscs.

I hope the cards will not follow the gov't mantra of only referring to 
the species by the 'official' English & French names, which are often 
artificial concoctions. If a species really is rare, those who work with 
it will refer to it by its Linnean name, and it's important to get youth 
using the real names of the species they're coming to be interested in.

fred.
-----------------------------------------------------------
>
> We are looking for great images that really highlight what the species
> look like and how to identify them. Photos of the species in their
> habitat would be ideal. List of species is below
>
> With respect to size and resolution, the images should be at least
> 300dpi (high-res), preferably as a PDF, PNG or JPG image file.
>
> If you have any photos you wish to share, please send them to
> staff AT naturenb.ca.
> Credit to the photography will be included on the cards.
>
>
> BIRDS
> Canada Warbler
> Chimney Swift
> Common Nighthawk
> Harlequin Duck
> Peregrine Falcon
> Piping Plover (melodus)
> Red Knot
> Roseate Turn
> Olivesided Flycatcher
>
> MAMMALS
> Blue Whale
> Canada Lynx
> Little Brown Bat
> North Atlantic Right Whale
> Northern Long-eared Bat
>
> REPTILES
> Blandings Turtles
> Eastern Ribbonsnake
> Leatherback Turtle
> Wood Turtle
>
> FISH
> American Eel
> Atlantic Salmon
> Porbeagle Shark
> White Shark
>
> ARTHROPODS
> Gyspy Cuckoo Bee
> Monarch Butterfly
>
> VASCULAR PLANTS
> Butternut
> Furbish's Lousewort
> Pink Coreopsis
> Ram's Head Lady Slipper
>
> LICHENS
> Boreal Felt Lichen

-- 
------------------------------------------------------------
           Frederick W. Schueler & Aleta Karstad
            Fragile Inheritance Natural History
------------------------------------------------------------
for our annual letter, click '2016' at http://pinicola.ca/aboutus.htm
------------------------------------------------------------
Daily Paintings - http://karstaddailypaintings.blogspot.com/
Mudpuppy Night in Oxford Mills - http://pinicola.ca/mudpup1.htm
4 St-Lawrence Street Bishops Mills, RR#2 Oxford Station, Ontario K0G 1T0
    on the Smiths Falls Limestone Plain 44.87156°N 75.70095°W
     (613)258-3107  http://pinicola.ca/
------------------------------------------------------------

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Subject: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE...FRIDAY MARCH 17
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 11:02:09 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 17, 2017 (Friday) 



To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 




Please advise editor at nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 




Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl AT eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca. 




** Doreen Rossiter reports that she has had an influx of DARK-EYED JUNCOS 
[Junco ardoisé] to her Alma yard, and 3 or 4 SONG SPARROWS [Bruant chanteur] 
have arrived which she suspects are spring migrants as she did not have any of 
this species overwintering this year. Doreen also had a visit from a NORTHERN 
SHRIKE [Pie-grièche grise]. 




** Kevin Renton reports there continues to be a nice turnout of PINE GROSBEAKS 
[Durbec des sapins], EVENING GROSBEAKS [Gros-bec errant], and BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS 
[Jaseur boréal] to their Stilesville feeder yard along with the expected 
regulars, but still including the star patron, a FIELD SPARROW [Bruant des 
champs], that has spent most of the winter with them. 




** Bev Schneider was able to get a great photo of the VARIED THRUSH [Grive à 
collier] that visited a yard in the Fredericton area in earlier March. What a 
strikingly plumaged specimen. 




** Brian Stone spotted two AMERICAN CROWS [Corneille d'Amérique] very 
intensely foraging on a dead RED SQUIRREL [Écureuil roux] outside his home on 
Thursday. This was very possibly the result of an animal struck by a car and 
the crows being opportunistic. Crows and Ravens can be very alert while 
patrolling roadways for other birds and animals struck by cars. 




** I was under the impression that WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie] numbers 
were low in the northern area of New Brunswick, but on a recent visit to 
Plaster Rock, I sure found there seemed to be a significant number in that 
area. Travelling between Perth-Andover and Plaster Rock, I saw several near the 
road in wooded areas and when stopping in on Fred and Donna Green’s in 
Plaster Rock, I was sure surprised to see a group of 17 in a wooded grove near 
their home where they put out food for them. Donna says they usually see 
between 17 to 26 most days. Note a very small one in one of Donna’s photos. 
This was a fawn born very late in the season, and they wondered if it would 
make it. Obviously it came along and now seems to be doing very well. Fred and 
Donna make no effort to tame the deer to keep them with a wariness of humans, 
but supplement their winter larder. 




** Danny Sullivan spotted a BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] and AMERICAN 
CROWS [Corneille d'Amérique] foraging on dead chickens a farmer had put out in 
a field at the McLaughlin Rd. end of the Indian Mountain Rd. on Thursday. This 
is a very popular fare for eagles and crows in the Annapolis Valley near the 
large poultry farms there. 




** Don and Faye Leaman were in Rockwood Park in Saint John Thursday evening to 
spot a group of 9 WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie]. They noted one animal 
had an obvious lesion in the neck area of denuded hair, wondering what may be 
the cause and were able to get a photo. To me this looks like a very 
circumscribed lesion that appears to be scabbing over nicely. It does not 
appear like mange mite infestation would appear or lesions from ticks or an 
area rubbed. I would expect the lesion to be from an injury, possibly from a 
predator. It does not appear like a coyote snare as damage is only on the top 
part of the neck. This animal is otherwise in nice condition for the time of 
year. 




** We took visiting family and grandkids to Mapleton Park on Thursday. The host 
of primarily MALLARDS [Canard colvert] were delighted to see them with a 
cracked corn handout, and the grandkids and parents were delighted to oblige. 
The leucistic Mallard was still present, but no WOOD DUCK [Canard branchu] or 
NORTHERN PINTAIL [Canard pilet] noted while we visited. The BLACK-CAPPED 
CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire] made for many smiles of delight when they 
came to handfuls of sunflower chips. 




** This week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is added to this edition, courtesy of Curt 
Nason. 




This Week’s Sky at a Glance, March 18 – March 25

This week we will take the path less travelled to pick out a few of the more 
obscure constellations in our sky. If you don’t have a clear view to the 
south or if you are cursed by light pollution in that direction, they will be 
obscure to the point of invisible. Around 9 pm, cast your eyes toward Sirius in 
Canis Major, the Big Dog. If you can’t see that star, the brightest in the 
sky, then go back inside and read a book. 


Hugging the horizon below Sirius you might detect a Y-shaped group of stars 
that forms Columba the Dove. This is one of the later constellations, created a 
century after Christopher Columbus made his first voyage, and it was meant to 
depict a dove sent by another famous sailor called Noah. It could also be the 
dove released by yet another famous sailor, Jason of the Argonauts fame, to 
gauge the speed of the Clashing Rocks of the Symplegades. The dove lost some 
tail feathers, and the Argo lost a bit of its stern. 


There is a good case to be made for this interpretation. To the left of 
Columba, rising past the rear end of Canis Major, is the upper part of Puppis 
the Stern. It was once part of a much larger constellation called Argo Navis, 
Jason’s ship, which has been disassembled to form Puppis, Vela the Sails and 
Carina the Keel. Puppis is more traditionally described as the Poop Deck, a 
rather appropriate name considering its location relative to the Big Dog. To 
the left of Puppis is a vertical line of three stars forming Pyxis the 
(Mariner’s) Compass. At its highest it does point roughly north-south. 

  
This Week in the Solar System

Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:25 am and sunset will occur at 7:29 pm, 
giving 12 hours, 4 minutes of daylight (7:30 am and 7:34 pm in Saint John). 
Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:12 am and set at 7:38 pm, giving 12 hours, 
26 minutes of daylight (7:17 am and 7:43 pm in Saint John). On Monday at 6:29 
am the Sun crosses the equator heading northward, marking the beginning of 
spring. Any remaining snow will magically turn to mud at that moment and marble 
season will officially open. 

 
The Moon is at third quarter near Saturn on Monday, so have a look before you 
watch the Sun rise due east. After the Sun sets early this week, use binoculars 
to look for the slim crescent of Venus above it. An ambitious and careful 
observer might also catch it in the east before sunrise. Venus is at inferior 
conjunction on March 25 and becomes the Morning Star in early April. This 
Saturday, Mercury sets an hour after sunset with Venus 8 degrees to its right 
and a tad higher. Jupiter rises at 9 pm mid-week, about two hours before Mars 
sets. Keen eyed observers might catch the glow of the zodiacal light along the 
western ecliptic, in a dark sky untarnished by light pollution, about an hour 
after sunset. 


The provincial astronomy club, RASC NB, meets at Moncton High School on 
Saturday, March 18 at 1 pm. One of the speakers will be a recently retired NASA 
astronomer and club member who was involved in building the Hubble Space 
Telescope. All are welcome. 

 
Questions? Contact Curt Nason at nasonc AT nbnet.nb.ca.





nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton



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Subject: Birds at Point Lepreau on Thursday, March 16th
From: Jim Wilson <jgw AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 21:12:06 -0300
I did a four-hour seabird count at the Point Lepreau Bird Observatory (PLBO)
on Thursday, March 16th. I had planned to go down on the first day of the
spring counting period, May 15th but the snowstorm the night before changed
my plans.

 

Things were very quiet at the Point on Thursday. I began the count at 8:15
AM and finished at noon. The wind was southwest at 30-35 kilometers per hour
and the temperature stood at -4C. It was certainly breezy and cool and there
was virtually no seabird movement; I saw as many birds moving west as I saw
flying east.

 

During the first half-hour there were close to 100 RAZORBILLS feeding off
the Point but as the tide neared low they all drifted or swam off to the
southwest. However a single THICK-BILLED MURRE remained just off the Point
for the next hour, diving and feeding.

 

There was a trickle of flying COMMON EIDER, BLACK and SURF SCOTER,
LONG-TAILED DUCK and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER as well as the occasional
RED-THROATED LOON that passed by or was seen feeding offshore.

 

Closer to shore the wind and huge surf combined to whip the water into a
substantial blanket of foam which seemed too much for the Harlequins that
normally feed just off the rocks. I did see three HARLEQUINS fly past but
they kept on going, presumably unwilling to try and cope with the "suds".
Just as I was finishing up a flock of 22 PURPLE SANDPIPERS came in and
landed on the foam-spattered rocks but did not stay long, probably for the
same reason as the Harlequins.

 

I saw no raptors nor land birds at the snow-covered and icy Point. I did a
walk in the alders for early American Woodcock but everywhere there was
snow-covered and solidly frozen

 

********

 

I later had a meeting at one of the buildings of the nuclear plant and as I
was walking near the sunny side a single SONG SPARROW hopped along the
ground, almost under my feet. It appeared to be really tired and simply
hopped out of my way and crouched on a patch of bare ground in the warm sun.
It certainly appeared to be a tired migrant, recently arrived.

 

Just up the road from the plant at Dipper Harbour I flushed a group of four
DARK-EYED JUNCOS from the roadside in a sunny area not near any houses (or
feeders). I assumed they too were likely new migrants.

 

A report from the south.

 

Jim Wilson


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Subject: White Head & Grand Manan birds, inc. NORTHERN SHRIKE
From: Roger Burrows <rtburrows AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 17:16:20 -0300
March 14

White Head Feeders    08:55-09:55 & 17:20-17:40
female Ring-necked Pheasant, 11 Mourning Doves, 3 Dark-eyed Juncos, Song
Sparrow

March 15

White Head Ferry    10:40-11:15
2 Common Loons, Red-necked Grebe, Double-crested & 9 Great Cormorants, 15
Common Eiders, 9 Surf & 9 White-winged Scoters, 11 Long-tailed Ducks, 6
Red-breasted Mergansers, 2 Black Guillemots

Whale Cove    11:50-12:00
Common Loon,19 American Black Ducks, 13 Mallards, 5 Red-breasted Mergansers

Castalia Marsh    12:05-12:55
ca. 595 Brants, 10 Canada Geese, 109 American Black Ducks, male Mallard, 4
Common Goldeneyes, 4 Red-breasted Mergansers, Iceland Gull, NORTHERN SHRIKE

Ingalls Head    13:10-13:25
Common Loon, 2 Black Scoters, 2 Buffleheads, 2 Common Goldeneyes, Iceland &
3 Ring-billed Gulls

White Head Ferry    13:30-14:00
3 Common Loons, 2 Cormorant spp., White-winged & 4 Surf Scoters, 3
Long-tailked Ducks, 2 Red-breasted Mergansers, Alcid spp. (probably
Razorbill), 6 Black Guillemots, Iceland Gull.

Roger Burrows
White Head

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Subject: Volunteer at the PLBO March 15 - May 9.
From: PLBO <plbo AT SAINTJOHNNATURALISTSCLUB.ORG>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 21:18:34 -0300
Greetings Naturalists, 


Sea ducks have already started their migration up the Bay of Fundy.  You can
contribute to science and indulge your passion for the birds by counting the
migrating sea ducks, loons, and other water birds at the Point Lepreau Bird
Observatory (PLBO) this spring. 

Volunteers with security clearance, a photo ID, and binoculars are welcomed
every day from Wednesday, March 15 to Tuesday, May 9 to count the sea ducks
as they pass the Observatory at the tip of Point Lepreau. 

Todd Watts will be working again as the dedicated observer on weekdays from
March 27 to May 7. Todd will be doing 2 shifts per day this year, morning
and afternoon. As well as acting as the primary observer, Todd will also
help new volunteers with identifying sea ducks in flight. You may volunteer
for morning sessions (8 am to noon) or afternoon sessions (noon to 4 pm). If
nobody else has signed up for the next session, you may stay beyond your
allotted time. 

Because the road to the Point passes through the restricted grounds of the
Point Lepreau Generating Station, first-time volunteers have to go through a
Criminal Record Check (CRC). This is done by your local police force
(municipal or RCMP). The requirements for a CRC vary from region to region
so you should call your local police to find out what they need for a CRC
for a volunteer position. Normally the police require a letter of
introduction which we can provide to you by email.

To get a letter of introduction, send your full name, full address and the
location and name of the police detachment nearest where you live to the
following email address < plbo AT saintjohnnaturalistsclub.org >. We will email
you an appropriate letter, along with detailed instructions on the remaining
steps required. Print the letter and deliver it to your police department.
Allow 10-14 days for your security clearance to be put in place.

You may also speak to a member of the PLBO Committee at one of the monthly
meetings of the Saint John Naturalists' Club to get information about what
is involved.
 
Once your name is on the list of volunteers who have security clearance, you
may sign up for observation sessions by sending a message to the same PLBO
e-mail address. We need at least 48 hours advance notice to add an observer
to the schedule. The Observatory is small and holds only three people
comfortably and space is assigned on a 'first come, first served' basis.
Don't forget, you will have to present photo ID (driver's licence or
passport) every time you pass through the security gate to get out to the
PLBO.  

A travel subsidy for PLBO volunteers is available again this year. Please
use the attached form when submitting a travel claim and note your actual
kilometres driven. 

For more information about the PLBO, check this link:   

http://saintjohnnaturalistsclub.org/plbo.htm


PLBO Committee
Saint John Naturalists' Club	



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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 16, 2017 ( Thursday )
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 10:38:24 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 16, 2017 ( Thursday ) 

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor, nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labeling. 


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com . 




 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone AT gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)



** Clarence Cormier has a resident SHORT-TAILED WEASEL [Belette à courte 
queue] that he often sees popping in and out of its snow holes around his 
Grande Digue home. He was finally able to get a quick photo of it, commenting 
that it is always in a rush and on a mission. Clarence also got a photo of a 
SHREW [Musaraigne] that he noticed around his bird feeders. The weasel may well 
be interested in the shrew/vole population that would be attracted to the bird 
feeders. 



** Stella Leblanc has noted a EUROPEAN STARLING [Étourneau sansonnet] about 
their Bouctouche yard over the winter with a very long, overgrown beak. She got 
a photo of it on Wednesday. Stella calls it her “Pinocchio bird”. 



** Anna Tucker visited the BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] nest at the 
Crowley Farm Rd. on Tuesday to find an adult, assumedly the female, very deep 
in the bowl of the nest. The nest looks like it has had some fresh building 
material recently added. 



** The Nature Moncton nest box workshop is now just a few days away and will 
happen this Saturday, March 18, with the write up added below. Fred Richards 
has all 49 boxes ready to go to the folks that have reserved them. The stamp 
has just arrived and Fred will have all the boxes stamped with the Nature 
Moncton logo and they will be numbered. 


Nature Moncton Nest Box Workshop

March 18, 2017   1:00 – 4:00 P.M.

Tankville School, 1665 Elmwood Drive

Swallow Box Erection, Placement, and Maintenance

Presenters: Fred Richards and Roger LeBlanc



Swallow Nest Box Project

The Nature Moncton Activities Committee is launching a long-term nest box 
project which we hope will be enthusiastically embraced for the duration. 


The nest boxes can also potentially be used by Eastern Bluebirds and 
Black-capped Chickadees. 




Our member, Fred Richards, has volunteered to cut-out and assemble 49/50 very 
solid and well-made nest boxes with an expected life-span of 15 years. The 50th 
one will be assembled at the Nest Box Project Workshop on March 18, 2017. The 
workshop, led by Fred Richards and Roger Leblanc, will provide all the 
knowledge needed on where best to erect the boxes for maximum effect and how to 
maintain them. The aim of assembling the last one at the workshop is to show 
participants the plans and how to build more should they wish. 


The first 50 will be free of charge to paid-up Nature Moncton members. This 
wonderful project can be offered thanks to Fred volunteering his time to build 
them and Louise Richard who obtained a grant from the Imperial Oil Volunteer 
Involvement Program which will fund the building materials. Each numbered box 
will be stamped with the Nature Moncton logo. 


We are asking for volunteers who will adopt the boxes and be willing to place 
them and maintain them each year. If interested in joining the project, please 
respond to this email with your name, contact email address, telephone number, 
and the number of nest boxes you feel you can place and maintain. 


Everyone is welcome to attend the March 18, 2017 workshop whether or not you 
will be an active participant in the project, be a perspective swallow 
landlord, or are an existing landlord interesting in learning new ideas. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

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Subject: Fw: NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 15, 2017 (Wednesday)
From: Nelson Poirier <nelson AT NB.SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 13:26:58 -0300
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 15, 2017 (Wednesday)


To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to 
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca 


Please advise editor at nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in 
wording or photo labeling. 



For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com 



Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Johnson johnson2 AT xplornet.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line 
editor nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca. 



**Marquette Winsor comments that she has seen a few immature male RING-NECKED 
PHEASANTS around their Salisbury home over the winter, but the male that showed 
up in their backyard on Monday took the prize for its handsome plumage. 



**John Filliter and Clevie Wall also enjoyed a male ring-necked pheasant boldly 
coming up to their Cape Brûlée home walkway. 

John recently saw a male strolling around his yard at 9:15pm under a full moon. 
Perhaps a Romeo out on an amorous adventure! 



**Jean-Paul Leblanc comments the BROWN CREEPER they saw on Monday was also at 
the Chislom's feeder yard in Bouctouche as well as the BOREAL CHICKADEE 
mentioned yesterday. 

Jean-Paul and Stella also got some nice photos of COMMON MERGANSERS on Tuesday 
in Bouctouche Bay along the small river just past the St Edouard wharf. 





**Brian Coates, a former Nature Moncton member, shares a photo taken after a 
scenario in August 1992 with a NORTHERN HARRIER. Georges Brun's recent photo of 
a northern harrier brought back the rewarding memory to Brian. Brian and wife 
Pam were on the Hillsborough marshes one afternoon when they came upon a 
northern harrier stuck in a mud shallow and not able to get into flight and 
making quite a commotion. They were able to capture it getting it into a 
blanket. They immediately took it to their home and showered it with water to 
remove the caked mud and put it into a box to dry. Later that evening they took 
it back to the marsh where they found it and released it. It immediately flew 
to a nearby fence then flew off into the distance seemingly none the worse for 
the experience. This incident took place at a time when bird rehabilitation 
sites were not as they are today. Pam Coates got a photo of it with Brian 
before they released it. 



**We've had a PINE WARBLER visiting our feeder yard the past few days but 
couldn't get it to settle down for a photo until Tuesday. We had one visiting 
earlier in the winter but I think this is a different one as it didn't seem to 
know the different feeder offerings when it first arrived, but getting onto 
things on Tuesday. 



nelson AT nb.sympatico.ca 
Nelson Poirier 
Nature Moncton

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Subject: Fwd: upcoming guest speakers
From: Karen Miller <markaren AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2017 20:17:19 -0300

-------- Original message --------
From: P&K Rustics
Date:03-17-2017 8:09 PM (GMT-04:00)
To: Karen Miller
Subject: upcoming guest speakers Hampton Nature Club 

Hi Everyone,

So this is the line up of guest speakers over the next 3 months;

April 4th; Vanessa Roy-McDougall | Executive Director/Directrice Générale
924 Prospect St. Suite 7, Fredericton, NB E3B 2T9 
executive.director AT naturenb.ca | 506-459-4209 
naturenb.ca She's going to talk to us about Nature NB, what they do, and how we 
can be part of it if we choose to. 




May 2: Holly Lightfoot

Maritimes Marsh Monitoring Program Coordinator

She will be presenting "The Secret Lives of Marsh Birds"





June 6; Todd Watts Raptors of NB - he will talk to us about Birds of Prey, and 
the work at Greenlaw Mtn Hawk Observatory. 




I'm hoping to get some field trips up and going, want to definetly get a trip 
up to Jemseg in May for waterfowl, maybe down to Maces Bay for Sea Birds, plus 
random stuff like an owl prowl sometime in the next week or so , as well as 
stuff posted on the fly , like a nature hike to Dutch Point or maybe MacManus 
Lake. Always love to hear imput for field trips or talks, just send a note. 




Paul

Hampton Nature Club

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Subject: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Bihoreau violace) at Grand Manan Today
From: Jim Wilson <jgw AT NBNET.NB.CA>
Date: Sat, 18 Mar 2017 20:44:40 -0300
Jennifer Pierce just sent me a photograph of an adult YELLOW-CROWNED
NIGHT-HERON perched on a roadside snowbank at Grand Manan today. The picture
was taken by a non-birder at Deep Cove and sent to her for an ID.

 

Jennifer was searching for the heron when she texted me the image. At that
point she hadn't relocated it as far as I know.

 

While looking for the heron she mentioned she had seen her sixth, seventh
and eighth AMERICAN WOODCOCK of the spring. Obviously there has been a good
movement of these birds during the last day or two.

 

For birders near the coast this is an excellent time to be looking for
woodcock. Much of the inland areas of southern NB are presently snow-covered
so woodcock tend to stick to coastal areas until inland areas are more clear
of snow. This concentrates them and they can often be found near the coast
on bare areas of sunlit ground along roadsides, in shallow ditches with
running water or near homes where the sun melts flower gardens facing east
or south-east or on lawns with septic systems that warm the ground and melt
the snow early. Woodcock seek earthworms in sunny places like that and can
often make great photo subjects as they can be quite tame if you remain in
your vehicle.

 

Spring is on the way!

 

Jim Wilson


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Subject: Upcoming Saint John Naturalists Club Events
From: Harry Scarth <hhcs AT BELLALIANT.NET>
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2017 20:26:51 -0300
Hello everyone:

Our Saint John Naturalists Club has a busy program over the next few months. 
The current list follows. Note that the list will soon be updated with 
additional events including a number of spring birding walks in the Saint John 
area. To get details about the events as well as their timing, locations, 
registration and related information, please visit us at 
www.saintjohnnaturalistsclub.org  or 
find us on Facebook as “Nature Saint John”. 



April 10: "The Secret Lives of Marsh Birds” presentation by Holly Lightfoot 
of Bird Studies Canada at our April meeting. 

April 22:  "Early Spring Migrants" Field Trip with Jim Wilson
April 23:  “Duck ID” workshop with Paul Mansz
April 27: "Identifying Migrating Shorebirds" workshop with Julie Paquet of the 
Canadian Wildlife Service 

April 29: “Birds, Bees and Butterflies - Creating Habitat” a hands-on 
workshop led by Nature NB 

May 6:    “Jemseg Waterfowl and Other Migrants” field trip with Paul Mansz
May 8: “The Evolution and Work of the St. Andrews Biological Station” 
presentation with Station Director, Mike Sullivan at our May meeting. 

May 13: “Visit the Atlantic Wildlife Institute” in Cookville with Pam Novak 

May 28:  “Collecting and Preserving Plant Specimens” with Gart Bishop
June 17: “The Acadian Forest“ presentation and Visit the Arboretum” with 
Emilie Murphy, Rockwood Park Naturalist followed by the Annual Meeting. 


SJNC events are open to one-and-all without charge (although modest donations 
to the clubs conservation programs are always gratefully accepted). 


Hank Scarth
Rothesay, NB














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